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Sample records for sarcoplasmic myosin heavy

  1. Heavy chain of Acanthamoeba myosine IB is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences

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    Jung, G.; Korn, E.D.; Hammer, J.A. III

    1987-10-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii myosins IA and IB demonstrate the catalytic properties of a myosin and can support analogues of contractile and motile activity in vitro, but their single, low molecular weight heavy chains, roughly globular shapes, and inabilities to self-assemble into filaments make them structurally atypical myosins. The authors present the complete amino acid sequence of the 128-kDa myosin IB heavy chain, which they deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the gene and which reveals that the polypeptide is a fusion of myosin-like and non-myosin-like sequences. Specifically, the amino-terminal approx. 76 kDa of amino acid sequence is highly similar to the globular head sequences of conventional myosins. By contrast, the remaining approx. 51 kDa of sequence shows no similarity to any portion of conventional myosin sequences, contains regions that are rich in glycine, proline, and alanine residues, and lacks the distinctive sequence characteristics of an ..cap alpha..-helical, coiled-coil structure. They conclude, therefore, that the protein is composed of a myosin globular head fused not to the typical coiled-coil rod-like myosin tail structure but rather to an unusual carboxyl-terminal domain. These results support the conclusion that filamentous myosin is not required for force generation and provide a further perspective on the structural requirements for myosin function. Finally, they find a striking conservation of intron/exon structure between this gene and a vertebrate muscle myosin gene. They discuss this observation in relation to the evolutionary origin of the myosin IB gene and the antiquity of myosin gene intron/exon structure.

  2. LPCES对慢性低压缺氧兔颏舌肌肌球蛋白重链和SR Ca2+摄取-释放动力学的影响%Electrical stimulation at lower physiological frequency induces myosin heavy chain isoform transformation and improves sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake/release in genioglossus of rabbits exposed to chronic hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘熙; 刘刚; 张妮; 欧娜; 张鹏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify the effect of chronic electrical stimulation at a lower physiological frequency on the expressions of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms and kinetics of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2 + uptake/release in the genioglossus of rabbits exposed to chronic hypoxia. Methods Twenty-four adult rabbits were randomized into control group ( A), chronic hypoxia group ( B ), 2.5 Hz electrical stimulation group (C) and (2.5 + 40) Hz electrical stimulation group (low frequency plus physical frequency, D).After the rabbits from group B, C and D had been fed with free access to food and water in a hypoxia cabin ( simulating 5 000 m altitude) in 10 h a day for 4 weeks, the rabbits in group C and D received electrical stimulation in their genioglossus at a frequency of 2.5 Hz and (2.5 +40) Hz respectively in 10 h per day for 14 d,while those in group B received no electrical stimulation. Expressions of MHC isoforms in the genioglossus of rabbits in 4 groups were detected by Western blotting, and Fura-2 fluorophotometry was used to assay the kinetics changes of SR Ca2 + uptake-release. Restlts The expression level of MHC l a was significantly higher while that of MHC I was significantly lower in group B than that in group A (P < 0.05 ). Meanwhile,the genioglossus SR Ca2+ uptake/release velocity in group B was significantly decreased compared with that in group A ( P < 0. 05 ). The expression levels of MHC Ⅱ a and MHC I in group C and D after electrical stimulation were significantly higher, while those of MHC Ⅱ b, especially in group D, were significantly lower than those in group B (P < 0.05 ). The genioglossus SR Ca2+ uptake/release velocity in group C and D, especially in group D, was significantly increased compared with that in group B ( P < 0.05 ). No significant difference was found in expression levels of MHC Ⅱ a and MHC I between group C and D after electrical stimulation ( P > 0.05). Conclusion MHC Ⅱb in the genioglossus of rabbits with

  3. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

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    Campbell, K.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from rabbit leg muscle have been used in a study of chloride-induced calcium release. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that light sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles are derived from the longitudinal reticulum and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles are derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP to amounts greater than 100 nmoles Ca/sup + +/ per mg of protein in less than one minute. Light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles each had a biphasic time course of calcium uptake. The initial uptake was followed by a rapid release after approximately one minute, of 30 to 40% of the accumulated calcium, which was then followed by a slower phase of calcium accumulation. Results indicate that the chloride induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization. The release of calcium from the light SR vesicles is probably due to osmotic swelling and the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles is probably due to depolarization.

  4. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles

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    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR,HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle using a combination of differential centrifugation and isopycnic zonal ultracentrifugation. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes whereas the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material, similar to that seen in the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The sucrose HSR vesicles have an additional morphological feature which appears as membrane projections that resemble the SR feet. The freeze-fracture morphology of either type of SR reveals an asymmetric distribution of intramembraneous particles in the same orientation and distribution as the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vivo. Biochemical studies were made on the content of Ca, Mg, ATPase, and protein of the vesicles and phosphorylation of the vesicles. The biochemical and morphological data indicate that the LSR is derived from the longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and the HSR is derived from the terminal cisternae of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, contains junctional SR membrane and has three unique proteins (calsequestrin, an intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein and a 9000 dalton proteolipid).

  5. Arginylation of Myosin Heavy Chain Regulates Skeletal Muscle Strength

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    Anabelle S. Cornachione

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein arginylation is a posttranslational modification with an emerging global role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton. To test the role of arginylation in the skeletal muscle, we generated a mouse model with Ate1 deletion driven by the skeletal muscle-specific creatine kinase (Ckmm promoter. Ckmm-Ate1 mice were viable and outwardly normal; however, their skeletal muscle strength was significantly reduced in comparison to controls. Mass spectrometry of isolated skeletal myofibrils showed a limited set of proteins, including myosin heavy chain, arginylated on specific sites. Atomic force microscopy measurements of contractile strength in individual myofibrils and isolated myosin filaments from these mice showed a significant reduction of contractile forces, which, in the case of myosin filaments, could be fully rescued by rearginylation with purified Ate1. Our results demonstrate that arginylation regulates force production in muscle and exerts a direct effect on muscle strength through arginylation of myosin.

  6. Biochemical and morphological characterization of light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Volume I

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    Campbell, Kevin Peter [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Light (30 to 32.5% sucrose) and heavy (38.5 to 42% sucrose) sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (LSR, HSR) were isolated from rabbit leg muscle. They were then diluted and washed with sucrose or KCl and referred to as sucrose or KCl washed vesicles. Thin-section electron microscopy of LSR vesicles reveals empty vesicles of various sizes and shapes where as the HSR vesicles appear as rounded vesicles of uniform size filled with electron dense material. The LSR consists of predominantly Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (80 to 90%), a small amount of the high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose HSR vesicles contain the Ca2+ + Mg2+ ATPase (50%), Calsequestrin (25%), high affinity Ca binding protein (5%), one extrinsic 34,000 dalton protein (3%), one intrinsic 30,000 dalton protein (3%), a 9000 dalton proteolipid, and a 5000 dalton proteolipid. The sucrose--washed HSR vesicles contain greater than three times the calcium content of the sucrose washed LSR vesicles where as the KCl--washed vesicles contain less than 15 nmoles Ca2+ mg of protein each. The light and heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles were both able to accumulate calcium in the presence of ATP. Exchange of methanesulfonate for chloride resulted in the release of calcium from both the light and heavy SR vesicles. Sucrose causes a slight inhibition of chloride--induced calcium release from the heavy SR vesicles but it greatly reduces the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles. Sodium dantrolene (20 uM) has no effect on the release of calcium from the light SR vesicles but it inhibits the release of calcium from the heavy SR vesicles. The results indicate that the chloride--induced release of calcium may be acting by two mechanisms, osmotic swelling and depolarization.

  7. Myosin heavy chain expression can vary over the length of jaw and leg muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korfage, J.A.M.; Kwee, K.E.; Everts, V.; Langenbach, G.E.J.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle fiber type classification can be determined by its myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition based on a few consecutive sections. It is generally assumed that the MyHC expression of a muscle fiber is the same over its length since neural stimulation and systemic influences are supposed to be the

  8. Direct photoaffinity labeling by nucleotides of the apparent catalytic site on the heavy chains of smooth muscle and Acanthamoeba myosins

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    Maruta, H.; Korn, E.D.

    1981-01-10

    The heavy chains of Acanthamoeba myosins, IA, IB and II, turkey gizzard myosin, and rabbit skeletal muscle myosin subfragment-1 were specifically labeled by radioactive ATP, ADP, and UTP, each of which is a substrate or product of myosin ATPase activity, when irradiated with uv light at 0/sup 0/C. With UTP, as much as 0.45 mol/mol of Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and 1 mol/mol of turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain was incorporated. Evidence that the ligands were associated with the catalytic site included the observations that reaction occurred only with nucleotides that are substrates or products of the ATPase activity; that the reaction was blocked by pyrophosphate which is an inhibitor of the ATPase activity; that ATP was bound as ADP; and that label was probably restricted to a single peptide following limited subtilisin proteolysis of labeled Acanthamoeba myosin IA heavy chain and extensive cleavage with CNBr and trypsin of labeled turkey gizzard myosin heavy chain.

  9. Expression of muscle-specific myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain 1 in the electric tissue of Electrophorus electricus (L.) in comparison with other vertebrate species.

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    Ayres Sá, L; Menezes, M A; dos Santos Mermelstein, C

    2001-08-01

    Myosin light and heavy chains from skeletal and cardiac muscles and from the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus (L.) were characterised using biochemical and immunological methods, and compared with myosin extracted from avian, reptilian, and mammalian skeletal and cardiac muscles. The results indicate that the electric tissue has a myosin light chain 1 (LC1) and a muscle-specific myosin heavy chain. We also show that monoclonal antibody F109-12A8 (against LC1 and LC2) recognizes LC1 of myosin from human skeletal and cardiac muscles as well as those of rabbit, lizard, chick, and electric eel. However, only cardiac muscles from humans and rabbits have LC2, which is recognized by antibody F109-16F4. The data presented confirm the muscle origin of the electric tissue of E. electricus. This electric tissue has a profile of LC1 protein expression that resembles the myosin from cardiac muscle of the eel more than that from eel skeletal muscle. This work raises an interesting question about the ontogenesis and differentiation of the electric tissue of E. electricus. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Novel Mutation in the α-Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Is Associated With Sick Sinus Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Taisuke; Jou, Chuanchau J.; Nogami, Akihiko; Kowase, Shinya; Arrington, Cammon B.; Barnett, Spencer M.; Harrell, Daniel T.; Arimura, Takuro; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Kimura, Akinori; Makita, Naomasa

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have demonstrated an association between MYH6, the gene encoding α-myosin heavy chain (α-MHC), and sinus node function in the general population. Moreover, a rare MYH6 variant, R721W, predisposing susceptibility to sick sinus syndrome has been identified. However, the existence of disease-causing MYH6 mutations for familial sick sinus syndrome and their underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Methods and Results-We screened 9 genotype-negative probands wit...

  11. Structures of smooth muscle myosin and heavy meromyosin in the folded, shutdown state.

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    Burgess, Stan A; Yu, Shuizi; Walker, Matt L; Hawkins, Rhoda J; Chalovich, Joseph M; Knight, Peter J

    2007-10-05

    Remodelling the contractile apparatus within smooth muscle cells allows effective contractile activity over a wide range of cell lengths. Thick filaments may be redistributed via depolymerisation into inactive myosin monomers that have been detected in vitro, in which the long tail has a folded conformation. Using negative stain electron microscopy of individual folded myosin molecules from turkey gizzard smooth muscle, we show that they are more compact than previously described, with heads and the three segments of the folded tail closely packed. Heavy meromyosin (HMM), which lacks two-thirds of the tail, closely resembles the equivalent parts of whole myosin. Image processing reveals a characteristic head region morphology for both HMM and myosin, with features identifiable by comparison with less compact molecules. The two heads associate asymmetrically: the tip of one motor domain touches the base of the other, resembling the blocked and free heads of this HMM when it forms 2D crystals on lipid monolayers. The tail of HMM lies between the heads, contacting the blocked motor domain, unlike in the 2D crystal. The tail of whole myosin is bent sharply and consistently close to residues 1175 and 1535. The first bend position correlates with a skip in the coiled coil sequence, the second does not. Tail segments 2 and 3 associate only with the blocked head, such that the second bend is near the C-lobe of the blocked head regulatory light chain. Quantitative analysis of tail flexibility shows that the single coiled coil of HMM has an apparent Young's modulus of about 0.5 GPa. The folded tail of the whole myosin is less flexible, indicating interactions between the segments. The folded tail does not modify the compact head arrangement but stabilises it, indicating a structural mechanism for the very low ATPase activity of the folded molecule.

  12. Effect of aerobic exercise on the contractile function of gastrocnemius myosin heavy chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of 4-6 weeks' treadmill training of male SD rats on the contractile function of their gastrocnemius myosin heavy chain (MHC). Methods Forty male SD rats were randomly divided into control group and training group. The treadmill training of the training group rats was incessantly performed for 4-6 weeks at an intensity of about 75% VO2max (18.5-24 m/min,gradient of 0°,each training session lasting 50 minutes,twice a day). The content of gastrocnemius MHC mRNA was tested by rever...

  13. Tuning of shortening speed in coleoid cephalopod muscle: no evidence for tissue-specific muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms.

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    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2016-03-01

    The contractile protein myosin II is ubiquitous in muscle. It is widely accepted that animals express tissue-specific myosin isoforms that differ in amino acid sequence and ATPase activity in order to tune muscle contractile velocities. Recent studies, however, suggested that the squid Doryteuthis pealeii might be an exception; members of this species do not express muscle-specific myosin isoforms, but instead alter sarcomeric ultrastructure to adjust contractile velocities. We investigated whether this alternative mechanism of tuning muscle contractile velocity is found in other coleoid cephalopods. We analyzed myosin heavy chain transcript sequences and expression profiles from muscular tissues of a cuttlefish, Sepia officinalis, and an octopus, Octopus bimaculoides, in order to determine if these cephalopods express tissue-specific myosin heavy chain isoforms. We identified transcripts of four and six different myosin heavy chain isoforms in S. officinalis and O. bimaculoides muscular tissues, respectively. Transcripts of all isoforms were expressed in all muscular tissues studied, and thus S. officinalis and O. bimaculoides do not appear to express tissue-specific muscle myosin isoforms. We also examined the sarcomeric ultrastructure in the transverse muscle fibers of the arms of O. bimaculoides and the arms and tentacles of S. officinalis using transmission electron microscopy and found that the fast contracting fibers of the prey capture tentacles of S. officinalis have shorter thick filaments than those found in the slower transverse muscle fibers of the arms of both species. It thus appears that coleoid cephalopods, including the cuttlefish and octopus, may use ultrastructural modifications rather than tissue-specific myosin isoforms to adjust contractile velocities.

  14. Position of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHC-IIA) mutations predicts the natural history of MYH9-related disease

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    Pecci, A.; Panza, E.; Pujol-Moix, N.

    2008-01-01

    MYH9-related disease (MYH9-RD) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder caused by mutations in MYH9, the gene for the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin IIA (NMMHC-IIA). All patients present from birth with macrothrombocytopenia, but in infancy or adult life, some of them develop sensorineural deafness...

  15. Protective Effects of Clenbuterol against Dexamethasone-Induced Masseter Muscle Atrophy and Myosin Heavy Chain Transition.

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    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has a direct catabolic effect on skeletal muscle, leading to muscle atrophy, but no effective pharmacotherapy is available. We reported that clenbuterol (CB) induced masseter muscle hypertrophy and slow-to-fast myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform transition through direct muscle β2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Thus, we hypothesized that CB would antagonize glucocorticoid (dexamethasone; DEX)-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition. We examined the effect of CB on DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy by measuring masseter muscle weight, fiber diameter, cross-sectional area, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we used immunoblotting to study the effects of CB on muscle hypertrophic signaling (insulin growth factor 1 (IGF1) expression, Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and calcineurin pathway) and atrophic signaling (Akt/Forkhead box-O (FOXO) pathway and myostatin expression) in masseter muscle of rats treated with DEX and/or CB. Masseter muscle weight in the DEX-treated group was significantly lower than that in the Control group, as expected, but co-treatment with CB suppressed the DEX-induced masseter muscle atrophy, concomitantly with inhibition of fast-to-slow MHC isoforms transition. Activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in masseter muscle of the DEX-treated group was significantly inhibited compared to that of the Control group, and CB suppressed this inhibition. DEX also suppressed expression of IGF1 (positive regulator of muscle growth), and CB attenuated this inhibition. Myostatin protein expression was unchanged. CB had no effect on activation of the Akt/FOXO pathway. These results indicate that CB antagonizes DEX-induced muscle atrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition via modulation of Akt/mTOR activity and IGF1 expression. CB might be a useful pharmacological agent for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy.

  16. Dilated cardiomyopathy mutation (R134W in mouse cardiac troponin T induces greater contractile deficits against α-myosin heavy chain than against β-myosin heavy chain

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    Sampath K Gollapudi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant — such as myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity — is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms that underlie disparate effects of DCM mutations on cardiac phenotypes. Dynamic features are dominated by myofilament cooperativity that stem from different sources. One such source is the strong tropomyosin binding region in troponin T (TnT, which is known to modulate crossbridge (XB recruitment dynamics in a myosin heavy chain (MHC-dependent manner. Therefore, we hypothesized that the effects of DCM-linked mutations in TnT on contractile dynamics would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC. After reconstitution with the mouse TnT equivalent (TnTR134W of the human DCM mutation (R131W, we measured dynamic contractile parameters in detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fiber bundles from normal (α-MHC and transgenic mice (β-MHC. TnTR134W significantly attenuated the rate constants of tension redevelopment, XB recruitment dynamics, XB distortion dynamics, and the magnitude of length-mediated XB recruitment only in α-MHC fiber bundles. TnTR134W decreased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity to a greater extent in α-MHC (0.14 pCa units than in β-MHC fiber bundles (0.08 pCa units. Thus, our data demonstrate that TnTR134W induces a more severe DCM-like contractile phenotype against α-MHC than against β-MHC background.

  17. Shifts in the myosin heavy chain isozymes in the mouse heart result in increased energy efficiency

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    Hoyer, Kirsten; Krenz, Maike; Robbins, Jeffrey; Ingwall, Joanne S.

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac-specific transgenesis in the mouse is widely used to study the basic biology and chemistry of the heart and to model human cardiovascular disease. A fundamental difference between mouse and human hearts is the background motor protein: mouse hearts contain predominantly the αα-myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isozyme while human hearts contain predominantly the ββ-MyHC isozyme. Although the intrinsic differences in mechanical and enzymatic properties of the αα- and ββ-MyHC molecules are well known, the consequences of isozyme shifts on energetic of the intact beating heart remain unknown. Therefore, we compared the free energy of ATP hydrolysis (|ΔG~ATP|) determined by 31P NMR spectroscopy in isolated perfused littermate mouse hearts containing the same amount of myosin comprised of either >95% αα-MyHC or ~83% ββ-MyHC. |ΔG~ATP| was ~2 kJ mol−1 higher in the ββ-MyHC hearts at all workloads. Furthermore, upon inotropic challenge, hearts containing predominantly ββ-MyHC hearts increased developed pressure more than αα-MyHC hearts whereas heart rate increased more in αα-MyHC hearts. Thus, hearts containing predominantly the ββ-MyHC isozyme are more energy efficient than αα-MyHC hearts. We suggest that these fundamental differences in the motor protein energy efficiency at the whole heart level should be considered when interpreting results using mouse-based cardiovascular modeling of normal and diseased human heart. PMID:17054980

  18. Interferon-γ causes cardiac myocyte atrophy via selective degradation of myosin heavy chain in a model of chronic myocarditis.

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    Cosper, Pippa F; Harvey, Pamela A; Leinwand, Leslie A

    2012-12-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ), a proinflammatory cytokine, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of forms of heart disease including myocarditis and congestive heart failure. In fact, overexpression of IFN-γ in mice causes dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the direct effects of IFN-γ on cardiac myocytes and the mechanism by which it causes cardiac dysfunction have not been described. Here, we present the molecular pathology of IFN-γ exposure and its effect on myofibrillar proteins in isolated neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Treatment with IFN-γ caused cardiac myocyte atrophy attributable to a specific decrease in myosin heavy chain protein. This selective degradation of myosin heavy chain was not accompanied by a decrease in total protein synthesis or by an increase in total protein degradation. IFN-γ increased both proteasome and immunoproteasome activity in cardiac myocytes and their inhibition blocked myosin heavy chain loss and myocyte atrophy, whereas inhibition of the lysosome or autophagosome did not. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism by which IFN-γ causes cardiac pathology in the setting of chronic inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Myosin heavy chain composition of tiger (Panthera tigris) and cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) hindlimb muscles.

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    Hyatt, Jon-Philippe K; Roy, Roland R; Rugg, Stuart; Talmadge, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    Felids have a wide range of locomotor activity patterns and maximal running speeds, including the very fast cheetah (Acinonyx jubatas), the roaming tiger (Panthera tigris), and the relatively sedentary domestic cat (Felis catus). As previous studies have suggested a relationship between the amount and type of activity and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition of a muscle, we assessed the MHC isoform composition of selected hindlimb muscles from these three felid species with differing activity regimens. Using gel electrophoresis, western blotting, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry with MHC isoform-specific antibodies, we compared the MHC composition in the tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius (MG), plantaris (Plt), and soleus muscles of the tiger, cheetah, and domestic cat. The soleus muscle was absent in the cheetah. At least one slow (type I) and three fast (types IIa, IIx, and IIb) MHC isoforms were present in the muscles of each felid. The tiger had a high combined percentage of the characteristically slower isoforms (MHCs I and IIa) in the MG (62%) and the Plt (86%), whereas these percentages were relatively low in the MG (44%) and Plt (55%) of the cheetah. In general, the MHC isoform characteristics of the hindlimb muscles matched the daily activity patterns of these felids: the tiger has daily demands for covering long distances, whereas the cheetah has requirements for speed and power. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Segmental distribution of myosin heavy chain isoforms within single muscle fibers.

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    Zhang, Ming; Gould, Maree

    2017-02-18

    Despite many studies looking at the distribution of myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms across a transverse section of muscle, knowledge of MHC distribution along the longitudinal axis of a single skeletal muscle fiber has been relatively overlooked. Immunocytochemistry was performed on serial sections of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle to identify MHC types I, IIA, IIX, IIY and IIB. Sixteen fascicles which contained a total of 362 fibers were randomly and systematically sampled from the 3 EDL muscles. All MHC type I and type II isoforms were expressed. Segmental expression occurred within a very limited segment. MHC isoform expression followed the accepted traditional order from I&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIA&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIX&cenveo_unknown_entity_wingdings_F0F3;IIB, however in some samples expression of an isoform was circumvented from IIB to I or from I to IIB directly. Segmental distribution of MHC isoforms along a single muscle fiber may be due to the myonuclear domain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA mediates integrin LFA-1 de-adhesion during T lymphocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Nicole A; Oakes, Patrick W; Hyun, Young-Min; Lee, Dooyoung; Chin, Y Eugene; Chin, Eugene Y; King, Michael R; Springer, Timothy A; Shimaoka, Motomu; Tang, Jay X; Reichner, Jonathan S; Kim, Minsoo

    2008-01-21

    Precise spatial and temporal regulation of cell adhesion and de-adhesion is critical for dynamic lymphocyte migration. Although a great deal of information has been learned about integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 adhesion, the mechanism that regulates efficient LFA-1 de-adhesion from intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 during T lymphocyte migration is unknown. Here, we show that nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (MyH9) is recruited to LFA-1 at the uropod of migrating T lymphocytes, and inhibition of the association of MyH9 with LFA-1 results in extreme uropod elongation, defective tail detachment, and decreased lymphocyte migration on ICAM-1, without affecting LFA-1 activation by chemokine CXCL-12. This defect was reversed by a small molecule antagonist that inhibits both LFA-1 affinity and avidity regulation, but not by an antagonist that inhibits only affinity regulation. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of the contact zone between migrating T lymphocytes and ICAM-1 substrate revealed that inactive LFA-1 is selectively localized to the posterior of polarized T lymphocytes, whereas active LFA-1 is localized to their anterior. Thus, during T lymphocyte migration, uropodal adhesion depends on LFA-1 avidity, where MyH9 serves as a key mechanical link between LFA-1 and the cytoskeleton that is critical for LFA-1 de-adhesion.

  2. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

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    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  3. Time course of myosin heavy chain transitions in neonatal rats: importance of innervation and thyroid state

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    Adams, G. R.; McCue, S. A.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the postnatal period, rat limb muscles adapt to weight bearing via the replacement of embryonic (Emb) and neonatal (Neo) myosin heavy chains (MHCs) by the adult isoforms. Our aim was to characterize this transition in terms of the six MHC isoforms expressed in skeletal muscle and to determine the importance of innervation and thyroid hormone status on the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype. Neonatal rats were made hypothyroid via propylthiouracil (PTU) injection. In normal and PTU subgroups, leg muscles were unilaterally denervated at 15 days of age. The MHC profiles of plantaris (PLN) and soleus (Sol) muscles were determined at 7, 14, 23, and 30 days postpartum. At day 7, the Sol MHC profile was 55% type I, 30% Emb, and 10% Neo; in the PLN, the pattern was 60% Neo and 25% Emb. By day 30 the Sol and PLN had essentially attained an adult MHC profile in the controls. PTU augmented slow MHC expression in the Sol, whereas in the PLN it markedly repressed IIb MHC by retaining neonatal MHC expression. Denervation blunted the upregulation of IIb in the PLN and of Type I in the Sol and shifted the pattern to greater expression of IIa and IIx MHCs in both muscles. In contrast to previous observations, these findings collectively suggest that both an intact thyroid and innervation state are obligatory for the attainment of the adult MHC phenotype, particularly in fast-twitch muscles.

  4. Effect of myosin heavy chain composition of muscles on meat quality in Laiwu pigs and Duroc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to explain the mechanism of high meat quality in Laiwu pigs and investigate the relation between myosin heavy chains (MyHC) composition and meat quality, meat quality analysis was conducted and mRNA expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb was quantified by real-time fluorescence PCR in longissimus muscle (LM) and semimembranous muscle of Laiwu pigs and Duroc. The result indicated that, compared with Duroc, mRNA expression of MyHC IIa, IIx in LM and semimembranous muscle of Laiwu pigs was significantly increased, mRNA expression of MyHC IIb was dramatically decreased. However, the expression of MyHC I was not significantly affected by breeds. The correlation between mRNA expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx in LM and meat color, pH value, marbling, intramuscular fat content was positive, but shear value of LM was negative. The relation between MyHC IIb mRNA expression and marbling, intramuscular fat content was dramatically negative, whereas shear value was strikingly positive, as well as fiber diameter, but without reaching statistical significance. Therefore, the composition of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb affected meat quality, furthermore, expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb mRNA prominently influenced meat characteristics, especially edible quality of muscle, suggesting that mRNA expression level of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb can exactly and impersonally estimate meat quality.

  5. Effect of myosin heavy chain composition of muscles on meat quality in Laiwu pigs and Duroc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU HongMei; WANG JiYing; ZHU RongSheng; GUO JianFeng; WU Ying

    2008-01-01

    In order to explain the mechanism of high meat quality in Laiwu pigs and investigate the relation between myosin heavy chains (MyHC) composition and meat quality, meat quality analysis was conducted and mRNA expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb was quantified by real-time fluorescence PCR in Iongissimus muscle (LM) and semimembranous muscle of Laiwu pigs and Duroc. The result indicated that, compared with Duroc, mRNA expression of MyHC IIa, IIx in LM and semimembranous muscle of Laiwu pigs was significantly increased, mRNA expression of MyHC Ilia'was dramatically decreased.However, the expression of MyHC I was not significantly affected by breeds. The correlation between mRNA expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx in LM and meat color, pH value, marbling, intramuscular fat content was positive, but shear value of LM was negative. The relation between MyHC lib mRNA expression and marbling, intramuscular fat content was dramatically negative, whereas shear value was strikingly positive, as well as fiber diameter, but without reaching statistical significance. Therefore, the composition of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb affected meat quality, furthermore, expression of MyHC I,IIa, IIx, IIb mRNA prominently influenced meat characteristics, especially edible quality of muscle, suggesting that mRNA expression level of MyHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb can exactly and impersonally estimate meat quality.

  6. Chronic sleep deprivation alters the myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masseter muscle in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ruihua; Huang, Fei; Wang, Peihuan; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Guoxiong; Chen, Lei; Wu, Gaoyi

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms of rat masseter muscle fibres caused by chronic sleep deprivation and a possible link with the pathogenesis of disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A total of 180 male rats were randomly divided into three groups (n=60 in each): cage controls, large platform controls, and chronic sleep deprivation group. Each group was further divided into three subgroups with different observation periods (7, 14, and 21 days). We investigated he expression of MyHC isoforms in masseter muscle fibres by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. In rats with chronic sleep deprivation there was increased MyHC-I expression in layers of both shallow and deep muscles at 7 and 21 days compared with the control groups, whereas sleep deprivation was associated with significantly decreased MyHC-II expression. At 21 days, there were no differences in MyHC-I or MyHC-II expression between the groups and there were no differences between the two control groups at any time point. These findings suggest that chronic sleep deprivation alters the expression of MyHC isoforms, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of disorders of the TMJ.

  7. An electrophoretic study of myosin heavy chain expression in skeletal muscles of the toad Bufo marinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L T; Stephenson, G M

    1999-10-01

    In this study we developed an SDS-PAGE protocol which for the first time separates effectively all myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms expected to be expressed in iliofibularis (IF), pyriformis (PYR), cruralis (CRU) and sartorius (SAR) muscles of the toad Bufo marinus on the basis of previously reported fibre type composition. The main feature of the method is the use of alanine instead of glycine both in the separating gel and in the running buffer. The correlation between the MHC isoform composition of IF, SAR and PYR muscles determined in this study and the previously reported fibre type composition of IF and SAR muscles in the toad and of PYR muscle in the frog was used to tentatively identify the MHC isoforms expressed by twitch fibre types 1, 2 and 3 and by tonic fibres. The alanine-SDS electrophoretic method was employed to examine changes in the MHC composition of IF, PYR, CRU and SAR muscles with the ontogenetic growth of the toad from post-natal life (body weight muscle observed in this study are in very good agreement with those in the fibre type composition of the developing IF muscle reported in the literature.

  8. Interaction of thyroid state and denervation on skeletal myosin heavy chain expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, F.; Arnold, C.; Zeng, M.; Baldwin, K.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of altered thyroid state and denervation (Den) on skeletal myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the plantaris and soleus muscles. Rats were subjected to unilateral denervation (Den) and randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) euthyroid; (2) hyperthyroid; (3) and hypothyroid. Denervation caused severe muscle atrophy and muscle-type specific MHC transformation. Denervation transformed the soleus to a faster muscle, and its effects required the presence of circulating thyroid hormone. In contrast, denervation transformed the plantaris to a slower muscle independently of thyroid state. Furthermore, thyroid hormone effects did not depend upon innervation status in the soleus, while they required the presence of the nerve in the plantaris. Collectively, these findings suggest that both thyroid hormone and intact nerve (a) differentially affect MHC transformations in fast and slow muscle; and (b) are important factors in regulating the optimal expression of both type I and IIB MHC genes. This research suggests that for patients with nerve damage and/or paralysis, both muscle mass and biochemical properties can also be affected by the thyroid state.

  9. Single rabbit stomach smooth muscle cell myosin heavy chain SMB expression and shortening velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddinger, T J; Meer, D P

    2001-02-01

    Isolated single smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from different regions of the rabbit stomach were used to determine a possible correlation between unloaded shortening velocity and smooth muscle (SM) myosin heavy chain (MHC) S1 head isoform composition (SMA, no head insert; SMB, with head insert). alpha-Toxin-permeabilized isolated single cells were maximally activated to measure unloaded shortening velocity and subsequently used in an RT-PCR reaction to determine the SMA/SMB content of the same cell. SM MHC SMA and SMB isoforms are uniquely distributed in the stomach with cells from the fundic region expressing little SMB (38.1 +/- 7.3% SMB; n = 16); cells from the antrum express primarily SMB (94.9 +/- 1.0% SMB; n = 16). Mean fundic cell unloaded shortening velocity was 0.014 +/- 0.002 cell lengths/s compared with 0.036 +/- 0.002 for the antrum cells. Unloaded shortening velocity in these cells was significantly correlated with their percent SMB expression (r2 = 0.58). Resting cell length does not correlate with the percent SMB expression (n = 32 cells). Previously published assays of purified or expressed SMA and SMB heavy meromyosin show a twofold difference in actin filament sliding speed in in vitro motility assays. Extrapolation of our data to 0-100% SMB would give a 10-fold range of shortening velocity, which is closer to the approximately 20-fold range reported from various SM tissues. This suggests that mechanisms in addition to the MHC S1 head isoforms regulate shortening velocity.

  10. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasibeh Yousefzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH in rats has not been elucidated thus far. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC and β-MHC isoforms. Methods: Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Results: Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p < 0.05 and heart rate (217 ± 11 vs. 273 ± 6 beat/min, p < 0.05 were lower in the FH rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201% and α- MHC expression was lower (47% than control. Conclusion: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart.

  11. Myosin heavy chain 15 is associated with bovine pulmonary arterial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, Marianne T; Neary, Joseph M; Lund, Gretchen K; Holt, Timothy N; Garry, Franklyn B; Mohun, Timothy J; Breckenridge, Ross A

    2014-09-01

    Bovine pulmonary hypertension, brisket disease, causes significant morbidity and mortality at elevations above 2,000 m. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) is moderately heritable, with inheritance estimated to lie within a few major genes. Invasive mPAP measurement is currently the only tool available to identify cattle at risk of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. A genetic test could allow selection of cattle suitable for high altitude without the need for invasive testing. In this study we evaluated three candidate genes (myosin heavy chain 15 [MYH15], NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein 2, and FK binding protein 1A) for association with mPAP in 166 yearling Angus bulls grazing at 2,182 m. The T allele (rs29016420) of MYH15 was linked to lower mPAP in a dominant manner (CC 47.2 ± 1.6 mmHg [mean ± standard error of the mean]; CT/TT 42.8 ± 0.7 mmHg; P = 0.02). The proportions of cattle with MYH15 CC, CT, and TT genotypes were 55%, 41%, and 4%, respectively. Given the high frequency of the deleterious allele, it is likely that the relative contribution of MYH15 polymorphisms to pulmonary hypertension is small, supporting previous predictions that the disease is polygenic. We evaluated allelic frequency of MYH15 in the Himalayan yak (Bos grunniens), a closely related species adapted to high altitude, and found 100% prevalence of T allele homozygosity. In summary, we identified a polymorphism in MYH15 significantly associated with mPAP. This finding may aid selection of cattle suitable for high altitude and contribute to understanding human hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Effect of Fetal Hypothyroidism on Cardiac Myosin Heavy Chain Expression in Male Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefzadeh, Nasibeh; Jeddi, Sajad; Alipour, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could affect the cardiac function in later life. The mechanism underlying this action in fetal hypothyroidism (FH) in rats has not been elucidated thus far. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluation the effect of FH on cardiac function in male rats and to determine the contribution of α-myosin heavy chain (MHC) and β-MHC isoforms. Methods: Six pregnant female rats were randomly divided into two groups: The hypothyroid group received water containing 6-propyl-2-thiouracil during gestation and the controls consumed tap water. The offspring of the rats were tested in adulthood. Hearts from the FH and control rats were isolated and perfused with langendroff setup for measuring hemodynamic parameters; also, the heart mRNA expressions of α- MHC and β-MHC were measured by qPCR. Results: Baseline LVDP (74.0 ± 3.1 vs. 92.5 ± 3.2 mmHg, p < 0.05) and heart rate (217 ± 11 vs. 273 ± 6 beat/min, p < 0.05) were lower in the FH rats than controls. Also, these results showed the same significance in ±dp/dt. In the FH rats, β-MHC expression was higher (201%) and α- MHC expression was lower (47%) than control. Conclusion: Thyroid hormone deficiency during fetal life could attenuate normal cardiac functions in adult rats, an effect at least in part due to the increased expression of β-MHC to α- MHC ratio in the heart. PMID:27411095

  13. Muscle fiber type specific induction of slow myosin heavy chain 2 gene expression by electrical stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crew, Jennifer R.; Falzari, Kanakeshwari [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Vertebrate skeletal muscle fiber types are defined by a broad array of differentially expressed contractile and metabolic protein genes. The mechanisms that establish and maintain these different fiber types vary throughout development and with changing functional demand. Chicken skeletal muscle fibers can be generally categorized as fast and fast/slow based on expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene in fast/slow muscle fibers. To investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control fiber type formation in secondary or fetal muscle fibers, myoblasts from the fast pectoralis major (PM) and fast/slow medial adductor (MA) muscles were isolated, allowed to differentiate in vitro, and electrically stimulated. MA muscle fibers were induced to express the slow MyHC2 gene by electrical stimulation, whereas PM muscle fibers did not express the slow MyHC2 gene under identical stimulation conditions. However, PM muscle fibers did express the slow MyHC2 gene when electrical stimulation was combined with inhibition of inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R) activity. Electrical stimulation was sufficient to increase nuclear localization of expressed nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cells (NFAT), NFAT-mediated transcription, and slow MyHC2 promoter activity in MA muscle fibers. In contrast, both electrical stimulation and inhibitors of IP3R activity were required for these effects in PM muscle fibers. Electrical stimulation also increased levels of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} co-activator-1 (PGC-1{alpha}) protein in PM and MA muscle fibers. These results indicate that MA muscle fibers can be induced by electrical stimulation to express the slow MyHC2 gene and that fast PM muscle fibers are refractory to stimulation-induced slow MyHC2 gene expression due to fast PM muscle fiber specific cellular mechanisms involving IP3R activity.

  14. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Myosin heavy chain 15 is associated with bovine pulmonary arterial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, Joseph M.; Lund, Gretchen K.; Holt, Timothy N.; Garry, Franklyn B.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Breckenridge, Ross A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bovine pulmonary hypertension, brisket disease, causes significant morbidity and mortality at elevations above 2,000 m. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) is moderately heritable, with inheritance estimated to lie within a few major genes. Invasive mPAP measurement is currently the only tool available to identify cattle at risk of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. A genetic test could allow selection of cattle suitable for high altitude without the need for invasive testing. In this study we evaluated three candidate genes (myosin heavy chain 15 [MYH15], NADH dehydrogenase flavoprotein 2, and FK binding protein 1A) for association with mPAP in 166 yearling Angus bulls grazing at 2,182 m. The T allele (rs29016420) of MYH15 was linked to lower mPAP in a dominant manner (CC 47.2 ± 1.6 mmHg [mean ± standard error of the mean]; CT/TT 42.8 ± 0.7 mmHg; P = 0.02). The proportions of cattle with MYH15 CC, CT, and TT genotypes were 55%, 41%, and 4%, respectively. Given the high frequency of the deleterious allele, it is likely that the relative contribution of MYH15 polymorphisms to pulmonary hypertension is small, supporting previous predictions that the disease is polygenic. We evaluated allelic frequency of MYH15 in the Himalayan yak (Bos grunniens), a closely related species adapted to high altitude, and found 100% prevalence of T allele homozygosity. In summary, we identified a polymorphism in MYH15 significantly associated with mPAP. This finding may aid selection of cattle suitable for high altitude and contribute to understanding human hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25621163

  16. Expression of myosin heavy-chain mRNA in cultured myoblasts induced by centrifugal force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Katsuhide; Sakiyama, Koji; Abe, Shinichi; Hiroki, Emi; Naito, Kaoru; Nakajima, Kazunori; Takeda, Tomotaka; Inoue, Takashi; Ide, Yoshinobu; Ishigami, Keiichi

    2008-11-01

    Ballistic muscle training leads to hypertrophy of fast type fibers and training for endurance induces that of slow type fibers. Numerous studies have been conducted on electrical, extending and magnetic stimulation of cells, but the effect of centrifugal force on cells remains to be investigated. In this study, we investigated the effect of stimulating cultured myoblasts with centrifugal force at different speeds on cell proliferation and myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) mRNA expression in muscle fiber. Stimulation of myoblasts was carried out at 2 different speeds for 20 min using the Himac CT6D, a desk centrifuge, and cells were observed at 1, 3 and 5 days later. Number of cells 1 and 5 days after centrifugal stimulation was significantly larger in the 62.5 x g and 4,170 x g stimulation groups than in the control group. Expression of MyHC-2b mRNA 1 day after centrifugal stimulation was significantly higher in the 2 stimulation groups than in the control group. Almost no expression of MyHC-2a was observed in any group at 1 and 3 days after centrifugal stimulation. However, 5 days after stimulation, MyHC-2a was strongly expressed in the 2 stimulation groups in comparison to the control group. Three days after centrifugal stimulation, expression of MyHC-1 was significantly higher in the 2 stimulation groups than in the control group. The results of this study clarified the effect of different centrifugal stimulation speeds on muscle fiber characteristics, and suggest that centrifugal stimulation of myoblasts enhances cell proliferation.

  17. Effect of aerobic exercise on the contractile function of gastrocnemius myosin heavy chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jun Ren

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of 4- 6 weeks' treadmill training of male SD rats on the contractile function of their gnstroenemius myosin heavy chain (MHC). Methods Forty male SD rats were randomly divided into control group and training group. The treadmill training of the training group rats was incessantly performed for 4- 6 weeks at an intensity of about 75% VO2max (18. 5- 24 m/min, gradient of 0°, each training session lasting 50 minutes, twice a day). The content of gastrocnemlas MHC mRNA was tested by reverse transcription polymernse chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the changes of muscle fibre and its cross-section area (CSA) were measured using immunohistochemistry. Electric stimulation tests were used to determine the maximal tension of isometric contraction of the post-training gastrocnemius. Results ① After continuous treadmill training for 4 - 6 weeks, we found that the content of the total MHC, MHC Ⅰ , MHC Ⅱ x, MHC Ⅱ a mRNAs was 105%, 105%, 109% and 108% of that in the resting control group, respectively, and the MHC Ⅱ b mRNA content did not change significantly. The percentage of MHC Ⅰ mRNA in the total MHC mRNA increased while that of MHC Ⅱ mRNA decreased after aerobic training. ② The slow type of fibre type Ⅰ was the main part of the MHC after training and the CSA of the muscle fibres increased simultaneously. ③ The maximal tension of isometric contraction by pulse stimulation of square wave in the training group increased significantly compared with that in the control group (P<0. 01). Conclusion The findings indicate that aerobic exercise may promote an increase in the contractile function of MHC.

  18. Differential expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the masticatory muscles of dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spassov, Alexander; Gredes, Tomasz; Gedrange, Tomasz; Lucke, Silke; Morgenstern, Sven; Pavlovic, Dragan; Kunert-Keil, Christiane

    2011-12-01

    The dystrophin-deficient mouse (mdx) is a homologue animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and is characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness accompanied by changes in myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition. It is likely that the masticatory muscles undergo similar changes. The aim of this study was to examine the masticatory muscles (masseter, temporal, tongue, and soleus) of 100-day-old mdx and control mice (n = 8-10), and the fibre type distribution (by immunohistochemistry) as well as the expression of the corresponding MyHC messenger RNA (mRNA) (protein and mRNA expression, using Western blot or quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)). Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis revealed that the masticatory muscles in the control and mdx mice consisted mainly of type 2 fibres, whereas soleus muscle consisted of both type 1 and 2 fibres. In the masseter muscle, the mRNA in mdx mice was not different from that found in the controls. However, the mRNA content of the MyHC-2b isoform in mdx mice was lower in comparison with the controls in the temporal muscle [11.9 versus 36.9 per cent; P muscle (65.7 versus 73.8 per cent; P muscle was lower than in the controls (25.9 versus 30.8 per cent; P muscles of mdx mice may lead to changed fibre type composition. The different MyHC gene expression in mdx mice masticatory muscles may be seen as an adaptive mechanism to muscular dystrophy.

  19. Species Differences in the Distribution of the Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain IIB Inserted Isoform in the Brain(Biochemistry)

    OpenAIRE

    Shin-ya, Hagiwara; MASAYUKI, TAKAHASHI; Akihiko, Yamagishi; Division of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University

    2001-01-01

    The alternatively spliced isoform of the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIB (MHC-IIB) with an insert of 21 amino acids near the actin-binding region, MHC-IIB (B2), is expressed specifically in the brain and spinal cord in Mammalia and Aves. We performed immunoblot analyses to elucidate the distribution of MHC-IIB (B2) in the brains of various animals. Nearly half of MHC-IIB existed as the B2 inserted isoform (MHC-IIB (B2)) in the cerebrum of the guinea-pig, rabbit and pig, while the non-B2 inse...

  20. Species Differences in the Distribution of the Nonmuscle Myosin Heavy Chain IIB Inserted Isoform in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Hagiwara, Shin-ya; Takahashi, Masayuki; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2001-01-01

    The alternatively spliced isoform of the nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIB (MHC-IIB) with an insert of 21 amino acids near the actin-binding region, MHC-IIB(B2), is expressed specifically in the brain and spinal cord in Mammalia and Aves. We performed immunoblot analyses to elucidate the distribution of MHC-IIB(B2) in the brains of various animals. Nearly half of MHC-IIB existed as the B2 inserted isoform (MHC-IIB(B2)) in the cerebrum of the guinea-pig, rabbit and pig, while the non-B2 inserte...

  1. Shared gene structures and clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons within the metazoan muscle myosin heavy chain genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kollmar

    Full Text Available Multicellular animals possess two to three different types of muscle tissues. Striated muscles have considerable ultrastructural similarity and contain a core set of proteins including the muscle myosin heavy chain (Mhc protein. The ATPase activity of this myosin motor protein largely dictates muscle performance at the molecular level. Two different solutions to adjusting myosin properties to different muscle subtypes have been identified so far: Vertebrates and nematodes contain many independent differentially expressed Mhc genes while arthropods have single Mhc genes with clusters of mutually exclusive spliced exons (MXEs. The availability of hundreds of metazoan genomes now allowed us to study whether the ancient bilateria already contained MXEs, how MXE complexity subsequently evolved, and whether additional scenarios to control contractile properties in different muscles could be proposed, By reconstructing the Mhc genes from 116 metazoans we showed that all intron positions within the motor domain coding regions are conserved in all bilateria analysed. The last common ancestor of the bilateria already contained a cluster of MXEs coding for part of the loop-2 actin-binding sequence. Subsequently the protostomes and later the arthropods gained many further clusters while MXEs got completely lost independently in several branches (vertebrates and nematodes and species (for example the annelid Helobdella robusta and the salmon louse Lepeophtheirus salmonis. Several bilateria have been found to encode multiple Mhc genes that might all or in part contain clusters of MXEs. Notable examples are a cluster of six tandemly arrayed Mhc genes, of which two contain MXEs, in the owl limpet Lottia gigantea and four Mhc genes with three encoding MXEs in the predatory mite Metaseiulus occidentalis. Our analysis showed that similar solutions to provide different myosin isoforms (multiple genes or clusters of MXEs or both have independently been developed

  2. Characterisation of the sarcomeric myosin heavy chain multigene family in the laboratory guinea pig

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    Bardsley Ronald G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several chronic conditions leading to skeletal muscle dysfunction are known to be associated with changes in the expression of myosin heavy chain (MHC isoforms at both the mRNA and protein level. Many of these conditions are modelled, pre-clinically, in the guinea pig due to similar disease onset and progression to the human condition, and their generally well-characterised anatomy. MHC composition is amenable to determination by protein and mRNA based methodologies, the latter quantifying the expression of MHC isoform-specific gene transcripts allowing the detection of earlier, and more subtle changes. As such, the MHC mRNAs, and specific oligonucleotide primers of all common laboratory species have been available for some time. However, due to incomplete genomic annotation, assessment of guinea pig MHC mRNA expression has not been previously possible, precluding the full characterisation of early changes in skeletal muscle in response to disease and disease modulation. The purpose of this study was to characterise the multigenic structure of the sarcomeric MHC family in the guinea pig, and to design and validate specific oligonucleotide primers to enable the assessment of the predominant adult-muscle associated MHC mRNAs in relevant disease models. Results Using a combination of ligase-mediated rapid amplification of 5' and 3' cDNA ends (RACE and bioinformatics, mRNAs to the four main skeletal-muscle isoforms of MHC were determined. Specific oligonucleotide primers were designed, and following verification of their specificity, found to successfully determine the expression of each MHC mRNA independently. Conclusions Because of their utilisation in the in vivo modelling of disease, there is a requirement to develop molecular methods that accurately differentiate the different MHC mRNAs in the guinea pig to enable rapid profiling of muscle composition in appropriate disease models. The methods developed here are suitable for

  3. Effects of different activity and inactivity paradigms on myosin heavy chain gene expression in striated muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Haddad, F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this mini-review is to summarize findings concerning the role that different models of muscular activity and inactivity play in altering gene expression of the myosin heavy chain (MHC) family of motor proteins in mammalian cardiac and skeletal muscle. This was done in the context of examining parallel findings concerning the role that thyroid hormone (T(3), 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) plays in MHC expression. Findings show that both cardiac and skeletal muscles of experimental animals are initially undifferentiated at birth and then undergo a marked level of growth and differentiation in attaining the adult MHC phenotype in a T(3)/activity level-dependent fashion. Cardiac MHC expression in small mammals is highly sensitive to thyroid deficiency, diabetes, energy deprivation, and hypertension; each of these interventions induces upregulation of the beta-MHC isoform, which functions to economize circulatory function in the face of altered energy demand. In skeletal muscle, hyperthyroidism, as well as interventions that unload or reduce the weight-bearing activity of the muscle, causes slow to fast MHC conversions. Fast to slow conversions, however, are seen under hypothyroidism or when the muscles either become chronically overloaded or subjected to intermittent loading as occurs during resistance training and endurance exercise. The regulation of MHC gene expression by T(3) or mechanical stimuli appears to be strongly regulated by transcriptional events, based on recent findings on transgenic models and animals transfected with promoter-reporter constructs. However, the mechanisms by which T(3) and mechanical stimuli exert their control on transcriptional processes appear to be different. Additional findings show that individual skeletal muscle fibers have the genetic machinery to express simultaneously all of the adult MHCs, e.g., slow type I and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb, in unique combinations under certain experimental conditions. This degree of

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of the arthropod muscle myosin heavy chain genes allows ancestral gene reconstruction and reveals a new type of 'partially' processed pseudogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollmar Martin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing of mutually exclusive exons is an important mechanism for increasing protein diversity in eukaryotes. The insect Mhc (myosin heavy chain gene produces all different muscle myosins as a result of alternative splicing in contrast to most other organisms of the Metazoa lineage, that have a family of muscle genes with each gene coding for a protein specialized for a functional niche. Results The muscle myosin heavy chain genes of 22 species of the Arthropoda ranging from the waterflea to wasp and Drosophila have been annotated. The analysis of the gene structures allowed the reconstruction of an ancient muscle myosin heavy chain gene and showed that during evolution of the arthropods introns have mainly been lost in these genes although intron gain might have happened in a few cases. Surprisingly, the genome of Aedes aegypti contains another and that of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus two further muscle myosin heavy chain genes, called Mhc3 and Mhc4, that contain only one variant of the corresponding alternative exons of the Mhc1 gene. Mhc3 transcription in Aedes aegypti is documented by EST data. Mhc3 and Mhc4 inserted in the Aedes and Culex genomes either by gene duplication followed by the loss of all but one variant of the alternative exons, or by incorporation of a transcript of which all other variants have been spliced out retaining the exon-intron structure. The second and more likely possibility represents a new type of a 'partially' processed pseudogene. Conclusion Based on the comparative genomic analysis of the alternatively spliced arthropod muscle myosin heavy chain genes we propose that the splicing process operates sequentially on the transcript. The process consists of the splicing of the mutually exclusive exons until one exon out of the cluster remains while retaining surrounding intronic sequence. In a second step splicing of introns takes place. A related mechanism could be responsible for

  5. Correlation between histochemically assessed fiber type distribution and isomyosin and myosin heavy chain content in porcine skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, G; Solomon, M B; Czerwinski, S M; Long, C; Pursel, V G

    1999-08-01

    Highly sensitive enzyme assays developed to differentiate skeletal muscle fibers allow the recognition of three main fiber types: slow-twitch oxidative (SO), fast-twitch oxidative glycolytic (FOG), and fast-twitch glycolytic (FG). Myosin, the predominant contractile protein in mammalian skeletal muscle, can be separated based on the electrophoretic mobility under nondissociating conditions into SM2, SM1, IM, FM3, and FM2 isoforms, or under dissociating conditions into myosin heavy chain (MHC) I, IIb, IIx/d, and IIa. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the histochemical method of differentiation of fiber types is consistent with the electrophoretically identified isomyosin and MHC isoforms. These comparisons were made using serratus ventralis (SV), gluteus medius (GM), and longissimus muscles (LM) from 13 pigs. Two calculation methods for the histochemical assessed fiber type distribution were adopted. The first method incorporated the number of fibers counted for each fiber type and calculated a percentage of the total fiber number (fiber number percentage: FNP). The second method expressed the cross-sectional area of each fiber type as a percentage of the total fiber area measured per muscle (fiber area percentage: FAP). Independent of the calculation methods, correlation analyses revealed in all muscles a strong relation between SO fibers, the slow isomyosin (SM1 and SM2), and MHCI, as well as between the FG fibers, the fast isomyosin (FM3 and FM2), and MHCIIx/b content (PFOG fiber population assessed by histochemical analysis and intermediate isoform (IM) or MHCIIa content. The present results did not provide conclusive evidence as to which of the calculation methods (FNP or FAP) was more closely related to myosin composition of skeletal muscles. Despite some incompatibility between the methods, the present study shows that histochemical as well as electrophoretic analyses yielded important information about the composition of porcine

  6. [Changes in titin and myosin heavy chain isoform composition in skeletal muscles of Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) after 12-day spaceflight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuneva, A D; Vikhliantsev, I M; Shpagina, M D; Rogachevskiĭ, V V; Khutsian, S S; Poddubnaia, Z A; Grigor'ev, A I

    2012-01-01

    Changes of titin and myosin heavy chain isoform composition in skeletal muscles (m. soleus, m. gastrocnemius, m. tibialis anterior, m. psoas major) in Mongolian Gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus ) were investigated after 12-day spaceflight on board of Russian space vehicle "Foton-M3". In m. psoas and m. soleus in the gerbils from "Flight" group the expected increase in the content of fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (IIxd and IIa, respectively) were observed. No significant differences were found in the content of IIxd and IIa isoforms of myosin heavy chain in m. tibialis anterior in the gerbils from control group as compared to that in "Flight" group. An unexpected increase in the content of slow myosin heavy chain I isoform and a decrease in the content of fast IIx/d isoform in m. gastrocnemius of the gerbils from "Flight" group were observed. In skeletal muscles of the gerbils from "Flight" group the relative content of titin N2A-isoform was reduced (by 1,2-1,7 times), although the content of its NT-isoform, which was revealed in striated muscles of mammals in our experiments earlier, remained the same. When the content of titin N2A-isoform was decreased, no predictable abnormalities in sarcomeric structure and contractile ability of skeletal muscles in the gerbils from "Flight" group were found. An assumption on the leading role of titin NT-isoform in maintenance of structural and functional properties of striated muscles of mammals was made.

  7. High fat/low carbohydrate diet attenuates left ventricular hypertrophy and prevents myosin heavy chain isoform switching induced by chronic hypertenstion

    Science.gov (United States)

    A switch in the expression of myosin heavy chain isoform (MHC) alpha to beta is observed with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and heart failure. This switch is associated with a defect in myocardial energy production and contractile dysfunction. Similar MHC isoform profile is observed in the fe...

  8. Cardiac and skeletal muscle expression of mutant β-myosin heavy chains, degree of functional impairment and phenotypic heterogeneity in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Marina; Casadonte, Rita; Ricci, Pietroantonio; Santini, Mario; Frati, Giacomo; Rizzo, Antonietta; Carratelli, Caterina Romano; Lamberti, Monica; Parrotta, Elvira; Quaresima, Barbara; Faniello, Concetta M; Costanzo, Francesco; Cuda, Giovanni

    2012-10-01

    Several mutations in distinct genes, all coding for sarcomeric proteins, have been reported in unrelated kindreds with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). We have identified nine individuals from three families harboring two distinct mutations in one copy of the β-myosin heavy chain (β-MHC) gene. In this study, the expression of the mutant β-myosin protein isoform, isolated from slow-twitch fibers of skeletal muscle, was demonstrated by Northern and Western blot analysis; this myosin showed a decreased in vitro motility activity and produced a lower actin-activated ATPase activity. Isometric tension, measured in single slow-twitch fibers isolated from the affected individuals, also showed a significant decrease. The degree of impairment of β-myosin function, as well as the loss in isometric tension development, were strictly dependent on the amount of the isoform transcribed from the mutated allele. Interestingly, a strong correlation was also demonstrated between mutant β-myosin content and clinical features of FHC. On the other hand, we were unable to detect any correlation between mutant β-myosin expression and degree of cardiac hypertrophy, thereby strengthening the hypothesis that hypertrophy, one of the hallmarks of FHC, might not necessarily be related to the clinical evolution of this disease. These findings lend support to the notion that additional factors rather than the mutated gene may play a pathogenetic role in cardiac wall thickening, whereas the prognosis appears to be strongly related to the amount of mutant protein.

  9. Direct photoaffinity labeling of gizzard myosin with ( sup 3 H)uridine diphosphate places Glu185 of the heavy chain at the active site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garabedian, T.E.; Yount, R.G. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1990-12-25

    The active site of chicken gizzard myosin was labeled by direct photoaffinity labeling with ({sup 3}H)UDP. ({sup 3}H) UDP was stably trapped at the active site by addition of vanadate (Vi) and Co{sup 2+}. The extraordinary stability of the myosin.Co2+.(3H)UDP.Vi complex (t1/2 greater than 5 days at 0{degrees}C) allowed it to be purified free of extraneous ({sup 3}H)UDP before irradiation began. Upon UV irradiation, greater than 60% of the trapped ({sup 3}H)UDP was photoincorporated into the active site. Only the 200-kDa heavy chain was labeled, confirming earlier results using ({sup 3}H)UTP. Extensive tryptic digestion of photolabeled myosin subfragment 1 followed by high performance liquid chromatography separations and removal of nucleotide phosphates by treatment with alkaline phosphatase allowed two labeled peptides to be isolated. Sequencing of the labeled peptides and radioactive counting showed that Glu185 was the residue labeled. Since UDP is a zero-length cross-linker, Glu185 is located at the purine-binding pocket of the active site of smooth myosin and adjacent to the glycine-rich loop which binds the polyphosphate portion of ATP. This Glu residue is conserved in smooth and nonmuscle myosins and is the same residue identified previously by ({sup 3}H)UTP photolabeling in Acanthamoeba myosin II.

  10. Myosin heavy-chain isoform distribution, fibre-type composition and fibre size in skeletal muscle of patients on haemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molsted, Stig; Eidemak, Inge; Sorensen, Helle Tauby;

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Chronic uraemia is associated with abnormalities in skeletal muscles, which can affect their working capacity. It is also well known that the fibre-type composition of skeletal muscles influences endurance, muscle strength and power. In this study we therefore determined the size...... and distribution of muscle fibres and the myosin heavy-chain (MHC) isoform composition in patiens on haemodialysis (HD) in order to establish any differences with values for untrained control subjects. Material and methods. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of 14 non-diabetic patients...... determined fibre-type composition of the vastus lateralis muscle. The mean fibre area of type 1 and 2 fibres was 3283±873 and 3594±1483 µm2, respectively. The MHC composition and the size of the type 1 fibres of the patients on HD were significantly different from those of the control subjects. Conclusions...

