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Sample records for sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium

  1. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release Channels in Ventricles of Older Adult Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholl, Peter A.; Howlett, Susan E.

    2006-01-01

    Whether the density of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors in the heart declines with age is not clear. We investigated age-related changes in the density of [3H]-ryanodine receptors in crude ventricular homogenates, which contained all ligand binding sites in heart and in isolated junctional SR membranes.…

  2. Time course of activation of calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, B J; Schneider, M F

    1988-01-01

    Myoplasmic free calcium transients were measured with antipyrylazo III in voltage clamped segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers and were used to calculate the rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Intramembrane charge movement was measured for the same pulses in the same fibers. During a depolarizing pulse Rrel rose to an early peak and then decayed relatively rapidly but incompletely due to calcium-dependent inactivation (Schneider M.F., and B.J. Simon. 1988. J...

  3. Calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-03-01

    The steady-state calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was studied in voltage-clamped, cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers containing two calcium indicators, fura-2 and anti-pyrylazo III (AP III). Fura-2 fluorescence was used to monitor resting calcium and relatively small calcium transients during small depolarizations. AP III absorbance signals were used to monitor larger calcium transients during larger depolarizations. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from the calcium transients. The equilibrium calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release was determined using 200-ms prepulses of various amplitudes to elevate [Ca2+] to various steady levels. Each prepulse was followed by a constant test pulse. The suppression of peak Rrel during the test pulse provided a measure of the extent of inactivation of release at the end of the prepulse. The [Ca2+] dependence of inactivation indicated that binding of more than one calcium ion was required to inactivate each release channel. Half-maximal inactivation was produced at a [Ca2+] of approximately 0.3 microM. Variation of the prepulse duration and amplitude showed that the suppression of peak release was consistent with calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release but not with calcium depletion. The same calcium dependence of inactivation was obtained using different amplitude test pulses to determine the degree of inactivation. Prepulses that produced near maximal inactivation of release during the following test pulse produced no suppression of intramembrane charge movement during the test pulse, indicating that inactivation occurred at a step beyond the voltage sensor for calcium release. Three alternative set of properties that were assumed for the rapidly equilibrating calcium-binding sites intrinsic to the fibers gave somewhat different Rrel records, but gave very similar calcium dependence of

  4. Target size of calcium pump protein from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, L; Maurer, A; Berenski, C; Jung, C Y; Fleischer, S

    1984-04-25

    The oligomeric size of calcium pump protein (CPP) in fast skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane was determined using target theory analysis of radiation inactivation data. There was a parallel decrease of Ca2+-ATPase and calcium pumping activities with increasing radiation dose. The loss of staining intensity of the CPP band, observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, also correlated directly with the loss of activity. The target size molecular weight of the CPP in the normal sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane ranged between 210,000 and 250,000, which is consistent with a dimeric structure. Essentially the same size is obtained for the non-phosphorylated CPP or for the phosphoenzyme form generated from either ATP (E1 state) or inorganic phosphate (E2 state). Hence, the oligomeric state of the pump does not appear to change during the catalytic cycle. Similar results were obtained with reconstituted sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles with different lipid to protein ratios. We conclude that the CPP is a dimer in both native and reconstituted sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes. The target size of the calcium-binding protein (calsequestrin) was found to be 50,000 daltons, approximating a monomer.

  5. Effect of articaine on calcium transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from medial pterygoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Di Croce, Daniel E; Richard, Susana B; Takara, Delia

    2012-01-01

    Local anesthetics used in dentistry have myotoxic effects. Articaine, also known as carticaine, is one of the local anesthetics most widely used in clinical dentistry. The aim of this work was to describe its effect on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isolated from medial pterygoid muscle. Ca-ATPase enzymatic activity was determined by a colorimetric method and ATP-dependent calcium uptake with a radioisotopic technique. Articaine inhibited both Ca-ATPase activity and calcium uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Both inhibitory effects became evident at articaine concentrations lower than those employed in clinical dentistry. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (K) were 15.1 +/- 1.8 mM (n = 6) and 25.2 +/- 1.6 mM (n = 6) for enzymatic activity and calcium uptake, respectively. Preincubation of sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes with articaine enhanced Ca-ATPase activity in the absence of calcium ionophore, suggesting an ionophoric-like effect of the local anesthetic. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of articaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isolated from medial pterygoid muscle is due to a direct interaction of the anesthetic with the enzyme and to the increased membrane permeability to calcium induced by this drug.

  6. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Christopher W.; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J.; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca2+ homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle’s lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles’ SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1 and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle’s lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition. PMID:26361872

  7. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Christopher W; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle's lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles' SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1, and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle's lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Effects of caffeine on calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M G; Simon, B J; Schneider, M F

    1990-06-01

    1. Resting myoplasmic [Ca2+] and [Ca2+] transients (delta [Ca2+]) were monitored using Fura-2 fluorescence and Antipyrylazo III absorbance signals from voltage-clamped segments of cut frog skeletal muscle fibres in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM-caffeine. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from delta [Ca2+]. 2. delta [Ca2+] and Rrel were increased in caffeine for all pulses. The decline of delta [Ca2+] was slower after a given pulse in caffeine than without caffeine. Resting [Ca2+] was slightly elevated in caffeine. 3. The voltage dependence of the peak value of Rrel and of the steady level of Rrel at the end of a 60-120 ms pulse were both shifted towards more negative voltages in caffeine. For relatively small pulses the voltage at which a given release waveform was observed was also shifted to more negative voltages. 4. Intramembrane charge movements measured in the same fibres in which the above changes in Rrel were observed showed no significant changes in caffeine. 5. In caffeine calcium release continued for many milliseconds after the end of a short (10 ms) pulse. Continued release after a pulse was not observed without caffeine and was probably due to positive feedback of elevated [Ca2+] on calcium release resulting from calcium-induced calcium release in caffeine. 6. Intramembrane charge movements after short pulses showed no change in caffeine that could account for the continued calcium release after the pulse. 7. Continued release after short pulses in caffeine decreased as the pulse duration was increased and was absent for pulses of 60 ms or longer. Rrel also inactivated during such pulses. 8. Relatively large and long conditioning pulses in caffeine suppressed both the peak Rrel and the continued release after short pulses. Peak release and continued release after short pulses recovered in parallel with increasing recovery time following suppression by a conditioning pulse in caffeine. 9. These

  9. Time course of activation of calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Schneider, M F

    1988-12-01

    Myoplasmic free calcium transients were measured with antipyrylazo III in voltage clamped segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers and were used to calculate the rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Intramembrane charge movement was measured for the same pulses in the same fibers. During a depolarizing pulse Rrel rose to an early peak and then decayed relatively rapidly but incompletely due to calcium-dependent inactivation (Schneider M.F., and B.J. Simon. 1988. J. Physiol. (Lond.). 405:727-745). Two approaches were used to determine release activation independent of the effects of inactivation: (a) a mathematical correction based on the assumption that inactivation was a process occurring in parallel with and independently of activation; (b) an experimental procedure in which release was maximally inactivated by a large short prepulse and then the remaining noninactivatable component of release was monitored during a subsequent test pulse. Both procedures gave the same time course of activation of release. Release activation paralleled the time course of intramembrane charge movement but was delayed by a few milliseconds.

  10. [ATPase activity and processes of calcium transport in membranes of sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscles with E-avitaminotic dystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurskiĭ, M D; Grigor'eva, V A; Medovar, E N; Meshkova, L I

    1978-01-01

    Peculiarities of functioning of the sarcoplasmic reticulum muscles membranes with E-avitaminotic distrophy were studied. It was determined that the level of ATP-dependent consumption of Ca2+, value of the Mg2+, Ca2+-ATPase activity and an amount of the intermediate phosphorylated product forming in the reaction of ATP hydrolysis decrease. The rate of this product formation in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of the distrophic muscles is inhibited as compared to normalcy. Elimination of Ca2+ into calcium-free medium from the vesicular membranes of the reticulum preliminarily loaded with Ca2+ occurs more rapidly under dystrophy than in normalcy. The data obtained evidence for a disturbance of mechanism of Ca2+ active transport and for an increase in the membrane permeability for Ca2+ in the membranes of the dystrophic muscles sarcoplasmic reticulum. A problem is considered on a dependence of the skeletal muscles observed in the reticulum under dystrophy of the functional changes on the membrane structure, in particular on their lipid composition.

  11. Study of the function of sarcoplasmic reticulum of vascular smooth muscle during activation due to depolarization-induced calcium influx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    The role of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in vascular smooth muscle was evaluated with respect to regulation of myoplasmic Ca{sup 2+} during the Ca{sup 2+} entry induced by depolarization. Calcium agonist, Bay K8644, stimulated Ca{sup 2+} influx as well as tension in physiological salt solution, (PSS) in contrast to the priming effects due to the depolarization originally reported. Disparity, however, was found between the Ca{sup 2+} entered and tension developed. Correlation between the tension and {sup 45}Ca influx showed a typical threshold phenomenon; the basal Ca{sup 2+} influx can be raised to a certain level (25%) without tension induction, after which a minor increase in Ca{sup 2+} influx produced significant tension. This subthreshold Ca{sup 2+} influx was found accumulated in the caffeine-sensitive Ca stores, the SR. This confirmed the dependency of tension on the rate of Ca{sup 2+} entry demonstrated by a previous report.

  12. Sarcoplasmic reticulum buffering of myoplasmic calcium in bovine coronary artery smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturek, M; Kunda, K; Hu, Q

    1992-01-01

    1. We tested the hypothesis that the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) buffers (attenuates) the increase in averaged myoplasmic free [Ca2+] (Ca(im)) resulting from Ca2+ influx. 2. Fura-2 measurements of Ca(im) were obtained in single smooth muscle cells freshly dispersed from bovine coronary artery. 3. Caffeine (5 x 10(-3) M) elicited a transient increase in Ca(im) and depleted the SR Ca2+ store. In the continued presence of caffeine or 10(-5) M-ryanodine SR buffering of Ca(im) was inhibited. Subsequent exposure to high extracellular [K+] (greater than 30 mM, equimolar Na+ removal) elicited a 2-fold more rapid and 2-fold greater peak increase in Ca(im) than high K+ elicited when SR buffering of Ca(im) was normal. The augmented increase in Ca(im) was inhibited 35% by 10(-5) M-diltiazem, 65% by 2 x 10(-4) M-LaCl3, and 87% in Ca(2+)-free external solution. 4. When Ca(im) buffering capacity was increased by partially depleting the SR with a transient (1 min) exposure to caffeine, subsequent exposure to 80 nM-K+ solution increased Ca(im) almost 2-fold more slowly than 80 mM-K+ before depletion of Ca2+ from the SR. However, the influxing Ca2+ was sequestered by the SR and refilled it, as evident by the subsequent caffeine-induced Ca(im) transient being identical to the first. Increasing extracellular [K+] (thus, increasing depolarization and Na+ removal) caused proportional increases in Ca(im) and the subsequent caffeine-induced Ca(im) transients were proportionally larger, indicating a graded filling of the SR by Ca2+ influx. 5. Diltiazem (10(-5) M) inhibited the refilling of the SR achieved by 80 mM-K+, by 26%. Refilling was inhibited 76% by 80 mM-K+, Ca(2+)-free solution, indicating the fraction of refilling dependent on influx of Ca2+ through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, leak channels, and other influx pathways. Mild depolarization with 35 mM-K+ (no Na+ removal) often caused no increase in Ca(im), but influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels occurred because the SR Ca2

  13. ATP-sensitive voltage- and calcium-dependent chloride channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourie, J I

    1997-05-01

    Chloride channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are thought to play an essential role in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling by balancing charge movement during calcium release and uptake. In this study the nucleotide-sensitivity of Cl- channels in the SR from rabbit skeletal muscle was investigated using the lipid bilayer technique. Two distinct ATP-sensitive Cl- channels that differ in their conductance and kinetic properties and in the mechanism of ATP-induced channel inhibition were observed. The first, a nonfrequent 150 pS channel was inhibited by trans (luminal) ATP, and the second, a common 75 pS small chloride (SCl) channel was inhibited by cis (cytoplasmic) ATP. In the case of the SCl channel the ATP-induced reversible decline in the values of current (maximal current amplitude, Imax and integral current, I') and kinetic parameters (frequency of opening FO, probability of the channel being open PO, mean open TO and closed Tc times) show a nonspecific block of the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent SCl channel. ATP was a more potent blocker from the cytoplasmic side than from the luminal side of the channel. The SCl channel block was not due to Ca2+ chelation by ATP, nor to phosphorylation of the channel protein. The inhibitory action of ATP was mimicked by the nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) in the absence of Mg2+. The inhibitory potency of the adenine nucleotides was charge dependent in the following order ATP4- > ADP3- > > > AMP2-. The data suggest that ATP-induced effects are mediated via an open channel block mechanism. Modulation of the SCl channel by [ATP]cis and [Ca2+]cis indicates that (i) this channel senses the bioenergetic state of the muscle fiber and (ii) it is linked to the ATP-dependent cycling of the Ca2+ between the SR and the sarcoplasm.

  14. Contractions induced by a calcium-triggered release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of single skinned cardiac cells.

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    Fabiato, A; Fabiato, F

    1975-08-01

    1. Fragments of single cardiac cells were obtained by homogenization of ventricular tissue from adult rats. Remaining pieces of sacrolemma were removed by micro-dissection. Tension was recorded from the ends of the skinned (sarcolemma-free) cells with a photodiode force transducer. 2. In the presence of a strong buffering of the free [Ca2+] with 4-0 mM total EGTA, a tonic tension was obtained that increased according to t sigmoid curve when the free ([Ca2+] was increased from 10(-6-75)M to 10(-5-0)M. This curve was not modified by the destruction of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) by the detergent Brij 58. Therefore, the tonic tension corresponded to the direct effect of the free [Ca2+] present in the buffer on the myofilaments. 3. In the presence of a slight buffering of the free [Ca2+] with 0-050 mM total EGTA, cyclic contractions were observed that were attributed to cyclic releases and re-sequestrations of Ca2+ by the SR. The absence of effect of azide and ruthenium red on the cyclic contractions obtained at a free [Ca2+] lower than 10(-6-50)M demonstrated that the mitochondria played no role in the triggering of these contractions. 4. Cyclic contractions were induced by a slight variation of free [Ca2+] in the buffer from 10(-7-65)M to 10(-7-40)M. Their amplitude at 10(-7-40)M free Ca2+ was equal to the tonic tension developed by a free [Ca2+] 20 times higher applied to the myofilaments when the SR was destroyed by detergent or functionally inhibited by high total [EGTA]. It was concluded that these cyclic contractions corresponded to a Ca2+-triggered release of Ca2+ from the SR. 5. The cyclic contractions were induced by the filling of the SR with Ca2+ to a critical level at which it released a fraction of the Ca2+ it contained. Each contraction was followed by a re-sequestration of Ca2+, the kinetics of which conditioned the duration of the cycles. 6. The amplitude of the cyclic contractions increased when the free [Ca2+] that triggered them was increased

  15. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from rabbit leg muscle have been used in a study of chloride-induced calcium release. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that light sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles are derived from the longitudinal reticulum and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles are derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP to amounts greater than 100 nmoles Ca/sup + +/ per mg of protein in less than one minute. Light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles each had a biphasic time course of calcium uptake. The initial uptake was followed by a rapid release after approximately one minute, of 30 to 40% of the accumulated calcium, which was then followed by a slower phase of calcium accumulation. Results indicate that the chloride induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization. The release of calcium from the light SR vesicles is probably due to osmotic swelling and the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles is probably due to depolarization.

  16. Endogenous and maximal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content and calsequestrin expression in type I and type II human skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamboley, C R; Murphy, R M; McKenna, M J; Lamb, G D

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content and calsequestrin (CSQ) isoforms was investigated in human skeletal muscle. A fibre-lysing assay was used to quantify the endogenous Ca(2+) content and maximal Ca(2+) capacity of the SR in skinned segments of type I and type II fibres from vastus lateralis muscles of young healthy adults. Western blotting of individual fibres showed the great majority contained either all fast or all slow isoforms of myosin heavy chain (MHC), troponins C and I, tropomyosin and SERCA, and that the strontium sensitivity of the force response was closely indicative of the troponin C isoform present. The endogenous SR Ca(2+) content was slightly lower in type I compared to type II fibres (0.76 ± 0.03 and 0.85 ± 0.02 mmol Ca(2+) per litre of fibre, respectively), with virtually all of this Ca(2+) evidently being in the SR, as it could be rapidly released with a caffeine-low [Mg(2+)] solution (only 0.08 ± 0.01 and fibres, respectively (P fibres, where the SR remained functional, repeated cycles of caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release and subsequent Ca(2+) reloading similarly indicated that (i) maximal SR Ca(2+) content was lower in type I fibres than in type II fibres (P fibres compared to type II fibres (∼59% and 41%, respectively, P fibres were found on average to contain ∼3-fold more CSQ1 and ∼5-fold less CSQ2 than type I fibres (P fibres being primarily determined by the CSQ1 abundance, and in type I fibres by the combined amounts of both CSQ1 and CSQ2.

  17. Fluvastatin and atorvastatin affect calcium homeostasis of rat skeletal muscle fibers in vivo and in vitro by impairing the sarcoplasmic reticulum/mitochondria Ca2+-release system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liantonio, Antonella; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Cippone, Valentina; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Pierno, Sabata; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2007-05-01

    The mechanism by which the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) induce skeletal muscle injury is still under debate. By using fura-2 cytofluorimetry on intact extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers, here we provided the first evidence that 2 months in vivo chronic treatment of rats with fluvastatin (5 and 20 mg kg-1) and atorvastatin (5 and 10 mg kg-1) caused an alteration of calcium homeostasis. All treated animals showed a significant increase of resting cytosolic calcium [Ca2+]i, up to 60% with the higher fluvastatin dose and up to 20% with the other treatments. The [Ca2+]i rise induced by statin administration was not due to an increase of sarcolemmal permeability to calcium. Furthermore, the treatments reduced caffeine responsiveness. In vitro application of fluvastatin caused changes of [Ca2+]i, resembling the effect obtained after the in vivo administration. Indeed, fluvastatin produced a shift of mechanical threshold for contraction toward negative potentials and an increase of resting [Ca2+]i. By using ruthenium red and cyclosporine A, we determined the sequence of the statin-induced Ca2+ release mechanism. Mitochondria appeared as the cellular structure responsible for the earlier event leading to a subsequent large sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release. In conclusion, we suggest that calcium homeostasis alteration may be a crucial event for myotoxicity induced by this widely used class of hypolipidemic drugs.

  18. Tissue-specific expression of Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPases (ATP2A/SERCA) 1, 2, 3 during Xenopus laevis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Caterina; Pollet, Nicolas; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-ATPase pumps are critical in most cells, to sequester calcium into intracytoplasmic stores and regulate general calcium signalling. In addition, cell-specific needs for calcium signals have been described and employ a diversity of calcium ATPases in adult tissues and oocytes. A major family of such calcium pumps is ATP2A/SERCA family, for Sarcoplasmic/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPases. Although largely studied in adults, the developmental expression of the atp2a/serca genes remains unknown. Here, we provide genome organisation in Xenopuslaevis and tropicalis and phylogeny of atp2a/serca genes in craniates. We detail embryonic expression for the three X. laevis atp2a/serca genes. We found that the three atp2a/serca genes are strongly conserved among vertebrates and display complementary and tissue-specific expression in embryos. These expression patterns present variations when compared to the data reported in adults. Atp2a1/serca1 is expressed as soon as the end of gastrulation in a subset of the myod-positive cells, and later labels prospective slow muscle cells in the superficial part of the somite. In contrast atp2a2/serca2 is found in a larger subset of cells, but is not ubiquitous as reported in adults. Notably, atp2a2/serca2 is prominently expressed in the neural-related tissues, i.e. the neural plate, cement gland, but is excluded from premigratory neural crest. Finally, atp2a3/serca3 expression is restricted to the ectoderm throughout development. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Altered calcium pump and secondary deficiency of γ-sarcoglycan and microspan in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from δ-sarcoglycan knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Álvarez, Rocío; Crosbie, Rachelle H.; Vega-Moreno, Jesús; Medina-Monares, Joel; Estrada, Francisco J.; Ortega, Alicia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoglycans (SGs) and sarcospan (SSPN) are transmembrane proteins of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Mutations in the genes encoding SGs cause many inherited forms of muscular dystrophy. In this study, using purified membranes of wild-type (WT) and δ-SG knockout (KO) mice, we found the specific localization of the SG-SSPN isoforms in transverse tubules (TT) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. Immunoblotting revealed that the absence of δ-SG isoforms in TT and SR results in a secondary deficiency of γ-SG and µSPN. Our results showed augmented ATP hydrolytic activity, ATP-dependent calcium uptake and passive calcium efflux, probably through SERCA1 in KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we found a conformational change in SERCA1 isolated from KO muscle as demonstrated by calorimetric analysis. Following these alterations with mechanical properties, we found an increase in force in KO muscle with the same rate of fatigue but with a decreased fatigue recovery compared to WT. Together our observations suggest, for the first time, that the δ-SG isoforms may stabilize the expression of γ-SG and µSPN in the TT and SR membranes and that this possible complex may play a role in the maintenance of a stable level of resting cytosolic calcium concentration in skeletal muscle. PMID:20638123

  20. Biphasic contractions induced by milrinone at low temperature in ferret ventricular muscle: role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and transmembrane calcium influx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malecot, C O; Bers, D M; Katzung, B G

    1986-08-01

    The effects of milrinone were studied in ferret papillary muscle stimulated at various rates and temperatures from 23 degrees to 36 degrees C. In voltage-clamp experiments, 50 micrograms/ml (0.237 mM) milrinone induced a 2.1-fold increase in calcium current at 28 degrees or 36 degrees C. At 50 micrograms/ml, milrinone transiently increased contractility in all muscles at 28 degrees C, but its steady-state effect was either increased (+50%) or decreased (-24.7%) steady-state twitch amplitude. A negative inotropic effect always occurred below 27 degrees C. Milrinone decreased the total twitch duration and split the twitch into two components (P1 and P2) in the absence of any evidence of aberrant conduction. Increasing milrinone concentration from 50 to 300 micrograms/ml decreased P1 and increased P2. Ryanodine (100 mM) or caffeine (10 mM) suppressed P1. Contractions elicited after 30 seconds of rest were also biphasic in the presence of milrinone, but not in its absence. P2 of post-rest contraction was increased by caffeine or calcium (10 mM) and decreased by cobalt (2 mM) when drugs were applied at the beginning of the rest. Ryanodine and caffeine also suppressed P1 of post-rest contraction. The evidence suggests that P1 may be caused by Ca release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and P2 by increased Ca influx during the action potential via the calcium channel. It is also suggested that P2 may be present under control conditions, but to a lesser extent, and masked by a large P1.

  1. Differential regulation of the fiber type-specific gene expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase isoforms induced by exercise training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morissette, Marc P; Susser, Shanel E; Stammers, Andrew N; O'Hara, Kimberley A; Gardiner, Phillip F; Sheppard, Patricia; Moffatt, Teri L; Duhamel, Todd A

    2014-09-01

    The regulatory role of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-α2 on sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA) 1a and SERCA2a in different skeletal muscle fiber types has yet to be elucidated. Sedentary (Sed) or exercise-trained (Ex) wild-type (WT) and AMPKα2-kinase dead (KD) transgenic mice, which overexpress a mutated and inactivated AMPKα2 subunit, were utilized to characterize how genotype or exercise training influenced the regulation of SERCA isoforms in gastrocnemius. As expected, both Sed and Ex KD mice had >40% lower AMPK phosphorylation and 30% lower SERCA1a protein than WT mice (P SERCA2a protein was not different among KD and WT mice. Exercise increased SERCA1a and SERCA2a protein content among WT and KD mice, compared with their Sed counterparts. Maximal SERCA activity was lower in KD mice, compared with WT. Total phospholamban protein was higher in KD mice than in WT and lower in Ex compared with Sed mice. Exercise training increased phospholamban Ser(16) phosphorylation in WT mice. Laser capture microdissection and quantitative PCR indicated that SERCA1a mRNA expression among type I fibers was not altered by genotype or exercise, but SERCA2a mRNA was increased 30-fold in WT+Ex, compared with WT+Sed. In contrast, the exercise-stimulated increase for SERCA2a mRNA was blunted in KD mice. Exercise upregulated SERCA1a and SERCA2a mRNA among type II fibers, but was not altered by genotype. Collectively, these data suggest that exercise differentially influences SERCA isoform expression in type I and type II fibers. Additionally, AMPKα2 influences the regulation of SERCA2a mRNA in type I skeletal muscle fibers following exercise training. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  2. [Effect of calmodulin and 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinases on calcium transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum of normal rabbit myocardium and in toxico-allergic myocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanov, N V; Khugashvili, Z G

    1983-08-01

    It was demonstrated that under normal conditions calmodulin and exogenous 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase considerably active Ca2+ transport by sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit myocardium; a combined action of these compounds produces an additive effect. The protein-inhibitor of 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase and trifluoroperazine eliminate the activating effect of 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase; in addition, trifluoroperazine decreases significantly the basal level of Ca2+ uptake. The 3':5'-AMP-dependent activation of Ca2+ transport becomes apparent after Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of FSR membrane proteins. In toxico-allergic myocarditis calmodulin and 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase do not activate the low level of Ca2+ uptake. No differences were observed between the action of calmodulin and 3':5'-AMP-dependent protein kinase isolated from normal and pathological rabbit heart. A conclusion is drawn that the decrease of Ca2+ transport is due to the impairment of Ca2+-calmodulin and 3':5'-AMP-dependent phosphorylation in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

  3. Inhibitory effect of lidocaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-dependent atpase from temporalis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Casadoumecq, Ana C; Alonso, Guillermo L; Takara, Delia

    2010-01-01

    Myotoxic effects of local anesthetics on skeletal musclefibers involve the inhibition ofsarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -dependent ATPase activity and Ca2 transport. Lidocaine is a local anesthetic frequently used to relieve the symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this work was to test the inhibitory and/or stimulatory effect of lidocaine on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -dependent ATPase isolated from rabbit temporalis muscle. Ca2+ -dependent ATPase activity was determined by a colorimetric method Calcium-binding to the Ca dependent ATPase, Ca2+ transport, and phosphorylation of the enzyme by ATP were determined with radioisotopic techniques. Lidocaine inhibited the Ca2+ -dependent ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. The preincubation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes with lidocaine enhanced the Ca2+ dependent ATPase activity in the absence of calcium ionophore. Lidocaine also inhibited both Ca2+ uptake and enzyme phosphorylation by ATP but had no effect on Ca2+ -binding to the enzyme. We conclude that the effect of lidocaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -dependent ATPase from temporalis muscle is due to the drug's direct interaction with the enzyme and the increased permeability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane to Ca.

  4. Contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content in type I and type II skeletal muscle fibres in active aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; Dutka, T L; McKenna, M J; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2015-06-01

    Muscle weakness in old age is due in large part to an overall loss of skeletal muscle tissue, but it remains uncertain how much also stems from alterations in the properties of the individual muscle fibres. This study examined the contractile properties and amount of stored intracellular calcium in single muscle fibres of Old (70 ± 4 years) and Young (22 ± 3 years) adults. The maximum level of force production (per unit cross-sectional area) in fast twitch fibres in Old subjects was lower than in Young subjects, and the fibres were also less sensitive to activation by calcium. The amount of calcium stored inside muscle fibres and available to trigger contraction was also lower in both fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres in the Old subjects. These findings indicate that muscle weakness in old age stems in part from an impaired capacity for force production in the individual muscle fibres. This study examined the contractile properties and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content in mechanically skinned vastus lateralis muscle fibres of Old (70 ± 4 years) and Young (22 ± 3 years) humans to investigate whether changes in muscle fibre properties contribute to muscle weakness in old age. In type II fibres of Old subjects, specific force was reduced by ∼17% and Ca(2+) sensitivity was also reduced (pCa50 decreased ∼0.05 pCa units) relative to that in Young. S-Glutathionylation of fast troponin I (TnIf ) markedly increased Ca(2+) sensitivity in type II fibres, but the increase was significantly smaller in Old versus Young (+0.136 and +0.164 pCa unit increases, respectively). Endogenous and maximal SR Ca(2+) content were significantly smaller in both type I and type II fibres in Old subjects. In fibres of Young, the SR could be nearly fully depleted of Ca(2+) by a combined caffeine and low Mg(2+) stimulus, whereas in fibres of Old the amount of non-releasable Ca(2+) was significantly increased (by > 12% of endogenous Ca(2+) content). Western

  5. Calsequestrin 2 deletion causes sinoatrial node dysfunction and atrial arrhythmias associated with altered sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium cycling and degenerative fibrosis within the mouse atrial pacemaker complex1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhov, Alexey V.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Lou, Qing; Hage, Lori T.; Hansen, Brian J.; Belevych, Andriy E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Knollmann, Björn C.; Periasamy, Muthu; Györke, Sandor; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Loss-of-function mutations in Calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2) are associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). CPVT patients also exhibit bradycardia and atrial arrhythmias for which the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We aimed to study the sinoatrial node (SAN) dysfunction due to loss of CASQ2. Methods and results In vivo electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring, in vitro high-resolution optical mapping, confocal imaging of intracellular Ca2+ cycling, and 3D atrial immunohistology were performed in wild-type (WT) and Casq2 null (Casq2−/−) mice. Casq2−/− mice exhibited bradycardia, SAN conduction abnormalities, and beat-to-beat heart rate variability due to enhanced atrial ectopic activity both at baseline and with autonomic stimulation. Loss of CASQ2 increased fibrosis within the pacemaker complex, depressed primary SAN activity, and conduction, but enhanced atrial ectopic activity and atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with macro- and micro-reentry during autonomic stimulation. In SAN myocytes, CASQ2 deficiency induced perturbations in intracellular Ca2+ cycling, including abnormal Ca2+ release, periods of significantly elevated diastolic Ca2+ levels leading to pauses and unstable pacemaker rate. Importantly, Ca2+ cycling dysfunction occurred not only at the SAN cellular level but was also globally manifested as an increased delay between action potential (AP) and Ca2+ transient upstrokes throughout the atrial pacemaker complex. Conclusions Loss of CASQ2 causes abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and selective interstitial fibrosis in the atrial pacemaker complex, which disrupt SAN pacemaking but enhance latent pacemaker activity, create conduction abnormalities and increase susceptibility to AF. These functional and extensive structural alterations could contribute to SAN dysfunction as well as AF in CPVT patients. PMID:24216388

  6. Alterations in mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum from heart and skeletal muscle of horizontally casted primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordahl, L. A.; Stone, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontally body-casted rhesus monkeys are used as an animal model in order to study the physiological changes known as cardiovascular deconditioning which occur during weightless conditions. No difference was found between the experimental and control animals in heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation which indicates that no apparent changes occurred in the primary energy-producing system of the heart. A marked increase in cytochrome oxidase activity was observed in the casted primate heart mitochondria compared to controls, while a 25% decrease in respiratory substrate-supported calcium uptake was found in casted primate heart mitochondria compared to controls. Sacroplasmic reticulum isolated from the primate hearts revealed marked changes in calcium transport activities. It is concluded that the marked depression in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum functions indicates altered calcium homeostasis in the casted-primate heart which could be a factor in cardiovascular deconditioning.

  7. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca2+ mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization.

  8. Characterization of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase from rabbit temporalis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel Antonio; Di Croce, Daniel Eduardo; Casadoumecq, Ana Clara; Richard, Susana Beatriz; Takara, Delia

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-ATPase from rabbit temporalis muscle and to determine the optimal conditions for calcium transport and enzymatic activity. SR vesicles were isolated from rabbit temporalis muscle by differential centrifugation, the protein composition analyzed by electrophoresis and compared to fast-twitch muscle membrane suspensions. ELISA was used to determine the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) isoform. Ca-ATPase activity was determined by a colorimetric method. Calcium-binding to the Ca-ATPase, calcium uptake, calcium efflux and phosphorylation by P(i) were determined with radioisotopic techniques. Sixty five percent of the total protein concentration of SR membranes suspensions from rabbit temporalis corresponded to SERCA. Of the total SERCA protein, 64% was SERCA 2, 35% was SERCA 1 and less than 1% was SERCA 3. The optimal conditions of the SERCA isolated from rabbit temporalis muscle were: pH 7.2, 5 μM Ca(2+), 100 μM EGTA, 90 μM Mg(2+), 3mM ATP and 100mM KCl and did not differ from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. The temporalis maximal calcium uptake and Ca-ATPase activity were lower but the sensitivity to the specific Ca-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin was higher. Calcium-binding to the enzyme and calcium efflux were similar while the phosphorylation of the enzyme by P(i) was lower. The lower enzymatic activity and calcium transport capability of the Ca-ATPase isolated from rabbit temporalis, and the higher sensitivity to inhibitory drugs are consistent with the presence of a substantial proportion of SERCA 2, which can be expected in other rabbit masticatory muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Down-regulation of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum ryanodine channel in severely food-restricted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Vizotto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that myocardial dysfunction induced by food restriction is related to calcium handling. Although cardiac function is depressed in food-restricted animals, there is limited information about the molecular mechanisms that lead to this abnormality. The present study evaluated the effects of food restriction on calcium cycling, focusing on sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine channel (RYR2 mRNA expressions in rat myocardium. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 60 days old, were submitted to ad libitum feeding (control rats or 50% diet restriction for 90 days. The levels of left ventricle SERCA2, PLB, and RYR2 were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Body and ventricular weights were reduced in 50% food-restricted animals. RYR2 mRNA was significantly decreased in the left ventricle of the food-restricted group (control = 5.92 ± 0.48 vs food-restricted group = 4.84 ± 0.33, P < 0.01. The levels of SERCA2 and PLB mRNA were similar between groups (control = 8.38 ± 0.44 vs food-restricted group = 7.96 ± 0.45, and control = 1.52 ± 0.06 vs food-restricted group = 1.53 ± 0.10, respectively. Down-regulation of RYR2 mRNA expressions suggests that chronic food restriction promotes abnormalities in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

  10. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR,HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle using a combination of differential centrifugation and isopycnic zonal ultracentrifugation. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes whereas the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material, similar to that seen in the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The sucrose HSR vesicles have an additional morphological feature which appears as membrane projections that resemble the SR feet. The freeze-fracture morphology of either type of SR reveals an asymmetric distribution of intramembraneous particles in the same orientation and distribution as the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vivo. Biochemical studies were made on the content of Ca, Mg, ATPase, and protein of the vesicles and phosphorylation of the vesicles. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that the LSR is derived from the longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and the HSR is derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, contains junctional SR membrane and has three unique proteins (calsequestrin, an intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein and a 9000 dalton proteolipid).

  11. Observation of Network Dynamics of Ryanodine Receptors on Skeletal Muscle Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rabbit muscle vesicles derived from sarcoplasmic reticulum were used as a material in studying networks of ryanodine receptors by cryo electron tomography. Three-dimensional analysis reveals the dynamical features of these networks. It was found that the connection angles were rotated along the transmembrane axis of ryanodine receptors. Majority of the connections was observed at domains 6/6 of ryanodine receptors while a small group of connections were showed at domains 9/10. The flexible rotation and connection shift seem to facilitate the extension of an annular network on the wall of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a triad.

  12. Sub-sarcolemmal swelling of sarcoplasmic reticulum after isometric contractions in rat semimembranosus lateralis muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, M.E.T.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; Friden, J.

    1999-01-01

    The decline in isometric force, swelling of sarcoplasmic reticulum and loss of desmin was measured in semimembranosus lateralis muscle of male Wistar rats immediately after a short series of brief (500 ms) maximal isometric contractions. For the active muscle, the series ended below (protocol A) and

  13. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-pump dysfunction in rat cardiomyocytes briefly exposed to hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, T E; Sulakhe, P V

    1997-01-01

    The effects of hydroxyl radical exposure of intact cardiomyocytes on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function were investigated. For this purpose, isolated rat heart myocytes were exposed briefly (1 min) to the hydroxyl radical generating system (H2O2/FeCl2 or FeSO4) or 5-5'-dithiobis-nitrobenzoic acid (DTNB), a sulfhydryl oxidizing reagent, and following this a SR-enriched fraction was isolated. Marked decreases in the SR calcium uptake activities were seen in the myocytes exposed to either the hydroxyl radical-generating system or DTNB. The exposure of myocytes to the hydroxyl radical, but not DTNB, markedly increased the amount of malonyldialdehyde (MDA) in the subsequently isolated SR. Total sulfhydryl group content in SR was decreased by exposure of myocytes to DTNB. Further, there was a significant decrease in [3H]-NEM binding to SR isolated from the hydoxyl radical-treated myocytes indicating that sulfhydryl groups are affected (oxidized). Both mannitol and catalase were found to offer complete protection against the inhibitory effect of peroxide +/- iron on calcium uptake. Also the above-mentioned alterations in both MDA and sulfhydryl group content were prevented by mannitol and catalase. Exogenously added cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-PK) or calmodulin (CAM) increased SR calcium uptake activity. In the SR isolated from the treated myocytes, the stimulatory effects of A-PK and CAM were also seen, although under all assay conditions calcium uptakes were of lower magnitude. The findings are consistent with the view that the damaging effect of the hydroxyl radical and DTNB on the functioning of SR occurs rapidly in the intact cardiomyocytes. The hydroxyl radical-provoked damage involves both protein sulfhydryl and lipid oxidation.

  14. Sarcoplasmic-reticulum biogenesis in contraction-inhibited skeletal-muscle cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Charuk, J H; Guerin, C.; Holland, P.C.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that inhibition of the spontaneous contractile activity of cultured embryonic-chick skeletal-muscle fibres with tetrodotoxin (TTX) leads to decreased sarcoplasmic-reticulum Ca(2+)-transport rates and steady-state concentrations of the high-energy Ca(2+)-ATPase phosphoenzyme intermediate [Charuk & Holland (1983) Exp. Cell Res. 144, 143-157]. In the present study we used a monoclonal antibody to the Ca(2+)-ATPase to show that there is a decreased amount of enzyme accumu...

  15. High resolution structural evidence suggests the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum forms microdomains with Acidic Stores (lysosomes) in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Daniel; Capel, Rebecca A; Ford, Kerrie L; Christian, Helen C; Mirams, Gary R; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Kohl, Peter; Galione, Antony; Burton, Rebecca A B; Terrar, Derek A

    2017-01-17

    Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) stimulates calcium release from acidic stores such as lysosomes and is a highly potent calcium-mobilising second messenger. NAADP plays an important role in calcium signalling in the heart under basal conditions and following β-adrenergic stress. Nevertheless, the spatial interaction of acidic stores with other parts of the calcium signalling apparatus in cardiac myocytes is unknown. We present evidence that lysosomes are intimately associated with the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in ventricular myocytes; a median separation of 20 nm in 2D electron microscopy and 3.3 nm in 3D electron tomography indicates a genuine signalling microdomain between these organelles. Fourier analysis of immunolabelled lysosomes suggests a sarcomeric pattern (dominant wavelength 1.80 μm). Furthermore, we show that lysosomes form close associations with mitochondria (median separation 6.2 nm in 3D studies) which may provide a basis for the recently-discovered role of NAADP in reperfusion-induced cell death. The trigger hypothesis for NAADP action proposes that calcium release from acidic stores subsequently acts to enhance calcium release from the SR. This work provides structural evidence in cardiac myocytes to indicate the formation of microdomains between acidic and SR calcium stores, supporting emerging interpretations of NAADP physiology and pharmacology in heart.

  16. Comparison of three tetramic acids and their ability to alter membrane function in cultured skeletal muscle cells and sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R T; Goeger, D E; Yoo, H; Showker, J L

    1992-06-01

    Cyclopiazonic acid is a potent inhibitor of calcium uptake and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity in sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. In L6 muscle myoblasts, cyclopiazonic acid stimulates the uptake of tetraphenylphosphonium, a lipophilic membrane potential probe, and has antioxidant properties. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the structural requirements necessary for causing the surface charge alterations, and the antioxidant activity in L6 skeletal muscle myoblasts, and for inhibition of calcium transport by rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. This was accomplished by comparing the effects of two structurally related tetramic acids, cyclopiazonic acid imine and tenuazonic acid, with cyclopiazonic acid. Cyclopiazonic acid imine inhibited oxalate-assisted 45Ca2+ uptake and ATPase activity in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles and stimulated tetraphenylphosphonium accumulation by L6 muscle myoblasts. However, these effects required an approximately fourfold higher concentration than that of cyclopiazonic acid. Tenuazonic acid, up to 1 mM, had no effect on oxalate-assisted 45Ca2+ uptake or Ca(2+)-ATPase activity in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles and did not stimulate tetraphenylphosphonium accumulation by L6 muscle myoblasts. Cyclopiazonic acid was only slightly more effective than cyclopiazonic acid imine at preventing the patulin-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid positive substance (used to estimate lipid peroxidation); tenuazonic acid was totally ineffective. Previously, it was shown that cyclopiazonic acid was twice as effective as cyclopiazonic acid imine at preventing increases in thiobarbituric acid positive substance in cultured renal cells, LLC-PK1. Thus, the indole nucleus of cyclopiazonic acid is essential for the membrane-associated biological activity; however, modification of the acetyl group reduces the potency of the activity.

  17. Expression of sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isoforms in masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Trinks, Pablo W; Richard, Susana B; Di Croce, Daniel E; Takara, Delia

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) isoforms in rabbit masticatory muscles compared with those in fast-twitch muscle. It was hypothesized that combined expression of the SERCA isoforms in fast- and slow-twitch muscles accounts for lower Ca-ATPase activity. SERCA was isolated by differential centrifugation, the isoforms were determined by ELISA, and the activity of each isoform was measured using a colorimetric method. Activity was tested for significance by anova, and the distribution of isoforms was assessed using the chi-square test (P < 0.05) and correlated to SERCA activity using Spearman's rank correlation. SERCA1 was predominant (90.5%) in fast-twitch muscle, whereas a mixture of SERCA isoforms was found in masticatory muscles: 62-78% was SERCA2, 20-37% was SERCA1, and the SERCA3 content was negligible. Depressor muscles showed a significantly higher content (77.8%) of SERCA2, and elevator muscles showed a higher content (35.4%) of SERCA1. Elevator muscles showed higher expression of SERCA2a (58%), and depressor muscles showed higher expression of SERCA2b (20%). The SERCA1 content was mainly SERCA1a and significantly higher for elevator muscles (33%), whereas depressor muscles showed a higher content of SERCA1b (4%). The SERCA1 content of fast-twitch muscle was mainly SERCA1a (88.5%). It is concluded that the mixture of different SERCA isoforms, along with a substantial content of SERCA2b, in masticatory muscles would support lower Ca-ATPase activity and calcium transport. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  18. Control of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+ pump expression in cardiac and smooth muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Misquitta, C M; A Sing; Grover, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Cardiac muscle expresses sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+ pump isoform SERCA2a; stomach smooth muscle expresses SERCA2b. In 2-day-old rabbits, cardiac muscle contained levels of SERCA2 protein that were 100-200-fold those in the stomach smooth muscle. In nuclear run-on assays, the rate of SERCA2 gene transcription in heart nuclei was not significantly higher than in the stomach smooth-muscle nuclei. However, the SERCA2 mRNA levels (mean+/-S.E.M.) were (29+/-4)-fold higher in the heart....

  19. Inside-outside distribution and diffusion of phosphatidylcholine in rat sarcoplasmic reticulum as determined by 13C NMR and phosphatidylcholine exchange protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, B. de; Besselaar, A.M.H.P. van den; Bosch, H. van den; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1979-01-01

    1. 1. The transverse distribution of phosphatidylcholine in rat sarcoplasmic reticulum was investigated employing 13C NMR in conjunction with the shift reagent DyCl3. 2. 2. Sarcoplasmic reticulum phosphatidylcholine was enriched with 13C by feeding rats a diet containing [N-Me3-13C]choline. Up to

  20. Involvement of sarcoplasmic reticulum 'Ca2+ release channels' in excitation-contraction coupling in vertebrate skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunder, D G; Györke, S; Dettbarn, C; Palade, P

    1992-01-01

    1. Pharmacological blockers of calcium-induced calcium release from isolated skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles have been introduced into frog skeletal muscle fibres to determine their effects on excitation-contraction coupling. 2. Among the blockers tested, Ruthenium Red, neomycin, gentamicin and 9-aminoacridine inhibited the SR Ca2+ release associated with excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling as much as they inhibited caffeine potentiation of that release. Protamine, certain of its derivatives, and spermine were ineffective in both in situ tests. 3. Alternative sites of polyamine action on the contractile proteins, SR Ca2+ uptake or charge movements were ruled out. 4. All polyamines tested required considerably higher concentrations to inhibit excitation-contraction coupling than to block Ca2+ release from isolated SR vesicles. 5. The quantitative pharmacological difference in sensitivity between isolated and intact systems serves as a reminder that results on isolated systems cannot generally be used to predict results of the same substances on more physiological systems. 6. Since caffeine is known to open the SR 'Ca2+ release channels' (the ryanodine receptors that mediate Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release), the equal effectiveness of these blockers at inhibiting excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling and its potentiation by caffeine suggests that the SR 'Ca2+ release channels' are indeed involved in excitation-concentration coupling in skeletal muscle, although the results do not indicate how the channel is gated open during E-C coupling. PMID:1380087

  1. Modulation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and oxidative modification during the development of adjuvant arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosova, Miriam K; Karlovska, Janka; Zizkova, Petronela; Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Ponist, Silvester; Spickett, Corinne M; Horakova, Lubica

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum to the tail of Lewis rats. In sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscles, we investigated the development of AA. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity decreased on day 21, suggesting possible conformational changes in the transmembrane part of the enzyme, especially at the site of the calcium binding transmembrane part. These events were associated with an increased level of protein carbonyls, a decrease in cysteine SH groups, and alterations in SR membrane fluidity. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site at any time point of AA, as detected by a FITC fluorescence marker. Some changes observed on day 21 appeared to be reversible, as indicated by SERCA activity, cysteine SH groups, SR membrane fluidity, protein carbonyl content and fluorescence of an NCD-4 marker specific for the calcium binding site. The reversibility may represent adaptive mechanisms of AA, induced by higher relative expression of SERCA, oxidation of cysteine, nitration of tyrosine and presence of acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid. Nitric oxide may regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level through conformational alterations of SERCA, and decreasing levels of calsequestrin in SR may also play regulatory role in SERCA activity and expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impaired sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release rate after fatiguing stimulation in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Sjøgaard, G; Madsen, Klavs

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function and contractile properties before and during recovery from fatigue in the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle. Fatiguing contractions (60 Hz, 150 ms/s for 4 min) induced a reduction of the SR Ca(2+) release rate...... to 66% that persisted for 1 h, followed by a gradual recovery to 87% of prefatigue release rate at 3 h recovery. Tetanic force and rate of force development (+dF/dt) and relaxation (-dF/dt) were depressed by approximately 80% after stimulation. Recovery occurred in two phases: an initial phase, in which.......05). Despite a slowing of the relaxation rate, we did not find any significant alterations in the SR Ca(2+) uptake function. These data demonstrate that the Ca(2+) release mechanism of SR is sensitive to repetitive in vitro muscle contraction. Moreover, the results indicate that +dF/dt to some extent depends...

  3. Disturbances of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and transverse tubular system in 24-h electrostimulated fast-twitch skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frías, J A; Cadefau, J A; Prats, C

    2005-01-01

    damage to longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and swelling of t-tubules revealed by electron microscopy. The ultrastructural changes observed here reflect exercise-induced damage of membrane systems that might severely compromise muscle function. Since this process is reversible, we suggest that it may......Chronic low-frequency stimulation of rabbit tibialis anterior muscle over a 24-h period induces a conspicuous loss of isometric tension that is unrelated to muscle energy metabolism (J.A. Cadefau, J. Parra, R. Cusso, G. Heine, D. Pette, Responses of fatigable and fatigue-resistant fibres of rabbit...... muscle to low-frequency stimulation, Pflugers Arch. 424 (1993) 529-537). To assess the involvement of sarcoplasmic reticulum and transverse tubular system in this force impairment, we isolated microsomal fractions from stimulated and control (contralateral, unstimulated) muscles on discontinuous sucrose...

  4. N-acetylcysteine protects against bupivacaine-induced myotoxicity caused by oxidative and sarcoplasmic reticulum stress in human skeletal myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbes, Olivier; Bourret, Annick; Nouette-Gaulain, Karine; Pillard, Fabien; Matecki, Stefan; Py, Guillaume; Mercier, Jacques; Capdevila, Xavier; Philips, Alexandre

    2010-09-01

    Local anesthetics offer the benefits of extended analgesia with greater patient satisfaction and faster rehabilitation compared with intravenous morphine. These benefits, however, can be offset by adverse iatrogenic muscle pain. Here, the authors investigate the mechanisms of local anesthetic-induced myotoxicity and assess the protective effect of N-acetylcysteine. The authors used primary cell cultures of human skeletal muscle myoblasts to study local anesthetic adverse effects. Production of reactive oxygen species was investigated in human skeletal myotubes by fluorescence microscopy. Expression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum stress markers and induction of apoptosis were followed by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis. Finally, the effect of N-acetylcysteine on bupivacaine-induced myotoxicity was investigated in vitro. Bupivacaine sequentially induced reactive oxygen species production, oxidative stress, sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum stress, and activation of caspases 9 and 7 in human differentiated myoblasts. These iatrogenic effects were prevented by N-acetylcysteine. The authors demonstrated a protective effect of N-acetylcysteine against bupivacaine-induced sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in primary human skeletal muscle cell.

  5. Effect of carticaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-adenosine triphosphatase. II. Cations dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Delia; Sánchez, Gabriel A; Toma, Augusto F; Bonazzola, Patricia; Alonso, Guillermo L

    2005-05-01

    Ca2+-ATPase is a major intrinsic protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) from skeletal muscles. It actively transports Ca2+ from the cytoplasm to the SR lumen, reducing cytoplasmic [Ca2+] to promote muscle relaxation. Carticaine is a local anesthetic widely used in operative dentistry. We previously showed that carticaine inhibits SR Ca2+-ATPase activity and the coupled Ca(2+) uptake by isolated SR vesicles, and increases the rate of Ca2+ efflux from preloaded vesicles. We also found that these effects were antagonized by divalent cations, and concluded that they were mainly due to the direct interaction of carticaine with the Ca2+-ATPase protein. Here we present additional results on the modulation of the above effects of carticaine by Ca2+ and Mg2+. The activating effect of Ca2+ on the ATPase activity is competitively inhibited by carticaine, indicating a decreased Ca2+ binding to the high affinity Ca2+ transport sites. The activating effect of Mg2+ on the phosphorylation of Ca2+-ATPase by orthophosphate is also inhibited by carticaine. The anesthetic does not affect the reaction mechanism of the cations acting as cofactors of ATP in the catalytic site. On the basis of the present and our previous results, we propose a model that describes the effect of carticaine on the Ca2+-ATPase cycle.

  6. Puerarin Enhances Ca2+ Reuptake and Ca2+ Content of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes via Upregulation of SERCA2a

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    Lu Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ES-CMs serve as potential sources for cardiac regenerative therapy. However, the immature sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR function of ES-CMs prevents its application. In this report, we examined the effect of puerarin, an isoflavone compound, on SR function of murine ES-CMs. Methods: Murine ES-CMs were harvested by embryoid body-based differentiation method. Confocal calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamps were performed to assess the function of SR. The mRNA expression levels of SR-related genes were examined by quantitative PCR. The protein expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a was evaluated by immunofluorescent and western blot. Results: Long-term application of puerarin promotes basic properties of spontaneous calcium transient with increased amplitude, decay velocity, and decreased duration. Puerarin fails to alter ICa,L but increases the Ca2+ content of SR. Puerarin-treated ES-CMs have intact SR Ca2+ cycling with more SR Ca2+ reuptake. Long-term application of puerarin asynchronously upregulates the mRNA and protein expression of SERCA2a, as well as the transcripts of calsequestrin and triadin in developing ES-CMs. Application of puerarin during the stage of post-cardiac differentiation upregulates dose-dependently the transcripts of SERCA2a, phospholamban and tridin which can be reversed by the inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways, but shows no effect on the protein expression of SERCA2a. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that long-term puerarin treatment enhances Ca2+ reuptake and Ca2+ content via upregulation of SERCA2a.

  7. Protein kinase C inhibits Ca sup 2+ accumulation in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

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    Rogers, T.B.; Gaa, S.T.; Massey, C.; Doesemeci, A. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore (USA))

    1990-03-15

    It is now recognized that phorbol esters are negative inotropic agents in mammalian heart which presumably act via stimulation of Ca2(+)-activated phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PKC). The goal in the present study was to identify the underlying cellular processes. Digitonin-permeabilized cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were used to study biochemical and functional effects of phorbol esters on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). These cells contracted spontaneously at 3 microM Ca2+. Beating was inhibited by 10 microM ryanodine and was insensitive to 1 microM nifedipine. Thus, beating behavior results from the phasic oscillation of Ca2+ transport by SR in this preparation. Phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), decreased frequency by 30%, suggesting that Ca2+ transport by SR had been reduced. Whereas cAMP stimulated the rate of oxalate-supported 45Ca2+ uptake 2-fold, phorbol esters, TPA, and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate inhibited this process by about 45%. The effects of phorbols were specific: (a) the alpha-analogues of TPA and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate were inactive; and (b) the phorbol esters had no effect on Ca2+ transport in cells that had been depleted of PKC. TPA decreased oxalate-stimulated Ca2+ uptake over the entire range of Ca2+ concentrations, from 0.1 to 10 microM, by at least 70% without shifting the half-maximal effective Ca2+ concentration. Taken together these results indicate that the effects of phorbol ester on cardiac contraction are due to decreased Ca2+ transport by the SR and that these responses are mediated by PKC. These studies support the interpretation that the negative inotropic effects of phorbol esters are due, in part, to decreased SR function.

  8. Crosstalk between mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ cycling modulates cardiac pacemaker cell automaticity.

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    Yael Yaniv

    Full Text Available Mitochondria dynamically buffer cytosolic Ca(2+ in cardiac ventricular cells and this affects the Ca(2+ load of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. In sinoatrial-node cells (SANC the SR generates periodic local, subsarcolemmal Ca(2+ releases (LCRs that depend upon the SR load and are involved in SANC automaticity: LCRs activate an inward Na(+-Ca(2+ exchange current to accelerate the diastolic depolarization, prompting the ensemble of surface membrane ion channels to generate the next action potential (AP.To determine if mitochondrial Ca(2+ (Ca(2+ (m, cytosolic Ca(2+ (Ca(2+ (c-SR-Ca(2+ crosstalk occurs in single rabbit SANC, and how this may relate to SANC normal automaticity.Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ influx into (Ru360 or Ca(2+ efflux from (CGP-37157 decreased [Ca(2+](m to 80 ± 8% control or increased [Ca(2+](m to 119 ± 7% control, respectively. Concurrent with inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ influx or efflux, the SR Ca(2+ load, and LCR size, duration, amplitude and period (imaged via confocal linescan significantly increased or decreased, respectively. Changes in total ensemble LCR Ca(2+ signal were highly correlated with the change in the SR Ca(2+ load (r(2 = 0.97. Changes in the spontaneous AP cycle length (Ru360, 111 ± 1% control; CGP-37157, 89 ± 2% control in response to changes in [Ca(2+](m were predicted by concurrent changes in LCR period (r(2 = 0.84.A change in SANC Ca(2+ (m flux translates into a change in the AP firing rate by effecting changes in Ca(2+ (c and SR Ca(2+ loading, which affects the characteristics of spontaneous SR Ca(2+ release.

  9. Variable luminal sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) buffer capacity in smooth muscle cells.

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    Dagnino-Acosta, Adán; Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín

    2009-09-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum contains the internal Ca(2+) store in smooth muscle cells and its lumen appears to be a continuum that lacks diffusion barriers. Accordingly, the free luminal Ca(2+) level is the same all throughout the SR; however, whether the Ca(2+) buffer capacity is the same in all the SR is unknown. We have estimated indirectly the luminal Ca(2+) buffer capacity of the SR by comparing the reduction in SR Ca(2+) levels with the corresponding increase in [Ca(2+)](i) during activation of either IP(3)Rs with carbachol or RyRs with caffeine, in smooth muscle cells from guinea pig urinary bladder. We have determined that carbachol-sensitive SR has a 2.4 times larger Ca(2+) buffer capacity than caffeine-sensitive SR. Rapid inhibition of SERCA pumps with thapsigargin revealed that this pump activity accounts for 80% and 60% of the Ca(2+) buffer capacities of carbachol- and caffeine-sensitive SR, respectively. Moreover, the Ca(2+) buffer capacity of carbachol-sensitive SR was similar to caffeine-sensitive SR when SERCA pumps were inhibited. Similar rates of Ca(2+) replenishments suggest similar levels of SERCA pump activities for either carbachol- or caffeine-sensitive SR. Paired pulses of caffeine, in conditions of low Ca(2+) influx, indicate the relevance of luminal SR Ca(2+) buffer capacity in the [Ca(2+)](i) response. To further study the importance of luminal SR Ca(2+) buffer capacity in the release process we used low levels of heparin to partially inhibit IP(3)Rs. This condition revealed carbachol-induced transient increase of luminal SR Ca(2+) levels provided that SERCA pumps were active. It thus appears that SERCA pump activity keeps the luminal SR Ca(2+)-binding proteins in the high-capacity, low-affinity conformation, particularly for IP(3)R-mediated Ca(2+) release.

  10. Effects of high pressure treatment on Ca2+ release and Ca2+ uptake of sarcoplasmic reticulum.

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    Okamoto, A; Suzuki, A; Ikeuchi, Y; Saito, M

    1995-02-01

    To clarify the mechanism of pressure-induced meat tenderization or acceleration of meat conditioning, the pressure-induced morphological and biochemical changes in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and Ca2+ release from SR in the rabbit skeletal muscle treated with high pressure (100-300 MPa, 5 min) were investigated in comparison with those of the SR from conditioned muscle. The destruction of the membrane structure of the SR expanded with increasing pressure applied to the muscle. Significant changes in the SDS-PAGE profile were not observed in the SR from the pressurized muscle up to 200 MPa, but a marked decrease of the ATPase protein and high-affinity Ca(2+)-binding protein were observed in the SR from the pressurized muscle at 300 MPa. The ATPase activities increased in the SR isolated from the muscle exposed to high pressure up to 200 MPa. When the muscle was pressurized at 300 MPa, the ATPase activity dropped to the same level with that of the SR from the untreated muscle. Ca2+ uptake ability of the SR vesicles measured using a fluorescent chelating reagent decreased with increasing pressure applied to the muscle. Ultrastructural studies showed that Ca2+, which was mainly localized in the SR region of the untreated fiber bundles, was translocated into myofibrillar space in the pressurized muscle. It is clear that a brief exposure of the muscle to high pressure causes considerable changes in membrane structure and biochemical function of SR as compared with those of SR in the muscle induced by conditioning.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Cysteine-674 oxidation and degradation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase in diabetic pig aorta.

