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Sample records for sarcoplasmic reticular calcium

  1. Calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-03-01

    The steady-state calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was studied in voltage-clamped, cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers containing two calcium indicators, fura-2 and anti-pyrylazo III (AP III). Fura-2 fluorescence was used to monitor resting calcium and relatively small calcium transients during small depolarizations. AP III absorbance signals were used to monitor larger calcium transients during larger depolarizations. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from the calcium transients. The equilibrium calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release was determined using 200-ms prepulses of various amplitudes to elevate [Ca2+] to various steady levels. Each prepulse was followed by a constant test pulse. The suppression of peak Rrel during the test pulse provided a measure of the extent of inactivation of release at the end of the prepulse. The [Ca2+] dependence of inactivation indicated that binding of more than one calcium ion was required to inactivate each release channel. Half-maximal inactivation was produced at a [Ca2+] of approximately 0.3 microM. Variation of the prepulse duration and amplitude showed that the suppression of peak release was consistent with calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release but not with calcium depletion. The same calcium dependence of inactivation was obtained using different amplitude test pulses to determine the degree of inactivation. Prepulses that produced near maximal inactivation of release during the following test pulse produced no suppression of intramembrane charge movement during the test pulse, indicating that inactivation occurred at a step beyond the voltage sensor for calcium release. Three alternative set of properties that were assumed for the rapidly equilibrating calcium-binding sites intrinsic to the fibers gave somewhat different Rrel records, but gave very similar calcium dependence of

  2. Time course of activation of calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, B J; Schneider, M F

    1988-01-01

    Myoplasmic free calcium transients were measured with antipyrylazo III in voltage clamped segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers and were used to calculate the rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Intramembrane charge movement was measured for the same pulses in the same fibers. During a depolarizing pulse Rrel rose to an early peak and then decayed relatively rapidly but incompletely due to calcium-dependent inactivation (Schneider M.F., and B.J. Simon. 1988. J...

  3. Effect of articaine on calcium transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from medial pterygoid muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Di Croce, Daniel E; Richard, Susana B; Takara, Delia

    2012-01-01

    Local anesthetics used in dentistry have myotoxic effects. Articaine, also known as carticaine, is one of the local anesthetics most widely used in clinical dentistry. The aim of this work was to describe its effect on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isolated from medial pterygoid muscle. Ca-ATPase enzymatic activity was determined by a colorimetric method and ATP-dependent calcium uptake with a radioisotopic technique. Articaine inhibited both Ca-ATPase activity and calcium uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Both inhibitory effects became evident at articaine concentrations lower than those employed in clinical dentistry. Half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (K) were 15.1 +/- 1.8 mM (n = 6) and 25.2 +/- 1.6 mM (n = 6) for enzymatic activity and calcium uptake, respectively. Preincubation of sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes with articaine enhanced Ca-ATPase activity in the absence of calcium ionophore, suggesting an ionophoric-like effect of the local anesthetic. We conclude that the inhibitory effect of articaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isolated from medial pterygoid muscle is due to a direct interaction of the anesthetic with the enzyme and to the increased membrane permeability to calcium induced by this drug.

  4. Methods for Creating and Animating a Computer Model Depicting the Structure and Function of the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alice Y.; McKee, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Describes the developmental process used to visualize the calcium ATPase enzyme of the sarcoplasmic reticulum which involves evaluating scientific information, consulting scientists, model making, storyboarding, and creating and editing in a computer medium. (Author/CCM)

  5. Calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum in the presence of organophosphorus insecticide methyl-parathion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasiak, J.

    1995-01-01

    Using an isotope labelling technique it has been shown that an organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion (0,0-diethyl 0-4-nitrophenyl phosphorothionate) depressed calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from rabbit hind leg muscle. The effect was significant for insecticide concentrations of 50 and 100 μM and was dose-dependent. The insecticide exerted a more pronounced effect on calcium uptake in the presence of ATP in the reticulum environment than in the absence of ATP. The inhibitory action of methyl parathion on Ca 2+ accumulation by sarcoplasmic reticulum can cause a rise in myoplasmic free Ca 2+ , the essential prerequisite for contracture activation. Because methyl parathion, as well as other organophosphorus insecticides, is primarily neurotoxic, evidence of non-specific effect could be important for assessing its environmental safety. (author). 20 refs, 2 figs

  6. Effects of temperature and buffer composition on calcium sequestration by sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane of rabbit renal artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuffee, L.J.; Little, S.A.; Mercure, J.V.; Skipper, B.J.; Wheeler-Clark, E.S.

    1990-01-01

    45Ca electron microscopic autoradiography was used to examine the effects of buffer composition and temperature on the distribution of calcium in rabbit renal artery smooth muscle cells. The results show that the relative distribution of calcium is dependent on both the buffer used (Tris or Krebs) and the temperature of the bathing solution (25 degrees C or 34 degrees C). Krebs buffer at 34 degrees C gave the highest relative activity in the plasma membrane, sarcoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria. Buffer and temperature had little effect on the relative activity of the nucleus or cytoplasm. Next, we identified the cellular sites of calcium accumulation after 5, 15, 30, or 60 min exposure to 45 Ca in Krebs buffer at 34 degrees C. The results show that sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane are the primary sites of calcium accumulation during influx into these cells. Although the amount of 45 Ca in the cell continues to increase with longer exposure, the relative distribution of calcium is essentially the same after 5 or 60 min. The data also indicate that the relative activity of plasma membrane + sarcoplasmic reticulum (a combination site that includes sarcoplasmic reticulum within a mean distance of 275 nm of the plasma membrane) is similar to the membrane alone and is lower than the sarcoplasmic reticulum alone

  7. Effects of caffeine on calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M G; Simon, B J; Schneider, M F

    1990-06-01

    1. Resting myoplasmic [Ca2+] and [Ca2+] transients (delta [Ca2+]) were monitored using Fura-2 fluorescence and Antipyrylazo III absorbance signals from voltage-clamped segments of cut frog skeletal muscle fibres in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM-caffeine. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from delta [Ca2+]. 2. delta [Ca2+] and Rrel were increased in caffeine for all pulses. The decline of delta [Ca2+] was slower after a given pulse in caffeine than without caffeine. Resting [Ca2+] was slightly elevated in caffeine. 3. The voltage dependence of the peak value of Rrel and of the steady level of Rrel at the end of a 60-120 ms pulse were both shifted towards more negative voltages in caffeine. For relatively small pulses the voltage at which a given release waveform was observed was also shifted to more negative voltages. 4. Intramembrane charge movements measured in the same fibres in which the above changes in Rrel were observed showed no significant changes in caffeine. 5. In caffeine calcium release continued for many milliseconds after the end of a short (10 ms) pulse. Continued release after a pulse was not observed without caffeine and was probably due to positive feedback of elevated [Ca2+] on calcium release resulting from calcium-induced calcium release in caffeine. 6. Intramembrane charge movements after short pulses showed no change in caffeine that could account for the continued calcium release after the pulse. 7. Continued release after short pulses in caffeine decreased as the pulse duration was increased and was absent for pulses of 60 ms or longer. Rrel also inactivated during such pulses. 8. Relatively large and long conditioning pulses in caffeine suppressed both the peak Rrel and the continued release after short pulses. Peak release and continued release after short pulses recovered in parallel with increasing recovery time following suppression by a conditioning pulse in caffeine. 9. These

  8. Investigation of function similarities between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and platelet calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases with the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, T.H.; Campbell, K.P.; White, G.C. II

    1987-01-01

    The platelet and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-dependent adenosinetriphosphatases (Ca 2+ -ATPases) were functionally compared with respect to substrate activation by steady-state kinetic methods using the inhibitors quercetin and calmidazolium. Quercetin inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase activities in a dose-dependent manner with IC 50 values of 25 and 10 μM, respectively. Calmidazolium also inhibited platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase activities, with half-maximal inhibition measured at 5 and 4 μM, respectively. Both inhibitors also affected the [ 45 Ca] calcium transport activity of intact platelet microsomes at concentrations similar to those which reduced Ca 2+ -ATPase activity. These inhibitors were then used to examine substrate ligation by the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump proteins. For both Ca 2+ -ATPase proteins, quercetin has an affinity for the E-Ca 2 (fully ligated with respect to calcium at the exterior high-affinity calcium binding sites, unligated with respect to ATP) conformational state of the protein that is approximately 10-fold grater than for other conformational states in the hydrolytic cycle. Quercetin can thus be considered a competitive inhibitor of the calcium pump proteins with respect to ATP. In contrast to the effect of quercetin, calmidazolium interacts with the platelet and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPases in an uncompetitive manner. The dissociation constants for this inhibitor for the different conformational states of the calcium pump proteins were similar, indicating that calmidazolium has equal affinity for all of the reaction intermediates probed. These observations indicate that the substrate ligation processes are similar for the two pump proteins. This supports the concept that the hydrolytic cycles of the two proteins are comparable

  9. Calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from hearts of septic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonough, K.H.

    1988-01-01

    Myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays a critical role in the regulation of the cytosolic calcium fluctuations that occur during the cardiac cycle. One function of the SR is to lower the calcium concentration so that myocardial relaxation and thus ventricular filling can occur. The aim of the present study was to determine if hyperdynamic sepsis induced a decrease in the capacity of SR to take up calcium. This defect would result in decreased ventricular filling and thus decreased cardiac output, as has previously been shown in isolated perfused working hearts removed from septic rats. Therefore, rats were anesthetized with ether, and sepsis was induced by the injection of an aliquot of a fecal homogenate into the peritoneal cavity. Control animals either underwent surgery and received an aliquot of sterilized fecal inoculum (sham) or were untreated (no surgery). On day 2 after surgery, animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital, and hearts were removed, weighted, and SR isolated. The rate of uptake of 45 Ca 2+ by SR from septic rats was not depressed compared to controls but in fact was elevated. Maximum 45 Ca 2+ accumulated by the SR and Ca 2+ -stimulated ATPase activity were similar in SR from control and septic hearts. These results suggest that the contractile dysfunction noted in the myocardium in early sepsis is probably not due to inadequate SR removal of Ca 2+ during diastole

  10. Time course of activation of calcium release from sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Schneider, M F

    1988-12-01

    Myoplasmic free calcium transients were measured with antipyrylazo III in voltage clamped segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers and were used to calculate the rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Intramembrane charge movement was measured for the same pulses in the same fibers. During a depolarizing pulse Rrel rose to an early peak and then decayed relatively rapidly but incompletely due to calcium-dependent inactivation (Schneider M.F., and B.J. Simon. 1988. J. Physiol. (Lond.). 405:727-745). Two approaches were used to determine release activation independent of the effects of inactivation: (a) a mathematical correction based on the assumption that inactivation was a process occurring in parallel with and independently of activation; (b) an experimental procedure in which release was maximally inactivated by a large short prepulse and then the remaining noninactivatable component of release was monitored during a subsequent test pulse. Both procedures gave the same time course of activation of release. Release activation paralleled the time course of intramembrane charge movement but was delayed by a few milliseconds.

  11. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M L

    2014-08-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4-8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K(+) contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R(2) ~ 0.76). SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, relative to Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments.

  12. ATP-sensitive voltage- and calcium-dependent chloride channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles from rabbit skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourie, J I

    1997-05-01

    Chloride channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) are thought to play an essential role in excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling by balancing charge movement during calcium release and uptake. In this study the nucleotide-sensitivity of Cl- channels in the SR from rabbit skeletal muscle was investigated using the lipid bilayer technique. Two distinct ATP-sensitive Cl- channels that differ in their conductance and kinetic properties and in the mechanism of ATP-induced channel inhibition were observed. The first, a nonfrequent 150 pS channel was inhibited by trans (luminal) ATP, and the second, a common 75 pS small chloride (SCl) channel was inhibited by cis (cytoplasmic) ATP. In the case of the SCl channel the ATP-induced reversible decline in the values of current (maximal current amplitude, Imax and integral current, I') and kinetic parameters (frequency of opening FO, probability of the channel being open PO, mean open TO and closed Tc times) show a nonspecific block of the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent SCl channel. ATP was a more potent blocker from the cytoplasmic side than from the luminal side of the channel. The SCl channel block was not due to Ca2+ chelation by ATP, nor to phosphorylation of the channel protein. The inhibitory action of ATP was mimicked by the nonhydrolyzable analogue adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) in the absence of Mg2+. The inhibitory potency of the adenine nucleotides was charge dependent in the following order ATP4- > ADP3- > > > AMP2-. The data suggest that ATP-induced effects are mediated via an open channel block mechanism. Modulation of the SCl channel by [ATP]cis and [Ca2+]cis indicates that (i) this channel senses the bioenergetic state of the muscle fiber and (ii) it is linked to the ATP-dependent cycling of the Ca2+ between the SR and the sarcoplasm.

  13. Hofmeister effect of anions on calcium translocation by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadini-Buoninsegni, Francesco; Moncelli, Maria Rosa; Peruzzi, Niccolò; Ninham, Barry W.; Dei, Luigi; Nostro, Pierandrea Lo

    2015-10-01

    The occurrence of Hofmeister (specific ion) effects in various membrane-related physiological processes is well documented. For example the effect of anions on the transport activity of the ion pump Na+, K+-ATPase has been investigated. Here we report on specific anion effects on the ATP-dependent Ca2+ translocation by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). Current measurements following ATP concentration jumps on SERCA-containing vesicles adsorbed on solid supported membranes were carried out in the presence of different potassium salts. We found that monovalent anions strongly interfere with ATP-induced Ca2+ translocation by SERCA, according to their increasing chaotropicity in the Hofmeister series. On the contrary, a significant increase in Ca2+ translocation was observed in the presence of sulphate. We suggest that the anions can affect the conformational transition between the phosphorylated intermediates E1P and E2P of the SERCA cycle. In particular, the stabilization of the E1P conformation by chaotropic anions seems to be related to their adsorption at the enzyme/water and/or at the membrane/water interface, while the more kosmotropic species affect SERCA conformation and functionality by modifying the hydration layers of the enzyme.

  14. Acute inhibitory effect of alpha-mangostin on sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase and myocardial relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phungphong, Sukanya; Kijtawornrat, Anusak; de Tombe, Pieter P; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Suksamrarn, Sunit

    2017-10-01

    The benefits of α-mangostin for various tissues have been reported, but its effect on the heart has not been clarified. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of α-mangostin on cardiac function. Using a cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane preparation, α-mangostin inhibited SR Ca 2+ -ATPase activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC 50 of 6.47 ± 0.7 μM). Its suppressive effect was specific to SR Ca 2+ -ATPase but not to myofibrillar Ca 2+ -ATPase. Using isolated cardiomyocytes, 50 μM of α-mangostin significantly increased the duration of cell relengthening and increased the duration of Ca 2+ transient decay, suggesting altered myocyte relaxation. The relaxation effect of α-mangostin was also supported in vivo after intravenous infusion. A significant suppression of both peak pressure and rate of ventricular relaxation (-dP/dt) relative to DMSO infusion was observed. The results from the present study demonstrated that α-mangostin exerts specific inhibitory action on SR Ca 2+ -ATPase activity, leading to myocardial relaxation dysfunction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Modulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by calsequestrin in cardiac myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANDOR GYÖRKE

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Calsequestrin (CASQ2 is a high capacity Ca-binding protein expressed inside the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. Mutations in the cardiac calsequestrin gene (CASQ2 have been linked to arrhythmias and sudden death induced by exercise and emotional stress. We have studied the function of CASQ2 and the consequences of arrhythmogenic CASQ2 mutations on intracellular Ca signalling using a combination of approaches of reverse genetics and cellular physiology in adult cardiac myocytes. We have found that CASQ2 is an essential determinant of the ability of the SR to store and release Ca2+ in cardiac muscle. CASQ2 serves as a reservoir for Ca2+ that is readily accessible for Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR and also as an active Ca2+ buffer that modulates the local luminal Ca-dependent closure of the SR Ca2+ release channels. At the same time, CASQ2 stabilizes the CICR process by slowing the functional recharging of SR Ca2+ stores. Abnormal restitution of the Ca2+ release channels from a luminal Ca-dependent refractory state could account for ventricular arrhythmias associated with mutations in the CASQ2 gene.

  16. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  17. mGluR-mediated calcium signalling in the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyer, Christina; Herr, David; Kohmann, Denise; Budde, Thomas; Pape, Hans-Christian; Coulon, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) plays a major role in modulating the transfer of information from the thalamus to the cortex. GABAergic inhibition via the TRN is differentially regulated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and the effect of mGluRs on the membrane potential, on ion channels, and on the plasticity of electrical coupling of TRN neurons has been studied previously. Although mGluRs are generally known to trigger Ca(2+) transients, mGluR-mediated Ca(2+)-transients in TRN neurons have not yet been investigated. In this study, we show that mGluRs can trigger Ca(2+)-transients in TRN neurons, that these transients depend on intracellular Ca(2+)-stores, and are mediated by IP3 receptors. Ca(2+) transients caused by the group I mGluR agonist DHPG elicit a current that is sensitive to flufenamic acid and has a reversal potential around -40mV. Our results add mGluR-mediated Ca(2+)-signalling in the TRN to the state-dependent modulators of the thalamocortical system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, M.S.; Ambudkar, I.S.; Young, E.P.; Naseem, S.M.; Heald, F.P.; Shamoo, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect on the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum of an atherogenic (1% cholesterol) diet fed during the neonatal vs the juvenile period of life was studied in Yorkshire swine. Male piglets were randomly assigned at birth to 1 of 4 groups: group I (control), group II (lactation feeding), group III (juvenile period feeding) and group IV (lactation and juvenile feeding). All animals were killed at 55 weeks of age and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) isolated for assay of calcium uptake, Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ ATPase activity, and lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The amount of cholesterol/mg SR protein and the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were higher in the animals fed during lactation (groups II and IV) and lower in those fed only during the juvenile period (group III). Phospholipid fatty acid patterns as measured by gas chromatography were unaltered in any group. Calcium uptake was markedly diminished in all experimental conditions: group II 47%, group III 65% and group IV 96%. Compared to the observed changes in calcium transport, the ATP hydrolytic activity was relatively less affected. Only in group IV a significant decrease (41%) was seen. Groups II and III show no change in ATP hydrolytic activity. The decrease in calcium uptake and altered cholesterol/phospholipid ratio without effect on ATP hydrolytic activity is consistent with an uncoupling of calcium transport related to the atherogenic diet in early life. (author)

  19. Fluvastatin and atorvastatin affect calcium homeostasis of rat skeletal muscle fibers in vivo and in vitro by impairing the sarcoplasmic reticulum/mitochondria Ca2+-release system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liantonio, Antonella; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Cippone, Valentina; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Pierno, Sabata; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2007-05-01

    The mechanism by which the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) induce skeletal muscle injury is still under debate. By using fura-2 cytofluorimetry on intact extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers, here we provided the first evidence that 2 months in vivo chronic treatment of rats with fluvastatin (5 and 20 mg kg-1) and atorvastatin (5 and 10 mg kg-1) caused an alteration of calcium homeostasis. All treated animals showed a significant increase of resting cytosolic calcium [Ca2+]i, up to 60% with the higher fluvastatin dose and up to 20% with the other treatments. The [Ca2+]i rise induced by statin administration was not due to an increase of sarcolemmal permeability to calcium. Furthermore, the treatments reduced caffeine responsiveness. In vitro application of fluvastatin caused changes of [Ca2+]i, resembling the effect obtained after the in vivo administration. Indeed, fluvastatin produced a shift of mechanical threshold for contraction toward negative potentials and an increase of resting [Ca2+]i. By using ruthenium red and cyclosporine A, we determined the sequence of the statin-induced Ca2+ release mechanism. Mitochondria appeared as the cellular structure responsible for the earlier event leading to a subsequent large sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release. In conclusion, we suggest that calcium homeostasis alteration may be a crucial event for myotoxicity induced by this widely used class of hypolipidemic drugs.

  20. Altered calcium pump and secondary deficiency of γ-sarcoglycan and microspan in sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from δ-sarcoglycan knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares-Pérez, Alhondra; Álvarez, Rocío; Crosbie, Rachelle H.; Vega-Moreno, Jesús; Medina-Monares, Joel; Estrada, Francisco J.; Ortega, Alicia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoglycans (SGs) and sarcospan (SSPN) are transmembrane proteins of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Mutations in the genes encoding SGs cause many inherited forms of muscular dystrophy. In this study, using purified membranes of wild-type (WT) and δ-SG knockout (KO) mice, we found the specific localization of the SG-SSPN isoforms in transverse tubules (TT) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes. Immunoblotting revealed that the absence of δ-SG isoforms in TT and SR results in a secondary deficiency of γ-SG and µSPN. Our results showed augmented ATP hydrolytic activity, ATP-dependent calcium uptake and passive calcium efflux, probably through SERCA1 in KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we found a conformational change in SERCA1 isolated from KO muscle as demonstrated by calorimetric analysis. Following these alterations with mechanical properties, we found an increase in force in KO muscle with the same rate of fatigue but with a decreased fatigue recovery compared to WT. Together our observations suggest, for the first time, that the δ-SG isoforms may stabilize the expression of γ-SG and µSPN in the TT and SR membranes and that this possible complex may play a role in the maintenance of a stable level of resting cytosolic calcium concentration in skeletal muscle. PMID:20638123

  1. Decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content is responsible for defective excitation-contraction coupling in canine heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, I A; O'Rourke, B

    2001-03-20

    Altered excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling in canine pacing-induced heart failure involves decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca uptake and enhanced Na/Ca exchange, which could be expected to decrease SR Ca content (Ca(SR)) and may explain the reduced intracellular Ca (Ca(i)) transient. Studies in other failure models have suggested that the intrinsic coupling between L-type Ca current (I:(Ca,L)) and SR Ca release is reduced without a change in SR Ca load. The present study investigates whether Ca(SR) and/or coupling is altered in midmyocardial myocytes from failing canine hearts (F). Myocytes were indo-1-loaded via patch pipette (37 degrees C), and Ca(i) transients were elicited with voltage-clamp steps applied at various frequencies. I(Ca,L) density was not significantly decreased in F, but steady-state Ca(i) transients were reduced to 20% to 40% of normal myocytes (N). Ca(SR), measured by integrating Na/Ca exchange currents during caffeine-induced release, was profoundly decreased in F, to 15% to 25% of N. When Ca(SR) was normalized in F by preloading in 5 mmol/L external Ca before a test pulse at 2 mmol/L Ca, a normal-amplitude Ca(i) transient was elicited. E-C coupling gain was dependent on Ca(SR) but was affected similarly in both groups, indicating that intrinsic coupling is unaltered in F. A decrease in Ca(SR) is sufficient to explain the diminished Ca(i) transients in F, without a change in the effectiveness of coupling. Therefore, therapeutic approaches that increase Ca(SR) may be able to fully correct the Ca handling deficit in heart failure.

  2. Increased sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak but unaltered contractility by acute CaMKII overexpression in isolated rabbit cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Zhang, Tong; Seidler, Tim; Zibrova, Darya; Dybkova, Nataliya; Steen, Astrid; Wagner, Stefan; Chen, Lu; Brown, Joan Heller; Bers, Donald M; Maier, Lars S

    2006-02-03

    The predominant cardiac Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) is CaMKIIdelta. Here we acutely overexpress CaMKIIdeltaC using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in adult rabbit ventricular myocytes. This circumvents confounding adaptive effects in CaMKIIdeltaC transgenic mice. CaMKIIdeltaC protein expression and activation state (autophosphorylation) were increased 5- to 6-fold. Basal twitch contraction amplitude and kinetics (1 Hz) were not changed in CaMKIIdeltaC versus LacZ expressing myocytes. However, the contraction-frequency relationship was more negative, frequency-dependent acceleration of relaxation was enhanced (tau(0.5Hz)/tau(3Hz)=2.14+/-0.10 versus 1.87+/-0.10), and peak Ca2+ current (ICa) was increased by 31% (-7.1+/-0.5 versus -5.4+/-0.5 pA/pF, P<0.05). Ca2+ transient amplitude was not significantly reduced (-27%, P=0.22), despite dramatically reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content (41%; P<0.05). Thus fractional SR Ca2+ release was increased by 60% (P<0.05). Diastolic SR Ca2+ leak assessed by Ca2+ spark frequency (normalized to SR Ca2+ load) was increased by 88% in CaMKIIdeltaC versus LacZ myocytes (P<0.05; in an multiplicity-of-infection-dependent manner), an effect blocked by CaMKII inhibitors KN-93 and autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide. This enhanced SR Ca2+ leak may explain reduced SR Ca2+ content, despite measured levels of SR Ca2+-ATPase and Na+/Ca2+ exchange expression and function being unaltered. Ryanodine receptor (RyR) phosphorylation in CaMKIIdeltaC myocytes was increased at both Ser2809 and Ser2815, but FKBP12.6 coimmunoprecipitation with RyR was unaltered. This shows for the first time that acute CaMKIIdeltaC overexpression alters RyR function, leading to enhanced SR Ca2+ leak and reduced SR Ca2+ content but without reducing twitch contraction and Ca2+ transients. We conclude that this is attributable to concomitant enhancement of fractional SR Ca2+ release in CaMKIIdeltaC myocytes (ie, Ca

  3. The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin modulates the firing 1 properties of the reticular thalamic nucleus bursting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albéri, Lavinia; Lintas, Alessandra; Kretz, Robert; Schwaller, Beat; Villa, Alessandro E P

    2013-06-01

    The reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) of the mouse is characterized by an overwhelming majority of GABAergic neurons receiving afferences from both the thalamus and the cerebral cortex and sending projections mainly on thalamocortical neurons. The RTN neurons express high levels of the "slow Ca(2+) buffer" parvalbumin (PV) and are characterized by low-threshold Ca(2+) currents, I(T). We performed extracellular recordings in ketamine/xylazine anesthetized mice in the rostromedial portion of the RTN. In the RTN of wild-type and PV knockout (PVKO) mice we distinguished four types of neurons characterized on the basis of their firing pattern: irregular firing (type I), medium bursting (type II), long bursting (type III), and tonically firing (type IV). Compared with wild-type mice, we observed in the PVKOs the medium bursting (type II) more frequently than the long bursting type and longer interspike intervals within the burst without affecting the number of spikes. This suggests that PV may affect the firing properties of RTN neurons via a mechanism associated with the kinetics of burst discharges. Ca(v)3.2 channels, which mediate the I(T) currents, were more localized to the somatic plasma membrane of RTN neurons in PVKO mice, whereas Ca(v)3.3 expression was similar in both genotypes. The immunoelectron microscopy analysis showed that Ca(v)3.2 channels were localized at active axosomatic synapses, thus suggesting that the differential localization of Ca(v)3.2 in the PVKOs may affect bursting dynamics. Cross-correlation analysis of simultaneously recorded neurons from the same electrode tip showed that about one-third of the cell pairs tended to fire synchronously in both genotypes, independent of PV expression. In summary, PV deficiency does not affect the functional connectivity between RTN neurons but affects the distribution of Ca(v)3.2 channels and the dynamics of burst discharges of RTN cells, which in turn regulate the activity in the thalamocortical circuit.

  4. Calsequestrin 2 deletion causes sinoatrial node dysfunction and atrial arrhythmias associated with altered sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium cycling and degenerative fibrosis within the mouse atrial pacemaker complex1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhov, Alexey V.; Kalyanasundaram, Anuradha; Lou, Qing; Hage, Lori T.; Hansen, Brian J.; Belevych, Andriy E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Knollmann, Björn C.; Periasamy, Muthu; Györke, Sandor; Fedorov, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Loss-of-function mutations in Calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2) are associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). CPVT patients also exhibit bradycardia and atrial arrhythmias for which the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We aimed to study the sinoatrial node (SAN) dysfunction due to loss of CASQ2. Methods and results In vivo electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring, in vitro high-resolution optical mapping, confocal imaging of intracellular Ca2+ cycling, and 3D atrial immunohistology were performed in wild-type (WT) and Casq2 null (Casq2−/−) mice. Casq2−/− mice exhibited bradycardia, SAN conduction abnormalities, and beat-to-beat heart rate variability due to enhanced atrial ectopic activity both at baseline and with autonomic stimulation. Loss of CASQ2 increased fibrosis within the pacemaker complex, depressed primary SAN activity, and conduction, but enhanced atrial ectopic activity and atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with macro- and micro-reentry during autonomic stimulation. In SAN myocytes, CASQ2 deficiency induced perturbations in intracellular Ca2+ cycling, including abnormal Ca2+ release, periods of significantly elevated diastolic Ca2+ levels leading to pauses and unstable pacemaker rate. Importantly, Ca2+ cycling dysfunction occurred not only at the SAN cellular level but was also globally manifested as an increased delay between action potential (AP) and Ca2+ transient upstrokes throughout the atrial pacemaker complex. Conclusions Loss of CASQ2 causes abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and selective interstitial fibrosis in the atrial pacemaker complex, which disrupt SAN pacemaking but enhance latent pacemaker activity, create conduction abnormalities and increase susceptibility to AF. These functional and extensive structural alterations could contribute to SAN dysfunction as well as AF in CPVT patients. PMID:24216388

  5. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from rabbit leg muscle have been used in a study of chloride-induced calcium release. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that light sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles are derived from the longitudinal reticulum and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles are derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP to amounts greater than 100 nmoles Ca/sup + +/ per mg of protein in less than one minute. Light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles each had a biphasic time course of calcium uptake. The initial uptake was followed by a rapid release after approximately one minute, of 30 to 40% of the accumulated calcium, which was then followed by a slower phase of calcium accumulation. Results indicate that the chloride induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization. The release of calcium from the light SR vesicles is probably due to osmotic swelling and the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles is probably due to depolarization.

  6. Cytoplasmic nanojunctions between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum are required for specific calcium signaling [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/32q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Fameli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Herein we demonstrate how nanojunctions between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum (L-SR junctions serve to couple lysosomal activation to regenerative, ryanodine receptor-mediated cellular Ca2+ waves. In pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs it has been proposed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP triggers increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+ via L-SR junctions, in a manner that requires initial Ca2+ release from lysosomes and subsequent Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR via ryanodine receptor (RyR subtype 3 on the SR membrane proximal to lysosomes. L-SR junction membrane separation has been estimated to be < 400 nm and thus beyond the resolution of light microscopy, which has restricted detailed investigations of the junctional coupling process. The present study utilizes standard and tomographic transmission electron microscopy to provide a thorough ultrastructural characterization of the L-SR junctions in PASMCs. We show that L-SR nanojunctions are prominent features within these cells and estimate that the junctional membrane separation and extension are about 15 nm and 300 nm, respectively. Furthermore, we develop a quantitative model of the L-SR junction using these measurements, prior kinetic and specific Ca2+ signal information as input data. Simulations of NAADP-dependent junctional Ca2+ transients demonstrate that the magnitude of these signals can breach the threshold for CICR via RyR3. By correlation analysis of live cell Ca2+ signals and simulated Ca2+ transients within L-SR junctions, we estimate that “trigger zones” comprising 60–100 junctions are required to confer a signal of similar magnitude. This is compatible with the 110 lysosomes/cell estimated from our ultrastructural observations. Most importantly, our model shows that increasing the L-SR junctional width above 50 nm lowers the magnitude of junctional [Ca2+] such that there is a failure to breach the threshold for CICR via RyR3. L

  7. Sequencing of genes involved in the movement of calcium across human skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum: continuing the search for genes associated with malignant hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorksten, A R; Gillies, R L; Hockey, B M; Du Sart, D

    2016-11-01

    The genetic basis of malignant hyperthermia (MH) is not fully characterised and likely involves more than just the currently classified mutations in the gene encoding the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor ( RYR1 ) and the gene encoding the α1 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor ( CACNA1S ). In this paper we sequence other genes involved in calcium trafficking within skeletal muscle in patients with positive in vitro contracture tests, searching for alternative genes associated with MH. We identified four rare variants in four different genes ( CACNB1, CASQ1, SERCA1 and CASQ2 ) encoding proteins involved in calcium handling in skeletal muscle in a cohort of 30 Australian MH susceptible probands in whom prior complete sequencing of RYR1 and CACNA1S had yielded no rare variants. These four variants have very low minor allele frequencies and while it is tempting to speculate that they have a role in MH, they remain at present variants of unknown significance. Nevertheless they provide the basis for a new set of functional studies, which may indeed identify novel players in MH.

  8. The control of calcium signaling in the heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye Samuel

    Shannon, T.R., Ginsburg, K.S., & Bers, D.M. 2000. Potentiation of fractional sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release by total and free intra-sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium concentration. Biophysical Journal,. 78, 334-343. Shannon, T.R., Pogwizd, S.M., & Bers, D.M. 2003. Elevated. Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Leak in Intact ...

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1 regulates calcium homeostasis and electrophysiological activities of HL-1 cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-Hung; Chen, Yao-Chang; Lee, Ting-I; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chazo, Tze-Fan; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-04-01

    Glucagon like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin hormone with antidiabetic effects through stimulating insulin secretion, β cell neogenesis, satiety sensation, and inhibiting glucagon secretion. Administration of GLP-1 provides cardioprotective effects through attenuating cardiac inflammation and insulin resistance. GLP-1 also modulates the heart rate and systolic pressure, which suggests that GLP-1 may have cardiac electrical effects. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to evaluate whether GLP-1 has direct cardiac effects and identify the underlying mechanisms. Patch clamp, confocal microscopy with Fluo-3 fluorescence, and Western blot analyses were used to evaluate the electrophysiological characteristics, calcium homeostasis, and calcium regulatory proteins in HL-1 atrial myocytes with and without GLP-1 (1 and 10nM) incubation for 24h. GLP-1 (1 and 10nM) and control cells had similar action potential durations. However, GLP-1 at 10nM significantly increased calcium transients and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) contents. Compared to the control, GLP-1 (10nM)-treated cells significantly decreased phosphorylation of the ryanodine receptor at S2814 and total phospholamban, but there were similar protein levels of sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase and the sodium-calcium exchanger. Moreover, exendin (9-39) amide (a GLP-1 receptor antagonist, 10nM) attenuated GLP-1-mediated effects on total SR content and phosphorylated ryanodine receptor S2814. This study demonstrates GLP-1 may regulate HL-1 cell arrhythmogenesis through modulating calcium handling proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hierarchical ordering of reticular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Mileyko

    Full Text Available The structure of hierarchical networks in biological and physical systems has long been characterized using the Horton-Strahler ordering scheme. The scheme assigns an integer order to each edge in the network based on the topology of branching such that the order increases from distal parts of the network (e.g., mountain streams or capillaries to the "root" of the network (e.g., the river outlet or the aorta. However, Horton-Strahler ordering cannot be applied to networks with loops because they they create a contradiction in the edge ordering in terms of which edge precedes another in the hierarchy. Here, we present a generalization of the Horton-Strahler order to weighted planar reticular networks, where weights are assumed to correlate with the importance of network edges, e.g., weights estimated from edge widths may correlate to flow capacity. Our method assigns hierarchical levels not only to edges of the network, but also to its loops, and classifies the edges into reticular edges, which are responsible for loop formation, and tree edges. In addition, we perform a detailed and rigorous theoretical analysis of the sensitivity of the hierarchical levels to weight perturbations. In doing so, we show that the ordering of the reticular edges is more robust to noise in weight estimation than is the ordering of the tree edges. We discuss applications of this generalized Horton-Strahler ordering to the study of leaf venation and other biological networks.

  11. Optimal reinforcing of reticular structures Optimal reinforcing of reticular structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Santiago Mejía

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an application of Genetic Algorithms (GA and Finite Element Analysis (FEA to solve a structural optimisation problem on reticular plastic structures. Structural optimisation is used to modify the original shape by placing reinforcements at optimum locations. As a result, a reduction in the maximum stress by 14,70% for a structure with a final volume increase of 8,36% was achieved. This procedure solves the structural optimisation problem by adjusting the original mold and thereby avoiding the re-construction of a new one.Este artículo presenta una aplicación de Algoritmos Genéticos (GA y Análisis por Elementos Finitos (FEA a la solución de un problema de optimización estructural en estructuras reticulares plásticas. Optimización estructurales usada para modificar la forma original colocando refuerzos en posiciones óptimas. Como resultado se obtuvo una reducción en el esfuerzo máximo de 14,70% para una estructura cuyo volumen original aumento en 8,36%. Este procedimiento soluciona el problema de optimización estructural ajustando el molde original y evitando la manufactura de un nuevo molde.

  12. Differentiation of sarcoplasmic reticulum during cardiac myogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegg, W.; Michalak, M.

    1987-01-01

    The composition and function of fetal and mature sheep cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes were investigated. Phospholamban, a major phosphoprotein in the mature sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes, was present in early stages of cardiac myogenesis. This fetal form of phospholamban was phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase but not in the presence of Ca 2+ and calmodulin. 35 Ca 2+ uptake and Ca 2+ -dependent ATPase activity were low in fetal sarcoplasmic reticulum compared with the adult controls, although the apparent affinities for Ca 2+ were similar. Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated at all developmental stages had very low levels of plasma membrane and mitochondrial contamination. Sarcoplasmic reticulum 45 Ca 2+ uptake and Ca 2+ -dependent. ATPase activities were not affected by micromolar concentrations of vanadate, and the accumulated 45 Ca 2+ could not be released by the addition of NaCl. The amount of both the 110- and 55-kDa protein bands, identified with pecific antibodies as Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin, respectively, was low in early stages of cardiac myogenesis. Age-related differences in the Ca 2+ transport properties of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum and in the amount of the Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin may explain alterations in the regulation of intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations in the fetal heart. This may contribute to the developmental changes in myocardial function

  13. Inhibitory effect of lidocaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-dependent atpase from temporalis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Casadoumecq, Ana C; Alonso, Guillermo L; Takara, Delia

    2010-01-01

    Myotoxic effects of local anesthetics on skeletal musclefibers involve the inhibition ofsarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -dependent ATPase activity and Ca2 transport. Lidocaine is a local anesthetic frequently used to relieve the symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this work was to test the inhibitory and/or stimulatory effect of lidocaine on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -dependent ATPase isolated from rabbit temporalis muscle. Ca2+ -dependent ATPase activity was determined by a colorimetric method Calcium-binding to the Ca dependent ATPase, Ca2+ transport, and phosphorylation of the enzyme by ATP were determined with radioisotopic techniques. Lidocaine inhibited the Ca2+ -dependent ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. The preincubation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes with lidocaine enhanced the Ca2+ dependent ATPase activity in the absence of calcium ionophore. Lidocaine also inhibited both Ca2+ uptake and enzyme phosphorylation by ATP but had no effect on Ca2+ -binding to the enzyme. We conclude that the effect of lidocaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ -dependent ATPase from temporalis muscle is due to the drug's direct interaction with the enzyme and the increased permeability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane to Ca.

  14. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  15. Phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) regulates baseline sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release and cardiac contractility, independently of L-type Ca2+current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Jeremy A.; Zhao, Dongling; Farman, Gerrie P.; Jones, Peter; Tian, Xixi; Wilson, Lindsay S.; Ahmad, Faiyaz; Chen, S.R. Wayne; Movsesian, Matthew A.; Manganiello, Vincent; Maurice, Donald H.; Conti, Marco; Backx, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Baseline contractility of mouse hearts is modulated in a PI3Kγ-dependent manner by type 4 phosphodiesterases (PDE4), which regulate cAMP levels within microdomains containing the sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) calcium-ATPase (SERCA2a). Objective To determine whether PDE4D regulates basal cAMP levels, phospholamban (PLN) phosphorylation and SERCA2a activity in SR microdomains. Methods & Results We assessed myocardial function in PDE4D-deficient (PDE4D−/−) and littermate wild-type (WT) mice at 10-12 weeks of age. Baseline cardiac contractility in PDE4D−/− mice was elevated in vivo and in Langendorff perfused hearts, while isolated PDE4D−/− cardiomyocytes showed increased Ca2+ transient amplitudes and SR Ca2+content, but unchanged ICa(L), compared to WT. The PKA inhibitor, Rp-cAMPS, lowered Ca2+ transient amplitudes and SR Ca2+ content in PDE4D−/− cardiomyocytes to WT levels. The PDE4 inhibitor rolipram (ROL) had no effect on cardiac contractility, Ca2+ transients or SR Ca2+ content in PDE4D−/− preparations but increased these parameters in WT hearts to levels indistinguishable from those in PDE4D−/−. The functional changes in PDE4D−/− myocardium were associated with increased PLN phosphorylation (pPLN) but not RyR2 receptor phosphorylation. ROL increased pPLN in WT cardiomyocytes to levels indistinguishable from those in PDE4D−/− cardiomyocytes. In murine and failing human hearts, PDE4D co-immunoprecipitated with SERCA2a but not with RyR2. Conclusions PDE4D regulates basal cAMP levels in SR microdomains through its interactions with SERCA2a-PLN. Since Ca2+ transient amplitudes are reduced in failing human myocardium, these observations may have therapeutic implications for patients with heart failure. PMID:21903937

  16. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... absorb calcium as well. Sufficient calcium intake from food, and supplements if needed, can slow the rate of bone loss. Women of childbearing ... calcium absorption. People who eat a variety of foods don't have to consider ... include consumption of alcohol- and caffeine-containing beverages as well ...

  17. Loss of skeletal muscle strength by ablation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein JP45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbono, Osvaldo; Xia, Jinyu; Treves, Susan; Wang, Zhong-Min; Jimenez-Moreno, Ramon; Payne, Anthony M.; Messi, María Laura; Briguet, Alexandre; Schaerer, Florian; Nishi, Miyuki; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Zorzato, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Skeletal muscle constitutes ≈40% of the human body mass, and alterations in muscle mass and strength may result in physical disability. Therefore, the elucidation of the factors responsible for muscle force development is of paramount importance. Excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) is a process during which the skeletal muscle surface membrane is depolarized, causing a transient release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum that activates the contractile proteins. The ECC machinery is complex, and the functional role of many of its protein components remains elusive. This study demonstrates that deletion of the gene encoding the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein JP45 results in decreased muscle strength in young mice. Specifically, this loss of muscle strength in JP45 knockout mice is caused by decreased functional expression of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel Cav1.1, which is the molecule that couples membrane depolarization and calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. These results point to JP45 as one of the molecules involved in the development or maintenance of skeletal muscle strength. PMID:18077436

  18. Management of reticular veins and telangiectases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip Coleridge

    2015-11-01

    To review the literature related to the management of reticular varices and telangiectases of the lower limbs to provide guidance on the treatment of these veins. Very few randomised clinical trials are available in this field. A European Guideline has been published on the treatment of reticular varices and telangiectases, which is largely based on the opinion of experts. Older accounts written by individual phlebologists contain extensive advice from their own practice, which is valuable in identifying effective methods of sclerotherapy. All accounts indicate that a history should be taken combined with a clinical and ultrasound examination to establish the full extent of the venous disease. Sclerotherapy is commenced by injecting the larger veins first of all, usually the reticular varices. Later in the same session or in subsequent sessions, telangiectases can be treated by direct injection. Following treatment, the application of class 2 compression stockings for a period of up to three weeks is beneficial but not used universally by all phlebologists. Further sessions can follow at intervals of 2-8 weeks in which small residual veins are treated. Resistant veins can be managed by ultrasound-guided injection of underlying perforating veins and varices. Other treatments including RF diathermy and laser ablation of telangiectases have very limited efficacy in this condition. Sclerotherapy, when used with the correct technique, is the most effective method for the management of reticular varices and telangiectases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  20. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca2+ mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization.

  1. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca 2+ + Mg 2+ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca 2+ + Mg 2+ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca 2+ /mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization

  2. Gamma band activity in the reticular activating system (RAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Urbano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review considers recent evidence showing that cells in three regions of the reticular activating system (RAS exhibit gamma band activity, and describes the mechanisms behind such manifestation. Specifically, we discuss how cells in the mesopontine pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN, intralaminar parafascicular nucleus (Pf, and pontine Subcoeruleus nucleus dorsalis (SubCD all fire in the beta/gamma band range when maximally activated, but no higher. The mechanisms behind this ceiling effect have been recently elucidated. We describe recent findings showing that every cell in the PPN have high threshold, voltage-dependent P/Q-type calcium channels that are essential, while N-type calcium channels are permissive, to gamma band activity. Every cell in the Pf also showed that P/Q-type and N-type calcium channels are responsible for this activity. On the other hand, every SubCD cell exhibited sodium-dependent subthreshold oscillations. A novel mechanism for sleep-wake control based on well-known transmitter interactions, electrical coupling, and gamma band activity is described. The data presented here on inherent gamma band activity demonstrates the global nature of sleep-wake oscillation that is orchestrated by brainstem-thalamic mechanism, and questions the undue importance given to the hypothalamus for regulation of sleep-wakefulness. The discovery of gamma band activity in the RAS follows recent reports of such activity in other subcortical regions like the hippocampus and cerebellum. We hypothesize that, rather than participating in the temporal binding of sensory events as seen in the cortex, gamma band activity manifested in the RAS may help stabilize coherence related to arousal, providing a stable activation state during waking and paradoxical sleep. Most of our thoughts and actions are driven by preconscious processes. We speculate that continuous sensory input will induce gamma band activity in the RAS that could participate in the

  3. The Reticular Cell Network : A Robust Backbone for Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Textor, Johannes; Mandl, Judith N; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes are meeting points for circulating immune cells. A network of reticular cells that ensheathe a mesh of collagen fibers crisscrosses the tissue in each lymph node. This reticular cell network distributes key molecules and provides a structure for immune cells to move around on. During

  4. Characterization of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase from rabbit temporalis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel Antonio; Di Croce, Daniel Eduardo; Casadoumecq, Ana Clara; Richard, Susana Beatriz; Takara, Delia

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work was to isolate the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-ATPase from rabbit temporalis muscle and to determine the optimal conditions for calcium transport and enzymatic activity. SR vesicles were isolated from rabbit temporalis muscle by differential centrifugation, the protein composition analyzed by electrophoresis and compared to fast-twitch muscle membrane suspensions. ELISA was used to determine the sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) isoform. Ca-ATPase activity was determined by a colorimetric method. Calcium-binding to the Ca-ATPase, calcium uptake, calcium efflux and phosphorylation by P(i) were determined with radioisotopic techniques. Sixty five percent of the total protein concentration of SR membranes suspensions from rabbit temporalis corresponded to SERCA. Of the total SERCA protein, 64% was SERCA 2, 35% was SERCA 1 and less than 1% was SERCA 3. The optimal conditions of the SERCA isolated from rabbit temporalis muscle were: pH 7.2, 5 μM Ca(2+), 100 μM EGTA, 90 μM Mg(2+), 3mM ATP and 100mM KCl and did not differ from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. The temporalis maximal calcium uptake and Ca-ATPase activity were lower but the sensitivity to the specific Ca-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin was higher. Calcium-binding to the enzyme and calcium efflux were similar while the phosphorylation of the enzyme by P(i) was lower. The lower enzymatic activity and calcium transport capability of the Ca-ATPase isolated from rabbit temporalis, and the higher sensitivity to inhibitory drugs are consistent with the presence of a substantial proportion of SERCA 2, which can be expected in other rabbit masticatory muscles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Ascending Reticular Activating System from Pontine Reticular Formation to the Thalamus in the Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Seok eYeo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Action of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS on the cerebral cortex is responsible for achievement of consciousness. In this study, we attempted to reconstruct the lower single component of the ARAS from the reticular formation (RF to the thalamus in the normal human brain using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI.Methods: Twenty six normal healthy subjects were recruited for this study. A 1.5-T scanner was used for scanning of diffusion tensor images, and the lower single component of the ARAS was reconstructed using FMRIB software. We utilized two ROIs for reconstruction of the lower single component of the ARAS: the seed ROI - the RF of the pons at the level of the trigeminal nerve entry zone, the target ROI - the intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus at the level of the commissural plane.Results: The reconstructed ARAS originated from the pontine RF, ascended through the mesencephalic tegmentum just posterior to the red nucleus, and then terminated on the intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus. No significant differences in fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tract number were observed between hemispheres (P>0.05Conclusion: We reconstructed the lower single component of the ARAS from the RF to the thalamus in the human brain using DTI. The results of this study might be of value for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with impaired consciousness

  6. Ractopamine-induced changes in sarcoplasmic proteome profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ractopamine is a beta-adrenergic agonist that increases leanness and carcass weight in finishing pigs. Our previous study observed that dietary ractopamine increased the abundance of several glycolytic enzymes in the sarcoplasmic proteome of post-rigor pork longissimus thoracis muscle. Pork semimembranosus is an ...

  7. Drug action of benzocaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase from fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Croce, D; Trinks, P W; Grifo, M B; Takara, D; Sánchez, G A

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the local anesthetic benzocaine on sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from fast-twitch muscles was tested. The effects on Ca-ATPase activity, calcium binding and uptake, phosphoenzyme accumulation and decomposition were assessed using radioisotopic methods. The calcium binding to the Ca-ATPase was noncompetitively inhibited, and the enzymatic activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 47.1 mM). The inhibition of the activity depended on the presence of the calcium ionophore calcimycin and the membrane protein concentration. The pre-exposure of the membranes to benzocaine enhanced the enzymatic activity in the absence of calcimycin, supporting the benzocaine permeabilizing effect, which was prevented by calcium. Benzocaine also interfered with the calcium transport capability by decreasing the maximal uptake (IC50 40.3 mM) without modification of the calcium affinity for the ATPase. It inhibited the phosphorylation of the enzyme, and at high benzocaine concentration, the dephosphorylation step became rate-limiting as suggested by the biphasic profile of phosphoenzyme accumulation at different benzocaine concentrations. The data reported in this paper revealed a complex pattern of inhibition involving two sites for interaction with low and high benzocaine concentrations. It is concluded that benzocaine not only exerts an indirect action on the membrane permeability to calcium but also affects key steps of the Ca-ATPase enzymatic cycle.

  8. Cooked sausage batter cohesiveness as affected by sarcoplasmic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, M M; Wieliczko, K; Lim, R; Turnwald, S; Macdonald, G A

    2002-05-01

    In the first trial, m. semitendinosus and m. biceps femoris were held at 0, 10 and 35 °C until they entered rigor, and in the second trial, minced m. semitendinosus was washed in water for 15, 30, 45 or 60 min. The samples from both the trials were then used to make a finely comminuted sausage batter. Soluble sarcoplasmic protein (SSP) levels decreased with increasing rigor temperature (P batter shear stress was not affected by SSP level, but batter shear strain decreased with the decreasing SSP level associated with an increasing rigor temperature (P batter from the washed samples compared to that of controls. The results suggest that sarcoplasmic proteins are important in determining the strain values (cohesiveness) of cooked sausage batter.

  9. Dietary ractopamine influences sarcoplasmic proteome profile of pork Longissimus thoracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Lima, Bruno R C; Suman, Surendranath P; Li, Shuting; Beach, Carol M; Silva, Teofilo J P; Silveira, Expedito T F; Bohrer, Benjamin M; Boler, Dustin D

    2015-05-01

    Dietary ractopamine improves pork leanness, whereas its effect on sarcoplasmic proteome has not been characterized. Therefore, the influence of ractopamine on sarcoplasmic proteome of post-mortem pork Longissimus thoracis muscle was examined. Longissimus thoracis samples were collected from carcasses (24 h post-mortem) of purebred Berkshire barrows (n=9) managed in mixed-sex pens and fed finishing diets containing ractopamine (RAC; 7.4 mg/kg for 14 days followed by 10.0 mg/kg for 14 days) or without ractopamine for 28 days (CON). Sarcoplasmic proteome was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Nine protein spots were differentially abundant between RAC and CON groups. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoglucomutase-1 were over-abundant in CON, whereas serum albumin, carbonic anhydrase 3, L-lactate dehydrogenase A chain, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A, and myosin light chain 1/3 were over-abundant in RAC. These results suggest that ractopamine influences the abundance of enzymes involved in glycolytic metabolism, and the differential abundance of glycolytic enzymes could potentially influence the conversion of muscle to meat. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Patterns of proteolytic cleavage and carbodiimide derivatization in sarcoplasmic reticulum adenosinetriphosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Ancos, J.G.; Inesi, G.

    1988-01-01

    Two series of experiments were carried out to characterize (a) peptide fragments of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) ATPase, based on proteolysis with different enzymes and distribution of known labels, and (b) specific labeling and functional inactivation patterns, following ATPase derivatization with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) under various conditions. Digestion with trypsin or chymotrypsin results in the initial cleavage of the SR ATPase in two fragments of similar size and then into smaller fragments, while subtilisin and thermolysin immediately yield smaller fragments. Peptide fragments were assigned to segments of the protein primary structure and to functionally relevant domains, such as those containing the 32 P at the active site and the fluorescein isothiocyanate at the nucleotide site. ATPase derivatization with [ 14 C]DCCD under mild conditions produced selective inhibition of ATPase hydrolytic catalysis without significant incorporation of the 14 C radioactive label. This effect is attributed to blockage of catalytically active residues by reaction of the initial DCCD adduct with endogenous or exogenous nucleophiles. ATPase derivatization with [ 14 C]DCCD under more drastic conditions produced inhibition of calcium binding, 14 C radioactive labeling of tryptic fragments A 1 and A 2 (but not of B), and extensive cross-linking. The presence of calcium during derivatization prevented functional inactivation, radioactive labeling of fragment A 2 , and internal cross-linking of fragment A 1 . It is proposed that both A 1 and A 2 fragments participate in formation of the calcium binding domain and that the labeled residues of fragment A 2 are directly involved in calcium complexation. A diagram is constructed, representing the relative positions of labels and functional domains within the ATPase protein

  11. Cellular Trafficking of Phospholamban and Formation of Functional Sarcoplasmic Reticulum During Myocyte DIfferentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenoien, David L.; Knyushko, Tatyana V.; Londono, Monica P.; Opresko, Lee; Mayer, M. Uljana; Brady, Scott T.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2007-06-01

    The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) family members are transmembrane proteins that play an essential role in regulating intracellular calcium levels. Phospholamban (PLB), a 52 amino acid phosphoprotein, regulates SERCA activity in adult heart and skeletal muscle. Using the C2C12 myocyte cell line, we find endogenous PLB constitutively expressed in both myoblasts and myotubes, whereas SERCA expression coincides with activation of the differentiation program. PLB has a punctuate distribution in myoblasts changing to a reticular distribution in myotubes where it colocalizes with SERCAs. To examine the distribution and dynamics of PLB and SERCA, we expressed fluorescent fusion proteins (GFP, CFP, and YFP) of PLB and SERCA in myoblasts. Coexpressed PLB and SERCA localize to distinct cellular compartments in myoblasts but begin to colocalize as cells differentiate. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) studies show different recovery patterns for each protein in myoblasts confirming their localization to distinct compartments. To extend these studies, we created stable cell lines expressing O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) fusions with PLB or SERCA to track their localization as myocytes differentiate. These experiments demonstrate that PLB localizes to punctate vesicles in myoblasts and adopts a reticular distribution that coincides with SERCA distribution after differentiation. Colocalization experiments indicate that a subset of PLB in myoblasts colocalizes with endosomes, Golgi, and the plasma membrane however PLB also localizes to other, as yet unidentified vesicles. Our results indicate that differentiation plays a critical role in regulating PLB distribution to ensure its colocalization within the same cellular compartment as SERCA in differentiated cells. The presence and altered distribution of PLB in undifferentiated myoblasts raises the possibility that this protein has additional functions distinct from SERCA regulation.