  11. Myosin Heavy Chain Gene Expression in Developing Neonatal Skeletal Muscle: Involvement of the Nerve, Gravity, and Thyroid State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, K. M.; Adams, G.; Haddad, F.; Zeng, M.; Qin, A.; Qin, L.; McCue, S.; Bodell, P.

    1999-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene family encodes at least six MHC proteins (herein designated as neonatal, embryonic, slow type I (beta), and fast IIa, IIx, and IIb) that are expressed in skeletal muscle in a muscle-specific and developmentally-regulated fashion. At birth, both antigravity (e.g. soleus) and locomotor (e.g., plantaris) skeletal muscles are undifferentiated relative to the adult MHC phenotype such that the neonatal and embryonic MHC isoforms account for 80 - 90% of the MHC pool in a fast locomotor muscle; whereas, the embryonic and slow, type I isoforms account for approx. 90% of the pool in a typical antigravity muscle. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of an intact nerve, gravity and thyroid hormone (T3), as well as certain interactions of these interventions, on MHC gene expression in developing neonatal skeletal muscles of rodents.

  12. Myosin heavy chain isoform expression in human extraocular muscles: longitudinal variation and patterns of expression in global and orbital layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Ah; Lim, Jeonghee; Sohn, Seongsoo; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms along the length of the global and orbital layers of human extraocular muscles (EOMs). Whole muscle tissue extracts of human EOMs were cross-sectioned consecutively and separated into orbital and global layers. The extracts from these layers were subjected to electrophoretic analysis, followed by quantification with scanning densitometry. MyHC isoforms displayed different distributions along the lengths of EOMs. In the orbital and global layers of all EOMs except for the superior oblique muscle, MyHCeom was enriched in the central regions. MyHCIIa and MyHCI were most abundant in the proximal and distal ends. A variation in MyHC isoform expression was apparent along the lengths of human EOMs. These results provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the functional diversity of EOMs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Myosin heavy chain-like localizes at cell contact sites during Drosophila myoblast fusion and interacts in vitro with Rolling pebbles 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonn, Bettina R.; Rudolf, Anja; Hornbruch-Freitag, Christina; Daum, Gabor; Kuckwa, Jessica; Kastl, Lena; Buttgereit, Detlev [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany); Renkawitz-Pohl, Renate, E-mail: renkawit@biologie.uni-marburg.de [Developmental Biology, Department of Biology, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Karl-von-Frisch-Strasse 8, 35037 Marburg (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Besides representing the sarcomeric thick filaments, myosins are involved in many cellular transport and motility processes. Myosin heavy chains are grouped into 18 classes. Here we show that in Drosophila, the unconventional group XVIII myosin heavy chain-like (Mhcl) is transcribed in the mesoderm of embryos, most prominently in founder cells (FCs). An ectopically expressed GFP-tagged Mhcl localizes in the growing muscle at cell–cell contacts towards the attached fusion competent myoblast (FCM). We further show that Mhcl interacts in vitro with the essential fusion protein Rolling pebbles 7 (Rols7), which is part of a protein complex established at cell contact sites (Fusion-restricted Myogenic-Adhesive Structure or FuRMAS). Here, branched F-actin is likely needed to widen the fusion pore and to integrate the myoblast into the growing muscle. We show that the localization of Mhcl is dependent on the presence of Rols7, and we postulate that Mhcl acts at the FuRMAS as an actin motor protein. We further show that Mhcl deficient embryos develop a wild-type musculature. We thus propose that Mhcl functions redundantly to other myosin heavy chains in myoblasts. Lastly, we found that the protein is detectable adjacent to the sarcomeric Z-discs, suggesting an additional function in mature muscles. - Highlights: ► The class XVIII myosin encoding gene Mhcl is transcribed in the mesoderm. ► Mhcl localization at contact sites of fusing myoblasts depends on Rols7. ► Mhcl interacts in vitro with Rols7 which is essential for myogenesis. ► Functional redundancy with other myosins is likely as mutants show no muscle defects. ► Mhcl localizes adjacent to Z-discs of sarcomeres and might support muscle integrity.

  14. SNPs within the beta myosin heavy chain (MYH7 and the pyruvate kinase muscle (PKM2 genes in horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Russo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Two highly expressed skeletal muscle genes (the MYH7 gene encoding the myosin heavy chain slow/β-cardiac isoform and the PKM2 gene encoding the pyruvate kinase muscle isoforms were investigated with the objective to identify DNA markers in horses. A panel of DNA samples from different horse breeds was analysed using a PCR-single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP approach. Four and two alleles were identified for the MYH7 and PKM2 loci, respectively. Mendelian inheritance of alleles of the two investigated genes was confirmed analysing horse families. Sequencing of PCR products obtained from the MYH7 and PKM2 genes made it possible to characterise two SSCP alleles for each gene. The polymorphisms found in the MYH7 and PKM2 genes were further studied in 61 and 68 horses of three (Italian Heavy Draught Horse, Italian Saddler and Murgese and five (Franches-Montagnes, Haflinger, Italian Heavy Draught Horse, Murgese and Standardbred breeds, respectively. Allele frequencies of the two loci varied among the considered breeds. The SNPs discovery in MYH7 and PKM2 genes makes it possible to locate new molecular markers to ECA1. The identified markers could be used in association analysis with performance traits in horses.

  15. Affi-gel blue treatment simplifies the protein composition of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, S; Dux, L; Martonosi, A

    1986-04-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated by conventional techniques usually contain, in addition to the recognized sarcoplasmic reticulum components, several other proteins (phosphorylase, myosin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, etc.) in variable amounts; these proteins complicate the interpretation of chemical modification data. Incubation of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles with Affi-Gel blue particles for 1-4 h at 2 degrees C, followed by sedimentation of the Affi-Gel in a clinical centrifuge, simplifies the protein composition by selective adsorption of the accessory proteins, and improves the consistency of the preparations. The Affi-Gel blue treatment is recommended as part of the standard procedure for the isolation of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles.

  16. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9 and Rac1 activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad G. Sabbir

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1 gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9, plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype.

  17. Identification of non-muscle myosin heavy chain as a substrate for Cdk5 and tool for drug screening

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    Hiller Gösta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deregulated activation of cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5 is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. One of the restricting factors for developing specific Cdk5 inhibitors is the lack of reproducible and well-characterized cellular in vitro assay systems. Methods HEK293 cells were transfected with Cdk5 and its activator p25 as a starting point for an assay to screen for Cdk5 kinase inhibitors. To identify suitable substrates for Cdk5 we utilized an antibody that recognizes phospho serine in a consensus motif for Cdk substrates. Results Western blot analysis of transfected cells detected a 200 kDa band that was identified, by mass spectrometry, as non-muscle myosin heavy chain, type B (NMHC-B. Phosphorylation of NMHC-B was evident only in cells that were double transfected with Cdk5/p25 and was dose-dependently inhibited by Roscovitine and other Cdk5 inhibitors. Cdk5 was found to phosphorylate NMHC-B also in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. Conclusion A novel Cdk5 substrate NMHC-B was identified in this study. A cellular assay for screening of Cdk5 inhibitors was established using NMHC-B phosphorylation as a read-out in Cdk5/p25 transfected HEK293 cells. A novel Cdk5 inhibitor was also pharmacologically characterized in this assay system.

  18. The resident endoplasmic reticulum protein, BAP31, associates with gamma-actin and myosin B heavy chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducret, Axel; Nguyen, Mai; Breckenridge, David G; Shore, Gordon C

    2003-01-01

    BAP31 is a 28-kDa integral membrane protein of the endoplasmic reticulum whose cytosolic domain contains two caspase recognition sites that are preferentially cleaved by initiator caspases, such as caspase-8. Recently, we reported that the caspase-resistant BAP31 inhibited Fas-mediated apoptotic membrane fragmentation and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in KB epithelial cells (Nguyen M., Breckenridge G., Ducret A & Shore G. (2000) Mol. Cell. Biol.20, 6731-6740). We describe here the characterization by capillary liquid chromatography microelectrospray tandem MS of a BAP31 immunocomplex isolated from a HepG2 cell lysate in the absence of a death signal. We show that BAP31 specifically associates with nonmuscle myosin heavy chain B and nonmuscle gamma-actin, two components of the cytoskeleton actomyosin complex. Collectively, these data confirm that BAP31, in addition to its potential role as a chaperone, may play a fundamental role in the structural organization of the cytoplasm. Here we also show that Fas stimulation of apoptosis releases BAP31 associations with these motor proteins, a step that may contribute to extranuclear events, such as membrane remodelling, during the execution phase of apoptosis.

  19. SMB myosin heavy chain knockout enhances tonic contraction and reduces the rate of force generation in ileum and stomach antrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qian; Babu, Gopal J; Periasamy, Muthu; Eddinger, Thomas J

    2013-01-15

    The role of SMA and SMB smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms in tonic and phasic contractions was studied in phasic (longitudinal ileum and stomach circular antrum) and tonic (stomach circular fundus) smooth muscle tissues of SMB knockout mice. Knocking out the SMB MHC gene eliminated SMB MHC protein expression and resulted in upregulation of the SMA MHC protein without altering the total MHC protein level. Switching from SMB to SMA MHC protein expression decreased the rate of the force transient and increased the sustained tonic force in SMB((-/-)) ileum and antrum with high potassium (KPSS) but not with carbachol (CCh) stimulation. The increased tonic contraction under the depolarized condition was not through changes in second messenger signaling pathways (PKC/CPI-17 or Rho/ROCK signaling pathway) or LC(20) phosphorylation. Biochemical analyses showed that the expression of contractile regulatory proteins (MLCK, MLCP, PKCδ, and CPI-17) did not change significantly in tissues tested except for PKCα protein expression being significantly decreased in the SMB((-/-)) antrum. However, specifically activating PKCα with phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) was not significantly different in knockout and wild-type tissues, with total force being a fraction of the force generation with KPSS or CCh stimulation in SMB((-/-)) ileum and antrum. Taken together, these data show removing the SMB MHC protein expression with a compensatory increase in the SMA MHC protein results in enhanced sustained KPSS-induced tonic contraction with a reduced rate of force generation in these phasic tissues.

  20. Myosin heavy chain expression and atrophy in rat skeletal muscle during transition from cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Robson Francisco; Cicogna, Antonio Carlos; Campos, Gerson Eduardo Rocha; De Assis, Jeane Marlene Fogaça; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Pai-Silva, Maeli Dal

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether changes in myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression and atrophy in rat skeletal muscle are observed during transition from cardiac hypertrophy to chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by aortic stenosis (AS). AS and control animals were studied 12 and 18 weeks after surgery and when overt CHF had developed in AS animals, 28 weeks after the surgery. The following parameters were studied in the soleus muscle: muscle atrophy index (soleus weight/body weight), muscle fibre diameter and frequency and MHC expression. AS animals presented decreases in both MHC1 and type I fibres and increases in both MHC2a and type IIa fibres during late cardiac hypertrophy and CHF. Type IIa fibre atrophy occurred during CHF. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that skeletal muscle phenotype changes occur in both late cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure; this suggests that attention should be given to the fact that skeletal muscle phenotype changes occur prior to overt heart failure symptoms.

  1. Intermediate filament-co-localized molecules with myosin heavy chain epitopes define distinct cellular domains in hair follicles and epidermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Simon M

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins linking intermediate filaments to other cytoskeletal components have important functions in maintaining tissue integrity and cell shape. Results We found a set of monoclonal antibodies raised against specific human sarcomeric myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms labels cells in distinct regions of the mammalian epidermis. The antigens co-localize with intermediate filament-containing structures. A slow MyHC-related antigen is punctate on the cell surface and co-localizes with desmoplakin at desmosomal junctions of all suprabasal epidermal layers from rat fœtal day 16 onwards, in the root sheath of the hair follicle and in intercalated disks of cardiomyocytes. A fast MyHC-related antigen occurs in cytoplasmic filaments in a subset of basal cells of skin epidermis and bulb, but not neck, of hair follicles. A fast IIA MyHC-related antigen labels filaments of a single layer of cells in hair bulb. This 230 000 Mr antigen co-purifies with keratin. No obvious candidate for any of the antigens appears in the literature. Conclusions We describe a set of molecules that co-localize with intermediate filament in specific cell subsets in epithelial tissues. These antigens presumably influence intermediate filament structure or function.

  2. Differential sensitivity of myosin-heavy-chain-typed fibers to distinct aggregates of nerve-mediated activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, S E; Michel, R N

    1999-02-01

    We studied the regulatory effects of nerve-mediated activity on the early expression of embryonic and adult myosin heavy chains (MHC) within inactive though still innervated rat plantaris and soleus muscle fibers. To this end, we stimulated motor nerves that were quiescent following treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX) with paradigms designed to partition the influence of neural activation frequency and assessed the selective expression and accumulation of MHCs within muscle fibers using an array of specific antibodies. We show rapid de novo expression of IIx MHC within select soleus fibers in response to high-frequency activation for more than 0.01% of daily time. High-frequency aggregates were also the most effective in preventing the TTX-induced reexpression of embryonic MHCs within specific fibers. Only configurations that included high-frequency trains for more than 0.01% of daily time or combined with 10 Hz stimulation preserved the size of select fibers, used as a measure of the net cellular content of MHC. The effectiveness of this preservation varied according to the muscle type and MHC expressed, and, in a subset of fibers, was influenced by contractile loading status. Our results demonstrate that distinct subsets of MHC-typed fibers are differentially sensitive to the neural activation cues mediating the cellular expression of these proteins.

  3. Ubiquitin Ligase, MuRF-1 regulates myosin heavy chain type IIa transcripts during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Sachiko

    Skeletal muscles are vulnerable to marked atrophy under microgravity conditions. We previously reported that gastrocnemius muscle atrophy by spaceflight was specifically sensitive to the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. We also screened more over 26,000 skeletal muscle genes in rats exposed to real weightlessness and found that the expression of Ubiquitin Ligase, Muscle specific Ring Finger-1 (MuRF-1) upregulated under microgravity. In the present study, we examined the role of MuRF-1 in microgravity-induced muscle atrophy. The amounts of MuRF-1 transcripts significantly increased in skeletal muscle after denervation, an in vivo model of microgravity-induced unloading. MuRF-1 deficient (MuRF-1-/-) mice significantly inhibited reduction of muscle weight for muscle atrophy, compared with wild type mice. Interestingly, MuRF-1-/- mice significantly inhibited upregulation of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) type IIa transcrips, while wild type mice significantly increased expression of MyHC type IIa transcripts in denervated skeletal muscle. Our present results suggest that MuRF-1 may play an important role in regulation of MyHC type IIa during muscle atrophy under microgravity conditions.

  4. Various Themes of Myosin Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-05-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are actin-based molecular motors that are indispensable for cellular homeostasis. The vast functional and structural diversity of myosins accounts for the variety and complexity of the underlying allosteric regulatory mechanisms that determine the activation or inhibition of myosin motor activity and enable precise timing and spatial aspects of myosin function at the cellular level. This review focuses on the molecular basis of posttranslational regulation of eukaryotic myosins from different classes across species by allosteric intrinsic and extrinsic effectors. First, we highlight the impact of heavy and light chain phosphorylation. Second, we outline intramolecular regulatory mechanisms such as autoinhibition and subsequent activation. Third, we discuss diverse extramolecular allosteric mechanisms ranging from actin-linked regulatory mechanisms to myosin:cargo interactions. At last, we briefly outline the allosteric regulation of myosins with synthetic compounds.

  5. Myosin heavy chain isoform expression regulates shortening velocity in smooth muscle: studies using an SMB KO mouse line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagiannis, Peter; Babu, G J; Periasamy, M; Brozovich, Frank V

    2004-01-01

    The kinetics of smooth muscle are thought to be partially determined by the level of the expression of the 7 amino acid insert, SMB, in the myosin heavy chain, as SMB is generally expressed at higher levels in faster smooth muscle. In this study, we determined the role of this insert on shortening velocity and force regeneration following rapid reduction in muscle length (k(step)) in bladder tissue from a transgenic mouse line expressing the insert at three different levels: wild type (WT, +/+, SMB/SMB), an SMA homozygous type (SMB KO, -/-), and a heterozygous type (+/-, SMB/SMA). Smooth muscle from +/+ bladder shorten faster than both the +/- and -/- bladder smooth muscle when activated with Ca2+, consistent with SMB determining the shortening velocity of smooth muscle. The addition of Pi to the fully activated skinned bladder strips did not affect the rate of shortening for either the +/+ or -/- bladder types but did significantly decrease the rate of shortening for the +/- type. In contrast, the addition of ADP to fully Ca2+ activated bladder strips increased the rate of shortening for all three bladder types. However after thiophosphorylation, ADP slowed the shortening velocity. These data are consistent with shortening velocity being determined by the level of activation (or crossbridge attachment) in smooth muscle. The rates of force regeneration according to the k(step) protocol showed no differences between bladder types and also proved insensitive to either Pi or ADP. These data suggest that the rates of force regeneration were determined not only by the kinetics of the crossbridge cycle, but also by factors outside the contractile apparatus.

  6. A continuum of myofibers in adult rabbit extraocular muscle: force, shortening velocity, and patterns of myosin heavy chain colocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLoon, Linda K; Park, Han Na; Kim, Jong-Hee; Pedrosa-Domellöf, Fatima; Thompson, Ladora V

    2011-10-01

    Extraocular muscle (EOM) myofibers do not fit the traditional fiber typing classifications normally used in noncranial skeletal muscle, in part, due to the complexity of their individual myofibers. With single skinned myofibers isolated from rectus muscles of normal adult rabbits, force and shortening velocity were determined for 220 fibers. Each fiber was examined for myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform composition by densitometric analysis of electrophoresis gels. Rectus muscle serial sections were examined for coexpression of eight MyHC isoforms. A continuum was seen in single myofiber shortening velocities as well as force generation, both in absolute force (g) and specific tension (kN/m(2)). Shortening velocity correlated with MyHCIIB, IIA, and I content, the more abundant MyHC isoforms expressed within individual myofibers. Importantly, single fibers with similar or identical shortening velocities expressed significantly different ratios of MyHC isoforms. The vast majority of myofibers in both the orbital and global layers expressed more than one MyHC isoform, with up to six isoforms in single fiber segments. MyHC expression varied significantly and unpredictably along the length of single myofibers. Thus EOM myofibers represent a continuum in their histological and physiological characteristics. This continuum would facilitate fine motor control of eye position, speed, and direction of movement in all positions of gaze and with all types of eye movements-from slow vergence movements to fast saccades. To fully understand how the brain controls eye position and movements, it is critical that this significant EOM myofiber heterogeneity be integrated into hypotheses of oculomotor control.

  7. Myosin heavy chain isoform composition and stretch activation kinetics in single fibres of Xenopus laevis iliofibularis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruchova, Olena; Stephenson, Gabriela M M; Andruchov, Oleg; Stephenson, D George; Galler, Stefan

    2006-07-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of specialized fibre types that enable it to fulfil complex and variable functional needs. Muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis, a frog formerly classified as a toad, were the first to be typed based on a combination of physiological, morphological, histochemical and biochemical characteristics. Currently the most widely accepted criterion for muscle fibre typing is the myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition because it is assumed that variations of this protein are the most important contributors to functional diversity. Yet this criterion has not been used for classification of Xenopus fibres due to the lack of an effective protocol for MHC isoform analysis. In the present study we aimed to resolve and visualize electrophoretically the MHC isoforms expressed in the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis, to define their functional identity and to classify the fibres based on their MHC isoform composition. Using a SDS-PAGE protocol that proved successful with mammalian muscle MHC isoforms, we were able to detect five MHC isoforms in Xenopus iliofibularis muscle. The kinetics of stretch-induced force transients (stretch activation) produced by a fibre was strongly correlated with its MHC isoform content indicating that the five MHC isoforms confer different kinetics characteristics. Hybrid fibre types containing two MHC isoforms exhibited stretch activation kinetics parameters that were intermediate between those of the corresponding pure fibre types. These results clearly show that the MHC isoforms expressed in Xenopus muscle are functionally different thereby validating the idea that MHC isoform composition is the most reliable criterion for vertebrate skeletal muscle fibre type classification. Thus, our results lay the foundation for the unequivocal classification of the muscle fibres in the Xenopus iliofibularis muscle and for gaining further insights into skeletal muscle fibre diversity.

  8. Cold exposure increases slow-type myosin heavy chain 1 (MyHC1) composition of soleus muscle in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizunoya, Wataru; Iwamoto, Yohei; Sato, Yusuke; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of cold exposure on rat skeletal muscle fiber type, according to myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform and metabolism-related factors. Male Wistar rats (7 weeks old) were housed individually at 4 ± 2°C as a cold-exposed group or at room temperature (22 ± 2°C) as a control group for 4 weeks. We found that cold exposure significantly increased the slow-type MyHC1 content in the soleus muscle (a typical slow-type fiber), while the intermediate-type MyHC2A content was significantly decreased. In contrast to soleus, MyHC composition of extensor digitorum longus (EDL, a typical fast-type fiber) and gastrocnemius (a mix of slow-type and fast-type fibers) muscle did not change from cold exposure. Cold exposure increased mRNA expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in both the soleus and EDL. Cold exposure also increased mRNA expression of myoglobin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1α (PGC1α) and forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) in the soleus. Upregulation of UCP3 and PGC1α proteins were observed with Western blotting in the gastrocnemius. Thus, cold exposure increased metabolism-related factors in all muscle types that were tested, but MyHC isoforms changed only in the soleus. © 2013 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  9. Developing cardiac and skeletal muscle share fast-skeletal myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin-I expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly C Clause

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle derived stem cells (MDSCs transplanted into injured myocardium can differentiate into fast skeletal muscle specific myosin heavy chain (sk-fMHC and cardiac specific troponin-I (cTn-I positive cells sustaining recipient myocardial function. We have recently found that MDSCs differentiate into a cardiomyocyte phenotype within a three-dimensional gel bioreactor. It is generally accepted that terminally differentiated myocardium or skeletal muscle only express cTn-I or sk-fMHC, respectively. Studies have shown the presence of non-cardiac muscle proteins in the developing myocardium or cardiac proteins in pathological skeletal muscle. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that normal developing myocardium and skeletal muscle transiently share both sk-fMHC and cTn-I proteins. Immunohistochemistry, western blot, and RT-PCR analyses were carried out in embryonic day 13 (ED13 and 20 (ED20, neonatal day 0 (ND0 and 4 (ND4, postnatal day 10 (PND10, and 8 week-old adult female Lewis rat ventricular myocardium and gastrocnemius muscle. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that sk-fMHC was expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern within ED13 ventricular myocardium, and the striated sk-fMHC expression was lost by ND4 and became negative in adult myocardium. cTn-I was not expressed as a typical striated muscle pattern throughout the myocardium until PND10. Western blot and RT-PCR analyses revealed that gene and protein expression patterns of cardiac and skeletal muscle transcription factors and sk-fMHC within ventricular myocardium and skeletal muscle were similar at ED20, and the expression patterns became cardiac or skeletal muscle specific during postnatal development. These findings provide new insight into cardiac muscle development and highlight previously unknown common developmental features of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

  10. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression analysis of myosin heavy chain(MyHC)from fast skeletal muscle of grass carp,Ctenopharyngodon idella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚武英; 符贵红; 宾石玉; 蒙涛; 周瑞雪; 成嘉; 赵发兰; 张红芳; 张建社

    2010-01-01

    The myosin heavy chain(MyHC)is one of the major structural and contracting proteins of muscle.We have isolated the cDNA clone encoding MyHC of the grass carp,Ctenopharyngodon idella. The sequence comprises 5 934 bp,including a 5 814 bp open reading frame encoding an amino acid sequence of 1 937 residues.The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69%homology to rabbit fast skeletal MyHC and 73%–76%homology to the MyHCs from the mandarin fish,walleye pollack,white croaker,chum salmon,and carp.The putative sequenc...

  11. Responses of Myosin Heavy Chain Phenotypes and Gene Expressions in Neck Muscle to Micro- an Hyper-Gravity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Tomotaka; Ohira, Takashi; Kawano, F.; Shibaguchi, T.; Okabe, H.; Ohno, Y.; Nakai, N.; Ochiai, T.; Goto, K.; Ohira, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Neck muscles are known to play important roles in the maintenance of head posture against gravity. However, it is not known how the properties of neck muscle are influenced by gravity. Therefore, the current study was performed to investigate the responses of neck muscle (rhomboideus capitis) in mice to inhibition of gravity and/or increase to 2-G for 3 months to test the hypothesis that the properties of neck muscles are regulated in response to the level of mechanical load applied by the gravitational load. Three male wild type C57BL/10J mice (8 weeks old) were launched by space shuttle Discovery (STS-128) and housed in Japanese Experimental Module “KIBO” on the International Space Station in mouse drawer system (MDS) project, which was organized by Italian Space Agency. Only 1 mouse returned to the Earth alive after 3 months by space shuttle Atlantis (STS-129). Neck muscles were sampled from both sides within 3 hours after landing. Cage and laboratory control experiments were also performed on the ground. Further, 3-month ground-based control experiments were performed with 6 groups, i.e. pre-experiment, 3-month hindlimb suspension, 2-G exposure by using animal centrifuge, and vivarium control (n=5 each group). Five mice were allowed to recover from hindlimb suspension (including 5 cage control) for 3 months in the cage. Neck muscles were sampled bilaterally before and after 3-month suspension and 2-G exposure, and at the end of 3-month ambulation recovery. Spaceflight-associated shift of myosin heavy chain phenotype from type I to II and atrophy of type I fibers were observed. In response to spaceflight, 17 genes were up-regulated and 13 genes were down-regulated vs. those in the laboratory control. Expression of 6 genes were up-regulated and that of 88 genes were down-regulated by 3-month exposure to 2-G vs. the age-matched cage control. In response to chronic hindlimb suspension, 4 and 20 genes were up- or down-regulated. Further, 98 genes responded

  12. Expression profiles of myostatin, myogenin, and Myosin heavy chain in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds differing in growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Liangde; Xie, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Lei, Min; Li, Congyan; Ren, Yongjun; Zheng, Jie; Guo, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Cuixia; Yang, Chao; Zheng, Yucai

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare mRNA levels of myostatin (MSTN), myogenin (MyoG), and fiber type compositions in terms of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in skeletal muscles of two rabbit breeds with different body sizes and growth rates. Longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles of 16 Californian rabbits (CW) and 16 Germany great line of ZIKA rabbits (GZ) were collected at the ages of 35d and 84d (slaughter age). The results showed that the live weights of GZ rabbits of 35d and 84d old were approximately 36% and 26% greater than those of CW rabbits, respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that at the age of 84d GZ rabbits contained significantly lower MSTN mRNA level and higher MyoG mRNA level in both longissimus dorsi and biceps femoris muscles than CW rabbits, and mRNA levels of MSTN and MyoG exhibited opposite changes from the age of 35d to 84d, suggesting that GZ rabbits were subjected to less growth inhibition from MSTN at slaughter age, which occurred most possibly in skeletal muscles. Four types of fiber were identified by real-time PCR in rabbit muscles, with MyHC-1 and MyHC-2D, MyHC-2B were the major types in biceps femoris and longissimus dorsi muscles, respectively. At the age of 84d, GZ rabbits contained greater proportion of MyHC-1 and decreased proportion of MyHC-2D and decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity in biceps femoris than CW rabbits, and the results were exactly opposite in longissimus dorsi, suggesting that GZ rabbits show higher oxidative capacity in biceps femoris muscle than CW rabbits. In conclusion, the trends of mRNA levels of MSTN and fiber types in GZ rabbits' skeletal muscles might be consistent with the putative fast growth characteristic of GZ rabbits compared to CW rabbits.

  13. Dietary cholecalciferol regulates the recruitment and growth of skeletal muscle fibers and the expressions of myogenic regulatory factors and the myosin heavy chain in European sea bass larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alami-Durante, Hélène; Cluzeaud, Marianne; Bazin, Didier; Mazurais, David; Zambonino-Infante, José L

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether dietary cholecalciferol affects the recruitment and growth of axial skeletal muscle fibers in first-feeding European sea bass. Larvae were fed diets containing 0.28 (VD-L, low dose), 0.69 (VD-C, control dose), or 3.00 (VD-H, high dose) mg cholecalciferol/kg from 9 to 44 d posthatching (dph). Larvae were sampled at 44 dph for quantification of somatic growth, muscle growth, and muscle growth dynamics and at 22 and 44 dph for the relative quantification of transcripts encoded by genes involved in myogenesis, cell proliferation, and muscle structure. The weight increase of the VD-L-fed larvae was less than that of the VD-H-fed group, whereas that of VD-C-fed larvae was intermediate. The level of expression of genes involved in cell proliferation (PCNA) and early myogenesis (Myf5) decreased between 22 and 44 dph, whereas that of the myogenic determination factor MyoD1 and that of genes involved in muscle structure and function (myosin heavy chain, myosin light chains 2 and 3) increased. Dietary cholecalciferol regulated Myf5, MyoD1, myogenin, and myosin heavy chain gene expression, with a gene-specific shape of response. The maximum hypertrophy of white muscle fibers was higher in larvae fed the VD-C and VD-H diets than in larvae fed the VD-L diet. White muscle hyperplasia was highly stimulated in VD-H-fed larvae compared to VD-L- and VD-C-fed ones. These findings demonstrate a dietary cholecalciferol effect on skeletal muscle growth mechanisms of a Teleost species.

  14. Comparisons of different myosin heavy chain types, AMPK, and PGC-1α gene expression in the longissimus dorsi muscles in Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y N; Ao, Q W; Jiang, Q Y; Guo, Y F; Lan, G Q; Jiang, H S

    2016-07-14

    Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs are the local fatty and lean breeds, respectively, in China. We compared differences in carcass traits, meat quality traits, and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) types in the longissimus dorsi muscles between Bama Xiang and Landrace pigs. This was done in pigs of the same age, using real-time PCR, to investigate the relationship between MyHC fiber types and carcass characteristics, meat quality traits, and the key factors regulating muscle fiber type. Bama Xiang pigs exhibited smaller size and slower growth than Landrace pigs (P Landrace pig muscle had a higher glycolytic type IIb muscle fiber content (P Landrace pigs. These results may provide a theoretical basis for further studies of the molecular mechanism underlying the excellent meat quality of the Bama Xiang pig.

  15. Differential effects of docoosahexaenoic and arachidonic acid on fatty acid composition and myosin heavy chain-related genes of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Michio; Inoue, Takayuki; Katakura, Masanori; Hossain, Shahdat; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Arai, Hiroyuki; Shido, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) mediates the metabolic and contractile responses of skeletal muscles. MHC displays different isoforms, each of which has different characteristics. To better understand the effect of polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscles, rats were fed with control-, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-, and arachidonic acid (ARA)-oil, and the effects on plasma and muscular fatty acid profile, oxidative stress, mRNA levels of myosin heavy chain isoforms MHC1 of slow-twitch muscle (SO) and MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHCB isoforms of extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of fast-twitch muscle were evaluated. Concomitantly, mRNA levels of anti-oxidative enzymes, such as, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD were determined. The expressions of MHC1, MHC2A, MHC2X, and MHC2B were lower in the SO of the DHA-fed rats. In the EDL muscles of DHA-fed rats, the expressions of MHC1 and MHC2A increased; however, the expressions of MHC2X increased and that of the MHC2 were not altered. Oxidative stress, as indicated by the levels of LPO, was significantly higher in the plasma of the ARA-fed rats, when compared with that of the DHA-fed rats. The LPO levels were higher both in the SO and EDL muscles of ARA-fed rats. Compared with ARA oil intake, DHA oil showed higher mRNA levels of GPx and SOD. Catalase expression was higher only in the EDL but not in the SO-type muscles. Our studies finally indicate that DHA and ARA differentially affect the regulation of contractile and metabolic properties of slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscles.

  16. Metastasis-associated protein Mts1 (S100A4) inhibits CK2-mediated phosphorylation and self-assembly of the heavy chain of nonmuscle myosin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriajevska, M; Bronstein, I B; Scott, D J

    2000-01-01

    A role for EF-hand calcium-binding protein Mts1 (S100A4) in the phosphorylation and the assembly of myosin filaments was studied. The nonmuscle myosin molecules form bipolar filaments, which interact with actin filaments to produce a contractile force. Phosphorylation of the myosin plays...

  17. Calcineurin-NFAT Signaling and Neurotrophins Control Transformation of Myosin Heavy Chain Isoforms in Rat Soleus Muscle in Response to Aerobic Treadmill Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenfeng Liu, Gan Chen, Fanling Li, Changfa Tang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study elucidated the role of CaN-NFAT signaling and neurotrophins on the transformation of myosin heavy chain isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber following aerobic exercise training. To do so, we examined the content and distribution of myosin heavy chain (MyHC isoforms in the rat soleus muscle fiber, the activity of CaN and expression of NFATc1 in these fibers, and changes in the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and neutrophin-3 (NT-3 in the soleus and striatum following high-and medium-intensity aerobic treadmill training. Specific pathogen-free 2 month old male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: Control group (Con, n = 8, moderate-intensity aerobic exercise group (M-Ex, n = 8 and high-intensity aerobic exercise group (H-Ex, n = 8. We used ATPase staining to identify the muscle fiber type I and II, SDS-PAGE to separate and analyze the isoforms MyHCI, MyHCIIA, MyHCIIB and MyHCIIx, and performed western blots to determine the expression of NFATc1, NGF, BDNF and NT-3. CaN activity was measured using a colorimetric assay. In the soleus muscle, 8 weeks of moderate-intensity exercise can induce transformation of MyHC IIA and MyHC IIB to MyHC IIX and MyHC I (p < 0.01, while high-intensity treadmill exercise can induce transform MyHC IIx to MyHC IIB, MyHC IIA and MyHC I (p < 0.01. In comparison to the control group, CaN activity and NFATcl protein level were significantly increased in both the M-Ex and H-Ex groups (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, with a more pronounced upregulation in the M-Ex group (p < 0.05. Eight weeks of moderate- and high-intensity aerobic exercise induced the expression of NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in the soleus muscle and the striatum (p < 0.01, with the most significant increase in the H-Ex group (p < 0.01. In the rat soleus muscle, (1 CaN–NFATcl signaling contributes to the conversion of MyHC I isoform in response to moderate-intensity exercise; (2

  18. Molecular cloning and mRNA expression analysis of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) from fast skeletal muscle of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wuying; Fu, Guihong; Bing, Shiyu; Meng, Tao; Zhou, Ruixue; Cheng, Jia; Zhao, Falan; Zhang, Hongfang; Zhang, Jianshe

    2010-03-01

    The myosin heavy chain (MyHC) is one of the major structural and contracting proteins of muscle. We have isolated the cDNA clone encoding MyHC of the grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella. The sequence comprises 5 934 bp, including a 5 814 bp open reading frame encoding an amino acid sequence of 1 937 residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69% homology to rabbit fast skeletal MyHC and 73%-76% homology to the MyHCs from the mandarin fish, walleye pollack, white croaker, chum salmon, and carp. The putative sequences of subfragment-1 and the light meromyosin region showed 61.4%-80% homology to the corresponding regions of other fish MyHCs. The tissue-specific and developmental stage-specific expressions of the MyHC gene were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. The MyHC gene showed the highest expression in the muscles compared with the kidney, spleen and intestine. Developmentally, there was a gradual increase in MyHC mRNA expression from the neural formation stage to the tail bud stage. The highest expression was detected in hatching larva. Our work on the MyHC gene from the grass carp has provided useful information for fish molecular biology and fish genomics.

  19. Immunolabelling, histochemistry and in situ hybridisation in human skeletal muscle fibres to detect myosin heavy chain expression at the protein and mRNA level

    Science.gov (United States)

    SERRANO, A. L.; PÉREZ, MARGARITA; LUCÍA, A.; CHICHARRO, J. L.; QUIROZ-ROTHE, E.; RIVERO, J. L. L.

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of muscle fibres classified on the basis of their content of different myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms was analysed in vastus lateralis muscle biopsies of 15 young men (with an average age of 22 y) by correlating immunohistochemistry with specific anti-MHC monoclonal antibodies, myofibrillar ATPase (mATPase) histochemistry and in situ hybridisation with probes specific for MHC β-slow, MHC-IIA and MHC-IIX. The characterisation of a large number of individual fibres was compared and correlated on a fibre-to-fibre basis. The panel of monoclonal antibodies used in the study allowed classification of human skeletal muscle fibres into 5 categories according to the MHC isoform they express at the protein level, types I, I+IIA, IIA, IIAX and IIX. Hybrid fibres coexpressing two isoforms represented a considerable proportion of the fibre composition (about 14%) and were clearly underestimated by mATPase histochemistry. For a very high percentage of fibres there was a precise correspondence between the MHC protein isoforms and mRNA transcripts. The integrated methods used demonstrate a high degree of precision of the immunohistochemical procedure used for the identification and quantification of human skeletal muscle fibre types. The monoclonal antibody S5-8H2 is particularly useful for identifying hybrid IIAX fibres. This protocol offers new prospects for muscle fibre classification in human experimental studies. PMID:11554510

  20. Muscle precursor cells in the developing limbs of two isopods (Crustacea, Peracarida): an immunohistochemical study using a novel monoclonal antibody against myosin heavy chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreissl, S; Uber, A; Harzsch, S

    2008-05-01

    In the hot debate on arthropod relationships, Crustaceans and the morphology of their appendages play a pivotal role. To gain new insights into how arthropod appendages evolved, developmental biologists recently have begun to examine the expression and function of Drosophila appendage genes in Crustaceans. However, cellular aspects of Crustacean limb development such as myogenesis are poorly understood in Crustaceans so that the interpretative context in which to analyse gene functions is still fragmentary. The goal of the present project was to analyse muscle development in Crustacean appendages, and to that end, monoclonal antibodies against arthropod muscle proteins were generated. One of these antibodies recognises certain isoforms of myosin heavy chain and strongly binds to muscle precursor cells in malacostracan Crustacea. We used this antibody to study myogenesis in two isopods, Porcellio scaber and Idotea balthica (Crustacea, Malacostraca, Peracarida), by immunohistochemistry. In these animals, muscles in the limbs originate from single muscle precursor cells, which subsequently grow to form multinucleated muscle precursors. The pattern of primordial muscles in the thoracic limbs was mapped, and results compared to muscle development in other Crustaceans and in insects.

  1. Altered expression of pectoral myosin heavy chain isoforms corresponds to migration status in the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kenneth C.; Ramenofsky, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Birds undergo numerous changes as they progress through life-history stages, yet relatively few studies have examined how birds adapt to both the dynamic energetic and mechanical demands associated with such transitions. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) expression, often linked with muscle fibre type, is strongly correlated with a muscle's mechanical power-generating capability, thus we examined several morphological properties, including MyHC expression of the pectoralis, in a long-distance migrant, the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii) throughout the progression from winter, spring departure and arrival on breeding grounds. White-crowned sparrows demonstrated significant phenotypic flexibility throughout the seasonal transition, including changes in prealternate moult status, lipid fuelling, body condition and flight muscle morphology. Pectoral MyHC expression also varied significantly over the course of the study. Wintering birds expressed a single, newly classified adult fast 2 isoform. At spring departure, pectoral isoform expression included two MyHC isoforms: the adult fast 2 isoform along with a smaller proportion of a newly present adult fast 1 isoform. By spring arrival, both adult fast isoforms present at departure remained, yet expression had shifted to a greater relative proportion of the adult fast 1 isoform. Altering pectoral MyHC isoform expression in preparation for and during spring migration may represent an adaptation to modulate muscle mechanical output to support long-distance flight. PMID:28018664

  2. Myosin Heavy Chain 2B isoform is expressed in specialized eye muscles but not in trunk and limb muscles of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Maccatrozzo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myosin heavy chain isoforms (MHC of adult skeletal muscles are codified by four genes named: slow, or type 1, and fast types 2A, 2X and 2B. The slow, 2A and 2X isoforms have been found expressed in all mammalian species studied so far whereas there is a large inter-species variability in the expression of MHC-2B. In this study histochemistry (m- ATPase, immunohistochemistry with the use of specific monoclonal antibodies and RT-PCR were combined together to assess whether the MHC-2B gene is expressed in bovine muscles. ATPase staining and RT-PCR experiments showed that three MHC isoforms (1, 2A, 2X were expressed in trunk and limb muscles. Slow or type 1 expression was confirmed using a specific antibody (BA-F8 whereas the detection of fast MHC isoforms were validate by means of BF-35 antibody although not by the SC-71 antibody. MHC-2B was absent in limb and trunk muscles, but was present in specialized eye muscles (rectus lateralis and retractor bulbi as consistently showed by RT-PCR and reactivity with a specific antibody (BF-F3. Interestingly, a cardiac isoform, MHC-a- cardiac was found to be expressed not only in extraocular muscles but also in masticatory muscles as masseter.

  3. Effects of chronic Akt/mTOR inhibition by rapamycin on mechanical overload-induced hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition in masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway on masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain (MHC) transition in response to mechanical overload, we analyzed the effects of bite-opening (BO) on the hypertrophy and MHC composition of masseter muscle of BO-rats treated or not treated with rapamycin (RAPA), a selective mTOR inhibitor. The masseter muscle weight in BO-rats was significantly greater than that in controls, and this increase was attenuated by RAPA treatment. Expression of slow-twitch MHC isoforms was significantly increased in BO-rats with/without RAPA treatment, compared with controls, but the magnitude of the increase was much smaller in RAPA-treated BO-rats. Phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2), which preserves fast-twitch MHC isoforms in skeletal muscle, was significantly decreased in BO-rats, but the decrease was abrogated by RAPA treatment. Calcineurin signaling is known to be important for masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition, but expression of known calcineurin activity modulators was unaffected by RAPA treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that the Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in both development of masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition in response to mechanical overload with inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway and operates independently of the calcineurin pathway.

  4. Passive Repetitive Stretching for a Short Duration within a Week Increases Myogenic Regulatory Factors and Myosin Heavy Chain mRNA in Rats' Skeletal Muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurie Kamikawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stretching is a stimulation of muscle growth. Stretching for hours or days has an effect on muscle hypertrophy. However, differences of continuous stretching and repetitive stretching to affect muscle growth are not well known. To clarify the difference of continuous and repetitive stretching within a short duration, we investigated the gene expression of muscle-related genes on stretched skeletal muscles. We used 8-week-old male Wistar rats ( for this study. Animals medial gastrocnemius muscle was stretched continuously or repetitively for 15 min daily and 4 times/week under anesthesia. After stretching, muscles were removed and total RNA was extracted. Then, reverse transcriptional quantitative real-time PCR was done to evaluate the mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic myosin heavy chain (MyHC. Muscles, either stretched continuously or repetitively, increased mRNA expression of MyoD, myogenin, and embryonic MyHC more than unstretched muscles. Notably, repetitive stretching resulted in more substantial effects on embryonic MyHC gene expression than continuous stretching. In conclusion, passive stretching for a short duration within a week is effective in increasing myogenic factor expression, and repetitive stretching had more effects than continuous stretching for skeletal muscle on muscle growth. These findings are applicable in clinical muscle-strengthening therapy.

  5. Muscle fiber type specific activation of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 promoter by a non-canonical E-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Kristina; DiMario, Joseph X

    2016-01-22

    Different mechanisms control skeletal muscle fiber type gene expression at specific times in vertebrate development. Embryonic myogenesis leading to formation of primary muscle fibers in avian species is largely directed by myoblast cell commitment to the formation of diverse fiber types. In contrast, development of different secondary fiber types during fetal myogenesis is partly determined by neural influences. In both primary and secondary chicken muscle fibers, differential expression of the slow myosin heavy chain 2 (MyHC2) gene distinguishes fast from fast/slow muscle fibers. This study focused on the transcriptional regulation of the slow MyHC2 gene in primary myotubes formed from distinct fast/slow and fast myogenic cell lineages. Promoter deletion analyses identified a discrete 86 bp promoter segment that conferred fiber type, lineage-specific gene expression in fast/slow versus fast myoblast derived primary myotubes. Sequence analysis and promoter activity assays determined that this segment contains two functional cis-regulatory elements. One element is a non-canonical E-box, and electromobility shift assays demonstrated that both cis-elements interacted with the E-protein, E47. The results indicate that primary muscle fiber type specific expression of the slow MyHC2 gene is controlled by a novel mechanism involving a transcriptional complex that includes E47 at a non-canonical E-box.

  6. Ginger extract mitigates ethanol-induced changes of alpha and beta - myosin heavy chain isoforms gene expression and oxidative stress in the heart of male wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirpoor, Alireza; Zerehpoosh, Mitra; Ansari, Mohammad Hasan Khadem; Kheradmand, Fatemeh; Rasmi, Yousef

    2017-09-01

    The association between ethanol consumption and heart abnormalities, such as chamber dilation, myocyte damage, ventricular hypertrophy, and hypertension is well known. However, underlying molecular mediators involved in ethanol-induced heart abnormalities remain elusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic ethanol exposure on alpha and beta - myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms gene expression transition and oxidative stress in rats' heart. It was also planned to find out whether ginger extract mitigated the abnormalities induced by ethanol in rats' heart. Male wistar rats were divided into three groups of eight animals as follows: Control, ethanol, and ginger extract treated ethanolic (GETE) groups. After six weeks of treatment, the results revealed a significant increase in the β-MHC gene expression, 8- OHdG amount, and NADPH oxidase level. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the ratio of α-MHC/β-MHC gene expression to the amount of paraoxonase enzyme in the ethanol group compared to the control group was found. The consumption of Ginger extract along with ethanol ameliorated the changes in MHC isoforms gene expression and reduced the elevated amount of 8-OHdG and NADPH oxidase. Moreover, compared to the consumption of ethanol alone, it increased the paraoxonase level significantly. These findings indicate that ethanol-induced heart abnormalities may in part be associated with MHC isoforms changes mediated by oxidative stress, and that these effects can be alleviated by using ginger extract as an antioxidant molecule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of tcRNA102 associated with myosin heavy chain-mRNPs in control and dystrophic chick pectoralis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezza, D J; Heywood, S M

    1986-06-05

    Translational control RNA (tcRNA102) is closely associated with nonpolysomal myosin heavy chain-mRNA in mRNP particles. The nucleotide sequence of tcRNA102 has revealed a heterogeneity at the 3' end. This heterogeneity is mostly with regard to an ambiguity between adenine and guanine residues. tcRNA102 (obtained from pectoralis muscle) runs as a single band on denaturing acrylamide gels. When this band is extracted and rerun on a native gel at low voltage, two individual bands appear (A the slower moving and B the faster moving). From the partial RNase U2 sequence analysis and our previous sequence determinations (McCarthy, T. L., Siegel, E., Mrockowski, B., and Heywood, S. M. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 935-941), we may now assign tcRNA102 (A) the 3'-terminal sequence ... GGUUGGACGG-3' and tcRNA102(B) and 3' terminal sequence ... GAUUAAGCAA-3'. Analysis of the tcRNA102s indicates that dystrophic pectoralis muscle contains much less tcRNA102 than a similar preparation from control muscle. The tcRNA102 found in dystrophic pectoralis muscle is of the "A" type while normal pectoralis muscle contains predominantly the "B" type. In addition, control leg muscle from dystrophic chick contains predominantly "B" type. These results suggest that the differences observed at the DNA level (see accompanying paper, Zezza, D. J., and Heywood, S. M. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7455-7460) may be reflected in the RNA transcripts.

  8. Precise positioning of myosin VI on endocytic vesicles in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Altman

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Myosin VI has been studied in both a monomeric and a dimeric form in vitro. Because the functional characteristics of the motor are dramatically different for these two forms, it is important to understand whether myosin VI heavy chains are brought together on endocytic vesicles. We have used fluorescence anisotropy measurements to detect fluorescence resonance energy transfer between identical fluorophores (homoFRET resulting from myosin VI heavy chains being brought into close proximity. We observed that, when associated with clathrin-mediated endocytic vesicles, myosin VI heavy chains are precisely positioned to bring their tail domains in close proximity. Our data show that on endocytic vesicles, myosin VI heavy chains are brought together in an orientation that previous in vitro studies have shown causes dimerization of the motor. Our results are therefore consistent with vesicle-associated myosin VI existing as a processive dimer, capable of its known trafficking function.

  9. Myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin T damage is associated with impaired myofibrillar ATPase activity contributing to sarcomeric dysfunction in Ca(2+)-paradox rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Árpád; Kalász, Judit; Pásztor, Enikő T; Tóth, Attila; Papp, Zoltán; Dhalla, Naranjan S; Barta, Judit

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to explore the potential contribution of myofibrils to contractile dysfunction in Ca(2+)-paradox hearts. Isolated rat hearts were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit solution (Control), followed by Ca(2+)-depletion, and then Ca(2+)-repletion after Ca(2+)-depletion (Ca(2+)-paradox) by Langendorff method. During heart perfusion left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), rate of pressure development (+ dP/dt), and pressure decay (-dP/dt) were registered. Control LVDP (127.4 ± 6.1 mmHg) was reduced during Ca(2+)-depletion (9.8 ± 1.3 mmHg) and Ca(2+)-paradox (12.9 ± 1.3 mmHg) with similar decline in +dP/dt and -dP/dt. LVEDP was increased in both Ca(2+)-depletion and Ca(2+)-paradox. Compared to Control, myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity was decreased in the Ca(2+)-depletion group (12.08 ± 0.57 vs. 8.13 ± 0.19 µmol Pi/mg protein/h), besides unvarying Mg(2+) ATPase activity, while upon Ca(2+)-paradox myofibrillar Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase activity was decreased (12.08 ± 0.57 vs. 8.40 ± 0.22 µmol Pi/mg protein/h), but Mg(2+) ATPase activity was increased (3.20 ± 0.25 vs. 7.21 ± 0.36 µmol Pi/mg protein/h). In force measurements of isolated cardiomyocytes at saturating [Ca(2+)], Ca(2+)-depleted cells had lower rate constant of force redevelopment (k tr,max, 3.85 ± 0.21) and unchanged active tension, while those in Ca(2+)-paradox produced lower active tension (12.12 ± 3.19 kN/m(2)) and k tr,max (3.21 ± 23) than cells of Control group (25.07 ± 3.51 and 4.61 ± 22 kN/m(2), respectively). In biochemical assays, α-myosin heavy chain and cardiac troponin T presented progressive degradation during Ca(2+)-depletion and Ca(2+)-paradox. Our results suggest that contractile impairment in Ca(2+)-paradox partially resides in deranged sarcomeric function and compromised myofibrillar ATPase activity as a result of myofilament protein degradation, such

  10. Association Analysis of Myosin Heavy-chain Genes mRNA Transcription with the Corresponding Proteins Expression of Muscle in Growing Pigs

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    X. M. Men

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to investigate the correlations between MyHC mRNA transcription and their corresponding protein expressions in porcine longissimus muscle (LM during postnatal growth of pigs. Five DLY (Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire crossbred pigs were selected, slaughtered and sampled at postnatal 7, 30, 60, 120, and 180 days, respectively. Each muscle was subjected to quantity MyHCs protein contents through an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, to quantity myosin heavy-chains (MyHCs mRNA abundances using real-time polymerase chain reaction. We calculated the proportion (% of each MyHC to total of four MyHC for two levels, respectively. Moreover, the activities of several key energy metabolism enzymes were determined in LM. The result showed that mRNA transcription and protein expression of MyHC I, IIa, IIx and IIb in LM all presented some obvious changes with postnatal aging of pigs, especially at the early stage after birth, and their mRNA transcriptions were easy to be influenced than their protein expressions. The relative proportion of each MyHC mRNA was significantly positively related to that of its corresponding protein (p<0.01, and MyHC I mRNA proportion was positively correlated with creatine kinase (CK, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, malate dehydrogenase (MDH activities (p<0.05. These data suggested that MyHC mRNA transcription can be used to reflect MyHC expression, metabolism property and adaptive plasticity of porcine skeletal muscles, and MyHC mRNA composition could be a molecular index reflecting muscle fiber type characteristics.

  11. Expression of the myosin heavy chain IIB gene in porcine skeletal muscle: the role of the CArG-Box promoter response element.

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    David M Brown

    Full Text Available Due to its similarity to humans, the pig is increasingly being considered as a good animal model for studying a range of human diseases. Despite their physiological similarities, differential expression of the myosin heavy chain (MyHC IIB gene (MYH4 exists in the skeletal muscles of these species, which is associated with a different muscle phenotype. The expression of different MyHC isoforms is a critical determinant of the contractile and metabolic characteristics of the muscle fibre. We aimed to elucidate whether a genomic mechanism was responsible for the drastically different expression of MYH4 between pigs and humans, thus improving our understanding of the pig as a model for human skeletal muscle research. We utilized approximately 1 kb of the MYH4 promoter from a domestic pig and a human (which do and do not express MYH4, respectively to elucidate the role of the promoter sequence in regulating the high expression of MYH4 in porcine skeletal muscle. We identified a 3 bp genomic difference within the proximal CArG and E-box region of the MYH4 promoter of pigs and humans that dictates the differential activity of these promoters during myogenesis. Subtle species-specific genomic differences within the CArG-box region caused differential protein-DNA interactions at this site and is likely accountable for the differential MYH4 promoter activity between pigs and humans. We propose that the genomic differences identified herein explain the differential activity of the MYH4 promoter of pigs and humans, which may contribute to the differential expression patterns displayed in these otherwise physiologically similar mammals. Further, we report that both the pig and human MYH4 promoters can be induced by MyoD over-expression, but the capacity to activate the MYH4 promoter is largely influenced by the 3 bp difference located within the CArG-box region of the proximal MYH4 promoter.

  12. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  13. Pilot study of an association between a common variant in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9) gene and type 2 diabetic nephropathy in a Taiwanese population

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Hung, Yi-Jen; Pei, Dee; Kuo, Shi-Wen; Lin, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Recent studies have demonstrated that the myosin, heavy chain 9, non-muscle (MYH9) gene is associated with ESRD in African Americans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a common single nucleotide polymorphism rs16996677 in the MYH9 gene may contribute to the etiology of DN in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in a Taiwanese population with T2D. There were 180 T2D patients diagnosed with DN and 178 age...

  14. Cardiomyopathy-related mutation (A30V) in mouse cardiac troponin T divergently alters the magnitude of stretch activation in α- and β-myosin heavy chain fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Alexis V; Gollapudi, Sampath K; Chandra, Murali

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the functional consequences of the human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) mutation A28V in cardiac troponin T (TnT). The A28V mutation is located within the NH2 terminus of TnT, a region known to be important for full activation of cardiac thin filaments. The functional consequences of the A28V mutation in TnT remain unknown. Given how α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms differently alter the functional effect of the NH2 terminus of TnT, we hypothesized that the A28V-induced effects would be differently modulated by α- and β-MHC isoforms. Recombinant wild-type mouse TnT (TnTWT) and the mouse equivalent of the human A28V mutation (TnTA30V) were reconstituted into detergent-skinned cardiac muscle fibers extracted from normal (α-MHC) and transgenic (β-MHC) mice. Dynamic and steady-state contractile parameters were measured in reconstituted muscle fibers. Step-like length perturbation experiments demonstrated that TnTA30V decreased the magnitude of the muscle length-mediated recruitment of new force-bearing cross bridges (ER) by 30% in α-MHC fibers. In sharp contrast, TnTA30V increased ER by 55% in β-MHC fibers. Inferences drawn from other dynamic contractile parameters suggest that directional changes in ER in TnTA30V + α-MHC and TnTA30V + β-MHC fibers result from a divergent impact on cross bridge-regulatory unit (troponin-tropomyosin complex) cooperativity. TnTA30V-mediated effects on Ca(2+)-activated maximal tension and instantaneous muscle fiber stiffness (ED) were also divergently affected by α- and β-MHC. Our study demonstrates that TnTA30V + α-MHC and TnTA30V + β-MHC fibers show contrasting contractile phenotypes; however, only the observations from β-MHC fibers are consistent with the clinical data for A28V in humans.

  15. Increase in cardiac myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) alpha protein isoform in hibernating ground squirrels, with echocardiographic visualization of ventricular wall hypertrophy and prolonged contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Rourke, Bryan C

    2013-12-15

    Deep hibernators such as golden-mantled ground squirrels (Callospermophilus lateralis) have multiple challenges to cardiac function during low temperature torpor and subsequent arousals. As heart rates fall from over 300 beats min(-1) to less than 10, chamber dilation and reduced cardiac output could lead to congestive myopathy. We performed echocardiography on a cohort of individuals prior to and after several months of hibernation. The left ventricular chamber exhibited eccentric and concentric hypertrophy during hibernation and thus calculated ventricular mass was ~30% greater. Ventricular ejection fraction was mildly reduced during hibernation but stroke volumes were greater due to the eccentric hypertrophy and dramatically increased diastolic filling volumes. Globally, the systolic phase in hibernation was ~9.5 times longer, and the diastolic phase was 28× longer. Left atrial ejection generally was not observed during hibernation. Atrial ejection returned weakly during early arousal. Strain echocardiography assessed the velocity and total movement distance of contraction and relaxation for regional ventricular segments in active and early arousal states. Myocardial systolic strain during early arousal was significantly greater than the active state, indicating greater total contractile movement. This mirrored the increased ventricular ejection fraction noted with early arousal. However, strain rates were slower during early arousal than during the active period, particularly systolic strain, which was 33% of active, compared with the rate of diastolic strain, which was 67% of active. As heart rate rose during the arousal period, myocardial velocities and strain rates also increased; this was matched closely by cardiac output. Curiously, though heart rates were only 26% of active heart rates during early arousal, the cardiac output was nearly 40% of the active state, suggesting an efficient pumping system. We further analyzed proportions of cardiac myosin

  16. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

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    Jyoti Gupta

    Full Text Available We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo of Brugia malayi (B. malayi in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+ and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32 against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23 and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45. In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC to B. malayi infective larvae (L3. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10 cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of

  17. Matching of sarcoplasmic reticulum and contractile properties in rat fast- and slow-twitch muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Huong H; Lamb, Graham D

    2006-07-01

    1. The twitch characteristics (fast-twitch or slow-twitch) of skeletal muscle fibres are determined not only by the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, but also by the time-course of Ca2+ release and re-uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). The present study examined, in individual fibres from non-transforming muscle of the rat, whether particular SR properties are matched to the contractile apparatus properties of the fibre, in particular in the case of fibres with fast-twitch contractile apparatus located in a slow-twitch muscle, namely the soleus. 2. Force was recorded in single, mechanically skinned fibres from extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius, peroneus longus and soleus muscles. Using repeated cycles in which the SR was emptied of all releasable Ca2+ and then reloaded, it was possible to determine the relative amount of Ca2+ present in the SR endogenously, the maximum SR capacity and the rate of Ca2+ loading. The sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ and Sr2+ was used to classify the fibres as fast-twitch (FT), slow-twitch (ST) or mixed (< 3% of the fibres examined) and thereby identify the likely troponin C and myosin heavy chain types present. 3. There was no significant difference in SR properties between the groups of FT fibres obtained from the four different muscles, including soleus. Despite some overlap in the SR properties of individual fibres between the FT and ST groups, the properties of the FT fibres in all four muscles studied were significantly different from those of the ST and mixed fibres. 4. In general, in FT fibres the SR had a larger capacity and the endogenous Ca2+ content was a relatively lower percentage of maximum compared with ST fibres. Importantly, in terms of their SR properties, FT fibres from soleus muscle more closely resembled FT fibres from other muscles than they did ST fibres from soleus muscle.