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    Ying, Jia; Sharov, Victor; Xu, Shanqin; Jiang, Bingbing; Gerrity, Ross; Schöneich, Christian; Cohen, Richard A

    2008-09-15

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) is redox-regulated by posttranslational thiol modifications of cysteine-674 to regulate smooth muscle relaxation and migration. To detect oxidation of cysteine-674 that irreversibly prevents redox regulation, a polyclonal, sequence-specific antibody was developed toward a peptide containing cysteine-674 sulfonic acid. The antibody stained intact 110-kDa SERCA in pig cardiac SR that was oxidized in vitro by peroxynitrite in a sequence-specific manner, and histochemically stained atherosclerotic pig and rabbit aorta. Surprisingly, immunoblots of the pig aorta failed to stain intact 110-kDa SERCA protein, but rather, higher molecular mass aggregates and lower molecular mass bands. Of the latter bands at 70 and 60 kDa, the largest were observed in diabetic, hyperlipidemic pigs, and coincided with the most positive histochemical staining. The 70- and 60-kDa molecular mass bands also coincided with the majority of the protein detected by a monoclonal total anti-SERCA antibody, which detected the intact 110-kDa protein in normal pigs. Mass spectrometry identified SERCA in all the major bands detected by the sulfonic acid antibody as well as the oxidation of cysteine-674 in the 70-kDa band. These studies demonstrate a sequence-specific antibody that detects partial degradation products of SERCA, which represent the majority of the protein in some diabetic hypercholesterolemic pig aortae. In addition, the results suggest an association between irreversible oxidation of SERCA and its degradation, and that an important portion of the oxidized protein in tissue samples may be partially degraded.

  12. Modulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release by glycolysis in cat atrial myocytes.

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    Kockskämper, Jens; Zima, Aleksey V; Blatter, Lothar A

    2005-05-01

    In cardiac myocytes, glycolysis and excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling are functionally coupled. We studied the effects of inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), iodoacetate (IAA)), intermediates (glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), fructose-6-phosphate (F6P), fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)) and products (pyruvate, L-lactate) of glycolysis on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release and uptake in intact and permeabilized cat atrial myocytes. In field-stimulated (0.5-0.7 Hz) intact myocytes, 2-DG (10 mm) and IAA (1 mm) caused elevation of diastolic [Ca(2+)](i) and [Ca(2+)](i) transient alternans (Ca(2+) alternans) followed by a decrease of the amplitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) transient. Focal application of 2-DG resulted in local Ca(2+) alternans that was confined to the region of exposure. 2-DG and IAA slowed the decay kinetics of the [Ca(2+)](i) transient and delayed its recovery (positive staircase) after complete SR depletion, suggesting impaired activity of the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). 2-DG and IAA reduced the rate of reuptake of Ca(2+) into the SR which was accompanied by a 15-20% decrease of SR Ca(2+) load. Major changes of mitochondrial redox state (measured as FAD autofluorescence) were not observed after inhibition of glycolysis. Pyruvate (10 mm) and L-lactate (10 mm) elicited similar changes of the [Ca(2+)](i) transient. Pyruvate, L-lactate and IAA - but not 2-DG - induced intracellular acidosis. Recording of single channel activity of ryanodine receptors (RyRs) incorporated into lipid bilayers revealed complex modulation by glycolytic intermediates and products (1 mm each): some were without effect (G6P, PEP, L-lactate) while others either increased (F6P, +40%; FBP, +265%) or decreased (pyruvate, -58%) the open probability of the RyR. Consistent with these findings, spontaneous SR Ca(2+) release (Ca(2+) sparks) in permeabilized myocytes was facilitated by FBP and inhibited by pyruvate. The results indicate that in atrial myocytes

  13. Activity of Ca(2+,Mg(2+-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and contraction strength of the frog skeletal muscles under the effect of organophosphorus insecticides

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    D. M. Nozdrenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of an experimental study of organo­phosphorus insecticides, including pirimiphosmethyl, diazinon and chlorpyrifos caused a decline of the contraction properties in m. tibialis anterior fiber bundles of Rana temporaria, as well as sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase enzymatic activity reduction are outlined in this paper. Concentration-dependent strengths response diminishing in isolated skeletal muscle fiber bundles as a result of non-cholinergic influence of organophosphorus insecticides were found. A decrease of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase enzymatic activity in sarcoplasmic reticulum was observed after administration of each insecticide. The most significant inhibition of this enzyme was observed when using chlorpyrifos.

  14. Cellular Trafficking of Phospholamban and Formation of Functional Sarcoplasmic Reticulum During Myocyte DIfferentiation

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    Stenoien, David L.; Knyushko, Tatyana V.; Londono, Monica P.; Opresko, Lee; Mayer, M. Uljana; Brady, Scott T.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2007-06-01

    The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) family members are transmembrane proteins that play an essential role in regulating intracellular calcium levels. Phospholamban (PLB), a 52 amino acid phosphoprotein, regulates SERCA activity in adult heart and skeletal muscle. Using the C2C12 myocyte cell line, we find endogenous PLB constitutively expressed in both myoblasts and myotubes, whereas SERCA expression coincides with activation of the differentiation program. PLB has a punctuate distribution in myoblasts changing to a reticular distribution in myotubes where it colocalizes with SERCAs. To examine the distribution and dynamics of PLB and SERCA, we expressed fluorescent fusion proteins (GFP, CFP, and YFP) of PLB and SERCA in myoblasts. Coexpressed PLB and SERCA localize to distinct cellular compartments in myoblasts but begin to colocalize as cells differentiate. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) studies show different recovery patterns for each protein in myoblasts confirming their localization to distinct compartments. To extend these studies, we created stable cell lines expressing O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) fusions with PLB or SERCA to track their localization as myocytes differentiate. These experiments demonstrate that PLB localizes to punctate vesicles in myoblasts and adopts a reticular distribution that coincides with SERCA distribution after differentiation. Colocalization experiments indicate that a subset of PLB in myoblasts colocalizes with endosomes, Golgi, and the plasma membrane however PLB also localizes to other, as yet unidentified vesicles. Our results indicate that differentiation plays a critical role in regulating PLB distribution to ensure its colocalization within the same cellular compartment as SERCA in differentiated cells. The presence and altered distribution of PLB in undifferentiated myoblasts raises the possibility that this protein has additional functions distinct from SERCA regulation.

  15. Nandrolone decanoate treatment affects sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase function in skinned rat slow- and fast-twitch fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Aicha; Joumaa, Wissam H; Léoty, Claude

    2003-09-01

    The effects of anabolic-androgenic steroid administration on the function of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) pump were investigated in chemically skinned fibres from the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles of sedentary rats. Twenty male rats were divided into two groups, one group received an intramuscular injection of nandrolone decanoate (15 mg x kg(-1)) weekly for 8 weeks, the second received similar weekly doses of vehicle (sterile peanut oil). Compared with control muscles, nandrolone decanoate treatment reduced SR Ca(2+) loading in EDL and soleus fibres by 49% and 29%, respectively. In control and treated muscles, the rate of Ca(2+) leakage depended on the quantity of Ca(2+) loaded. Furthermore, for similar SR Ca(2+) contents, the Ca(2+) leakage rate was not significantly modified by nandrolone decanoate treatment. Nandrolone decanoate treatment thus affects Ca (2+) uptake by the SR in a fibre-type dependent manner.

  16. Post mortem changes in Ca2+ transporting proteins of sarcoplasmic reticulum in dependence on malignant hyperthermia status in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchenmeister, U; Kuhn, G; Wegner, J; Nürnberg, G; Ender, K

    1999-05-01

    Meat quality of pigs is dependent on biochemical and biophysical processes in the time course post mortem (p.m.) and is associated with the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. However, there is little known about changes in the Ca2+ transporting proteins controlling the Ca2+ uptake of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in the time course p.m. In this study changes in the Ca2+ transporting proteins were investigated in homogenates of longissimus muscles of 4 malignant hyperthermia susceptible (MHS) and 6 malignant hyperthermia resistant (MHR) Pietrain pigs. Muscle samples were obtained at different time intervals: biopsy 2 h prior slaughtering and from the carcass immediately after exsanguination (0 h), 45 min, 4 h, and 22 h p.m. The SR Ca2+ uptake rate was measured immediately after homogenization with closed calcium release channel (CRC), with opened CRC and without manipulation of CRC. Additionally the SR Ca2+ ATPase activity was determined. The results show: (i) The ability of SR to sequester Ca2+ declined to about 60% in the first 45 min p.m. in MHS samples irrespective of CRC state, whereas in MHR samples this decline was about 5%; (ii) Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+ ATPase activity were not different between the biopsy and 0 h samples, i.e. the stress of slaughter was of no immediate influence; (iii) The Ca2+ ATPase activity of the SR declined at about the same rate as the Ca2+ uptake in both MHS and MHR pig samples in the course of time p.m.; (iv) In samples, taken immediately after exsanguination, the Ca2+ ATPase activity of MHS pigs was higher than that of MHR pigs. However, in samples taken 4 h p.m. Ca2+ ATPase activity of MHS pigs has declined to about 30% of the value at 0 h; (v) The CRC can be closed and opened in all samples up to 22 h p.m. and seems to be fully functional at all sampling times; (vi) The CRC of MHS pigs is almost fully open, whereas the CRC of MHR pigs is only partially open at all sampling times; (vii) The permeability of the SR membrane to Ca2

  17. Excitation-contraction coupling in zebrafish ventricular myocardium is regulated by trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Moritz; Hannes, Tobias; Trieschmann, Jan; Verhaegh, Rabea; Köster, Annette; Hescheler, Jürgen; Brockmeier, Konrad; Adelmann, Roland; Khalil, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have become a popular model in cardiovascular research mainly due to identification of a large number of mutants with structural defects. In recent years, cardiomyopathies and other diseases influencing contractility of the heart have been studied in zebrafish mutants. However, little is known about the regulation of contractility of the zebrafish heart on a tissue level. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of trans-sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-flux and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-release in zebrafish myocardium. Using isometric force measurements of fresh heart slices, we characterised the effects of changes of the extracellular Ca(2+)-concentration, trans-sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-flux via L-type Ca(2+)-channels and Na(+)-Ca(2+)-exchanger, and Ca(2+)-release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as beating frequency and β-adrenergic stimulation on contractility of adult zebrafish myocardium. We found an overall negative force-frequency relationship (FFR). Inhibition of L-type Ca(2+)-channels by verapamil (1 μM) decreased force of contraction to 22 ± 7% compared to baseline (n=4, pmyocardium (n=5, pmyocardium requires not only trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+-flux, but also intact sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-cycling. In contrast to mammals, FFR is strongly negative in the zebrafish heart. These aspects need to be considered when using zebrafish to model human diseases of myocardial contractility.

  18. The interactions between mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum and the proteome characterization of mitochondrion-associated membrane from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhouying; Du, Xiangning; Deng, Jie; Gu, Mingyue; Hu, Hongli; Gui, Miao; Yin, Chang-Cheng; Chang, Zhenzhan

    2015-08-01

    To obtain a comprehensive understanding of proteins involved in mitochondrion-sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) linking, a catalog of proteins from mitochondrion-associated membrane (MAM) of New Zealand white rabbit skeletal muscle were analyzed by an optimized shotgun proteomic method. The membrane fractions were prepared by differential centrifugation and separated by 1D electrophoresis followed by a highly reproducible, automated LC-MS/MS on the hybrid linear ion trap (LTQ)-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. By integrating as low as 1% false discovery rate as one of the features for quality control method, 459 proteins were identified from both of the two independent MAM preparations. Protein pI value, molecular weight range, and transmembrane region were calculated using bioinformatics softwares. One hundred one proteins were recognized as membrane proteins. This protein database suggested that the MAM preparations composed of proteins from mitochondrion, SR, and transverse-tubule. This result indicated mitochondria physically linked with SR in rabbit skeletal muscle, voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), VDAC2, and VDAC3 might participate in formation of the tethers between SR and mitochondria. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effects of oestrogen on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase activity and gene expression in genioglossus in chronic intermittent hypoxia rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-Hua; Li, Wen; Song, Wei-Hua

    2009-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of oestrogen on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and gene expression in ovariectomised rats under the condition of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Thirty-two female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: the normal control group (NC), the CIH group (CIH), the CIH-ovariectomised group (CIH+OVX), and the group of CIH-ovariectomised rats receiving estradiol replacement (CIH+OVX+E(2)). Rats in the latter three groups were exposed to CIH for 5 weeks. The animals were killed before genioglossus (GG) was rapidly excised, and their body and uterus mass were determined. Estradiol level was detected by radioimmunoassay. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity was observed by detecting inorganic phosphorus ion, and the SERCA mRNA level was measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). It was found that, compared with the NC group, the SERCA activity and mRNA level were remarkably reduced (pSERCA activity and mRNA level were also significantly reduced (pSERCA activity and mRNA level significantly increased (pSERCA activity and mRNA expression, and oestrogen-deficiency could exacerbate this effect; whilst estradiol replacement can partially reverse the effect of CIH in ovariectomised rats.

  20. Interactions of Phosphate Groups of ATP and Aspartyl Phosphate with the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase: An FTIR Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man; Krasteva, Maria; Barth, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Phosphate binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase was studied by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with ATP and isotopically labeled ATP ([β-18O2, βγ-18O]ATP and [γ-18O3]ATP). Isotopic substitution identified several bands that can be assigned to phosphate groups of bound ATP: bands at 1260, 1207, 1145, 1110, and 1085 cm−1 are affected by labeling of the β-phosphate, bands likely near 1154, and 1098–1089 cm−1 are affected by γ-phosphate labeling. The findings indicate that the strength of interactions of β- and γ- phosphate with the protein are similar to those in aqueous solution. Two bands, at 1175 and 1113 cm−1, were identified for the phosphate group of the ADP-sensitive phosphoenzyme Ca2E1P. They indicate terminal and bridging P-O bond strengths that are intermediate between those of ADP-insensitive phosphoenzyme E2P and the model compound acetyl phosphate in water. The bridging bond of Ca2E1P is weaker than for acetyl phosphate, which will facilitate phosphate transfer to ADP, but is stronger than for E2P, which will make the Ca2E1P phosphate less susceptible to attack by water. PMID:16169973

  1. Pycnogenol® and Ginkgo biloba extract: effect on peroxynitrite-oxidized sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žižková, Petronela; Viskupičová, Jana; Horáková, L'ubica

    2010-01-01

    The effect of two natural standardized plant extracts, Pycnogenol® and EGb 761, on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) activity and posttranslational modifications induced by peroxynitrite was investigated to assess their possible protective role. EGb 761 was found to have a protective effect on SERCA activity in the concentration range of 5–40 µg/ml. On the other hand, Pycnogenol® caused a decrease of SERCA activity at concentrations of 25 µg/ml. EGb 761 did not prevent protein carbonyl formation upon oxidation with peroxynitrite. On the contrary, Pycnogenol® at the concentrations of 5 and 10 µg/ml significantly decreased the level of protein carbonyls by 44% and 54%, respectively. Neither Pycnogenol® nor EGb 761 exerted a protective effect against thiol group oxidation.The plant extracts studied modulated peroxynitrite-injured SERCA activity by different ways and failed to correlate with posttranslational modifications. Their effect seems to be associated with their ability to change SERCA conformation rather than by their antioxidant capacity. PMID:21331179

  2. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake and leak properties, and SERCA isoform expression, in type I and type II fibres of human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamboley, C R; Murphy, R M; McKenna, M J; Lamb, G D

    2014-03-15

    The Ca(2+) uptake properties of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were compared between type I and type II fibres of vastus lateralis muscle of young healthy adults. Individual mechanically skinned muscle fibres were exposed to solutions with the free [Ca(2+)] heavily buffered in the pCa range (-log10[Ca(2+)]) 7.3-6.0 for set times and the amount of net SR Ca(2+) accumulation determined from the force response elicited upon emptying the SR of all Ca(2+). Western blotting was used to determine fibre type and the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) isoform present in every fibre examined. Type I fibres contained only SERCA2 and displayed half-maximal Ca(2+) uptake rate at ∼pCa 6.8, whereas type II fibres contained only SERCA1 and displayed half-maximal Ca(2+) uptake rate at ∼pCa 6.6. Maximal Ca(2+) uptake rate was ∼0.18 and ∼0.21 mmol Ca(2+) (l fibre)(-1) s(-1) in type I and type II fibres, respectively, in good accord with previously measured SR ATPase activity. Increasing free [Mg(2+)] from 1 to 3 mM had no significant effect on the net Ca(2+) uptake rate at pCa 6.0, indicating that there was little or no calcium-induced calcium release occurring through the Ca(2+) release channels during uptake in either fibre type. Ca(2+) leakage from the SR at pCa 8.5, which is thought to occur at least in part through the SERCA, was ∼2-fold lower in type II fibres than in type I fibres, and was little affected by the presence of ADP, in marked contrast to the larger SR Ca(2+) leak observed in rat muscle fibres under the same conditions. The higher affinity of Ca(2+) uptake in the type I human fibres can account for the higher relative level of SR Ca(2+) loading observed in type I compared to type II fibres, and the SR Ca(2+) leakage characteristics of the human fibres suggest that the SERCAs are regulated differently from those in rat and contribute comparatively less to resting metabolic rate.

  3. Ca(2+) leakage out of the sarcoplasmic reticulum is increased in type I skeletal muscle fibres in aged humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamboley, C R; Wyckelsma, V L; McKenna, M J; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2016-01-15

    The amount of Ca(2+) stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of muscle fibres is decreased in aged individuals, and an important question is whether this results from increased Ca(2+) leakage out through the Ca(2+) release channels (ryanodine receptors; RyRs). The present study examined the effects of blocking the RyRs with Mg(2+), or applying a strong reducing treatment, on net Ca(2+) accumulation by the SR in skinned muscle fibres from Old (∼70 years) and Young (∼24 years) adults. Raising cytoplasmic [Mg(2+)] and reducing treatment increased net SR Ca(2+) accumulation in type I fibres of Old subjects relative to that in Young. The densities of RyRs and dihydropyridine receptors were not significantly changed in the muscle of Old subjects. These findings indicate that oxidative modification of the RyRs causes increased Ca(2+) leakage from the SR in muscle fibres in Old subjects, which probably deleteriously affects normal muscle function both directly and indirectly. The present study examined whether the lower Ca(2+) storage levels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in vastus lateralis muscle fibres in Old (70 ± 4 years) relative to Young (24 ± 4 years) human subjects is the result of increased leakage of Ca(2+) out of the SR through the Ca(2+) release channels/ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and due to oxidative modification of the RyRs. SR Ca(2+) accumulation in mechanically skinned muscle fibres was examined in the presence of 1, 3 or 10 mm cytoplasmic Mg(2+) because raising [Mg(2+)] strongly inhibits Ca(2+) efflux through the RyRs. In type I fibres of Old subjects, SR Ca(2+) accumulation in the presence of 1 mm Mg(2+) approached saturation at shorter loading times than in Young subjects, consistent with Ca(2+) leakage limiting net uptake, and raising [Mg(2+)] to 10 mm in such fibres increased maximal SR Ca(2+) accumulation. No significant differences were seen in type II fibres. Treatment with dithiothreitol (10 mm for 5 min), a strong reducing agent, also

  4. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Menahem; Korkotian, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the role of calcium stores in dendritic spines structure, function and plasticity is still debated. The reasons for this may have to do with the multitude of overlapping calcium handling machineries in the neuron, including stores, voltage and ligand gated channels, pumps and transporters. Also, different cells in the brain are endowed with calcium stores that are activated by different receptor types, and their differential compartmentalization in dendrites, spines and presynaptic terminals complicates their analysis. In the present review we address several key issues, including the role of calcium stores in synaptic plasticity, their role during development, in stress and in neurodegenerative diseases. Apparently, there is increasing evidence for a crucial role of calcium stores, especially of the ryanodine species, in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival.

  6. Beta-Adrenoceptor Stimulation Reveals Ca2+ Waves and Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Depletion in Left Ventricular Cardiomyocytes from Post-Infarction Rats with and without Heart Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Sadredini

    Full Text Available Abnormal cellular Ca2+ handling contributes to both contractile dysfunction and arrhythmias in heart failure. Reduced Ca2+ transient amplitude due to decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content is a common finding in heart failure models. However, heart failure models also show increased propensity for diastolic Ca2+ release events which occur when sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content exceeds a certain threshold level. Such Ca2+ release events can initiate arrhythmias. In this study we aimed to investigate if both of these aspects of altered Ca2+ homeostasis could be found in left ventricular cardiomyocytes from rats with different states of cardiac function six weeks after myocardial infarction when compared to sham-operated controls. Video edge-detection, whole-cell Ca2+ imaging and confocal line-scan imaging were used to investigate cardiomyocyte contractile properties, Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ waves. In baseline conditions, i.e. without beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, cardiomyocytes from rats with large myocardial infarction, but without heart failure, did not differ from sham-operated animals in any of these aspects of cellular function. However, when exposed to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation, cardiomyocytes from both non-failing and failing rat hearts showed decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content, decreased Ca2+ transient amplitude, and increased frequency of Ca2+ waves. These results are in line with a decreased threshold for diastolic Ca2+ release established by other studies. In the present study, factors that might contribute to a lower threshold for diastolic Ca2+ release were increased THR286 phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and increased protein phosphatase 1 abundance. In conclusion, this study demonstrates both decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content and increased propensity for diastolic Ca2+ release events in ventricular cardiomyocytes from rats with heart failure after myocardial

  7. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  8. Interaction of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine with the Ca2+-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mechanism of inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, K A; East, J M; Mall, S; Oliver, S; Starling, A P; Lee, A G

    1998-02-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle contains anionic phospholipids as well as the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Here we study the effects of anionic phospholipids on the activity of the Ca2+-ATPase purified from the membrane. Reconstitution of the Ca2+-ATPase into dioleoylphosphatidylserine [di(C18:1)PS] or dioleoylphosphatidic acid [di(C18:1)PA] leads to a decrease in ATPase activity. Measurements of the quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence of the ATPase by brominated phospholipids give a relative binding constant for the anionic lipids compared with dioleoylphosphatidylcholine close to 1 and suggest that phosphatidic acid only binds to the ATPase at the bulk lipid sites around the ATPase. Addition of di(C18:1)PS or di(C18:1)PA to the ATPase in the short-chain dimyristoleoylphosphatidylcholine [di(C14:1)PC] reverse the effects of the short-chain lipid on ATPase activity and on Ca2+ binding, as revealed by the response of tryptophan fluorescence intensity to Ca2+ binding. It is concluded that the lipid headgroup and lipid fatty acyl chains have separate effects on the function of the ATPase. The anionic phospholipids have no significant effect on Ca2+ binding to the ATPase; the level of Ca2+ binding to the ATPase, the affinity of binding and the rate of dissociation of Ca2+ are unchanged by reconstitution into di(C18:1)PA. The major effect of the anionic lipids is a reduction in the maximal level of binding of MgATP. This is attributed to the formation of oligomers of the Ca2+-ATPase, in which only one molecule of the ATPase can bind MgATP dimers in di(C18:1)PS and trimers or tetramers in di(C18:1)PA. The rates of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for the proportion of the ATPase still able to bind ATP are unaffected by reconstitution. Larger changes were observed in the level of phosphorylation of the ATPase by Pi, which became very low in the anionic phospholipids. The fluorescence response to Mg2+ for the ATPase

  9. Size of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Neurospora crassa determined by radiation inactivation and comparison with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase from skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, B J; Berenski, C J; Jung, C Y

    1985-07-25

    Using radiation inactivation, we have measured the size of the H+-ATPase in Neurospora crassa plasma membranes. Membranes were exposed to either high energy electrons from a Van de Graaff generator or to gamma irradiation from 60Co. Both forms of radiation caused an exponential loss of ATPase activity in parallel with the physical destruction of the Mr = 104,000 polypeptide of which this enzyme is composed. By applying target theory, the size of the H+-ATPase in situ was found to be approximately 2.3 X 10(5) daltons. We also used radiation inactivation to measure the size of the Ca2+-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and got a value of approximately 2.4 X 10(5) daltons, in agreement with previous reports. By irradiating a mixture of Neurospora plasma membranes and rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum, we directly compared the sizes of these two ATPases and found them to be essentially the same. We conclude that both H+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase are oligomeric enzymes, most likely composed of two approximately 100,000-dalton polypeptides.

  10. Nanospan, an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan, localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle and is absent in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Angela K; Miller, Gaynor; Capote, Joana; DiFranco, Marino; Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Wang, Emily L; Heighway, Jim; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M; Vergara, Julio; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2017-06-06

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the sarcoglycans (SGs) to form a tight subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that spans the sarcolemma and interacts with laminin in the extracellular matrix. Overexpression of SSPN ameliorates Duchenne muscular dystrophy in murine models. Standard cloning approaches were used to identify nanospan, and nanospan-specific polyclonal antibodies were generated and validated. Biochemical isolation of skeletal muscle membranes and two-photon laser scanning microscopy were used to analyze nanospan localization in muscle from multiple murine models. Duchenne muscular dystrophy biopsies were analyzed by immunoblot analysis of protein lysates as well as indirect immunofluorescence analysis of muscle cryosections. Nanospan is an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan. While SSPN has four transmembrane domains and is a core component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, nanospan is a type II transmembrane protein that does not associate with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. We demonstrate that nanospan is enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fractions and is not present in the T-tubules. SR fractions contain membranes from three distinct structural regions: a region flanking the T-tubules (triadic SR), a SR region across the Z-line (ZSR), and a longitudinal SR region across the M-line (LSR). Analysis of isolated murine muscles reveals that nanospan is mostly associated with the ZSR and triadic SR, and only minimally with the LSR. Furthermore, nanospan is absent from the SR of δ-SG-null (Sgcd-/-) skeletal muscle, a murine model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F. Analysis of skeletal muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients reveals that nanospan is preferentially expressed in type I (slow) fibers in both control and Duchenne samples. Furthermore, nanospan is significantly reduced in Duchenne biopsies. Alternative splicing of proteins from the SG

  11. Nanospan, an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan, localizes to the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle and is absent in limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Angela K; Miller, Gaynor; Capote, Joana; DiFranco, Marino; Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Wang, Emily L; Heighway, Jim; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón M; Vergara, Julio; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2017-01-01

    Sarcospan (SSPN) is a transmembrane protein that interacts with the sarcoglycans (SGs) to form a tight subcomplex within the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex that spans the sarcolemma and interacts with laminin in the extracellular matrix. Overexpression of SSPN ameliorates Duchenne muscular dystrophy in murine models. Standard cloning approaches were used to identify nanospan, and nanospan-specific polyclonal antibodies were generated and validated. Biochemical isolation of skeletal muscle membranes and two-photon laser scanning microscopy were used to analyze nanospan localization in muscle from multiple murine models. Duchenne muscular dystrophy biopsies were analyzed by immunoblot analysis of protein lysates as well as indirect immunofluorescence analysis of muscle cryosections. Nanospan is an alternatively spliced isoform of sarcospan. While SSPN has four transmembrane domains and is a core component of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, nanospan is a type II transmembrane protein that does not associate with the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. We demonstrate that nanospan is enriched in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) fractions and is not present in the T-tubules. SR fractions contain membranes from three distinct structural regions: a region flanking the T-tubules (triadic SR), a SR region across the Z-line (ZSR), and a longitudinal SR region across the M-line (LSR). Analysis of isolated murine muscles reveals that nanospan is mostly associated with the ZSR and triadic SR, and only minimally with the LSR. Furthermore, nanospan is absent from the SR of δ-SG-null (Sgcd-/-) skeletal muscle, a murine model for limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2F. Analysis of skeletal muscle biopsies from Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients reveals that nanospan is preferentially expressed in type I (slow) fibers in both control and Duchenne samples. Furthermore, nanospan is significantly reduced in Duchenne biopsies. Alternative splicing of proteins from the SG

  12. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully...

  13. Fluoride induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and calcium overload in ameloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, KaiQiang; Ma, Lin; Gu, HeFeng; Li, Jian; Lei, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress and intracellular calcium overload on the development of dental fluorosis. We cultured and exposed rat ameloblast HAT-7 cells to various concentrations of fluoride and measured apoptosis with flow cytometry and intracellular Ca2+ changes using confocal microscopy, investigated the protein levels of GRP78, calreticulin, XBP1 and CHOP by western blotting, and their transcriptional levels with RT-PCR. We also created an in vivo model of dental fluorosis by exposing animals to various concentrations of fluoride. Subsequently, thin dental tissue slices were analyzed with H&E staining, immunohistochemical staining, and transmission electron microscopy, TUNEL assay was also performed on dental tissue slices for assessment of apoptosis. High fluoride concentration was associated with decreased ameloblast proliferation, elevated ameloblast apoptosis, and increased intracellular Ca2+ in vitro. The translation and transcription of the proteins associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress were significantly elevated with high concentrations of fluoride. Based on immunohistochemical staining, these proteins were also highly expressed in animals exposed to high fluoride concentrations. Histologically, we found significant fluorosis-like changes in tissues from animals exposed to high fluoride concentrations. Transmission electron microscopy cytology indicated significant apoptotic changes in tissues exposed to high concentrations of fluoride. These results indicate that exposure to high levels of fluoride led to endoplasmic reticulum stress which induced apoptosis in cultured ameloblasts and in vivo rat model, suggesting an important role of calcium overload and endoplasmic reticulum stress triggered by high concentrations of fluoride in the development of dental fluorosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cardiac function improved by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase overexpression in a heart failure model induced by chronic myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei XIN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Chronic myocardial ischemia(CMI has become an important cause of heart failure(HF.The aim of present study was to examine the effects of Sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase(SERCA2a gene transfer in HF model in large animal induced by CMI.Methods HF was reproduced in minipigs by ligating the initial segment of proximal left anterior descending(LAD coronary artery with an ameroid constrictor to produce progressive vessel occlusion and ischemia.After confirmation of myocardial perfusion defect and cardiac function impairment by SPECT and echocardiography in the model,animals were divided into 4 groups: HF group;HF+enhanced green fluorescent protein(EGFP group;HF+SERCA2a group;and sham operation group as control.rAAV1-EGFP and rAAV1-SERCA2a(1×1012 vg for each animal were directly and intramyocardially injected to the animals of HF+EGFP and HF+SERCA2a groups.Sixty days after the gene transfer,the expression of SERCA2a at the protein level was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry,the changes in cardiac function were determined by echocardiographic and hemodynamic analysis,and the changes in serum inflammatory and neuro-hormonal factors(including BNP,TNF-a,IL-6,ET-1 and Ang II were determined by radioimmunoassay.Results Sixty days after gene transfer,LVEF,Ev/Av and ±dp/dtmax increased significantly(P < 0.05,along with an increase of SERCA2a protein expression in the ischemic myocardium(PP < 0.05,accompanied by a significant decrease of inflammatory and neural-hormonal factors(PP < 0.05 in HF+SERCA2a group as compared with HF/HF+EGFP group.Conclusions Overexpression of SERCA2a may significantly improve the cardiac function of the ischemic myocardium of HF model induced by CMI and reverse the activation of neural-hormonal factors,implying that it has a potential therapeutic significance in CMI related heart failure.

  15. The inhibitory influence of calix[4]arene of C-90 on the activity of Ca(2+,Mg(2+-ATPases in plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum in myometrium сells

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    T. O. Veklich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Our study on the plasma membrane vesicles and myometrium cells treated with 0.1% digitonin showed that inhibitory effect of calix[4]arene C-90 (5,11,17,23-tetra(trifluoromethyl(phenylsulphonylimino-methylamino-25,26,27,28-tetrapropoxy-calix[4]arene on the plasma membrane Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase was more significant than on the Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase in sarcoplasmic reticulum (the inhibition coefficient I0.5 values were 20.2 ± 0.5 µM and 57.0 ± 1.4 µM for the plasma membrane Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase and Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase in sarcoplasmic reticulum, respectively (n = 5. Inhibition kinetics of calix[4]arene C-90 effect on the Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase activities in plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum were studied. This substance inhibited both pumps as complete noncompetitive inhibitor. Calix[4]arene C-90 caused the increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration and decrease of hydrodynamic diameter in smooth muscle cells similar to the action of uterotonic drug oxytocin.

  16. Constitutive cardiac overexpression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase delays myocardial failure after myocardial infarction in rats at a cost of increased acute arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Escoubet, Brigitte; Prunier, Fabrice; Amour, Julien; Simonides, Warner S; Vivien, Benoît; Lenoir, Christophe; Heimburger, Michèle; Choqueux, Christine; Gellen, Barnabas; Riou, Bruno; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Franz, Wolfgang M; Mercadier, Jean-Jacques

    2004-04-20

    Heart failure often complicates myocardial infarction (MI), and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) is underexpressed in the failing myocardium. We examined the effect of preexisting cardiac SERCA2a protein overexpression on rat survival and left ventricular (LV) remodeling after MI. Baseline myocardial SERCA2a expression was 37% higher in transgenic (TG) rats than in their wild-type (WT) controls, consistent with enhanced myocardial function. The mortality rate of TG rats during the 24 hours after surgical MI was higher than that of WT rats (71% versus 35%, P<0.001), associated with a higher frequency of ventricular arrhythmias, and was normalized by lidocaine treatment. The increased acute-phase mortality in TG rats was not accompanied by increased 6-month mortality. Function of the noninfarcted myocardium, as assessed by tissue Doppler imaging, was higher in TG rats than in WT rats for up to 1 month after MI, a beneficial effect no longer observed at 3 months. LV remodeling and global function were similar in TG and WT rats. No difference in papillary muscle function was found at 6 months. Constitutive cardiac SERCA2a overexpression has a transient beneficial effect on remote myocardium function in rat MI, with no improvement in LV global function or prevention of LV remodeling and failure. This benefit is associated with a higher risk of acute mortality, which is prevented by lidocaine treatment.

  17. Changes in T-Tubules and Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in Ventricular Myocytes in Early Cardiac Hypertrophy in a Pressure Overload Rat Model

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    Perla Pérez-Treviño

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Pressure-overload (PO causes cardiac hypertrophy (CH, and eventually leads to heart failure (HF. HF ventricular myocytes present transverse-tubules (TT loss or disarrangement and decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR density, and both contribute to altered Ca2+ signaling and heart dysfunction. It has been shown that TT remodeling precedes HF, however, it is unknown whether SR structural and functional remodeling also starts early in CH. Methods: Using confocal microscopy, we assessed TT (with Di-8-ANNEPS and SR (with SR-trapped Mag-Fluo-4 densities, as well as SR fluorophore diffusion (fluorescence recovery after photobleach; FRAP, cytosolic Ca2+ signaling and ex vivo cardiac performance in a PO rat hypertrophy model induced by abdominal aortic constriction (at 6 weeks. Results: Rats developed CH, while cardiac performance, basal and upon β-adrenergic stimulation, remained unaltered. TT density decreased by ∼14%, without spatial disarrangement, while SR density decreased by ∼7%. More important, FRAP was ∼30% slower, but with similar maximum recovery, suggesting decreased SR interconnectivity. Systolic and diastolic Ca2+ signaling and SR Ca2+ content were unaltered. Conclusion: SR remodeling is an early CH event, similar to TT remodeling, appearing during compensated hypertrophy. Nevertheless, myocytes can withstand those moderate structural changes in SR and TT, preserving normal Ca2+ signaling and contractility.

  18. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nucle...

  19. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria calcium signaling in hepatic metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieusset, Jennifer

    2017-06-01

    The liver plays a central role in glucose homeostasis, and both metabolic inflexibility and insulin resistance predispose to the development of hepatic metabolic diseases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which play a key role in the control of hepatic metabolism, also interact at contact points defined as mitochondria-associated membranes (MAM), in order to exchange metabolites and calcium (Ca 2+ ) and regulate cellular homeostasis and signaling. Here, we overview the role of the liver in the control of glucose homeostasis, mainly focusing on the independent involvement of mitochondria, ER and Ca 2+ signaling in both healthy and pathological contexts. Then we focus on recent data highlighting MAM as important hubs for hormone and nutrient signaling in the liver, thus adapting mitochondria physiology and cellular metabolism to energy availability. Lastly, we discuss how chronic ER-mitochondria miscommunication could participate to hepatic metabolic diseases, pointing MAM interface as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: ECS Meeting edited by Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs and Jacques Haiech. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A pK change of acidic residues contributes to cation countertransport in the Ca-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum. Role of H+ in Ca(2+)-ATPase countertransport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Hao, L; Inesi, G

    1994-06-17

    Proteoliposomal vesicles reconstituted with sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase and exogenous lipids sustain ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake and H+ ejection, as well as net charge displacement by Ca2+. We have studied the effect of lumenal (inner) and medium (extravesicular) pH variations on the countertransport ratios of H+ and Ca2+. We find that the Ca2+/H+ molar ratio is approximately 1 when the lumenal and medium pH is near neutrality, but changes with a specific pattern when the medium pH is varied in the presence of a constant lumenal pH and when the lumenal pH is varied in the presence of a constant medium pH. Empirical analysis of the experimental data shows that the apparent pK of the residue(s) releasing H+ into the medium is approximately 6.1, whereas the apparent pK of the residue(s) binding lumenal H+ is approximately 7.7. Assuming that the same acidic residues are involved in H+ and Ca2+ countertransport, our findings suggest a lower affinity for H+ in their outward orientation (prevalent in the ground state of the enzyme) and a higher affinity for H+ in lumenal orientation (prevalent in the phosphorylated state of the enzyme). Cyclic pK changes, coupled to ATP utilization, promote cation exchange, Ca2+ uptake, and H+ ejection by the vesicles. The stoichiometry of countertransport and net charge displacement is matched by a corresponding electrogenic behavior. A calculation of voltage development related to initial rates of charge transfer (dV/dt = (dQ/dt)/Cm) is given as a corrective replacement of a previous steady state calculation.

  2. Regulation of transient receptor potential melastatin 4 channel by sarcoplasmic reticulum inositol trisphosphate receptors: Role in human detrusor smooth muscle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provence, Aaron; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2017-09-03

    We recently reported key physiologic roles for Ca(2+)-activated transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (TRPM4) channels in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM). However, the Ca(2+)-signaling mechanisms governing TRPM4 channel activity in human DSM cells are unexplored. As the TRPM4 channels are activated by Ca(2+), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-mediated Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum represents a potential Ca(2+) source for TRPM4 channel activation. We used clinically-characterized human DSM tissues to investigate the molecular and functional interactions of the IP3Rs and TRPM4 channels. With in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA) and perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology, we tested the hypothesis that TRPM4 channels are tightly associated with the IP3Rs and are activated by IP3R-mediated Ca(2+) release in human DSM. With in situ PLA, we demonstrated co-localization of the TRPM4 channels and IP3Rs in human DSM cells. As the TRPM4 channels and IP3Rs must be located within close apposition to functionally interact, these findings support the concept of a potential Ca(2+)-mediated TRPM4-IP3R regulatory mechanism. To investigate IP3R regulation of TRPM4 channel activity, we sought to determine the consequences of IP3R pharmacological inhibition on TRPM4 channel-mediated transient inward cation currents (TICCs). In freshly-isolated human DSM cells, blocking the IP3Rs with the selective IP3R inhibitor xestospongin-C significantly decreased TICCs. The data suggest that IP3Rs have a key role in mediating the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of TRPM4 channels in human DSM. The study provides novel insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating TRPM4 channels by revealing that TRPM4 channels and IP3Rs are spatially and functionally coupled in human DSM.

  3. Transcription of the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase type 3 gene, ATP2A3, is regulated by the calcineurin/NFAT pathway in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadri, Lahouaria; Pavoine, Catherine; Lipskaia, Larissa; Yacoubi, Sabrina; Lompré, Anne-Marie

    2006-02-15

    Histamine, known to induce Ca2+ oscillations in endothelial cells, was used to alter Ca2+ cycling. Treatment of HUVEC (human umbilical-vein endothelial cell)-derived EA.hy926 cells with histamine for 1-3 days increased the levels of SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase) 3, but not of SERCA 2b, transcripts and proteins. Promoter-reporter gene assays demonstrated that this increase in expression was due to activation of SERCA 3 gene transcription. The effect of histamine was abolished by mepyramine, but not by cimetidine, indicating that the H1 receptor, but not the H2 receptor, was involved. The histamine-induced up-regulation of SERCA 3 was abolished by cyclosporin A and by VIVIT, a peptide that prevents calcineurin and NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells) from interacting, indicating involvement of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. Histamine also induced the nuclear translocation of NFAT. NFAT did not directly bind to the SERCA 3 promoter, but activated Ets-1 (E twenty-six-1), which drives the expression of the SERCA 3 gene. Finally, cells treated with histamine and loaded with fura 2 exhibited an improved capacity in eliminating high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations, in accordance with an increase in activity of a low-affinity Ca2+-ATPase, like SERCA 3. Thus chronic treatment of endothelial cells with histamine up-regulates SERCA 3 transcription. The effect of histamine is mediated by the H1R (histamine 1 receptor) and involves activation of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway. By increasing the rate of Ca2+ sequestration, up-regulation of SERCA 3 counteracts the cytosolic increase in Ca2+ concentration.

  4. Inhibition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump with thapsigargin to estimate the contribution of Na+-Ca2+ exchange to ventricular myocyte relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassani R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Relaxation in the mammalian ventricle is initiated by Ca2+ removal from the cytosol, which is performed by three main transport systems: sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SR-A, Na+-Ca2+ exchanger (NCX and the so-called slow mechanisms (sarcolemmal Ca2+-ATPase and mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. To estimate the relative contribution of each system to twitch relaxation, SR Ca2+ accumulation must be selectively inhibited, usually by the application of high caffeine concentrations. However, caffeine has been reported to often cause changes in membrane potential due to NCX-generated inward current, which compromises the reliability of its use. In the present study, we estimated integrated Ca2+ fluxes carried by SR-A, NCX and slow mechanisms during twitch relaxation, and compared the results when using caffeine application (Cf-NT and an electrically evoked twitch after inhibition of SR-A with thapsigargin (TG-TW. Ca2+ transients were measured in 20 isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes with indo-1. For transients in which one or more transporters were inhibited, Ca2+ fluxes were estimated from the measured free Ca2+ concentration and myocardial Ca2+ buffering characteristics. NCX-mediated integrated Ca2+ flux was significantly higher with TG-TW than with Cf-NT (12 vs 7 µM, whereas SR-dependent flux was lower with TG-TW (77 vs 81 µM. The relative participations of NCX (12.5 vs 8% with TG-TW and Cf-NT, respectively and SR-A (85 vs 89.5% with TG-TW and Cf-NT, respectively in total relaxation-associated Ca2+ flux were also significantly different. We thus propose TG-TW as a reliable alternative to estimate NCX contribution to twitch relaxation in this kind of analysis.

  5. A novel artificial microRNA expressing AAV vector for phospholamban silencing in cardiomyocytes improves Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum.

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    Tobias Gröβl

    Full Text Available In failing rat hearts, post-transcriptonal inhibition of phospholamban (PLB expression by AAV9 vector-mediated cardiac delivery of short hairpin RNAs directed against PLB (shPLBr improves both impaired SERCA2a controlled Ca2+ cycling and contractile dysfunction. Cardiac delivery of shPLB, however, was reported to cause cardiac toxicity in canines. Thus we developed a new AAV vector, scAAV6-amiR155-PLBr, expressing a novel engineered artificial microRNA (amiR155-PLBr directed against PLB under control of a heart-specific hybrid promoter. Its PLB silencing efficiency and safety were compared with those of an AAV vector expressing shPLBr (scAAV6-shPLBr from an ubiquitously active U6 promoter. Investigations were carried out in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (CM over a period of 14 days. Compared to shPLBr, amiR155-PLBr was expressed at a significantly lower level, resulting in delayed and less pronounced PLB silencing. Despite decreased knockdown efficiency of scAAV6-amiR155-PLBr, a similar increase of the SERCA2a-catalyzed Ca2+ uptake into sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR vesicles was observed for both the shPLBr and amiR155-PLBr vectors. Proteomic analysis confirmed PLB silencing of both therapeutic vectors and revealed that shPLBr, but not the amiR155-PLBr vector, increased the proinflammatory proteins STAT3, STAT1 and activated STAT1 phosphorylation at the key amino acid residue Tyr701. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis detected alterations in the expression of several cardiac microRNAs after treatment of CM with scAAV6-shPLBr and scAAV6-amiR155-PLBr, as well as after treatment with its related amiR155- and shRNAs-expressing control AAV vectors. The results demonstrate that scAAV6-amiR155-PLBr is capable of enhancing the Ca2+ transport function of the cardiac SR PLB/SERCA2a system as efficiently as scAAV6-shPLBr while offering a superior safety profile.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and effect of calcium dobesilate

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    Yu-Min Gui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and effect of calcium dobesilate. Methods: A total of 120 diabetic retinopathy patients treated in our hospital from January 2010 to September 2015 were enrolled in this article. The serum endoplasmic reticulum stress protein and interleukin protein expression levels were analyzed before and after calcium dobesilate treatment. A total of 55 cases of healthy subjects receiving physical examination in our hospital during the same period were taken as control group. Results: Serum endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins PERK, CHOP and IRE as well as interleukin proteins IL1, IL2, IL6 and IL10 expression significantly increased, serum MDA level significantly increased while SOD, CAT and GSHpx levels significantly decreased in diabetic retinopathy patients, and compared with control group (P<0.01; after calcium dobesilate treatment, above factors were significantly restored (P<0.01. Conclusions: Diabetic retinopathy is closely related to endoplasmic reticulum stress and calcium dobesilate treatment may improve diabetic retinopathy by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  7. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum.

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    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T; Zipfel, Warren R; Nathanson, Michael H

    2003-05-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum generates calcium signalling microdomains around the nucleus and spindle in syncytial Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, H; McDougall, A; Whitaker, M

    2006-06-01

    Cell cycle calcium signals are generated by inositol trisphosphate-mediated release of calcium from internal stores [Ciapa, Pesando, Wilding and Whitaker (1994) Nature (London) 368, 875-878; Groigno and Whitaker (1998) Cell 92, 193-204]. The major internal calcium store is the ER (endoplasmic reticulum): the spatial organization of the ER during mitosis is important in defining a microdomain around the nucleus and mitotic spindle in early Drosophila embryos [Parry, McDougall and Whitaker (2005) J. Cell Biol. 171, 47-59]. Nuclear divisions in syncytial Drosophila embryos are accompanied by both cortical and nuclear localized calcium transients. Mitosis is prevented by the InsP(3) antagonists Xestospongin C and heparin. Nuclear-localized transients and cortical transients rely on extraembryonic calcium, suggesting that ER calcium levels are maintained by calcium influx.

  9. IP3 constricts cerebral arteries via IP3 receptor-mediated TRPC3 channel activation and independently of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xi, Q.; Adebiyi, A.; Zhao, G.; Chapman, K.E.; Waters, C.M.; Hassid, A.; Jaggar, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Vasoconstrictors that bind to phospholipase C-coupled receptors elevate inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)). IP(3) is generally considered to elevate intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in arterial myocytes and induce vasoconstriction via a single mechanism: by activating sarcoplasmic

  10. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter in Drosophila transfers calcium between the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sekyu; Quan, Xianglan; Bang, Sunhoe; Yoo, Heesuk; Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Jiwon; Park, Kyu-Sang; Chung, Jongkyeong

    2017-09-01

    Mitochondrial calcium plays critical roles in diverse cellular processes ranging from energy metabolism to cell death. Previous studies have demonstrated that mitochondrial calcium uptake is mainly mediated by the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) complex. However, the roles of the MCU complex in calcium transport, signaling, and dysregulation by oxidative stress still remain unclear. Here, we confirmed that Drosophila MCU contains evolutionarily conserved structures and requires essential MCU regulator (EMRE) for its calcium channel activities. We generated Drosophila MCU loss-of-function mutants, which lacked mitochondrial calcium uptake in response to caffeine stimulation. Basal metabolic activities were not significantly affected in these MCU mutants, as observed in examinations of body weight, food intake, body sugar level, and starvation-induced autophagy. However, oxidative stress-induced increases in mitochondrial calcium, mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization, and cell death were prevented in these mutants. We also found that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor genetically interacts with Drosophila MCU and effectively modulates mitochondrial calcium uptake upon oxidative stress. Taken together, these results support the idea that Drosophila MCU is responsible for endoplasmic reticulum-to-mitochondrial calcium transfer and for cell death due to mitochondrial dysfunction under oxidative stress. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Advanced glycation end product cross-link breaker attenuates diabetes-induced cardiac dysfunction by improving sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium handling

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    Allyson eKranstuber

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic heart disease is a distinct clinical entity that can progress to heart failure and sudden death. However, the mechanisms responsible for the alterations in excitation-contraction coupling leading to cardiac dysfunction during diabetes are not well known. Hyperglycemia, the landmark of diabetes, leads to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE on long-lived proteins, including SR Ca2+ regulatory proteins. However, their pathogenic role on SR Ca2+ handling in cardiac myocytes is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether an AGE cross-link breaker could prevent the alterations in SR Ca2+ cycling that lead to in vivo cardiac dysfunction during diabetes. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were treated with Alagebrium Chloride (ALT-711 for 8 weeks and compared to age-matched placebo-treated diabetic rats and healthy rats. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiographic examination. Ventricular myocytes were isolated to assess SR Ca2+ cycling by confocal imaging and quantitative Western blots. Diabetes resulted in in vivo cardiac dysfunction and ALT-711 therapy partially alleviated diastolic dysfunction by decreasing isovolumetric relaxation time and myocardial performance index (by 27 and 41% vs. untreated diabetic rats, respectively, P<0.05. In cardiac myocytes, diabetes induced prolongation of cytosolic Ca2+ transient clearance by 43% and decreased SR Ca2+ load by 25% (P<0.05; these parameters were partially improved after ALT-711 therapy. SERCA2a and RyR2 protein expression was significantly decreased in the myocardium of untreated diabetic rats (by 64 and 36% vs. controls, respectively, P<0.05, but preserved in the treated diabetic group compared to controls. Collectively, our result suggest that, in a model of type 1 diabetes, AGE accumulation primarily impairs SR Ca2+ reuptake in cardiac myocytes and that long term treatment with an AGE cross-link breaker partially normalized SR Ca2+ handling and improved diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  12. Analysis of Conditional Paralytic Mutants in Drosophila Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase Reveals Novel Mechanisms for Regulating Membrane Excitability

    OpenAIRE

    Sanyal, S.; Consoulas, C.; Kuromi, H.; Basole, A.; Mukai, L.; Kidokoro, Y.; Krishnan, K. S.; Ramaswami, M.

    2005-01-01

    Individual contributions made by different calcium release and sequestration mechanisms to various aspects of excitable cell physiology are incompletely understood. SERCA, a sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase, being the main agent for calcium uptake into the ER, plays a central role in this process. By isolation and extensive characterization of conditional mutations in the Drosophila SERCA gene, we describe novel roles of this key protein in neuromuscular physiology and enable a gene...

  13. High fat diet disrupts endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis in the rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wires, Emily S; Trychta, Kathleen A; Bäck, Susanne; Sulima, Agnieszka; Rice, Kenner C; Harvey, Brandon K

    2017-11-01

    Disruption to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis has been implicated in obesity, however, the ability to longitudinally monitor ER calcium fluctuations has been challenging with prior methodologies. We recently described the development of a Gaussia luciferase (GLuc)-based reporter protein responsive to ER calcium depletion (GLuc-SERCaMP) and investigated the effect of a high fat diet on ER calcium homeostasis. A GLuc-based reporter cell line was treated with palmitate, a free fatty acid. Rats intrahepatically injected with GLuc-SERCaMP reporter were fed a cafeteria diet or high fat diet. The liver and plasma were examined for established markers of steatosis and compared to plasma levels of SERCaMP activity. Palmitate induced GLuc-SERCaMP release in vitro, indicating ER calcium depletion. Consumption of a cafeteria diet or high fat pellets correlated with alterations to hepatic ER calcium homeostasis in rats, shown by increased GLuc-SERCaMP release. Access to ad lib high fat pellets also led to a corresponding decrease in microsomal calcium ATPase activity and an increase in markers of hepatic steatosis. In addition to GLuc-SERCaMP, we have also identified endogenous proteins (endogenous SERCaMPs) with a similar response to ER calcium depletion. We demonstrated the release of an endogenous SERCaMP, thought to be a liver esterase, during access to a high fat diet. Attenuation of both GLuc-SERCaMP and endogenous SERCaMP was observed during dantrolene administration. Here we describe the use of a reporter for in vitro and in vivo models of high fat diet. Our results support the theory that dietary fat intake correlates with a decrease in ER calcium levels in the liver and suggest a high fat diet alters the ER proteome. Lay summary: ER calcium dysregulation was observed in rats fed a cafeteria diet or high fat pellets, with fluctuations in sensor release correlating with fat intake. Attenuation of sensor release, as well as food intake was observed during

  14. Citrate synthase, sarcoplasmic reticular calcium ATPase, and choline acetyltransferase activities of specific pelvic floor muscles of the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spettel, Sara; De, Elise; Elias, Tamer; Schuler, Catherine; Leggett, Robert E; Levin, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    There is a clear relationship between the pelvic floor muscles and urinary systems, which relates to urgency, frequency, incontinence, pelvic pain, and bowel complaints. The specific mechanisms which relate these two systems are not clear. Improved understanding of the relation between the pelvic floor muscles and bladder function is clinically relevant in establishing effective treatments to such problems as incontinence, secondary to birth. The following tissues were collected from normal adult female rabbits: pubococcygeus (Pc) and ischiocavernosus/bulbospongiosus (Ic/Bs) pelvic floor muscles. Bladder body muscle and mucosa, bladder base muscle and mucosa, and leg skeletal muscle were also collected. The following enzymatic assays were performed on each tissue: citrate synthase (CS), sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticular ATPase (SERCA), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT). CS and SERCA activities were significantly higher in the Pc compared with the Ic/Bs pelvic floor muscles, whereas the ChAT activity of the Ic/Bs was higher than that of the Pc muscle. Based on our results, the Pc muscle is expected to have a significantly greater capacity to contract and a higher metabolic activity than those of the Ic/Bs muscles. We believe that an understanding of the biochemical activities of these three biomarker enzymes in normal pelvic floor muscles is essential in evaluating the effects of specific experimental dysfunctions created in pelvic floor muscle activity.

  15. Tuning the structural coupling between the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of phospholamban to control sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Kim N; Gustavsson, Martin; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2012-12-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) is the endogenous inhibitor of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), the integral membrane enzyme responsible for 70 % of the removal of Ca(2+) from the cytosol, inducing cardiac muscle relaxation in humans. Dysfunctions in SERCA:PLN interactions have been implicated as having a critical role in cardiac disease, and targeting Ca(2+) transport has been demonstrated to be a promising avenue in treating conditions of heart failure. Here, we designed a series of new mutants able to tune SERCA function, targeting the loop sequence that connects the transmembrane and cytoplasmic helices of PLN. We found that a variable degree of loss of inhibition mutants is attainable by engineering glycine mutations along PLN's loop domain. Remarkably, a double glycine mutation results in a complete loss-of-function mutant, fully mimicking the phosphorylated state of PLN. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we rationalized the effects of these mutations in terms of entropic control on PLN function, whose inhibitory function can be modulated by increasing its conformational dynamics. However, if PLN mutations go past a threshold set by the phosphorylated state, they break the structural coupling between the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, resulting in a species that behaves as the inhibitory transmembrane domain alone. These studies provide new potential candidates for gene therapy to reverse the effects of heart failure.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium regulates the retrotranslocation of Trypanosoma cruzi calreticulin to the cytosol.

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    Carlos A Labriola

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For most secretory pathway proteins, crossing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane is an irreversible process. However, in some cases this flow can be reversed. For instance, misfolded proteins retained in the ER are retrotranslocated to the cytosol to be degraded by the proteasome. This mechanism, known as ER associated degradation (ERAD, is exploited by several bacterial toxins to gain access to the cytosol. Interestingly, some ER resident proteins can also be detected in the cytosol or nucleus, calreticulin (CRT being the most studied. Here we show that in Trypanosoma cruzi a minor fraction of CRT localized to the cytosol. ER calcium depletion, but not increasing cytosolic calcium, triggered the retrotranslocation of CRT in a relatively short period of time. Cytosolic CRT was subsequently degraded by the proteasome. Interestingly, the single disulfide bridge of CRT is reduced when the protein is located in the cytosol. The effect exerted by ER calcium was strictly dependent on the C-terminal domain (CRT-C, since a CRT lacking it was totally retained in the ER, whereas the localization of an unrelated protein fused to CRT-C mirrored that of endogenous CRT. This finding expands the regulatory mechanisms of protein sorting and may represent a new crossroad between diverse physiological processes.

  17. Are there different water requirements in different steps of a catalytic cycle? Hydration effects at the E1 and E2 conformers of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase studied in organic solvents with low amounts of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrabin, H; Scofano, H M; de Gómez-Puyou, M T; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1993-04-15

    The Ca(2+)-ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum was transferred in an active form to a low-water system composed of toluene, phospholipids, and Triton X-100 (TPT). The Ca(2+)-ATPase activity in the TPT system with 4.0% water (by vol. was about 50% of the activity observed in all-aqueous mixtures. Phosphate formation was linear with time up to 20% of ATP hydrolysis and, as expected from an enzyme-catalysed reaction, activity was linear with protein concentration. No ATPase activity was detected in the presence of 3 mM EGTA, indicating that the enzyme retained its Ca2+ dependence in the TPT system. A hyperbolic response to ATP concentration was observed with a Km of 0.15 mM. There was no detectable ATPase activity at water concentrations below 1.5% (by vol.). With 2.0% water, activity became detectable and increased as the water content was progressively raised to 7.0% (by vol.). Higher amounts of water produced unstable emulsions. Enzyme phosphorylation by ATP and dephosphorylation took place in the TPT system. The velocities of both enzyme phosphorylation and dephosphorylation increased with increments in the water content. The enzyme could also be phosphorylated in the TPT system by inorganic phosphate. However, in comparison to ATP, phosphorylation by phosphate took place with significantly lower amounts of water. It is suggested that at low amounts of water, the enzyme is in a relatively rigid conformation and, as the water content is increased, the ATPase acquires more flexibility and, hence, the capacity to carry out catalysis at higher rates. Nevertheless, the release of conformational constraints of the catalytic site of the E2 conformer takes place at water concentrations much lower than those needed for the expression of catalytic activity by the E1 conformer.