  12. Reticular pattern detection in dermoscopy: an approach using Curvelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Machado

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dermoscopy is a non-invasive in vivo imaging technique, used in dermatology in feature identification, among pigmented melanocytic neoplasms, from suspicious skin lesions. Often, in the skin exam is possible to ascertain markers, whose identification and proper characterization is difficult, even when it is used a magnifying lens and a source of light. Dermoscopic images are thus a challenging source of a wide range of digital features, frequently with clinical correlation. Among these markers, one of particular interest to diagnosis in skin evaluation is the reticular pattern. Methods This paper presents a novel approach (avoiding pre-processing, e.g. segmentation and filtering for reticular pattern detection in dermoscopic images, using texture spectral analysis. The proposed methodology involves a Curvelet Transform procedure to identify features. Results Feature extraction is applied to identify a set of discriminant characteristics in the reticular pattern, and it is also employed in the automatic classification task. The results obtained are encouraging, presenting Sensitivity and Specificity of 82.35% and 76.79%, respectively. Conclusions These results highlight the use of automatic classification, in the context of artificial intelligence, within a computer-aided diagnosis strategy, as a strong tool to help the human decision making task in clinical practice. Moreover, the results were obtained using images from three different sources, without previous lesion segmentation, achieving to a rapid, robust and low complexity methodology. These properties boost the presented approach to be easily used in clinical practice as an aid to the diagnostic process.

  13. Local circuit input to the medullary reticular formation from the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasse, J; Terman, D; Venugopal, S; Hermann, G; Rogers, R; Travers, J B

    2008-11-01

    The intermediate reticular formation (IRt) subjacent to the rostral (gustatory) nucleus of the solitary tract (rNST) receives projections from the rNST and appears essential to the expression of taste-elicited ingestion and rejection responses. We used whole cell patch-clamp recording and calcium imaging to characterize responses from an identified population of prehypoglossal neurons in the IRt to electrical stimulation of the rNST in a neonatal rat pup slice preparation. The calcium imaging studies indicated that IRt neurons could be activated by rNST stimulation and that many neurons were under tonic inhibition. Whole cell patch-clamp recording revealed mono- and polysynaptic projections from the rNST to identified prehypoglossal neurons. The projection was primarily excitatory and glutamatergic; however, there were some inhibitory GABAergic projections, and many neurons received excitatory and inhibitory inputs. There was also evidence of disinhibition. Overall, bath application of GABA(A) antagonists increased the amplitude of excitatory currents, and, in several neurons, stimulation of the rNST systematically decreased inhibitory currents. We have hypothesized that the transition from licks to gapes by natural stimuli, such as quinine monohydrochloride, could occur via such disinhibition. We present an updated dynamic model that summarizes the complex synaptic interface between the rNST and the IRt and demonstrates how inhibition could contribute to the transition from ingestion to rejection.

  14. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum

    OpenAIRE

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M. Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2003-01-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues1. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nucle...

  15. Reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum content of releasable Ca2+ in rat soleus muscle fibres after eccentric contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J S; Sahlin, K; Ørtenblad, N

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The purpose was to evaluate the effects of fatiguing eccentric contractions (EC) on calcium (Ca2+) handling properties in mammalian type I muscles. We hypothesized that EC reduces both endogenous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content of releasable Ca2+ (eSRCa2+) and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity....... METHODS: Isolated rat soleus muscles performed 30 EC bouts. Single fibres were isolated from the muscle and after mechanical removal of sarcolemma used to measure eSRCa2+, rate of SR Ca2+ loading and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity. RESULTS: Following EC maximal force in whole muscle was reduced by 30......% and 16/100 Hz force ratio by 33%. The eSRCa2+ in fibres from non-stimulated muscles was 45 +/- 5% of the maximal loading capacity. After EC, eSRCa2+ per fibre CSA decreased by 38% (P = 0.05), and the maximal capacity of SR Ca2+ loading was depressed by 32%. There were no effects of EC on either...

  16. Dynamic Changes in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Structure in Ventricular Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Vega

    2011-01-01

    sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and the sarcolemma where Ca2+ release is activated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the SR is a structurally inert organelle in ventricular myocytes. Our data suggest that rather than being static, the SR undergoes frequent dynamic structural changes. SR boutons expressing functional ryanodine receptors moved throughout the cell, approaching or moving away from the sarcolemma of ventricular myocytes. These changes in SR structure occurred in the absence of changes in [Ca2+] during EC coupling. Microtubules and the molecular motors dynein and kinesin 1(Kif5b were important regulators of SR motility. These findings support a model in which the SR is a motile organelle capable of molecular motor protein-driven structural changes.

  17. Hearts of surviving MLP-KO mice show transient changes of intracellular calcium handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemecsei, Péter; Miklós, Zsuzsanna; Bíró, Tamás; Marincsák, Rita; Tóth, Balázs I; Komlódi-Pásztor, Edina; Barnucz, Eniko; Mirk, Eva; Van der Vusse, Ger J; Ligeti, László; Ivanics, Tamás

    2010-09-01

    The muscle Lim protein knock-out (MLP-KO) mouse model is extensively used for studying the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy. However, explanation is lacking for the observed long survival of the diseased mice which develop until adulthood despite the gene defect, which theoretically predestines them to early death due to heart failure. We hypothesized that adaptive changes of cardiac intracellular calcium (Ca(i)(2+)) handling might explain the phenomenon. In order to study the progression of changes in cardiac function and Ca(i)(2+) cycling, myocardial Ca(i)(2+)-transients recorded by Indo-1 surface fluorometry were assessed with concomitant measurement of hemodynamic performance in isolated Langendorff-perfused hearts of 3- and 9-month old MLP-KO animals. Hearts were challenged with beta-agonist isoproterenol and the sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA2a) inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA). Cardiac mRNA content and levels of key Ca(2+) handling proteins were also measured. A decline in lusitropic function was observed in 3-month old, but not in 9-month old MLP-KO mice under unchallenged conditions. beta-adrenergic responses to isoproterenol were similar in all the studied groups. The CPA induced an increase in end-diastolic Ca(i)(2+)-level and a decrease in Ca(2+)-sequestration capacity in 3-month old MLP-KO mice compared to age-matched controls. This unfavorable condition was absent at 9 months of age. SERCA2a expression was lower in 3-month old MLP-KO than in the corresponding controls and in 9-month old MLP-KO hearts. Our results show time-related recovery of hemodynamic function and an age-dependent compensatory upregulation of Ca(i)(2+) handling in hearts of MLP-KO mice, which most likely involve the normalization of the expression of SERCA2a in the affected hearts.

  18. State-dependent architecture of thalamic reticular subnetworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halassa, Michael M; Chen, Zhe; Wimmer, Ralf D; Brunetti, Philip M; Zhao, Shengli; Zikopoulos, Basilis; Wang, Fan; Brown, Emery N; Wilson, Matthew A

    2014-08-14

    Behavioral state is known to influence interactions between thalamus and cortex, which are important for sensation, action, and cognition. The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is hypothesized to regulate thalamo-cortical interactions, but the underlying functional architecture of this process and its state dependence are unknown. By combining the first TRN ensemble recording with psychophysics and connectivity-based optogenetic tagging, we found reticular circuits to be composed of distinct subnetworks. While activity of limbic-projecting TRN neurons positively correlates with arousal, sensory-projecting neurons participate in spindles and show elevated synchrony by slow waves during sleep. Sensory-projecting neurons are suppressed by attentional states, demonstrating that their gating of thalamo-cortical interactions is matched to behavioral state. Bidirectional manipulation of attentional performance was achieved through subnetwork-specific optogenetic stimulation. Together, our findings provide evidence for differential inhibition of thalamic nuclei across brain states, where the TRN separately controls external sensory and internal limbic processing facilitating normal cognitive function. PAPERFLICK: Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential effect of extracellular matrix derived from papillary and reticular fibroblasts on epidermal development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, David; Rietveld, Marion; Mahé, Christian; Saintigny, Gaëlle; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2017-06-01

    Papillary and reticular fibroblasts have different effects on keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these effects are caused by differential secretion of soluble factors or by differential generation of extracellular matrix from papillary and reticular fibroblasts. To study the effect of soluble factors, keratinocyte monolayer cultures were grown in papillary or reticular fibroblast-conditioned medium. To study the effect of extracellular matrix, keratinocytes were grown on papillary or reticular-derived matrix. Conditioned medium from papillary or reticular fibroblasts did not differentially affect keratinocyte viability or epidermal development. However, keratinocyte viability was increased when grown on matrix derived from papillary, compared with reticular, fibroblasts. In addition, the longevity of the epidermis was increased when cultured on papillary fibroblast-derived matrix skin equivalents compared with reticular-derived matrix skin equivalents. The findings indicate that the matrix secreted by papillary and reticular fibroblasts is the main causal factor to account for the differences in keratinocyte growth and viability observed in our study. Differences in response to soluble factors between both populations were less significant. Matrix components specific to the papillary dermis may account for the preferential growth of keratinocytes on papillary dermis.

  20. Fibroblastic reticular cells and their role in viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Keith E; Anderson, Arthur O; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2009-05-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by Ebola, Marburg and Lassa viruses often manifest as multiple organ dysfunction and hemorrhagic shock with high mortality. These viruses target numerous cell types, including monocytes and dendritic cells, which are primary early targets that mediate critical pathogenetic processes. This review focuses on fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), another prevalent infected cell type that is known as a key regulator of circulatory and immune functions. Viral infection of FRCs could have debilitating effects in secondary lymphoid organs and various other tissues. FRCs may also contribute to the spread of these deadly viruses throughout the body. Here, we review the salient features of these VHFs and the biology of FRCs, emphasizing the potential role of these cells in VHFs and the rapid deterioration of immune and hemovascular sytems that are characteristic of such acute infections.

  1. Expression of sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase isoforms in masticatory muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Gabriel A; Trinks, Pablo W; Richard, Susana B; Di Croce, Daniel E; Takara, Delia

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) isoforms in rabbit masticatory muscles compared with those in fast-twitch muscle. It was hypothesized that combined expression of the SERCA isoforms in fast- and slow-twitch muscles accounts for lower Ca-ATPase activity. SERCA was isolated by differential centrifugation, the isoforms were determined by ELISA, and the activity of each isoform was measured using a colorimetric method. Activity was tested for significance by anova, and the distribution of isoforms was assessed using the chi-square test (P < 0.05) and correlated to SERCA activity using Spearman's rank correlation. SERCA1 was predominant (90.5%) in fast-twitch muscle, whereas a mixture of SERCA isoforms was found in masticatory muscles: 62-78% was SERCA2, 20-37% was SERCA1, and the SERCA3 content was negligible. Depressor muscles showed a significantly higher content (77.8%) of SERCA2, and elevator muscles showed a higher content (35.4%) of SERCA1. Elevator muscles showed higher expression of SERCA2a (58%), and depressor muscles showed higher expression of SERCA2b (20%). The SERCA1 content was mainly SERCA1a and significantly higher for elevator muscles (33%), whereas depressor muscles showed a higher content of SERCA1b (4%). The SERCA1 content of fast-twitch muscle was mainly SERCA1a (88.5%). It is concluded that the mixture of different SERCA isoforms, along with a substantial content of SERCA2b, in masticatory muscles would support lower Ca-ATPase activity and calcium transport. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. The decompensated detrusor I: the effects of bladder outlet obstruction on the use of intracellular calcium stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmann, D; Levin, R M; Duckett, J W; Zderic, S A

    1996-08-01

    As in other smooth muscle groups, extracellular calcium influx as well as the release of calcium from intracellular storage sites or sarcoplasmic reticulum occur in response to receptor stimulation. The relative participation of extracellular influx versus intracellular release has recently been shown to be influenced by developmental stage and obstruction. Partial bladder outlet obstruction results in marked hypertrophy of the bladder and produces alterations in contractile function. To understand better how this contractile dysfunction after outlet obstruction is influenced by intracellular calcium handling we tested the effects of 2 drugs with known effects on the sarcoplasmic reticulum. We evaluated ryanodine, which blocks the release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and thapsigargin, which blocks the ability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum to pump cytosolic calcium back into the storage sites. Rabbit bladders were obstructed for different periods, after which detrusor muscle strips were harvested and contractile performance was evaluated in the absence and presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin. In the early phases of outlet obstruction the release of intracellular calcium increased significantly. With prolonged obstruction and detrusor decompensation the intracellular storage sites lost the ability to contribute to the generation of contractile force. Alterations in the calcium handling ability of the smooth muscle cell appear to have an important role in the process of decompensation of bladder function in infravesical obstruction.

  3. Reticular Formation and Pain: The Past and the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of the reticular formation (RF in the transmission and modulation of nociceptive information has been extensively studied. The brainstem RF contains several areas which are targeted by spinal cord afferents conveying nociceptive input. The arrival of nociceptive input to the RF may trigger alert reactions which generate a protective/defense reaction to pain. RF neurons located at the medulla oblongata and targeted by ascending nociceptive information are also involved in the control of vital functions that can be affected by pain, namely cardiovascular control. The RF contains centers that belong to the pain modulatory system, namely areas involved in bidirectional balance (decrease or enhancement of pain responses. It is currently accepted that the imbalance of pain modulation towards pain facilitation accounts for chronic pain. The medullary RF has the peculiarity of harboring areas involved in bidirectional pain control namely by the existence of specific neuronal populations involved in antinociceptive or pronociceptive behavioral responses, namely at the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM and the caudal ventrolateral medulla (VLM. Furthermore the dorsal reticular nucleus (also known as subnucleus reticularis dorsalis; DRt may enhance nociceptive responses, through a reverberative circuit established with spinal lamina I neurons and inhibit wide-dynamic range (WDR neurons of the deep dorsal horn. The components of the triad RVM-VLM-DRt are reciprocally connected and represent a key gateway for top-down pain modulation. The RVM-VLM-DRt triad also represents the neurobiological substrate for the emotional and cognitive modulation of pain, through pathways that involve the periaqueductal gray (PAG-RVM connection. Collectively, we propose that the RVM-VLM-DRt triad represents a key component of the “dynamic pain connectome” with special features to provide integrated and rapid responses in situations which are life

  4. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR,HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle using a combination of differential centrifugation and isopycnic zonal ultracentrifugation. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes whereas the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material, similar to that seen in the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The sucrose HSR vesicles have an additional morphological feature which appears as membrane projections that resemble the SR feet. The freeze-fracture morphology of either type of SR reveals an asymmetric distribution of intramembraneous particles in the same orientation and distribution as the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vivo. Biochemical studies were made on the content of Ca, Mg, ATPase, and protein of the vesicles and phosphorylation of the vesicles. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that the LSR is derived from the longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and the HSR is derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, contains junctional SR membrane and has three unique proteins (calsequestrin, an intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein and a 9000 dalton proteolipid).

  5. Puerarin Enhances Ca2+ Reuptake and Ca2+ Content of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum in Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes via Upregulation of SERCA2a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ES-CMs serve as potential sources for cardiac regenerative therapy. However, the immature sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR function of ES-CMs prevents its application. In this report, we examined the effect of puerarin, an isoflavone compound, on SR function of murine ES-CMs. Methods: Murine ES-CMs were harvested by embryoid body-based differentiation method. Confocal calcium imaging and whole-cell patch clamps were performed to assess the function of SR. The mRNA expression levels of SR-related genes were examined by quantitative PCR. The protein expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a was evaluated by immunofluorescent and western blot. Results: Long-term application of puerarin promotes basic properties of spontaneous calcium transient with increased amplitude, decay velocity, and decreased duration. Puerarin fails to alter ICa,L but increases the Ca2+ content of SR. Puerarin-treated ES-CMs have intact SR Ca2+ cycling with more SR Ca2+ reuptake. Long-term application of puerarin asynchronously upregulates the mRNA and protein expression of SERCA2a, as well as the transcripts of calsequestrin and triadin in developing ES-CMs. Application of puerarin during the stage of post-cardiac differentiation upregulates dose-dependently the transcripts of SERCA2a, phospholamban and tridin which can be reversed by the inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways, but shows no effect on the protein expression of SERCA2a. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that long-term puerarin treatment enhances Ca2+ reuptake and Ca2+ content via upregulation of SERCA2a.

  6. The thalamic reticular nucleus: structure, function and concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinault, Didier

    2004-08-01

    On the basis of theoretical, anatomical, psychological and physiological considerations, Francis Crick (1984) proposed that, during selective attention, the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) controls the internal attentional searchlight that simultaneously highlights all the neural circuits called on by the object of attention. In other words, he submitted that during either perception, or the preparation and execution of any cognitive and/or motor task, the TRN sets all the corresponding thalamocortical (TC) circuits in motion. Over the last two decades, behavioural, electrophysiological, anatomical and neurochemical findings have been accumulating, supporting the complex nature of the TRN and raising questions about the validity of this speculative hypothesis. Indeed, our knowledge of the actual functioning of the TRN is still sprinkled with unresolved questions. Therefore, the time has come to join forces and discuss some recent cellular and network findings concerning this diencephalic GABAergic structure, which plays important roles during various states of consciousness. On the whole, the present critical survey emphasizes the TRN's complexity, and provides arguments combining anatomy, physiology and cognitive psychology.

  7. Two Crosslinking Technologies for Superficial Reticular Dermis Injection: A Comparative Ultrasound and Histologic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Micheels, Patrick; Besse, Stéphanie; Sarazin, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Background: Few hyaluronic acid fillers have been developed for superficial injection. Objective: To compare the diffusion and integration properties of cohesive polydensified matrix and Vycross® technology hyaluronic acid fillers with lidocaine following injection into the superficial reticular dermis. Methods and materials: Two subjects received two injections each of cohesive polydensified matrix and Vycross® hyaluronic acid (0.2mL/site) in the superficial reticular dermis of the buttock u...

  8. Association of age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Neelesh; Smith, R Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of adult blindness in the developed world. Thus, major endeavors to understand the risk factors and pathogenesis of this disease have been undertaken. Reticular macular disease is a proposed subtype of age-related macular degeneration correlating histologically with subretinal drusenoid deposits located between the retinal pigment epithelium and the inner segment ellipsoid zone. Reticular lesions are more prevalent in females and in older age groups and are associated with a higher mortality rate. Risk factors for developing age-related macular degeneration include hypertension, smoking, and angina. Several genes related to increased risk for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease are also associated with cardiovascular disease. Better understanding of the clinical and genetic risk factors for age-related macular degeneration and reticular macular disease has led to the hypothesis that these eye diseases are systemic. A systemic origin may help to explain why reticular disease is diagnosed more frequently in females as males suffer cardiovascular mortality at an earlier age, before the age of diagnosis of reticular macular disease and age-related macular degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Observation of Network Dynamics of Ryanodine Receptors on Skeletal Muscle Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongli Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rabbit muscle vesicles derived from sarcoplasmic reticulum were used as a material in studying networks of ryanodine receptors by cryo electron tomography. Three-dimensional analysis reveals the dynamical features of these networks. It was found that the connection angles were rotated along the transmembrane axis of ryanodine receptors. Majority of the connections was observed at domains 6/6 of ryanodine receptors while a small group of connections were showed at domains 9/10. The flexible rotation and connection shift seem to facilitate the extension of an annular network on the wall of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a triad.

  10. Role of Sodium-Calcium Exchanger in Modulating the Action Potential of Ventricular Myocytes From Normal and Failing Hearts

    OpenAIRE

    Armoundas, Antonis A.; Hobai, Ion A.; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Winslow, Raimond L.; O’Rourke, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Increased Na+-Ca2+ exchange (NCX) activity in heart failure and hypertrophy may compensate for depressed sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ uptake, provide inotropic support through reverse-mode Ca2+ entry, and/or deplete intracellular Ca2+ stores. NCX is electrogenic and depends on Na+ and Ca2+ transmembrane gradients, making it difficult to predict its effect on the action potential (AP). Here, we examine the effect of [Na+]i on the AP in myocytes from normal and pacing-induced failing canine hear...

  11. Tinnitus and hyperacusis: Contributions of paraflocculus, reticular formation and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Chen, Guang-Di; Auerbach, Benjamin D; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Radziwon, Kelly; Salvi, Richard

    2017-06-01

    Tinnitus and hyperacusis are common and potentially serious hearing disorders associated with noise-, age- or drug-induced hearing loss. Accumulating evidence suggests that tinnitus and hyperacusis are linked to excessive neural activity in a distributed brain network that not only includes the central auditory pathway, but also brain regions involved in arousal, emotion, stress and motor control. Here we examine electrophysiological changes in two novel non-auditory areas implicated in tinnitus and hyperacusis: the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC), involved in arousal, and the paraflocculus lobe of the cerebellum (PFL), implicated in head-eye coordination and gating tinnitus and we measure the changes in corticosterone stress hormone levels. Using the salicylate-induced model of tinnitus and hyperacusis, we found that long-latency (>10 ms) sound-evoked response components in both the brain regions were significantly enhanced after salicylate administration, while the short-latency responses were reduced, likely reflecting cochlear hearing loss. These results are consistent with the central gain model of tinnitus and hyperacusis, which proposes that these disorders arise from the amplification of neural activity in central auditory pathway plus other regions linked to arousal, emotion, tinnitus gating and motor control. Finally, we demonstrate that salicylate results in an increase in corticosterone level in a dose-dependent manner consistent with the notion that stress may interact with hearing loss in tinnitus and hyperacusis development. This increased stress response has the potential to have wide-ranging effects on the central nervous system and may therefore contribute to brain-wide changes in neural activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impaired sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release rate after fatiguing stimulation in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Sjøgaard, G; Madsen, Klavs

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function and contractile properties before and during recovery from fatigue in the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle. Fatiguing contractions (60 Hz, 150 ms/s for 4 min) induced a reduction of the SR Ca(2+) release rate...

  13. Mass spectrometric characterization of the sarcoplasmic reticulum from rabbit skeletal muscle by on-membrane digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Lisa; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2012-03-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum from skeletal muscle constitutes an elaborate membrane system that contains a considerable number of integral and very large proteins that exist in highly complex supramolecular clusters. Conventional proteomics using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis greatly underestimates the presence of these proteins. Here, we have applied one-dimensional gradient gels and on-membrane digestion to overcome this technical problem. Mass spectrometric analysis has determined the presence of 31 distinct protein species in the sarcoplasmic reticulum, including key Ca2+-handling proteins such as the ryanodine receptor, Ca2+-ATPase, calsequestrin and sarcalumenin. Immunoblotting confirmed the relative position of these Ca2+-regulatory elements in analytical gel replicas. Interestingly, aldolase and phosphofructokinase were found to be present in the purified sarcoplasmic reticulum, supporting the idea of a close physical coupling between the glycolytic pathway and the energy-dependent sarcoplasmic reticulum. Hence, on-membrane digestion is highly suitable as the method of choice for studying integral and high-molecular-mass proteins in proteomic studies.

  14. The involvement of medullary reticular formation in the hypotensive effect of extracts from seeds of Cassia tora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S H; Koo, A; Li, K M

    In pentobarbital anesthetized rats, the medial portion of the medullary reticular formation has been identified to be directly involved in the hypotensive effect of extracts from the seeds of Cassia tora. This conclusion was drawn from the observed decrease in arterial blood pressure following local injection of extracts of this herb into this reticular site and from its inability to promote hypotension when the same reticular site has been electrolytically lesioned. The role of the medullary reticular formation in the Cassia tora-induced hypotension was suggested to be one which modulates the basic cardiovascular reflexes, favoring a decrease in vasomotor tone.

  15. Sclerotherapy for Reticular Veins in the Lower Limbs: A Triple-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanha, Matheus; Jaldin, Rodrigo Gibin; Moura, Regina; Pimenta, Rafael Elias Farres; Mariúba, Jamil Victor de Oliveira; Lúcio Filho, Carlos Eduardo Pinheiro; Alcantara, Giovana Piteri; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti; Sobreira, Marcone Lima

    2017-12-01

    Reticular veins are subdermal veins located in the lower limbs and are mainly associated with aesthetic complaints. Although sclerotherapy is the treatment of choice for reticular veins in the lower limbs, no consensus has been reached regarding to the optimal sclerosant. To compare the efficacy and safety of 2 sclerosants used to treat reticular veins: 0.2% polidocanol diluted in 70% hypertonic glucose (HG) (group 1) vs 75% HG alone (group 2). Prospective, randomized, triple-blind, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial with patients randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio between the 2 treatment groups from March through December 2014, with 2 months' follow-up. The study was conducted in a single academic medical center. Eligible participants were all women, aged 18 to 69 years, who had at least 1 reticular vein with a minimum length of 10 cm in 1 of their lower limbs. The patients underwent sclerotherapy in a single intervention with either 0.2% polidocanol plus 70% HG or 75% HG alone to eliminate reticular veins. The primary efficacy end point was the disappearance of the reticular veins within 60 days after treatment with sclerotherapy. The reticular veins were measured on images obtained before treatment and after treatment using ImageJ software. Safety outcomes were analyzed immediately after treatment and 7 days and 60 days after treatment and included serious adverse events (eg, deep vein thrombosis and systemic complications) and minor adverse events (eg, pigmentation, edema, telangiectatic matting, and hematomas). Ninety-three women completed the study, median (interquartile range) age 43.0 (24.0-61.0) years for group 1 and 41.0 (27.0-62.0) years for group 2. Sclerotherapy with 0.2% polidocanol plus 70% HG was significantly more effective than with 75% HG alone in eliminating reticular veins from the treated area (95.17% vs 85.40%; P vein pigmentation length for group 1 and 7.09% for group 2, with no significant difference between the groups (P = .09

  16. The role of reticular chemistry in the design of CO2 reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, Christian S.; Liu, Yuzhong; Cordova, Kyle E.; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2018-02-01

    The problem with current state-of-the-art catalysts for CO2 photo- or electroreduction is rooted in the notion that no single system can independently control, and thus optimize, the interplay between activity, selectivity and efficiency. At its core, reticular chemistry is recognized for its ability to control, with atomic precision, the chemical and structural features (activity and selectivity) as well as the output optoelectronic properties (efficiency) of porous, crystalline materials. The molecular building blocks that are in a reticular chemist's toolbox are chosen in such a way that the structures are rationally designed, framework chemistry is performed to integrate catalytically active components, and the manner in which these building blocks are connected endows the material with the desired optoelectronic properties. The fact that these aspects can be fine-tuned independently lends credence to the prospect of reticular chemistry contributing to the design of next-generation CO2 reduction catalysts.

  17. Calcium exchange, structure, and function in cultured adult myocardial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.A.; Frank, J.S.; Rich, T.L.; Orner, F.B.

    1987-01-01

    Cells digested from adult rat heart and cultured for 14 days demonstrate all the structural elements, in mature form, associated with the process of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. The transverse tubular (TT) system is well developed with an extensive junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum (JSR). In nonphosphate-containing buffer contraction of the cells is lost as rapidly as zero extracellular Ca concentration ([Ca] 0 ) solution is applied and a negative contraction staircase is produced on increase of stimulation frequency. Structurally and functionally the cells have the characteristics of adult cells in situ. 45 Ca exchange and total 45 Ca measurement in N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES)-buffered perfusate define three components of cellular Ca: 1) a rapidly exchangeable component accounting for 36% of total Ca, 2) a slowly exchangeable component (t/sub 1/2/ 53 min) accounting for 7% total Ca, and 3) the remaining 57% cellular Ca is inexchangeable (demonstrates no significant exchange within 60 min). The slowly exchangeable component can be increased 10-fold within 60 min by addition of phosphate to the perfusate. The Ca distribution and exchange characteristics are little different from those of 3-day cultures of neonatal rat heart previously studied. The results suggest that the cells are representative of adult cells in situ and that both sarcolemmal-bound and sarcoplasmic reticular Ca contribute to the component of Ca that is rapidly exchangeable

  18. Fast kinetics of calcium dissociation from calsequestrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIANELA BELTRÁN

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured the kinetics of calcium dissociation from calsequestrin in solution or forming part of isolated junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes by mixing calsequestrin equilibrated with calcium with calcium-free solutions in a stopped-flow system. In parallel, we measured the kinetics of the intrinsic fluorescence changes that take place following calcium dissociation from calsequestrin. We found that at 25ºC calcium dissociation was 10-fold faster for calsequestrin attached to junctional membranes (k = 109 s-1 than in solution. These results imply that calcium dissociation from calsequestrin in vivo is not rate limiting during excitation-contraction coupling. In addition, we found that the intrinsic fluorescence decrease for calsequestrin in solution or forming part of junctional membranes was significantly slower than the rates of calcium dissociation. The kinetics of intrinsic fluorescence changes had two components for calsequestrin associated to junctional membranes and only one for calsequestrin in solution; the faster component was 8-fold faster (k = 54.1 s-1 than the slower component (k = 6.9 s-1, which had the same k value as for calsequestrin in solution. These combined results suggest that the presence of calsequestrin at high concentrations in a restricted space, such as when bound to the junctional membrane, accelerates calcium dissociation and the resulting structural changes, presumably as a result of cooperative molecular interactions.

  19. The α2δ subunit and absence epilepsy: Beyond calcium channels?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Celli, R.; Santolini, I.; Guiducci, M.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; Parisi, P.; Striano, P.; Gradini, R.; Battaglia, G.; Ngomba, R.T.; Nicoletti, F.

    2017-01-01

    Spike-wave discharges, underlying absence seizures, are generated within a cortico-thalamo-cortical network that involves the somatosensory cortex, the reticular thalamic nucleus, and the ventrobasal thalamic nuclei. Activation of T-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) contributes to the

  20. PROJECTIONS FROM THE ROSTRAL PARVOCELLULAR RETICULAR-FORMATION TO PONTINE AND MEDULLARY NUCLEI IN THE RAT - INVOLVEMENT IN AUTONOMIC REGULATION AND OROFACIAL MOTOR CONTROL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TERHORST, GJ; COPRAY, JCVM; LIEM, RSB; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1991-01-01

    The efferent connections of the rostral parvocellular reticular formation to pontine and medullary nuclei in the rat were studied with anterogradely transported Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin. Dense innervations from the rostral parvocellular reticular formation were found in the mesencephalic

  1. Serotonergic Projections and Serotonin Receptor Expression in the Reticular Nucleus of the Thalamus in the Rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rodríguez Arellano, Jose Julio; Noristani, H. N.; Hoover, W. B.; Linley, S. B.; Vertes, R. P.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 9 (2011), s. 919-928 ISSN 0887-4476 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/09/1696 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : reticular nucleus * thalamus * serotonin receptors Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.945, year: 2011

  2. PROJECTIONS OF THE PARVOCELLULAR RETICULAR-FORMATION TO THE CONTRALATERAL MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MINKELS, RF; JUCH, PJW; TERHORST, GJ; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1991-01-01

    Projections of the parvocellular reticular nucleus (PCRt) to the contralateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) were studied in the rat with neurophysiological and neuroanatomical techniques. Three types of responses (classified by latencies) were recorded extracellularly in the Me5 area after

  3. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (Machado-Joseph disease) : severe destruction of the lateral reticular nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rub, U; de Vos, RAI; Schultz, C; Brunt, ER; Paulson, H; Braak, H

    The lateral reticular nucleus (LRT) of the medulla oblongata is a precerebellar nucleus involved in proprioception and somatomotor automatisms. We investigated this nucleus in five individuals with clinically diagnosed and genetically confirmed spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3, Machado-Joseph

  4. Reticular alignment: A progressive corner-cutting method for multiple sequence alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novák Ádám

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we introduce a progressive corner cutting method called Reticular Alignment for multiple sequence alignment. Unlike previous corner-cutting methods, our approach does not define a compact part of the dynamic programming table. Instead, it defines a set of optimal and suboptimal alignments at each step during the progressive alignment. The set of alignments are represented with a network to store them and use them during the progressive alignment in an efficient way. The program contains a threshold parameter on which the size of the network depends. The larger the threshold parameter and thus the network, the deeper the search in the alignment space for better scored alignments. Results We implemented the program in the Java programming language, and tested it on the BAliBASE database. Reticular Alignment can outperform ClustalW even if a very simple scoring scheme (BLOSUM62 and affine gap penalty is implemented and merely the threshold value is increased. However, this set-up is not sufficient for outperforming other cutting-edge alignment methods. On the other hand, the reticular alignment search strategy together with sophisticated scoring schemes (for example, differentiating gap penalties for hydrophobic and hydrophylic amino acids overcome FSA and in some accuracy measurement, even MAFFT. The program is available from http://phylogeny-cafe.elte.hu/RetAlign/ Conclusions Reticular alignment is an efficient search strategy for finding accurate multiple alignments. The highest accuracy achieved when this searching strategy is combined with sophisticated scoring schemes.

  5. Residual sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ concentration after Ca2+ release in skeletal myofibers from young adult and old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Min; Tang, Shen; Messi, María Laura; Yang, Jenny J; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2012-04-01

    Contrasting information suggests either almost complete depletion of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) or significant residual Ca(2+) concentration after prolonged depolarization of the skeletal muscle fiber. The primary obstacle to resolving this controversy is the lack of genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators targeted to the SR that exhibit low-Ca(2+) affinity, a fast biosensor: Ca(2+) off-rate reaction, and can be expressed in myofibers from adult and older adult mammalian species. This work used the recently designed low-affinity Ca(2+) sensor (Kd = 1.66 mM in the myofiber) CatchER (calcium sensor for detecting high concentrations in the ER) targeted to the SR, to investigate whether prolonged skeletal muscle fiber depolarization significantly alters residual SR Ca(2+) with aging. We found CatchER a proper tool to investigate SR Ca(2+) depletion in young adult and older adult mice, consistently tracking SR luminal Ca(2+) release in response to brief and repetitive stimulation. We evoked SR Ca(2+) release in whole-cell voltage-clamped flexor digitorum brevis muscle fibers from young and old FVB mice and tested the maximal SR Ca(2+) release by directly activating the ryanodine receptor (RyR1) with 4-chloro-m-cresol in the same myofibers. Here, we report for the first time that the Ca(2+) remaining in the SR after prolonged depolarization (2 s) in myofibers from aging (~220 μM) was larger than young (~132 μM) mice. These experiments indicate that SR Ca(2+) is far from fully depleted under physiological conditions throughout life, and support the concept of excitation-contraction uncoupling in functional senescent myofibers.

  6. Relevance of brain natriuretic peptide in preload-dependent regulation of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögler, Harald; Schott, Peter; Toischer, Karl; Milting, Hendrik; Van, Phuc Nguyen; Kohlhaas, Michael; Grebe, Cornelia; Kassner, Astrid; Domeier, Erik; Teucher, Nils; Seidler, Tim; Knöll, Ralph; Maier, Lars S; El-Banayosy, Aly; Körfer, Reiner; Hasenfuss, Gerd

    2006-06-13

    In heart failure (HF), ventricular myocardium expresses brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Despite the association of elevated serum levels with poor prognosis, BNP release is considered beneficial because of its antihypertrophic, vasodilating, and diuretic properties. However, there is evidence that BNP-mediated signaling may adversely influence cardiac remodeling, with further impairment of calcium homeostasis. We studied the effects of BNP on preload-dependent myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA2a) expression. In rabbit isolated muscle strips stretched to high preload and shortening isotonically over 6 hours, the SERCA/glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA ratio was enhanced by 168% (n=8) compared with unloaded preparations (n=8; P<0.001). Recombinant human BNP at a concentration typically found in end-stage HF patients (350 pg/mL) abolished SERCA upregulation by stretch (n=9; P<0.0001 versus BNP free). Inhibition of cyclic guanosine 3',5' monophosphate (cGMP)-phosphodiesterase-5 mimicked this effect, whereas inhibition of cGMP-dependent protein kinase restored preload-dependent SERCA upregulation in the presence of recombinant human BNP. Furthermore, in myocardium from human end-stage HF patients undergoing cardiac transplantation (n=15), BNP expression was inversely correlated with SERCA levels. Moreover, among 23 patients treated with left ventricular assist devices, significant SERCA2a recovery occurred in those downregulating BNP. Our data indicate that preload stimulates SERCA expression. BNP antagonizes this mechanism via guanylyl cyclase-A, cGMP, and cGMP-dependent protein kinase. This novel action of BNP to uncouple preload-dependent SERCA expression may adversely affect contractility in patients with HF.

  7. Neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus are selective for diverse and complex visual features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaingankar, Vishal; Soto-Sanchez, Cristina; Wang, Xin; Sommer, Friedrich T; Hirsch, Judith A

    2012-01-01

    All visual signals the cortex receives are influenced by the perigeniculate sector (PGN) of the thalamic reticular nucleus, which receives input from relay cells in the lateral geniculate and provides feedback inhibition in return. Relay cells have been studied in quantitative depth; they behave in a roughly linear fashion and have receptive fields with a stereotyped center-surround structure. We know far less about reticular neurons. Qualitative studies indicate they simply pool ascending input to generate non-selective gain control. Yet the perigeniculate is complicated; local cells are densely interconnected and fire lengthy bursts. Thus, we employed quantitative methods to explore the perigeniculate using relay cells as controls. By adapting methods of spike-triggered averaging and covariance analysis for bursts, we identified both first and second order features that build reticular receptive fields. The shapes of these spatiotemporal subunits varied widely; no stereotyped pattern emerged. Companion experiments showed that the shape of the first but not second order features could be explained by the overlap of On and Off inputs to a given cell. Moreover, we assessed the predictive power of the receptive field and how much information each component subunit conveyed. Linear-non-linear (LN) models including multiple subunits performed better than those made with just one; further each subunit encoded different visual information. Model performance for reticular cells was always lesser than for relay cells, however, indicating that reticular cells process inputs non-linearly. All told, our results suggest that the perigeniculate encodes diverse visual features to selectively modulate activity transmitted downstream.

  8. Increased salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in non-reticular oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansourian, Arash; Shanbehzadeh, Najmeh; Kia, Seyed Javad; Moosavi, Mahdieh-Sadat

    2017-01-01

    Oral lichen planus is a potentially malignant disorder. One of the malignant transformation markers is cancer stem cells. One of the proposed marker for the detection of cancer stem cells's in head and neck cancer is aldehyde dehydrogenase. Recently it is shown that aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 expression in tissue samples is associated with oral lichen planus malignant transformation. This study evaluates salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 in oral lichen planus. Thirty patients and 30 age and sex-matched healthy volunteers were recruited. Oral lichen planus was diagnosed based on the modified World Health Organization criteria. Subjects in the case group were divided into reticular and non-reticular forms. Unstimulated salivary samples were collected at 10-12 AM. Saliva concentrations of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 were measured by ELISA. The differences between aldehyde dehydrogenase levels in the oral lichen planus group compared with the control group were not significant but aldehyde dehydrogenase in non-reticular oral lichen planus was significantly higher than that of the reticular form. This is a cross-sectional study, thus longitudinal studies in oral lichen planus may present similar or different results. The mechanism of malignant transformation in oral lichen planus is not defined. Previous analyses revealed that the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 expression is significantly correlated with increased risk of transformation. This finding is consistent with our results because in the erosive and ulcerative forms of oral lichen planus, which have an increased risk of transformation, salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 was overexpressed. A higher salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase level in non-reticular oral lichen planus can be a defensive mechanism against higher oxidative stress in these groups. Aldehyde dehydrogenase may be one of the malignant transformation markers in oral lichen planus. Further studies are needed for introducing aldehyde dehydrogenase as a prognostic

  9. Up-regulation of Intracellular Calcium Handling Underlies the Recovery of Endotoxemic Cardiomyopathy in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Justin C; Huang, Joanne; Khona, Natasha; Miller, Edward J; Siwik, Deborah A; Colucci, Wilson S; Hobai, Ion A

    2017-06-01

    In surviving patients, sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy is spontaneously reversible. In the absence of any experimental data, it is generally thought that cardiac recovery in sepsis simply follows the remission of systemic inflammation. Here the authors aimed to identify the myocardial mechanisms underlying cardiac recovery in endotoxemic mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (7 μg/g, intraperitoneally) and followed for 12 days. The authors assessed survival, cardiac function by echocardiography, sarcomere shortening, and calcium transients (with fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester) in electrically paced cardiomyocytes (5 Hz, 37°C) and myocardial protein expression by immunoblotting. Left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiomyocyte sarcomere shortening, and calcium transients were depressed 12 h after lipopolysaccharide challenge, started to recover by 24 h (day 1), and were back to baseline at day 3. The recovery of calcium transients at day 3 was associated with the up-regulation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump to 139 ± 19% (mean ± SD) of baseline and phospholamban down-regulation to 35 ± 20% of baseline. At day 6, calcium transients were increased to 123 ± 31% of baseline, associated with increased sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium load (to 126 ± 32% of baseline, as measured with caffeine) and inhibition of sodium/calcium exchange (to 48 ± 12% of baseline). In mice surviving lipopolysaccharide challenge, the natural recovery of cardiac contractility was associated with the up-regulation of cardiomyocyte calcium handling above baseline levels, indicating the presence of an active myocardial recovery process, which included sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump activation, the down-regulation of phospholamban, and sodium/calcium exchange inhibition.

  10. Effects of trunk-to-head rotation on the labyrinthine responses of rat reticular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, M; Grasso, C; Bruschini, L; Berrettini, S; Manzoni, D

    2012-11-08

    Vestibulospinal reflexes elicited by head displacement become appropriate for body stabilization owing to the integration of neck input by the cerebellar anterior vermis. Due to this integration, the preferred direction of spinal motoneurons' responses to animal tilt rotates by the same angle and by the same direction as the head over the body, which makes it dependent on the direction of body displacement rather than on head displacement. It is known that the cerebellar control of spinal motoneurons involves the reticular formation. Since the preferred directions of corticocerebellar units' responses to animal tilt are tuned by neck rotation, as occuring in spinal motoneurons, we investigated whether a similar tuning can be observed also in the intermediate station of reticular formation. In anaesthetized rats, the activity of neurons in the medullary reticular formation was recorded during wobble of the whole animal at 0.156 Hz, a stimulus that tilted the animal's head by a constant amplitude (5°), in a direction rotating clockwise or counter clockwise over the horizontal plane. The response gain and the direction of tilt eliciting the maximal activity were evaluated with the head and body axes aligned and during a maintained body-to-head displacement of 5-20° over the horizontal plane, in either direction. We found that the neck displacement modified the response gain and/or the average activity of most of the responsive neurons. Rotation of the response direction was observed only in a minor percentage of the recorded neurons. The modifications of reticular neurons' responses were different from those observed in the P-cells of the cerebellar anterior vermis, which rarely showed gain and activity changes and often exhibited a rotation of their response directions. In conclusion, reticular neurons take part in the neck tuning of vestibulospinal reflexes by transforming a head-driven sensory input into a body-centred postural response. The present findings

  11. The ascending reticular activating system from pontine reticular formation to the hypothalamus in the human brain: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2015-03-17

    The ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) is responsible for regulation of consciousness. Precise evaluation of the ARAS is important for diagnosis and management of patients with impaired consciousness. In the current study, we attempted to reconstruct the portion of the ARAS from the pontine reticular formation (RF) to the hypothalamus in normal subjects, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). A total of 31 healthy subjects were recruited for this study. DTI scanning was performed using 1.5-T, and the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus was reconstructed. Values of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and tract volume of the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus were measured. In all subjects, the ARAS from the pontine RF to the hypothalamus originated from the RF at the level of the mid-pons, where the trigeminal nerve could be seen, ascended through the periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain anterolaterally to the anterior commissure level, and then terminated into the hypothalamus. No significant differences in DTI parameters were observed between the left and right hemispheres and between males and females (phypothalamus in normal subjects using DTI. We believe that the reconstruction methodology and the results of this study would be useful to clinicians involved in the care of patients with impaired consciousness and researchers in studies of the ARAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Study of reticular defects in V3Si (A15 structure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Lamine, Abdelmottaleb

    1980-01-01

    The A15 crystal structure is that of superconductive compounds with high critical temperature. This research thesis aims at studying its possible reticular defects. In a first part, the author presents this structure and more particularly its crystallographic properties, reports the indexing of electronic diffraction diagrams (point diagrams and line diagrams of Kikuchi) in the case of V 3 Si. Then, after having described the sample preparation technique, the author reports the study of reticular defects by high voltage electronic microscopy on a raw V 3 Si crystal. The existence of a specific defect is highlighted and the crystallographic study of this defect is reported. It has been performed by means of computer-based simulation of contrast (TWODIS software). Results are then discussed

  13. TNP-AMP Binding to the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase Studied by Infrared Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Man; Barth, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor the conformational change of 2′,3′-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5′-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase. TNP-AMP binding was observed in a competition experiment: TNP-AMP is initially bound to the ATPase but is then replaced by β,γ-iminoadenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPPNP) after AMPPNP release from P3-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethyl AMPPNP (caged AMPPNP). The resulting infrared difference spectra are compared to those of...

  14. Reticulospinal neurons in the pontomedullary reticular formation of the monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, S T; Davidson, A G; Buford, J A

    2009-11-10

    Recent neurophysiological studies indicate a role for reticulospinal neurons of the pontomedullary reticular formation (PMRF) in motor preparation and goal-directed reaching in the monkey. Although the macaque monkey is an important model for such investigations, little is known regarding the organization of the PMRF in the monkey. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of reticulospinal neurons in the macaque. Bilateral injections of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) were made into the cervical spinal cord. A wide band of retrogradely labeled cells was found in the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (Gi) and labeled cells continued rostrally into the caudal pontine reticular nucleus (PnC) and into the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO). Additional retrograde tracing studies following unilateral cervical spinal cord injections of cholera toxin subunit B revealed that there were more ipsilateral (60%) than contralateral (40%) projecting cells in Gi, while an approximately 50:50 ratio contralateral to ipsilateral split was found in PnC and more contralateral projections arose from PnO. Reticulospinal neurons in PMRF ranged widely in size from over 50 microm to under 25 microm across the major somatic axis. Labeled giant cells (soma diameters greater than 50 microm) comprised a small percentage of the neurons and were found in Gi, PnC and PnO. The present results define the origins of the reticulospinal system in the monkey and provide an important foundation for future investigations of the anatomy and physiology of this system in primates.

  15. Classification of reticular pattern and streaks in dermoscopic images based on texture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Marlene; Pereira, Jorge; Fonseca-Pinto, Rui

    2015-10-01

    The early detection of melanoma is one of the greatest challenges in clinical practice of dermatology, and the reticular pattern is one of the most important dermoscopic structures to improve melanocytic lesion diagnosis. A texture-based approach is developed for the automatic detection of reticular patterns, whose output will assist clinical decision-making. Feature selection was based on the use of two algorithms by means of the classical graylevel co-occurrence matrix and Laws energy masks optimized on a set of 104 dermoscopy images. The AdaBoost (adaptive boosting) approach to machine learning was used within this strategy. Results suggest superiority of LEM for reticular pattern detection in dermoscopic images, achieving a sensitivity of 90.16% and a specificity of 86.67%. The use of automatic classification in dermoscopy to support clinicians is a strong tool to assist diagnosis; however, the use of automatic classification as a complementary tool in clinical routine requires algorithms with high levels of sensitivity and specificity. The results presented in this work will contribute to achieving this goal.

  16. Feed-forward and feedback projections of midbrain reticular formation neurons in the cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie ePerkins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaze changes involving the eyes and head are orchestrated by brainstem gaze centers found within the superior colliculus (SC, paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF, and medullary reticular formation (MdRF. The mesencephalic reticular formation (MRF also plays a role in gaze. It receives a major input from the ipsilateral SC and contains cells that fire in relation to gaze changes. Moreover, it provides a feedback projection to the SC and feed-forward projections to the PPRF and MdRF. We sought to determine whether these MRF feedback and feed-forward projections originate from the same or different neuronal populations by utilizing paired fluorescent retrograde tracers in cats. Specifically, we tested: 1. whether MRF neurons that control eye movements form a single population by injecting the SC and PPRF with different tracers, and 2. whether MRF neurons that control head movements form a single population by injecting the SC and MdRF with different tracers. In neither case were double labeled neurons observed, indicating that feedback and feed-forward projections originate from separate MRF populations. In both cases, the labeled reticulotectal and reticuloreticular neurons were distributed bilaterally in the MRF. However, neurons projecting to the MdRF were generally constrained to the medial half of the MRF, while those projecting to the PPRF, like MRF reticulotectal neurons, were spread throughout the mediolateral axis. Thus, the medial MRF may be specialized for control of head movements, with control of eye movements being more widespread in this structure.

  17. TYPE 2 (SUBRETINAL) NEOVASCULARIZATION IN AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION ASSOCIATED WITH PURE RETICULAR PSEUDODRUSEN PHENOTYPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naysan, Jonathan; Jung, Jesse J; Dansingani, Kunal K; Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Freund, K Bailey

    2016-03-01

    To report the association of pure type 2 neovascularization (NV) in age-related macular degeneration occurring almost exclusively in patients with reticular pseudodrusen. An observational retrospective cohort study of all eyes receiving antivascular endothelial growth factor therapy for newly diagnosed neovascular age-related macular degeneration by a single practitioner over a 6-year period. Only patients with treatment-naive, pure type 2 NV who also had either pre-neovascular imaging of the study eye or imaging of a nonneovascular fellow eye available to determine baseline characteristics including drusen type and choroidal thickness were incuded. Of 694 patients treated for neovascular age-related macular degeneration, only 8 met the inclusion criteria with pure type 2 NV. Of these, 7 (88%) had exclusively reticular pseudodrusen (5 in the nonneovascular fellow eye, 2 in the study eye before developing NV). Six (75%) patients in the affected neovascular eye and 6 (75%) in the fellow nonneovascular eye had choroidal thickness age-related macular degeneration, occurring almost exclusively in patients with reticular pseudodrusen and thin choroids.

  18. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rei Ogawa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scars are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scars suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scars are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scars merely reflect differences in the intensity, frequency

  19. Characterization of endonuclease G and mitochondria-sarcoplasmic reticulum-related proteins during cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xingguang; Ma, Kuifen; Rao, Yuefeng; Hong, Dongsheng; Huo, Zhaoxia; Ye, Ziqi; Huang, Mingzhu; Zhang, Xingguo; Zhao, Qingwei

    2015-09-01

    Endonuclease G (Endo G) is a novel determinant of cardiac hypertrophy. Here, we report the characterization of Endo G and mitochondria-sarcoplasmic reticulum-related proteins during cardiac hypertrophy, and hypothesize that Endo G regulate mitochondrial function partly through Mfn2 and Jp2 during cardiac hypertrophy. Our results show that Endo G levels gradually increased at the beginning of phenylephrine-induced cardiac hypertrophy, accompanied by an abnormal mitochondrial membrane potential. The up-regulation of Mfn2, Jp2, and Endo G appeared at an early stage of cardiac hypertrophy, whereas PGC1α was not up-regulated until a later stage. Abolishing Endo G with siRNA led to the uncoupling of the mitochondrial electron transport chain from ATP production and decreased PGC1α expression, likely by affecting the juxtaposition of the mitochondria and the sarcoplasmic reticulum via Mfn2 and Jp2. Furthermore, abolishing Jp2 altered the expression of Endo G expression and induced mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting that mitochondrial abnormalities in cardiac hypertrophy are most likely caused by Endo G. Taken together, our study established a link between Endo G and mitochondrial function during cardiac hypertrophy, partly through the effects of Endo G on Mfn2 and Jp2, and revealed a role for Endo G in the crosstalk between the processes controlled by Mfn2 and Jp2 in maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy.

  20. Effects of Preslaughter Stress Levels on the Post-mortem Sarcoplasmic Proteomic Profile of Gilthead Seabream Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Tomé Santos; Cordeiro, Odete D; Matos, Elisabete D.

    2012-01-01

    identification was performed by MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. Analysis of the results indicates changes on several cellular pathways, with some of these changes being attributable to oxidative and proteolytic activity on sarcoplasmic proteins, together with leaking of myofibrillar proteins. These processes appear to have...

  1. Reticular Chemistry for the Highly Connected Porous Crystalline Frameworks and Their Potential Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Zhijie

    2018-03-31

    Control at the molecular level over porous solid-state materials is of prime importance for fine-tuning the local structures, as well as the resultant properties. Traditional porous solid-state materials such as zeolite and activated carbon are the benchmarks in the current market with vital applications in sorption and heterogeneous catalysis. However, the adjustments of pore size and geometry of those materials, which are essential for the broader aspect of modern prominent applications, remain challenging. Reticular chemistry has emerged as a dominant tool toward the ‘designed syntheses’ of porous crystalline frameworks (e.g. metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)) with a specific pore system. This dissertation illustrates the power of reticular chemistry and its use in the directional assembly of highly coordinated MOF materials, as well as their potential applications such as gas storage, natural gas upgrading, and light hydrocarbon separation. Highly connected minimal edge-transitive derived and related nets, obtained via the deconstruction of nodes of the edge-transitive nets, are suitable blueprints and can potentially be deployed in the future ‘designed syntheses’ of MOFs. The further employment of the conceptual net-coded building units (e.g. highly connected MBBs and edge-transitive SBLs) in the practical reticular synthesis results in the rational design and construction of functional MOF platforms like shp-, alb-, kce-, kex- and eea- MOFs. In addition, the isoreticular synthesis of Al-cea-MOF-2 with functionalized pendant acid moieties inside pore channels in comparison to the parent Al-cea-MOF-1 led to enhanced light hydrocarbons separation performance. Moreover, controlling the molecular defects in Zr-fum-fcu-MOFs resulted in the development of an ultramicroporous adsorbent with an engineered aperture size for the highly efficient separation of butane/iso-butane.