  18. Overexpression of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain leads to activation of the unfolded protein response and autophagic turnover of thick filament-associated proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwartler, Callie S; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A; Epstein, Henry F; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2014-05-16

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications.

  19. Overexpression of Smooth Muscle Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response and Autophagic Turnover of Thick Filament-associated Proteins in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwartler, Callie S.; Chen, Jiyuan; Thakur, Dhananjay; Li, Shumin; Baskin, Kedryn; Wang, Shanzhi; Wang, Zhao V.; Walker, Lori; Hill, Joseph A.; Epstein, Henry F.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Duplications spanning nine genes at the genomic locus 16p13.1 predispose individuals to acute aortic dissections. The most likely candidate gene in this region leading to the predisposition for dissection is MYH11, which encodes smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). The effects of increased expression of MYH11 on smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypes were explored using mouse aortic SMCs with transgenic overexpression of one isoform of SM-MHC. We found that these cells show increased expression of Myh11 and myosin filament-associated contractile genes at the message level when compared with control SMCs, but not at the protein level due to increased protein degradation. Increased expression of Myh11 resulted in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in SMCs, which led to a paradoxical decrease of protein levels through increased autophagic degradation. An additional consequence of ER stress in SMCs was increased intracellular calcium ion concentration, resulting in increased contractile signaling and contraction. The increased signals for contraction further promote transcription of contractile genes, leading to a feedback loop of metabolic abnormalities in these SMCs. We suggest that overexpression of MYH11 can lead to increased ER stress and autophagy, findings that may be globally implicated in disease processes associated with genomic duplications. PMID:24711452

  20. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patient with the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7 gene

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    Samantha Barratt Ross

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs isolated from the whole blood of a 43-year-old male with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM who carries the pathogenic variant p.Val698Ala in beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7. Patient-derived PBMCs were reprogrammed using non-integrative episomal vectors containing reprogramming factors OCT4, SOX2, LIN28, KLF4 and L-MYC. iPSCs were shown to express pluripotent markers, have trilineage differentiation potential, carry the pathogenic MYH7 variant p.Val698Ala, have a normal karyotype and no longer carry the episomal reprogramming vector. This line is useful for studying the link between variants in MYH7 and the pathogenesis of HCM.

  1. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    ) quadriceps muscle power; 3) quadriceps muscle fiber type, size, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition; 4) quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) [nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI)]; 5) body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning); and 6) GH-related serum markers were performed......GH administration, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training (RT), has attracted interest as a means of increasing muscle mass and strength in the elderly. In the present study, 31 healthy, elderly men [age, 74 +/- 1 yr (mean +/- SEM)] were assigned to either RT [3 sessions/wk, 3...... by additional GH administration. In the RT + GH group, there was a significant decrease in MHC 1 and 2X isoforms, whereas MHC 2A increased. RT, therefore, seems to overrule the changes in MHC composition induced by GH administration alone. Changes in body composition confirmed previous reports of decreased fat...

  2. GH administration changes myosin heavy chain isoforms in skeletal muscle but does not augment muscle strength or hypertrophy, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training in healthy elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Beyer, Nina

    2002-01-01

    GH administration, either alone or combined with resistance exercise training (RT), has attracted interest as a means of increasing muscle mass and strength in the elderly. In the present study, 31 healthy, elderly men [age, 74 +/- 1 yr (mean +/- SEM)] were assigned to either RT [3 sessions/wk, 3......-5 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum (RM)/session] + placebo (n = 8), RT + GH (n = 8), GH (n = 8), or placebo (n = 7) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded (RT + placebo and RT + GH) or single-blinded (GH or placebo) design. Measurements of: 1) isokinetic quadriceps muscle strength; 2......) quadriceps muscle power; 3) quadriceps muscle fiber type, size, and myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition; 4) quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) [nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMRI)]; 5) body composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scanning); and 6) GH-related serum markers were performed...

  3. Molecular transformations in sarcoplasmic reticulum of fast-twitch muscle by electro-stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, C; Pette, D

    1979-02-01

    Chronic electro-stimulation of fast-twitch rabbit muscle with the frequency pattern received by a slow-twitch muscle induces a progressive transformation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. After 2 days stimulation activities of Ca2+-dependent ATPase and of Ca2+ transport begin to decrease, and are paralleled by a progressive decrease in Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent phosphoprotein formation, reduced rate of dephosphorylation and a rearrangement of the electrophoretic polypeptide and phosphoprotein patterns. These findings suggest a transformation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum to resemble that of a slow-twitch muscle. This transformation is paralleled by increase in time-to-peak of twitch contraction and half relaxation time and occurs before conversion of the myosin light chain pattern is observed. The parallel time course of changes in contractile properties of stimulated muscle and the molecular and functional properties of the sarcoplasmic reticulum emphasizes the definitive role of the latter in determining the twitch characteristics of fast and slow twitch muscles.

  4. Secretory vesicle transport velocity in living cells depends on the myosin-V lever arm length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Daniel H; Collins, Ruth N; Bretscher, Anthony

    2002-01-01

    Myosins are molecular motors that exert force against actin filaments. One widely conserved myosin class, the myosin-Vs, recruits organelles to polarized sites in animal and fungal cells. However, it has been unclear whether myosin-Vs actively transport organelles, and whether the recently challenged lever arm model developed for muscle myosin applies to myosin-Vs. Here we demonstrate in living, intact yeast that secretory vesicles move rapidly toward their site of exocytosis. The maximal speed varies linearly over a wide range of lever arm lengths genetically engineered into the myosin-V heavy chain encoded by the MYO2 gene. Thus, secretory vesicle polarization is achieved through active transport by a myosin-V, and the motor mechanism is consistent with the lever arm model.

  5. Nerve-dependent changes in skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain after experimental denervation, cross-reinnervation and in a demyelinating mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggs, Alison M.; Huxley, Clare; Hughes, Simon M.

    2010-01-01

    Innervation regulates the contractile properties of vertebrate muscle fibers, in part through the effect of electrical activity on expression of distinct myosins. Here we analyse the role of innervation in regulating the accumulation of the general, maturational and adult forms of rodent slow myosin heavy chain (MyHC) that are defined by the presence of distinct antigenic epitopes. Denervation increases the number of fibers that express general slow MyHC, but it decreases the adult slow MyHC epitope. Cross-reinnervation of slow muscle by a fast nerve leads to an increase in the number of fibers that express fast MyHC. In both cases, there is an increase in fibers that express slow and fast IIA MyHCs but without the adult slow MyHC epitope. The data suggest that innervation is required for maturation and maintenance of diversity of both slow and fast fibers. The sequence of slow MyHC epitope transitions is a useful biomarker, and it may play a significant role during nerve-dependent changes in muscle fiber function. We applied this detailed muscle analysis to a transgenic mouse model of Human Motor and Sensory Neuropathy IA, also known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 1A (CMT1A), in which electrical conduction in some motor neurons is poor due to demyelination. The mice display atrophy of some muscle fibers and changes in slow and fast MyHC epitope expression suggestive of a progressive increase in innervation of muscle fibers by fast motor neurons, even at early stages. The potential role of these early changes in disease pathogenesis is discussed. PMID:19016545

  6. A Novel Alpha Cardiac Actin (ACTC1) Mutation Mapping to a Domain in Close Contact with Myosin Heavy Chain Leads to a Variety of Congenital Heart Defects, Arrhythmia and Possibly Midline Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augière, Céline; Mégy, Simon; El Malti, Rajae; Boland, Anne; El Zein, Loubna; Verrier, Bernard; Mégarbané, André; Deleuze, Jean-François; Bouvagnet, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background A Lebanese Maronite family presented with 13 relatives affected by various congenital heart defects (mainly atrial septal defects), conduction tissue anomalies and midline defects. No mutations were found in GATA4 and NKX2-5. Methods and Results A set of 399 poly(AC) markers was used to perform a linkage analysis which peaked at a 2.98 lod score on the long arm of chromosome 15. The haplotype analysis delineated a 7.7 meganucleotides genomic interval which included the alpha-cardiac actin gene (ACTC1) among 36 other protein coding genes. A heterozygous missense mutation was found (c.251T>C, p.(Met84Thr)) in the ACTC1 gene which changed a methionine residue conserved up to yeast. This mutation was absent from 1000 genomes and exome variant server database but segregated perfectly in this family with the affection status. This mutation and 2 other ACTC1 mutations (p.(Glu101Lys) and p.(Met125Val)) which result also in congenital heart defects are located in a region in close apposition to a myosin heavy chain head region by contrast to 3 other alpha-cardiac actin mutations (p.(Ala297Ser),p.(Asp313His) and p.(Arg314His)) which result in diverse cardiomyopathies and are located in a totally different interaction surface. Conclusions Alpha-cardiac actin mutations lead to congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathies and eventually midline defects. The consequence of an ACTC1 mutation may in part be dependent on the interaction surface between actin and myosin. PMID:26061005

  7. Kinetic properties and small-molecule inhibition of human myosin-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M.; Selvadurai, Jayashankar; Bond, Lisa M.; Fedorov, Roman; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2012-01-01

    Myosin-6 is an actin-based motor protein that moves its cargo towards the minus-end of actin filaments. Mutations in the gene encoding the myosin-6 heavy chain and changes in the cellular abundance of the protein have been linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. Here, we present a detailed kinetic characterization of the human myosin-6 motor domain, describe the effect of 2,4,6-triiodophenol on the interaction of myosin-6 with F-actin and nucleotides, and show how addition of the drug reduces the number of myosin-6-dependent vesicle fusion events at the plasma membrane during constitutive secretion. PMID:22884421

  8. Pesquisa de marcadores para os genes da cadeia pesada da beta-miosina cardíaca e da proteína C de ligação à miosina em familiares de pacientes com cardiomiopatia hipertrófica Research of markers for the genes of the heavy chain of cardiac beta-myosin and myosin binding protein C in relatives of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Paula Tirone

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar os marcadores moleculares para os genes da cadeia pesada da beta-miosina cardíaca e da proteína-C de ligação à miosina em familiares de portadores de cardiomiopatia hipertrófica. MÉTODOS: Foram estudadas 12 famílias que realizaram anamnese, exame físico, eletrocardiograma, ecocardiograma e coleta de sangue para o estudo genético através da reação em cadeia da polimerasse. RESULTADOS: Dos 227 familiares 25% eram acometidos, sendo 51% do sexo masculino com idade média de 35±19 (2 a 95 anos. A análise genética mostrou ligação com o gene da b-miosina cardíaca em uma família e, em outra, ligação com o gene da proteína C de ligação à miosina. Em cinco famílias foram excluídas ligações com os dois genes; em duas, a ligação com o gene da proteína C de ligação à miosina, porém para o gene da b-miosina os resultados foram inconclusivos; em duas famílias os resultados foram inconclusivos para os dois genes e em uma foi excluída ligação para o gene da b-miosina mas ficou inconclusivo para o gene da proteína C de ligação à miosina. CONCLUSÃO: Em nosso meio, talvez predominem outros genes que não aqueles descritos na literatura, ou que existam outras diferenças genéticas relacionadas com a origem de nossa população e/ou fatores ambientais.OBJECTIVE: To study the molecular markers for the genes of the heavy chain of cardiac beta-myosin and the myosin binding protein C in relatives of carriers of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. METHODS: Twelve families who had anamnesis, physical exam, electrocardiogram, echocardiogram and blood collection for the genetic study through the chain reaction of polymerase. RESULTS: From the 227 relatives, 25% were ill-taken, with 51% men, with an average age of 35±19 (2 to 95 years old. The genetic analysis showed a connection with the gene of the cardiac b-myosin in a family and, in another, a connection with the gene of the myosin-binding protein C. In five

  9. In vivo definition of cardiac myosin-binding protein C's critical interactions with myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; McLendon, Patrick; James, Jeanne; Osinska, Hanna; Gulick, James; Bhandary, Bidur; Lorenz, John N; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2016-10-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is an integral part of the sarcomeric machinery in cardiac muscle that enables normal function. cMyBP-C regulates normal cardiac contraction by functioning as a brake through interactions with the sarcomere's thick, thin, and titin filaments. cMyBP-C's precise effects as it binds to the different filament systems remain obscure, particularly as it impacts on the myosin heavy chain's head domain, contained within the subfragment 2 (S2) region. This portion of the myosin heavy chain also contains the ATPase activity critical for myosin's function. Mutations in myosin's head, as well as in cMyBP-C, are a frequent cause of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). We generated transgenic lines in which endogenous cMyBP-C was replaced by protein lacking the residues necessary for binding to S2 (cMyBP-C(S2-)). We found, surprisingly, that cMyBP-C lacking the S2 binding site is incorporated normally into the sarcomere, although systolic function is compromised. We show for the first time the acute and chronic in vivo consequences of ablating a filament-specific interaction of cMyBP-C. This work probes the functional consequences, in the whole animal, of modifying a critical structure-function relationship, the protein's ability to bind to a region of the critical enzyme responsible for muscle contraction, the subfragment 2 domain of the myosin heavy chain. We show that the binding is not critical for the protein's correct insertion into the sarcomere's architecture, but is essential for long-term, normal function in the physiological context of the heart.

  10. Polymorphisms in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain gene (MYH9 are associated with lower glomerular filtration rate in mixed ancestry diabetic subjects from South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandi Edith Matsha

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Though single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the non-muscle myosin gene (MYH9 have been reported to explain most of the excess risk of nondiabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD, in African-Americans, some studies have also shown associations with diabetic end-stage renal disease. We investigated the association of MYH9 SNPs with renal traits in a mixed-ancestry South African population prone to diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Three SNPs known to be associated with CKD (rs4821480, rs5756152 and rs12107 were genotyped using Taqman assay in 716 adults (198 with diabetes from the Bellville-South community, Cape Town. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated (eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR assessed. Multivariable regressions were used to relate the SNPs with renal traits. RESULTS: Mean age was 53.6 years, with the expected differences observed in characteristics by diabetic status. Significant associations were found between rs575152 and serum creatinine, and eGFR in the total population, and in diabetic participants (all p≤0.003, but not in non-diabetics (all p≥0.16, with significant interactions by diabetes status (interaction-p≤0.009. The association with ACR was borderline in diabetic participants (p = 0.05 and non-significant in non-diabetics (p = 0.85, with significant interaction (interaction p = 0.02. rs12107 was associated with fasting-, 2-hour glucose and HbA1c in diabetic participants only (interaction-p≤0.003, but not with renal traits. CONCLUSION: MYH9 SNPs were associated with renal traits only in diabetic participants in this population. Our findings and other studies suggest that MYH9 may have a broader genetic risk effect on kidney diseases.

  11. Pilot study of an association between a common variant in the non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9 gene and type 2 diabetic nephropathy in a Taiwanese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Hsun Hsieh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Chang-Hsun Hsieh1, Yi-Jen Hung1, Dee Pei2, Shi-Wen Kuo3, Eugene Lin41Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei; 2Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Cardinal Tien Hospital, Taipei County; 3Division of Endocrinology, Buddhist Xindian Tzu Chi General Hospital, Taipei; 4Vita Genomics Inc., Wugu Shiang, Taipei, TaiwanAbstract: Nowadays diabetic nephropathy (DN is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Recent studies have demonstrated that the myosin, heavy chain 9, non-muscle (MYH9 gene is associated with ESRD in African Americans. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a common single nucleotide polymorphism rs16996677 in the MYH9 gene may contribute to the etiology of DN in type 2 diabetes (T2D in a Taiwanese population with T2D. There were 180 T2D patients diagnosed with DN and 178 age- and sex-similar T2D without DN controls. Single locus analyses showed no significant main effects of MYH9 rs16996677 on the risk of DN in T2D. The results suggest that the rs16996677 SNP in MYH9 may not contribute to the risk of DN in T2D in Taiwanese T2D patients.Keywords: diabetic nephropathy, end-stage renal disease, single nucleotide polymorphisms, type 2 diabetes

  12. Actin-myosin contractility is responsible for the reduced viability of dissociated human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guokai; Hou, Zhonggang; Gulbranson, Daniel R; Thomson, James A

    2010-08-06

    Human ESCs are the pluripotent precursor of the three embryonic germ layers. Human ESCs exhibit basal-apical polarity, junctional complexes, integrin-dependent matrix adhesion, and E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion, all characteristics shared by the epiblast epithelium of the intact mammalian embryo. After disruption of epithelial structures, programmed cell death is commonly observed. If individualized human ESCs are prevented from reattaching and forming colonies, their viability is significantly reduced. Here, we show that actin-myosin contraction is a critical effector of the cell death response to human ESC dissociation. Inhibition of myosin heavy chain ATPase, downregulation of myosin heavy chain, and downregulation of myosin light chain all increase survival and cloning efficiency of individualized human ESCs. ROCK inhibition decreases phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggesting that inhibition of actin-myosin contraction is also the mechanism through which ROCK inhibitors increase cloning efficiency of human ESCs.

  13. Decavanadate interactions with sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Although not stable, once formed, decameric vanadate (V10) disintegration is in general slow enough to allow the study of its effects even in the micromolar range. Besides, it may become inaccessible to decomposition due to their specific interaction upon target proteins such as the Ca2+-ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Characterization of the vanadate solutions and interactions with compounds containing phosphate as well as with the SR Ca2+-ATPase was analysed by 51V NMR spectr...

  14. Model for processive movement of myosin Ⅴ and myosin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Ping; Dou Shuo-Xing; Wang Peng-Ye

    2005-01-01

    Myosin Ⅴ and myosin Ⅵ are two classes of two-headed molecular motors of the myosin superfamily that move processively along helical actin filaments in opposite directions. Here we present a hand-over-hand model for their processive movements. In the model, the moving direction of a dimeric molecular motor is automatically determined by the relative orientation between its two heads at free state and its head's binding orientation on track filament.This determines that myosin Ⅴ moves toward the barbed end and myosin Ⅵ moves toward the pointed end of actin.During the moving period in one step, one head remains bound to actin for myosin Ⅴ whereas two heads are detached for myosin Ⅵ: the moving manner is determined by the length of neck domain. This naturally explains the similar dynamic behaviours but opposite moving directions of myosin Ⅵ and mutant myosin Ⅴ (the neck of which is truncated to only one-sixth of the native length). Because of different moving manners, myosin Ⅵ and mutant myosin Ⅴ exhibit significantly broader step-size distribution than native myosin Ⅴ. However, all the three motors give the same mean step size of ~36nm (the pseudo-repeat of actin helix). All these theoretical results are in agreement with previous experimental ones.

  15. Ramipril restores PPARβ/δ and PPARγ expressions and reduces cardiac NADPH oxidase but fails to restore cardiac function and accompanied myosin heavy chain ratio shift in severe anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernecka, Hana; Doka, Gabriel; Srankova, Jasna; Pivackova, Lenka; Malikova, Eva; Galkova, Kristina; Kyselovic, Jan; Krenek, Peter; Klimas, Jan

    2016-11-15

    We hypothesized that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) might be involved in a complex protective action of ACE inhibitors (ACEi) in anthracyclines-induced cardiomyopathy. For purpose of study, we compared effects of ramipril on cardiac dysfunction, cardiac failure markers and PPAR isoforms in moderate and severe chronic daunorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Male Wistar rats were administered with a single intravenous injection of daunorubicin: 5mg/kg (moderate cardiomyopathy), or 15mg/kg (severe cardiomyopathy) or co-administered with daunorubicin and ramipril (1mg/kg/d, orally) or vehicle for 8 weeks. Left ventricular function was measured invasively under anesthesia. Cardiac mRNA levels of heart failure markers (ANP, Myh6, Myh7, Myh7b) and PPARs (alpha, beta/delta and gama) were measured by qRT-PCR. Protein expression of NADPH subunit (gp91phox) was measured by Western blot. Moderate cardiomyopathy exhibited only minor cardiac dysfunction what was corrected by ramipril. In severe cardiomyopathy, hemodynamic dysfunction remained unaltered upon ramipril although it decreased the significantly up-regulated cardiac ANP mRNA expression. Simultaneously, while high-dose daunorubicin significantly decreased PPARbeta/delta and PPARgama mRNA, ramipril normalized these abnormalities. Similarly, ramipril reduced altered levels of oxidative stress-related gp91phox. On the other hand, ramipril was unable to correct both the significantly decreased relative abundance of Myh6 and increased Myh7 mRNA levels, respectively. In conclusion, ramipril had a protective effect on cardiac function exclusively in moderate chronic daunorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Although it normalized abnormal PPARs expression and exerted also additional protective effects also in severe cardiomyopathy, it was insufficient to influence impaired cardiac function probably because of a shift in myosin heavy chain isoform content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Increased cardiac alpha-myosin heavy chain in left atria and decreased myocardial insulin-like growth factor (Igf-I) expression accompany low heart rate in hibernating grizzly bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, N D; Nelson, O L; Robbins, C T; Rourke, B C

    2011-01-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) tolerate extended periods of extremely low heart rate during hibernation without developing congestive heart failure or cardiac chamber dilation. Left ventricular atrophy and decreased left ventricular compliance have been reported in this species during hibernation. We evaluated the myocardial response to significantly reduced heart rate during hibernation by measuring relative myosin heavy-chain (MyHC) isoform expression and expression of a set of genes important to muscle plasticity and mass regulation in the left atria and left ventricles of active and hibernating bears. We supplemented these data with measurements of systolic and diastolic function via echocardiography in unanesthetized grizzly bears. Atrial strain imaging revealed decreased atrial contractility, decreased expansion/reservoir function (increased atrial stiffness), and decreased passive-filling function (increased ventricular stiffness) in hibernating bears. Relative MyHC-α protein expression increased significantly in the atrium during hibernation. The left ventricle expressed 100% MyHC-β protein in both groups. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) mRNA expression was reduced by ∼50% in both chambers during hibernation, consistent with the ventricular atrophy observed in these bears. Interestingly, mRNA expression of the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (MAFBx) and Muscle Ring Finger 1 did not increase, nor did expression of myostatin or hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α). We report atrium-specific decreases of 40% and 50%, respectively, in MAFBx and creatine kinase mRNA expression during hibernation. Decreased creatine kinase expression is consistent with lowered energy requirements and could relate to reduced atrial emptying function during hibernation. Taken together with our hemodynamic assessment, these data suggest a potential downregulation of atrial chamber function during hibernation to prevent fatigue and dilation

  17. Myosin heavy chain expression pattern as a marker for anabolic potency: desoxymethyltestosterone (madol), norandrostenedione and testosterone repress MHC-IIb expression and stimulate MHC-IId/x expression in orchiectomized rat gastrocnemius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, S; Velders, M; Schleipen, B; Schänzer, W; Bloch, W; Diel, P

    2011-06-01

    Both 19-norandrostenedione (estr-4-ene-3,17-dione, NOR) and desoxymethyltestosterone (17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-ol, DMT or "madol") are 'designer steroids' misused for doping purposes in the bodybuilding scene. We have previously characterized the pharmacological profile of madol and identified potential adverse side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anabolic potency of NOR, madol and the reference substance testosterone propionate (TP). Besides wet weight of the M.levator ani (LA), we examined the effects on muscle fiber type composition and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the M.gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle as additional markers for anabolic potency. A Hershberger assay was performed, where orchiectomized (orchi) male Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously with NOR, madol, TP or vehicle control (all 1 mg/kg BW/day) for 12 days. Wet weights of the Gas, LA, prostate and seminal vesicle were examined to determine anabolic and androgenic effects. Fiber type composition of the Gas muscle was analyzed using ATPase staining, and MHC protein profiles were determined by silver stain and Western blot analysis. NOR and madol exhibited strong anabolic and weak androgenic potency by stimulating growth of the LA but not the prostate and seminal vesicle. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition characterized by ATPase staining was not significantly altered between the treatment groups, although there was a tendency toward lower levels of type IIB and increased type IIA fibers in all treatment groups relative to orchi. MHC protein expression determined by Western blot and silver stain analysis revealed that MHC IId/x was significantly up-regulated, while MHC IIb was significantly down-regulated in NOR, madol and TP groups relative to orchi. There were no significant differences for MHC IIa and MHC I expression between groups. Results suggest that the observed MHC expression shift could serve as a molecular marker to determine anabolic

  18. Stimulatory and inhibitory mechanisms of slow muscle-specific myosin heavy chain gene expression in fish: Transient and transgenic analysis of torafugu MYH{sub M86-2} promoter in zebrafish embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaduzzaman, Md. [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kinoshita, Shigeharu, E-mail: akino@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Bhuiyan, Sharmin Siddique; Asakawa, Shuichi [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Watabe, Shugo [Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); School of Marine Biosciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373 (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    The myosin heavy chain gene, MYH{sub M86-2}, exhibited restricted expression in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae, suggesting its functional roles for embryonic and larval muscle development. However, the transcriptional mechanisms involved in its expression are still ambiguous. The present study is the first extensive analysis of slow muscle-specific MYH{sub M86-2} promoter in fish for identifying the cis-elements that are crucial for its expression. Combining both transient transfection and transgenic approaches, we demonstrated that the 2614 bp 5′-flanking sequences of MYH{sub M86-2} contain a sufficient promoter activity to drive gene expression specific to superficial slow muscle fibers. By cyclopamine treatment, we also demonstrated that the differentiation of such superficial slow muscle fibers depends on hedgehog signaling activity. The deletion analyses defined an upstream fragment necessary for repressing ectopic MYH{sub M86-2} expression in the fast muscle fibers. The transcriptional mechanism that prevents MYH{sub M86-2} expression in the fast muscle fibers is mediated through Sox6 binding elements. We also demonstrated that Sox6 may function as a transcriptional repressor of MYH{sub M86-2} expression. We further discovered that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) binding elements plays a key role and myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) binding elements participate in the transcriptional regulation of MYH{sub M86-2} expression. - Highlights: ► MYH{sub M86-2} is highly expressed in slow muscle fibers of torafugu embryos and larvae. ► MYH{sub M86-2} promoter activity depends on the hedgehog signaling. ► Sox6 binding elements inhibits MYH{sub M86-2} expression in fast muscle fibers. ► Sox6 elements function as transcriptional repressor of MYH{sub M86-2} promoter activity. ► NFAT and MEF2 binding elements play a key role for directing MYH{sub M86-2} expression.

  19. 乌珠穆沁羊生长过程中骨骼肌MyHC基因变化%Changes in Myosin Heavy Chain (MyHC) Gene from Skeletal Muscle during the Growth of Wuzhumuqin Sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯青辉; 斯琴其木格; 苏和; 朝格赛; 薛宝玲; 格日勒图

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the changes in the relative expression level of myosin heavy chain (MyHC) gene from skeletal muscle during the growth of Wuzhumuqin sheep. Free-grazing Wuzhumuqin sheep were slaughtered at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 18 months of age and thebiceps femoris andlongissimus dorsi muscles were excised. MyHC isoforms were separated from the muscles by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and the relative expression level ofMyHC gene was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results showed that four clear bands representing typeⅡa, typeⅡx, typeⅡb and typeⅠ, respectively, were observed in the electrophoretic pattern. The expression ofMyHC typeⅠ gene and typeⅡa inbiceps femoris andlongissimus dorsiwas higher than that ofMyHC typeⅡb gene. Understanding theMyHC gene expression in skeletal muscle during the growth of sheep is of great practical importance for improving meat quality and post-mortem physiological and biochemical characteristics.%研究不同生长阶段肉羊骨骼肌肌球蛋白重链(MyHC)基因相对表达量的变化规律,实验选择自然放牧条件下的1、3、6、9、12、18月龄的乌珠穆沁羊,屠宰后采取股二头肌、背最长肌,采用十二烷基磺酸钠-聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electropheresis,SDS-PAGE)法分离骨骼肌中肌球蛋白重链异构体,利用实时荧光定量聚合酶链式反应(polymerase chain reaction,PCR)技术测定MyHC基因的相对表达量并探讨其变化规律。结果表明:从SDS-PAGE图中可以清晰地观察到4条条带分别为Ⅱa、Ⅱx、Ⅱb型与Ⅰ型。其中乌珠穆沁羊股二头肌和背最长肌中MyHC的Ⅰ型和Ⅱa型基因的相对表达量均高于Ⅱb型基因的相对表达量。

  20. Vanadate oligomer interactions with myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M

    2000-05-30

    'Monovanadate' containing a mixture of at least four different vanadate species and 'decavanadate' containing apparently only two vanadate species, mainly decameric species, inhibit myosin and actomyosin ATPase activities. The addition of myosin to 'monovanadate' and 'decavanadate' solutions promotes differential increases on the 51V NMR spectral linewidths of vanadate oligomers. The relative order of line broadening upon myosin addition, reflecting the interaction of the vanadate oligomers with the protein, was V10 > V4 > V1 = 1, whereas no changes were observed for monomeric vanadate species. It is concluded that decameric and tetrameric vanadate species interact quite potently with the protein and affect myosin as well actomyosin ATPase activities.

  1. Internal Motility in Stiffening Actin-Myosin Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Uhde, J; Sackmann, E; Parmeggiani, A; Frey, E; Uhde, Joerg; Keller, Manfred; Sackmann, Erich; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Frey, Erwin

    2003-01-01

    We present a study on filamentous actin solutions containing heavy meromyosin subfragments of myosin II motor molecules. We focus on the viscoelastic phase behavior and internal dynamics of such networks during ATP depletion. Upon simultaneously using micro-rheology and fluorescence microscopy as complementary experimental tools, we find a sol-gel transition accompanied by a sudden onset of directed filament motion. We interpret the sol-gel transition in terms of myosin II enzymology, and suggest a "zipping" mechanism to explain the filament motion in the vicinity of the sol-gel transition.

  2. The Role of Structural Dynamics of Actin in Class-Specific Myosin Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Taro Q. P.; Morimatsu, Masatoshi; Iwane, Atsuko H.; Yanagida, Toshio; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.

    2015-01-01

    The structural dynamics of actin, including the tilting motion between the small and large domains, are essential for proper interactions with actin-binding proteins. Gly146 is situated at the hinge between the two domains, and we previously showed that a G146V mutation leads to severe motility defects in skeletal myosin but has no effect on motility of myosin V. The present study tested the hypothesis that G146V mutation impaired rotation between the two domains, leading to such functional defects. First, our study showed that depolymerization of G146V filaments was slower than that of wild-type filaments. This result is consistent with the distinction of structural states of G146V filaments from those of the wild type, considering the recent report that stabilization of actin filaments involves rotation of the two domains. Next, we measured intramolecular FRET efficiencies between two fluorophores in the two domains with or without skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin or the heavy meromyosin equivalent of myosin V in the presence of ATP. Single-molecule FRET measurements showed that the conformations of actin subunits of control and G146V actin filaments were different in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin. This altered conformation of G146V subunits may lead to motility defects in myosin II. In contrast, distributions of FRET efficiencies of control and G146V subunits were similar in the presence of myosin V, consistent with the lack of motility defects in G146V actin with myosin V. The distribution of FRET efficiencies in the presence of myosin V was different from that in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin, implying that the roles of actin conformation in myosin motility depend on the type of myosin. PMID:25945499

  3. The role of structural dynamics of actin in class-specific myosin motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Q P Noguchi

    Full Text Available The structural dynamics of actin, including the tilting motion between the small and large domains, are essential for proper interactions with actin-binding proteins. Gly146 is situated at the hinge between the two domains, and we previously showed that a G146V mutation leads to severe motility defects in skeletal myosin but has no effect on motility of myosin V. The present study tested the hypothesis that G146V mutation impaired rotation between the two domains, leading to such functional defects. First, our study showed that depolymerization of G146V filaments was slower than that of wild-type filaments. This result is consistent with the distinction of structural states of G146V filaments from those of the wild type, considering the recent report that stabilization of actin filaments involves rotation of the two domains. Next, we measured intramolecular FRET efficiencies between two fluorophores in the two domains with or without skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin or the heavy meromyosin equivalent of myosin V in the presence of ATP. Single-molecule FRET measurements showed that the conformations of actin subunits of control and G146V actin filaments were different in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin. This altered conformation of G146V subunits may lead to motility defects in myosin II. In contrast, distributions of FRET efficiencies of control and G146V subunits were similar in the presence of myosin V, consistent with the lack of motility defects in G146V actin with myosin V. The distribution of FRET efficiencies in the presence of myosin V was different from that in the presence of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin, implying that the roles of actin conformation in myosin motility depend on the type of myosin.

  4. Bioactive electrospun fish sarcoplasmic proteins as a drug delivery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, Karen; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Jessen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Nano-microfibers were made from cod (Gadus morhua) sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP) (Mwelectrospinning technique. The FSP fibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy, and thefiber morphology was found to be strongly dependent on FSP concentration. Interestingly, the FSP...

  5. 雌、雄草原田鼠外周骨骼肌肌球蛋白重链的表达%Myosin heavy chain expression in peripheral muscles of male and female prairie voles Microtus ochrogaster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew C. FRY; Michael H. FERKIN; Brian K. SCHILLING; Stuart T. LEONARD; Matthew P. HARBER; Martyn R. RUBIN; J.Chadwick SMITH

    2008-01-01

    已往的研究对于实验室应用的各种啮齿类动物,如大鼠和小鼠骨骼肌蛋白表达的特性已有报道.然而,至今不清楚其它啮齿类动物如野生鼠骨骼肌蛋白的表达或性双态性的特征,而这些野生鼠的行为学、形态学及生理学特点均已有报道.已知骨骼肌的肌球蛋白重链(MHC)成分与其功能特性有关.我们研究了草原田鼠的肱三头肌、胫骨前肌、腓肠肌和比目鱼肌MHC蛋白表达的性别特性.应用SDS聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳法测定MHC Ⅰ型、Ⅱa型、Ⅱd/x和Ⅱb型的蛋白表达相对含量.结果表明:与雌鼠相比,雄鼠的比目鱼肌湿重较大,胫骨前肌的MHC Ⅱa蛋白量表达较高.未见骨骼肌重量及MHC蛋白表达含量在雌雄鼠间的性别差异.血中睾酮的浓度差异可能不影响外周骨骼肌蛋白的表达特性.然而,与过去在大鼠、兔和小鼠中的已报道的结果相比,草原田鼠骨骼肌MHC的表达显示了更多异质性.推测这可能与草原田鼠和其它小型哺乳类动物生存的自然环境和功能需要有关.%Previous research has reported skeletal muscle protein expression characteristics for laboratory strains of various rodents, such as rats and mice. However, we do not know the muscle protein expression or sexual dimorphism characteristics of skeletal muscle for other rodents such as voles, for which the behavior, morphology, and physiology have been documented. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) content in skeletal muscle is related to functional characteristics. This study investigated sex characteristics (male,n=6; female,n=8) for MHC expression for triceps brachii, tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscles in prairie voles. Relative (%) MHC protein expression was determined via SDS-PAGE for types Ⅰ, Ⅱa, Ⅱd/x, and Ⅱb MHC isoforms. Male voles had greater soleus wet weight and greater Ⅱa MHC expression for tibialis anterior as compared to those of female voles. Skeletal muscle

  6. Influence of fast and slow alkali myosin light chain isoforms on the kinetics of stretch-induced force transients of fast-twitch type IIA fibres of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruchov, Oleg; Galler, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    This study contributes to understand the physiological role of slow myosin light chain isoforms in fast-twitch type IIA fibres of skeletal muscle. These isoforms are often attached to the myosin necks of rat type IIA fibres, whereby the slow alkali myosin light chain isoform MLC1s is much more frequent and abundant than the slow regulatory myosin light chain isoform MLC2s. In the present study, single-skinned rat type IIA fibres were maximally Ca(2+) activated and subjected to stepwise stretches for causing a perturbation of myosin head pulling cycles. From the time course of the resulting force transients, myosin head kinetics was deduced. Fibres containing MLC1s exhibited slower kinetics independently of the presence or absence of MLC2s. At the maximal MLC1s concentration of about 75%, the slowing was about 40%. The slowing effect of MLC1s is possibly due to differences in the myosin heavy chain binding sites of the fast and slow alkali MLC isoforms, which changes the rigidity of the myosin neck. Compared with the impact of myosin heavy chain isoforms in various fast-twitch fibre types, the influence of MLC1s on myosin head kinetics of type IIA fibres is much smaller. In conclusion, the physiological role of fast and slow MLC isoforms in type IIA fibres is a fine-tuning of the myosin head kinetics.

  7. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle–like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle–like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath. PMID:26864628

  8. Two distinct myosin II populations coordinate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath in the Caenorhabditis elegans somatic gonad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-04-01

    The myoepithelial sheath in the somatic gonad of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has nonstriated contractile actomyosin networks that produce highly coordinated contractility for ovulation of mature oocytes. Two myosin heavy chains are expressed in the myoepithelial sheath, which are also expressed in the body-wall striated muscle. The troponin/tropomyosin system is also present and essential for ovulation. Therefore, although the myoepithelial sheath has smooth muscle-like contractile apparatuses, it has a striated muscle-like regulatory mechanism through troponin/tropomyosin. Here we report that the myoepithelial sheath has a distinct myosin population containing nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which is regulated by phosphorylation and essential for ovulation. MLC-4, a nonmuscle myosin regulatory light chain, localizes to small punctate structures and does not colocalize with large, needle-like myosin filaments containing MYO-3, a striated-muscle myosin isoform. RNA interference of MLC-4, as well as of its upstream regulators, LET-502 (Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase) and MEL-11 (a myosin-binding subunit of myosin phosphatase), impairs ovulation. Expression of a phosphomimetic MLC-4 mutant mimicking a constitutively active state also impairs ovulation. A striated-muscle myosin (UNC-54) appears to provide partially compensatory contractility. Thus the results indicate that the two spatially distinct myosin II populations coordinately regulate ovulatory contraction of the myoepithelial sheath.

  9. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. II. Atrial myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies were produced against myosins isolated from the left atrial myocardium (anti-bAm) and the left ventricular myocardium (anti-bVm) of the bovine heart. Cross-reactive antibodies were removed by cross- absorption. Absorbed anti-bAm and anti-bVm were specific for the myosin heavy chains when tested by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS gel electrophoresis. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the reactivity of atrial muscle fibers to the two antibodies. Three populations...

  10. Cylindrical Spirals in Skeletal Muscles Originate From the Longitudinal Sarcoplasmic Reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-Wen; Liu, Fu-Chen; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yu-Ying; Zhao, Dan-Dan; Luo, Yue-Bei; Lu, Jian-Qiang; Yan, Chuan-Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Cylindrical spirals (CSs) are rare but distinct subsarcolemmal accumulations in skeletal muscle fibers. To date, CSs have been reported in only 16 patients with a variety of neuromuscular conditions. The origin and composition of CSs are unknown, although there are some morphologic similarities between CSs and tubular aggregates (TAs). To clarify the nature of CSs, we characterized the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and other intracellular membrane system proteins in CSs of muscle biopsies from 2 adult Chinese siblings. Immunohistochemical studies revealed subsarcolemmal immunoreactivity for sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2þ-ATPase 1 (SERCA 1) in the longitudinal SR, but no immunoreactivity for calsequestrin in the terminal cisternae or type 1 ryanodine receptor (RYR1) in the junctional SR. Muscles biopsied from 2 patients with TAs showed immunoreactivity not only for SERCA1 but also for other SR proteins, including calsequestrin and RYR1. CSs exhibited no immunoreactivity for the Golgi apparatus marker GM130, the nuclear membrane emerin, desmin, the autophagosome marker LC3, the lysosomal membrane marker LAMP2, dystrophin, or myosin. Our results suggest CSs may originate only from the longitudinal SR, whereas TAs are composed of both the junctional and longitudinal SR. Immunochemical staining with antibodies against calsequestrin and RYR1 help to distinguish these 2 pathological alterations.

  11. Rare, Non-Synonymous Variant in the Smooth Muscle-Specific Isoform of Myosin Heavy Chain, MYH11, R247C, Alters Force Generation in the Aorta and Phenotype of Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Shao-Qing; Kwartler, Callie S.; Byanova, Katerina L.; Pham, John; Gong, Limin; Prakash, Siddharth K.; Huang, Jian; Kamm, Kristine E.; Stull, James T.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Mutations in MYH11 cause autosomal dominant inheritance of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. At the same time, rare, non-synonymous variants in MYH11 that are predicted to disrupt protein function but do not cause inherited aortic disease are common in the general population and the vascular disease risk associated with these variants is unknown. Objective To determine the consequences of the recurrent MYH11 rare variant, R247C, through functional studies in vitro and analysis of a knock-in mouse model with this specific variant, including assessment of aortic contraction, response to vascular injury, and phenotype of primary aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Methods and Results The steady state ATPase activity (actin-activated) and the rates of phosphate and ADP release were lower for the R247C mutant myosin than for the wild-type, as was the rate of actin filament sliding in an in vitro motility assay. Myh11R247C/R247C mice exhibited normal growth, reproduction, and aortic histology but decreased aortic contraction. In response to vascular injury, Myh11R247C/R247C mice showed significantly increased neointimal formation due to increased SMC proliferation when compared with the wild-type mice. Primary aortic SMCs explanted from the Myh11R247C/R247C mice were de-differentiated compared with wild-type SMCs based on increased proliferation and reduced expression of SMC contractile proteins. The mutant SMCs also displayed altered focal adhesions and decreased Rho activation, associated with decreased nuclear localization of myocardin-related transcription factor-A. Exposure of the Myh11R247C/R247C SMCs to a Rho activator rescued the de-differentiated phenotype of the SMCs. Conclusions These results indicate that a rare variant in MYH11, R247C, alters myosin contractile function and SMC phenotype, leading to increased proliferation in vitro and in response to vascular injury. PMID:22511748

  12. Determining the impact of oxidation on the motility of single muscle-fibres expressing different myosin isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanos, Dimitrios; Li, M.; Baron, Caroline P.

    2013-01-01

    Under oxidative stress, myosin has been shown to be one of the muscle proteins that are extensively modified, leading to carbonylation and cross-linking. However, how oxidation affects the actomyosin interaction in muscle fibres with different metabolic profiles and expressing different myosin...... heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms has not been previously investigated. Oxidation of myosin isolated from muscle fibres originating from various porcine muscles with a different metabolic profile was studied using a single muscle fibre in-vitro motility assay, allowing measurements of catalytic properties...

  13. Kinetic characterization of the ATPase and actin-activated ATPase activities of Acanthamoeba castellanii myosin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Liu, Xiong; Korn, Edward D; Sellers, James R

    2013-09-13

    Phosphorylation of Ser-639 in loop-2 of the catalytic motor domain of the heavy chain of Acanthamoeba castellanii myosin-2 and the phosphomimetic mutation S639D have been shown previously to down-regulate the actin-activated ATPase activity of both the full-length myosin and single-headed subfragment-1 (Liu, X., Lee, D. Y., Cai, S., Yu, S., Shu, S., Levine, R. L., and Korn, E. D. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 110, E23-E32). In the present study we determined the kinetic constants for each step in the myosin and actomyosin ATPase cycles of recombinant wild-type S1 and S1-S639D. The kinetic parameter predominantly affected by the S639D mutation is the actin-activated release of inorganic phosphate from the acto myosin·ADP·Pi complex, which is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state actomyosin ATPase cycle. As consequence of this change, the duty ratio of this conventional myosin decreases. We speculate on the effect of Ser-639 phosphorylation on the processive behavior of myosin-2 filaments.

  14. Smooth muscle actin and myosin expression in cultured airway smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, J Z; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Rippetoe, P; White, S; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Evans, J; McHugh, K M; Low, R B

    1998-05-01

    In this study, the expression of smooth muscle actin and myosin was examined in cultures of rat tracheal smooth muscle cells. Protein and mRNA analyses demonstrated that these cells express alpha- and gamma-smooth muscle actin and smooth muscle myosin and nonmuscle myosin-B heavy chains. The expression of the smooth muscle specific actin and myosin isoforms was regulated in the same direction when growth conditions were changed. Thus, at confluency in 1 or 10% serum-containing medium as well as for low-density cells (50-60% confluent) deprived of serum, the expression of the smooth muscle forms of actin and myosin was relatively high. Conversely, in rapidly proliferating cultures at low density in 10% serum, smooth muscle contractile protein expression was low. The expression of nonmuscle myosin-B mRNA and protein was more stable and was upregulated only to a small degree in growing cells. Our results provide new insight into the molecular basis of differentiation and contractile function in airway smooth muscle cells.

  15. Lead reduces tension development and the myosin ATPase activity of the rat right ventricular myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Vassallo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb2+ poisoning causes hypertension, but little is known regarding its acute effects on cardiac contractility. To evaluate these effects, force was measured in right ventricular strips that were contracting isometrically in 45 male Wistar rats (250-300 g before and after the addition of increasing concentrations of lead acetate (3, 7, 10, 30, 70, 100, and 300 µM to the bath. Changes in rate of stimulation (0.1-1.5 Hz, relative potentiation after pauses of 15, 30, and 60 s, effect of Ca2+ concentration (0.62, 1.25, and 2.5 mM, and the effect of isoproterenol (20 ng/mL were determined before and after the addition of 100 µM Pb2+. Effects on contractile proteins were evaluated after caffeine treatment using tetanic stimulation (10 Hz and measuring the activity of the myosin ATPase. Pb2+ produced concentration-dependent force reduction, significant at concentrations greater than 30 µM. The force developed in response to increasing rates of stimulation became smaller at 0.5 and 0.8 Hz. Relative potentiation increased after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment. Extracellular Ca2+ increment and isoproterenol administration increased force development but after 100 µM Pb2+ treatment the force was significantly reduced suggesting an effect of the metal on the sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx. Concentration of 100 µM Pb2+ also reduced the peak and plateau force of tetanic contractions and reduced the activity of the myosin ATPase. Results showed that acute Pb2+ administration, although not affecting the sarcoplasmic reticulum activity, produces a concentration-dependent negative inotropic effect and reduces myosin ATPase activity. Results suggest that acute lead administration reduced myocardial contractility by reducing sarcolemmal calcium influx and the myosin ATPase activity. These results also suggest that lead exposure is hazardous and has toxicological consequences affecting cardiac muscle.

  16. Discontinuity of sarcoplasmic reticulum in the mid-sarcomere region in flight muscle of dragonflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Eguileor, M; Valvassori, R; Lanzavecchia, G

    1980-01-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum organization of dragonfly flight muscles is analyzed, with particular reference to the doubling existing at H-band level. This doubling could be explained as a consequence of a regular discontinuity in the sarcoplasmic reticulum covering myofibrils. In each sarcomere, two sleeves of the sarcoplasmic reticulum seem to overlap forming a telescopic system which can slide outside each other during the lengthening and shortening movements of the fiber.

  17. Muscle myosin filaments: cores, crowns and couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, John M

    2009-09-01

    Myosin filaments in muscle, carrying the ATPase myosin heads that interact with actin filaments to produce force and movement, come in multiple varieties depending on species and functional need, but most are based on a common structural theme. The now successful journeys to solve the ultrastructures of many of these myosin filaments, at least at modest resolution, have not been without their false starts and erroneous sidetracks, but the picture now emerging is of both diversity in the rotational symmetries of different filaments and a degree of commonality in the way the myosin heads are organised in resting muscle. Some of the remaining differences may be associated with how the muscle is regulated. Several proteins in cardiac muscle myosin filaments can carry mutations associated with heart disease, so the elucidation of myosin filament structure to understand the effects of these mutations has a clear and topical clinical relevance.

  18. Myosin lever arm directs collective motion on cellular actin network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariadi, Rizal F; Cale, Mario; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-03-18

    The molecular motor myosin teams up to drive muscle contraction, membrane traffic, and cell division in biological cells. Myosin function in cells emerges from the interaction of multiple motors tethered to a scaffold, with surrounding actin filaments organized into 3D networks. Despite the importance of myosin function, the influence of intermotor interactions on collective motion remains poorly understood. In this study, we used precisely engineered myosin assemblies to examine emergence in collective myosin movement. We report that tethering multiple myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, modifies their movement trajectories on keratocyte actin networks. Single myosin V and VI dimers display similar skewed trajectories, albeit in opposite directions, when traversing the keratocyte actin network. In contrast, tethering myosin VI motors, but not myosin V motors, progressively straightens the trajectories with increasing myosin number. Trajectory shape of multimotor scaffolds positively correlates with the stiffness of the myosin lever arm. Swapping the flexible myosin VI lever arm for the relatively rigid myosin V lever increases trajectory skewness, and vice versa. A simplified model of coupled motor movement demonstrates that the differences in flexural rigidity of the two myosin lever arms is sufficient to account for the differences in observed behavior of groups of myosin V and VI motors. In accordance with this model trajectory, shapes for scaffolds containing both myosin V and VI are dominated by the myosin with a stiffer lever arm. Our findings suggest that structural features unique to each myosin type may confer selective advantages in cellular functions.

  19. Clinical significance and pathogenic role of anti-cardiac myosin autoantibody in dilated cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective In order to explore the possible roles played by the autoimmune mechanism in the progression of myocarditis into dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) using an animal model, we investigated whether autoimmune myocarditis might develop into DCM. Methods Experimental Balb/C mice (n=20) were immunized with cardiac myosin with Freund's complete adjuvant at days 0, 7 and 30. The control Balb/C mice (n=10) were immunized with Freund's complete adjuvant in the same mannere. Serum and myocardium samples were collected after the first immunization at days 15, 21 and 120. The anti-myosin antibody was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting.Results Pathological findings demonstrated that there was myocardial necrosis or inflammatory infiltration during acute stages and fibrosis mainly in the late phase of experimental group, but the myocardial lesions were not found in the control group. Autoimmunity could induce myocarditis and DCM in the absence of viral infection. High titer anti-myosin IgG antibodies were found in the experimental group, but not in the control group. Furthermore, the anti-myosin heavy chain (200 KD) antibody was positive in 21 of 48 patients with DCM and viral myocarditis, but only 4 of 20 patients with coronary heart disease, including 1 case and 3 cases that reacted with heavy and light chains (27.5 KD), respectively. The antibodies were not detected in healthy donors.Conclusion Cardiac myosin might be an autoantigen that provokes autoimmunity and leads to the transformation of myocarditis into DCM. Detection of anti-myosin heavy chain antibody might contribute to diagnosis for DCM and viral myocarditis.

  20. Nonmuscle Myosin IIA Regulates Platelet Contractile Forces Through Rho Kinase and Myosin Light-Chain Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghhi, Shirin; Tooley, Wes W; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-10-01

    Platelet contractile forces play a major role in clot retraction and help to hold hemostatic clots against the vessel wall. Platelet forces are produced by its cytoskeleton, which is composed of actin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. In this work, we studied the role of Rho kinase, myosin light-chain kinase, and myosin in the generation of contractile forces by using pharmacological inhibitors and arrays of flexible microposts to measure platelet forces. When platelets were seeded onto microposts, they formed aggregates on the tips of the microposts. Forces produced by the platelets in the aggregates were measured by quantifying the deflection of the microposts, which bent in proportion to the force of the platelets. Platelets were treated with small molecule inhibitors of myosin activity: Y-27632 to inhibit the Rho kinase (ROCK), ML-7 to inhibit myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK), and blebbistatin to inhibit myosin ATPase activity. ROCK inhibition reduced platelet forces, demonstrating the importance of the assembly of actin and myosin phosphorylation in generating contractile forces. Similarly, MLCK inhibition caused weaker platelet forces, which verifies that myosin phosphorylation is needed for force generation in platelets. Platelets treated with blebbistatin also had weaker forces, which indicates that myosin's ATPase activity is necessary for platelet forces. Our studies demonstrate that myosin ATPase activity and the regulation of actin-myosin assembly by ROCK and MLCK are needed for the generation of platelet forces. Our findings illustrate and explain the importance of myosin for clot compaction in hemostasis and thrombosis.

  1. Dilated cardiomyopathy in homozygous myosin-binding protein-C mutant mice

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    To elucidate the role of cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (MyBP-C) in myocardial structure and function, we have produced mice expressing altered forms of this sarcomere protein. The engineered mutations encode truncated forms of MyBP-C in which the cardiac myosin heavy chain-binding and titin-binding domain has been replaced with novel amino acid residues. Analogous heterozygous defects in humans cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Mice that are homozygous for the mutated MyBP-C alleles expre...

  2. Enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release following intermittent sprint training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Lunde, Per; Levin, Kasper

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of intermittent sprint training on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function, nine young men performed a 5 wk high-intensity intermittent bicycle training, and six served as controls. SR function was evaluated from resting vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, before and after...... the training period. Intermittent sprint performance (ten 8-s all-out periods alternating with 32-s recovery) was enhanced 12% (P training. The 5-wk sprint training induced a significantly higher (P ...-977) arbitrary units Ca(2+). g protein(-1). min(-1) (after). The relative SR density of functional ryanodine receptors (RyR) remained unchanged after training; there was, however, a 48% (P

  3. Enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release following intermittent sprint training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Lunde, Per; Levin, Kasper

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of intermittent sprint training on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function, nine young men performed a 5 wk high-intensity intermittent bicycle training, and six served as controls. SR function was evaluated from resting vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, before and after...... the training period. Intermittent sprint performance (ten 8-s all-out periods alternating with 32-s recovery) was enhanced 12% (P training. The 5-wk sprint training induced a significantly higher (P ...-977) arbitrary units Ca(2+). g protein(-1). min(-1) (after). The relative SR density of functional ryanodine receptors (RyR) remained unchanged after training; there was, however, a 48% (P

  4. Kinetic characterization of Channa striatus muscle sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassem, Masomeh; Fern, See Siau; Said, Mamot; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Ibrahim, Saadiah; Babji, Abdul Salam

    2014-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the kinetic characteristics of proteolytic activity of proteases on Channa striatus protein fractions. Degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition and kinetic parameters of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins were investigated when incubated with proteinase K and thermolysin, separately. After 30 min incubation with proteases, a decrease in DH of sarcoplasmic protein was observed whereas, hydrolysis of myofibrillar protein with proteases took 2 h with an increase in DH. The major amino acids were glutamic acid (16.6%) in thermolysin- myofibrillar hydrolysate followed by aspartic acid (11.1%) in sarcoplasmic protein fraction with no enzyme treatment and lysine (10%) in thermolysin-myofibrillar hydrolysate. The apparent Michaelis constant of proteinase K was lower than thermolysin for both sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins. However, rate of turnover and enzyme efficiency suggested that sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins are suitable substrates for proteinase K and thermolysin hydrolytic reaction, respectively.

  5. Cooked sausage batter cohesiveness as affected by sarcoplasmic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farouk, M M; Wieliczko, K; Lim, R; Turnwald, S; Macdonald, G A

    2002-05-01

    In the first trial, m. semitendinosus and m. biceps femoris were held at 0, 10 and 35 °C until they entered rigor, and in the second trial, minced m. semitendinosus was washed in water for 15, 30, 45 or 60 min. The samples from both the trials were then used to make a finely comminuted sausage batter. Soluble sarcoplasmic protein (SSP) levels decreased with increasing rigor temperature (P < 0.05) or washing (P < 0.01). Cooked batter shear stress was not affected by SSP level, but batter shear strain decreased with the decreasing SSP level associated with an increasing rigor temperature (P < 0.05) or washing (P < 0.01). Reducing the SSP content lowered the cook yield (P < 0.05) and emulsion stability (P < 0.01) of the batter from the washed samples compared to that of controls. The results suggest that sarcoplasmic proteins are important in determining the strain values (cohesiveness) of cooked sausage batter.

  6. Native myosin from adult rabbit skeletal muscle: isoenzymes and states of aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, J E; D'hahan, N; Taouil, K; Francin, M; Aguilar, A; Dalbiez, J P; Merah, Z; Grussaute, H; Hilbert, B; Ollagnon, F; Selva, G; Piot, F

    1998-04-21

    The globular heads of skeletal muscle myosin have been shown to exist as isoenzymes S1 (A1) and S1 (A2), and there are also isoforms of the heavy chains. Using capillary electrophoresis, we found two dominant isoenzymes of the whole native myosin molecule, in agreement with what has previously been found by various techniques for native and nondenatured myosin from adult rabbits. Findings about possible states of aggregation of myosin and its heads are contradictory. By analytical ultracentrifugation, we confirmed the existence of a tail-tail dimer. By laser light scattering, we found a head-head dimer in the presence of MgATP. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with analytical ultracentrifugation and laser light scattering led us to refine these results. We found tail-tail dimers in a conventional buffer. We found tail-tail and head-head dimers in the presence of 0.5 mM MgATP and pure head-head dimers in the presence of 6 mM MgATP. All the dimers were homodimers. Naming the dominant isoenzymes of myosin a and b, we observed tail-tail dimers with isoenzyme a (TaTa) and with isoenzyme b (TbTb) and also head-head dimers with isoenzyme a (HaHa) and with isoenzyme b (HbHb).

  7. An embryonic myosin converter domain influences Drosophila indirect flight muscle stretch activation, power generation and flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Newhard, Christopher S; Ramanath, Seemanti; Sheppard, Debra; Swank, Douglas M

    2014-01-15

    Stretch activation (SA) is critical to the flight ability of insects powered by asynchronous, indirect flight muscles (IFMs). An essential muscle protein component for SA and power generation is myosin. Which structural domains of myosin are significant for setting SA properties and power generation levels is poorly understood. We made use of the transgenic techniques and unique single muscle myosin heavy chain gene of Drosophila to test the influence of the myosin converter domain on IFM SA and power generation. Replacing the endogenous converter with an embryonic version decreased SA tension and the rate of SA tension generation. The alterations in SA properties and myosin kinetics from the converter exchange caused power generation to drop to 10% of control fiber power when the optimal conditions for control fibers - 1% muscle length (ML) amplitude and 150 Hz oscillation frequency - were applied to fibers expressing the embryonic converter (IFI-EC). Optimizing conditions for IFI-EC fiber power production, by doubling ML amplitude and decreasing oscillation frequency by 60%, improved power output to 60% of optimized control fiber power. IFI-EC flies altered their aerodynamic flight characteristics to better match optimal fiber power generation conditions as wing beat frequency decreased and wing stroke amplitude increased. This enabled flight in spite of the drastic changes to fiber mechanical performance.

  8. Response of slow and fast muscle to hypothyroidism: maximal shortening velocity and myosin isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiozzo, V. J.; Herrick, R. E.; Baldwin, K. M.

    1992-01-01

    This study examined both the shortening velocity and myosin isoform distribution of slow- (soleus) and fast-twitch (plantaris) skeletal muscles under hypothyroid conditions. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of two groups: control (n = 7) or hypothyroid (n = 7). In both muscles, the relative contents of native slow myosin (SM) and type I myosin heavy chain (MHC) increased in response to the hypothyroid treatment. The effects were such that the hypothyroid soleus muscle expressed only the native SM and type I MHC isoforms while repressing native intermediate myosin and type IIA MHC. In the plantaris, the relative content of native SM and type I MHC isoforms increased from 5 to 13% and from 4 to 10% of the total myosin pool, respectively. Maximal shortening velocity of the soleus and plantaris as measured by the slack test decreased by 32 and 19%, respectively, in response to hypothyroidism. In contrast, maximal shortening velocity as estimated by force-velocity data decreased only in the soleus (-19%). No significant change was observed for the plantaris.