  18. [Mass spectrometry identification and immune cross-reactivity of a minor shrimp allergen-sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein from Litopenaeus vannamei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cai-xia; Huang, Jian-fang; Xiang, Jun-jian; Sun, Yi-fan; Lv, Si; Guo, Jie

    2012-08-01

    To identify sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SCP) as a minor shrimp allergen by mass spectrometry, and to analyze the immune cross-reactivity among crustacean SCPs. The M(r); 21 000 allergen from Litopenaeus vannamei was identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS. BLAST and ClustalW were used to compare amino acid sequence identity of the allergen among crustaceans. The puritifed M(r); 21 000 allergen was injected subcutaneously in mice to produce the specific polyclonal antibodies to analyze immune cross-reactivity of the allergen with proteins from 8 other species of crustaceans by Western blotting. The M(r); 21 000 shrimp allergen was identified as SCP. Sequence comparison revealed that SCP had 81%-100% amino acid identity among crustaceans. Western blotting showed that the proteins with M(r); about 21 000, corresponding to SCP from Metapenaeus ensis, Penaeus monodon, Oratosquilla oratoria, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, Procambarus clarkii, Portunus pelagicus, Charybdis feriatus, Eriocheir sinensis were recognized by polyclonal antibodies against SCP of Litopenaeus vannamei. SCP is a minor shrimp allergen, and SCPs have a high sequence homology and strong immune cross-reactivity among crustaceans, which can be used as detective, diagnostic and safe immunotherapeutic agents for subjects with shrimp allergy.

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate reduces calcium accumulation in rat brain endoplasmic reticulum

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    Jeffrey Thomas Cole

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain cells expend large amounts of energy sequestering calcium (Ca2+, while loss of Ca2+ compartmentalization leads to cell damage or death. Upon cell entry, glucose is converted to glucose-6-phosphate (G6P, a parent substrate to several metabolic major pathways, including glycolysis. In several tissues, G6P alters the ability of the endoplasmic reticulum to sequester Ca2+. This led to the hypothesis that G6P regulates Ca2+ accumulation by acting as an endogenous ligand for sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA. Whole brain ER microsomes were pooled from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using radio-isotopic assays, 45Ca2+ accumulation was quantified following incubation with increasing amounts of G6P, in the presence or absence of thapsigargin, a potent SERCA inhibitor. To qualitatively assess SERCA activity, the simultaneous release of inorganic phosphate (Pi coupled with Ca2+ accumulation was quantified. Addition of G6P significantly and decreased Ca2+ accumulation in a dose-dependent fashion (1-10 mM. The reduction in Ca2+ accumulation was not significantly different that seen with addition of thapsigargin. Addition of glucose-1-phosphate or fructose-6-phosphate, or other glucose metabolic pathway intermediates, had no effect on Ca2+ accumulation. Further, the release of Pi was markedly decreased, indicating G6P-mediated SERCA inhibition as the responsible mechanism for reduced Ca2+ uptake. Simultaneous addition of thapsigargin and G6P did decrease inorganic phosphate in comparison to either treatment alone, which suggests that the two treatments have different mechanisms of action. Therefore, G6P may be a novel, endogenous regulator of SERCA activity. Additionally, pathological conditions observed during disease states that disrupt glucose homeostasis, may be attributable to Ca2+ dystasis caused by altered G6P regulation of SERCA activity

  20. Two isoforms of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) are essential in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J H; Bandyopadhyay, J; Lee, J; Park, C S; Ahnn, J

    2000-12-31

    SERCA (Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase), a membrane bound Ca(2+)- /Mg(2+)- dependent ATPase that sequesters Ca(2+) into the SR/ER lumen, is one of the essential components for the maintenance of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Here we describe the identification and functional characterization of a C. elegans SERCA gene (ser-1). ser-1 is a single gene alternatively spliced at its carboxyl terminus to form two isoforms (SER-1A and SER-1B) and displays a high homology (70% identity, 80% similarity) with mammalian SERCAs. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) and whole-mount immunostaining analyses reveal that SER-1 expresses in neuronal cells, body-wall muscles, pharyngeal and vulval muscles, excretory cells, and vulva epithelial cells. Furthermore, SER-1::GFP expresses during embryonic stages and the expression is maintained through the adult stages. Double-stranded RNA injection (also known as RNAi) targeted to each SER-1 isoform results in severe phenotypic defects: ser-1A(RNAi) animals show embryonic lethality, whereas ser-1B(RNAi) results in L1 larval arrest phenotype. These findings suggest that both isoforms of C. elegans SERCA, like in mammals, are essential for embryonic development and post-embryonic growth and survival.

  1. Permethrin potentiates adipogenesis via intracellular calcium and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated mechanisms in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiao; Qi, Weipeng; Clark, John M; Park, Yeonhwa

    2017-11-01

    Permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, was previously reported to promote adipogenesis in vitro and weight gain in vivo. The mechanism by which permethrin promotes adipogenesis/obesity, however, has not been fully explored. Intracellular calcium and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been reported to be linked with adipogenesis and obesity. Because pyrethroid insecticides have been determined to influence intracellular calcium and ER stress in vitro, the purpose of this current study was to investigate whether permethrin potentiates adipogenesis via a change in intracellular calcium, leading to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. 3T3-L1 cells were exposed to four different concentrations of permethrin (0.01, 0.1, 1 & 10 μM) for 6 days during differentiation. Treatment of permethrin increased intracellular calcium level in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, permethrin treatment increased protein levels of ER stress markers in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that intracellular calcium and ER stress may be involved in permethrin-induced adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Low Affinity GCaMP3 Variant (GCaMPer for Imaging the Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Store.

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    Mark J Henderson

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is critical for cellular functions and is disrupted in diverse pathologies including neurodegeneration and cardiovascular disease. Owing to the high concentration of calcium within the ER, studying this subcellular compartment requires tools that are optimized for these conditions. To develop a single-fluorophore genetically encoded calcium indicator for this organelle, we targeted a low affinity variant of GCaMP3 to the ER lumen (GCaMPer (10.19. A set of viral vectors was constructed to express GCaMPer in human neuroblastoma cells, rat primary cortical neurons, and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. We observed dynamic changes in GCaMPer (10.19 fluorescence in response to pharmacologic manipulations of the ER calcium store. Additionally, periodic calcium efflux from the ER was observed during spontaneous beating of cardiomyocytes. GCaMPer (10.19 has utility in imaging ER calcium in living cells and providing insight into luminal calcium dynamics under physiologic and pathologic states.

  3. Cloning of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -ATPase (SERCA) from Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, A; Arunachalam, S C; Meleshkevitch, E A; Mandal, P K; Boudko, D Y; Ahearn, G A

    2009-02-01

    We have previously reported on calcium transport mechanisms in American lobster, Homarus americanus, using (45)Ca(2+) coupled with vesicle preparations of hepatopancreatic endoplasmic reticulum. The active transport of calcium across membranes bordering calcium-sequestering stores such as sarcoplasmic or endoplasmic reticulum is catalyzed by membrane-spanning proteins, the sarco-endoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCAs). In the study described here we used advanced bioinformatics and molecular techniques to clone SERCA from the economically important Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus. We report the complete cloning of a full-length SERCA from P. argus antenna cDNA (GenBank accession number AY702617). This cDNA has a 1020-amino acid residue open reading frame which is 90% identical to published sequences of other crustacean SERCA proteins. Our data support the hypothesis that one crustacean and three vertebrate genes controlling calcium transport were derived from a common ancestral gene.

  4. Ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel PKA phosphorylation: A critical mediator of heart failure progression

    OpenAIRE

    Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Reiken, Steven; Vest, John A.; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R.

    2006-01-01

    Defective regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2)/calcium release channel, required for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart, has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. For example, diastolic calcium “leak” via RyR2 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been identified as an important factor contributing to impaired contractility in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death. In patients with heart failure, chronic activat...

  5. Inhibition of Calcium Influx Reduces Dysfunction and Apoptosis in Lipotoxic Pancreatic β-Cells via Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

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    Yuren Zhou

    Full Text Available Lipotoxicity plays an important role in pancreatic β-cell failure during the development of type 2 diabetes. Prolonged exposure of β-cells to elevated free fatty acids level could cause deterioration of β-cell function and induce cell apoptosis. Therefore, inhibition of fatty acids-induced β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis might provide benefit for the therapy of type 2 diabetes. The present study examined whether regulation of fatty acids-triggered calcium influx could protect pancreatic β-cells from lipotoxicity. Two small molecule compounds, L-type calcium channel blocker nifedipine and potassium channel activator diazoxide were used to inhibit palmitic acid-induced calcium influx. And whether the compounds could reduce palmitic acid-induced β-cell failure and the underlying mechanism were also investigated. It was found that both nifedipine and diazoxide protected MIN6 pancreatic β-cells and primary cultured murine islets from palmitic acid-induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, the impaired insulin secretion was also recovered to varying degrees by these two compounds. Our results verified that nifedipine and diazoxide could reduce palmitic acid-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress to generate protective effects on pancreatic β-cells. More importantly, it suggested that regulation of calcium influx by small molecule compounds might provide benefits for the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes.

  6. The Role of Parvalbumin, Sarcoplasmatic Reticulum Calcium Pump Rate, Rates of Cross-Bridge Dynamics, and Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Current on Peripheral Muscle Fatigue: A Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Verena

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of the excitation-contraction pathway, which has previously been validated for slow-twitch and fast-twitch skeletal muscles, is employed to investigate key biophysical processes leading to peripheral muscle fatigue. Special emphasis hereby is on investigating how the model's original parameter sets can be interpolated such that realistic behaviour with respect to contraction time and fatigue progression can be obtained for a continuous distribution of the model's parameters across the muscle units, as found for the functional properties of muscles. The parameters are divided into 5 groups describing (i) the sarcoplasmatic reticulum calcium pump rate, (ii) the cross-bridge dynamics rates, (iii) the ryanodine receptor calcium current, (iv) the rates of binding of magnesium and calcium ions to parvalbumin and corresponding dissociations, and (v) the remaining processes. The simulations reveal that the first two parameter groups are sensitive to contraction time but not fatigue, the third parameter group affects both considered properties, and the fourth parameter group is only sensitive to fatigue progression. Hence, within the scope of the underlying model, further experimental studies should investigate parvalbumin dynamics and the ryanodine receptor calcium current to enhance the understanding of peripheral muscle fatigue. PMID:27980606

  7. Two distinct calcium pools in the endoplasmic reticulum of HEK-293T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aulestia, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-García, Arancha; Alonso, María Teresa; García-Sancho, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Agonist-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores may be heterogeneous and exhibit distinct functional features. We have studied the properties of intracellular Ca2+ stores using targeted aequorins for selective measurements in different subcellular compartments. Both, HEK-293T [HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells expressing the large T-antigen of SV40 (simian virus 40)] and HeLa cells accumulated Ca2+ into the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to near millimolar concentrations and the IP3-generating a...

  8. Reduction of calcium flux from the extracellular region and endoplasmic reticulum by amorphous nano-silica particles owing to carboxy group addition on their surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Onodera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported that amorphous nano-silica particles (nano-SPs modulate calcium flux, although the mechanism remains incompletely understood. We thus analyzed the relationship between calcium flux and particle surface properties and determined the calcium flux route. Treatment of Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts with nano-SPs with a diameter of 70 nm (nSP70 increased cytosolic calcium concentration, but that with SPs with a diameter of 300 or 1000 nm did not. Surface modification of nSP70 with a carboxy group also did not modulate calcium flux. Pretreatment with a general calcium entry blocker almost completely suppressed calcium flux by nSP70. Preconditioning by emptying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER calcium stores slightly suppressed calcium flux by nSP70. These results indicate that nSP70 mainly modulates calcium flux across plasma membrane calcium channels, with subsequent activation of the ER calcium pump, and that the potential of calcium flux by nano-SPs is determined by the particle surface charge.

  9. Reduction of calcium flux from the extracellular region and endoplasmic reticulum by amorphous nano-silica particles owing to carboxy group addition on their surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Akira; Yayama, Katsutoshi; Morosawa, Hideto; Ishii, Yukina; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Kawai, Yuichi

    2017-03-01

    Several studies have reported that amorphous nano-silica particles (nano-SPs) modulate calcium flux, although the mechanism remains incompletely understood. We thus analyzed the relationship between calcium flux and particle surface properties and determined the calcium flux route. Treatment of Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts with nano-SPs with a diameter of 70 nm (nSP70) increased cytosolic calcium concentration, but that with SPs with a diameter of 300 or 1000 nm did not. Surface modification of nSP70 with a carboxy group also did not modulate calcium flux. Pretreatment with a general calcium entry blocker almost completely suppressed calcium flux by nSP70. Preconditioning by emptying the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium stores slightly suppressed calcium flux by nSP70. These results indicate that nSP70 mainly modulates calcium flux across plasma membrane calcium channels, with subsequent activation of the ER calcium pump, and that the potential of calcium flux by nano-SPs is determined by the particle surface charge.

  10. Isolation of a plasma-membrane fraction from gastric smooth muscle. Comparison of the calcium uptake with that in endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeymaekers, L; Wuytack, F; Eggermont, J; De Schutter, G; Casteels, R

    1983-01-01

    1. A plasma-membrane fraction was isolated from the smooth muscle of the pig stomach by using differential and sucrose-density-gradient centrifugations. When the centrifugation was carried out after preloading the crude microsomal fraction with Ca2+ in the presence of oxalate, the contamination of the plasma-membrane fraction by endoplasmic reticulum was decreased and a fraction enriched in endoplasmic reticulum vesicles filled with calcium oxalate crystals was obtained. 2. The plasmalemmal and endoplasmic-reticulum membranes could be distinguished by differences in the activity of marker enzymes and in the cholesterol content and by their different permeability to oxalate and phosphate. Oxalate and phosphate stimulated the Ca2+ uptake in the endoplasmic reticulum much more than in the plasmalemmal vesicles. In the plasma-membrane vesicles 40 mM-phosphate was more effective for stimulating the Ca2+ uptake than was 5 mM-oxalate, but the reverse was seen in the endoplasmic reticulum. 3. The high cholesterol/phospholipid ratio of the crude microsomal fraction are of the majority of the vesicles present in the crude microsomal fraction are of plasmalemmal origin. 4. The Ca2+ pump of the plasmalemmal and endoplasmic-reticulum vesicles could be differentiated by their different sensitivities to calmodulin. However, the two Ca2+-transport ATPases did not differ by their sensitivity to vanadate nor by the energization of the Ca2+ transport by different nucleoside triphosphates. PMID:6860302

  11. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ (SERCA)-pumps: link to heart beats and calcium waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misquitta, C M; Mack, D P; Grover, A K

    1999-04-01

    Mobilization of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ is pivotal to the ability of a cell to send or respond to stimuli. Ca(2+)-Mg(2+)-ATPases, termed SERCA pumps, sequester Ca2+ into the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum. There are several SERCA protein isoforms encoded by three genes. This paper summarizes the structure, function, tissue and subcellular distribution, and regulation of various SERCA isoforms. Then it attempts to link divergence in the signal transduction processes of cells to the types and levels of SERCA proteins they express and to how the cells regulate their SERCA pump activity. The paper examines possible linkages between SERCA pumps and receptor-activated Ca2+ entry, SERCA isoform localization and Ca(2+)-waves, and the role of SERCA pumps in nuclear Ca2+ in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Then it uses available information on cardiac function and chronic stimulation of the fast-twitch muscle to answer a series of basic questions on the regulation of SERCA activity and expression and their linkage to signal transduction. Finally, it discusses the possibility that neurons exhibit complex Ca(2+)-waves whose interactions have the potential to explain the operational basis of neural networks. A series of unanswered questions emerge based on this synthesis, including the unsettling issue of whether all the isoforms are needed to achieve the divergence in signal transduction or if there is a degree of redundancy in the system.

  12. Myosin Va and Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Channel Complex Regulates Membrane Export during Axon Guidance

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    Fumitaka Wada

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During axon guidance, growth cones navigate toward attractive cues by inserting new membrane on the cue side. This process depends on Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+ channels, but the Ca2+ sensor and effector governing this asymmetric vesicle export remain unknown. We identified a protein complex that controls asymmetric ER Ca2+-dependent membrane vesicle export. The Ca2+-dependent motor protein myosin Va (MyoVa tethers membrane vesicles to the ER via a common binding site on the two major ER Ca2+ channels, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ryanodine receptors. In response to attractive cues, micromolar Ca2+ from ER channels triggers MyoVa-channel dissociation and the movement of freed vesicles to the cue side, enabling growth cone turning. MyoVa-Ca2+ channel interactions are required for proper long-range axon growth in developing spinal cord in vivo. These findings reveal a peri-ER membrane export pathway for Ca2+-dependent attraction in axon guidance.

  13. Inositol trisphosphate and thapsigargin discriminate endoplasmic reticulum stores of calcium in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, A; Hirsch, D J; Hanley, M R

    1990-01-01

    ATP dependent Ca2+ accumulation into oxalate-loaded rat brain microsomes is potently inhibited by thapsigargin with an IC50 of 2 nM and maximal inhibition at 10 nM. Approximately 15% of the total A23187-releasable microsomal calcium store is insensitive to thapsigargin concentrations up to 100...... microM. Inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) maximally inhibits 40% of the net Ca2+ accumulation by whole brain microsomes. Its effects are non-additive with thapsigargin suggesting that the IP3-sensitive Ca2+ pool is a subset of the thapsigargin sensitive Ca2+ pool. Marked regional differences occur...

  14. Chronic inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum calcium-release channels and calcium-ATPase lengthens the period of hepatic clock gene Per1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz-Muñoz Mauricio

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role played by calcium as a regulator of circadian rhythms is not well understood. The effect of the pharmacological inhibition of the ryanodine receptor (RyR, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R, and endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA, as well as the intracellular Ca2+-chelator BAPTA-AM was explored on the 24-h rhythmicity of the liver-clock protein PER1 in an experimental model of circadian synchronization by light and restricted-feeding schedules. Methods Liver explants from Period1-luciferase (Per1-luc transgenic rats with either free food access or with a restricted meal schedule were treated for several days with drugs to inhibit the activity of IP3Rs (2-APB, RyRs (ryanodine, or SERCA (thapsigargin as well as to suppress intracellular calcium fluctuations (BAPTA-AM. The period of Per1-luc expression was measured during and after drug administration. Results Liver explants from rats fed ad libitum showed a lengthened period in response to all the drugs tested. The pharmacological treatments of the explants from meal-entrained rats induced the same pattern, with the exception of the ryanodine treatment which, unexpectedly, did not modify the Per1-luc period. All effects associated with drug application were reversed after washout, indicating that none of the pharmacological treatments was toxic to the liver cultures. Conclusions Our data suggest that Ca2+ mobilized from internal deposits modulates the molecular circadian clock in the liver of rats entrained by light and by restricted meal access.

  15. The proarrhythmic antihistaminic drug terfenadine increases spontaneous calcium release in human atrial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove-Madsen, Leif; Llach, Anna; Molina, Cristina E; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Farré, Jordi; Roura, Santiago; Cinca, Juan

    2006-12-28

    Spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac myocytes plays a central role in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. Compounds intended for therapeutical use that interfere with intracellular calcium handling may therefore have an undesired proarrhythmic potential. Here we have used isolated human atrial myocytes to compare the effect of the proarrhythmic antihistaminic drug terfenadine with the non-proarrhythmic antihistaminic drugs fexofenadine and rupatadine on intracellular calcium homeostasis. Perforated patch-clamp technique was used to measure ionic currents and to detect spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Our results show that the compound terfenadine, with known arrhythmogenic effects, inhibits L-type calcium current (I(Ca)) with an IC(50) of 185 nM when cells are stimulated at 1.0 Hz. The inhibitory effect of 0.3 muM terfenadine increased from 19+/-4% at stimulation frequency of 0.2 Hz to 63+/-6% at 2.0 Hz. Moreover, terfenadine also increased spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. At a concentration of 1 muM, terfenadine significantly increased the spontaneous Na-Ca exchange current (I(NCX)) frequency from 0.48+/-0.25 to 1.93+/-0.67 s(-1). In contrast, fexofenadine and rupatadine did not change I(Ca) or the frequency of spontaneous I(NCX). We conclude that the proarrhythmic antihistaminic drug terfenadine alters intracellular calcium handling in isolated human atrial myocytes. This experimental model may be suitable to screen for potential arrhythmogenic side-effects of compounds intended for therapeutical use.

  16. Model of intracellular calcium cycling in ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiferaw, Y; Watanabe, M A; Garfinkel, A; Weiss, J N; Karma, A

    2003-12-01

    We present a mathematical model of calcium cycling that takes into account the spatially localized nature of release events that correspond to experimentally observed calcium sparks. This model naturally incorporates graded release by making the rate at which calcium sparks are recruited proportional to the whole cell L-type calcium current, with the total release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) being just the sum of local releases. The dynamics of calcium cycling is studied by pacing the model with a clamped action potential waveform. Experimentally observed calcium alternans are obtained at high pacing rates. The results show that the underlying mechanism for this phenomenon is a steep nonlinear dependence of the calcium released from the SR on the diastolic SR calcium concentration (SR load) and/or the diastolic calcium level in the cytosol, where the dependence on diastolic calcium is due to calcium-induced inactivation of the L-type calcium current. In addition, the results reveal that the calcium dynamics can become chaotic even though the voltage pacing is periodic. We reduce the equations of the model to a two-dimensional discrete map that relates the SR and cytosolic concentrations at one beat and the previous beat. From this map, we obtain a condition for the onset of calcium alternans in terms of the slopes of the release-versus-SR load and release-versus-diastolic-calcium curves. From an analysis of this map, we also obtain an understanding of the origin of chaotic dynamics.

  17. Regulation of the endoplasmic reticulum calcium storage during the unfolded protein response--significance in tissue ischemia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treiman, Marek

    2002-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle intimately involved in control of cell activities through Ca(2+) signaling, as well as in post-translational protein folding and maturation. Ca(2+) storage within the ER is required for both of these functions. Several of the ER-resident proteins essenti...

  18. Hypotonic stress-induced calcium signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves TRP-like transporters on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigamonti, M; Groppi, S; Belotti, F; Ambrosini, R; Filippi, G; Martegani, E; Tisi, R

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells respond to hypotonic stress (HTS) by a cytosolic calcium rise, either generated by an influx of calcium from extracellular medium, when calcium is available, or by a release from intracellular stores in scarcity of extracellular calcium. Calcium release from intracellular compartments is peculiarly inhibited by external calcium in a calcineurin-independent and Cch1-, but not Mid1-, driven manner. HTS-induced calcium release is also negatively regulated by the ER protein Cls2 and involves a poorly characterized protein, FLC2/YAL053W gene product, previously proposed to be required for FAD transport in the ER, albeit, due to its molecular features, it was also previously classified as an ion transporter. A computational analysis revealed that this gene and its three homologs in S. cerevisiae, together with previously identified Schizosaccharomyces pombe pkd2 and Neurospora crassa calcium-related spray protein, belong to a fungal branch of TRP-like ion transporters related to human mucolipin and polycystin 2 calcium transporters. Moreover, disruption of FLC2 gene confers severe sensitivity to Calcofluor white and hyper-activation of the cell wall integrity MAPK cascade, suggesting a role in cell wall maintenance as previously suggested for the fission yeast homolog. Perturbation in cytosolic resting calcium concentration and hyper-activation of calcineurin in exponentially growing cells suggest a role for this transporter in calcium homeostasis in yeast. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Activation of a cGMP-sensitive calcium-dependent chloride channel may cause transition from calcium waves to whole cell oscillations in smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    In vitro, alpha-adrenoreceptor stimulation of rat mesenteric small arteries often leads to a rhythmic change in wall tension, i.e., vasomotion. Within the individual smooth muscle cells of the vascular wall, vasomotion is often preceded by a period of asynchronous calcium waves. Abruptly, these low......-frequency waves may transform into high-frequency whole cell calcium oscillations. Simultaneously, multiple cells synchronize, leading to rhythmic generation of tension. We present a mathematical model of vascular smooth muscle cells that aims at characterizing this sudden transition. Simulations show calcium...... waves sweeping through the cytoplasm when the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is stimulated to release calcium. A rise in cGMP leads to the experimentally observed transition from waves to whole cell calcium oscillations. At the same time, membrane potential starts to oscillate and the frequency...

  20. Inherited dysfunction of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handling and arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priori, Silvia G; Chen, S R Wayne

    2011-04-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inherited arrhythmogenic disease occurring in patients with a structurally normal heart: the disease is characterized by life-threatening arrhythmias elicited by stress and emotion. In 2001, the ryanodine receptor was identified as the gene that is linked to CPVT; shortly thereafter, cardiac calsequestrin was implicated in the recessive form of the same disease. It became clear that abnormalities in intracellular Ca(2+) regulation could profoundly disrupt the electrophysiological properties of the heart. In this article, we discuss the molecular basis of the disease and the pathophysiological mechanisms that are impacting clinical diagnosis and management of affected individuals. As of today, the interaction between basic scientists and clinicians to understand CPVT and identify new therapeutic strategies is one of the most compelling examples of the importance of translational research in cardiology.

  1. Enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release following intermittent sprint training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Lunde, Per; Levin, Kasper

    2000-01-01

    -977) arbitrary units Ca(2+). g protein(-1). min(-1) (after). The relative SR density of functional ryanodine receptors (RyR) remained unchanged after training; there was, however, a 48% (P RyR. No significant differences in Ca(2+) uptake rate and Ca(2+)-ATPase capacity were...

  2. Calcium plays a key role in paraoxon-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells by regulating both endoplasmic reticulum- and mitochondria-associated pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Du, Yi; Ju, Furong; Ma, Shunxiang; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Paraoxon (POX) is one of the most toxic organophosphorus pesticides, but its toxic mechanisms associated with apoptosis remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate calcium-associated mechanisms in POX-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells. EL4 cells were exposed to POX for 0-16 h. EGTA was used to chelate Ca(2+ ) in extracellular medium, and heparin and procaine were used to inhibit Ca(2+ )efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Z-ATAD-FMK was used to inhibit caspase-12 activity. The apoptotic rate assay, western blotting and immunocytochemistry (ICC) were used to reveal the mechanisms of POX-induced apoptosis. POX significantly increased the expression and activation of caspase-12 and caspase-3, enhanced expression of calpain 1 and calpain 2, and induced the release of cyt c, but did not change the expression of Grp 78. Inhibiting caspase-12 activity alleviated POX-induced upregulation of calpain 1 and caspase-3, promoted POX-induced upregulation of calpain 2, and reduced POX-induced cyt c release, suggesting that there was a cross-talk between the ER-associated pathway and mitochondria-associated apoptotic signals. Attenuating intracellular calcium concentration with EGTA, heparin or procaine decreased POX-induced upregulation of calpain 1, calpain 2, caspase-12 and caspase-3, and reduced POX-induced cyt c release. After pretreatment with EGTA or procaine, POX significantly promoted expression of Grp 78. Calcium played a key role in POX-induced apoptosis in EL4 cells by regulating both ER- and mitochondria-associated pathways. The cross-talk of ER- and mitochondria-associated pathways was accomplished through calcium signal.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum refilling and mitochondrial calcium extrusion promoted in neurons by NCX1 and NCX3 in ischemic preconditioning are determinant for neuroprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisalli, M J; Secondo, A; Esposito, A; Valsecchi, V; Savoia, C; Di Renzo, G F; Annunziato, L; Scorziello, A

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC), an important endogenous adaptive mechanism of the CNS, renders the brain more tolerant to lethal cerebral ischemia. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the induction and maintenance of ischemic tolerance in the brain are complex and still remain undefined. Considering the increased expression of the two sodium calcium exchanger (NCX) isoforms, NCX1 and NCX3, during cerebral ischemia and the relevance of nitric oxide (NO) in IPC modulation, we investigated whether the activation of the NO/PI3K/Akt pathway induced by IPC could regulate calcium homeostasis through changes in NCX1 and NCX3 expression and activity, thus contributing to ischemic tolerance. To this aim, we set up an in vitro model of IPC by exposing cortical neurons to a 30-min oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by 3-h OGD plus reoxygenation. IPC was able to stimulate NCX activity, as revealed by Fura-2AM single-cell microfluorimetry. This effect was mediated by the NO/PI3K/Akt pathway since it was blocked by the following: (a) the NOS inhibitors L-NAME and 7-Nitroindazole, (b) the IP3K/Akt inhibitors LY294002, wortmannin and the Akt-negative dominant, (c) the NCX1 and NCX3 siRNA. Intriguingly, this IPC-mediated upregulation of NCX1 and NCX3 activity may control calcium level within endoplasimc reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, respectively. In fact, IPC-induced NCX1 upregulation produced an increase in ER calcium refilling since this increase was prevented by siNCX1. Moreover, by increasing NCX3 activity, IPC reduced mitochondrial calcium concentration. Accordingly, the inhibition of NCX by CGP37157 reverted this effect, thus suggesting that IPC-induced NCX3-increased activity may improve mitochondrial function during OGD/reoxygenation. Collectively, these results indicate that IPC-induced neuroprotection may occur through the modulation of calcium homeostasis in ER and mitochondria through NO/PI3K/Akt-mediated NCX1 and NCX3 upregulation. PMID:24632945

  4. Rhein triggers apoptosis via induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress, caspase-4 and intracellular calcium in primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KoraMagazi, Arouna [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Dandan [Department of Pharmacology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yousef, Bashir; Guerram, Mounia [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Drug Screening, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Yu, Feng, E-mail: yufengcpu14@yahoo.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Department of Pharmacology, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-04-22

    Rhein is an active component of rhubarb; a traditional Chinese medicine reported to induce apoptosis and cause liver toxicity. However, rhein's apoptotic-inducing effects, as well as its molecular mechanisms of action on hepatic cells need to be further explored. In the present study, rhein was found to trigger apoptosis in primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells as showed by annexin V/PI double staining assay and nuclear morphological changes demonstrated by Hoechst 33258 staining. Moreover, it was observed that the mechanism implicated in rhein-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent, presumably via ER-stress associated pathways, as illustrated by up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP 78), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Meanwhile, caspase-4 as a hallmark of ER-stress, was also showed to be activated following by caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, rhein also promoted intracellular elevation of calcium that contributed in apoptosis induction. Interestingly, pre-treatment with calpain inhibitor I reduced the effects of rhein on apoptosis induction and JNK activation. These data suggested that rhein-induced apoptosis through ER-stress and elevated intracellular calcium level in HL-7702 cells. - Highlights: • Rhein triggers apoptotic cell death on primary human hepatic HL-7702 cells. • Rhein leads to caspase-4 activation in HL-7702 cells. • Rhein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways in HL-7702 cells. • Rhein causes elevation of intracellular calcium concentrations in HL-7702 cells.

  5. ERO1α-dependent endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial calcium flux contributes to ER stress and mitochondrial permeabilization by procaspase-activating compound-1 (PAC-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seervi, M; Sobhan, P K; Joseph, J; Ann Mathew, K; Santhoshkumar, T R

    2013-12-19

    Procaspase-activating compound-1 (PAC-1) is the first direct caspase-activating compound discovered; using an in vitro cell-free system of caspase activation. Subsequently, this compound was shown to induce apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells with promising in vivo antitumor activity in canine lymphoma model. Recently, we have reported its ability to kill drug-resistant, Bcl-2/Bcl-xL overexpressing and Bax/Bak-deficient cells despite the essential requirement of mitochondrial cytochrome c (cyt. c) release for caspase activation, indicating that the key molecular targets of PAC-1 in cancer cells are yet to be identified. Here, we have identified Ero1α-dependent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium leakage to mitochondria through mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM) and ER luminal hyper-oxidation as the critical events of PAC-1-mediated cell death. PAC-1 treatment upregulated Ero1α in multiple cell lines, whereas silencing of Ero1α significantly inhibited calcium release from ER and cell death. Loss of ER calcium and hyper-oxidation of ER lumen by Ero1α collectively triggered ER stress. Upregulation of GRP78 and splicing of X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA in multiple cancer cells suggested ER stress as the general event triggered by PAC-1. XBP1 mRNA splicing and GRP78 upregulation confirmed ER stress even in Bax/Bak double knockout and PAC-1-resistant Apaf-1-knockout cells, indicating an induction of ER stress-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis by PAC-1. Furthermore, we identified BH3-only protein p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) as the key molecular link that orchestrates overwhelmed ER stress to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, involving mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, in a p53-independent manner. Silencing of PUMA in cancer cells effectively reduced cyt. c release and cell death by PAC-1.

  6. CPEB4 is a cell survival protein retained in the nucleus upon ischemia or endoplasmic reticulum calcium depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Ming-Chung; Oruganty-Das, Aparna; Cooper-Morgan, Amalene; Jin, Guang; Swanger, Sharon A; Bassell, Gary J; Florman, Harvey; van Leyen, Klaus; Richter, Joel D

    2010-12-01

    The RNA binding protein CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding) regulates cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translation in germ cells and the brain. In neurons, CPEB is detected at postsynaptic sites, as well as in the cell body. The related CPEB3 protein also regulates translation in neurons, albeit probably not through polyadenylation; it, as well as CPEB4, is present in dendrites and the cell body. Here, we show that treatment of neurons with ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists causes CPEB4 to accumulate in the nucleus. All CPEB proteins are nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling proteins that are retained in the nucleus in response to calcium-mediated signaling and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase protein II (CaMKII) activity. CPEB2, -3, and -4 have conserved nuclear export signals that are not present in CPEB. CPEB4 is necessary for cell survival and becomes nuclear in response to focal ischemia in vivo and when cultured neurons are deprived of oxygen and glucose. Further analysis indicates that nuclear accumulation of CPEB4 is controlled by the depletion of calcium from the ER, specifically, through the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor, indicating a communication between these organelles in redistributing proteins between subcellular compartments.

  7. CPEB4 Is a Cell Survival Protein Retained in the Nucleus upon Ischemia or Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Depletion ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Ming-Chung; Oruganty-Das, Aparna; Cooper-Morgan, Amalene; Jin, Guang; Swanger, Sharon A.; Bassell, Gary J.; Florman, Harvey; van Leyen, Klaus; Richter, Joel D.

    2010-01-01

    The RNA binding protein CPEB (cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding) regulates cytoplasmic polyadenylation and translation in germ cells and the brain. In neurons, CPEB is detected at postsynaptic sites, as well as in the cell body. The related CPEB3 protein also regulates translation in neurons, albeit probably not through polyadenylation; it, as well as CPEB4, is present in dendrites and the cell body. Here, we show that treatment of neurons with ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists causes CPEB4 to accumulate in the nucleus. All CPEB proteins are nucleus-cytoplasm shuttling proteins that are retained in the nucleus in response to calcium-mediated signaling and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase protein II (CaMKII) activity. CPEB2, -3, and -4 have conserved nuclear export signals that are not present in CPEB. CPEB4 is necessary for cell survival and becomes nuclear in response to focal ischemia in vivo and when cultured neurons are deprived of oxygen and glucose. Further analysis indicates that nuclear accumulation of CPEB4 is controlled by the depletion of calcium from the ER, specifically, through the inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor, indicating a communication between these organelles in redistributing proteins between subcellular compartments. PMID:20937770

  8. Calcium-induced alteration of mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial-endoplasmic reticulum contacts in rat brown adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Golic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are key organelles maintaining cellular bioenergetics and integrity, and their regulation of [Ca2+]i homeostasis has been investigated in many cell types. We investigated the short-term Ca-SANDOZ® treatment on brown adipocyte mitochondria, using imaging and molecular biology techniques. Two-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Ca-SANDOZ® drinking or tap water (control drinking for three days. Alizarin Red S staining showed increased Ca2+ level in the brown adipocytes of treated rats, and potassium pyroantimonate staining localized electron-dense regions in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and around lipid droplets. Ca-SANDOZ® decreased mitochondrial number, but increased their size and mitochondrial cristae volume. Transmission electron microscopy revealed numerous enlarged and fusioned-like mitochondria in the Ca-SANDOZ® treated group compared to the control, and megamitochondria in some brown adipocytes. The Ca2+ diet affected mitochondrial fusion as mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and mitofusin 2 (MFN2 were increased, and mitochondrial fission as dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1 was decreased. Confocal microscopy showed a higher colocalization rate between functional mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The level of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1 was elevated, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. These results suggest that Ca-SANDOZ® stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial-ER contacts and the thermogenic capacity of brown adipocytes

  9. Notoginsenoside R1 Alleviates Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reoxygenation Injury by Suppressing Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Release via PLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Tu, Liu; Li, Yingbo; Chen, Di; Liu, Zhao; Hu, Xuelian; Wang, Shali

    2017-11-24

    As documented in our previous study, notoginsenoside R1 (NGR1) can inhibit neuron apoptosis and the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated pro-apoptotic proteins in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Recent evidence indicates that the Phospholipase C (PLC)/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) is important for the regulation of Ca 2+ release in the ER. Ca 2+ imbalance can stimulate ER stress, CAMKII, and cell apoptosis. The purpose of this study was to further investigate the neuroprotective effect of NGR1 and elucidate how NGR1 regulates ER stress and cell apoptosis in the oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) model. Cells were exposed to NGR1 or the PLC activator m-3M3FBS. Then, IP3R- and IP3-induced Ca 2+ release (IICR) and activation of the ER stress and CaMKII signal pathway were measured. The results showed that NGR1 inhibited IICR and strengthened the binding of GRP78 with PERK and IRE1. NGR1 also alleviated the activation of the CaMKII pathway. Pretreatment with m-3M3FBS attenuated the neuroprotective effect of NGR1; IICR was activated, activation of the ER stress and CaMKII pathway was increased, and more cells were injured. These results indicate that NGR1 may suppress activation of the PLC/IP3R pathway, subsequently inhibiting ER Ca 2+ release, ER stress, and CaMKII and resulting in suppressed cell apoptosis.

  10. Synaptic plasticity at the interface of health and disease: New insights on the role of endoplasmic reticulum intracellular calcium stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, N; Vlachos, A

    2014-12-05

    Work from the past 40years has unraveled a wealth of information on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity and their relevance in physiological brain function. At the same time, it has been recognized that a broad range of neurological diseases may be accompanied by severe alterations in synaptic plasticity, i.e., 'maladaptive synaptic plasticity', which could initiate and sustain the remodeling of neuronal networks under pathological conditions. Nonetheless, our current knowledge on the specific contribution and interaction of distinct forms of synaptic plasticity (including metaplasticity and homeostatic plasticity) in the context of pathological brain states remains limited. This review focuses on recent experimental evidence, which highlights the fundamental role of endoplasmic reticulum-mediated Ca(2+) signals in modulating the duration, direction, extent and type of synaptic plasticity. We discuss the possibility that intracellular Ca(2+) stores may regulate synaptic plasticity and hence behavioral and cognitive functions at the interface between physiology and pathology. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Bcl-2 gene polymorphism rs956572AA increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated endoplasmic reticulum calcium release in subjects with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Stanika, Ruslan I; Yuan, Peixiong; Wang, Yun; Zhou, Rulun; Zarate, Carlos A; Drevets, Wayne C; Brantner, Christine A; Baum, Amber; Laje, Gonzalo; McMahon, Francis J; Chen, Guang; Du, Jing; Manji, Husseini K; Andrews, S Brian

    2011-02-15

    Bipolar disorder (BPD) is characterized by altered intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) homeostasis. Underlying mechanisms involve dysfunctions in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling, potentially mediated by B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), a key protein that regulates Ca(2+) signaling by interacting directly with these organelles, and which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of BPD. Here, we examined the effects of the Bcl-2 gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs956572 on intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in patients with BPD. Live cell fluorescence imaging and electron probe microanalysis were used to measure intracellular and intra-organelle free and total calcium in lymphoblasts from 18 subjects with BPD carrying the AA, AG, or GG variants of the rs956572 SNP. Analyses were carried out under basal conditions and in the presence of agents that affect Ca(2+) dynamics. Compared with GG homozygotes, variant AA-which expresses significantly reduced Bcl-2 messenger RNA and protein-exhibited elevated basal cytosolic Ca(2+) and larger increases in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-mediated cytosolic Ca(2+) elevations, the latter in parallel with enhanced depletion of the ER Ca(2+) pool. The aberrant behavior of AA cells was reversed by chronic lithium treatment and mimicked in variant GG by a Bcl-2 inhibitor. In contrast, no differences between SNP variants were found in ER or mitochondrial total Ca(2+) content or in basal store-operated Ca(2+) entry. These results demonstrate that, in patients with BPD, abnormal Bcl-2 gene expression in the AA variant contributes to dysfunctional Ca(2+) homeostasis through a specific ER inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Calcium Dysregulation and Altered Protein Translation: Intersection of Processes That Contribute to Cancer Cachexia Induced Skeletal Muscle Wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Stephanie T; Tan, Timothy C; Polly, Patsie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a debilitating paraneoplastic wasting syndrome characterized by skeletal muscle depletion and unintentional weight loss. It affects up to 50-80% of patients with cancer and directly accounts for one-quarter of cancer-related deaths due to cardio-respiratory failure. Muscle weakness, one of the hallmarks of this syndrome, has been postulated to be due to a combination of muscle breakdown, dysfunction and decrease in the ability to repair, with effective treatment strategies presently limited. Excessive inflammatory cytokine levels due to the host-tumor interaction, such as Interleukin (IL)-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-α, are hypothesised to drive this pathological process but the specific mechanisms by which these cytokines produce skeletal muscle dysfunction in cancer cachexia remain undefined. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) stress and the associated disruptions in calcium signaling have been implicated in cytokine-mediated disruptions in skeletal muscle and function. Disrupted ER stress-related processes such as the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR), calcium homeostasis and altered muscle protein synthesis have been reported in clinical and experimental cachexia and other inflammation-driven muscle diseases such as myositis, potentially suggesting a link between increased IL-6 and TNF-α and ER stress in skeletal muscle cells. As the concept of upregulated ER stress in skeletal muscle cells due to elevated cytokines is novel and potentially very relevant to our understanding of cancer cachexia, this review aims to examine the potential relationship between inflammatory cytokine mediated muscle breakdown and ER stress, in the context of cancer cachexia, and to discuss the molecular signaling pathways underpinning this pathology.

  13. Cantharidin Induces Apoptosis Through the Calcium/PKC-Regulated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway in Human Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chin-Chuan; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Kuan-I; Huang, Kou-Tong; Lu, Tien-Hui; Fang, Kai-Min; Wu, Chin-Ching; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Lai, Chih-Ho; Su, Yi-Chang; Huang, Chun-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Bladder cancer is a common malignancy worldwide. However, there is still no effective therapy for bladder cancer. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of cantharidin [a natural toxin produced (pure compound) from Chinese blister beetles (Mylabrisphalerata or Mylabriscichorii) and Spanish flies (Cantharis vesicatoria)] in human bladder cancer cell lines (including: T24 and RT4 cells). Treatment of human bladder cancer cells with cantharidin significantly decreased cell viability. The increase in the expressions of caspase-3 activity and cleaved form of caspase-9/-7/-3 were also increased in cantharidin-treated T24 cells. Furthermore, cantharidin increased the levels of phospho-eIF2α and Grp78 and decreased the protein expression of procaspase-12, which was accompanied by the increase in calpain activity in T24 cells. Cantharidin was capable of increasing the intracellular Ca (2+) and the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) in T24 cells. The addition of BAPTA/AM (a Ca (2+) chelator) and RO320432 (a selective cell-permeable PKC inhibitor) effectively reversed the increase in caspase-3 and calpain activity, the phosphorylation levels of PKC and eIF2α and Grp78 protein expression, and the decrease in procaspase-12 expression induced by cantharidin. Importantly, cantharidin significantly decreased the tumor volume (a dramatic 71% reduction after 21 days of treatment) in nude mice xenografted with T24 cells. Taken together, these results indicate cantharidin induced human bladder cancer cell apoptosis through a calcium/PKC-regulated ER stress pathway. These findings suggest that cantharidin may be a novel and potential anticancer agent targeting on bladder cancer cells.

  14. Voltage-dependent mobilization of intracellular calcium in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M F

    1986-01-01

    In skeletal muscle calcium is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), an internal organelle, in response to changes in the voltage across the transverse tubule (T-tubule) membrane, an external membrane system that is distinct from the SR but in close proximity to it. For T-tubule voltage changes within the physiological range, calcium release can be turned on or off on a time scale of milliseconds. The control of calcium release from the SR appears to involve at least three functional components: a voltage sensor in the T-tubule membrane, a calcium channel in the SR, and a mechanism for coupling the voltage sensor to the channel. Movement of charged or dipolar molecules within the T-tubule membrane is thought to serve as the voltage sensor. Such intramembrane charge movement (Q) can be monitored electrically and can be compared with the rate of calcium release from the SR. Calcium release is calculated from cytosolic calcium transients measured with a metallochromic indicator. Comparison of Q and the rate of release in the same isolated muscle fibre indicates that this rate is directly proportional to the amount of charge displaced in excess of a 'threshold' amount. The nature of the coupling mechanism between T-tubules and SR remains to be established but present observations impose some restrictions on possible mechanisms.

  15. Minimal model for calcium alternans due to SR release refractoriness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalapiedra, Inma R.; Alvarez-Lacalle, Enrique; Peñaranda, Angelina; Echebarria, Blas

    2017-09-01

    In the heart, rapid pacing rates may induce alternations in the strength of cardiac contraction, termed pulsus alternans. Often, this is due to an instability in the dynamics of the intracellular calcium concentration, whose transients become larger and smaller at consecutive beats. This alternation has been linked experimentally and theoretically to two different mechanisms: an instability due to (1) a strong dependence of calcium release on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) load, together with a slow calcium reuptake into the SR or (2) to SR release refractoriness, due to a slow recovery of the ryanodine receptors (RyR2) from inactivation. The relationship between calcium alternans and refractoriness of the RyR2 has been more elusive than the corresponding SR Ca load mechanism. To study the former, we reduce a general calcium model, which mimics the deterministic evolution of a calcium release unit, to its most basic elements. We show that calcium alternans can be understood using a simple nonlinear equation for calcium concentration at the dyadic space, coupled to a relaxation equation for the number of recovered RyR2s. Depending on the number of RyR2s that are recovered at the beginning of a stimulation, the increase in calcium concentration may pass, or not, over an excitability threshold that limits the occurrence of a large calcium transient. When the recovery of the RyR2 is slow, this produces naturally a period doubling bifurcation, resulting in calcium alternans. We then study the effects of inactivation, calcium diffusion, and release conductance for the onset of alternans. We find that the development of alternans requires a well-defined value of diffusion while it is less sensitive to the values of inactivation or release conductance.

  16. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turn to calcium-fortified (or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look for calcium-fortified orange juice, soy or rice milk, breads, and cereal. Beans. You can get decent ...

  17. Association of the Igamma and Idelta charge movement with calcium release in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chiu Shuen

    2005-02-01

    Charge movement and calcium transient were measured simultaneously in stretched frog cut twitch fibers under voltage clamp, with the internal solution containing 20 mM EGTA plus added calcium and antipyrylazo III. When the nominal free [Ca2+]i was 10 nM, the shape of the broad I(gamma) hump in the ON segments of charge movement traces remained invariant when the calcium release rate was greatly diminished. When the nominal free [Ca2+]i was 50 nM, which was close to the physiological level, the I(gamma) humps were accelerated and a slow calcium-dependent I(delta) component (or state) was generated. The peak of ON I(delta) synchronized perfectly with the peak of the calcium release rate whereas the slow decay of ON I(delta) followed the same time course as the decay of calcium release rate. Suppression of calcium release by TMB-8 reduced the amount of Q(delta) concomitantly but not completely, and the effects were partially reversible. The same simultaneous suppression effects were achieved by depleting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium store with repetitive stimulation. The results suggest that the mobility of Q(delta) needs to be primed by a physiological level of resting myoplasmic Ca2+. Once the priming is completed, more I(delta) is mobilized by the released Ca2+ during depolarization.

  18. The sarcolipin-bound calcium pump stabilizes calcium sites exposed to the cytoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Bublitz, Maike; Karlsen, Jesper Lykkegaard

    2013-01-01

    The contraction and relaxation of muscle cells is controlled by the successive rise and fall of cytosolic Ca(2+), initiated by the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and terminated by re-sequestration of Ca(2+) into the sarcoplasmic reticulum as the main mechanism of Ca(2+) removal....... Re-sequestration requires active transport and is catalysed by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), which has a key role in defining the contractile properties of skeletal and heart muscle tissue. The activity of SERCA is regulated by two small, homologous membrane proteins called...... report the crystal structure of rabbit SERCA1a (also known as ATP2A1) in complex with SLN at 3.1 Å resolution. The regulatory SLN traps the Ca(2+)-ATPase in a previously undescribed E1 state, with exposure of the Ca(2+) sites through an open cytoplasmic pathway stabilized by Mg(2+). The structure...

  19. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  20. Effects of chronic administration of clenbuterol on contractile properties and calcium homeostasis in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Sirvent

    Full Text Available Clenbuterol, a β2-agonist, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a shift from slow-oxidative to fast-glycolytic muscle fiber type profile. However, the cellular mechanisms of the effects of chronic clenbuterol administration on skeletal muscle are not completely understood. As the intracellular Ca2+ concentration must be finely regulated in many cellular processes, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on force, fatigue, intracellular calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in fast-twitch skeletal muscles (the extensor digitorum longus, EDL, muscle, as they are more sensitive to clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were chronically treated with 4 mg.kg-1 clenbuterol or saline vehicle (controls for 21 days. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, Ca2+-transient amplitude and Ca2+ spark properties. EDL muscles from clenbuterol-treated animals displayed hypertrophy, a shift from slow to fast fiber type profile and increased absolute force, while the relative force remained unchanged and resistance to fatigue decreased compared to control muscles from rats treated with saline vehicle. Compared to control animals, clenbuterol treatment decreased Ca2+-transient amplitude, Ca2+ spark amplitude and frequency and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load was markedly reduced. Conversely, calpain activity was increased by clenbuterol chronic treatment. These results indicate that chronic treatment with clenbuterol impairs Ca2+ homeostasis and this could contribute to the remodeling and functional impairment of fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

  1. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from dietary supplements are linked to a greater risk of kidney stones, especially among older adults. But calcium from foods does not appear to cause kidney stones. For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have ...

  2. Calcium signalling silencing in atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiser, Maura

    2017-06-15

    Subcellular calcium signalling silencing is a novel and distinct cellular and molecular adaptive response to rapid cardiac activation. Calcium signalling silencing develops during short-term sustained rapid atrial activation as seen clinically during paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF). It is the first 'anti-arrhythmic' adaptive response in the setting of AF and appears to counteract the maladaptive changes that lead to intracellular Ca(2+) signalling instability and Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity. Calcium signalling silencing results in a failed propagation of the [Ca(2+) ]i signal to the myocyte centre both in patients with AF and in a rabbit model. This adaptive mechanism leads to a substantial reduction in the expression levels of calcium release channels (ryanodine receptors, RyR2) in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks and arrhythmogenic Ca(2+) waves remains low. Less Ca(2+) release per [Ca(2+) ]i transient, increased fast Ca(2+) buffering strength, shortened action potentials and reduced L-type Ca(2+) current contribute to a substantial reduction of intracellular [Na(+) ]. These features of Ca(2+) signalling silencing are distinct and in contrast to the changes attributed to Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity. Some features of Ca(2+) signalling silencing prevail in human AF suggesting that the Ca(2+) signalling 'phenotype' in AF is a sum of Ca(2+) stabilizing (Ca(2+) signalling silencing) and Ca(2+) destabilizing (arrhythmogenic unstable Ca(2+) signalling) factors. Calcium signalling silencing is a part of the mechanisms that contribute to the natural progression of AF and may limit the role of Ca(2+) -based arrhythmogenicity after the onset of AF. © 2017 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  3. Induction of cell differentiation activates transcription of the Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum calcium-ATPase 3 gene (ATP2A3) in gastric and colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Peredo, Lucía; Rodríguez, Gabriela; Zarain-Herzberg, Angel

    2017-02-01

    The Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ -ATPases (SERCAs), pump Ca2+ into the endoplasmic reticulum lumen modulating cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations to regulate various cellular processes including cell growth. Previous studies have reported a downregulation of SERCA3 protein expression in gastric and colon cancer cell lines and showed that in vitro cell differentiation increases its expression. However, little is known about the transcriptional mechanisms and transcription factors that regulate SERCA3 expression in epithelial cancer cells. In this work, we demonstrate that SERCA3 mRNA is upregulated up to 45-fold in two epithelial cancer cell lines, KATO-III and Caco-2, induced to differentiate with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and by cell confluence, respectively. To evaluate the transcriptional elements responding to the differentiation stimuli, we cloned the human ATP2A3 promoter, generated deletion constructs and transfected them into KATO-III cells. Basal and differentiation responsive DNA elements were located by functional analysis within the first -135 bp of the promoter region. Using site-directed mutagenesis and DNA-protein binding assays we found that Sp1, Sp3, and Klf-4 transcription factors bind to ATP2A3 proximal promoter elements and regulate basal gene expression. We showed that these factors participated in the increase of ATP2A3 expression during cancer cell differentiation. This study provides evidence for the first time that Sp1, Sp3, and Klf-4 transcriptionally modulate the expression of SERCA3 during induction of epithelial cancer cell differentiation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of caffeine on intramembrane charge movement and calcium transients in cut skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L; Szücs, G

    1983-08-01

    had equal but smaller peak amplitudes, shorter latency times and the same magnitude of voltage-independent rate coefficients for the declining phase as in the control solution.9. The twitch potentiating effect of caffeine can be explained by its facilitating calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, while the re-uptake rate is not modified. The apparent inhibition of re-uptake can be related to the enhanced release of calcium due to caffeine effect. Due to the sensitizing effect of caffeine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane, smaller amounts of charge are needed to reach the contraction threshold than without caffeine.

  5. The calcium binding protein ALG-2 binds and stabilizes Scotin, a p53-inducible gene product localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draeby, Ingrid; Woods, Yvonne L; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand

    2007-01-01

    ALG-2 (apoptosis linked gene 2 product) is a calcium binding protein for which no clear cellular function has been established. In this study we identified Scotin as a novel ALG-2 target protein containing 6 PXY and 4 PYP repeats, earlier identified in the ALG-2 binding regions of AIP1/ALIX and TSG...

  6. Calcium homeostasis is altered in skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats: cytofluorimetric and gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liantonio, Antonella; Camerino, Giulia M; Scaramuzzi, Antonia; Cannone, Maria; Pierno, Sabata; De Bellis, Michela; Conte, Elena; Fraysse, Bodvael; Tricarico, Domenico; Conte Camerino, Diana

    2014-10-01

    Hypertension is often associated with skeletal muscle pathological conditions related to function and metabolism. The mechanisms underlying the development of these pathological conditions remain undefined. Because calcium homeostasis is a biomarker of muscle function, we assessed whether it is altered in hypertensive muscles. We measured resting intracellular calcium and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibers from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) by cytofluorimetric technique and determined the expression of SOCE gene machinery by real-time PCR. Hypertension caused a phenotype-dependent dysregulation of calcium homeostasis; the resting intracellular calcium of extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of SHRs were differently altered with respect to the related muscle of normotensive animals. In addition, soleus muscles of SHR showed reduced activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and decreased sarcolemmal calcium permeability at rest and after SOCE activation. Accordingly, we found an alteration of the expression levels of some SOCE components, such as stromal interaction molecule 1, calcium release-activated calcium modulator 1, and transient receptor potential canonical 1. The hypertension-induced alterations of calcium homeostasis in the soleus muscle of SHRs occurred with changes of some functional outcomes as excitability and resting chloride conductance. We provide suitable targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at counterbalancing muscle performance decline in hypertension, and propose the reported calcium-dependent parameters as indexes to predict how the antihypertensive drugs could influence muscle function. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An exposed carboxyl group on sialic acid is essential for gangliosides to inhibit calcium uptake via the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase: relevance to gangliosidoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Luba; Li, Su-Chen; Li, Yu-Teh; Futerman, Anthony H

    2008-01-01

    We previously observed that gangliosides GM2, GM1, and GM3 inhibit Ca2+-uptake via the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) in neurons and in brain microsomes. We now systematically examine the effect of various gangliosides and their analogs on Ca2+-uptake via SERCA and demonstrate that an exposed carboxyl group on the ganglioside sialic acid residue is required for inhibition. Thus, asialo-GM2 and asialo-GM1 have no inhibitory effect, and modifications of the carboxyl group of GM1 and GM2 into a hydroxymethyl residue (CH2OH), a methyl ester (COOCH3) or a taurine-conjugated amide (CONHCH2CH2SO3H) drastically diminish their inhibitory activities. We also demonstrate that the saccharides must be attached to a ceramide backbone in order to inhibit SERCA as the ceramide-free ganglioside saccharides only inhibit SERCA to a minimal extent. Finally, we attempted to use the ceramide-free ganglioside saccharides to antagonize the effects of the gangliosides on SERCA; although some reversal was observed, the inhibitory effects of the gangliosides were not completely abolished.