  2. Curcumin-induced inhibition of cellular reactive oxygen species ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    To measure intracellular ROS production, cells were loaded with ... ROS production. Tg is a pharmacological specific inhibitor of sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticular calcium (SERCA). ATPases and cells treated with Tg exhibit depletion of intracellular .... The dietary pigment curcumin reduces endothelial tissue fac- tor gene ...

  3. Activation of substantia gelatinosa by midbrain reticular stimulation demonstrated with 2-deoxyglucose in the rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales-Lima, F.

    1986-01-01

    The autoradiographic ( 14 C)2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) method was used to map the descending effects of midbrain reticular stimulation on the rat cervical spinal cord. The stimulation evoked consistently a defensive 'freezing' reaction as well as a large and highly localized increase in 2-DG uptake in the substantia gelatinosa (SG)(Rexed laminae 2-3). No stimulus-induced changes in 2-DG uptake were produced in the other regions of the spinal cord. The findings represent the first anatomical demonstration of the activating effects of the spinal cord. The findings represent the first anatomical demonstration of the activating effects of midbrain reticular stimulation on the spinal cord. They also support the concept of an integrative role for the SG in descending reticular mechanisms at the spinal cord level. (author)

  4. Reticular Formation Connections Underlying Horizontal Gaze: The Central Mesencephalic Reticular Formation (cMRF as a Conduit for the Collicular Saccade Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. May

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The central mesencephalic reticular formation (cMRF occupies much of the core of the midbrain tegmentum. Physiological studies indicate that it is involved in controlling gaze changes, particularly horizontal saccades. Anatomically, it receives input from the ipsilateral superior colliculus (SC and it has downstream projections to the brainstem, including the horizontal gaze center located in the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF. Consequently, it has been hypothesized that the cMRF plays a role in the spatiotemporal transformation needed to convert spatially coded collicular saccade signals into the temporally coded signals utilized by the premotor neurons of the horizontal gaze center. In this study, we used neuroanatomical tracers to examine the patterns of connectivity of the cMRF in macaque monkeys in order to determine whether the circuit organization supports this hypothesis. Since stimulation of the cMRF produces contraversive horizontal saccades and stimulation of the horizontal gaze center produces ipsiversive saccades, this would require an excitatory cMRF projection to the contralateral PPRF. Injections of anterograde tracers into the cMRF did produce labeled terminals within the PPRF. However, the terminations were denser ipsilaterally. Since the PPRF located contralateral to the movement direction is generally considered to be silent during a horizontal saccade, we then tested the hypothesis that this ipsilateral reticuloreticular pathway might be inhibitory. The ultrastructure of ipsilateral terminals was heterogeneous, with some displaying more extensive postsynaptic densities than others. Postembedding immunohistochemistry for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA indicated that only a portion (35% of these cMRF terminals are GABAergic. Dual tracer experiments were undertaken to determine whether the SC provides input to cMRF reticuloreticular neurons projecting to the ipsilateral pons. Retrogradely labeled reticuloreticular

  5. A simplified technique to determine intraparticle diffusivity of macro-reticular resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kawakita

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Both resins and activated carbons are commonly used as adsorbents in water and wastewater treatment. In general, intraparticle diffusion mechanisms within macro reticular resin particles (such as XAD-2000 are different from those in activated carbon particles. Currently, completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR technique can be used to determine the intraparticle diffusivity for phenolic compounds adsorbed onto activated carbon systems. However, the technology cannot determine the intraparticle diffusivity accurately if the fluid-film resistance is significant, such as synthetic macro-reticular resins. Therefore, this study develops a technique to determine the intraparticle diffusivities of XAD-2000 resin. This paper characterized the concentration decay curves of para-nitrophenol in CMBR to determine effective pore diffusivity (DP of the resin. The obtained mean and standard deviation of DP are about 1.1 × 10−5 and 3.2 × 10−6 (cm2 s−1, respectively. The technology developed in this study has the advantages of significant chemical saving and easy operation.

  6. Fibroblast reticular cells engineer a blastema extracellular network during digit tip regeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Luis; Simkin, Jennifer; Sammarco, Mimi; Muneoka, Ken

    2017-04-01

    The regeneration blastema which forms following amputation of the mouse digit tip is composed of undifferentiated cells bound together by an organized network of fibers. A monoclonal antibody (ER-TR7) that identifies extracellular matrix (ECM) fibers produced by fibroblast reticular cells during lymphoid organogenesis was used to characterize the ECM of the digit, the blastema, and the regenerate. Digit fibroblast reticular cells produce an ER-TR7 + ECM network associated with different tissues and represent a subset of loose connective tissue fibroblasts. During blastema formation there is an upregulation of matrix production that returns to its pre-existing level and anatomical pattern in the endpoint regenerate. Co-localization studies demonstrate a strong spatial correlation between the ER-TR7 antigen and collagen type III (COL3) in histological sections. ER-TR7 and COL3 are co-induced in cultured digit fibroblasts following treatment with tumor necrosis factor alpha and a lymphotoxin beta receptor agonist. These results provide an initial characterization of the ECM during digit regeneration and identify a subpopulation of fibroblasts involved in producing the blastema provisional matrix that is remodeled during the regeneration response.

  7. Marginal reticular cells: a stromal subset directly descended from the lymphoid tissue organizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya eKatakai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The architecture of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs is supported by several nonhematopoietic stromal cells. Currently it is established that two distinct stromal subsets, follicular dendritic cells and fibroblastic reticular cells, play crucial roles in the formation of tissue compartments within SLOs, i.e., the follicle and T zone, respectively. Although stromal cells in the anlagen are essential for SLO development, the relationship between these primordial cells and the subsets in adulthood remains poorly understood. In addition, the roles of stromal cells in the entry of antigens into the compartments through some tissue structures peculiar to SLOs remain unclear. A recently identified stromal subset, marginal reticular cells (MRCs, covers the margin of SLOs that are primarily located in the outer edge of follicles and construct a unique reticulum. MRCs are closely associated with specialized endothelial or epithelial structures for antigen transport. The similarities in marker expression profiles and successive localization during development suggest that MRCs directly descend from organizer stromal cells in the anlagen. Therefore, MRCs are thought to be a crucial stromal component for the organization and function of SLOs.

  8. Voltage-dependent mobilization of intracellular calcium in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, M F

    1986-01-01

    In skeletal muscle calcium is released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), an internal organelle, in response to changes in the voltage across the transverse tubule (T-tubule) membrane, an external membrane system that is distinct from the SR but in close proximity to it. For T-tubule voltage changes within the physiological range, calcium release can be turned on or off on a time scale of milliseconds. The control of calcium release from the SR appears to involve at least three functional components: a voltage sensor in the T-tubule membrane, a calcium channel in the SR, and a mechanism for coupling the voltage sensor to the channel. Movement of charged or dipolar molecules within the T-tubule membrane is thought to serve as the voltage sensor. Such intramembrane charge movement (Q) can be monitored electrically and can be compared with the rate of calcium release from the SR. Calcium release is calculated from cytosolic calcium transients measured with a metallochromic indicator. Comparison of Q and the rate of release in the same isolated muscle fibre indicates that this rate is directly proportional to the amount of charge displaced in excess of a 'threshold' amount. The nature of the coupling mechanism between T-tubules and SR remains to be established but present observations impose some restrictions on possible mechanisms.

  9. Intracellular calcium movements during excitation–contraction coupling in mammalian slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In skeletal muscle fibers, action potentials elicit contractions by releasing calcium ions (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Experiments on individual mouse muscle fibers micro-injected with a rapidly responding fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye reveal that the amount of Ca2+ released is three- to fourfold larger in fast-twitch fibers than in slow-twitch fibers, and the proportion of the released Ca2+ that binds to troponin to activate contraction is substantially smaller. PMID:22450485

  10. Different contributions of primary motor cortex, reticular formation, and spinal cord to fractionated muscle activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaaimi, Boubker; Dean, Lauren R; Baker, Stuart N

    2018-01-01

    Coordinated movement requires patterned activation of muscles. In this study, we examined differences in selective activation of primate upper limb muscles by cortical and subcortical regions. Five macaque monkeys were trained to perform a reach and grasp task, and electromyogram (EMG) was recorded from 10 to 24 muscles while weak single-pulse stimuli were delivered through microelectrodes inserted in the motor cortex (M1), reticular formation (RF), or cervical spinal cord (SC). Stimulus intensity was adjusted to a level just above threshold. Stimulus-evoked effects were assessed from averages of rectified EMG. M1, RF, and SC activated 1.5 ± 0.9, 1.9 ± 0.8, and 2.5 ± 1.6 muscles per site (means ± SD); only M1 and SC differed significantly. In between recording sessions, natural muscle activity in the home cage was recorded using a miniature data logger. A novel analysis assessed how well natural activity could be reconstructed by stimulus-evoked responses. This provided two measures: normalized vector length L, reflecting how closely aligned natural and stimulus-evoked activity were, and normalized residual R, measuring the fraction of natural activity not reachable using stimulus-evoked patterns. Average values for M1, RF, and SC were L = 119.1 ± 9.6, 105.9 ± 6.2, and 109.3 ± 8.4% and R = 50.3 ± 4.9, 56.4 ± 3.5, and 51.5 ± 4.8%, respectively. RF was significantly different from M1 and SC on both measurements. RF is thus able to generate an approximation to the motor output with less activation than required by M1 and SC, but M1 and SC are more precise in reaching the exact activation pattern required. Cortical, brainstem, and spinal centers likely play distinct roles, as they cooperate to generate voluntary movements. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Brainstem reticular formation, primary motor cortex, and cervical spinal cord intermediate zone can all activate primate upper limb muscles. However, brainstem output is more

  11. The role of bacterial fermentation in the hydrolysis and oxidation of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in Harbin dry sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Kong, Baohua; Han, Qi; Liu, Qian; Xu, Li

    2016-11-01

    Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus sake and Staphylococcus xylosus were evaluated to determine their role in the hydrolysis and oxidation of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in Harbin dry sausages. Electrophoresis analysis showed that the hydrolysis of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins in dry sausages inoculated with bacterial strains was more severe than that in the non-inoculated control. The predominant free amino acids at the end of the fermentation were glutamic acid and alanine, both of which are involved in creating a desirable taste. The inoculation of dry sausages with bacterial strains, especially mixed strains, significantly decreased carbonyl formation and sulfhydryl loss in sausages (Psausage with multiple bacterial strains could contribute to flavour formation via flavour precursors. The results demonstrate that Harbin dry sausage can be inoculated with a starter culture mixture of P. pentosaceus, L. curvatus and S. xylosus to improve flavour formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies of sarcoplasmic oxygenation in the red cell-perfused rat heart

    OpenAIRE

    Jelicks, L.A.; Wittenberg, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    The proximal histidine N delta H proton of deoxymyoglobin experiences a large hyperfine shift resulting in its 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal appearing at approximately 76 ppm (at 35 degrees C), downfield of the diamagnetic spectral region. 1H NMR of this proton is used to monitor sarcoplasmic oxygen pressure in isolated perfused rat heart. This method monitors intracellular oxygenation in the whole heart and does not reflect oxygenation in a limited region. The deoxymyoglobin res...

  13. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide excites medial pontine reticular formation neurons in the brainstem rapid eye movement sleep-induction zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Reiner, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although it has long been known that microinjection of the cholinergic agonist carbachol into the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF) induces a state that resembles rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, it is likely that other transmitters contribute to mPRF regulation of behavioral states. A key...

  14. Anisotropy of electron work function and reticular compacting of friable faces of metallic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimirov, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    The review and statistical estimate of experimental data on work functions for BCC-, FCC- and HCP - metals (W, Mo, Ta, Nb, Cr, V, Ni, Y) as well as the earlier developed quantum-mechanical statistical model of double electrical layer formation at metal surface and the calculation of an electron work function dipole constituent serve as a basis for the development of a semi-empirical theory of electron work function anisotropy. A coefficient of reticular compacting of friable crystal faces is introduced and statistically estimated. A coefficient of crystal emission anisotropy is also introduced and estimated both theoretically and empirically. The theory permits calculating work functions for all crystal faces and a volumetric constituent of the work function from the measured value of electron work function for a single face [ru

  15. The endocochlear potential as an indicator of reticular lamina integrity after noise exposure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Kaur, Tejbeer; Warchol, Mark E; Withnell, Robert H

    2018-02-01

    The endocochlear potential (EP) provides part of the electrochemical drive for sound-driven currents through cochlear hair cells. Intense noise exposure (110 dB SPL, 2 h) differentially affects the EP in three inbred mouse strains (C57BL/6 [B6], CBA/J [CBA], BALB/cJ [BALB]) (Ohlemiller and Gagnon, 2007, Hearing Research 224:34-50; Ohlemiller et al., 2011, JARO 12:45-58). At least for mice older than 3 mos, B6 mice are unaffected, CBA mice show temporary EP reduction, and BALB mice may show temporary or permanent EP reduction. EP reduction was well correlated with histological metrics for injury to stria vascularis and spiral ligament, and little evidence was found for holes or tears in the reticular lamina that might 'short out' the EP. Thus we suggested that the genes and processes that underlie the strain EP differences primarily impact cochlear lateral wall, not the organ of Corti. Our previous work did not test the range of noise exposure conditions over which strain differences apply. It therefore remained possible that the relation between exposure severity and acute EP reduction simply has a higher exposure threshold in B6 mice compared to CBA and BALB. We also did not test for age dependence. It is well established that young adult animals are especially vulnerable to noise-induced permanent threshold shifts (NIPTS). It is unknown, however, whether heightened vulnerability of the lateral wall contributes to this condition. The present study extends our previous work to multiple noise exposure levels and durations, and explicitly compares young adult (6-7 wks) and older mice (>4 mos). We find that the exposure level-versus-acute EP relation is dramatically strain-dependent, such that B6 mice widely diverge from both CBA and BALB. For all three strains, however, acute EP reduction is greater in young mice. Above 110 dB SPL, all mice exhibited rapid and severe EP reduction that is likely related to tearing of the reticular lamina. By contrast, EP

  16. Three-dimensional reticular tin-manganese oxide composite anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, X.J.; Guo, Z.P.; Zhang, P.; Du, G.D.; Poh, C.K.; Chen, Z.X.; Li, S.; Liu, H.K.

    2010-01-01

    Tin-manganese oxide film with three-dimensional (3D) reticular structure has been prepared by electrostatic spray deposition (ESD). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicate that the film is amorphous. X-ray-photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) demonstrates that the 3D grid is composed of tin-manganese oxide. As an anode electrode for the lithium ion battery, the tin-manganese oxide film has 1188.3 mAh g -1 of initial discharge capacity and very good capacity retention of 656.2 mAh g -1 up to the 30th cycle. Such a composite film can be used as an anode for lithium ion batteries with higher energy densities.

  17. Relative power contributions of unit discharges simultaneously recorded in the mesencephalic reticular formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, T; Honda, Y; Nakao, M; Sato, S; Yamamoto, M

    2000-06-01

    In order to investigate mutual interactions between neuronal discharges in the mesencepahlic reticular formation, relative power contributions (RPC) were estimated during sleep-wake cycles and serotonin (5HT)-depleted conditions by the administration of parachlorophenylalanine (PCPA). The RPC for most of the neurons dominated in the lower frequency range below 0.4 Hz during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and the PCPA-treated conditions, which were qualitatively reproduced by the neural network model under global disinhibition. The results supported the hypothesis that the peculiar dynamics of neuronal activities during REM sleep, 1/f fluctuations, were generated by neuronal interactions augmented by the release from the global inhibition of 5HT.

  18. Variable Action Potential Backpropagation during Tonic Firing and Low-Threshold Spike Bursts in Thalamocortical But Not Thalamic Reticular Nucleus Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, William M; Crunelli, Vincenzo; Errington, Adam C

    2017-05-24

    Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs) are indispensable in dendritic signaling. Conflicting Ca 2+ -imaging data and an absence of dendritic recording data means that the extent of backpropagation in thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) neurons remains unknown. Because TRN neurons signal electrically through dendrodendritic gap junctions and possibly via chemical dendritic GABAergic synapses, as well as classical axonal GABA release, this lack of knowledge is problematic. To address this issue, we made two-photon targeted patch-clamp recordings from rat TC and TRN neuron dendrites to measure bAPs directly. These recordings reveal that "tonic"' and low-threshold-spike (LTS) "burst" APs in both cell types are always recorded first at the soma before backpropagating into the dendrites while undergoing substantial distance-dependent dendritic amplitude attenuation. In TC neurons, bAP attenuation strength varies according to firing mode. During LTS bursts, somatic AP half-width increases progressively with increasing spike number, allowing late-burst spikes to propagate more efficiently into the dendritic tree compared with spikes occurring at burst onset. Tonic spikes have similar somatic half-widths to late burst spikes and undergo similar dendritic attenuation. In contrast, in TRN neurons, AP properties are unchanged between LTS bursts and tonic firing and, as a result, distance-dependent dendritic attenuation remains consistent across different firing modes. Therefore, unlike LTS-associated global electrical and calcium signals, the spatial influence of bAP signaling in TC and TRN neurons is more restricted, with potentially important behavioral-state-dependent consequences for synaptic integration and plasticity in thalamic neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In most neurons, action potentials (APs) initiate in the axosomatic region and propagate into the dendritic tree to provide a retrograde signal that conveys information about the level of

  19. Sarcoplasmic Protein Profile from Drip Loss in Relation to Pork Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Wiesław; Kaczor, Damian; Żelechowska, Elżbieta; Jaworska, Danuta; Kajak-Siemaszko, Katarzyna; Boruszewska, Kinga; Jankiewicz, Urszula

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this research was to correlate the sarcoplasmic protein profile of the natural drip loss of muscle with the technological and sensory quality of pork meat. Material for analysis was taken from 14 PenArLan pigs. Simple analysis of relationships between the test protein and meat quality traits showed that they adopt a range of from -0.58 to 0.72. It has been shown that the significance of glycolysis expressed as level of glycogen and lactic acid may be 86% (coefficient of correlations, C R = 0.93), explained by the amount of certain enzymes. The higher relation has been obtained between studied enzymes and value of pH 24 , L * and b * parameters of raw meat (98%; C R = 0.99). By contrast, L * and a * parameters, sour flavor, and tenderness of grilled meat in 79% can be explained based on the content of the enolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate mutase (C R = 0.89). The results of the multiple regression showed that amount of lactic acid was related to the quantity of the 3 enzymes: phosphofructokinase, AMP deaminase, phosphorylase b/phosphorylase b kinase (r = 0.88). © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. Effect of carticaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-adenosine triphosphatase. II. Cations dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Delia; Sánchez, Gabriel A; Toma, Augusto F; Bonazzola, Patricia; Alonso, Guillermo L

    2005-05-01

    Ca2+-ATPase is a major intrinsic protein in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) from skeletal muscles. It actively transports Ca2+ from the cytoplasm to the SR lumen, reducing cytoplasmic [Ca2+] to promote muscle relaxation. Carticaine is a local anesthetic widely used in operative dentistry. We previously showed that carticaine inhibits SR Ca2+-ATPase activity and the coupled Ca(2+) uptake by isolated SR vesicles, and increases the rate of Ca2+ efflux from preloaded vesicles. We also found that these effects were antagonized by divalent cations, and concluded that they were mainly due to the direct interaction of carticaine with the Ca2+-ATPase protein. Here we present additional results on the modulation of the above effects of carticaine by Ca2+ and Mg2+. The activating effect of Ca2+ on the ATPase activity is competitively inhibited by carticaine, indicating a decreased Ca2+ binding to the high affinity Ca2+ transport sites. The activating effect of Mg2+ on the phosphorylation of Ca2+-ATPase by orthophosphate is also inhibited by carticaine. The anesthetic does not affect the reaction mechanism of the cations acting as cofactors of ATP in the catalytic site. On the basis of the present and our previous results, we propose a model that describes the effect of carticaine on the Ca2+-ATPase cycle.

  1. A histochemical and X-ray microanalysis study of calcium changes in insect flight muscle degeneration in Solenopsis, the queen fire ant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.G.; Davis, W.L.; Vinson, S.B.

    1982-01-01

    Potassium pyroantimonate histochemistry, coupled with ethyleneglycoltetraacetic acid (EGTA)-chelation and X-ray microprobe analysis, was employed to localize intracellular calcium binding sites in the normal and degenerating flight musculature in queens of Solenopsis, the fire ant. In normal animals, calcium distribution was light to moderate within myofibrils and mitochondria. In the early contracture stages of the insemination-induced degeneration, both myofilament and mitochondrial calcium loading was markedly increased. In the terminal stages of myofibril breakdown, only Z-lines (isolated or in clusters) with an associated filamentous residue persisted. These complexes were also intensely calcium positive. This study further documents the presence of increased sarcoplasmic calcium during muscle necrosis. Surface membrane defects, mitochondrial calcium overload, and calcium-activated proteases may all be involved in this ''normal'' breakdown process

  2. Regulation of calcium signals in the nucleus by a nucleoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, Wihelma; Leite, M Fatima; Guerra, Mateus T; Zipfel, Warren R; Nathanson, Michael H

    2003-05-01

    Calcium is a second messenger in virtually all cells and tissues. Calcium signals in the nucleus have effects on gene transcription and cell growth that are distinct from those of cytosolic calcium signals; however, it is unknown how nuclear calcium signals are regulated. Here we identify a reticular network of nuclear calcium stores that is continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum and the nuclear envelope. This network expresses inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) receptors, and the nuclear component of InsP3-mediated calcium signals begins in its locality. Stimulation of these receptors with a little InsP3 results in small calcium signals that are initiated in this region of the nucleus. Localized release of calcium in the nucleus causes nuclear protein kinase C (PKC) to translocate to the region of the nuclear envelope, whereas release of calcium in the cytosol induces translocation of cytosolic PKC to the plasma membrane. Our findings show that the nucleus contains a nucleoplasmic reticulum with the capacity to regulate calcium signals in localized subnuclear regions. The presence of such machinery provides a potential mechanism by which calcium can simultaneously regulate many independent processes in the nucleus.

  3. Atividade elétrica cerebral do rato com lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica Electrocorticographic study of the rats's bram after lesioning of the midbrain reticular formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-09-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo foram utilizados 73 ratos em preparações agudas e crônicas, nas quais lesamos a formação reticular mesencefálica com corrente contínua (3,5 a 4,0 mA durante 5 a 10 segundos. O eletródio ativo era implantado estereotàxicamente segundo as coordenadas de König e Klippel. As lesões eram feitas parcial ou totalmente, uni ou bilateralmente, e em todos os animais procedeu-se ao controle histológico das áreas lesadas, usando-se o método de Weil. O registro da atividade elétrica cortical foi feito com polígrafo Beckman de 4 canais, utilizando-se derivações bipolares curtas (1mm com eletródios esféricos de platina. As experiências permitiram as seguintes conclusões: 1 — As características eletrofisiológicas dos fusos que ocorrem após lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica são muito semelhantes às dos fusos espontâneos e barbitúricos, inclusive quanto à projeção cortical. Quanto à duração dos potenciais que os constituem, contudo, notamos que a faixa de variação era mais centuada (20 a 80 ms, o que pode ser atribuído à maior complexidade dos potenciais do cérebro isolado, possivelmente pela falta de ação cronadora da formação reticular sobre o sistema sincronizador talâmico. 2 — Os mecanismos envolvidos na gênese dos fusos do sono barbitúrico ou espontâneo e os do cérebro isolado são, pelo menos em parte, dependentes do bloqueio da formação reticular mesencefálica. 3 — A formação reticular mesencefálica ativa preferencialmente o hemisfério cerebral homolateral; o contingente cruzado talvez seja mobilizado somente quando estímulos alertantes intensos atingem o tegmento mesencefálico. 4 — Além da formação reticular mesencefálica deve haver outros mecanismos ativadores corticais, visto que, em preparações agudas de cérebro isolado, observamos: a surtos de curta duração de atividade dessincronizada; b oscilações freqüentes do ECoG durante o registro

  4. Antagonists of the TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel modulate airway smooth muscle tone and intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsson, Jennifer; Perez-Zoghbi, Jose; Bernstein, Kyra; Barajas, Matthew B; Zhang, Yi; Kumar, Satish; Sharma, Pawan K; Gallos, George; Emala, Charles W

    2015-09-01

    Perioperative bronchospasm refractory to β agonists continues to challenge anesthesiologists and intensivists. The TMEM16A calcium-activated chloride channel modulates airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. The authors hypothesized that TMEM16A antagonists would relax ASM contraction by modulating membrane potential and calcium flux. Human ASM, guinea pig tracheal rings, or mouse peripheral airways were contracted with acetylcholine or leukotriene D4 and then treated with the TMEM16A antagonists: benzbromarone, T16Ainh-A01, N-((4-methoxy)-2-naphthyl)-5-nitroanthranilic acid, or B25. In separate studies, guinea pig tracheal rings were contracted with acetylcholine and then exposed to increasing concentrations of isoproterenol (0.01 nM to 10 μM) ± benzbromarone. Plasma membrane potential and intracellular calcium concentrations were measured in human ASM cells. Benzbromarone was the most potent TMEM16A antagonist tested for relaxing an acetylcholine -induced contraction in guinea pig tracheal rings (n = 6). Further studies were carried out to investigate the clinical utility of benzbromarone. In human ASM, benzbromarone relaxed either an acetylcholine- or a leukotriene D4-induced contraction (n = 8). Benzbromarone was also effective in relaxing peripheral airways (n = 9) and potentiating relaxation by β agonists (n = 5 to 10). In cellular mechanistic studies, benzbromarone hyperpolarized human ASM cells (n = 9 to 12) and attenuated intracellular calcium flux from both the plasma membrane and the sarcoplasmic reticulum (n = 6 to 12). TMEM16A antagonists work synergistically with β agonists and through a novel pathway of interrupting ion flux at both the plasma membrane and sarcoplasmic reticulum to acutely relax human ASM.

  5. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    ), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p...-malignant as well as normal. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, calcium electroporation seems to be more effective in inducing cell death in cancer cell spheroids than in a normal fibroblast spheroid, even though intracellular ATP level is depleted in all spheroid types after treatment. These results may indicate......BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...

  6. Characterization of detergent-solubilized sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase by high-performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, J.P.; Vilsen, B.; Nielsen, H.; Moller, J.V.

    1986-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase solubilized by the nonionic detergent octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether was studied by molecular sieve high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and analytical ultracentrifugation. Significant irreversible aggregation of soluble Ca 2+ -ATPase occurred within a few hours in the presence of ≤ 50 μM Ca 2+ . The aggregates were inactive and were primarily held together by hydrophobic forces. In the absence of reducing agent, secondary formation of disulfide bonds occurred. The stability of the inactive dimer upon dilution permitted unambiguous assignment of its elution position and sedimentation coefficient. At high 45 Ca 2+ concentration (500 μM), monomeric Ca 2+ -ATPase was stable for several house. Reversible self-association induced by variation in protein, detergent, and lipid concentrations was studied by large-zone HPLC. The association constant for dimerization of active Ca 2+ -ATPase was found to be 10 5 -10 6 M -1 depending on the detergent concentration. More detergent was bound to monomeric than to dimeric Ca 2+ -ATPase, even above the critical micellar concentration of the detergent. Binding of Ca 2+ and 48 V vanadate as well as ATP-dependent phosphorylation was studied in monomeric and in reversibly associated dimeric preparations. In both forms, two high-affinity Ca 2+ binding sites per phosphorylation site existed. The delipidated monomer purified by HPLC was able to form ADP-insensitive phosphoenzyme and to bind ATP and vanadate simultaneously. The results suggest that formation of Ca 2+ -ATPase oligomers in the membrane is governed by nonspecific forces (low affinity) and that each polypeptide chain constitutes a functional unit

  7. Crosstalk between mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ cycling modulates cardiac pacemaker cell automaticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Yaniv

    Full Text Available Mitochondria dynamically buffer cytosolic Ca(2+ in cardiac ventricular cells and this affects the Ca(2+ load of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. In sinoatrial-node cells (SANC the SR generates periodic local, subsarcolemmal Ca(2+ releases (LCRs that depend upon the SR load and are involved in SANC automaticity: LCRs activate an inward Na(+-Ca(2+ exchange current to accelerate the diastolic depolarization, prompting the ensemble of surface membrane ion channels to generate the next action potential (AP.To determine if mitochondrial Ca(2+ (Ca(2+ (m, cytosolic Ca(2+ (Ca(2+ (c-SR-Ca(2+ crosstalk occurs in single rabbit SANC, and how this may relate to SANC normal automaticity.Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ influx into (Ru360 or Ca(2+ efflux from (CGP-37157 decreased [Ca(2+](m to 80 ± 8% control or increased [Ca(2+](m to 119 ± 7% control, respectively. Concurrent with inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ influx or efflux, the SR Ca(2+ load, and LCR size, duration, amplitude and period (imaged via confocal linescan significantly increased or decreased, respectively. Changes in total ensemble LCR Ca(2+ signal were highly correlated with the change in the SR Ca(2+ load (r(2 = 0.97. Changes in the spontaneous AP cycle length (Ru360, 111 ± 1% control; CGP-37157, 89 ± 2% control in response to changes in [Ca(2+](m were predicted by concurrent changes in LCR period (r(2 = 0.84.A change in SANC Ca(2+ (m flux translates into a change in the AP firing rate by effecting changes in Ca(2+ (c and SR Ca(2+ loading, which affects the characteristics of spontaneous SR Ca(2+ release.

  8. Glycinergic Pathways of the Central Auditory System and Adjacent Reticular Formation of the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Chyren

    The development of techniques to visualize and identify specific transmitters of neuronal circuits has stimulated work on the characterization of pathways in the rat central nervous system that utilize the inhibitory amino acid glycine as its neurotransmitter. Glycine is a major inhibitory transmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem of vertebrates where it satisfies the major criteria for neurotransmitter action. Some of these characteristics are: uneven distribution in brain, high affinity reuptake mechanisms, inhibitory neurophysiological actions on certain neuronal populations, uneven receptor distribution and the specific antagonism of its actions by the convulsant alkaloid strychnine. Behaviorally, antagonism of glycinergic neurotransmission in the medullary reticular formation is linked to the development of myoclonus and seizures which may be initiated by auditory as well as other stimuli. In the present study, decreases in the concentration of glycine as well as the density of glycine receptors in the medulla with aging were found and may be responsible for the lowered threshold for strychnine seizures observed in older rats. Neuroanatomical pathways in the central auditory system and medullary and pontine reticular formation (RF) were investigated using retrograde transport of tritiated glycine to identify glycinergic pathways; immunohistochemical techniques were used to corroborate the location of glycine neurons. Within the central auditory system, retrograde transport studies using tritiated glycine demonstrated an ipsilateral glycinergic pathway linking nuclei of the ascending auditory system. This pathway has its cell bodies in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) and projects to the ventrocaudal division of the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (VLL). Collaterals of this glycinergic projection terminate in the ipsilateral lateral superior olive (LSO). Other glycinergic pathways found were afferent to the VLL and have their origin

  9. Alkylation of reticular polymers of ethynyl piperidol by alkyl halogen and investigation of the swelling of the products in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimkhodjaev, S.N.; Khalikov, D.Kh.

    1999-01-01

    In the paper the results of investigation on alkylation of reticular polymer of ethyl piperidol by methyl Iodide and ethyl Iodide are adduced. It have been shown that in the first case the reaction of an alkylation proceeds up to 100% of a degree of completion. In the second case of an alkylation the highest degree of alkylation reaches only 60% which is connected with formation of secondary structures. In both cases the process of an alkylation results in deriving highly swelled system

  10. Potential pathogenetic role of Th17, Th0, and Th2 cells in erosive and reticular oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinni, M-P; Lombardelli, L; Logiodice, F; Tesi, D; Kullolli, O; Biagiotti, R; Giudizi, Mg; Romagnani, S; Maggi, E; Ficarra, G

    2014-03-01

    The role of Th17 cells and associated cytokines was investigated in oral lichen planus. 14 consecutive patients with oral lichen planus were investigated. For biological studies, tissues were taken from reticular or erosive lesions and from normal oral mucosa (controls) of the same patient. mRNA expression for IL-17F, IL-17A, MCP-1, IL-13, IL-2, IL-10, IL-1β, RANTES, IL-4, IL-12B, IL-8, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-18, TGF-β1, IL-23R, IL-7, IL-15, IL-6, MIG, IP-10, LTB, VEGF, IL-5, IL-27, IL-23A, GAPDH, PPIB, Foxp3, GATA3, and RORC was measured using the QuantiGene 2.0. Results showed that Th17-type and Th0-type molecules' mRNAs, when compared with results obtained from tissue controls, were increased in biopsies of erosive lesions, whereas Th2-type molecules' mRNAs were increased in reticular lesions. When the CD4+ T-cell clones, derived from oral lichen planus tissues and tissue controls, were analyzed, a higher prevalence of Th17 (confirmed by an increased CD161 expression) and Th0 CD4+ T clones was found in erosive lesions, whereas a prevalence of Th2 clones was observed in reticular lesions. Our data suggest that Th17, Th0, and Th2 cells, respectively, may have a role in the pathogenesis of erosive and reticular oral lichen planus. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Differential stimulation of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis with protein ingestion at rest and after resistance exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Daniel R; Tang, Jason E; Burd, Nicholas A; Rerecich, Tracy; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Phillips, Stuart M

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether there is a differential stimulation of the contractile myofibrillar and the cellular sarcoplasmic proteins after ingestion of protein and how this is affected by resistance exercise. Fasted (FAST) muscle protein synthesis was measured in seven healthy young men with a primed constant infusion of l-[ring-13C6]phenylalanine. Participants then performed an intense bout of unilateral resistance exercise followed by the consumption of 25 g of whey protein to maximally stimulate protein synthesis. In the rested (FED) leg myofibrillar (MYO) protein synthesis was elevated (P 0.05). In contrast, MYO protein synthesis in the exercised (FED-EX) leg was stimulated above FAST at 1, 3 and 5 h (∼100, 216, and 229%, respectively; P < 0.01) with the increase at 5 h being greater than FED (P < 0.01). Thus, the synthesis of muscle contractile proteins is stimulated by both feeding and resistance exercise early (1 h) but has a greater duration and amplitude after resistance exercise. Sarcoplasmic (SARC) protein synthesis was similarly elevated (P < 0.01) above FAST by ∼104% at 3 h in both FED and FED-EX suggesting SARC protein synthesis is stimulated by feeding but that this response is not augmented by resistance exercise. In conclusion, myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis are similarly, but transiently, stimulated with protein feeding. In contrast, resistance exercise rapidly stimulates and sustains the synthesis of only the myofibrillar protein fraction after protein ingestion. These data highlight the importance of measuring the synthetic response of specific muscle protein fractions when examining the effects of exercise and nutrition. PMID:19124543

  12. Reticular Chemistry in Action: A Hydrolytically Stable MOF Capturing Twice Its Weight in Adsorbed Water

    KAUST Repository

    Towsif Abtab, Sk Md

    2018-01-11

    Summary Hydrolytically stable adsorbents, with notable water uptake, are of prime importance and offer great potential for many water-adsorption-related applications. Nevertheless, deliberate construction of tunable porous solids with high porosity and high stability remains challenging. Here, we present the successful deployment of reticular chemistry to address this demand: we constructed Cr-soc-MOF-1, a chemically and hydrolytically stable chromium-based metal-organic framework (MOF) with underlying soc topology. Prominently, Cr-soc-MOF-1 offers the requisite thermal and chemical stability concomitant with unique adsorption properties, namely extraordinary high porosity (apparent surface area of 4,549 m2/g) affording a water vapor uptake of 1.95 g/g at 70% relative humidity. This exceptional water uptake is maintained over more than 100 adsorption-desorption cycles. Markedly, the adsorbed water can be fully desorbed by just the simple reduction of the relative humidity at 25°C. Cr-soc-MOF-1 offers great potential for use in applications pertaining to water vapor control in enclosed and confined spaces and dehumidification.

  13. Dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Fabián; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms of action potential generation is critical to establish the way neural circuits generate and coordinate activity. Accordingly, we investigated the dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) using in vivo intracellular recordings in cats in order to preserve anatomically-intact axo-dendritic distributions and naturally-occurring spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic activity in this structure that regulates the thalamic relay to neocortex. We found a wide operational range of voltage thresholds for action potentials, mostly due to intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and not synaptic activity driven by network oscillations. Varying levels of synchronous synaptic inputs produced fast rates of membrane potential depolarization preceding the action potential onset that were associated with lower thresholds and increased excitability, consistent with TRN neurons performing as coincidence detectors. On the other hand the presence of action potentials preceding any given spike was associated with more depolarized thresholds. The phase-plane trajectory of the action potential showed somato-dendritic propagation, but no obvious axon initial segment component, prominent in other neuronal classes and allegedly responsible for the high onset speed. Overall, our results suggest that TRN neurons could flexibly integrate synaptic inputs to discharge action potentials over wide voltage ranges, and perform as coincidence detectors and temporal integrators, supported by a dynamic action potential threshold.

  14. Favoring the unfavored: Selective electrochemical nitrogen fixation using a reticular chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hiang Kwee; Koh, Charlynn Sher Lin; Lee, Yih Hong; Liu, Chong; Phang, In Yee; Han, Xuemei; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Ling, Xing Yi

    2018-03-01

    Electrochemical nitrogen-to-ammonia fixation is emerging as a sustainable strategy to tackle the hydrogen- and energy-intensive operations by Haber-Bosch process for ammonia production. However, current electrochemical nitrogen reduction reaction (NRR) progress is impeded by overwhelming competition from the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) across all traditional NRR catalysts and the requirement for elevated temperature/pressure. We achieve both excellent NRR selectivity (~90%) and a significant boost to Faradic efficiency by 10 percentage points even at ambient operations by coating a superhydrophobic metal-organic framework (MOF) layer over the NRR electrocatalyst. Our reticular chemistry approach exploits MOF's water-repelling and molecular-concentrating effects to overcome HER-imposed bottlenecks, uncovering the unprecedented electrochemical features of NRR critical for future theoretical studies. By favoring the originally unfavored NRR, we envisage our electrocatalytic design as a starting point for high-performance nitrogen-to-ammonia electroconversion directly from water vapor-abundant air to address increasing global demand of ammonia in (bio)chemical and energy industries.

  15. The Neuroanatomy of the Reticular Nucleus Locus Coeruleus in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo S. Giorgi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s Disease (AD features the accumulation of β-amyloid and Tau aggregates, which deposit as extracellular plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, respectively. Neuronal Tau aggregates may appear early in life, in the absence of clinical symptoms. This occurs in the brainstem reticular formation and mostly within Locus Coeruleus (LC, which is consistently affected during AD. LC is the main source of forebrain norepinephrine (NE and it modulates a variety of functions including sleep-waking cycle, alertness, synaptic plasticity, and memory. The iso-dendritic nature of LC neurons allows their axons to spread NE throughout the whole forebrain. Likewise, a prion-like hypothesis suggests that Tau aggregates may travel along LC axons to reach out cortical neurons. Despite this timing is compatible with cross-sectional studies, there is no actual evidence for a causal relationship between these events. In the present mini-review, we dedicate special emphasis to those various mechanisms that may link degeneration of LC neurons to the onset of AD pathology. This includes the hypothesis that a damage to LC neurons contributes to the onset of dementia due to a loss of neuroprotective effects or, even the chance that, LC degenerates independently from cortical pathology. At the same time, since LC neurons are lost in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders we considered which molecular mechanism may render these brainstem neurons so vulnerable.

  16. Endovenous and perivenous 808-nm laser treatment of lower limb collateral, reticular and telangiectasiac veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugiantella, Walter; Bovani, Bruno; Zini, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Visible leg veins are not only a mere aesthetic problem, but may also be manifestation of altered microcirculation and superficial venous incompetency. Sclerotherapy is the first-line treatment for leg veins veins: the greater, the harder photothermolysis is, so that higher powers may lead to aesthetic complications. We report our experience in the treatment of small collateral (reticular and telangiectasiac veins with endovenous and perivenous 808-nm laser. Overall, 325 treatments were performed on 113 patients. The endovenous and perivenous treatment proved to be a safe, quick, well-tolerated and effective procedure. It ensured an optimal closure of the target veins right from the first treatment in most patients. Sometimes, a second treatment of the same vein was needed. The endovenous and perivenous 808-nm laser photothermal sclerosis ensures a quick coagulation-fibrosis of the veins of the lower limbs, thus allowing rapid healing and good aesthetic results (stable in 95% of patients after an average follow-up of 18 months). It may be an effective alternative to sclerotherapy.

  17. Hypocretin and GABA interact in the pontine reticular formation to increase wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevig, Holly N; Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2010-10-01

    Hypocretin-1/orexin A administered directly into the oral part of rat pontine reticular formation (PnO) causes an increase in wakefulness and extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels. The receptors in the PnO that mediate these effects have not been identified. Therefore, this study tested the hypothesis that the increase in wakefulness caused by administration of hypocretin-1 into the PnO occurs via activation of GABAA receptors and hypocretin receptors. Within/between subjects. University of Michigan. Twenty-three adult male Crl:CD*(SD) (Sprague Dawley) rats. Microinjection of hypocretin-1, bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist), SB-334867 (hypocretin receptor-1 antagonist), and Ringer solution (vehicle control) into the PnO. Hypocretin-1 caused a significant concentration-dependent increase in wakefulness and decrease in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM (NREM) sleep. Coadministration of SB-334867 and hypocretin-1 blocked the hypocretin-1-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in both the NREM and REM phases of sleep. Coadministration of bicuculline and hypocretin-1 blocked the hypocretin-1-induced increase in wakefulness and decrease in NREM sleep caused by hypocretin-1. The increase in wakefulness caused by administering hypocretin-1 to the PnO is mediated by hypocretin receptors and GABAA receptors in the PnO. These results show for the first time that hypocretinergic and GABAergic transmission in the PnO can interact to promote wakefulness.

  18. Differential gating of thalamo-cortical signals by reticular nucleus of thalamus during locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlinski, Vladimir; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Beloozerova, Irina N.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The thalamic reticular nucleus (RE) provides inhibition to the dorsal thalamus, and forms a crucial interface between thalamo-cortical and cortico-thalamic signals. Whereas there has been significant interest in the role of the RE in organizing thalamo-cortical signaling, information on the activity of the RE in the awake animal is scant. Here we investigated the activity of neurons within the ‘motor’ compartment of the RE in the awake, unrestrained cat during simple locomotion on a flat surface and complex locomotion along a horizontal ladder that required visual control of stepping. The activity of 88% of neurons in this region was modulated during locomotion. Neurons with receptive fields on the shoulder were located dorsally in the nucleus and had regular discharges; during locomotion they had relatively low activity and modest magnitudes of stride-related modulation, and their group activity was distributed over the stride. In contrast, neurons with receptive fields on the wrist/paw were located more ventrally, often discharged sleep-type bursts during locomotion, were very active and profoundly modulated, and their group activity was concentrated in the swing and end of stance. 75% of RE neurons had different activity during the two locomotion tasks. We conclude that during locomotion the RE differentially gates thalamo-cortical signals transmitted during different phases of the stride, in relation to different parts of the limb, and the type of locomotion task. PMID:23136421

  19. Clinical characteristics of reticular pseudodrusen in the fellow eye of patients with unilateral neovascular age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogg, Ruth E; Silva, Rufino; Staurenghi, Giovanni; Murphy, George; Santos, Ana R; Rosina, Chiara; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2014-09-01

    To describe associations between reticular pseudodrusen, individual characteristics, and retinal function. Cohort study. We recruited 105 patients (age range, 52-93 years) who had advanced neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in only 1 eye from 3 clinical centers in Europe. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. The eye selected for study was the fellow eye without advanced disease. Clinical measures of vision were distance visual acuity, near visual acuity, and results of the Smith-Kettlewell low-luminance acuity test (SKILL). Fundus imaging included color photography, red-free imaging, blue autofluorescence imaging, fluorescein angiography, indocyanine green angiography, and optical coherence tomography using standardized protocols. These were used to detect progression to neovascular AMD in the study eye during follow-up. All imaging outputs were graded for the presence or absence of reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) using a multimodal approach. Choroidal thickness was measured at the foveal center and at 2 other equidistant locations from the fovea (1500 μm) nasally and temporally. Metrics on retinal thickness and volume were obtained from the manufacturer-supplied automated segmentation readouts. Presence of RPD, distance visual acuity, near visual acuity, SKILL score, choroidal thickness, retinal thickness, and retinal volume. Reticular pseudodrusen was found in 43 participants (41%) on 1 or more imaging method. The SKILL score was significantly worse in those with reticular drusen (mean score ± standard deviation [SD, 38±12) versus those without (mean score ± SD, 33±9) (P = 0.034). Parafoveal retinal thickness, parafoveal retinal volume, and all of the choroidal thickness parameters measured were significantly lower in those with reticular drusen than in those without. The presence of RPD was associated with development of neovascular AMD when corrected for age and sex (odds ratio, 5.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-28.8; P = 0.042). All participants

  20. Activity of Ca(2+,Mg(2+-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and contraction strength of the frog skeletal muscles under the effect of organophosphorus insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Nozdrenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The results of an experimental study of organo­phosphorus insecticides, including pirimiphosmethyl, diazinon and chlorpyrifos caused a decline of the contraction properties in m. tibialis anterior fiber bundles of Rana temporaria, as well as sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase enzymatic activity reduction are outlined in this paper. Concentration-dependent strengths response diminishing in isolated skeletal muscle fiber bundles as a result of non-cholinergic influence of organophosphorus insecticides were found. A decrease of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase enzymatic activity in sarcoplasmic reticulum was observed after administration of each insecticide. The most significant inhibition of this enzyme was observed when using chlorpyrifos.

  1. Association of the Igamma and Idelta charge movement with calcium release in frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Chiu Shuen

    2005-02-01

    Charge movement and calcium transient were measured simultaneously in stretched frog cut twitch fibers under voltage clamp, with the internal solution containing 20 mM EGTA plus added calcium and antipyrylazo III. When the nominal free [Ca2+]i was 10 nM, the shape of the broad I(gamma) hump in the ON segments of charge movement traces remained invariant when the calcium release rate was greatly diminished. When the nominal free [Ca2+]i was 50 nM, which was close to the physiological level, the I(gamma) humps were accelerated and a slow calcium-dependent I(delta) component (or state) was generated. The peak of ON I(delta) synchronized perfectly with the peak of the calcium release rate whereas the slow decay of ON I(delta) followed the same time course as the decay of calcium release rate. Suppression of calcium release by TMB-8 reduced the amount of Q(delta) concomitantly but not completely, and the effects were partially reversible. The same simultaneous suppression effects were achieved by depleting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium store with repetitive stimulation. The results suggest that the mobility of Q(delta) needs to be primed by a physiological level of resting myoplasmic Ca2+. Once the priming is completed, more I(delta) is mobilized by the released Ca2+ during depolarization.

  2. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and over: 1,200 mg/day The body needs vitamin D to help absorb calcium. You can get ... from your diet. Ask your provider whether you need to take a vitamin D supplement. SIDE EFFECTS AND SAFETY DO NOT ...

  3. Reticular synthesis of HKUST-like tbo MOFs with enhanced CH4 storage

    KAUST Repository

    Spanopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-12-22

    Successful implementation of reticular chemistry using a judiciously designed rigid octatopic carboxylate organic linker allowed the construction of expanded HKUST-1-like tbo-MOF series with intrinsic strong CH4 adsorption sites. The Cu-analogue displayed a concomitant enhancement of the gravimetric and volumetric surface area with the highest reported CH4 uptake among the tbo family, comparable to the best performing MOFs for CH4 storage. The corresponding gravimetric (BET) and volumetric surface area of 3971 m2 g-1 and 2363 m2 cm-3 represent an increase of respectively 115 % and 47 % in comparison to the corresponding values for the prototypical HKUST-1 (tbo-MOF-1), and 42 % and 20 % higher than tbo-MOF-2. High pressure methane adsorption isotherms revealed a high total gravimetric and volumetric CH4 uptakes, reaching 372 cm3 (STP) g-1 and 221 cm3 (STP) cm-3 respectively at 85 bar and 298 K. The corresponding working capacities between 5-80 bar were found to be 294 cm3 (STP) g-1 and 175 cm3 (STP) cm-3 and are placed among the best performing MOFs for CH4 storage particularly at relatively low temperature (e.g. 326 cm3 (STP) g-1 and 194 cm3 (STP) cm-3 at 258 K). To better understand the structure-property relationship and gain insight on the mechanism accounting for the resultant enhanced CH4 storage capacity, molecular simulation study was performed and revealed the presence of very strong CH4 adsorption sites at the vicinity of the organic linker with similar adsorption energetics as the open metal sites. The present findings supports the potential of tbo-MOFs based on the supermolecular building layer (SBL) approach as an ideal platform to further enhance the CH4 storage capacity via expansion and functionalization of the quadrangular pillars.

  4. Intraretinal Correlates of Reticular Pseudodrusen Revealed by Autofluorescence and En Face OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavo, Maarjaliis; Lee, Winston; Merriam, John; Bearelly, Srilaxmi; Tsang, Stephen; Chang, Stanley; Sparrow, Janet R

    2017-09-01

    We sought to determine whether information revealed from the reflectance, autofluorescence, and absorption properties of RPE cells situated posterior to reticular pseudodrusen (RPD) could provide insight into the origins and structure of RPD. RPD were studied qualitatively by near-infrared fundus autofluorescence (NIR-AF), short-wavelength fundus autofluorescence (SW-AF), and infrared reflectance (IR-R) images, and the presentation was compared to horizontal and en face spectral domain optical coherence tomographic (SD-OCT) images. Images were acquired from 23 patients (39 eyes) diagnosed with RPD (mean age 80.7 ± 7.1 [SD]; 16 female; 4 Hispanics, 19 non-Hispanic whites). In SW-AF, NIR-AF, and IR-R images, fundus RPD were recognized as interlacing networks of small scale variations in IR-R and fluorescence (SW-AF, NIR-AF) intensities. Darkened foci of RPD colocalized in SW-AF and NIR-AF images, and in SD-OCT images corresponded to disturbances of the interdigitation (IZ) and ellipsoid (EZ) zones and to more pronounced hyperreflective lesions traversing photoreceptor-attributable bands in SD-OCT images. Qualitative assessment of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) revealed thinning as RPD extended radially from the outer to inner retina. In en face OCT, hyperreflective areas in the EZ band correlated topographically with hyporeflective foci at the level of the RPE. The hyperreflective lesions corresponding to RPD in SD-OCT scans are likely indicative of degenerating photoreceptor cells. The darkened foci at positions of RPD in NIR-AF and en face OCT images indicate changes in the RPE monolayer with the reduced NIR-AF and en face OCT signal suggesting a reduction in melanin that could be accounted for by RPE thinning.

  5. Event time representation in cerebellar mossy fibres arising from the lateral reticular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W; Jones, S; Edgley, S A

    2013-02-15

    Time representation is an important element of cerebellar neural processing, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. We demonstrate that the major mossy fibre input system originating from the lateral reticular nucleus (LRN) can represent sensory event timing over hundreds of milliseconds. In vivo, cerebellar-projecting LRN neurons discharge extremely regularly with a clock-like rhythm. In response to stimulation of a wide peripheral receptive field, firing briefly pauses then resumes with precise timing. The precision of post-stimulus spikes and the regularity of firing mean that the stimulus timing is represented by LRN spike timing over hundreds of milliseconds. In an arithmetic progression model of LRN neuron firing, highly predictable post-stimulus spike timing is modulated by changing the variability of the first post-inhibitory spike and of the subsequent interspike intervals. From in vitro analysis we show that the Ca(2+)-activated small-conductance K(+) current (SK) contributes to interspike interval regularity and that the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (I(h)) contributes to short-latency, high-precision post-hyperpolarisation spike timing. Consistent with this, we demonstrate in vivo that resumption of firing becomes more sharply timed after longer stimulus-evoked pauses. Thus, I(h) is a potential conductance that could mediate the precisely timed resumption of firing after the pause. Through the widespread projections of LRN neurons, these properties may enable the LRN to provide precisely timed signals to the cerebellum over a prolonged period following a stimulus, which may also both activate and sustain oscillatory processes in the cerebellar cortex.

  6. Astrocytes potentiate GABAergic transmission in the thalamic reticular nucleus via endozepine signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Catherine A.; Huguenard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI) mediates an endogenous benzodiazepine-mimicking (endozepine) effect on synaptic inhibition in the thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT). Here we demonstrate that DBI peptide colocalizes with both astrocytic and neuronal markers in mouse nRT, and investigate the role of astrocytic function in endozepine modulation in this nucleus by testing the effects of the gliotoxin fluorocitrate (FC) on synaptic inhibition and endozepine signaling in the nRT using patch-clamp recordings. FC treatment reduced the effective inhibitory charge of GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in WT mice, indicating that astrocytes enhance GABAAR responses in the nRT. This effect was abolished by both a point mutation that inhibits classical benzodiazepine binding to GABAARs containing the α3 subunit (predominant in the nRT) and a chromosomal deletion that removes the Dbi gene. Thus, astrocytes are required for positive allosteric modulation via the α3 subunit benzodiazepine-binding site by DBI peptide family endozepines. Outside-out sniffer patches pulled from neurons in the adjacent ventrobasal nucleus, which does not contain endozepines, show a potentiated response to laser photostimulation of caged GABA when placed in the nRT. FC treatment blocked the nRT-dependent potentiation of this response, as did the benzodiazepine site antagonist flumazenil. When sniffer patches were placed in the ventrobasal nucleus, however, subsequent treatment with FC led to potentiation of the uncaged GABA response, suggesting nucleus-specific roles for thalamic astrocytes in regulating inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that astrocytes are required for endozepine actions in the nRT, and as such can be positive modulators of synaptic inhibition. PMID:24262146

  7. Intravenous or local injections of flavoxate in the rostral pontine reticular formation inhibit urinary frequency induced by activation of medial frontal lobe neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugaya, Kimio; Nishijima, Saori; Kadekawa, Katsumi; Ashitomi, Katsuhiro; Ueda, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2014-10-01

    The rostral pontine reticular formation has a strong inhibitory effect on micturition by facilitating lumbosacral glycinergic neurons. We assessed the influence of the rostral pontine reticular formation on the micturition reflex after noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe. We also examined the relation between the medial frontal lobe and the rostral pontine reticular formation. Continuous cystometry was performed in 28 female rats. After the interval between bladder contractions was shortened by noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe we injected glutamate or flavoxate hydrochloride in the rostral pontine reticular formation or intravenously injected flavoxate or propiverine. The change in bladder activity was examined. Noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe shortened the interval between bladder contractions. In contrast to the bladder contraction interval before and after noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe, the interval was prolonged after noradrenaline injection when glutamate or flavoxate was injected in the rostral pontine reticular formation, or flavoxate was injected intravenously. Noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe plus intravenous propiverine injection also prolonged the interval compared to that after noradrenaline injection alone. However, the interval after noradrenaline injection in the medial frontal lobe plus intravenous injection of propiverine was shorter than that before noradrenaline injection only. Medial frontal lobe neurons excited by noradrenaline may facilitate the micturition reflex via activation of inhibitory interneurons, which inhibit descending rostral pontine reticular formation neurons that innervate the lumbosacral glycinergic inhibitory neurons. Therefore, the mechanism of micturition reflex facilitation by the activation of medial frontal lobe neurons involves the rostral pontine reticular formation. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education

  8. La innovación epistémica reticular: De la transferencia del conocimiento al conocimiento transferido

    OpenAIRE

    José Antonio MARÍN-CASANOVA

    2016-01-01

    El estudio filosófico de la innovación epistémica comportada por la transferencia reticular del conocimiento transferido se hace en el doble sentido del genitivo. En el sentido objetivo reflexiona sobre la evolución de los canales distributivos hasta llegar a la red ciberespacial como soporte del nuevo fenómeno de las comunidades del conocimiento y la acción. En el sentido subjetivo argumenta cómo el retículo hipervinculado innova la propia noción de conocimiento: el conocimie...