  9. Myosin individualized: single nucleotide polymorphisms in energy transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieben Eric D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin performs ATP free energy transduction into mechanical work in the motor domain of the myosin heavy chain (MHC. Energy transduction is the definitive systemic feature of the myosin motor performed by coordinating in a time ordered sequence: ATP hydrolysis at the active site, actin affinity modulation at the actin binding site, and the lever-arm rotation of the power stroke. These functions are carried out by several conserved sub-domains within the motor domain. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affect the MHC sequence of many isoforms expressed in striated muscle, smooth muscle, and non-muscle tissue. The purpose of this work is to provide a rationale for using SNPs as a functional genomics tool to investigate structurefunction relationships in myosin. In particular, to discover SNP distribution over the conserved sub-domains and surmise what it implies about sub-domain stability and criticality in the energy transduction mechanism. Results An automated routine identifying human nonsynonymous SNP amino acid missense substitutions for any MHC gene mined the NCBI SNP data base. The routine tested 22 MHC genes coding muscle and non-muscle isoforms and identified 89 missense mutation positions in the motor domain with 10 already implicated in heart disease and another 8 lacking sequence homology with a skeletal MHC isoform for which a crystallographic model is available. The remaining 71 SNP substitutions were found to be distributed over MHC with 22 falling outside identified functional sub-domains and 49 in or very near to myosin sub-domains assigned specific crucial functions in energy transduction. The latter includes the active site, the actin binding site, the rigid lever-arm, and regions facilitating their communication. Most MHC isoforms contained SNPs somewhere in the motor domain. Conclusions Several functional-crucial sub-domains are infiltrated by a large number of SNP substitution sites suggesting these

  10. Non-muscle myosin as target antigen for human autoantibodies in patients with hepatitis C virus-associated chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mühlen, C A; Chan, E K; Peebles, C L; Imai, H; Kiyosawa, K; Tan, E M

    1995-04-01

    Three patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related chronic liver disease were shown to have autoantibodies strongly reacting with cytoskeletal fibres of non-muscle cells. The heavy chain of non-muscle myosin microfilament was the main target for those autoantibodies, as determined by (i) cell and tissue immunofluorescence studies showing colocalization with an anti-myosin antibody prototype; (ii) primary reactivity in immunoblotting with a 200-kD protein, using either MOLT-4 cells, human platelets, or affinity-purified non-muscle myosin as antigen extract; and (iii) immunoblotting of similar immunoreactive fragments in papain-digested MOLT-4 cell extracts, by using those human sera and antibody prototype. Autoantibodies to non-muscle myosin heavy chain were not previously reported in patients with chronic liver diseases, especially in those associated with HCV infection.

  11. Visualizing Key Hinges and a Potential Major Source of Compliance in the Lever Arm of Myosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Brown; V Senthil Kumar; E ONeall-Hennessey; L Reshetnikova; H Robinson; M Nguyen-McCarty; A Szent-Gyorgyi; C Cohen

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of a myosin light chain domain, corresponding to one type found in sea scallop catch ('smooth') muscle. This structure reveals hinges that may function in the 'on' and 'off' states of myosin. The molecule adopts two different conformations about the heavy chain 'hook' and regulatory light chain (RLC) helix D. This conformational change results in extended and compressed forms of the lever arm whose lengths differ by 10 {angstrom}. The heavy chain hook and RLC helix D hinges could thus serve as a potential major and localized source of cross-bridge compliance during the contractile cycle. In addition, in one of the molecules of the crystal, part of the RLC N-terminal extension is seen in atomic detail and forms a one-turn alpha-helix that interacts with RLC helix D. This extension, whose sequence is highly variable in different myosins, may thus modulate the flexibility of the lever arm. Moreover, the relative proximity of the phosphorylation site to the helix D hinge suggests a potential role for conformational changes about this hinge in the transition between the on and off states of regulated myosins.

  12. Myosin types and fiber types in cardiac muscle. II. Atrial myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorza, L; Sartore, S; Schiaffino, S

    1982-12-01

    Antibodies were produced against myosins isolated from the left atrial myocardium (anti-bAm) and the left ventricular myocardium (anti-bVm) of the bovine heart. Cross-reactive antibodies were removed by cross-absorption. Absorbed anti-bAm and anti-bVm were specific for the myosin heavy chains when tested by enzyme immunoassay combined with SDS gel electrophoresis. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to determine the reactivity of atrial muscle fibers to the two antibodies. Three populations of atrial muscle fibers were distinguished in the bovine heart: (a) fibers reactive with anti-bAm and unreactive with anti-bVm, like most fibers in the left atrium; (b) fibers reactive with both antibodies, especially numerous in the right atrium; (c) fibers reactive with anti-bVm and unreactive with anti-bAm, present only in the interatrial septum and in specific regions of the right atrium, such as the crista terminalis. These findings can be accounted for by postulating the existence of two distinct types of atrial myosin heavy chains, one of which is antigenically related to ventricular myosin. The tendency for fibers labeled by anti-bVm to occur frequently in bundles and their preferential distribution in the crista terminalis, namely along one of the main conduction pathways between the sinus node and the atrioventricular node, and in the interatrial septum, where different internodal tracts are known to converge, suggests that these fibers may be specialized for faster conduction.

  13. An embryonic myosin isoform enables stretch activation and cyclical power in Drosophila jump muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cuiping; Swank, Douglas M

    2013-06-18

    The mechanism behind stretch activation (SA), a mechanical property that increases muscle force and oscillatory power generation, is not known. We used Drosophila transgenic techniques and our new muscle preparation, the jump muscle, to determine if myosin heavy chain isoforms influence the magnitude and rate of SA force generation. We found that Drosophila jump muscles show very low SA force and cannot produce positive power under oscillatory conditions at pCa 5.0. However, we transformed the jump muscle to be moderately stretch-activatable by replacing its myosin isoform with an embryonic isoform (EMB). Expressing EMB, jump muscle SA force increased by 163% and it generated net positive power. The rate of SA force development decreased by 58% with EMB expression. Power generation is Pi dependent as >4 mM Pi was required for positive power from EMB. Pi increased EMB SA force, but not wild-type SA force. Our data suggest that when muscle expressing EMB is stretched, EMB is more easily driven backward to a weakly bound state than wild-type jump muscle. This increases the number of myosin heads available to rapidly bind to actin and contribute to SA force generation. We conclude that myosin heavy chain isoforms influence both SA kinetics and SA force, which can determine if a muscle is capable of generating oscillatory power at a fixed calcium concentration. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Visualizing key hinges and a potential major source of compliance in the lever arm of myosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.H.; Robinson, H.; Senthil Kumar, V. S.; O' Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Nguyen-McCarty, M.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-01-04

    We have determined the 2.3-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of a myosin light chain domain, corresponding to one type found in sea scallop catch ('smooth') muscle. This structure reveals hinges that may function in the 'on' and 'off' states of myosin. The molecule adopts two different conformations about the heavy chain 'hook' and regulatory light chain (RLC) helix D. This conformational change results in extended and compressed forms of the lever arm whose lengths differ by 10 {angstrom}. The heavy chain hook and RLC helix D hinges could thus serve as a potential major and localized source of cross-bridge compliance during the contractile cycle. In addition, in one of the molecules of the crystal, part of the RLC N-terminal extension is seen in atomic detail and forms a one-turn alpha-helix that interacts with RLC helix D. This extension, whose sequence is highly variable in different myosins, may thus modulate the flexibility of the lever arm. Moreover, the relative proximity of the phosphorylation site to the helix D hinge suggests a potential role for conformational changes about this hinge in the transition between the on and off states of regulated myosins.

  15. Class I myosins have overlapping and specialized functions in left-right asymmetric development in Drosophila

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okumura, Takashi; Sasamura, Takeshi; Inatomi, Momoko; Hozumi, Shunya; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Hatori, Ryo; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Nakazawa, Naotaka; Suzuki, Emiko; Maeda, Reo; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    .... Drosophila melanogaster has three class I myosin genes, Myosin 31DF (Myo31DF), Myosin 61F (Myo61F), and Myosin 95E (Myo95E). Myo31DF, Myo61F, and Myo95E belong to the Myosin ID, Myosin IC, and Myosin IB families, respectively...

  16. Dynamic Changes in Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Structure in Ventricular Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Vega

    2011-01-01

    sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR and the sarcolemma where Ca2+ release is activated. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the SR is a structurally inert organelle in ventricular myocytes. Our data suggest that rather than being static, the SR undergoes frequent dynamic structural changes. SR boutons expressing functional ryanodine receptors moved throughout the cell, approaching or moving away from the sarcolemma of ventricular myocytes. These changes in SR structure occurred in the absence of changes in [Ca2+] during EC coupling. Microtubules and the molecular motors dynein and kinesin 1(Kif5b were important regulators of SR motility. These findings support a model in which the SR is a motile organelle capable of molecular motor protein-driven structural changes.

  17. Mechanochemical model for myosin V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Erin M; Linke, Heiner

    2009-10-27

    A rigorous numerical test of a hypothetical mechanism of a molecular motor should model explicitly the diffusive motion of the motor's degrees of freedom as well as the transition rates between the motor's chemical states. We present such a Brownian dynamics, mechanochemcial model of the coarse-grain structure of the dimeric, linear motor myosin V. Compared with run-length data, our model provides strong support for a proposed strain-controlled gating mechanism that enhances processivity. We demonstrate that the diffusion rate of a detached motor head during motor stepping is self-consistent with known kinetic rate constants and can explain the motor's key performance features, such as speed and stall force. We present illustrative and realistic animations of motor stepping in the presence of thermal noise. The quantitative success and illustrative power of this type of model suggest that it will be useful in testing our understanding of a range of biological and synthetic motors.

  18. Interactions of vanadate oligomers with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M; Mdeira, V M

    1994-04-28

    Upon addition of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), the line width of tetrameric vanadate signal of 51V-NMR spectra narrowed in the presence of ATP and Ca2+, whereas monomeric vanadate line widths were broadened. Thus, ATP decreases the affinity of the enzyme for tetravanadate whereas it induces the interaction with monomeric vanadate. In the presence of Ca2+ it was observed that tetrameric and decameric vanadate bind to SR ATPase whereas monomeric vanadate only binds to SR when ATP is present. However, decameric vanadate clearly differs from vanadate oligomers present in monovanadate solutions in preventing the accumulation of Ca2+ by sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles coupled to ATP hydrolysis. Mg2+ increased the inhibitory effect promoted by decavanadate whereas a slight enhancement of Ca2+ uptake was observed in the presence of monovanadate. For 5 mM Mg2+, a nominal 2 mM vanadium 'decavanadate' solution containing about 190 to 200 microM decameric and less than 100 microM monomeric species depressed the rate of Ca2+ uptake by 50% whereas a nominal 2 mM monovanadate solution containing about 662 microM monomeric, 143 microM dimeric and 252 microM tetrameric species had no effect on the rate of Ca2+ accumulation. However, 2 mM 'decavanadate' inhibits by 75% the SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity whereas the presence of 2 mM 'monovanadate' produces an inhibitory effect below 50%. Therefore, the Ca:ATP stoichiometry of Ca2+ transport is enhanced by monovanadate. In the presence of oxalate, inhibition of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity by these solutions is enhanced to 97% and 86% whereas in the presence of the ionophore lasalocid, the inhibitory values were 87% and 19% for 2 mM decavanadate and 2 mM monovanadate solutions, respectively. Apparently, the increase of vesicular Ca2+ concentration counteracts monovanadate inhibition of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity but it does not significantly affect decavanadate inhibition.

  19. [Clinical relevance of myosin isoforms in the diaphragm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayan-Ramirez, G; Decramer, M

    2000-06-01

    The diaphragm as a striated muscle is characterized by the repetition of a single element arranged in series: the sarcomere containing two kinds of myofilaments: a thick one constituted by the myosin, and a thin one primarily composed of actin. The myosin molecule consists of two heads where two myosin heavy chains (MHC) are fixed, a flexible hinge with two light (MLC) chains, and long rod-shaped tails. The diaphragm contains 4 MHC isoforms (MHC-slow, MHC-2A, MHC-2B, MHC-2X) and 6 MLC isoforms (MLC-1f, MLC-3f, MLC-1sa, MLC-1sb, MLC-2f, MLC-2s/v). In humans, the diaphragm contains mainly fibers expressing the isoforms MHC-slow, MHC-2A, and MLC-2f, MLC-2s et MLC-1f. For the mechanical properties of the different isoforms, there is a gradient from the MHC-slow to the MHC-2A, MHC-2B and MHC-2X/2B. According to the circumstances, the diaphragm will adapt towards a slow profile (COPD, cardiac failure and in animals: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, denervation-1 week, age-female, corticosteroids, chronic stimulation), or a fast profile (in animals: chronic hypoxia, denervation-2 weeks, age-males) or a more oxidative profile (in animals: cachexia, obesity). The reasons why the diaphragm adapts towards a slower or a faster muscle are not known. In fact, for a given pathological situation, several factors are able to influence the fiber composition of the diaphragm. Therefore, the net result of the influence of these different factors in terms of MHC and MLC diaphragm adaptation is difficult to predict.

  20. Phosphorylated peptides occur in a non-helical portion of the tail of a catch muscle myosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellani, L.; Elliott, B.W. Jr.; Cohen, C.

    1987-05-01

    Myosin from a molluscan catch muscle (the Anterior Byssus Retractor (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis) is unusual in being phosphorylated in the rod by an endogenous heavy-chain kinase. This phosphorylation enhances myosin solubility at low ionic strength and induces molecular folding of the myosin tail. Papain and chymotryptic cleavage of this myosin, phosphorylated with (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, indicates that the phosphorylated residues are associated with the carboxy-terminal end of the light meromyosin. Ion-exchange and reverse-phase HPLC of radiolabeled chymotryptic peptides allow the isolation of two different peptides with high specific activity. One of these peptides is rich in lysine and arginine residues, a finding consistent with the observation that basic residues often determine the substrate specificity of protein kinases. The second peptide contains proline residues. Taken together, these results suggest that, as in the case of Acanthamoeba myosin, phosphorylation occurs in a nonhelical portion of the rod that may also control solubility. Identification of the residues that are phosphorylated and their location in the rod may reveal how the phosphorylation-dependent changes observed in the myosin in vitro are related to changes in intermolecular interactions in the thick filaments in vivo.

  1. Importance of salt and temperature in myosin polymerization during surimi gelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez-Flores, Ruth; Cando, Deysi; Borderías, A Javier; Moreno, Helena M

    2018-01-15

    To address the effect of absence of NaCl on myosin heavy chain polymerization during two-step surimi gelation (different setting temperatures/times -5°C/24h and 30°C/30min-followed by heating at 90°C/30min) were considered. In gel samples made without salt (Lot A), no myosin heavy chain (MHC) polymerization was observed, only aggregation, as indicated by the electrophoresis in polyacrylamide/agarose gel profile. Moreover, these gels were characterized by weakly stabilized protein networks as denoted by the dynamic oscillatory measurement and FTIR analysis, resulting in poor quality gels. On the other hand, in gels made with added salt, MHC polymerization occurred, as evidenced by the electrophoresis, and the gelation resulted in a well-stabilized protein network with good physicochemical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of Amoeba proteus myosin VI immunoanalog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominik, Magdalena; Kłopocka, Wanda; Pomorski, Paweł; Kocik, Elzbieta; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2005-07-01

    Amoeba proteus, the highly motile free-living unicellular organism, has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion and intracellular actin-based-only trafficking remain poorly understood. A search for myosin motors responsible for vesicular transport in these giant cells resulted in detection of 130-kDa protein interacting with several polyclonal antibodies against different tail regions of human and chicken myosin VI. This protein was binding to actin in the ATP-dependent manner, and immunoprecipitated with anti-myosin VI antibodies. In order to characterize its possible functions in vivo, its cellular distribution and colocalization with actin filaments and dynamin II during migration and pinocytosis were examined. In migrating amoebae, myosin VI immunoanalog localized to vesicular structures, particularly within the perinuclear and sub-plasma membrane areas, and colocalized with dynamin II immunoanalog and actin filaments. The colocalization was even more evident in pinocytotic cells as proteins concentrated within pinocytotic pseudopodia. Moreover, dynamin II and myosin VI immunoanalogs cosedimented with actin filaments, and were found on the same isolated vesicles. Blocking endogenous myosin VI immunoanalog with anti-myosin VI antibodies inhibited the rate of pseudopodia protrusion (about 19% decrease) and uroidal retraction (about 28% decrease) but did not affect cell morphology and the manner of cell migration. Treatment with anti-human dynamin II antibodies led to changes in directionality of amebae migration and affected the rate of only uroidal translocation (about 30% inhibition). These results indicate that myosin VI immunoanalog is expressed in protist Amoeba proteus and may be involved in vesicle translocation and cell locomotion.

  3. Induction of antibodies reactive to cardiac myosin and development of heart alterations in cruzipain-immunized mice and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, L; Maldonado, C; Rivarola, H W; Iosa, D; Girones, N; Fresno, M; Gea, S

    2000-11-01

    Human and murine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi parasite is usually accompanied by strong humoral and cellular immune response to cruzipain, a parasite immunodominant antigen. In the present study we report that the immunization of mice with cruzipain devoid of enzymatic activity, was able to induce antibodies which bind to a 223-kDa antigen from a mouse heart extract. We identified this protein as the mouse cardiac myosin heavy chain by sequencing analysis. The study of IgG isotype profile revealed the occurrence of all IgG isotypes against cruzipain and myosin. IgG1 showed the strongest reactivity against cruzipain, whereas IgG2a was the main isotype against myosin. Anti-cruzipain antibodies purified by immunoabsorption recognized the cardiac myosin heavy chain, suggesting cross-reactive epitopes between cruzipain and myosin. Autoimmune response in mice immunized with cruzipain was associated to heart conduction disturbances. In addition, ultrastructural findings revealed severe alterations of cardiomyocytes and IgG deposit on heart tissue of immunized mice. We investigated whether antibodies induced by cruzipain transferred from immunized mothers to their offsprings could alter the heart function in the pups. All IgG isotypes against cruzipain derived from transplacental crossing were detected in pups' sera. Electrocardiographic studies performed in the offsprings born to immunized mothers revealed conduction abnormalities. These results provide strong evidence for a pathogenic role of autoimmune response induced by a purified T. cruzi antigen in the development of experimental Chagas' disease.

  4. Aberrant post-translational modifications compromise human myosin motor function in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meishan; Ogilvie, Hannah; Ochala, Julien; Artemenko, Konstantin; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Naoto; Bergquist, Jonas; Larsson, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Novel experimental methods, including a modified single fiber in vitro motility assay, X-ray diffraction experiments, and mass spectrometry analyses, have been performed to unravel the molecular events underlying the aging-related impairment in human skeletal muscle function at the motor protein level. The effects of old age on the function of specific myosin isoforms extracted from single human muscle fiber segments, demonstrated a significant slowing of motility speed (P old age in both type I and IIa myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. The force-generating capacity of the type I and IIa MyHC isoforms was, on the other hand, not affected by old age. Similar effects were also observed when the myosin molecules extracted from muscle fibers were exposed to oxidative stress. X-ray diffraction experiments did not show any myofilament lattice spacing changes, but unraveled a more disordered filament organization in old age as shown by the greater widths of the 1, 0 equatorial reflections. Mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed eight age-specific myosin post-translational modifications (PTMs), in which two were located in the motor domain (carbonylation of Pro79 and Asn81) and six in the tail region (carbonylation of Asp900, Asp904, and Arg908; methylation of Glu1166; deamidation of Gln1164 and Asn1168). However, PTMs in the motor domain were only observed in the IIx MyHC isoform, suggesting PTMs in the rod region contributed to the observed disordering of myosin filaments and the slowing of motility speed. Hence, interventions that would specifically target these PTMs are warranted to reverse myosin dysfunction in old age.

  5. The reaction of N-(1-pyrene)maleimide with sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, S; Kracke, G; Joshi, N; Martonosi, A

    1986-01-01

    The excimer fluorescence of the adduct of N-(1-pyrene)maleimide (PMI) with the Ca2+-ATPase was proposed as a probe of ATPase-ATPase interactions in sarcoplasmic reticulum (Lüdi and Hasselbach, Eur. J. Biochem., 1983, 130:5-8). We tested this proposition by analyzing the spectral properties and stoichiometry of the adducts of pyrenemaleimide with sarcoplasmic reticulum and with dithiothreitol and by comparing the effects of various detergents on the excimer fluorescence of the two adducts, with their influence on the sedimentation characteristics, ATPase activity, and light scattering of the pyrenemaleimide-labeled sarcoplasmic reticulum. These studies indicate that pyrenemaleimide reacts nearly randomly with several SH groups on the Ca2+-ATPase, and suggest that the observed excimer fluorescence of pyrenemaleimide-labeled sarcoplasmic reticulum may reflect intramolecular phenomena rather than ATPase-ATPase interactions. Further work is required to establish the relative contribution of intra- and intermolecular mechanisms to the excimer fluorescence. PMID:2937461

  6. Myogenin, MyoD, and myosin expression after pharmacologically and surgically induced hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Greaser, M. L.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between myogenin or MyoD expression and hypertrophy of the rat soleus produced either by clenbuterol and 3,3', 5-triiodo-L-thyronine (CT) treatment or by surgical overload was examined. Mature female rats were subjected to surgical overload of the right soleus with the left soleus serving as a control. Another group received the same surgical treatment but were administered CT. Soleus muscles were harvested 4 wk after surgical overload and weighed. Myosin heavy chain isoforms were separated by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis while myogenin and MyoD expression were evaluated by Northern analysis. CT and functional overload increased soleus muscle weight. CT treatment induced the appearance of the fast type IIX myosin heavy chain isoform, depressed myogenin expression, and induced MyoD expression. However, functional overload did not alter myogenin or MyoD expression in CT-treated or non-CT-treated rats. Thus pharmacologically and surgically induced hypertrophy have differing effects on myogenin and MyoD expression, because their levels were associated with changes in myosin heavy chain composition (especially type IIX) rather than changes in muscle mass.

  7. Kinetic characterization of Channa striatus muscle sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Ghassem, Masomeh; Fern, See Siau; Said, Mamot; Ali, Zainon Mohd; Ibrahim, Saadiah; Babji, Abdul Salam

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the kinetic characteristics of proteolytic activity of proteases on Channa striatus protein fractions. Degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition and kinetic parameters of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins were investigated when incubated with proteinase K and thermolysin, separately. After 30 min incubation with proteases, a decrease in DH of sarcoplasmic protein was observed whereas, hydrolysis of myofibrillar protein with proteases took 2 h ...

  8. Dictyostelium myosin bipolar thick filament formation: importance of charge and specific domains of the myosin rod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hostetter

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Myosin-II thick filament formation in Dictyostelium is an excellent system for investigating the phenomenon of self-assembly, as the myosin molecule itself contains all the information required to form a structure of defined size. Phosphorylation of only three threonine residues can dramatically change the assembly state of myosin-II. We show here that the C-terminal 68 kDa of the myosin-II tail (termed AD-Cterm assembles in a regulated manner similar to full-length myosin-II and forms bipolar thick filament (BTF structures when a green fluorescent protein (GFP "head" is added to the N terminus. The localization of this GFP-AD-Cterm to the cleavage furrow of dividing Dictyostelium cells depends on assembly state, similar to full-length myosin-II. This tail fragment therefore represents a good model system for the regulated formation and localization of BTFs. By reducing regulated BTF assembly to a more manageable model system, we were able to explore determinants of myosin-II self-assembly. Our data support a model in which a globular head limits the size of a BTF, and the large-scale charge character of the AD-Cterm region is important for BTF formation. Truncation analysis of AD-Cterm tail fragments shows that assembly is delicately balanced, resulting in assembled myosin-II molecules that are poised to disassemble due to the phosphorylation of only three threonines.

  9. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Genioglossus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Megan; Luo, Qingwei; Sokoloff, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The human tongue muscle genioglossus (GG) is active in speech, swallowing, respiration, and oral transport, behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue shapes and movement speeds. Studies demonstrate substantial diversity in patterns of human GG motor unit activation, but whether this is accompanied by complex expression of muscle…

  10. Myosin Heavy Chain Composition of the Human Genioglossus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Megan; Luo, Qingwei; Sokoloff, Alan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The human tongue muscle genioglossus (GG) is active in speech, swallowing, respiration, and oral transport, behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue shapes and movement speeds. Studies demonstrate substantial diversity in patterns of human GG motor unit activation, but whether this is accompanied by complex expression of muscle…

  11. The sarcoplasmic calcium pump - a most efficient ion translocating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, W

    1977-04-21

    In contrast to the sodium-potassium transporting plasma membranes, the sarcoplasmic membranes (SR) are highly specialized structures into which only two major intrinsic proteins, a calcium transporting protein and a calcium binding protein are embedded. The calcium transporting protein is a highly asymmetric molecule. It binds two calcium ions with a very high affinity at its external, and two calcium ions with low affinity at the internal section of the molecule. ATP is bound with high afffinity to an external binding site, inducing a conformational change. When the vesicular membranes are exposed to solutions containing Ca++, Mg++ and ATP, ATP is hydrolyzed and simultaneously calcium ions are translocated from the external medium into the vesicular space. When calcium ions are translocated in the opposite direction, ATP is synthesized. The calcium-ATP ratio for ATP cleavage as well as for ATP synthesis is 2. Thus, the SR membranes can transform reversibly chemical into osmotical energy. Inward and outward movements of calcium ions are relatively slow processes connected with the appearance and disappearance of different phosphorylated intermediates. One phosphorylated intermediate is formed by phosphoryltransfer from ATP when calcium ions are present in the medium. In contrast, when calcium ions are absent from the external medium, two different intermediates can be formed by the incorporation of inorganic phosphate. Only when calcium ions present in the internal space of the vesicles are released, the incorporation of inorganic phosphate gives rise to an intermediate who phosphoryl group can be transferred to ADP.

  12. Alternative S2 Hinge Regions of the Myosin Rod Affect Myofibrillar Structure and Myosin Kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mark S.; Dambacher, Corey M.; Knowles, Aileen F.; Braddock, Joan M.; Farman, Gerrie P.; Irving, Thomas C.; Swank, Douglas M.; Bernstein, Sanford I.; Maughan, David W.; (RPI); (IIT); (SDSU); (Vermont)

    2009-07-01

    The subfragment 2/light meromyosin 'hinge' region has been proposed to significantly contribute to muscle contraction force and/or speed. Transgenic replacement of the endogenous fast muscle isovariant hinge A (exon 15a) in Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle with the slow muscle hinge B (exon 15b) allows examination of the structural and functional changes when only this region of the myosin molecule is different. Hinge B was previously shown to increase myosin rod length, increase A-band and sarcomere length, and decrease flight performance compared to hinge A. We applied additional measures to these transgenic lines to further evaluate the consequences of modifying this hinge region. Structurally, the longer A-band and sarcomere lengths found in the hinge B myofibrils appear to be due to the longitudinal addition of myosin heads. Functionally, hinge B, although a significant distance from the myosin catalytic domain, alters myosin kinetics in a manner consistent with this region increasing myosin rod length. These structural and functional changes combine to decrease whole fly wing-beat frequency and flight performance. Our results indicate that this hinge region plays an important role in determining myosin kinetics and in regulating thick and thin filament lengths as well as sarcomere length.

  13. Mutations in either the essential or regulatory light chains of myosin are associated with a rare myopathy in human heart and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poetter, K; Jiang, H; Hassanzadeh, S; Master, S R; Chang, A; Dalakas, M C; Rayment, I; Sellers, J R; Fananapazir, L; Epstein, N D

    1996-05-01

    The muscle myosins and hexomeric proteins consisting of two heavy chains and two pairs of light chains, the latter called essential (ELC) and regulatory (RLC). The light chains stabilize the long alpha helical neck of the myosin head. Their function in striated muscle, however, is only partially understood. We report here the identification of distinct missense mutations in a skeletal/ventricular ELC and RLC, each of which are associated with a rare variant of cardiac hypertrophy as well as abnormal skeletal muscle. We show that myosin containing the mutant ELC has abnormal function, map the mutant residues on the three-dimensional structure of myosin and suggest that the mutations disrupt the stretch activation response of the cardiac papillary muscles.

  14. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase efficiently phosphorylates serine 15 of cardiac myosin regulatory light chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Matthew P.; Sikkink, Laura A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Penheiter, Alan R. [Molecular Medicine Program, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Burghardt, Thomas P., E-mail: burghardt@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Ajtai, Katalin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) is phosphorylated at S15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is a widely believed that MYL2 is a poor substrate for smMLCK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In fact, smMLCK efficiently and rapidly phosphorylates S15 in MYL2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phosphorylation kinetics measured by novel fluorescence method without radioactivity. -- Abstract: Specific phosphorylation of the human ventricular cardiac myosin regulatory light chain (MYL2) modifies the protein at S15. This modification affects MYL2 secondary structure and modulates the Ca{sup 2+} sensitivity of contraction in cardiac tissue. Smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (smMLCK) is a ubiquitous kinase prevalent in uterus and present in other contracting tissues including cardiac muscle. The recombinant 130 kDa (short) smMLCK phosphorylated S15 in MYL2 in vitro. Specific modification of S15 was verified using the direct detection of the phospho group on S15 with mass spectrometry. SmMLCK also specifically phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain S15 in porcine ventricular myosin and chicken gizzard smooth muscle myosin (S20 in smooth muscle) but failed to phosphorylate the myosin regulatory light chain in rabbit skeletal myosin. Phosphorylation kinetics, measured using a novel fluorescence method eliminating the use of radioactive isotopes, indicates similar Michaelis-Menten V{sub max} and K{sub M} for regulatory light chain S15 phosphorylation rates in MYL2, porcine ventricular myosin, and chicken gizzard myosin. These data demonstrate that smMLCK is a specific and efficient kinase for the in vitro phosphorylation of MYL2, cardiac, and smooth muscle myosin. Whether smMLCK plays a role in cardiac muscle regulation or response to a disease causing stimulus is unclear but it should be considered a potentially significant

  15. Plant-specific myosin XI, a molecular perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoki eTominaga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, organelle movement, positioning, and communications are critical for maintaining cellular functions and are highly regulated by intracellular trafficking. Directional movement of motor proteins along the cytoskeleton is one of the key regulators of such trafficking. Most plants have developed a unique actin–myosin system for intracellular trafficking. Although the composition of myosin motors in angiosperms is limited to plant-specific myosin classes VIII and XI, there are large families of myosins, especially in class XI, suggesting functional diversification among class XI members. However, the molecular properties and regulation of each myosin XI member remains unclear.To achieve a better understanding of the plant-specific actin–myosin system, the characterization of myosin XI members at the molecular level is essential. In the first half of this review, we summarize the molecular properties of tobacco 175-kDa myosin XI, and in the later half, we focus on myosin XI members in Arabidopsis thaliana.Through detailed comparison of the functional domains of these myosins with the functional domain of myosin V, we look for possible diversification in enzymatic and mechanical properties among myosin XI members concomitant with their regulation.

  16. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Girish C; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Detor, Mia M; Melkani, Anju; Marsan, Nathan P; Swank, Douglas M; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2017-06-01

    Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3) display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K) in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in decreased in vitro

  17. A Drosophila model of dominant inclusion body myopathy type 3 shows diminished myosin kinetics that reduce muscle power and yield myofibrillar defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A. Suggs

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with inclusion body myopathy type 3 (IBM3 display congenital joint contractures with early-onset muscle weakness that becomes more severe in adulthood. The disease arises from an autosomal dominant point mutation causing an E706K substitution in myosin heavy chain type IIa. We have previously expressed the corresponding myosin mutation (E701K in homozygous Drosophila indirect flight muscles and recapitulated the myofibrillar degeneration and inclusion bodies observed in the human disease. We have also found that purified E701K myosin has dramatically reduced actin-sliding velocity and ATPase levels. Since IBM3 is a dominant condition, we now examine the disease state in heterozygote Drosophila in order to gain a mechanistic understanding of E701K pathogenicity. Myosin ATPase activities in heterozygotes suggest that approximately equimolar levels of myosin accumulate from each allele. In vitro actin sliding velocity rates for myosin isolated from the heterozygotes were lower than the control, but higher than for the pure mutant isoform. Although sarcomeric ultrastructure was nearly wild type in young adults, mechanical analysis of skinned indirect flight muscle fibers revealed a 59% decrease in maximum oscillatory power generation and an approximately 20% reduction in the frequency at which maximum power was produced. Rate constant analyses suggest a decrease in the rate of myosin attachment to actin, with myosin spending decreased time in the strongly bound state. These mechanical alterations result in a one-third decrease in wing beat frequency and marginal flight ability. With aging, muscle ultrastructure and function progressively declined. Aged myofibrils showed Z-line streaming, consistent with the human heterozygote phenotype. Based upon the mechanical studies, we hypothesize that the mutation decreases the probability of the power stroke occurring and/or alters the degree of movement of the myosin lever arm, resulting in

  18. Alternative exon-encoding regions of Locusta migratoria muscle myosin modulate the pH dependence of ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Lu, Z; He, J; Chen, Q; Wang, X; Kang, L; Li, X-D

    2016-12-01

    Whereas the vertebrate muscle myosin heavy chains (MHCs) are encoded by a family of Mhc genes, most insects examined to date contain a single Mhc gene and produce all of the different MHC isoforms by alternative RNA splicing. Here, we found that the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, has one Mhc gene, which contains 41 exons, including five alternative exclusive exons and one differently included penultimate exon, and potentially encodes 360 MHC isoforms. From the adult L. migratoria, we identified 14 MHC isoforms (including two identical isoforms): four from flight muscle (the thorax dorsal longitudinal muscle), three from jump muscle (the hind leg extensor tibiae muscle) and seven from the abdominal intersegmental muscle. We purified myosins from flight muscle and jump muscle and characterized their motor activities. At neutral pH, the flight and the jump muscle myosins displayed similar levels of in vitro actin-gliding activity, whereas the former had a slightly higher actin-activated ATPase activity than the latter. Interestingly, the pH dependences of the actin-activated ATPase activity of these two myosins are different. Because the dominant MHC isoforms in these two muscles are identical except for the two alternative exon-encoding regions, we propose that these two alternative regions modulate the pH dependence of L. migratoria muscle myosin.

  19. Orbit/CLASP is required for myosin accumulation at the cleavage furrow in Drosophila male meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishi Kitazawa

    Full Text Available Peripheral microtubules (MTs near the cell cortex are essential for the positioning and continuous constriction of the contractile ring (CR in cytokinesis. Time-lapse observations of Drosophila male meiosis showed that myosin II was first recruited along the cell cortex independent of MTs. Then, shortly after peripheral MTs made contact with the equatorial cortex, myosin II was concentrated there in a narrow band. After MT contact, anillin and F-actin abruptly appeared on the equatorial cortex, simultaneously with myosin accumulation. We found that the accumulation of myosin did not require centralspindlin, but was instead dependent on Orbit, a Drosophila ortholog of the MT plus-end tracking protein CLASP. This protein is required for stabilization of central spindle MTs, which are essential for cytokinesis. Orbit was also localized in a mid-zone of peripheral MTs, and was concentrated in a ring at the equatorial cortex during late anaphase. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments indicated that Orbit is closely associated with F-actin in the CR. We also showed that the myosin heavy chain was in close proximity with Orbit in the cleavage furrow region. Centralspindlin was dispensable in Orbit ring formation. Instead, the Polo-KLP3A/Feo complex was required for the Orbit accumulation independently of the Orbit MT-binding domain. However, orbit mutations of consensus sites for the phosphorylation of Cdk1 or Polo did not influence the Orbit accumulation, suggesting an indirect regulatory role of these protein kinases in Orbit localization. Orbit was also necessary for the maintenance of the CR. Our data suggest that Orbit plays an essential role as a connector between MTs and the CR in Drosophila male meiosis.

  20. A family of microRNAs encoded by myosin genes governs myosin expression and muscle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Eva; Quiat, Daniel; Johnson, Brett A.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Qi, Xiaoxia; Richardson, James A.; Kelm, Robert J.; Olson, Eric N.

    2009-01-01

    Myosin is the primary regulator of muscle strength and contractility. Here we show that three myosin genes, Myh6, Myh7, and Myh7b, encode related microRNAs (miRNAs) within their introns, which, in turn, control muscle myosin content, myofiber identity and muscle performance. Within the adult heart, the Myh6 gene, encoding a fast myosin, co-expresses miR-208a, which regulates the expression of two slow myosins and their intronic miRNAs, Myh7/miR-208b and Myh7b/miR-499, respectively. miR-208b and miR-499 are functionally redundant, and play a dominant role in the specification of muscle fiber identity by activating slow and repressing fast myofiber gene programs. The actions of these miRNAs are mediated by a collection of transcriptional repressors of slow myofiber genes. These findings reveal that myosin genes not only encode the major contractile proteins of muscle, but act more broadly to influence muscle function by encoding a network of intronic miRNAs that control muscle gene expression and performance. PMID:19922871

  1. Drosophila UNC-45 prevents heat-induced aggregation of skeletal muscle myosin and facilitates refolding of citrate synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melkani, Girish C.; Lee, Chi F.; Cammarato, Anthony [Department of Biology and the Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614 (United States); Bernstein, Sanford I., E-mail: sbernst@sciences.sdsu.edu [Department of Biology and the Molecular Biology Institute, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-4614 (United States)

    2010-05-28

    UNC-45 belongs to the UCS (UNC-45, CRO1, She4p) domain protein family, whose members interact with various classes of myosin. Here we provide structural and biochemical evidence that Escherichia coli-expressed Drosophila UNC-45 (DUNC-45) maintains the integrity of several substrates during heat-induced stress in vitro. DUNC-45 displays chaperone function in suppressing aggregation of the muscle myosin heavy meromyosin fragment, the myosin S-1 motor domain, {alpha}-lactalbumin and citrate synthase. Biochemical evidence is supported by electron microscopy, which reveals the first structural evidence that DUNC-45 prevents inter- or intra-molecular aggregates of skeletal muscle heavy meromyosin caused by elevated temperatures. We also demonstrate for the first time that UNC-45 is able to refold a denatured substrate, urea-unfolded citrate synthase. Overall, this in vitro study provides insight into the fate of muscle myosin under stress conditions and suggests that UNC-45 protects and maintains the contractile machinery during in vivo stress.

  2. Myosin 18A coassembles with nonmuscle myosin 2 to form mixed bipolar filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billington, Neil; Beach, Jordan R; Heissler, Sarah M; Remmert, Kirsten; Guzik-Lendrum, Stephanie; Nagy, Attila; Takagi, Yasuharu; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Yang, Yi; Zhang, Yingfan; Barzik, Melanie; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A; Sellers, James R

    2015-03-30

    Class-18 myosins are most closely related to conventional class-2 nonmuscle myosins (NM2). Surprisingly, the purified head domains of Drosophila, mouse, and human myosin 18A (M18A) lack actin-activated ATPase activity and the ability to translocate actin filaments, suggesting that the functions of M18A in vivo do not depend on intrinsic motor activity. M18A has the longest coiled coil of any myosin outside of the class-2 myosins, suggesting that it might form bipolar filaments similar to conventional myosins. To address this possibility, we expressed and purified full-length mouse M18A using the baculovirus/Sf9 system. M18A did not form large bipolar filaments under any of the conditions tested. Instead, M18A formed an ∼ 65-nm-long bipolar structure with two heads at each end. Importantly, when NM2 was polymerized in the presence of M18A, the two myosins formed mixed bipolar filaments, as evidenced by cosedimentation, electron microscopy, and single-molecule imaging. Moreover, super-resolution imaging of NM2 and M18A using fluorescently tagged proteins and immunostaining of endogenous proteins showed that NM2 and M18A are present together within individual filaments inside living cells. Together, our in vitro and live-cell imaging data argue strongly that M18A coassembles with NM2 into mixed bipolar filaments. M18A could regulate the biophysical properties of these filaments and, by virtue of its extra N- and C-terminal domains, determine the localization and/or molecular interactions of the filaments. Given the numerous, fundamental cellular and developmental roles attributed to NM2, our results have far-reaching biological implications.

  3. Distinct functional interactions between actin isoforms and nonsarcomeric myosins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Müller

    Full Text Available Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments.

  4. Regenerating tail muscles in lizard contain Fast but not Slow Myosin indicating that most myofibers belong to the fast twitch type for rapid contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, L

    2015-10-01

    During tail regeneration in lizards a large mass of muscle tissue is formed in form of segmental myomeres of similar size located under the dermis of the new tail. These muscles accumulate glycogen and a fast form of myosin typical for twitch myofibers as it is shown by light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry using an antibody directed against a Fast Myosin Heavy Chain. High resolution immunogold labeling shows that an intense labeling for fast myosin is localized over the thick filaments of the numerous myofibrils in about 70% of the regenerated myofibers while the labeling becomes less intense in the remaining muscle fibers. The present observations indicate that at least two subtypes of Fast Myosin containing muscle fibers are regenerated, the prevalent type was of the fast twitch containing few mitochondria, sparse glycogen, numerous smooth endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The second, and less frequent type was a Fast-Oxidative-Glycolitic twitch fiber containing more mitochondria, a denser cytoplasm and myofibrils. Since their initial differentiation, myoblasts, myotubes and especially the regenerated myofibers do not accumulate any immuno-detectable Slow Myosin Heavy Chain. The study indicates that most of the segmental muscles of the regenerated tail serve for the limited bending of the tail during locomotion and trashing after amputation of the regenerated tail, a phenomenon that facilitates predator escape.

  5. A Toxoplasma gondii class XIV myosin, expressed in Sf9 cells with a parasite co-chaperone, requires two light chains for fast motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M; Ward, Gary E; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2014-10-31

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors.

  6. A Toxoplasma gondii Class XIV Myosin, Expressed in Sf9 Cells with a Parasite Co-chaperone, Requires Two Light Chains for Fast Motility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookwalter, Carol S.; Kelsen, Anne; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Ward, Gary E.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Many diverse myosin classes can be expressed using the baculovirus/Sf9 insect cell expression system, whereas others have been recalcitrant. We hypothesized that most myosins utilize Sf9 cell chaperones, but others require an organism-specific co-chaperone. TgMyoA, a class XIVa myosin from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, is required for the parasite to efficiently move and invade host cells. The T. gondii genome contains one UCS family myosin co-chaperone (TgUNC). TgMyoA expressed in Sf9 cells was soluble and functional only if the heavy and light chain(s) were co-expressed with TgUNC. The tetratricopeptide repeat domain of TgUNC was not essential to obtain functional myosin, implying that there are other mechanisms to recruit Hsp90. Purified TgMyoA heavy chain complexed with its regulatory light chain (TgMLC1) moved actin in a motility assay at a speed of ∼1.5 μm/s. When a putative essential light chain (TgELC1) was also bound, TgMyoA moved actin at more than twice that speed (∼3.4 μm/s). This result implies that two light chains bind to and stabilize the lever arm, the domain that amplifies small motions at the active site into the larger motions that propel actin at fast speeds. Our results show that the TgMyoA domain structure is more similar to other myosins than previously appreciated and provide a molecular explanation for how it moves actin at fast speeds. The ability to express milligram quantities of a class XIV myosin in a heterologous system paves the way for detailed structure-function analysis of TgMyoA and identification of small molecule inhibitors. PMID:25231988

  7. Mechanical output of myosin II motors is regulated by myosin filament size and actin network mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Samantha; Alberts, Jonathan; Gardel, Margaret; Munro, Edwin

    2013-03-01

    The interactions of bipolar myosin II filaments with actin arrays are a predominate means of generating forces in numerous physiological processes including muscle contraction and cell migration. However, how the spatiotemporal regulation of these forces depends on motor mechanochemistry, bipolar filament size, and local actin mechanics is unknown. Here, we simulate myosin II motors with an agent-based model in which the motors have been benchmarked against experimental measurements. Force generation occurs in two distinct regimes characterized either by stable tension maintenance or by stochastic buildup and release; transitions between these regimes occur by changes to duty ratio and myosin filament size. The time required for building force to stall scales inversely with the stiffness of a network and the actin gliding speed of a motor. Finally, myosin motors are predicted to contract a network toward stiffer regions, which is consistent with experimental observations. Our representation of myosin motors can be used to understand how their mechanical and biochemical properties influence their observed behavior in a variety of in vitro and in vivo contexts.

  8. Reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum content of releasable Ca2+ in rat soleus muscle fibres after eccentric contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J S; Sahlin, K; Ørtenblad, N

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The purpose was to evaluate the effects of fatiguing eccentric contractions (EC) on calcium (Ca2+) handling properties in mammalian type I muscles. We hypothesized that EC reduces both endogenous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) content of releasable Ca2+ (eSRCa2+) and myofibrillar Ca2+ sensitivity...

  9. Sub-sarcolemmal swelling of sarcoplasmic reticulum after isometric contractions in rat semimembranosus lateralis muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, M.E.T.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; Friden, J.

    1999-01-01

    The decline in isometric force, swelling of sarcoplasmic reticulum and loss of desmin was measured in semimembranosus lateralis muscle of male Wistar rats immediately after a short series of brief (500 ms) maximal isometric contractions. For the active muscle, the series ended below (protocol A) and

  10. Effects of boldine on mouse diaphragm and sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J J; Cheng, Y W

    1998-02-01

    The effects of boldine [(S)-2,9-dihydroxy-1,10-dimethoxyaporphine], a major alkaloid in the leaves and bark of boldo (Peumus boldus Mol.), on skeletal muscle were studied using mouse diaphragm and isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles. Boldine, at 10-200 microM, has little effect on the muscle-evoked twitches; however, the ryanodine-induced contracture was potentiated dose-dependently. At higher concentrations of 300 microM, boldine by itself induced muscle contracture of two phases, which were caused by the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and induction of Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site, the sarcoplasmic reticulum, respectively. When tested with isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles, boldine dose-dependently induced Ca2+ release from actively loaded sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from skeletal muscle of rabbit or rat which was inhibited by ruthenium red, suggesting that the release was through the Ca2+ release channel, also known as the ryanodine receptor. Boldine also dose-dependently increased apparent [3H]-ryanodine binding with the EC50 value of 50 microM. In conclusion, we have shown that boldine could sensitize the ryanodine receptor and induce Ca2+ release from the internal Ca2+ storage site of skeletal muscle.

  11. Effect of losartan on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ handing proteins in heart failure rabbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚艳

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of losartan on mRNA expression of myocardial sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium handling proteins (SERCA2, RyR2 and PLB) and the role of which in prevention of chronic heart failure in rabbit. Methods After chronic heart failure was

  12. Cargo binding activates myosin VIIA motor function in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tsuyoshi; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Ikebe, Reiko; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2011-04-26

    Myosin VIIA, thought to be involved in human auditory function, is a gene responsible for human Usher syndrome type 1B, which causes hearing and visual loss. Recent studies have suggested that it can move processively if it forms a dimer. Nevertheless, it exists as a monomer in vitro, unlike the well-known two-headed processive myosin Va. Here we studied the molecular mechanism, which is currently unknown, of activating myosin VIIA as a cargo-transporting motor. Human myosin VIIA was present throughout cytosol, but it moved to the tip of filopodia upon the formation of dimer induced by dimer-inducing reagent. The forced dimer of myosin VIIA translocated its cargo molecule, MyRip, to the tip of filopodia, whereas myosin VIIA without the forced dimer-forming module does not translocate to the filopodial tips. These results suggest that dimer formation of myosin VIIA is important for its cargo-transporting activity. On the other hand, myosin VIIA without the forced dimerization module became translocated to the filopodial tips in the presence of cargo complex, i.e., MyRip/Rab27a, and transported its cargo complex to the tip. Coexpression of MyRip promoted the association of myosin VIIA to vesicles and the dimer formation. These results suggest that association of myosin VIIA monomers with membrane via the MyRip/Rab27a complex facilitates the cargo-transporting activity of myosin VIIA, which is achieved by cluster formation on the membrane, where it possibly forms a dimer. Present findings support that MyRip, a cargo molecule, functions as an activator of myosin VIIA transporter function.

  13. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P.; Slayter, H. S.

    1991-01-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myos...

  14. Myosin Assembly, Maintenance and Degradation in Muscle: Role of the Chaperone UNC-45 in Myosin Thick Filament Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Pilgrim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Myofibrillogenesis in striated muscle cells requires a precise ordered pathway to assemble different proteins into a linear array of sarcomeres. The sarcomere relies on interdigitated thick and thin filaments to ensure muscle contraction, as well as properly folded and catalytically active myosin head. Achieving this organization requires a series of protein folding and assembly steps. The folding of the myosin head domain requires chaperone activity to attain its functional conformation. Folded or unfolded myosin can spontaneously assemble into short myosin filaments, but further assembly requires the short and incomplete myosin filaments to assemble into the developing thick filament. These longer filaments are then incorporated into the developing sarcomere of the muscle. Both myosin folding and assembly require factors to coordinate the formation of the thick filament in the sarcomere and these factors include chaperone molecules. Myosin folding and sarcomeric assembly requires association of classical chaperones as well as folding cofactors such as UNC-45. Recent research has suggested that UNC-45 is required beyond initial myosin head folding and may be directly or indirectly involved in different stages of myosin thick filament assembly, maintenance and degradation.

  15. Cargo recognition and cargo-mediated regulation of unconventional myosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qing; Li, Jianchao; Zhang, Mingjie

    2014-10-21

    Organized motions are hallmarks of living organisms. Such motions range from collective cell movements during development and muscle contractions at the macroscopic scale all the way down to cellular cargo (e.g., various biomolecules and organelles) transportation and mechanoforce sensing at more microscopic scales. Energy required for these biological motions is almost invariably provided by cellular chemical fuels in the form of nucleotide triphosphate. Biological systems have designed a group of nanoscale engines, known as molecular motors, to convert cellular chemical fuels into mechanical energy. Molecular motors come in various forms including cytoskeleton motors (myosin, kinesin, and dynein), nucleic-acid-based motors, cellular membrane-based rotary motors, and so on. The main focus of this Account is one subfamily of actin filament-based motors called unconventional myosins (other than muscle myosin II, the remaining myosins are collectively referred to as unconventional myosins). In general, myosins can use ATP to fuel two types of mechanomotions: dynamic tethering actin filaments with various cellular compartments or structures and actin filament-based intracellular transport. In contrast to rich knowledge accumulated over many decades on ATP hydrolyzing motor heads and their interactions with actin filaments, how various myosins recognize their specific cargoes and whether and how cargoes can in return regulate functions of motors are less understood. Nonetheless, a series of biochemical and structural investigations in the past few years, including works from our own laboratory, begin to shed lights on these latter questions. Some myosins (e.g., myosin-VI) can function both as cellular transporters and as mechanical tethers. To function as a processive transporter, myosins need to form dimers or multimers. To be a mechanical tether, a monomeric myosin is sufficient. It has been shown for myosin-VI that its cellular cargo proteins can play critical roles

  16. Shrimp allergy beyond Tropomyosin in Italy: clinical relevance of Arginine Kinase, Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein and Hemocyanin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giuffrida, M G; Villalta, D; Mistrello, G; Amato, S; Asero, R

    2014-01-01

    .... We detected the prevalence of arginine kinase and sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein sensitization, and identified a high molecular weight allergen that is frequently recognized by Italian shrimp-allergic patients...

  17. Calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum in the presence of organophosphorus insecticide methyl-parathion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasiak, J. [Lodz Univ. (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Using an isotope labelling technique it has been shown that an organophosphorus insecticide methyl parathion (0,0-diethyl 0-4-nitrophenyl phosphorothionate) depressed calcium uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from rabbit hind leg muscle. The effect was significant for insecticide concentrations of 50 and 100 {mu}M and was dose-dependent. The insecticide exerted a more pronounced effect on calcium uptake in the presence of ATP in the reticulum environment than in the absence of ATP. The inhibitory action of methyl parathion on Ca{sup 2+} accumulation by sarcoplasmic reticulum can cause a rise in myoplasmic free Ca{sup 2+}, the essential prerequisite for contracture activation. Because methyl parathion, as well as other organophosphorus insecticides, is primarily neurotoxic, evidence of non-specific effect could be important for assessing its environmental safety. (author). 20 refs, 2 figs.

  18. Time Course of the Response of Myofibrillar and Sarcoplasmic Protein Metabolism to Unweighting of the Soleus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Kathryn A.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Tischler, Marc E.

    1993-01-01

    Contributions of altered in vivo protein synthesis and degradation to unweighting atrophy of the soleus muscle in tail-suspended young female rats were analyzed daily for up to 6 days. Specific changes in myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins were also evaluated to assess their contributions to the loss of total protein. Synthesis of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins was estimated by intramuscular (IM) injection and total protein by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of flooding doses of H-3-phenylaianine. Total protein loss was greatest during the first 3 days following suspension and was a consequence of the loss of myofibrillar rather than sarcoplasmic proteins. However, synthesis of total myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins diminished in parallel beginning in the first 24 hours. Therefore sarcoplasmic proteins must be spared due to a decrease in their degradation. In contrast, myofibrillar protein degradation increased, thus explaining the elevated degradation of the total pool. Following 72 hours of suspension, protein synthesis remained low, but the rate of myofibrillar protein loss diminished, suggesting a slowing of degradation. These various results show acute loss of protein during unweighting atrophy is a consequence of decreased synthesis and increased degradation of myofibrillar proteins, and sarcoplasmic proteins are spared due to slower degradation, likely explaining the sparing of plasma membrane receptors. Based on other published data, we propose that the slowing of atrophy after the initial response may be attributed to an increased effect of insulin.

  19. Alterations in rat cardiac myosin isozymes induced by whole-body irradiation are prevented by 3,5,3'-L-triiodothyronine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litten, R.Z.; Fein, H.G.; Gainey, G.T.; Walden, T.L.; Smallridge, R.C. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Changes in cardiac myosin isozymes and serum thyroid hormone levels were investigated in rats following 10 Gy whole-body gamma irradiation. The percent beta-myosin heavy chain increased from 21.3 {plus minus} 1.8 to 28.1 {plus minus} 6.8 (NS) at 3-day postirradiation, 37.7 {plus minus} 1.9 (P less than .001) at 6-day postirradiation, and 43.8 {plus minus} 3.3 (P less than .001) at 9-day postirradiation. Along with the change in myosin isozymes was a significant 53% decrease (P less than .001) in the serum thyroxine (T4) level by day 3 postirradiation, remaining depressed through day 9 postirradiation. The serum 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) level, however, was normal until day 9, when significant depression was also observed. In contrast, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) level was significantly increased by fourfold at day 3, returning to near normal values by day 9 postirradiation. Daily injections of physiological doses of T3 (0.3 microgram/100 g body weight) prevented the change in the myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation. Daily pharmacological injections of T3 (3.0 micrograms/100 g body weight) to the irradiated rats produced a further decrease in the percent beta-myosin heavy chain (below control values) indicating tissue hyperthyroidism. Thus, this study suggests that the change in myosin isozymes following whole-body irradiation is caused by an alteration in thyroid hormone activity.

  20. [Calcium transport in sarcoplasmic reticulum in the presence of AR-L 115 BS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, W

    1981-01-01

    2-[(2-Methoxy-4-methylsulfinyl)phenyl]-1H-imidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (AR-L 115 BS) is a substance with positive inotropic activity which does not influence the activity of the sarcoplasmic calcium pump. It can, therefore, be expected that AR-L 115 BS does not interfere with the distribution and movement of calcium in the resting and active muscle.

  1. Transient kinetics of Ca2+ transport of sarcoplasmic reticulum. A comparison of cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, M; Wang, T; Mandel, F; Froehlich, J P; Schwartz, A

    1978-12-25

    Current evidence supports similar functions and mechanisms for cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (CSR) as for skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SSR). It is thought that the slower relaxation rate of cardiac muscle compared to fast skeletal muscle reflects the lower ATPase activity and calcium transport of CSR. Possible quantitative differences is phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, and calcium transport of the isolated preparations are studied using a quench-flow apparatus. The results show that both CSR and SSR bind calcium tightly in the absence of ATP, and coupling of E approximately P formation and calcium transport occurs in the transient phase of ATP hydrolysis. The rate of phosphorylation (t-1/2 - 10 ms) of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) preloaded with calcium is the same for cardiac and skeletal preparations. However, the rates of dissociation of extra vesicular calcium (10 s-1 versus 15 s-1), phosphorylation of calcium-free SR, and dephosphorylation of E approximately P (8 s-1 versus 12 s-1) are lower for CSR than for SSR. By computer simulation, the apparent rate constants associated with the reduced rates of phosphorylation of calcium-free SR were: 12 s-1 for CSR and 63 s-1 for SSR in the presence of high Mg2+. The difference in the rates may be partly responsible for the lower levels of ATPase and calcium transport activity with characterize cardiac muscle preparations.

  2. Minor sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane components that modulate excitation–contraction coupling in striated muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, Susan; Vukcevic, Mirko; Maj, Marcin; Thurnheer, Raphael; Mosca, Barbara; Zorzato, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    In striated muscle, activation of contraction is initiated by membrane depolarisation caused by an action potential, which triggers the release of Ca2+ stored in the sarcoplasmic reticulum by a process called excitation–contraction coupling. Excitation–contraction coupling occurs via a highly sophisticated supramolecular signalling complex at the junction between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the transverse tubules. It is generally accepted that the core components of the excitation–contraction coupling machinery are the dihydropyridine receptors, ryanodine receptors and calsequestrin, which serve as voltage sensor, Ca2+ release channel, and Ca2+ storage protein, respectively. Nevertheless, a number of additional proteins have been shown to be essential both for the structural formation of the machinery involved in excitation–contraction coupling and for its fine tuning. In this review we discuss the functional role of minor sarcoplasmic reticulum protein components. The definition of their roles in excitation–contraction coupling is important in order to understand how mutations in genes involved in Ca2+ signalling cause neuromuscular disorders. PMID:19403606

  3. Effect of compound huangjing oral liquid on myocardial myosin heavy-chain in rats with heart failure%复方黄精口服液对心力衰竭大鼠心肌肌球蛋白重链变化的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈金水; 吴天敏; 林圣远; 杜建; 吴可贵; 王华军; 陈小明

    2005-01-01

    every two days, totally for 8 days, in which, the dose of adriamycin was same as adriamycin group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: To observe the changes of Left ventricular weight and body weight (LVW/BW), α-MHC (myosin heavy-chain)and β-MHC.RESULTS: In the whole experiment, of 66 experimental animals, 5 rats in adriamycin group, 4 rats in small-dose group, 2 rats in moderate-dose group, 3 rats in large-dose group were died from obvious congestive heart failure, finally, 47 rats entered result analysis. Compared with normal group, in adriamycin group, α-MHC was reduced by 20.88% (P < 0.01), β-MHC was increased by 50.93% (P < 0.01) and LVW/BW was increased by 33.83% (P < 0.01). After medication, myocardial β-MHC was transformed to α-MHC; compared with adriamycin group, α-MHC in every medical group was increased (P < 0.01), β-MHC was decreased (P < 0.01) and LVW/BW was decreased of different degrees (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05); among the above-changes, the results in moderate group were the best.CONCLUSION: Compound huangjing oral liquid alleviates toxicity of heart failure induced by adriamycin, probably due to the dose-dependence improvement of the oral liquid in myocardial α-MHC transformation.