  8. C9orf72 Hexanucleotide Expansions Are Associated with Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis and Stress Granule Formation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell‐Derived Neurons from Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafinca, Ruxandra; Scaber, Jakub; Ababneh, Nida'a; Lalic, Tatjana; Weir, Gregory; Christian, Helen; Vowles, Jane; Douglas, Andrew G.L.; Fletcher‐Jones, Alexandra; Browne, Cathy; Nakanishi, Mahito; Turner, Martin R.; Wade‐Martins, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract An expanded hexanucleotide repeat in a noncoding region of the C9orf72 gene is a major cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accounting for up to 40% of familial cases and 7% of sporadic ALS in European populations. We have generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts of patients carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions, differentiated these to functional motor and cortical neurons, and performed an extensive phenotypic characterization. In C9orf72 iPSC‐derived motor neurons, decreased cell survival is correlated with dysfunction in Ca2+ homeostasis, reduced levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl‐2, increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, C9orf72 motor neurons, and also cortical neurons, show evidence of abnormal protein aggregation and stress granule formation. This study is an extensive characterization of iPSC‐derived motor neurons as cellular models of ALS carrying C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeats, which describes a novel pathogenic link between C9orf72 mutations, dysregulation of calcium signaling, and altered proteostasis and provides a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of ALS and the related neurodegenerative disease frontotemporal dementia. Stem Cells 2016;34:2063–2078 PMID:27097283

  9. Differential effects of thapsigargin analogues on apoptosis of prostate cancer cells: complex regulation by intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Charlotte; Vanden Abeele, Fabien; Sehgal, Pankaj; Olesen, Claus; Junker, Steffen; Christensen, Søren B; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Møller, Jesper V

    2013-11-01

    The inhibition of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) by thapsigargin (Tg) and Tg-type analogues is considered to trigger cell death by activation of apoptotic pathways. Some of these analogues may be useful as antineoplastic agents after appropriate targeting as peptide conjugated prodrugs to cancer cells. With this in mind, this study evaluates the effect on LNCaP androgen-sensitive cancer cells of thapsigargin substituted with 12-aminododecanoyl linkers and Leu (Leu-8ADT), aspartate (Asp-8ADT) or Boc-8ADT. Our results show that both Leu-8ADT and Asp-8ADT result in rapid ER calcium depletion and an influx of calcium across the plasma membrane by activation of store-operated calcium entry. By contrast, ER Ca(2+) depletion by Boc-8ADT is a very slow process that does not perceptibly increase cytosolic Ca(2+) and activate store-operated calcium entry, because the inhibition of SERCA with this compound is very slow. Nevertheless, we find that Boc-8ADT is a more efficient inducer of apoptosis than both Tg and Leu-8ADT. Compared with Tg and the other analogues, apoptosis induced by Asp-8ADT is very modest, although this compound also activates store-operated calcium entry and at high concentrations (1 μm) causes severe morphological changes, reflecting decreased cell viability. We conclude that many factors need to be considered for optimization of these compounds in antineoplastic drug design. Among these ER stress induced by Ca(2+) endoplasmic reticulum mobilization seems particularly important, whereas the early cytosolic increase of Ca(2+) concentration preceding the executive phase of apoptosis appears to be of no, or little, consequence for a subsequent apoptotic effect. © 2013 FEBS.

  10. Inhibitors of arachidonate-regulated calcium channel signaling suppress triggered activity induced by the late sodium current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolkowicz, Paul; Umeda, Patrick K; Sharifov, Oleg F; White, C Roger; Huang, Jian; Mahtani, Harry; Urthaler, Ferdinand

    2014-02-05

    Disturbances in myocyte calcium homeostasis are hypothesized to be one cause for cardiac arrhythmia. The full development of this hypothesis requires (i) the identification of all sources of arrhythmogenic calcium and (ii) an understanding of the mechanism(s) through which calcium initiates arrhythmia. To these ends we superfused rat left atria with the late sodium current activator type II Anemonia sulcata toxin (ATXII). This toxin prolonged atrial action potentials, induced early afterdepolarization, and provoked triggered activity. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-93 (N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphon-amide) suppressed ATXII triggered activity but its inactive congener KN-92 (2-[N-(4-methoxy benzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine) did not. Neither drug affected normal atrial contractility. Calcium entry via L-type channels or calcium leakage from sarcoplasmic reticulum stores are not critical for this type of ectopy as neither verapamil ((RS)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-5-{[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)ethyl]-(methyl)amino}-2-prop-2-ylpentanenitrile) nor ryanodine affected ATXII triggered activity. By contrast, inhibitors of the voltage independent arachidonate-regulated calcium (ARC) channel and the store-operated calcium channel specifically suppressed ATXII triggered activity without normalizing action potentials or affecting atrial contractility. Inhibitors of cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 also suppressed triggered activity suggesting that this lipase, which generates free arachidonate, plays a key role in ATXII ectopy. Thus, increased left atrial late sodium current appears to activate atrial Orai-linked ARC and store operated calcium channels, and these voltage-independent channels may be unexpected sources for the arrhythmogenic calcium that underlies triggered activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum content of releasable Ca2+ in rat soleus muscle fibres after eccentric contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J S; Sahlin, K; Ørtenblad, N

    2007-01-01

    % and 16/100 Hz force ratio by 33%. The eSRCa2+ in fibres from non-stimulated muscles was 45 +/- 5% of the maximal loading capacity. After EC, eSRCa2+ per fibre CSA decreased by 38% (P = 0.05), and the maximal capacity of SR Ca2+ loading was depressed by 32%. There were no effects of EC on either...

  12. Impaired sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release rate after fatiguing stimulation in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Sjøgaard, G; Madsen, Klavs

    2000-01-01

    to 66% that persisted for 1 h, followed by a gradual recovery to 87% of prefatigue release rate at 3 h recovery. Tetanic force and rate of force development (+dF/dt) and relaxation (-dF/dt) were depressed by approximately 80% after stimulation. Recovery occurred in two phases: an initial phase, in which...

  13. Role of glycogen availability in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ kinetics in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is stored as glycogen in skeletal muscle. The importance of glycogen as a fuel during exercise has been recognized since the 1960s; however, little is known about the precise mechanism that relates skeletal muscle glycogen to muscle fatigue. We show that low muscle glycogen is associated...... with an impairment of muscle ability to release Ca(2+), which is an important signal in the muscle activation. Thus, depletion of glycogen during prolonged, exhausting exercise may contribute to muscle fatigue by causing decreased Ca(2+) release inside the muscle. These data provide indications of a signal...

  14. Temperature dependence of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemma in the ventricle of catfish (Clarias gariepinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sabry Abu-Amra

    2015-10-01

    The sarcolemmal Ca2+ contribution of activator Ca2+ was greater at a test temperature of 30 °C as assessed by verapamil. Whereas the SR-Ca2+ contribution was higher at 20 and 30 °C and a frequency rate of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz as assessed by caffeine and adrenaline, respectively. Bradykinin potentiating factor (BPF7 which was isolated from jelly fish (Cassiopea andromeda decreased the cardiac force developed at a frequency rate of 0.2 Hz and a temperature of 20 °C, whereas it increased the force developed at frequency rates of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz at 30 °C. These results indicate that BPF7 may act like verapamil in reducing the cardiac force through blocking the sarcolemmal Ca2+ channels at low temperature and like adrenaline in an increase of the cardiac force developed at warm temperature and the high frequency rate through stimulation of SR-Ca2+ activator. Therefore, this study indicates that the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx and the SR-Ca2+ release contributors of activator Ca2+ for cardiac force development in the catfish heart were significantly greater at warm temperature and at the pacing frequency rates of 0.2 and 0.4 Hz as assessed by verapamil, adrenaline, caffeine and BPF7. However, the relative contribution of the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx in the development of cardiac force in the catfish heart was greater than that of SR-Ca2+ release.

  15. Is the Ca2+-ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum also a heat pump?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelstrup, Signe; de Meis, Leopoldo; Bedeaux, Dick; Simon, Jean-Marc

    2008-11-01

    We calculate, using the first law of thermodynamics, the membrane heat fluxes during active transport of Ca(2+) in the Ca(2+)-ATPase in leaky and intact vesicles, during ATP hydrolysis or synthesis conditions. The results show that the vesicle interior may cool down during hydrolysis and Ca(2+)-uptake, and heat up during ATP synthesis and Ca(2+)-efflux. The heat flux varies with the SERCA isoform. Electroneutral processes and rapid equilibration of water were assumed. The results are consistent with the second law of thermodynamics for the overall processes. The expression for the heat flux and experimental data, show that important contributions come from the enthalpy of hydrolysis for the medium in question, and from proton transport between the vesicle interior and exterior. The analysis give quantitative support to earlier proposals that certain, but not all, Ca(2+)-ATPases, not only act as Ca(2+)-pumps, but also as heat pumps. It can thus help explain why SERCA 1 type enzymes dominate in tissues where thermal regulation is important, while SERCA 2 type enzymes, with their lower activity and better ability to use the energy from the reaction to pump ions, dominate in tissues where this is not an issue.

  16. Sulfur dioxide restores calcium homeostasis disturbance in rat with isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanshan; Du, Junbao; Liang, Yinfang; Zhang, Rongyuan; Tang, Chaoshu; Jin, Hongfang

    2012-09-01

    sulfur dioxide (SO₂) could relieve isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial injury, while the mechanism is unclear. This study aims to explore whether the protective effect of SO₂ on ISO-induced myocardial injury was mediated by the restoration of calcium homeostasis disturbance in cardiomyocyte. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: ISO group, ISO+SO₂ group, control group and SO₂ group. Content of Ca²⁺ in H9c2 cells was assayed using confocal microscope, and cardiac function parameters were measured by echocardiography. Plasma biochemical values and myocardial ultra-structure changes were measured. Meanwhile, the activity, protein and gene levels of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺ ATPase (SERCA), and protein and phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLN) were detected. We found SO₂ derivatives could restore the decreased cardiac function, the abnormal lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, potassium, calcium, blood urea nitrogen and the damaged myocardial ultra-structure in rats, and regulate the increased Ca²⁺ content in H9c2 induced by ISO. In addition, compared with ISO group, the decreased activities, protein and mRNA level of SERCA, as well as the decreased protein phosphorylation level of PLN in myocardial tissues were increased in ISO+SO₂ group. SO₂ derivatives might relieve calcium overload in association with the upregulating expression of SERCA and p-PLN/PLN by myocardial tissues in rats with ISO-induced myocardial injury.

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Erkan

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the world has seen an alarming increase in obesity and closely associated with insulin resistance which is a state of low-grade inflammation, the latter characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines in blood and tissues. A shift in energy balance alters systemic metabolic regulation and the important role that chronic inflammation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) play in this process.Why obesity is so closely associated with insulin resistance and inflammation is not understood well. This suggests that there are probably other causes for obesity-related insulin resistance and inflammation. One of these appears to be endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.The ER is a vast membranous network responsible for the trafficking of a wide range of proteins and plays a central role in integrating multiple metabolic signals critical in cellular homeostasis. Conditions that may trigger unfolded protein response activation include increased protein synthesis, the presence of mutant or misfolded proteins, inhibition of protein glycosylation, imbalance of ER calcium levels, glucose and energy deprivation, hypoxia, pathogens or pathogen-associated components and toxins. Thus, characterizing the mechanisms contributing to obesity and identifying potential targets for its prevention and treatment will have a great impact on the control of associated conditions, particularly T2D.

  18. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodvaël Fraysse

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2, a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2R465W model. Heterozygous (HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice progressively develop muscle atrophy, impairment of contractile properties, histopathological abnormalities, and elevated cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, we aim at better characterizing the calcium homeostasis impairment in extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus muscles from adult HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice. We demonstrate abnormal contractile properties and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL but not soleus muscles showing that calcium impairment is correlated with muscle weakness and might be a determinant factor of the spatial muscle involvement. In addition, the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL muscles is associated with an increased sarcolemmal permeability to Ca2+ and releasable Ca2+ content from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, amplitude and kinetics characteristics of the calcium transient appear unchanged. This suggests that calcium defect is probably not a primary cause of decreased force generation by compromised sarcomere shortening but may be involved in long-term deleterious consequences on muscle physiology. Our results highlight the first pathomechanism which may explain the spatial muscle involvement occurring in DNM2-related CNM and open the way toward development of a therapeutic approach to normalize calcium content.

  19. Mitochondrial hyperfusion during oxidative stress is coupled to a dysregulation in calcium handling within a C2C12 cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calum J Redpath

    Full Text Available Atrial Fibrillation is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia worldwide harming millions of people every year. Atrial Fibrillation (AF abruptly induces rapid conduction between atrial myocytes which is associated with oxidative stress and abnormal calcium handling. Unfortunately this new equilibrium promotes perpetuation of the arrhythmia. Recently, in addition to being the major source of oxidative stress within cells, mitochondria have been observed to fuse, forming mitochondrial networks and attach to intracellular calcium stores in response to cellular stress. We sought to identify a potential role for rapid stimulation, oxidative stress and mitochondrial hyperfusion in acute changes to myocyte calcium handling. In addition we hoped to link altered calcium handling to increased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR-mitochondrial contacts, the so-called mitochondrial associated membrane (MAM. We selected the C2C12 murine myotube model as it has previously been successfully used to investigate mitochondrial dynamics and has a myofibrillar system similar to atrial myocytes. We observed that rapid stimulation of C2C12 cells resulted in mitochondrial hyperfusion and increased mitochondrial colocalisation with calcium stores. Inhibition of mitochondrial fission by transfection of mutant DRP1K38E resulted in similar effects on mitochondrial fusion, SR colocalisation and altered calcium handling. Interestingly the effects of 'forced fusion' were reversed by co-incubation with the reducing agent N-Acetyl cysteine (NAC. Subsequently we demonstrated that oxidative stress resulted in similar reversible increases in mitochondrial fusion, SR-colocalisation and altered calcium handling. Finally, we believe we have identified that myocyte calcium handling is reliant on baseline levels of reactive oxygen species as co-incubation with NAC both reversed and retarded myocyte response to caffeine induced calcium release and re-uptake. Based on these results we

  20. Ractopamine-induced changes in sarcoplasmic proteome profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ractopamine is a beta-adrenergic agonist that increases leanness and carcass weight in finishing pigs. Our previous study observed that dietary ractopamine increased the abundance of several glycolytic enzymes in the sarcoplasmic proteome of post-rigor pork longissimus thoracis muscle. Pork semimembranosus is an ...

  1. The disorders of the calcium release unit of skeletal muscles: what have we learned from mouse models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canato, Marta; Capitanio, Paola; Reggiani, Carlo; Cancellara, Lina

    2015-02-01

    Calcium storage, release, and reuptake are essential for normal physiological function of muscle. Several human skeletal muscle disorders can arise from dysfunction in the control and coordination of these three critical processes. The release from the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum stores (SR) is handled by a multiprotein complex called Calcium Release Unit and composed of DiHydroPyridine Receptor or DHPR, Ryanodine Receptor or RYR, Calsequestrin or CASQ, junctin, Triadin, Junctophilin and Mitsugumin 29. Malignant hyperthermia (MH), Central Core Disease (CCD), Exertional/environmental Heat Stroke (EHS) and Multiminicore disease (MmD) are inherited disorders of calcium homeostasis in skeletal muscles directly related to mutations of genes coding for proteins of the CRU, primarily ryanodine receptor (RYR1). To understand the pathophysiology of MH and CCD, four murine lines carrying point mutations of human RYR1 have been developed: Y524S, R163C, I4898T and T4826I. Mice carrying those mutations show a phenotype with the traits of MH and/or CCD. Interestingly, also ablation of skeletal muscle calsequestrin (CASQ1) leads to a phenotype with MH-like lethal episodes in response to halothane and heat stress and development of central cores. In this review, we aim to describe the murine lines with RYR mutations or CASQ ablation, which show a phenotype similar to human MH or CCD, to underline their specific phenotypes and their differences and to discuss their contribution to the understanding of the pathophysiology of the disorders and the development of therapeutic strategies.

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeshan, Hafiz Maher Ali; Lee, Geum Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO)-1, glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disuphide (GSSG), NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR), and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases. PMID:26950115

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Maher Ali Zeeshan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO-1, glutathione (GSH/glutathione disuphide (GSSG, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4, NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR, and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases.

  4. Sensory Neurons Derived from Diabetic Rats Have Diminished Internal Ca2+ Stores Linked to Impaired Re-uptake by the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zherebitskaya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal symmetrical sensory neuropathy in diabetes involves the dying back of axons, and the pathology equates with axonal dystrophy generated under conditions of aberrant Ca2+ signalling. Previous work has described abnormalities in Ca2+ homoeostasis in sensory and dorsal horn neurons acutely isolated from diabetic rodents. We extended this work by testing the hypothesis that sensory neurons exposed to long-term Type 1 diabetes in vivo would exhibit abnormal axonal Ca2+ homoeostasis and focused on the role of SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. DRG (dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons from age-matched normal and 3–5-month-old STZ (streptozotocin-diabetic rats (an experimental model of Type 1 diabetes were cultured. At 1–2 days in vitro an array of parameters were measured to investigate Ca2+ homoeostasis including (i axonal levels of intracellular Ca2+, (ii Ca2+ uptake by the ER (endoplasmic reticulum, (iii assessment of Ca2+ signalling following a long-term thapsigargin-induced blockade of SERCA and (iv determination of expression of ER mass and stress markers using immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. KCl- and caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients in axons were 2-fold lower in cultures of diabetic neurons compared with normal neurons indicative of reduced ER calcium loading. The rate of uptake of Ca2+ into the ER was reduced by 2-fold (P<0.05 in diabetic neurons, while markers for ER mass and ER stress were unchanged. Abnormalities in Ca2+ homoeostasis in diabetic neurons could be mimicked via long-term inhibition of SERCA in normal neurons. In summary, axons of neurons from diabetic rats exhibited aberrant Ca2+ homoeostasis possibly triggered by suboptimal SERCA activity that could contribute to the distal axonopathy observed in diabetes.

  5. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ryanodine receptor/calcium release channel PKA phosphorylation: A critical mediator of heart failure progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrens, Xander H. T.; Lehnart, Stephan E.; Reiken, Steven; Vest, John A.; Wronska, Anetta; Marks, Andrew R.

    2006-01-01

    Defective regulation of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2)/calcium release channel, required for excitation-contraction coupling in the heart, has been linked to cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. For example, diastolic calcium “leak” via RyR2 channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum has been identified as an important factor contributing to impaired contractility in heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias that cause sudden cardiac death. In patients with heart failure, chronic activation of the “fight or flight” stress response leads to protein kinase A (PKA) hyperphosphorylation of RyR2 at Ser-2808. PKA phosphorylation of RyR2 Ser-2808 reduces the binding affinity of the channel-stabilizing subunit calstabin2, resulting in leaky RyR2 channels. We developed RyR2-S2808A mice to determine whether Ser-2808 is the functional PKA phosphorylation site on RyR2. Furthermore, mice in which the RyR2 channel cannot be PKA phosphorylated were relatively protected against the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction. Taken together, these data show that PKA phosphorylation of Ser-2808 on the RyR2 channel appears to be a critical mediator of progressive cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction. PMID:16407108

  7. Bioactive electrospun fish sarcoplasmic proteins as a drug delivery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, Karen; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    fiberswere insoluble in water. However, when exposed to proteolytic enzymes, the fibers were degraded. Thedegradation products of the FSP fibers proved to be inhibitors of the diabetes-related enzyme DPP-IV. TheFSP fibers may have biomedical applications, among others as a delivery system. To demonstrate......Nano-microfibers were made from cod (Gadus morhua) sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) (Mwconcentration. Interestingly, the FSP...

  8. Role of calcium influx through voltage-operated calcium channels and of calcium mobilization in the physiology of Schistosoma mansoni muscle contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça-Silva, D L; Novozhilova, E; Cobbett, P J R; Silva, C L M; Noël, F; Totten, M I J; Maule, A G; Day, T A

    2006-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that voltage-operated Ca2+ channels mediate an extracellular Ca2+ influx in muscle fibres from the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni and, along with Ca2+ mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, contribute to muscle contraction. Indeed, whole-cell voltage clamp revealed voltage-gated inward currents carried by divalent ions with a peak current elicited by steps to +20 mV (from a holding potential of -70 mV). Depolarization of the fibres by elevated extracellular K+ elicited contractions that were completely dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and inhibited by nicardipine (half inhibition at 4.1 microM). However these contractions were not very sensitive to other classical blockers of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, indicating that the schistosome muscle channels have an atypical pharmacology when compared to their mammalian counterparts. Futhermore, the contraction induced by 5 mM caffeine was inhibited after depletion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum either with thapsigargin (10 microM) or ryanodine (10 microM). These data suggest that voltage-operated Ca2+ channels do contribute to S. mansoni contraction as does the mobilization of stored Ca2+, despite the small volume of sarcoplasmic reticulum in schistosome smooth muscles.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER–mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) protects against pressure overload-induced heart failure and lung remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Kwak, Dongmin; Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Wang, Huan; Wei, Yidong; Cavener, Douglas R; Hu, Xinli; Hall, Jennifer; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2014-10-01

    Studies have reported that development of congestive heart failure is associated with increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Double stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is a major transducer of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and directly phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, resulting in translational attenuation. However, the physiological effect of PERK on congestive heart failure development is unknown. To study the effect of PERK on ventricular structure and function, we generated inducible cardiac-specific PERK knockout mice. Under unstressed conditions, cardiac PERK knockout had no effect on left ventricular mass, or its ratio to body weight, cardiomyocyte size, fibrosis, or left ventricular function. However, in response to chronic transverse aortic constriction, PERK knockout mice exhibited decreased ejection fraction, increased left ventricular fibrosis, enhanced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and exacerbated lung remodeling in comparison with wild-type mice. PERK knockout also dramatically attenuated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in response to aortic constriction. Our findings suggest that PERK is required to protect the heart from pressure overload-induced congestive heart failure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Alpha 1B-receptors and intracellular calcium mediate sympathetic nerve induced constriction of rat irideal blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, D J; Hill, C E

    1994-12-15

    The present study has investigated the receptors involved in the non-cholinergic nerve mediated constriction of the larger blood vessels (30-50 microns) within the rat iris. This response was blocked by the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, benextramine (10(5) M). Furthermore, the response was more sensitive to blockade by the alpha 1 antagonist, prazosin (IC50 9 x 10(-10) M), than to blockade by the alpha 2 antagonist, yohimbine (IC50 2 x 10(-7) M), or the adrenergic antagonist, WB4101 (IC50 2 x 10(-8) M), and was abolished by chloroethylclonidine (10(-5) M). These results suggest the involvement of alpha 1B-adrenoceptors. The nerve mediated constriction was not blocked by the voltage-dependent calcium channel blocking drugs, nifedipine (10(-6) M), verapamil (10(-6) M) or diltiazem (10(-6) M), but was completely abolished by the intracellular calcium mobilizer, caffeine (10(-3) M), supporting the hypothesis that alpha 1B-adrenoceptors are activated following nerve stimulation. Dantrolene (10(-4) M), which interferes with calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, reduced the nerve mediated constriction by 40% as did thapsigargin (2 x 10(-6) M), which inhibits the calcium ATPase responsible for uptake of calcium into intracellular stores. When influx of calcium was blocked by verapamil (10(-6) M), thapsigargin, but not dantrolene, completely abolished the response. Noradrenaline (10(-5) M) produced a vasoconstriction in the presence or absence of external calcium although the latter response was significantly smaller than the former. Vasoconstriction produced by a submaximal concentration of noradrenaline (10(-6) M), was completely prevented by pretreatment with chloroethylclonidine. The data indicate that noradrenaline released from sympathetic nerves causes a constriction of arterioles in the iris by activating alpha 1B-adrenoceptors and releasing calcium from dantrolene sensitive and insensitive intracellular stores, followed by inflow of calcium through

  12. Selectivity and permeation in calcium release channel of cardiac muscle: alkali metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D P; Xu, L; Tripathy, A; Meissner, G; Eisenberg, B

    1999-03-01

    Current was measured from single open channels of the calcium release channel (CRC) of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (over the range +/-180 mV) in pure and mixed solutions (e.g., biionic conditions) of the alkali metal ions Li+, K+, Na+, Rb+, Cs+, ranging in concentration from 25 mM to 2 M. The current-voltage (I-V) relations were analyzed by an extension of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) formulation of electrodiffusion, which includes local chemical interaction described by an offset in chemical potential, which likely reflects the difference in dehydration/solvation/rehydration energies in the entry/exit steps of permeation. The theory fits all of the data with few adjustable parameters: the diffusion coefficient of each ion species, the average effective charge distribution on the wall of the pore, and an offset in chemical potential for lithium and sodium ions. In particular, the theory explains the discrepancy between "selectivities" defined by conductance sequence and "selectivities" determined by the permeability ratios (i.e., reversal potentials) in biionic conditions. The extended PNP formulation seems to offer a successful combined treatment of selectivity and permeation. Conductance selectivity in this channel arises mostly from friction: different species of ions have different diffusion coefficients in the channel. Permeability selectivity of an ion is determined by its electrochemical potential gradient and local chemical interaction with the channel. Neither selectivity (in CRC) seems to involve different electrostatic interaction of different ions with the channel protein, even though the ions have widely varying diameters.

  13. Cell Death and Survival Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo-Sagua, R.; Rodriguez, A.E.; Kuzmicic, J.; Gutierrez, T.; Lopez-Crisosto, C.; Quiroga, C.; Díaz-Elizondo, J.; Chiong, M.; Gillette, T.G.; Rothermel, B.A.; Lavandero, S.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has a central role in biosynthesis of a variety of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria generate ATP, synthesize and process numerous metabolites, and are key regulators of cell death. The architectures of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria change continually via the process of membrane fusion, fission, elongation, degradation, and renewal. These structural changes correlate with important changes in organellar function. Both organelles are capable of moving along the cytoskeleton, thus changing their cellular distribution. Numerous studies have demonstrated coordination and communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. A focal point for these interactions is a zone of close contact between them known as the mitochondrial–associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), which serves as a signaling juncture that facilitates calcium and lipid transfer between organelles. Here we review the emerging data on how communication between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can modulate organelle function and determine cellular fate. PMID:23228132

  14. Calcium upregulation by percutaneous administration of gene therapy in patients with cardiac disease (CUPID 2) : a randomised, multinational, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenberg, Barry; Butler, Javed; Felker, G. Michael; Ponikowski, Piotr; Voors, Adriaan A.; Desai, Akshay S.; Barnard, Denise; Bouchard, Alain; Jaski, Brian; Lyon, Alexander R.; Pogoda, Janice M.; Rudy, Jeffrey J.; Zsebo, Krisztina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) activity is deficient in the failing heart. Correction of this abnormality by gene transfer might improve cardiac function. We aimed to investigate the clinical benefits and safety of gene therapy through infusion of

  15. Solution-blown nanofiber mats from fish sarcoplasmic protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sett, S.; Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; Yarin, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, solution-blowing was adopted to form nanofibers from fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSPs). Nanofiber mats containing different weight ratios (up to 90/10) of FSP in the FSP/nylon 6 blended nanofibers were formed from formic acid solutions, and compared to electrospun fibers made...... techniques were similar, but with some exceptions. The fiber diameter of the electrospun fibers was slightly smaller than those made using solution-blowing, however in both cases the fiber diameter increased with increasing FSP content. Interestingly, for uniform fibers the stretchability of the fibers...... that the production rate of solution-blowing was increased 30-fold in relation to electrospinning. Overall, this study reveals FSP as an interesting biopolymeric alternative to synthetic polymers, and the introduction of FSP to nylon 6 provides a composite with controlled properties....

  16. Islet secretory defect in insulin receptor substrate 1 null mice is linked with reduced calcium signaling and expression of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)-2b and -3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rohit N; Roper, Michael G; Dahlgren, Gabriella; Shih, David Q; Kauri, Lisa M; Peters, Jennifer L; Stoffel, Markus; Kennedy, Robert T

    2004-06-01

    Mice with deletion of insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 (IRS-1 knockout [KO] mice) show mild insulin resistance and defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and reduced insulin synthesis. To further define the role of IRS-1 in islet function, we examined the insulin secretory defect in the knockouts using freshly isolated islets and primary beta-cells. IRS-1 KO beta-cells exhibited a significantly shorter increase in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) than controls when briefly stimulated with glucose or glyceraldehyde and when l-arginine was used to potentiate the stimulatory effect of glucose. These changes were paralleled by a lower number of exocytotic events in the KO beta-cells in response to the same secretagogues, indicating reduced insulin secretion. Furthermore, the normal oscillations in intracellular Ca(2+) and O(2) consumption after glucose stimulation were dampened in freshly isolated KO islets. Semiquantitative RT-PCR showed a dramatically reduced islet expression of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA)-2b and -3 in the mutants. These data provide evidence that IRS-1 modulation of insulin secretion is associated with Ca(2+) signaling and expression of SERCA-2b and -3 genes in pancreatic islets and provides a direct link between insulin resistance and defective insulin secretion.

  17. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi Pan; Andrew Avila; Lauren Gollahon

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and...

  18. Herpesviral G protein-coupled receptors activate NFAT to induce tumor formation via inhibiting the SERCA calcium ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjie; He, Shanping; Wang, Yi; Brulois, Kevin; Lan, Ke; Jung, Jae U; Feng, Pinghui

    2015-03-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of proteins that transmit signal to regulate an array of fundamental biological processes. Viruses deploy diverse tactics to hijack and harness intracellular signaling events induced by GPCR. Herpesviruses encode multiple GPCR homologues that are implicated in viral pathogenesis. Cellular GPCRs are primarily regulated by their cognate ligands, while herpesviral GPCRs constitutively activate downstream signaling cascades, including the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. However, the roles of NFAT activation and mechanism thereof in viral GPCR tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here we report that GPCRs of human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (kGPCR) and cytomegalovirus (US28) shortcut NFAT activation by inhibiting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), which is necessary for viral GPCR tumorigenesis. Biochemical approaches, entailing pharmacological inhibitors and protein purification, demonstrate that viral GPCRs target SERCA2 to increase cytosolic calcium concentration. As such, NFAT activation induced by vGPCRs was exceedingly sensitive to cyclosporine A that targets calcineurin, but resistant to inhibition upstream of ER calcium release. Gene expression profiling identified a signature of NFAT activation in endothelial cells expressing viral GPCRs. The expression of NFAT-dependent genes was up-regulated in tumors derived from tva-kGPCR mouse and human KS. Employing recombinant kGPCR-deficient KSHV, we showed that kGPCR was critical for NFAT-dependent gene expression in KSHV lytic replication. Finally, cyclosporine A treatment diminished NFAT-dependent gene expression and tumor formation induced by viral GPCRs. These findings reveal essential roles of NFAT activation in viral GPCR tumorigenesis and a mechanism of "constitutive" NFAT activation by viral GPCRs.

  19. Herpesviral G protein-coupled receptors activate NFAT to induce tumor formation via inhibiting the SERCA calcium ATPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs constitute the largest family of proteins that transmit signal to regulate an array of fundamental biological processes. Viruses deploy diverse tactics to hijack and harness intracellular signaling events induced by GPCR. Herpesviruses encode multiple GPCR homologues that are implicated in viral pathogenesis. Cellular GPCRs are primarily regulated by their cognate ligands, while herpesviral GPCRs constitutively activate downstream signaling cascades, including the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT pathway. However, the roles of NFAT activation and mechanism thereof in viral GPCR tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here we report that GPCRs of human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (kGPCR and cytomegalovirus (US28 shortcut NFAT activation by inhibiting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA, which is necessary for viral GPCR tumorigenesis. Biochemical approaches, entailing pharmacological inhibitors and protein purification, demonstrate that viral GPCRs target SERCA2 to increase cytosolic calcium concentration. As such, NFAT activation induced by vGPCRs was exceedingly sensitive to cyclosporine A that targets calcineurin, but resistant to inhibition upstream of ER calcium release. Gene expression profiling identified a signature of NFAT activation in endothelial cells expressing viral GPCRs. The expression of NFAT-dependent genes was up-regulated in tumors derived from tva-kGPCR mouse and human KS. Employing recombinant kGPCR-deficient KSHV, we showed that kGPCR was critical for NFAT-dependent gene expression in KSHV lytic replication. Finally, cyclosporine A treatment diminished NFAT-dependent gene expression and tumor formation induced by viral GPCRs. These findings reveal essential roles of NFAT activation in viral GPCR tumorigenesis and a mechanism of "constitutive" NFAT activation by viral GPCRs.

  20. Paclitaxel induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells through different calcium--regulating mechanisms depending on external calcium conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-02-17

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an "Enhanced Calcium Efflux" mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel's stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis.

  1. Growth hormone secretagogues exert differential effects on skeletal muscle calcium homeostasis in male rats depending on the peptidyl/nonpeptidyl structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liantonio, Antonella; Gramegna, Gianluca; Carbonara, Giuseppe; Sblendorio, Valeriana Teresa; Pierno, Sabata; Fraysse, Bodvaël; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Rizzi, Laura; Torsello, Antonio; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2013-10-01

    The orexigenic and anabolic effects induced by ghrelin and the synthetic GH secretagogues (GHSs) are thought to positively contribute to therapeutic approaches and the adjunct treatment of a number of diseases associated with muscle wasting such as cachexia and sarcopenia. However, many questions about the potential utility and safety of GHSs in both therapy and skeletal muscle function remain unanswered. By using fura-2 cytofluorimetric technique, we determined the acute effects of ghrelin, as well as of peptidyl and nonpeptidyl synthetic GHSs on calcium homeostasis, a critical biomarker of muscle function, in isolated tendon-to-tendon male rat skeletal muscle fibers. The synthetic nonpeptidyl GHSs, but not peptidyl ghrelin and hexarelin, were able to significantly increase resting cytosolic calcium [Ca²⁺]i. The nonpeptidyl GHS-induced [Ca²⁺]i increase was independent of GHS-receptor 1a but was antagonized by both thapsigargin/caffeine and cyclosporine A, indicating the involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Evaluation of the effects of a pseudopeptidyl GHS and a nonpeptidyl antagonist of the GHS-receptor 1a together with a drug-modeling study suggest the conclusion that the lipophilic nonpeptidyl structure of the tested compounds is the key chemical feature crucial for the GHS-induced calcium alterations in the skeletal muscle. Thus, synthetic GHSs can have different effects on skeletal muscle fibers depending on their molecular structures. The calcium homeostasis dysregulation specifically induced by the nonpeptidyl GHSs used in this study could potentially counteract the beneficial effects associated with these drugs in the treatment of muscle wasting of cachexia- or other age-related disorders.

  2. Identification and characterization of calcium sparks in cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Qin Zhang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Ca2+ spark constitutes the elementary units of cardiac excitation-contraction (E-C coupling in mature cardiomyocytes. Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes are known to have electrophysiological properties similar to mature adult cardiomyocytes. However, it is unclear if they share similar calcium handling property. We hypothesized that Ca2+ sparks in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSCs-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs may display unique structural and functional properties than mature adult cardiomyocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ca2+ sparks in hiPSC-CMs were recorded with Ca2+ imaging assay with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Those sparks were stochastic with a tendency of repetitive occurrence at the same site. Nevertheless, the spatial-temporal properties of Ca2+ spark were analogous to that of adult CMs. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels by nifedipine caused a 61% reduction in calcium spark frequency without affecting amplitude of those sparks and magnitude of caffeine releasable sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca2+ content. In contrast, high extracellular Ca2+ and ryanodine increased the frequency, full width at half maximum (FWHM and full duration at half maximum (FDHM of spontaneous Ca2+ sparks. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, spontaneous Ca2+ sparks were detected in hiPSC-CMs. The Ca2+ sparks are predominately triggered by L-type Ca2+ channels mediated Ca2+ influx, which is comparable to sparks detected in adult ventricular myocytes in which cardiac E-C coupling was governed by a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR mechanism. However, focal repetitive sparks originated from the same intracellular organelle could reflect an immature status of the hiPSC-CMs.

  3. A key role for STIM1 in store operated calcium channel activation in airway smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Samantha E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of cytosolic calcium plays a key role in airway myocyte function. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ stores can modulate contractile responses, modulate proliferation and regulate synthetic activity. Influx of Ca2+ in non excitable smooth muscle is believed to be predominantly through store operated channels (SOC or receptor operated channels (ROC. Whereas agonists can activate both SOC and ROC in a range of smooth muscle types, the specific trigger for SOC activation is depletion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. The mechanism underlying SOC activation following depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores in smooth muscle has not been identified. Methods To investigate the roles of the STIM homologues in SOC activation in airway myocytes, specific siRNA sequences were utilised to target and selectively suppress both STIM1 and STIM2. Quantitative real time PCR was employed to assess the efficiency and the specificity of the siRNA mediated knockdown of mRNA. Activation of SOC was investigated by both whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology and a fluorescence based calcium assay. Results Transfection of 20 nM siRNA specific for STIM1 or 2 resulted in robust decreases (>70% of the relevant mRNA. siRNA targeted at STIM1 resulted in a reduction of SOC associated Ca2+ influx in response to store depletion by cyclopiazonic acid (60% or histamine but not bradykinin. siRNA to STIM2 had no effect on these responses. In addition STIM1 suppression resulted in a more or less complete abrogation of SOC associated inward currents assessed by whole cell patch clamp. Conclusion Here we show that STIM1 acts as a key signal for SOC activation following intracellular Ca2+ store depletion or following agonist stimulation with histamine in human airway myocytes. These are the first data demonstrating a role for STIM1 in a physiologically relevant, non-transformed endogenous expression cell model.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Karli; Malik, Bilal; Gray, Anna L; La Spada, Albert R; Hanna, Michael G; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked degenerative motor neuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine encoding CAG repeat of the androgen receptor gene. There is evidence implicating endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease, including polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and in motor neuron disease, where cellular stress disrupts functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to induction of the unfolded protein response. We examined whether endoplasmic reticulum stress is also involved in the pathogenesis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice that carry 100 pathogenic polyglutamine repeats in the androgen receptor, and develop a late-onset neuromuscular phenotype with motor neuron degeneration, were studied. We observed a disturbance in endoplasmic reticulum-associated calcium homeostasis in cultured embryonic motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice, which was accompanied by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress reduced the endoplasmic reticulum-associated cell death pathway. Examination of spinal cord motor neurons of pathogenic mice at different disease stages revealed elevated expression of markers for endoplasmic reticulum stress, confirming an increase in this stress response in vivo. Importantly, the most significant increase was detected presymptomatically, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play an early and possibly causal role in disease pathogenesis. Our results therefore indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway could potentially be a therapeutic target for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and related polyglutamine diseases. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  5. Activation of calcium-sensing receptor increases TRPC3 expression in rat cardiomyocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Shan-Li [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Sun, Ming-Rui [Department of Pharmacology, Qiqihaer Medical College, Qiqihaer 160001 (China); Li, Ting-Ting; Yin, Xin [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Xu, Chang-Qing [Department of Pathophysiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Sun, Yi-Hua, E-mail: syh200415@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China)

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) activation stimulates TRP channels. {yields} CaR promoted transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3) expression. {yields} Adult rat ventricular myocytes display capacitative calcium entry (CCE), which was operated by TRPCs. {yields} TRPC channels activation induced by CaR activator sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} to evoke cardiomyocytes apoptosis. -- Abstract: Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are expressed in cardiomyocytes, which gate a type of influx of extracellular calcium, the capacitative calcium entry. TRP channels play a role in mediating Ca{sup 2+} overload in the heart. Calcium-sensing receptors (CaR) are also expressed in rat cardiac tissue and promote the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes by Ca{sup 2+} overload. However, data about the link between CaR and TRP channels in rat heart are few. In this study, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting were used to examine the expression of the TRP canonical proteins TRPC1 and TRPC3 in adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Laser scan confocal microscopy was used to detect intracellular [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} levels in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. The results showed that, in adult rat cardiomyocytes, the depletion of Ca{sup 2+} stores in the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) by thapsigargin induced a transient increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} and the subsequent restoration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o} sustained the increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} for a few minutes, whereas, the persisting elevation of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} was reduced in the presence of the TRPC inhibitor SKF96365. The stimulation of CaR by its activator gadolinium chloride (GdCl{sub 3}) or spermine also resulted in the same effect and the duration of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} increase was also shortened in the absence of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub o}. In adult and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, GdCl{sub 3

  6. The Calcium Wave of Vegetable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TD. Geydan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is an essential nutrient for plants; it is involved in developmental processes and in responses to biotic and abiotic factors. Several signals that modify the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and/or plastids have been observed. These changes in the calcium concentration in the cell interior are rapidly returned to basal levels, in the meantime, innumerable and complex signaling cascades. This note exposes the mechanisms of calcium transport through the cell membranes of the entrance of calcium in the plant cells.

  7. Alterations in the sarcoplasmic protein fraction of beef muscle with postmortem aging and hydrodynamic pressure processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) analysis were utilized to detect differences in the sarcoplasmic protein profiles of beef strip loins subjected to aging and hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP) treatments. At 48 h postmortem, stri...

  8. Cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iurlaro, Raffaella; Muñoz‐Pinedo, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    .... Many conditions that impose stress on cells, including hypoxia, starvation, infections and changes in secretory needs, challenge the folding capacity of the cell and promote endoplasmic reticulum stress...

  9. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary Ca+2; Kidney stones - calcium in urine; Renal calculi - calcium in your urine; Parathyroid - calcium in urine ... Urine calcium level can help your provider: Decide on the best treatment for the most common type of kidney ...

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Raj Kumar; Chae, Soo-Wan; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han Jung

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the principal organelle responsible for multiple cellular functions including protein folding and maturation and the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. ER stress is activated by a variety of factors and triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR), which restores homeostasis or activates cell death. Multiple studies have clarified the link between ER stress and cancer, and particularly the involvement of the UPR. The UPR seems to adjust the paradoxical microenvironment of cancer and, as such, is one of resistance mechanisms against cancer therapy. This review describes the activity of different UPRs involved in tumorigenesis and resistance to cancer therapy. PMID:25337575

  11. Chronic Intermittent Hypobaric Hypoxia Ameliorates Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Calcium Overload in Heart via Na+/Ca2+ Exchanger in Developing Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jie Ma

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIHH protects the heart against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. This study investigated the calcium homeostasis mechanism and the role of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX in the cardiac protective effect of CIHH in developing rats. Methods: Neonatal male rats received CIHH treatment or no treatment (control in a hypobaric chamber simulating 3000-meter altitude for 42 days. The left ventricular function of isolated hearts was evaluated after 30 minutes of ischemia and 60 minutes of reperfusion. Myocardial infarct size, intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, Na+-Ca2+ exchanger currents (INa/Ca in ventricular myocytes, and NCX1 protein level in the sarcolemmal membrane were determined. Results: The recovery of cardiac function after I/R was improved, with the myocardial infarct size reduced, in CIHH rats compared with control rats (p2+ channel agonist, or ryanodine, a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ channel receptor activator. Furthermore, the increases in [Ca2+]i during I/R were blunted in CIHH rats, but this effect was abolished by Bay K8644 or chelerythrine, a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor. The INa/Ca was decreased and the reversal potential of INa/Ca was shifted toward negative potential during simulated ischemia in the control cardiomyocytes (pConclusion: These data suggest that CIHH protects developing rat hearts during I/R by enhancing the resistance against calcium overload and by preserving normal INa/Ca and NCX1 protein. PKC activation might be involved in this protective process of CIHH.

  12. Sympathetic Nervous Regulation of Calcium and Action Potential Alternans in the Intact Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, James; Bishop, Martin J; Wilder, Catherine D E; O'Shea, Christopher; Pavlovic, Davor; Shattock, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    into the sarcoplasmic reticulum is a major mechanism by which SNS suppresses alternans in the guinea pig heart. Conclusions : SNS suppresses calcium and action potential alternans in the intact guinea pig heart by an action mediated through accelerated Ca handling and via increased I Ks .

  13. Sympathetic Nervous Regulation of Calcium and Action Potential Alternans in the Intact Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Winter

    2018-01-01

    reuptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum is a major mechanism by which SNS suppresses alternans in the guinea pig heart.Conclusions: SNS suppresses calcium and action potential alternans in the intact guinea pig heart by an action mediated through accelerated Ca handling and via increased IKs.

  14. Interfering with calcium release suppresses I gamma, the "hump" component of intramembranous charge movement in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernoch, L; Pizarro, G; Uribe, I; Rodríguez, M; Ríos, E

    1991-05-01

    Four manifestations of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling were derived from measurements in cut skeletal muscle fibers of the frog, voltage clamped in a Vaseline-gap chamber: intramembranous charge movement currents, myoplasmic [Ca2+] transients, flux of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and the intrinsic optical transparency change that accompanies calcium release. In attempts to suppress Ca release by direct effects on the SR, three interventions were applied: (a) a conditioning pulse that causes calcium release and inhibits release in subsequent pulses by Ca-dependent inactivation; (b) a series of brief, large pulses, separated by long intervals (greater than 700 ms), which deplete Ca2+ in the SR; and (c) intracellular application of the release channel blocker ruthenium red. All these reduced calcium release flux. None was expected to affect directly the voltage sensor of the T-tubule; however, all of them reduced or eliminated a component of charge movement current with the following characteristics: (a) delayed onset, peaking 10-20 ms into the pulse; (b) current reversal during the pulse, with an inward phase after the outward peak; and (c) OFF transient of smaller magnitude than the ON, of variable polarity, and sometimes biphasic. When the total charge movement current had a visible hump, the positive phase of the current eliminated by the interventions agreed with the hump in timing and size. The component of charge movement current blocked by the interventions was greater and had a greater inward phase in slack fibers with high [EGTA] inside than in stretched fibers with no EGTA. Its amplitude at -40 mV was on average 0.26 A/F (SEM 0.03) in slack fibers. The waveform of release flux determined from the Ca transients measured simultaneously with the membrane currents had, as described previously (Melzer, W., E. Ríos, and M. F. Schneider. 1984. Biophysical Journal. 45:637-641), an early peak followed by a descent to a steady level

  15. Sarcoplasmic masses in the skeletal muscle of a stranded pigmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Eva; de los Monteros, Antonio Espinosa; Fernández, Antonio; Arbelo, Manuel; Caballero, María José; Rivero, Miguel; Herráez, Pedro

    2013-07-01

    We measured the abundance of sarcoplasmic masses within skeletal muscle myocytes of an adult female stranded pigmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps). The presence of these masses in other species has been reported in association with myopathies, including myotonic dystrophy, the most frequently related pathology. Other histopathologic muscle changes included a high number of internal nuclei, variations in fiber size and shape, and the predominance of type I fibers.

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress: Its Role in Disease and Novel Prospects for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Schönthal, Axel H.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle required for lipid biosynthesis, calcium storage, and protein folding and processing. A number of physiological and pathological conditions, as well as a variety of pharmacological agents, are able to disturb proper ER function and thereby cause ER stress, which severely impairs protein folding and therefore poses the risk of proteotoxicity. Specific triggers for ER stress include, for example, particular intracellul...

  17. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  18. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Marciniak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to inhaled pollutants, including fine particulates and cigarette smoke is a major cause of lung disease in Europe. While it is established that inhaled pollutants have devastating effects on the genome, it is now recognised that additional effects on protein folding also drive the development of lung disease. Protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum affects the pathogenesis of many diseases, ranging from pulmonary fibrosis to cancer. It is therefore important to understand how cells respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress and how this affects pulmonary tissues in disease. These insights may offer opportunities to manipulate such endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and thereby cure lung disease.

  20. Crucial role for endoplasmic reticulum stress during megakaryocyte maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose J; Palazzo, Alberta; Chaabane, Chiraz; Albarran, Letizia; Polidano, Evelyne; Lebozec, Kristell; Dally, Saoussen; Nurden, Paquita; Enouf, Jocelyne; Debili, Najet; Bobe, Régis

    2013-12-01

    Apoptotic-like phase is an essential step for the platelet formation from megakaryocytes. How controlled is this signaling pathway remained poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis occurs during thrombopoiesis. Investigation of ER stress and maturation markers in different models of human thrombopoiesis (CHRF, DAMI, MEG-01 cell lines, and hematopoietic stem cells: CD34(+)) as well as in immature pathological platelets clearly indicated that ER stress occurs transiently during thrombopoiesis. Direct ER stress induction by tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation, or by sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase type 3b overexpression, which interferes with reticular calcium, leads to some degree of maturation in megakaryocytic cell lines. On the contrary, exposure to salubrinal, a phosphatase inhibitor that prevents eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α-P dephosphorylation and inhibits ER stress-induced apoptosis, decreased both expression of maturation markers in MEG-01 and CD34(+) cells as well as numbers of mature megakaryocytes and proplatelet formation in cultured CD34(+) cells. Taken as a whole, our research suggests that transient ER stress activation triggers the apoptotic-like phase of the thrombopoiesis process.

  1. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Integrated endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moenner, Michel; Pluquet, Olivier; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Chevet, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has emerged as a major site of cellular homeostasis regulation, particularly in the unfolded protein response, which is being found to play a major role in cancer and many other diseases...

  3. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  4. Calcium ion in skeletal muscle: its crucial role for muscle function, plasticity, and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berchtold, M W; Brinkmeier, H; Müntener, M

    2000-01-01

    . Additionally, the muscle fibers are arranged in compartments that often function as largely independent muscular subunits. All muscle fibers use Ca(2+) as their main regulatory and signaling molecule. Therefore, contractile properties of muscle fibers are dependent on the variable expression of proteins...... in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition, a multitude of Ca(2+)-binding proteins is present in muscle tissue including parvalbumin, calmodulin, S100 proteins, annexins, sorcin, myosin light chains, beta-actinin, calcineurin, and calpain. These Ca(2+)-binding proteins may either exert an important role in Ca(2...

  5. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Pan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis.

  6. Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. PMID:24549172

  7. Revealing calcium fluxes by analyzing inhibition dynamics in action potential clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laasmaa, Martin; Birkedal, Rikke; Vendelin, Marko

    2016-11-01

    In cardiac excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), calcium enters the cytosol via L-type Ca 2+ channels (LTCC) and reverse Na + /Ca 2+ -exchange (NCX rev ), or is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) by Ca 2+ -induced Ca 2+ -release (CICR). The magnitude of Ca 2+ influx via the different pathways varies with the state of the cell and is difficult to assess quantitatively, because changes in Ca 2+ influx through one pathway affect the others. In rainbow trout ventricular myocytes, the role of the SR has been uncertain for decades. The aim of this work was therefore two-fold: 1) to develop a method to quantify the Ca 2+ influx pathways, and 2) to determine the role of CICR from the SR in trout ventricular myocytes. The novelty of our developed method lies in the mathematical analysis of measured transsarcolemmal Ca 2+ currents and their impact on the corresponding Ca 2+ transient during gradual inhibition of the currents in action potential (AP) clamp. We tested the developed method using an excitation-contraction model and showed that the method was able to recover calcium fluxes from noisy synthetic data. We applied the approach to trout ventricular myocytes and quantified the relative contributions of different Ca 2+ influx pathways in ECC and determined the kinetics of these fluxes. Under baseline conditions, NCX rev is the main transmembrane Ca 2+ influx pathway contributing 29 ± 6% (of the Ca 2+ influx), LTCC 18 ± 7%, and CICR 53 ± 10% to overall Ca 2+ transient. Thus, NCX rev is an important regulator of contractility and probably plays a role in the negative force-frequency relationship of trout ventricular preparations. These results demonstrate that trout and neonatal mammalian cardiomyocytes resemble each other not only in terms of morphology and energetics but ECC as well. In summary, the developed method resolves the major problem how to separate highly interconnected fluxes in AP clamp and allows to study Ca 2+ fluxes in cardiomyocytes under

  8. GRP94: An HSP90-like protein specialized for protein folding and quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Eletto, Davide; Argon, Yair

    2012-01-01

    Glucose-regulated protein 94 is the HSP90-like protein in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum and therefore it chaperones secreted and membrane proteins. It has essential functions in development and physiology of multicellular organisms, at least in part because of this unique clientele. GRP94...... shares many biochemical features with other HSP90 proteins, in particular its domain structure and ATPase activity, but also displays distinct activities, such as calcium binding, necessitated by the conditions in the endoplasmic reticulum. GRP94's mode of action varies from the general HSP90 theme...

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Moshahid; Yang, Weng-Lang; Wang, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is an enormous public health issue and the leading cause of death in critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICU). Overwhelming inflammation, characterized by cytokine storm, oxidative threats, and neutrophil sequestration is an underlying component of sepsis-associated organ failure. Despite recent advances in sepsis research, there is still no effective treatment available beyond the standard of care and supportive therapy. To reduce sepsis-related mortality, a better understanding of the biological mechanism associated with the sepsis is essential. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a subcellular organelle is responsible for the facilitation of protein folding and assembly and involved in several other physiological activities. Under the stress and inflammation condition, ER loses the homeostasis in its function, which is termed as ER stress. During ER stress, unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated to restore ER function to its normal balance. However, once the stress is beyond the compensatory capacity of UPR or protracted, the apoptosis would be initiated by triggering cell injuries, even to cell death. As such, ER stress and UPR are reported to be implicated in several pathological and inflammatory conditions. Although the detrimental role of ER stress during infections has been demonstrated, there is growing evidences that ER stress participate in the pathogenesis of sepsis. In this review, we summarize the current research in the context of ER stress and UPR signaling associated with sepsis and its related clinical conditions, such as trauma- hemorrhage, and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We also discuss the potential implication of ER stress as a novel therapeutic target and prognostic marker in patients with sepsis. PMID:26125088

  10. Design and characterization of self-assembled fish sarcoplasmic protein-alginate nanocomplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Wattjes, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Macrostructures based on natural polymers are subject to large attention, as the application range is wide within the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study we present nanocomplexes (NCXs) made from electrostatic self-assembly between negatively charged alginate and positively charged...... fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP), prepared by bulk mixing. A concentration screening revealed that there was a range of alginate and FSP concentrations where stable NCXs with similar properties were formed, rather than two exact concentrations. The size of the NCXs was 293 +/- 3 nm, and the zeta...

  11. Cell death induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurlaro, Raffaella; Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle with multiple functions. The synthesis of transmembrane proteins and proteins that are to be secreted occurs in this organelle. Many conditions that impose stress on cells, including hypoxia, starvation, infections and changes in secretory needs, challenge the folding capacity of the cell and promote endoplasmic reticulum stress. The cellular response involves the activation of sensors that transduce signaling cascades with the aim of restoring homeostasis. This is known as the unfolded protein response, which also intersects with the integrated stress response that reduces protein synthesis through inactivation of the initiation factor eIF2α. Central to the unfolded protein response are the sensors PERK, IRE1 and ATF6, as well as other signaling nodes such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK) and the downstream transcription factors XBP1, ATF4 and CHOP. These proteins aim to restore homeostasis, but they can also induce cell death, which has been shown to occur by necroptosis and, more commonly, through the regulation of Bcl-2 family proteins (Bim, Noxa and Puma) that leads to mitochondrial apoptosis. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proteotoxic stress have been shown to induce TRAIL receptors and activation of caspase-8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is a common feature in the pathology of numerous diseases because it plays a role in neurodegeneration, stroke, cancer, metabolic diseases and inflammation. Understanding how cells react to endoplasmic reticulum stress can accelerate discovery of drugs against these diseases. © 2015 FEBS.

  12. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  13. Differential abundance of sarcoplasmic proteome explains animal effect on beef Longissimus lumborum color stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canto, Anna C V C S; Suman, Surendranath P; Nair, Mahesh N; Li, Shuting; Rentfrow, Gregg; Beach, Carol M; Silva, Teofilo J P; Wheeler, Tommy L; Shackelford, Steven D; Grayson, Adria; McKeith, Russell O; King, D Andy

    2015-04-01

    The sarcoplasmic proteome of beef Longissimus lumborum demonstrating animal-to-animal variation in color stability was examined to correlate proteome profile with color. Longissimus lumborum (36 h post-mortem) muscles were obtained from 73 beef carcasses, aged for 13 days, and fabricated to 2.5-cm steaks. One steak was allotted to retail display, and another was immediately vacuum packaged and frozen at -80°C. Aerobically packaged steaks were stored under display, and color was evaluated on days 0 and 11. The steaks were ranked based on redness and color stability on day 11, and ten color-stable and ten color-labile carcasses were identified. Sarcoplasmic proteome of frozen steaks from the selected carcasses was analyzed. Nine proteins were differentially abundant in color-stable and color-labile steaks. Three glycolytic enzymes (phosphoglucomutase-1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase M2) were over-abundant in color-stable steaks and positively correlated (P<0.05) to redness and color stability. These results indicated that animal variations in proteome contribute to differences in beef color. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Uncoupling of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca²⁺-ATPase by N-arachidonoyl dopamine. Members of the endocannabinoid family as thermogenic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmmoud, Yasser Ahmed; Gaster, Michel

    2013-01-01

    agents. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Using isolated SR vesicles from rabbits, we have screened for endogenous compounds that uncouple SERCA. We have also studied their ability to deplete cytoplasmic ATP from human skeletal muscle cells in culture. KEY RESULTS: Studies on SR vesicles showed that the endogenous...... lipid metabolite N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA) was a potent stimulator of SERCA uncoupling. NADA stabilized an E₁-like pump conformation that had a lower dephosphorylation rate, low affinity for Ca²⁺ at the luminal sites and a specific proteinase K cleavage pattern involving protection of the C......-terminal p83C fragment from further cleavage. Moreover, we found a significantly decreased cytoplasmic ATP levels following treatment of skeletal muscle cells with 100 nM NADA. This effect was dependent on the presence of glucose and abolished by pretreatment with the specific SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin...

  15. Angiotensin receptor antagonism and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition improve diastolic dysfunction and Ca2+-ATPase expression in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in hypertensive cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flesch, M; Schiffer, F; Zolk, O; Pinto, Y; Stasch, JP; Knorr, A; Ettelbruck, S; Bohm, M

    Background Hypertensive cardiomyopathy is a major risk factor for the development of chronic heart failure, Objective To investigate whether treatment with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or with an angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist (AT(1)-RA) is sufficient to prevent the

  16. Angiotensin receptor antagonism and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition improve diastolic dysfunction and Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in the sarcoplasmic reticulum in hypertensive cardiomyopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flesch, M.; Schiffer, F.; Zolk, O.; Pinto, Y.; Stasch, J. P.; Knorr, A.; Ettelbrück, S.; Böhm, M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertensive cardiomyopathy is a major risk factor for the development of chronic heart failure. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether treatment with an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or with an angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist (AT1-RA) is sufficient to prevent the

  17. Critical roles of hydrophobicity and orientation of side chains for inactivation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase with thapsigargin and thapsigargin analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Liu, Huizhen; Sonntag, Yonathan

    2010-01-01

    fluorescence data to show how Tg and chemical analogs of the compound with modified or removed side chains bind to isolated SERCA 1a membranes. This occurs by uptake via the membrane lipid followed by insertion into a resident intramembranous binding site with few adaptative changes. Our binding data indicate...

  18. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake rate and endogenous content in MHC I and MHC II fibres of human skeletal muscle following prolonged exercise in highly trained

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Jens Steen

    load time was increased by 8% (P direct measures that the SR Ca2+ loading time decreases in MHCI fibres following prolonged cycling exercise in highly trained humans, however...... no differences in eSR content between the fibre types before exercise and no change with exhaustive exercise. The loading time was 17% slower in MHC II fibres (13.4 ± 0.2 vs 15.7 ± 0.2 sec, MHCI and MHCII respectively). However, the maximum loading capacity was higher in MHC II fibres. Following exercise the SR...