  9. Injections of Algesic Solutions into Muscle Activate the Lateral Reticular Formation: A Nociceptive Relay of the Spinoreticulothalamic Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Michael Panneton

    Full Text Available Although musculoskeletal pain disorders are common clinically, the central processing of muscle pain is little understood. The present study reports on central neurons activated by injections of algesic solutions into the gastrocnemius muscle of the rat, and their subsequent localization by c-Fos immunohistochemistry in the spinal cord and brainstem. An injection (300 μl of an algesic solution (6% hypertonic saline, pH 4.0 acetate buffer, or 0.05% capsaicin was made into the gastrocnemius muscle and the distribution of immunolabeled neurons compared to that obtained after control injections of phosphate buffered saline [pH 7.0]. Most labeled neurons in the spinal cord were found in laminae IV-V, VI, VII and X, comparing favorably with other studies, with fewer labeled neurons in laminae I and II. This finding is consistent with the diffuse pain perception due to noxious stimuli to muscles mediated by sensory fibers to deep spinal neurons as compared to more restricted pain localization during noxious stimuli to skin mediated by sensory fibers to superficial laminae. Numerous neurons were immunolabeled in the brainstem, predominantly in the lateral reticular formation (LRF. Labeled neurons were found bilaterally in the caudalmost ventrolateral medulla, where neurons responsive to noxious stimulation of cutaneous and visceral structures lie. Immunolabeled neurons in the LRF continued rostrally and dorsally along the intermediate reticular nucleus in the medulla, including the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis caudally and the parvicellular reticular nucleus more rostrally, and through the pons medial and lateral to the motor trigeminal nucleus, including the subcoerulear network. Immunolabeled neurons, many of them catecholaminergic, were found bilaterally in the nucleus tractus solitarii, the gracile nucleus, the A1 area, the CVLM and RVLM, the superior salivatory nucleus, the nucleus locus coeruleus, the A5 area, and the nucleus raphe magnus in

  10. El poder del ejemplo: un análisis reticular del rodaje de una escena cinematográfica

    OpenAIRE

    Lozares Colina, Carlos; Muntanyola, Dafne

    2006-01-01

    Este artículo se propone explicar el rodaje de una escena cinematográfica, definido como proceso de representación, integrado por agentes intencionales y recursos representacionales. En concreto, el análisis reticular da una representación externa de una red técnico-funcional, y explicita sus dimensiones de coordinación, sincronización y complejidad, en tanto que proceso productivo. Con relación a la perspectiva sociológica, en la que haremos una síntesis entre el marco conceptual propuesto y...

  11. The pacemaker role of thalamic reticular nucleus in controlling spike-wave discharges and spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Denggui; Liao, Fucheng; Wang, Qingyun

    2017-07-01

    Absence epilepsy, characterized by 2-4 Hz spike-wave discharges (SWDs), can be caused by pathological interactions within the thalamocortical system. Cortical spindling oscillations are also demonstrated to involve the oscillatory thalamocortical rhythms generated by the synaptic circuitry of the thalamus and cortex. This implies that SWDs and spindling oscillations can share the common thalamocortical mechanism. Additionally, the thalamic reticular nucleus (RE) is hypothesized to regulate the onsets and propagations of both the epileptic SWDs and sleep spindles. Based on the proposed single-compartment thalamocortical neural field model, we firstly investigate the stimulation effect of RE on the initiations, terminations, and transitions of SWDs. It is shown that the activations and deactivations of RE triggered by single-pulse stimuli can drive the cortical subsystem to behave as the experimentally observed onsets and self-abatements of SWDs, as well as the transitions from 2-spike and wave discharges (2-SWDs) to SWDs. In particular, with increasing inhibition from RE to the specific relay nucleus (TC), rich transition behaviors in cortex can be obtained through the upstream projection path, RE → TC → Cortex . Although some of the complex dynamical patterns can be expected from the earlier single compartment thalamocortical model, the effect of brain network topology on the emergence of SWDs and spindles, as well as the transitions between them, has not been fully investigated. We thereby develop a spatially extended 3-compartment coupled network model with open-/closed-end connective configurations, to investigate the spatiotemporal effect of RE on the SWDs and spindles. Results show that the degrees of activations of RE 1 can induce the rich spatiotemporal evolution properties including the propagations from SWDs to spindles within different compartments and the transitions between them, through the RE 1 → TC 1 → Cortex 1 and Cortex 1 → Cortex 2

  12. Role of the JP45-Calsequestrin Complex on Calcium Entry in Slow Twitch Skeletal Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Barbara; Eckhardt, Jan; Bergamelli, Leda; Treves, Susan; Bongianino, Rossana; De Negri, Marco; Priori, Silvia G; Protasi, Feliciano; Zorzato, Francesco

    2016-07-08

    We exploited a variety of mouse models to assess the roles of JP45-CASQ1 (CASQ, calsequestrin) and JP45-CASQ2 on calcium entry in slow twitch muscles. In flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers isolated from JP45-CASQ1-CASQ2 triple KO mice, calcium transients induced by tetanic stimulation rely on calcium entry via La(3+)- and nifedipine-sensitive calcium channels. The comparison of excitation-coupled calcium entry (ECCE) between FDB fibers from WT, JP45KO, CASQ1KO, CASQ2KO, JP45-CASQ1 double KO, JP45-CASQ2 double KO, and JP45-CASQ1-CASQ2 triple KO shows that ECCE enhancement requires ablation of both CASQs and JP45. Calcium entry activated by ablation of both JP45-CASQ1 and JP45-CASQ2 complexes supports tetanic force development in slow twitch soleus muscles. In addition, we show that CASQs interact with JP45 at Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those present in the lumen of the sarcoplasmic reticulum at rest, whereas Ca(2+) concentrations similar to those present in the SR lumen after depolarization-induced calcium release cause the dissociation of JP45 from CASQs. Our results show that the complex JP45-CASQs is a negative regulator of ECCE and that tetanic force development in slow twitch muscles is supported by the dynamic interaction between JP45 and CASQs. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Skeletal muscle myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rates are affected differently by altitude-induced hypoxia in native lowlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Haslund, Mads Lyhne; Robach, Paul

    2010-01-01

    As a consequence to hypobaric hypoxic exposure skeletal muscle atrophy is often reported. The underlying mechanism has been suggested to involve a decrease in protein synthesis in order to conserve O(2). With the aim to challenge this hypothesis, we applied a primed, constant infusion of 1-(13)C......-leucine in nine healthy male subjects at sea level and subsequently at high-altitude (4559 m) after 7-9 days of acclimatization. Physical activity levels and food and energy intake were controlled prior to the two experimental conditions with the aim to standardize these confounding factors. Blood samples...... synthesis rate was concomitantly elevated by high-altitude induced hypoxia, whereas the sarcoplasmic protein synthesis rate was unaffected by hypoxia. These changed responses may lead to divergent adaptation over the course of prolonged exposure...

  14. Sarcoplasmic phospholamban protein is involved in the mechanisms of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and the cardioprotective effect of nitrite during resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+-handling proteins play an important role in myocardial dysfunction after acute ischemia/reperfusion injury. We hypothesized that nitrite would improve postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction by increasing nitric oxide (NO generation and that the mechanism of this protection is related to the modulation of SR Ca(2+-handling proteins. METHODS: We conducted a randomized prospective animal study using male Sprague-Dawley rats. Cardiac arrest was induced by intravenous bolus of potassium chloride (40 µg/g. Nitrite (1.2 nmol/g or placebo was administered when chest compression was started. No cardiac arrest was induced in the sham group. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored invasively for 90 minutes after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Echocardiogram was performed to evaluate cardiac function. Myocardial samples were harvested 5 minutes and 1 hour after ROSC. RESULTS: Myocardial function was significantly impaired in the nitrite and placebo groups after resuscitation, whereas cardiac function (i.e., ejection fraction and fractional shortening was significantly greater in the nitrite group than in the placebo group. Nitrite administration increased the level of nitric oxide in the myocardium 5 min after resuscitation compared to the other two groups. The levels of phosphorylated phospholamban (PLB were decreased after resuscitation, and nitrite increased the phosphorylation of phospholamban compared to the placebo. No significant differences were found in the expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ ATPase (SERCA2a and ryanodine receptors (RyRs. CONCLUSIONS: postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction is associated with the impairment of PLB phosphorylation. Nitrite administered during resuscitation improves postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction by preserving phosphorylated PLB protein during resuscitation.

  15. Xestoquinone, isolated from sea sponge, causes Ca(2+) release through sulfhydryl modification from skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, M; Hirata, Y; Nakamura, H; Ohizumi, Y

    1999-12-01

    Xestoquinone (XQN) (3 x 10(-7) to 3 x 10(-3) M), isolated from the sea sponge Xestospongia sapra, induced a concentration-dependent Ca(2+) release from the heavy fraction of fragmented sarcoplasmic reticulum (HSR) of rabbit skeletal muscle with an EC(50) value of approximately 30 microM. On the basis of the EC(50), XQN is 10 times more potent than caffeine. Dithiothreitol completely blocked XQN-induced Ca(2+) release from HSR without affecting that induced by caffeine. Caffeine-induced Ca(2+) release was reduced markedly by Mg(2+), procaine, and ruthenium red, agents that are known to block release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum, whereas that induced by XQN was not inhibited. The bell-shaped profile of Ca(2+) dependence for XQN was significantly shifted upward in a wider range of pCa (between 7 and 3), whereas that for caffeine was shifted to the left in a narrower range of pCa (between 8 and 7). The maximum response to caffeine in (45)Ca(2+) release was not affected by 9-methyl-7-bromoeudistomin D, whereas the response was further increased by XQN. XQN caused a concentration-dependent decrease in [(3)H]ryanodine binding to HSR. This effect of XQN also was abolished in the presence of dithiothreitol. Scatchard analysis revealed that the mode of inhibition by XQN was noncompetitive in [(3)H]ryanodine binding to HSR. These results indicate that sulfhydryl groups are involved in both the XQN effect on ryanodine binding and on Ca(2+) release.

  16. Image cytometric evaluation of nuclear texture features and DNA content of the reticular form of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Matjaz; Flezar, Margareta Strojan; Kogoj-Rode, Mirela; Us-Krasovec, Marija

    2006-10-01

    To analyze image cytometric chromatin changes reflected in nuclear texture features and DNA ploidy of oral lichen planus in relation to the normal buccal mucosa and buccal mucosa expressing malignancy-associated changes in cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients with the reticular form of oral lichen planus, with a follow-up period of 25 years, 50 healthy controls and 50 lung cancer patients were included in the study. Scrapings of buccal mucosa were suspended in transport medium. Monolayer filter preparations were Feulgen-thionin stained. Image cytometric analysis was performed by Cyto-Savant. All oral lichen planus specimens in our study were diploid. In univariate analysis, differences between the normal buccal mucosa and oral lichen planus were found in several nuclear texture features, which gave an 80% correct classification rate in multivariate analysis. In the second part of the study, the classifier that recognizes malignancy-associated changes on the buccal mucosa of patients with lung cancer correctly recognized > 80% of oral lichen planus samples as normal buccal mucosa. Our results indicate that chromatin changes in oral lichen planus exist compared to normal cells; however, the chromatin structure of the reticular form of oral lichen planus does not express malignancy-associated changes and is more similar to normal squamous cells.

  17. A Non-canonical Reticular-Limbic Central Auditory Pathway via Medial Septum Contributes to Fear Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Wei; Sun, Wen-Jian; Zingg, Brian; Shen, Li; He, Jufang; Xiong, Ying; Tao, Huizhong W; Zhang, Li I

    2018-01-17

    In the mammalian brain, auditory information is known to be processed along a central ascending pathway leading to auditory cortex (AC). Whether there exist any major pathways beyond this canonical auditory neuraxis remains unclear. In awake mice, we found that auditory responses in entorhinal cortex (EC) cannot be explained by a previously proposed relay from AC based on response properties. By combining anatomical tracing and optogenetic/pharmacological manipulations, we discovered that EC received auditory input primarily from the medial septum (MS), rather than AC. A previously uncharacterized auditory pathway was then revealed: it branched from the cochlear nucleus, and via caudal pontine reticular nucleus, pontine central gray, and MS, reached EC. Neurons along this non-canonical auditory pathway responded selectively to high-intensity broadband noise, but not pure tones. Disruption of the pathway resulted in an impairment of specifically noise-cued fear conditioning. This reticular-limbic pathway may thus function in processing aversive acoustic signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coordination of eye and head components of movements evoked by stimulation of the paramedian pontine reticular formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Ellen J.; Sparks, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Constant frequency microstimulation of the paramedian pontine reticular formation (PPRF) in head-restrained monkeys evokes a constant velocity eye movement. Since the PPRF receives significant projections from structures that control coordinated eye-head movements, we asked whether stimulation of the pontine reticular formation in the head-unrestrained animal generates a combined eye-head movement or only an eye movement. Microstimulation of most sites yielded a constant-velocity gaze shift executed as a coordinated eye-head movement, although eye-only movements were evoked from some sites. The eye and head contributions to the stimulation-evoked movements varied across stimulation sites and were drastically different from the lawful relationship observed for visually-guided gaze shifts. These results indicate that the microstimulation activated elements that issued movement commands to the extraocular and, for most sites, neck motoneurons. In addition, the stimulation-evoked changes in gaze were similar in the head-restrained and head-unrestrained conditions despite the assortment of eye and head contributions, suggesting that the vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) gain must be near unity during the coordinated eye-head movements evoked by stimulation of the PPRF. These findings contrast the attenuation of VOR gain associated with visually-guided gaze shifts and suggest that the vestibulo-ocular pathway processes volitional and PPRF stimulation-evoked gaze shifts differently. PMID:18458891

  19. A Taiwanese Propolis Derivative Induces Apoptosis through Inducing Endoplasmic Reticular Stress and Activating Transcription Factor-3 in Human Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fat-Moon Suk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activating transcription factor-(ATF- 3, a stress-inducible transcription factor, is rapidly upregulated under various stress conditions and plays an important role in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. NBM-TP-007-GS-002 (GS-002 is a Taiwanese propolin G (PPG derivative. In this study, we examined the antitumor effects of GS-002 in human hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells in vitro. First, we found that GS-002 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in dose-dependent manners. Several main apoptotic indicators were found in GS-002-treated cells, such as the cleaved forms of caspase-3, caspase-9, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. GS-002 also induced endoplasmic reticular (ER stress as evidenced by increases in ER stress-responsive proteins including glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78, growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153, phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α, phosphorylated protein endoplasmic-reticular-resident kinase (PERK, and ATF-3. The induction of ATF-3 expression was mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways in GS-002-treated cells. Furthermore, we found that GS-002 induced more cell apoptosis in ATF-3-overexpressing cells. These results suggest that the induction of apoptosis by the propolis derivative, GS-002, is partially mediated through ER stress and ATF-3-dependent pathways, and GS-002 has the potential for development as an antitumor drug.

  20. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  1. Proteomic study of muscle sarcoplasmic proteins using AUT-PAGE/SDS-PAGE as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picariello, Gianluca; De Martino, Alessandra; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Addeo, Francesco; Faccia, Michele; Spagnamusso, Salvatore; Di Luccia, Aldo

    2006-03-20

    In the present study, an alternative procedure for two-dimensional (2D) electrophoretic analysis in proteomic investigation of the most represented basic muscle water-soluble proteins is suggested. Our method consists of Acetic acid-Urea-Triton polyacrylamide gel (AUT-PAGE) analysis in the first dimension and standard sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel (SDS-PAGE) in the second dimension. Although standard two-dimensional Immobilized pH Gradient-Sodium Dodecyl-Sulphate (2D IPG-SDS) gel electrophoresis has been successfully used to study these proteins, most of the water-soluble proteins are spread on the alkaline part of the 2D map and are poorly focused. Furthermore, the similarity in their molecular weights impairs resolution of the classical approach. The addition of Triton X-100, a non-ionic detergent, into the gel induces a differential electrophoretic mobility of proteins as a result of the formation of mixed micelles between the detergent and the hydrophobic moieties of polypeptides, separating basic proteins with a criterion similar to reversed phase chromatography based on their hydrophobicity. The acid pH induces positive net charges, increasing with the isoelectric point of proteins, thus allowing enhanced resolution in the separation. By using 2D AUT-PAGE/SDS electrophoresis approach to separate water-soluble proteins from fresh pork and from dry-cured products, we could spread proteins over a greater area, achieving a greater resolution than that obtained by IPG in the pH range 3-10 and 6-11. Sarcoplasmic proteins undergoing proteolysis during the ripening of products were identified by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting in a easier and more effective way. Two-dimensional AUT-PAGE/SDS electrophoresis has allowed to simplify separation of sarcoplasmic protein mixtures making this technique suitable in the defining of quality of dry-cured pork products by immediate

  2. Sclerosis and the Nd:YAG, Q-switched laser with multiple frequency for treatment of telangiectases, reticular veins, and residual pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, J L; Del Rio, R; Palou, J

    1998-10-01

    The combination of low concentrations of sclerosing solution and the Nd:YAG, Q-switched laser with multiple (quadruple) frequency provides good results in the treatment of telangiectases and reticular varicose veins of the lower extremities, as well as pigmentation that may appear during sclerotherapy. This paper is based on a series of patients with telangiectases and reticular veins who were treated with sclerotherapy and the Nd:YAG, Q-switched laser with quadruple frequency. Patients with telangiectases and reticular veins received two or three treatment sessions with polydocanol and the Nd:YAG, Q-switched laser with quadruple frequency. Then, they were assessed a clinical score corresponding to the level of improvement achieved. Residual hematic pigmentation lesions were also eliminated with the laser. Excellent improvement was evident in 90% of the patients with minimal residual lesions. The combined technique of sclerosing solution and the Nd:YAG laser with multiple frequency is a valid alternative for the elimination of telangiectases and reticular veins of the lower limbs. This technique has several advantages, such as the use of low concentrations of sclerosing solution, high patient acceptance levels due to minimal disturbances, and the fact that local anesthesia is unnecessary. Good results are obtained without complications and minimal residual pigmentation. These mild pigmentation can be treated with the Nd:YAG laser.

  3. Different expressions of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel types in the rostral reticular thalamic nucleus of the absence epileptic WAG/Rij rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bovenkamp-Janssen, M.C. van de; Scheenen, W.J.J.M.; Kuijpers-Kwant, F.J.; Kozicz, L.T.; Veening, J.G.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van; McEnery, M.W.; Roubos, E.W.

    2004-01-01

    In the WAG/Rij rat, a model for human absence epilepsy, spike-wave discharges (SWD) and absence epileptic behavior develop after the age of 3 months. The rostral part of the reticular thalamic nucleus (rRTN) is involved in SWD. Ca(2+) channels play a central role in the initiation and maintenance of

  4. The effects of reactive oxygen species on calcium- and carbachol-induced contractile responses in beta-escin permeabilized rat bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durlu-Kandilci, N Tugba; Sahin-Erdemli, Inci

    2008-12-01

    The effect of reactive oxygen species on contractions in beta-escin permeabilized rat detrusor was investigated. Cumulative calcium contractions were inhibited by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and hydroxyl (*OH) but not by superoxide (O(2) *). The sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and the mitochondrial blocker carbonyl cyanide p-trifluromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) decreased the calcium contractions, however in their presence, H(2)O(2) and *OH did not have further effect. Carbachol contractions were inhibited by either H(2)O(2)/*OH/O(2) * or CPA/FCCP. In the presence of CPA, carbachol contractions were not affected by H(2)O(2) and *OH but further decreased by O(2) *. On the other hand, only H(2)O(2) and *OH elicited additional inhibition in carbachol responses in the presence of FCCP. Inositol triphosphate contraction was inhibited by *OH whereas none of the radicals affect carbachol induced calcium sensitization. These results show that H(2)O(2) and *OH affects sarcoplasmic reticulum where O(2) * acts on mitochondria to change contractions in rat detrusor smooth muscle.

  5. Organellar Calcium Buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Daniel; Michalak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ is an important intracellular messenger affecting many diverse processes. In eukaryotic cells, Ca2+ storage is achieved within specific intracellular organelles, especially the endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum, in which Ca2+ is buffered by specific proteins known as Ca2+ buffers. Ca2+ buffers are a diverse group of proteins, varying in their affinities and capacities for Ca2+, but they typically also carry out other functions within the cell. The wide range of organelles containing Ca2+ and the evidence supporting cross-talk between these organelles suggest the existence of a dynamic network of organellar Ca2+ signaling, mediated by a variety of organellar Ca2+ buffers. PMID:21421925

  6. The structural basis of calcium transport by the calcium pump

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Claus; Picard, Martin; Winther, Anne-Marie Lund

    2007-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase, a P-type ATPase, has a critical role in muscle function and metabolism. Here we present functional studies and three new crystal structures of the rabbit skeletal muscle Ca2+-ATPase, representing the phosphoenzyme intermediates associated with Ca2+ binding...

  7. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    -saccharate becomes spontaneously supersaturated with both d-gluconate and d-saccharate calcium salts, from which only calcium d-saccharate slowly precipitates. Calcium d-saccharate is suggested to act as a stabilizer of supersaturated solutions of other calcium hydroxycarboxylates with endothermic complex formation......Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc...

  8. Effect of Fish Sarcoplasmic Protein on Quality Attributes of No-fat Chicken Sausages Mediated by Microbial Transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemung, Bung-Orn; Chin, Koo Bok

    2015-01-01

    Fish sarcoplasmic protein (SP) obtaining from lyophilization was evaluated its effect on the qualities of the no-fat chicken sausages in the presence of microbial transglutaminase (MTG) as compared to sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP). The cooking yields of all sausage samples were not different. Expressible moisture (EM) of sausage samples was reduced by adding fish SP, while the lowest EM values were observed in sausage samples containing STPP. The pH values of sausage samples were increased with the addition of fish SP and STPP. Proximate analysis revealed that the moisture, fat, and protein contents of all samples were not different (p>0.05). Textural properties (TP), measured by texture profile analysis, showed that hardness of no-fat sausages increased upon adding fish SP. However, the highest TP values were found in sausage samples with STPP. The redness values were reduced in sausage samples with STPP, while other color values were not affected by STPP. Sensory evaluation revealed that sausages with fish SP were accepted at the higher level than that of control. However, sausage samples with STPP showed highest TP and acceptability. Thus, partial substitution of STPP by SP would be possible to reduce phosphate level in the chicken sausages.

  9. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ depletion in adult skeletal muscle fibres measured with the biosensor D1ER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Moreno, Ramón; Wang, Zhong-Ming; Messi, María Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) plays a crucial role in cytoplasmic signalling in a variety of cells. It is particularly relevant to skeletal muscle fibres, where this organelle constitutes the main Ca2+ store for essential functions, such as contraction. In this work, we expressed the cameleon biosensor D1ER by in vivo electroporation in the mouse flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscle to directly assess SR Ca2+ depletion in response to electrical and pharmacological stimulation. The main conclusions are: (1) D1ER is expressed in the SR of FDB fibres according to both di-8-(amino naphthyl ethenyl pyridinium) staining experiments and reductions in the Förster resonance energy transfer signal consequent to SR Ca2+ release; (2) the amplitude of D1ER citrine/cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) ratio evoked by either 4-chloro-m-cresol (4-CmC) or electrical stimulation is directly proportional to the basal citrine/CFP ratio, which indicates that SR Ca2+ modulates ryanodine-receptor-isoform-1-mediated SR Ca2+ release in the intact muscle fibre; (3) SR Ca2+ release, measured as D1ER citrine/CFP signal, is voltage-dependent and follows a Boltzmann function; and (4) average SR Ca2+ depletion is 20% in response to 4-CmC and 6.4% in response to prolonged sarcolemmal depolarization. These results indicate that significantly depleting SR Ca2+ content under physiological conditions is difficult. PMID:20069312

  10. Characterization of insulin receptors and hormone induced augmentation of Ca2+ pools in cardiac sarcolemma and sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.P.; Innes, I.R.; Dhalla, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    Although insulin is known to bind with heart cells, no information on specific binding sites for insulin in cardiac sarcolemma (SL) or sarcoplasmic-reticulum (SR) is available in the literature. Subcellular distribution of 125 I-insulin in myocardium after an intravenous injection of the hormone indicated highest specific activity of the radio-ligand in the 40,000 g fraction. However, insulin binding to SL was 2 to 3 folds more than that to SR membranes. Scatchard plots were nonlinear in both cases but the apparent affinity constants and receptor population in SR were substantially different than that in SL. Insulin binding to both the membranes obeyed the phenomenon of negative cooperativity; however, dissociation rate of the high affinity component of binding was 2 fold faster in SR than SL. The optimum pH for insulin binding to SR was between 6.5 to 7.5 in comparison to a sharp peak at pH 8.0 in SL. In physiological concentrations insulin enhanced ATP dependent Ca 2+ binding and oxalate supported Ca 2+ uptake of SL and SR, respectively. These studies indicate that specific insulin binding sites on SR are characteristically distinct from those in SL and insulin is capable of stimulating Ca 2+ pumps located in both membranes

  11. Effect of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum function and force in skinned fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibres of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Anthony J; Berg, Helen M

    2002-01-01

    We examined the effect of taurine on depolarisation-induced force responses and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function in mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres from the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of the rat. Taurine (20 mM) produced a small but significant (P Taurine had no statistically significant effect on the slope of the force-pCa curve. Depolarisation-induced force responses in the skinned fibres were markedly increased in peak value by 20 mM taurine, to 120.8 +/- 5.3 % of control measurements (P = 0.0006, n = 27). Taurine (20 mM) significantly increased the SR Ca(2+) accumulation in the skinned fibres by 34.6 +/- 9.3 % compared to control conditions (measured by comparing the integral of caffeine contractures in fibres previously loaded with Ca(2+) in the absence or presence of taurine; P = 0.0014, n = 10). Taurine (20 mM) also increased both the peak and rate of rise of caffeine-induced force responses in the fibres by 29.2 +/- 9.7 % (P = 0.0298, n = 6) and 27.6 +/- 8.9 % (P = 0.037), respectively, compared with controls. This study shows that taurine is a modulator of contractile function in mammalian skeletal muscle. Taurine may increase the size of depolarisation-induced force responses by augmenting SR Ca(2+) accumulation and release.

  12. Phosphorylation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase from ATP and ATP analogs studied by infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man; Barth, Andreas

    2004-11-26

    Phosphorylation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1a) was studied with time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. ATP and ATP analogs (ITP, 2'- and 3'-dATP) were used to study the effect of the adenine ring and the ribose hydroxyl groups on ATPase phosphorylation. All modifications of ATP altered conformational changes and phosphorylation kinetics. The differences compared with ATP increased in the following order: 3'-dATP > ITP > 2'-dATP. Enzyme phosphorylation with ITP results in larger absorbance changes in the amide I region, indicating larger conformational changes of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. The respective absorbance changes obtained with 3'-dATP are significantly different from the others with different band positions and amplitudes in the amide I region, indicating different conformational changes of the protein backbone. ATPase phosphorylation with 3'-dATP is also much ( approximately 30 times) slower than with ATP. Our results indicate that modifications to functional groups of ATP (the ribose 2'- and 3'-OH and the amino group in the adenine ring) affect gamma-phosphate transfer to the phosphorylation site of the Ca(2+)-ATPase by changing the extent of conformational change and the phosphorylation rate. ADP binding to the ADP-sensitive phosphoenzyme (Ca(2)E1P) stabilizes the closed conformation of Ca(2)E1P.

  13. Probing the SERCA1a sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase phosphorylation-site mutant D351E with inorganic phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C.O. Carreira

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum SERCA1a Ca2+-ATPase wild-type and D351E mutants was optimized in yeast under the control of a galactose promoter. Fully active wild-type enzyme was recovered in yeast microsomal membrane fractions in sufficient amounts to permit a rapid and practical assay of ATP hydrolysis and phosphoenzyme formation from ATP or Pi. Mutant and wild-type Ca2+-ATPase were assayed for phosphorylation by Pi under conditions that are known to facilitate this reaction in the wild-type enzyme, including pH 6.0 or 7.0 at 25ºC in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide. Although glutamyl (E and aspartyl (D residue side chains differ by only one methylene group, no phosphoenzyme could be detected in the D351E mutant, even upon the addition of 40% dimethylsulfoxide and 1 mM 32Pi in the presence of 10 mM EGTA and 5 mM MgCl2. These results show that in the D351E mutant, increasing hydrophobicity of the site with inorganic solvent was not a sufficient factor for the required abstraction of water in the reaction of E351 with Pi to form a glutamylphosphate (P-E351 phosphoenzyme moiety. Mutation D351E may disrupt the proposed alignment of the reactive water molecule with the aspartylphosphate (P-D351 moiety in the phosphorylation site, which may be an essential alignment both in the forward reaction (hydrolysis of aspartylphosphate and in the reverse reaction (abstraction of water upon formation of an aspartylphosphate intermediate.

  14. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group.

  15. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Ca(v)3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, I.; Pamphlett, R.; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2016), s. 466-477 ISSN 1933-6950 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ALS * amyotrophic lateral sclerosis * biophysics * CACNA1H * Ca(v)3 * 2 channel Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.042, year: 2016

  16. Correlation between oxidative stress and alteration of intracellular calcium handling in isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio; Alvarez-Pérez, Marco Antonio; Yáñez, Lucía; Vidrio, Susana; Martínez, Lidia; Rosas, Gisele; Yáñez, Mario; Ramírez, Sotero; de Sánchez, Victoria Chagoya

    2006-09-01

    Myocardial Ca(2+) overload and oxidative stress are well documented effects associated to isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial necrosis, but information correlating these two issues is scarce. Using an ISO-induced myocardial infarction model, 3 stages of myocardial damage were defined: pre-infarction (0-12 h), infarction (12-24 h) and post-infarction (24-96 h). Alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis and oxidative stress were studied in mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasmalemma by measuring the Ca(2+) content, the activity of Ca(2+) handling proteins, and by quantifying TBARs, nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative protein damage (changes in carbonyl and thiol groups). Free radicals generated system, antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress (GSH/GSSG ratio) were also monitored at different times of ISO-induced cardiotoxicity. The Ca(2+) overload induced by ISO was counterbalanced by a diminution in the ryanodine receptor activity and the Na(+)-Ca(+2) exchanger as well as by the increase in both calcium ATPases activities (vanadate- and thapsigargine-sensitive) and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake during pre-infarction and infarction stages. Pro-oxidative reactions and antioxidant defences during the 3 stages of cardiotoxicity were observed, with maximal oxidative stress during the infarction. Significant correlations were found among pro-oxidative reactions with plasmalemma and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases, and ryanodine receptor activities at the onset and development of ISO-induced infarction. These findings could be helpful in the design of antioxidant therapies in this pathology.

  17. Calcium Channel Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conditions, such as Raynaud's disease For people of African heritage and older people, calcium channel blockers might ... high-blood-pressure/in-depth/calcium-channel-blockers/ART-20047605 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  18. [Progress of Researches on Protective Effect of Acupuncture and Moxibustion in Relieving Intracellular Calcium Overload of Cradiomyocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Gu, Yi-Huang; Chen, Hao

    2016-06-25

    Myocardial contraction and relaxation are regulated by increases and decreases of the intracellular cytoplasmic calcium (Ca 2+ ) concentration. Intracellular calcium ion is also a ubiquitous second messenger, and its related signal transduction pathways involve a variety of physiological activities and pathological changes. It has been well documented that intracellular calcium overload is involved in myocardial cellular injury. In the present paper, the authors make a review about experimental researches on the underlying mechanisms of acupuncture and moxibustion in the prevention and treatment of ischemic myocardial injury from reducing calcium overload in recent 10 years. Results of recent studies indicate that acupuncture and moxibustion interventions have a cardioprotective effect by raising Ca 2+ -ATPase activity and nitric oxide content, lowering L-type voltage depen-dent calcium channel activity, and ameliorating calcium overload in ischemic cardiomyocytes mainly through cytomembrane, sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane and mitochondrial membrane pathways. However, the current studies on the mechanisms of acupuncture in the improvement of the ischemic myocardial injury are far unclear up to now and do not closely combine the clinical application.

  19. Large isoforms of UNC-89 (obscurin are required for muscle cell architecture and optimal calcium release in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M Spooner

    Full Text Available Calcium, a ubiquitous intracellular signaling molecule, controls a diverse array of cellular processes. Consequently, cells have developed strategies to modulate the shape of calcium signals in space and time. The force generating machinery in muscle is regulated by the influx and efflux of calcium ions into the muscle cytoplasm. In order for efficient and effective muscle contraction to occur, calcium needs to be rapidly, accurately and reliably regulated. The mechanisms underlying this highly regulated process are not fully understood. Here, we show that the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of the giant muscle protein obscurin, UNC-89, is required for normal muscle cell architecture. The large immunoglobulin domain-rich isoforms of UNC-89 are critical for sarcomere and sarcoplasmic reticulum organization. Furthermore, we have found evidence that this structural organization is crucial for excitation-contraction coupling in the body wall muscle, through the coordination of calcium signaling. Thus, our data implicates UNC-89 in maintaining muscle cell architecture and that this precise organization is essential for optimal calcium mobilization and efficient and effective muscle contraction.

  20. Polidocanol versus hypertonic glucose for sclerotherapy treatment of reticular veins of the lower limbs: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bertanha, Matheus [UNESP; Sobreira, Marcone Lima [UNESP; Lúcio Filho, Carlos Eduardo Pinheiro [UNESP; Mariúba, Jamil Victor de Oliveira [UNESP; Pimenta, Rafael Elias Farres [UNESP; Jaldin, Rodrigo Gibin [UNESP; Moroz, Andrei [UNESP; Moura, Regina [UNESP; Rollo, Hamilton Almeida [UNESP; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic venous disease is high and occurs more frequently in females. According to the clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathological classification (CEAP) definition, the reticular veins are included in the C1 class and are mainly associated with aesthetic complaints. Several invasive techniques are used for treatment, including mini phlebectomy, laser ablation, and radiofrequency ablation. However, a wide range of sclerosing agents may serve as minimally in...

  1. Calcium - Function and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Jianfen; He, Yifan; Gao, Qian; Wang, Xuan; Nout, M.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Rice is the primary food source for more than half of the world population. Levels of calcium contents and inhibitor - phytic acid are summarized in this chapter. Phytic acid has a very strong chelating ability and it is the main inhibit factor for calcium in rice products. Calcium contents in

  2. Calcium, An Overview-1989.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiercinski, Floyd J

    1989-06-01

    An overview of calcium is presented including introduction, pre-history, chronology of the research recorded in the literature, discussion, summary, recent references, literature cited, acknowledgments, and appendix. Elemental calcium began with the Earth's formation. Calcium was used for utilitarian purposes in B.C. times. In the 12th and 13th centuries A.D., calcium oxide was formed by roasting limestone to form calcium carbonate. A test for calcium was found in the 17th century, and "stones" were observed in humans (see appendix). In the 19th century, calcium was isolated and chemically identified by electrolysis, and later in that century calcium was found to be needed in a physiological solution similar to the ionic content of blood. In the 20th century it was found that, in the absence of calcium, living cells pulled away from one another. Anesthesia was produced by massive injection of magnesium salts into a mammal-conciousness could be restored by the addition of calcium, which neutralized the magnesium. Finally, calcium out of control in necrosis has an invasive action. Calcium antagonists and their mode of action were described in 1986.

  3. Wisteria Floribunda Agglutinin-Labeled Perineuronal Nets in the Mouse Inferior Colliculus, Thalamic Reticular Nucleus and Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Fader

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Perineuronal nets (PNNs are specialized extracellular matrix molecules that are associated with the closing of the critical period, among other functions. In the adult brain, PNNs surround specific types of neurons, however the expression of PNNs in the auditory system of the mouse, particularly at the level of the midbrain and forebrain, has not been fully described. In addition, the association of PNNs with excitatory and inhibitory cell types in these structures remains unknown. Therefore, we sought to investigate the expression of PNNs in the inferior colliculus (IC, thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN and primary auditory cortex (A1 of the mouse brain by labeling with wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA. To aid in the identification of inhibitory neurons in these structures, we employed the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT-Venus transgenic mouse strain, which robustly expresses an enhanced yellow-fluorescent protein (Venus natively in nearly all gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA-ergic inhibitory neurons, thus enabling a rapid and unambiguous assessment of inhibitory neurons throughout the nervous system. Our results demonstrate that PNNs are expressed throughout the auditory midbrain and forebrain, but vary in their local distribution. PNNs are most dense in the TRN and least dense in A1. Furthermore, PNNs are preferentially associated with inhibitory neurons in A1 and the TRN, but not in the IC of the mouse. These data suggest regionally specific roles for PNNs in auditory information processing.

  4. Reach-scale variation surface water quality in a reticular canal system in the lower Yangtze River Delta region, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, James Andrew; Chan, Faith Ka Shun; Zhu, Fangfang; Wang, Vickie; Higgitt, David Laurence

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the spatial and temporal distribution of surface water pollution within a reticular canal system typical of those found in the lower Yangtze River Delta (YRD). For this purpose, surface water quality data was collected from a drainage canal that bisected the southeast district of Ningbo Municipality (Zhejiang) from 2013 to 2015. The sampling transect was designed to represent the change in land-use from the agriculture dominated rural hinterland, to the predominantly urban city-centre. To calculate the representative land-use fraction of each sampling location, the contributing area was defined using an uni-directional 1 km vector line-buffer around the 'upstream' section of canal. The spatial and temporal variation of EC, DO, NH 3 and turbidity indicated a measureable difference between the urban and rural sections of the channel. Water quality indicators were most sensitive to urban and parkland land-use types. The study yielded an increased spatial resolution to knowledge of water-quality variability in the urban environment compared to previous studies within the YRD region. The results were used to make recommendations for the development of an effective long-term strategy for the improvement in surface water quality in this region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of caffeine on intramembrane charge movement and calcium transients in cut skeletal muscle fibres of the frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, L; Szücs, G

    1983-08-01

    had equal but smaller peak amplitudes, shorter latency times and the same magnitude of voltage-independent rate coefficients for the declining phase as in the control solution.9. The twitch potentiating effect of caffeine can be explained by its facilitating calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, while the re-uptake rate is not modified. The apparent inhibition of re-uptake can be related to the enhanced release of calcium due to caffeine effect. Due to the sensitizing effect of caffeine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane, smaller amounts of charge are needed to reach the contraction threshold than without caffeine.

  6. A double-blind, randomized study comparing pure chromated glycerin with chromated glycerin with 1% lidocaine and epinephrine for sclerotherapy of telangiectasias and reticular veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Philippe; Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Wutschert, Robert; Mazzolai, Lucia

    2011-11-01

    Chromated glycerin (CG) is an effective, although painful, sclerosing agent for telangiectasias and reticular leg veins treatment. To determine pain level and relative efficacy of pure or one-third lidocaine-epinephrine 1% mixed chromated glycerin in a prospective randomized double-blind trial. Patients presenting with telangiectasias and reticular leg veins on the lateral aspect of the thigh (C(1A) or (S) E(P) A(S) P(N1) ) were randomized to receive pure CG or CG mixed with one-third lidocaine-epinephrine 1% (CGX) treatment. Lower limb photographs were taken before and after treatment and analyzed by blinded expert reviewers for efficacy assessment (visual vein disappearance). Patients' pain and satisfaction were assessed using visual analogue scales. Data from 102 of 110 randomized patients could be evaluated. Patient pain scores were significantly higher when pure CG was used than with CGX (psclerotherapy pain without affecting efficacy when treating telangiectasias and reticular leg veins. © 2011 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  7. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase increases caffeine- and halothane-induced contractures in muscle bundles of malignant hyperthermia susceptible and healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roewer Norbert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant hyperthermia (MH is triggered by halogenated anaesthetics and depolarising muscle relaxants, leading to an uncontrolled hypermetabolic state of skeletal muscle. An uncontrolled sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release is mediated via the ryanodine receptor. A compensatory mechanism of increased sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase activity was described in pigs and in transfected cell lines. We hypothesized that inhibition of Ca2+ reuptake via the sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced muscle contractures in MH susceptible more than in non-susceptible skeletal muscle. Methods With informed consent, surplus muscle bundles of 7 MHS (susceptible, 7 MHE (equivocal and 16 MHN (non-susceptible classified patients were mounted to an isometric force transducer, electrically stimulated, preloaded and equilibrated. Following 15 min incubation with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA 25 μM, the European MH standard in-vitro-contracture test protocol with caffeine (0.5; 1; 1.5; 2; 3; 4 mM and halothane (0.11; 0.22; 0.44; 0.66 mM was performed. Data as median and quartiles; Friedman- and Wilcoxon-test for differences with and without CPA; p Results Initial length, weight, maximum twitch height, predrug resting tension and predrug twitch height of muscle bundles did not differ between groups. CPA increased halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures significantly. This increase was more pronounced in MHS and MHE than in MHN muscle bundles. Conclusion Inhibition of the SERCA activity by CPA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures especially in MHS and MHE skeletal muscle and may help for the diagnostic assignment of MH susceptibility. The status of SERCA activity may play a significant but so far unknown role in the genesis of malignant hyperthermia.

  8. The amino-terminal 200 amino acids of the plasma membrane Na+,K+-ATPase alpha subunit confer ouabain sensitivity on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, T; Takeyasu, K

    1993-01-01

    Cardiac glycosides such as G-strophanthin (ouabain) bind to and inhibit the plasma membrane Na+,K(+)-ATPase but not the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-ATPase, whereas thapsigargin specifically blocks the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase. The chimera [n/c]CC, in which the amino-terminal amino acids Met1 to Asp162 of the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA1) were replaced with the corresponding portion of the Na+,K(+)-ATPase alpha 1 subunit (Met1 to Asp200), retained thapsigargin- and Ca(2+)-sensitive ATPase activity,...

  9. Mitofusin 2-containing mitochondrial-reticular microdomains direct rapid cardiomyocyte bioenergetic responses via interorganelle Ca(2+) crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Csordás, György; Jowdy, Casey; Schneider, Timothy G; Csordás, Norbert; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yingqiu; Kohlhaas, Michael; Meiser, Maxie; Bergem, Stefanie; Nerbonne, Jeanne M; Dorn, Gerald W; Maack, Christoph

    2012-09-14

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is essential for the bioenergetic feedback response through stimulation of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases. Close association of mitochondria to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) may explain efficient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake despite low Ca(2+) affinity of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter. However, the existence of such mitochondrial Ca(2+) microdomains and their functional role are presently unresolved. Mitofusin (Mfn) 1 and 2 mediate mitochondrial outer membrane fusion, whereas Mfn2 but not Mfn1 tethers endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria in noncardiac cells. To elucidate roles for Mfn1 and 2 in SR-mitochondrial tethering, Ca(2+) signaling, and bioenergetic regulation in cardiac myocytes. Fruit fly heart tubes deficient of the Drosophila Mfn ortholog MARF had increased contraction-associated and caffeine-sensitive Ca(2+) release, suggesting a role for Mfn in SR Ca(2+) handling. Whereas cardiac-specific Mfn1 ablation had no effects on murine heart function or Ca(2+) cycling, Mfn2 deficiency decreased cardiomyocyte SR-mitochondrial contact length by 30% and reduced the content of SR-associated proteins in mitochondria-associated membranes. This was associated with decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake (despite unchanged mitochondrial membrane potential) but increased steady-state and caffeine-induced SR Ca(2+) release. Accordingly, Ca(2+)-induced stimulation of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases during β-adrenergic stimulation was hampered in Mfn2-KO but not Mfn1-KO myocytes, evidenced by oxidation of the redox states of NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) and FADH(2)/FAD. Physical tethering of SR and mitochondria via Mfn2 is essential for normal interorganelle Ca(2+) signaling in the myocardium, consistent with a requirement for SR-mitochondrial Ca(2+) signaling through microdomains in the cardiomyocyte bioenergetic feedback response to physiological stress.

  10. Mitofusin 2-containing Mitochondrial-Reticular Microdomains Direct Rapid Cardiomyocyte Bioenergetic Responses via Inter-Organelle Ca2+ Crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun; Csordás, György; Jowdy, Casey; Schneider, Timothy G.; Csordás, Norbert; Wang, Wei; Liu, Yingqiu; Kohlhaas, Michael; Meiser, Maxie; Bergem, Stefanie; Nerbonne, Jeanne M.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Maack, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is essential for the bioenergetic feedback response through stimulation of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases. Close association of mitochondria to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) may explain efficient mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake despite low Ca2+ affinity of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. However, the existence of such mitochondrial Ca2+ microdomains and their functional role are presently unresolved. Mitofusin (Mfn) 1 and 2 mediate mitochondrial outer membrane fusion, while Mfn2, but not Mfn1, tethers endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria in non-cardiac cells. Objective To elucidate roles for Mfn1 and 2 in SR-mitochondrial tethering, Ca2+ signaling and bioenergetic regulation in cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results Fruit fly heart tubes deficient of the Drosophila Mfn ortholog, MARF, had increased contraction-associated and caffeine-sensitive Ca2+ release, suggesting a role for Mfn in SR Ca2+ handling. While cardiac-specific Mfn1 ablation had no effects on murine heart function or Ca2+ cycling, Mfn2 deficiency decreased cardiomyocyte SR-mitochondrial contact length by 30% and reduced the content of SR-associated proteins in mitochondria-associated membranes. This was associated with decreased mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake (despite unchanged mitochondrial membrane potential) but increased steady-state and caffeine-induced SR Ca2+ release. Accordingly, Ca2+-induced stimulation of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases during β-adrenergic stimulation was hampered in Mfn2-, but not Mfn1-KO myocytes, evidenced by oxidation of the redox states of NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ and FADH2/FAD. Conclusions Physical tethering of SR and mitochondria via Mfn2 is essential for normal inter-organelle Ca2+ signaling in the myocardium, consistent with a requirement for SR-mitochondrial Ca2+ signaling through microdomains in the cardiomyocyte bioenergetic feedback response to physiological stress. PMID:22777004

  11. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  12. Size of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Neurospora crassa determined by radiation inactivation and comparison with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase from skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, B.J.; Berenski, C.J.; Jung, C.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Using radiation inactivation, the authors have measured the size of the H + -ATPase in Neurospora crassa plasma membranes. Membranes were exposed to either high energy electrons from a Van de Graaff generator or to gamma irradiation from 60 Co. Both forms of radiation caused an exponential loss of ATPase activity in parallel with the physical destruction of the Mr = 104,000 polypeptide of which this enzyme is composed. By applying target theory, the size of the H + -ATPase in situ was found to be approximately 2.3 X 10(5) daltons. They also used radiation inactivation to measure the size of the Ca 2+ -ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and got a value of approximately 2.4 X 10(5) daltons, in agreement with previous reports. By irradiating a mixture of Neurospora plasma membranes and rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum, they directly compared the sizes of these two ATPases and found them to be essentially the same. The authors conclude that both H + -ATPase and Ca 2+ -ATPase are oligomeric enzymes, most likely composed of two approximately 100,000-dalton polypeptides

  13. Size of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase from Neurospora crassa determined by radiation inactivation and comparison with the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase from skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, B J; Berenski, C J; Jung, C Y

    1985-07-25

    Using radiation inactivation, we have measured the size of the H+-ATPase in Neurospora crassa plasma membranes. Membranes were exposed to either high energy electrons from a Van de Graaff generator or to gamma irradiation from 60Co. Both forms of radiation caused an exponential loss of ATPase activity in parallel with the physical destruction of the Mr = 104,000 polypeptide of which this enzyme is composed. By applying target theory, the size of the H+-ATPase in situ was found to be approximately 2.3 X 10(5) daltons. We also used radiation inactivation to measure the size of the Ca2+-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and got a value of approximately 2.4 X 10(5) daltons, in agreement with previous reports. By irradiating a mixture of Neurospora plasma membranes and rabbit sarcoplasmic reticulum, we directly compared the sizes of these two ATPases and found them to be essentially the same. We conclude that both H+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase are oligomeric enzymes, most likely composed of two approximately 100,000-dalton polypeptides.

  14. Medium Calcium Concentration Determines Keratin Intermediate Filament Density and Distribution in Immortalized Cultured Thymic Epithelial Cells (TECs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Sandra S.; Meek, William D.; Hayashi, Jun; Ketchum, Robert J.

    2005-08-01

    Isolation and culture of thymic epithelial cells (TECs) using conventional primary tissue culture techniques under conditions employing supplemented low calcium medium yielded an immortalized cell line derived from the LDA rat (Lewis [Rt1l] cross DA [Rt1a]) that could be manipulated in vitro. Thymi were harvested from 4 5-day-old neonates, enzymically digested using collagenase (1 mg/ml, 37°C, 1 h) and cultured in low calcium WAJC404A medium containing cholera toxin (20 ng/ml), dexamethasone (10 nM), epidermal growth factor (10 ng/ml), insulin (10 [mu]g/ml), transferrin (10 [mu]g/ml), 2% calf serum, 2.5% Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM), and 1% antibiotic/antimycotic. TECs cultured in low calcium displayed round to spindle-shaped morphology, distinct intercellular spaces (even at confluence), and dense reticular-like keratin patterns. In high calcium (0.188 mM), TECs formed cobblestone-like confluent monolayers that were resistant to trypsinization (0.05%) and displayed keratin intermediate filaments concentrated at desmosomal junctions between contiguous cells. Changes in cultured TEC morphology were quantified by an analysis of desmosome/membrane relationships in high and low calcium media. Desmosomes were significantly increased in the high calcium medium. These studies may have value when considering the growth conditions of cultured primary cell lines like TECs.

  15. Adenosine A1 Receptors in Mouse Pontine Reticular Formation Depress Breathing, Increase Anesthesia Recovery Time, and Decrease Acetylcholine Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettys, George C.; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Methods Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX), or SPA and DPCPX. Results First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (−18%), tidal volume (−12%) and minute ventilation (−16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). DPCPX alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, decrease in RoRR, and decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and DPCPX blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Conclusions Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing. PMID:23263018

  16. Adenosine A(1) receptors in mouse pontine reticular formation depress breathing, increase anesthesia recovery time, and decrease acetylcholine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettys, George C; Liu, Fang; Kimlin, Ed; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2013-02-01

    Clinical and preclinical data demonstrate the analgesic actions of adenosine. Central administration of adenosine agonists, however, suppresses arousal and breathing by poorly understood mechanisms. This study tested the two-tailed hypothesis that adenosine A1 receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) of C57BL/6J mice modulate breathing, behavioral arousal, and PRF acetylcholine release. Three sets of experiments used 51 mice. First, breathing was measured by plethysmography after PRF microinjection of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N-sulfophenyl adenosine (SPA) or saline. Second, mice were anesthetized with isoflurane and the time to recovery of righting response (RoRR) was quantified after a PRF microinjection of SPA or saline. Third, acetylcholine release in the PRF was measured before and during microdialysis delivery of SPA, the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine, or SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine. First, SPA significantly decreased respiratory rate (-18%), tidal volume (-12%), and minute ventilation (-16%). Second, SPA concentration accounted for 76% of the variance in RoRR. Third, SPA concentration accounted for a significant amount of the variance in acetylcholine release (52%), RoRR (98%), and breathing rate (86%). 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine alone caused a concentration-dependent increase in acetylcholine, a decrease in RoRR, and a decrease in breathing rate. Coadministration of SPA and 1, 3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine blocked the SPA-induced decrease in acetylcholine and increase in RoRR. Endogenous adenosine acting at adenosine A1 receptors in the PRF modulates breathing, behavioral arousal, and acetylcholine release. The results support the interpretation that an adenosinergic-cholinergic interaction within the PRF comprises one neurochemical mechanism underlying the wakefulness stimulus for breathing.