  4. Characteristics of myosin profile in human vastus lateralis muscle in relation to training background.

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    J A Zoladz

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four male volunteers (mean +/- SD: age 25.4+/-5.8 years, height 178.6+/-5.5 cm, body mass 72.1+/-7.7 kg of different training background were investigated and classified into three groups according to their physical activity and sport discipline: untrained students (group A, national and sub-national level endurance athletes (group B, 7.8+/-2.9 years of specialised training and sprint-power athletes (group C, 12.8+/-8.7 years of specialised training. Muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis were analysed histochemically for mATPase and SDH activities, immunohistochemically for fast and slow myosin, and electrophoretically followed by Western immunoblotting for myosin heavy chain (MyHC composition. Significant differences (P<0.05 regarding composition of muscle fibre types and myosin heavy chains were found only between groups A (41.7+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 40.8+/-4.0% of MyHCIIA and 17.5+/-4.0% of MyHCIIX and B (64.3+/-0.8% of MyHCI, 34.0+/-1.4% of MyHCIIA and 1.7+/-1.4% of MyHCIIX and groups A and C (59.6+/-1.6% of MyHCI, 37.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIA and 3.2+/-1.3% of MyHCIIX. Unexpectedly, endurance athletes (group B such as long-distance runners, cyclists and cross country skiers, did not differ from the athletes representing short term, high power output sports (group C such as ice hockey, karate, ski-jumping, volleyball, soccer and modern dance. Furthermore, the relative amount of the fastest MyHCIIX isoform in vastus lateralis muscle was significantly lower in the athletes from group C than in students (group A. We conclude that the myosin profile in the athletes belonging to group C was unfavourable for their sport disciplines. This could be the reason why those athletes did not reach international level despite of several years of training.

  5. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Sarah F; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2016-03-29

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V.

  7. Electron microscopic evidence for the myosin head lever arm mechanism in hydrated myosin filaments using the gas environmental chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoda, Hiroki [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Okabe, Tatsuhiro; Inayoshi, Yuhri [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganeishi, Tokyo184-8588 (Japan); Miyakawa, Takuya; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Tanokura, Masaru [Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Katayama, Eisaku [Graduate School of Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8639 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki [Department of Biosciences, School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Utsunomiya, Tochigiken 320-8551 (Japan); Akimoto, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan); Sugi, Haruo, E-mail: sugi@kyf.biglobe.ne.jp [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Teikyo University, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 173-8605 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We succeeded in recording structural changes of hydrated myosin cross-bridges. {yields} We succeeded in position-marking the cross-bridges with site-directed antibodies. {yields} We recorded cross-bridge movement at different regions in individual cross-bridge. {yields} The movement was smallest at the cross-bridge-subfragment two boundary. {yields} The results provide evidence for the cross-bridge lever arm mechanism. -- Abstract: Muscle contraction results from an attachment-detachment cycle between the myosin heads extending from myosin filaments and the sites on actin filaments. The myosin head first attaches to actin together with the products of ATP hydrolysis, performs a power stroke associated with release of hydrolysis products, and detaches from actin upon binding with new ATP. The detached myosin head then hydrolyses ATP, and performs a recovery stroke to restore its initial position. The strokes have been suggested to result from rotation of the lever arm domain around the converter domain, while the catalytic domain remains rigid. To ascertain the validity of the lever arm hypothesis in muscle, we recorded ATP-induced movement at different regions within individual myosin heads in hydrated myosin filaments, using the gas environmental chamber attached to the electron microscope. The myosin head were position-marked with gold particles using three different site-directed antibodies. The amplitude of ATP-induced movement at the actin binding site in the catalytic domain was similar to that at the boundary between the catalytic and converter domains, but was definitely larger than that at the regulatory light chain in the lever arm domain. These results are consistent with the myosin head lever arm mechanism in muscle contraction if some assumptions are made.

  8. Myosin and Actin Filaments in Muscle: Structures and Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, John M; Paul, Danielle M; Morris, Edward P

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, improvements in electron microscopy and image processing have permitted significantly higher resolutions to be achieved (sometimes <1 nm) when studying isolated actin and myosin filaments. In the case of actin filaments the changing structure when troponin binds calcium ions can be followed using electron microscopy and single particle analysis to reveal what happens on each of the seven non-equivalent pseudo-repeats of the tropomyosin α-helical coiled-coil. In the case of the known family of myosin filaments not only are the myosin head arrangements under relaxing conditions being defined, but the latest analysis, also using single particle methods, is starting to reveal the way that the α-helical coiled-coil myosin rods are packed to give the filament backbones.

  9. Axial disposition of myosin heads in isometrically contracting muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanhuix, J; Bordas, J; Campmany, J; Svensson, A; Bassford, M L; Narayanan, T

    2001-03-01

    Meridional x-ray diffraction diagrams, recorded with high angular resolution, from muscles contracting at the plateau of isometric tension show that the myosin diffraction orders are clusters of peaks. These clusters are due to pronounced interference effects between the myosin diffracting units on either side of the M-line. A theoretical analysis based on the polarity of the myosin (and actin) filaments shows that it is possible to extract phase information from which the axial disposition of the myosin heads can be determined. The results show that each head in a crown pair has a distinct structural disposition. It appears that only one of the heads in the pair stereospecifically interacts with the thin filament at any one time.

  10. Actin filaments on myosin beds: The velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, L.; Magnasco, M. O.; Winkelmann, D. A.; Libchaber, A.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro studies of actin filaments sliding on a myosin-coated surface are analyzed, filament by filament, at a sampling rate of 30 per second. For each filament, the mean arc length coordinate is computed and histograms of instantaneous velocities, along the arc length, are established. Two types of motion are observed, depending on the experimental conditions. The first one is characterized by a homogeneous flow, with well defined velocities. In this regime, specific defects are a constitutive part of the flow. It is observed at high temperature, at high myosin coverage, and with a particular mode of attachment of myosin to the surface. The second regime shows no clear velocity selection, but a broadband distribution. It is characterized by high friction and is observed at low temperature or low myosin density. (c) 1995 The American Physical Society

  11. Kinetic Adaptations of Myosins for Their Diverse Cellular Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-08-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are involved in all aspects of eukaryotic life. Their function ranges from the transport of organelles and cargos to the generation of membrane tension, and the contraction of muscle. The diversity of physiological functions is remarkable, given that all enzymatically active myosins follow a conserved mechanoenzymatic cycle in which the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate is coupled to either actin-based transport or tethering of actin to defined cellular compartments. Kinetic capacities and limitations of a myosin are determined by the extent to which actin can accelerate the hydrolysis of ATP and the release of the hydrolysis products and are indispensably linked to its physiological tasks. This review focuses on kinetic competencies that - together with structural adaptations - result in myosins with unique mechanoenzymatic properties targeted to their diverse cellular functions.

  12. Effects of tetrandrine on calcium transport, protein fluorescences and membrane fluidity of sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L Y; Chen, X; Tian, X L; Yu, X H

    2000-10-01

    To understand whether the molecular mechanism of Tetrandrine (Tet)'s pharmacological effects is concerned with sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium transport so as to be involved in myocardial contractility, we observed the effects of Tet on calcium transport and membrane structure of rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (SR) and rat cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles (CSR). Calcium uptake was monitored with a dual-wavelength spectrophotometer. Protein conformation and fluorescence polarization were measured by fluospectrophotometric method and membrane lipids labelled with fluorescence probes for SR, respectively. 128 micromol l(-1) Tet reduced the initial rate of calcium uptake to 59% of control 6 min after reaction. Tet un-competitively inhibited SR Ca(2+), Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, causing the stoichiometric ratio of SR Ca(2+)/ATP to decrease to 1.43 from 2.0 of control. Inhibitory rates on SR Ca(2+),Mg(2+)-ATPase by Tet were reduced from 60% in the absence of phosphate to 50% in the presence of phosphate and reduced from 92% in 1 mmol l(-1) ATP to 60% in 5 mmol l(-1) ATP. Tet markedly reduced SR intrinsic protein fluorescence, while it slightly decreased the thiol(SH)-modified protein fluorescence of SR labelled with N-(3-pyrene)-maleimide. Tet slightly increased fluorescence polarization in the middle and deep layers of SR membrane lipids labelled with 7- or 12-(9-anthroyloxy) stearic acid (AS) probes, whereas it did not change that of SR labelled with 1, 6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatrine (DPH). These results revealed that prevention of SR calcium uptake by Tet was due to inhibition of the SR calcium pump Ca(2+),Mg(2+)-ATPase, changes in spatial conformation of the pumps protein molecules and a decrease in the extent of motion of membrane lipid molecules, thus altering the regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) and myocardial contractility.

  13. Minimal Mechanochemical Model for the Processivity of Myosin VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yubo; Lowe, Ian; Tehver, Riina

    2014-03-01

    Myosin VI is an ATPase responsible for force generation in cells. It dimerizes upon actin binding, and is proposed to walk along the actin filament. Single headed reaction mechanism of myosin VI is well understood but much of its walking mechanism remains unclear. We aim to construct a minimum model for the myosin VI walking mechanism and explore the minimal requirements for processivity. We constructed a kinetic model for the stepping mechanism of Myosin VI using minimum assumptions. The kinetics of the myosin VI dimer is modeled as a three state linear reaction network with reaction rates extracted from relevant experiments. The time limiting step in in-vitro experiments (low APT concentration) is the diffusion of detached head. In this process the myosin dimer is modeled as a tethered polymer with a flexible joint at the dimerization site. The relevance of this polymer model is checked with coarse-grained simulation. We found that the motor maintains processivity for a wide range of kinetic parameters, however long persistence length for the lever arm is crucial for processivity especially under resistive load.

  14. Digoxin activates sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-release channels: a possible role in cardiac inotropy.

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    1. The effect of digoxin on rapid 45Ca2+ efflux from cardiac and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. Additionally the interaction of digoxin with single cardiac and skeletal muscle SR Ca(2+)-release channels incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers and held under voltage clamp was determined. 2. Digoxin (1 nM) increased the initial rate and amount of Ca(2+)-induced release of 45Ca2+ from cardiac SR vesicles, passively loaded with 45CaCl2, at an extravesicular...

  15. Design and characterization of self-assembled fish sarcoplasmic protein-alginate nanocomplexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm; Wattjes, Jasper;

    2015-01-01

    Macrostructures based on natural polymers are subject to large attention, as the application range is wide within the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study we present nanocomplexes (NCXs) made from electrostatic self-assembly between negatively charged alginate and positively charged...... fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP), prepared by bulk mixing. A concentration screening revealed that there was a range of alginate and FSP concentrations where stable NCXs with similar properties were formed, rather than two exact concentrations. The size of the NCXs was 293 +/- 3 nm, and the zeta...

  16. Impact of resistance exercise during bed rest on skeletal muscle sarcopenia and myosin isoform distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Feeback, D. L.; Talmadge, R. J.; Stevens, B. R.; Lieberman, S. A.; Greenisen, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Because resistance exercise (REx) and bed-rest unloading (BRU) are associated with opposing adaptations, our purpose was to test the efficacy of REx against the effects of 14 days of BRU on the knee-extensor muscle group. Sixteen healthy men were randomly assigned to no exercise (NoEx; n = 8) or REx (n = 8). REx performed five sets of leg press exercise with 80-85% of one repetition maximum (1 RM) every other day during BRU. Muscle samples were removed from the vastus lateralis muscle by percutaneous needle biopsy. Myofiber distribution was determined immunohistochemically with three monoclonal antibodies against myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (I, IIa, IIx). MHC distribution was further assessed by quantitative gel electrophoresis. Dynamic 1-RM leg press and unilateral maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) were determined. Maximal neural activation (root mean squared electromyogram) and rate of torque development (RTD) were measured during MVC. Reductions (P training-specific strength. Unlike spaceflight, BRU did not induce shifts in myosin phenotype. The reported benefits of REx may prove useful in prescribing exercise for astronauts in microgravity.

  17. Cooperative regulation of myosin-S1 binding to actin filaments by a continuous flexible Tm-Tn chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Li, Xiaochuan; Griffiths, Hugh; Geeves, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    The regulation of striated muscle contraction involves cooperative interactions between actin filaments, myosin-S1 (S1), tropomyosin (Tm), troponin (Tn), and calcium. These interactions are modeled by treating overlapping tropomyosins as a continuous flexible chain (CFC), weakly confined by electrostatic interactions with actin. The CFC is displaced locally in opposite directions on the actin surface by the binding of either S1 or Troponin I (TnI) to actin. The apparent rate constants for myosin and TnI binding to and detachment from actin are then intrinsically coupled via the CFC model to the presence of neighboring bound S1s and TnIs. Monte Carlo simulations at prescribed values of the CFC stiffness, the CFC's degree of azimuthal confinement, and the angular displacements caused by the bound proteins were able to predict the stopped-flow transients of S1 binding to regulated F-actin. The transients collected over a large range of calcium concentrations could be well described by adjusting a single calcium-dependent parameter, the rate constant of TnI detachment from actin, k(-I). The resulting equilibrium constant K(B) ≡ 1/K(I) varied sigmoidally with the free calcium, increasing from 0.12 at low calcium (pCa >7) to 12 at high calcium (pCa Hill coefficient of ~2.15. The similarity of the curves for excess-actin and excess-myosin data confirms their allosteric relationship. The spatially explicit calculations confirmed variable sizes for the cooperative units and clustering of bound myosins at low calcium concentrations. Moreover, inclusion of negative cooperativity between myosin units predicted the observed slowing of myosin binding at excess-myosin concentrations.

  18. Allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments drives mutually exclusive binding with cofilin and myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Kien Xuan; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Kijima, Saku T; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Furutani-Umezu, Nozomi; Nakajima, Jun; Noguchi, Taro Q P; Nagasaki, Akira; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2016-10-20

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) of myosin II and cofilin each binds to actin filaments cooperatively and forms clusters along the filaments, but it is unknown whether the two cooperative bindings are correlated and what physiological roles they have. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that HMM-GFP and cofilin-mCherry each bound cooperatively to different parts of actin filaments when they were added simultaneously in 0.2 μM ATP, indicating that the two cooperative bindings are mutually exclusive. In 0.1 mM ATP, the motor domain of myosin (S1) strongly inhibited the formation of cofilin clusters along actin filaments. Under this condition, most actin protomers were unoccupied by S1 at any given moment, suggesting that transiently bound S1 alters the structure of actin filaments cooperatively and/or persistently to inhibit cofilin binding. Consistently, cosedimentation experiments using copolymers of actin and actin-S1 fusion protein demonstrated that the fusion protein affects the neighboring actin protomers, reducing their affinity for cofilin. In reciprocal experiments, cofilin-actin fusion protein reduced the affinity of neighboring actin protomers for S1. Thus, allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments contributes to mutually exclusive cooperative binding of myosin II and cofilin to actin filaments, and presumably to the differential localization of both proteins in cells.

  19. Oxidation of myosin by haem proteins generates myosin radicals and protein cross-links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lametsch, Marianne Lund; Luxford, Catherine; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2008-01-01

    as a result of the reaction with activated haem proteins (horseradish peroxidase/H2O2) and met-myoglobin/H2O2) has been investigated by EPR spectroscopy and amino-acid consumption, product formation has been characterized by HPLC, and changes in protein integrity have been determined by SDS/PAGE. Multiple...... of thiyl and tyrosyl radicals is consistent with the observed consumption of cysteine and tyrosine residues, the detection of di-tyrosine by HPLC and the detection of both reducible (disulfide bond) and non-reducible cross-links between myosin molecules by SDS/PAGE. The time course of radical formation...

  20. Vanadate oligomer inhibition of passive and active Ca2+ translocation by the Ca2+ pump of sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M

    2000-05-30

    'Monovanadate' containing mainly monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric vanadate species or 'decavanadate', containing mainly decameric vanadate species inhibits the passive and the active efflux of Ca2+ through the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump. When the efflux of Ca2+ by sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles is not associated with ATP synthesis both vanadate solutions inhibit the passive efflux of Ca2+. However, only 'decavanadate' exerts noticeable effects when the efflux of Ca2+ is associated with ATP synthesis being the active efflux of Ca2+ almost completely inhibited by decameric species concentration as low as 40 microM.

  1. Down-regulation of the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum ryanodine channel in severely food-restricted rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Vizotto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that myocardial dysfunction induced by food restriction is related to calcium handling. Although cardiac function is depressed in food-restricted animals, there is limited information about the molecular mechanisms that lead to this abnormality. The present study evaluated the effects of food restriction on calcium cycling, focusing on sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2, phospholamban (PLB, and ryanodine channel (RYR2 mRNA expressions in rat myocardium. Male Wistar-Kyoto rats, 60 days old, were submitted to ad libitum feeding (control rats or 50% diet restriction for 90 days. The levels of left ventricle SERCA2, PLB, and RYR2 were measured using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Body and ventricular weights were reduced in 50% food-restricted animals. RYR2 mRNA was significantly decreased in the left ventricle of the food-restricted group (control = 5.92 ± 0.48 vs food-restricted group = 4.84 ± 0.33, P < 0.01. The levels of SERCA2 and PLB mRNA were similar between groups (control = 8.38 ± 0.44 vs food-restricted group = 7.96 ± 0.45, and control = 1.52 ± 0.06 vs food-restricted group = 1.53 ± 0.10, respectively. Down-regulation of RYR2 mRNA expressions suggests that chronic food restriction promotes abnormalities in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

  2. Thermal acclimation to cold alters myosin content and contractile properties of rainbow smelt, Osmerus mordax, red muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, David J; Shiels, Lisa P; Nuthakki, Seshuvardhan; Shuman, Jacie L

    2016-06-01

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax), a eurythermal fish, live in environments from -1.8 to 20°C, with some populations facing substantial annual variation in environmental temperature. These different temperature regimes pose distinct challenges to locomotion by smelt. Steady swimming performance, red muscle function and muscle myosin content were examined to assess the prediction that cold acclimation by smelt will lead to improved steady swimming performance and that any performance shift will be associated with changes in red muscle function and in its myosin heavy chain composition. Cold acclimated (4°C) smelt had a faster maximum steady swimming speed and swam with a higher tailbeat frequency than warm acclimated (10°C) smelt when tested at the same temperature (10°C). Muscle mechanics experiments demonstrated faster contractile properties in the cold acclimated fish when tested at 10°C. The red muscle of cold acclimated smelt had a shorter twitch times, a shorter relaxation times and a higher maximum shortening velocity. In addition, red muscle from cold acclimated fish displayed reduced thermal sensitivity to cold, maintaining higher force levels at 4°C compared to red muscle from warm acclimated fish. Immunohistochemistry suggests shifts in muscle myosin composition and a decrease in muscle cross-sectional area with cold acclimation. Dot blot analysis confirmed a shift in myosin content. Rainbow smelt do show a significant thermal acclimation response to cold. An examination of published values of maximum muscle shortening velocity in fishes suggests that smelt are particularly well suited to high levels of activity in very cold water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Independent specialisation of myosin II paralogues in muscle vs. non-muscle functions during early animal evolution: a ctenophore perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayraud Cyrielle

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin II (or Myosin Heavy Chain II, MHCII is a family of molecular motors involved in the contractile activity of animal muscle cells but also in various other cellular processes in non-muscle cells. Previous phylogenetic analyses of bilaterian MHCII genes identified two main clades associated respectively with smooth/non-muscle cells (MHCIIa and striated muscle cells (MHCIIb. Muscle cells are generally thought to have originated only once in ancient animal history, and decisive insights about their early evolution are expected to come from expression studies of Myosin II genes in the two non-bilaterian phyla that possess muscles, the Cnidaria and Ctenophora. Results We have uncovered three MHCII paralogues in the ctenophore species Pleurobrachia pileus. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the MHCIIa / MHCIIb duplication is more ancient than the divergence between extant metazoan lineages. The ctenophore MHCIIa gene (PpiMHCIIa has an expression pattern akin to that of "stem cell markers" (Piwi, Vasa… and is expressed in proliferating cells. We identified two MHCIIb genes that originated from a ctenophore-specific duplication. PpiMHCIIb1 represents the exclusively muscular form of myosin II in ctenophore, while PpiMHCIIb2 is expressed in non-muscle cells of various types. In parallel, our phalloidin staining and TEM observations highlight the structural complexity of ctenophore musculature and emphasize the experimental interest of the ctenophore tentacle root, in which myogenesis is spatially ordered and strikingly similar to striated muscle formation in vertebrates. Conclusion MHCIIa expression in putative stem cells/proliferating cells probably represents an ancestral trait, while specific involvement of some MHCIIa genes in smooth muscle fibres is a uniquely derived feature of the vertebrates. That one ctenophore MHCIIb paralogue (PpiMHCIIb2 has retained MHCIIa-like expression features furthermore suggests that muscular

  4. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Abrams

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11. Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt, which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y and coil-coiled (L1287M domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt. Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress.

  5. Global fit analysis of myosin-5b motility reveals thermodynamics of Mg2+-sensitive acto-myosin-ADP states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Chizhov

    Full Text Available Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of the mechanochemical cycle of myosin motors are essential for understanding the mechanism of energy conversion. Here, we report our investigation of temperature and free Mg(2+-ion dependencies of sliding velocities of a high duty ratio class-5 myosin motor, myosin-5b from D. discoideum using in vitro motility assays. Previous studies have shown that the sliding velocity of class-5 myosins obeys modulation by free Mg(2+-ions. Free Mg(2+-ions affect ADP release kinetics and the dwell time of actin-attached states. The latter determines the maximal velocity of actin translocation in the sliding filament assay. We measured the temperature dependence of sliding velocity in the range from 5 to 55°C at two limiting free Mg(2+-ion concentrations. Arrhenius plots demonstrated non-linear behavior. Based on this observation we propose a kinetic model, which explains both sensitivity towards free Mg(2+-ions and non-linearity of the temperature dependence of sliding velocity. According to this model, velocity is represented as a simple analytical function of temperature and free Mg(2+-ion concentrations. This function has been applied to global non-linear fit analysis of three data sets including temperature and magnesium (at 20°C dependence of sliding velocity. As a result we obtain thermodynamic parameters (ΔH(Mg and ΔS(Mg of a fast equilibrium between magnesium free (AM·D and magnesium bound acto-myosin-ADP (AM· Mg(2+D states and the corresponding enthalpic barriers associated with ADP release (ΔH1(‡ and ΔH2(‡. The herein presented integrative approach of data analysis based on global fitting can be applied to the remaining steps of the acto-myosin ATPase cycle facilitating the determination of energetic parameters and thermodynamics of acto-myosin interactions.

  6. Calcium-regulated import of myosin IC into the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Ivan V; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2016-06-01

    Myosin IC is a molecular motor involved in intracellular transport, cell motility, and transcription. Its mechanical properties are regulated by calcium via calmodulin binding, and its functions in the nucleus depend on import from the cytoplasm. The import has recently been shown to be mediated by the nuclear localization signal located within the calmodulin-binding domain. In the present paper, it is demonstrated that mutations in the calmodulin-binding sequence shift the intracellular distribution of myosin IC to the nucleus. The redistribution is displayed by isoform B, described originally as the "nuclear myosin," but is particularly pronounced with isoform C, the normally cytoplasmic isoform. Furthermore, experimental elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration induces a rapid import of myosin into the nucleus. The import is blocked by the importin β inhibitor importazole. These findings are consistent with a mechanism whereby calmodulin binding prevents recognition of the nuclear localization sequence by importin β, and the steric inhibition of import is released by cell signaling leading to the intracellular calcium elevation. The results establish a mechanistic connection between the calcium regulation of the motor function of myosin IC in the cytoplasm and the induction of its import into the nucleus. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Influence of the cardiac myosin hinge region on contractile activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, S S; Krueger, J W; Sellers, J R; Cuda, G; Caulfield, J B; Norton, P; Slayter, H S

    1991-06-01

    The participation of cardiac myosin hinge in contractility was investigated by in vitro motility and ATPase assays and by measurements of sarcomere shortening. The effect on contractile activity was analyzed using an antibody directed against a 20-amino acid peptide within the hinge region of myosin. This antibody bound specifically at the hinge at a distance of 55 nm from the S1/S2 junction, was specific to human, dog, and rat cardiac myosins, did not crossreact with gizzard or skeletal myosin, and had no effect on ATPase activity of purified S1 and myofibrils. However, it completely suppressed the movement of actin filaments in in vitro motility assays and reduced active shortening of sarcomeres of skinned cardiac myocytes by half. Suppression of motion by the anti-hinge antibody may reflect a mechanical constraint imposed by the antibody upon the mobility of the S2 region of myosin. The results suggest that the steps in the mechanochemical energy transduction can be separately influenced through S2.

  8. Reciprocal and dynamic polarization of planar cell polarity core components and myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Smith, Erin; Kourakis, Matthew J; Reeves, Wendy; Veeman, Michael; Smith, William C

    2015-04-13

    The Ciona notochord displays planar cell polarity (PCP), with anterior localization of Prickle (Pk) and Strabismus (Stbm). We report that a myosin is polarized anteriorly in these cells and strongly colocalizes with Stbm. Disruption of the actin/myosin machinery with cytochalasin or blebbistatin disrupts polarization of Pk and Stbm, but not of myosin complexes, suggesting a PCP-independent aspect of myosin localization. Wash out of cytochalasin restored Pk polarization, but not if done in the presence of blebbistatin, suggesting an active role for myosin in core PCP protein localization. On the other hand, in the pk mutant line, aimless, myosin polarization is disrupted in approximately one third of the cells, indicating a reciprocal action of core PCP signaling on myosin localization. Our results indicate a complex relationship between the actomyosin cytoskeleton and core PCP components in which myosin is not simply a downstream target of PCP signaling, but also required for PCP protein localization.

  9. Association of six YFP-myosin XI-tail fusions with mobile plant cell organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Maureen R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosins are molecular motors that carry cargo on actin filaments in eukaryotic cells. Seventeen myosin genes have been identified in the nuclear genome of Arabidopsis. The myosin genes can be divided into two plant-specific subfamilies, class VIII with four members and class XI with 13 members. Class XI myosins are related to animal and fungal myosin class V that are responsible for movement of particular vesicles and organelles. Organelle localization of only one of the 13 Arabidopsis myosin XI (myosin XI-6; At MYA2, which is found on peroxisomes, has so far been reported. Little information is available concerning the remaining 12 class XI myosins. Results We investigated 6 of the 13 class XI Arabidopsis myosins. cDNAs corresponding to the tail region of 6 myosin genes were generated and incorporated into a vector to encode YFP-myosin tail fusion proteins lacking the motor domain. Chimeric genes incorporating tail regions of myosin XI-5 (At MYA1, myosin XI-6 (At MYA2, myosin XI-8 (At XI-B, myosin XI-15 (At XI-I, myosin XI-16 (At XI-J and myosin XI-17 (At XI-K were expressed transiently. All YFP-myosin-tail fusion proteins were targeted to small organelles ranging in size from 0.5 to 3.0 μm. Despite the absence of a motor domain, the fluorescently-labeled organelles were motile in most cells. Tail cropping experiments demonstrated that the coiled-coil region was required for specific localization and shorter tail regions were inadequate for targeting. Myosin XI-6 (At MYA2, previously reported to localize to peroxisomes by immunofluorescence, labeled both peroxisomes and vesicles when expressed as a YFP-tail fusion. None of the 6 YFP-myosin tail fusions interacted with chloroplasts, and only one YFP-tail fusion appeared to sometimes co-localize with fluorescent proteins targeted to Golgi and mitochondria. Conclusion 6 myosin XI tails, extending from the coiled-coil region to the C-terminus, label specific vesicles and

  10. Inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate activates a calcium channel in isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Isla, B. A.; Irribarra, V.; Oberhauser, A.; Larralde, L.; Bull, R.; Hidalgo, C.; Jaimovich, E.

    1988-01-01

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles isolated from frog skeletal muscle display high conductance calcium channels when fused into phospholipid bilayers. The channels are selective for calcium and barium over Tris. The fractional open time was voltage-independent (-40 to +25 mV), but was steeply dependent on the free cis [Ca2+] (P0 = 0.02 at 10 microM cis Ca2+ and 0.77 at 150 microM Ca2+; estimated Hill coefficient: 1.6). Addition of ATP (1 mM; cis) further increased P0 from 0.77 to 0.94. Calcium activation was reversed by addition of EGTA to the cis compartment. Magnesium (2 mM) increased the frequency of rapid closures and 8 mM magnesium decreased the current amplitude from 3.4 to 1.2 pA at 0 mV, suggesting a reversible fast blockade. Addition of increasing concentrations of inositol (1, 4, 5)-triphosphate (cis), increased P0 from 0.10 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- SEM) in the control to 0.85 +/- 0.02 at 50 microM in an approximately sigmoidal fashion, with an apparent half-maximal activation at 15 microM inositol (1, 4, 5)-trisphosphate in the presence of 40 microM cis Ca2+. Lower concentrations of this agonist were required to produce a significant increase in P0 when 10 microM or less cis Ca2+ were used. The channel was blocked by the addition to the cis compartment of either 0.5 mM lanthanum, 0.5 microM ruthenium red, or 200 nM ryanodine, all known inhibitors of Ca2+ release from sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. These results demonstrate the presence of calcium channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum from frog skeletal muscle with a pharmacological profile consistent with a role in excitation contraction coupling and with the hypothesis that inositol ( 1,4,5)-trisphosphate is a physiological agonist in this process. PMID:2852037

  11. Myosin domain evolution and the primary divergence of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2005-08-25

    Eukaryotic cells have two contrasting cytoskeletal and ciliary organizations. The simplest involves a single cilium-bearing centriole, nucleating a cone of individual microtubules (probably ancestral for unikonts: animals, fungi, Choanozoa and Amoebozoa). In contrast, bikonts (plants, chromists and all other protozoa) were ancestrally biciliate with a younger anterior cilium, converted every cell cycle into a dissimilar posterior cilium and multiple ciliary roots of microtubule bands. Here we show by comparative genomic analysis that this fundamental cellular dichotomy also involves different myosin molecular motors. We found 37 different protein domain combinations, often lineage-specific, and many previously unidentified. The sequence phylogeny and taxonomic distribution of myosin domain combinations identified five innovations that strongly support unikont monophyly and the primary bikont/unikont bifurcation. We conclude that the eukaryotic cenancestor (last common ancestor) had a cilium, mitochondria, pseudopodia, and myosins with three contrasting domain combinations and putative functions.

  12. Preliminary research on myosin light chain kinase in rabbit liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Ren; Hua-Qing Zhu; Zhao-Feng Luo; Qing Zhou; Yuan Wang; Yu-Zhen Wang

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study preliminarily the properties of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) in rabbit liver. METHODS: The expression of MLCK was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR);the MLCK was obtained from rabbit liver, and its activity was analyzed by γ-32P incorporation technique to detect the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. RESULTS: MLCK was expressed in rabbit liver, and the activity of the enzyme was similar to rabbit smooth muscle MLCK, and calmodulin-dependent. When the concentration was 0.65 mg-L-1, the activity was at the highest level. CONCLUSION: MLCK expressed in rabbit liver may catalyze the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, which may play important roles in the regulation of hepatic cell functions.

  13. Role of myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Guo, Xiaohua; Xu, Jing; Wang, Weiju; Li, Bingling; Huang, Qiaobing; Su, Lei; Xu, Qiulin

    2016-03-01

    We have previously reported that advanced glycation end products activated Rho-associated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, causing endothelial hyperpermeability. However, the mechanisms involved were not fully clarified. Here, we explored the role of myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Myosin light chain phosphorylation significantly increased by advanced glycation end products in endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating that myosin light chain phosphorylation is involved in the advanced glycation end product pathway. Advanced glycation end products also induced myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit 1 phosphorylation, and small interfering RNA knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, or blocking myosin light chain kinase with its inhibitor, ML-7, or small interfering RNA abated advanced glycation end product-induced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Advanced glycation end product-induced F-actin rearrangement and endothelial hyperpermeability were also diminished by inhibition of receptor for advanced glycation end product or myosin light chain kinase signalling. Moreover, inhibiting myosin light chain kinase with ML-7 or blocking receptor for advanced glycation end product with its neutralizing antibody attenuated advanced glycation end product-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Our findings suggest a novel role for myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability.

  14. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  15. Myosin IIA deficient cells migrate efficiently despite reduced traction forces at cell periphery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H. Jorrisch

    2013-02-01

    Cell motility is a cornerstone of embryogenesis, tissue remodeling and repair, and cancer cell invasion. It is generally thought that migrating cells grab and exert traction force onto the extracellular matrix in order to pull the cell body forward. While previous studies have shown that myosin II deficient cells migrate efficiently, whether these cells exert traction forces during cell migration in the absence of the major contractile machinery is currently unknown. Using an array of micron-sized pillars as a force sensor and shRNA specific to each myosin II isoform (A and B, we analyzed how myosin IIA and IIB individually regulate cell migration and traction force generation. Myosin IIA and IIB localized preferentially to the leading edge where traction force was greatest, and the trailing edge, respectively. When individual myosin II isoforms were depleted by shRNA, myosin IIA deficient cells lost actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, whereas myosin IIB deficient cells maintained similar actin organization and focal adhesions as wild-type cells. Interestingly, myosin IIA deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells on both a rigid surface and a pillar array, yet myosin IIA deficient cells exerted significantly less traction force at the leading edge than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells. These results suggest that, in the absence of myosin IIA mediated force-generating machinery, cells move with minimal traction forces at the cell periphery, thus demonstrating the remarkable ability of cells to adapt and migrate.

  16. Myosin IIA deficient cells migrate efficiently despite reduced traction forces at cell periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorrisch, Melissa H; Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2013-04-15

    Cell motility is a cornerstone of embryogenesis, tissue remodeling and repair, and cancer cell invasion. It is generally thought that migrating cells grab and exert traction force onto the extracellular matrix in order to pull the cell body forward. While previous studies have shown that myosin II deficient cells migrate efficiently, whether these cells exert traction forces during cell migration in the absence of the major contractile machinery is currently unknown. Using an array of micron-sized pillars as a force sensor and shRNA specific to each myosin II isoform (A and B), we analyzed how myosin IIA and IIB individually regulate cell migration and traction force generation. Myosin IIA and IIB localized preferentially to the leading edge where traction force was greatest, and the trailing edge, respectively. When individual myosin II isoforms were depleted by shRNA, myosin IIA deficient cells lost actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, whereas myosin IIB deficient cells maintained similar actin organization and focal adhesions as wild-type cells. Interestingly, myosin IIA deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells on both a rigid surface and a pillar array, yet myosin IIA deficient cells exerted significantly less traction force at the leading edge than wild-type or myosin IIB deficient cells. These results suggest that, in the absence of myosin IIA mediated force-generating machinery, cells move with minimal traction forces at the cell periphery, thus demonstrating the remarkable ability of cells to adapt and migrate.

  17. Detection of myosin immunoanalogue in the yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, M; Rodier, M H; el Moudni, B; Quellard, N; Jacquemin, J L

    1995-06-01

    Detection and localization of myosin immunoanalogue protein in the yeast Candida albicans were achieved by immunoblotting, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and immunoelectron microscopy. A polypeptide with an M(r) about 110,000, from cytosolic extract and insoluble fraction in the corresponding membrane pellet, was reacted with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies raised against vertebrate muscle myosin. This protein was located by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in the cell cortex along the plasmalemma, in the cytoplasm, and in the septum corresponding to bud scar region situated between the yeast-mother cell and the bud.

  18. Alterations in mitochondria and sarcoplasmic reticulum from heart and skeletal muscle of horizontally casted primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordahl, L. A.; Stone, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontally body-casted rhesus monkeys are used as an animal model in order to study the physiological changes known as cardiovascular deconditioning which occur during weightless conditions. No difference was found between the experimental and control animals in heart mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation which indicates that no apparent changes occurred in the primary energy-producing system of the heart. A marked increase in cytochrome oxidase activity was observed in the casted primate heart mitochondria compared to controls, while a 25% decrease in respiratory substrate-supported calcium uptake was found in casted primate heart mitochondria compared to controls. Sacroplasmic reticulum isolated from the primate hearts revealed marked changes in calcium transport activities. It is concluded that the marked depression in cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum functions indicates altered calcium homeostasis in the casted-primate heart which could be a factor in cardiovascular deconditioning.

  19. Chemical and Functional Characterization of Sarcoplasmic Proteins from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas Mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Linda Lopez-Enriquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modification of pH and NaCl concentration changed the physicochemical properties of sarcoplasmic proteins (SP from jumbo squid mantle and consequently their functional properties. Better results of emulsifying activity index (EAI and foam capacity (FC were exhibited at pH 11 in NaCl absence due to higher solubility. But better emulsifying stability index (ESI was obtained at pH 11 in 0.5 M NaCl, while, foaming stability (FS was better at pH near to isoelectric point (pI. These results suggest that SP from jumbo squid may be a promising ingredient, whose functional properties can be manipulated by changing pH and NaCl concentration.

  20. Conformational changes in the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum detected using phosphorescence polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restall, C J; Coke, M; Murray, E K; Chapman, D

    1985-02-28

    The technique of time-averaged phosphorescence has been used to study the interaction of calcium ions and ATP with the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. The presence of excess calcium ions was found to cause a 20% decrease in the phosphorescence emission anisotropy. This is interpreted as being due to a conformational change in the protein and is supported by data from time-resolved phosphorescence measurements which also show a lowering of the anisotropy. This change in the decay of the emission anisotropy is associated with only minor changes in the rotational relaxation time of the protein and is again suggestive of a conformational change in the protein. In some cases ATP was also observed to lower the time-averaged phosphorescence anisotropy possibly via an interaction with the low-affinity regulatory site of the protein.

  1. Taurine protects cardiac contractility in killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, by enhancing sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+) cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Elenor F; MacCormack, Tyson J

    2017-05-23

    Intracellular taurine is abundant in many animals and it influences an array of physiological processes, including osmoregulation, metabolism, and cardiac contractility. Taurine is an important osmolyte in teleost hearts, but its role in stress tolerance, cardiac metabolism, and contractility has not been assessed. The goal of this study was to determine if ventricular taurine concentration changes in response to environmental stress and to characterize its influence on contractility. Cardiac taurine concentrations varied in killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) but were generally maintained following acute environmental challenges. In isometrically contracting ventricular strips, supplemental taurine (40 mmol L(-1)) protected peak tension development (F max) at high stimulation frequencies, an effect abolished by treatment with ryanodine, a blocker of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release. In the presence of ryanodine, taurine-treated preparations were also better able to maintain F max at supraphysiological extracellular Ca(2+) levels, but a prior anoxia exposure abolished this effect. Taurine had no impact on basal F max during or after anoxia, but it provided additive protection to high-frequency contractility post-anoxia. Tissue oxygen consumption and extracellular glucose utilization were unaffected by taurine in non-contracting preparations, indicating that it does not impact energy metabolism. Overall, the results suggest that cardiac taurine levels are well maintained on acute time scales in this highly stress-tolerant species. Supplemental taurine has no effect on aerobic metabolism in vitro, but it significantly improved cardiac contractility in a manner dependent upon sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) cycling. The data indicate that taurine likely plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac performance in teleosts.

  2. H+ countertransport and electrogenicity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump in reconstituted proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Carroll, S; Rigaud, J L; Inesi, G

    1993-04-01

    The Ca2+ transport adenosine triphosphatase of sarcoplasmic reticulum was reconstituted in unilamellar liposomes prepared by reverse-phase evaporation. The size of the resulting proteoliposomes was similar to that of native sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, but their protein content was much lower, with a protein/lipid ratio (wt/wt) of 1:40-160, as compared with 1:1 in the native membrane. The proteoliposomes sustained adenosine triphosphate-dependent Ca2+ uptake at rates proportional to the protein content (1-2 mumol Ca2+/mg protein/min), reaching asymptotic levels corresponding to a lumenal calcium concentration of 10-20 mM. The low permeability of the proteoliposomes permitted direct demonstration of Ca2+/H+ countertransport and electrogenicity by parallel measurements in the same experimental system. Countertransport of one H+ per one Ca2+ was demonstrated, and inhibition of the Ca2+ pump by lumenal alkalinization was relieved by the H+ ionophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone. Consistent with the countertransport stoichiometry, net positive charge displacement was produced by Ca2+ transport, as revealed by a rapid oxonol VI absorption rise. The initial rise and the following steady-state level of oxonol absorption were highest when SO4(2-) was the prevalent anion and lowest in the presence of the lipophilic anion SCN-. The influence of anions was attributed to potential driven counterion compensation. The absorption rise was rapidly collapsed by addition of valinomycin in the presence of K+. Experimentation with Ca2+ and H+ ionophores was consistent with a primary role of Ca2+ and H+ in net charge displacement. The estimated value of the steady-state electrical potential observed under optimal conditions was approximately 50 mV and was accounted for by the estimated charge transfer associated with Ca2+ and H+ countertransport under the same conditions.

  3. Elevated rates of force development and MgATP binding in F764L and S532P myosin mutations causing dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Bradley M; Schmitt, Joachim P; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, J G; Wang, Yuan; Bell, Stephen P; Lewinter, Martin M; Maughan, David W

    2013-04-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is a disease characterized by dilation of the ventricular chambers and reduced contractile function. We examined the contractile performance of chemically-skinned ventricular strips from two heterozygous murine models of DCM-causing missense mutations of myosin, F764L/+ and S532P/+, in an α-myosin heavy chain (MyHC) background. In Ca(2+)-activated skinned myocardial strips, the maximum developed tension in F764L/+ was only ~50% that of litter-mate controls (+/+). The F764L/+ also exhibited significantly reduced rigor stiffness, loaded shortening velocity and power output. Corresponding indices for S532P/+ strips were not different from controls. Manipulation of MgATP concentration in conjunction with measures of viscoelasticity, which provides estimates of myosin detachment rate 2πc, allowed us to probe the molecular basis of changes in crossbridge kinetics that occur with the myosin mutations. By examining the response of detachment rate to varying MgATP we found the rate of MgADP release was unaffected by the myosin mutations. However, MgATP binding rate was higher in the DCM groups compared to controls (422±109mM(-1)·s(-1) in F764L/+, 483±74mM(-1)·s(-1) in S532P/+ and 303±18mM(-1)·s(-1) in +/+). In addition, the rate constant of force development, 2πb, was significantly higher in DCM groups compared to controls (at 5mM MgATP: 36.9±4.9s(-1) in F764L/+, 32.9±4.5s(-1) in S532P/+ and 18.2±1.7s(-1) in +/+). These results suggest that elevated rates of force development and MgATP binding are features of cardiac myofilament function that underlie the development of DCM.

  4. Dilated Cardiomyopathy Mutation (R134W) in Mouse Cardiac Troponin T Induces Greater Contractile Deficits against α-Myosin Heavy Chain than against β-Myosin Heavy Chain

    OpenAIRE

    Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Murali Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity is common to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) in humans. However, it remains unclear whether a single determinant — such as myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity — is sufficient to characterize all cases of DCM because the severity of disease varies widely with a given mutation. Because dynamic features dominate in the heart muscle, alterations in dynamic contractile parameters may offer better insight on the molecular mechanisms...

  5. Influence of Trace Amount of Calponin on Smooth Muscle Myosin in Different States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Xian YANG; Xiao-Hua FENG; Ying ZHANG; Yuan LIN

    2004-01-01

    Calponin(CaP),a thin filament-associated protein,is thought to be involved in modulating smooth muscle contractile activity,but the role and mechanism keep unknown.In this study,trace amount of calponin(TAC)was found to obviously influence myosin in different states in Ca2+-independent manner,suggesting a high efficient interaction between TAC and myosin.In this assay,the lowest ratio of CaP vs.myosin was 1:10,000,with the concentration of CaP 10,000-fold lower than that used previously.Myosin phosphorylation,myosin Mg2+-ATPase activity and protein binding activity were detected to determine the effects of TAC on the myosin in different states.The amount of precipitated myosin that bound to TAC was used as the index to determine the interaction between myosin and TAC in binding assay.Our data showed that in the absence of actin,TAC significantly increased the precipitation of unphosphorylated myosin,Ca2+-dependently or independently phosphorylated myosin by MLCK,and stimulated the Mg2+-ATPase activities of these myosins slightly but significantly.However,no obvious change of precipitation of myosin phosphorylated by PKA was observed,indicating the relatively selective effect of TAC.In the presence of actin,the increase of myosin precipitations was abolished,and no obvious change of actin precipitations and actinactivated myosin Mg2+-ATPase activities were observed implicating the high efficiency of TAC on myosin being present in the absence of actin.Although we can not give conclusive comments to our results,we propose that the high efficiency of TAC-myosin interaction is present when actin is dissociated from myosin,even if CaP/myosin ratio is very low;this high efficient interaction can be abolished by actin.However,why and how TAC can possess such a high efficiency to influence myosin and how the physiological significance of the high efficiency of TAC is in regulating the interaction between myosin and actin remain to be investigated.

  6. Blebbistain, a myosin II inhibitor, as a novel strategy to regulate detrusor contractility in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zhang

    Full Text Available Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO, a common urologic pathology mostly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, can coexist in 40-45% of patients with overactive bladder (OAB and is associated with detrusor overactivity (DO. PBOO that induces DO results in alteration in bladder myosin II type and isoform composition. Blebbistatin (BLEB is a myosin II inhibitor we recently demonstrated potently relaxed normal detrusor smooth muscle (SM and reports suggest varied BLEB efficacy for different SM myosin (SMM isoforms and/or SMM vs nonmuscle myosin (NMM. We hypothesize BLEB inhibition of myosin II as a novel contraction protein targeted strategy to regulate DO. Using a surgically-induced male rat PBOO model, organ bath contractility, competitive and Real-Time-RT-PCR were performed. It was found that obstructed-bladder weight significantly increased 2.74-fold while in vitro contractility of detrusor to various stimuli was impaired ∼50% along with decreased shortening velocity. Obstruction also altered detrusor spontaneous activities with significantly increased amplitude but depressed frequency. PBOO switched bladder from a phasic-type to a more tonic-type SM. Expression of 5' myosin heavy chain (MHC alternatively spliced isoform SM-A (associated with tonic-type SM increased 3-fold while 3' MHC SM1 and essential light chain isoform MLC(17b also exhibited increased relative expression. Total SMMHC expression was decreased by 25% while the expression of NMM IIB (SMemb was greatly increased by 4.5-fold. BLEB was found to completely relax detrusor strips from both sham-operated and PBOO rats pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or electrical field stimulation although sensitivity was slightly decreased (20% only at lower doses for PBOO. Thus we provide the first thorough characterization of the response of rat bladder myosin to PBOO and demonstrate complete BLEB-induced PBOO bladder SM relaxation. Furthermore, the present study provides valuable

  7. Engineering controllable bidirectional molecular motors based on myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Nakamura, Muneaki; Schindler, Tony D; Parker, David; Bryant, Zev

    2012-02-19

    Cytoskeletal motors drive the transport of organelles and molecular cargoes within cells and have potential applications in molecular detection and diagnostic devices. Engineering molecular motors with controllable properties will allow selective perturbation of mechanical processes in living cells and provide optimized device components for tasks such as molecular sorting and directed assembly. Biological motors have previously been modified by introducing activation/deactivation switches that respond to metal ions and other signals. Here, we show that myosin motors can be engineered to reversibly change their direction of motion in response to a calcium signal. Building on previous protein engineering studies and guided by a structural model for the redirected power stroke of myosin VI, we have constructed bidirectional myosins through the rigid recombination of structural modules. The performance of the motors was confirmed using gliding filament assays and single fluorophore tracking. Our strategy, in which external signals trigger changes in the geometry and mechanics of myosin lever arms, should make it possible to achieve spatiotemporal control over a range of motor properties including processivity, stride size and branchpoint turning.

  8. Myosin-I molecular motors at a glance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Betsy B; Ostap, E Michael

    2016-07-15

    Myosin-I molecular motors are proposed to play various cellular roles related to membrane dynamics and trafficking. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we review and illustrate the proposed cellular functions of metazoan myosin-I molecular motors by examining the structural, biochemical, mechanical and cell biological evidence for their proposed molecular roles. We highlight evidence for the roles of myosin-I isoforms in regulating membrane tension and actin architecture, powering plasma membrane and organelle deformation, participating in membrane trafficking, and functioning as a tension-sensitive dock or tether. Collectively, myosin-I motors have been implicated in increasingly complex cellular phenomena, yet how a single isoform accomplishes multiple types of molecular functions is still an active area of investigation. To fully understand the underlying physiology, it is now essential to piece together different approaches of biological investigation. This article will appeal to investigators who study immunology, metabolic diseases, endosomal trafficking, cell motility, cancer and kidney disease, and to those who are interested in how cellular membranes are coupled to the underlying actin cytoskeleton in a variety of different applications.

  9. Myosin light chain genes in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, L D; Ostroski, B J; Reed, K M

    2003-01-01

    Myosin light chains associate with the motor protein myosin and are believed to play a role in the regulation of its actin-based ATPase activity. Myosin light chain cDNA clones from the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) were isolated and sequenced. One sequence corresponded to an alternative transcript, the skeletal muscle essential light chain (MYL1 isoform 1) and a second to the smooth muscle isoform of myosin light chain (MYL6). The DNA and predicted amino acid sequences of both light chain genes were compared to that of the chicken. Based on the cDNA sequence, oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify genomic DNA from six of the seven introns of the MYL1 gene. Approximately 5 kb of DNA was sequenced (introns and 3' UTR) and evaluated for the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs were verified by sequencing common intron regions from multiple individuals and three polymorphisms were used to genotype pedigreed families. MYL1 is assigned to a turkey linkage group that corresponds to a region of chicken chromosome 7 (GGA7). The results of this study provide genomic reagents for comparative studies of avian muscle components and muscle biology.

  10. Drebrin attenuates the interaction between actin and myosin-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ryoki; Katoh, Kaoru; Takahashi, Ayumi; Xie, Ce; Oseki, Koushi; Watanabe, Michitoshi; Igarashi, Michihiro; Nakamura, Akio; Kohama, Kazuhiro

    2007-07-27

    Drebrin-A is an actin-binding protein localized in the dendritic spines of mature neurons, and has been suggested to affect spine morphology [K. Hayashi, T. Shirao, Change in the shape of dendritic spines caused by overexpression of drebrin in cultured cortical neurons, J. Neurosci. 19 (1999) 3918-3925]. However, no biochemical analysis of drebrin-A has yet been reported. In this study, we purified drebrin-A using a bacterial expression system, and characterized it in vitro. Drebrin-A bound to actin filaments with a stoichiometry of one drebrin molecule to 5-6 actin molecules. Furthermore, drebrin-A decreased the Mg-ATPase activity of myosin V. In vitro motility assay revealed that the attachment of F-actin to glass surface coated with myosin-V was decreased by drebrin-A, but once F-actin attached to the surface, the sliding speed of F-actin was unaffected by the presence of drebrin A. These findings suggest that drebrin-A may affect spine dynamics, vesicle transport, and other myosin-V-driven motility in neurons through attenuating the interaction between actin and myosin-V.

  11. MyosinV controls PTEN function and neuronal cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Michiel T; Parsons, Maddy; Downes, C Peter; Leslie, Nicholas R; Hindges, Robert; Eickholt, Britta J

    2009-10-01

    The tumour suppressor PTEN can inhibit cell proliferation and migration as well as control cell growth, in different cell types. PTEN functions predominately as a lipid phosphatase, converting PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) to PtdIns(4,5)P(2), thereby antagonizing PI(3)K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and its established downstream effector pathways. However, much is unclear concerning the mechanisms that regulate PTEN movement to the cell membrane, which is necessary for its activity towards PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) (Refs 3, 4, 5). Here we show a requirement for functional motor proteins in the control of PI3K signalling, involving a previously unknown association between PTEN and myosinV. FRET (Förster resonance energy transfer) measurements revealed that PTEN interacts directly with myosinV, which is dependent on PTEN phosphorylation mediated by CK2 and/or GSK3. Inactivation of myosinV-transport function in neurons increased cell size, which, in line with known attributes of PTEN-loss, required PI(3)K and mTor. Our data demonstrate a myosin-based transport mechanism that regulates PTEN function, providing new insights into the signalling networks regulating cell growth.

  12. Structural insight into the UNC-45–myosin complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fratev, Filip; Jonsdottir, Svava Osk; Pajeva, Ilza

    2013-01-01

    in silico methods. Initially, the human UNC-45B binding epitope was identified and the protein was docked to the cardiac myosin (MYH7) motor domain. The final UNC45B–MYH7 structure was obtained by performing of total 630 ns molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate a complex formation, which...

  13. Globular tail of myosin-V is bound to vamp/synaptobrevin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, A; Komiya, Y; Igarashi, M

    2001-02-01

    VAMP/synaptobrevin is one of a number of v-SNAREs involved in vesicular fusion events in neurons. In a previous report, VAMP was shown to form a complex with synaptophysin and myosin V, a motor protein based on the F-actin, and that myosin V was then released from the complex in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Here, we found that VAMP alone is bound to myosin V in a Ca(2+)-independent manner, and determined that the globular tail domain of myosin V is its binding site. The syntaxin-VAMP-myosin V formed in the presence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). In the absence of CaM, only syntaxin-VAMP, or VAMP-myosin V complex was formed. Our results suggest that VAMP acts as a myosin V receptor on the vesicles and regulates formation of the complex.

  14. Structural Basis of Cargo Recognition by Unconventional Myosins in Cellular Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianchao; Lu, Qing; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-08-01

    Unconventional myosins are a superfamily of actin-based molecular motors playing diverse roles including cellular trafficking, mechanical supports, force sensing and transmission, etc. The variable neck and tail domains of unconventional myosins function to bind to specific cargoes including proteins and lipid vesicles and thus are largely responsible for the diverse cellular functions of myosins in vivo. In addition, the tail regions, together with their cognate cargoes, can regulate activities of the motor heads. This review outlines the advances made in recent years on cargo recognition and cargo binding-induced regulation of the activity of several unconventional myosins including myosin-I, V, VI and X in cellular trafficking. We approach this topic by describing a series of high-resolution structures of the neck and tail domains of these unconventional myosins either alone or in complex with their specific cargoes, and by discussing potential implications of these structural studies on cellular trafficking of these myosin motors.

  15. Myosin superfamily: The multi-functional and irreplaceable factors in spermatogenesis and testicular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ruide; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-01-15

    Spermatogenesis is a fundamental process in sexual development and reproduction, in which the diploid spermatogonia transform into haploid mature spermatozoa. This process is under the regulation of multiple factors and pathway. Myosin has been implicated in various aspects during spermatogenesis. Myosins constitute a diverse superfamily of actin-based molecular motors that translocate along microfilament in an ATP-dependent manner, and six kinds of myosins have been proved that function during spermatogenesis. In mitosis and meiosis, myosins play an important role in spindle assembly and positioning, karyokinesis and cytokinesis. During spermiogenesis, myosins participate in acrosomal formation, nuclear morphogenesis, mitochondrial translocation and spermatid individualization. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the functions of myosin in spermatogenesis and some reproductive system diseases such as testicular tumors and prostate cancer, and discuss the roles of possible upstream molecules which regulate myosin in these processes.

  16. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ting

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+ to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our

  17. Zinc-induced cardiomyocyte relaxation in a rat model of hyperglycemia is independent of myosin isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ting; Cheema, Yaser; Tremble, Sarah M; Bell, Stephen P; Chen, Zengyi; Subramanian, Meenakumari; LeWinter, Martin M; VanBuren, Peter; Palmer, Bradley M

    2012-11-02

    It has been reported previously that diabetic cardiomyopathy can be inhibited or reverted with chronic zinc supplementation. In the current study, we hypothesized that total cardiac calcium and zinc content is altered in early onset diabetes mellitus characterized in part as hyperglycemia (HG) and that exposure of zinc ion (Zn2+) to isolated cardiomyocytes would enhance contraction-relaxation function in HG more so than in nonHG controls. To better control for differential cardiac myosin isoform expression as occurs in rodents after β-islet cell necrosis, hypothyroidism was induced in 16 rats resulting in 100% β-myosin heavy chain expression in the heart. β-Islet cell necrosis was induced in half of the rats by streptozocin administration. After 6 wks of HG, both HG and nonHG controls rats demonstrated similar myofilament performance measured as thin filament calcium sensitivity, native thin filament velocity in the myosin motility assay and contractile velocity and power. Extracellular Zn2+ reduced cardiomyocyte contractile function in both groups, but enhanced relaxation function significantly in the HG group compared to controls. Most notably, a reduction in diastolic sarcomere length with increasing pacing frequencies, i.e., incomplete relaxation, was more pronounced in the HG compared to controls, but was normalized with extracellular Zn2+ application. This is a novel finding implicating that the detrimental effect of HG on cardiomyocyte Ca2+ regulation can be amelioration by Zn2+. Among the many post-translational modifications examined, only phosphorylation of ryanodine receptor (RyR) at S-2808 was significantly higher in HG compared to nonHG. We did not find in our hypothyroid rats any differentiating effects of HG on myofibrillar protein phosphorylation, lysine acetylation, O-linked N-acetylglucosamine and advanced glycated end-products, which are often implicated as complicating factors in cardiac performance due to HG. Our results suggest that the

  18. Determination of the critical residues responsible for cardiac myosin binding protein C's interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md Shenuarin; Gulick, James; Osinska, Hanna; Gupta, Manish; Robbins, Jeffrey

    2012-12-01

    Despite early demonstrations of myosin binding protein C's (MyBP-C) interaction with actin, different investigators have reached different conclusions regarding the relevant and necessary domains mediating this binding. Establishing the detailed structure-function relationships is needed to fully understand cMyBP-C's ability to impact on myofilament contraction as mutations in different domains are causative for familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We defined cMyBP-C's N-terminal structural domains that are necessary or sufficient to mediate interactions with actin and/or the head region of the myosin heavy chain (S2-MyHC). Using a combination of genetics and functional assays, we defined the actin binding site(s) present in cMyBP-C. We confirmed that cMyBP-C's C1 and m domains productively interact with actin, while S2-MyHC interactions are restricted to the m domain. Using residue-specific mutagenesis, we identified the critical actin binding residues and distinguished them from the residues that were critical for S2-MyHC binding. To validate the structural and functional significance of these residues, we silenced the endogenous cMyBP-C in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRC) using cMyBP-C siRNA, and replaced the endogenous cMyBP-C with normal or actin binding-ablated cMyBP-C. Replacement with actin binding-ablated cMyBP-C showed that the mutated protein did not incorporate into the sarcomere normally. Residues responsible for actin and S2-MyHC binding are partially present in overlapping domains but are unique. Expression of an actin binding-deficient cMyBP-C resulted in abnormal cytosolic distribution of the protein, indicating that interaction with actin is essential for the formation and/or maintenance of normal cMyBP-C sarcomeric distribution.