  19. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  20. An Involvement of Oxidative Stress in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Its Associated Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Bidur; Marahatta, Anu; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the major site of calcium storage and protein folding. It has a unique oxidizing-folding environment due to the predominant disulfide bond formation during the process of protein folding. Alterations in the oxidative environment of the ER and also intra-ER Ca2+ cause the production of ER stress-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Protein disulfide isomerases, endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin-1, reduced glutathione and mitochondrial electron transport chain proteins also play crucial roles in ER stress-induced production of ROS. In this article, we discuss ER stress-associated ROS and related diseases, and the current understanding of the signaling transduction involved in ER stress. PMID:23263672

  1. Protein transport into the human endoplasmic reticulum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudek, Johanna; Pfeffer, Stefan; Lee, Po-Hsien; Jung, Martin; Cavalié, Adolfo; Helms, Volkhard; Förster, Friedrich; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Protein transport into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is essential for all eukaryotic cells and evolutionary related to protein transport into and across the cytoplasmic membrane of eubacteria and archaea. It is based on amino-terminal signal peptides in the precursor polypeptides plus various

  2. Long-Lasting Sparks: Multi-Metastability and Release Competition in the Calcium Release Unit Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen; Karma, Alain; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2016-01-01

    Calcium (Ca) sparks are elementary events of biological Ca signaling. A normal Ca spark has a brief duration in the range of 10 to 100 ms, but long-lasting sparks with durations of several hundred milliseconds to seconds are also widely observed. Experiments have shown that the transition from normal to long-lasting sparks can occur when ryanodine receptor (RyR) open probability is either increased or decreased. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and computationally that long-lasting sparks emerge as a collective dynamical behavior of the network of diffusively coupled Ca release units (CRUs). We show that normal sparks occur when the CRU network is monostable and excitable, while long-lasting sparks occur when the network dynamics possesses multiple metastable attractors, each attractor corresponding to a different spatial firing pattern of sparks. We further highlight the mechanisms and conditions that produce long-lasting sparks, demonstrating the existence of an optimal range of RyR open probability favoring long-lasting sparks. We find that when CRU firings are sparse and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load is high, increasing RyR open probability promotes long-lasting sparks by potentiating Ca-induced Ca release (CICR). In contrast, when CICR is already strong enough to produce frequent firings, decreasing RyR open probability counter-intuitively promotes long-lasting sparks by decreasing spark frequency. The decrease in spark frequency promotes intra-SR Ca diffusion from neighboring non-firing CRUs to the firing CRUs, which helps to maintain the local SR Ca concentration of the firing CRUs above a critical level to sustain firing. In this setting, decreasing RyR open probability further suppresses long-lasting sparks by weakening CICR. Since a long-lasting spark terminates via the Kramers' escape process over a potential barrier, its duration exhibits an exponential distribution determined by the barrier height and noise strength, which is modulated

  3. Long-Lasting Sparks: Multi-Metastability and Release Competition in the Calcium Release Unit Network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Song

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca sparks are elementary events of biological Ca signaling. A normal Ca spark has a brief duration in the range of 10 to 100 ms, but long-lasting sparks with durations of several hundred milliseconds to seconds are also widely observed. Experiments have shown that the transition from normal to long-lasting sparks can occur when ryanodine receptor (RyR open probability is either increased or decreased. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and computationally that long-lasting sparks emerge as a collective dynamical behavior of the network of diffusively coupled Ca release units (CRUs. We show that normal sparks occur when the CRU network is monostable and excitable, while long-lasting sparks occur when the network dynamics possesses multiple metastable attractors, each attractor corresponding to a different spatial firing pattern of sparks. We further highlight the mechanisms and conditions that produce long-lasting sparks, demonstrating the existence of an optimal range of RyR open probability favoring long-lasting sparks. We find that when CRU firings are sparse and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca load is high, increasing RyR open probability promotes long-lasting sparks by potentiating Ca-induced Ca release (CICR. In contrast, when CICR is already strong enough to produce frequent firings, decreasing RyR open probability counter-intuitively promotes long-lasting sparks by decreasing spark frequency. The decrease in spark frequency promotes intra-SR Ca diffusion from neighboring non-firing CRUs to the firing CRUs, which helps to maintain the local SR Ca concentration of the firing CRUs above a critical level to sustain firing. In this setting, decreasing RyR open probability further suppresses long-lasting sparks by weakening CICR. Since a long-lasting spark terminates via the Kramers' escape process over a potential barrier, its duration exhibits an exponential distribution determined by the barrier height and noise strength, which is

  4. Calcium and IP3 dynamics in cardiac myocytes: Experimental and computational perspectives and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix eHohendanner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays a crucial role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, but it is also a pivotal second messenger activating Ca2+-dependent transcription factors in a process termed excitation-transcription coupling (ETC. Evidence accumulated over the past decade indicates a pivotal role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in the regulation of cytosolic and nuclear Ca2+ signals. IP3 is generated by stimulation of plasma membrane receptors that couple to phospholipase C (PLC, liberating IP3 from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. An intriguing aspect of IP3 signaling is the presence of the entire PIP2-PLC-IP3 signaling cascade as well as the presence of IP3Rs at the inner and outer membranes of the nuclear envelope (NE which functions as a Ca2+ store. The observation that the nucleus is surrounded by its own putative Ca2+ store raises the possibility that nuclear IP3-dependent Ca2+ release plays a critical role in ETC. This provides a potential mechanism of regulation that acts locally and autonomously from the global cytosolic Ca2+ signal underlying ECC. Moreover, there is evidence that: (i the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and NE are a single contiguous Ca2+ store; (ii the nuclear pore complex is the major gateway for Ca2+ and macromolecules to pass between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm; (iii the inner membrane of the NE hosts key Ca2+ handling proteins including the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX/GM1 complex, ryanodine receptors (RyRs, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors (NAADPRs, Na+/K+ ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger. Thus, it appears that the nucleus represents a Ca2+ signaling domain equipped with its own ion channels and transporters that allow for complex local Ca2+ signals. Many experimental and modeling approaches have been used for the study of intracellular Ca2+ signaling but the key to understanding of the dual role of Ca2+ mediating ECC and ECT lays in quantitative differences of

  5. Central activation, metabolites, and calcium handling during fatigue with repeated maximal isometric contractions in human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Simeon P; Inman, Luke A G; MacManus, Caroline P; van de Port, Ingrid G L; Ruell, Patricia A; Thom, Jeanette M; Thompson, Martin W

    2017-08-01

    To determine the roles of calcium (Ca 2+ ) handling by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and central activation impairment (i.e., central fatigue) during fatigue with repeated maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) in human muscles. Contractile performance was assessed during 3 min of repeated MVCs (7-s contraction, 3-s rest, n = 17). In ten participants, in vitro SR Ca 2+ -handling, metabolites, and fibre-type composition were quantified in biopsy samples from quadriceps muscle, along with plasma venous [K + ]. In 11 participants, central fatigue was compared using tetanic stimulation superimposed on MVC in quadriceps and adductor pollicis muscles. The decline of peak MVC force with fatigue was similar for both muscles. Fatigue resistance correlated directly with % type I fibre area in quadriceps (r = 0.77, P = 0.009). The maximal rate of ryanodine-induced Ca 2+ -release and Ca 2+ -uptake fell by 31 ± 26 and 28 ± 13%, respectively. The tetanic force depression was correlated with the combined reduction of ATP and PCr, and increase of lactate (r = 0.77, P = 0.009). Plasma venous [K + ] increased from 4.0 ± 0.3 to 5.4 ± 0.8 mM over 1-3-min exercise. Central fatigue occurred during the early contractions in the quadriceps in 7 out of 17 participants (central activation ratio fell from 0.98 ± 0.05 to 0.86 ± 0.11 at 1 min), but dwindled at exercise cessation. Central fatigue was seldom apparent in adductor pollicis. Fatigue with repeated MVC in human limb muscles mainly involves peripheral aspects which include impaired SR Ca 2+ -handling and we speculate that anaerobic metabolite changes are involved. A faster early force loss in quadriceps muscle with some participants is attributed to central fatigue.

  6. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano-Muñoz, Manuel; Schnee, Michael E; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Protein Secretion and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Benham, Adam M.

    2012-01-01

    In a complex multicellular organism, different cell types engage in specialist functions, and as a result, the secretory output of cells and tissues varies widely. Whereas some quiescent cell types secrete minor amounts of proteins, tissues like the pancreas, producing insulin and other hormones, and mature B cells, producing antibodies, place a great demand on their endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our understanding of how protein secretion in general is controlled in the ER is now quite sophisti...

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: a novel mechanism and therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-qing; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Lin-xi

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum is a principal organelle responsible for folding, post-translational modifications and transport of secretory, luminal and membrane proteins, thus palys an important rale in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is a condition that is accelerated by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins after endoplasmic reticulum environment disturbance, triggered by a variety of physiological and pathological factors, such as nutrient deprivation, altered glycosylation, calcium depletion, oxidative stress, DNA damage and energy disturbance, etc. ERS may initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore cellular homeostasis or lead to apoptosis. Numerous studies have clarified the link between ERS and cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on ERS-associated molecular mechanisms that participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes of heart and blood vessels. In addition, a number of drugs that regulate ERS was introduced, which may be used to treat cardiovascular diseases. This review may open new avenues for studying the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and discovering novel drugs targeting ERS. PMID:26838072

  9. Calcium response of KCl-excited populations of ventricular myocytes from the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): a promising approach to integrate cell-to-cell heterogeneity in studying the cellular basis of fish cardiac performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, Hélène; Marchant, James; Le Bayon, Nicolas; Servili, Arianna; Claireaux, Guy

    2015-10-01

    Climate change challenges the capacity of fishes to thrive in their habitat. However, through phenotypic diversity, they demonstrate remarkable resilience to deteriorating conditions. In fish populations, inter-individual variation in a number of fitness-determining physiological traits, including cardiac performance, is classically observed. Information about the cellular bases of inter-individual variability in cardiac performance is scarce including the possible contribution of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. This study aimed at providing insight into EC coupling-related Ca(2+) response and thermal plasticity in the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). A cell population approach was used to lay the methodological basis for identifying the cellular determinants of cardiac performance. Fish were acclimated at 12 and 22 °C and changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) following KCl stimulation were measured using Fura-2, at 12 or 22 °C-test. The increase in [Ca(2+)]i resulted primarily from extracellular Ca(2+) entry but sarcoplasmic reticulum stores were also shown to be involved. As previously reported in sea bass, a modest effect of adrenaline was observed. Moreover, although the response appeared relatively insensitive to an acute temperature change, a difference in Ca(2+) response was observed between 12- and 22 °C-acclimated fish. In particular, a greater increase in [Ca(2+)]i at a high level of adrenaline was observed in 22 °C-acclimated fish that may be related to an improved efficiency of adrenaline under these conditions. In conclusion, this method allows a rapid screening of cellular characteristics. It represents a promising tool to identify the cellular determinants of inter-individual variability in fishes' capacity for environmental adaptation.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria junction is required for iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Schmollinger, Stefan; Attar, Narsis; Campos, Oscar A; Vogelauer, Maria; Carey, Michael F; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2017-08-11

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) is a protein complex that physically tethers the two organelles to each other and creates the physical basis for communication between them. ERMES functions in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria, protein import into mitochondria, and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and genome. Here, we report that ERMES is also required for iron homeostasis. Loss of ERMES components activates an Aft1-dependent iron deficiency response even in iron-replete conditions, leading to accumulation of excess iron inside the cell. This function is independent of known ERMES roles in calcium regulation, phospholipid biosynthesis, or effects on mitochondrial morphology. A mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 13 ( VPS13 ) gene that rescues the glycolytic phenotype of ERMES mutants suppresses the iron deficiency response and iron accumulation. Our findings reveal that proper communication between the ER and mitochondria is required for appropriate maintenance of cellular iron levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Stress responses from the endoplasmic reticulum in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori eKato

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a dynamic organelle that is essential for multiple cellular functions. During cellular stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation and dysregulation of protein synthesis, unfolded/misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER lumen, resulting in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR. The UPR also contributes to the regulation of various intracellular signalling pathways such as calcium signalling and lipid signalling. More recently, the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM, which is a site of close contact between the ER and mitochondria, has been shown to function as a platform for various intracellular stress responses including apoptotic signalling, inflammatory signalling, the autophagic response, and the UPR. Interestingly, in cancer, these signalling pathways from the ER are often dysregulated, contributing to cancer cell metabolism. Thus, the signalling pathway from the ER may be a novel therapeutic target for various cancers. In this review, we discuss recent research on the roles of stress responses from the ER, including the MAM.

  12. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin) and genetic (si

  13. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintao Zhang

    Full Text Available Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells.Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29 were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5-5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining, and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot.Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II, beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin and genetic

  14. Flavour formation from hydrolysis of pork sarcoplasmic protein extract by a unique LAB culture isolated from Harbin dry sausage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Liu, Qian; Sun, Qinxiu; Kong, Baohua; Xiong, Youling

    2015-02-01

    The lactic acid bacteria Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Lactobacillus fermentum isolated from Harbin dry sausage were assessed for their protein hydrolysis and flavour development in pork muscle sarcoplasmic protein extracts. Gel electrophoresis indicated that sarcoplasmic proteins were degraded by all of the strains, especially by P. pentosaceus and L. curvatus. Trichloroacetic acid-soluble peptides increased in all of the samples (P < 0.05), especially samples inoculated with P. pentosaceus. Samples inoculated with P. pentosaceus and L. curvatus had higher free amino acid contents than did the other two strains(P < 0.05), and glutamic acid and alanine appeared to be the predominant free amino acids. The volatile compound analysis indicated that the highest aldehydes, alcohols and acid contents were found in the sample with P. pentosaceus followed by L. curvatus. The results revealed that P. pentosaceus could be appropriate for use as a meat starter culture.

  15. Effects of Conformational Peptide Probe DP4 on Bidirectional Signaling between DHPR and RyR1 Calcium Channels in Voltage-Clamped Skeletal Muscle Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Olojo, Rotimi O.; Hernández-Ochoa, Erick O.; Ikemoto, Noriaki; Schneider, Martin F.

    2011-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, excitation-contraction coupling involves the activation of dihydropyridine receptors (DHPR) and type-1 ryanodine receptors (RyR1) to produce depolarization-dependent sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release via orthograde signaling. Another form of DHPR-RyR1 communication is retrograde signaling, in which RyRs modulate the gating of DHPR. DP4 (domain peptide 4), is a peptide corresponding to residues Leu2442-Pro2477 of the central domain of the RyR1 that produces RyR1 channel d...

  16. Modification of intracellular free calcium in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells by exogenous phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhugra, Praveen; Xu, Yan-Jun; Rathi, Satyajeet; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2003-06-15

    Exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) was observed to produce a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. Preincubation of cells with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors (cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin), a phospholipase C inhibitor (2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl-N,N-diphenylcarbamate), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonists (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin), and an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) depressed the PA-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although EGTA, an extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, decreased the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i), sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil or diltiazem) did not alter the action of PA. On the other hand, inhibitors of PKC (bisindolylmaleimide I) and G(i)-protein (pertussis toxin) potentiated the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by PA significantly. These results suggest that the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in vascular smooth muscle cells may occur upon the activation of phospholipase C and the subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) pool in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This action of PA may be mediated through the involvement of PKC.

  17. Sex differences play a role in cardiac endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and ERS-initiated apoptosis induced by pressure overload and thapsigargin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Flori R; Watanabe, Kenichi; Widyantoro, Bambang; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Harima, Meilei; Kodama, Makoto; Aizawa, Yoshifusa

    2011-01-01

    Excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) triggers myocardial apoptosis. Sex differences appear to be an important determinant in the occurrence of stress and apoptosis through many pathways, but the roles of sex differences in the cardiac ERS and ERS-initiated apoptosis are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo role of sex differences in the cardiac ERS and apoptosis elicited by ascending aortic banding surgery or thapsigargin (Thap) injection using male and female C57BL/6 JAX mice. The surgery significantly increased the expression levels of cardiac glucose-regulated protein (GRP)78 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homology protein (CHOP) protein, increased the myocardial apoptosis and decreased the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform (SERCA)2 immunoreactivity in the male mice relative to female mice. Furthermore, during ERS induction using Thap, myocardial apoptosis and the expression levels of cardiac GRP78, inositol-requiring enzyme (Ire)1α and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)2 were significantly increased in male mice relative to female mice. Sex differences significantly affected the above results. Our data suggest that sex differences affected the response of myocardial tissues in dealing with cardiac ERS and further result of ERS, apoptosis, at least in part through the regulation of SERCA2, CHOP, Ire1α and TRAF2. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Ultrasonography of the reticulum in 30 healthy Saanen goats

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Ueli; Jacquat, Désirée

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The reticulum plays a crucial role in the ruminant digestive tract because the primary cycle of rumen motility always starts with a reticular contraction. In contrast to cattle, there are only few results on the ultrasonographic examination of the reticulum in goats. Therefore, it was the goal of the present study, to describe the results of ultrasonography of the reticulum of 30 healthy Saanen goats. Methods Ultrasonography was carried out on standing, non-sedated animals...

  19. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  20. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeong-Nam Yu

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o- were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA, mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Oshitari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Toshiyuki Oshitari1,2, Natsuyo Hata1, Shuichi Yamamoto11Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba City, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Kimitsu Central Hospital, Kisarazu City, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases including Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease. Many recent studies have shown that ER stress is related to the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, and with the death of pancreatic β-cells, insulin resistance, and the death of the vascular cells in the retina. Diabetic retinopathy is a major complication of diabetes and results in death of both neural and vascular cells. Because the death of the neurons directly affects visual function, the precise mechanism causing the death of neurons in early diabetic retinopathy must be determined. The ideal therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy would be to treat the factors involved with both the vascular and neuronal abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. In this review, we present evidence that ER stress is involved in the death of both retinal neurons and vascular cells in diabetic eyes, and thus reducing or blocking ER stress may be a potential therapy for preventing the onset and the progression of diabetic retinopathy.Keywords: endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetic retinopathy, vascular cell death, neuronal cell death

  2. Interactions between small ankyrin 1 and sarcolipin coordinately regulate activity of the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, Patrick F; Labuza, Amanda; Muriel, Joaquin; Markwardt, Michele L; Mancini, Allison E; Rizzo, Mark A; Bloch, Robert J

    2017-06-30

    SERCA1, the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase of skeletal muscle, is essential for muscle relaxation and maintenance of low resting Ca(2+) levels in the myoplasm. We recently reported that small ankyrin 1 (sAnk1) interacts with the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase in skeletal muscle (SERCA1) to inhibit its activity. We also showed that this interaction is mediated at least in part through sAnk1's transmembrane domain in a manner similar to that of sarcolipin (SLN). Earlier studies have shown that SLN and phospholamban, the other well studied small SERCA-regulatory proteins, oligomerize either alone or together. As sAnk1 is coexpressed with SLN in muscle, we sought to determine whether these two proteins interact with one another when coexpressed exogenously in COS7 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation (coIP) and anisotropy-based FRET (AFRET) assays confirmed this interaction. Our results indicated that sAnk1 and SLN can associate in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane and after exogenous expression in COS7 cells in vitro but that their association did not require endogenous SERCA2. Significantly, SLN promoted the interaction between sAnk1 and SERCA1 when the three proteins were coexpressed, and both coIP and AFRET experiments suggested the formation of a complex consisting of all three proteins. Ca(2+)-ATPase assays showed that sAnk1 ablated SLN's inhibition of SERCA1 activity. These results suggest that sAnk1 interacts with SLN both directly and in complex with SERCA1 and reduces SLN's inhibitory effect on SERCA1 activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Differential effects of organic calcium-channel blockers on diastolic SR calcium-handling in the frog heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Sathya; Vijayanand, Caroline; Tharion, Elizabeth

    2002-11-01

    1. Gradual loss of sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) calcium during a rest-period is responsible for the rest-induced decay (RID) of force in mammalian myocardium. Effect of verapamil and diltiazem on a similar RID in the frog myocardium suggests a new mechanism of action of these drugs. 2. Strips of frog-ventricle were paced at 0.2 Hz and the rhythm was interrupted by varying rest-periods ranging from 10 to 180 s. In control conditions, the amplitude of the post-rest beat was significantly lower than that of the pre-rest beat for rest-periods more than 40 s (RID). 3. Verapamil and diltiazem (which are organic calcium-channel blockers (OCCB)) changed the pattern of RID in the control solution to a 'rest-induced potentiation' (RIP) in the same preparation while another OCCB nifedipine and the inorganic calcium-channel blocker cadmium did not alter the post-rest phenomenon. 4. We propose that verapamil and diltiazem produce an RIP due to either blockade of SR calcium-leak during rest or enhancement of SR calcium-uptake during rest.

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Homeostasis in Reproductive Physiology and Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzel, Elif; Arlier, Sefa; Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Tabak, Mehmet Selcuk; Ekiz, Tugba; Semerci, Nihan; Larsen, Kellie; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles Joseph; Kayisli, Umit Ali

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), comprises 60% of the total cell membrane and interacts directly or indirectly with several cell organelles i.e., Golgi bodies, mitochondria and proteasomes. The ER is usually associated with large numbers of attached ribosomes. During evolution, ER developed as the specific cellular site of synthesis, folding, modification and trafficking of secretory and cell-surface proteins. The ER is also the major intracellular calcium storage compartment that maintains cellular calcium homeostasis. During the production of functionally effective proteins, several ER-specific molecular steps sense quantity and quality of synthesized proteins as well as proper folding into their native structures. During this process, excess accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the ER lumen results in ER stress, the homeostatic coping mechanism that activates an ER-specific adaptation program, (the unfolded protein response; UPR) to increase ER-associated degradation of structurally and/or functionally defective proteins, thus sustaining ER homeostasis. Impaired ER homeostasis results in aberrant cellular responses, contributing to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Both female and male reproductive tissues undergo highly dynamic cellular, molecular and genetic changes such as oogenesis and spermatogenesis starting in prenatal life, mainly controlled by sex-steroids but also cytokines and growth factors throughout reproductive life. These reproductive changes require ER to provide extensive protein synthesis, folding, maturation and then their trafficking to appropriate cellular location as well as destroying unfolded/misfolded proteins via activating ER-associated degradation mediated proteasomes. Many studies have now shown roles for ER stress/UPR signaling cascades in the endometrial menstrual cycle, ovarian folliculogenesis and oocyte maturation, spermatogenesis, fertilization, pre-implantation embryo development and pregnancy and parturition

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress and Endocrine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyasu, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hiderou; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-02-11

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the "unfolded protein response" (UPR), which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2) are discussed in this article.

  6. Targeting endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fa-Ling; Liu, Wen-Yue; Van Poucke, Sven; Braddock, Martin; Jin, Wei-Min; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiao-Kun; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2016-09-01

    The accumulation of unfolded protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) initiates an unfolded protein response (UPR) via three signal transduction cascades, which involve protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring enzyme-1α (IRE1α) and activating transcription factor-6α (ATF6α). An ER stress response is observed in nearly all physiologies related to acute and chronic liver disease and therapeutic targeting of the mechanisms implicated in UPR signaling have attracted considerable attention. This review focuses on the correlation between ER stress and liver disease and the possible targets which may drive the potential for novel therapeutic intervention. Expert Commentary: We describe pathways which are involved in UPR signaling and their potential correlation with various liver diseases and underlying mechanisms which may present opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies are discussed.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Sung Hoon; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the functional importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that performs folding, modification, and trafficking of secretory and membrane proteins to the Golgi compartment, the maintenance of ER homeostasis in insulin-secreting β-cells is very important. When ER homeostasis is disrupted, the ER generates adaptive signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR), to maintain homeostasis of this organelle. However, if homeostasis fails to be restored, the ER initiates death signaling pathways. New observations suggest that both chronic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, known as important causative factors of type 2 diabetes (T2D), disrupt ER homeostasis to induce unresolvable UPR activation and β-cell death. This review examines how the UPR pathways, induced by high glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs), interact to disrupt ER function and cause β-cell dysfunction and death. PMID:22443930

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER Stress and Endocrine Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ariyasu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR, which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI, Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2 are discussed in this article.

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Malfunction in the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Michalak

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases often have multifactorial causes and are progressive diseases. Some are inherited while others are acquired, and both vary greatly in onset and severity. Impaired endoplasmic reticulum (ER proteostasis, involving Ca2+ signaling, protein synthesis, processing, trafficking, and degradation, is now recognized as a key risk factor in the pathogenesis of neurological disorders. Lipidostasis involves lipid synthesis, quality control, membrane assembly as well as sequestration of excess lipids or degradation of damaged lipids. Proteostasis and lipidostasis are maintained by interconnected pathways within the cellular reticular network, which includes the ER and Ca2+ signaling. Importantly, lipidostasis is important in the maintenance of membranes and luminal environment that enable optimal protein processing. Accumulating evidence suggest that the loss of coordinate regulation of proteostasis and lipidostasis has a direct and negative impact on the health of the nervous system.

  10. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  11. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanmuyi Yang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK, inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6. UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Huntington’s disease (HD, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity.

  13. Bax inhibitor 1, a modulator of calcium homeostasis, confers affective resilience

    OpenAIRE

    Hunsberger, Joshua G.; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Austin, Daniel R.; Zarate, Carlos; Chuang, De-Maw; Chen, Guang; Reed, John C.; Manji, Husseini K.

    2011-01-01

    The endoplamic reticulum (ER) is a critical site for intracellular calcium storage as well as protein synthesis, folding, and trafficking. Disruption of these processes is gaining support for contributing to heritable vulnerability of certain diseases. Here, we investigated Bax inhibitor 1 (BI-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that primarily resides in the ER and associates with B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-XL, as an affective resiliency factor through its modulation of calcium homeostasis. ...

  14. Development of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress during Experimental Oxalate Nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motin, Yu G; Lepilov, A V; Bgatova, N P; Zharikov, A Yu; Motina, N V; Lapii, G A; Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural study of the kidney was performed in rats with oxalate nephrolithiasis. Specific features of endoplasmic reticulum stress were evaluated during nephrolithiasis and treatment with α-tocopherol. We observed the signs of endoplasmic reticulum stress with activation of proapoptotic pathways and injury to the cell lining in nephron tubules and collecting ducts. Ultrastructural changes were found in the organelles, nuclei, and cell membranes of epitheliocytes. A relationship was revealed between endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative damage, which developed at the early state of lithogenesis.

  15. Calcium homeostasis in digitonin-permeabilized bovine chromaffin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, L.S.

    1988-07-01

    The regulation of cytosolic calcium was studied in digitonin-permeabilized chromaffin cells. Accumulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ by permeabilized cells was measured at various Ca2+ concentrations in the incubation solutions. In the absence of ATP, there was a small (10-15% of total uptake) but significant increase in accumulation of Ca2+ into both the vesicular and nonvesicular pools. In the presence of ATP, the permeabilized cells accumulated Ca2+ into carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP)-sensitive and -insensitive pools. The CCCP-sensitive pool--mainly mitochondria--was active when the calcium concentration was greater than 1 microM and was not saturated at 25 microM. The Ca2+ sequestered by the CCCP-insensitive pool could be inhibited by vanadate and released by inositol trisphosphate, a combination suggesting that this pool was the endoplasmic reticulum. The CCCP-insensitive pool had a high affinity for calcium, with an EC50 of approximately 1 microM. When the Ca2+ concentration was adjusted to the level in the cytoplasm of resting cells (0.1 microM), the presumed endoplasmic reticulum pool was responsible for approximately 90% of the ATP-stimulated calcium uptake. At a calcium level similar to the acetylcholine-stimulated level in intact cells (5-10 microM), most of the Ca2+ (greater than 95%) went into the CCCP-sensitive pool.

  16. Role of oxidative stress and intracellular calcium in nickel carbonate hydroxide-induced sister-chromatid exchange, and alterations in replication index and mitotic index in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' Bemba-Meka, Prosper [Universite de Montreal, Human Toxicology Research Group (TOXHUM), Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Main Station, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC (Canada); University of Louisville, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Center for Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Lemieux, Nicole [Universite de Montreal, Department of Pathology and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Main Station, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC (Canada); Chakrabarti, Saroj K. [Universite de Montreal, Human Toxicology Research Group (TOXHUM), Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Main Station, P.O. Box 6128, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2007-02-15

    Human peripheral lymphocytes from whole blood cultures were exposed to either soluble form of nickel carbonate hydroxide (NiCH) (0-60 {mu}M), or of nickel subsulfide (Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}) (0-120 {mu}M), or of nickel oxide (NiO) (0-120 {mu}M), or nickel sulfate (NiSO{sub 4}) (0-120 {mu}M) for a short duration of 2 h. The treatments occurred 46 h after the beginning of the cultures. The cultures were harvested after a total incubation of 72 h, and sister-chromatid exchange (SCE), replication index (RI), and mitotic index (MI) were measured for each nickel compound. The soluble form of NiCH at 30 {mu}M but those of Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2} and NiO at 120 {mu}M produced significant increase in the SCE per cell compared to the control value, whereas NiSO{sub 4} failed to produce any such significant increase. Except NiSO{sub 4}, the soluble forms of NiCH, Ni{sub 3}S{sub 2}, and NiO produced significant cell-cycle delay (as measured by the inhibition of RI) as well as significant inhibition of the MI at respective similar concentrations as mentioned above. Pretreatment of human blood lymphocytes with catalase (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} scavenger), or superoxide dismutase (superoxide anion scavenger), or dimethylthiourea (hydroxyl radical scavenger), or deferoxamine (iron chelator), or N-acetylcysteine (general antioxidant) inhibited NiCH-induced SCE, and changes in RI and MI. This suggests the participation of oxidative stress involving H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the superoxide anion radical, the hydroxyl radical, and iron in the NiCH-induced genotoxic responses. Cotreatment of NiCH with either verapamil (inhibitor of intracellular calcium ion ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) movement through plasma membranes), or dantrolene (inhibitor of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} release from sarcoplasmic reticulum), or BAPTA (Ca{sup 2+} chelator) also inhibited the NiCH-induced responses. These results suggest that [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} is also implicated in the genotoxicity of NiCH. Overall these data indicate that various types

  17. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensing in the unfolded protein response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gardner, Brooke M; Pincus, David; Gotthardt, Katja; Gallagher, Ciara M; Walter, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Secretory and transmembrane proteins enter the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as unfolded proteins and exit as either folded proteins in transit to their target organelles or as misfolded proteins targeted for degradation...

  19. Apoptosis-linked Gene-2 (ALG-2)/Sec31 Interactions Regulate Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Jared R.; Bentley, Marvin; Thorsen, Kevin D.; Wang, Ting; Foltz, Lauren; Oorschot, Viola; Klumperman, Judith; Hay, Jesse C.

    2014-01-01

    Luminal calcium released from secretory organelles has been suggested to play a regulatory role in vesicle transport at several steps in the secretory pathway; however, its functional roles and effector pathways have not been elucidated. Here we demonstrate for the first time that specific luminal calcium depletion leads to a significant decrease in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport rates in intact cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that luminal calcium depletion is accompanied by increased accumulation of intermediate compartment proteins in COPII buds and clusters of unfused COPII vesicles at ER exit sites. Furthermore, we present several lines of evidence suggesting that luminal calcium affected transport at least in part through calcium-dependent interactions between apoptosis-linked gene-2 (ALG-2) and the Sec31A proline-rich region: 1) targeted disruption of ALG-2/Sec31A interactions caused severe defects in ER-to-Golgi transport in intact cells; 2) effects of luminal calcium and ALG-2/Sec31A interactions on transport mutually required each other; and 3) Sec31A function in transport required luminal calcium. Morphological phenotypes of disrupted ALG-2/Sec31A interactions were characterized. We found that ALG-2/Sec31A interactions were not required for the localization of Sec31A to ER exit sites per se but appeared to acutely regulate the stability and trafficking of the cargo receptor p24 and the distribution of the vesicle tether protein p115. These results represent the first outline of a mechanism that connects luminal calcium to specific protein interactions regulating vesicle trafficking machinery. PMID:25006245

  20. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rayavarapu, Sree; Coley, William; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2012-01-01

    Our appreciation of the role of endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress pathways in both skeletal muscle homeostasis and the progression of muscle diseases is gaining momentum. This review provides insight into ER stress mechanisms during physiologic and pathological disturbances in skeletal muscle. The role of ER stress in the response to dietary alterations and acute stressors, including its role in autoimmune and genetic muscle disorders, has been described. Recent studies identifying ER stress m...

  2. Calcium signalling indicates bilateral power balancing in the Drosophila flight muscle during manoeuvring flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf; Skandalis, Dimitri A; Berthé, Ruben

    2013-05-06

    Manoeuvring flight in animals requires precise adjustments of mechanical power output produced by the flight musculature. In many insects such as fruit flies, power generation is most likely varied by altering stretch-activated tension, that is set by sarcoplasmic calcium levels. The muscles reside in a thoracic shell that simultaneously drives both wings during wing flapping. Using a genetically expressed muscle calcium indicator, we here demonstrate in vivo the ability of this animal to bilaterally adjust its calcium activation to the mechanical power output required to sustain aerodynamic costs during flight. Motoneuron-specific comparisons of calcium activation during lift modulation and yaw turning behaviour suggest slightly higher calcium activation for dorso-longitudinal than for dorsoventral muscle fibres, which corroborates the elevated need for muscle mechanical power during the wings' downstroke. During turning flight, calcium activation explains only up to 54 per cent of the required changes in mechanical power, suggesting substantial power transmission between both sides of the thoracic shell. The bilateral control of muscle calcium runs counter to the hypothesis that the thorax of flies acts as a single, equally proportional source for mechanical power production for both flapping wings. Collectively, power balancing highlights the precision with which insects adjust their flight motor to changing energetic requirements during aerial steering. This potentially enhances flight efficiency and is thus of interest for the development of technical vehicles that employ bioinspired strategies of power delivery to flapping wings.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress implicated in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Nguyen, Linda; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Robson, Matthew J; Omalu, Bennet I; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by neurofibrillary tau tangles following repetitive neurotrauma. The underlying mechanism linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy has not been elucidated. The authors investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress as a link between acute neurotrauma and chronic neurodegeneration. The authors used pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools to assess the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in linking acute repetitive traumatic brain injury to the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Data from the authors' clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model were compared with those obtained from postmortem human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens from a National Football League player and World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler. The results demonstrated strong correlation of endoplasmic reticulum stress activation with subsequent tau hyperphosphorylation. Various endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were increased in human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response was associated with an increase in the tau kinase, glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Docosahexaenoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, improved cognitive performance in the rat model 3 weeks after repetitive blast exposure. The data showed that docosahexaenoic acid administration substantially reduced tau hyperphosphorylation (t = 4.111, p chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Docosahexaenoic acid therefore warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptosis Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Seyda Seydel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Thhe endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the principal site for the synthesis, folding and maturation of most secreted proteins in the cell and essential for most cellular activities. Conditions that impair the folding capacity of the ER cause ER stress and induce a set of signaling pathways termed the unfolded protein response (UPR. If the protective mechanism activated by the UPR is not sufficient to restore normal ER function, cells die by apoptosis mechanism. Recent research suggests that ER stress and UPR play important roles in the metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity, cancer, immune response and in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington. Further studies on ER stress and UPR are necessary to clarify the exact role of this physiological mechanism and provide novel avenues to potential therapies. This review will provide an overview of ER stress, the UPR signaling pathways and ER stress induced apoptosis mechanism. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 221-235

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang-sheng LIU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal folding requires that unique conditions should be maintained within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER lumen, and nascent proteins are initially bound to Ca2+dependent chaperone proteins. Proteins synthesized in the ER are properly folded with the assistance of ER chaperones. misfolded proteins are disposed by ER-associated protein degradation. Accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER triggers an adaptive ER stress response, which leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR, a conserved pathway that transmits signals to restore homeostasis or eliminate the irreparably damaged cells. It has been shown that ER stress involves in pathophysiological development of many diseases, including neurological diseases. However, nowadays, a few studies have begun to focus on the possibility that the accumulation of misfolded proteins can also contribute to reproductive diseases. In this article, we mainly introduced the involvement of ER stress response in preimplantation embryos, placental development, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR and testicular germ cells so as to provide important insights for the molecular mechanisms of ER stress-induced apoptosis in reproductive diseases.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis impairment in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Gabriela; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Cabral-Miranda, Felipe; Vivar, Juan P; Hetz, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    Perturbed neuronal proteostasis is a salient feature shared by both aging and protein misfolding disorders. The proteostasis network controls the health of the proteome by integrating pathways involved in protein synthesis, folding, trafficking, secretion, and their degradation. A reduction in the buffering capacity of the proteostasis network during aging may increase the risk to undergo neurodegeneration by enhancing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. As almost one-third of the proteome is synthetized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), maintenance of its proper function is fundamental to sustain neuronal function. In fact, ER stress is a common feature of most neurodegenerative diseases. The unfolded protein response (UPR) operates as central player to maintain ER homeostasis or the induction of cell death of chronically damaged cells. Here, we discuss recent evidence placing ER stress as a driver of brain aging, and the emerging impact of neuronal UPR in controlling global proteostasis at the whole organismal level. Finally, we discuss possible therapeutic interventions to improve proteostasis and prevent pathological brain aging. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Ergin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, which results from different stimuli, is an important cellular event. There are different types of response to ER stress. One of them is evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response (UPR. UPR has three sensors for further activation of molecules. These sensors are inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1, activated transcription factor 6 (ATF6, and ER-resident protein kinase RNA (PKR-like ER kinase (PERK. In the absence of ER stress, these sensors are maintained in an inactive state. However, under ER stress conditions, they became activated and induce the downstream targets. As a consequence of ER stress, the cell may stay alive or became dead. Several studies have shown that ER stress is associated with different types of diseases such as diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer’s disease, prion disease, and cancer. As a cancer type, it has been shown that pancreatic cancer is also associated with ER stress. Pancreatic cancer has a low cure potential with its late diagnosis. Its association with ER stress is seen as a new therapeutic approach. The aim of this is review is to provide an overview of the mechanisms of ER stress and its relationship with pancreatic cancer, one of the diseases in which ER stress affects pathogenesis.

  8. Expression of the high capacity calcium-binding domain of calreticulin increases bioavailable calcium stores in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah E.; Tsou, Pei-Lan; Robertson, Dominique; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Modulation of cytosolic calcium levels in both plants and animals is achieved by a system of Ca2+-transport and storage pathways that include Ca2+ buffering proteins in the lumen of intracellular compartments. To date, most research has focused on the role of transporters in regulating cytosolic calcium. We used a reverse genetics approach to modulate calcium stores in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. Our goals were two-fold: to use the low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ binding characteristics of the C-domain of calreticulin to selectively increase Ca2+ storage in the endoplasmic reticulum, and to determine if those alterations affected plant physiological responses to stress. The C-domain of calreticulin is a highly acidic region that binds 20-50 moles of Ca2+ per mole of protein and has been shown to be the major site of Ca2+ storage within the endoplasmic reticulum of plant cells. A 377-bp fragment encoding the C-domain and ER retention signal from the maize calreticulin gene was fused to a gene for the green fluorescent protein and expressed in Arabidopsis under the control of a heat shock promoter. Following induction on normal medium, the C-domain transformants showed delayed loss of chlorophyll after transfer to calcium depleted medium when compared to seedlings transformed with green fluorescent protein alone. Total calcium measurements showed a 9-35% increase for induced C-domain transformants compared to controls. The data suggest that ectopic expression of the calreticulin C-domain increases Ca2+ stores, and that this Ca2+ reserve can be used by the plant in times of stress.

  9. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Calcium Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Also known as Calcium Scan Test A coronary calcium scan is a CT scan of your heart that detects and measures the amount of calcium in the walls of your coronary arteries. Overview ...

  10. SR and mitochondria: calcium cross-talk between kissing cousins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Gerald W; Maack, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    The processes of excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac myocytes require enormous amounts of energy in the form of ATP, which is produced by oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Due to the constantly varying workloads of the heart, efficient matching of energy supply to demand is a requisite for proper heart function. Ca(2+) is taken up by mitochondria via the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) where it stimulates key dehydrogenases of the Krebs cycle to match regeneration of NADH to its oxidation by the respiratory chain. The kinetics of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, however, remain controversial due to the low Ca(2+) sensitivity of the MCU. Here, we review the evidence for the existence of a "mitochondrial Ca(2+) microdomain", in which the close association of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) to mitochondria provides "hot spots" of very high Ca(2+) concentrations in the vicinity of mitochondria, sufficient to overcome the low Ca(2+) affinity of the MCU. Mitofusins 1 and 2 play redundant roles in regulating mitochondrial dynamics by controlling fusion of mitochondria with each other. Recent work revealed a unique role for mitofusin 2 in tethering mitochondria to the sarco-/endoplasmic reticulum in various cell types, including cardiac myocytes. Disruption of SR-mitochondrial Ca(2+) cross talk in heart failure through spatial and ionic alterations may give rise to energetic deficit and oxidative stress, two factors believed to play causal roles in the progression of the disease. On the other hand, excessive mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake can trigger programmed necrosis, substantiating the ambiguity of the close interplay between these cousin organelles in health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Focus on Cardiac Metabolism". Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analytical solution of reaction-diffusion equations for calcium wave propagation in a starburst amacrine cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, R R

    2010-09-01

    A reaction-diffusion model is presented to encapsulate calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) as a potential mechanism for somatofugal bias of dendritic calcium movement in starburst amacrine cells. Calcium dynamics involves a simple calcium extrusion (pump) and a buffering mechanism of calcium binding proteins homogeneously distributed over the plasma membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum within starburst amacrine cells. The system of reaction-diffusion equations in the excess buffer (or low calcium concentration) approximation are reformulated as a nonlinear Volterra integral equation which is solved analytically via a regular perturbation series expansion in response to calcium feedback from a continuously and uniformly distributed calcium sources. Calculation of luminal calcium diffusion in the absence of buffering enables a wave to travel at distances of 120 μm from the soma to distal tips of a starburst amacrine cell dendrite in 100 msec, yet in the presence of discretely distributed calcium-binding proteins it is unknown whether the propagating calcium wave-front in the somatofugal direction is further impeded by endogenous buffers. If so, this would indicate CICR to be an unlikely mechanism of retinal direction selectivity in starburst amacrine cells.

  12. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  13. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  14. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  15. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  16. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  17. Critical reappraisal confirms that Mitofusin 2 is an endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria tether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naon, Deborah; Zaninello, Marta; Giacomello, Marta; Varanita, Tatiana; Grespi, Francesca; Lakshminaranayan, Sowmya; Serafini, Annalisa; Semenzato, Martina; Herkenne, Stephanie; Hernández-Alvarez, Maria Isabel; Zorzano, Antonio; De Stefani, Diego; Dorn, Gerald W; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-10-04

    The discovery of the multiple roles of mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) juxtaposition in cell biology often relied upon the exploitation of Mitofusin (Mfn) 2 as an ER-mitochondria tether. However, this established Mfn2 function was recently questioned, calling for a critical re-evaluation of Mfn2's role in ER-mitochondria cross-talk. Electron microscopy and fluorescence-based probes of organelle proximity confirmed that ER-mitochondria juxtaposition was reduced by constitutive or acute Mfn2 deletion. Functionally, mitochondrial uptake of Ca 2+ released from the ER was reduced following acute Mfn2 ablation, as well as in Mfn2 -/- cells overexpressing the mitochondrial calcium uniporter. Mitochondrial Ca 2+ uptake rate and extent were normal in isolated Mfn2 -/- liver mitochondria, consistent with the finding that acute or chronic Mfn2 ablation or overexpression did not alter mitochondrial calcium uniporter complex component levels. Hence, Mfn2 stands as a bona fide ER-mitochondria tether whose ablation decreases interorganellar juxtaposition and communication.

  18. Baicalein Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxia Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains a disastrous disease and the treatment for HCC is rather limited. Separation and identification of active compounds from traditionally used herbs in HCC treatment may shed light on novel therapeutic drugs for HCC. Methods. Cell viability and colony forming assay were conducted to determine anti-HCC activity. Morphology of cells and activity of caspases were analyzed. Antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and JNK were also examined. Levels of unfolded protein response (UPR markers were determined and intracellular calcium was assayed. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs were used to investigate the role of UPR and autophagy in baicalein-induced cell death. Results. Among four studied flavonoids, only baicalein exhibited satisfactory inhibition of viability and colony formation of HCC cells within water-soluble concentration. Baicalein induced apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, possibly by downregulating prosurvival Bcl-2 family, increasing intracellular calcium, and activating JNK. CHOP was the executor of cell death during baicalein-induced ER stress while eIF2α and IRE1α played protective roles. Protective autophagy was also triggered by baicalein in HCC cells. Conclusion. Baicalein exhibits prominent anti-HCC activity. This flavonoid induces apoptosis and protective autophagy via ER stress. Combination of baicalein and autophagy inhibitors may represent a promising therapy against HCC.

  19. Hyperthermia Induces Apoptosis through Endoplasmic Reticulum and Reactive Oxygen Species in Human Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Han Hou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a relatively rare form of cancer, but OS is the most commonly diagnosed bone cancer in children and adolescents. Chemotherapy has side effects and induces drug resistance in OS. Since an effective adjuvant therapy was insufficient for treating OS, researching novel and adequate remedies is critical. Hyperthermia can induce cell death in various cancer cells, and thus, in this study, we investigated the anticancer method of hyperthermia in human OS (U-2 OS cells. Treatment at 43 °C for 60 min induced apoptosis in human OS cell lines, but not in primary bone cells. Furthermore, hyperthermia was associated with increases of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and caspase-3 activation in U-2 OS cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction was followed by the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, and was accompanied by decreased anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, and increased pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax. Hyperthermia triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, which was characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels, as well as increased calpain expression and activity. In addition, cells treated with calcium chelator (BAPTA-AM blocked hyperthermia-induced cell apoptosis in U-2 OS cells. In conclusion, hyperthermia induced cell apoptosis substantially via the ROS, ER stress, mitochondria, and caspase pathways. Thus, hyperthermia may be a novel anticancer method for treating OS.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α mediates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress in homocysteine-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Xu, Hua; Hao, Yinju; Zhao, Li; Cai, Xin; Tian, Jue; Zhang, Minghao; Han, Xuebo; Ma, Shengchao; Cao, Jun; Jiang, Yideng

    2014-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is emerging as an important modulator of different pathological process and as a mechanism contributing to homocysteine (Hcy)-induced hepar injury. However, the molecular event that Hcy-induced ER stress in the hepar under the atherosclerosis background is currently unknown. Endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α (ERO1α) plays a crucial role in maintaining ER stress function. In this study, we determined the expression of ERO1α in the hepar in hyperhomocysteinemia and the effect of ERO1α in hepacytes ER stress in the presence of Hcy. HHcy model was established by feeding the methionine diet in apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice, and the hepatocytes were incubated with folate and different concentrations of Hcy. Our results showed that Hcy triggered ER stress characterized by an increased contents of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), activating transcription factor (ATF) 6 and X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1). The ERO1α expressions in HHcy mice and Hcy-treated hepatocytes were decreased compared with those in ApoE-/- group and control hepacytes (P stress. Meanwhile, the expressions of ER stress-related factor including GRP78, PERK, ATF6 and XBP-1, were significantly decreased when the ERO1α gene was over-expressed in hepacytes. Our results suggested that ERO1α may be involved in Hcy-induced hepar ER stress, and the inhibition of ERO1α expression can accelerate this process. © The Author 2014. Published by ABBS Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-homeostasis is altered in small and non-small cell lung cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufman Amanda

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of differences in the cellular physiology of malignant and non-malignant cells is a prerequisite for the development of cancer treatments that effectively kill cancer without damaging normal cells. Calcium is a ubiquitous signal molecule that is involved in the control of proliferation and apoptosis. We aimed to investigate if the endoplasmic reticulum (ER Ca2+-homeostasis is different in lung cancer and normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells. Methods The intracellular Ca2+-signaling was investigated using fluorescence microscopy and the expression of Ca2+-regulating proteins was assessed using Western Blot analysis. Results In a Small Cell Lung Cancer (H1339 and an Adeno Carcinoma Lung Cancer (HCC cell line but not in a Squamous Cell Lung Cancer (EPLC and a Large Cell Lung Cancer (LCLC cell line the ER Ca2+-content was reduced compared to NHBE. The reduced Ca2+-content correlated with a reduced expression of SERCA 2 pumping calcium into the ER, an increased expression of IP3R releasing calcium from the ER, and a reduced expression of calreticulin buffering calcium within the ER. Lowering the ER Ca2+-content with CPA led to increased proliferation NHBE and lung cancer cells. Conclusion The significant differences in Ca2+-homeostasis between lung cancer and NHBE cells could represent a new target for cancer treatments.

  2. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium...

  3. Cardiovascular Topics The effect of anthracyclines on myocardial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1999-02-01

    Feb 1, 1999 ... tion impede the return of myocytes to the resting state, and therefore decrease diastolic compliance.1O Anthracyclines also interfere with calcium homeostasis by injuring the mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcolemma. These events lead to death of the myocyte, which is replaced by fibrosis ...

  4. Localization and in-vivo characterization of thapsia garganica CYP76AE2 indicates a role in thapsigargin biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine Bundgaard; Martinez-Swatson, Karen Agatha; Rasmussen, Silas Anselm

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean plant Thapsia garganica (dicot, Apiaceae), also known as deadly carrot, produces the highly toxic compound thapsigargin. This compound is a potent inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -ATPase calcium pump in mammals and is of industrial importance as the active...

  5. Lipid Transport between the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flis, Vid V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are partially autonomous organelles that depend on the import of certain proteins and lipids to maintain cell survival and membrane formation. Although phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylethanolamine are synthesized by mitochondrial enzymes, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and sterols need to be imported from other organelles. The origin of most lipids imported into mitochondria is the endoplasmic reticulum, which requires interaction of these two subcellular compartments. Recently, protein complexes that are involved in membrane contact between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria were identified, but their role in lipid transport is still unclear. In the present review, we describe components involved in lipid translocation between the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria and discuss functional as well as regulatory aspects that are important for lipid homeostasis. PMID:23732475

  6. Arabidopsis SYT1 maintains stability of cortical endoplasmic reticulum networks and VAP27-1-enriched endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, Wei; Wang, Pengwei; Voigt, Boris; Hussey, Patrick J; Baluska, Frantisek

    2016-11-01

    Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is localized on the endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane (ER-PM) contact sites in leaf and root cells. The ER-PM localization of Arabidopsis SYT1 resembles that of the extended synaptotagmins (E-SYTs) in animal cells. In mammals, E-SYTs have been shown to regulate calcium signaling, lipid transfer, and endocytosis. Arabidopsis SYT1 was reported to be essential for maintaining cell integrity and virus movement. This study provides detailed insight into the subcellular localization of SYT1 and VAP27-1, another ER-PM-tethering protein. SYT1 and VAP27-1 were shown to be localized on distinct ER-PM contact sites. The VAP27-1-enriched ER-PM contact sites (V-EPCSs) were always in contact with the SYT1-enriched ER-PM contact sites (S-EPCSs). The V-EPCSs still existed in the leaf epidermal cells of the SYT1 null mutant; however, they were less stable than those in the wild type. The polygonal networks of cortical ER disassembled and the mobility of VAP27-1 protein on the ER-PM contact sites increased in leaf cells of the SYT1 null mutant. These results suggest that SYT1 is responsible for stabilizing the ER network and V-EPCSs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. Identification of calcium-transporting ATPases of Entamoeba histolytica and cellular localization of the putative SERCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Higuera, Aarón; Salas-Casas, Andrés; Calixto-Gálvez, Mercedes; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Pérez-Ishiwara, D Guillermo; Ximénez, Cecilia; Rodríguez, Mario A

    2013-09-01

    Calcium has an important role on signaling of different cellular processes in the protozoa parasite Entamoeba histolytica, including development and pathogenesis. However, the systems that control calcium responses in this parasite are incompletely understood. Calcium-ATPases (Ca(2+)-ATPases) are proteins that play an important role in calcium homeostasis by catalyzing the active efflux of this ion from cytoplasm and are essential to the correct functioning of the cell machinery. Here, we reported the identification of five E. histolytica genes encoding putative Ca(2+)-ATPases, three related to PMCA, and two related to organellar ATPases. RT-PCR assays showed that all those genes are expressed in trophozoites and specific antibodies against the SERCA-like member located this protein in a continuous cytoplasmic network, supporting the hypothesis that it corresponds to the Ca(2+)-ATPase responsible to sequester calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum of this parasite. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A luminal flavoprotein in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riemer, Jan; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian; Johansson, Linda

    2009-01-01

    The quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) discriminates between native and nonnative proteins. The latter are degraded by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. Whereas many cytosolic and membrane components of this system are known, only few luminal players have been id...

  9. Region-specific vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-11-06

    Nov 6, 2013 ... Region-specific vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal death in rat brain after status epilepticus. JING CHEN. †,*. , HU GUO. †. , GUO ZHENG and ZHONG-NAN SHI. Department of Neurology, Nanjing Children's Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical. University, No. 72, Guangzhou ...

  10. How are proteins reduced in the endoplasmic reticulum?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellgaard, Lars; Sevier, Carolyn S.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2018-01-01

    The reversal of thiol oxidation in proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for protein folding, degradation, chaperone function, and the ER stress response. Our understanding of this process is generally poor but progress has been made. Enzymes performing the initial reduction o...

  11. Effect of tumour necrosis factor-alpha on total myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis and polysomal aggregation in rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheema, I R; Hermann, C; Postell, S; Holifield, B

    1999-01-01

    The total sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein synthesis was reduced in incubated fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus of rat after in vivo tumour necrosis factor-alpha treatment at 50 micrograms/kg/day for 5 days. The rate of protein synthesis in the myofibrillar fraction was inhibited more severely (41% in EDL and 34% in soleus) than that in the sarcoplasmic fraction (23% in EDL and 14% in soleus). Sucrose density gradient centrifugation analysis indicated that TNF-alpha treatment impaired polysomal aggregation in rat diaphragm muscle. Compared with the control muscles, the ratio of 40S and 60S subunits to polysomes was higher in TNF-alpha treated muscles. These findings suggest a role for TNF-alpha in the translational regulation of protein synthesis in rat skeletal muscle.

  12. Gel-based phosphoproteomics analysis of sarcoplasmic proteins in postmortem porcine muscle with pH decline rate and time differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Honggang; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Karlsson, Anders H

    2011-01-01

    phosphorylation in sarcoplasmic proteins from three groups of pigs with different pH decline rates from PM 1 to 24¿h. Globally, the fast pH decline group had the highest phosphorylation level at PM 1¿h, but lowest at 24¿h, whereas the slow pH decline group showed the reverse case. The same pattern was also...

  13. Bax inhibitor 1, a modulator of calcium homeostasis, confers affective resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsberger, Joshua G; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Austin, Daniel R; Zarate, Carlos; Chuang, De-Maw; Chen, Guang; Reed, John C; Manji, Husseini K

    2011-07-27

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a critical site for intracellular calcium storage as well as protein synthesis, folding, and trafficking. Disruption of these processes is gaining support for contributing to heritable vulnerability of certain diseases. Here, we investigated Bax inhibitor 1 (BI-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that primarily resides in the ER and associates with B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-XL, as an affective resiliency factor through its modulation of calcium homeostasis. We found that transgenic (TG) mice with BI-1 reinforced expression, via the neuronal specific enolase promoter, showed protection against the learned helplessness (LH) paradigm, an animal model to test stress coping. TG mice were also protected against anhedonia following both serotonin and catecholamine depletion as measured in two different models, the female urine sniffing test and the saccharine preference test. In addition, we used primary mouse cortical cultures to explore the ability of BI-1 to influence calcium homeostasis under basal conditions and also following challenge with thapsigargin (THPS), an inhibitor of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) that disrupts calcium homeostasis. TG neurons showed decreased basal cytosolic calcium levels and decreased Ca(2+) cytosolic accumulation following challenge with THPS as compared to WT neuronal cultures. Together, these data suggest that BI-1, through its actions on calcium homeostasis, may confer affective resiliency in multiple animal models of depression and anhedonia. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Sulfatase modifying factor 1 trafficking through the cells: from endoplasmic reticulum to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Ester; Buono, Mario; Pepe, Stefano; Settembre, Carmine; Annunziata, Ida; Surace, Enrico Maria; Dierks, Thomas; Monti, Maria; Cozzolino, Marianna; Pucci, Piero; Ballabio, Andrea; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2007-05-16

    Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) is the gene mutated in multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) that encodes the formylglycine-generating enzyme, an essential activator of all the sulfatases. SUMF1 is a glycosylated enzyme that is resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although it is also secreted. Here, we demonstrate that upon secretion, SUMF1 can be taken up from the medium by several cell lines. Furthermore, the in vivo engineering of mice liver to produce SUMF1 shows its secretion into the blood serum and its uptake into different tissues. Additionally, we show that non-glycosylated forms of SUMF1 can still be secreted, while only the glycosylated SUMF1 enters cells, via a receptor-mediated mechanism. Surprisingly, following its uptake, SUMF1 shuttles from the plasma membrane to the ER, a route that has to date only been well characterized for some of the toxins. Remarkably, once taken up and relocalized into the ER, SUMF1 is still active, enhancing the sulfatase activities in both cultured cells and mice tissues.

  15. Substitutions in Calcium Aluminates and Calcium Aluminoferrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, *CEMENTS, * CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, * FERRITES , *SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, SUBSTITUTES, CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS.

  16. Drosophila wing imaginal discs respond to mechanical injury via slow InsP3R-mediated intercellular calcium waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Simon; Basler, Konrad

    2016-08-01

    Calcium signalling is a highly versatile cellular communication system that modulates basic functions such as cell contractility, essential steps of animal development such as fertilization and higher-order processes such as memory. We probed the function of calcium signalling in Drosophila wing imaginal discs through a combination of ex vivo and in vivo imaging and genetic analysis. Here we discover that wing discs display slow, long-range intercellular calcium waves (ICWs) when mechanically stressed in vivo or cultured ex vivo. These slow imaginal disc intercellular calcium waves (SIDICs) are mediated by the inositol-3-phosphate receptor, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium pump SERCA and the key gap junction component Inx2. The knockdown of genes required for SIDIC formation and propagation negatively affects wing disc recovery after mechanical injury. Our results reveal a role for ICWs in wing disc homoeostasis and highlight the utility of the wing disc as a model for calcium signalling studies.