  17. Robust interactions between the effects of auditory and cutaneous electrical stimulations on cell activities in the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Akihisa

    2017-04-15

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a cluster of GABAergic cells, is thought to regulate bottom-up and top-down streams of sensory processing in the loop circuitry between the thalamus and cortex. Provided that sensory inputs of different modalities interact in the TRN, the TRN could contribute to fast and flexible cross-modal modulation of attention and perception that incessantly takes place in our everyday life. Indeed, diverse subthreshold interactions of auditory and visual inputs have been revealed in TRN cells (Kimura, 2014). To determine whether such sensory interaction could extend across modalities as a universal neural mechanism, the present study examined TRN cell activities elicited by auditory and cutaneous electrical stimulations in anesthetized rats. Juxta-cellular recording and labeling techniques were used. Recordings were obtained from 129 cells. Auditory or somatosensory responses were modulated by subthreshold electrical stimulation or sound (noise burst) in the majority of recordings (77 of 85 auditory and 13 of 15 somatosensory cells). Additionally, 22 bimodal cells and seven cells that responded only to combined stimulation were recognized. Suppression was predominant in modulation that was observed in both early and repeatedly evoked late responses. Combined stimulation also induced de novo cell activities. Further, response latency and burst spiking were modulated. Axonal projections of cells showing modulation terminated in first- or higher-order thalamic nuclei. Nine auditory cells projected to somatosensory thalamic nuclei. These results suggest that the TRN could regulate sensory processing in the loop circuitry between the thalamus and cortex through the sensory interaction pervasive across modalities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  19. Dengue and Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  20. Calcium homeostasis alterations in a mouse model of the Dynamin 2-related centronuclear myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodvaël Fraysse

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by centrally located nuclei in muscle fibers. CNM results from mutations in the gene encoding dynamin 2 (DNM2, a large GTPase involved in endocytosis, intracellular membrane trafficking, and cytoskeleton regulation. We developed a knock-in mouse model expressing the most frequent DNM2-CNM mutation; i.e. the KI-Dnm2R465W model. Heterozygous (HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice progressively develop muscle atrophy, impairment of contractile properties, histopathological abnormalities, and elevated cytosolic calcium concentration. Here, we aim at better characterizing the calcium homeostasis impairment in extensor digitorum longus (EDL and soleus muscles from adult HTZ KI-Dnm2 mice. We demonstrate abnormal contractile properties and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL but not soleus muscles showing that calcium impairment is correlated with muscle weakness and might be a determinant factor of the spatial muscle involvement. In addition, the elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in EDL muscles is associated with an increased sarcolemmal permeability to Ca2+ and releasable Ca2+ content from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. However, amplitude and kinetics characteristics of the calcium transient appear unchanged. This suggests that calcium defect is probably not a primary cause of decreased force generation by compromised sarcomere shortening but may be involved in long-term deleterious consequences on muscle physiology. Our results highlight the first pathomechanism which may explain the spatial muscle involvement occurring in DNM2-related CNM and open the way toward development of a therapeutic approach to normalize calcium content.

  1. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide excites medial pontine reticular formation neurons in the brainstem rapid eye movement sleep-induction zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne; Reiner, P B

    1999-01-01

    -clamp recordings in the in vitro rat brainstem slice. VIP directly depolarized cells via activation of an inward current; these effects were attenuated and potentiated in low-sodium and low-calcium medium, respectively. The depolarization induced by VIP was slower in onset and longer-lived than that evoked...

  2. Partial inhibition of sodium/calcium exchange restores cellular calcium handling in canine heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Maack, Christoph; O'Rourke, Brian

    2004-08-06

    Sodium/calcium (Na+/Ca2+) exchange (NCX) overexpression is common to human heart failure and heart failure in many animal models, but its specific contribution to the cellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) handling deficit is unclear. Here, we investigate the effects of exchange inhibitory peptide (XIP) on Ca2+ handling in myocytes isolated from canine tachycardic pacing-induced failing hearts. Whole-cell patch-clamped left ventricular myocytes from failing hearts (F) showed a 52% decrease in steady-state sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ load and a 44% reduction in the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient, as compared with myocytes from normal hearts (N). Intracellular application of XIP (30 micromol/L) normalized the [Ca2+]i transient amplitude in F (3.86-fold increase), concomitant with a similar increase in SR Ca2+ load. The degree of NCX inhibition at this concentration of XIP was 27% and was selective for NCX: L-type Ca2+ currents and plasmalemmal Ca2+ pumps were not affected. XIP also indirectly improved the rate of [Ca2+]i removal at steady-state, secondary to Ca2+-dependent activation of SR Ca2+ uptake. The findings indicate that in the failing heart cell, NCX inhibition can improve SR Ca2+ load by shifting the balance of Ca2+ fluxes away from trans-sarcolemmal efflux toward SR accumulation. Hence, inhibition of the Ca2+ efflux mode of the exchanger could potentially be an effective therapeutic strategy for improving contractility in congestive heart failure.

  3. Atividade elétrica cerebral do rato com lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-09-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo foram utilizados 73 ratos em preparações agudas e crônicas, nas quais lesamos a formação reticular mesencefálica com corrente contínua (3,5 a 4,0 mA durante 5 a 10 segundos. O eletródio ativo era implantado estereotàxicamente segundo as coordenadas de König e Klippel. As lesões eram feitas parcial ou totalmente, uni ou bilateralmente, e em todos os animais procedeu-se ao controle histológico das áreas lesadas, usando-se o método de Weil. O registro da atividade elétrica cortical foi feito com polígrafo Beckman de 4 canais, utilizando-se derivações bipolares curtas (1mm com eletródios esféricos de platina. As experiências permitiram as seguintes conclusões: 1 — As características eletrofisiológicas dos fusos que ocorrem após lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica são muito semelhantes às dos fusos espontâneos e barbitúricos, inclusive quanto à projeção cortical. Quanto à duração dos potenciais que os constituem, contudo, notamos que a faixa de variação era mais centuada (20 a 80 ms, o que pode ser atribuído à maior complexidade dos potenciais do cérebro isolado, possivelmente pela falta de ação cronadora da formação reticular sobre o sistema sincronizador talâmico. 2 — Os mecanismos envolvidos na gênese dos fusos do sono barbitúrico ou espontâneo e os do cérebro isolado são, pelo menos em parte, dependentes do bloqueio da formação reticular mesencefálica. 3 — A formação reticular mesencefálica ativa preferencialmente o hemisfério cerebral homolateral; o contingente cruzado talvez seja mobilizado somente quando estímulos alertantes intensos atingem o tegmento mesencefálico. 4 — Além da formação reticular mesencefálica deve haver outros mecanismos ativadores corticais, visto que, em preparações agudas de cérebro isolado, observamos: a surtos de curta duração de atividade dessincronizada; b oscilações freqüentes do ECoG durante o registro

  4. Src tyrosine kinases contribute to serotonin-mediated contraction by regulating calcium-dependent pathways in rat skeletal muscle arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavaritskaya, Olga; Lubomirov, Lubomir T; Altay, Serdar; Schubert, Rudolf

    2017-06-01

    The Src tyrosine kinase family contributes to the signalling mechanism mediating serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT))-induced vasoconstriction. These kinases were reported to influence the calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus. Whether Src kinases affect also the intracellular calcium concentration during constriction of intact arteries is unknown. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that constriction of arteries is associated with a Src kinase-dependent alteration of the intracellular calcium concentration. Contractility of gracilis arteries of Wistar rats was studied using isometric and isobaric myography. The intracellular calcium concentration was measured simultaneously with tension by FURA-2 fluorimetry. Inhibition of Src kinases with 10 μM PP2, 30 μM dasatinib and 100 μM AZM 475271 resulted in a strong attenuation of 5-HT-induced contractions. Vessel incubation with 10 μM PP3, an inactive analogue of PP2, had no effect. Removal of the endothelium did not alter vessel contractile responses to 5-HT nor the action of the Src-kinase inhibitor PP2. The PP2-mediated inhibition of 5-HT-induced contraction was associated with a reduced response of [Ca 2+ ] i to 5-HT. In particular, inhibition of Src kinases attenuates 5-HT-induced calcium influx as well as calcium release from intracellular stores. In contrast, the calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and the filling state of the sarcoplasmic reticulum were not influenced by Src kinases during 5-HT-induced contractions. We conclude that Src kinase activation is a powerful mechanism to produce vasoconstriction of small skeletal muscle arteries of rats. This effect is endothelium-independent. The data further suggest that the action of c-Src kinases is associated with a change in the intracellular calcium concentration that involves Ca 2+ entry and Ca 2+ release pathways.

  5. ¿Cómo ve la gente a la sociedad?: la estructura reticular de la opinión pública sobre conflictos sociales.

    OpenAIRE

    van Meter, Karl M.

    2004-01-01

    Rusia y Costa Rica refuerza esta sorprendente conclusión. Otro resultado que estas encuestas producen es que las cuestiones “troncales”, y las otras 50 a 70 cuestiones sobre conflicto social que constituyen el cuestionario cada año no tienen una estructura arbitraria que cambia de una encuesta a la otra. Las cuestiones “troncales” definen cada año una estructura reticular que se repite cada año con muy pocas modificaciones y que mediante sus vínculos (y oposiciones) define una estructura gene...

  6. Effects of chronic administration of clenbuterol on contractile properties and calcium homeostasis in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvent, Pascal; Douillard, Aymerick; Galbes, Olivier; Ramonatxo, Christelle; Py, Guillaume; Candau, Robin; Lacampagne, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Clenbuterol, a β2-agonist, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a shift from slow-oxidative to fast-glycolytic muscle fiber type profile. However, the cellular mechanisms of the effects of chronic clenbuterol administration on skeletal muscle are not completely understood. As the intracellular Ca2+ concentration must be finely regulated in many cellular processes, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on force, fatigue, intracellular calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in fast-twitch skeletal muscles (the extensor digitorum longus, EDL, muscle), as they are more sensitive to clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were chronically treated with 4 mg.kg-1 clenbuterol or saline vehicle (controls) for 21 days. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, Ca2+-transient amplitude and Ca2+ spark properties. EDL muscles from clenbuterol-treated animals displayed hypertrophy, a shift from slow to fast fiber type profile and increased absolute force, while the relative force remained unchanged and resistance to fatigue decreased compared to control muscles from rats treated with saline vehicle. Compared to control animals, clenbuterol treatment decreased Ca2+-transient amplitude, Ca2+ spark amplitude and frequency and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load was markedly reduced. Conversely, calpain activity was increased by clenbuterol chronic treatment. These results indicate that chronic treatment with clenbuterol impairs Ca2+ homeostasis and this could contribute to the remodeling and functional impairment of fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

  7. Effects of chronic administration of clenbuterol on contractile properties and calcium homeostasis in rat extensor digitorum longus muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Sirvent

    Full Text Available Clenbuterol, a β2-agonist, induces skeletal muscle hypertrophy and a shift from slow-oxidative to fast-glycolytic muscle fiber type profile. However, the cellular mechanisms of the effects of chronic clenbuterol administration on skeletal muscle are not completely understood. As the intracellular Ca2+ concentration must be finely regulated in many cellular processes, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic clenbuterol treatment on force, fatigue, intracellular calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and Ca2+-dependent proteolysis in fast-twitch skeletal muscles (the extensor digitorum longus, EDL, muscle, as they are more sensitive to clenbuterol-induced hypertrophy. Male Wistar rats were chronically treated with 4 mg.kg-1 clenbuterol or saline vehicle (controls for 21 days. Confocal microscopy was used to evaluate sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load, Ca2+-transient amplitude and Ca2+ spark properties. EDL muscles from clenbuterol-treated animals displayed hypertrophy, a shift from slow to fast fiber type profile and increased absolute force, while the relative force remained unchanged and resistance to fatigue decreased compared to control muscles from rats treated with saline vehicle. Compared to control animals, clenbuterol treatment decreased Ca2+-transient amplitude, Ca2+ spark amplitude and frequency and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ load was markedly reduced. Conversely, calpain activity was increased by clenbuterol chronic treatment. These results indicate that chronic treatment with clenbuterol impairs Ca2+ homeostasis and this could contribute to the remodeling and functional impairment of fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

  8. Calcium signaling in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreses-Werringloer Ute

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is a key signaling ion involved in many different intracellular and extracellular processes ranging from synaptic activity to cell-cell communication and adhesion. The exact definition at the molecular level of the versatility of this ion has made overwhelming progress in the past several years and has been extensively reviewed. In the brain, calcium is fundamental in the control of synaptic activity and memory formation, a process that leads to the activation of specific calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways and implicates key protein effectors, such as CaMKs, MAPK/ERKs, and CREB. Properly controlled homeostasis of calcium signaling not only supports normal brain physiology but also maintains neuronal integrity and long-term cell survival. Emerging knowledge indicates that calcium homeostasis is not only critical for cell physiology and health, but also, when deregulated, can lead to neurodegeneration via complex and diverse mechanisms involved in selective neuronal impairments and death. The identification of several modulators of calcium homeostasis, such as presenilins and CALHM1, as potential factors involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, provides strong support for a role of calcium in neurodegeneration. These observations represent an important step towards understanding the molecular mechanisms of calcium signaling disturbances observed in different brain diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases.

  9. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM- CHANNELBLOCKERSFOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and degenerative dementias the calcium-channel blocker nimodipine, compared with placebo, slightly improved the. MMSE scores." Thus, an additional or alternative explanation, albeit still unproven, could involve specific neuroprotection conferred by calcium-channel blockade.~Indeed, the ageing brain loses its ability to ...

  10. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this ... vary. However, the main ingredient is called a calcium-channel antagonist. It helps decrease the heart's pumping strength, which ...

  11. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The cause of preeclampsia remains unknown and calcium and magnesium supplement are being suggested as means of prevention. The objective of this study was to assess magnesium and calcium in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Nigerian women with preedamp sia and eclampsia. Setting was ...

  12. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat in their diet. Vitamin D is the hormone that helps the gut absorb more calcium. Many older adults have common risks that make bone health worse. Calcium intake in the diet (milk, cheese, yogurt) is low. Vitamin D levels are ...

  13. Reticular Chemistry and Metal-Organic Frameworks: Design and Synthesis of Functional Materials for Clean Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal A.

    2017-06-01

    Gaining control over the assembly of crystalline solid-state materials has been significantly advanced through the field of reticular chemistry and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs have emerged as a unique modular class of porous materials amenable to a rational design with targeted properties for given applications. Several design approaches have been deployed to construct targeted functional MOFs, where desired structural and geometrical attributes are incorporated in preselected building units prior to the assembly process. This dissertation illustrates the merit of the molecular building block approach (MBB) for the rational construction and discovery of stable and highly porous MOFs, and their exploration as potential gas storage medium for sustainable and clean energy applications. Specifically, emphasis was placed on gaining insights into the structure-property relationships that impact the methane (CH4) storage in MOFs and its subsequent delivery. The foreseen gained understanding is essential for the design of new adsorbent materials or adjusting existing MOF platforms to encompass the desired features that subsequently afford meeting the challenging targets for methane storage in mobile and stationary applications.In this context, we report the successful use of the MBB approach for the design and deliberate construction of a series of novel isoreticular, highly porous and stable, aluminum based MOFs with the square-octahedral (soc) underlying net topology. From this platform, Al-soc-MOF-1, with more than 6000 m2/g apparent Langmuir specific surface area, exhibits outstanding gravimetric CH4 uptake (total and working capacities). It is shown experimentally, for the first time, that the Al-soc-MOF platform can address the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) challenging gravimetric and volumetric targets for the CH4 working capacity for on-board CH4 storage. Furthermore, Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits the highest total gravimetric and volumetric uptake for carbon

  14. Gel-based phosphoproteomics analysis of sarcoplasmic proteins in postmortem porcine muscle with pH decline rate and time differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Honggang; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Karlsson, Anders H

    2011-01-01

    Meat quality development is highly influenced by the pH decline caused by the postmortem (PM) glycolysis. Protein phosphorylation is an important mechanism in regulating the activity of glycometabolic enzymes. Here, a gel-based phosphoproteomic study was performed to analyze the protein...... observed in most individual bands in 1-DE. The protein phosphorylation levels of 12 bands were significantly affected by the synergy effects of pH and time (p...... phosphorylation in sarcoplasmic proteins from three groups of pigs with different pH decline rates from PM 1 to 24¿h. Globally, the fast pH decline group had the highest phosphorylation level at PM 1¿h, but lowest at 24¿h, whereas the slow pH decline group showed the reverse case. The same pattern was also...

  15. Relaciones, redes y discurso: revisión y propuestas en torno al análisis reticular de datos textuales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozares Colina, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available El artículo hace un repaso de las diferentes propuestas que dentro del ámbito de la sociología (o cercanos toman elementos de o se han inspirado en el Análisis de Redes Sociales para realizar el análisis de textos y/o discursos.A pesar de que la concepción relacionista tiene ya una cierta tradición en el análisis del discurso, no ha sido mas que a partir de la década de los ochenta que se han desarrollado propuestas que, con mayor o menor intensidad, aplican la idea y el instrumental de redes sociales al análisis de textos. No obstante, muchas propuestas no superan los problemas que llevan asociados los análisis de carácter atributivo y/o categorial. Sólo algunos procedimientos llegan a utilizar la aproximación reticular como forma de preservar la articulación, y con ello, la estructura semántica y sintáctica del texto. Al panorama de las escasas propuestas existentes que siguen esta orientación, el artículo incorpora los procedimientos (que denominados Análisis Reticular del Discurso que los autores vienen desarrollado sobre dicha perspectiva y que insisten además particularmente en el trabajo de interpretación y con-textualización del discurso.

  16. Efeitos do pentobarbital sódico sobre a atividade elétrica cerebral do rato com lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica Action of sodium pentobarbital on the cortical electrical activity of the rat after lesion of the midbrain reticular formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-12-01

    Full Text Available Para êste estudo foram empregados 35 ratos da raça Wistar em preparação aguda (24 com lesão bilateral e 11 com lesão unilateral da formação reticular mesencefálica e 18 preparações crônicas. O método empregado na obtenção das preparações foi descrito em trabalho anterior12. O objetivo desta série de experiências foi o de verificar de que maneira o pentobarbital interfere sobre as características da atividade elétrica cortical após lesão da formação reticular mesencefálica. Para tal, em animais preparados agudamente, foram feitas lesões progressivamente mais extensas e o barbitúrico injetado por via intravenosa em doses crescentes. A fim de testar a integridade do sistema reticular ativador ascendente, além de estímulos dolorosos intensos, aplicávamos pulsos de 5 a 10 V, 100 Hz, e 0,1 ms à formação reticular mesencefálica situada abaixo da região lesada. A ausência de reação de alerta cortical (dessincronização nos assegurava que tal sistema havia sido lesado completamente. Nas preparações crônicas o pentobarbital era injetado por via intraperitoneal. Dessas experiências concluimos o seguinte: 1. Aumento da sincronização do eletrocorticograma nos animais com lesões parciais ou totais da formação reticular mesencefálica. 2. Depressão acentuada e precoce da atividade elétrica cerebral nos ratos com lesão muito extensa (comprometendo também a porção ventrobasal do tálamo. 3. Isocronismo da atividade elétrica cortical nos dois hemisférios cerebrais. 4. O pentobarbital parece agir tanto sobre os sistemas ativadores como sobre o sincronizador do eletrocorticograma. As doses pequenas deprimem os primeiros, liberando o segundo, enquanto que as maiores bloqueiam também este último. Sòmente doses muito mais altas é que fazem desaparecer totalmente a atividade do córtex cerebral, que se mostra, portanto, mais resistente à ação da droga.This study was performed on 35 albino rats prepared for

  17. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by supporting muscles needed to avoid falls. Children need vitamin D to build strong bones, and adults need ... be taken at one time. While your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium, you do not need ...

  18. High Blood Calcium (Hypercalcemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidney function and levels of calcium in your urine. Your provider may do other tests to further assess your condition, such as checking your blood levels of phosphorus (a mineral). Imaging studies also may be helpful, ...

  19. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement thickening products, and many others) Many hair relaxers and straighteners Slaked lime This list may not include all sources of ...

  20. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  1. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  2. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  3. Polidocanol versus hypertonic glucose for sclerotherapy treatment of reticular veins of the lower limbs: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertanha, Matheus; Sobreira, Marcone Lima; Pinheiro Lúcio Filho, Carlos Eduardo; de Oliveira Mariúba, Jamil Victor; Farres Pimenta, Rafael Elias; Jaldin, Rodrigo Gibin; Moroz, Andrei; Moura, Regina; Rollo, Hamilton Almeida; Yoshida, Winston Bonetti

    2014-12-19

    The prevalence of chronic venous disease is high and occurs more frequently in females. According to the clinical, etiological, anatomical, and pathological classification (CEAP) definition, the reticular veins are included in the C1 class and are mainly associated with aesthetic complaints. Several invasive techniques are used for treatment, including mini phlebectomy, laser ablation, and radiofrequency ablation. However, a wide range of sclerosing agents may serve as minimally invasive alternatives, promoting chemical sclerosis of the vein wall. Although this technique is routinely performed around the world, there is no consensus on the most efficacious and safe chemical agent to be used. Inclusion criteria are women between 18 and 69 years old with at least 10 cm long reticular veins in the lower limbs, on the outer side of the leg/thigh. Patients with CEAP 2 to 6, or with allergies, pregnancy, performing breastfeeding, or with any dermatologic or clinical problems will be excluded. Patients with venous ultrasound mapping showing involvement of saphenous trunks and/or a deep venous system will also be excluded. Patients will be randomized into two groups, one receiving 75% pure glucose and the other group receiving 0.2% polidocanol diluted in 70% glucose. Just one limb and one session per patient will be performed. The sclerosing agent volume will not exceed 5 mL. Clinical follow-up will include visits on days 7 and 60, always with photographic documentation. This project aims to enroll 96 patients and subject them to a double-blind treatment after the randomization process. The design is intended to evaluate efficacy through a primary end point and safety through a secondary end point. Forty-eight patients have currently been enrolled. Preliminary results for these patients showed that 25 received treatment, 2 were excluded, and 22 returned after 7 days and showed no greater adverse events. To date, establishing efficacy criteria has not been possible, and no

  4. Increase vs. decrease of calcium uptake by isolated heart cells induced by H2O2 vs. HOCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminishi, T.; Matsuoka, T.; Yanagishita, T.; Kako, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Adult rat heart myocytes were labeled rapidly with exogenous [45Ca2+]. Addition of 2.5 mM H2O2 to the heart cell suspension raised the content of rapidly exchangeable intracellular Ca2+ twofold, whereas addition of 1-30 mM HOCl decreased the Ca2+ content. The H2O2-induced increase in Ca2+ content was dependent on the medium Na+, pH, and temperature but was not significantly affected by addition of verapamil, diltiazem, amiloride, or 3-aminobenzamide. The [3H]ouabain binding to myocytes was suppressed by H2O2, whereas the Ca2+ efflux from myocytes was not influenced. An uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, reduced Ca2+ content, implying that the H2O2-induced change in Ca2+ content was not directly related to ATP depletion. On the other hand, the H2O2-induced Ca2+ accumulation in myocytes was prevented by deferoxamine or o-phenanthroline. These results suggest that H2O2 inhibited Na+-K+-ATPase, resulting in an increase in intracellular Na+ concentration and stimulation of sarcolemmal Na+-Ca2+ exchange activity, which caused a transient net Ca2+ influx into myocytes. By contrast, HOCl decreased the Ca2+ content of the rapidly exchangeable pool below control levels and this action of HOCl was antagonized by 1,4-dithiothreitol. HOCl accelerated Ca2+ efflux from myocytes. Ca2+ uptake and Ca2+-ATPase of the isolated sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) fraction were highly sensitive to the action of HOCl. Ca2+ uptake by intracellular sites, studied with myocytes permeabilized with digitonin, was inhibited by both H2O2 and HOCl. Thus these results suggest that HOCl inhibits the SR Ca2+ pump, resulting in the observed acceleration of Ca2+ efflux from and decline in Ca2+ content of myocytes

  5. Role of sodium-calcium exchanger in modulating the action potential of ventricular myocytes from normal and failing hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoundas, Antonis A; Hobai, Ion A; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Winslow, Raimond L; O'Rourke, Brian

    2003-07-11

    Increased Na+-Ca2+ exchange (NCX) activity in heart failure and hypertrophy may compensate for depressed sarcoplasmic reticular Ca2+ uptake, provide inotropic support through reverse-mode Ca2+ entry, and/or deplete intracellular Ca2+ stores. NCX is electrogenic and depends on Na+ and Ca2+ transmembrane gradients, making it difficult to predict its effect on the action potential (AP). Here, we examine the effect of [Na+]i on the AP in myocytes from normal and pacing-induced failing canine hearts and estimate the direction of the NCX driving force using simultaneously recorded APs and Ca2+ transients. AP duration shortened with increasing [Na+]i and was correlated with a shift in the reversal point of the NCX driving force. At [Na+]i > or =10 mmol/L, outward NCX current during the plateau facilitated repolarization, whereas at 5 mmol/L [Na+]i, NCX had a depolarizing effect, confirmed by partially inhibiting NCX with exchange inhibitory peptide. Exchange inhibitory peptide shortened the AP duration at 5 mmol/L [Na+]i and prolonged it at [Na+]i > or =10 mmol/L. With K+ currents blocked, total membrane current was outward during the late plateau of an AP clamp at 10 mmol/L [Na+]i and became inward close to the predicted reversal point for the NCX driving force. The results were reproduced using a computer model. These results indicate that NCX plays an important role in shaping the AP of the canine myocyte, helping it to repolarize at high [Na+]i, especially in the failing heart, but contributing a depolarizing, potentially arrhythmogenic, influence at low [Na+]i.

  6. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  7. Role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 in the modulation of airway smooth muscle tone and calcium handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yocum, Gene T; Chen, Jun; Choi, Christine H; Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Dingbang; Fu, Xiao W; Sanderson, Michael J; Emala, Charles W

    2017-06-01

    Asthma is a common disorder characterized, in part, by airway smooth muscle (ASM) hyperresponsiveness. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel expressed on airway nerve fibers that modulates afferent signals, resulting in cough, and potentially bronchoconstriction. In the present study, the TRPV1 transcript was detected by RT-PCR in primary cultured human ASM cells, and the TRPV1 protein was detected in ASM of human trachea by immunohistochemistry. Proximity ligation assays suggest that TRPV1 is expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane of human ASM cells in close association with sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ -ATPase-2. In guinea pig tracheal ring organ bath experiments, the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin led to ASM contraction, but this contraction was significantly attenuated by the sodium channel inhibitor bupivacaine ( n = 4, P antagonist GR-159897 ( n = 4, P antagonist capsazepine inhibited the maintenance phase of an acetylcholine-induced contraction ( n = 4, P calcium entry in mouse ASM cells in PCLS ( n = 4-7, P = nonsignificant), it did inhibit calcium oscillations ( n = 3, P calcium oscillations. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Evolution of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins. II. Domains of several subfamilies have diverse evolutionary histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, S.; Moncrief, N. D.; Kretsinger, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the first report in this series we described the relationships and evolution of 152 individual proteins of the EF-hand subfamilies. Here we add 66 additional proteins and define eight (CDC, TPNV, CLNB, LPS, DGK, 1F8, VIS, TCBP) new subfamilies and seven (CAL, SQUD, CDPK, EFH5, TPP, LAV, CRGP) new unique proteins, which we assume represent new subfamilies. The main focus of this study is the classification of individual EF-hand domains. Five subfamilies--calmodulin, troponin C, essential light chain, regulatory light chain, CDC31/caltractin--and three uniques--call, squidulin, and calcium-dependent protein kinase--are congruent in that all evolved from a common four-domain precursor. In contrast calpain and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SARC) each evolved from its own one-domain precursor. The remaining 19 subfamilies and uniques appear to have evolved by translocation and splicing of genes encoding the EF-hand domains that were precursors to the congruent eight and to calpain and to SARC. The rates of evolution of the EF-hand domains are slower following formation of the subfamilies and establishment of their functions. Subfamilies are not readily classified by patterns of calcium coordination, interdomain linker stability, and glycine and proline distribution. There are many homoplasies indicating that similar variants of the EF-hand evolved by independent pathways.

  9. Determination of the separate lipid and protein profile structures derived from the total membrane profile structure or isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum via x-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbette, L.; Blasie, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membranes were prepared to contain biosynthetically deuterated SR phospholipids utilizing specific and general phospholipid exchange proteins (PLEP). Functional measurements and freeze fracture on SR dispersions and x-ray diffraction of hydrated oriented membrane multilayers revealed that the exchanged SR membranes were very similar to unexchanged SR membranes. Low resolution (28-A) neutron diffraction studies utilizing SR membranes exchanged with either protonated or perdeuterated SR phospholipids allowed direct determination of the lipid profile within the isolated SR membrane at two different unit cell repeat distances. These lipid profile structures were found to be highly asymmetric regarding the conformation of the fatty acid chain extents and compositional distribution of phospholipid molecules in the inner vs. outer monolayer of the SR membrane bilayer. The relatively high resolution (11-A) electron-density profile from x-ray diffraction was decomposed by utilizing the asymmetry in the number of phospholipid molecules residing in the inner vs. outer monolayer of the SR lipid bilayer as obtained from the neutron diffraction study. To our knowledge, this represents the first direct determination of a lipid bilayer profile structure within an isolated membrane system

  10. Interaction between endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress (ER/SR stress), mitochondrial signaling and Ca(2+) regulation in airway smooth muscle (ASM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmotte, Philippe; Sieck, Gary C

    2015-02-01

    Airway inflammation is a key aspect of diseases such as asthma. Several inflammatory cytokines (e.g., TNFα and IL-13) increase cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]cyt) responses to agonist stimulation and Ca(2+) sensitivity of force generation, thereby enhancing airway smooth muscle (ASM) contractility (hyper-reactive state). Inflammation also induces ASM proliferation and remodeling (synthetic state). In normal ASM, the transient elevation of [Ca(2+)]cyt induced by agonists leads to a transient increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]mito) that may be important in matching ATP production with ATP consumption. In human ASM (hASM) exposed to TNFα and IL-13, the transient increase in [Ca(2+)]mito is blunted despite enhanced [Ca(2+)]cyt responses. We also found that TNFα and IL-13 induce reactive oxidant species (ROS) formation and endoplasmic/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) stress (unfolded protein response) in hASM. ER/SR stress in hASM is associated with disruption of mitochondrial coupling with the ER/SR membrane, which relates to reduced mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) expression. Thus, in hASM it appears that TNFα and IL-13 result in ROS formation leading to ER/SR stress, reduced Mfn2 expression, disruption of mitochondrion-ER/SR coupling, decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+) buffering, mitochondrial fragmentation, and increased cell proliferation.

  11. Constitutive cardiac overexpression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase delays myocardial failure after myocardial infarction in rats at a cost of increased acute arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Escoubet, Brigitte; Prunier, Fabrice; Amour, Julien; Simonides, Warner S; Vivien, Benoît; Lenoir, Christophe; Heimburger, Michèle; Choqueux, Christine; Gellen, Barnabas; Riou, Bruno; Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Franz, Wolfgang M; Mercadier, Jean-Jacques

    2004-04-20

    Heart failure often complicates myocardial infarction (MI), and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) is underexpressed in the failing myocardium. We examined the effect of preexisting cardiac SERCA2a protein overexpression on rat survival and left ventricular (LV) remodeling after MI. Baseline myocardial SERCA2a expression was 37% higher in transgenic (TG) rats than in their wild-type (WT) controls, consistent with enhanced myocardial function. The mortality rate of TG rats during the 24 hours after surgical MI was higher than that of WT rats (71% versus 35%, P<0.001), associated with a higher frequency of ventricular arrhythmias, and was normalized by lidocaine treatment. The increased acute-phase mortality in TG rats was not accompanied by increased 6-month mortality. Function of the noninfarcted myocardium, as assessed by tissue Doppler imaging, was higher in TG rats than in WT rats for up to 1 month after MI, a beneficial effect no longer observed at 3 months. LV remodeling and global function were similar in TG and WT rats. No difference in papillary muscle function was found at 6 months. Constitutive cardiac SERCA2a overexpression has a transient beneficial effect on remote myocardium function in rat MI, with no improvement in LV global function or prevention of LV remodeling and failure. This benefit is associated with a higher risk of acute mortality, which is prevented by lidocaine treatment.

  12. Cardiac function improved by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase overexpression in a heart failure model induced by chronic myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei XIN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Chronic myocardial ischemia(CMI has become an important cause of heart failure(HF.The aim of present study was to examine the effects of Sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase(SERCA2a gene transfer in HF model in large animal induced by CMI.Methods HF was reproduced in minipigs by ligating the initial segment of proximal left anterior descending(LAD coronary artery with an ameroid constrictor to produce progressive vessel occlusion and ischemia.After confirmation of myocardial perfusion defect and cardiac function impairment by SPECT and echocardiography in the model,animals were divided into 4 groups: HF group;HF+enhanced green fluorescent protein(EGFP group;HF+SERCA2a group;and sham operation group as control.rAAV1-EGFP and rAAV1-SERCA2a(1×1012 vg for each animal were directly and intramyocardially injected to the animals of HF+EGFP and HF+SERCA2a groups.Sixty days after the gene transfer,the expression of SERCA2a at the protein level was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry,the changes in cardiac function were determined by echocardiographic and hemodynamic analysis,and the changes in serum inflammatory and neuro-hormonal factors(including BNP,TNF-a,IL-6,ET-1 and Ang II were determined by radioimmunoassay.Results Sixty days after gene transfer,LVEF,Ev/Av and ±dp/dtmax increased significantly(P < 0.05,along with an increase of SERCA2a protein expression in the ischemic myocardium(PP < 0.05,accompanied by a significant decrease of inflammatory and neural-hormonal factors(PP < 0.05 in HF+SERCA2a group as compared with HF/HF+EGFP group.Conclusions Overexpression of SERCA2a may significantly improve the cardiac function of the ischemic myocardium of HF model induced by CMI and reverse the activation of neural-hormonal factors,implying that it has a potential therapeutic significance in CMI related heart failure.

  13. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  14. Calcium in aardappel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velvis, H.

    2001-01-01

    Een overzicht wordt gegeven van de literatuur m.b.t. het element calcium in aardappel. Daarbij wordt gekeken naar de functie in de plant, de opname en het interne transport, en de gevolgen van tekorten voor de opbrengst en de vatbaarheid voor pathogenen

  15. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling...

  16. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone...... in the renal tubule and then discuss why not all gene defects that cause renal tubular acidosis are associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis....

  17. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  18. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh eHocking

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact fruit development, physical traits and disease susceptibility through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to ripening and the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g. blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples. This review works towards an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved

  19. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  20. Lead content of calcium supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, E A; Szabo, N J; Tebbett, I R

    2000-09-20

    Substantial quantities of lead have been reported in some over-the-counter calcium supplement preparations, including not only bone-meal and dolomite, but also over-the-counter natural and refined calcium carbonate formulations. Examination of this issue is warranted given recent increases in physician recommendations for calcium supplements for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. To determine the lead content of calcium supplements and to quantify the lead exposure from popular brands of calcium in dosages used for childhood recommended daily allowance, osteoporosis, and phosphate binding in dialysis patients. Analysis of lead content in 21 formulations of nonprescription calcium carbonate (including 7 natural [ie, oyster shell] and 14 refined), 1 brand of prescription-only calcium acetate, and 1 noncalcium synthetic phosphate binder conducted in March 2000. Lead content, assayed using electrothermal atomic absorption, expressed as micrograms of lead per 800 mg/d of elemental calcium, per 1500 mg/d of calcium, and for a range of dosages for patients with renal failure. Six microg/d of lead was considered the absolute dietary limit, with no more than 1 microg/d being the goal for supplements. Four of 7 natural products had measurable lead content, amounting to approximately 1 microg/d for 800 mg/d of calcium, between 1 and 2 microg/d for 1500 mg/d of calcium, and up to 10 microg/d for renal dosages. Four of the 14 refined products had similar lead content, including up to 3 microg/d of lead in osteoporosis calcium dosages and up to 20 microg/d in high renal dosages. No lead was detected in the calcium acetate or polymer products. Lead was present even in some brand name products from major pharmaceutical companies not of natural oyster shell derivation. Despite increasingly stringent limits of lead exposure, many calcium supplement formulations contain lead and thereby may pose an easily avoidable public health concern. JAMA. 2000;284:1425-1429.

  1. Technical note: A comparison of reticular and ruminal pH monitored continuously with 2 measurement systems at different weeks of early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, M; Münger, A; Dohme-Meier, F

    2016-03-01

    Subacute ruminal acidosis is one of the most important digestive disorders in high-yielding dairy cows fed highly fermentable diets. Monitoring of forestomach pH has been suggested as a potentially valuable tool for diagnosing subacute ruminal acidosis. The objective of the present study was to compare continuously recorded measurements of an indwelling telemetric pH sensor inserted orally in the reticulum with those obtained from a measurement system placed in the ventral sac of the rumen through a cannula. The experiment was conducted with 6 ruminally cannulated Holstein cows kept in a freestall barn. Equal numbers of cows were assigned to 2 treatment groups based on their previous lactation milk yield. Cows in treatment CON- were offered a diet consisting of only fresh herbage cut once daily, and cows in treatment CON+ got fresh herbage plus a concentrate supplement according to the individual milk yield of each cow to meet their predicted nutrient requirements. The experiment lasted from 2 wk before the predicted calving date until wk 8 of lactation. During the whole experiment, a pH value was recorded every 10 min in the reticulum using a wireless telemetry bolus including a pH sensor (eBolus, eCow Ltd., Exeter, Devon, UK), which had been applied orally using a balling gun. Simultaneously, in wk 2, before the estimated calving date and in wk 2, 4, 6, and 8 of lactation, the ruminal pH was measured every 30 s for 48 h with the LRCpH measurement system (Dascor Inc., Escondido, CA) placed in the ventral sac of the rumen through the cannula. The readings of the LRCpH measurement system were summarized as an average over 10 min for statistical analysis. The recorded pH values were on average 0.24 pH units higher in the reticulum than in the rumen. The reticular pH also showed less fluctuation (overall SD 0.19 pH units) than pH profiles recorded in the rumen (overall SD 0.51 pH units). Regardless of measurement system, pH was not influenced by treatment, but varied

  2. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  3. Calcium, essential for health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Victoria, Emilio

    2016-07-12

    Calcium (Ca) is the most abundant mineral element in our body. It accounts for about 2% of body weight. The functions of calcium are: a) functions skeletal and b) regulatory functions. Bone consists of a protein matrix that mineralizes mainly with calcium (the most abundant), phosphate and magnesium, for it is essential an adequate dietary intake of Ca, phosphorus and vitamin D. The ionic Ca (Ca2+) is essential to maintain and / or perform different specialized functions of, virtually, all body cells cellular. Because of its important functions Ca2+ must be closely regulated, keeping plasma concentrations within narrow ranges. For this reason there is an accurate response against hypocalcemia or hypercalcemia in which the parathormone, calcitriol, calcitonin and vitamin K are involved. Ca intakes in the Spanish population are low in a significant percentage of the older adult’s population, especially in women. The main source of Ca in the diet is milk and milk derivatives. Green leafy vegetables, fruits and legumes can be important sources of Ca in a Mediterranean dietary pattern. The bioavailability of dietary Ca depends on physiological and dietary factors. Physiological include age, physiological status (gestation and lactation) Ca and vitamin D status and disease. Several studies relate Ca intake in the diet and various diseases, such as osteoporosis, cancer, cardiovascular disease and obesity.

  4. Evolução do comportamento e da atividade elétrica cortical do rato com lesões crônicas da formação reticular mesencefálica Behavioral and electrographic studies on rats after chronic lesion of the midbrain reticular formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-12-01

    Full Text Available Para este trabalho foram utilizados 18 ratos albinos da raça Wistar com lesões eletrolíticas crônicas da formação reticular mesencefálica, sendo 11 unilaterais e 7 bilaterais. Todas as lesões foram suficientemente amplas para interromper completamente o sistema ativador ascendente de uma ou de ambas as metades do mesencéfalo. Aumento da sincronização do eletrocorticograma provocado pelo sono espontâneo foi observado mesmo nos animais com lesão bilateral; este fato fala a favor da existência de mecanismos ativadores corticais situados acima do nível mesencefálico, que são deprimidos durante o sono. Progressivamente observa-se recuperação da atividade elétrica cortical dessincronizada e da atividade motora (comportamentos de alerta e de vigília, tanto nos animais com lesão unilateral como nos com bilateral. Nos primeiros, contudo, a recuperação é mais precoce e rápida. O sono fisiológico se desenvolve com todas as suas fases normais a partir do 4.° ou 5.° dias depois da lesão. A atividade dessincronizada do neocórtex observada durante a fase paradoxal do sono independe de qualquer estrutura em particular existente no tegmento do mesencéfalo.This study was performed on 18 albino rats subjected to either unilateral (11 or bilateral (7 electrolytic destruction of the midbrain reticular formation. In all preparations a complete unilateral or bilateral interruption of the ascending activating system was achieved. The electrocorticographic pattern of synchronized sleep ocurred in both unilaterally and bilaterally lesioned rats. This was found as soon as the animal recovered from the surgical trauma, when slow waves still predominated. Such finding support the hypothesis that activating systems other than the midbrain reticular activating system exist whose functional block during sleep furthers the synchronization of the cortical electrical activity. An increasing recovery of desynchronization and motor activity as a

  5. Irradiation with ultraviolet light in the presence of vanadate increases Ca2+ permeability of the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane via Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, T; Yamasaki, K; Yamamoto, T

    1995-02-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of rabbit skeletal muscle was irradiated with ultraviolet light (UV) in the presence of vanadate plus 2 mM EGTA, 10 mM MgCl2, 20% DMSO, and 50 mM PIPES (pH 6.5) at room temperature. In the presence of 100 microM vanadate, the Ca(2+)-uptake activity of SR rapidly decreased and was almost lost in 20 min. The activity was inhibited as a function of vanadate concentration with an apparent Ki of about 20 microM. On the other hand, Ca(2+)-dependent ATP hydrolytic activity as well as phosphoenzyme (EP) formation activity decreased very slowly, and more than 50% of these activities remained 20 min after initiation of the vanadate-UV treatment. Half inhibition of these activities required about 100 microM vanadate. The loss of the relationship between Ca(2+)-uptake and ATPase reaction was found to be mainly caused by an increase in the Ca2+ permeability of the SR membrane, which was raised by increasing the vanadate concentration or UV irradiation time in a manner similar to that observed for the Ca2+ uptake. No rise in Ca2+ permeability occurred in liposomes reconstituted from SR lipid when they were irradiated with UV in the presence of 100 microM vanadate. When the vanadate-UV-treated SR was allowed to react with fluoral-P (4-amino-3-penten-2-one), an indicator of aldehyde, and the membrane proteins were separated by HPLC in the presence of SDS, the fluorescent probe was found to be closely associated with the Ca(2+)-ATPase fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Acute effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ accumulation and contractility in human type I and type II skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutka, T L; Lamboley, C R; Murphy, R M; Lamb, G D

    2014-10-01

    Taurine occurs in high concentrations in muscle and is implicated in numerous physiological processes, yet its effects on many aspects of contractility remain unclear. Using mechanically skinned segments of human vastus lateralis muscle fibers, we characterized the effects of taurine on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ accumulation and contractile apparatus properties in type I and type II fibers. Prolonged myoplasmic exposure (>10 min) to taurine substantially increased the rate of accumulation of Ca2+ by the SR in both fiber types, with no change in the maximum amount accumulated; no such effect was found with carnosine. SR Ca2+ accumulation was similar with 10 or 20 mM taurine, but was significantly slower at 5 mM taurine. Cytoplasmic taurine (20 mM) had no detectable effects on the responsiveness of the Ca2+ release channels in either fiber type. Taurine caused a small increase in Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in type I fibers, but type II fibers were unaffected; maximum Ca(2+)-activated force was unchanged in both cases. The effects of taurine on SR Ca2+ accumulation (1) only became apparent after prolonged cytoplasmic exposure, and (2) persisted for some minutes after complete removal of taurine from the cytoplasm, consistent with the hypothesis that the effects were due to an action of taurine from inside the SR. In summary, taurine potentiates the rate of SR Ca2+ uptake in both type I and type II human fibers, possibly via an action from within the SR lumen, with the degree of potentiation being significantly reduced at low physiological taurine levels. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Inhibition of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump with thapsigargin to estimate the contribution of Na+-Ca2+ exchange to ventricular myocyte relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassani R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Relaxation in the mammalian ventricle is initiated by Ca2+ removal from the cytosol, which is performed by three main transport systems: sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SR-A, Na+-Ca2+ exchanger (NCX and the so-called slow mechanisms (sarcolemmal Ca2+-ATPase and mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. To estimate the relative contribution of each system to twitch relaxation, SR Ca2+ accumulation must be selectively inhibited, usually by the application of high caffeine concentrations. However, caffeine has been reported to often cause changes in membrane potential due to NCX-generated inward current, which compromises the reliability of its use. In the present study, we estimated integrated Ca2+ fluxes carried by SR-A, NCX and slow mechanisms during twitch relaxation, and compared the results when using caffeine application (Cf-NT and an electrically evoked twitch after inhibition of SR-A with thapsigargin (TG-TW. Ca2+ transients were measured in 20 isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes with indo-1. For transients in which one or more transporters were inhibited, Ca2+ fluxes were estimated from the measured free Ca2+ concentration and myocardial Ca2+ buffering characteristics. NCX-mediated integrated Ca2+ flux was significantly higher with TG-TW than with Cf-NT (12 vs 7 µM, whereas SR-dependent flux was lower with TG-TW (77 vs 81 µM. The relative participations of NCX (12.5 vs 8% with TG-TW and Cf-NT, respectively and SR-A (85 vs 89.5% with TG-TW and Cf-NT, respectively in total relaxation-associated Ca2+ flux were also significantly different. We thus propose TG-TW as a reliable alternative to estimate NCX contribution to twitch relaxation in this kind of analysis.

  8. Determination of percent calcium carbonate in calcium chromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    The precision, accuracy and reliability of the macro-combustion method is superior to the Knorr alkalimetric method, and it is faster. It also significantly reduces the calcium chromate waste accrual problem. The macro-combustion method has been adopted as the official method for determination of percent calcium carbonate in thermal battery grade anhydrous calcium chromate and percent calcium carbonate in quicklime used in the production of calcium chromate. The apparatus and procedure can be used to measure the percent carbonate in inorganic materials other than calcium chromate. With simple modifications in the basic apparatus and procedure, the percent carbon and hydrogen can be measured in many organic material, including polymers and polymeric formulations. 5 figures, 5 tables

  9. Espécies de Parmotrema (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) no Parque Estadual da Cantareira, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. I. As espécies com máculas efiguradas ou reticulares

    OpenAIRE

    Benatti,Michel Navarro

    2013-01-01

    O levantamento das espécies pertencentes a Parmotrema no Parque Estadual da Cantareira e arredores revelou a ocorrência de 20 espécies, seis delas com máculas reticulares ou efiguradas. Parmotrema pilosum está sendo descrita pela primeira vez para o Estado de São Paulo. São apresentadas uma chave de identificação, descrições, comentários e ilustrações.

  10. Análisis del fenónemo de las personas sin hogar en los medios de comunicación escrita mayoritarios. Una aproximación desde el análisis reticular del discurso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estíbaliz García Juan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación se propone examinar algunos medios de prensa escrita de masas, en busca de el/los marco/s culturales utilizados para orientar, percibir, racionalizar y comprender el fenómeno del sinhogarismo; organizando y analizando el contenido de esto/s marco/s (conceptos, estereotipos, problemáticas asociadas, etc, y las relaciones entre ellos en forma reticular.

  11. Trigeminal, Visceral and Vestibular Inputs May Improve Cognitive Functions by Acting through the Locus Coeruleus and the Ascending Reticular Activating System: A New Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo De Cicco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that sensory signals sustain the background discharge of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS which includes the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC neurons and controls the level of attention and alertness. Moreover, LC neurons influence brain metabolic activity, gene expression and brain inflammatory processes. As a consequence of the sensory control of ARAS/LC, stimulation of a sensory channel may potential influence neuronal activity and trophic state all over the brain, supporting cognitive functions and exerting a neuroprotective action. On the other hand, an imbalance of the same input on the two sides may lead to an asymmetric hemispheric excitability, leading to an impairment in cognitive functions. Among the inputs that may drive LC neurons and ARAS, those arising from the trigeminal region, from visceral organs and, possibly, from the vestibular system seem to be particularly relevant in regulating their activity. The trigeminal, visceral and vestibular control of ARAS/LC activity may explain why these input signals: (1 affect sensorimotor and cognitive functions which are not directly related to their specific informational content; and (2 are effective in relieving the symptoms of some brain pathologies, thus prompting peripheral activation of these input systems as a complementary approach for the treatment of cognitive impairments and neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. The Emotional Gatekeeper: A Computational Model of Attentional Selection and Suppression through the Pathway from the Amygdala to the Inhibitory Thalamic Reticular Nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Daniel; Barbas, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In a complex environment that contains both opportunities and threats, it is important for an organism to flexibly direct attention based on current events and prior plans. The amygdala, the hub of the brain's emotional system, is involved in forming and signaling affective associations between stimuli and their consequences. The inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) is a hub of the attentional system that gates thalamo-cortical signaling. In the primate brain, a recently discovered pathway from the amygdala sends robust projections to TRN. Here we used computational modeling to demonstrate how the amygdala-TRN pathway, embedded in a wider neural circuit, can mediate selective attention guided by emotions. Our Emotional Gatekeeper model demonstrates how this circuit enables focused top-down, and flexible bottom-up, allocation of attention. The model suggests that the amygdala-TRN projection can serve as a unique mechanism for emotion-guided selection of signals sent to cortex for further processing. This inhibitory selection mechanism can mediate a powerful affective ‘framing’ effect that may lead to biased decision-making in highly charged emotional situations. The model also supports the idea that the amygdala can serve as a relevance detection system. Further, the model demonstrates how abnormal top-down drive and dysregulated local inhibition in the amygdala and in the cortex can contribute to the attentional symptoms that accompany several neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26828203

  13. Reticular Basement Membrane Vessels Are Increased in COPD Bronchial Mucosa by Both Factor VIII and Collagen IV Immunostaining and Are Hyperpermeable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Soltani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Using Collagen IV staining, we have previously reported that the reticular basement membrane (Rbm is hypervascular and the lamina propria (LP is hypovascular in COPD airways. This study compared Collagen IV staining with vessels marked with anti-Factor VIII and examined vessel permeability in bronchial biopsies from COPD and normal subjects using albumin staining. Results. Anti-Collagen IV antibody detected more vessels in the Rbm (P=0.002 and larger vessels in both Rbm (P<0.001 and LP (P=0.003 compared to Factor VIII. COPD airways had more vessels (with greater permeability in the Rbm (P=0.01 and fewer vessels (with normal permeability in the LP compared to controls with both Collagen IV and Factor VIII antibodies (P=0.04 and P=0.01. Conclusion. Rbm vessels were increased in number and were hyperpermeable in COPD airways. Anti-Collagen IV and anti-Factor VIII antibodies did not uniformly detect the same vessel populations; the first is likely to reflect larger and older vessels with the latter reflecting smaller, younger vessels.

  14. The selective distribution of LYVE-1-expressing endothelial cells and reticular cells in the reticulo-endothelial system (RES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Miao; Kimura, Shunsuke; Nio-Kobayashi, Junko; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    LYVE-1, a receptor molecule for hyaluronan, is expressed in the lymphatic endothelium, blood sinus endothelium, and certain macrophage lineages. The present immunohistochemical study revealed a broader distribution of LYVE-1 in vascular endothelial cells of the murine lung, adrenal gland, and heart as well as the liver and spleen. In addition, sinus reticular cells-including sinuslining cells-in the medulla of the lymph node also intensely expressed LYVE-1. Ultrastructurally, immuno-gold particles for LYVE-1 were localized on the entire length of plasma membrane in all cell types. Most of these LYVE-1-expressing cells had previously been classified as the reticuloendothelial system (RES) specialized for eliminating foreign particles. An LPS stimulation decreased the LYVE-1 expression in macrophages but elevated the expression at mRNA and protein levels in the liver and lung, major organs for the elimination of blood-born waste substances. LYVE-1-expressing endothelial cells in these organs participated in the endocytosis of exogenous particles, and the uptake ability was conspicuously enhanced by the LPS challenge. Although the expression of the degrading enzyme, hyaluronidase, was generally low in the LYVE-1-expressing cells, they were topographically associated with a dense distribution of macrophages possessing hyaluronidase activities in each tissue. These findings suggest that the LYVE-1-expressing cells might be involved in the uptake of hyaluronan and other waste products as well as foreign particles circulating in the blood and lymph while participating in the subsequent degradation in relay with adjacent macrophage populations.

  15. Reticular Chemistry at Its Best: Directed Assembly of Hexagonal Building Units into the Awaited Metal-Organic Framework with the Intricate Polybenzene Topology, pbz-MOF

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2016-10-05

    The ability to direct the assembly of hexagonal building units offers great prospective to construct the awaited and looked-for hypothetical polybenzene (pbz) or “cubic graphite” structure, described 70 years ago. Here, we demonstrate the successful use of reticular chemistry as an appropriate strategy for the design and deliberate construction of a zirconium-based metal–organic framework (MOF) with the intricate pbz underlying net topology. The judicious selection of the perquisite hexagonal building units, six connected organic and inorganic building blocks, allowed the formation of the pbz-MOF-1, the first example of a Zr(IV)-based MOF with pbz topology. Prominently, pbz-MOF-1 is highly porous, with associated pore size and pore volume of 13 Å and 0.99 cm3 g–1, respectively, and offers high gravimetric and volumetric methane storage capacities (0.23 g g–1 and 210.4 cm3 (STP) cm–3 at 80 bar). Notably, the pbz-MOF-1 pore system permits the attainment of one of the highest CH4 adsorbed phase density enhancements at high pressures (0.15 and 0.21 g cm–3 at 35 and 65 bar, respectively) as compared to benchmark microporous MOFs.

  16. [Calcium--essential for everybody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, Grazyna; Czeczot, Hanna

    2014-06-01

    Calcium regulates majority of metabolic processes within human organism and its optimal intake decreases risk of metabolic illnesses conditioned by diet. Deficiency of calcium results in higher body max index, increase risk of insulin resistance, diabetes type 2 and osteoporosis. Diet delivering full calcium load diminished impendency of hypertension; calcium regulates tension of smooth muscles of blood vessels, limits neurotransmitters activity and also diminish hazardous activity of sodium chloride. Anticancerogenic activity of calcium results from formation insoluble bile acids and fat acids salts, and most of all, from inhibition of intestine mucosa cells hyper proliferation. Due to presence of vitamin D3, CLA, proteins and bioactive peptides emerging from them, milk is more efficient in prophylaxis of diet conditioned illnesses than calcium supplements. Efficiency of milk and dairy products in treatment of obesity, sclerosis and hypertension has been proved by DASH diet.

  17. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...