  19. Mechanical characterization of one-headed myosin-V using optical tweezers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonobu M Watanabe

    Full Text Available Class V myosin (myosin-V is a cargo transporter that moves along an actin filament with large (approximately 36-nm successive steps. It consists of two heads that each includes a motor domain and a long (23 nm neck domain. One of the more popular models describing these steps, the hand-over-hand model, assumes the two-headed structure is imperative. However, we previously succeeded in observing successive large steps by one-headed myosin-V upon optimizing the angle of the acto-myosin interaction. In addition, it was reported that wild type myosin-VI and myosin-IX, both one-headed myosins, can also generate successive large steps. Here, we describe the mechanical properties (stepsize and stepping kinetics of successive large steps by one-headed and two-headed myosin-Vs. This study shows that the stepsize and stepping kinetics of one-headed myosin-V are very similar to those of the two-headed one. However, there was a difference with regards to stability against load and the number of multisteps. One-headed myosin-V also showed unidirectional movement that like two-headed myosin-V required 3.5 k(BT from ATP hydrolysis. This value is also similar to that of smooth muscle myosin-II, a non-processive motor, suggesting the myosin family uses a common mechanism for stepping regardless of the steps being processive or non-processive. In this present paper, we conclude that one-headed myosin-V can produce successive large steps without following the hand-over-hand mechanism.

  20. Preliminary investigation of sequence-independent DNA binding proteins in rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum and their function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵文; 姜志胜; 倪菊华; 陈光慧; 刘乃奎; 汤健; 贾弘褆; 唐朝枢

    2000-01-01

    To observe the binding of plasmid DNA to non-nuclear DNA binding proteins in sar-coplasmic reticulum (SR) and the effects of this binding on SR function, sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins in rat skeletal muscle were isolated by differential centrifuge and sucrose density-gradient centrifuge. The results showed that there are two sequence-independent DNA binding proteins in SR proteins, the molecular weights of which are 83 and 58 ku, respectively. Ca2+ uptake and release of SR were remarkably promoted by the binding of plasmid DNA to DNA binding proteins in SR, the mechanism is probably through increasing of Ca2+-ATPase activity in SR and changing of character of Ca2+ release channel ryanodine receptors induced by the binding. These results suggest that there exist DNA binding proteins in SR and its binding to DNA may affect Ca2+ transport of SR.

  1. Preliminary investigation of sequence-independent DNA binding proteins in rat skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum and their function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To observe the binding of plasmid DNA to non-nuclear DNA binding proteins in sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and the effects of this binding on SR function, sarcoplasmic reticulum proteins in rat skeletal muscle were isolated by differential centrifuge and sucrose density-gradient centrifuge. The results showed that there are two sequence-independent DNA binding proteins in SR proteins, the molecular weights of which are 83 and 58 ku, respectively. Ca2+ uptake and release of SR were remarkably promoted by the binding of plasmid DNA to DNA binding proteins in SR, the mechanism is probably through increasing of Ca2+-ATPase activity in SR and changing of character of Ca2+ release channel ryanodine receptors induced by the binding. These results suggest that there exist DNA binding proteins in SR and its binding to DNA may affect Ca2+ transport of SR.

  2. Disturbances of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and transverse tubular system in 24-h electrostimulated fast-twitch skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frías, J A; Cadefau, J A; Prats, C;

    2005-01-01

    -migration of terminal cisternae and t-tubules from R3 to R4, indicating the presence of triads. This density change may be associated with calcium overload of the sarcoplasmic reticulum, since total calcium rose three- to fourfold in stimulated muscle homogenates. These changes correlate well with ultrastructural...... damage to longitudinal sarcoplasmic reticulum and swelling of t-tubules revealed by electron microscopy. The ultrastructural changes observed here reflect exercise-induced damage of membrane systems that might severely compromise muscle function. Since this process is reversible, we suggest that it may......Chronic low-frequency stimulation of rabbit tibialis anterior muscle over a 24-h period induces a conspicuous loss of isometric tension that is unrelated to muscle energy metabolism (J.A. Cadefau, J. Parra, R. Cusso, G. Heine, D. Pette, Responses of fatigable and fatigue-resistant fibres of rabbit...

  3. Slit and Netrin-1 guide cranial motor axon pathfinding via Rho-kinase, myosin light chain kinase and myosin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drescher Uwe

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing hindbrain, cranial motor axon guidance depends on diffusible repellent factors produced by the floor plate. Our previous studies have suggested that candidate molecules for mediating this effect are Slits, Netrin-1 and Semaphorin3A (Sema3A. It is unknown to what extent these factors contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of motor axons, and the downstream signalling pathways are largely unclear. Results In this study, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches to identify the components of floor plate chemorepulsion and their downstream signalling pathways. Using in vitro motor axon deflection assays, we demonstrate that Slits and Netrin-1, but not Sema3A, contribute to floor plate repulsion. We also find that the axon pathways of dorsally projecting branchiomotor neurons are disrupted in Netrin-1 mutant mice and in chick embryos expressing dominant-negative Unc5a receptors, indicating an in vivo role for Netrin-1. We further demonstrate that Slit and Netrin-1 signalling are mediated by Rho-kinase (ROCK and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK, which regulate myosin II activity, controlling actin retrograde flow in the growth cone. We show that MLCK, ROCK and myosin II are required for Slit and Netrin-1-mediated growth cone collapse of cranial motor axons. Inhibition of these molecules in explant cultures, or genetic manipulation of RhoA or myosin II function in vivo causes characteristic cranial motor axon pathfinding errors, including the inability to exit the midline, and loss of turning towards exit points. Conclusions Our findings suggest that both Slits and Netrin-1 contribute to floor plate-derived chemorepulsion of cranial motor axons. They further indicate that RhoA/ROCK, MLCK and myosin II are components of Slit and Netrin-1 signalling pathways, and suggest that these pathways are of key importance in cranial motor axon navigation.

  4. Comparison of the kinetics of calcium transport in vesicular dispersions and oriented multilayers of isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, D H; Scarpa, A.; Trentham, D R; Topp, M. R.; Blasie, J K

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the functional properties of the protein in oriented multilayers, in addition to vesicular dispersions, of membranes such as the isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), extends the variety of techniques that can be effectively used in studies of the membrane protein's structure or structural changes associated with its function. One technique requiring the use of oriented multilayers to provide more direct time-averaged and time-resolved structural investigations of the SR membrane...

  5. Biphasic decay of the Ca transient results from increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Rajiv; Li, Yatong; Greensmith, David J.; Eisner, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Ca leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor (RyR) reduces the amplitude of the Ca transient and slows its rate of decay.In the presence of β‐adrenergic stimulation, RyR‐mediated Ca leak produces a biphasic decay of the Ca transient with a fast early phase and a slow late phase.Two forms of Ca leak have been studied, Ca‐sensitising (induced by caffeine) and non‐sensitising (induced by ryanodine) and both induce biphasic decay of the Ca transient.Only Ca‐sensitising leak can be reversed by traditional RyR inhibitors such as tetracaine.Ca leak can also induce Ca waves. At low levels of leak, waves occur. As leak is increased, first biphasic decay and then slowed monophasic decay is seen. The level of leak has major effects on the shape of the Ca transient. Abstract In heart failure, a reduction in Ca transient amplitude and contractile dysfunction can by caused by Ca leak through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR) and/or decreased activity of the SR Ca ATPase (SERCA). We have characterised the effects of two forms of Ca leak (Ca‐sensitising and non‐sensitising) on calcium cycling and compared with those of SERCA inhibition. We measured [Ca2+]i with fluo‐3 in voltage‐clamped rat ventricular myocytes. Increasing SR leak with either caffeine (to sensitise the RyR to Ca activation) or ryanodine (non‐sensitising) had similar effects to SERCA inhibition: decreased systolic [Ca2+]i, increased diastolic [Ca2+]i and slowed decay. However, in the presence of isoproterenol, leak produced a biphasic decay of the Ca transient in the majority of cells while SERCA inhibition produced monophasic decay. Tetracaine reversed the effects of caffeine but not of ryanodine. When caffeine (1 mmol l−1) was added to a cell which displayed Ca waves, the wave frequency initially increased before waves disappeared and biphasic decay developed. Eventually (at higher caffeine concentrations), the

  6. Actin dynamics and competition for myosin monomer govern the sequential amplification of myosin filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R; Bruun, Kyle S; Shao, Lin; Li, Dong; Swider, Zac; Remmert, Kirsten; Zhang, Yingfan; Conti, Mary A; Adelstein, Robert S; Rusan, Nasser M; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2017-02-01

    The cellular mechanisms governing non-muscle myosin II (NM2) filament assembly are largely unknown. Using EGFP-NM2A knock-in fibroblasts and multiple super-resolution imaging modalities, we characterized and quantified the sequential amplification of NM2 filaments within lamellae, wherein filaments emanating from single nucleation events continuously partition, forming filament clusters that populate large-scale actomyosin structures deeper in the cell. Individual partitioning events coincide spatially and temporally with the movements of diverging actin fibres, suppression of which inhibits partitioning. These and other data indicate that NM2A filaments are partitioned by the dynamic movements of actin fibres to which they are bound. Finally, we showed that partition frequency and filament growth rate in the lamella depend on MLCK, and that MLCK is competing with centrally active ROCK for a limiting pool of monomer with which to drive lamellar filament assembly. Together, our results provide new insights into the mechanism and spatio-temporal regulation of NM2 filament assembly in cells.

  7. Kinetic characterization of the sole nonmuscle myosin-2 from the model organism Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heissler, Sarah M; Chinthalapudi, Krishna; Sellers, James R

    2015-04-01

    Nonmuscle myosin-2 is the primary enzyme complex powering contractility of the F-actin cytoskeleton in the model organism Drosophila. Despite myosin's essential function in fly development and homeostasis, its kinetic features remain elusive. The purpose of this in vitro study is a detailed steady-state and presteady-state kinetic characterization of the Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 motor domain. Kinetic features are a slow steady-state ATPase activity, high affinities for F-actin and ADP, and a low duty ratio. Comparative analysis of the overall enzymatic signatures across the nonmuscle myosin-2 complement from model organisms indicates that the Drosophila protein resembles nonmuscle myosin-2s from metazoa rather than protozoa, though modulatory aspects of myosin motor function are distinct. Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 is uniquely insensitive toward blebbistatin, a commonly used myosin-2 inhibitor. An in silico modeling approach together with kinetic studies indicate that the nonconsensus amino acid Met466 in the Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 active-site loop switch-2 acts as blebbistatin desensitizer. Introduction of the M466I mutation sensitized the protein for blebbistatin, resulting in a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 36.3 ± 4.1 µM. Together, these data show that Drosophila nonmuscle myosin-2 is a bona fide molecular motor and establish an important link between switch-2 and blebbistatin sensitivity.

  8. Comparison of biochemical and immunochemical properties of myosin II in taeniid parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Rivera, M; Reyes-Torres, A; Reynoso-Ducoing, O; Flisser, A; Ambrosio, J R

    2006-07-01

    Type II myosins are highly conserved proteins, though differences have been observed among organisms, mainly in the filamentous region. Myosin isoforms have been identified in Taenia solium, a helminth parasite of public health importance in many developing countries. These isoforms are probably associated with the physiological requirements of each developmental stage of the parasite. In this paper we extend the characterization of myosin to several other Taenia species. Type II myosins were purified from the larvae (cysticerci) of Taenia solium, T. taeniaeformis and T. crassiceps and the adult stages of T. solium, T. taeniaeformis and T. saginata. Rabbit polyclonal antibodies against some of these myosins were specific at high dilutions but cross-reacted at low dilutions. ATPase activity was evaluated and kinetic values were calculated for each myosin. Homologous actin-myosin interactions increased both the affinity of myosin for ATP and the hydrolysis rate. The results indicate immunological and biochemical differences among taeniid myosins. This variability suggests that different isoforms are found not only in different taeniid species but also at different developmental stages. Further characterization of myosin isoforms should include determination of their amino acid composition.

  9. Rho kinase's role in myosin recruitment to the equatorial cortex of mitotic Drosophila S2 cells is for myosin regulatory light chain phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara O Dean

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myosin II recruitment to the equatorial cortex is one of the earliest events in establishment of the cytokinetic contractile ring. In Drosophila S2 cells, we previously showed that myosin II is recruited to the furrow independently of F-actin, and that Rho1 and Rok are essential for this recruitment [1]. Rok phosphorylates several cellular proteins, including the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we express phosphorylation state mimic constructs of the RLC in S2 cells to examine the role of RLC phosphorylation involving Rok in the localization of myosin. Phosphorylation of the RLC is required for myosin localization to the equatorial cortex during mitosis, and the essential role of Rok in this localization and for cytokinesis is to maintain phosphorylation of the RLC. The ability to regulate the RLC phosphorylation state spatio-temporally is not essential for the myosin localization. Furthermore, the essential role of Citron in cytokinesis is not phosphorylation of the RLC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the Rho1 pathway leading to myosin localization to the future cytokinetic furrow is relatively straightforward, where only Rok is needed, and it is only needed to maintain phosphorylation of the myosin RLC.

  10. Quantitative Measurement of Ca2+ in the Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Lumen of Mammalian Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziman, Andrew P.; Ward, Christopher W.; Rodney, George G.; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Bloch, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle stores Ca2+ in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and releases it to initiate contraction, but the concentration of luminal Ca2+ in the SR ([Ca2+]SR) and the amount that is released by physiological or pharmacological stimulation has been difficult to measure. Here we present a novel, yet simple and direct, method that provides the first quantitative estimates of static content and dynamic changes in [Ca2+]SR in mammalian skeletal muscle, to our knowledge. The method uses fluo-5N loaded into the SR of single, mammalian skeletal muscle cells (murine flexor digitorum brevis myofibers) and confocal imaging to detect and calibrate the signals. Using this method, we have determined that [Ca2+]SR, free is 390 μM. 4-Chloro-m-cresol, an activator of the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor, reduces [Ca2+]SR, free to ∼8 μM, when values are corrected for background fluorescence from cytoplasmic pools of dye. Prolonged electrical stimulation (10 s) at 50 Hz releases 88% of the SR Ca2+ content, whereas stimulation at 1 Hz (10 s) releases only 20%. Our results lay the foundation for molecular modeling of the dynamics of luminal SR Ca2+ and for future studies of the role of SR Ca2+ in healthy and diseased mammalian muscle. PMID:20959112

  11. The calcium uptake of the rat heart sarcoplasmic reticulum is altered by dietary lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffet, G E; Pham, T T; Bick, D L; Entman, M L; Pownall, H J; Bick, R J

    1993-01-01

    Small amounts of dietary n-3 fatty acids can have dramatic physiological effects, including the reduction of plasma triglycerides and an elevation of cellular eicosapentanoic (EPA) and docosahexanoic acids (DHA) at the expense of arachidonic acid (AA). We investigated the effects of alterations in the fatty acid compositions of cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (CSR) produced by dietary manipulation on the calcium pump protein that is required for energy dependent calcium transport. CSR was isolated from rats fed menhaden oil, which is rich in n-3 fatty acids, and from control animals that were given corn oil. Relative to control membranes, those isolated from rats fed menhaden oil, had a lower content of saturated phospholipids, an increased DHA/AA ratio, and an increased ratio of n-3 to n-6 fatty acids. These changes were associated with a 30% decrease in oxalate-facilitated, ATP-dependent calcium uptake and concomitant decreased Ca-ATPase activity in the membranes from the animals fed menhaden oil. In contrast, there was no alteration in active pump sites as measured by phosphoenzyme formation. Thus, the CSR Ca-ATPase function can be altered by dietary interventions that change the composition, and possibly structure, of the phospholipid membranes thereby affecting enzyme turnover.

  12. Identification and characterization of alpha-I-proteinase inhibitor from common carp sarcoplasmic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriangkanakun, Siriphon; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Yongsawadigul, Jirawat

    2016-02-01

    Purification of proteinase inhibitor from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sarcoplasmic proteins resulted in 2.8% yield with purification fold of 111. Two inhibitors, namely inhibitor I and II, exhibited molecular mass of 47 and 52 kDa, respectively, based on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both inhibitors I and II were identified to be alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) based on LC-MS/MS. They were glycoproteins and molecular mass after peptide-N-glycosidase F treatment was 38 and 45 kDa, respectively. The N-glycosylation sites of both inhibitors were determined to be at N214 and N226. The inhibitors specifically inhibited trypsin. The common carp α1-PI showed high thermal stability with denaturation temperatures of 65.43 and 73.31 °C, which were slightly less than those of ovomucoid. High stability toward NaCl was also evident up to 3M. The common carp α1-PI effectively reduced autolytic degradation of bigeye snapper surimi at the concentration as low as 0.025%.

  13. Design and characterization of self-assembled fish sarcoplasmic protein-alginate nanocomplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephansen, Karen; Mattebjerg, Maria; Wattjes, Jasper; Milisavljevic, Ana; Jessen, Flemming; Qvortrup, Klaus; Goycoolea, Francisco M; Chronakis, Ioannis S

    2015-05-01

    Macrostructures based on natural polymers are subject to large attention, as the application range is wide within the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study we present nanocomplexes (NCXs) made from electrostatic self-assembly between negatively charged alginate and positively charged fish sarcoplasmic proteins (FSP), prepared by bulk mixing. A concentration screening revealed that there was a range of alginate and FSP concentrations where stable NCXs with similar properties were formed, rather than two exact concentrations. The size of the NCXs was 293 ± 3 nm, and the zeta potential was -42 ± 0.3 mV. The NCXs were stable in water, gastric buffer, intestinal buffer and HEPES buffered glycose, and at all pH values from 2 to 9 except pH 3, where they aggregated. When proteolytic enzymes were present in the buffer, the NCXs were degraded. Only at high concentrations the NCXs caused a decreased viability in HeLa and U2OS cell lines. The simple processing procedure and the high stability of the NCXs, makes them excellent candidates for use in the food and pharmaceutical industry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Thyroid hormones differentially affect sarcoplasmic reticulum function in rat atria and ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasik, A; Minajeva, A; Paju, K; Eimre, M; Seppet, E K

    1997-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-pump activity, together with assessment of the functional role of SR in providing activator Ca2+ under these altered thyroid states. In response to a shift from hypothyroid to hyperthyroid state, a 10 fold and 2 fold increase in SR Ca(2+)-pump activity in atria and ventricles, respectively, were observed. This was associated with the 8-9 fold increases in atrial contractility (+dT/dt) and relaxation (-dT/dt), but only with a 3-4 fold increase in their ventricular counterparts. Also, the recirculation fraction of activator Ca2+ (RFA) increased to a far greater extent in atria (4 fold) than in papillary muscles, and the relative increment in inhibition of developed tension by ryanodine became 3 times larger in atria than in papillary muscles. A positive force-frequency relationship (FFR) was observed in hypothyroid atria, whereas the hyperthyroid atria, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid papillary muscles showed a negative FFR. These results suggest the greater role of transsarcolemmal (SL) Ca2+ and smaller role of SR Ca2+ in activating contraction in hypothyroid atria compared to other preparations. Thyroid hormones decrease the contribution of SL and increase that of SR in providing activator Ca2+ to the greater extent in atria than in ventricles. This effect of thyroid hormones is based on larger stimulation of SR Ca(2+)-pump in atria compared to ventricles.

  15. Calcium handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum during oscillatory contractions of skinned skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentesi, P; Zaremba, R; Stienen, G J

    1998-08-01

    Isometric ATP consumption and force were investigated in mechanically skinned fibres from iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis. Measurements were performed at different [Ca2+], in the presence and absence of caffeine (5 nM). In weakly Ca2+-buffered solutions without caffeine, spontaneous oscillations in force and ATPase activity occurred. The repetition frequency was [Ca2+]-and temperature-dependent. The Ca2+ threshold (+/- SEM) for the oscillations corresponded to a pCa of 6.5 +/- 0.1. The maximum ATP consumption associated with calcium uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) reached during the oscillations was similar to the activity under steady-state conditions at saturating calcium concentrations in the presence of caffeine. Maximum activity was reached when the force relaxation was almost complete. The calculated amount of Ca2+ taken up by the SR during a complete cycle corresponded to 5.4 +/ 0.4 mmol per litre cell volume. In strongly Ca2+-buffered solutions, caffeine enhanced the calcium sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and, at low calcium concentrations, SR Ca uptake. These results suggest that when the SR is heavily loaded by net Ca uptake, there is a massive calcium-induced calcium release. Subsequent net Ca uptake by the SR then gives rise to the periodic nature of the calcium transient.

  16. Impaired sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release rate after fatiguing stimulation in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Sjøgaard, G; Madsen, Klavs

    2000-01-01

    to 66% that persisted for 1 h, followed by a gradual recovery to 87% of prefatigue release rate at 3 h recovery. Tetanic force and rate of force development (+dF/dt) and relaxation (-dF/dt) were depressed by approximately 80% after stimulation. Recovery occurred in two phases: an initial phase, in which......The purpose of the study was to characterize the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function and contractile properties before and during recovery from fatigue in the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle. Fatiguing contractions (60 Hz, 150 ms/s for 4 min) induced a reduction of the SR Ca(2+) release rate...... during the first 0.5-1 h the metabolic state recovered to resting levels, and a slow phase from 1-3 h characterized by a rather slow recovery of the mechanical properties. The recovery of SR Ca(2+) release rate was closely correlated to +dF/dt during the slow phase of recovery (r(2) = 0.51; P

  17. Alteration of Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+ Release in Skeletal Muscle from Calpain 3-Deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govindan Dayanithi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of Ca2+-activated proteases (calpains cause muscular dystrophies. Nevertheless, the specific role of calpains in Ca2+ signalling during the onset of dystrophies remains unclear. We investigated Ca2+ handling in skeletal cells from calpain 3-deficient mice. [Ca2+]i responses to caffeine, a ryanodine receptor (RyR agonist, were decreased in −/− myotubes and absent in −/− myoblasts. The −/− myotubes displayed smaller amplitudes of the Ca2+ transients induced by cyclopiazonic acid in comparison to wild type cells. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels (LCC suppressed the caffeine-induced [Ca2+]i responses in −/− myotubes. Hence, the absence of calpain 3 modifies the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca2+ release, by a decrease of the SR content, an impairment of RyR signalling, and an increase of LCC activity. We propose that calpain 3-dependent proteolysis plays a role in activating support proteins of intracellular Ca2+ signalling at a stage of cellular differentiation which is crucial for skeletal muscle regeneration.

  18. Vanadate oligoanions interact with the proton ejection by the Ca2+ pump of sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, M; Madeira, V M

    1994-11-30

    Decameric vanadate differs from other oligomeric vanadate species in inhibiting Ca2+ uptake and H+ ejection promoted by sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase. A decavanadate solution, 2 mM in total vanadium, containing about 200 microM decameric species, inhibits by about 50% the uptake of Ca2+ and by 75% the H+ ejection, whereas 2 mM nominal monovanadate slightly increases the uptake of Ca2+ and inhibits the ejection of H+ by 25%. Moreover, decavanadate linearly increases the Ca2+/H+ ratio, whereas monovanadate mimicks decavanadate behavior only at concentrations up to 1.2 mM. For higher concentrations of monovanadate, this effect is reversed probably due to the formation of metavanadates, namely tetravandate. It is concluded that Ca2+ uptake is tightly coupled to proton ejection through molecular events that are sensitive to the interaction of vanadate species. Apparently, the stoichiometry is variable and modulated by molecular events involved in vanadate interaction suggesting alterations in the energetic coupling associated with Ca2+ translocation.

  19. Rho-kinase regulates tissue morphogenesis via non-muscle myosin and LIM-kinase during Drosophila development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settleman Jeffrey

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Rho-kinases (ROCKs are major effector targets of the activated Rho GTPase that have been implicated in many of the Rho-mediated effects on cell shape and movement via their ability to affect acto-myosin contractility. The role of ROCKs in cell shape change and motility suggests a potentially important role for Rho-ROCK signaling in tissue morphogenesis during development. Indeed, in Drosophila, a single ROCK ortholog, DRok, has been identified and has been found to be required for establishing planar cell polarity. Results We have examined a potential role for DRok in additional aspects of tissue morphogenesis using an activated form of the protein in transgenic flies. Our findings demonstrate that DRok activity can influence multiple morphogenetic processes, including eye and wing development. Furthermore, genetic studies reveal that Drok interacts with multiple downstream effectors of the Rho GTPase signaling pathway, including non-muscle myosin heavy chain, adducin, and Diaphanous in those developmental processes. Finally, in overexpression studies, we determined that Drok and Drosophila Lim-kinase interact in the developing nervous system. Conclusion These findings indicate widespread diverse roles for DRok in tissue morphogenesis during Drosophila development, in which multiple DRok substrates appear to be required.

  20. Reverse actin sliding triggers strong myosin binding that moves tropomyosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekyarova, T.I.; Reedy, M.C.; Baumann, B.A.J.; Tregear, R.T.; Ward, A.; Krzic, U.; Prince, K.M.; Perz-Edwards, R.J.; Reconditi, M.; Gore, D.; Irving, T.C.; Reedy, M.K. (IIT); (EMBL); (Scripps); (Duke); (Prince); (FSU); (MRC); (U. Florence)

    2008-09-03

    Actin/myosin interactions in vertebrate striated muscles are believed to be regulated by the 'steric blocking' mechanism whereby the binding of calcium to the troponin complex allows tropomyosin (TM) to change position on actin, acting as a molecular switch that blocks or allows myosin heads to interact with actin. Movement of TM during activation is initiated by interaction of Ca{sup 2+} with troponin, then completed by further displacement by strong binding cross-bridges. We report x-ray evidence that TM in insect flight muscle (IFM) moves in a manner consistent with the steric blocking mechanism. We find that both isometric contraction, at high [Ca{sup 2+}], and stretch activation, at lower [Ca{sup 2+}], develop similarly high x-ray intensities on the IFM fourth actin layer line because of TM movement, coinciding with x-ray signals of strong-binding cross-bridge attachment to helically favored 'actin target zones.' Vanadate (Vi), a phosphate analog that inhibits active cross-bridge cycling, abolishes all active force in IFM, allowing high [Ca{sup 2+}] to elicit initial TM movement without cross-bridge attachment or other changes from relaxed structure. However, when stretched in high [Ca{sup 2+}], Vi-'paralyzed' fibers produce force substantially above passive response at pCa {approx} 9, concurrent with full conversion from resting to active x-ray pattern, including x-ray signals of cross-bridge strong-binding and TM movement. This argues that myosin heads can be recruited as strong-binding 'brakes' by backward-sliding, calcium-activated thin filaments, and are as effective in moving TM as actively force-producing cross-bridges. Such recruitment of myosin as brakes may be the major mechanism resisting extension during lengthening contractions.

  1. Covalent immobilization of myosin for in-vitro motility of actin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ellis Bagga; Sunita Kumari; Rajesh Kumar; Rakesh Kumar; R P Bajpai; Lalit M Bharadwaj

    2005-11-01

    The present study reports the covalent immobilization of myosin on glass surface and in-vitro motility of actin-myosin biomolecular motor. Myosin was immobilized on poly-L-lysine coated glass using heterobifunctional cross linker EDC and characterized by AFM. The in-vitro motility of actin was carried out on the immobilized myosin. It was observed that velocity of actin over myosin increases with increasing actin concentration (0.4-1.0 mg/ml) and was found in the range of 0.40-3.25 m/s. The motility of actin-myosin motor on artificial surfaces is of immense importance for developing nanodevices for healthcare and engineering applications.

  2. Autoantibody germ-line gene segment encodes V{sub H} and V{sub L} regions of a human anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibody recognizing streptococcal M protein and human cardiac myosin epitopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, A.; Cunningham, M.W. [Univ. of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Adderson, E.E. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-15

    Cross-reactivity of anti-streptococcal Abs with human cardiac myosin may result in sequelae following group A streptococcal infections. Molecular mimicry between group A streptococcal M protein and cardiac myosin may be the basis for the immunologic cross-reactivity. In this study, a cross-reactive human anti-streptococcal/antimyosin mAb (10.2.3) was characterized, and the myosin epitopes were recognized by the Ab identified. mAb 10.2.3 reacted with four peptides from the light meromyosin (LMM) tail fragment of human cardiac myosin, including LMM-10 (1411-1428), LMM-23 (1580-1597), LMM-27 (1632-1649), and LMM-30 (1671-1687). Only LMM-30 inhibited binding of mAb 10.2.3 to streptococcal M protein and human cardiac myosin. Human mAb 10.2.3 labeled cytoskeletal structures within rat heart cells in indirect immunofluorescence, and reacted with group A streptococci expressing various M protein serotypes, PepM5, and recombinant M protein. The nucleotide sequence of gene segments encoding the Ig heavy and light chain V region of mAb 10.2.3 was determined. The light chain V segment was encoded by a VK1 gene segment that was 98.5% identical with germ-line gene humig{sub K}Vi5. The V segment of the heavy chain was encoded by a V{sub H}3a gene segment that differed from the V{sub H}26 germ-line gene by a single base change. V{sub H}26 is expressed preferentially in early development and encodes autoantibodies with anti-DNA and rheumatoid factor specificities. Anti-streptococcal mAb 10.2.3 is an autoantibody encoded by V{sub H} and V{sub L} genes, with little or no somatic mutation. 63 refs., 11 figs.

  3. ' HEAVY METALS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    exposed fish were about 3-5 times higher than the concentrations detected in control fish. ... The outcome effect 15 impairment of carbohydrate metabolism, which caused fish ..... of pesticides, heavy metal, detergent and petroleum.

  4. The kinetics of bivalent metal ion dissociation from myosin subfragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, A J; Bagshaw, C R

    1986-01-01

    Bivalent metal ions have multiple roles in subunit association and ATPase regulation in scallop adductor-muscle myosin. To help elucidate these functions, the rates of Ca2+ and Mg2+ dissociation from the non-specific high-affinity sites on the regulatory light chains were measured and compared with those of rabbit skeletal-muscle myosin subfragments. Ca2+ dissociation had a rate constant of about 0.7 s-1 in both species, as measured by the time course of the pH change on EDTA addition. Mg2+ dissociation had a rate constant of 0.05 s-1, as monitored by its displacement with the paramagnetic Mn2+ ion. It is concluded that the exchange between Ca2+ and Mg2+ at the non-specific site, on excitation of both skeletal and adductor muscles, is too slow to contribute to the activation itself. The release of bivalent metal ions from the non-specific site is, however, the first step in release of the scallop regulatory light chain (Bennett & Bagshaw (1986) Biochem. J. 233, 179-186). In scallop myosin additional specific sites are present, which can bind Ca2+ rapidly, to effect activation of the ATPase. In the course of this work, Ca2+ dissociation from EGTA was studied as a model system. This gave rates of 1 s-1 and 0.3 s-1 at pH 7.0 and pH 8.0 respectively.

  5. Neuromuscular partitioning, architectural design, and myosin fiber types of the M. vastus lateralis of the llama (Lama glama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziotti, Guillermo H; Palencia, Pablo; Delhon, Gustavo; Rivero, José-Luis L

    2004-11-01

    The llama (Lama glama) is one of the few mammals of relatively large body size in which three fast myosin heavy chain isoforms (i.e., IIA, IIX, IIB) are extensively expressed in their locomotory muscles. This study was designed to gain insight into the morphological and functional organization of skeletal musculature in this peculiar animal model. The neuromuscular partitioning, architectural design, and myosin fiber types were systematically studied in the M. vastus lateralis of adult llamas (n = 15). Four nonoverlapping neuromuscular partitions or compartments were identified macroscopically (using a modified Sihler's technique for muscle depigmentation), although they did not conform strictly to the definitions of "neuromuscular compartments." Each neuromuscular partition was innervated by primary branches of the femoral nerve and was arranged within the muscle as paired partitions, two in parallel (deep-superficial compartmentalization) and the other two in-series (proximo-distal compartmentalization). These neuromuscular partitions of the muscle varied in their respective architectural designs (studied after partial digestion with diluted nitric acid) and myosin fiber type characteristics (identified immunohistochemically with specific anti-myosin monoclonal antibodies, then examined by quantitative histochemistry and image analysis). The deep partitions of the muscle had longer fibers, with lower angles of pinnation, and higher percentages of fast-glycolytic fibers than the superficial partitions of the muscle. These differences clearly suggest a division of labor in the whole M. vastus lateralis of llamas, with deep partitions exhibiting features well adapted for dynamic activities in the extension of stifle, whereas superficial portions seem to be related to the antigravitational role of the muscle in preserving the extension of the stifle during standing and stance phase of the stride. This peculiar structural and functional organization of the llama M

  6. Myosin VI regulates actin structure specialization through conserved cargo-binding domain sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamiko Isaji

    Full Text Available Actin structures are often stable, remaining unchanged in organization for the lifetime of a differentiated cell. Little is known about stable actin structure formation, organization, or maintenance. During Drosophila spermatid individualization, long-lived actin cones mediate cellular remodeling. Myosin VI is necessary for building the dense meshwork at the cones' fronts. We test several ideas for myosin VI's mechanism of action using domain deletions or site-specific mutations of myosin VI. The head (motor and globular tail (cargo-binding domains were both needed for localization at the cone front and dense meshwork formation. Several conserved partner-binding sites in the globular tail previously identified in vertebrate myosin VI were critical for function in cones. Localization and promotion of proper actin organization were separable properties of myosin VI. A vertebrate myosin VI was able to localize and function, indicating that functional properties are conserved. Our data eliminate several models for myosin VI's mechanism of action and suggest its role is controlling organization and action of actin assembly regulators through interactions at conserved sites. The Drosophila orthologues of interaction partners previously identified for vertebrate myosin VI are likely not required, indicating novel partners mediate this effect. These data demonstrate that generating an organized and functional actin structure in this cell requires multiple activities coordinated by myosin VI.

  7. Evolutionary traces decode molecular mechanism behind fast pace of myosin XI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamaladevi Divya P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytoplasmic class XI myosins are the fastest processive motors known. This class functions in high-velocity cytoplasmic streaming in various plant cells from algae to angiosperms. The velocities at which they process are ten times faster than its closest class V homologues. Results To provide sequence determinants and structural rationale for the molecular mechanism of this fast pace myosin, we have compared the sequences from myosin class V and XI through Evolutionary Trace (ET analysis. The current study identifies class-specific residues of myosin XI spread over the actin binding site, ATP binding site and light chain binding neck region. Sequences for ET analysis were accumulated from six plant genomes, using literature based text search and sequence searches, followed by triple validation viz. CDD search, string-based searches and phylogenetic clustering. We have identified nine myosin XI genes in sorghum and seven in grape by sequence searches. Both the plants possess one gene product each belonging to myosin type VIII as well. During this process, we have re-defined the gene boundaries for three sorghum myosin XI genes using fgenesh program. Conclusion Molecular modelling and subsequent analysis of putative interactions involving these class-specific residues suggest a structural basis for the molecular mechanism behind high velocity of plant myosin XI. We propose a model of a more flexible switch I region that contributes to faster ADP release leading to high velocity movement of the algal myosin XI.

  8. Axon extension in the fast and slow lanes: substratum-dependent engagement of myosin II functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketschek, Andrea R; Jones, Steven L; Gallo, Gianluca

    2007-09-01

    Axon extension involves the coordinated regulation of the neuronal cytoskeleton. Actin filaments drive protrusion of filopodia and lamellipodia while microtubules invade the growth cone, thereby providing structural support for the nascent axon. Furthermore, in order for axons to extend the growth cone must attach to the substratum. Previous work indicates that myosin II activity inhibits the advance of microtubules into the periphery of growth cones, and myosin II has also been implicated in mediating integrin-dependent cell attachment. However, it is not clear how the functions of myosin II in regulating substratum attachment and microtubule advance are integrated during axon extension. We report that inhibition of myosin II function decreases the rate of axon extension on laminin, but surprisingly promotes extension rate on polylysine. The differential effects of myosin II inhibition on axon extension rate are attributable to myosin II having the primary function of mediating substratum attachment on laminin, but not on polylysine. Conversely, on polylysine the primary function of myosin II is to inhibit microtubule advance into growth cones. Thus, the substratum determines the role of myosin II in axon extension by controlling the functions of myosin II that contribute to extension.

  9. Myosin inhibitors block accumulation movement of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paves, H; Truve, E

    2007-01-01

    Chloroplasts alter their distribution within plant cells depending on the external light conditions. Myosin inhibitors 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) were used to study the possible role of myosins in chloroplast photorelocation in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. None of these agents had an effect on the chloroplast high-fluence-rate avoidance movement but all of the three myosin inhibitors blocked the accumulation movement of chloroplasts after a high-fluence-rate irradiation of the leaves. The results suggest that myosins have a role in A. thaliana chloroplast photorelocation.

  10. Myosin VI contributes to synaptic transmission and development at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Shelagh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myosin VI, encoded by jaguar (jar in Drosophila melanogaster, is a unique member of the myosin superfamily of actin-based motor proteins. Myosin VI is the only myosin known to move towards the minus or pointed ends of actin filaments. Although Myosin VI has been implicated in numerous cellular processes as both an anchor and a transporter, little is known about the role of Myosin VI in the nervous system. We previously recovered jar in a screen for genes that modify neuromuscular junction (NMJ development and here we report on the genetic analysis of Myosin VI in synaptic development and function using loss of function jar alleles. Results Our experiments on Drosophila third instar larvae revealed decreased locomotor activity, a decrease in NMJ length, a reduction in synaptic bouton number, and altered synaptic vesicle localization in jar mutants. Furthermore, our studies of synaptic transmission revealed alterations in both basal synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity at the jar mutant neuromuscular synapse. Conclusions Altogether these findings indicate that Myosin VI is important for proper synaptic function and morphology. Myosin VI may be functioning as an anchor to tether vesicles to the bouton periphery and, thereby, participating in the regulation of synaptic vesicle mobilization during synaptic transmission.

  11. Structural and molecular conformation of myosin in intact muscle fibers by second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucciotti, V.; Stringari, C.; Sacconi, L.; Vanzi, F.; Linari, M.; Piazzesi, G.; Lombardi, V.; Pavone, F. S.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the use of Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) for imaging biological samples has been explored with regard to intrinsic SHG in highly ordered biological samples. As shown by fractional extraction of proteins, myosin is the source of SHG signal in skeletal muscle. SHG is highly dependent on symmetries and provides selective information on the structural order and orientation of the emitting proteins and the dynamics of myosin molecules responsible for the mechano-chemical transduction during contraction. We characterise the polarization-dependence of SHG intensity in three different physiological states: resting, rigor and isometric tetanic contraction in a sarcomere length range between 2.0 μm and 4.0 μm. The orientation of motor domains of the myosin molecules is dependent on their physiological states and modulate the SHG signal. We can discriminate the orientation of the emitting dipoles in four different molecular conformations of myosin heads in intact fibers during isometric contraction, in resting and rigor. We estimate the contribution of the myosin motor domain to the total second order bulk susceptibility from its molecular structure and its functional conformation. We demonstrate that SHG is sensitive to the fraction of ordered myosin heads by disrupting the order of myosin heads in rigor with an ATP analog. We estimate the fraction of myosin motors generating the isometric force in the active muscle fiber from the dependence of the SHG modulation on the degree of overlap between actin and myosin filaments during an isometric contraction.

  12. Microscopic model of the actin-myosin interaction in muscular contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaveau, B.; Moreau, M.; Schuman, B.

    2004-01-01

    We define and study a detailed many body model for the muscular contraction taking into account the various myosin heads. The state of the system is defined by the position of the actin and by an internal coordinate of rotation for each myosin head. We write a system of Fokker-Planck equations and calculate the average for the position, the number of attached myosin heads, and the total force exerted on the actin. We also study the correlation between these quantities, in particular between the number of attached myosin heads and the force on the actin.

  13. Differential patterns of myosin Va expression during the ontogenesis of the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Brinn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va is an actin-based, processive molecular motor protein highly enriched in the nervous tissue of vertebrates. It has been associated with processes of cellular motility, which include organelle transport and neurite outgrowth. The in vivo expression of myosin Va protein in the developing nervous system of mammals has not yet been reported. We describe here the immunolocalization of myosin Va in the developing rat hippocampus. Coronal sections of the embryonic and postnatal rat hippocampus were probed with an affinity-purified, polyclonal anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was localized in the cytoplasm of granule cells in the dentate gyrus and of pyramidal cells in Ammon's horn formation. Myosin Va expression changed during development, being higher in differentiating rather than already differentiated granule and pyramidal cells. Some of these cells presented a typical migratory profile, while others resembled neurons that were in the process of differentiation. Myosin Va was also transiently expressed in fibers present in the fimbria. Myosin Va was not detected in germinative matrices of the hippocampus proper or of the dentate gyrus. In conclusion, myosin Va expression in both granule and pyramidal cells showed both position and time dependency during hippocampal development, indicating that this motor protein is under developmental regulation.

  14. Phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C releases myosin heads from the surface of cardiac thick filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kensler, Robert W.; Craig, Roger; Moss, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) has a key regulatory role in cardiac contraction, but the mechanism by which changes in phosphorylation of cMyBP-C accelerate cross-bridge kinetics remains unknown. In this study, we isolated thick filaments from the hearts of mice in which the three serine residues (Ser273, Ser282, and Ser302) that are phosphorylated by protein kinase A in the m-domain of cMyBP-C were replaced by either alanine or aspartic acid, mimicking the fully nonphosphorylated and the fully phosphorylated state of cMyBP-C, respectively. We found that thick filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-deficient hearts had highly ordered cross-bridge arrays, whereas the filaments from the cMyBP-C phospho-mimetic hearts showed a strong tendency toward disorder. Our results support the hypothesis that dephosphorylation of cMyBP-C promotes or stabilizes the relaxed/superrelaxed quasi-helical ordering of the myosin heads on the filament surface, whereas phosphorylation weakens this stabilization and binding of the heads to the backbone. Such structural changes would modulate the probability of myosin binding to actin and could help explain the acceleration of cross-bridge interactions with actin when cMyBP-C is phosphorylated because of, for example, activation of β1-adrenergic receptors in myocardium. PMID:28167762

  15. A Myo6 mutation destroys coordination between the myosin heads, revealing new functions of myosin VI in the stereocilia of mammalian inner ear hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronna Hertzano

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Myosin VI, found in organisms from Caenorhabditis elegans to humans, is essential for auditory and vestibular function in mammals, since genetic mutations lead to hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction in both humans and mice. Here, we show that a missense mutation in this molecular motor in an ENU-generated mouse model, Tailchaser, disrupts myosin VI function. Structural changes in the Tailchaser hair bundles include mislocalization of the kinocilia and branching of stereocilia. Transfection of GFP-labeled myosin VI into epithelial cells and delivery of endocytic vesicles to the early endosome revealed that the mutant phenotype displays disrupted motor function. The actin-activated ATPase rates measured for the D179Y mutation are decreased, and indicate loss of coordination of the myosin VI heads or 'gating' in the dimer form. Proper coordination is required for walking processively along, or anchoring to, actin filaments, and is apparently destroyed by the proximity of the mutation to the nucleotide-binding pocket. This loss of myosin VI function may not allow myosin VI to transport its cargoes appropriately at the base and within the stereocilia, or to anchor the membrane of stereocilia to actin filaments via its cargos, both of which lead to structural changes in the stereocilia of myosin VI-impaired hair cells, and ultimately leading to deafness.

  16. Isolation of rat cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum with improved Ca2+ uptake and ryanodine binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feher, J J; Davis, M D

    1991-03-01

    The instability of the oxalate-supported Ca2+ uptake activity of rat cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (CSR) in ventricular homogenates most likely accounts for the low specific activity of the rate of oxalate-supported Ca2+ uptake in previously reported fractions of isolated rat CSR. We have found that CSR vesicles with improved Ca2+ transport capabilities can be isolated if 1 M KCl is used to stabilize the CSR activity and to allow the extraction of the CSR from the cellular debris. The average rate of Ca2+ uptake by the isolated rat CSR in the presence of 10 mM oxalate at 37 degrees C was 0.45 mumols/min-mg in the absence of CSR Ca2+ channel blockers and 0.87 mumols/min-mg in the presence of 10 microM ruthenium red. The Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase activity under the conditions of oxlate-supported uptake was 1.25 mumols/min-mg and 0.84 mumols/min-mg in the absence and presence of 10 microM ruthenium red, respectively. The rat CSR vesicles bound 3H-ryanodine with a Kd of 1.45 nM and a Bmax of 3.7 pmol mg. The level of phosphorylated intermediate was 0.30 nmol/mg. The values Bmax, EP and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity are from one-third to one-half of those previously reported for isolated canine CSR vesicles. These results suggest that the isolated rat CSR may be quite similar to dog CSR.

  17. Crosstalk between mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ cycling modulates cardiac pacemaker cell automaticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Yaniv

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria dynamically buffer cytosolic Ca(2+ in cardiac ventricular cells and this affects the Ca(2+ load of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR. In sinoatrial-node cells (SANC the SR generates periodic local, subsarcolemmal Ca(2+ releases (LCRs that depend upon the SR load and are involved in SANC automaticity: LCRs activate an inward Na(+-Ca(2+ exchange current to accelerate the diastolic depolarization, prompting the ensemble of surface membrane ion channels to generate the next action potential (AP. OBJECTIVE: To determine if mitochondrial Ca(2+ (Ca(2+ (m, cytosolic Ca(2+ (Ca(2+ (c-SR-Ca(2+ crosstalk occurs in single rabbit SANC, and how this may relate to SANC normal automaticity. RESULTS: Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ influx into (Ru360 or Ca(2+ efflux from (CGP-37157 decreased [Ca(2+](m to 80 ± 8% control or increased [Ca(2+](m to 119 ± 7% control, respectively. Concurrent with inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+ influx or efflux, the SR Ca(2+ load, and LCR size, duration, amplitude and period (imaged via confocal linescan significantly increased or decreased, respectively. Changes in total ensemble LCR Ca(2+ signal were highly correlated with the change in the SR Ca(2+ load (r(2 = 0.97. Changes in the spontaneous AP cycle length (Ru360, 111 ± 1% control; CGP-37157, 89 ± 2% control in response to changes in [Ca(2+](m were predicted by concurrent changes in LCR period (r(2 = 0.84. CONCLUSION: A change in SANC Ca(2+ (m flux translates into a change in the AP firing rate by effecting changes in Ca(2+ (c and SR Ca(2+ loading, which affects the characteristics of spontaneous SR Ca(2+ release.

  18. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  19. Contractile properties and myosin expression in rats born and reared in hypergravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picquet, F; Bouet, V; Canu, M H; Stevens, L; Mounier, Y; Lacour, M; Falempin, M

    2002-06-01

    The effects of hypergravity (HG) on soleus and plantaris muscles were studied in Long Evans rats aged 100 days, born and reared in 2-g conditions (HG group). The morphological and contractile properties and the myosin heavy chain (MHC) content were examined in whole muscles and compared with terrestrial control (Cont) age-paired rats. The growth of HG rats was slowed compared with Cont rats. A decrease in absolute muscle weight was observed. An increase in fiber cross-sectional area/muscle wet weight was demonstrated, associated with an increase in relative maximal tension. The soleus muscle changed into a slower type both in contractile parameters and in MHC content, since HG soleus contained only the MHC I isoform. The HG plantaris muscle presented a faster contractile behavior. Moreover, the diversity of hybrid fiber types expressing multiple MHC isoforms (including MHC IIB and MHC IIX isoforms) was increased in plantaris muscle after HG. Thus the HG environment appears as an important inductor of muscular plasticity both in slow and fast muscle types.

  20. Direct Measurements of Local Coupling between Myosin Molecules Are Consistent with a Model of Muscle Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Walcott

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contracts due to ATP-dependent interactions of myosin motors with thin filaments composed of the proteins actin, troponin, and tropomyosin. Contraction is initiated when calcium binds to troponin, which changes conformation and displaces tropomyosin, a filamentous protein that wraps around the actin filament, thereby exposing myosin binding sites on actin. Myosin motors interact with each other indirectly via tropomyosin, since myosin binding to actin locally displaces tropomyosin and thereby facilitates binding of nearby myosin. Defining and modeling this local coupling between myosin motors is an open problem in muscle modeling and, more broadly, a requirement to understanding the connection between muscle contraction at the molecular and macro scale. It is challenging to directly observe this coupling, and such measurements have only recently been made. Analysis of these data suggests that two myosin heads are required to activate the thin filament. This result contrasts with a theoretical model, which reproduces several indirect measurements of coupling between myosin, that assumes a single myosin head can activate the thin filament. To understand this apparent discrepancy, we incorporated the model into stochastic simulations of the experiments, which generated simulated data that were then analyzed identically to the experimental measurements. By varying a single parameter, good agreement between simulation and experiment was established. The conclusion that two myosin molecules are required to activate the thin filament arises from an assumption, made during data analysis, that the intensity of the fluorescent tags attached to myosin varies depending on experimental condition. We provide an alternative explanation that reconciles theory and experiment without assuming that the intensity of the fluorescent tags varies.

  1. Myosin Va is developmentally regulated and expressed in the human cerebellum from birth to old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.R. Souza

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin Va functions as a processive, actin-based motor molecule highly enriched in the nervous system, which transports and/or tethers organelles, vesicles, and mRNA and protein translation machinery. Mutation of myosin Va leads to Griscelli disease that is associated with severe neurological deficits and a short life span. Despite playing a critical role in development, the expression of myosin Va in the central nervous system throughout the human life span has not been reported. To address this issue, the cerebellar expression of myosin Va from newborns to elderly humans was studied by immunohistochemistry using an affinity-purified anti-myosin Va antibody. Myosin Va was expressed at all ages from the 10th postnatal day to the 98th year of life, in molecular, Purkinje and granular cerebellar layers. Cerebellar myosin Va expression did not differ essentially in localization or intensity from childhood to old age, except during the postnatal developmental period. Structures resembling granules and climbing fibers in Purkinje cells were deeply stained. In dentate neurons, long processes were deeply stained by anti-myosin Va, as were punctate nuclear structures. During the first postnatal year, myosin Va was differentially expressed in the external granular layer (EGL. In the EGL, proliferating prospective granule cells were not stained by anti-myosin Va antibody. In contrast, premigratory granule cells in the EGL stained moderately. Granule cells exhibiting a migratory profile in the molecular layer were also moderately stained. In conclusion, neuronal myosin Va is developmentally regulated, and appears to be required for cerebellar function from early postnatal life to senescence.

  2. Analysis of Organelle Targeting by DIL Domains of the Arabidopsis Myosin XI Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hanson, Maureen R.

    2011-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 myosin XI motor proteins. Previous insertional mutant analysis has implicated substantial redundancy of function of plant myosin XIs in transport of intracellular organelles. Considerable information is available about the interaction of cargo with the myosin XI-homologous yeast myosin V protein myo2p. We identified a region in each of 12 myosin XI sequences that correspond to the yeast myo2p secretory-vesicle binding domain (the “DIL” domain). Structural modeling of the myosin DIL domain region of plant myosin XIs revealed significant similarity to the yeast myo2p and myo4p DIL domains. Transient expression of YFP fusions with the Arabidopsis myosin XI DIL domain resulted in fluorescent labeling of a variety of organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, Golgi, and nuclear envelope. With the exception of the YFP::MYA1 DIL fusion, expression of the DIL–YFP fusions resulted in loss of motility of labeled organelles, consistent with a dominant-negative effect. Certain fusions resulted in localization to the cytoplasm, plasma membrane, or to unidentified vesicles. The same YFP-domain fusion sometimes labeled more than one organelle. Expression of a YFP fusion to a yeast myo2p DIL domain resulted in labeling of plant peroxisomes. Fusions with some of the myosin XI domains resulted in labeling of known cargoes of the particular myosin XI; however, certain myosin XI YFP fusions labeled organelles that had not previously been found to be detectably affected by mutations nor by expression of dominant-negative constructs. PMID:22645548

  3. Class I myosins have overlapping and specialized functions in left-right asymmetric development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Takashi; Sasamura, Takeshi; Inatomi, Momoko; Hozumi, Shunya; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Hatori, Ryo; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Nakazawa, Naotaka; Suzuki, Emiko; Maeda, Reo; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    The class I myosin genes are conserved in diverse organisms, and their gene products are involved in actin dynamics, endocytosis, and signal transduction. Drosophila melanogaster has three class I myosin genes, Myosin 31DF (Myo31DF), Myosin 61F (Myo61F), and Myosin 95E (Myo95E). Myo31DF, Myo61F, and Myo95E belong to the Myosin ID, Myosin IC, and Myosin IB families, respectively. Previous loss-of-function analyses of Myo31DF and Myo61F revealed important roles in left-right (LR) asymmetric development and enterocyte maintenance, respectively. However, it was difficult to elucidate their roles in vivo, because of potential redundant activities. Here we generated class I myosin double and triple mutants to address this issue. We found that the triple mutant was viable and fertile, indicating that all three class I myosins were dispensable for survival. A loss-of-function analysis revealed further that Myo31DF and Myo61F, but not Myo95E, had redundant functions in promoting the dextral LR asymmetric development of the male genitalia. Myo61F overexpression is known to antagonize the dextral activity of Myo31DF in various Drosophila organs. Thus, the LR-reversing activity of overexpressed Myo61F may not reflect its physiological function. The endogenous activity of Myo61F in promoting dextral LR asymmetric development was observed in the male genitalia, but not the embryonic gut, another LR asymmetric organ. Thus, Myo61F and Myo31DF, but not Myo95E, play tissue-specific, redundant roles in LR asymmetric development. Our studies also revealed differential colocalization of the class I myosins with filamentous (F)-actin in the brush border of intestinal enterocytes. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Shrimp allergy beyond Tropomyosin in Italy: clinical relevance of Arginine Kinase, Sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein and Hemocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffrida, M G; Villalta, D; Mistrello, G; Amato, S; Asero, R

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the prevalence and clinical relevance of sensitization to shrimp allergens other than tropomyosin. We detected the prevalence of arginine kinase and sarcoplasmic calcium binding protein sensitization, and identified a high molecular weight allergen that is frequently recognized by Italian shrimp-allergic patients. Sera from 40 shrimp-allergic patients underwent the detection of IgE specific for arginine kinase (rPen m 2) and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (rPen m 4) by ISAC 112 Microarray platform and immunoblot analysis. A high molecular weight shrimp allergen was identified by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. IgE to rPen m 2 and rPen m 4 were found in 4/40 (10%) and 6/40 (15%) sera, respectively; two sera reacted to both allergens. Clinically, 6/8 Pen m 2 and/or Pen m 4 reactors experienced severe allergies to shrimp. On immunoblot, 4/6 rPen m 4-positive sera showed IgE reactivity at about 20 kDa, whereas no rPen m 2-positive serum reacted at about 40 kDa. Nineteen (47%) sera showed IgE reactivity at molecular weights > 60 kDa. Such profile was not associated with IgE reactivity to rPen m 2 or rPen m 4. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the high molecular weight allergen led to the identification of hemocyanin. Shrimp arginine kinase and sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein are minor allergens sensitizing only 10%-15% of Italian shrimp-allergic patients, but are clinically relevant. Hemocyanin is a clinically relevant high molecular weight shrimp allergen possibly cross-reacting to house dust mite.

  5. Denervation causes fiber atrophy and myosin heavy chain co-expression in senescent skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon L Rowan

    Full Text Available Although denervation has long been implicated in aging muscle, the degree to which it is causes the fiber atrophy seen in aging muscle is unknown. To address this question, we quantified motoneuron soma counts in the lumbar spinal cord using choline acetyl transferase immunhistochemistry and quantified the size of denervated versus innervated muscle fibers in the gastrocnemius muscle using the in situ expression of the denervation-specific sodium channel, Nav₁.₅, in young adult (YA and senescent (SEN rats. To gain insights into the mechanisms driving myofiber atrophy, we also examined the myofiber expression of the two primary ubiquitin ligases necessary for muscle atrophy (MAFbx, MuRF1. MN soma number in lumbar spinal cord declined 27% between YA (638±34 MNs×mm⁻¹ and SEN (469±13 MNs×mm⁻¹. Nav₁.₅ positive fibers (1548±70 μm² were 35% smaller than Nav₁.₅ negative fibers (2367±78 μm²; P<0.05 in SEN muscle, whereas Nav₁.₅ negative fibers in SEN were only 7% smaller than fibers in YA (2553±33 μm²; P<0.05 where no Nav₁.₅ labeling was seen, suggesting denervation is the primary cause of aging myofiber atrophy. Nav₁.₅ positive fibers had higher levels of MAFbx and MuRF1 (P<0.05, consistent with involvement of the proteasome proteolytic pathway in the atrophy of denervated muscle fibers in aging muscle. In summary, our study provides the first quantitative assessment of the contribution of denervation to myofiber atrophy in aging muscle, suggesting it explains the majority of the atrophy we observed. This striking result suggests a renewed focus should be placed on denervation in seeking understanding of the causes of and treatments for aging muscle atrophy.

  6. Myosin heavy chain composition of single fibres from m. biceps brachii of male body builders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, H; Zhou, M.-Y.; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    expression of MHC isoforms within histochemical type II fibres of human skeletal muscle with body building. Furthermore, in human skeletal muscle differences in expression of MHC isoforms may not always be reflected in the traditional histochemical classification of types I, IIa, IIb and IIc fibres....

  7. CONTRACTION CHARACTERISTICS AND MYOSIN HEAVY-CHAIN COMPOSITION OF RABBIT MASSETER MOTOR UNITS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KWA, SHS; WEIJS, WA; JUCH, PJW

    1995-01-01

    1. We studied isometric twitch peak force (TPF) and twitch contraction time (TCT) of 249 motor units of the masseter muscle in 41 rabbits after extracellular electrical stimulation of single trigeminal motoneurons in the brain stem. In 41 of these units we determined the amount of tension decrease d

  8. CaMKII inhibition targeted to the sarcoplasmic reticulum inhibits frequency dependent acceleration of relaxation and Ca2+ current facilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Picht, Eckard; DeSantiago, Jaime; Huke, Sabine; Kaetzel, Marcia A.; Dedman, John R.; Bers, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in heart has been implicated in Ca2+ current (ICa) facilitation, enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release and frequency dependent acceleration of relaxation (FDAR) via enhanced SR Ca2+ uptake. However, questions remain about how CaMKII may work in these three processes. Here we tested the role of CaM-KII in these processes using transgenic mice (SR-AIP) that express four concatenated repeats of the CaMKII inhibitory peptide...

  9. Menorrhagia (Heavy Menstrual Bleeding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Menorrhagia (heavy menstrual bleeding) By Mayo Clinic Staff Menorrhagia is the medical term for menstrual periods with abnormally heavy or prolonged bleeding. Although heavy ...

  10. A role for myosin VI in the localization of axonal proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy L Lewis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In neurons polarized trafficking of vesicle-bound membrane proteins gives rise to the distinct molecular composition and functional properties of axons and dendrites. Despite their central role in shaping neuronal form and function, surprisingly little is known about the molecular processes that mediate polarized targeting of neuronal proteins. Recently, the plus-end-directed motor Myosin Va was shown to play a critical role in targeting of transmembrane proteins to dendrites; however, the role of myosin motors in axonal targeting is unknown. Here we show that Myosin VI, a minus-end-directed motor, plays a vital role in the enrichment of proteins on the surface of axons. Engineering non-neuronal proteins to interact with Myosin VI causes them to become highly concentrated at the axonal surface in dissociated rat cortical neurons. Furthermore, disruption of either Myosin VI function or expression leads to aberrant dendritic localization of axonal proteins. Myosin VI mediates the enrichment of proteins on the axonal surface at least in part by stimulating dendrite-specific endocytosis, a mechanism that has been shown to underlie the localization of many axonal proteins. In addition, a version of Channelrhodopsin 2 that was engineered to bind to Myosin VI is concentrated at the surface of the axon of cortical neurons in mice in vivo, suggesting that it could be a useful tool for probing circuit structure and function. Together, our results indicate that myosins help shape the polarized distributions of both axonal and dendritic proteins.