  17. Inhibition of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+-ATPase by thapsigargin analogs induces cell death via ER Ca2+ depletion and the unfolded protein response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehgal, Pankaj; Szalai, Paula; Olesen, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) is a fundamental regulator of cell signaling and function. Thapsigargin (Tg) blocks the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA), disrupts Ca2+ homeostasis, and causes cell death. However, the exact mechanisms whereby SERCA-inhibition induces cell death are incompletely...... and their detrimental effects on cell viability. Furthermore, caspase activation and cell death were associated with a sustained unfolded protein response (UPR). We conclude that ER Ca2+ drainage and sustained UPR activation are key for initiation of apoptosis at low concentrations of Tg and Tg analogs, whereas high...

  18. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium-channel blockers are a type of medicine used to ...

  19. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  20. Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase is a molecular partner of Wolfram syndrome 1 protein, which negatively regulates its expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatyka, Malgorzata; Da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Bellomo, Elisa A.; Leadbeater, Wendy; Astuti, Dewi; Smith, Joel; Michelangeli, Frank; Rutter, Guy A.; Barrett, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and diabetes mellitus. The gene responsible for the syndrome (WFS1) encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that is involved in the regulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), intracellular ion homeostasis, cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. In this study, single cell Ca2+ imaging with fura-2 and direct measurements of free cytosolic ATP concentration ([ATP]CYT) with adenovirally expressed luciferase confirmed a reduced and delayed rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]CYT), and additionally, diminished [ATP]CYT rises in response to elevated glucose concentrations in WFS1-depleted MIN6 cells. We also observed that sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) expression was elevated in several WFS1-depleted cell models and primary islets. We demonstrated a novel interaction between WFS1 and SERCA by co-immunoprecipitation in Cos7 cells and with endogenous proteins in human neuroblastoma cells. This interaction was reduced when cells were treated with the ER stress inducer dithiothreitol. Treatment of WFS1-depleted neuroblastoma cells with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 resulted in reduced accumulation of SERCA levels compared with wild-type cells. Together these results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of SERCA and provide further insights into the function of WFS1 in calcium homeostasis. PMID:25274773

  1. ER-mitochondria contacts: Actin dynamics at the ER control mitochondrial fission via calcium release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Janos; Koehler, Carla M

    2018-01-02

    The formin-like protein INF2 is an important player in the polymerization of actin filaments. In this issue, Chakrabarti et al. (2018. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201709111) demonstrate that INF2 mediates actin polymerization at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in increased ER-mitochondria contacts, calcium uptake by mitochondria, and mitochondrial division. © 2018 Steffen and Koehler.

  2. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of

  3. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  4. Excessive Signal Transduction of Gain-of-Function Variants of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) Are Associated with Increased ER to Cytosol Calcium Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mise, Annarita; Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Soldati, Laura; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA) and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA). Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt) and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K) variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate) receptor inputs to cell function. PMID:24244430

  5. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response: A link with tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yongyong; Zhao, Deming; Barrow, Paul Andrew; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the worldwide. The endoplasmic-reticulum stress (ERS) response constitutes a cellular process that is triggered by mycobacterial infection that disturbs the folding of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced to suspend the synthesis of early proteins and reduce the accumulation of unfolded- or misfolded proteins in the ER restoring normal physiological cell function. Prolonged or uncontrolled ERS leads to the activation of three signaling pathways (IRE1, PERK and ATF6) which directs the cell towards apoptosis. The absence of this process facilitates spread of the mycobacteria within the body. We summarize here recent advances in understanding the signaling pathway diversity governing ERS in relation to TB. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of glycoproteins in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eHüttner

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In all eukaryotes the endoplasmic reticulum (ER has a central role in protein folding and maturation of secretory and membrane proteins. Upon translocation into the ER polypeptides are immediately subjected to folding and modifications involving the formation of disulfide bridges, assembly of subunits to multi-protein complexes and glycosylation. During these processes incompletely folded, terminally misfolded and unassembled proteins can accumulate which endanger the cellular homeostasis and subsequently the survival of cells and tissues. Consequently, organisms have developed a quality control system to cope with this problem and remove the unwanted protein load from the ER by a process collectively referred to as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD pathway. Recent studies in Arabidopsis have identified plant ERAD components involved in the degradation of aberrant proteins and evidence was provided for a specific role in abiotic stress tolerance. In this short review we discuss our current knowledge about this important cellular pathway.

  7. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A

    2011-01-01

    Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) fragments, cartilage and blood from four patients were used for morphological and molecular analysis. Controls included articular cartilage and blood samples from healthy individuals. Light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed abnormalities...... in chondrocytes and extracellular matrix of cartilage from OCD patients. Abnormal type II collagen heterofibrils in "bundles" and chondrocytes with abnormal accumulation of matrix proteins in distended rough endoplasmic reticulum were typical findings. Further, Von Kossa staining and TEM showed empty lacunae...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress: Its Role in Disease and Novel Prospects for Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönthal, Axel H.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle required for lipid biosynthesis, calcium storage, and protein folding and processing. A number of physiological and pathological conditions, as well as a variety of pharmacological agents, are able to disturb proper ER function and thereby cause ER stress, which severely impairs protein folding and therefore poses the risk of proteotoxicity. Specific triggers for ER stress include, for example, particular intracellular alterations (e.g., calcium or redox imbalances), certain microenvironmental conditions (e.g., hypoglycemia, hypoxia, and acidosis), high-fat and high-sugar diet, a variety of natural compounds (e.g., thapsigargin, tunicamycin, and geldanamycin), and several prescription drugs (e.g., bortezomib/Velcade, celecoxib/Celebrex, and nelfinavir/Viracept). The cell reacts to ER stress by initiating a defensive process, called the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is comprised of cellular mechanisms aimed at adaptation and safeguarding cellular survival or, in cases of excessively severe stress, at initiation of apoptosis and elimination of the faulty cell. In recent years, this dichotomic stress response system has been linked to several human diseases, and efforts are underway to develop approaches to exploit ER stress mechanisms for therapy. For example, obesity and type 2 diabetes have been linked to ER stress-induced failure of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and current research efforts are aimed at developing drugs that ameliorate cellular stress and thereby protect beta cell function. Other studies seek to pharmacologically aggravate chronic ER stress in cancer cells in order to enhance apoptosis and achieve tumor cell death. In the following, these principles will be presented and discussed. PMID:24278747

  9. Where the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondrion tie the knot: the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raturi, Arun; Simmen, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    More than a billion years ago, bacterial precursors of mitochondria became endosymbionts in what we call eukaryotic cells today. The true significance of the word "endosymbiont" has only become clear to cell biologists with the discovery that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) superorganelle dedicates a special domain for the metabolic interaction with mitochondria. This domain, identified in all eukaryotic cell systems from yeast to man and called the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM), has a distinct proteome, specific tethers on the cytosolic face and regulatory proteins in the ER lumen of the ER. The MAM has distinct biochemical properties and appears as ER tubules closely apposed to mitochondria on electron micrographs. The functions of the MAM range from lipid metabolism and calcium signaling to inflammasome formation. Consistent with these functions, the MAM is enriched in lipid metabolism enzymes and calcium handling proteins. During cellular stress situations, like an altered cellular redox state, the MAM alters its set of regulatory proteins and thus alters MAM functions. Notably, this set prominently comprises ER chaperones and oxidoreductases that connect protein synthesis and folding inside the ER to mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, ER membranes associated with mitochondria also accommodate parts of the machinery that determines mitochondrial membrane dynamics and connect mitochondria to the cytoskeleton. Together, these exciting findings demonstrate that the physiological interactions between the ER and mitochondria are so bilateral that we are tempted to compare their relationship to the one of a married couple: distinct, but inseparable and certainly dependent on each other. In this paradigm, the MAM stands for the intracellular location where the two organelles tie the knot. Resembling "real life", the happy marriage between the two organelles prevents the onset of diseases that are characterized by disrupted metabolism and decreased lifespan

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-sensing mechanism is activated in Entamoeba histolytica upon treatment with nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Santi-Rocca

    Full Text Available The Endoplasmic Reticulum stores calcium and is a site of protein synthesis and modification. Changes in ER homeostasis lead to stress responses with an activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR. The Entamoeba histolytica endomembrane system is simple compared to those of higher eukaryotes, as a canonical ER is not observed. During amoebiasis, an infection of the human intestine and liver by E. histolytica, nitric oxide (NO triggers an apoptotic-like event preceded by an impairment of energy production and a loss of important parasite pathogenic features. We address the question of how this ancient eukaryote responds to stress induced by immune components (i.e. NO and whether stress leads to ER changes and subsequently to an UPR. Gene expression analysis suggested that NO triggers stress responses marked by (i dramatic up-regulation of hsp genes although a bona fide UPR is absent; (ii induction of DNA repair and redox gene expression and iii up-regulation of glycolysis-related gene expression. Enzymology approaches demonstrate that NO directly inhibits glycolysis and enhance cysteine synthase activity. Using live imaging and confocal microscopy we found that NO dramatically provokes extensive ER fragmentation. ER fission in E. histolytica appears as a protective response against stress, as it has been recently proposed for neuron self-defense during neurologic disorders. Chronic ER stress is also involved in metabolic diseases including diabetes, where NO production reduces ER calcium levels and activates cell death. Our data highlighted unique cellular responses of interest to understand the mechanisms of parasite death during amoebiasis.

  11. Osteochondritis dissecans (OCD), an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, Peter Storgaard; Horn, T; Kruse, H A

    2011-01-01

    and aggrecan indicating that hypertrophic chondrocytes express a phenotype of bone cells during endochondral ossification. Types I, VI and X collagens were also present across the entire dissecates suggesting that chondrocytes were dedifferentiated. DNA sequencings were non-conclusive, only single nucleotide...... polymorphism was found within the COL2A1 gene for one patient. We suggest that OCD lesions are caused by an alteration in chondrocyte matrix synthesis causing an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease phenotype, which disturbs or abrupts endochondral ossification....

  12. Prediction of endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins using fragmented amino acid composition and support vector machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The endoplasmic reticulum plays an important role in many cellular processes, which includes protein synthesis, folding and post-translational processing of newly synthesized proteins. It is also the site for quality control of misfolded proteins and entry point of extracellular proteins to the secretory pathway. Hence at any given point of time, endoplasmic reticulum contains two different cohorts of proteins, (i proteins involved in endoplasmic reticulum-specific function, which reside in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, called as endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins and (ii proteins which are in process of moving to the extracellular space. Thus, endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins must somehow be distinguished from newly synthesized secretory proteins, which pass through the endoplasmic reticulum on their way out of the cell. Approximately only 50% of the proteins used in this study as training data had endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, which shows that these signals are not essentially present in all endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins. This also strongly indicates the role of additional factors in retention of endoplasmic reticulum-specific proteins inside the endoplasmic reticulum. Methods This is a support vector machine based method, where we had used different forms of protein features as inputs for support vector machine to develop the prediction models. During training leave-one-out approach of cross-validation was used. Maximum performance was obtained with a combination of amino acid compositions of different part of proteins. Results In this study, we have reported a novel support vector machine based method for predicting endoplasmic reticulum resident proteins, named as ERPred. During training we achieved a maximum accuracy of 81.42% with leave-one-out approach of cross-validation. When evaluated on independent dataset, ERPred did prediction with sensitivity of 72.31% and specificity of 83

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: implications for inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, Arthur; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of the emerging role of cellular stress responses in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent findings The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a primitive cellular pathway that is engaged when responding to endoplasmic reticulum stress and regulates autophagy. Highly secretory cells such as Paneth cells and goblet cells in the intestines are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum stress and are exceedingly dependent upon a properly functioning UPR to maintain cellular viability and homeostasis. Primary genetic abnormalities within the components of the UPR (e.g. XBP1, ARG2, ORMDL3), genes that encode proteins reliant upon a robust secretory pathway (e.g. MUC2, HLAB27) and environmental factors that create disturbances in the UPR (e.g. microbial products and inflammatory cytokines) are important factors in the primary development and/or perpetuation of intestinal inflammation. Summary Endoplasmic reticulum stress is an important new pathway involved in the development of intestinal inflammation associated with IBD and likely other intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:20495455

  14. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Chen-Ming [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shih-Wei [Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Lee, Tzong-Huei [Graduate Institute of Pharmacognosy, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Wen-Pei [Graduate Institute of Sports and Health, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Che-Jen [School of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, Shih-Chia [Department of Orthopaedics, Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tang, Chih-Hsin, E-mail: chtang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, College of Health Science, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. - Highlights: • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma apoptosis. • ER stress is involved in trichodermin-induced cell death. • Trichodermin induces chondrosarcoma death in vivo.

  15. Sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase. A critical target in chlorine inhalation-induced cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shama; Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B; Loader, Joan E; Claycomb, William C; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian; Reisdorph, Nichole; Powell, Roger L; Chandler, Joshua D; Day, Brian J; Veress, Livia A; White, Carl W

    2015-04-01

    Autopsy specimens from human victims or experimental animals that die due to acute chlorine gas exposure present features of cardiovascular pathology. We demonstrate acute chlorine inhalation-induced reduction in heart rate and oxygen saturation in rats. Chlorine inhalation elevated chlorine reactants, such as chlorotyrosine and chloramine, in blood plasma. Using heart tissue and primary cardiomyocytes, we demonstrated that acute high-concentration chlorine exposure in vivo (500 ppm for 30 min) caused decreased total ATP content and loss of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) activity. Loss of SERCA activity was attributed to chlorination of tyrosine residues and oxidation of an important cysteine residue, cysteine-674, in SERCA, as demonstrated by immunoblots and mass spectrometry. Using cardiomyocytes, we found that chlorine-induced cell death and damage to SERCA could be decreased by thiocyanate, an important biological antioxidant, and by genetic SERCA2 overexpression. We also investigated a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug, ranolazine, used in treatment of cardiac diseases, and previously shown to stabilize SERCA in animal models of ischemia-reperfusion. Pretreatment with ranolazine or istaroxime, another SERCA activator, prevented chlorine-induced cardiomyocyte death. Further investigation of responsible mechanisms showed that ranolazine- and istaroxime-treated cells preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP after chlorine exposure. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel critical target for chlorine in the heart and identify potentially useful therapies to mitigate toxicity of acute chlorine exposure.

  16. Sarcoendoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ ATPase. A Critical Target in Chlorine Inhalation–Induced Cardiotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aftab; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.; Loader, Joan E.; Claycomb, William C.; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian; Reisdorph, Nichole; Powell, Roger L.; Chandler, Joshua D.; Day, Brian J.; Veress, Livia A.; White, Carl W.

    2015-01-01

    Autopsy specimens from human victims or experimental animals that die due to acute chlorine gas exposure present features of cardiovascular pathology. We demonstrate acute chlorine inhalation–induced reduction in heart rate and oxygen saturation in rats. Chlorine inhalation elevated chlorine reactants, such as chlorotyrosine and chloramine, in blood plasma. Using heart tissue and primary cardiomyocytes, we demonstrated that acute high-concentration chlorine exposure in vivo (500 ppm for 30 min) caused decreased total ATP content and loss of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) activity. Loss of SERCA activity was attributed to chlorination of tyrosine residues and oxidation of an important cysteine residue, cysteine-674, in SERCA, as demonstrated by immunoblots and mass spectrometry. Using cardiomyocytes, we found that chlorine-induced cell death and damage to SERCA could be decreased by thiocyanate, an important biological antioxidant, and by genetic SERCA2 overexpression. We also investigated a U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved drug, ranolazine, used in treatment of cardiac diseases, and previously shown to stabilize SERCA in animal models of ischemia–reperfusion. Pretreatment with ranolazine or istaroxime, another SERCA activator, prevented chlorine-induced cardiomyocyte death. Further investigation of responsible mechanisms showed that ranolazine- and istaroxime-treated cells preserved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP after chlorine exposure. Thus, these studies demonstrate a novel critical target for chlorine in the heart and identify potentially useful therapies to mitigate toxicity of acute chlorine exposure. PMID:25188881

  17. Expanded polyglutamine embedded in the endoplasmic reticulum causes membrane distortion and coincides with Bax insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Masashi; Li, Shimo; Itoh, Masanori; Wang, Miao-xing; Hayakawa, Miki; Islam, Saiful; Tana; Nakagawa, Kiyomi [Department of Neurobiology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Chen, Huayue [Department of Anatomy, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan); Nakagawa, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tnakagaw@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurobiology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1194 (Japan)

    2016-05-27

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is important in various cellular functions, such as secretary and membrane protein biosynthesis, lipid synthesis, and calcium storage. ER stress, including membrane distortion, is associated with many diseases such as Huntington's disease. In particular, nuclear envelope distortion is related to neuronal cell death associated with polyglutamine. However, the mechanism by which polyglutamine causes ER membrane distortion remains unclear. We used electron microscopy, fluorescence protease protection assay, and alkaline treatment to analyze the localization of polyglutamine in cells. We characterized polyglutamine embedded in the ER membrane and noted an effect on morphology, including the dilation of ER luminal space and elongation of ER-mitochondria contact sites, in addition to the distortion of the nuclear envelope. The polyglutamine embedded in the ER membrane was observed at the same time as Bax insertion. These results demonstrated that the ER membrane may be a target of polyglutamine, which triggers cell death through Bax. -- Highlights: •We characterized polyglutamine embedded in the ER membrane. •The polyglutamine embedded in the ER membrane was observed at the same time as Bax insertion. •The ER membrane may be a target of polyglutamine, which triggers cell death.

  18. Trichodermin induces cell apoptosis through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress in human chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen-Ming; Wang, Shih-Wei; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Tzeng, Wen-Pei; Hsiao, Che-Jen; Liu, Shih-Chia; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2013-10-15

    Chondrosarcoma is the second most common primary bone tumor, and it responds poorly to both chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Nalanthamala psidii was described originally as Myxosporium in 1926. This is the first study to investigate the anti-tumor activity of trichodermin (trichothec-9-en-4-ol, 12,13-epoxy-, acetate), an endophytic fungal metabolite from N. psidii against human chondrosarcoma cells. We demonstrated that trichodermin induced cell apoptosis in human chondrosarcoma cell lines (JJ012 and SW1353 cells) instead of primary chondrocytes. In addition, trichodermin triggered endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress protein levels of IRE1, p-PERK, GRP78, and GRP94, which were characterized by changes in cytosolic calcium levels. Furthermore, trichodermin induced the upregulation of Bax and Bid, the downregulation of Bcl-2, and the dysfunction of mitochondria, which released cytochrome c and activated caspase-3 in human chondrosarcoma. In addition, animal experiments illustrated reduced tumor volume, which led to an increased number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and an increased level of cleaved PARP protein following trichodermin treatment. Together, this study demonstrates that trichodermin is a novel anti-tumor agent against human chondrosarcoma cells both in vitro and in vivo via mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Naphthoquinone Derivative PPE8 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in p53 Null H1299 Cells

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    Jin-Cherng Lien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER plays a key role in synthesizing secretory proteins and sensing signal function in eukaryotic cells. Responding to calcium disturbance, oxidation state change, or pharmacological agents, ER transmembrane protein, inositol-regulating enzyme 1 (IRE1, senses the stress and triggers downstream signals. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 dissociates from IRE1 to assist protein folding and guard against cell death. In prolonged ER stress, IRE1 recruits and activates apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 as well as downstream JNK for cell death. Naphthoquinones are widespread natural phenolic compounds. Vitamin K3, a derivative of naphthoquinone, inhibits variant tumor cell growth via oxygen uptake and oxygen stress. We synthesized a novel naphthoquinone derivative PPE8 and evaluated capacity to induce ER stress in p53 null H1299 and p53 wild-type A549 cells. In H1299 cells, PPE8 induced ER enlargement, GRP78 expression, and transient IER1 activation. Activated IRE1 recruited ASK1 for downstream JNK phosphorylation. IRE1 knockdown by siRNA attenuated PPE8-induced JNK phosphorylation and cytotoxicity. Prolonged JNK phosphorylation may be involved in PPE8-induced cytotoxicity. Such results did not arise in A549 cells, but p53 knockdown by siRNA restored PPE8-induced GRP78 expression and JNK phosphorylation. We offer a novel compound to induce ER stress and cytotoxicity in p53-deficient cancer cells, presenting an opportunity for treatment.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in obesity and obesity-related disorders: An expanded view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliassotti, Michael J; Kim, Paul Y; Estrada, Andrea L; Stewart, Claire M; Gentile, Christopher L

    2016-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is most notable for its central roles in calcium ion storage, lipid biosynthesis, and protein sorting and processing. By virtue of its extensive membrane contact sites that connect the ER to most other organelles and to the plasma membrane, the ER can also regulate diverse cellular processes including inflammatory and insulin signaling, nutrient metabolism, and cell proliferation and death via a signaling pathway called the unfolded protein response (UPR). Chronic UPR activation has been observed in liver and/or adipose tissue of dietary and genetic murine models of obesity, and in human obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Activation of the UPR in obesity and obesity-related disorders likely has two origins. One linked to classic ER stress involving the ER lumen and one linked to alterations to the ER membrane environment. This review discusses both of these origins and also considers the role of post-translational protein modifications, such as acetylation and palmitoylation, and ER-mitochondrial interactions to obesity-mediated impairments in the ER and activation of the UPR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Momordicacharantia: A New Strategic Vision to Improve the Therapy of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Wai Chin; Gundamaraju, Rohit; Vemuri, Ravichandra; Scotti, Marcus T; Scotti, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum is the major site for protein biosynthesis. Any perturbation in the endoplasmic reticulum will compromise its functions and reduce its efficiency in protein biosynthesis. As a result, misfolded proteins are produced and accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum. This will result in endoplasmic reticulum stress, which reduces the quantity and quality of the functional protein synthesized from the cell. Besides that, the protein biosynthesis is also highly affected by oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a condition where the cell has excessive exogenous and endogenous radical oxygen species overwhelming the human body's antioxidant mechanisms. Recent researches have shown that endoplasmic reticulum stress has a strong relationship with oxidative stress and both of them can form a vicious cycle that exacerbates endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress are harmful to human health since they can disrupt cellular homoeostasis and damage cells. This work reported several studies that demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress have a vital role in the pathogenesis of several diseases, such as diabetes and colitis. Further research is needed to develop the therapeutic strategies that resolve endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in order to treat these diseases. Currently, Momordicacharantia attracts worldwide attentions due to its various beneficial effects as the functional foods and can possibly help in treating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmat, Tauseef M; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Jonsson, Ann-Beth; Schwerk, Christian; Schroten, Horst

    2014-01-01

    The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci) facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor) abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC) is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF) staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  3. Impact of calcium signaling during infection of Neisseria meningitidis to human brain microvascular endothelial cells.

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    Tauseef M Asmat

    Full Text Available The pili and outer membrane proteins of Neisseria meningitidis (meningococci facilitate bacterial adhesion and invasion into host cells. In this context expression of meningococcal PilC1 protein has been reported to play a crucial role. Intracellular calcium mobilization has been implicated as an important signaling event during internalization of several bacterial pathogens. Here we employed time lapse calcium-imaging and demonstrated that PilC1 of meningococci triggered a significant increase in cytoplasmic calcium in human brain microvascular endothelial cells, whereas PilC1-deficient meningococci could not initiate this signaling process. The increase in cytosolic calcium in response to PilC1-expressing meningococci was due to efflux of calcium from host intracellular stores as demonstrated by using 2-APB, which inhibits the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, pre-treatment of host cells with U73122 (phospholipase C inhibitor abolished the cytosolic calcium increase caused by PilC1-expressing meningococci demonstrating that active phospholipase C (PLC is required to induce calcium transients in host cells. Furthermore, the role of cytosolic calcium on meningococcal adherence and internalization was documented by gentamicin protection assay and double immunofluorescence (DIF staining. Results indicated that chelation of intracellular calcium by using BAPTA-AM significantly impaired PilC1-mediated meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host endothelial cells. However, buffering of extracellular calcium by BAPTA or EGTA demonstrated no significant effect on meningococcal adherence to and invasion into host cells. Taken together, these results indicate that meningococci induce calcium release from intracellular stores of host endothelial cells via PilC1 and cytoplasmic calcium concentrations play a critical role during PilC1 mediated meningococcal adherence to and subsequent invasion into host endothelial cells.

  4. Voltage dependence of membrane charge movement and calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

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    Rakowski, R F; Best, P M; James-Kracke, M R

    1985-08-01

    Voltage dependent membrane charge movement (gating current) and the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores have been measured simultaneously in intact frog skeletal muscle fibres. Charge movement was measured using the three microelectrode voltage clamp technique. Ca2+ release was measured using the metallochromic indicator dye arsenazo III. Fibres were bathed in 2.3 X hypertonic solutions to prevent contraction. Rb+, tetraethylammonium and tetrodotoxin (TTX) were used to eliminate voltage-dependent ionic currents. The maximum rate of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in response to voltage-clamp step depolarizations to 0 mV was calculated using the dye-related parameters of model 2 of Baylor et al. (1983) and a method described in the Appendix for calculating a scaling factor (1 + p) that accounts for the additional Ca2+ buffering power of the indicator dye. The estimates of the maximum rate of Ca2+ release at 5-6 degrees C ranged from 3 to 19 microM ms-1 in the 17 fibres examined. The mean value was 8.9 +/- 1.1 microM ms-1 (S.E.M.) The maximum rate of Ca2+ release was linearly related to the magnitude of the nonlinear membrane change moved during suprathreshold depolarizing steps. The voltage dependence of charge movement and the maximum rate of Ca2+ releases were nearly identical at 6 degrees C. The voltage-dependence of the delay between the test step and the onset of Ca2+ release could be adequately described by an equation having the same functional form as the voltage dependence of nonlinear charge movement. The relationship between the test pulse voltage and the delay was shifted to more negative voltages and to shorter delays as the temperature was raised from 6 degrees C to 15 degrees C. The inactivation of Ca2+ release was found to occur at more negative holding voltages and to be more steeply voltage dependent than the immobilization of nonlinear membrane charge movement. The above data are discussed using the 'hypothetical coupler' model

  5. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

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    Maltsev, Alexander V; Maltsev, Victor A; Stern, Michael D

    2017-08-01

    Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs) from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX) during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations) that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup) that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s). Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs) quickly decays to resting Ca levels (pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  6. IDENTIFICATION DE NOUVEAUX DETERMINANTS MOLECULAIRES DE L'INTERACTION DU RECEPTEUR DES DIHYDROPYRIDINES AVEC LE RECEPTEUR A LA RYANODINE

    OpenAIRE

    Bichraoui, Hicham

    2010-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, the action potential triggers muscle contraction through a massive calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). This process, called excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), requires physical interactions between two calcium channels: (1) the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), a voltage-dependent channel composed of four subunits among which the 1S subunit, that forms both the pore and the voltage-sensor, and the 1a subunit fully cytoplasmic, and (2) the ryanodine r...

  7. Geographic structuring of the Plasmodium falciparum sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (PfSERCA gene diversity.

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    Ronan Jambou

    Full Text Available Artemisinin, a thapsigargin-like sesquiterpene has been shown to inhibit the Plasmodium falciparum sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase PfSERCA. To collect baseline pfserca sequence information before field deployment of Artemisinin-based Combination therapies that may select mutant parasites, we conducted a sequence analysis of 100 isolates from multiple sites in Africa, Asia and South America. Coding sequence diversity was large, with 29 mutated codons, including 32 SNPs (average of one SNP/115 bp, of which 19 were novel mutations. Most SNP detected in this study were clustered within a region in the cytosolic head of the protein. The PfSERCA functional domains were very well conserved, with non synonymous mutations located outside the functional domains, except for the S769N mutation associated in French Guiana with elevated IC(50 for artemether. The S769N mutation is located close to the hinge of the headpiece, which in other species modulates calcium affinity and in consequence efficacy of inhibitors, possibly linking calcium homeostasis to drug resistance. Genetic diversity was highest in Senegal, Brazil and French Guiana, and few mutations were identified in Asia. Population genetic analysis was conducted for a partial fragment of the gene encompassing nucleotide coordinates 87-2862 (unambiguous sequence available for 96 isolates. This supported a geographic clustering, with a separation between Old and New World samples and one dominant ancestral haplotype. Genetic drift alone cannot explain the observed polymorphism, suggesting that other evolutionary mechanisms are operating. One possible contributor could be the frequency of haemoglobinopathies that are associated with calcium dysregulation in the erythrocyte.

  8. Calcium-ATPases: Gene disorders and dysregulation in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Donna; Rao, Rajini

    2016-06-01

    Ca(2+)-ATPases belonging to the superfamily of P-type pumps play an important role in maintaining low, nanomolar cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels at rest and priming organellar stores, including the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, and secretory vesicles with high levels of Ca(2+) for a wide range of signaling functions. In this review, we introduce the distinct subtypes of Ca(2+)-ATPases and their isoforms and splice variants and provide an overview of their specific cellular roles as they relate to genetic disorders and cancer, with a particular emphasis on recent findings on the secretory pathway Ca(2+)-ATPases (SPCA). Mutations in human ATP2A2, ATP2C1 genes, encoding housekeeping isoforms of the endoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) and secretory pathway (SPCA1) pumps, respectively, confer autosomal dominant disorders of the skin, whereas mutations in other isoforms underlie various muscular, neurological, or developmental disorders. Emerging evidence points to an important function of dysregulated Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in cancers of the colon, lung, and breast where they may serve as markers of differentiation or novel targets for therapeutic intervention. We review the mechanisms underlying the link between calcium homeostasis and cancer and discuss the potential clinical relevance of these observations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Calcium handling in human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes.

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    Ilanit Itzhaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to establish human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs by reprogramming of adult fibroblasts and to coax their differentiation into cardiomyocytes opens unique opportunities for cardiovascular regenerative and personalized medicine. In the current study, we investigated the Ca(2+-handling properties of hiPSCs derived-cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry experiments identified the expression of key Ca(2+-handling proteins. Detailed laser confocal Ca(2+ imaging demonstrated spontaneous whole-cell [Ca(2+](i transients. These transients required Ca(2+ influx via L-type Ca(2+ channels, as demonstrated by their elimination in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+ or by administration of the L-type Ca(2+ channel blocker nifedipine. The presence of a functional ryanodine receptor (RyR-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ store, contributing to [Ca(2+](i transients, was established by application of caffeine (triggering a rapid increase in cytosolic Ca(2+ and ryanodine (decreasing [Ca(2+](i. Similarly, the importance of Ca(2+ reuptake into the SR via the SR Ca(2+ ATPase (SERCA pump was demonstrated by the inhibiting effect of its blocker (thapsigargin, which led to [Ca(2+](i transients elimination. Finally, the presence of an IP3-releasable Ca(2+ pool in hiPSC-CMs and its contribution to whole-cell [Ca(2+](i transients was demonstrated by the inhibitory effects induced by the IP3-receptor blocker 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study establishes the presence of a functional, SERCA-sequestering, RyR-mediated SR Ca(2+ store in hiPSC-CMs. Furthermore, it demonstrates the dependency of whole-cell [Ca(2+](i transients in hiPSC-CMs on both sarcolemmal Ca(2+ entry via L-type Ca(2+ channels and intracellular store Ca(2+ release.

  10. Mixed-mode oscillations in a three-store calcium dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Liu, Xijun; Yu, Pei

    2017-11-01

    Calcium ions are important in cell process, which control cell functions. Many models on calcium oscillation have been proposed. Most of existing literature analyzed calcium oscillations using numerical methods, and found rich dynamical behaviours. In this paper, we explore a further study on an established three-store model, which contains endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondria and calcium binding proteins. We conduct bifurcation analysis to identify two Hopf bifurcations, and apply normal form theory to study their stability and show that one of them is supercritical while the other is subcritical. Further, we transform the model into a slow-fast system, and then apply the geometrical singular perturbation theory to investigate the mechanism of generating slow-fast motions. The study reveals that the mechanism of generating the slow-fast oscillating behaviour in the three-store calcium model for certain parameter values is due to the relative fast change in the free calcium in cytosol, and relative slow changes in the free calcium in mitochondria and in the bounded Ca2+ binding sites on the cytosolic proteins. A further parametric study may provide some useful information for controlling harmful effect, by adjusting the amount of calcium in a human body. Numerical simulations are present to demonstrate the correct analytical predictions.

  11. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

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    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  12. Detection and quantification of endoplasmic reticulum stress in living cells using the fluorescent compound, Thioflavin T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beriault, Daniel R; Werstuck, Geoff H

    2013-10-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a central role in the co- and post-translational modification of many proteins. Disruption of these processes can lead to the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum - a condition known as endoplasmic reticulum stress. In recent years, the association of endoplasmic reticulum stress with a number of disease pathologies has increased interest in the study of this condition. Current methods to detect endoplasmic reticulum stress are indirect and retrospective. Here we describe a new method to detect and quantify endoplasmic reticulum stress in live cells using Thioflavin T (ThT), a small molecule that exhibits enhanced fluorescence when it binds to protein aggregates. We show that enhanced ThT-fluorescence correlates directly with established indicators of unfolded protein response activation. Furthermore, enhanced ThT-fluorescence can be detected in living cells within 20 min of application of an endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agent. ThT is capable of detecting endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by distinctly different conditions and compounds, in different cultured cell types as well as in mouse tissue samples. Pre-treatment with a potent endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing agent, 4-phenylbutyric acid, mitigates the enhanced ThT signal. This new tool will be useful in future research investigating the role of protein misfolding in the development and/or progression of human diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

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    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  14. [Effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive protein glucose-regulated protein 78, 94 and endoplasmic reticulum apoptosis factor caspase-12 in trophocyte on the pathogenesis of preeclampsia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Zhou; Ma, Xiao-Tian; Ge, Zhi-Ping; Han, Ping

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between pathogenesis of preeclampsia (PE) and the ultrastructure change of the endoplasmic reticulum in trophocyte, mRNA and protein expression levels of endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), endoplasmic reticulum apoptosis factor cysteine protease protein 12 (caspase-12). Sixty-five pregnant women who were hospitalized in the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University from July 2008 to January 2010, were selected as the subject. Thirty pregnancy women diagnosed with PE were divided into PE group and 35 normal pregnant women were used as control group. Electron Microscopy was used to measure ultrastructure change of the endoplasmic reticulum in placenta trophocyte. Reverse transcription (RT) PCR and western blot were used to investigute the expression levels of GRP78, GRP94, caspase-12 mRNA and protein in placenta. (1) In control group the volume of endoplasmic reticulum does not increase; no swelling and no expansion of endoplasmic reticulum was found. In PE group the edema number of endoplasmic reticulum was reduced; the volume of endoplasmic reticulum increased; expansion and vacuolation of cavity and degranulation of the endoplasmic reticulum was observed significantly. (2) The mRNA and protein expression levels of GRP78 in placenta of PE group (2.59 ± 0.09 and 0.81 ± 0.31) were significantly higher than those in placenta of control group (1.16 ± 0.07 and 0.40 ± 0.10, P apoptosis may be involved in the pathophysiological processes of PE.

  15. Acrolein induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and causes airspace enlargement.

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    Yoshiaki Kitaguchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the relative abundance and toxic potential of acrolein in inhaled cigarette smoke, it is surprising how little is known about the pulmonary and systemic effects of acrolein. Here we test the hypothesis whether systemic administration of acrolein could cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, and lung cell apoptosis, leading to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces in rats. METHODS: Acute and chronic effects of intraperitoneally administered acrolein were tested. Mean alveolar airspace area was measured by using light microscopy and imaging system software. TUNEL staining and immunohistochemistry (IHC for active caspase 3 and Western blot analysis for active caspase 3, and caspase 12 were performed to detect apoptosis. The ER-stress related gene expression in the lungs was determined by Quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Acrolein-protein adducts in the lung tissue were detected by IHC. RESULTS: Acute administration of acrolein caused a significant elevation of activated caspase 3, upregulation of VEGF expression and induced ER stress proteins in the lung tissue. The chronic administration of acrolein in rats led to emphysematous lung tissue remodeling. TUNEL staining and IHC for cleaved caspase 3 showed a large number of apoptotic septal cells in the acrolein-treated rat lungs. Chronic acrolein administration cause the endoplasmic reticulum stress response manifested by significant upregulation of ATF4, CHOP and GADd34 expression. In smokers with COPD there was a considerable accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the inflammatory, airway and vascular cells. CONCLUSIONS: Systemic administration of acrolein causes endoplasmic reticulum stress response, lung cell apoptosis, and chronic administration leads to the enlargement of the alveolar air spaces and emphysema in rats. The substantial accumulation of acrolein-protein adducts in the lungs of COPD patients suggest a role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of emphysema.

  16. Emergence of the mitochondrial reticulum from fission and fusion dynamics.

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    Valerii M Sukhorukov

    Full Text Available Mitochondria form a dynamic tubular reticulum within eukaryotic cells. Currently, quantitative understanding of its morphological characteristics is largely absent, despite major progress in deciphering the molecular fission and fusion machineries shaping its structure. Here we address the principles of formation and the large-scale organization of the cell-wide network of mitochondria. On the basis of experimentally determined structural features we establish the tip-to-tip and tip-to-side fission and fusion events as dominant reactions in the motility of this organelle. Subsequently, we introduce a graph-based model of the chondriome able to encompass its inherent variability in a single framework. Using both mean-field deterministic and explicit stochastic mathematical methods we establish a relationship between the chondriome structural network characteristics and underlying kinetic rate parameters. The computational analysis indicates that mitochondrial networks exhibit a percolation threshold. Intrinsic morphological instability of the mitochondrial reticulum resulting from its vicinity to the percolation transition is proposed as a novel mechanism that can be utilized by cells for optimizing their functional competence via dynamic remodeling of the chondriome. The detailed size distribution of the network components predicted by the dynamic graph representation introduces a relationship between chondriome characteristics and cell function. It forms a basis for understanding the architecture of mitochondria as a cell-wide but inhomogeneous organelle. Analysis of the reticulum adaptive configuration offers a direct clarification for its impact on numerous physiological processes strongly dependent on mitochondrial dynamics and organization, such as efficiency of cellular metabolism, tissue differentiation and aging.

  17. The role of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response following cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Gina; Neuhaus, Ain A; Couch, Yvonne; Beard, Daniel J; Adriaanse, Bryan A; Vekrellis, Kostas; DeLuca, Gabriele C; Papadakis, Michalis; Sutherland, Brad A; Buchan, Alastair M

    2017-01-01

    Background Cornu ammonis 3 (CA3) hippocampal neurons are resistant to global ischemia, whereas cornu ammonis (CA1) 1 neurons are vulnerable. Hamartin expression in CA3 neurons mediates this endogenous resistance via productive autophagy. Neurons lacking hamartin demonstrate exacerbated endoplasmic reticulum stress and increased cell death. We investigated endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in CA1 and CA3 regions following global cerebral ischemia, and whether pharmacological modulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress or autophagy altered neuronal viability . Methods In vivo: male Wistar rats underwent sham or 10 min of transient global cerebral ischemia. CA1 and CA3 areas were microdissected and endoplasmic reticulum stress protein expression quantified at 3 h and 12 h of reperfusion. In vitro: primary neuronal cultures (E18 Wistar rat embryos) were exposed to 2 h of oxygen and glucose deprivation or normoxia in the presence of an endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer (thapsigargin or tunicamycin), an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor (salubrinal or 4-phenylbutyric acid), an autophagy inducer ([4'-(N-diethylamino) butyl]-2-chlorophenoxazine (10-NCP)) or autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine). Results In vivo, decreased endoplasmic reticulum stress protein expression (phospho-eIF2α and ATF4) was observed at 3 h of reperfusion in CA3 neurons following ischemia, and increased in CA1 neurons at 12 h of reperfusion. In vitro, endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers and high doses of the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors also increased cell death. Both induction and inhibition of autophagy also increased cell death. Conclusion Endoplasmic reticulum stress is associated with neuronal cell death following ischemia. Neither reduction of endoplasmic reticulum stress nor induction of autophagy demonstrated neuroprotection in vitro, highlighting their complex role in neuronal biology following ischemia.

  18. Lyso-glycosphingolipids mobilize calcium from brain microsomes via multiple mechanisms.

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    Lloyd-Evans, Emyr; Pelled, Dori; Riebeling, Christian; Futerman, Anthony H

    2003-11-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the GSL (glycosphingolipid), GlcCer (glucosylceramide), modulates Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and from microsomes by sensitizing the RyaR (ryanodine receptor), a major Ca2+-release channel of the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas the lyso derivative of GlcCer, namely GlcSph (glucosylsphingosine), induced Ca2+ release via a mechanism independent of the RyaR [Lloyd-Evans, Pelled, Riebeling, Bodennec, de-Morgan, Waller, Schiffmann and Futerman (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 23594-23599]. We now systematically examine the mechanism by which GlcSph and other lyso-GSLs modulate Ca2+ mobilization from rat brain cortical and cerebellar microsomes. GlcSph, lactosylsphingosine and galactosylsphingosine all mobilized Ca2+, but at significantly higher concentrations than those required for GlcCer-mediated sensitization of the RyaR. GlcSph-induced Ca2+ mobilization was partially blocked by heparin, an inhibitor of the Ins(1,4,5) P3 receptor, and also partially blocked by thapsigargin or ADP, inhibitors of SERCA (sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase), but completely blocked when both acted together. In contrast, neither lactosylsphingosine nor galactosylsphingosine had any effect on Ca2+ release via either the Ins(1,4,5) P3 receptor or SERCA, but acted as agonists of the RyaR. Finally, and surprisingly, all three lyso-GSLs reversed inhibition of SERCA by thapsigargin. We conclude that different lyso-GSLs modulate Ca2+ mobilization via different mechanisms, and discuss the relevance of these findings to the GSL storage diseases in which lyso-GSLs accumulate.

  19. The central role of calcium in the effects of cytokines on beta-cell function: implications for type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, James W; Steiner, Stephen R; O'Neill, Christina M; Nunemaker, Craig S

    2011-12-01

    The appropriate regulation of intracellular calcium is a requirement for proper cell function and survival. This review focuses on the effects of proinflammatory cytokines on calcium regulation in the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cell and how normal stimulus-secretion coupling, organelle function, and overall beta-cell viability are impacted. Proinflammatory cytokines are increasingly thought to contribute to beta-cell dysfunction not only in type 1 diabetes (T1D), but also in the progression of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Cytokine-induced disruptions in calcium handling result in reduced insulin release in response to glucose stimulation. Cytokines can alter intracellular calcium levels by depleting calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and by increasing calcium influx from the extracellular space. Depleting ER calcium leads to protein misfolding and activation of the ER stress response. Disrupting intracellular calcium may also affect organelles, including the mitochondria and the nucleus. As a chronic condition, cytokine-induced calcium disruptions may lead to beta-cell death in T1D and T2D, although possible protective effects are also discussed. Calcium is thus central to both normal and pathological cell processes. Because the tight regulation of intracellular calcium is crucial to homeostasis, measuring the dynamics of calcium may serve as a good indicator of overall beta-cell function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Consequences of depleted SERCA2-gated calcium stores in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Eliane J; Caldelari, Reto; Kolly, Carine; Williamson, Lina; Baumann, Dominique; Richard, Gabriele; Jensen, Pamela; Girling, Peter; Delprincipe, Franco; Wyder, Marianne; Balmer, Vreni; Suter, Maja M

    2006-04-01

    Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2) pumps belong to the family of Ca2+-ATPases responsible for the maintenance of calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum. In epidermal keratinocytes, SERCA2-controlled calcium stores are involved in cell cycle exit and onset of terminal differentiation. Hence, their dysfunction was thought to provoke impaired keratinocyte cohesion and hampered terminal differentiation. Here, we assessed cultured keratinocytes and skin biopsies from a canine family with an inherited skin blistering disorder. Cells from lesional and phenotypically normal areas of one of these dogs revealed affected calcium homeostasis due to depleted SERCA2-gated stores. In phenotypically normal patient cells, this defect compromised upregulation of p21(WAF1) and delayed the exit from the cell cycle. Despite this abnormality it failed to impede the terminal differentiation process in the long term but instead coincided with enhanced apoptosis and appearance of chronic wounds, suggestive of secondary mutations. Collectively, these findings provide the first survey on phenotypic consequences of depleted SERCA-gated stores for epidermal homeostasis that explain how depleted SERCA2 calcium stores provoke focal lesions rather than generalized dermatoses, a phenotype highly reminiscent of the human genodermatosis Darier disease.

  1. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  2. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat in their diet. Vitamin D is the hormone that helps the gut absorb more calcium. Many older adults have common risks that make bone health worse. Calcium intake in the diet (milk, cheese, yogurt) is low. Vitamin D levels are ...

  3. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  4. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The cause of preeclampsia remains unknown and calcium and magnesium supplement are being suggested as means of prevention. The objective of this study was to assess magnesium and calcium in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Nigerian women with preedamp sia and eclampsia. Setting was ...

  5. Ghrelin Ameliorates Asthma by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian; Wang, Lei; Zeng, Qingdi; Zhang, Yan; Sheng, Baowei; Han, Liping

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to confirm the ameliorative effect of ghrelin on asthma and investigate its mechanism. The murine model of asthma was induced by ovalbumin (OVA) treatment and assessed by histological pathology and airway responsiveness to methacholine. The total and differential leukocytes were counted. Tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were quantified by commercial kits. The protein levels in pulmonary tissues were measured by Western blot analysis. Ghrelin ameliorated the histological pathology and airway hyperresponsiveness in the OVA-induced asthmatic mouse model. Consistently, OVA-increased total and differential leukocytes and levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin-5 and interleukin-13 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were significantly attenuated by ghrelin. Ghrelin prevented the increased protein levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress markers glucose regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein and reversed the reduced levels of p-Akt in asthmatic mice. Ghrelin might prevent endoplasmic reticulum stress activation by stimulating the Akt signaling pathway, which attenuated inflammation and ameliorated asthma in mice. Ghrelin might be a new target for asthma therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Synaptic calcium regulation in hair cells of the chicken basilar papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Gi Jung; Moskowitz, Howard S; Lehar, Mohammed; Hiel, Hakim; Fuchs, Paul Albert

    2014-12-10

    Cholinergic inhibition of hair cells occurs by activation of calcium-dependent potassium channels. A near-membrane postsynaptic cistern has been proposed to serve as a store from which calcium is released to supplement influx through the ionotropic ACh receptor. However, the time and voltage dependence of acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked potassium currents reveal a more complex relationship between calcium entry and release from stores. The present work uses voltage steps to regulate calcium influx during the application of ACh to hair cells in the chicken basilar papilla. When calcium influx was terminated at positive membrane potential, the ACh-evoked potassium current decayed exponentially over ∼100 ms. However, at negative membrane potentials, this current exhibited a secondary rise in amplitude that could be eliminated by dihydropyridine block of the voltage-gated calcium channels of the hair cell. Calcium entering through voltage-gated channels may transit through the postsynaptic cistern, since ryanodine and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase blockers altered the time course and magnitude of this secondary, voltage-dependent contribution to ACh-evoked potassium current. Serial section electron microscopy showed that efferent and afferent synaptic structures are juxtaposed, supporting the possibility that voltage-gated influx at afferent ribbon synapses influences calcium homeostasis during long-lasting cholinergic inhibition. In contrast, spontaneous postsynaptic currents ("minis") resulting from stochastic efferent release of ACh were made briefer by ryanodine, supporting the hypothesis that the synaptic cistern serves primarily as a calcium barrier and sink during low-level synaptic activity. Hypolemmal cisterns such as that at the efferent synapse of the hair cell can play a dynamic role in segregating near-membrane calcium for short-term and long-term signaling. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416688-10$15.00/0.

  7. Diffusive spatio-temporal noise in a first-passage time model for intracellular calcium release

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Mark B.

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum is controlled by ion channels. The resulting calcium signals exhibit a rich spatio-temporal signature, which originates at least partly from microscopic fluctuations. While stochasticity in the gating transition of ion channels has been incorporated into many models, the distribution of calcium is usually described by deterministic reaction-diffusion equations. Here we test the validity of the latter modeling approach by using two different models to calculate the frequency of localized calcium signals (calcium puffs) from clustered IP3 receptor channels. The complexity of the full calcium system is here limited to the basic opening mechanism of the ion channels and, in the mathematical reduction simplifies to the calculation of a first passage time. Two models are then studied: (i) a hybrid model, where channel gating is treated stochastically, while calcium concentration is deterministic and (ii) a fully stochastic model with noisy channel gating and Brownian calcium ion motion. The second model utilises the recently developed two-regime method [M. B. Flegg, S. J. Chapman, and R. Erban, "The two-regime method for optimizing stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations," J. R. Soc., Interface 9, 859-868 (2012)] in order to simulate a large domain with precision required only near the Ca2+ absorbing channels. The expected time for a first channel opening that results in a calcium puff event is calculated. It is found that for a large diffusion constant, predictions of the interpuff time are significantly overestimated using the model (i) with a deterministic non-spatial calcium variable. It is thus demonstrated that the presence of diffusive noise in local concentrations of intracellular Ca2+ ions can substantially influence the occurrence of calcium signals. The presented approach and results may also be relevant for other cell-physiological first-passage time problems with small ligand concentration

  8. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0203 TITLE: The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL...1 July 2015- 30 June 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease 5a... chronic kidney disease , diabetic nephropathy, calreticulin, TGF-beta, ER stress, ultrasound, tubulointerstitial fibrosis 5 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS a. WHAT

  9. Different oxidative status and expression of calcium channel components in stress-induced dysfunctional chicken muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, T; Zhao, X; Wang, P; Chen, H; Xu, X; Zhou, G

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effects of transport stress at high ambient temperatures on the oxidation status and the expression of essential elements responsible for the Ca transport (sarco- (endo-) plasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA1) and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in (PM) muscles of broilers. Briefly, Arbor Acres broiler chickens ( = 112) were randomly categorized into 2 treatments: unstressed control (C) and 0.5 h transport (T). Each treatment consisted of 8 replicates of 7 birds each. Birds were transported according to a designed protocol. PM muscle samples in T group were collected and classified as normal (T-NOR) or pale, soft, and exudative-like (T-PSE) using meat quality parameters. The results indicated that production of corticosterone (CORT) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased significantly after transportation ( biochemical changes which may lead to different oxidative states and, importantly, to different expressions of SERCA and RyR. These induced changes in abnormal sarcoplasmic Ca homeostasis have significant implications for the development of PSE-like meat.

  10. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  11. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress signalling in diabetic endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yunzhou; Fernandes, Conrad; Liu, Yanjun; Wu, Yong; Wu, Hao; Brophy, Megan L; Deng, Lin; Song, Kai; Wen, Aiyun; Wong, Scott; Yan, Daoguang; Towner, Rheal; Chen, Hong

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that diabetes mellitus accelerates atherosclerotic vascular disease. Endothelial injury has been proposed to be the initial event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Endothelium not only acts as a semi-selective barrier but also serves physiological and metabolic functions. Diabetes or high glucose in circulation triggers a series of intracellular responses and organ damage such as endothelial dysfunction and apoptosis. One such response is high glucose-induced chronic endoplasmic reticulum stress in the endothelium. The unfolded protein response is an acute reaction that enables cells to overcome endoplasmic reticulum stress. However, when chronically persistent, endoplasmic reticulum stress response could ultimately lead to endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Herein, we discuss the scientific advances in understanding endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced endothelial dysfunction, the pathogenesis of diabetes-accelerated atherosclerosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress as a potential target in therapies for diabetic atherosclerosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Calcitriol exerts an anti-tumor effect in osteosarcoma by inducing the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takatsune; Kamel, Walied A; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Sayaka; Fukuchi, Yumi; Muto, Akihiro; Saya, Hideyuki

    2017-09-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common type of primary bone tumor, and novel therapeutic approaches for this disease are urgently required. To identify effective agents, we screened a panel of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs in AXT cells, our newly established mouse osteosarcoma line, and identified calcitriol as a candidate compound with therapeutic efficacy for this disease. Calcitriol inhibited cell proliferation in AXT cells by blocking cell cycle progression. From a mechanistic standpoint, calcitriol induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which was potentially responsible for downregulation of cyclin D1, activation of p38 MAPK, and intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Knockdown of Atf4 or Ddit3 restored cell viability after calcitriol treatment, indicating that the ER stress response was indeed responsible for the anti-proliferative effect in AXT cells. Notably, the ER stress response was induced to a lesser extent in human osteosarcoma than in AXT cells, consistent with the weaker suppressive effect on cell growth in the human cells. Thus, the magnitude of ER stress induced by calcitriol might be an index of its anti-osteosarcoma effect. Although mice treated with calcitriol exhibited weight loss and elevated serum calcium levels, a single dose was sufficient to decrease osteosarcoma tumor size in vivo. Our findings suggest that calcitriol holds therapeutic potential for treatment of osteosarcoma, assuming that techniques to diminish its toxicity could be established. In addition, our results show that calcitriol could still be safely administered to osteosarcoma patients for its original purposes, including treatment of osteoporosis. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. Alix is involved in caspase 9 activation during calcium-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strappazzon, Flavie; Torch, Sakina; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Petiot, Anne; Thibert, Chantal; Blot, Béatrice; Verna, Jean-Marc; Sadoul, Rémy

    2010-06-18

    The cytoplasmic protein Alix/AIP1 (ALG-2 interacting protein X) is involved in cell death through mechanisms which remain unclear but require its binding partner ALG-2 (apoptosis-linked gene-2). The latter was defined as a regulator of calcium-induced apoptosis following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We show here that Alix is also a critical component of caspase 9 activation and apoptosis triggered by calcium. Indeed, expression of Alix dominant-negative mutants or downregulation of Alix afford significant protection against cytosolic calcium elevation following thapsigargin (Tg) treatment. The function of Alix in this paradigm requires its interaction with ALG-2. In addition, we demonstrate that caspase 9 activation is necessary for apoptosis induced by Tg and that this activation is impaired by knocking down Alix. Altogether, our findings identify, for the first time, Alix as a crucial mediator of Ca(2+) induced caspase 9 activation. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles. This complex and highly regulated process is orchestrated by SNAREs and their associated proteins. The triggering signal for regulated exocytosis is usually...... an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...

  15. Comparative study the expression of calcium cycling genes in Bombay duck (Harpadon nehereus and beltfish (Trichiurus lepturus with different swimming activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The contraction and relaxation events of the muscle is mediated by the coordination of many important calcium cycling proteins of ryanodine receptor (RYR, troponin C (TNNC, parvalbumin (PVALB, sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase (SERCA and calsequestrin (CASQ. In higher vertebrates, the expression level of calcium cycling proteins are positively correlated to the muscle contraction/relaxation ability of the cell. In this study, we used RNAseq to explore the expression profile of calcium cycling genes between two marine fish of Bombay duck (Harpadon nehereus and beltfish (Trichiurus lepturus with poor and robust swimming activities, respectively. We have studied the hypothesis whether the expression level of calcium cycling proteins are also positive correlated to swimming ability in fish. We used Illumina sequencing technology (NextSeq500 to sequence, assemble and annotate the muscle transcriptome of Bombay duck for the first time. A total of 47,752,240 cleaned reads (deposited in NCBI SRA database with accession number of SRX1706379 were obtained from RNA sequencing and 26,288 unigenes (with N50 of 486 bp were obtained after de novo assembling with Trinity software. BLASTX against NR, GO, KEGG and eggNOG databases show 100%, 65%, 26%, 94% and 88% annotation rate, respectively. Comparison of the dominantly expressed unigenes in fish muscle shows calcium cycling gene expression in beltfish (SRX1674471 is 1.4- to 51.6-fold higher than Bombay duck. Among five calcium cycling genes, the fold change results are very significant in CASQ (51.6 fold and PVALB (9.1 fold and both of them are responsive for calcium binding to reduce free calcium concentration in the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm. In conclusion, we confirmed that the high abundant expression rate of calcium cycling genes in robust swimming fish species. The current muscle transcriptome and identified calcium cycling gene data can provide more insights into the

  16. Comparative study the expression of calcium cycling genes in Bombay duck (Harpadon nehereus) and beltfish (Trichiurus lepturus) with different swimming activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Audira, Gilbert; Li, Yuan; Xian, Weiwei; Varikkodan, Muhammed Muhsin; Hsiao, Chung-Der

    2017-06-01

    The contraction and relaxation events of the muscle is mediated by the coordination of many important calcium cycling proteins of ryanodine receptor (RYR), troponin C (TNNC), parvalbumin (PVALB), sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium transport ATPase (SERCA) and calsequestrin (CASQ). In higher vertebrates, the expression level of calcium cycling proteins are positively correlated to the muscle contraction/relaxation ability of the cell. In this study, we used RNAseq to explore the expression profile of calcium cycling genes between two marine fish of Bombay duck ( Harpadon nehereus ) and beltfish ( Trichiurus lepturus ) with poor and robust swimming activities, respectively. We have studied the hypothesis whether the expression level of calcium cycling proteins are also positive correlated to swimming ability in fish. We used Illumina sequencing technology (NextSeq500) to sequence, assemble and annotate the muscle transcriptome of Bombay duck for the first time. A total of 47,752,240 cleaned reads (deposited in NCBI SRA database with accession number of SRX1706379) were obtained from RNA sequencing and 26,288 unigenes (with N50 of 486 bp) were obtained after de novo assembling with Trinity software. BLASTX against NR, GO, KEGG and eggNOG databases show 100%, 65%, 26%, 94% and 88% annotation rate, respectively. Comparison of the dominantly expressed unigenes in fish muscle shows calcium cycling gene expression in beltfish (SRX1674471) is 1.4- to 51.6-fold higher than Bombay duck. Among five calcium cycling genes, the fold change results are very significant in CASQ (51.6 fold) and PVALB (9.1 fold) and both of them are responsive for calcium binding to reduce free calcium concentration in the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum and cytoplasm. In conclusion, we confirmed that the high abundant expression rate of calcium cycling genes in robust swimming fish species. The current muscle transcriptome and identified calcium cycling gene data can provide more insights into the

  17. Modeling of axonal endoplasmic reticulum network by spastic paraplegia proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçın, Belgin; Zhao, Lu; Stofanko, Martin; O'Sullivan, Niamh C; Kang, Zi Han; Roost, Annika; Thomas, Matthew R; Zaessinger, Sophie; Blard, Olivier; Patto, Alex L; Sohail, Anood; Baena, Valentina; Terasaki, Mark; O'Kane, Cahir J

    2017-07-25

    Axons contain a smooth tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network that is thought to be continuous with ER throughout the neuron; the mechanisms that form this axonal network are unknown. Mutations affecting reticulon or REEP proteins, with intramembrane hairpin domains that model ER membranes, cause an axon degenerative disease, hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We show that Drosophila axons have a dynamic axonal ER network, which these proteins help to model. Loss of HSP hairpin proteins causes ER sheet expansion, partial loss of ER from distal motor axons, and occasional discontinuities in axonal ER. Ultrastructural analysis reveals an extensive ER network in axons, which shows larger and fewer tubules in larvae that lack reticulon and REEP proteins, consistent with loss of membrane curvature. Therefore HSP hairpin-containing proteins are required for shaping and continuity of axonal ER, thus suggesting roles for ER modeling in axon maintenance and function.