  18. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  19. Simulation of the effect of rogue ryanodine receptors on a calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Ye, Xuesong; Cheng, Heping

    2010-06-01

    Calcium homeostasis is considered to be one of the most important factors for the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. However, under some pathological conditions, such as heart failure (HF), calcium homeostasis is disordered, and spontaneous waves may occur. In this study, we developed a mathematical model of formation and propagation of a calcium wave based upon a governing system of diffusion-reaction equations presented by Izu et al (2001 Biophys. J. 80 103-20) and integrated non-clustered or 'rogue' ryanodine receptors (rogue RyRs) into a two-dimensional (2D) model of ventricular myocytes isolated from failing hearts in which sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pools are partially unloaded. The model was then used to simulate the effect of rogue RyRs on initiation and propagation of the calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with HF. Our simulation results show that rogue RyRs can amplify the diastolic SR Ca2+ leak in the form of Ca2+ quarks, increase the probability of occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ waves even with smaller SR Ca2+ stores, accelerate Ca2+ wave propagation, and hence lead to delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) and cardiac arrhythmia in the diseased heart. This investigation suggests that incorporating rogue RyRs in the Ca2+ wave model under HF conditions provides a new view of Ca2+ dynamics that could not be mimicked by adjusting traditional parameters involved in Ca2+ release units and other ion channels, and contributes to understanding the underlying mechanism of HF.

  20. Effects of atorvastatin on calcium-regulating proteins: a possible mechanism to repair cardiac dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lei; Chen, Guo-Ping; Lu, Xian; Zheng, Liang-Rong; Mou, Yun; Hu, Shen-Jiang

    2009-05-01

    Previous clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that statins, the inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, can improve left ventricular function in damaged hearts. Also, the normal expression of Ca(2+) regulatory proteins is critical for efficient myocardial function. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effect of statins on cardiac function is associated with alterations of Ca(2+) regulatory proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin on cardiac function in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), focusing in particular on its impact on the expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA2a), phospholamban (PLB) and its phosphorylated form (phosphorylated PLB), all of which are Ca(2+) regulatory proteins in myocardium. SHRs showed decreases in gene expression of SERCA2a and phosphorylated PLB, and reduction in SERCA activity in the left ventricular myocardium, as well as reduced cardiac function, compared to age-matched Wistar Kyoto rats (WKYs). Furthermore, we showed that in SHRs atorvastatin preserved cardiac dysfunction accompanied by positive alterations in calcium regulatory proteins, with up-regulation in expression of SERCA2a and phosphorylated PLB, and with improvement of SERCA activity. Thus, atorvastatin has positive effects on calcium regulatory proteins, which may be one of the mechanisms of the beneficial effect of statins on cardiac function in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

  1. Efeitos do pentobarbital sódico sobre a atividade elétrica cerebral do rato com lesões da formação reticular mesencefálica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter C. Pereira

    1970-12-01

    Full Text Available Para êste estudo foram empregados 35 ratos da raça Wistar em preparação aguda (24 com lesão bilateral e 11 com lesão unilateral da formação reticular mesencefálica e 18 preparações crônicas. O método empregado na obtenção das preparações foi descrito em trabalho anterior12. O objetivo desta série de experiências foi o de verificar de que maneira o pentobarbital interfere sobre as características da atividade elétrica cortical após lesão da formação reticular mesencefálica. Para tal, em animais preparados agudamente, foram feitas lesões progressivamente mais extensas e o barbitúrico injetado por via intravenosa em doses crescentes. A fim de testar a integridade do sistema reticular ativador ascendente, além de estímulos dolorosos intensos, aplicávamos pulsos de 5 a 10 V, 100 Hz, e 0,1 ms à formação reticular mesencefálica situada abaixo da região lesada. A ausência de reação de alerta cortical (dessincronização nos assegurava que tal sistema havia sido lesado completamente. Nas preparações crônicas o pentobarbital era injetado por via intraperitoneal. Dessas experiências concluimos o seguinte: 1. Aumento da sincronização do eletrocorticograma nos animais com lesões parciais ou totais da formação reticular mesencefálica. 2. Depressão acentuada e precoce da atividade elétrica cerebral nos ratos com lesão muito extensa (comprometendo também a porção ventrobasal do tálamo. 3. Isocronismo da atividade elétrica cortical nos dois hemisférios cerebrais. 4. O pentobarbital parece agir tanto sobre os sistemas ativadores como sobre o sincronizador do eletrocorticograma. As doses pequenas deprimem os primeiros, liberando o segundo, enquanto que as maiores bloqueiam também este último. Sòmente doses muito mais altas é que fazem desaparecer totalmente a atividade do córtex cerebral, que se mostra, portanto, mais resistente à ação da droga.

  2. [Mechanism of 17β-estrogen on intracellular free calcium regulation in smooth muscle cells at the endometrial-myometrial interface in uteri with adenomyosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sha; Duan, Hua; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Henghui; Li, Guoli

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the regulation mechanism of estrogen on the free calcium of smooth muscle cells at the endometrial-myometrial interface (EMI) in uteri with adenomyosis. From September 2011 to November 2012, 59 uterine myometrial specimens were obtained from 59 cases underwent hysterectomy, including 28 adenomyosis patients as adenomyosis (ADS) group and 31 patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III as control group. EMI smooth muscle cells were cultured and loaded with calcium ion fluorescent probe fluo-4/AM. After treated with trisphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonist, blocker of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-adenosine triphosphate (ATP), depleted agent of the ryanodine receptor-operated Ca(2+), inhibitor of L-type calcium channel, inhibitor of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchanger, the labeled cells were stimulated with estrogen. The changes of intracellular Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity were detected by laser scanning microscopy. The changes of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was indicated by △F[Ca(2+)](i). (1) Under normal calcium conditions, after the stimulation of estrogen, intracellular Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity in ADS group and control group both increased than those without estrogen. The △F[Ca(2+)](i) in ADS group was 384 ± 26, and in the control group △F[Ca(2+)](i) was 235 ± 20. The △F[Ca(2+)](i) in ADS group was higher than that in the control (P calcium conditions, the △F[Ca(2+)](i) in ADS group was 207 ± 17, and in the control group △F[Ca(2+)](i) was 221 ± 19. The △F[Ca(2+)](i) in ADS group was almost the same with the increase in the control (P = 0.731). The △F[Ca(2+)](i) in ADS group was significantly decreased compared with the calcium condition (P calcium conditions (P = 0.060). (2) After treated with IP3 receptor antagonist, blocker of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATP, depleted agent of the ryanodine receptor-operated Ca(2+), the △F[Ca(2+)]i in both groups were significantly reduced (P calcium channel, the △F[Ca(2+)](i

  3. Effects of beta-escin and saponin on the transverse-tubular system and sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes of rat and toad skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launikonis, B S; Stephenson, D G

    1999-05-01

    Mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres from rat and toad were exposed to the permeabilizing agents beta-escin and saponin. The effects of these agents on the sealed transverse tubular system (t-system) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) were examined by looking at changes in the magnitude of the force responses to t-system depolarization, the time course of the fluorescence of fura-2 trapped in the sealed t-system, and changes in the magnitude of caffeine-induced contractures following SR loading with Ca2+ under defined conditions. In the presence of 2 microg ml-1 beta-escin and saponin, the response to t-system depolarization was not completely abolished, decreasing to a plateau, and a large proportion of fura-2 remained in the sealed t-system. At 10 microg ml-1, both agents abolished the ability of both rat and toad preparations to respond to t-system depolarization after 3 min of exposure, but a significant amount of fura-2 remained in sealed t-tubules even after exposure to 100 microg ml-1 beta-escin and saponin for 10 min. beta-Escin took longer than saponin to reduce the t-system depolarizations and fura-2 content of the sealed t-system to a similar level. The ability of the SR to load Ca2+ was reduced to a lower level after treatment with beta-escin than saponin. This direct effect on the SR occurred at much lower concentrations for rat (2 microg ml-1 beta-escin and 10 microg ml-1 saponin) than toad (10 microg ml-1 beta-escin and 150 microg ml-1 saponin). The reverse order in sensitivities to beta-escin and saponin of t-system and SR membranes indicates that the mechanisms of action of beta-escin and saponin are different in the two types of membrane. In conclusion, this study shows that: (1) beta-escin has a milder action on the surface membrane than saponin; (2) beta-escin is a more potent modifier of SR function; (3) simple permeabilization of membranes is not sufficient to explain the effects of beta-escin and saponin on muscle membranes; and (4) the t

  4. Numerical Analysis of the Effect of T-tubule Location on Calcium Transient in Ventricular Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Uduak Z.; Wang, Jun; Yu, Zeyun

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signaling in cardiac myocytes is vital for proper functioning of the heart. Understanding the intracellular Ca2+ dynamics would give an insight into the functions of normal and diseased hearts. In the current study, spatiotemporal Ca2+ dynamics is investigated in ventricular myocytes by considering Ca2+ release and re-uptake via sarcolemma and transverse tubules (T-tubules), Ca2+ diffusion and buffering in the cytosol, and the blockade of Ca2+ activities associated with the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This study is carried out using a three dimensional (3D) geometric model of a branch of T-tubule extracted from the electron microscopy (EM) images of a partial ventricular myocyte. Mathematical modeling is done by using a system of partial differential equations involving Ca2+ , buffers, and membrane channels. Numerical simulation results suggest that a lack of T-tubule structure at the vicinity of the cell surface could increase the peak time of Ca2+ concentration in myocytes. The results also show that T-tubules and mobile buffers play an important role in the regulation of Ca2+ transient in ventricular myocytes. PMID:24212025

  5. Critical roles of hydrophobicity and orientation of side chains for inactivation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase with thapsigargin and thapsigargin analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Anne-Marie Lund; Liu, Huizhen; Sonntag, Yonathan

    2010-01-01

    Thapsigargin (Tg), a specific inhibitor of sarco/endoplasmic Ca(2+)-ATPases (SERCA), binds with high affinity to the E2 conformation of these ATPases. SERCA inhibition leads to elevated calcium levels in the cytoplasm, which in turn induces apoptosis. We present x-ray crystallographic and intrins...

  6. Calcium chromate process related investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillard, B.M.

    1979-01-01

    A pilot plant for production of calcium chromate has been scaled up to a small production facility at the General Electric Neutron Devices Department. In preparation for this scale-up, the process and final product were studied in order to evaluate problems not considered previously. The variables and processes studied included: (1) the determination of optimum drying temperature and time for product analysis; (2) the effect of the grade of lime used as the precipitating agent on the purity of the calcium chromate; (3) product purity when calcium chromate is precipitated by the addition of ammonium chromate to slaked lime; (4) the reagents best suited for cleaning calcium chromate spills; and (5) methods for determining hydroxide ion concentration in calcium chromate. The optimum drying time for the product before analysis is four hours at 600 0 C. Gases evolved at various temperatures during the drying process were carbon dioxide and water vapor. Technical grade lime produced calcium chromate of the highest purity. Both nitric and acetic acids were efficient dissolvers of calcium chromate spills. Direct titration of hydroxide ion with sulfuric acid gave an average recovery of 93% for samples spiked with calcium hydroxide. 1 figure, 17 tables

  7. Calcium kinetics in parathyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymling, J.F.

    1964-01-01

    This paper reports a study of calcium kinetics in twelve cases of parathyroid disease. The data suggest that hyperparathyroidism usually causes increased bone turnover. The study of calcium kinetics may be a valuable tool in the differential diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism and in evaluating treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. The bone turnover in one case of hypoparathyroidism was extremely low. 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a ... tion and development of tissues (bone and calcareous skeleton) (Ringer and Sainsbury 1894), conduction of nerve impulse to muscle, cell ...

  9. Calcium Supplements: Do Men Need Them Too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition and healthy eating Should men take calcium supplements? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. ... healthy men don't need to take calcium supplements. Calcium is important for men for optimal bone ...

  10. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing features ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are given ...

  11. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... in the char conversion process. Comprehensive global equilibrium calculations predicted important characteristics of the inorganic ash residue. Equilibrium calculations predict the formation of liquid salt if sufficient amounts of Ca are added and according to experiments as well as calculations calcium binds...

  12. The inhibition of the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus induces waking and the activation of all adrenergic and noradrenergic neurons: a combined pharmacological and functional neuroanatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Olivier; Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Arthaud, Sébastien; Fort, Patrice; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic neurons specifically active during paradoxical sleep (PS) localized in the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi) are known to be responsible for the cessation of activity of the noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus during PS. In the present study, we therefore sought to determine the role of the DPGi in PS onset and maintenance and in the inhibition of the LC noradrenergic neurons during this state. The effect of the inactivation of DPGi neurons on the sleep-waking cycle was examined in rats by microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, or clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist. Combining immunostaining of the different populations of wake-inducing neurons with that of c-FOS, we then determined whether muscimol inhibition of the DPGi specifically induces the activation of the noradrenergic neurons of the LC. Slow wave sleep and PS were abolished during 3 and 5 h after muscimol injection in the DPGi, respectively. The application of clonidine in the DPGi specifically induced a significant decrease in PS quantities and delayed PS appearance compared to NaCl. We further surprisingly found out that more than 75% of the noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons of all adrenergic and noradrenergic cell groups are activated after muscimol treatment in contrast to the other wake active systems significantly less activated. These results suggest that, in addition to its already know inhibition of LC noradrenergic neurons during PS, the DPGi might inhibit the activity of noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons from all groups during PS, but also to a minor extent during SWS and waking.

  13. The inhibition of the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus induces waking and the activation of all adrenergic and noradrenergic neurons: a combined pharmacological and functional neuroanatomical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Clément

    Full Text Available GABAergic neurons specifically active during paradoxical sleep (PS localized in the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi are known to be responsible for the cessation of activity of the noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus during PS. In the present study, we therefore sought to determine the role of the DPGi in PS onset and maintenance and in the inhibition of the LC noradrenergic neurons during this state. The effect of the inactivation of DPGi neurons on the sleep-waking cycle was examined in rats by microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, or clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist. Combining immunostaining of the different populations of wake-inducing neurons with that of c-FOS, we then determined whether muscimol inhibition of the DPGi specifically induces the activation of the noradrenergic neurons of the LC. Slow wave sleep and PS were abolished during 3 and 5 h after muscimol injection in the DPGi, respectively. The application of clonidine in the DPGi specifically induced a significant decrease in PS quantities and delayed PS appearance compared to NaCl. We further surprisingly found out that more than 75% of the noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons of all adrenergic and noradrenergic cell groups are activated after muscimol treatment in contrast to the other wake active systems significantly less activated. These results suggest that, in addition to its already know inhibition of LC noradrenergic neurons during PS, the DPGi might inhibit the activity of noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons from all groups during PS, but also to a minor extent during SWS and waking.

  14. Dialysis delivery of an adenosine A2A agonist into the pontine reticular formation of C57BL/6J mouse increases pontine acetylcholine release and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Christal G; Baghdoyan, Helen A; Lydic, Ralph

    2006-03-01

    In vivo microdialysis in C57BL/6J (B6) mouse was used to test the hypothesis that activating adenosine A(2A) receptors in the pontine reticular formation (PRF) increases acetylcholine (ACh) release and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Eight concentrations of the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS 21680; CGS) were delivered to the PRF and ACh in the PRF was quantified. ACh release was significantly increased by dialysis with 3 mum CGS and significantly decreased by dialysis with 10 and 100 microm CGS. Co-administration of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385; 30 nM) blocked the CGS-induced increase in ACh release. In a second series of experiments, CGS (3 microm) was delivered by dialysis to the PRF for 2 h while recording sleep and wakefulness. CGS significantly decreased time in wakefulness (-51% in h 1; -54% in h 2), increased time in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep (90% in h 1; 151% in h 2), and increased both time in REM sleep (331% in h 2) and the number of REM sleep episodes (488% in h 2). The enhancement of REM sleep is consistent with the interpretation that adenosine A(2A) receptors in the PRF of the B6 mouse contribute to REM sleep regulation, in part, by increasing ACh release in the PRF. A(2A) receptor activation may promote NREM sleep via GABAergic inhibition of arousal promoting neurons in the PRF.

  15. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel eNunez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins, mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC nucleus (contributing to wakefulness and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO nucleus (contributing to REM sleepAnatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  16. Transmisión de cargas entre forjados y puntales en un edificio de forjado reticular de casetón perdido utilizando clareado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasch, I.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of tests carried out during the construction of a building of flats with cast-in-place girderless hollow floor slab in Sabadell, Spain, using the shoring, clearing and striking (SCS process. Loads on shores were recorded during the different construction stages of floor slabs 1 to 6. The two first floor slabs had geometry different than the rest. The experimental results were used to analyse load transmission between slabs and shores during the construction of the building with a SCS process. The experimental results were compared with those obtained applying simplified methods that consider the real stiffness of the shoring, obtaining that the method with a better fit was the New Simplified Procedure.En el presente artículo se presentan los resultados de la instrumentación llevada a cabo durante la construcción de un edificio de viviendas resuelto con forjados reticulares de casetón perdido situado en Sabadell (España, en el que se ha empleado un proceso de cimbrado, clareado, descimbrado (CCD. Se han registrado las cargas debidas a las operaciones constructivas de CCD en puntales de los seis primeros forjados. Dichos registros han permitido analizar la transmisión de cargas entre forjados y puntales durante la construcción de este edificio, teniendo un proceso de CCD. El análisis de las medidas experimentales ha permitido concluir que la transmisión de cargas entre forjados y puntales difiere según las condiciones de contorno del vano estudiado. Asimismo, se han comparado las medidas experimentales con diversos métodos simplificados que permiten simular la operación del clareado, obteniendo que el método que mejor se ajusta es el Nuevo Procedimiento Simplificado.

  17. Calcium release microdomains and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Maack, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    The processes of excitation-contraction (EC) coupling consume large amounts of energy that need to be replenished by oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria. Since Ca(2+) activates key enzymes of the Krebs cycle in the mitochondrial matrix, it is important to understand the mechanisms and kinetics of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake to delineate how in cardiac myocytes, energy supply is efficiently matched to demand. In recent years, the identification of various proteins involved in mitochondrial Ca(2+) signalling and the tethering of mitochondria to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) has considerably advanced the field and supported the concept of a mitochondrial Ca(2+) microdomain, in which Ca(2+) concentrations are high enough to overcome the low Ca(2+) affinity of the principal mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake mechanism, the Ca(2+) uniporter. Furthermore, defects in EC coupling that occur in heart failure disrupt SR-mitochondrial Ca(2+) crosstalk and may cause energetic deficit and oxidative stress, both factors that are thought to be causally involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.

  18. Colchicine modulates calcium homeostasis and electrical property of HL-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yen-Yu; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Lin, Yung-Kuo; Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Colchicine is a microtubule disruptor that reduces the occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after an operation or ablation. However, knowledge of the effects of colchicine on atrial myocytes is limited. The aim of this study was to determine if colchicine can regulate calcium (Ca(2+) ) homeostasis and attenuate the electrical effects of the extracellular matrix on atrial myocytes. Whole-cell clamp, confocal microscopy with fluorescence, and western blotting were used to evaluate the action potential and ionic currents of HL-1 cells treated with and without (control) colchicine (3 nM) for 24 hrs. Compared with control cells, colchicine-treated HL-1 cells had a longer action potential duration with smaller intracellular Ca(2+) transients and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content by 10% and 47%, respectively. Colchicine-treated HL-1 cells showed a smaller L-type Ca(2+) current, reverse mode sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) current and transient outward potassium current than control cells, but had a similar ultra-rapid activating outward potassium current and apamin-sensitive small-conductance Ca(2+) -activated potassium current compared with control cells. Colchicine-treated HL-1 cells expressed less SERCA2a, total, Thr17-phosphorylated phospholamban, Cav1.2, CaMKII, NCX, Kv1.4 and Kv1.5, but they expressed similar levels of the ryanodine receptor, Ser16-phosphorylated phospholamban and Kv4.2. Colchicine attenuated the shortening of the collagen-induced action potential duration in HL-1 cells. These findings suggest that colchicine modulates the atrial electrical activity and Ca(2+) regulation and attenuates the electrical effects of collagen, which may contribute to its anti-AF activity. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Heat-Induced Calcium Leakage Causes Mitochondrial Damage inCaenorhabditis elegansBody-Wall Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momma, Kenta; Homma, Takashi; Isaka, Ruri; Sudevan, Surabhi; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    Acute onset of organ failure in heatstroke is triggered by rhabdomyolysis of skeletal muscle. Here, we showed that elevated temperature increases free cytosolic Ca 2+ [Ca 2+ ]f from RYR (ryanodine receptor)/UNC-68 in vivo in the muscles of an experimental model animal, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans This subsequently leads to mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction, and breakdown of myofilaments similar to rhabdomyolysis. In addition, treatment with an inhibitor of RYR (dantrolene) or activation of FoxO (Forkhead box O)/DAF-16 is effective against heat-induced muscle damage. Acute onset of organ failure in heatstroke is triggered by rhabdomyolysis of skeletal muscle. To gain insight into heat-induced muscle breakdown, we investigated alterations of Ca 2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial morphology in vivo in body-wall muscles of C. elegans exposed to elevated temperature. Heat stress for 3 hr at 35° increased the concentration of [Ca 2+ ]f, and led to mitochondrial fragmentation and subsequent dysfunction in the muscle cells. A similar mitochondrial fragmentation phenotype is induced in the absence of heat stress by treatment with a calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Mutation of the unc-68 gene, which encodes the ryanodine receptor that is linked to Ca 2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, could suppress the mitochondrial dysfunction, muscle degeneration, and reduced mobility and life span induced by heat stress. In addition, in a daf-2 mutant, in which the DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor is activated, resistance to calcium overload, mitochondrial fragmentation, and dysfunction was observed. These findings reveal that heat-induced Ca 2+ accumulation causes mitochondrial damage and consequently induces muscle breakdown. Copyright © 2017 Momma et al.

  20. A key role for STIM1 in store operated calcium channel activation in airway smooth muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peel Samantha E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of cytosolic calcium plays a key role in airway myocyte function. Changes in intracellular Ca2+ stores can modulate contractile responses, modulate proliferation and regulate synthetic activity. Influx of Ca2+ in non excitable smooth muscle is believed to be predominantly through store operated channels (SOC or receptor operated channels (ROC. Whereas agonists can activate both SOC and ROC in a range of smooth muscle types, the specific trigger for SOC activation is depletion of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores. The mechanism underlying SOC activation following depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores in smooth muscle has not been identified. Methods To investigate the roles of the STIM homologues in SOC activation in airway myocytes, specific siRNA sequences were utilised to target and selectively suppress both STIM1 and STIM2. Quantitative real time PCR was employed to assess the efficiency and the specificity of the siRNA mediated knockdown of mRNA. Activation of SOC was investigated by both whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology and a fluorescence based calcium assay. Results Transfection of 20 nM siRNA specific for STIM1 or 2 resulted in robust decreases (>70% of the relevant mRNA. siRNA targeted at STIM1 resulted in a reduction of SOC associated Ca2+ influx in response to store depletion by cyclopiazonic acid (60% or histamine but not bradykinin. siRNA to STIM2 had no effect on these responses. In addition STIM1 suppression resulted in a more or less complete abrogation of SOC associated inward currents assessed by whole cell patch clamp. Conclusion Here we show that STIM1 acts as a key signal for SOC activation following intracellular Ca2+ store depletion or following agonist stimulation with histamine in human airway myocytes. These are the first data demonstrating a role for STIM1 in a physiologically relevant, non-transformed endogenous expression cell model.

  1. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    salts. The perturbation of calcium equilibria by these factors will affect the final properties of acid, calcium and rennet milk gels. By decreasing the pH from 6.0 to 5.2 (acid gels), the calcium equilibrium was significantly affected by temperature (4, 20, 30, 40 oC), and different combinations...... enriched dairy products. Calcium gels can be produced by addition of a calcium salt and heat treatment at temperatures higher than 70 oC for several minutes. The combination of heat treatment and calcium addition to milk with pH values between 6.6 and 5.6, will produce calcium milk gels with unique...... to be formed. In addition the low amount of micellar calcium caused a more compact gel structure with many protein aggregates. The results of this study highlighted the importance of calcium for the formation of acid, calcium and rennet gels. The content and the interactions of calcium with proteins during...

  2. A Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Localized Protein Phosphatase Regulates Phospholamban Phosphorylation and Promotes Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in the Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Akaike, MD, PhD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Phospholamban (PLN is a key regulator of sarcolemma calcium uptake in cardiomyocyte; its inhibitory activity to sarcolemma-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase is regulated by phosphorylation. PLN hypophosphorylation is a common molecular feature in the failing heart. The current study provided evidence at the molecular, cellular, and whole-heart levels to implicate a sarcolemma membrane-targeted protein phosphatase, PP2Ce, as a specific and potent PLN phosphatase. PP2Ce expression was elevated in failing human heart and induced acutely at protein level by β-adrenergic stimulation or oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. PP2Ce expression in mouse heart blunted β-adrenergic response and exacerbated ischemia/reperfusion injury. Therefore, PP2Ce is a new regulator for cardiac function and pathogenesis. Key Words: heart, phosphatase, phospholamban

  3. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  4. Influence of dietary calcium on bone calcium utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, M.; Roland, D.A. Sr.; Clark, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    In Experiment 1, 10 microCi 45 Ca/day were administered to 125 hens for 10 days. Hens were then allocated to five treatments with calcium levels ranging from .08 to 3.75% of the diet. In Experiment 2, hens with morning oviposition times were randomly allocated to 11 treatments that were periods of time postoviposition ranging from 6 hr to 24 hr, in 2-hr increments (Experiment 2). At the end of each 2-hr period, eggs from 25 hens were removed from the uterus. The 18-, 20-, and 22-hr treatments were replicated three times. In Experiment 3, hens were fed either ad libitum or feed was withheld the last 5 or 6 hr before oviposition. In Experiment 4, hens were fed 10 microCi of 45 Ca for 15 days to label skeletal calcium. Hens were divided into two groups and fed a .08 or 3.75% calcium diet for 2 days. On the second day, 25 hens fed the 3.75% calcium diet were intubated with 7 g of the same diet containing .5 g calcium at 1700, 2100, 0100, 0500, and 0700 hr. The measurements used were egg weight, shell weight, and 45 Ca content of the egg shell. Results indicated a significant linear or quadratic regression of dietary calcium levels on 45 Ca accumulation in eggshells and eggshell weight (Experiment 1). As the calcium level of the diet increased, eggshell weight increased and 45 Ca recovery decreased. Utilization of skeletal calcium for shell formation ranged from 28 to 96%. In Experiment 2, the rate of shell calcification was not constant throughout the calcification process but varied significantly

  5. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  6. [Calcium metabolism after the menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanovitch, D; Klotz, H P

    1976-02-16

    The authors recall the antagonism between estradiol and parathormone. Estradiol tends to lower serum calcium and fix calcium in the bones as shown by one of us 25 years ago. The mechanism of this action of estrogen on calcium metabolism has been determined by numerous authors but some points are still not clear, e.g. the interferences between estrogen and calcitonin. Classically, parathormone is known to increase bony reabsorption and raise serum calcium. After the menopause the gradual reduction in estradiol secretion leads to post-menopausal osteoporosis. It is better to administer estrogens prophylactically to women after the menopause provided a cervical smear and mammography have been carried out to eliminate latent carcinoma of the breast or uterine cervix.

  7. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Canillas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies.

  8. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  9. Espécies de Parmotrema (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) no Parque Estadual da Cantareira, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. I. As espécies com máculas efiguradas ou reticulares

    OpenAIRE

    Benatti, Michel Navarro

    2013-01-01

    O levantamento das espécies pertencentes a Parmotrema no Parque Estadual da Cantareira e arredores revelou a ocorrência de 20 espécies, seis delas com máculas reticulares ou efiguradas. Parmotrema pilosum está sendo descrita pela primeira vez para o Estado de São Paulo. São apresentadas uma chave de identificação, descrições, comentários e ilustrações. The survey of the species belonging to Parmotrema in the Parque Estadual da Cantareira and adjacencies revealed the occurrence of 20 specie...

  10. Fortification of milk with calcium: effect on calcium bioavailability and interactions with iron and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Sara; Barberá, Reyes; Lagarda, María Jesús; Farré, Rosaura

    2006-06-28

    Calcium solubility, dialysability, and transport and uptake (retention + transport) by Caco-2 cells as indicators of calcium bioavailability have been estimated in the in vitro gastrointestinal digests of milk and calcium fortified milk. A significant linear correlation (p calcium uptake and the amount of soluble calcium added to the cells, and also between percentage calcium uptake and the calcium measured in the analyzed samples. The solubility, dialysis, transport, and uptake values are higher (p calcium fortified milks than for nonfortified milks; that is, calcium fortification increases not only calcium content but also its bioavailability. An inhibitory effect of calcium from fortified milks upon iron absorption was found. The observed effect of calcium from fortified milks upon zinc bioavailability depends on the in vitro method used, zinc solubility and dialysis decrease in calcium fortified milks, and percentage zinc uptake remains unchanged.

  11. Observation of the molecular organization of calcium release sites in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscle with nanoscale imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, Isuru D; Munro, Michelle; Baddeley, David; Launikonis, Bradley S; Soeller, Christian

    2014-10-06

    Localization microscopy is a fairly recently introduced super-resolution fluorescence imaging modality capable of achieving nanometre-scale resolution. We have applied the dSTORM variation of this method to image intracellular molecular assemblies in skeletal muscle fibres which are large cells that critically rely on nanoscale signalling domains, the triads. Immunofluorescence staining in fixed adult rat skeletal muscle sections revealed clear differences between fast- and slow-twitch fibres in the molecular organization of ryanodine receptors (RyRs; the primary calcium release channels) within triads. With the improved resolution offered by dSTORM, abutting arrays of RyRs in transverse view of fast fibres were observed in contrast to the fragmented distribution on slow-twitch muscle that were approximately 1.8 times shorter and consisted of approximately 1.6 times fewer receptors. To the best of our knowledge, for the first time, we have quantified the nanometre-scale spatial association between triadic proteins using multi-colour super-resolution, an analysis difficult to conduct with electron microscopy. Our findings confirm that junctophilin-1 (JPH1), which tethers the sarcoplasmic reticulum ((SR) intracellular calcium store) to the tubular (t-) system at triads, was present throughout the RyR array, whereas JPH2 was contained within much smaller nanodomains. Similar imaging of the primary SR calcium buffer, calsequestrin (CSQ), detected less overlap of the triad with CSQ in slow-twitch muscle supporting greater spatial heterogeneity in the luminal Ca2+ buffering when compared with fast twitch muscle. Taken together, these nanoscale differences can explain the fundamentally different physiologies of fast- and slow-twitch muscle. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P Basal and thrombin-stimulated platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P metabolism (P metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  13. Calcium affects on vascular endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vaishali B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is one of the most abundant minerals in the body and its metabolism is one of the basic biologic processes in humans. Although historically linked primarily to bone structural development and maintenance, calcium is now recognized as a key component of many physiologic pathways necessary for optimum health including cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, renal, and gastrointestinal systems. A recent meta-analysis published in August 2011 showed a potential increase in cardiovascular events related to calcium supplementation. The possible mechanism of action of this correlation has not been well elucidated. This topic has generated intense interest due to the widespread use of calcium supplements, particularly among the middle aged and elderly who are at the most risk from cardiac events. Prior studies did not control for potential confounding factors such as the use of statins, aspirin or other medications. These controversial results warrant additional well-designed studies to investigate the relationship between calcium supplementation and cardiovascular outcomes. The purpose of this review is to highlight the current literature in regards to calcium supplementation and cardiovascular health; and to identify areas of future research.

  14. Elogio de la ciudad reticular

    OpenAIRE

    González Capitel, Antón

    2004-01-01

    La ciudad no ha sido casi nunca un producto muy claro de decisiones racionales. Hijas de la geografía y del tiempo, las ciudades tuvieron muy a menudo una condición orgánica, cuya inconveniencia y excesiva irregularidad ha quedado frecuentemente compensada por el pintoresquismo que celebran tan a menudo diletantes y turistas. Hijas también del acontecimiento y 03 de la historia -como Rossi nos recordó lúcidamente-, de mitos y de ritos -como Rykwert ilustró con atractivo y acier...

  15. Modeling Calcium Microdomains using Homogenisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Erin R.; Goel, Pranay; Puglisi, Jose L.; Bers, Donald M.; Cannell, Mark; Sneyd, James

    2007-01-01

    Microdomains of calcium (i.e., areas on the nanometer scale that have qualitatively different calcium concentrations from that in the bulk cytosol) are known to be important in many situations. In cardiac cells, for instance, a calcium microdomain between the L-type channels and the ryanodine receptors, the so-called diadic cleft, is where the majority of the control of calcium release occurs. In other cell types that exhibit calcium oscillations and waves, the importance of microdomains in the vicinity of clusters of inositol trisphosphate receptors, or between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and other internal organelles or the plasma membrane, is clear. Given the limits of computational power, it is not currently realistic to model an entire cellular cytoplasm by incorporating detailed structural information about the ER throughout the entire cytoplasm. Hence, most models use a homogenised approach, assuming that both cytoplasm and ER coexist at each point of the domain. Conversely, microdomain models can be constructed, in which detailed structural information can be incorporated, but, until now, methods have not been developed for linking such a microdomain model to a model at the level of the entire cell. Using the homogenisation approach we developed in an earlier paper (Goel P., A. Friedman and J. Sneyd. 2006. Homogenization of the cell cytoplasm: the calcium bidomain equations. SIAM J. on Multiscale Modeling and Simulation, in press) we show how a multiscale model of a calcium microdomain can be constructed. In this model a detailed model of the microdomain (in which the ER and the cytoplasm are separate compartments) is coupled to a homogenised model of the entire cell in a rigorous way. Our method is illustrated by a simple model of the diadic cleft of a cardiac half-sarcomere. PMID:17499276

  16. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  17. Lead in calcium supplements (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, S.; Khalid, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead present in calcium supplements is of grave concern as some lead levels have been measured up to the extent of regulatory limit set by the United States. Calcium supplements inevitably get contaminated with lead as both are naturally occurring elements. Therefore, it is imperative to indicate its level in these supplements in order to create awareness among consumers. In this study, a sophisticated analytical technique, atomic absorption spectrometry was used to analyze Pb contents in 27 commonly consumed Ca supplements manufactured by different national and multinational companies. The daily intake of lead through these supplements was calculated. Only 10% of the calcium supplements analyzed met the criteria of acceptable Pb levels (1.5 mu g/daily dose) in supplements/consumer products set by the United States. It was also found that Pb intake was highest in chelated calcium supplements 28.5 mu g/daily dose, whereas lowest 0.47 mu g/daily dose through calcium supplements with vitamin D formulation. In order to validate our results from the study conducted, IAEA-certified reference material (animal bone, H-5) was analyzed for its Pb levels. The levels of Pb determined were quite in good agreement with the certified values. (author)

  18. Prostaglandin induced changes in the tone of porcine retinal arterioles in vitro involve other factors than calcium activity in perivascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtseva, Olga; Aalkjær, Christian; Bek, Toke

    2015-09-01

    The cellular basis for the regulation of retinal blood flow is unknown, but recently a new type of perivascular cell (PVC) with pericyte characteristics was identified in the retinal arterial vascular wall located immediately external to the vascular smooth muscle cells. A possible involvement of this cell type in the regulation of retinal vascular tone might be elucidated by studying differences in the response after the addition of compounds stimulating respectively relaxation and contraction. The effects of PGE2 and PGF2α on vascular tone and calcium activity in PVCs in porcine retinal arterioles were studied in a confocal myograph after the addition of the ryanodine receptor blocker ryanodine, the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nifedipine, the non-specific cation channel blocker LOE908, the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) blocker CPA, and the inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) and transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel blocker 2-APB. The Ca(2+) channel blockers nifedipine and LOE908 induced significant relaxation of retinal arterioles. After the addition of both PGE2 and PGF2α calcium activity in the PVCs was significantly reduced by both the SERCA inhibitor CPA and the IP3R antagonist 2-APB, but the changes in calcium activity were unrelated to the changes in tone induced by PGE2 and PGF2α. Changes in the tone of porcine retinal arterioles in vitro induced by PGE2 and PGF2α involve other factors than calcium activity in the perivascular cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P parathyroid hormone levels (P animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  20. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  2. Gene expression changes of single skeletal muscle fibers in response to modulation of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chemello

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU gene codifies for the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM channel responsible for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Cytosolic Ca2+ transients are involved in sarcomere contraction through cycles of release and storage in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition cytosolic Ca2+ regulates various signaling cascades that eventually lead to gene expression reprogramming. Mitochondria are strategically placed in close contact with the ER/SR, thus cytosolic Ca2+ transients elicit large increases in the [Ca2+] of the mitochondrial matrix ([Ca2+]mt. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake regulates energy production and cell survival. In addition, we recently showed that MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake controls skeletal muscle trophism. In the same report, we dissected the effects of MCU-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake on gene expression through microarray gene expression analysis upon modulation of MCU expression by in vivo AAV infection. Analyses were performed on single skeletal muscle fibers at two time points (7 and 14 days post-AAV injection. Raw and normalized data are available on the GEO database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/ (GSE60931.

  3. Leveraging the coronary calcium scan beyond the coronary calcium score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Bos (Daniel); M.J.G. Leening (Maarten)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Non-contrast cardiac computed tomography in order to obtain the coronary artery calcium score has become an established diagnostic procedure in the clinical setting, and is commonly employed in clinical and population-based research. This state-of-the-art review paper

  4. Calcium fortification of breakfast cereal enhances calcium absorption in children without affecting iron absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, S A; Griffin, I J; Davila, P; Liang, L

    2001-10-01

    Provision of calcium-fortified foods may represent an important component of improving the calcium intake of children. We sought to determine whether the addition of calcium to cereal would have a net positive effect on calcium absorption without decreasing iron absorption. Twenty-seven children, 6 to 9 years of age, were provided two servings per day (30 g of cereal per serving) of either a low (39 mg/serving) or fortified (156 mg/serving) calcium-containing cereal product for 14 days. Calcium absorption was measured by using stable isotopes added to milk (extrinsically labeled) and to the calcium-fortified cereal (intrinsically labeled). Fractional calcium absorption from the fortified cereal was virtually identical to that from milk. Fractional absorption of calcium from milk did not differ significantly when given with enriched or low-calcium-containing cereal. Total calcium absorption increased from 215 +/- 45 mg/d to 269 +/- 45 mg/d with the addition of the calcium-fortified cereal (P Iron absorption was similar when children received the calcium-fortified cereal or unfortified cereal. The addition of a moderate amount of calcium to a cereal product was beneficial to calcium absorption and did not interfere with iron absorption. Use of calcium-fortified food products may be considered a practical approach to increasing the calcium intake of children.

  5. Vitamin D and intestinal calcium absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J; Seth, Tanya

    2011-12-05

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium through the interior of the enterocyte and basolateral extrusion of calcium by the intestinal plasma membrane pump. This article reviews recent studies that have challenged the traditional model of vitamin D mediated transcellular calcium absorption and the crucial role of specific calcium transport proteins in intestinal calcium absorption. There is also increasing evidence that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can enhance paracellular calcium diffusion. The influence of estrogen, prolactin, glucocorticoids and aging on intestinal calcium absorption and the role of the distal intestine in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption are also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  7. Extra-intestinal calcium handling contributes to normal serum calcium levels when intestinal calcium absorption is suboptimal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieben, Liesbet; Verlinden, Lieve; Masuyama, Ritsuko; Torrekens, Sophie; Moermans, Karen; Schoonjans, Luc; Carmeliet, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert

    2015-12-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D, is a crucial regulator of calcium homeostasis, especially through stimulation of intestinal calcium transport. Lack of intestinal vitamin D receptor (VDR) signaling does however not result in hypocalcemia, because the increased 1,25(OH)2D levels stimulate calcium handling in extra-intestinal tissues. Systemic VDR deficiency, on the other hand, results in hypocalcemia because calcium handling is impaired not only in the intestine, but also in kidney and bone. It remains however unclear whether low intestinal VDR activity, as observed during aging, is sufficient for intestinal calcium transport and for mineral and bone homeostasis. To this end, we generated mice that expressed the Vdr exclusively in the gut, but at reduced levels. We found that ~15% of intestinal VDR expression greatly prevented the Vdr null phenotype in young-adult mice, including the severe hypocalcemia. Serum calcium levels were, however, in the low-normal range, which may be due to the suboptimal intestinal calcium absorption, renal calcium loss, insufficient increase in bone resorption and normal calcium incorporation in the bone matrix. In conclusion, our results indicate that low intestinal VDR levels improve intestinal calcium absorption compared to Vdr null mice, but also show that 1,25(OH)2D-mediated fine-tuning of renal calcium reabsorption and bone mineralization and resorption is required to maintain fully normal serum calcium levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  9. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2014-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers-which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal-has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca(2+) currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 pA and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 μM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  10. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Download PDFs English Espanol ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  11. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to grow and stay strong. The body also needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Nutrition surveys have shown ... found in dairy products. How much calcium and vitamin D you need depends on your age and other factors. If ...

  12. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  13. 21 CFR 182.8223 - Calcium pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8223 Calcium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Calcium pyrophosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  14. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...

  15. Calcium-tolerant anionic surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooreman, Alexander

    1995-01-01

    One of the problems of applying anionic surfactants in, for example, laundry detergents is the precipitation of calcium salts. Much effort has been directed towards avoiding precipitation. There are at least three ways for tackling the problem. The first involves the use of a large quantity of

  16. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    muscle cells, he demonstrated that it was only calcium that could cause the muscle fibre to contract (Heilbrunn and Wiercinski 1947). Later in 1952, Sandow proposed the term excitation-contraction coupling for this phe- nomenon. Heilbrunn's views are best summarized by the following statement published in 1937 in his ...

  17. Discovery and Development of Calcium Channel Blockers

    OpenAIRE

    Godfraind, Théophile

    2017-01-01

    In the mid 1960s, experimental work on molecules under screening as coronary dilators allowed the discovery of the mechanism of calcium entry blockade by drugs later named calcium channel blockers. This paper summarizes scientific research on these small molecules interacting directly with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. It also reports on experimental approaches translated into understanding of their therapeutic actions. The importance of calcium in muscle contraction was discovere...

  18. Absorbability of calcium from calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides in comparison with that from various calcium compounds in the rat ligated jejunum loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To-o, Kenji; Kamasaka, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takahisa; Kuriki, Takashi; Saeki, Shigeru; Nakabou, Yukihiro

    2003-08-01

    Calcium-bound phosphoryl oligosaccharides (POs-Ca) were prepared from potato starch. Their solubility and in situ absorbability as a calcium source were investigated by comparing with the soluble calcium compounds, calcium chloride and calcium lactate, or insoluble calcium compounds, calcium carbonate and dibasic calcium phosphate. The solubility of POs-Ca was as high as that of calcium chloride and about 3-fold higher than that of calcium lactate. An in situ experiment showed that the intestinal calcium absorption rate of POs-Ca was almost comparable with that of the soluble calcium compounds, and was significantly higher (pcalcium groups. Moreover, the total absorption rate of a 1:1 mixture of the calcium from POs-Ca and a whey mineral complex (WMC) was significantly higher (psoluble calcium source with relatively high absorption in the intestinal tract.

  19. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the ...

  20. Physicochemical characterization of zinc-substituted calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to form synthetic calcium phosphates incorporated with. Zn, such as zinc acetate and calcium acetate, 65% nitric acid, sodium hydrogen phosphate, trietanoloamine, 0.025 M. EDTA, calcein indicator and 35–38% hydrochloric acid were purchased from POCh SA. Other reagents necessary for determining amount of calcium, ...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  3. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    The idea is used here to break human calcium signalling pathway into simple entities known as ... [Nayak L and De R K 2007 Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway; J. Biosci. 32 1009–1017] http://www.ias.ac.in/ ..... cellular physiology of intracellular calcium stores; Physiol. Rev. 74 595–636. Bertram R ...

  4. Calcium Orthophosphate-Based Bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of grafts have been traditionally used to restore damaged bones. In the late 1960s, a strong interest was raised in studying ceramics as potential bone grafts due to their biomechanical properties. A bit later, such synthetic biomaterials were called bioceramics. In principle, bioceramics can be prepared from diverse materials but this review is limited to calcium orthophosphate-based formulations only, which possess the specific advantages due to the chemical similarity to mammalian bones and teeth. During the past 40 years, there have been a number of important achievements in this field. Namely, after the initial development of bioceramics that was just tolerated in the physiological environment, an emphasis was shifted towards the formulations able to form direct chemical bonds with the adjacent bones. Afterwards, by the structural and compositional controls, it became possible to choose whether the calcium orthophosphate-based implants remain biologically stable once incorporated into the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of regenerative bioceramics was developed and such formulations became an integrated part of the tissue engineering approach. Now calcium orthophosphate scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are often porous and harbor different biomolecules and/or cells. Therefore, current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include bone augmentations, artificial bone grafts, maxillofacial reconstruction, spinal fusion, periodontal disease repairs and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Perspective future applications comprise drug delivery and tissue engineering purposes because calcium orthophosphates appear to be promising carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and various types of cells.

  5. Dysregulation of intracellular calcium transporters in animal models of sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Edgecomb, Jessica; LaBarge, Kara; Colucci, Wilson S

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC) develops as the result of myocardial calcium (Ca) dysregulation. Here we reviewed all published studies that quantified the dysfunction of intracellular Ca transporters and the myofilaments in animal models of SIC. Cardiomyocytes isolated from septic animals showed, invariably, a decreased twitch amplitude, which is frequently caused by a decrease in the amplitude of cellular Ca transients (ΔCai) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load (CaSR). Underlying these deficits, the L-type Ca channel is downregulated, through mechanisms that may involve adrenomedullin-mediated redox signaling. The SR Ca pump is also inhibited, through oxidative modifications (sulfonylation) of one reactive thiol group (on Cys) and/or modulation of phospholamban. Diastolic Ca leak of ryanodine receptors is frequently increased. In contrast, Na/Ca exchange inhibition may play a partially compensatory role by increasing CaSR and ΔCai. The action potential is usually shortened. Myofilaments show a bidirectional regulation, with decreased Ca sensitivity in milder forms of disease (due to troponin I hyperphosphorylation) and an increase (redox mediated) in more severe forms. Most deficits occurred similarly in two different disease models, induced by either intraperitoneal administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide or cecal ligation and puncture. In conclusion, substantial cumulative evidence implicates various Ca transporters and the myofilaments in SIC pathology. What is less clear, however, are the identity and interplay of the signaling pathways that are responsible for Ca transporters dysfunction. With few exceptions, all studies we found used solely male animals. Identifying sex differences in Ca dysregulation in SIC becomes, therefore, another priority.

  6. Dysregulation of intracellular calcium transporters in animal models of sepsis induced cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A.; Edgecomb, Jessica; LaBarge, Kara; Colucci, Wilson S.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis induced cardiomyopathy (SIC) develops as the result of myocardial calcium (Ca2+) dysregulation. Here we reviewed all published studies that quantified the dysfunction of intracellular Ca2+ transporters and the myofilaments in animal models of SIC. Cardiomyocytes isolated from septic animals showed, invariably, a decreased twitch amplitude, which is frequently caused by a decrease in the amplitude of cellular Ca2+ transients (ΔCai) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ load (CaSR). Underlying these deficits, the L-type Ca2+ channel is downregulated, through mechanisms that may involve adrenomedullin-mediated redox signaling. SR Ca2+ pump (SERCA) is also inhibited, through oxidative modifications (sulphonylation) of one reactive thiol group (on Cys674), and/or modulation of phospholamban. Diastolic Ca2+ leak of ryanodine receptors is frequently increased. In contrast, Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibition may play a partially compensatory role by increasing CaSR and ΔCai. The action potential is usually shortened. Myofilaments show a bidirectional regulation, with decreased Ca2+ sensitivity in milder forms of disease (due to troponin I hyperphosphorylation) and a (redox mediated) increase in more severe forms. Most deficits occurred similarly in two different disease models, induced by either intraperitoneal administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). In conclusion, substantial cumulative evidence implicates various Ca2+ transporters and the myofilaments in SIC pathology. What is less clear, however, is the identity and interplay of the signaling pathways that are responsible for Ca2+ transporters dysfunction. With few exceptions, all studies we found used solely male animals. Identifying sex differences in Ca2+ dysregulation in SIC becomes, therefore, another priority. PMID:25186837

  7. T-tubule disruption promotes calcium alternans in failing ventricular myocytes: mechanistic insights from computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivala, Michael; Song, Zhen; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-02-01

    In heart failure (HF), T-tubule (TT) disruption contributes to dyssynchronous calcium (Ca) release and impaired contraction, but its role in arrhythmogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effects of TT disruption and other HF remodeling factors on Ca alternans in ventricular myocytes using computer modeling. A ventricular myocyte model with detailed spatiotemporal Ca cycling modeled by a coupled Ca release unit (CRU) network was used, in which the L-type Ca channels and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels were simulated by random Markov transitions. TT disruption, which removes the L-type Ca channels from the associated CRUs, results in "orphaned" RyR clusters and thus provides increased opportunity for spark-induced Ca sparks to occur. This effect combined with other HF remodeling factors promoted alternans by two distinct mechanisms: 1) for normal sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) activity, alternans was caused by both CRU refractoriness and coupling. The increased opportunity for spark-induced sparks by TT disruption combined with the enhanced CRU coupling by Ca elevation in the presence or absence of increased RyR leakiness facilitated spark synchronization on alternate beats to promote Ca alternans; 2) for down-regulated SERCA, alternans was caused by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load-dependent mechanism, independent of CRU refractoriness. TT disruption and increased RyR leakiness shifted and steepened the SR Ca release-load relationship, which combines with down-regulated SERCA to promote Ca alternans. In conclusion, the mechanisms of Ca alternans for normal and down-regulated SERCA are different, and TT disruption promotes Ca alternans by both mechanisms, which may contribute to alternans at different stages of HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  9. The Calcium Wave of Vegetable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TD. Geydan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is an essential nutrient for plants; it is involved in developmental processes and in responses to biotic and abiotic factors. Several signals that modify the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and/or plastids have been observed. These changes in the calcium concentration in the cell interior are rapidly returned to basal levels, in the meantime, innumerable and complex signaling cascades. This note exposes the mechanisms of calcium transport through the cell membranes of the entrance of calcium in the plant cells.

  10. The Effect of SERCA1b Silencing on the Differentiation and Calcium Homeostasis of C2C12 Skeletal Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienn Tóth

    Full Text Available The sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ATPases (SERCAs are the main Ca2+ pumps which decrease the intracellular Ca2+ level by reaccumulating Ca2+ into the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The neonatal SERCA1b is the major Ca2+ pump in myotubes and young muscle fibers. To understand its role during skeletal muscle differentiation its synthesis has been interfered with specific shRNA sequence. Stably transfected clones showing significantly decreased SERCA1b expression (cloneC1 were selected for experiments. The expression of the regulatory proteins of skeletal muscle differentiation was examined either by Western-blot at the protein level for MyoD, STIM1, calsequestrin (CSQ, and calcineurin (CaN or by RT-PCR for myostatin and MCIP1.4. Quantitative analysis revealed significant alterations in CSQ, STIM1, and CaN expression in cloneC1 as compared to control cells. To examine the functional consequences of the decreased expression of SERCA1b, repeated Ca2+-transients were evoked by applications of 120 mM KCl. The significantly higher [Ca2+]i measured at the 20th and 40th seconds after the beginning of KCl application (112±3 and 110±3 nM vs. 150±7 and 135±5 nM, in control and in cloneC1 cells, respectively indicated a decreased Ca2+-uptake capability which was quantified by extracting the maximal pump rate (454±41 μM/s vs. 144±24 μM/s, in control and in cloneC1 cells. Furthermore, the rate of calcium release from the SR (610±60 vs. 377±64 μM/s and the amount of calcium released (843±75 μM vs. 576±80 μM were also significantly suppressed. These changes were also accompanied by a reduced activity of CaN in cells with decreased SERCA1b. In parallel, cloneC1 cells showed inhibited cell proliferation and decreased myotube nuclear numbers. Moreover, while cyclosporineA treatment suppressed the proliferation of parental cultures it had no effect on cloneC1 cells. SERCA1b is thus considered to play an essential role in the regulation of [Ca2+]i and

  11. Calcium Intake in the Moroccan Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebbar El-houcine

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calcium intakes of elderly people are often below the recommendations which are 1200 mg/day. The advancing age may be accompanied by a loss of capacity to absorb additional calcium in case of deficiency. The aim of our work is to evaluate the calcium intake in the Moroccan elderly. Methods: The version translated into Arabic dialect Fardellone questionnaire is tested on a sample of 159 subjects aged over 60 years. Results: The study population includes 87 women (55%, 72 men (45%. The mean calcium intake was respectively 3078 mg by week (that means 440 mg/day. The assessment of calcium intake showed a deficiency and the average consumption of calcium per day is significantly lower than the recommended daily amount for this population. The comparison of both gender found a deficit higher among women than among men. Conclusion: Evaluation of the calcium intake is an essential tool for better management of metabolic bone diseases.