  11. Myosin Ⅷ Regulates Protonemal Patterning and Developmental Timing in the Moss Physcomitrella patens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Zon Wua; Julie A. Ritchie; Ai-Hong Pan; Ralph S. Quatrano; Magdalena Bezanilla

    2011-01-01

    Plants have two classes of myosins.While recent work has focused on class Ⅺ myosins showing that myosin Ⅺ is responsible for organelle motility and cytoplasmic streaming,much less is known about the role of myosin Ⅷ in plant growth and development.We have used a combination of RNAi and insertional knockouts to probe myosin Ⅷ function in the moss Physcomitrella patens.We isolated △myo8ABCDE plants demonstrating that myosin Ⅷ is not required for plant viability.However,myosin Ⅷ mutants are smaller than wild-type plants in part due to a defect in cell size.Additionally,△myo8ABCDE plants produce more side branches and form gametophores much earlier than wild-type plants.In the absence of nutrient media,△myo8ABCDE plants exhibit significant protonemal patterning defects,including highly curved protonemal filaments,morphologically defective side branches,as well as an increase in the number of branches.Exogenous auxin partially rescues protonemal defects in △myo8ABCDE plants grown in the absence of nutrients.This result,together with defects in protonemal branching,smaller caulonemal cells,and accelerated development in the △myo8ABCDE plants,suggests that myosin Ⅷ is involved in hormone homeostasis in P patens.

  12. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Ryan S; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z S A; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms.

  13. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Lana M; Chou, Shih-Wei; McDermott, Brian M

    2016-01-18

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle's morphology and hearing.

  14. Interactions of vanadium(V)-citrate complexes with the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, Manuel; Tiago, Teresa; Gândara, Ricardo M C; Sousa, Andrea; Moderno, A; Kaliva, M; Salifoglou, A; Duarte, Rui O; Moura, José J G

    2005-12-01

    Among the biotargets interacting with vanadium is the calcium pump from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). To this end, initial research efforts were launched with two vanadium(V)-citrate complexes, namely (NH(4))(6)[V(2)O(4)(C(6)H(4)O(7))(2)].6H(2)O and (NH(4))(6)[V(2)O(2)(O(2))(2)(C(6)H(4)O(7))(2)].4H(2)O, potentially capable of interacting with the SR calcium pump by combining kinetic studies with (51)V NMR spectroscopy. Upon dissolution in the reaction medium (concentration range: 4-0.5mM), both vanadium(V):citrate (VC) and peroxovanadium(V):citrate (PVC) complexes are partially converted into vanadate oligomers. A 1mM solution of the PVC complex, containing 184microM of the PVC complex, 94microM oxoperoxovanadium(V) (PV) species, 222microM monomeric (V1), 43microM dimeric (V2) and 53microM tetrameric (V4) species, inhibits Ca(2+) accumulation by 75 %, whereas a solution of the VC complex of the same vanadium concentration, containing 98microM of the VC complex, 263microM monomeric (V1), 64microM dimeric (V2) and 92microM tetrameric (V4) species inhibits the calcium pump activity by 33 %. In contrast, a 1 mM metavanadate solution, containing 460microM monomeric (V1), 90.2microM dimeric (V2) and 80microM tetrameric (V4) species, has no effect on Ca(2+) accumulation. The NMR signals from the VC complex (-548.0ppm), PVC complex (-551.5ppm) and PV (-611.1ppm) are broadened upon SR vesicle addition (2.5mg/ml total protein). The relative order for the half width line broadening of the NMR signals, which reflect the interaction with the protein, was found to be V4>PVC>VC>PV>V2=V1=1, with no effect observed for the V1 and V2 signals. Putting it all together the effects of two vanadium(V)-citrate complexes on the modulation of calcium accumulation and ATP hydrolysis by the SR calcium pump reflected the observed variable reactivity into the nature of key species forming upon dissolution of the title complexes in the reaction media.

  15. Sensitivity of small myosin II ensembles from different isoforms to mechanical load and ATP concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Thorsten; Bartelheimer, Kathrin; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2016-11-01

    Based on a detailed crossbridge model for individual myosin II motors, we systematically study the influence of mechanical load and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration on small myosin II ensembles made from different isoforms. For skeletal and smooth muscle myosin II, which are often used in actomyosin gels that reconstitute cell contractility, fast forward movement is restricted to a small region of phase space with low mechanical load and high ATP concentration, which is also characterized by frequent ensemble detachment. At high load, these ensembles are stalled or move backwards, but forward motion can be restored by decreasing ATP concentration. In contrast, small ensembles of nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, which are found in the cytoskeleton of nonmuscle cells, are hardly affected by ATP concentration due to the slow kinetics of the bound states. For all isoforms, the thermodynamic efficiency of ensemble movement increases with decreasing ATP concentration, but this effect is weaker for the nonmuscle myosin II isoforms.

  16. Modeling Hand-Over-Hand and Inchworm Steps in Myosin VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Amanda; Lowe, Ian; Tehver, Riina

    Myosin VI is a molecular motor protein that moves along actin filaments to transport cargo within a cell. There is much experimental evidence that the myosin VI dimer moves ``hand-over-hand'' along actin; however, recent experiments suggest that the protein can also move via an ``inchworm'' mechanism. We created a mechanochemical kinetic model to predict myosin VI's behavior under different ATP, ADP, and force conditions, taking these alternative mechanisms into account. Our model's calculations agree well with experimental results and can also be used to predict myosin VI's behavior outside experimentally tested regimes, such as under forward force. We also predict an optimized motor function for the protein around physiological (-2 pN) load and anchoring under -3 pN load. By using our model to predict myosin VI's response to environmental change, we can gain insight into the behavior of a protein that can be difficult to observe experimentally.

  17. Peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative modifications of myosin and implications on structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Teresa; Palma, Pedro S; Gutierrez-Merino, Carlos; Aureliano, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Abstract The peroxynitrite-induced functional impairment of myosin was studied in different reaction conditions, known to alter the oxidative chemistry of peroxynitrite, to better understand the molecular mechanisms of this interaction. It is shown that peroxynitrite is able to enhance the basal MgATPase activity up to 2-fold while inhibiting the actin-stimulated ATPase activity of myosin and that the extent of these functional alterations is dependent on the reaction medium. The observed changes in the stimulation of the MgATPase activity correlate with the extent of carbonyl formation in myosin. The enzyme inhibition is more potent in conditions where the efficiency of tyrosine nitration and peroxynitrite reactivity towards sulphydryls are lower. Together with the observation that reversion of sulphydryl oxidation did not lead to the recovery of myosin functional and structural impairments, these results point out to the importance of protein carbonylation as a post-translational modification in the peroxynitrite-induced myosin functional impairment.

  18. Modulating Beta-Cardiac Myosin Function at the Molecular and Tissue Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wanjian; Blair, Cheavar A.; Walton, Shane D.; Málnási-Csizmadia, András; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Yengo, Christopher M.

    2017-01-01

    Inherited cardiomyopathies are a common form of heart disease that are caused by mutations in sarcomeric proteins with beta cardiac myosin (MYH7) being one of the most frequently affected genes. Since the discovery of the first cardiomyopathy associated mutation in beta-cardiac myosin, a major goal has been to correlate the in vitro myosin motor properties with the contractile performance of cardiac muscle. There has been substantial progress in developing assays to measure the force and velocity properties of purified cardiac muscle myosin but it is still challenging to correlate results from molecular and tissue-level experiments. Mutations that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are more common than mutations that lead to dilated cardiomyopathy and are also often associated with increased isometric force and hyper-contractility. Therefore, the development of drugs designed to decrease isometric force by reducing the duty ratio (the proportion of time myosin spends bound to actin during its ATPase cycle) has been proposed for the treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Para-Nitroblebbistatin is a small molecule drug proposed to decrease the duty ratio of class II myosins. We examined the impact of this drug on human beta cardiac myosin using purified myosin motor assays and studies of permeabilized muscle fiber mechanics. We find that with purified human beta-cardiac myosin para-Nitroblebbistatin slows actin-activated ATPase and in vitro motility without altering the ADP release rate constant. In permeabilized human myocardium, para-Nitroblebbistatin reduces isometric force, power, and calcium sensitivity while not changing shortening velocity or the rate of force development (ktr). Therefore, designing a drug that reduces the myosin duty ratio by inhibiting strong attachment to actin while not changing detachment can cause a reduction in force without changing shortening velocity or relaxation. PMID:28119616

  19. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkaiah eBetapudi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  20. Life without double-headed non-muscle myosin II motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah

    2014-07-01

    Non-muscle myosin II motor proteins (myosin IIA, myosin IIB, and myosin IIC) belong to a class of molecular motor proteins that are known to transduce cellular free-energy into biological work more efficiently than man-made combustion engines. Nature has given a single myosin II motor protein for lower eukaryotes and multiple for mammals but none for plants in order to provide impetus for their life. These specialized nanomachines drive cellular activities necessary for embryogenesis, organogenesis, and immunity. However, these multifunctional myosin II motor proteins are believed to go awry due to unknown reasons and contribute for the onset and progression of many autosomal-dominant disorders, cataract, deafness, infertility, cancer, kidney, neuronal, and inflammatory diseases. Many pathogens like HIV, Dengue, hepatitis C, and Lymphoma viruses as well as Salmonella and Mycobacteria are now known to take hostage of these dedicated myosin II motor proteins for their efficient pathogenesis. Even after four decades since their discovery, we still have a limited knowledge of how these motor proteins drive cell migration and cytokinesis. We need to enrich our current knowledge on these fundamental cellular processes and develop novel therapeutic strategies to fix mutated myosin II motor proteins in pathological conditions. This is the time to think how to relieve the hijacked myosins from pathogens in order to provide a renewed impetus for patients’ life. Understanding how to steer these molecular motors in proliferating and differentiating stem cells will improve stem cell based-therapeutics development. Given the plethora of cellular activities non-muscle myosin motor proteins are involved in, their importance is apparent for human life.

  1. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States); Hofmann, Wilma A., E-mail: whofmann@buffalo.edu [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University at Buffalo—State University of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  2. Effects of prior exercise and a low-carbohydrate diet on muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum function during cycling in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, T A; Green, H J; Perco, J G; Ouyang, J

    2006-09-01

    The effects of exercise and diet on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-cycling properties in female vastus lateralis muscle were investigated in two groups of women following four different conditions. The conditions were 4 days of a low-carbohydrate (Lo CHO) and glycogen-depleting exercise plus a Lo CHO diet (Ex + Lo CHO) (experiment 2) and 4 days of normal CHO (Norm CHO) and glycogen-depleting exercise plus Norm CHO (Ex + Norm CHO) (experiment 1). Peak aerobic power (Vo2peak)) was 38.1 +/- 1.4 (SE); n = 9 and 35.6 +/- 1.4 ml.kg(-1).min(-1); n = 9, respectively. Sarcoplasmic reticulum properties measured in vitro in homogenates (micromol.g protein(-1).min(-1)) indicated exercise-induced reductions (P 30, 60 min > fatigue), Ca(2+) uptake (0 > 30 > 60 min, fatigue), and Ca(2+) release, both phase 1 (0, 30 > 60 min, fatigue) and phase 2 (0 > 30, 60 min, fatigue; 30 min > fatigue) in Norm CHO. Exercise was without effect in altering the Hill slope (n(H)), defined as the slope of relationship between Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and Ca(2+) concentration. No differences were observed between Norm CHO and Ex+Norm CHO. Compared with Norm CHO, Lo CHO resulted in a lower (P cycling and that, with the exception of Ca(2+) release, a glycogen-depleting session of exercise before Lo CHO can reverse the effects.

  3. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  4. A new role for myosin II in vesicle fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Juan A; Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Cabeza, Jose M; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2014-01-01

    An endocytic vesicle is formed from a flat plasma membrane patch by a sequential process of invagination, bud formation and fission. The scission step requires the formation of a tubular membrane neck (the fission pore) that connects the endocytic vesicle with the plasma membrane. Progress in vesicle fission can be measured by the formation and closure of the fission pore. Live-cell imaging and sensitive biophysical measurements have provided various glimpses into the structure and behaviour of the fission pore. In the present study, the role of non-muscle myosin II (NM-2) in vesicle fission was tested by analyzing the kinetics of the fission pore with perforated-patch clamp capacitance measurements to detect single vesicle endocytosis with millisecond time resolution in peritoneal mast cells. Blebbistatin, a specific inhibitor of NM-2, dramatically increased the duration of the fission pore and also prevented closure during large endocytic events. Using the fluorescent markers FM1-43 and pHrodo Green dextran, we found that NM-2 inhibition greatly arrested vesicle fission in a late phase of the scission event when the pore reached a final diameter of ∼ 5 nm. Our results indicate that loss of the ATPase activity of myosin II drastically reduces the efficiency of membrane scission by making vesicle closure incomplete and suggest that NM-2 might be especially relevant in vesicle fission during compound endocytosis.

  5. Bulkiness or aromatic nature of tyrosine-143 of actin is important for the weak binding between F-actin and myosin-ADP-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomibuchi, Yuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Uyeda, Taro Q.P. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, AIST Tsukuba Central 4, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan); Wakabayashi, Takeyuki, E-mail: tw007@nasu.bio.teikyo-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan); Department of Judo Therapy, Faculty of Medical Technology, Teikyo University, Toyosatodai 1-1, Utsunomiya 320-8551 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •The effect of mutation of Tyr143 that becomes more exposed on assembly was examined. •Mutation of tyrosine-143 of Dictyostelium actin changed actin polymerizability. •The bulkiness or aromatic nature of Tyr143 is important for the weak binding. •The weak interaction between myosin and actin strengthened by Tyr143Trp mutation. -- Abstract: Actin filaments (F-actin) interact with myosin and activate its ATPase to support force generation. By comparing crystal structures of G-actin and the quasi-atomic model of F-actin based on high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, the tyrosine-143 was found to be exposed more than 60 Å{sup 2} to the solvent in F-actin. Because tyrosine-143 flanks the hydrophobic cleft near the hydrophobic helix that binds to myosin, the mutant actins, of which the tyrosine-143 was replaced with tryptophan, phenylalanine, or isoleucine, were generated using the Dictyostelium expression system. It polymerized significantly poorly when induced by NaCl, but almost normally by KCl. In the presence of phalloidin and KCl, the extents of the polymerization of all the mutant actins were comparable to that of the wild-type actin so that the actin-activated myosin ATPase activity could be reliably compared. The affinity of skeletal heavy meromyosin to F-actin and the maximum ATPase activity (V{sub max}) were estimated by a double reciprocal plot. The Tyr143Trp-actin showed the higher affinity (smaller K{sub app}) than that of the wild-type actin, with the V{sub max} being almost unchanged. The K{sub app} and V{sub max} of the Tyr143Phe-actin were similar to those of the wild-type actin. However, the activation by Tyr143Ile-actin was much smaller than the wild-type actin and the accurate determination of K{sub app} was difficult. Comparison of the myosin ATPase activated by the various mutant actins at the same concentration of F-actin showed that the extent of activation correlates well with the solvent-accessible surface areas (ASA

  6. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles. PMID:27583360

  7. Tension Recovery following Ramp-Shaped Release in High-Ca and Low-Ca Rigor Muscle Fibers: Evidence for the Dynamic State of AMADP Myosin Heads in the Absence of ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugi, Haruo; Yamaguchi, Maki; Ohno, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Takakazu; Chaen, Shigeru; Okuyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    During muscle contraction, myosin heads (M) bound to actin (A) perform power stroke associated with reaction, AMADPPi → AM + ADP + Pi. In this scheme, A • M is believed to be a high-affinity complex after removal of ATP. Biochemical studies on extracted protein samples show that, in the AM complex, actin-binding sites are located at both sides of junctional peptide between 50K and 20K segments of myosin heavy chain. Recently, we found that a monoclonal antibody (IgG) to the junctional peptide had no effect on both in vitro actin-myosin sliding and skinned muscle fiber contraction, though it covers the actin-binding sites on myosin. It follows from this that, during muscle contraction, myosin heads do not pass through the static rigor AM configuration, determined biochemically and electron microscopically using extracted protein samples. To study the nature of AM and AMADP myosin heads, actually existing in muscle, we examined mechanical responses to ramp-shaped releases (0.5% of Lo, complete in 5ms) in single skinned rabbit psoas muscle fibers in high-Ca (pCa, 4) and low-Ca (pCa, >9) rigor states. The fibers exhibited initial elastic tension drop and subsequent small but definite tension recovery to a steady level. The tension recovery was present over many minutes in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it tended to decrease quickly in low-Ca rigor fibers. EDTA (10mM, with MgCl2 removed) had no appreciable effect on the tension recovery in high-Ca rigor fibers, while it completely eliminated the tension recovery in low-Ca rigor fibers. These results suggest that the AMADP myosin heads in rigor muscle have long lifetimes and dynamic properties, which show up as the tension recovery following applied release. Possible AM linkage structure in muscle is discussed in connection with the X-ray diffraction pattern from contracting muscle, which is intermediate between resting and rigor muscles.

  8. Yeast myosin light chain, Mlc1p, interacts with both IQGAP and class II myosin to effect cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyne, J R; Yosuf, H M; Bieganowski, P; Brenner, C; Price, C

    2000-12-01

    MLC1 (myosin light chain) acts as a dosage suppressor of a temperature sensitive mutation in the gene encoding the S. cerevisiae IQGAP protein. Both proteins localize to the bud neck in mitosis although Mlc1p localisation precedes Iqg1p. Mlc1p is also found at the incipient bud site in G(1) and the growing bud tip during S and G(2) phases of the cell cycle. A dominant negative GST-Mlc1p fusion protein specifically blocks cytokinesis and prevents Iqg1p localisation to the bud neck, as does depletion of Mlc1p. These data support a direct interaction between the two proteins and immunoprecipitation experiments confirm this prediction. Mlc1p is also shown to interact with the class II conventional myosin (Myo1p). All three proteins form a complex, however, the interaction between Mlc1p and Iqg1p can be separated from the Mlc1p/Myo1p interaction. Mlc1p localisation and maintenance at the bud neck is independent of actin, Myo1p and Iqg1p. It is proposed that Mlc1p therefore functions to recruit Iqg1p and in turn actin to the actomyosin ring and that it is also required for Myo1p function during ring contraction.

  9. Loss of cargo binding in the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) leads to increased actin filament binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arden, Susan D; Tumbarello, David A; Butt, Tariq; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in myosin VI have been associated with autosomal-recessive (DFNB37) and autosomal-dominant (DFNA22) deafness in humans. Here, we characterise an myosin VI nonsense mutation (R1166X) that was identified in a family with hereditary hearing loss in Pakistan. This mutation leads to the deletion of the C-terminal 120 amino acids of the myosin VI cargo-binding domain, which includes the WWY-binding motif for the adaptor proteins LMTK2, Tom1 as well as Dab2. Interestingly, compromising myosin VI vesicle-binding ability by expressing myosin VI with the R1166X mutation or with single point mutations in the adaptor-binding sites leads to increased F-actin binding of this myosin in vitro and in vivo As our results highlight the importance of cargo attachment for regulating actin binding to the motor domain, we perform a detailed characterisation of adaptor protein binding and identify single amino acids within myosin VI required for binding to cargo adaptors. We not only show that the adaptor proteins can directly interact with the cargo-binding tail of myosin VI, but our in vitro studies also suggest that multiple adaptor proteins can bind simultaneously to non-overlapping sites in the myosin VI tail. In conclusion, our characterisation of the human myosin VI deafness mutant (R1166X) suggests that defects in cargo binding may leave myosin VI in a primed/activated state with an increased actin-binding ability.

  10. Approaches to myosin modelling in a two-phase flow model for cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, L. S.; Whiteley, J. P.; Waters, S. L.; Oliver, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A wide range of biological processes rely on the ability of cells to move through their environment. Mathematical models have been developed to improve our understanding of how cells achieve motion. Here we develop models that explicitly track the cell's distribution of myosin within a two-phase flow framework. Myosin is a small motor protein which is important for contracting the cell's actin cytoskeleton and enabling cell motion. The two phases represent the actin network and the cytosol in the cell. We start from a fairly general description of myosin kinetics, advection and diffusion in the two-phase flow framework, then identify a number of sub-limits of the model that may be relevant in practice, two of which we investigate further via linear stability analyses and numerical simulations. We demonstrate that myosin-driven contraction of the actin network destabilizes a stationary steady state leading to cell motion, but that rapid diffusion of myosin and rapid unbinding of myosin from the actin network are stabilizing. We use numerical simulation to investigate travelling-wave solutions relevant to a steadily gliding cell and we consider a reduction of the model in which the cell adheres strongly to the substrate on which it is crawling. This work demonstrates that a number of existing models for the effect of myosin on cell motility can be understood as different sub-limits of our two-phase flow model.

  11. Long-range self-organization of cytoskeletal myosin II filament stacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqiong; Dasbiswas, Kinjal; Guo, Zhenhuan; Tee, Yee-Han; Thiagarajan, Visalatchi; Hersen, Pascal; Chew, Teng-Leong; Safran, Samuel A; Zaidel-Bar, Ronen; Bershadsky, Alexander D

    2017-02-01

    Although myosin II filaments are known to exist in non-muscle cells, their dynamics and organization are incompletely understood. Here, we combined structured illumination microscopy with pharmacological and genetic perturbations, to study the process of actomyosin cytoskeleton self-organization into arcs and stress fibres. A striking feature of the myosin II filament organization was their 'registered' alignment into stacks, spanning up to several micrometres in the direction orthogonal to the parallel actin bundles. While turnover of individual myosin II filaments was fast (characteristic half-life time 60 s) and independent of actin filament turnover, the process of stack formation lasted a longer time (in the range of several minutes) and required myosin II contractility, as well as actin filament assembly/disassembly and crosslinking (dependent on formin Fmnl3, cofilin1 and α-actinin-4). Furthermore, myosin filament stack formation involved long-range movements of individual myosin filaments towards each other suggesting the existence of attractive forces between myosin II filaments. These forces, possibly transmitted via mechanical deformations of the intervening actin filament network, may in turn remodel the actomyosin cytoskeleton and drive its self-organization.

  12. Digoxin activates sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-release channels: a possible role in cardiac inotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, S J; Williams, A J

    1993-04-01

    1. The effect of digoxin on rapid 45Ca2+ efflux from cardiac and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles was investigated. Additionally the interaction of digoxin with single cardiac and skeletal muscle SR Ca(2+)-release channels incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers and held under voltage clamp was determined. 2. Digoxin (1 nM) increased the initial rate and amount of Ca(2+)-induced release of 45Ca2+ from cardiac SR vesicles, passively loaded with 45CaCl2, at an extravesicular [Ca2+] of 0.1 microM. The efflux in the presence and absence of digoxin was inhibited at pM extravesicular Ca2+ and blocked by 5 mM Mg2+. 3. To elucidate the mechanism of action of digoxin, single-channel recording was used. Digoxin (1-20 nM) increased single-channel open probability (Po) when added to the cytosolic but not the luminal face of the cardiac channel in the presence of sub-maximally activating Ca2+ (0.1 microM-10 microM) with an EC50 of 0.91 nM at 10 microM Ca2+. The mechanisms underlying the action of digoxin appear to be concentration-dependent. The activation observed at 1 nM digoxin appears to be consistent with the sensitization of the channel to the effects of Ca2+. At higher concentrations the drug appears to interact synergistically with Ca2+ to produce values of Po considerably greater than those seen with Ca2+ as the sole activating ligand. 4. Digoxin had no effect on single-channel conductance or the Ca2+/Tris permeability ratio. In channels activated by digoxin the Po was decreased by Mg2+. Single-channels were characteristically modified to along lasting open, but reduced, conductance state when 100 nM ryanodine was added to the cytosolic side of the channel.5. Activation of the cardiac SR Ca2+-release channel was observed with similar concentrations of digitoxin, however, higher concentrations of ouabain were required to increase PO. In contrast, a steroid which is not positively inotropic, chlormadinone acetate, had no effect on either cardiac or

  13. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase interactions with decaniobate, decavanadate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraqueza, Gil; Ohlin, C André; Casey, William H; Aureliano, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    Over the last few decades there has been increasing interest in oxometalate and polyoxometalate applications to medicine and pharmacology. This interest arose, at least in part, due to the properties of these classes of compounds as anti-cancer, anti-diabetic agents, and also for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, among others. However, our understanding of the mechanism of action would be improved if biological models could be used to clarify potential toxicological effects in main cellular processes. Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles, containing a large amount of Ca(2+)-ATPase, an enzyme that accumulates calcium by active transport using ATP, have been suggested as a useful model to study the effects of oxometalates on calcium homeostasis. In the present article, it is shown that decavanadate, decaniobate, vanadate, tungstate and molybdate, all inhibited SR Ca(2+)-ATPase, with the following IC(50) values: 15, 35, 50, 400 μM and 45 mM, respectively. Decaniobate (Nb(10)), is the strongest P-type enzyme inhibitor, after decavanadate (V(10)). Atomic-absorption spectroscopy (AAS) analysis, indicates that decavanadate binds to the protein with a 1:1 decavanadate:Ca(2+)-ATPase stoichiometry. Furthermore, V(10) binds with similar extension to all the protein conformations, which occur during calcium translocation by active transport, namely E1, E1P, E2 and E2P, as analysed by AAS. In contrast, it was confirmed that the binding of monomeric vanadate (H(2)VO(4)(2-); V(1)) to the calcium pump is favoured only for the E2 and E2P conformations of the ATPase, whereas no significant amount of vanadate is bound to the E1 and E1P conformations. Scatchard plot analysis, confirmed a 1:1 ratio for decavanadate-Ca(2+)-ATPase, with a dissociation constant, k(d) of 1 μM(-1). The interaction of decavanadate V(10)O(28)(6-) (V(10)) with Ca(2+)-ATPase is prevented by the isostructural and isoelectronic decaniobate Nb(10)O(28)(6-) (Nb(10)), whereas no significant effects were

  14. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres estimated from Arsenazo III calcium transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, S M; Chandler, W K; Marshall, M W

    1983-01-01

    Single twitch fibres, dissected from frog muscle, were injected with the metallochromic dye Arsenazo III. Changes in dye-related absorbance measured at 650 or 660 nm were used to estimate the time course of myoplasmic free [Ca2+] following either action potential stimulation or voltage-clamp depolarization (temperature, 15-17 degrees C). The amplitude of the Ca2+ transient decreased when fibres were stretched to sarcomere spacings approaching 4 microns. The effect appeared to be less marked in H2O Ringer than in D2O Ringer, where a reduction of about 40% was observed in going from 3.0 microns to 3.7-3.9 microns. In fibres heavily injected with dye (1.5-2.2 mM-dye) at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was complexed with Arsenazo III following a single action potential, implying that at least 0.1 mM-Ca2+ was released from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.) into the myoplasm. Computer simulations were carried out to estimate the flux of Ca2+ between the s.r. and myoplasm (in fibres containing no more that 0.8 mM-dye). The amounts and time courses of Ca2+ bound to the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin and to the Ca2+, Mg2+ sites on parvalbumin were estimated from the free [Ca2+] wave form and the law of mass action. In the computations the total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was taken as the total amount of Ca2+ existing either as free ion or as ion complexed with dye, troponin or parvalbumin. The time derivative of total myoplasmic [Ca2+] was used as an estimate of net Ca2+ flux (release minus uptake) from the s.r. into myoplasm. Rate constants for formation of cation: receptor complex were taken from published values. For the Ca2+-regulatory sites on troponin, three sets of rate constants, corresponding to two values of dissociation constant (0.2 and 2 microM) were used. Each set of three simulations was carried out both with and without parvalbumin. The simulations show that following action potential stimulation, 0.2-0.3 mM-Ca2+ enters the myoplasm from the s.r. The wave form of s.r. Ca2

  15. The use of label-free mass spectrometry for relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Marta; Mora, Leticia; Concepción Aristoy, M; Toldrá, Fidel

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify changes in the abundance of the major sarcoplasmic proteins throughout the ham dry-curing process by using a label-free mass spectrometry methodology based on the measurement of mass spectral peak intensities obtained from the extracted ion chromatogram. For this purpose, extraction of sarcoplasmic proteins was followed by trypsin digestion and analysis by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (Q/TOF) for the identification and relative quantification of sarcoplasmic proteins through individual quantification of trypsinised peptides. In total, 20 proteins, including 12 glycolytic enzymes, were identified and quantified. The accuracy of the protocol was based on MS/MS replicates, and beta-lactoglobulin protein was used to normalise data and correct possible variations during sample preparation or LC-MS/MS analysis. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides precise identification and quantification of proteins in comparison with traditional methodologies based on gel electrophoresis, especially in the case of overlapping proteins. Moreover, the label-free approach used in this study proved to be a simple, fast, reliable method for evaluating proteolytic degradation of sarcoplasmic proteins during the processing of dry-cured ham.

  16. The changes of cardioelectrical activity of rat with myocardial infarction receiving sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase gene modified bone marrow stem cell transplantation by microelectrode array technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范平

    2012-01-01

    Objective Therapy effects and cardiac electrical activity comparison of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a) gene modified BMSCs transplantation after acute myocardial infarction(AMI) in rats.Methods Rats with AMI were divided

  17. Motility assays using myosin attached to surfaces through specific binding to monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, D A; Bourdieu, L; Kinose, F; Libchaber, A

    1995-04-01

    We have analyzed the dependence of actin filament movement on the mode of myosin attachment to surfaces. Monoclonal antibodies that bind to three distinct sites were used to tether myosin to nitrocellulose-coated glass. One antibody reacts with an epitope on the regulatory light chain located at the head-rod junction. The other two react with sites in the rod domain, one in the S2 region near the S2-LMM hinge, and the other at the C terminus of the myosin rod. These monoclonal antibodies were used to provide increasing flexibility in the mode of attachment. Fast skeletal muscle myosin monomers were bound to the surfaces through the specific interaction with these monoclonal antibodies and the sliding movement of fluorescently labeled actin filaments analyzed by video microscopy. Each of these antibodies produced stable, myosin-coated surfaces that supported uniform movement of actin over the course of several hours. Attachment of myosin through the anti-S2 and anti-LMM monoclonal antibodies yielded a maximum velocity of 10 microns/s at 30 degrees C, whereas attachment through anti-LC2 produced a lower velocity of 4-5 microns/s. Each antibody showed a characteristic minimum myosin density below which sliding movement was no longer supported and an exponential dependence of actin filament velocity on myosin surface density below Vmax. Maximum sliding velocity was achieved over a range of myosin surface densities. Thus, the specific mode of attachment can influence the characteristic velocity of actin filament movement and the surface density needed to support movement. These data are being used to analyze the dynamics of sliding filament assays and evaluate estimates of the average number of motor molecules per unit length of actin required to support movement.

  18. Genetic Variation in Myosin 1H Contributes to Mandibular Prognathism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassopoulou-Fishell, Maria; Deeley, Kathleen; Harvey, Erika M.; Sciote, James; Vieira, Alexandre R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several candidate loci have been suggested as influencing mandibular prognathism (1p22.1, 1p22.2, 1p36, 3q26.2, 5p13-p12, 6q25, 11q22.2-q22.3, 12q23, 12q13.13, and 19p13.2). The goal of this study was to replicate these results in a well-characterized homogeneous sample set. Methods Thirty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms spanning all candidate regions were studied in 44 prognathic and 35 Class I subjects from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine Dental Registry and DNA Repository. The 44 mandibular prognathism subjects had an average age of 18.4 years, 31 were females and 13 males, and 24 were White, 15 African American, two Hispanic, and three Asian. The 35 Class I subjects had an average age of 17.6 years, 27 were females and 9 males, and 27 were White, six African Americans, one Hispanic, and two Asian. Skeletal mandibular prognathism diagnosis included cephalometric values indicative of Class III such as ANB smaller than two degrees, negative Witts appraisal, and positive A–B plane. Additional mandibular prognathism criteria included negative OJ and visually prognathic (concave) profile as determined by the subject's clinical evaluation. Orthognathic subjects without jaw deformations were used as a comparison group. Mandibular prognathism and orthognathic subjects were matched based on race, sex and age. Genetic markers were tested by polymerase chain reaction using TaqMan chemistry. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to determine overrepresentation of marker allele with alpha of 0.05. Results An association was unveiled between a marker in MYO1H (rs10850110) and the mandibular prognathism phenotype (p=0.03). MYO1H is a Class-I myosin that is in a different protein group than the myosin isoforms of muscle sarcomeres, which are the basis of skeletal muscle fiber typing. Class I myosins are necessary for cell motility, phagocytosis and vesicle transport. Conclusions More strict clinical definitions may increase

  19. Role of Heavy Meromyosin in Heat-Induced Gelation in Low Ionic Strength Solution Containing L-Histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Toru; Yoshida, Yuri; Yasui, Masanori; Ito, Toshiaki; Wakamatsu, Jun-ichi; Hattori, Akihito; Nishimura, Takanori

    2015-08-01

    The gelation of myosin has a very important role in meat products. We have already shown that myosin in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine forms a transparent gel after heating. To clarify the mechanism of this unique gelation, we investigated the changes in the nature of myosin subfragments during heating in solutions with low and high ionic strengths with and without L-histidine. The hydrophobicity of myosin and heavy meromyosin (HMM) in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine was lower than in high ionic strength solution. The SH contents of myosin and HMM in low ionic strength solution containing l-histidine did not change during the heating process, whereas in high ionic strength solution they decreased slightly. The heat-induced globular masses of HMM in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine were smaller than those in high ionic strength solution. These findings suggested that the polymerization of HMM molecules by heating was suppressed in low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine, resulting in formation of the unique gel. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  20. Imaging the bipolarity of myosin filaments with Interferometric Second Harmonic Generation microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Maxime; Couture, Charles-André; Miri, Amir K; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Mongeau, Luc; Légaré, François

    2013-01-01

    We report that combining interferometry with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy provides valuable information about the relative orientation of noncentrosymmetric structures composing tissues. This is confirmed through the imaging of rat medial gastrocnemius muscle. The inteferometric Second Harmonic Generation (ISHG) images reveal that each side of the myosin filaments composing the A band of the sarcomere generates π phase shifted SHG signal which implies that the myosin proteins at each end of the filaments are oriented in opposite directions. This highlights the bipolar structural organization of the myosin filaments and shows that muscles can be considered as a periodically poled biological structure.

  1. Cooperative folding of muscle myosins: I. Mechanical model

    CERN Document Server

    Caruel, Matthieu; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2013-01-01

    Mechanically induced folding of passive cross-linkers is a fundamental biological phenomenon. A typical example is a conformational change in myosin II responsible for the power-stroke in skeletal muscles. In this paper we present an athermal perspective on such folding by analyzing the simplest purely mechanical prototype: a parallel bundle of bi-stable units attached to a common backbone. We show that in this analytically transparent model, characterized by a rugged energy landscape, the ground states are always highly coherent, single-phase configurations. We argue that such cooperative behavior, ensuring collective conformational change, is due to the dominance of long- range interactions making the system non-additive. The detailed predictions of our model are in agreement with experimentally observed non-equivalence of fast force recovery in skeletal muscles loaded in soft and hard devices. Some features displayed by the model are also recognizable in the behavior of other biological systems with passiv...

  2. Sarcomere lattice geometry influences cooperative myosin binding in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand C W Tanner

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In muscle, force emerges from myosin binding with actin (forming a cross-bridge. This actomyosin binding depends upon myofilament geometry, kinetics of thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and kinetics of cross-bridge cycling. Binding occurs within a compliant network of protein filaments where there is mechanical coupling between myosins along the thick-filament backbone and between actin monomers along the thin filament. Such mechanical coupling precludes using ordinary differential equation models when examining the effects of lattice geometry, kinetics, or compliance on force production. This study uses two stochastically driven, spatially explicit models to predict levels of cross-bridge binding, force, thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and ATP utilization. One model incorporates the 2-to-1 ratio of thin to thick filaments of vertebrate striated muscle (multi-filament model, while the other comprises only one thick and one thin filament (two-filament model. Simulations comparing these models show that the multi-filament predictions of force, fractional cross-bridge binding, and cross-bridge turnover are more consistent with published experimental values. Furthermore, the values predicted by the multi-filament model are greater than those values predicted by the two-filament model. These increases are larger than the relative increase of potential inter-filament interactions in the multi-filament model versus the two-filament model. This amplification of coordinated cross-bridge binding and cycling indicates a mechanism of cooperativity that depends on sarcomere lattice geometry, specifically the ratio and arrangement of myofilaments.

  3. Nonmuscle myosin II isoforms coassemble in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Jordan R; Shao, Lin; Remmert, Kirsten; Li, Dong; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2014-05-19

    Nonmuscle myosin II (NM II) powers myriad developmental and cellular processes, including embryogenesis, cell migration, and cytokinesis [1]. To exert its functions, monomers of NM II assemble into bipolar filaments that produce a contractile force on the actin cytoskeleton. Mammalian cells express up to three isoforms of NM II (NM IIA, IIB, and IIC), each of which possesses distinct biophysical properties and supports unique as well as redundant cellular functions [2-8]. Despite previous efforts [9-13], it remains unclear whether NM II isoforms assemble in living cells to produce mixed (heterotypic) bipolar filaments or whether filaments consist entirely of a single isoform (homotypic). We addressed this question using fluorescently tagged versions of NM IIA, IIB, and IIC, isoform-specific immunostaining of the endogenous proteins, and two-color total internal reflection fluorescence structured-illumination microscopy, or TIRF-SIM, to visualize individual myosin II bipolar filaments inside cells. We show that NM II isoforms coassemble into heterotypic filaments in a variety of settings, including various types of stress fibers, individual filaments throughout the cell, and the contractile ring. We also show that the differential distribution of NM IIA and NM IIB typically seen in confocal micrographs of well-polarized cells is reflected in the composition of individual bipolar filaments. Interestingly, this differential distribution is less pronounced in freshly spread cells, arguing for the existence of a sorting mechanism acting over time. Together, our work argues that individual NM II isoforms are potentially performing both isoform-specific and isoform-redundant functions while coassembled with other NM II isoforms.

  4. Myosin Vc Is Specialized for Transport on a Secretory Superhighway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladewski, Thomas E; Krementsova, Elena B; Trybus, Kathleen M

    2016-08-22

    A hallmark of the well-studied vertebrate class Va myosin is its ability to take multiple steps on actin as a single molecule without dissociating, a feature called "processivity." Therefore, it was surprising when kinetic and single-molecule assays showed that human myosin Vc (MyoVc) was not processive on single-actin filaments [1-3]. We explored the possibility that MyoVc is processive only under conditions that resemble its biological context. Recently, it was shown that zymogen vesicles are transported on actin "superhighways" composed of parallel actin cables nucleated by formins from the plasma membrane [4]. Loss of these cables compromises orderly apical targeting of vesicles. MyoVc has been implicated in transporting secretory vesicles to the apical membrane [5]. We hypothesized that actin cables regulate the processive properties of MyoVc. We show that MyoVc is unique in taking variable size steps, which are frequently in the backward direction. Results obtained with chimeric constructs implicate the lever arm/rod of MyoVc as being responsible for these properties. Actin bundles allow single MyoVc motors to move processively. Remarkably, even teams of MyoVc motors require actin bundles to move continuously at physiological ionic strength. The irregular stepping pattern of MyoVc, which may result from flexibility in the lever arm/rod of MyoVc, appears to be a unique structural adaptation that allows the actin track to spatially restrict the activity of MyoVc to specialized actin cables in order to co-ordinate and target the final stages of vesicle secretion.

  5. Temperature and Ca2+-dependence of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2(+)-ATPase in haddock, salmon, rainbow trout and zebra cichlid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Temperature dependence of Ca2+-ATPase from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in rabbit muscle has been widely studied, and it is generally accepted that a break point in Arrhenius plot exist at approximately 20 degreesC. Whether the break point arises as a result of temperature dependent changes...... nigrofasciatum). The Arrhenius plot of zebra cichlid showed a break point at 20 degreesC, and the haddock Arrhenius plot was non-linear with pronounced changes in slope in the. temperature area, 6-14 degreesC. In Arrhenius plot from both salmon and rainbow trout a plateau exists with an almost constant SR Ca2.......5) between 60 and 250 muM. Results indicated that interaction between SR Ca2+-ATPase and its lipid environment may play an important role for the different Arrhenius plot of the different types of fish species investigated. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved....

  6. Smooth muscle myosin regulation by serum and cell density in cultured rat lung connective tissue cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, P; Zhao, J; White, S; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Absher, M; Baldor, L; Periasamy, M; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    RNA and protein analyses were used to detect expression of SM1 and SM2 smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) in cultured adult rat lung connective tissue cells (RL-90). Smooth muscle MHC mRNA expression in confluent cells grown in 10% serum was approximately 50% of the level in adult stomach. Similar results were obtained in cells cultured at low density (25% confluency) in 1% serum. However, in low-density cultures transferred to 10% serum for 24 h, the level of MHC mRNA decreased to approximately 20% of that in adult stomach. Smooth muscle alpha-actin showed a pattern of expression similar to that for smooth muscle MHC. Expression of nonmuscle MHC-A mRNA was higher in all culture conditions compared to stomach. MHC-A mRNA expression was less in low-density cultures in low serum and increased when low-density cultures were transferred to 10% serum for 24 h. MHC-B mRNA expression was less in low- vs. high-density cultures. In contrast to MHC-A, however, MHC-B mRNA expression in low-density cultures was higher in low serum. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting with SM1-specific antibody demonstrated the presence of the SM1 protein isoform as well as reactivity to a protein band migrating slightly faster than SM2. These results demonstrate that cultured rat lung connective tissue cells express smooth muscle MHC and that expression is modulated by culture conditions.

  7. Sarcoplasmic phospholamban protein is involved in the mechanisms of postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction and the cardioprotective effect of nitrite during resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR Ca(2+-handling proteins play an important role in myocardial dysfunction after acute ischemia/reperfusion injury. We hypothesized that nitrite would improve postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction by increasing nitric oxide (NO generation and that the mechanism of this protection is related to the modulation of SR Ca(2+-handling proteins. METHODS: We conducted a randomized prospective animal study using male Sprague-Dawley rats. Cardiac arrest was induced by intravenous bolus of potassium chloride (40 µg/g. Nitrite (1.2 nmol/g or placebo was administered when chest compression was started. No cardiac arrest was induced in the sham group. Hemodynamic parameters were monitored invasively for 90 minutes after the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC. Echocardiogram was performed to evaluate cardiac function. Myocardial samples were harvested 5 minutes and 1 hour after ROSC. RESULTS: Myocardial function was significantly impaired in the nitrite and placebo groups after resuscitation, whereas cardiac function (i.e., ejection fraction and fractional shortening was significantly greater in the nitrite group than in the placebo group. Nitrite administration increased the level of nitric oxide in the myocardium 5 min after resuscitation compared to the other two groups. The levels of phosphorylated phospholamban (PLB were decreased after resuscitation, and nitrite increased the phosphorylation of phospholamban compared to the placebo. No significant differences were found in the expression of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+ ATPase (SERCA2a and ryanodine receptors (RyRs. CONCLUSIONS: postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction is associated with the impairment of PLB phosphorylation. Nitrite administered during resuscitation improves postresuscitation myocardial dysfunction by preserving phosphorylated PLB protein during resuscitation.

  8. Identification and characterization of the Bombyx mori myosin II essential light chain and its effect in BmNPV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Hao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Myosin, as a type of molecular motor, is mainly involved in muscle contraction. Recently, myosin research has made considerable progress. However, the function of Bombyx mori myosin remains unclear. In this study, we cloned the BmMyosin II essential light chain (BmMyosin II ELC gene from a cDNA library of silkworm, which had an open reading frame (ORF of 444 bp encoding 147 amino acids (about 16 kDa. After analyzing their sequences, BmMyosin II ELC was similar to the ELCs of 27 other Myosin II types, which contained EFh domain that bound Ca2+. In addition, 28 sequences had five motifs, motifs 1 and 3 were relatively conserved. We constructed two vectors with BmMyosin to transfect MGC803 or BmN, monolayer wound healing of cells indicated they can promote cell migration successfully. For three fifth instar silkworms, Bm306, BmNB, BmBC8, we mainly analyzed the change of BmMyosin II ELC from transcription and translation after infecting with nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV. We found that gene expression of resistant strains were higher than susceptible strains at 12 h, while the result of the translation level was opposite that of the transcription level. Through in vitro protein interactions, we found BmMyosin II ELC can interact with BmNPV ubiquitin.

  9. Involvement of myosin VI immunoanalog in pinocytosis and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczak, Magdalena; Wasik, Anna; Kłopocka, Wanda; Redowicz, Maria Jolanta

    2008-12-01

    Recently, we found a 130-kDa myosin VI immunoanalog in amoeba, which bound to actin in an ATP-sensitive manner and in migrating amoebae colocalized to filamentous actin and dynamin II-containing vesicular structures. To further characterize this protein, we assessed its involvement in amoeba pinocytosis and phagocytosis. Confocal immunofluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy of immunogold-stained cells revealed that, in pinocytotic and phagocytotic amoebae, the myosin VI immunoanalog was visible throughout the cells, including pinocytotic channels and pinocytotic vesicles as well as phagosomes and emerging phagocytic cups. Blocking endogenous protein with anti-porcine myosin VI antibody (introduced into cells by means of microinjection) caused severe defects in pinocytosis and phagocytosis. In comparison with control cells, the treated amoebae formed ~75% less pinocytotic channels and phagocytosed ~65% less Tetrahymena cells. These data indicate that the myosin VI immunoanalog has an important role in pinocytosis and phagocytosis in Amoeba proteus (Pal.).

  10. Characterization and localization of dynein and myosins V and VI in the ovaries of queen bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricio, Karina; Calábria, Luciana Karen; Peixoto, Pablo Marco; Espindola, Foued Salmen; Da Cruz-Landim, Carminda

    2010-10-01

    The presence of myosin and dynein in the ovaries of both Apis mellifera and Scaptotrigona postica was investigated in extracts and in histological sections. In the ovary extracts, motor proteins, myosins V, VI and dynein were detected by Western blot. In histological sections, they were detected by immunocytochemistry, using a mouse monoclonal antibody against the intermediary chain of dynein and a rabbit polyclonal antibody against the myosin V head domain. The myosin VI tail domain was recognized by a pig polyclonal antibody. The results show that these molecular motors are expressed in the ovaries of both bee species with few differences in location and intensity, in regions where movement of substances is expected during oogenesis. The fact that antibodies against vertebrate proteins recognize proteins of bee species indicates that the specific epitopes are evolutionarily well preserved.

  11. Drosophila PATJ supports adherens junction stability by modulating Myosin light chain activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sen, Arnab; Nagy-Zsvér-Vadas, Zsanett; Krahn, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    ... (Pals1-associated tight junction protein) was not per se crucial for the maintenance of apical-basal polarity in Drosophila melanogaster epithelial cells but rather regulated Myosin localization and phosphorylation...

  12. Kinetics of myosin light chain kinase activation of smooth muscle myosin in an in vitro model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Feng; Facemyer, Kevin C; Carter, Michael S; Jackson, Del R; Haldeman, Brian D; Ruana, Nick; Sutherland, Cindy; Walsh, Michael P; Cremo, Christine R; Baker, Josh E

    2013-11-26

    During activation of smooth muscle contraction, one myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) molecule rapidly phosphorylates many smooth muscle myosin (SMM) molecules, suggesting that muscle activation rates are influenced by the kinetics of MLCK-SMM interactions. To determine the rate-limiting step underlying activation of SMM by MLCK, we measured the kinetics of calcium-calmodulin (Ca²⁺CaM)-MLCK-mediated SMM phosphorylation and the corresponding initiation of SMM-based F-actin motility in an in vitro system with SMM attached to a coverslip surface. Fitting the time course of SMM phosphorylation to a kinetic model gave an initial phosphorylation rate, kp(o), of ~1.17 heads s⁻¹ MLCK⁻¹. Also, we measured the dwell time of single streptavidin-coated quantum dot-labeled MLCK molecules interacting with surface-attached SMM and phosphorylated SMM using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. From these data, the dissociation rate constant from phosphorylated SMM was 0.80 s⁻¹, which was similar to the kp(o) mentioned above and with rates measured in solution. This dissociation rate was essentially independent of the phosphorylation state of SMM. From calculations using our measured dissociation rates and Kd values, and estimates of SMM and MLCK concentrations in muscle, we predict that the dissociation of MLCK from phosphorylated SMM is rate-limiting and that the rate of the phosphorylation step is faster than this dissociation rate. Also, association with SMM (11-46 s⁻¹) would be much faster than with pSMM (SMM is 55-460 times greater. This would avoid sequestering MLCK to unproductive interactions with previously phosphorylated SMM, potentially leading to faster rates of phosphorylation in muscle.

  13. Interaction of Myosin Phosphatase Target Subunit (MYPT1) with Myosin Phosphatase-RhoA Interacting Protein (MRIP): A Role of Glutamic Acids in the Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhee; Stafford, Walter F

    2015-01-01

    Scaffold proteins bind to and functionally link protein members of signaling pathways. Interaction of the scaffold proteins, myosin phosphatase target subunit (MYPT1) and myosin phosphatase-RhoA interacting protein (MRIP), causes co-localization of myosin phosphatase and RhoA to actomyosin. To examine biophysical properties of interaction of MYPT1 with MRIP, we employed analytical ultracentrifugation and surface plasmon resonance. In regard to MRIP, its residues 724-837 are sufficient for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Moreover, MRIP binds to MYPT1 as either a monomer or a dimer. With respect to MYPT1, its leucine repeat region, LR (residues 991-1030) is sufficient to account for the MYPT1/MRIP interaction. Furthermore, point mutations that replace glutamic acids 998-1000 within LR reduced the binding affinity toward MRIP. This suggests that the glutamic acids of MYPT1 play an important role in the interaction.

  14. Localization and mobility of synaptic vesicles in Myosin VI mutants of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kisiel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ, synaptic vesicles are mobile; however, the mechanisms that regulate vesicle traffic at the nerve terminal are not fully understood. Myosin VI has been shown to be important for proper synaptic physiology and morphology at the NMJ, likely by functioning as a vesicle tether. Here we investigate vesicle dynamics in Myosin VI mutants of Drosophila. RESULTS: In Drosophila, Myosin VI is encoded by the gene, jaguar (jar. To visualize active vesicle cycling we used FM dye loading and compared loss of function alleles of jar with controls. These studies revealed a differential distribution of vesicles at the jar mutant nerve terminal, with the newly endocytosed vesicles observed throughout the mutant boutons in contrast to the peripheral localization visualized at control NMJs. This finding is consistent with a role for Myosin VI in restraining vesicle mobility at the synapse to ensure proper localization. To further investigate regulation of vesicle dynamics by Myosin VI, FRAP analysis was used to analyze movement of GFP-labeled synaptic vesicles within individual boutons. FRAP revealed that synaptic vesicles are moving more freely in the jar mutant boutons, indicated by changes in initial bleach depth and rapid recovery of fluorescence following photobleaching. CONCLUSION: This data provides insights into the role for Myosin VI in mediating synaptic vesicle dynamics at the nerve terminal. We observed mislocalization of actively cycling vesicles and an apparent increase in vesicle mobility when Myosin VI levels are reduced. These observations support the notion that a major function of Myosin VI in the nerve terminal is tethering synaptic vesicles to proper sub-cellular location within the bouton.

  15. Single-Molecule Measurement of the Stiffness of the Rigor Myosin Head

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The force-extension curve of single myosin subfragment-1 molecules, interacting in the rigor state with an actin filament, has been investigated at low [ATP] by applying a slow triangle-wave movement to the optical traps holding a bead-actin-bead dumbbell. In combination with a measurement of the overall stiffness of the dumbbell, this allowed characterization of the three extensible elements, the actin-bead links and the myosin. Simultaneously, another method, based on an analysis of bead po...

  16. Class III myosins shape the auditory hair bundles by limiting microvilli and stereocilia growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Andrea; Michel, Vincent; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Cortese, Matteo; Bosch-Grau, Montserrat; Aghaie, Asadollah; Perfettini, Isabelle; Dupont, Typhaine; Avan, Paul; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine

    2016-01-18

    The precise architecture of hair bundles, the arrays of mechanosensitive microvilli-like stereocilia crowning the auditory hair cells, is essential to hearing. Myosin IIIa, defective in the late-onset deafness form DFNB30, has been proposed to transport espin-1 to the tips of stereocilia, thereby promoting their elongation. We show that Myo3a(-/-)Myo3b(-/-) mice lacking myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb are profoundly deaf, whereas Myo3a-cKO Myo3b(-/-) mice lacking myosin IIIb and losing myosin IIIa postnatally have normal hearing. Myo3a(-/-)Myo3b(-/-) cochlear hair bundles display robust mechanoelectrical transduction currents with normal kinetics but show severe embryonic abnormalities whose features rapidly change. These include abnormally tall and numerous microvilli or stereocilia, ungraded stereocilia bundles, and bundle rounding and closure. Surprisingly, espin-1 is properly targeted to Myo3a(-/-)Myo3b(-/-) stereocilia tips. Our results uncover the critical role that class III myosins play redundantly in hair-bundle morphogenesis; they unexpectedly limit the elongation of stereocilia and of subsequently regressing microvilli, thus contributing to the early hair bundle shaping.

  17. Myosin light-chain phosphatase regulates basal actomyosin oscillations during morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Expósito, Andrea; Grosheva, Inna; Míguez, David G; González-Reyes, Acaimo; Martín-Bermudo, María D

    2016-01-01

    Contractile actomyosin networks generate forces that drive tissue morphogenesis. Actomyosin contractility is controlled primarily by reversible phosphorylation of the myosin-II regulatory light chain through the action of myosin kinases and phosphatases. While the role of myosin light-chain kinase in regulating contractility during morphogenesis has been largely characterized, there is surprisingly little information on myosin light-chain phosphatase (MLCP) function in this context. Here, we use live imaging of Drosophila follicle cells combined with mathematical modelling to demonstrate that the MLCP subunit flapwing (flw) is a key regulator of basal myosin oscillations and cell contractions underlying egg chamber elongation. Flw expression decreases specifically on the basal side of follicle cells at the onset of contraction and flw controls the initiation and periodicity of basal actomyosin oscillations. Contrary to previous reports, basal F-actin pulsates similarly to myosin. Finally, we propose a quantitative model in which periodic basal actomyosin oscillations arise in a cell-autonomous fashion from intrinsic properties of motor assemblies.

  18. Nonmuscle Myosin II helps regulate synaptic vesicle mobility at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Xinping

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mechanistic details of the vesicle transport process from the cell body to the nerve terminal are well described, the mechanisms underlying vesicle traffic within nerve terminal boutons is relatively unknown. The actin cytoskeleton has been implicated but exactly how actin or actin-binding proteins participate in vesicle movement is not clear. Results In the present study we have identified Nonmuscle Myosin II as a candidate molecule important for synaptic vesicle traffic within Drosophila larval neuromuscular boutons. Nonmuscle Myosin II was found to be localized at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction; genetics and pharmacology combined with the time-lapse imaging technique FRAP were used to reveal a contribution of Nonmuscle Myosin II to synaptic vesicle movement. FRAP analysis showed that vesicle dynamics were highly dependent on the expression level of Nonmuscle Myosin II. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that Nonmuscle Myosin II is present presynaptically, is important for synaptic vesicle mobility and suggests a role for Nonmuscle Myosin II in shuttling vesicles at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. This work begins to reveal the process by which synaptic vesicles traverse within the bouton.

  19. P-cadherin counteracts myosin II-B function: implications in melanoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Wever Olivier

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant transformation of melanocytes is frequently attended by a switch in cadherin expression profile as shown for E- and N-cadherin. For P-cadherin, downregulation in metastasizing melanoma has been demonstrated, and over-expression of P-cadherin in melanoma cell lines has been shown to inhibit invasion. The strong invasive and metastatic nature of cutaneous melanoma implies a deregulated interplay between intercellular adhesion and migration-related molecules Results In this study we performed a microarray analysis to compare the mRNA expression profile of an invasive BLM melanoma cell line (BLM LIE and the non-invasive P-cadherin over-expression variant (BLM P-cad. Results indicate that nonmuscle myosin II-B is downregulated in BLM P-cad. Moreover, myosin II-B plays a major role in melanoma migration and invasiveness by retracting the tail during the migratory cycle, as shown by the localization of myosin II-B stress fibers relative to Golgi and the higher levels of phosphorylated myosin light chain. Analysis of P-cadherin and myosin II-B in nodular melanoma sections and in a panel of melanoma cell lines further confirmed that there is an inverse relationship between both molecules. Conclusions Therefore, we conclude that P-cadherin counteracts the expression and function of myosin II-B, resulting in the suppression of the invasive and migratory behaviour of BLM melanoma cells

  20. Class III myosins shape the auditory hair bundles by limiting microvilli and stereocilia growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Andrea; Michel, Vincent; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Cortese, Matteo; Bosch-Grau, Montserrat; Aghaie, Asadollah; Perfettini, Isabelle; Dupont, Typhaine; Avan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The precise architecture of hair bundles, the arrays of mechanosensitive microvilli-like stereocilia crowning the auditory hair cells, is essential to hearing. Myosin IIIa, defective in the late-onset deafness form DFNB30, has been proposed to transport espin-1 to the tips of stereocilia, thereby promoting their elongation. We show that Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− mice lacking myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb are profoundly deaf, whereas Myo3a-cKO Myo3b−/− mice lacking myosin IIIb and losing myosin IIIa postnatally have normal hearing. Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− cochlear hair bundles display robust mechanoelectrical transduction currents with normal kinetics but show severe embryonic abnormalities whose features rapidly change. These include abnormally tall and numerous microvilli or stereocilia, ungraded stereocilia bundles, and bundle rounding and closure. Surprisingly, espin-1 is properly targeted to Myo3a−/−Myo3b−/− stereocilia tips. Our results uncover the critical role that class III myosins play redundantly in hair-bundle morphogenesis; they unexpectedly limit the elongation of stereocilia and of subsequently regressing microvilli, thus contributing to the early hair bundle shaping. PMID:26754646

  1. Actin-myosin network is required for proper assembly of influenza virus particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakura, Michiko; Kawaguchi, Atsushi, E-mail: ats-kawaguchi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Nagata, Kyosuke, E-mail: knagata@md.tsukuba.ac.jp

    2015-02-15

    Actin filaments are known to play a central role in cellular dynamics. After polymerization of actin, various actin-crosslinking proteins including non-muscle myosin II facilitate the formation of spatially organized actin filament networks. The actin-myosin network is highly expanded beneath plasma membrane. The genome of influenza virus (vRNA) replicates in the cell nucleus. Then, newly synthesized vRNAs are nuclear-exported to the cytoplasm as ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), followed by transport to the beneath plasma membrane where virus particles assemble. Here, we found that, by inhibiting actin-myosin network formation, the virus titer tends to be reduced and HA viral spike protein is aggregated on the plasma membrane. These results indicate that the actin-myosin network plays an important role in the virus formation. - Highlights: • Actin-myosin network is important for the influenza virus production. • HA forms aggregations at the plasma membrane in the presence of blebbistatin. • M1 is recruited to the budding site through the actin-myosin network.