  18. Homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum membranes in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie eHu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a membrane-bounded organelle whose membrane comprises a network of tubules and sheets. The formation of these characteristic shapes and maintenance of their continuity through homotypic membrane fusion appears to be critical for the proper functioning of the ER. The atlastins (ATLs, a family of ER-localized dynamin-like GTPases, have been identified as fusogens of the ER membranes in metazoans. Mutations of the ATL proteins in mammalian cells cause morphological defects in the ER, and purified Drosophila ATL mediates membrane fusion in vitro. Plant cells do not possess ATL, but a family of similar GTPases, named root hair defective 3 (RHD3, are likely the functional orthologs of ATLs. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of how RHD3 proteins play a role in homotypic ER fusion. We also discuss the possible physiological significance of forming a tubular ER network in plant cells.

  19. Induction of Apoptosis by Hypertension Via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Sun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is one of the intrinsic apoptosis pathways, and cardiac apoptosis can occur in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension. However, the mechanisms by which ER stress leads to apoptosis remain enigmatic, particularly in the progression from cardiac hypertrophy to diastolic heart failure due to hypertension. Methods: We used spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs to investigate possible signalling pathways for ER stress. Results: We found that cardiac protein and mRNA levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 were up-regulated. In addition, the CHOP- and caspase-12-dependent pathways, but not that of JNK, were activated in the SHR rats. Conclusions: These results suggest that ER stress can contribute to myocardial apoptosis during hypertensive disease.

  20. Plant transducers of the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2012-12-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) activates a set of genes to overcome accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a condition termed ER stress, and constitutes an essential part of ER protein quality control that ensures efficient maturation of secretory and membrane proteins in eukaryotes. Recent studies on Arabidopsis and rice identified the signaling pathway in which the ER membrane-localized ribonuclease IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) catalyzes unconventional cytoplasmic splicing of mRNA, thereby producing the active transcription factor Arabidopsis bZIP60 (basic leucine zipper 60) and its ortholog in rice. Here we review recent findings identifying the molecular components of the plant UPR, including IRE1/bZIP60 and the membrane-bound transcription factors bZIP17 and bZIP28, and implicating its importance in several physiological phenomena such as pathogen response. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Inflammation and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Gotoh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the site of synthesis and maturation of proteins designed for secretion or for localization on the cell membrane. Various types of stress from both inside and outside cells disturb ER function, thus causing unfolded or misfolded proteins to accumulate in the ER. To improve and maintain the ER functions against such stresses, the ER stress response pathway is activated. However, when the stress is prolonged or severe, apoptosis pathways are activated to remove damaged cells. It was recently reported that the ER stress pathway is also involved in the inflammatory response, whereby inflammation induces ER stress, and ER stress induces an inflammatory response. Therefore, the ER stress response pathway is involved in various diseases, including cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and ischemic diseases, in various ways. The ER stress pathway may represent a novel target for the treatment of these diseases.

  2. Plant Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengwei; Hawes, Chris; Hussey, Patrick J

    2017-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) acts as a superhighway with multiple sideroads that connects the different membrane compartments including the ER to the plasma membrane (PM). ER-PM contact sites (EPCSs) are a common feature in eukaryotic organisms, but have not been studied well in plants owing to the lack of molecular markers and to the difficulty in resolving the EPCS structure using conventional microscopy. Recently, however, plant protein complexes required for linking the ER and PM have been identified. This is a further step towards understanding the structure and function of plant EPCSs. We highlight some recent studies in this field and suggest several hypotheses that relate to the possible function of EPCSs in plants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. How Are Proteins Reduced in the Endoplasmic Reticulum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellgaard, Lars; Sevier, Carolyn S; Bulleid, Neil J

    2018-01-01

    The reversal of thiol oxidation in proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is crucial for protein folding, degradation, chaperone function, and the ER stress response. Our understanding of this process is generally poor but progress has been made. Enzymes performing the initial reduction of client proteins, as well as the ultimate electron donor in the pathway, have been identified. Most recently, a role for the cytosol in ER protein reduction has been revealed. Nevertheless, how reducing equivalents are transferred from the cytosol to the ER lumen remains an open question. We review here why proteins are reduced in the ER, discuss recent data on catalysis of steps in the pathway, and consider the implications for redox homeostasis within the early secretory pathway. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Related Factors Protect against Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Kun Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a principal mediator of signal transduction in the cell, and disruption of its normal function (a mechanism known as ER stress has been associated with the pathogenesis of several diseases. ER stress has been demonstrated to contribute to onset and progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR by induction of multiple inflammatory signaling pathways. Recent studies have begun to describe the gene expression profile of ER stress-related genes in DR; moreover, genes that play a protective role against DR have been identified. P58IPK was determined to be able to reduce retinal vascular leakage under high glucose conditions, thus protecting retinal cells. It has also been found by our lab that ER-associated protein degradation factors exhibit significantly different expression patterns in rat retinas under sustained high glucose conditions. Future research based upon these collective genomic findings will contribute to our overall understanding of DR pathogenesis as well as identify potential therapeutic targets.

  5. Bone repair in calcium-deficient rats: comparison of xylitol+calcium carbonate with calcium carbonate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate on the repletion of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, M M

    1994-06-01

    The potential value of xylitol in calcium therapy was evaluated by comparing the effect of dietary xylitol (50 g/kg diet) + calcium carbonate with the effects of calcium carbonate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate on bone repair of young male rats after the rats consumed for 3 wk a calcium-deficient diet (0.2 g Ca/kg diet). After this calcium-depletion period, the rats were fed for 2 wk one of four diets, each containing 5 g Ca/kg diet as one of the four dietary calcium sources. The diet of the control animals was supplemented with CaCO3 (5 g Ca/kg diet) throughout the study. The Ca-deficient rats showed low bone mass, low serum calcium and high serum 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, parathyroid hormone (1-34 fraction) and osteocalcin concentrations. They also excreted magnesium, phosphate and hydroxyproline in the urine in high concentrations, and had high bone alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activities. Most of these changes were reversed by the administered of the calcium salts. The highest recoveries of femoral dry weight, calcium, magnesium and phosphate were observed in the groups receiving xylitol+CaCO3 and calcium lactate. Calcium lactate and calcium citrate caused low serum phosphate concentration compared with rats receiving CaCO3 and with the age-matched Ca-replete controls. Xylitol-treated rats excreted more calcium and magnesium in urine than did the other rats, probably due to increased absorption of these minerals from the gut. These results suggest that dietary xylitol improves the bioavailability of calcium salts.

  6. Arc Interacts with the Integral Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein, Calnexin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Myrum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc, is a major regulator of long-term synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Here we reveal a novel interaction partner of Arc, a resident endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein, calnexin. We show an interaction between recombinantly-expressed GST-tagged Arc and endogenous calnexin in HEK293, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma and PC12 cells. The interaction was dependent on the central linker region of the Arc protein that is also required for endocytosis of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. High-resolution proximity-ligation assays (PLAs demonstrate molecular proximity of endogenous Arc with the cytosolic C-terminus, but not the lumenal N-terminus of calnexin. In hippocampal neuronal cultures treated with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, Arc interacted with calnexin in the perinuclear cytoplasm and dendritic shaft. Arc also interacted with C-terminal calnexin in the adult rat dentate gyrus (DG. After induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in the perforant path projection to the DG of adult anesthetized rats, enhanced interaction between Arc and calnexin was obtained in the dentate granule cell layer (GCL. Although Arc and calnexin are both implicated in the regulation of receptor endocytosis, no modulation of endocytosis was detected in transferrin uptake assays. Previous work showed that Arc interacts with multiple protein partners to regulate synaptic transmission and nuclear signaling. The identification of calnexin as a binding partner further supports the role of Arc as a hub protein and extends the range of Arc function to the endoplasmic reticulum, though the function of the Arc/calnexin interaction remains to be defined.

  7. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears ...

  8. Calcium and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Milk Allergy Figuring Out Food Labels What's a Vegetarian? Osteoporosis Minerals Your Bones Mineral Chart Vitamin D ... Need to Drink Milk? Lactose Intolerance Becoming a Vegetarian Soy Foods and Health Calcium Bones, Muscles, and ...

  9. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  10. Magnesium, calcium and cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anghileri, Leopoldo J

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) control a diverse and important range of cellular processes, such as gene transcription, cell proliferation, neoplastic transformation, immune response and therapeutic treatment...

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates the arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yang, Shu-Meng; Zhang, Hao-Peng; Yang, Yue; Sun, Shi-Bo; Chang, Jian-Ping; Tao, Xuan-Chen; Yang, Tuo-Yun; Liu, Chun; Yang, Yan-Mei

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic trioxide has been proven to trigger apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Endoplasmic reticulum stress has been known to be involved in apoptosis through the induction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. However, it is unknown whether endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Our data showed that arsenic trioxide significantly induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Furthermore, arsenic trioxide triggered endoplasmic reticulum stress, as indicated by endoplasmic reticulum dilation, upregulation of glucose-regulated protein 78 and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. We further found that 4-phenylbutyric acid, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum stress, alleviated arsenic trioxide-induced expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein. More important, knockdown of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein by siRNA or inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress by 4-phenylbutyric acid alleviated apoptosis induced by arsenic trioxide. Consequently, our results suggested that arsenic trioxide could induce endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein might play an important role in this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The overexpression of nuclear envelope protein Lap2β induces endoplasmic reticulum reorganisation via membrane stacking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina G. Volkova

    2012-06-01

    Some nuclear envelope proteins are localised to both the nuclear envelope and the endoplasmic reticulum; therefore, it seems plausible that even small amounts of these proteins can influence the organisation of the endoplasmic reticulum. A simple method to study the possible effects of nuclear envelope proteins on endoplasmic reticulum organisation is to analyze nuclear envelope protein overexpression. Here, we demonstrate that Lap2β overexpression can induce the formation of cytoplasmic vesicular structures derived from endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Correlative light and electron microscopy demonstrated that these vesicular structures were composed of a series of closely apposed membranes that were frequently arranged in a circular fashion. Although stacked endoplasmic reticulum cisternae were highly ordered, Lap2β could readily diffuse into and out of these structures into the surrounding reticulum. It appears that low-affinity interactions between cytoplasmic domains of Lap2β can reorganise reticular endoplasmic reticulum into stacked cisternae. Although the effect of one protein may be insignificant at low concentrations, the cumulative effect of many non-specialised proteins may be significant.

  13. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiman, Daniel; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2014-02-01

    Puffs are localized Ca(2 +) signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca(2 +) from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca(2 +) provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio-temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca(2 +) signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca(2 +) channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca(2 +) buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff.

  14. Autophagy modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death in podocytes: a protective role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Chi; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress occurs in a variety of patho-physiological mechanisms and there has been great interest in managing this pathway for the treatment of clinical diseases. Autophagy is closely interconnected with endoplasmic reticulum stress to counteract the possible injurious effects related with the impairment of protein folding. Studies have shown that glomerular podocytes exhibit high rate of autophagy to maintain as terminally differentiated cells. In this study, podocytes were exposed to tunicamycin and thapsigargin to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. Thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced a significant increase in endoplasmic reticulum stress and of cell death, represented by higher GADD153 and GRP78 expression and propidium iodide flow cytometry, respectively. However, thapsigargin/tunicamycin stimulation also enhanced autophagy development, demonstrated by monodansylcadaverine assay and LC3 conversion. To evaluate the regulatory effects of autophagy on endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death, rapamycin (Rap) or 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was added to enhance or inhibit autophagosome formation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death was decreased at 6 h, but was not reduced at 24 h after Rap+TG or Rap+TM treatment. In contrast, endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death increased at 6 and 24 h after 3-MA+TG or 3-MA+TM treatment. Our study demonstrated that thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which resulted in podocytes death. Autophagy, which counteracted the induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, was simultaneously enhanced. The salvational role of autophagy was supported by adding Rap/3-MA to mechanistically regulate the expression of autophagy and autophagosome formation. In summary, autophagy helps the podocytes from cell death and may contribute to sustain the longevity as a highly differentiated cell lineage. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  15. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  16. Resveratrol and Calcium Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey E. McCalley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a naturally occurring compound contributing to cellular defense mechanisms in plants. Its use as a nutritional component and/or supplement in a number of diseases, disorders, and syndromes such as chronic diseases of the central nervous system, cancer, inflammatory diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases has prompted great interest in the underlying molecular mechanisms of action. The present review focuses on resveratrol, specifically its isomer trans-resveratrol, and its effects on intracellular calcium signaling mechanisms. As resveratrol’s mechanisms of action are likely pleiotropic, its effects and interactions with key signaling proteins controlling cellular calcium homeostasis are reviewed and discussed. The clinical relevance of resveratrol’s actions on excitable cells, transformed or cancer cells, immune cells and retinal pigment epithelial cells are contrasted with a review of the molecular mechanisms affecting calcium signaling proteins on the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. The present review emphasizes the correlation between molecular mechanisms of action that have recently been identified for resveratrol and their clinical implications.

  17. Aluminium induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated cell death in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line is independent of p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Husain Mustafa Rizvi

    Full Text Available Aluminium (Al is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust and its compounds are used in the form of house hold utensils, medicines and in antiperspirant etc. Increasing number of evidences suggest the involvement of Al+3 ions in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Here, we have attempted to investigate the role of Al in endoplasmic reticulum stress and the regulation of p53 during neuronal apoptosis using neuroblastoma cell line. We observed that Al caused oxidative stress by increasing ROS production and intracellular calcium levels together with depletion of intracellular GSH levels. We also studied modulation of key pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and found significant alterations in the levels of Nrf2, NQO1, pAKT, p21, Bax, Bcl2, Aβ1-40 and Cyt c together with increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress related proteins like CHOP and caspase 12. However, with respect to the role of p53, we observed downregulation of its transcript as well as protein levels while analysis of its ubiquitination status revealed no significant changes. Not only did Al increase the activities of caspase 9, caspase 12 and caspase 3, but, by the use of peptide inhibitors of specific and pan-caspases, we observed significant protection against neuronal cell death upon inhibition of caspase 12, demonstrating the prominent role of endoplasmic reticulum stress generated responses in Al toxicity. Overall our findings suggest that Al induces ER stress and ROS generation which compromises the antioxidant defenses of neuronal cells thereby promoting neuronal apoptosis in p53 independent pathway.

  18. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  19. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  20. РОЛЬ АКТИВАЦИИ СИМПАТИЧЕСКОЙ НЕРВНОЙ СИСТЕМЫ В РАЗВИТИИ СТРУКТУРНО-ФУНКЦИОНАЛЬНЫХ ИЗМЕНЕНИЙ МИОКАРДА ПРИ СЕРДЕЧНОЙ НЕДОСТАТОЧНОСТИ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Oleg

    2018-01-01

    to induce cardiac hypertrophy owing to the increased protein synthesis in cardiac myocytes, and to promote myocardial fibrosis by stimulating collagen production in cardiac fibroblasts. Catecholamines also produce toxic effects leading to the myocyte cell death via necrosis and apoptosis. Systolic...... dysfunction in the setting of adrenergic overactivation is partly attributed to the eccentric ventricular chamber remodeling, an effect related to the increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases which digest cross-linked collagen, and promote myocyte slippage. At the cellular level, cardiac contractile...... sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. This change is further exacerbated owing to the decreased SERCA2a expression in failing cardiac myocytes, which impairs sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in diastole. Overall, myocardial structural changes upon sustained adrenergic overactivation are related...

  1. Calcium orthophosphates in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2013-06-01

    Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or a cavity, remains a major public health problem in the most communities even though the prevalence of disease has decreased since the introduction of fluorides for dental care. Therefore, biomaterials to fill dental defects appear to be necessary to fulfill customers' needs regarding the properties and the processing of the products. Bioceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used for these purposes, as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Calcium orthophosphates belong to bioceramics but they have some specific advantages over other types of bioceramics due to a chemical similarity to the inorganic part of both human and mammalian bones and teeth. Therefore, calcium orthophosphates (both alone and as components of various formulations) are used in dentistry as both dental fillers and implantable scaffolds. This review provides brief information on calcium orthophosphates and describes in details current state-of-the-art on their applications in dentistry and dentistry-related fields. Among the recognized dental specialties, calcium orthophosphates are most frequently used in periodontics; however, the majority of the publications on calcium orthophosphates in dentistry are devoted to unspecified "dental" fields.

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Is at the Crossroads of Autophagy, Inflammation, and Apoptosis Signaling Pathways and Participates in the Pathogenesis of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic metabolic disease, and its incidence is growing worldwide. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a central component of cellular functions and is involved in protein folding and trafficking, lipid synthesis, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis. The ER is also a sensor of both intra- and extracellular stress and thus participates in monitoring and maintaining cellular homeostasis. Therefore, the ER is one site of interaction between environmental signals and a cell’s biological function. The ER is tightly linked to autophagy, inflammation, and apoptosis, and recent evidence suggests that these processes are related to the pathogenesis of DM and its complications. Thus, the ER has been considered an intersection integrating multiple stress responses and playing an important role in metabolism-related diseases including DM. Here, we review the relationship between the ER and autophagy, inflammation, and apoptosis in DM to better understand the molecular mechanisms of this disease.

  3. The evolutionary history of sarco(endoplasmic calcium ATPase (SERCA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianina Altshuler

    Full Text Available Investigating the phylogenetic relationships within physiologically essential gene families across a broad range of taxa can reveal the key gene duplication events underlying their family expansion and is thus important to functional genomics studies. P-Type II ATPases represent a large family of ATP powered transporters that move ions across cellular membranes and includes Na(+/K(+ transporters, H(+/K(+ transporters, and plasma membrane Ca(2+ pumps. Here, we examine the evolutionary history of one such transporter, the Sarco(endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA, which maintains calcium homeostasis in the cell by actively pumping Ca(2+ into the sarco(endoplasmic reticulum. Our protein-based phylogenetic analyses across Eukaryotes revealed two monophyletic clades of SERCA proteins, one containing animals, fungi, and plants, and the other consisting of plants and protists. Our analyses suggest that the three known SERCA proteins in vertebrates arose through two major gene duplication events after the divergence from tunicates, but before the separation of fishes and tetrapods. In plants, we recovered two SERCA clades, one being the sister group to Metazoa and the other to Apicomplexa clade, suggesting an ancient duplication in an early eukaryotic ancestor, followed by subsequent loss of one copy in Opisthokonta, the other in protists, and retention of both in plants. We also report relatively recent and independent gene duplication events within invertebrate taxa including tunicates and the leech Helobdella robusta. Thus, it appears that both ancient and recent gene duplication events have played an important role in the evolution of this ubiquitous gene family across the eukaryotic domain.

  4. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  5. Placental endoplasmic reticulum stress and acidosis: relevant aspects in gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    In this issue, Yung and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4040-2 ) report endoplasmic reticulum stress in the placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus. With the use of a trophoblast-like cell line, these authors identify putative mechanisms involved in, and treatments to prevent the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Here, the relevance and possible implications of these findings and areas for further research are discussed.

  6. Calcium Signalling: Fishing Out Molecules of Mitochondrial Calcium Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins — MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 — to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport.

  7. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  8. Stabilization of diastolic calcium signal via calcium pump regulation of complex local calcium releases and transient decay in a computational model of cardiac pacemaker cell with individual release channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V Maltsev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular Local Ca releases (LCRs from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR regulate cardiac pacemaker cell function by activation of electrogenic Na/Ca exchanger (NCX during diastole. Prior studies demonstrated the existence of powerful compensatory mechanisms of LCR regulation via a complex local cross-talk of Ca pump, release and NCX. One major obstacle to study these mechanisms is that LCR exhibit complex Ca release propagation patterns (including merges and separations that have not been characterized. Here we developed new terminology, classification, and computer algorithms for automatic detection of numerically simulated LCRs and examined LCR regulation by SR Ca pumping rate (Pup that provides a major contribution to fight-or-flight response. In our simulations the faster SR Ca pumping accelerates action potential-induced Ca transient decay and quickly clears Ca under the cell membrane in diastole, preventing premature releases. Then the SR generates an earlier, more synchronized, and stronger diastolic LCR signal activating an earlier and larger inward NCX current. LCRs at higher Pup exhibit larger amplitudes and faster propagation with more collisions to each other. The LCRs overlap with Ca transient decay, causing an elevation of the average diastolic [Ca] nadir to ~200 nM (at Pup = 24 mM/s. Background Ca (in locations lacking LCRs quickly decays to resting Ca levels (<100 nM at high Pup, but remained elevated during slower decay at low Pup. Release propagation is facilitated at higher Pup by a larger LCR amplitude, whereas at low Pup by higher background Ca. While at low Pup LCRs show smaller amplitudes, their larger durations and sizes combined with longer transient decay stabilize integrals of diastolic Ca and NCX current signals. Thus, the local interplay of SR Ca pump and release channels regulates LCRs and Ca transient decay to insure fail-safe pacemaker cell operation within a wide range of rates.

  9. Analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress in placentas of HIV-infected women treated with protease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Ansgar; Kimmich, Tanja; Brem, German J; Buchholtz, Marie L; Mylonas, Ioannis; Kost, Bernd; Weizsäcker, Katharina; Gingelmaier, Andrea

    2014-12-01

    Combined antiretroviral therapy has proven efficacy in decreasing vertical HIV transmission. However, endoplasmic reticulum stress is a known side effect of HIV protease inhibitors. We investigated endoplasmic reticulum stress in placentas of HIV-infected and uninfected mothers by PCR-based splicing analysis of the specific endoplasmic reticulum stress marker XBP1 in post-delivery placental samples of uninfected mothers and in HIV-infected mothers taking antiretroviral therapy. No elevated XBP1 splicing could be detected in placentas of uninfected mothers and most of the mothers receiving combined anti-retroviral therapy. However, markedly elevated XBP1 splicing was found in the placentas of three individuals on combined antiviral therapy, all receiving lopinavir or atazanavir. In vitro experiments confirmed induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by lopinavir and atazanavir in trophoblast-derived cell lines. Since endoplasmic reticulum stress occurred in selective patients only, individual differences in susceptibility of HIV-infected mothers to protease inhibitor induced endoplasmic reticulum stress can be postulated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Oxidative Stress: A Vicious Nexus Implicated in Bowel Disease Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Wai Chin; Shastri, Madhur D; Eri, Rajaraman

    2017-04-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a complex protein folding and trafficking organelle. Alteration and discrepancy in the endoplasmic reticulum environment can affect the protein folding process and hence, can result in the production of misfolded proteins. The accumulation of misfolded proteins causes cellular damage and elicits endoplasmic reticulum stress. Under such stress conditions, cells exhibit reduced functional synthesis, and will undergo apoptosis if the stress is prolonged. To resolve the ER stress, cells trigger an intrinsic mechanism called an unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR is an adaptive signaling process that triggers multiple pathways through the endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane transducers, to reduce and remove misfolded proteins and improve the protein folding mechanism, in order to improve and maintain endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. An increasing number of studies support the view that oxidative stress has a strong connection with ER stress. During the protein folding process, reactive oxygen species are produced as by-products, leading to impaired reduction-oxidation (redox) balance conferring oxidative stress. As the protein folding process is dependent on redox homeostasis, the oxidative stress can disrupt the protein folding mechanism and enhance the production of misfolded proteins, causing further ER stress. It is proposed that endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress together play significant roles in the pathophysiology of bowel diseases.

  11. Essential Role of X-Box Binding Protein-1 during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hossam; Tian, Xuefei; Inoue, Kazunori; Chai, Nathan; Liu, Chang; Soda, Keita; Moeckel, Gilbert; Tufro, Alda; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Somlo, Stefan; Fedeles, Sorin; Ishibe, Shuta

    2016-04-01

    Podocytes are terminally differentiated epithelial cells that reside along the glomerular filtration barrier. Evidence suggests that after podocyte injury, endoplasmic reticulum stress response is activated, but the molecular mechanisms involved are incompletely defined. In a mouse model, we confirmed that podocyte injury induces endoplasmic reticulum stress response and upregulated unfolded protein response pathways, which have been shown to mitigate damage by preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, simultaneous podocyte-specific genetic inactivation of X-box binding protein-1 (Xbp1), a transcription factor activated during endoplasmic reticulum stress and critically involved in the untranslated protein response, and Sec63, a heat shock protein-40 chaperone required for protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum, resulted in progressive albuminuria, foot process effacement, and histology consistent with ESRD. Finally, loss of both Sec63 and Xbp1 induced apoptosis in podocytes, which associated with activation of the JNK pathway. Collectively, our results indicate that an intact Xbp1 pathway operating to mitigate stress in the endoplasmic reticulum is essential for the maintenance of a normal glomerular filtration barrier. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  12. [Research on olaquindox induced endoplasmic reticulum stress related apoptosis on nephrotoxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongsheng; Yu, Changyan; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Bin; Cao, Peng; Li, Bin; Xiao, Jingwei

    2015-05-01

    Renal tubular epithelial cell were exposed to olaquindox and detected the ROS and apoptosis related proteins, to investigate the renal tubular epithelial cell apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated pathway induced by olaquindox. MTT assay (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7and 8 μmol/ml olaquindox exposure) was used to detect the effects of olaquindox on renal tubular epithelial cell proliferation to determine test concentrations. Hoechst-33258 was used to detect morphological changes on apoptotic cells in each group. Flow cytometry method was applied to detect the apoptosis rate and intracellular reactive oxygen, and western blot assay was performed to detect the levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related apoptosis proteins, GRP78, GRP94 and CHOP. According to results of the MTT test, 1, 2, 3 and 4 μmol/ml olaquindox concentrations were determined for apoptosis analysis. With the increase of olaquindox concentration, apoptosis rate and levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress related apoptosis pathway protein GRP78, GRP94 and CHOP increased, levels of ROS were increased in every groups (P endoplasmic reticulum stress related apoptosis pathway protein GRP78 and GRP94 increased in 12 and 24 h olaquindox exposure groups, whereas in groups of olaquindox exposed for 6, 12 and 24 h, levels of ROS and endoplasmic reticulum stress related apoptosis pathway protein CHOP increased (P endoplasmic reticulum stress-related apoptosis maybe the associated toxicity pathway.

  13. Estrogen protects SGC7901 cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by the Akt pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    FU, ZHENGQI; ZOU, FENG; DENG, HAO; ZHOU, HONGYAN; LIU, LIJIANG

    2014-01-01

    Several previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen may protect cancer cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. In the present study, human gastric adenocarcinoma SGC7901 cells were treated with tunicamycin (TM) to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. This was demonstrated by increased glucose-regulated protein 78 expression and enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis with the inhibition of Akt; the latter of which was measured by the activity-dependent phosphorylation at Ser473 of Akt. Simultaneous treatment of 10−9 M 17β-estradiol (E2) with TM may protect SGC7901 cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis by counteracting the inhibitory effect of TM on Akt, causing an increase in the phosphorylation of Ser473-Akt. It was concluded that low concentrations of E2 may counteract endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced inactivation of Akt to block caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:24396487

  14. Lipocalin 2, a new GADD153 target gene, as an apoptosis inducer of endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsin, I-Lun; Hsiao, Yueh-Chieh [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Fang [Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Jan, Ming-Shiou [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Tang, Sheau-Chung; Lin, Yu-Wen [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chung-Ping, E-mail: cliff@vghtc.com.tw [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Veterans General Hospital—Taichung, Taichung 40705, Taiwan (China); Department of Surgery, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine and Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Ko, Jiunn-Liang, E-mail: jlko@csmu.edu.tw [Institute of Medical and Molecular Toxicology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China); Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 40201, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is activated under severe cellular conditions. GADD153, a member of the C/EBP family, is an unfolded protein response (UPR) responsive transcription factor. Increased levels of lipocalin 2, an acute phase protein, have been found in several epithelial cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the function of lipocalin 2 in lung cancer cells under ER stress. Treatment with thapsigargin, an ER stress activator, led to increases in cytotoxicity, ER stress, apoptosis, and lipocalin 2 expression in A549 cells. GADD153 silencing decreased lipocalin 2 expression in A549 cells. On chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, ER stress increased GADD153 DNA binding to lipocalin 2 promoter. Furthermore, silencing of lipocalin 2 mitigated ER stress-mediated apoptosis in A549 cells. Our findings demonstrated that lipocalin 2 is a new GADD153 target gene that mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis. Highlights: ► We demonstrate that Lipocalin 2 is a new GADD153 target gene. ► Lipocalin 2 mediates ER stress-induced apoptosis. ► ER stress-induced lipocalin 2 expression is calcium-independent in A549 cells. ► Lipocalin 2 dose not play a major role in ER stress-induced autophagy.

  15. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum-derived oxidative stress by an occult infection related S surface antigen variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Kyung; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Kim, Hong; Won, You-Sub; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2015-06-14

    To investigate the mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induction by an occult infection related hepatitis B virus S surface antigen (HBsAg) variant. We used an HBsAg variant with lower secretion capacity, which was a KD variant from a Korean subject who was occultly infected with the genotype C. We compared the expression profiles of ER stress-related proteins between HuH-7 cells transfected with HBsAg plasmids of a wild-type and a KD variant using Western blot. Confocal microscopy indicated that the KD variant had higher levels of co-localization with ER than the wild-type HBsAg. The KD variant up-regulated ER stress-related proteins and induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to the wild-type via an increase in calcium. The KD variant also down-regulated anti-oxidant proteins (HO-1, catalase and SOD) compared to the wild-type, which indicates positive amplification loops of the ER-ROS axis. The KD variant also induced apoptotic cell death via the up-regulation of caspase proteins (caspase 6, 9 and 12). Furthermore, the KD variant induced a higher level of nitric oxide than wild-type HBsAg via the up-regulation of the iNOS protein. Our data indicate that occult infection related HBsAg variants can lead to ER-derived oxidative stress and liver cell death in HuH-7 cells.

  16. Curcumin induces apoptosis by inhibiting sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase activity in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Boyun; Dhanasekaran, Danny N; Tsang, Benjamin K; Song, Yong Sang

    2016-02-01

    Aberrant increase in the expression levels of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA), which regulates Ca(2+) homeostasis, has been observed in ovarian cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that curcumin increases cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration through inhibition of SERCA activity, causing apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells but not in normal cells, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSE). Curcumin induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Cytosolic Ca(2+) flux was evident after the curcumin treatment (15 µM). Treatment with Ca(2+) chelator reduced curcumin-induced apoptosis, confirming the possible involvement of increased cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration in this response. Basal mRNA and protein levels of SERCA2 were significantly higher in ovarian cancer cells than in OSE. SERCA activity was suppressed by curcumin, with no effect on protein expression. Forced expression of the SERCA2b gene in ovarian cancer cells prevented curcumin-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation and subsequent apoptosis, supporting an important role of SERCA in curcumin-induced apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Taken together, inhibition of SERCA activity by curcumin disrupts the Ca(2+) homeostasis and thereby promotes apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel benzofuran derivative, ACDB, induces apoptosis of human chondrosarcoma cells through mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen-Ming; Chen, Chien-Yu; Lu, Tingting; Sun, Yi; Li, Weimin; Huang, Yuan-Li; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Chang, Chih-Shiang; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-12-13

    Chondrosarcoma is one of the bone tumor with high mortality in respond to poor radiation and chemotherapy treatment. Here, we analyze the antitumor activity of a novel benzofuran derivative, 2-amino-3-(2-chlorophenyl)-6-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)benzofuran-4-yl acetate (ACDB), in human chondrosarcoma cells. ACDB increased the cell apoptosis of human chondrosarcomas without harm in chondrocytes. ACDB also enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which was characterized by varieties in the cytosolic calcium levels and induced the expression of glucose-regulated protein (GRP) and calpain. Furthermore, the ACDB-induced chondrosarcoma apoptosis was associated with the upregulation of the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family members including pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, downregulation of dysfunctional mitochondria that released cytochrome C, and subsequent activation of caspases-3. In addition, the ACDB-mediated cellular apoptosis was suppressed by transfecting cells with glucose-regulated protein (GRP) and calpain siRNA or treating cells with ER stress chelators and caspase inhibitors. Interestingly, animal experiments illustrated a reduction in the tumor volume following ACDB treatment. Together, these results suggest that ACDB may be a novel tumor suppressor of chondrosarcoma, and this study demonstrates that the novel antitumor agent, ACDB, induced apoptosis by mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in human chondrosarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  18. The Regulation of Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis by Endoplasmic Reticulum-to-Mitochondrial Ca2+ Transfer

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    Carl White

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration is one of the many processes orchestrated by calcium (Ca2+ signaling, and its dysregulation drives the increased invasive and metastatic potential of cancer cells. The ability of Ca2+ to function effectively as a regulator of migration requires the generation of temporally complex signals within spatially restricted microdomains. The generation and maintenance of these Ca2+ signals require a specific structural architecture and tightly regulated communication between the extracellular space, intracellular organelles, and cytoplasmic compartments. New insights into how Ca2+ microdomains are shaped by interorganellar Ca2+ communication have shed light on how Ca2+ coordinates cell migration by directing cellular polarization and the rearrangement of structural proteins. Importantly, we are beginning to understand how cancer subverts normal migration through the activity of oncogenes and tumor suppressors that impinge directly on the physiological function or expression levels of Ca2+ signaling proteins. In this review, we present and discuss research at the forefront of interorganellar Ca2+ signaling as it relates to cell migration, metastasis, and cancer progression, with special focus on endoplasmic reticulum-to-mitochondrial Ca2+ transfer.

  19. Arachidonoyl-specific diacylglycerol kinase ε and the endoplasmic reticulum

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    Tomoyuki Nakano

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER comprises an interconnected membrane network, which is made up of lipid bilayer and associated proteins. This organelle plays a central role in the protein synthesis and sorting. In addition, it represents the synthetic machinery of phospholipids, the major constituents of the biological membrane. In this process, phosphatidic acid (PA serves as a precursor of all phospholipids, suggesting that PA synthetic activity is closely associated with the ER function. One enzyme responsible for PA synthesis is diacylglycerol kinase (DGK that phosphorylates diacylglycerol (DG to PA. DGK is composed of a family of enzymes with distinct features assigned to each isozyme in terms of structure, enzymology and subcellular localization. Of DGKs, DGKε uniquely exhibits substrate specificity toward arachidonate-containing DG and is shown to reside in the ER. Arachidonic acid, a precursor of bioactive eicosanoids, is usually acylated at the sn-2 position of phospholipids, being especially enriched in phosphoinositide. In this review, we focus on arachidonoyl-specific DGKε with respect to the historical context, molecular basis of the substrate specificity and ER-targeting, and functional implications in the ER.

  20. Emerging role of the endoplasmic reticulum in peroxisome biogenesis

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    Gaurav eAgrawal

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, we have witnessed a paradigm shift in our long-standing concept of peroxisome biogenesis. Recent biochemical and morphological studies have revealed a primary role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in the de novo formation of peroxisomes, thus challenging the prevalent model invoking growth and division of pre-existing peroxisomes. Importantly, a novel sorting process has been recently defined at the ER that segregates and assembles specific sets of peroxisomal membrane proteins into distinct pre-peroxisomal vesicular carriers (ppVs that later undergo heterotypic fusion to form mature peroxisomes. Consequently, the emerging model has redefined the function of many peroxins (most notably Pex3, Pex19 and Pex25 and assigned them novel roles in vesicular budding and subsequent peroxisome assembly. These advances establish a novel intracellular membrane trafficking route between the ER and peroxisomes, but the components remain elusive. This review will provide a historical perspective and focus on recent developments in the emerging role of the ER in peroxisome biogenesis.

  1. ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS AS A PRO-FIBROTIC STIUMULUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanjore, Harikrishna; Lawson, William E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence suggests a prominent role for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in fibrotic conditions affecting a number of internal organs, including the lungs, liver, GI tract, kidney, and heart. ER stress enhances the susceptibility of structural cells, in most cases the epithelium, to pro-fibrotic stimuli. Studies suggest that ER stress facilitates fibrotic remodeling through activation of pro-apoptotic pathways, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and promotion of inflammatory responses. While genetic mutations that lead to ER stress underlie some cases of fibrosis, including lung fibrosis secondary to mutations in surfactant protein C (SFTPC), a variety of other factors can cause ER stress. These ER stress inducing factors include metabolic abnormalities, oxidative stress, viruses, and environmental exposures. Interestingly, the ability of the ER to maintain homeostasis under stress diminishes with age, potentially contributing to the fact that fibrotic disorders increase in incidence with aging. Taken together, underlying ER stress and UPR pathways are emerging as important determinants of fibrotic remodeling in different forms of tissue fibrosis. Further work is needed to better define the mechanisms by which ER stress facilitates progressive tissue fibrosis. In addition, it remains to be seen whether targeting ER stress and the UPR could have therapeutic benefit. PMID:23201247

  2. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Human Pathology

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    Oakes, Scott A.; Papa, Feroz R.

    2017-01-01

    Numerous genetic and environmental insults impede the ability of cells to properly fold and posttranslationally modify secretory and transmembrane proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), leading to a buildup of misfolded proteins in this organelle—a condition called ER stress. ER-stressed cells must rapidly restore protein-folding capacity to match protein-folding demand if they are to survive. In the presence of high levels of misfolded proteins in the ER, an intracellular signaling pathway called the unfolded protein response (UPR) induces a set of transcriptional and translational events that restore ER homeostasis. However, if ER stress persists chronically at high levels, a terminal UPR program ensures that cells commit to self-destruction. Chronic ER stress and defects in UPR signaling are emerging as key contributors to a growing list of human diseases, including diabetes, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Hence, there is much interest in targeting components of the UPR as a therapeutic strategy to combat these ER stress–associated pathologies. PMID:25387057

  3. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response and diabetic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) folds and modifies proteins; however, during conditions of cellular stress, unfolded proteins accumulate in the ER and activate the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR, also referred to as the ER stress response, activates three distinct signaling cascades that are designed to globally reduce transcription and translation. The three major arms of the mammalian UPR include 1) protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK), 2) inositol-requiring protein-1 (IRE1α), and 3) activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6) pathways. The PERK pathway rapidly attenuates protein translation, whereas the ATF6 and IRE1α cascades transcriptionally upregulate ER chaperone genes that promote proper folding and ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of proteins. This integrated response in turn allows the folding machinery of the ER to catch up with the backlog of unfolded proteins. The ER stress response plays a role in a number of pathophysiological processes, including pancreatic β-cell failure and apoptosis. The goals of the current review are to familiarize investigators with cellular and tissue activation of this response in the rodent and human diabetic kidney. Additionally, we will review therapeutic modulators of the ER stress response and discuss their efficacy in models of diabetic kidney disease. The ER stress response has both protective and deleterious features. A better understanding of the molecular pathways regulated during this process in a cell- and disease-specific manner could reveal novel therapeutic strategies in chronic renal diseases, including diabetic kidney disease. PMID:21345978

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Cancer Cell Fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzari, Marco; Gagliardi, Mara; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Perturbation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis results in a stress condition termed “ER stress” determining the activation of a finely regulated program defined as unfolded protein response (UPR) and whose primary aim is to restore this organelle’s physiological activity. Several physiological and pathological stimuli deregulate normal ER activity causing UPR activation, such as hypoxia, glucose shortage, genome instability, and cytotoxic compounds administration. Some of these stimuli are frequently observed during uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells, resulting in tumor core formation and stage progression. Therefore, it is not surprising that ER stress is usually induced during solid tumor development and stage progression, becoming an hallmark of such malignancies. Several UPR components are in fact deregulated in different tumor types, and accumulating data indicate their active involvement in tumor development/progression. However, although the UPR program is primarily a pro-survival process, sustained and/or prolonged stress may result in cell death induction. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s) regulating the cell survival/death decision under ER stress condition may be crucial in order to specifically target tumor cells and possibly circumvent or overcome tumor resistance to therapies. In this review, we discuss the role played by the UPR program in tumor initiation, progression and resistance to therapy, highlighting the recent advances that have improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the survival/death switch. PMID:28491820

  5. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimellaro, A; Perticone, M; Fiorentino, T V; Sciacqua, A; Hribal, M L

    2016-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human disorders, including cardiovascular disease (CVD). CVD recognizes endothelial dysfunction (ED) as its pathogenetic primum movens; interestingly a large body of evidence has identified the unchecked ER stress response as a main actor in vascular damage elicited by various cardio-metabolic risk factors. In the present Review, we summarize findings from experimental studies on the ER stress-related ED, focusing on the mechanisms underlying this association. Different noxious agents, such as hyperhomocysteinemia, hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia and chronic inflammation, induce ED promoting an amplified ER stress response as demonstrated by several studies in animal models, as well as in human primary and immortalized endothelial cells. ER stress represents therefore a key mediator of vascular damage, operating in a setting of increased inflammatory burden and oxidative stress, thus contributing to foster a vicious pathogenic cycle. Experimental studies summarized in this Review strongly suggest that an unchecked ER stress response plays a central role in the pathogenesis of ED and, consequently, CVD. Counteracting ER stress may thus represent a promising, even if largely unexplored as-yet, therapeutic approach aimed to prevent vascular damage, slowing the progression from ED to cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in insulin resistance and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Hernández, Agustin; Leon-Aparicio, Daniel; Chavez-Reyes, Jesus; Olivares-Reyes, Jesus A; DeJesus, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is the main intracellular Ca(2+) store for Ca(2+) release during cell signaling. There are different strategies to avoid ER Ca(2+) depletion. Release channels utilize first Ca(2+)-bound to proteins and this minimizes the reduction of the free luminal [Ca(2+)]. However, if release channels stay open after exhaustion of Ca(2+)-bound to proteins, then the reduction of the free luminal ER [Ca(2+)] (via STIM proteins) activates Ca(2+) entry at the plasma membrane to restore the ER Ca(2+) load, which will work provided that SERCA pump is active. Nevertheless, there are several noxious conditions that result in decreased activity of the SERCA pump such as oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines, and saturated fatty acids, among others. These conditions result in a deficient restoration of the ER [Ca(2+)] and lead to the ER stress response that should facilitate recovery of the ER. However, if the stressful condition persists then ER stress ends up triggering cell death and the ensuing degenerative process leads to diverse pathologies; particularly insulin resistance, diabetes and several of the complications associated with diabetes. This scenario suggests that limiting ER stress should decrease the incidence of diabetes and the mobility and mortality associated with this illness. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Cancer Cell Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Corazzari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Perturbation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis results in a stress condition termed “ER stress” determining the activation of a finely regulated program defined as unfolded protein response (UPR and whose primary aim is to restore this organelle’s physiological activity. Several physiological and pathological stimuli deregulate normal ER activity causing UPR activation, such as hypoxia, glucose shortage, genome instability, and cytotoxic compounds administration. Some of these stimuli are frequently observed during uncontrolled proliferation of transformed cells, resulting in tumor core formation and stage progression. Therefore, it is not surprising that ER stress is usually induced during solid tumor development and stage progression, becoming an hallmark of such malignancies. Several UPR components are in fact deregulated in different tumor types, and accumulating data indicate their active involvement in tumor development/progression. However, although the UPR program is primarily a pro-survival process, sustained and/or prolonged stress may result in cell death induction. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s regulating the cell survival/death decision under ER stress condition may be crucial in order to specifically target tumor cells and possibly circumvent or overcome tumor resistance to therapies. In this review, we discuss the role played by the UPR program in tumor initiation, progression and resistance to therapy, highlighting the recent advances that have improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the survival/death switch.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis-folded ones in the ER for additional folding attempts, marking and removing terminally-misfolded ones via a unique multiple-step degradation process known as ER-associate degradation (ERAD. Most of our current knowledge on ERQC and ERAD came from genetic and biochemical investigations in yeast and mammalian cells. Recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovered homologous components and similar mechanisms in plants for monitoring protein folding and for retaining, repairing, and removing misfolded proteins. These studies also revealed critical roles of the plant ERQC/ERAD systems in regulating important biochemical/physiological processes, such as abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense. In this review, we discuss our current understanding about the molecular components and biochemical mechanisms of the plant ERQC/ERAD system in comparison to yeast and mammalian systems.

  9. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

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    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Proteomic analysis of endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dandan; Tian, Lihong; Qu, Leqing

    2015-09-23

    The defects in storage proteins secretion in the endosperm of transgenic rice seeds often leads to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which produces floury and shrunken seeds, but the mechanism of this response remains unclear. We used an iTRAQ-based proteomics analysis of ER-stressed rice seeds due to the endosperm-specific suppression of OsSar1 to identify changes in the protein levels in response to ER stress. ER stress changed the expression of 405 proteins in rice seed by >2.0- fold compared with the wild-type control. Of these proteins, 140 were upregulated and 265 were downregulated. The upregulated proteins were mainly involved in protein modification, transport and degradation, and the downregulated proteins were mainly involved in metabolism and stress/defense responses. A KOBAS analysis revealed that protein-processing in the ER and degradation-related proteasome were the predominant upregulated pathways in the rice endosperm in response to ER stress. Trans-Golgi protein transport was also involved in the ER stress response. Combined with bioinformatic and molecular biology analyses, our proteomic data will facilitate our understanding of the systemic responses to ER stress in rice seeds.

  11. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  12. Methods to Study PTEN in Mitochondria and Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missiroli, Sonia; Morganti, Claudia; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Although PTEN has been widely described as a nuclear and cytosolic protein, in the last 2 years, alternative organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), pure mitochondria, and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), have been recognized as pivotal targets of PTEN activity.Here, we describe different methods that have been used to highlight PTEN subcellular localization.First, a protocol to extract nuclear and cytosolic fractions has been described to assess the "canonical" PTEN localization. Moreover, we describe a protocol for mitochondria isolation with proteinase K (PK) to further discriminate whether PTEN associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) or resides within the mitochondria. Finally, we focus our attention on a subcellular fractionation protocol of cells that permits the isolation of MAMs containing unique regions of ER membranes attached to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and mitochondria without contamination from other organelles. In addition to biochemical fractionations, immunostaining can be used to determine the subcellular localization of proteins; thus, a detailed protocol to obtain good immunofluorescence (IF) is described. The employment of these methodological approaches could facilitate the identification of different PTEN localizations in several physiopathological contexts.

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Pyo [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Pae, Hyun-Ock [Department of Immunology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Je Moon [Department of Opthalmology, Ulasn University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Son, Yong [Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Wonkwang University School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hun-Taeg, E-mail: chung@ulsan.ac.kr [School of Biological Sciences, Ulsan University (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  14. Endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated microtubule alignment governs cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kenji; Mamane, Alexandre; Sasaki, Tohru; Sato, Kohta; Takagi, Jun; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Hufnagel, Lars; Shimamoto, Yuta; Joanny, Jean-François; Uchida, Seiichi; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2017-04-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming refers to a collective movement of cytoplasm observed in many cell types. The mechanism of meiotic cytoplasmic streaming (MeiCS) in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes is puzzling as the direction of the flow is not predefined by cell polarity and occasionally reverses. Here, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network structure is required for the collective flow. Using a combination of RNAi, microscopy and image processing of C. elegans zygotes, we devise a theoretical model, which reproduces and predicts the emergence and reversal of the flow. We propose a positive-feedback mechanism, where a local flow generated along a microtubule is transmitted to neighbouring regions through the ER. This, in turn, aligns microtubules over a broader area to self-organize the collective flow. The proposed model could be applicable to various cytoplasmic streaming phenomena in the absence of predefined polarity. The increased mobility of cortical granules by MeiCS correlates with the efficient exocytosis of the granules to protect the zygotes from osmotic and mechanical stresses.

  15. The endoplasmic reticulum in plant immunity and cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eSchäfer

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is a highly dynamic organelle in eukaryotic cells and a major production site of proteins destined for vacuoles, the plasma membrane or apoplast in plants. At the ER, these secreted proteins undergo multiple processing steps, which are supervised and conducted by the ER quality control system. Notably, processing of secreted proteins can considerably elevate under stress conditions and exceed ER folding capacities. The resulting accumulation of unfolded proteins is defined as ER stress. The efficiency of cells to re-establish proper ER function is crucial for stress adaptation. Besides delivering proteins directly antagonizing and resolving stress conditions, the ER monitors synthesis of immune receptors. This indicates the significance of the ER for the establishment and function of the plant immune system. Recent studies point out the fragility of the entire system and highlight the ER as initiator of programmed cell death (PCD in plants as was reported for vertebrates. This review summarizes current knowledge on the impact of the ER on immune and PCD signalling. Understanding the integration of stress signals by the ER bears a considerable potential to optimize development and to enhance stress resistance of plants.

  16. Glycolaldehyde induces endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in Schwann cells

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    Keisuke Sato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cell injury is caused by diabetic neuropathy. The apoptosis of Schwann cells plays a pivotal role in diabetic nerve dysfunction. Glycolaldehyde is a precursor of advanced glycation end products that contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. In this study, we examined whether glycolaldehyde induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and apoptosis in rat Schwann cells. Schwann cells treated with 500 μM glycolaldehyde showed morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis. Glycolaldehyde activated apoptotic signals, such as caspase-3 and caspase-8. Furthermore, it induced ER stress response involving RNA-dependent protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK, inositol-requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1α (IRE1α, and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α. In addition, glycolaldehyde activated CCAAT/enhancer-binding homologous protein (CHOP, an ER stress response factor crucial to executing apoptosis. Knockdown of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, which is involved in the promotion of cell survival following ER stress, enhanced glycolaldehyde-induced cytotoxicity, indicating that Nrf2 plays a protective role in the cytotoxicity caused by glycolaldehyde. Taken together, these findings indicate that glycolaldehyde is capable of inducing apoptosis and ER stress in Schwann cells. The ER stress induced by glycolaldehyde may trigger the glycolaldehyde-induced apoptosis in Schwann cells. This study demonstrated for the first time that glycolaldehyde induced ER stress.

  17. Connecting the cytoskeleton to the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Pinar S; Hatch, Anna L; Higgs, Henry N

    2014-07-21

    A tendency in cell biology is to divide and conquer. For example, decades of painstaking work have led to an understanding of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi structure, dynamics, and transport. In parallel, cytoskeletal researchers have revealed a fantastic diversity of structure and cellular function in both actin and microtubules. Increasingly, these areas overlap, necessitating an understanding of both organelle and cytoskeletal biology. This review addresses connections between the actin/microtubule cytoskeletons and organelles in animal cells, focusing on three key areas: ER structure and function; ER-to-Golgi transport; and Golgi structure and function. Making these connections has been challenging for several reasons: the small sizes and dynamic characteristics of some components; the fact that organelle-specific cytoskeletal elements can easily be obscured by more abundant cytoskeletal structures; and the difficulties in imaging membranes and cytoskeleton simultaneously, especially at the ultrastructural level. One major concept is that the cytoskeleton is frequently used to generate force for membrane movement, with two potential consequences: translocation of the organelle, or deformation of the organelle membrane. While initially discussing issues common to metazoan cells in general, we subsequently highlight specific features of neurons, since these highly polarized cells present unique challenges for organellar distribution and dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Homocysteine inhibits hepatocyte proliferation via endoplasmic reticulum stress.

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    Xue Yu

    Full Text Available Homocysteine is an independent risk factor for coronary, cerebral, and peripheral vascular diseases. Recent studies have shown that levels of homocysteine are elevated in patients with impaired hepatic function, but the precise role of homocysteine in the development of hepatic dysfunction is unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of homocysteine on hepatocyte proliferation in vitro. Our results demonstrated that homocysteine inhibited hepatocyte proliferation by up-regulating protein levels of p53 as well as mRNA and protein levels of p21(Cip1 in primary cultured hepatocytes. Homocysteine induced cell growth arrest in p53-positive hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2, but not in p53-null hepatocarcinoma cell line Hep3B. A p53 inhibitor pifithrin-α inhibited the expression of p21(Cip1 and attenuated homocysteine-induced cell growth arrest. Homocysteine induced TRB3 expression via endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway, resulting in Akt dephosphorylation. Knock-down of endogenous TRB3 significantly suppressed the inhibitory effect of homocysteine on cell proliferation and the phosphorylation of Akt. LiCl reversed homocysteine-mediated cell growth arrest by inhibiting TRB3-mediated Akt dephosphorylation. These results demonstrate that both TRB3 and p21(Cip1 are critical molecules in the homocysteine signaling cascade and provide a mechanistic explanation for impairment of liver regeneration in hyperhomocysteinemia.

  19. Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Milagros; Diaz-Morales, Noelia; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Escribano-Lopez, Irene; Bañuls, Celia; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Victor, Victor M

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are related to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Mitochondria use substrates from lipid and glucose metabolism in order to generate ATP, and when mitochondrial O2 consumption is decreased due to an altered metabolism there is an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can impair different types of molecules and cells, especially in β- cells during type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, the maintenance of ER function in insulin-secreting β-cells is crucial, and when ER homeostasis is disrupted, the ER develops an unfolded protein response (UPR) in order to maintain the homeostasis of this organelle. However, when homeostasis fails in mitochondria and ER, these organelles can initiate death signalling pathways. New research has suggested that hyperlipidemia and hyperliglucaemia, known as key factors of type 2 diabetes (T2D), disrupt mitochondrial activity and ER homeostasis, thus triggering a disruption of energy metabolism, unresolvable UPR activation and β-cell death. This review explains the mechanisms of mitochondrial function and ER stress related to the pathological effects of type 2 diabetes in different tissues.

  20. Apoptosis, autophagy & endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtas, Levent; Guclu, Aydin; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing secondary to increased consumption of food and decreased physical activity worldwide. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells occur in the early phase of diabetes. However, with the progression of diabetes, dysfunction and loss of beta cells occur in both types 1 and 2 DM. Programmed cell death also named apoptosis is found to be associated with diabetes, and apoptosis of beta cells might be the main mechanism of relative insulin deficiency in DM. Autophagic cell death and apoptosis are not entirely distinct programmed cell death mechanisms and share many of the regulator proteins. These processes can occur in both physiologic and pathologic conditions including DM. Besides these two important pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) also acts as a cell sensor to monitor and maintain cellular homeostasis. ER stress has been found to be associated with autophagy and apoptosis. This review was aimed to describe the interactions between apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress pathways in DM.

  1. Sphingolipids activate the endoplasmic reticulum stress surveillance pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, Francisco; Yagisawa, Fumi; Obara, Keisuke; Gregerson, J D; Kihara, Akio; Niwa, Maho

    2018-01-09

    Proper inheritance of functional organelles is vital to cell survival. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress surveillance (ERSU) pathway ensures that daughter cells inherit a functional ER. Here, we show that the ERSU pathway is activated by phytosphingosine (PHS), an early biosynthetic sphingolipid. Multiple lines of evidence support this: (1) Reducing PHS levels with myriocin diminishes the ability of cells to induce ERSU phenotypes. (2) Aureobasidin A treatment, which blocks conversion of early intermediates to downstream complex sphingolipids, induces ERSU. (3) orm1Δorm2Δ cells, which up-regulate PHS, show an ERSU response even in the absence of ER stress. (4) Lipid analyses confirm that PHS levels are indeed elevated in ER-stressed cells. (5) Lastly, the addition of exogenous PHS is sufficient to induce all ERSU phenotypes. We propose that ER stress elevates PHS, which in turn activates the ERSU pathway to ensure future daughter-cell viability. © 2018 Piña et al.

  2. An allosteric model of the molecular interactions of excitation- contraction coupling in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    A contact interaction is proposed to exist between the voltage sensor of the transverse tubular membrane of skeletal muscle and the calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This interaction is given a quantitative formulation inspired in the Monod, Wyman, and Changeux model of allosteric transitions in hemoglobin (Monod, J., J. Wyman, and J.-P. Changeux. 1965. Journal of Molecular Biology. 12:88- 118), and analogous to one proposed by Marks and Jones for voltage- dependent Ca ch...

  3. Abstracts of Papers Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of General Physiologists (40th) Held in Woods Hole, Massachusetts on 4-7 September 1986,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Investigations and Patient Care Branch, National Institute of Dental Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland (Sponsor: William B. Guggino...Angiotensin i (ang II) is a potent vasoconstrictor that stimulates Na’ influx in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). To investigate the role of Na/H...pathway for Na+ influx in cultured VSMC and is stimulated by vasoconstrictors such as ang II. 126. Calcium Channels from Cardiac Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

  4. Compromised Myocardial Energetics in Hypertrophied Mouse Hearts Diminish the Beneficial Effect of Overexpressing SERCA2a

    OpenAIRE

    Pinz, Ilka; Tian, Rong; Belke, Darrell; Swanson, Eric; Dillmann, Wolfgang; Ingwall, Joanne S.

    2011-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) plays a central role in regulating intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and myocardial contractility. Several studies show that improving Ca2+ handling in hypertrophied rodent hearts by increasing SERCA activity results in enhanced contractile function. This suggests that SERCA is a potential target for gene therapy in cardiac hypertrophy and failure. However, it raises the issue of increased energy cost resulting from a higher ATPase activity. In t...

  5. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Share Dialog × Print Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information What is bone health and how ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  6. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. II. Domains of several subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Moncrief, N. D.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first report in this series we described the relationships and evolution of 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand subfamilies. Here we add 66 additional proteins and define eight (CDC, TPNV, CLNB, LPS, DGK, 1F8, VIS, TCBP) new subfamilies and seven (CAL, SQUD, CDPK, EFH5, TPP, LAV, CRGP) new unique proteins, which we assume represent new subfamilies. The main focus of this study is the classification of individual EF-hand domains. Five subfamilies--calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, regulatory light chain, CDC31/caltractin--and three uniques--call, squidulin, and calcium-dependent protein kinase--are congruent in that all evolved from a common four-domain precursor. In contrast calpain and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) each evolved from its own one-domain precursor. The remaining 19 subfamilies and uniques appear to have evolved by translocation and splicing of genes encoding the EF-hand domains that were precursors to the congruent eight and to calpain and to SARC. The rates of evolution of the EF-hand domains are slower following formation of the subfamilies and establishment of their functions. Subfamilies are not readily classified by patterns of calcium coordination, interdomain linker stability, and glycine and proline distribution. There are many homoplasies indicating that similar variants of the EF-hand evolved by independent pathways.

  7. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate...