  12. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Astasov-Frauenhoffer

    Full Text Available Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC. Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  13. Interfering with calcium release suppresses I gamma, the "hump" component of intramembranous charge movement in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernoch, L; Pizarro, G; Uribe, I; Rodríguez, M; Ríos, E

    1991-05-01

    Four manifestations of excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling were derived from measurements in cut skeletal muscle fibers of the frog, voltage clamped in a Vaseline-gap chamber: intramembranous charge movement currents, myoplasmic [Ca2+] transients, flux of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and the intrinsic optical transparency change that accompanies calcium release. In attempts to suppress Ca release by direct effects on the SR, three interventions were applied: (a) a conditioning pulse that causes calcium release and inhibits release in subsequent pulses by Ca-dependent inactivation; (b) a series of brief, large pulses, separated by long intervals (greater than 700 ms), which deplete Ca2+ in the SR; and (c) intracellular application of the release channel blocker ruthenium red. All these reduced calcium release flux. None was expected to affect directly the voltage sensor of the T-tubule; however, all of them reduced or eliminated a component of charge movement current with the following characteristics: (a) delayed onset, peaking 10-20 ms into the pulse; (b) current reversal during the pulse, with an inward phase after the outward peak; and (c) OFF transient of smaller magnitude than the ON, of variable polarity, and sometimes biphasic. When the total charge movement current had a visible hump, the positive phase of the current eliminated by the interventions agreed with the hump in timing and size. The component of charge movement current blocked by the interventions was greater and had a greater inward phase in slack fibers with high [EGTA] inside than in stretched fibers with no EGTA. Its amplitude at -40 mV was on average 0.26 A/F (SEM 0.03) in slack fibers. The waveform of release flux determined from the Ca transients measured simultaneously with the membrane currents had, as described previously (Melzer, W., E. Ríos, and M. F. Schneider. 1984. Biophysical Journal. 45:637-641), an early peak followed by a descent to a steady level

  14. Trafficking of neuronal calcium channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weiss, Norbert; Zamponi, G. W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2017), č. článku NS20160003. ISSN 2059-6553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-13556S; GA MŠk 7AMB15FR015 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : calcium channel * neuron * trafficing Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) http://www. neuron alsignaling.org/content/1/1/NS20160003

  15. Compton profile of calcium fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, R.; Rajasekaran, L.; Ramamurthy, N.; Shivaramu

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Compton profile of polycrystalline calcium fluoride is measured using 661.6 keV γ- radiation from a 137 Cs source. The experimental data are compared with HF-LCAO model calculation computed using CRYSTAL98 program, Hartree-Fock free atom theoretical values and with the other available experimental data. Experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the HF-LCAO model calculations and in qualitative agreement with Hartree-Fock free atom theoretical values

  16. The Role of Calcium in Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, C. D.; Sanchez, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25 to 30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years). Starting at age 40 to 50, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D2. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. Generally, the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis are uncontrollable (e.g., sex, age, and race) or less controllable (e.g., disease and medications). However, several factors such as diet, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use are lifestyle related and can be modified to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  17. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    enriched dairy products. Calcium gels can be produced by addition of a calcium salt and heat treatment at temperatures higher than 70 oC for several minutes. The combination of heat treatment and calcium addition to milk with pH values between 6.6 and 5.6, will produce calcium milk gels with unique...... and dense gel structure and with little seperation of whey due to participation of calcium to the final gel structure. On the other hand, the combination of heat treatment and calcium addition to milk with pH values lower than 5.6 will still produce gel structures which are dominated by the decrease of p...... to be formed. In addition the low amount of micellar calcium caused a more compact gel structure with many protein aggregates. The results of this study highlighted the importance of calcium for the formation of acid, calcium and rennet gels. The content and the interactions of calcium with proteins during...

  18. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhrsen, K.R.; Hudepohl, G.R.; Smith, K.T.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium ( 47 Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO 3 . In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the 47 Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison

  19. The Risks and Benefits of Calcium Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Soo Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The association between calcium supplementation and adverse cardiovascular events has recently become a topic of debate due to the publication of two epidemiological studies and one meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. The reports indicate that there is a significant increase in adverse cardiovascular events following supplementation with calcium; however, a number of experts have raised several issues with these reports such as inconsistencies in attempts to reproduce the findings in other populations and questions concerning the validity of the data due to low compliance, biases in case ascertainment, and/or a lack of adjustment. Additionally, the Auckland Calcium Study, the Women's Health Initiative, and many other studies included in the meta-analysis obtained data from calcium-replete subjects and it is not clear whether the same risk profile would be observed in populations with low calcium intakes. Dietary calcium intake varies widely throughout the world and it is especially low in East Asia, although the risk of cardiovascular events is less prominent in this region. Therefore, clarification is necessary regarding the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular events following calcium supplementation and whether this relationship can be generalized to populations with low calcium intakes. Additionally, the skeletal benefits from calcium supplementation are greater in subjects with low calcium intakes and, therefore, the risk-benefit ratio of calcium supplementation is likely to differ based on the dietary calcium intake and risks of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases of various populations. Further studies investigating the risk-benefit profiles of calcium supplementation in various populations are required to develop population-specific guidelines for individuals of different genders, ages, ethnicities, and risk profiles around the world.

  20. Differential expression of genes involved in the calcium homeostasis in masticatory muscles of MDX mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert-Keil, C H; Gredes, T; Lucke, S; Botzenhart, U; Dominiak, M; Gedrange, T

    2014-04-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and its murine model, mdx, are characterized by Ca(2+) induced muscle damage and muscle weakness followed by distorted dentofacial morphology. In both, DMD patients and in mdx mice, could be proven so far that only the extraocular muscles (EOM) are not affected by muscular dystrophy. The EOMs are protected against calcium overload by enhanced expression of genes involved in the Ca(2+) homeostasis. We could recently demonstrate that masticatory muscles of mdx mice are differentially affected by muscle dystrophy. The dystrophic masseter and temporalis shows muscle histology comparable to all other skeletal muscles in this animal model, whereas dystrophic tongue muscles seem to develop a milder phenotype. Due to this fact it is to hypothesize that an altered Ca(2+) homeostasis seems to underlie the mdx masticatory muscle pathology. Aim of this study was to examine the mRNA and protein levels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases SERCA1 and SERCA2, the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases Atp2b1 and Atp2b4, the sodium/calcium exchanger NCX1, the ryanodine receptor 1, parvalbumin, sarcolipin, phospholamban and the L-type Ca(2+) channel alpha-1 subunit (Cacna1s) in Musculus masseter, temporalis, and tongue of 100 day old control and mdx mice. In mdx masseter muscle significant increased mRNA levels of NCX1 and Cacna1s were found compared to control mice. In contrast, the mRNA amount of RYR1 was significant reduced in mdx temporalis muscle, whereas ATP2b4 was significant increased. In mdx tongue a down-regulation of the ATP2b1, sarcolipin and parvalbumin mRNA expression was found, whereas the phospholamban mRNA level was significantly increased compared to controls. These data were verified by western blot analyses. Our findings revealed that mdx masticatory muscles showed an unequally altered expression of genes involved in the Ca(2+) homeostasis that can support the differences in masticatory muscles response to dystrophin deficiency.

  1. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    OpenAIRE

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nuc...

  2. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Herv?r L.; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R.; Ashmore, Jonathan F.; Ahmed, Aamir

    2017-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including the cell membrane potential, proliferation and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca2+]i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca2+]i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We sho...

  3. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  4. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events. PMID:17663775

  5. WAYS TO CORRECT CALCIUM DEFFICIT AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Taibulatov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the urgent issue of the pediatrics — calcium deficit among children. The authors provide modern data on the scheme of the normal calcium exchange in the human body. They also review the main diseases related to the disorders of the pho sphorocalcic metabolism, requiring prompt prevention and treatment by calcium based medications. The researchers stress the diseases of the musculoskeletal system, as insufficient calcium, phosphorus and vitamins supply of the child's body chiefly effects the state of the skeletal and muscular tissue. They give recommendations how to use the vitamin and mineral complex to correct calcium deficit.Key words: calcium deficit, diseases of the musculoskeletal system, vitamin and mineral complex, children.

  6. Store-Operated Calcium Channel and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yang S; Chang WC

    2012-01-01

    The increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration is an important mechanism that regulates a variety of physiological processes ranging from exocytosis to gene regulation and cell proliferation [1]. Calcium release from intracellular stores (mainly endoplasmic reticulum, ER) or calcium entry through calcium channels can be used by cells to evoke a higher level of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. In non-excitable cells, a major pathway for Ca2+ influx is via store-operated Ca2+ channels (also know...

  7. The Total Synthesis Of Calcium Atorvastatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Luiz C; Vieira, Adriano S; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-01-01

    A practical and convergent asymmetric route to calcium atorvastatin (1) is reported. The synthesis of calcium atorvastatin (1) was performed using the remote 1,5-anti asymmetric induction in the boron-mediated aldol reaction of β-alkoxy methylketone (4) with pyrrolic aldehyde (3) as a key step. Calcium atorvastatin was obtained from aldehyde (3) after 6 steps, with a 41% overall yield.

  8. The total synthesis of calcium atorvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Luiz C; Vieira, Adriano S; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-02-21

    A practical and convergent asymmetric route to calcium atorvastatin (1) is reported. The synthesis of calcium atorvastatin (1) was performed using the remote 1,5-anti asymmetric induction in the boron-mediated aldol reaction of β-alkoxy methylketone (4) with pyrrolic aldehyde (3) as a key step. Calcium atorvastatin was obtained from aldehyde (3) after 6 steps, with a 41% overall yield.

  9. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, B.; L'Hopital, E.; Nied, D.; Achiedo, G.; Dauzeres, A.

    2015-01-01

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29 Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q 3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca 2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg 2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  10. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Building Bones Print You probably heard "drink your milk" all the time from your parents when you were a kid, and you knew it was good for you. But now you may opt for sodas or sports drinks, and other than adding a splash to ... much thought to milk. But your parents were right to make you ...

  11. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure.......149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including...

  12. [Calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazantseva, M A; Mozhaeva, G N; Kaznacheeva, E V

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory and cognitive abilities loss. The etiology of Alzheimer's disease is poorly understood. In this regard, there is no effective treatment for the disease. Various hypotheses to explain the nature of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease led to the development of appropriate therapeutics. Despite of decades of research and clinical trials available therapeutics, at best, can only slow down the progression of the disease, but cannot cure it. This review dedicated to the one of modern hypotheses of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis implied the impairment of calcium homeostasis as a key event for the development of neurodegenerative processes.

  13. Diuretics and disorders of calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieff, Marvin; Bushinsky, David A

    2011-11-01

    Diuretics commonly are administered in disorders of sodium balance. Loop diuretics inhibit the Na-K-2Cl transporter and also increase calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of hypercalcemia. Thiazide diuretics block the thiazide-sensitive NaCl transporter in the distal convoluted tubule, and can decrease calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of nephrolithiasis. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors decrease bicarbonate absorption and the resultant metabolic acidosis can increase calcium excretion. Their use can promote nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. This review will address the use of diuretics on disorders of calcium homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Calcium channel blockers and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughlin, Kevin R

    2014-07-01

    The relationship between calcium channel blockers and prostate cancer has been an area of increased interest to investigators. Calcium channel blockers have been shown to influence cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Clinically, the association between calcium channel blockers and the development of prostate cancer has been controversial. However, on a basic science level, there is evidence that calcium channel blockers induce cytotoxicity in androgen receptor positive cell lines and may offer an innovative strategy for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Short communication: Urinary oxalate and calcium excretion by dogs and cats diagnosed with calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.; Kummeling, A.; Hagen-Plantinga, E.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urine concentrations of oxalate and calcium play an important role in calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolith formation in dogs and cats, with high excretions of both substances increasing the chance of CaOx urolithiasis. In 17 CaOx-forming dogs, urine calcium:creatinine ratio (Ca:Cr) was found

  16. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate...

  17. An overview of techniques for the measurement of calcium distribution, calcium fluxes, and cytosolic free calcium in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borle, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    An array of techniques can be used to study cell calcium metabolism that comprises several calcium compartments and many types of transport systems such as ion channels, ATP-dependent pumps, and antiporters. The measurement of total call calcium brings little information of value since 60 to 80% of total cell calcium is actually bound to the extracellular glycocalyx. Cell fractionation and differential centrifugation have been used to study intracellular Ca 2+ compartmentalization, but the methods suffer from the possibility of Ca 2+ loss or redistribution among cell fractions. Steady-state kinetic analyses of 45 Ca uptake or desaturation curves have been used to study the distribution of Ca 2+ among various kinetic pools in living cells and their rate of Ca 2+ exchange, but the analyses are constrained by many limitations. Nonsteady-state tracer studies can provide information about rapid changes in calcium influx or efflux in and out of the cell. Zero-time kinetics of 45 Ca uptake can detect instantaneous changes in calcium influx, while 45 Ca fractional efflux ratio, can detect rapid stimulations or inhibitions of calcium efflux out of cells. The best strategy to study cell calcium metabolism is to use several different methods that focus on a specific problem from widely different angles

  18. Codissolution of calcium hydrogenphosphate and sodium hydrogencitrate in water. Spontaneous supersaturation of calcium citrate increasing calcium bioavailability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Danielsen, Bente Pia; Garcia, André Castilho

    2018-01-01

    . The supersaturated solutions had a pH around 4.7, and calcium binding to hydrogencitrate as the dominant citrate species during precipitation was found to be exothermic with a determined association constant of 357 L mol-1 at 25 °C for unit ionic strength, and δH° = -22 ± 2 kJ mol-1, δS° = -26 ± 8 J K-1 mol-1......The sparingly soluble calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate, co-dissolving in water during dissolution of freely soluble sodium hydrogencitrate sesquihydrate as caused by proton transfer from hydrogencitrate to hydrogenphosphate, was found to form homogenous solutions supersaturated by a factor up...... to 8 in calcium citrate tetrahydrate. A critical hydrogencitrate concentration for formation of homogeneous solutions was found to depend linearly on dissolved calcium hydrogenphosphate: [HCitr2-] = 14[CaHPO4] - 0.05 at 25 °C. The lag phase for precipitation of calcium citrate tetrahydrate...

  19. Sarcoplasmatic and myofibrillar protein changes caused by acute heat stress in broiler chicken Alterações nas proteínas sarcoplasmáticas e miofibrilares em frangos de corte causadas por estresse térmico agudo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina de Castro Santos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute heat stress (AHS modifies the structure of myofibrils affecting functional properties of meat, mainly the water holding capacity. This experiment aimed to identify changes in proteolysis and migration between the myofibrillar and sarcoplasmatic fractions due to pre-slaughter AHS. Myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI, SDS-PAGE, western blot of vinculin (WB and shear force (SF were determined. Six hundred broilers (Gallus gallus were slaughtered in three different days (ST. In each ST, groups of ten animals were placed in transport crates and submitted to AHS (35ºC, 75 - 85% RH for 2 hours. Simultaneously, the non-stressed broilers (NS were kept in thermoneutral environment (22ºC, 83 ± 6.6% RH within the crates in the same density. After slaughter, the breast muscles were kept refrigerated until the withdrawal of all samples (0, 1, 2, 6 and 24 hours after slaughter. Sampling within AHS and NS birds was collected according to lightness value (normal L* 51, except for determination of MFI and SF. The lightness was used later to perform SDS-PAGE and WB analyses. MFI kinetics showed that the fragmentation rate was superior in animals NS, indicating that AHS can harm proteolysis and rate of myofibrillar fragmentation. However, the extent of fragmentation did not change, as well as SF values. SDS-PAGE for Troponin fragments indicated a differentiated pattern between AHS and NS. The WB did not show alterations in vinculin fragmentation. Modifications in sarcoplasmatic fraction are observed in meat with high L*values, independent of environmental condition.O estresse térmico agudo (ET causa alterações na estrutura das miofibrilas, afetando propriedades funcionais da carne, principalmente a capacidade de retenção de água. Identificaram-se mudanças na proteólise e migração entre as frações miofibrilar e sarcoplasmática, decorrentes do ET pré-abate, através do índice de fragmentação miofibrilar (MFI, SDS-PAGE para troponina (SDS

  20. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article d...

  1. Interaction between Vitamin D and calcium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    A low calcium intake aggravates the consequences of vitamin D deficiency. This suggests an interaction between vitamin D and calcium intake, which is the subject of this review. The active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)

  2. Comparison of Serum Calcium and Magnesium Between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence suggests the involvement of calcium and magnesium metabolism in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. However, findings from studies are heterogenous and inconsistent. Aim: The study aimed to compare the total serum calcium and magnesium levels in preeclamptic women with that of ...

  3. Calcium supplementation in osteoporosis: useful or harmful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, Iacopo; Bolland, Mark J

    2018-04-01

    Osteoporosis and fragility fractures are important social and economic problems worldwide and are due to both the loss of bone mineral density and sarcopenia. Indeed, fragility fractures are associated with increased disability, morbidity and mortality. It is known that a normal calcium balance together with a normal vitamin D status is important for maintaining well-balanced bone metabolism, and for many years, calcium and vitamin D have been considered crucial in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. However, recently, the usefulness of calcium supplementation (alone or with concomitant vitamin D) has been questioned, since some studies reported only weak efficacy of these supplementations in reducing fragility fracture risk. On the other hand, besides the gastrointestinal side effects of calcium supplements and the risk of kidney stones related to use of co-administered calcium and vitamin D supplements, other recent data suggested potential adverse cardiovascular effects from calcium supplementation. This debate article is focused on the evidence regarding both the possible usefulness for bone health and the potential harmful effects of calcium and/or calcium with vitamin D supplementation. © 2018 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. 21 CFR 182.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium sorbate. 182.3225 Section 182.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3225 Calcium...

  5. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  6. Serum Calcium, Inorganic Phosphates and some Haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum calcium level was determined by EDTA titration, inorganic phosphate by spectrophotometric method of Goldberg and the Haematological parameters by Bain method. Results: The age range of both test subjects and controls was 3 to 26 years. There were no significant differences in calcium and inorganic phosphate ...

  7. Physicochemical characterization of zinc-substituted calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zinc embedded into calcium phosphate may enhance the bone formation and in addition exhibits antifungal and antibacterial properties. Therefore, it is rational to form structures incorporated with this ion. In this paper the incorporation of the Zn ions into natural and synthetic calcium phosphates has been reported.Natural ...

  8. Calcium Orthophosphates in Nature, Biology and Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The present overview is intended to point the readers’ attention to the important subject of calcium orthophosphates. These materials are of the special significance because they represent the inorganic part of major normal (bones, teeth and dear antlers and pathological (i.e. those appearing due to various diseases calcified tissues of mammals. Due to a great chemical similarity with the biological calcified tissues, many calcium orthophosphates possess remarkable biocompatibility and bioactivity. Materials scientists use this property extensively to construct artificial bone grafts that are either entirely made of or only surface-coated with the biologically relevant calcium orthophosphates. For example, self-setting hydraulic cements made of calcium orthophosphates are helpful in bone repair, while titanium substitutes covered by a surface layer of calcium orthophosphates are used for hip joint endoprostheses and as tooth substitutes. Porous scaffolds made of calcium orthophosphates are very promising tools for tissue engineering applications. In addition, technical grade calcium orthophosphates are very popular mineral fertilizers. Thus ere calcium orthophosphates are of great significance for humankind and, in this paper, an overview on the current knowledge on this subject is provided.

  9. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in accordance with good...

  10. Rates of calcium carbonate removal from soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Protz, R.

    1988-01-01

    Mean annual rates of calcium carbonate removal from soils in a subarctic climate estimated from data on two chronosequences of calcareous storm ridges, appeared to be relatively constant through time. Concentrations of dissolved calcium carbonate in the soil solution in the study sites calculated

  11. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  12. Role of Calcium and Calmodulin in Plant Cell Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium and calmodulin in plant cell regulation is discussed. Experiments are done to discover the level of calcium in plants and animals. The effect of intracellular calcium on photosynthesis is discussed.

  13. Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cup 80–500 (varies) Calcium Culprits Although a balanced diet aids calcium absorption, high levels of protein and ... vitamin D. A Complete Osteoporosis Program Remember, a balanced diet rich in calcium and vitamin D is only ...

  14. Calcium Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/calciumbloodtest.html Calcium Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Calcium Blood Test? A calcium blood test measures the amount of ...

  15. Determination of the primary structure of intermolecular cross-linking sites on the Ca2(+)-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum using 14C-labeled N,N'-(1,4-phenylene)bismaleimide or N-ethylmaleimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, K; Sano, N; Ohe, M; Yamamoto, T

    1990-12-01

    To determine the intermolecular cross-linking site on the primary structure sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-ATPase, the conditions for the specific binding of 14C-labeled 1,4-phenylene bis maleimide (PBM) or 14C-labeled N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) to the ATPase were explored. SR vesicles were preincubated with nonradioactive PBM in the presence of 1 mM vanadate for 1 h, then washed by centrifugation to remove free PBM and vanadate. When the pretreated SR vesicles were allowed to react with 1 mM [14C]PBM in the presence of 1 mM AMPPNP, the amount of [14C]PBM incorporated into the ATPase increased with time in parallel with the formation of dimeric ATPase and reached the maximum labeling density of 1 mol of [14C]PBM per mol of dimeric ATPase at 40 min after the start of the reaction. When the pretreated SR vesicles were allowed to react with 2 mM [14C]NEM in the absence of AMPPNP, a maximum of about 2 mol of NEM was bound per mol of the ATPase monomer. The labeling density of [14C]NEM decreased from 2 to 1 mol per mol of the ATPase when the SR vesicles were allowed to react with [14C]NEM in the presence of AMPPNP. From the analysis of the amino acid composition of the two major [14C]NEM-labeled peptides isolated from the thermolytic digest of the enzyme after the reaction of SR with [14C]NEM in the absence of AMPPNP, we deduced that [14C]NEM was incorporated into Cys377 and Cys614. On the other hand, the labeling of SR in the presence of AMPPNP resulted in inhibition of the [14C]NEM binding to Cys614, leaving Cys377 unaltered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Effects of adenyl-5'-imidodiphosphate and vanadate Ion on the intermolecular cross-linking of Ca2(+)-ATPase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane with N,N'-(1,4-phenylene)bismaleimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, K; Yamamoto, T

    1989-12-01

    The functional significance of the molecular interaction of Ca2(+)-ATPase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane was examined using intermolecular cross-linking of Ca2(+)-ATPase with N,N'-(1,4-phenylene)bismaleimide (PBM). When SR vesicles were allowed to react with 1 mM PBM at pH 7 and 23 degrees C for various intervals and subjected to SDS-PAGE, the amount of the major band of monomeric ATPase decreased with a half life of about 20 min. Higher orders of oligomers were concurrently formed without accumulation of any particular species of oligomer. When SR vesicles were allowed to react with 1 mM PBM in the presence of 1 mM adenyl-5'-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), the rate of oligomerization was markedly reduced and the amount of dimeric Ca2(+)-ATPase increased with time. After 1 h, more than 40% of the Ca2(+)-ATPase had accumulated in the dimeric form. When 1 mol of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was bound per mol of ATPase, the effects of AMP-PNP on the cross-linking with PBM were completely abolished. When SR vesicles were treated with PBM in the presence of 0.1 mM vanadate in Ca2+ free medium, the oligomerization of the Ca2(+)-ATPase by PBM was strongly inhibited. The vanadate effect on the cross-link formation was completely removed by the presence of Ca2+ and AMP-PNP in the reaction medium. When SR vesicles were pretreated with PBM in the presence of AMP-PNP and digested with trypsin for a short time, the dimeric ATPase was degraded to a peptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 170 kDa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Regulation of intestinal calcium absorption by luminal calcium content: role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Lucas R; Brance, María L; Lombarte, Mercedes; Lupo, Maela; Di Loreto, Verónica E; Rigalli, Alfredo

    2014-07-01

    Intestinal alkaline phosphatase is a brush border enzyme that is stimulated by calcium. Inhibition of intestinal alkaline phosphatase increases intestinal calcium absorption. We hypothesized that intestinal alkaline phosphatase acts as a minute-to-minute regulatory mechanism of calcium entry. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanism by which intestinal luminal calcium controls intestinal calcium absorption. We performed kinetic studies with purified intestinal alkaline phosphatase and everted duodenal sacs and showed that intestinal alkaline phosphatase modifies the luminal pH as a function of enzyme concentration and calcium luminal content. A decrease in pH occurred simultaneously with a decrease in calcium absorption. The inhibition of intestinal alkaline phosphatase by l-phenylalanine caused an increase in calcium absorption. This effect was also confirmed in calcium uptake experiments with isolated duodenal cells. Changes in luminal pH arising from intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity induced by luminal calcium concentration modulate intestinal calcium absorption. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Calcium and caffeine interaction in increased calcium balance in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tavares da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine intake associated with inadequate or adequate calcium intake in laparotomized or ovariectomized rats by means of the calcium balance. Forty adults Wistar rats were ovariectomized or laparotomized. METHODS: The animals (n=40 were randomly placed in eight groups receiving the AIN-93 diet with 100% or 50% of the recommended calcium intake with or without added caffeine (6mg/kg/day. The animals were kept in individuals metabolic cages at a temperature of 24°±2ºC, light/dark cycles of 12/12 hours, and deionized water available ad libitum. On the 8th week of the experiment, food consumption was measured and 24-hour urine and 4-day feces were collected to determine calcium balance [Balance=Ca intake-(Urinary Ca+Fecal Ca]. RESULTS: Animals with adequate calcium intake presented higher balances and rates of calcium absorption and retention (p<0.05 than those with inadequate calcium intake, regardless of caffeine intake (p<0.05. Caffeine intake did not affect urinary calcium excretion but increased balance (p<0.05 in the groups with adequate calcium intake. CONCLUSION: Adequate calcium intake attenuated the negative effects of estrogen deficiency and improved calcium balance even in the presence of caffeine.

  19. Calcium Phosphates as Delivery Systems for Bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bigi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates (BPs are the most utilized drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis, and are usefully employed also for other pathologies characterized by abnormally high bone resorption, including bone metastases. Due to the great affinity of these drugs for calcium ions, calcium phosphates are ideal delivery systems for local administration of BPs to bone, which is aimed to avoid/limit the undesirable side effects of their prolonged systemic use. Direct synthesis in aqueous medium and chemisorptions from solution are the two main routes proposed to synthesize BP functionalized calcium phosphates. The present review overviews the information acquired through the studies on the interaction between bisphosphonate molecules and calcium phosphates. Moreover, particular attention is addressed to some important recent achievements on the applications of BP functionalized calcium phosphates as biomaterials for bone substitution/repair.

  20. Calcium ion currents mediating oocyte maturation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosti Elisabetta

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During maturation, the last phase of oogenesis, the oocyte undergoes several changes which prepare it to be ovulated and fertilized. Immature oocytes are arrested in the first meiotic process prophase, that is morphologically identified by a germinal vesicle. The removal of the first meiotic block marks the initiation of maturation. Although a large number of molecules are involved in complex sequences of events, there is evidence that a calcium increase plays a pivotal role in meiosis re-initiation. It is well established that, during this process, calcium is released from the intracellular stores, whereas less is known on the role of external calcium entering the cell through the plasma membrane ion channels. This review is focused on the functional role of calcium currents during oocyte maturation in all the species, from invertebrates to mammals. The emerging role of specific L-type calcium channels will be discussed.

  1. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  2. The calcium and vitamin D controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Areas of the world where vitamin D levels are low for months of the year and intakes of calcium are high have a high prevalence of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. This suggests a public health message of avoiding calcium supplements and increasing vitamin D intake. No message could be more...... welcome as vitamin D can be given as a bolus while calcium must be taken daily and may be poorly tolerated. This approach is based on no evidence from intervention studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that vitamin D given with calcium elicits a small reduction in fracture risk and deaths....... This has not been demonstrated for D given alone. The cardiovascular safety of calcium and vitamin D (CaD) supplements is difficult to ascertain due to weaknesses in RCT designs and adjudication that cannot be remedied by subanalysis. Moreover, no major new RCTs are in process to provide better evidence...

  3. [Extracorporeal life support in calcium antagonist intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, M W; Grewal, S; Meeder, H J; van Thiel, R J; den Uil, C A

    2017-01-01

    Intoxication with calcium antagonists is associated with poor outcome. Even mild calcium antagonist overdose may be fatal. A 51-year-old woman and a 51-year-old man came to the Accident and Emergency Department in severe shock after they had taken a calcium antagonist overdose. After extensive medicinal therapy had failed, they both needed extracorporeal life support (ECLS) as a bridge to recovery. In severe calcium antagonist overdose, the combination of vasoplegia and cardiac failure leads to refractory shock. ECLS temporarily supports the circulation and maintains organ perfusion. In this way ECLS functions as a bridge to recovery and may possibly save lives. Timely consultation with and referral to an ECLS centre is recommended in patients with calcium antagonist overdose.

  4. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could......Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX......)-sensitive fast Na(+) spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers...

  5. [Calcium and vitamin D in osteology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amling, M; Barvencik, F

    2015-06-01

    Calcium homeostasis is of paramount physiological and pathophysiological importance in health and disease. This article focuses on the skeletal relevance of calcium and vitamin D in daily clinical practice. Against the background of an endemic vitamin D deficiency in Germany and the increasing number of patients with drug-induced (proton pump inhibitor) enteral calcium uptake problems, it is of critical importance to understand that a vitamin D level of > 30 µg/l (> 75 nmol/l) is required for intact skeletal mineralization and that furthermore, a physiological gastric acid production is essential for a normal enteral uptake of calcium from foodstuffs. Therefore, a guideline-conform handling of vitamin D and calcium substitution is required not only for patients with rheumatoid diseases but also for any osteological therapy.

  6. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3–4 chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M.; Martin, Berdine R.; Wastney, Meryl; McCabe, George P.; Moe, Sharon M.; Weaver, Connie M.; Peacock, Munro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus and reduce phosphorus retention, and to prevent negative calcium balance. Data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance in CKD to support this. The aim of this study was to determine calcium and phosphorus balance and calcium kinetics with and without calcium carbonate in CKD patients. Eight stage 3/4 CKD patients, eGFR 36 mL/min, participated in two 3-week balances in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study of calcium carbonate (1500 mg/d calcium). Calcium and phosphorus balance were determined on a controlled diet. Oral and intravenous 45calcium with blood sampling and urine and fecal collections were used for calcium kinetics. Fasting blood and urine were collected at baseline and end of each week of each balance period for biochemical analyses. Results showed that patients were in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on placebo. Calcium carbonate produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance suggesting tissue deposition. Fasting biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. If they can be extrapolated to effects of chronic therapy, these data caution against the use of calcium carbonate as a phosphate binder. PMID:23254903

  7. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Lindhardt Madsen, Kirstine; Skjoedt, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    chromatography was superior to the traditional immunoaffinity chromatographies and resulted in a nine-fold improvement of the purification factor. The technique is applicable for the purification of proteins in complex mixtures by single-step fractionation without the denaturation of eluted antigens......Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful fractionation technique that has become indispensable for protein purification and characterization. However, it is difficult to retrieve bound proteins without using harsh or denaturing elution conditions, and the purification of scarce antigens...... to homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 m...

  8. Impaired recovery of intracellular calcium and force after activation in isolated myometrial and subcutaneous resistance arteries from women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimalasundera, Ruwan C; Wijetunge, Sumangali; Thom, Simon M; Regan, Lesley; Hughes, Alun D

    2010-03-01

    Preeclampsia is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, but its cause is poorly understood. This study investigated whether there is an abnormality of intracellular calcium ([Ca2=]i) and tension during recovery from activation in isolated resistance arteries in preeclampsia and investigated the underlying mechanisms. Subcutaneous and myometrial resistance arteries from preeclamptic, normotensive pregnant and nonpregnant women were mounted on an isometric myograph and loaded with fura-2 to allow simultaneous measurement of force and [Ca2+]i. Arteries were activated by a high-potassium solution or noradrenaline, and the rate of decline in force and [Ca2+]i examined following washout. Basal tone and [Ca2+]i and rise in force and [Ca2+]i induced by high-potassium solution did not differ between groups but the rate of decline after washout was significantly slowed in both subcutaneous and myometrial arteries from preeclamptic women as compared with normotensive pregnant or nonpregnant women. The rate of decline in force after noradrenaline was also slowed in arteries from preeclamptic women. In subcutaneous resistance arteries from nonpregnant women, removal of the endothelium did not affect the rate of decline in force after high-potassium solution. However, inhibition of the plasma membrane Ca ATPase with carboxyeosin mimicked the findings seen in preeclampsia. In contrast, inhibition of the sarcoplasmic endoreticulum Ca ATPase with cyclopiazonic acid had no effect on the rate of decline in force or [Ca2+]i. The rate of relaxation and decline in [Ca2+]i in resistance arteries are impaired in preeclampsia. This may be mediated by decreased activity of plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase and could be a mechanism contributing to elevated peripheral resistance and raised blood pressure in preeclampsia.

  9. [Ryanodine receptor, calcium leak and arrhythmias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Angélica; de Alba-Aguayo, David R; Valdivia, Héctor H

    2014-01-01

    The participation of the ionic Ca(2+) release channel/ryanodine receptor in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling is well known since the late '80s, when various seminal papers communicated its purification for the first time and its identity with the "foot" structures located at the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In addition to its main role as the Ca(2+) channel responsible for the transient Ca(2+) increase that activates the contractile machinery of the cardiomyocytes, the ryanodine receptor releases Ca(2+) during the relaxation phase of the cardiac cycle, giving rise to a diastolic Ca(2+) leak. In normal physiological conditions, diastolic Ca(2+) leak regulates the proper level of luminal Ca(2+), but in pathological conditions it participates in the generation of both, acquired and hereditary arrhythmias. Very recently, several groups have focused their efforts into the development of pharmacological tools to control the altered diastolic Ca(2+) leak via ryanodine receptors. In this review, we focus our interest on describing the participation of cardiac ryanodine receptor in the diastolic Ca(2+) leak under physiological or pathological conditions and also on the therapeutic approaches to control its undesired exacerbated activity during diastole. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  10. Atrial Fibrillation Activates AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase and its Regulation of Cellular Calcium Handling: Potential Role in Metabolic Adaptation and Prevention of Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Masahide; Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Qi, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Jiening; Liu, Tao; Voigt, Niels; Karck, Matthias; Kamler, Markus; Kodama, Itsuo; Murohara, Toyoaki; Dobrev, Dobromir; Nattel, Stanley

    2015-07-07

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with metabolic stress, which activates adenosine monophosphate-regulated protein kinase (AMPK). This study sought to examine AMPK response to AF and associated metabolic stress, along with consequences for atrial cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) handling. Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) transients (CaTs) and cell shortening (CS) were measured in dog and human atrial cardiomyocytes. AMPK phosphorylation and AMPK association with Ca(2+)-handling proteins were evaluated by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. CaT amplitude and CS decreased at 4-min glycolysis inhibition (GI) but returned to baseline at 8 min, suggesting cellular adaptation to metabolic stress, potentially due to AMPK activation. GI increased AMPK-activating phosphorylation, and an AMPK inhibitor, compound C (CompC), abolished the adaptation of CaT and CS to GI. The AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) increased CaT amplitude and CS, restoring CompC-induced CaT and CS decreases. CompC decreased L-type calcium channel current (ICa,L), along with ICa,L-triggered CaT amplitude and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content under voltage clamp conditions in dog cells and suppressed CaT and ICa,L in human cardiomyocytes. Small interfering ribonucleic acid-based AMPK knockdown decreased CaT amplitude in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. L-type Ca(2+) channel α subunits coimmunoprecipitated with AMPKα. Atrial AMPK-activating phosphorylation was enhanced by 1 week of electrically maintained AF in dogs; fractional AMPK phosphorylation was increased in paroxysmal AF and reduced in longstanding persistent AF patients. AMPK is activated by metabolic stress and AF, and helps maintain the intactness of atrial ICa,L, Ca(2+) handling, and cell contractility. AMPK contributes to the atrial compensatory response to AF-related metabolic stress; AF-related metabolic responses may be an interesting new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology

  11. Relationship of calcium absorption with 25(OH)D and calcium intake in children with rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Abrams, Steven A

    2010-11-01

    Nutritional rickets has long been considered a disease caused by vitamin D deficiency, but recent data indicate that inadequate dietary calcium intake is an important cause of rickets, particularly in tropical countries. Children with rickets due to calcium deficiency do not have very low 25(OH)D concentrations, and serum 1,25(OH)(2) D values are markedly elevated. Studies of Nigerian children with rickets demonstrated they have high fractional calcium absorption. A high-phytate diet was demonstrated to increase calcium absorption compared with the fasting state, and enzymatic dephytinization did not significantly improve calcium absorption. When given vitamin D, children with rickets have a marked increase in 1,25(OH)(2) D concentrations without any change in fractional calcium absorption. No positive relationship was found between fractional calcium absorption and serum 25(OH)D concentrations in children on low-calcium diets. More research is needed to understand the interaction between calcium and vitamin D and the role of vitamin D in calcium absorption. © 2010 International Life Sciences Institute.

  12. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from calcium silicates and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teir, Sebastian; Eloneva, Sanni; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the pulp and paper industry by calcium carbonation are presented. The current precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production uses mined, crushed calcium carbonate as raw materials. If calcium silicates were used instead, carbon dioxide emissions from the calcination of carbonates would be eliminated. In Finland, there could, thus, be a potential for eliminating 200 kt of carbon dioxide emissions per year, considering only the PCC used in the pulp and paper industry. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility to produce PCC from calcium silicates and the potential to replace calcium carbonate as the raw material was made. Calcium carbonate can be manufactured from calcium silicates by various methods, but only a few have been experimentally verified. The possibility and feasibility of these methods as a replacement for the current PCC production process was studied by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using HSC software and process modelling using Aspen Plus[reg]. The results from the process modelling showed that a process that uses acetic acid for extraction of the calcium ions is a high potential option for sequestering carbon dioxide by mineral carbonation. The main obstacle seems to be the limited availability and relatively high price of wollastonite, which is a mineral with high calcium silicate content. An alternative is to use the more common, but also more complex, basalt rock instead

  13. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  14. Renoprotective effect of calcium channel blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimković Nada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The advancing chronic renal failure is at most the consequence of secondary haemodynamic and metabolic factors as intraglomerular hypertension and glomerular hypertrophy. Although tight blood pressure control is the major preventive mechanism for progressive renal failure, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers have some other renoprotective mechanisms beyond the blood pressure control. That is why these two groups of antihypertensive drugs traditionally have advantages in treating renal patients especially those with proteinuria over 400-1000 mg/day. Even if earlier experimental studies have shown renoprotective effect of calcium channel blockers, later clinical studies did not prove that calcium channel blockers have any advantages in renal protection over ACE inhibitors given as monotherapy or in combination with ACE inhibitors. It was explained by action of calcium channel blockers on afferent but not on efferent glomerular arterioles; a well known mechanism that leads to intraglomerular hypertension. New generations of dihydropiridine calcium channel blockers can dilate even efferent arterioles not causing unfavorable haemodynamic disturbances. This finding was confirmed in clinical studies which showed that renoprotection established by calcium channel blockers was not inferior to that of ACE inhibitors and that calcium channel blockers and ACE inhibitors have additive effect on renoprotection. Newer generation of dihydropiridine calcium channel blockers seem to offer more therapeutic possibilities in renoprotection by their dual action on afferent and efferent glomerular arterioles and, possibly by other effects beyond the blood pressure control.

  15. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  16. Effects of adding chymosin to milk on calcium homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ulla Kristine; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Mosekilde, Leif

    2015-01-01

    either chymosin or similar placebo was added. Compared with placebo, chymosin did not affect 24-h urinary calcium, calcium/creatinine ratio, plasma parathyroid hormone, calcitonin or ionized calcium levels. However, during the first 4 h after intake of milk with chymosin, urinary calcium-creatinine ratio...... not depend on plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Chymosin added to milk increases renal calcium excretion in the hours following intake without affecting plasma levels of calcium or calciotropic hormones. The effect most likely represents enhanced intestinal calcium absorption shortly after intake. Further......Calcium intake and absorption is important for bone health. In a randomized double-blind cross-over trial, we investigated effects of adding chymosin to milk on the intestinal calcium absorption as measured by renal calcium excretion and indices of calcium homeostasis. The primary outcome...

  17. Chapter 15. Measurement of the main calcium metabolism processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milhaud, G.

    1975-01-01

    A method of measuring the chief calcium metabolism processes in man is described and is based on the following techniques and theory: intraveinous injection of 45 Ca; determination of the specific radioactivity of serum calcium, total radioactivity of urine and stools, ingested and excreted calcium; mathematical analysis of the specific radioactivity decay curve for serum calcium. The following data were obtained in this way: intestinal absorption fraction of calcium in the chemical state in which it is found in foods; quantity of calcium excreted by the intestin, as distinct from the non-absorbed fraction; physiological turnover rates in the skeleton by osteolysis and osteoblastosis; mass of rapidly exchangeable calcium in the organism, i.e. the calcium pool; rates of exchange with serum calcium of calcium from the different pool components, mass of bone calcium subjected to recrystallisation. Some applications of the method in man and the verification of the theory in rats are reported [fr

  18. Effect of calcium intake on urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone-forming patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary calcium lowers the risk of nephrolithiasis due to a decreased absorption of dietary oxalate that is bound by intestinal calcium. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxaluria in normocalciuric and hypercalciuric lithiasic patients under different calcium intake. Fifty patients (26 females and 24 males, 41 ± 10 years old, whose 4-day dietary records revealed a regular low calcium intake (<=500 mg/day, received an oral calcium load (1 g/day for 7 days. A 24-h urine was obtained before and after load and according to the calciuria under both diets, patients were considered as normocalciuric (NC, N = 15, diet-dependent hypercalciuric (DDHC, N = 9 or diet-independent hypercalciuric (DIHC, N = 26. On regular diet, mean oxaluria was 30 ± 14 mg/24 h for all patients. The 7-day calcium load induced a significant decrease in mean oxaluria compared to the regular diet in NC and DIHC (20 ± 12 vs 26 ± 7 and 27 ± 18 vs 32 ± 15 mg/24 h, respectively, P<0.05 but not in DDHC patients (22 ± 10 vs 23 ± 5 mg/24 h. The lack of an oxalate decrease among DDHC patients after the calcium load might have been due to higher calcium absorption under higher calcium supply, with a consequent lower amount of calcium left in the intestine to bind with oxalate. These data suggest that a long-lasting regular calcium consumption <500 mg was not associated with high oxaluria and that a subpopulation of hypercalciuric patients who presented a higher intestinal calcium absorption (DDHC tended to hyperabsorb oxalate as well, so that oxaluria did not change under different calcium intake.

  19. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  20. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina B Wölwer

    Full Text Available Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation.

  1. Calcium: A Nutrient Deserving a Special Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Whiting

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in calcium has continued since the 1980s when its role in promoting bone growth and retention was established in clinical trials of children and postmenopausal women. The human nutrition functions now attributed to calcium have expanded beyond bone health to include other conditions such as body weight maintenance. While most efforts have been focused on the findings that dietary intakes are low, there are emerging data on safety concerns of excess amounts. This Special Issue on calcium nutrition, spanning the lifecycle from critically ill neonates through to older adults, has been written by some of the leading researchers in this field.

  2. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  3. Intracellular Calcium Mobilization in Response to Ion Channel Regulators via a Calcium-Induced Calcium Release Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, Terry; Olsen, Hervør L; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Masters, John R; Ashmore, Jonathan F; Ahmed, Aamir

    2017-02-01

    Free intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ), in addition to being an important second messenger, is a key regulator of many cellular processes including cell membrane potential, proliferation, and apoptosis. In many cases, the mobilization of [Ca 2+ ] i is controlled by intracellular store activation and calcium influx. We have investigated the effect of several ion channel modulators, which have been used to treat a range of human diseases, on [Ca 2+ ] i release, by ratiometric calcium imaging. We show that six such modulators [amiodarone (Ami), dofetilide, furosemide (Fur), minoxidil (Min), loxapine (Lox), and Nicorandil] initiate release of [Ca 2+ ] i in prostate and breast cancer cell lines, PC3 and MCF7, respectively. Whole-cell currents in PC3 cells were inhibited by the compounds tested in patch-clamp experiments in a concentration-dependent manner. In all cases [Ca 2+ ] i was increased by modulator concentrations comparable to those used clinically. The increase in [Ca 2+ ] i in response to Ami, Fur, Lox, and Min was reduced significantly (P calcium was reduced to nM concentration by chelation with EGTA. The data suggest that many ion channel regulators mobilize [Ca 2+ ] i We suggest a mechanism whereby calcium-induced calcium release is implicated; such a mechanism may be important for understanding the action of these compounds. Copyright © 2017 by The Author(s).

  4. Sympathetic Nervous Regulation of Calcium and Action Potential Alternans in the Intact Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, James; Bishop, Martin J; Wilder, Catherine D E; O'Shea, Christopher; Pavlovic, Davor; Shattock, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    into the sarcoplasmic reticulum is a major mechanism by which SNS suppresses alternans in the guinea pig heart. Conclusions : SNS suppresses calcium and action potential alternans in the intact guinea pig heart by an action mediated through accelerated Ca handling and via increased I Ks .

  5. Central activation, metabolites, and calcium handling during fatigue with repeated maximal isometric contractions in human muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, Simeon P; Inman, Luke A G; MacManus, Caroline P; van de Port, Ingrid G L; Ruell, Patricia A; Thom, Jeanette M; Thompson, Martin W

    2017-08-01

    To determine the roles of calcium (Ca 2+ ) handling by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and central activation impairment (i.e., central fatigue) during fatigue with repeated maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) in human muscles. Contractile performance was assessed during 3 min of repeated MVCs (7-s contraction, 3-s rest, n = 17). In ten participants, in vitro SR Ca 2+ -handling, metabolites, and fibre-type composition were quantified in biopsy samples from quadriceps muscle, along with plasma venous [K + ]. In 11 participants, central fatigue was compared using tetanic stimulation superimposed on MVC in quadriceps and adductor pollicis muscles. The decline of peak MVC force with fatigue was similar for both muscles. Fatigue resistance correlated directly with % type I fibre area in quadriceps (r = 0.77, P = 0.009). The maximal rate of ryanodine-induced Ca 2+ -release and Ca 2+ -uptake fell by 31 ± 26 and 28 ± 13%, respectively. The tetanic force depression was correlated with the combined reduction of ATP and PCr, and increase of lactate (r = 0.77, P = 0.009). Plasma venous [K + ] increased from 4.0 ± 0.3 to 5.4 ± 0.8 mM over 1-3-min exercise. Central fatigue occurred during the early contractions in the quadriceps in 7 out of 17 participants (central activation ratio fell from 0.98 ± 0.05 to 0.86 ± 0.11 at 1 min), but dwindled at exercise cessation. Central fatigue was seldom apparent in adductor pollicis. Fatigue with repeated MVC in human limb muscles mainly involves peripheral aspects which include impaired SR Ca 2+ -handling and we speculate that anaerobic metabolite changes are involved. A faster early force loss in quadriceps muscle with some participants is attributed to central fatigue.

  6. Calcium and IP3 dynamics in cardiac myocytes: Experimental and computational perspectives and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix eHohendanner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays a crucial role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC, but it is also a pivotal second messenger activating Ca2+-dependent transcription factors in a process termed excitation-transcription coupling (ETC. Evidence accumulated over the past decade indicates a pivotal role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in the regulation of cytosolic and nuclear Ca2+ signals. IP3 is generated by stimulation of plasma membrane receptors that couple to phospholipase C (PLC, liberating IP3 from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2. An intriguing aspect of IP3 signaling is the presence of the entire PIP2-PLC-IP3 signaling cascade as well as the presence of IP3Rs at the inner and outer membranes of the nuclear envelope (NE which functions as a Ca2+ store. The observation that the nucleus is surrounded by its own putative Ca2+ store raises the possibility that nuclear IP3-dependent Ca2+ release plays a critical role in ETC. This provides a potential mechanism of regulation that acts locally and autonomously from the global cytosolic Ca2+ signal underlying ECC. Moreover, there is evidence that: (i the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and NE are a single contiguous Ca2+ store; (ii the nuclear pore complex is the major gateway for Ca2+ and macromolecules to pass between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm; (iii the inner membrane of the NE hosts key Ca2+ handling proteins including the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX/GM1 complex, ryanodine receptors (RyRs, nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors (NAADPRs, Na+/K+ ATPase and Na+/H+ exchanger. Thus, it appears that the nucleus represents a Ca2+ signaling domain equipped with its own ion channels and transporters that allow for complex local Ca2+ signals. Many experimental and modeling approaches have been used for the study of intracellular Ca2+ signaling but the key to understanding of the dual role of Ca2+ mediating ECC and ECT lays in quantitative differences of

  7. Sympathetic Nervous Regulation of Calcium and Action Potential Alternans in the Intact Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Winter

    2018-01-01

    reuptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum is a major mechanism by which SNS suppresses alternans in the guinea pig heart.Conclusions: SNS suppresses calcium and action potential alternans in the intact guinea pig heart by an action mediated through accelerated Ca handling and via increased IKs.

  8. Calcium absorption from fortified ice cream formulations compared with calcium absorption from milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hee, Regine M; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Rietveld, Anton G; Wilkinson, Joy E; Quail, Patricia J; Berry, Mark J; Dainty, Jack R; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%+/-8%, 28%+/-5%, and 31%+/-9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1185 - Calcium acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Listing of Specific...-4), also known as acetate of lime or vinegar salts, is the calcium salt of acetic acid. It may be...

  10. 21 CFR 172.720 - Calcium lactobionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION... additive is the calcium salt of lactobionic acid (4-(β,D-galactosido)-D-gluconic acid) produced by the...

  11. Vitamin D with Calcium Reduces Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Avenell, Alison; Masud, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    D was given with calcium (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.98). The number needed to treat with vitamin D plus calcium for 3 yr to prevent one death was 151. Trial level meta-analysis (24 trials with 88,097 participants) showed similar results, i.e. mortality was reduced with vitamin D plus......Introduction:Vitamin D may affect multiple health outcomes. If so, an effect on mortality is to be expected. Using pooled data from randomized controlled trials, we performed individual patient data (IPD) and trial level meta-analyses to assess mortality among participants randomized to either...... vitamin D alone or vitamin D with calcium.Subjects and Methods:Through a systematic literature search, we identified 24 randomized controlled trials reporting data on mortality in which vitamin D was given either alone or with calcium. From a total of 13 trials with more than 1000 participants each, eight...

  12. Obtainment of calcium carbonate from mussels shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamester, M.R.R.; Becker, D.

    2010-01-01

    The mussels and oyster shell are discarded at environment, and this accumulation is causing negative consequences to ecosystem. Calcium carbonate is main constituent of the shell chemical composition. Aiming to reduce environmental aggression and generate income to shellfish producer, there was the possibility of using these shells as an alternative to commercial calcium carbonate. For this physics, chemicals and thermal properties were evaluated, using X-ray fluorescence, thermogravimetric analysis, size distribution, abrasiveness and scanning electronic microscopy. The results indicate that mussels shells have an initial degradation temperature higher than commercial calcium carbonate e same lost weight behavior and 95% of shell chemical composition is calcium carbonate. The sample size distribution was influenced by grinding condition and time as well as its abrasiveness. (author)

  13. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorhout Mees, S. M.; Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has been incompletely elucidated, but vasospasm probably is a contributing factor. Experimental studies have suggested that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse

  14. Modeling and analysis of calcium bromide hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, Steven A.; Lyczkowski, Robert W.; Panchal, Chandrakant B.; Doctor, Richard D. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The main focus of this paper is the modeling, simulation, and analysis of the calcium bromide hydrolysis reactor stage in the calcium-bromine thermochemical water-splitting cycle for nuclear hydrogen production. One reactor concept is to use a spray of calcium bromide into steam, in which the heat of fusion supplies the heat of reaction. Droplet models were built up in a series of steps incorporating various physical phenomena, including droplet flow, heat transfer, phase change, and reaction, separately. Given the large heat reservoir contained in a pool of molten calcium bromide that allows bubbles to rise easily, using a bubble column reactor for the hydrolysis appears to be a feasible and promising alternative to the spray reactor concept. The two limiting cases of bubble geometry, spherical and spherical-cap, are considered in the modeling. Results for both droplet and bubble modeling with COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS trademark are presented, with recommendations for the path forward. (author)

  15. Can atorvastatin calcium cause asymptomatic hypercalcemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipekçi, Süleyman Hilmi; Baldane, Süleyman; Sözen, Mehmet; Kebapçılar, Levent

    2014-10-01

    The use of statins may have unnatural effects. A 54-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital with an incidental finding of hypercalcemia (10.8 mg/dL). There was no disease other than hyperlipidemia, and the patient had been on a course of atorvastatin calcium 10 mg for 1.5 years. A workup investigation to diagnose the cause of hypercalcemia was completed. The investigation did not reveal any pathological diseases that may have caused the hypercalcemia. The hypercalcemia resolved after atorvastatin-calcium was stopped, and the patient developed hypercalcemia shortly after the initiation of the atorvastatin calcium. Here, we report a clinical case of recurrent hypercalcemia possibly induced by atorvastatin calcium administration.

  16. 21 CFR 172.120 - Calcium disodium EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Food Preservatives § 172.120 Calcium disodium EDTA. The food additive calcium disodium EDTA (calcium... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium disodium EDTA. 172.120 Section 172.120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  17. Does calcium constrain reproductive activity in insectivorous bats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insects are a poor source of dietary calcium and since they are seasonally abundant, it has been suggested that calcium availability may play a significant role in controlling the timing of reproduction in insectivorous bats. To assess the possible role of dietary calcium, we have measured bone calcium concentrations in ...

  18. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Calcium-dependent protein kinase; degenerate primer; Funaria hygrometrica; nutrient; polymerase chain reaction; starvation ... Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an inter- esting class of ..... Saunders M J and Hepler P K 1983 Calcium antagonists and.

  19. [Effect of dietary calcium vs calcium citrate on conventional biochemical markers in perimenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Barreiro, Ma de los Angeles; Guerrero-Mercado, Aixa del Socorro; Méndez-Jiménez, Tannia Erika; Milián-Suazo, Feliciano

    2005-01-01

    To compare the effect of calcium citrate and a calcium enriched diet on conventional biochemical markers. Eighty-two women aged 30 to 35 years were randomized to any of three groups:A control group of 23 women who remained intact in their dietary habits and physical activity; a second group of 28 women who received 1000 mg of dietary calcium plus physical activity 30 minutes three times per week; and a third group of 31 women who received 600 mg of calcium citrate plus 500 mg of dietary calcium and physical activity three times per week for seven months. Calcaneum bone densitometry was measured to classify women into normal and osteopenic groups. Biochemical markers were measured at baseline and at the end of the study, as follows: serum alkaline phosphatase, magnesium, calcium and phosphorus, as well as the calcium/creatinine ratio in urine. Thirty-four percent of women were osteopenic. These women showed a significant reduction in the final level of calcium in the third group, as compared to the second group (p Phosphorus levels decreased in the second group (3.5 to 3.2 mg/dl) (p > 0.05). The calcium/creatinine ratio was normal in all groups. The second group showed a higher bone production than the third group. No group showed bone resorption.

  20. Understanding calcium dynamics experiments and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malchow, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Calcium is an important messenger in living cells. Calcium dynamics display complex temporal and spatial structures created by the concentration patterns which are characteristic for a nonlinear system operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Written as a set of tutorial reviews on both experimental facts and theoretical modelling, this volume is intended as an introduction and modern reference in the field for graduate students and researchers in biophysics, biochemistry and applied mathematics.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of porous calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados C, F.; Serrano G, J.; Bonifacio M, J.