  8. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  9. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum redox state is not perturbed by pharmacological or pathological endoplasmic reticulum stress in live pancreatic β-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmgard Schuiki

    Full Text Available Accumulation of unfolded, misfolded and aggregated proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causes ER stress. ER stress can result from physiological situations such as acute increases in secretory protein biosynthesis or pathological conditions that perturb ER homeostasis such as alterations in the ER redox state. Here we monitored ER redox together with transcriptional output of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR in INS-1 insulinoma cells stably expressing eroGFP (ER-redox-sensor and mCherry protein driven by a GRP78 promoter (UPR-sensor. Live cell imaging, flow cytometry and biochemical characterization were used to examine these parameters in response to various conditions known to induce ER stress. As expected, treatment of the cells with the reducing agent dithiothreitol caused a decrease in the oxidation state of the ER accompanied by an increase in XBP-1 splicing. Unexpectedly however, other treatments including tunicamycin, thapsigargin, DL-homocysteine, elevated free fatty acids or high glucose had essentially no influence on the ER redox state, despite inducing ER stress. Comparable results were obtained with dispersed rat islet cells expressing eroGFP. Thus, unlike in yeast cells, ER stress in pancreatic β-cells is not associated with a more reducing ER environment.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress affects the transport of phosphatidylethanolamine from mitochondria to the endoplasmic reticulum in S.cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Muthukumar; Sivaprakasam, Chinnarasu; Prinz, William A; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-12-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are two of the most abundant phospholipids in cells. Although both lipids can be synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in S. cerevisiae PE can also be produced in mitochondria and endosomes; this PE can be transported back to the ER where it is converted to PC. In this study we found that dithiothreitol (DTT), which induces ER stress, decreases PE export from mitochondria to the ER. This results in decreased levels of total cellular PC and mitochondrial PC. These decreases were not caused by changes in levels of PC synthesizing or degrading enzymes. PE export from mitochondria to the ER during ER stress was further reduced in cells lacking Mdm10p, a component of an ER-mitochondrial tethering complex that may facilitated lipid exchange between these compartments. We also found that reducing mitochondrial PC levels induces mitophagy. In conclusion, we show that ER stress affected PE export from mitochondria to ER and the Mdm10p is important for this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and implementation of a high-throughput compound screening assay for targeting disrupted ER calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Honarnejad

    Full Text Available Disrupted intracellular calcium homeostasis is believed to occur early in the cascade of events leading to Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Particularly familial AD mutations linked to Presenilins result in exaggerated agonist-evoked calcium release from endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Here we report the development of a fully automated high-throughput calcium imaging assay utilizing a genetically-encoded FRET-based calcium indicator at single cell resolution for compound screening. The established high-throughput screening assay offers several advantages over conventional high-throughput calcium imaging technologies. We employed this assay for drug discovery in AD by screening compound libraries consisting of over 20,000 small molecules followed by structure-activity-relationship analysis. This led to the identification of Bepridil, a calcium channel antagonist drug in addition to four further lead structures capable of normalizing the potentiated FAD-PS1-induced calcium release from ER. Interestingly, it has recently been reported that Bepridil can reduce Aβ production by lowering BACE1 activity. Indeed, we also detected lowered Aβ, increased sAPPα and decreased sAPPβ fragment levels upon Bepridil treatment. The latter findings suggest that Bepridil may provide a multifactorial therapeutic modality for AD by simultaneously addressing multiple aspects of the disease.

  13. Role of calcium loading in early afterdepolarizations generated by Cs+ in canine and guinea pig Purkinje fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, B; Kovacs, T; Lazzara, R

    1995-10-01

    Our previous observations indicate that the Na+:Ca2+ exchange current (INa:Ca) plays an important role in early afterdepolarizations occurring at more negative Vm (L-EAD). The purpose of these studies was to examine the role of Ca(2+)-loading, which stimulates INa:Ca, in generation of L-EAD. Purkinje strands and preparations of ventricular myocardium from dogs and guinea pigs were superfused with oxygenated physiologic buffer solutions at 37 degrees C. To induce EADs, [K+]o was reduced to 2.0 to 3.0 mM and [Cs+]o (3.6 to 4.0 mM) was added at slow rates of fraction of Purkinje fibers after a latent period during which Ca(2+)-loading of the sarcoplasmic reticulum occurred, while fibers preloaded with Ca2+ developed L-EAD rapidly and uniformly. These findings indicate that Ca(2+)-loading is a critical condition for the development of L-EAD. Early suppression of L-EAD by ouabian suggests a dependence of L-EAD on low [Na+]i. These findings implicate INa:Ca in the generation of L-EAD.

  14. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  15. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...

  16. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  17. LA ONDA DE CALCIO EN CÉLULAS VEGETALES The Calcium Wave of Vegetable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TD GEYDAN

    Full Text Available El calcio es un nutriente esencial para las plantas, se encuentra involucrado en procesos de desarrollo y de respuesta a factores bióticos y abióticos. Numerosas señales modifican la concentración de calcio en el citoplasma, núcleo, retículo endoplásmico o plastídios. El incremento del calcio en el citosol es rápidamente disminuido, pero en el lapso de incremento, se forman innumerables y complejas cascadas de señalización que conllevan a la respuesta celular. Este nota expone los mecanismos implicaciones de la entrada del calcio en las células vegetales.Calcium is an essential nutrient for plants; it is involved in developmental processes and in responses to biotic and abiotic factors. Several signals that modify the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and/or plastids have been observed. These changes in the calcium concentration in the cell interior are rapidly returned to basal levels, in the meantime, innumerable and complex signaling cascades. This note exposes the mechanisms of calcium transport through the cell membranes of the entrance of calcium in the plant cells.

  18. La onda de calcio en células vegetales The Calcium Wave of Vegetable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinel Clara

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El calcio es un nutriente esencial para las plantas, se encuentra involucrado en procesos de desarrollo y de respuesta a factores bióticos y abióticos. Numerosas señales modifican la concentración de calcio en el citoplasma, núcleo, retículo endoplásmico o plastídios. El incremento del calcio en el citosol es rápidamente disminuido, pero en el lapso de incremento, se forman innumerables y complejas cascadas de señalización que conllevan a la respuesta celular. Este nota expone los mecanismos implicaciones de la entrada del calcio en las células vegetales.Calcium is an essential nutrient for plants; it is involved in developmental processes and in responses to biotic and abiotic factors. Several signals that modify the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and/or plastids have been observed. These changes in the calcium concentration in the cell interior are rapidly returned to basal levels, in the meantime, innumerable and complex signaling cascades. This note exposes the mechanisms of calcium transport through the cell membranes of the entrance of calcium in the plant cells.

  19. Regulation of xanthine oxidoreductase protein expression by hydrogen peroxide and calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, J Scott; Saxena, Archana; Cai, Hua; Dikalov, Sergey; Harrison, David G

    2005-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated that endothelial xanthine oxidase (XO) levels are dependent on the NADPH oxidase. We postulated that H2O2 may modulate the irreversible conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) to XO and sought to examine mechanisms involved. H2O2 (100 micromol/L) decreased bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) XDH protein expression, and metabolic labeling studies indicated that H2O2 stimulated conversion of XDH to XO. The decline in XDH was mimicked by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating compounds SIN-1 and Menadione, as well as by stimulating BAECs with angiotensin II (200 nmol/L). BAPTA-AM prevented the decline in XDH by H2O2, indicating that it was calcium-dependent. In keeping with calcium acting downstream of H2O2, the calcium ionophore A23187 (1 micromol/L) caused XDH-to-XO conversion, and this was not prevented by the antioxidants. In addition, XDH-to-XO conversion was blocked by 2-APB and NO donors and induced by thapsigargin and M-3M3FBS, implicating phospholipase C and endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in this process. Endothelial XO and XDH expression are strongly dependent on H2O2 and calcium. Stimulation of XDH conversion to XO may represent a feed-forward mechanism whereby H2O2 can stimulate further production of ROS.

  20. Mitochondria-Endoplasmic Reticulum Contact Sites Mediate Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Takuma; Takahama, Michihiro; Saitoh, Tatsuya

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are fundamental organelles that coordinate high-order cell functions. Mitochondria are centers of energy production, whereas the ER is responsible for folding, transport, and degradation of proteins. In addition to their specific functions, mitochondria and ER actively communicate with each other to promote a variety of cellular events, such as material transfer and signal transduction. Recent studies have shown the critical involvement of these organelles in regulation of the innate immune system, which functions in host defense. The innate immune system utilizes a wide range of germ-line-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and induces inflammatory and antiviral responses. Contact sites between mitochondria and the ER function in assembly of the NLR family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3)-inflammasome to promote the inflammatory response. The NLRP3-inflammasome is a protein complex composed of the receptor NLRP3 on the ER side and the adaptor apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD on the mitochondrial side; it induces caspase-1-dependent maturation of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Furthermore, ER-mitochondria contact sites function in initiation and mediation of signal transduction pathways downstream of intracellular PRRs, such as retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptor and cyclic GMP-AMP synthase, to promote the antiviral response. Therefore, ER-mitochondria contact sites, also known as mitochondria-associated membranes, play key roles in regulation of innate immune responses.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: key promoter of rosacea pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific interest in the pathogenesis of rosacea focuses on abnormally high facial skin levels of cathelicidin and the trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein 5 (KLK5) that cleaves the cathelicidin precursor protein into the bioactive fragment LL-37, which exerts crucial proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial activities. Furthermore, increased expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been identified in rosacea skin supporting the participation of the innate immune system. Notably, TLRs are expressed on sensory neurons and increase neuronal excitability linking TLR signalling to the transmission of neuroinflammatory responses. It is the intention of this viewpoint to present a unifying concept that links all known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV irradiation, heat, skin irritants and special foods to one converging point: enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress via upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 increases TLR2 expression, resulting in enhanced production of cathelicidin and KLK5 mediating downstream proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial signalling. The presented concept identifies rosacea trigger factors as environmental stressors that enhance the skin's ER stress response. Exaggerated cutaneous ER stress that stimulates the TLR2-driven inflammatory response may involve sebocytes, keratinocytes, monocyte-macrophages and sensory cutaneous neurons. Finally, all antirosacea drugs are proposed to attenuate the ER stress signalling cascade at some point. Overstimulated ER stress signalling may have evolutionarily evolved as a compensatory mechanism to balance impaired vitamin D-driven LL-37-mediated antimicrobial defenses due to lower exposure of UV-B irradiation of the northern Celtic population. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Transcriptional analysis implicates endoplasmic reticulum stress in bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Tang

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a fatal, transmissible, neurodegenerative disease of cattle. To date, the disease process is still poorly understood. In this study, brain tissue samples from animals naturally infected with BSE were analysed to identify differentially regulated genes using Affymetrix GeneChip Bovine Genome Arrays. A total of 230 genes were shown to be differentially regulated and many of these genes encode proteins involved in immune response, apoptosis, cell adhesion, stress response and transcription. Seventeen genes are associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and 10 of these 17 genes are involved in stress related responses including ER chaperones, Grp94 and Grp170. Western blotting analysis showed that another ER chaperone, Grp78, was up-regulated in BSE. Up-regulation of these three chaperones strongly suggests the presence of ER stress and the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR in BSE. The occurrence of ER stress was also supported by changes in gene expression for cytosolic proteins, such as the chaperone pair of Hsp70 and DnaJ. Many genes associated with the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the autophagy-lysosome system were differentially regulated, indicating that both pathways might be activated in response to ER stress. A model is presented to explain the mechanisms of prion neurotoxicity using these ER stress related responses. Clustering analysis showed that the differently regulated genes found from the naturally infected BSE cases could be used to predict the infectious status of the samples experimentally infected with BSE from the previous study and vice versa. Proof-of-principle gene expression biomarkers were found to represent BSE using 10 genes with 94% sensitivity and 87% specificity.

  3. Analysis of nelfinavir-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüning, Ansgar

    2011-01-01

    Nelfinavir (Viracept®) is an HIV protease inhibitor that has been shown to induce the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress reaction in human cancer cells. Although the presumed drug doses needed for an efficient ER stress reaction and ensuing apoptosis in cancer cells is somewhat higher than those prescribed for HIV-infected persons, nelfinavir represents one of the few clinically applicable ER stress-inducing agents, and is currently being tested in clinical studies on cancer patients. Therefore, this chapter describes how to obtain and use nelfinavir for in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, methods are described that might facilitate the analysis and monitoring of the nelfinavir-induced ER stress response either in cancer cells in cell culture or in cancer tissue biopsies. These methods include various fluorescence-based ER staining techniques and the expression analysis of primary and secondary ER stress markers by immunoblotting and RT-PCR analysis. Among the several methods presented, the analysis of an unconventional XBP1 splicing, caused by the ER stress sensor IRE1, is shown to present the most sensitive and most specific marker for nelfinavir-induced ER stress. Primers and PCR conditions suitable for XBP1 PCR and splicing analysis are presented. Such a PCR-based XBP1 splicing analysis might not only be suitable to monitor nelfinavir-induced ER stress, but could also be applied in drug screening programs to test for other ER stress-inducing agents with similar activities or synergistic activities with nelfinavir. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition reduces hypertension through the preservation of resistance blood vessel structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Rachel E; Werner, Kaitlyn E; Yum, Victoria; Lu, Chao; Tat, Victor; Memon, Muzammil; No, Yejin; Ask, Kjetil; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2016-08-01

    Our purpose was to determine if endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition lowers blood pressure (BP) in hypertension by correcting vascular dysfunction. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) was used as a model of human essential hypertension with its normotensive control, the Wistar Kyoto rat. Animals were subjected to endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition with 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA; 1 g/kg per day, orally) for 5 weeks from 12 weeks of age. BP was measured weekly noninvasively and at endpoint with carotid arterial cannulation. Small mesenteric arteries were removed for vascular studies. Function was assessed with a Mulvany-Halpern style myograph, and structure was assessed by measurement of medial-to-lumen ratio in perfusion fixed vessels as well as three-dimensional confocal reconstruction of vessel wall components. Endoplasmic reticulum stress was assessed by quantitative real time-PCR and western blotting; oxidative stress was assessed by 3-nitrotyrosine and dihydroethidium staining. 4-PBA significantly lowered BP in SHR (vehicle 206.1 ± 4.3 vs. 4-PBA 178.9 ± 3.1, systolic) but not Wistar Kyoto. 4-PBA diminished contractility and augmented endothelial-dependent vasodilation in SHR small mesenteric arteries, as well as reducing media-to-lumen ratio. 4-PBA significantly reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress in SHR resistance vessels. Normotensive resistance vessels, treated with the endoplasmic reticulum stress-inducing agent, tunicamycin, show decreased endothelial-dependent vasodilation; this was improved with 4-PBA treatment. 3-Nitrotyrosine and dihydroethidium staining indicated that endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to reactive oxygen species generation resolvable by 4-PBA treatment. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused endothelial-mediated vascular dysfunction contributing to elevated BP in the SHR model of human essential hypertension.

  5. The Hypothermic Influence on CHOP and Ero1-α in an Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Model of Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poone, Gagandip K.; Hasseldam, Henrik; Munkholm, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causes accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and activates the unfolded protein response,resulting in apoptosis through CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) activation. In an in vitro and in vivo model...... (p endoplasmic reticulum stress induced apoptosis in stroke. Ashypothermia further...... globalischemia. A stable increase in CHOP expression was observed throughout the time course (p stressed PC12 cells resulted in a decreased expression of CHOP after three, six and twelve hours...

  6. Role and mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum stress and Ca2+ overload in pulmonary endothelial cell damage induced by heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-jun YU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the effect of different temperatures on endoplasmic reticulum stress, calcium overload, mitochondria and cell damage in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC induced by heat stress, and clarify the mechanism of endothelial cell injury in the process of heat stress to provide experimental basis for clinical prevention and treatment of heat stree. Methods Heat stress model of PMVEC cell was set up. Control group cells were incubated at 37℃, 5%CO2, while heat stress group cells were incubated at 39℃, 41℃, 43℃ for 2h, respectively, then further incubated at 37℃, 5%CO2 for 6h. Pretreatment of cells with 20μmol/L BAPTA-AM or 50μmol/L CsA before heat stress at 43℃. The protein levels of p-PERK, PERK p-eIF2a, eIF2a, ATF4 and GRP78 were analyzed by Western blotting. Intracellular Ca2+, mitochondrial membrane potential and the changes in mitochondrial permeability transition pore were investigated by flow cytometry. The change of caspase-3 was detected by Caspase Assay Kit. Millicell-ERS Volt-Ohm Meter and Accessories was used for determining the changes of transepithelium electrical resistance (TER. Results Compared with the control group, with the increase of heat stress temperature (41-43℃, the phosphorylation of p-PERK and p-eIF2a protein and the expressions of ATF4 and GRP78 proteins were gradually activated, intracellular Ca2+ increased, MPTP pore was opened, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased, cell permeability increased and apoptosis occurred, and it was the most obvious in the 43℃ heat stress group, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05. Pretreatment with Ca2+ inhibitors promoted the recovery of the MPTP hole, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell permeability, and reduced the occurrence of apoptosis. While pretreatment with the mitochondrial protective agent did not reduce the release of Ca2+, but it could promote the recovery of cell permeability and reduce the

  7. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Control of IsAHP in mouse hippocampus CA1 pyramidal neurons by RyR3-mediated calcium-induced calcium release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vrede, Y; Fossier, P; Baux, G; Joels, M; Chameau, P

    2007-11-01

    In several neuronal preparations, the ryanodine-sensitive calcium store was reported to participate in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization currents (IsAHP) involved in spike frequency adaptation. We show that calcium release from the ryanodine-sensitive calcium store is a major determinant of the triggering of IsAHP in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings in hippocampus slices show that the intracellular calcium stores depletion using an inhibitor of the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (5 microM cyclopiazonic acid), as well as the specific blockade of ryanodine receptors (100 microM ryanodine) both reduced the IsAHP by about 70%. Immunohistology, using an anti-RyR3 specific antibody, indicates that RyR3 expression is particularly enriched in the CA1 apical dendrites (considered as the most important site for sAHP generation). We show that our anti-RyR3 antibody acts as a functional RyR3 antagonist and induced a reduction in IsAHP by about 70%. The additional ryanodine application (100 micro M) did not further affect IsAHP, thus excluding RyR2 in IsAHP activation. Our results argue in favor of a specialized function of RyR3 in CA1 pyramidal cells in triggering IsAHP due to their localization in the apical dendrite.

  9. Oxidation in HiOx-packaged pork Longissimus muscle predisposes myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins to N-nitrosamine formation in nitrite-curing solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Meng, Peipei; Xiong, Youling L; Ma, Lizhen; Wang, Changlu; Zhu, Yingchun

    2013-11-01

    The effect of meat protein in situ oxidation on the formation of N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) was investigated. Fresh minced pork was untreated (Con) or treated with 700mg/kg α-tocopherol (Toc) or 300mg/kg tea polyphenols (PPE), packaged in a HiOx atmosphere (78.8% O2, 18.8% CO2, 2.4% N2), then stored at 2±1°C for up to 10days. Crude myofibrillar (MP) or sarcoplasmic (SP) protein (20mg/mL) extracted from stored meat was reacted with 43μM sodium nitrite at 80°C for 1h. Lipid oxidation was totally inhibited in PPE pork but increased in Con and Toc samples after 10days. There was significant protein oxidation (losses of sulfhydryls, formation of protein carbonyls) in both MP and SP in all samples during storage. However, the Con group suffered more extensive protein oxidation than Toc and PPE and produced more NDEA (P<0.05), indicating that protein oxidation promoted nitrosation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PARM-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum molecule involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Isodono

    Full Text Available To identify novel transmembrane and secretory molecules expressed in cardiac myocytes, signal sequence trap screening was performed in rat neonatal cardiac myocytes. One of the molecules identified was a transmembrane protein, prostatic androgen repressed message-1 (PARM-1. While PARM-1 has been identified as a gene induced in prostate in response to castration, its function is largely unknown. Our expression analysis revealed that PARM-1 was specifically expressed in hearts and skeletal muscles, and in the heart, cardiac myocytes, but not non-myocytes expressed PARM-1. Immunofluorescent staining showed that PARM-1 was predominantly localized in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In Dahl salt-sensitive rats, high-salt diet resulted in hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and subsequent heart failure, and significantly stimulated PARM-1 expression in the hearts, with a concomitant increase in ER stress markers such as GRP78 and CHOP. In cultured cardiac myocytes, PARM-1 expression was stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines, but not by hypertrophic stimuli. A marked increase in PARM-1 expression was observed in response to ER stress inducers such as thapsigargin and tunicamycin, which also induced apoptotic cell death. Silencing PARM-1 expression by siRNAs enhanced apoptotic response in cardiac myocytes to ER stresses. PARM-1 silencing also repressed expression of PERK and ATF6, and augmented expression of CHOP without affecting IRE-1 expression and JNK and Caspase-12 activation. Thus, PARM-1 expression is induced by ER stress, which plays a protective role in cardiac myocytes through regulating PERK, ATF6 and CHOP expression. These results suggested that PARM-1 is a novel ER transmembrane molecule involved in cardiac remodeling in hypertensive heart disease.

  11. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  12. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P metabolism (P metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  13. Alginate Oligosaccharide Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Ma, Lei-Lei; Shi, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Jian-Bing; Wu, Jian; Ding, Zhi-Wen; An, Yi; Zou, Yun-Zeng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2016-12-20

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its usage is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative stress and activated endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS) is a non-immunogenic, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress properties. The present study examined whether AOS pretreatment could protect against acute DOX cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms focused on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. We found that AOS pretreatment markedly increased the survival rate of mice insulted with DOX, improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction and attenuated DOX-induced myocardial apoptosis. AOS pretreatment mitigated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative stress, as shown by the decreased expressions of gp91 (phox) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Moreover, AOS pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of Caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) (markers for endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis) and Bax (a downstream molecule of CHOP), while up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these findings identify AOS as a potent compound that prevents acute DOX cardiotoxicity, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis.

  14. Ibutilide protects against cardiomyocytes injury via inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial stress pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yi-Li; Huang, Xia; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Ya-Jun; Wei, Cheng-Xi; Zhao, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a complex disease with multiple inter-relating causes culminating in rapid atrial activation and atrial structural remodeling. The contribution of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria stress to AF has been highlighted. As the class III antiarrhythmic agent, ibutilide are widely used to AF. This study was designed to explore whether ibutilide could treat AF by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and mitochondria stress. The neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were isolated and exposed to H2O2, ibutilide was add to the culture medium 12 h. Then the cell viability, oxidative stress levels and apoptotic rate were analyzed. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum stress related protein (GRP78, GRP94, CHOP), mitochondria-dependent protein (Bax, Bcl-2) and caspase-3/9/12 were identified by real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In our results, remarkable decreased cell viability and oxidative stress levels were detected in cardiomyocytes after treating with H2O2. The apoptotic rate and the expression of proteins involved in mitochondrial stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways increased. While ibutilide significantly inhibited these changes. These data suggested that ibutilide serves a protective role against H2O2-induced apoptosis of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, and the mechanism is related to suppression of mitochondrial stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  15. Effects of two medicinal plants Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae) and Diospyros mespiliformis L. (Ebenaceae) leaf extracts on rat skeletal muscle cells in primary culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belemtougri, R.G.; Constantin, B.; Cognard, C.; Raymond, G.; Sawadogo, L.

    2006-01-01

    Crude decoction, aqueous and ethanolic extracts of two medicinal plants (Psidium guajava and Diospyros mespiliformis), widely used in the central plateau of Burkina Faso to treat many diseases were evaluated for their antagonistic effects on caffeine induced calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat skeletal muscle cells. These different extracts showed a decrease of caffeine induced calcium release in a dose dependent manner. Comparison of the results showed that Psidium guajava leaf extracts are more active than extracts of Diospyros mespiliformis and that crude decoctions show better inhibitory activity. The observed results could explaine their use as antihypertensive and antidiarrhoeal agents in traditional medicine, by inhibiting intracellular calcium release. PMID:16365927

  16. STIM and calcium channel complexes in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Isaac; Rosado, Juan A

    2016-06-01

    The ion Ca(2+) is a ubiquitous second messenger that mediates a variety of cellular functions. Dysfunction of the mechanisms involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis underlies a number of pathological processes, including cancer. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is a major mechanism for Ca(2+) entry modulated by the intracellular Ca(2+) stores. The Ca(2+)-selective store-operated current (ICRAC) is mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 and the store-operated Ca(2+) (SOC) channel Orai1, while other non-selective cation currents (ISOC) involves the participation of members of the canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channel family, including TRPC1. Distinct isoforms of the key components of SOCE have been described in mammalian cells, STIM1 and 2, Orai1-3 and TRPC1-7. In cancer cells, SOCE has been reported to play an important role in cell cycle progression and proliferation, migration, metastasis and evasion of apoptosis. Changes in the expression of the key elements of SOCE and Ca(2+) homeostasis remodeling have been account to play important roles in the phenotypic changes observed in transformed cells. Despite there are differences in the expression level of the molecular components of SOCE, as well as in the relevance of the STIM, Orai and TRPC isoforms in SOCE and tumorigenesis among cancer cell types, there is a body of evidence supporting an important role for SOCE underlying the phenotypic modifications of cancer cells that propose STIM and the SOC channels as suitable candidate targets for future prognostic or therapeutic strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  18. Mice carrying a conditional Serca2flox allele for the generation of Ca2+ handling-deficient mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Kristin B.; Alexandra V Finsen; Sjåland, Cecilie; Winer, Lisbeth H; Sjaastad, Ivar; Ødegaard, Annlaug; Louch, William E.; Wang, Yibin; Chen, Ju; Chien, Kenneth R; Sejersted, Ole M; Christensen, Geir

    2009-01-01

    Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCA) are cellular pumps that transport Ca2+ into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Serca2 is the most widely expressed gene family member. The very early embryonic lethality of Serca2null mouse embryos has precluded further evaluation of loss of Serca2 function in the context of organ physiology. We have generated mice carrying a conditional Serca2flox allele which allows disruption of the Serca2 gene in an organ-specific and/or inducible manner....

  19. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance.

  20. Dysregulation of cellular calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease: bad genes and bad habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, M P; Chan, S L

    2001-10-01

    Calcium is one of the most important intracellular messengers in the brain, being essential for neuronal development, synaptic transmission and plasticity, and the regulation of various metabolic pathways. The findings reviewed in the present article suggest that calcium also plays a prominent role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Associations between the pathological hallmarks ofAD (neurofibrillary tangles [NFT] and amyloid plaques) and perturbed cellular calcium homeostasis have been established in studies of patients, and in animal and cell culture models of AD. Studies of the effects of mutations in the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins on neuronal plasticity and survival have provided insight into the molecular cascades that result in synaptic dysfunction and neuronal degeneration in AD. Central to the neurodegenerative process is the inability of neurons to properly regulate intracellular calcium levels. Increased levels of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) induce oxidative stress, which impairs cellular ion homeostasis and energy metabolism and renders neurons vulnerable to apoptosis and excitotoxicity. Subtoxic levels of Abeta may induce synaptic dysfunction by impairing multiple signal transduction pathways. Presenilin mutations perturb calcium homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum in a way that sensitizes neurons to apoptosis and excitotoxicity; links between aberrant calcium regulation and altered APP processing are emerging. Environmental risk factors for AD are being identified and may include high calorie diets, folic acid insufficiency, and a low level of intellectual activity (bad habits); in each case, the environmental factor impacts on neuronal calcium homeostasis. Low calorie diets and intellectual activity may guard against AD by stimulating production of neurotrophic factors and chaperone proteins. The emerging picture of the cell and molecular biology of AD is revealing novel preventative and therapeutic

  1. Parameter sensitivity analysis of stochastic models provides insights into cardiac calcium sparks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Seon; Liu, Ona Z; Hwang, Hyun Seok; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Sobie, Eric A

    2013-03-05

    We present a parameter sensitivity analysis method that is appropriate for stochastic models, and we demonstrate how this analysis generates experimentally testable predictions about the factors that influence local Ca(2+) release in heart cells. The method involves randomly varying all parameters, running a single simulation with each set of parameters, running simulations with hundreds of model variants, then statistically relating the parameters to the simulation results using regression methods. We tested this method on a stochastic model, containing 18 parameters, of the cardiac Ca(2+) spark. Results show that multivariable linear regression can successfully relate parameters to continuous model outputs such as Ca(2+) spark amplitude and duration, and multivariable logistic regression can provide insight into how parameters affect Ca(2+) spark triggering (a probabilistic process that is all-or-none in a single simulation). Benchmark studies demonstrate that this method is less computationally intensive than standard methods by a factor of 16. Importantly, predictions were tested experimentally by measuring Ca(2+) sparks in mice with knockout of the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein triadin. These mice exhibit multiple changes in Ca(2+) release unit structures, and the regression model both accurately predicts changes in Ca(2+) spark amplitude (30% decrease in model, 29% decrease in experiments) and provides an intuitive and quantitative understanding of how much each alteration contributes to the result. This approach is therefore an effective, efficient, and predictive method for analyzing stochastic mathematical models to gain biological insight. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modulation of intracellular calcium waves and triggered activities by mitochondrial ca flux in mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghang Zhao

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that mitochondria may play important roles in the Ca(2+ homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. However, it is still unclear if mitochondrial Ca(2+ flux can regulate the generation of Ca(2+ waves (CaWs and triggered activities in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, intracellular/cytosolic Ca(2+ (Cai (2+ was imaged in Fluo-4-AM loaded mouse ventricular myocytes. Spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+ release and CaWs were induced in the presence of high (4 mM external Ca(2+ (Cao (2+. The protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP reversibly raised basal Cai (2+ levels even after depletion of SR Ca(2+ in the absence of Cao (2+ , suggesting Ca(2+ release from mitochondria. FCCP at 0.01 - 0.1 µM partially depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m and increased the frequency and amplitude of CaWs in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous recording of cell membrane potentials showed the augmentation of delayed afterdepolarization amplitudes and frequencies, and induction of triggered action potentials. The effect of FCCP on CaWs was mimicked by antimycin A (an electron transport chain inhibitor disrupting Δψ m or Ru360 (a mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter inhibitor, but not by oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor or iodoacetic acid (a glycolytic inhibitor, excluding the contribution of intracellular ATP levels. The effects of FCCP on CaWs were counteracted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporine A, or the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter activator kaempferol. Our results suggest that mitochondrial Ca(2+ release and uptake exquisitely control the local Ca(2+ level in the micro-domain near SR ryanodine receptors and play an important role in regulation of intracellular CaWs and arrhythmogenesis.

  3. Triggered intracellular calcium waves in dog and human left atrial myocytes from normal and failing hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aistrup, Gary L; Arora, Rishi; Grubb, Søren; Yoo, Shin; Toren, Benjamin; Kumar, Manvinder; Kunamalla, Aaron; Marszalec, William; Motiwala, Tej; Tai, Shannon; Yamakawa, Sean; Yerrabolu, Satya; Alvarado, Francisco J; Valdivia, Hector H; Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Shiferaw, Yohannes; Wasserstrom, John Andrew

    2017-11-01

    Abnormal intracellular Ca2+ cycling contributes to triggered activity and arrhythmias in the heart. We investigated the properties and underlying mechanisms for systolic triggered Ca2+ waves in left atria from normal and failing dog hearts. Intracellular Ca2+ cycling was studied using confocal microscopy during rapid pacing of atrial myocytes (36 °C) isolated from normal and failing canine hearts (ventricular tachypacing model). In normal atrial myocytes (NAMs), Ca2+ waves developed during rapid pacing at rates ≥ 3.3 Hz and immediately disappeared upon cessation of pacing despite high sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) load. In heart failure atrial myocytes (HFAMs), triggered Ca2+ waves (TCWs) developed at a higher incidence at slower rates. Because of their timing, TCW development relies upon action potential (AP)-evoked Ca2+ entry. The distribution of Ca2+ wave latencies indicated two populations of waves, with early events representing TCWs and late events representing conventional spontaneous Ca2+ waves. Latency analysis also demonstrated that TCWs arise after junctional Ca2+ release has occurred and spread to non-junctional (cell core) SR. TCWs also occurred in intact dog atrium and in myocytes from humans and pigs. β-adrenergic stimulation increased Ca2+ release and abolished TCWs in NAMs but was ineffective in HFAMs making this a potentially effective adaptive mechanism in normals but potentially arrhythmogenic in HF. Block of Ca-calmodulin kinase II also abolished TCWs, suggesting a role in TCW formation. Pharmacological manoeuvres that increased Ca2+ release suppressed TCWs as did interventions that decreased Ca2+ release but these also severely reduced excitation-contraction coupling. TCWs develop during the atrial AP and thus could affect AP duration, producing repolarization gradients and creating a substrate for reentry, particularly in HF where they develop at slower rates and a higher incidence. TCWs may represent a mechanism for the initiation

  4. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bizzozero, Julien; Scrivener, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate ...

  5. Mixed calcium-magnesium pre-nucleation clusters enrich calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Verch, Andreas; Antonietti, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    It is demonstrated that magnesium and carbonate ions can form pre-nucleation clusters in analogy to calcium carbonate. If a mixed calcium and magnesium solution is brought in contact with carbonate ions, mixed pre-nucleation clusters form. The equilibrium constants for their formation are reported revealing that over the entire range of possible cation mixing ratios, calcium gets enriched over magnesium in the pre-nucleation clusters. This can explain high magnesium contents in amorphous calc...

  6. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-02-01

    Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is a complex process involving several metabolic and signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated apoptosis can be induced in the pathological conditions of atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the disease progression. Notably, they may play a role in the development of vulnerable plaques that induce thrombosis and are therefore especially dangerous. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response is regulated by several signaling mechanisms that involve protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these molecules can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets to improve treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we will discuss the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in atherosclerosis development in different cell types and summarize the current knowledge on potential therapeutic agents targeting molecules regulating these pathways and their possible use for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  7. Biological Reactions to Calcium Phosphate-coated Calcium Carbonate Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tetsunari NISHIKAWA; Kazuya MASUNO; Tomoharu OKAMURA; Kazuya TOMINAGA; Masahiro WATO; Mayu KOKUBU; Koichi IMAI; Shoji TAKEDA; Yoichro TAGUCHI; Masatoshi UEDA; Akio TANAKA

    2010-01-01

    [SYNOPSIS][Objectives]: In order to histopathologically investigate biological reactions to materials used for scaffolds, we examined the cytotoxicity to calcium particles in vitro and bioabsorption in vivo...

  8. Penfluridol induces endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to autophagy in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Alok; German, Nadezhda; Mikelis, Constantinos; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte; Srivastava, Sanjay K

    2017-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and difficult to treat cancers. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that high basal state autophagy in pancreatic tumors could induce resistance to chemotherapy. Recently, we have demonstrated that penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo; however, the mechanism of autophagy induction by penfluridol was not clear. Several studies have established that endoplasmic reticulum stress could lead to autophagy and inhibit tumor progression. In this study, we demonstrated that penfluridol induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in BxPC-3, AsPC-1, and Panc-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines as indicated by upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers such as binding protein (BIP), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and inositol requiring 1α (IRE1α) after treatment with penfluridol in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress by pretreatment with pharmacological inhibitors such as sodium phenylbutyrate and mithramycin or by silencing CHOP using CHOP small interfering RNA, blocked penfluridol-induced autophagy. These results clearly indicate that penfluridol-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress lead to autophagy in our model. Western blot analysis of subcutaneously implanted AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 tumors as well as orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors demonstrated upregulation of BIP, CHOP, and IRE1α expression in the tumor lysates from penfluridol-treated mice as compared to tumors from control mice. Altogether, our study establishes that penfluridol-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to autophagy resulting in reduced pancreatic tumor growth. Our study opens a new therapeutic target for advanced chemotherapies against pancreatic cancer.

  9. Y1 receptors for neuropeptide Y are coupled to mobilization of intracellular calcium and inhibition of adenylate cyclase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakerlund, L; Gether, U; Fuhlendorff, J

    1990-01-01

    a rapid and transient increase in the concentration of free calcium in the cytoplasm as measured by the fluorescent probe, Fura-2. The effect of both peptides was independent of extracellular calcium as addition of EGTA or manganese neither changed the size nor the shape of the calcium response....... The calcium response to NPY was abolished by pretreatment with thapsigargin, which can selectively deplete a calcium store in the endoplasmic reticulum. Y1 receptor stimulation, by both NPY and [Leu31,Pro34]NPY, also inhibited the forskolin-stimulated cAMP production with an EC50 of 3.5 nM. There was a close...... relation between the receptor binding and the cellular effects as half-maximal displacement of [125I-Tyr36]monoiodoNPY from the receptor was obtained with 2.1 nM NPY. The Y2-specific ligand NPY(16-36)peptide had no effect on either intracellular calcium or cAMP levels in the SK-N-MC cells. It is concluded...

  10. [Effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress in trophocytes on the pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y; Zhou, C L; Yu, T T; Han, X J; Shi, H Y; Wang, H Z; Shen, J J; He, J

    2017-06-25

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress in trophocytes, in patients with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). Methods: Sixty-one pregnant women who were hospitalized in Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University from January to December 2015 were recruited. Thirty-one women who were diagnosed as ICP were defined as the ICP group and 30 healthy pregnant women were defined as the control group. The localization and expression intensity of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP-78) in placental tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry technique. Electronic microscope was used to observe ultra-microstructure change of the endoplasmic reticulum in trophocytes and cell line Swan71. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blot were used to investigate the expression of GRP-78 mRNA and protein in Swan 71 cell. Results: (1) GRP-78 protein was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm of cytotrophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. The protein expression of GRP-78 in placentas of the ICP group (13.2±2.4) was significantly higher than that in the control group (7.8±1.3, Preticulum did not increase and the microvilli developed well, with no swelling and no expansion of endoplasmic reticulum in the control group.In the ICP group, microvilli injury, endoplasmic reticulum edema were found; the volume of endoplasmic reticulum increased, with dilation, vacuolation and significant degranulation. After treated with 100 μmol/L cholyglycine for 24 hours, universal dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum were seen in the Swan71 cells. (3) In Swan71 cells, cholylglycine displayed a concentration-dependent up-regulation on the expression of GRP-78. The expressions of GRP-78 mRNA in 0, 25, 50, 100 μmol/L cholylglycine experimental group were 1.01±0.17, 2.17±0.16, 5.47±0.36, 5.65±0.82, respectively. The expression of GRP-78 protein in 0, 25, 50, 100 μmol/L cholylglycine experimental group were 1.01±0.04, 1.17±0.15, 1.33±0.13, 1.73±0

  11. [Excessive fluoride inducing calcium overload and apoptosis of ameloblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Zhang; Lin, Ma; Jian, Li; Ming, Zhong; Kaiqiang, Zhang; Hefeng, Gu

    2014-12-01

    To study the effect of excessive fluoride on calcium overload and apoptosis in cultured rat ameloblasts in vitro. Logarithmic-phase ameloblasts (HAT-7) were treated with 0, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6, 3.2, and 6.4 mmol · L(-1) sodium fluoride (NaF) solution. Cell activities were detected by using a Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8) assay after 48 h of treatment. The effect of fluoride on cell apoptosis was analyzed by using flow cytometry. Excessive fluoride-induced calcium concentration and calreticulin expression changes in ameloblasts were detected by using laser scanning confocal microscopy, Western blot analysis, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. NaF inhibited ameloblast activity at 1.6, 3.2, and 6.4 mmol · L(-1) (dose-dependent) after 48 h of induction. The Ca2+ fluorescence intensity of HAT-7 cells incubated with 1.6 and 3.2 mmol · L(-1) NaF was higher than that in the control group. The fluoride-induced early-stage apoptosis of ameloblasts after 48 h of induction and the early-stage apoptosis rate was positively correlated with fluoride concentration. Calreticulin mRNA expression in HAT-7 cells was higher than that in the control group after 48 h of incubation with 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 mmol · L(-1) NaF. Excessive fluoride-induced calcium overload in ameloblasts and further caused endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis.

  12. Osteoporosis, calcium and physical activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, A. D.; Houston, C S

    1987-01-01

    Sales of calcium supplements have increased dramatically since 1983, as middle-aged women seek to prevent or treat bone loss due to osteoporosis. However, epidemiologic studies have failed to support the hypothesis that larger amounts of calcium are associated with increased bone density or a decreased incidence of fractures. The authors examine the evidence from controlled trials on the effects of calcium supplementation and physical activity on bone loss and find that weight-bearing activit...

  13. Neuroprotective effects of atorvastatin against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Wen; Hu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers secondary ischemia/reperfusion injury and endoplasmic reticulum stress initiates cell apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the signaling pathway remains unclear. We hypothesize that the regulatory mechanisms are mediated by the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway. To verify this hypothesis, we occluded the middle cerebral artery in rats to establish focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Results showed that the expression levels of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and caspase-3, as well as the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, were increased after ischemia/reperfusion. Administration of atorvastatin decreased the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, reduced the infarct volume and improved ultrastructure in the rat brain. After salubrinal, the specific inhibitor of phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α was given into the rats intragastrically, the expression levels of caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the were decreased, a reduction of the infarct volume and less ultrastructural damage were observed than the untreated, ischemic brain. However, salubrinal had no impact on the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Experimental findings indicate that atorvastatin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress and exerts neuroprotective effects. The underlying mechanisms of attenuating ischemia/reperfusion injury are associated with the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α/caspase-3 pathway.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum proteins quality control and the unfolded protein response: the regulative mechanism of organisms against stress injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xi Ling; Gao, Dong Sheng

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is the cellular compartment in which secretory proteins are synthesized and folded. Perturbations of endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis lead to the accumulation of unfolded proteins. The activation of the unfolded protein response during endoplasmic reticulum stress transmits information about the status of protein folding to the cytosol and nucleus. The unfolded protein response leads to the upregulation of genes encoding endoplasmic reticulum chaperones, attenuation of translation, and initiation of the endoplasmic reticulum quality control system to restore endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis. When the unfolded protein response is insufficient to rebuild the steady state in endoplasmic reticulum, the programmed cell death or apoptosis would be initiated, by triggering cell injuries, even to cell death through apoptosis signals. In this review, we briefly outline research on the chaperones and foldases conserved in eukaryotes and plants, and describe the general principles and mechanisms of the endoplasmic reticulum quality control and the unfolded protein response. We describe the current models for the molecular mechanism of the unfolded protein response in plants, and emphasize the role of inositol requiring enzyme-1-dependent network in the unfolded protein response. Finally, we give a general overview of the directions for future research on the unfolded protein response in plants and its role in the response to environmental stresses. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  15. Cardiovascular Effects of Calcium Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Reid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%–31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%–20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  16. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  17. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... precipitated calcium carbonate (CaCO3). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with calcium carbonate... precipitated calcium carbonate in the United States Pharmacopeia XX (1980). (c) Uses and restrictions. Calcium... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS Reg... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation...

  19. Nifetepimine, a dihydropyrimidone, ensures CD4+ T cell survival in a tumor microenvironment by maneuvering sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Swatilekha; Adhikary, Arghya; Chakraborty, Samik; Nandi, Pinki; Mohanty, Suchismita; Chakraborty, Supriya; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Mukherjee, Sanhita; Putatunda, Salil; Chakraborty, Srabasti; Chakraborty, Arijit; Sa, Gaurisankar; Das, Tanya; Sen, Parimal C

    2012-09-21

    Multiple mechanisms have been proposed by which tumors induce T cell apoptosis to circumvent tumor immune-surveillance. Although sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) have long been known to regulate intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis, few studies have examined the role of SERCA in processes of T lymphocyte survival and activation. In this context it remains largely unexplored as to how tumors jeopardize SERCA function to disable T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Here, we show that human CD4(+) T cells in the presence of tumor conditions manifested an up-regulation of SERCA3 expression that resulted in development of endoplasmic reticulum stress leading to CD4(+) T cell apoptosis. Prostaglandin E(2) produced by the tumor cell plays a critical role in up-regulating SERCA3 by enhancing the binding of its transcription factor Sp1. Gene manipulation and pharmacological approaches further established that an increase in SERCA expression also resulted in subsequent inhibition of PKCα and -θ and retention of NFκB in the cytosol; however, down-modulation of SERCA3 expression by a dihydropyrimidone derivative, ethyl-4-(3-nitro)-phenyl-6-methyl-2-oxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5 carboxylate (nifetepimine), protected the CD4(+) T cells from tumor-induced apoptosis. In fact, nifetepimine-mediated restoration of PKC activity resulted in nuclear translocation of p65NFκB, thereby ensuring its survival. Studies further undertaken in a tumor-bearing mice model revalidated the immunoprotective role of nifetepimine. Our present study thus strongly suggests that imbalance in cellular calcium homeostasis is an important factor leading to CD4(+) T cell death during cancer and holds promise that nifetepimine may have the potential to be used as an immunorestoring agent in cancer bearers.

  20. Enhanced endoplasmic reticulum SERCA activity by overexpression of hepatic stimulator substance gene prevents hepatic cells from ER stress-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Yuan; Jiang, Shujun; Yu, Hao; An, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Although the potential pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unclear, increasing evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress may link free fatty acids to NAFLD. Since we previously reported that hepatic stimulator substance (HSS) could protect the liver from steatosis, this study is aimed to investigate whether HSS protection could be related with its inhibition on ER stress. The HSS gene was stably transfected into BEL-7402 hepatoma cells and effectively expressed in ER. The palmitic acid (PA)-induced heptocyte lipotoxicity was reproduced in the HSS-transfected cells, and HSS alleviation of the ER stress and apoptosis were subsequently examined. The results showed that PA treatment led to a heavy accumulation of fatty acids within the cells and a remarkable increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, in the HSS-expressing cells, production of ROS was inhibited and ER stress-related marker glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP-78), sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP), anti-phospho-PRK-1ike ER kinase (p-PERK), anti-phospho-eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), and anti-C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were downregulated compared with the wild-type or mutant HSS-transfected cells. Furthermore, PA treatment severely impaired the activity of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA), leading to imbalanced calcium homeostasis during ER stress, which could be rescued in the HSS-trasfected cells. The protection provided by HSS to the SERCA is identical to that observed with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and sodium dimercaptopropane sulfonate (Na-DMPS), which are two typical free radical scavengers. As a consequence, the rate of ER stress-mediated apoptosis in the HSS-expressing cells was significantly reduced. In conclusion, the protective effect of HSS against ER stress may be associated with the removal of ROS to restore the activity of the SERCA.

  1. An essential and NSF independent role for α-SNAP in store-operated calcium entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yong; Miner, Cathrine; Zhang, Lei; Hanson, Phyllis I; Dani, Adish; Vig, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) by calcium release activated calcium (CRAC) channels constitutes a primary route of calcium entry in most cells. Orai1 forms the pore subunit of CRAC channels and Stim1 is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident Ca2+ sensor. Upon store-depletion, Stim1 translocates to domains of ER adjacent to the plasma membrane where it interacts with and clusters Orai1 hexamers to form the CRAC channel complex. Molecular steps enabling activation of SOCE via CRAC channel clusters remain incompletely defined. Here we identify an essential role of α-SNAP in mediating functional coupling of Stim1 and Orai1 molecules to activate SOCE. This role for α-SNAP is direct and independent of its known activity in NSF dependent SNARE complex disassembly. Importantly, Stim1-Orai1 clustering still occurs in the absence of α-SNAP but its inability to support SOCE reveals that a previously unsuspected molecular re-arrangement within CRAC channel clusters is necessary for SOCE. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00802.001 PMID:23878724

  2. Calcium signalling: fishing out molecules of mitochondrial calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-10-26

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins - MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 - to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Monitoring Changes in the Oligomeric State of a Candidate Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Ceramide Sensor by Single-molecule Photobleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabukusta, Birol; Köhlen, Jan A; Richter, Christian P; You, Changjiang; Holthuis, Joost C M

    2016-11-18

    Single-molecule photobleaching has emerged as a powerful non-invasive approach to extract the stoichiometry of multimeric membrane proteins in their native cellular environment. However, this method has mainly been used to determine the subunit composition of ion channels and receptors at the plasma membrane. Here, we applied single-molecule photobleaching to analyze the oligomeric state of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident candidate ceramide sensor protein, SMSr/SAMD8. Co-immunoprecipitation and chemical cross-linking studies previously revealed that the N-terminal sterile alpha motif (or SAM) domain of SMSr drives self-assembly of the protein into oligomers and that SMSr oligomerization is promoted by curcumin, a drug known to perturb ER ceramide and calcium homeostasis. Application of cell spreading surface-active coating materials in combination with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy allowed us to image GFP-tagged SMSr proteins as single fluorescent spots in the ER of HeLa cells in which expression of endogenous SMSr was abolished. In line with our biochemical analysis, we find that the number of bleaching steps in SMSr-GFP-positive spots displays a substantial drop after removal of the SAM domain. In contrast, treatment of cells with curcumin increased the number of bleaching steps. Our results document the first successful application of single-molecule photobleaching to resolve drug-induced and domain-dependent changes in the oligomeric state of an ER-resident membrane protein, hence establishing a complementary method to unravel the mechanism by which SMSr controls ceramide levels in the ER. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. The effect of chronic ozone exposure on the activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Rodríguez-Martínez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The chronic exposure to low doses of ozone, like in environmental pollution, leads to a state of oxidative stress, which has been proposed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. It induces an increase of calcium in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, which produces ER stress. On the other hand, different studies show that, in diseases such as Alzheimer’s, there exist disturbances in protein folding where ER plays an important role. The objective of this study was to evaluate the state of chronic oxidative stress on ER stress and its relationship with apoptotic death in the hippocampus of rats exposed to low doses of ozone. We used 108 male Wistar rats randomly divided into five groups. The groups received one of the following treatments: 1 Control (air, 2 Ozone (O3 7 days, 3 O3 15 days, 4 O3 30 days, 5 O3 60 days, and 6 O3 90 days. Two hours after each treatment, the animals were sacrificed and the hippocampus was extracted. Afterwards, the tissue was processed for western blot and immunohistochemistry using the following antibodies: ATF6, GRP8 and caspase 12. It was also performed TUNEL assay and electronic microscopy. Our results show an increase in ATF6, GRP78 and caspase 12 as well as ER ultrastructural alterations and an increase of TUNEL positive cells after 60 and 90 days of exposure to ozone. With the obtained results, we can conclude that oxidative stress induced by chronic exposure to low doses of ozone leads to ER stress. ER stress activates ATF6 inducing the increase of GRP78 in the cytoplasm, which leads to the increase in the nuclear translocation of ATF6. Finally, the translocation creates a vicious cycle that, together with the activation of the cascade for apoptotic cell death, contributes to the maintenance of ER stress. These events potentially contribute in the neurodegeneration processes in diseases like Alzheimer’s Disease.

  5. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroporation with calcium (calcium electroporation) can induce ATP depletion-associated cellular death. In the clinical setting, the cytotoxic drug bleomycin is currently used with electroporation (electrochemotherapy) for palliative treatment of tumors. Calcium electroporation off...

  6. Lithium prevents early cytosolic calcium increase and secondary injurious calcium overload in glycolytically inhibited endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosche, Bert, E-mail: bert.bosche@uk-essen.de [Department of Neurology, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research with Klaus-Joachim-Zülch Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Medical Faculty of the University of Cologne (Germany); Schäfer, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schaefer@sanofi.com [Institute of Physiology, Justus-Liebig-University Giessen (Germany); Graf, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.graf@nf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research with Klaus-Joachim-Zülch Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Medical Faculty of the University of Cologne (Germany); Härtel, Frauke V., E-mail: frauke.haertel@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden (Germany); Schäfer, Ute, E-mail: ute.schaefer@medunigraz.at [Research Unit for Experimental Neurotraumatology, Medical University of Graz (Austria); Noll, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.noll@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden (Germany)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We investigate free calcium as a central signalling element in endothelial cells. •Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose reduces cellular ATP. •This manoeuvre leads to a biphasic increase and overload of free calcium. •Pre-treatment with lithium for 24 h abolishes both phases of the calcium increase. •This provides a new strategy to protect endothelial calcium homeostasis and barrier function. -- Abstract: Cytosolic free calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) is a central signalling element for the maintenance of endothelial barrier function. Under physiological conditions, it is controlled within narrow limits. Metabolic inhibition during ischemia/reperfusion, however, induces [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload, which results in barrier failure. In a model of cultured porcine aortic endothelial monolayers (EC), we addressed the question of whether [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} overload can be prevented by lithium treatment. [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} and ATP were analysed using Fura-2 and HPLC, respectively. The combined inhibition of glycolytic and mitochondrial ATP synthesis by 2-desoxy-D-glucose (5 mM; 2-DG) plus sodium cyanide (5 mM; NaCN) caused a significant decrease in cellular ATP content (14 ± 1 nmol/mg protein vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg protein in the control, n = 6 culture dishes, P < 0.05), an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} (278 ± 24 nM vs. 71 ± 2 nM in the control, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05), and the formation of gaps between adjacent EC. These observations indicate that there is impaired barrier function at an early state of metabolic inhibition. Glycolytic inhibition alone by 10 mM 2-DG led to a similar decrease in ATP content (14 ± 2 nmol/mg vs. 18 ± 1 nmol/mg in the control, P < 0.05) with a delay of 5 min. The [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} response of EC was biphasic with a peak after 1 min (183 ± 6 nM vs. 71 ± 1 nM, n = 60 cells, P < 0.05) followed by a sustained increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. A 24-h pre-treatment with 10 mM of lithium

  7. Brain endoplasmic reticulum stress mechanistically distinguishes the saline-intake and hypertensive response to deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Fusakazu; Jo, Hiromi; Hilzendeger, Aline M; Thompson, Anthony P; Cassell, Martin D; Rutkowski, D Thomas; Davisson, Robin L; Grobe, Justin L; Sigmund, Curt D

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress has become an important mechanism in hypertension. We examined the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in mediating the increased saline-intake and hypertensive effects in response to deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt. Intracerebroventricular delivery of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid did not affect the magnitude of hypertension, but markedly decreased saline-intake in response to DOCA-salt. Increased saline-intake returned after tauroursodeoxycholic acid was terminated. Decreased saline-intake was also observed after intracerebroventricular infusion of 4-phenylbutyrate, another chemical chaperone. Immunoreactivity to CCAAT homologous binding protein, a marker of irremediable endoplasmic reticulum stress, was increased in the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus of DOCA-salt mice, but the signal was absent in control and CCAAT homologous binding protein-deficient mice. Electron microscopy revealed abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum structure (decrease in membrane length, swollen membranes, and decreased ribosome numbers) in the subfornical organ consistent with endoplasmic reticulum stress. Subfornical organ-targeted adenoviral delivery of GRP78, a resident endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, decreased DOCA-salt-induced saline-intake. The increase in saline-intake in response to DOCA-salt was blunted in CCAAT homologous binding protein-deficient mice, but these mice exhibited a normal hypertensive response. We conclude that (1) brain endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates the saline-intake, but not blood pressure response to DOCA-salt, (2) DOCA-salt causes endoplasmic reticulum stress in the subfornical organ, which when attenuated by GRP78 blunts saline-intake, and (3) CCAAT homologous binding protein may play a functional role in DOCA-salt-induced saline-intake. The results suggest a mechanistic distinction between the importance of endoplasmic reticulum stress in

  8. 4-Phenylbutyric Acid Reveals Good Beneficial Effects on Vital Organ Function via Anti-Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Septic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangming; Wu, Huiling; Zang, JiaTao; Yang, Guangming; Zhu, Yu; Wu, Yue; Chen, Xiangyun; Lan, Dan; Li, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are the common complications in ICUs. Vital organ function disorder contributes a critical role in high mortality after severe sepsis or septic shock, in which endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role. Whether anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress with 4-phenylbutyric acid is beneficial to sepsis and the underlying mechanisms are not known. Laboratory investigation. State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury. Sprague-Dawley rats. Using cecal ligation and puncture-induced septic shock rats, lipopolysaccharide-treated vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes, effects of 4-phenylbutyric acid on vital organ function and the relationship with endoplasmic reticulum stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated inflammation, apoptosis, and oxidative stress were observed. Conventional treatment, including fluid resuscitation, vasopressin, and antibiotic, only slightly improved the hemodynamic variable, such as mean arterial blood pressure and cardiac output, and slightly improved the vital organ function and the animal survival of septic shock rats. Supplementation of 4-phenylbutyric acid (5 mg/kg; anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress), especially administered at early stage, significantly improved the hemodynamic variables, vital organ function, such as liver, renal, and intestinal barrier function, and animal survival in septic shock rats. 4-Phenylbutyric acid application inhibited the endoplasmic reticulum stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related proteins, such as CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein in vital organs, such as heart and superior mesenteric artery after severe sepsis. Further studies showed that 4-phenylbutyric acid inhibited endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated cytokine release, apoptosis, and oxidative stress via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, caspase-3 and caspase-9, and increasing glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase expression, respectively. Anti

  9. Computational analysis of calcium signaling and membrane electrophysiology in cerebellar Purkinje neurons associated with ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Sherry-Ann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER calcium channel Inositol Trisphosphate Receptor type 1 (IP3R1 in humans with the motor function coordination disorders Spinocerebellar Ataxia Types 15 and 16 (SCA15/16 and in a corresponding mouse model, the IP3R1delta18/delta18 mice, lead to reduced IP3R1 levels. We posit that increasing IP3R1 sensitivity to IP3 in ataxias with reduced IP3R1 could restore normal calcium response. On the other hand, in mouse models of the human polyglutamine (polyQ ataxias, SCA2, and SCA3, the primary finding appears to be hyperactive IP3R1-mediated calcium release. It has been suggested that the polyQ SCA1 mice may also show hyperactive IP3R1. Yet, SCA1 mice show downregulated gene expression of IP3R1, Homer, metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR, smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATP-ase (SERCA, calbindin, parvalbumin, and other calcium signaling proteins. Results We create a computational model of pathological alterations in calcium signaling in cerebellar Purkinje neurons to investigate several forms of spinocerebellar ataxia associated with changes in the abundance, sensitivity, or activity of the calcium channel IP3R1. We find that increasing IP3R1 sensitivity to IP3 in computational models of SCA15/16 can restore normal calcium response if IP3R1 abundance is not too low. The studied range in IP3R1 levels reflects variability found in human and mouse ataxic models. Further, the required fold increases in sensitivity are within experimental ranges from experiments that use IP3R1 phosphorylation status to adjust its sensitivity to IP3. Results from our simulations of polyglutamine SCAs suggest that downregulation of some calcium signaling proteins may be partially compensatory. However, the downregulation of calcium buffer proteins observed in the SCA1 mice may contribute to pathology. Finally, our model suggests that the calcium-activated voltage-gated potassium channels may provide an

  10. Effects of ginger extract on smooth muscle activity of sheep reticulum and rumen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Mamaghani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reticulorumen hypomotility leads to the impaired physiologic functions of the digestive tract. Prokinetic action of ginger has been demonstrated in t