    2007-01-01

    The porous calcium phosphate was prepared by the continuous precipitation method using Ca(NO 3 ) 2 .4H 2 O and NH 4 H 2 PO 4 salts. The synthesized material was structurally and superficially characterized using the XRD, BET, IR TGA and SEM techniques. The obtained inorganic material was identified as calcium phosphate that presents a great specific area for what can be efficiently used as adsorbent material for adsorption studies in the radioactive wastes treatment present in aqueous solution. (Author)

  2. Self-Setting Calcium Orthophosphate Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2013-01-01

    In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are bioactive and biodegradable grafting bioceramics in the form of a powder and a liquid. After mixing, both phases form pastes, which set and harden forming either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite or brushite. Since both of them are remarkably biocompartible, bioresorbable and osteoconductive, self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations appear to be promising bioceramics for bone grafting. Furthermore, such formulations possess excellent molding capabilities, easy manipulation and nearly perfect adaptation to the complex shapes of bone defects, followed by gradual bioresorption and new bone formation. In addition, reinforced formulations have been introduced, which might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The discovery of self-setting properties opened up a new era in the medical application of calcium orthophosphates and many commercial trademarks have been introduced as a result. Currently such formulations are widely used as synthetic bone grafts, with several advantages, such as pourability and injectability. Moreover, their low-temperature setting reactions and intrinsic porosity allow loading by drugs, biomolecules and even cells for tissue engineering purposes. In this review, an insight into the self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations, as excellent bioceramics suitable for both dental and bone grafting applications, has been provided. PMID:24956191

  3. Estudio de la Estructura Reticular de la Barriada de Las Palmeras, Córdoba, para la Planificación Participada de Propuestas de Convivencias Pacíficas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban A. Ramos Muslera

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available El estudio participado de redes (institucionales y de base en la barriada de Las Palmeras (Córdoba, en el que se da cuenta del dinámico entramado relacional-reticular existente, constituye una herramienta básica para la Planificación Participada de Propuestas de Convivencias Pacíficas y Estrategias para el Desarrollo Local Integral de la comunidad. Además de arrojar luz sobre las diferentes redes presentes, sus relaciones, la fuerza de éstas, su jerarquía, los actores puente y el impacto de éstos en la situación convivencial imperante en la barriada, la perspectiva participativa desde la que se ha desarrollado la investigación ha facilitado la implicación de la ciudadanía en todo el proceso de reflexión, favoreciendo la asunción de las responsabilidades sociales necesarias por parte de los vecinos para la implementación de las propuestas generadoras de Convivencias Pacíficas, a través de la creación de unas estructuras de participación, reflexión y consenso, capaces de abordar autónomamente las situaciones de confrontación resultantes del conflicto.La estrategia de intervención partía de la construcción-reflexión comunitaria sobre las redes y relaciones, abordando las problemáticas sociales comunitarias e iniciando la búsqueda, desarrollo e implementación de las propuestas consensuadas capaces de generar más y mejores convivencias pacíficas.

  4. Calcium homeostasis in low and high calcium water acclimatized Oreochromis mossambicus exposed to ambient and dietary cadmium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pratap, H.B.; Wendelaar Bonga, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of cadmium administered via ambient water (10 mg/l) or food (10 mgCd/fish/day) on plasma calcium, corpuscles of Stannius and bony tissues of Oreochromis mossambicus acclimated to low calcium (0.2 mM) and high calcium (0.8 mM) water were studied for 2, 4, 14 and 35 days. In low calcium

  5. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  6. Factors to consider in the selection of a calcium supplement.

    OpenAIRE

    Shangraw, R F

    1989-01-01

    Calcium supplements are widely used, yet many questions remain as to the absorption of various calcium salts. Because the solubility of many calcium salts is dependent upon pH, the type of salt used, the condition of the patient, and the time of administration should be considered. Studies show that many calcium supplements on the market today do not meet standards of quality established in the "U.S. Pharmacopeia" (USP). Consumers must be discerning about the products they purchase. Calcium s...

  7. Estimation of ionized calcium, total calcium and albumin corrected calcium for the diagnosis of hypocalcaemia of malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijaz, A.; Mehmood, T.; Qureshi, A.H.; Anwar, M.; Dilawar, M.; Hussain, I.; Khan, F.A.; Khan, D.A.; Hussain, S.; Khan, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To measure levels of ionized calcium, total calcium and albumin corrected calcium in patients with different malignant disorders for the diagnosis of hypercalcaemia of malignancy. Design: A case control comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out in the Department of Pathology, Army Medical College Rawalpindi, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and Department of Oncology CMH, Rawalpindi from March 2003 to December 2003. Subjects and Methods: Ninety-seven patients of various malignant disorders, admitted in the Department of Oncology, CMH, Rawalpindi, and 39 age and gender-matched disease-free persons (as control) were included in the study. Blood ionized calcium (Ca/sup ++/), pH, sodium (Na/sup +/) and potassium (K/sup +/) were analysed by Ion selective electrode (ISE) on Easylyte> auto analyser. Other related parameters were measured by colorimetric methods. Results: Blood Ca/sup ++/ levels in patients suffering from malignant disorders were found significantly high (mean +- j 1.30+017 mmoV/L) as compared to control subjects (mean +- 1.23+0.03 mmoV/L) (p<0.001). The number of patients with hypercalcaemia of malignancy detected by Ca/sup ++/ estimation was significantly higher (38%) as compared to total calcium (8.4%) and albumin corrected calcium ACC (10.6%) (p<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in other parameters e.g. phosphate, urea, creatinine, pH, Na/sup +/ and K/sup +/ levels in study subjects and controls. Conclusion: Detection of hypercalcaemia can be markedly improved if ionized calcium estimation is used in patients with malignant disorders. (author)

  8. Expanding the neuron's calcium signaling repertoire: intracellular calcium release via voltage-induced PLC and IP3R activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Ryglewski

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal calcium acts as a charge carrier during information processing and as a ubiquitous intracellular messenger. Calcium signals are fundamental to numerous aspects of neuronal development and plasticity. Specific and independent regulation of these vital cellular processes is achieved by a rich bouquet of different calcium signaling mechanisms within the neuron, which either can operate independently or may act in concert. This study demonstrates the existence of a novel calcium signaling mechanism by simultaneous patch clamping and calcium imaging from acutely isolated central neurons. These neurons possess a membrane voltage sensor that, independent of calcium influx, causes G-protein activation, which subsequently leads to calcium release from intracellular stores via phospholipase C and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activation. This allows neurons to monitor activity by intracellular calcium release without relying on calcium as the input signal and opens up new insights into intracellular signaling, developmental regulation, and information processing in neuronal compartments lacking calcium channels.

  9. Structure-activity relationship study and discovery of indazole 3-carboxamides as calcium-release activated calcium channel blockers

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Sha; Nagai, Masazumi; Koerner, Steffi K.; Veves, Aristidis; Sun, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of mast cells contributes to the development of numerous diseases including cancer, autoimmune disorders, as well as diabetes and its complications. The influx of extracellular calcium via the highly calcium selective calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channel controls mast cell functions. Intracellular calcium homeostasis in mast cells can be maintained via the modulation of the CRAC channel, representing a critical point for therapeutic interventions. We describe t...

  10. Calcium response to vitamin D supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Spivacow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies show the importance of serum vitamin D sufficient levels to prevent multiple chronic diseases. However, vitamin D supplementation and its effects on urine calcium excretion remain controversial. The objective of this prospective and interventional study was to evaluate urine calcium excretion in women with normal calciuria or hypercalciuria, once serum vitamin D sufficiency was achieved. We studied 63 women with idiopathic hypercalciuria, (9 with renal lithiasis and 50 normocalciuric women. Both groups had serum vitamin D levels low (deficiency or insufficiency. Baseline urine calcium excretion was measured before being supplemented with vitamin D2 or D3 weekly or vitamin D3 100.000 IU monthly. Once serum vitamin D levels were corrected achieving at least 30 ng/ml, a second urine calcium excretion was obtained. Although in the whole sample we did not observe significant changes in urine calcium excretion according to the way of supplementation, some of those with weekly supplementation had significant higher urine calcium excretion, 19% (n = 12 of hypercalciuric women and 12% (n = 6 of the normocalciuric group. Monthly doses, also showed higher urine calcium excretion in 40% of hypercalciuric women (n = 4/10 and in 44% (n = 4/9 of the renal lithiasis hypercalciuric patients. In conclusion, different ways of vitamin D supplementation and adequate serum levels are safe in most patients, although it should be taken into account a subgroup, mainly with monthly loading doses, that could increase the calciuria significantly eventually rising renal lithiasis risk or bone mass loss, if genetically predisposed.

  11. Calcium soap from palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD for ruminant feed: quality of calcium source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handojo Lienda A.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium soap is potentially used as fat supplements for ruminants since it contains high concentration of fat and calcium that are useful for ruminants. The consumption of calcium soap may increase the yield and the fat content of milk, as well as increase the ruminant’s fertility. Calcium soap can be produced from palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD, which is a by-product of crude palm oil (CPO refining process, and calcium oxide (CaO. In this study, the effect of CaO quality on the acid value of the product has been observed. It was found that the reaction with lower concentration of active calcium of CaO resulted in products with a higher acid value, which indicates a lower reaction conversion. Thus, the produced calcium soap requires further treatment in order to remove the unreacted calcium and free fatty acid. Washing with hexane followed by either vacuum or convection drying has been found to be able to reduce the acid value of the product significantly.

  12. Eggshell powder, a comparable or better source of calcium than purified calcium carbonate: Piglet studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; Beelen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Powdered chicken eggshells might be an interesting and widely available source of calcium. In two studies using piglets we determined the digestibility of calcium from different diets. The first study compared casein-based diets with CaCO3 (CasCC) or eggshell powder (CasES). The second study

  13. Relative biological activity of amorphous calcium and calcium-magnesium phosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silina, E.N.; Kunitsa, T.N.; Shuslikova, E.S.; Griggs, J.; Levchenko, L.V.; Karjaubaeva, R.A.; Sinyayev, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    Three amorphous calcium and calcium-magnesium phosphates that are close on composition to mineral basis of the bone tissues are compared on bioactivity in the given article. Properties of the hydrated substances produced from water solutions and their derivations, which are formed due to thermal treatment, are discussed here. As a detector of bioactivity was used microbial culture E-Coli. [author

  14. Calcium spikes and calcium plateaux evoked by differential polarization in dendrites of turtle motoneurones in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Kiehn, O

    1993-01-01

    The ability of dendrites in turtle motoneurones to support calcium spikes and calcium plateaux was investigated using differential polarization by applied electric fields. 2. Electric fields were generated by passing current through transverse slices of the turtle spinal cord between two plate......+ spikes and Ca2+ plateaux are present in dendrites of spinal motoneurones of the turtle....

  15. Derivation of a formula for adjusting the total serum calcium in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-06-16

    Jun 16, 2006 ... homeostasis. Calcium sensing receptors have also been identified. The total serum calcium is accounted for as calcium bound to protein, ionized calcium and calcium complexed to citrate, lactate, sulphate, carbonate and phosphate. The calcium bound to protein and ionized calcium is roughly in equal ...

  16. Effect of dietary calcium and phosphorus on intestinal calcium absorption and vitamin D metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribovich, M.L.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    To understand better dietary regulation of intestinal calcium absorption, a quantitative assessment of the metabolites in plasma and duodenum of rats given daily doses of radioactive vitamin D 3 and diets differing in calcium and phosphorus content was made. All known vitamin D metabolites were ultimately identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. In addition to the known metabolites (25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 , 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 , 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 , 25,26-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 , and 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D 3 ), several new and unidentified metabolites were found. In addition to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 and 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D 3 , the levels of some of the unknown metabolites could be correlated with intestinal calcium transport. However, whether or not any of these metabolites plays a role in the stimulation of intestinal calcium absorption by low dietary calcium or low dietary phosphorus remains unknown

  17. Calcium carbonate scaling kinetics determined from radiotracer experiments with calcium-47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, C.W.; Smith, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    The deposition rate of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface has been measured using a calcium-47 radiotracer and compared to the measured rate of thermal fouling. The crystalline phase of calcium carbonate that precipitates depends on the degree of supersaturation at the heat-transfer surface, with aragonite precipitating at higher supersaturations and calcite precipitating at lower supersaturations. Whereas the mass deposition rates were constant with time, the thermal fouling rates decreased throughout the course of each experiment as a result of densification of the deposit. It is proposed that the densification was driven by the temperature gradient across the deposit together with the retrograde solubility of calcium carbonate. The temperature dependence of the deposition rate yielded an activation energy of 79 ± 4 kJ/mol for the precipitation of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface. (author)

  18. Discovery and Development of Calcium Channel Blockers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfraind, Théophile

    2017-01-01

    In the mid 1960s, experimental work on molecules under screening as coronary dilators allowed the discovery of the mechanism of calcium entry blockade by drugs later named calcium channel blockers. This paper summarizes scientific research on these small molecules interacting directly with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. It also reports on experimental approaches translated into understanding of their therapeutic actions. The importance of calcium in muscle contraction was discovered by Sidney Ringer who reported this fact in 1883. Interest in the intracellular role of calcium arose 60 years later out of Kamada (Japan) and Heibrunn (USA) experiments in the early 1940s. Studies on pharmacology of calcium function were initiated in the mid 1960s and their therapeutic applications globally occurred in the the 1980s. The first part of this report deals with basic pharmacology in the cardiovascular system particularly in isolated arteries. In the section entitled from calcium antagonists to calcium channel blockers, it is recalled that drugs of a series of diphenylpiperazines screened in vivo on coronary bed precontracted by angiotensin were initially named calcium antagonists on the basis of their effect in depolarized arteries contracted by calcium. Studies on arteries contracted by catecholamines showed that the vasorelaxation resulted from blockade of calcium entry. Radiochemical and electrophysiological studies performed with dihydropyridines allowed their cellular targets to be identified with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. The modulated receptor theory helped the understanding of their variation in affinity dependent on arterial cell membrane potential and promoted the terminology calcium channel blocker (CCB) of which the various chemical families are introduced in the paper. In the section entitled tissue selectivity of CCBs, it is shown that characteristics of the drug, properties of the tissue, and of the stimuli are important factors of

  19. Discovery and Development of Calcium Channel Blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfraind, Théophile

    2017-01-01

    In the mid 1960s, experimental work on molecules under screening as coronary dilators allowed the discovery of the mechanism of calcium entry blockade by drugs later named calcium channel blockers. This paper summarizes scientific research on these small molecules interacting directly with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. It also reports on experimental approaches translated into understanding of their therapeutic actions. The importance of calcium in muscle contraction was discovered by Sidney Ringer who reported this fact in 1883. Interest in the intracellular role of calcium arose 60 years later out of Kamada (Japan) and Heibrunn (USA) experiments in the early 1940s. Studies on pharmacology of calcium function were initiated in the mid 1960s and their therapeutic applications globally occurred in the the 1980s. The first part of this report deals with basic pharmacology in the cardiovascular system particularly in isolated arteries. In the section entitled from calcium antagonists to calcium channel blockers, it is recalled that drugs of a series of diphenylpiperazines screened in vivo on coronary bed precontracted by angiotensin were initially named calcium antagonists on the basis of their effect in depolarized arteries contracted by calcium. Studies on arteries contracted by catecholamines showed that the vasorelaxation resulted from blockade of calcium entry. Radiochemical and electrophysiological studies performed with dihydropyridines allowed their cellular targets to be identified with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. The modulated receptor theory helped the understanding of their variation in affinity dependent on arterial cell membrane potential and promoted the terminology calcium channel blocker (CCB) of which the various chemical families are introduced in the paper. In the section entitled tissue selectivity of CCBs, it is shown that characteristics of the drug, properties of the tissue, and of the stimuli are important factors of

  20. Discovery and Development of Calcium Channel Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Théophile Godfraind

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the mid 1960s, experimental work on molecules under screening as coronary dilators allowed the discovery of the mechanism of calcium entry blockade by drugs later named calcium channel blockers. This paper summarizes scientific research on these small molecules interacting directly with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. It also reports on experimental approaches translated into understanding of their therapeutic actions. The importance of calcium in muscle contraction was discovered by Sidney Ringer who reported this fact in 1883. Interest in the intracellular role of calcium arose 60 years later out of Kamada (Japan and Heibrunn (USA experiments in the early 1940s. Studies on pharmacology of calcium function were initiated in the mid 1960s and their therapeutic applications globally occurred in the the 1980s. The first part of this report deals with basic pharmacology in the cardiovascular system particularly in isolated arteries. In the section entitled from calcium antagonists to calcium channel blockers, it is recalled that drugs of a series of diphenylpiperazines screened in vivo on coronary bed precontracted by angiotensin were initially named calcium antagonists on the basis of their effect in depolarized arteries contracted by calcium. Studies on arteries contracted by catecholamines showed that the vasorelaxation resulted from blockade of calcium entry. Radiochemical and electrophysiological studies performed with dihydropyridines allowed their cellular targets to be identified with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels. The modulated receptor theory helped the understanding of their variation in affinity dependent on arterial cell membrane potential and promoted the terminology calcium channel blocker (CCB of which the various chemical families are introduced in the paper. In the section entitled tissue selectivity of CCBs, it is shown that characteristics of the drug, properties of the tissue, and of the stimuli are

  1. Calcium-Induced calcium release during action potential firing in developing inner hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosub, Radu; Avitabile, Daniele; Grant, Lisa; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Kennedy, Helen J

    2015-03-10

    In the mature auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) convert sound-induced vibrations into electrical signals that are relayed to the central nervous system via auditory afferents. Before the cochlea can respond to normal sound levels, developing IHCs fire calcium-based action potentials that disappear close to the onset of hearing. Action potential firing triggers transmitter release from the immature IHC that in turn generates experience-independent firing in auditory neurons. These early signaling events are thought to be essential for the organization and development of the auditory system and hair cells. A critical component of the action potential is the rise in intracellular calcium that activates both small conductance potassium channels essential during membrane repolarization, and triggers transmitter release from the cell. Whether this calcium signal is generated by calcium influx or requires calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is not yet known. IHCs can generate CICR, but to date its physiological role has remained unclear. Here, we used high and low concentrations of ryanodine to block or enhance CICR to determine whether calcium release from intracellular stores affected action potential waveform, interspike interval, or changes in membrane capacitance during development of mouse IHCs. Blocking CICR resulted in mixed action potential waveforms with both brief and prolonged oscillations in membrane potential and intracellular calcium. This mixed behavior is captured well by our mathematical model of IHC electrical activity. We perform two-parameter bifurcation analysis of the model that predicts the dependence of IHCs firing patterns on the level of activation of two parameters, the SK2 channels activation and CICR rate. Our data show that CICR forms an important component of the calcium signal that shapes action potentials and regulates firing patterns, but is not involved directly in triggering exocytosis. These data provide important insights

  2. Bioavailability of vitamin D₂ and calcium from fortified milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Ravinder; Sachdeva, Bhawana; Arora, Sumit; Kapila, Suman; Wadhwa, Balbir Kaur

    2014-03-15

    The objective of the present investigation was to determine bioavailability of calcium and vitamin D₂ from milk fortified with either calcium or vitamin D₂ alone or when both were used for preparation of multiple micronutrient fortified milk and also to study its interaction with iron and zinc bioavailability. 32 weanling male rats (aged 21-28 days) were assigned into four groups and were fed milk and milk fortified with calcium, vitamin D₂ and calcium+vitamin D₂. Vitamin D₂ increased calcium bioavailability. In multiple micronutrient fortified milk, the bioavailability of both calcium+vitamin D₂ increased in comparison to single fortification. Calcium fortification decreased, whereas vitamin D₂ increased the absorption of iron and zinc. However, calcium and vitamin D₂ when fortified in combination, the iron and zinc bioavailability was similar to control group. There was positive association between bioavailability of calcium and vitamin D₂. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Localization of calcium changes in stimulated rat mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horoyan, M; Soler, M; Benoliel, A M; Fraterno, M; Passerel, M; Subra, H; Martin, J M; Bongrand, P; Foa, C

    1992-01-01

    We studied intracellular free, bound, and sequestered calcium in rat mast cells after various stimulations. The use of a fluorescent probe combined with digitized imaging on individual living cells demonstrated transient increases of free Ca2+ in the micromolar range. The use of histochemical techniques (K pyroantimonate and anhydrous fixation), together with X-ray microanalysis, energy electron-loss spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopic imaging, revealed large amounts of stored calcium within the cells (in the millimolar range). Chelation experiments and stimulations enabled us to identify at least two pools of bound calcium which exhibited different dynamic behaviors. Stimulation in the presence of EGTA did not modify calcium from granules, granule membranes, and heterochromatin, whereas it decreased calcium from other cell compartments. Stimulation triggered variations in the amount of bound calcium but they did not parallel free calcium movements. Hence, whereas free calcium is implicated in exocytosis, bound calcium may be involved in altogether different cell functions.

  4. Absorption of levothyroxine when coadministered with various calcium formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfirescu, Isabelle; Carlson, Harold E

    2011-05-01

    Calcium carbonate is a commonly used dietary supplement and has been shown to interfere with levothyroxine absorption. However, calcium citrate, which is also used for supplementation purposes, has not been studied previously and calcium acetate, which is used to treat hyperphosphatemia in renal failure, has been reported to show little or no interference with levothyroxine absorption in a retrospective pharmacoepidemiologic study. We aimed to compare the effect of these three calcium formulations on levothyroxine absorption. The study was conducted in eight healthy, euthyroid adults. We performed single-dose pharmacokinetic studies in which we measured levothyroxine absorption when given alone or when coadministered with calcium carbonate, calcium citrate, or calcium acetate in doses containing 500 mg elemental calcium. Serum thyroxine was measured at intervals over a 6-hour period after ingestion of the study drugs. Coadministration of each of the three calcium preparations significantly reduced levothyroxine absorption by about 20%-25% compared with levothyroxine given alone. Contrary to a prior report, our data suggest that calcium acetate interferes with levothyroxine absorption in a manner similar to that seen with calcium carbonate and calcium citrate. Although the effect of calcium is modest compared with some other medications previously studied, hypothyroid patients should be cautioned to take their levothyroxine well-separated from all of these calcium formulations.

  5. Contracture of Slow Striated Muscle during Calcium Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Richard L.; Hein, Manfred M.

    1963-01-01

    When deprived of calcium the slow striated muscle fibers of the frog develop reversible contractures in either hypertonic or isotonic solutions. While calcium deprivation continues because of a flowing calcium-free solution the muscles relax slowly and completely. Restoration of calcium during contracture relaxes the muscle promptly to initial tension. When relaxed during calcium lack the return of calcium does not change tension and the muscle stays relaxed. When contractures are induced by solutions containing small amounts of calcium relaxation does not occur or requires several hours. The rate of tension development depends upon the rate at which calcium moves outward since the contractures develop slower in low concentrations of calcium and are absent or greatly slowed in a stagnant calcium-free solution. Withdrawal of calcium prevents the contractile responses to ACh, KCl, or electrical stimulation through the nerve. Muscles return to their original excitability after calcium is restored. Origin of the contractures is unrelated to nerve activity since they are maximal during transmission failure from calcium lack, occur in denervated muscles, and are not blocked by high concentrations of d-tubocurarine, procaine, or atropine. The experiments also indicate that the contractures do not originate from repetitive activity of muscle membranes. The findings are most simply explained by relating the outward movement of calcium as a link for initiating contraction in slow type striated muscle. PMID:14065284

  6. The spatial pattern of atrial cardiomyocyte calcium signalling modulates contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Lauren; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Berridge, Michael J; Conway, Stuart J; Bootman, Martin D

    2004-12-15

    We examined the regulation of calcium signalling in atrial cardiomyocytes during excitation-contraction coupling, and how changes in the distribution of calcium impacts on contractility. Under control conditions, calcium transients originated in subsarcolemmal locations and showed local regeneration through activation of calcium-induced calcium release from ryanodine receptors. Despite functional ryanodine receptors being expressed at regular (approximately 2 microm) intervals throughout atrial myocytes, the subsarcolemmal calcium signal did not spread in a fully regenerative manner through the interior of a cell. Rather, there was a diminishing centripetal propagation of calcium. The lack of regeneration was due to mitochondria and SERCA pumps preventing the inward movement of calcium. Inhibiting these calcium buffering mechanisms allowed the globalisation of action potential-evoked responses. In addition, physiological positive inotropic agents, such as endothelin-1 and beta-adrenergic agonists, as well as enhanced calcium current, calcium store loading and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate infusion also led to regenerative global responses. The consequence of globalising calcium signals was a significant increase in cellular contraction. These data indicate how calcium signals and their consequences are determined by the interplay of multiple subcellular calcium management systems.

  7. Role of claudins in renal calcium handling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Luis Negri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paracellular channels occurring in tight junctions play a major role in transepithelial ionic flows. This pathway includes a high number of proteins, such as claudins. Within renal epithelium, claudins result in an ionic selectivity in tight junctions. Ascending thick limb of loop of Henle (ATLH is the most important segment for calcium reabsorption in renal tubules. Its cells create a water-proof barrier, actively transport sodium and chlorine through a transcellular pathway, and provide a paracellular pathway for selective calcium reabsorption. Several studies have led to a model of paracellular channel consisting of various claudins, particularly claudin-16 and 19. Claudin-16 mediates cationic paracellular permeability in ATLH, whereas claudin-19 increases cationic selectivity of claudin-16 by blocking anionic permeability. Recent studies have shown that claudin-14 promoting activity is only located in ATLH. When co-expressed with claudin-16, claudin-14 inhibits the permeability of claudin-16 and reduces paracellular permeability to calcium. Calcium reabsorption process in ATLH is closely regulated by calcium sensor receptor (CaSR, which monitors circulating Ca levels and adjusts renal excretion rate accordingly. Two microRNA, miR-9 and miR-374, are directly regulated by CaSR. Thus, miR-9 and miR-374 suppress mRNA translation for claudin-14 and induce claudin-14 decline.

  8. Calcium and bone disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriraam Mahadevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant transplacental calcium transfer occurs during pregnancy, especially during the last trimester, to meet the demands of the rapidly mineralizing fetal skeleton. Similarly, there is an obligate loss of calcium in the breast milk during lactation. Both these result in considerable stress on the bone mineral homeostasis in the mother. The maternal adaptive mechanisms to conserve calcium are different in pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy, increased intestinal absorption of calcium from the gut mainly due to higher generation of calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D helps in maintaining maternal calcium levels. On the other hand, during lactation, the main compensatory mechanism is skeletal resorption due to increased generation of parathormone related peptide (PTHrP from the breast. Previous studies suggest that in spite of considerable changes in bone mineral metabolism during pregnancy, parity and lactation are not significantly associated with future risk for osteoporosis. However, in India, the situation may not be the same as a significant proportion of pregnancies occur in the early twenties when peak bone mass is not yet achieved. Further, malnutrition, anemia and vitamin D deficiency are commonly encountered in this age group. This may have an impact on future bone health of the mother. It may also probably provide an opportunity for health care providers for prevention. Other metabolic bone diseases like hypoparathyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism are rarely encountered in pregnancy. Their clinical implications and management are also discussed.

  9. Calcium's Role in Mechanotransduction during Muscle Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Benavides Damm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanotransduction is a process where cells sense their surroundings and convert the physical forces in their environment into an appropriate response. Calcium plays a crucial role in the translation of such forces to biochemical signals that control various biological processes fundamental in muscle development. The mechanical stimulation of muscle cells may for example result from stretch, electric and magnetic stimulation, shear stress, and altered gravity exposure. The response, mainly involving changes in intracellular calcium concentration then leads to a cascade of events by the activation of downstream signaling pathways. The key calcium-dependent pathways described here include the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. The subsequent effects in cellular homeostasis consist of cytoskeletal remodeling, cell cycle progression, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis, all necessary for healthy muscle development, repair, and regeneration. A deregulation from the normal process due to disuse, trauma, or disease can result in a clinical condition such as muscle atrophy, which entails a significant loss of muscle mass. In order to develop therapies against such diseased states, we need to better understand the relevance of calcium signaling and the downstream responses to mechanical forces in skeletal muscle. The purpose of this review is to discuss in detail how diverse mechanical stimuli cause changes in calcium homeostasis by affecting membrane channels and the intracellular stores, which in turn regulate multiple pathways that impart these effects and control the fate of muscle tissue.

  10. Role of claudins in renal calcium handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Armando Luis

    2015-01-01

    Paracellular channels occurring in tight junctions play a major role in transepithelial ionic flows. This pathway includes a high number of proteins, such as claudins. Within renal epithelium, claudins result in an ionic selectivity in tight junctions. Ascending thick limb of loop of Henle (ATLH) is the most important segment for calcium reabsorption in renal tubules. Its cells create a water-proof barrier, actively transport sodium and chlorine through a transcellular pathway, and provide a paracellular pathway for selective calcium reabsorption. Several studies have led to a model of paracellular channel consisting of various claudins, particularly claudin-16 and 19. Claudin-16 mediates cationic paracellular permeability in ATLH, whereas claudin-19 increases cationic selectivity of claudin-16 by blocking anionic permeability. Recent studies have shown that claudin-14 promoting activity is only located in ATLH. When co-expressed with claudin-16, claudin-14 inhibits the permeability of claudin-16 and reduces paracellular permeability to calcium. Calcium reabsorption process in ATLH is closely regulated by calcium sensor receptor (CaSR), which monitors circulating Ca levels and adjusts renal excretion rate accordingly. Two microRNA, miR-9 and miR-374, are directly regulated by CaSR. Thus, miR-9 and miR-374 suppress mRNA translation for claudin-14 and induce claudin-14 decline. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Coronary dilation with nitrocompounds and calcium antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, S; Rafflenbeul, W; Lichtlen, P R

    1990-01-01

    The vasodilatory effects of nitrocompounds and calcium antagonists on epicardial coronary arteries represent substantial antianginal mechanisms in the presence of coronary vasospasm or eccentric coronary stenoses. With high doses of nitrocompounds, angiographically normal coronary segments can be dilated by an average of approx. 30%, some coronary stenoses even by up to 100%, usually without severe reduction of blood pressure. With calcium antagonists, a similar extent of dilation of normal coronary arteries and eccentric stenoses can be obtained. Our own group demonstrated an average dilation of normal coronary arteries of about 20% after intravenous administration of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists; however, the average systolic blood pressure dropped below 100 mmHg after these compounds. Hence, although in isolated human coronary arteries high concentrations of calcium antagonists were shown to induce a considerably greater vasodilation than nitrocompounds, the early drop in blood pressure prohibits a higher dosage of calcium antagonists in vivo. In the presence of coronary artery disease, particularly when associated with coronary vasospasm, a combination of the two groups of compounds might be recommendable, since an addition of the effects of coronary vasomotor tone is likely. Furthermore, the antianginal effects of a reduction of preload and afterload are complementary.

  12. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...... transfected. Parvalbumin-transfected and mock-transfected cells were loaded with the calcium indicator fura-2 and were exposed, in the same dish, to different concentrations of the calcium ionophore A23187 or to KCI. The results show that parvalbumin-transfected PCC7 cells had much better calcium buffering...

  13. Subcellular distribution of calcium-binding proteins and a calcium-ATPase in canine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, S.K.; Towers, T.

    1990-01-01

    Using a 45Ca blot-overlay assay, we monitored the subcellular fractionation pattern of several Ca binding proteins of apparent molecular masses 94, 61, and 59 kD. These proteins also appeared to stain blue with Stains-All. Additionally, using a monoclonal antiserum raised against canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase, we examined the subcellular distribution of a canine pancreatic 110-kD protein recognized by this antiserum. This protein had the same electrophoretic mobility as the cardiac protein against which the antiserum was raised. The three Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase cofractionated into the rough microsomal fraction (RM), previously shown to consist of highly purified RER, in a pattern highly similar to that of the RER marker, ribophorin I. To provide further evidence for an RER localization, native RM were subjected to isopycnic flotation in sucrose gradients. The Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase were found in dense fractions, along with ribophorin I. When RM were stripped of ribosomes with puromycin/high salt, the Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase exhibited a shift to less dense fractions, as did ribophorin I. We conclude that, in pancreas, the Ca binding proteins and Ca-ATPase we detect are localized to the RER (conceivably a subcompartment of the RER) or, possibly, a structure intimately associated with the RER

  14. OSTEOPOROSIS IN CALCIUM PYROPHOSPHATE CRYSTAL DEPOSITION DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S A Vladimirov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence of osteoporosis (OP in patients with calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition disease (CPCDD. Subjects and methods. Eighty patients with CPCDD were examined. Bone mineral density (BMD of the forearm, lumbar spine, and femoral neck was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Laboratory diagnosis involved determination of the blood levels of C-reactive protein, parathyroid hormone, calcium, magnesium, and phosphorus and the daily urinary excretion of calcium and phosphates. Results. The patients with OP were significantly older than those with normal BMD and osteopenia. Forearm bones were the most common isolated location of OP and osteopenia. Injuries in the history, traumatic fractures, and the intake of diuretics were somewhat more common in the patients diagnosed with OP. The incidence of hyperparathyroidism did not differ significantly in the groups.

  15. Frequency Measurement of Tellurium Lines Near Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammalapati, Umakanth; Harada, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Takeshi; Ito, Saki; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Tanaka, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Aiko; Yoshioka, Risa; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2017-12-01

    We report measurement of frequencies of tellurium lines with respect to atomic calcium employing a 423 nm commercial violet laser diode placed in an extended cavity. Doppler-free saturated absorption spectroscopy of molecular tellurium is performed on three lines, which are lower and higher in energy to the calcium 4s2 1S0-4s4p 1P1 transition. The measured frequency difference of 717(13) MHz between the strong absorption line, #1508 in the tellurium atlas and the calcium transition is in agreement within 10% of the values available from literature. Wavenumbers of two new tellurium lines are derived from the measurement. In addition, spectroscopy and laser cooling and trapping of francium (n = 7) on the ns 2S1/2-(n + 1)p 2P3/2 transition and spectroscopy of Te2 lines near francium could be performed employing the 423 nm diode laser.

  16. Urinary calcium excretion in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, E W; Morris, C D; McCarron, D A

    1992-10-01

    Patients with essential hypertension have been reported to have higher levels of urinary calcium excretion (UCaV) than normotensive persons. We tested the hypothesis that the calciuria of hypertension is due to dietary factors and evaluated several alternate mechanisms. UCaV was studied in 15 patients with essential hypertension compared with 16 age- and gender-matched normotensive control subjects. For subjects taking self-selected, free-living diets, the difference in UCaV between normotensive (130 +/- 14 mg/day) and hypertensive subjects (201 +/- 37 mg/day) was not significant (p = 0.1). However, in a controlled diet with moderately restricted sodium intake (88 mEq), urinary calcium excretion was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in the hypertensive than in the normotensive group receiving 400 mg calcium (204 +/- 25 vs 132 +/- 13 mg/day) and 1400 mg calcium (272 +/- 31 vs 187 +/- 25 mg/day). Twenty-four-hour UCaV was directly and significantly correlated with blood pressure (r = 0.63 for standing systolic blood pressure; p UCaV (0.12 +/- 0.11 vs 0.12 +/- 0.07 mg per 100 ml glomerular filtration) and serum ionized calcium level (0.06 +/- 0.08 vs 0.06 +/- 0.02 mmol/L) in normotensive and hypertensive subjects, respectively, suggesting that there was no difference in intestinal calcium absorption between the groups. Fasting UCaV did not differ between the hypertensive (8.9 +/- 4.5 mg per 2 hours) and normotensive groups (10.9 +/- 11.5 mg per 2 hours).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Evolutionary Diversity of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bick, Alexander G.; Calvo, Sarah E.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium uptake into mitochondria occurs via a recently identified ion channel called the uniporter. Here, we characterize the phylogenomic distribution of the uniporter’s membrane-spanning pore subunit (MCU) and regulatory partner (MICU1). Homologs of both components tend to co-occur in all major branches of eukaryotic life, but both have been lost along certain protozoan and fungal lineages. Several bacterial genomes also contain putative MCU homologs that may represent prokaryotic calcium channels. The analyses indicate that the uniporter may have been an early feature of mitochondria. PMID:22605770

  18. Calcium Oxalate: A Surface Treatment for Limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tody M. Cezar

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the artificially induced surface conversion of calcium carbonate to the more durable calcium oxalate. Extensive research is being carried out on wall paintings and marble sculpture at the Opicificio delle Pietre Dure e Laboratori di Restauro in Florence, Encouraged by their work, I have researched the effectiveness of the conversion on English limestones. The treated samples have been compared to untreated samples for appearance, hardness, resistance to acid and alkali, porosity, and durability. The results have been assessed considering ease of use, effectiveness, and the appropriateness of the treatment.

  19. NMR study of hydrated calcium silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klur, I.

    1996-01-01

    Radioactive wastes storage methods are developed by the CEA. As cements are important materials as well for hours living radioisotopes than for years living radioisotopes, a better knowledge of this material will allow to anticipate its behaviour and to obtain safer storage methods. The structure of calcium silicates (C-S-H) (main constituent of cements) have then been determined in this thesis by nuclear magnetic resonance. This method has allow to explain in structural terms, the different calcium rates that can be measured in the C-S-H too. (O.M.)

  20. Plasma concentration of ionized calcium in healthy iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, P M; Bennett, R A; Harr, K E; Lock, B A

    2001-08-01

    To measure plasma concentration of ionized calcium in healthy green iguanas. Prospective study. 9 juvenile and 21 (10 male, 11 female) adult iguanas. Blood samples were obtained from each iguana, and plasma calcium, glucose, phosphorus, uric acid, total protein, albumin, globulin, potassium, and ionized calcium concentrations, aspartate transaminase (AST) activity, and pH were measured. Heparinized blood was used for measurement of ionized calcium concentration and blood pH. A CBC was also performed to assess the health of the iguanas. Significant differences were not detected among the 3 groups (juveniles, males, and females) with regard to ionized calcium concentration. Mean ionized calcium concentration measured in blood was 1.47 +/- 0.105 mmol/L. Significant differences were detected between juveniles and adults for values of phosphorus, glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, and AST activity. Ionized calcium concentration provides a clinical measurement of the physiologically active calcium in circulation. Evaluation of physiologically active calcium in animals with suspected calcium imbalance that have total plasma calcium concentrations within reference range or in gravid animals with considerably increased total plasma calcium concentrations is vital for determining a therapeutic plan. Accurate evaluation of calcium status will provide assistance in the diagnosis of renal disease and seizures and allow for better evaluation of the health status of gravid female iguanas.

  1. Avian eggshell formation in calcium-rich and calcium-poor habitats: Importance of snail shells and anthropogenic calcium sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland, J.

    1996-01-01

    Most passerines depend on the intake of calcium-rich material in addition to their normal food for proper eggshell formation and skeletal growth. A large proportion of Great Tits (Pants major) in forests on nutrient-poor soils in the Netherlands produce eggs with defective shells as a result of

  2. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    electroporation and electrochemotherapy. METHODS: The effects of calcium electroporation and bleomycin electroporation (alone or in combination) were compared in three different cell lines (DC-3F, transformed Chinese hamster lung fibroblast; K-562, human leukemia; and murine Lewis Lung Carcinoma). Furthermore...

  3. Calcium and Iron Levels in Some Fruits and Vegetables Commonly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Cabbage, Pepper, Spinach, and Tomato) in each case were analysed for their Calcium and iron levels using spectrophotometric method of analysis; From the results, it was found that the concentration of Calcium was highest in spinach ...

  4. Calcium Supplements: A Risk Factor for Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for heart attack? I've read that calcium supplements may increase the risk of heart attack. Is ... Some doctors think it's possible that taking calcium supplements may increase your risk of a heart attack. ...

  5. Calcium Supplements: Do They Interfere with Blood Pressure Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure drugs? Is it true that calcium supplements may interact with blood pressure medications? Answers from ... Sheps, M.D. Yes. In large amounts, calcium supplements may interact with some blood pressure medications. Interactions ...

  6. The effect of farmyard manure and calcium ammonium nitrate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of farmyard manure and calcium ammonium nitrate fertilisers on micronutrient density (iron, zinc, manganese, calcium and potassium) and seed yields of solanium villosum (black nightshade) and cleome gynandra (cat whiskers) on uetric nitisol.

  7. The role of trace metals in calcium urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, J L; Angino, E E

    1977-03-01

    Ten urinary stones composed of calcium oxalate or a mixture of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate were analyzed for trace metal content by emission spectroscopy. Trace metals found in amounts of 0.001 per cent or more were iron, copper, zinic, tin, lead, and aluminum. The inhibitory effect of each of these trace metals on the crystal growth of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate was tested. Results indicated that none of the metal affect the crystal growth of calcium oxalate at concentrations approximating those found in normal urine. The metal ions copper (II), zinc (II), tin (II), and aluminum (III) did affect the crystal growth of calcium phosphate when present at physiologic concentrations; however, their contribution to the total calcium phosphate inhibitor activity in urine was estimated to be insufficient to have a regulatory role in urinary stone growth.

  8. Similarities and differences between calcium antagonists: pharmacological aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Pfaffendorf, M.

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of three different calcium antagonist groups: Most important calcium antagonists used to treat cardiovascular disease belong to one of three main groups, phenylalkylamines, dihydropyridines and benzothiazepines. The best known drug in each group is verapamil, nifedipine and

  9. Protective effects of calcium antagonists in different organs and tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of calcium antagonists in ischemic disorders of various tissues is attributed to vasodilator and antivasoconstrictor activities. A direct, energy-conserving, antiischemic effect of certain calcium antagonists has been claimed repeatedly by basic scientists. The clinical

  10. Mucins and calcium phosphate precipitates additively stimulate cholesterol crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, A. A.; van Buul, J. D.; Tytgat, G. N.; Groen, A. K.; Ostrow, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    Human biliary mucin and calcium binding protein (CBP) influence formation of both calcium salt precipitates and cholesterol crystals and colocalize in the center of cholesterol gallstones. We investigated how physiological concentrations of these proteins regulate cholesterol crystallization in

  11. Development of calcium phosphate based apatite from hen's eggshell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Cowin et al 1987). The apatitic calcium phosphate of bone mineral consists of carbonate, small amount of sodium, magnesium and other trace ele- ments. The submicroscopic crystal of calcium phosphate in bone resembles the crystal structure ...

  12. Calcium phosphate saturation in seawater around the Andaman Island

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Ionic product (IP) of calcium phosphate is calculated at some stations around Andaman Island. The depthwise variations of the ionic product of calcium phosphate seem to follow a normal trend with maximum saturation value between 100 to 200 m. Using...

  13. Calcium absorption from corn tortilla is relatively high and is dependent upon calcium content and liming in Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jorge L; Díaz, Margarita; Rosas, Angélica; Griffit, Ian; García, Olga P

    2005-11-01

    Corn tortillas are the staple food of Mexico. During their preparation, calcium is added to the tortillas; therefore, tortillas are the main source of calcium for a large proportion of the population. The bioavailability of calcium from lime-treated tortillas in humans is not known. The objectives of the present study were to determine calcium absorption from corn tortilla, to determine the effect of lime treatment on calcium absorption from corn tortilla, and to compare calcium absorption from tortilla prepared with a commercial corn flour and tortillas prepared with the traditional lime treatment at home. Nonpregnant, nonlactating women (n = 9) were administered 3 different treatments: 1) 180 g of corn tortilla prepared from corn flour with no lime treatment (CF), 2) 180 g of corn tortilla prepared from lime-treated commercial corn flour (LTCCF), or 3) 180 g of corn tortillas prepared from lime-treated home-prepared corn flour (LTHCF). Calcium absorption was measured using an established dual-tracer stable isotope technique. Calcium absorption of CF, LTCCF, and LTHCF was (mean +/- SD): 44 +/- 3.2, 32 +/- 4.4, and 30 +/- 2.4%, respectively; the fractional calcium absorption from CF differed from that of either LTCCF or LTHCF (P corn tortillas is high and dependent on calcium concentration. The addition of calcium during lime treatment increases calcium concentration and total calcium absorption.

  14. Faecal calcium excretion does not decrease during long-term feeding of a low-calcium diet in adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, S; Mack, J; Kienzle, E; Alexander, L G; Morris, P J; Colyer, A; Dobenecker, B

    2018-04-01

    According to a previous meta-analysis, adult dogs do not notably increase calcium absorption from the gastrointestinal tract when calcium intake is decreased. This results in a negative calcium balance even with a moderate calcium reduction. In this study we wanted to verify (i) whether a negative calcium balance occurs at a calcium intake equivalent to NRC (2006) (Nutrient requirements of dogs and cats, 2006, The National Academies Press, Washington, DC) minimal requirements, and if so (ii) whether the negative calcium balance will persist for up to 6 months on a low-calcium diet. After a pre-feeding period of at least 18 weeks with calcium intake slightly exceeding maintenance requirements (200 mg/kg body weight 0.75 ), 12 dogs (6 Beagles, 6 Foxhound crossbreds) were fed a low-calcium diet for 28 weeks. One dog was removed from the trial for reasons unrelated to the study at week 23. Calcium intake amounted to 60 mg/kg body weight 0.75 corresponding to the minimal requirement for maintenance in dogs (NRC, 2006 (Nutrient requirements of dogs and cats, 2006, The National Academies Press, Washington, DC)). Digestion trials were carried out at week 7, 14, 21 and 28 of the low calcium feeding period. At these time points, and at week 18 of the pre-trial, blood samples were taken and analysed for calcium, ionised calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, serum crosslaps and bone alkaline phosphatase. Apparent calcium digestibility was negative throughout the study, suggesting a negative calcium balance. There was no systematic decrease in faecal calcium excretion. Serum calcium, ionised calcium and phosphorus remained within the reference range. Serum crosslaps increased continuously from baseline to week 28 of trial, with averages increasing from 0.102 ng/ml to 0.279 ng/ml, suggesting osteoclastic activity, indicative of calcium mobilisation from the skeleton. The study supports the theory of a lack of adaptation of intestinal calcium absorption from

  15. Calcium hydroxylapatite for jawline rejuvenation: consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallara, Jean-Marie; Baspeyras, Martine; Bui, Patrick; Cartier, Hugues; Charavel, Marie-Hélène; Dumas, Laurent

    2014-03-01

    Age-associated volume loss is now known to play an important role in the structural changes of the aging face. In the lower face, this manifests as drooping of the corners of the mouth and jowl leading to a loss of the oval jawline of youth. Jawline reshaping by replacing volume has therefore become an indispensable component of modern facial rejuvenation. Calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA; Radiesse® , Merz Pharmaceuticals GmbH, Frankfurt, Germany) is an injectable filler with a cosmetic indication for tissue augmentation. The ability of calcium hydroxylapatite to provide immediate and long-lasting volume enhancement makes it an ideal agent for restoring an oval jawline. This consensus statement has been developed to assist clinicians who would like to gain more experience in the use of volumizing agents to achieve an optimal outcome with this procedure. Using the recently developed Merz Aesthetics Scale® for jawline, the consensus provides a treatment protocol for individuals at each stage of oval loss and presents a series of before and after images to illustrate the improvements that can be achieved. Specific recommendations for calcium hydroxylapatite including type of anesthesia, injection techniques, volume for injection, use in combination with other procedures, and expected duration of corrections are provided. Techniques for minimizing and managing expected problems and potential complications are also described. Calcium hydroxylapatite is appropriate for treating patients at any stage of oval loss. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. CALCIUM DEFICIENCY AND CAUSATION OF RICKETS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2005-03-03

    Mar 3, 2005 ... Objective: To assess the role of calcium in the development of clinical rickets among. Ethiopian children coming to Jimma Specialised Hospital outpatient, department. Design: Case control study. Settings: Jimma Specialised Teaching Hospital and surrounding urban and rural community in the catchment ...

  17. Calcium chloride improve ethanol production in recombinant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... significantly improve the ethanol production. This was also clearly ... parameter values over time in Z.M.F-4 under high sugar osmotic stress. Calcium chloride .... These genes were introduced into Z. mobilis ATCC 31821 by the transposition method as described in the literature (Foulongne et al., 1999). The.

  18. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking... agent in food in an amount not in excess of that reasonably required to produce its intended effect. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and...

  19. Isolation and characterization of biogenic calcium carbonate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bacterial adhesion result reveals that YSZ coating drastically reduce bacterial invasion than titanium substrate. Keywords. Oral bacteria; bioceramic; dental implant; YSZ .... ity of the cell [15]. Figure 3c shows the schematic view of calcium precipitation from the oral bacteria which constitutes three major metabolic activities to ...

  20. 21 CFR 582.3225 - Calcium sorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium sorbate. 582.3225 Section 582.3225 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 582...

  1. 21 CFR 582.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium ascorbate. 582.3189 Section 582.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 582...

  2. 21 CFR 582.3221 - Calcium propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium propionate. 582.3221 Section 582.3221 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 582...

  3. 21 CFR 182.3189 - Calcium ascorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium ascorbate. 182.3189 Section 182.3189 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Chemical Preservatives § 182.3189...

  4. Laterality of Symptomatic Recurrent Calcium Nephrolithiasis | Ketata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Although it is presumed that both kidneys excrete similar urinary constituents, it is a general observation that the majority of patients present with unilateral stone disease. The aim of this work was to study the laterality of recurrence in calcium stone formers. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study of 154 ...

  5. Calcium carbonate precipitation by different bacterial strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bacteria are capable of performing metabolic activities which thereby promote precipitation of calcium carbonate in the form of calcite. In this study, it is shown that microbial mineral precipitation was a result of metabolic activities of some specific microorganisms. Concrete microorganisms were used to improve the overall ...

  6. Scattering lengths of calcium and barium isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammalapati, U.; Willmann, L.; Knoop, S.

    2011-01-01

    We have calculated the s-wave scattering length of all the even isotopes of calcium (Ca) and barium (Ba) in order to investigate the prospect of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). For Ca we have used an accurate molecular potential based on detailed spectroscopic data. Our calculations show that Ca

  7. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  8. Thermoluminescence dosimetry of rare earth doped calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermoluminescence (TL) properties of calcium aluminate (CaAl2O4) doped with different rare earth ions have been studied and their suitability for radiation dosimetry applications is discussed. It is observed that monocalcium aluminate doped with cerium is a good dosimeter having linear response up to about 4 kGy of ...

  9. [Intra-cystic renal calcium milk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, B; Médart, L; Massart, J P; Collignon, L

    2015-02-01

    Intra-cystic renal calcium milk is a rare entity. The authors report a clinical case, and describe the radiographic and tomodensitometric appearances. This 50 year old patient has been followed up for more than ten years for urinary lithiasis with recurrent pain.

  10. Effect of Ultrasound on Calcium Carbonate Crystallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagterveld, R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Scaling comprises the formation of hard mineral deposits on process or membrane equipment and calcium carbonate is the most common scaling salt. Especially in reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems, scale formation has always been a serious limitation, causing flux decline, membrane degradation, loss

  11. Calcium, channels, intracellular signaling and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Jorge-Hernán; Bonilla-Abadía, Fabio; Cañas, Carlos A; Tobón, Gabriel J

    2014-01-01

    Calcium (Ca²⁺) is an important cation able to function as a second messenger in different cells of the immune system, particularly in B and T lymphocytes, macrophages and mastocytes, among others. Recent discoveries related to the entry of Ca²⁺ through the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) has opened a new investigation area about the cell destiny regulated by Ca²⁺ especially in B and T lymphocytes. SOCE acts through calcium-release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels. The function of CRAC depends of two recently discovered regulators: the Ca²⁺ sensor in the endoplasmic reticulum or stromal interaction molecule (STIM-1) and one subunit of CRAC channels called Orai1. This review focuses on the role of Ca²⁺ signals in B and T lymphocytes functions, the signalling pathways leading to Ca²⁺ influx, and the relationship between Ca²⁺ signals and autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Serum Calcium, Inorganic Phosphates and some Haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Sickle cell disease has long been associated with bone deformities and pain. Mineral salts such as calcium and inorganic phosphate are critical in bone formation and metabolism. This investigation was designed to study the serum concentration of these minerals as well as some haematological parameters in ...

  13. Calcium and M'yocardial Infarction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-16

    Mar 16, 1974 ... Associated risk factors apart, attention has been directed at other possible ... later T-wave inversion, a falling R wave in the praecordial leads, complete left ... TABLE I. SERUM CALCIUM LEVELS RELATIVE TO AGE AND SEX IN 75 PATIENTS WITH MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. 5.0. 00 •. O. 0e4i...... •. 0000.

  14. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect...

  15. An improved calcium chloride method preparation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    method, improved from a classical protocol, has made some modifications on the concentration of calcium chloride and competent bacteria solution, rotation speed in centrifugation and centrifugation time. It was found that the optimal transformation efficiency were obtained when the concentration of CaCl2 was 75 mmol/l, ...

  16. Calcium antagonists for aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinkel, G. J. E.; Feigin, V. L.; Algra, A.; van den Bergh, W. M.; Vermeulen, M.; van Gijn, J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secondary ischaemia is a frequent cause of poor outcome in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Its pathogenesis has not been elucidated yet, but may be related to vasospasm. Experimental studies have indicated that calcium antagonists can prevent or reverse vasospasm and have

  17. Mechanism of unusual polymorph transformations in calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research for many years. However, till date the ... Polymorph selection plays key role in biominerali- zation as the .... Mechanism of unusual polymorph transformations in calcium carbonate. 1401. In te n s ity. 2-Theta - Scale. 20. 30. 40. 50. 60. V. V110. V. V. V. V. V. Refluxed for 75 mins: 100% Aragonite. A221. A. A. A. A. A.

  18. Calcium model for mammalian skeletal muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, W.; Boom, H.B.K.; Heijink, R.J.; van der Vliet, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    A model is presented describing quantitatively the events between excitation and force development in skeletal muscle. It consists of a calcium mediated activation model (c.m.a.m.) in series with a force generator model (f.g.m.). The c.m.a.m. was based on intracellular processes such as cisternal

  19. Thermoluminescence dosimetry of rare earth doped calcium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Calcium aluminate crystals can also exist in mono- clinic as well as orthorhombic structures (Dougill 1957). Many researchers have studied CaAl2O4 as an important constituent of cementitious compositions (Mohamed and. Sharp 1997). Of late, the thrust is on its use as lumines- cent host. Several reports dealing with the ...

  20. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Modularization is a process by which we can break a network into small units for better analysis of the original network. The idea is used here to break human calcium signalling pathway into simple entities known as modules. Since there is no single definition of a module, we have followed certain criteria to create them.