  2. Role of plant myosins in motile organelles:Is a direct interaction required?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Limor Buchnik; Mohamad Abu-Abied; Einat Sadot

    2015-01-01

    Plant organel es are highly motile, with speed values of 3–7 mm/s in cel s of land plants and about 20–60 mm/s in characean algal cel s. This movement is believed to be important for rapid distribution of materials around the cel , for the plant’s ability to respond to environmental biotic and abiotic signals and for proper growth. The main machinery that propels motility of organel es within plant cel s is based on the actin cytoskeleton and its motor proteins the myosins. Most plants express multiple members of two main classes:myosin VIII and myosin XI. While myosin VIII has been characterized as a slow motor protein, myosins from class XI were found to be the fastest motor proteins known in al kingdoms. Paradoxical y, while it was found that myosins from class XI regulate most organel e movement, it is not quite clear how or even if these motor proteins attach to the organel es whose movement they regulate.

  3. Heavy flavour in ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Pillot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium states are expected to provide essential informa- tion on the properties of the strongly interacting system fo rmed in the early stages of heavy-ion collisions at very high energy density. Such probes are espe cially promising at LHC energies where heavy quarks (both c and b) are copiously produced. The ALICE detector shall measure the production of open heavy flavours and heavy quarkonium st ates in both proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions at the LHC. The expected performances of ALICE for heavy flavour physics is discussed based on the results of simulation studies on a s election of benchmark channels

  4. Myosin II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in three dimensions by minimizing cell-surface curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert S; Myers, Kenneth A; Desai, Ravi A; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S; Adelstein, Robert S; Waterman, Clare M; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-02-01

    In many cases, cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We used endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell-surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell-surface curvature. Using microfabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between regulation of myosin II by curvature and control of curvature by myosin II drives cycles of localized cortical myosin II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration.

  5. Myosin Va participates in acrosomal formation and nuclear morphogenesis during spermatogenesis of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis belongs to the Class Crustacea, Decapoda, Brachyura. The spermatozoon of this species is of aflagellated type, it has a spherical acrosome surrounded by the cup-shaped nucleus, which are unique to brachyurans. For the past several decades, studies on the spermatogenesis of the mitten crab mainly focus on the morphology. Compared with the extensive study of molecular mechanism of spermatogenesis in mammals, relatively less information is available in crustacean species. Myosin Va, a member of Class V myosin, has been implicated in acrosome biogenesis and vesicle transport during spermatogenesis in mammals. In the present study we demonstrate the expression and cellular localization of myosin Va during spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Western blot demonstrated that myosin Va is expressed during spermatogenesis. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural analyses showed that myosin Va mainly localizes in the cytoplasm in spermatocytes. At the early stage of spermiogenesis, myosin Va binds to the endoplasmic reticulum vesicle (EV and proacrosomal granule (PG. Subsequently, myosin Va localizes within the proacrosomal vesicle (PV formed by PG and EV fusion and locates in the membrane complex (MC at the mid spermatid stage. At the late spermatid stage, myosin Va is associated with the shaping nucleus and mitochondria. In mature spermatozoon, myosin Va predominates in acrosomal tubule (AT and nucleus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study demonstrates that myosin Va may be involved in acrosome biogenesis and nuclear morphogenesis during spermatogenesis in E. sinensis. Considering the distribution and molecular characteristics of myosin Va, we also propose a hypothesis of AT formation in this species. It is the first time to uncover the role of myosin Va in crustacean spermatogenesis.

  6. Genome-wide identification, splicing, and expression analysis of the myosin gene family in maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guifeng; Zhong, Mingyu; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Jushan; Tang, Yuanping; Wang, Gang; Song, Rentao

    2014-03-01

    The actin-based myosin system is essential for the organization and dynamics of the endomembrane system and transport network in plant cells. Plants harbour two unique myosin groups, class VIII and class XI, and the latter is structurally and functionally analogous to the animal and fungal class V myosin. Little is known about myosins in grass, even though grass includes several agronomically important cereal crops. Here, we identified 14 myosin genes from the genome of maize (Zea mays). The relatively larger sizes of maize myosin genes are due to their much longer introns, which are abundant in transposable elements. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that maize myosin genes could be classified into class VIII and class XI, with three and 11 members, respectively. Apart from subgroup XI-F, the remaining subgroups were duplicated at least in one analysed lineage, and the duplication events occurred more extensively in Arabidopsis than in maize. Only two pairs of maize myosins were generated from segmental duplication. Expression analysis revealed that most maize myosin genes were expressed universally, whereas a few members (XI-1, -6, and -11) showed an anther-specific pattern, and many underwent extensive alternative splicing. We also found a short transcript at the O1 locus, which conceptually encoded a headless myosin that most likely functions at the transcriptional level rather than via a dominant-negative mechanism at the translational level. Together, these data provide significant insights into the evolutionary and functional characterization of maize myosin genes that could transfer to the identification and application of homologous myosins of other grasses.

  7. Exploration of flexible phenylpropylurea scaffold as novel cardiac myosin activators for the treatment of systolic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manickam, Manoj; Jalani, Hitesh B; Pillaiyar, Thanigaimalai; Sharma, Niti; Boggu, Pulla Reddy; Venkateswararao, Eeda; Lee, You-Jung; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Jung, Sang-Hun

    2017-07-07

    A series of flexible urea derivatives have been synthesized and demonstrated as selective cardiac myosin ATPase activator. Among them 1-phenethyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (1, cardiac myosin ATPase activation at 10 μM = 51.1%; FS = 18.90; EF = 12.15) and 1-benzyl-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (9, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 53.3%; FS = 30.04; EF = 18.27) showed significant activity in vitro and in vivo. The change of phenyl ring with tetrahydropyran-4-yl moiety viz., 1-(3-phenylpropyl)-3-((tetrahydro-2H-pyran-4-yl)methyl)urea (14, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 81.4%; FS = 20.50; EF = 13.10), and morpholine moiety viz., 1-(2-morpholinoethyl)-3-(3-phenylpropyl)urea (21, cardiac myosin ATPase activation = 44.0%; FS = 24.79; EF = 15.65), proved to be efficient to activate the cardiac myosin. The potent compounds 1, 9, 14 and 21 were found to be selective for cardiac myosin over skeletal and smooth myosins. Thus, these urea derivatives are potent scaffold to develop as a newer cardiac myosin activator for the treatment of systolic heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification, modeling, and characterization studies of Tetrahymena thermophila myosin FERM domains suggests a conserved core fold but functional differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Che L; Singh, Shaneen M

    2015-11-01

    Myosins (MYO) define a superfamily of motor proteins which facilitate movement along cytoskeletal actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. To date, over 30 classes of myosin have been defined that vary in their roles and distribution across different taxa. The multidomain tail of myosin is responsible for the observed functional differences in different myosin classes facilitating differential binding to different cargos. One domain found in this region, the FERM domain, is found in several diverse proteins and is involved in many biological functions ranging from cell adhesion and actin-driven cytoskeleton assembly to cell signaling. Recently, new classes of unconventional myosin have been identified in Tetrahymena thermophila. In this study, we have identified, modeled, and characterized eight FERM domains from the unconventional T. thermophila myosins as their complete functional MyTH4-FERM cassettes. Our results reveal notable sequence, structural, and electrostatic differences between T. thermophila and other characterized FERM domains. Specifically, T. thermophila FERM domains contain helical inserts or extensions, which contribute to significant differences in surface electrostatic profiles of T. thermophila myosin FERMs when compared to the conventional FERM domains. Analyses of the modeled domains reveal differences in key functional residues as well as phosphoinositide-binding signatures and affinities. The work presented here broadens the scope of our understanding of myosin classes and their inherent functions, and provides a platform for experimentalists to design rational experimental studies to test the functional roles for T. thermophila myosins.

  9. Role of Mitochondrial Enzymes and Sarcoplasmic ATPase in Cardioprotection Mediated by Aqueous Extract of Desmodium gangeticum (L) DC Root on Ischemic Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, G A; Paddikkala, J

    2010-11-01

    The present study investigate the protective effect of aqueous root extract of Desmodium gangeticum in preserving mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic ATPase during ischemia reperfusion injury. The isolated rat hearts in both drug and control group were subjected to warm ischemia (37°), followed by reperfusion with the Langendorff perfusion system. The aqueous root extract of Desmodium gangeticum (L) at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight was found to be effective in the rat heart for the management of ischemic reperfusion injury. Physiological parameters were significantly (PDesmodium gangeticum treated rat heart. These results suggest that Desmodium gangeticum aqueous root extract can preserve the mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic ATPase in the myocardium, resulting in the improvement of cardiac function after ischemia reperfusion injury.

  10. Decavanadate binding to a high affinity site near the myosin catalytic centre inhibits F-actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Teresa; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2004-05-11

    Decameric vanadate (V(10)) inhibits the actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity, noncompetitively with actin or with ATP upon interaction with a high-affinity binding site (K(i) = 0.27 +/- 0.05 microM) in myosin subfragment-1 (S1). The binding of V(10) to S1 can be monitored from titration with V(10) of the fluorescence of S1 labeled at Cys-707 and Cys-697 with N-iodo-acetyl-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine (IAEDANS) or 5-(iodoacetamido) fluorescein, which showed the presence of only one V(10) binding site per monomer with a dissociation constant of 0.16-0.7 microM, indicating that S1 labeling with these dyes produced only a small distortion of the V(10) binding site. The large quenching of AEDANS-labeled S1 fluorescence produced by V(10) indicated that the V(10) binding site is close to Cys-697 and 707. Fluorescence studies demonstrated the following: (i) the binding of V(10) to S1 is not competitive either with actin or with ADP.V(1) or ADP.AlF(4); (ii) the affinity of V(10) for the complex S1/ADP.V(1) and S1/ADP.AlF(4) is 2- and 3-fold lower than for S1; and (iii) it is competitive with the S1 "back door" ligand P(1)P(5)-diadenosine pentaphosphate. A local conformational change in S1 upon binding of V(10) is supported by (i) a decrease of the efficiency of fluorescence energy transfer between eosin-labeled F-actin and fluorescein-labeled S1, and (ii) slower reassociation between S1 and F-actin after ATP hydrolysis. The results are consistent with binding of V(10) to the Walker A motif of ABC ATPases, which in S1 corresponds to conserved regions of the P-loop which form part of the phosphate tube.

  11. Direct observation of the myosin Va recovery stroke that contributes to unidirectional stepping along actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Shiroguchi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Myosins are ATP-driven linear molecular motors that work as cellular force generators, transporters, and force sensors. These functions are driven by large-scale nucleotide-dependent conformational changes, termed "strokes"; the "power stroke" is the force-generating swinging of the myosin light chain-binding "neck" domain relative to the motor domain "head" while bound to actin; the "recovery stroke" is the necessary initial motion that primes, or "cocks," myosin while detached from actin. Myosin Va is a processive dimer that steps unidirectionally along actin following a "hand over hand" mechanism in which the trailing head detaches and steps forward ∼72 nm. Despite large rotational Brownian motion of the detached head about a free joint adjoining the two necks, unidirectional stepping is achieved, in part by the power stroke of the attached head that moves the joint forward. However, the power stroke alone cannot fully account for preferential forward site binding since the orientation and angle stability of the detached head, which is determined by the properties of the recovery stroke, dictate actin binding site accessibility. Here, we directly observe the recovery stroke dynamics and fluctuations of myosin Va using a novel, transient caged ATP-controlling system that maintains constant ATP levels through stepwise UV-pulse sequences of varying intensity. We immobilized the neck of monomeric myosin Va on a surface and observed real time motions of bead(s attached site-specifically to the head. ATP induces a transient swing of the neck to the post-recovery stroke conformation, where it remains for ∼40 s, until ATP hydrolysis products are released. Angle distributions indicate that the post-recovery stroke conformation is stabilized by ≥ 5 k(BT of energy. The high kinetic and energetic stability of the post-recovery stroke conformation favors preferential binding of the detached head to a forward site 72 nm away. Thus, the recovery

  12. Myosin MyTH4-FERM structures highlight important principles of convergent evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planelles-Herrero, Vicente José; Blanc, Florian; Sirigu, Serena; Sirkia, Helena; Clause, Jeffrey; Sourigues, Yannick; Johnsrud, Daniel O; Amigues, Beatrice; Cecchini, Marco; Gilbert, Susan P; Houdusse, Anne; Titus, Margaret A

    2016-05-24

    Myosins containing MyTH4-FERM (myosin tail homology 4-band 4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin, or MF) domains in their tails are found in a wide range of phylogenetically divergent organisms, such as humans and the social amoeba Dictyostelium (Dd). Interestingly, evolutionarily distant MF myosins have similar roles in the extension of actin-filled membrane protrusions such as filopodia and bind to microtubules (MT), suggesting that the core functions of these MF myosins have been highly conserved over evolution. The structures of two DdMyo7 signature MF domains have been determined and comparison with mammalian MF structures reveals that characteristic features of MF domains are conserved. However, across millions of years of evolution conserved class-specific insertions are seen to alter the surfaces and the orientation of subdomains with respect to each other, likely resulting in new sites for binding partners. The MyTH4 domains of Myo10 and DdMyo7 bind to MT with micromolar affinity but, surprisingly, their MT binding sites are on opposite surfaces of the MyTH4 domain. The structural analysis in combination with comparison of diverse MF myosin sequences provides evidence that myosin tail domain features can be maintained without strict conservation of motifs. The results illustrate how tuning of existing features can give rise to new structures while preserving the general properties necessary for myosin tails. Thus, tinkering with the MF domain enables it to serve as a multifunctional platform for cooperative recruitment of various partners, allowing common properties such as autoinhibition of the motor and microtubule binding to arise through convergent evolution.

  13. Myosin-II-Mediated Directional Migration of Dictyostelium Cells in Response to Cyclic Stretching of Substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Okimura, Chika; Sato, Katsuya; Nakashima, Yuta; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Minami, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to various mechanical stimulations, such as shear flow, osmotic pressure, and hardness of substratum. They must sense the mechanical aspects of their environment and respond appropriately for proper cell function. Cells adhering to substrata must receive and respond to mechanical stimuli from the substrata to decide their shape and/or migrating direction. In response to cyclic stretching of the elastic substratum, intracellular stress fibers in fibroblasts and endothelial, osteosarcoma, and smooth muscle cells are rearranged perpendicular to the stretching direction, and the shape of those cells becomes extended in this new direction. In the case of migrating Dictyostelium cells, cyclic stretching regulates the direction of migration, and not the shape, of the cell. The cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to that of the stretching. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce the directional migration remain unknown. Here, using a microstretching device, we recorded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-myosin-II dynamics in Dictyostelium cells on an elastic substratum under cyclic stretching. Repeated stretching induced myosin II localization equally on both stretching sides in the cells. Although myosin-II-null cells migrated randomly, myosin-II-null cells expressing a variant of myosin II that cannot hydrolyze ATP migrated perpendicular to the stretching. These results indicate that Dictyostelium cells accumulate myosin II at the portion of the cell where a large strain is received and migrate in a direction other than that of the portion where myosin II accumulated. This polarity generation for migration does not require the contraction of actomyosin. PMID:23442953

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation for the reversed power stroke motion of a myosin subfragment-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Tadashi

    2015-06-01

    Myosins are typical molecular motor proteins that convert the chemical energy from the ATP hydrolysis into mechanical work. The fundamental mechanism of this energy conversion is still unknown. To explain the experimental results already obtained, Masuda has proposed a hypothesis called the "Driven by Detachment" theory for the working principle of the myosins. This theory insists that the energy used during the power stroke of the myosins does not directly originate from the chemical energy of ATP, but is converted from the elastic energy within the molecule at the joint between the head and neck domains. One method for demonstrating the validity of this theory is a computational simulation using the molecular dynamics (MD) method. The MD software used was GROMACS. The target of the MD simulations was myosin subfragment-1 (S1), for which the initial structure was obtained from the Protein Data Bank entry 1M8Q. The AFM pull code of GROMACS was used to apply an external force of 17 pN at the end of the neck domain in the direction opposite to the power stroke to observe whether the myosin S1 takes the pre-power stroke conformation. The residues assumed to be engaged in the docking with an actin filament were fixed to the space. Starting from exactly the same initial position, 10 simulations were repeated by varying the random seeds for generating the initial velocities of the atoms. After 64ns of calculations, the myosin S1 took the conformation of the pre-power stroke state in which the neck domain was bent around the joint between the head and the neck domains. This result agrees with the prediction expected by the DbD theory, the validity of which may be established by conducting similar simulations for the other steps of the myosin working processes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Spontaneous Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum limits Ca2+- dependent twitch potentiation in individual cardiac myocytes. A mechanism for maximum inotropy in the myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    We hypothesized that the occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), in diastole, might be a mechanism for the saturation of twitch potentiation common to a variety of inotropic perturbations that increase the total cell Ca. We used a videomicroscopic technique in single cardiac myocytes to quantify the amplitude of electrically stimulated twitches and to monitor the occurrence of the mechanical manifestation of spontaneous SR Ca2+ release, i.e., the spontaneo...

  16. Effects of simvastatin on cardiac performance and expression of sarcoplasmic reticular calcium regulatory proteins in rat heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia ZHENG; Shen-jiang HU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of simvastatin on the cardiac contractile function and the alteration of gene and protein expression of the sarcoplasmic calcium regulatory proteins, including sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA),phospholamban (PLB), and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) in rat hearts. Methods:Langendorff-perfused rat hearts were subjected to 60-min perfusion with different concentrations of simvastatin (1, 3, 10, 30, or 100 μmol/L), and the parameters of cardiac function such as left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), +dp/dtmax,and -dp/dtmax were determined. The cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were incubated with simvastatin (1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 μmol/L) for 1 h or 24 h.The levels of SERCA, PLB, and RyR2 expression were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Cytotoxic effect of simvastatin on ventricular cardiomyocytes was assessed by the MTT colorimetric assay.Results: LVDP, +dp/dtmax, and -dp/dtmax of hearts were increased significantly after treatment with simvastatin 3, 10, and 30 μmol/L. In simvastatin-treated isolated hearts, the levels of mRNA expression of SERCA and RyR2 were elevated compared with the control (P<0.05), while the mRNA expression of PLB did not change. After the cultured neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were incubated with 3, 10, 30, and 100 μmol/L simvastatin for 1 h, SERCA and RyR2 mRNA expressions of cardiomyocytes rose, but there was no alteration in protein expressions. However, with the elongation of simvastatin treatment to 24 h, the protein expression of SERCA and RyR2 were also elevated. Additionally,simvastatin (1-30 μmol/L) had no influence on cell viability of cultured cardiac myocytes, but simvastatin 100 μmol/L inhibited the cell viability. Conclusion:Simvastatin improved cardiac performance accompanied by the elevation of SERCA and RyR2 gene and protein expression.

  17. Proteomic study of muscle sarcoplasmic proteins using AUT-PAGE/SDS-PAGE as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picariello, Gianluca; De Martino, Alessandra; Mamone, Gianfranco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Addeo, Francesco; Faccia, Michele; Spagnamusso, Salvatore; Di Luccia, Aldo

    2006-03-20

    In the present study, an alternative procedure for two-dimensional (2D) electrophoretic analysis in proteomic investigation of the most represented basic muscle water-soluble proteins is suggested. Our method consists of Acetic acid-Urea-Triton polyacrylamide gel (AUT-PAGE) analysis in the first dimension and standard sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel (SDS-PAGE) in the second dimension. Although standard two-dimensional Immobilized pH Gradient-Sodium Dodecyl-Sulphate (2D IPG-SDS) gel electrophoresis has been successfully used to study these proteins, most of the water-soluble proteins are spread on the alkaline part of the 2D map and are poorly focused. Furthermore, the similarity in their molecular weights impairs resolution of the classical approach. The addition of Triton X-100, a non-ionic detergent, into the gel induces a differential electrophoretic mobility of proteins as a result of the formation of mixed micelles between the detergent and the hydrophobic moieties of polypeptides, separating basic proteins with a criterion similar to reversed phase chromatography based on their hydrophobicity. The acid pH induces positive net charges, increasing with the isoelectric point of proteins, thus allowing enhanced resolution in the separation. By using 2D AUT-PAGE/SDS electrophoresis approach to separate water-soluble proteins from fresh pork and from dry-cured products, we could spread proteins over a greater area, achieving a greater resolution than that obtained by IPG in the pH range 3-10 and 6-11. Sarcoplasmic proteins undergoing proteolysis during the ripening of products were identified by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting in a easier and more effective way. Two-dimensional AUT-PAGE/SDS electrophoresis has allowed to simplify separation of sarcoplasmic protein mixtures making this technique suitable in the defining of quality of dry-cured pork products by immediate

  18. Heavy metal jako subkultura

    OpenAIRE

    KOUTNÁ, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with heavy metal subculture. Its aim is to introduce the most important branches and to show broadness of heavy metal. This bachelor thesis describes development and history, briefly shows Czech heavy metal history alongside with the biggest and most popular Czech heavy metal festivals. It shows the most dressing concerns of society against this style.

  19. The development of longitudinal variation of Myosin isoforms in the orbital fibers of extraocular muscles of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Neal A; Porter, John D; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2004-09-01

    To examine the appearance of longitudinal variation of extraocular and embryonic myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms during the development of orbital singly innervated fibers of rat extraocular muscles (EOMs). EOMs were dissected from rat pups of various ages and stained with isoform-specific monoclonal antibodies to the embryonic and extraocular MyHC isoforms and to neurofilaments, as well as with labeled alpha-bungarotoxin. The orbital layers of whole muscles were examined by confocal microscopy. RNase protection assays for the embryonic (Myh3) and extraocular (Myh13) MyHC isoform mRNAs were also performed. At 10 days postpartum, the EOM MyHC RNA was first detected by RNase protection assay. At 11 days postpartum, the extraocular isoform was detected in the orbital fibers as two thin stripes just proximal and distal to the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Over the next few weeks, the area occupied by the extraocular isoform increased to include the entire central region of the orbital fibers at and surrounding the NMJ. At the same time, the embryonic isoform became excluded from the region of the NMJ. The orbital layer fibers of rat EOMs contain a longitudinal variation in MyHC isoforms not seen in other skeletal muscles. Development of this longitudinal variation begins as a late event postpartum; and the first appearance of it may be closely linked to neural contact. This targeting of MyHC isoforms to distinct domains is unique to EOMs. Copyright Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

  20. Role of nonmuscle myosin IIB and N-RAP in cell spreading and myofibril assembly in primary mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shajia; Horowits, Robert

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the role of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain (NMHC) IIB in cultured embryonic mouse cardiomyocytes by specific knockdown using RNA interference. NMHC IIB protein levels decreased 90% compared with mock-transfected cells by 3 days post transfection. NMHC IIB knockdown resulted in a slow decrease in N-RAP protein levels over 6 days with no change in N-RAP transcript levels. N-RAP is a scaffold for alpha-actinin and actin assembly during myofibrillogenesis, and we quantitated myofibril accumulation by morphometric analysis of alpha-actinin organization. Between 3 and 6 days, NMHC IIB knockdown was accompanied by the abolishment of cardiomyocyte spreading. During this period the rate of myofibril accumulation steadily decreased, correlating with the slowly decreasing levels of N-RAP. Between 6 and 8 days NMHC IIB and N-RAP protein levels recovered, and cardiomyocyte spreading and myofibril accumulation resumed. Inhibition of proteasome function using MG132 led to accumulation of excess N-RAP, and the secondary decrease in N-RAP that otherwise accompanied NMHC IIB knockdown was abolished. The results show that NMHC IIB knockdown led to decreased N-RAP levels through proteasome-mediated degradation. Furthermore, these proteins have distinct functional roles, with NMHC IIB playing a role in cardiomyocyte spreading and N-RAP functioning in myofibril assembly.

  1. Actomyosin content of Physarum plasmodia and detection of immunological cross-reactions with myosins from related species

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The content of myosin in plasmodia of the myxomycete Physarum polycephalum was measured by an immunological technique, quantitative microcomplement (C') fixation. Migrating plasmodia (starved after growth on rolled oats) contained 0.60 +/- 0.08 (SD) mg myosin per g fresh plasmodia. Myosin comprised 0.77% +/- 0.05 (SD) of the total plasmodial protein. When total plasmodial proteins were separated by electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels, a large amount of protein appeared in a band comigrating with muscle actin. Densitometry performed after Coomassie blue staining indicated that as much as 15- 25% of the total protein in the plasmodium could be actin. This gives an actin/myosin ratio by weight in the myxomycete plasmodium as high as 19-33, a very "actin-rich" actomyosin compared with rabbit skeletal muscle actomyosin with an actin/myosin ratio of 0.6. Starvation stimulates rapid migration and is correlated with a higher percent of both myosin and actin in the total protein of the plasmodium compared with normally growing cultures. Immunological cross-reaction of myosins from a variety of species was measured by C' fixation using an antiserum produced against purified native myosin from P. polycephalum. Although myxomycete and vertebrate striated muscle myosins have very similar morphological and biochemical properties, and apparently possess similar binding properties to F-actin, only myosins from myxomycetes in the order Physarales, rather closely related to P. polycephalum, gave detectable cross-reactions. This finding suggests that many amino acid sequences in myosin have been variable during evolution. PMID:944188

  2. Roles of an unconventional protein kinase and myosin II in amoeba osmotic shock responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betapudi, Venkaiah; Egelhoff, Thomas T

    2009-12-01

    The contractile vacuole (CV) is a dynamic organelle that enables Dictyostelium amoeba and other protist to maintain osmotic homeostasis by expelling excess water. In the present study, we have uncovered a mechanism that coordinates the mechanics of the CV with myosin II, regulated by VwkA, an unconventional protein kinase that is conserved in an array of protozoa. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-VwkA fusion proteins localize persistently to the CV during both filling and expulsion phases of water. In vwkA null cells, the established CV marker dajumin still localizes to the CV, but these structures are large, spherical and severely impaired for discharge. Furthermore, myosin II cortical localization and assembly are abnormal in vwkA null cells. Parallel analysis of wild-type cells treated with myosin II inhibitors or of myosin II null cells also results in enlarged CVs with impaired dynamics. We suggest that the myosin II cortical cytoskeleton, regulated by VwkA, serves a critical conserved role in the periodic contractions of the CV, as part of the osmotic protective mechanism of protozoa.

  3. Increased Association of Dynamin Ⅱ with Myosin Ⅱ in Ras Transformed NIH3T3 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soon-Jeong JEONG; Su-Gwan KIM; Jiyun YOO; Mi-Young HAN; Joo-Cheol PARK; Heung-Joong KIM; Seong Soo KANG; Baik-Dong CHOI; Moon-Jin JEONG

    2006-01-01

    Dynamin has been implicated in the formation of nascent vesicles through both endocytic and secretory pathways. However, dynamin has recently been implicated in altering the cell membrane shape during cell migration associated with cytoskeleton-related proteins. Myosin Ⅱ has been implicated in maintaining cell morphology and in cellular movement. Therefore, reciprocal immunoprecipitation was carried out to identify the potential relationship between dynamin Ⅱ and myosin Ⅱ. The dynamin Ⅱ expression level was higher when co-expressed with myosin Ⅱ in Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells than in normal NIH3T3 cells.Confocal microscopy also confirmed the interaction between these two proteins. Interestingly, exposing the NIH3T3 cells to platelet-derived growth factor altered the interaction and localization of these two proteins.The platelet-derived growth factor treatment induced lamellipodia and cell migration, and dynamin Ⅱ interacted with myosin Ⅱ. Grb2, a 24 kDa adaptor protein and an essential element of the Ras signaling pathway,was found to be associated with dynamin Ⅱ and myosin Ⅱ gene expression in the Ras transformed NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest that dynamin Ⅱ acts as an intermediate messenger in the Ras signal transduction pathway leading to membrane ruffling and cell migration.

  4. Myosin VI deafness mutation prevents the initiation of processive runs on actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypenko, Olena; Song, Lin; Shima, Ai; Yang, Zhaohui; Houdusse, Anne M; Sweeney, H Lee

    2015-03-17

    Mutations in the reverse-direction myosin, myosin VI, are associated with deafness in humans and mice. A myosin VI deafness mutation, D179Y, which is in the transducer of the motor, uncoupled the release of the ATP hydrolysis product, inorganic phosphate (Pi), from dependency on actin binding and destroyed the ability of single dimeric molecules to move processively on actin filaments. We observed that processive movement is rescued if ATP is added to the mutant dimer following binding of both heads to actin in the absence of ATP, demonstrating that the mutation selectively destroys the initiation of processive runs at physiological ATP levels. A drug (omecamtiv) that accelerates the actin-activated activity of cardiac myosin was able to rescue processivity of the D179Y mutant dimers at physiological ATP concentrations by slowing the actin-independent release of Pi. Thus, it may be possible to create myosin VI-specific drugs that rescue the function of deafness-causing mutations.

  5. Identification and characterization of an unusual class I myosin involved in vesicle traffic in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Spitznagel

    Full Text Available Myosins are a multimember family of motor proteins with diverse functions in eukaryotic cells. African trypanosomes possess only two candidate myosins and thus represent a useful system for functional analysis of these motors. One of these candidates is an unusual class I myosin (TbMyo1 that is expressed at similar levels but organized differently during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei. This myosin localizes to the polarized endocytic pathway in bloodstream forms of the parasite. This organization is actin dependent. Knock down of TbMyo1 results in a significant reduction in endocytic activity, a cessation in cell division and eventually cell death. A striking morphological feature in these cells is an enlargement of the flagellar pocket, which is consistent with an imbalance in traffic to and from the surface. In contrast TbMyo1 is distributed throughout procyclic forms of the tsetse vector and a loss of approximately 90% of the protein has no obvious effects on growth or morphology. These results reveal a life cycle stage specific requirement for this myosin in essential endocytic traffic and represent the first description of the involvement of a motor protein in vesicle traffic in these parasites.

  6. Identification and characterization of an unusual class I myosin involved in vesicle traffic in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitznagel, Diana; O'Rourke, John F; Leddy, Neal; Hanrahan, Orla; Nolan, Derek P

    2010-01-01

    Myosins are a multimember family of motor proteins with diverse functions in eukaryotic cells. African trypanosomes possess only two candidate myosins and thus represent a useful system for functional analysis of these motors. One of these candidates is an unusual class I myosin (TbMyo1) that is expressed at similar levels but organized differently during the life cycle of Trypanosoma brucei. This myosin localizes to the polarized endocytic pathway in bloodstream forms of the parasite. This organization is actin dependent. Knock down of TbMyo1 results in a significant reduction in endocytic activity, a cessation in cell division and eventually cell death. A striking morphological feature in these cells is an enlargement of the flagellar pocket, which is consistent with an imbalance in traffic to and from the surface. In contrast TbMyo1 is distributed throughout procyclic forms of the tsetse vector and a loss of approximately 90% of the protein has no obvious effects on growth or morphology. These results reveal a life cycle stage specific requirement for this myosin in essential endocytic traffic and represent the first description of the involvement of a motor protein in vesicle traffic in these parasites.

  7. Actin and myosin regulate cytoplasm stiffness in plant cells: a study using optical tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Honing, Hannie S; de Ruijter, Norbert C A; Emons, Anne Mie C; Ketelaar, Tijs

    2010-01-01

    Here, we produced cytoplasmic protrusions with optical tweezers in mature BY-2 suspension cultured cells to study the parameters involved in the movement of actin filaments during changes in cytoplasmic organization and to determine whether stiffness is an actin-related property of plant cytoplasm. Optical tweezers were used to create cytoplasmic protrusions resembling cytoplasmic strands. Simultaneously, the behavior of the actin cytoskeleton was imaged. After actin filament depolymerization, less force was needed to create cytoplasmic protrusions. During treatment with the myosin ATPase inhibitor 2,3-butanedione monoxime, more trapping force was needed to create and maintain cytoplasmic protrusions. Thus, the presence of actin filaments and, even more so, the deactivation of a 2,3-butanedione monoxime-sensitive factor, probably myosin, stiffens the cytoplasm. During 2,3-butanedione monoxime treatment, none of the tweezer-formed protrusions contained filamentous actin, showing that a 2,3-butanedione monoxime-sensitive factor, probably myosin, is responsible for the movement of actin filaments, and implying that myosin serves as a static cross-linker of actin filaments when its motor function is inhibited. The presence of actin filaments does not delay the collapse of cytoplasmic protrusions after tweezer release. Myosin-based reorganization of the existing actin cytoskeleton could be the basis for new cytoplasmic strand formation, and thus the production of an organized cytoarchitecture.

  8. Strain Mediated Adaptation Is Key for Myosin Mechanochemistry: Discovering General Rules for Motor Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Biman; Onuchic, José N

    2016-08-01

    A structure-based model of myosin motor is built in the same spirit of our early work for kinesin-1 and Ncd towards physical understanding of its mechanochemical cycle. We find a structural adaptation of the motor head domain in post-powerstroke state that signals faster ADP release from it compared to the same from the motor head in the pre-powerstroke state. For dimeric myosin, an additional forward strain on the trailing head, originating from the postponed powerstroke state of the leading head in the waiting state of myosin, further increases the rate of ADP release. This coordination between the two heads is the essence of the processivity of the cycle. Our model provides a structural description of the powerstroke step of the cycle as an allosteric transition of the converter domain in response to the Pi release. Additionally, the variation in structural elements peripheral to catalytic motor domain is the deciding factor behind diverse directionalities of myosin motors (myosin V & VI). Finally, we observe that there are general rules for functional molecular motors across the different families. Allosteric structural adaptation of the catalytic motor head in different nucleotide states is crucial for mechanochemistry. Strain-mediated coordination between motor heads is essential for processivity and the variation of peripheral structural elements is essential for their diverse functionalities.

  9. Drug action of benzocaine on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase from fast-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Croce, D; Trinks, P W; Grifo, M B; Takara, D; Sánchez, G A

    2015-11-01

    The effect of the local anesthetic benzocaine on sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from fast-twitch muscles was tested. The effects on Ca-ATPase activity, calcium binding and uptake, phosphoenzyme accumulation and decomposition were assessed using radioisotopic methods. The calcium binding to the Ca-ATPase was noncompetitively inhibited, and the enzymatic activity decreased in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 47.1 mM). The inhibition of the activity depended on the presence of the calcium ionophore calcimycin and the membrane protein concentration. The pre-exposure of the membranes to benzocaine enhanced the enzymatic activity in the absence of calcimycin, supporting the benzocaine permeabilizing effect, which was prevented by calcium. Benzocaine also interfered with the calcium transport capability by decreasing the maximal uptake (IC50 40.3 mM) without modification of the calcium affinity for the ATPase. It inhibited the phosphorylation of the enzyme, and at high benzocaine concentration, the dephosphorylation step became rate-limiting as suggested by the biphasic profile of phosphoenzyme accumulation at different benzocaine concentrations. The data reported in this paper revealed a complex pattern of inhibition involving two sites for interaction with low and high benzocaine concentrations. It is concluded that benzocaine not only exerts an indirect action on the membrane permeability to calcium but also affects key steps of the Ca-ATPase enzymatic cycle.

  10. Short and long range functions of amino acids in the transmembrane region of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase. A mutational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L; Sumbilla, C; Lewis, D; Zhong, L; Strock, C; Kirtley, M E; Inesi, G

    1996-05-01

    Mutational analysis of several amino acids in the transmembrane region of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase was performed by expressing wild type ATPase and 32 site-directed mutants in COS-1 cells followed by functional characterization of the microsomal fraction. Four different phenotype characteristics were observed in the mutants: (a) functions similar to those sustained by the wild type ATPase; (b) Ca2+ transport inhibited to a greater extent than ATPase hydrolytic activity; (c) inhibition of transport and hydrolytic activity in the presence of high levels of phosphorylated enzyme intermediate; and (d) total inhibition of ATP utilization by the enzyme while retaining the ability to form phosphoenzyme by utilization of P(i). Analysis of experimental observations and molecular models revealed short and long range functions of several amino acids within the transmembrane region. Short range functions include: (a) direct involvement of five amino acids in Ca2+ binding within a channel formed by clustered transmembrane helices M4, M5, M6, and M8; (b) roles of several amino acids in structural stabilization of the helical cluster for optimal channel function; and (c) a specific role of Lys297 in sealing the distal end of the channel, suggesting that the M4 helix rotates to allow vectorial flux of Ca2+ upon enzyme phosphorylation. Long range functions are related to the influence of several transmembrane amino acids on phosphorylation reactions with ATP or P(i), transmitted to the extramembranous region of the ATPase in the presence or in the absence of Ca2+.

  11. Luteolin improves cardiac dysfunction in heart failure rats by regulating sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenjing; Xu, Tongda; Wu, Pei; Pan, Defeng; Chen, Junhong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Buchun; Zhu, Hong; Li, Dongye

    2017-01-01

    We previously found that luteolin (Lut) appeared to improve the contractility of cardiomyocytes during ischemia/reperfusion in rats. The enhancement was associated with the alteration in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a). This finding prompted us to consider if the mechanism worked in heart failure (HF). We studied the regulation of SERCA2a by Lut in failing cardiomyocytes and intact heart of rats. Improvement of contractility and the mechanisms centered on SERCA2a were studied in isolated cardiomyocytes and intact heart. We found that Lut significantly improved contractility and Ca2+ transients, ameliorated expression, activity and stability of SERCA2a and upregulated expression of small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) 1, which is a newfound SERCA2a regulator. Lut also increased phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt), phospholaban (PLB) and sumoylation of SERCA2a, specificity protein 1 (Sp1). Transcriptions of SUMO1 and SERCA2a were concurrently increased. Inhibition of posphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) pathway and SERCA2a activity both markedly abolished Lut-induced benefits in vitro and in vivo. Lut upregulated the expression ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, caspase-3/cleaved-Caspase3. Meanwhile, Lut ameliorated the myocardium fibrosis of HF. These discoveries provide an important potential therapeutic strategy that Lut targeted SERCA2a SUMOylation related to PI3K/Akt-mediated regulations on rescuing the dysfunction of HF.

  12. Modulation of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase activity and oxidative modification during the development of adjuvant arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strosova, Miriam K; Karlovska, Janka; Zizkova, Petronela; Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Ponist, Silvester; Spickett, Corinne M; Horakova, Lubica

    2011-07-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) was induced by intradermal administration of Mycobacterium butyricum to the tail of Lewis rats. In sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of skeletal muscles, we investigated the development of AA. SR Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity decreased on day 21, suggesting possible conformational changes in the transmembrane part of the enzyme, especially at the site of the calcium binding transmembrane part. These events were associated with an increased level of protein carbonyls, a decrease in cysteine SH groups, and alterations in SR membrane fluidity. There was no alteration in the nucleotide binding site at any time point of AA, as detected by a FITC fluorescence marker. Some changes observed on day 21 appeared to be reversible, as indicated by SERCA activity, cysteine SH groups, SR membrane fluidity, protein carbonyl content and fluorescence of an NCD-4 marker specific for the calcium binding site. The reversibility may represent adaptive mechanisms of AA, induced by higher relative expression of SERCA, oxidation of cysteine, nitration of tyrosine and presence of acidic phospholipids such as phosphatidic acid. Nitric oxide may regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level through conformational alterations of SERCA, and decreasing levels of calsequestrin in SR may also play regulatory role in SERCA activity and expression.

  13. Effect of Zn2+ ions on ryanodine binding to sarcoplasmic reticulum of striated muscles in the presence of pyrithione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong XIE; Ke-ying CHEN; Pei-hong ZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore whether the differential effects of Zn2+ on ryanodine binding to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR)of skeletal and cardiac muscles resulted from different permeability of the SR to Zn2+. METHODS: [3H]ryanodine binding assays were performed to examine the effect of Zn2+ on ryanodine binding to the SR in the presence of pyrithione sodium (PyNa), a specific Zn2+ ionophore. RESULTS: As a control, PyNa up to 50 μmol/L did not induce any effect on ryanodine binding to the SR of cardiac muscle. But PyNa 1-100 μmol/L increased ryanodine binding in skeletal muscle with maximum binding (222.2 %+20.9 % of the control) and inhibited ryanodine binding to 50 % of the control at about 500 μrnol/L. In the presence of PyNa 10 and 50 μmol/L the dose-dependence of the effect of Zn2+ in cardiac muscle was still monophasic and not changed by PyNa, while the biphasic effect of Zn2+in skeletal muscle became monophasic. CONCLUSION: Different permeability of the SR to Zn2+ may account for the differential effects of Zn2+on ryanodine binding in skeletal and cardiac muscles. PyNa is not a strictly specific Zn2+ ionophore.

  14. Effect of chloride on Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum of mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonan, J R; Lamb, G D

    1998-04-01

    The effect of intracellular Cl- on Ca2+ release in mechanically skinned fibres of rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and toad iliofibularis muscles was examined under physiological conditions of myoplasmic [Mg2+] and [ATP] and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ loading. Both in rat and toad fibres, the presence of 20 mM Cl- in the myoplasm increased Ca2+ leakage from the SR at pCa (i.e. -log10 [Ca2+]) 6.7, but not at pCa 8. Ca2+ uptake was not significantly affected by the presence of Cl-. This Ca2+-dependent effect of Cl- on Ca2+ leakage was most likely due to a direct action on the ryanodine receptor/Ca2+ release channel, and could influence channel sensitivity and the resting [Ca2+] in muscle fibres in vivo. In contrast to this effect, acute addition of 20 mM Cl- to the myoplasm caused a 40-50% reduction in Ca2+ release in response to a low caffeine concentration both in toad and rat fibres. One possible explanation for this latter effect is that the addition of Cl- induces a potential across the SR (lumen negative) which might reduce Ca2+ release via several different mechanisms.

  15. Effects of thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid on the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump of skinned fibres from frog skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, G G; Ashley, C C; Lea, T J

    1994-12-01

    Thapsigargin has been reported to inhibit ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake by isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) vesicles of vertebrate skeletal muscle fibres at nanomolar concentrations. There have been no reports confirming this effect in skinned muscle fibre preparations. We have examined the ability of thapsigargin to inhibit the uptake of Ca2+ by the SR in mechanically skinned fibres of frog iliofibularis muscles, using the size of the caffeine-induced contracture to assess the Ca2+ content of the SR. The SR was first depleted of Ca2+ and then reloaded for 1 min at pCa 6.2 in the presence and absence of thapsigargin. When 5 min were allowed for diffusion, a thapsigargin concentration of at least 131 microM was required to inhibit Ca2+ loading by 50%. In contrast, another SR Ca2+ uptake inhibitor, cyclopiazonic acid, was more effective, producing 50% inhibition at 7.0 microM and total inhibition at 50 microM. When cyclopiazonic acid (100 microM) was applied after, rather than during, Ca2+ loading, the caffeine-induced contracture was not changed. Thapsigargin (300 microM), on the other hand, caused some reduction in the peak amplitude of the caffeine-induced contracture when applied after Ca2+ loading. The poor effectiveness of thapsigargin in the skinned fibres, compared with in SR vesicles, is attributed to its slow diffusion into the skinned fibres, perhaps as a result of binding to myofibrillar components.

  16. Influence of inorganic phosphate and pH on sarcoplasmic reticular ATPase in skinned muscle fibres of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stienen, G J; Papp, Z; Zaremba, R

    1999-08-01

    1. The influence of 30 mM inorganic phosphate (Pi) and pH (6.2-7.4) on the rate of ATP utilization was determined in mechanically skinned bundles of myofibrils from the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis at approximately 5 C. 2. BDM (2,3-butanedione monoxime; 10 mM) depressed isometric force production and actomyosin (AM) ATPase activity equally. Therefore sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) ATPase activity could be determined by extrapolation of the total ATPase activity to zero force. 3. The SR ATPase activity without added Pi at pH 7.1 was 42 +/- 2 % of the total ATPase activity. Addition of 30 mM Pi reduced SR ATPase activity slightly, by 9 +/- 5 %, and depressed force by 62 +/- 2 % and AM ATPase activity by 21 +/- 6 %. 4. At pH 6.2, force, SR ATPase activity and AM ATPase activity were reduced by 21 +/- 5, 61 +/- 5 and 10 +/- 4 % of their respective values at pH 7.1. 5. The SR ATPase activity at 30 mM Pi and pH 6.2 was reduced markedly to 20 +/- 6 % of the value under control conditions, suggesting that the maximum rate of Ca2+ uptake during muscle fatigue was strongly depressed. This reduction was larger than expected on the basis of the effects of Pi and pH alone.

  17. Cellular mechanisms of reduced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in L-thyroxin-induced rat ventricular hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lai-jing SONG; Guan-lei WANG; Jie LIU; Qin-ying QIU; Jing-hua OU; Yong-yuan GUAN

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To examine how the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ content changes and the underlying mechanism in L-thyroxin-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Methods:Echocardiography was used to confirm the establishment of the cardiac hypertro-phy model. The confocal microscopy and fluorescent indicator Fluo-3 was ap-plied to examine the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]I), the Ca2+ sparks, and the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient in freshly isolated cardiac ventricular myocytes. The activity of sarcolemmal and SR Ca2+-ATPase 2a (SERCA2a) in the ventricular tissue was also measured, respectively. Results:L-thyroxin (1 mg/kg injection for 10 d) induces left ventricular cardiac hypertrophy with normal myocardial function. The decreased caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient in the Ca2+-free solution was detected. The spontaneous Ca2+ sparks in hypertrophied myocytes occurred more frequently than in normal cells, with similar duration and spatial spread, but smaller amplitude. Then the basal [Ca2+]I increase was observed in quiescent left ventricular myocytes from hyperthyroidism rats. The activity of sarcolemmal and SR Ca2+-ATPase was decreased in the hypertrophied ventricle tissue. Conclusion:The results suggested that the reduced SR Ca2+ content may be associated with an increased Ca2+ leak and reduced SERCA2a activity, contributing to abnormal intracellular Ca2+ handling during hypertrophy in hyperthyroidism rats.

  18. Protective and inhibitory effects of various types of amphipols on the Ca2+-ATPase from sarcoplasmic reticulum: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; Dahmane, Tassadite; Garrigos, Manuel; Gauron, Carole; Giusti, Fabrice; le Maire, Marc; Popot, Jean-Luc; Champeil, Philippe

    2006-02-14

    Amphipols are amphipathic polymers designed to replace or supplement detergents in membrane protein solution studies. Previous work has suggested both advantages and disadvantages to the use of a polyacrylate-based amphipol, A8-35, for studying the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA1a). We investigated this issue further using a set of four amphipols with different chemical structures. Previous size exclusion chromatography experiments had shown that A8-35 and SERCA1a/A8-35 complexes aggregate under certain conditions. We show here that aggregation can be prevented by omitting calcium from buffers or by using a sulfonated version of A8-35. A8-35 had previously been shown to protect Ca2+-ATPase from irreversible denaturation, while inhibiting its activity in a reversible manner. We show here that the other three amphipols tested also display these properties and that all four amphipols slow down backward calcium dissociation from the nonphosphorylated solubilized enzyme, a priori an unrelated step. As this calcium dissociation involves the opening up of the bundle of transmembrane ATPase segments, the slowing of this process may indicate that multipoint attachment of the polymers to the hydrophobic transmembrane surface damps protein dynamics ("Gulliver" effect). Damping might be the reason why amphipols also simultaneously protect membrane proteins against irreversible denaturation and may inhibit the activity of those of them that display large rearrangements of their transmembrane surface during their catalytic cycle.

  19. Luteolin Exerts Cardioprotective Effects through Improving Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase Activity in Rats during Ischemia/Reperfusion In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsheng Nai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flavonoid luteolin exists in many types of fruits, vegetables, and medicinal herbs. Our previous studies have demonstrated that luteolin reduced ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury in vitro, which was related with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2a activity. However, the effects of luteolin on SERCA2a activity during I/R in vivo remain unclear. To investigate whether luteolin exerts cardioprotective effects and to monitor changes in SERCA2a expression and activity levels in vivo during I/R, we created a myocardial I/R rat model by ligating the coronary artery. We demonstrated that luteolin could reduce the myocardial infarct size, lactate dehydrogenase release, and apoptosis during I/R injury in vivo. Furthermore, we found that luteolin inhibited the I/R-induced decrease in SERCA2a activity in vivo. However, neither I/R nor luteolin altered SERCA2a expression levels in myocardiocytes. Moreover, the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway played a vital role in this mechanism. In conclusion, the present study has confirmed for the first time that luteolin yields cardioprotective effects against I/R injury by inhibiting the I/R-induced decrease in SERCA2a activity partially via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in vivo, independent of SERCA2a protein level regulation. SERCA2a activity presents a novel biomarker to assess the progress of I/R injury in experimental research and clinical applications.

  20. Expression of the inclusion body myopathy 3 mutation in Drosophila depresses myosin function and stability and recapitulates muscle inclusions and weakness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Yang; Melkani, Girish C; Suggs, Jennifer A; Melkani, Anju; Kronert, William A; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2012-01-01

    .... We constructed a transgene encoding E706K myosin and expressed it in Drosophila (E701K) indirect flight and jump muscles to establish a novel homozygous organism with homogeneous populations of fast IBM-3 myosin and muscle fibers...

  1. Criticalities in crosslinked actin networks due to myosin activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinman, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Many essential processes in cells and tissues, like motility and morphogenesis, are orchestrated by molecular motors applying internal, active stresses on crosslinked networks of actin filaments. Using scaling analysis, mean-field calculation, numerical modelling and in vitro experiments of such active networks we predict and observe different mechanical regimes exhibiting interesting critical behaviours with non-trivial power-law dependencies. Firstly, we find that the presence of active stresses can dramatically increase the stiffness of a floppy network, as was observed in reconstituted intracellular F-actin networks with myosin motors and extracellular gels with contractile cells. Uniform internal stress results in an anomalous, critical mechanical regime only in the vicinity of the rigidity percolation points of the network. However, taking into account heterogeneity of motors, we demonstrate that the motors, stiffening any floppy network, induce large non-affine fluctuations, giving rise to a critical mechanical regime. Secondly, upon increasing motor concentration, the resulting large internal stress is able to significantly enhance unbinding of the network's crosslinks and, therefore, disconnect the initially well-connected network to isolated clusters. However, during this process, when the network approaches marginal connectivity the internal stresses are expected to drop drastically such that the connectivity stabilizes. This general argument and detailed numerical simulations show that motors should drive a well connected network to a close vicinity of a critical point of marginal connectivity. Experiments clearly confirm this conclusion and demonstrate robust critical connectivity of initially well-connected networks, ruptured by the motor activity for a wide range of parameters. M. Sheinman, C.P. Broedersz and F.C. MacKintosh, Phys. Rev. Lett, in press. J. Alvarado, M. Sheinman, A. Sharma, F.C. MacKintosh and G. Koenderink, in preparation.

  2. Surface-Controlled Properties of Myosin Studied by Electric Field Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zalinge, Harm; Ramsey, Laurence C; Aveyard, Jenny; Persson, Malin; Mansson, Alf; Nicolau, Dan V

    2015-08-04

    The efficiency of dynamic nanodevices using surface-immobilized protein molecular motors, which have been proposed for diagnostics, drug discovery, and biocomputation, critically depends on the ability to precisely control the motion of motor-propelled, individual cytoskeletal filaments transporting cargo to designated locations. The efficiency of these devices also critically depends on the proper function of the propelling motors, which is controlled by their interaction with the surfaces they are immobilized on. Here we use a microfluidic device to study how the motion of the motile elements, i.e., actin filaments propelled by heavy mero-myosin (HMM) motor fragments immobilized on various surfaces, is altered by the application of electrical loads generated by an external electric field with strengths ranging from 0 to 8 kVm(-1). Because the motility is intimately linked to the function of surface-immobilized motors, the study also showed how the adsorption properties of HMM on various surfaces, such as nitrocellulose (NC), trimethylclorosilane (TMCS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), poly(tert-butyl methacrylate) (PtBMA), and poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA), can be characterized using an external field. It was found that at an electric field of 5 kVm(-1) the force exerted on the filaments is sufficient to overcome the frictionlike resistive force of the inactive motors. It was also found that the effect of assisting electric fields on the relative increase in the sliding velocity was markedly higher for the TMCS-derivatized surface than for all other polymer-based surfaces. An explanation of this behavior, based on the molecular rigidity of the TMCS-on-glass surfaces as opposed to the flexibility of the polymer-based ones, is considered. To this end, the proposed microfluidic device could be used to select appropriate surfaces for future lab-on-a-chip applications as illustrated here for the almost ideal TMCS surface. Furthermore, the proposed methodology can

  3. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  4. Crystal Structure of a Phosphorylated Light Chain Domain of Scallop Smooth-Muscle Myosin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, V.S.; Robinson, H.; O-Neall-Hennessey, E.; Reshetnikova, L.; Brown, J. H.; Szent-Gyorgyi, A. G.; Cohen, C.

    2011-11-02

    We have determined the crystal structure of a phosphorylated smooth-muscle myosin light chain domain (LCD). This reconstituted LCD is of a sea scallop catch muscle myosin with its phosphorylatable regulatory light chain (RLC SmoA). In the crystal structure, Arg{sup 16}, an arginine residue that is present in this isoform but not in vertebrate smooth-muscle RLC, stabilizes the phosphorylation site. This arginine interacts with the carbonyl group of the phosphorylation-site serine in the unphosphorylated LCD (determined previously), and with the phosphate group when the serine is phosphorylated. However, the overall conformation of the LCD is essentially unchanged upon phosphorylation. This result provides additional evidence that phosphorylation of the RLC is unlikely to act as an on-switch in regulation of scallop catch muscle myosin.

  5. BMP-2 Overexpression Augments Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Motility by Upregulating Myosin Va via Erk Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The disruption of physiologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration initiates atherosclerosis development. The biochemical mechanisms leading to dysfunctional VSMC motility remain unknown. Recently, cytokine BMP-2 has been implicated in various vascular physiologic and pathologic processes. However, whether BMP-2 has any effect upon VSMC motility, or by what manner, has never been investigated. Methods. VSMCs were adenovirally transfected to genetically overexpress BMP-2. VSMC motility was detected by modified Boyden chamber assay, confocal time-lapse video assay, and a colony wounding assay. Gene chip array and RT-PCR were employed to identify genes potentially regulated by BMP-2. Western blot and real-time PCR detected the expression of myosin Va and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed myosin Va expression locale. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were recorded. Results. VSMC migration was augmented in VSMCs overexpressing BMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myosin Va inhibited VSMC motility. Both myosin Va mRNA and protein expression significantly increased after BMP-2 administration and were inhibited by Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126. BMP-2 induced Ca2+ oscillations, generated largely by a “cytosolic oscillator”. Conclusion. BMP-2 significantly increased VSMCs migration and myosin Va expression, via the Erk signaling pathway and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and inhibition of BMP-2-induced myosin Va expression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy.

  6. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valera V Peremyslov

    Full Text Available Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI, cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  7. Electron Tomography of Cryofixed, Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Reveals Novel Actin-Myosin Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Reedy, Mary C.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Lucaveche, Carmen; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A. (UPENN); (Duke); (MRCLMB); (FSU); (Jikei-Med)

    2010-10-22

    Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ. We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the 'target zone', situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77{sup o}/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127{sup o} range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening. We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are

  8. Electron tomography of cryofixed, isometrically contracting insect flight muscle reveals novel actin-myosin interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenping Wu

    Full Text Available Isometric muscle contraction, where force is generated without muscle shortening, is a molecular traffic jam in which the number of actin-attached motors is maximized and all states of motor action are trapped with consequently high heterogeneity. This heterogeneity is a major limitation to deciphering myosin conformational changes in situ.We used multivariate data analysis to group repeat segments in electron tomograms of isometrically contracting insect flight muscle, mechanically monitored, rapidly frozen, freeze substituted, and thin sectioned. Improved resolution reveals the helical arrangement of F-actin subunits in the thin filament enabling an atomic model to be built into the thin filament density independent of the myosin. Actin-myosin attachments can now be assigned as weak or strong by their motor domain orientation relative to actin. Myosin attachments were quantified everywhere along the thin filament including troponin. Strong binding myosin attachments are found on only four F-actin subunits, the "target zone", situated exactly midway between successive troponin complexes. They show an axial lever arm range of 77°/12.9 nm. The lever arm azimuthal range of strong binding attachments has a highly skewed, 127° range compared with X-ray crystallographic structures. Two types of weak actin attachments are described. One type, found exclusively in the target zone, appears to represent pre-working-stroke intermediates. The other, which contacts tropomyosin rather than actin, is positioned M-ward of the target zone, i.e. the position toward which thin filaments slide during shortening.We present a model for the weak to strong transition in the myosin ATPase cycle that incorporates azimuthal movements of the motor domain on actin. Stress/strain in the S2 domain may explain azimuthal lever arm changes in the strong binding attachments. The results support previous conclusions that the weak attachments preceding force generation are very

  9. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Cole, Rex A; Fowler, John E; Dolja, Valerian V

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  10. Humoral immune response against contractile proteins (actin and myosin) during cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Scheerder, I K; De Buyzere, M; Delanghe, J; Maas, A; Clement, D L; Wieme, R

    1991-08-01

    Sensitive and highly specific ELISA assays were developed to determine humoral immune response against actin and myosin in 122 patients suffering from various cardiovascular diseases: acute viral myocarditis (n = 10, MYO), acute myocardial infarction (n = 28, AMI), valve surgery (n = 35, VALVE), coronary bypass surgery (n = 35, CABG), and peripheral vascular surgery (n = 14, VASC). Anti-actin and anti-myosin antibodies were determined on admission and serially during a period of 90 days. Anti-actin and anti-myosin immune response (IgG, IgM) was expressed comparing absorbance of the patients' serum with a reference serum. In the different patient groups significantly (P less than 0.01) higher anti-actin and anti-myosin antibody concentrations were found on admission compared with age-matched control groups. During follow-up, all patient groups except the vascular surgery group showed a significant immune response against actin and myosin, with an immune response ratio (peak/admission) for AMA IgG and IgM respectively of 2.12 and 2.40 in the VALVE group, 1.30 and 1.99 in the CABG group, 1.42 and 1.48 in the AMI group and 1.66 and 1.25 in the MYO group; and for AAA IgG and IgM respectively of 1.57 and 3.00 in the VALVE group, 1.54 and 1.64 in the CABG group, 1.25 and 1.07 in the AMI group, and 1.42 and 1.42 in the MYO group. A significant correlation between pre-cardiac injury and peak post-cardiac injury anti-myosin and anti-actin autoantibody levels could be demonstrated suggesting that pre-injury sensitization to these antigens plays an important role in evoking post-cardiac injury immune response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Deletion of myosin VI causes slow retinal optic neuropathy and age-related macular degeneration (AMD)-relevant retinal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Timm; Gleiser, Corinna; Heiduschka, Peter; Franz, Christoph; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Weisschuh, Nicole; Eske, Gordon; Rohbock, Karin; Rieger, Norman; Paquet-Durand, François; Wissinger, Bernd; Wolfrum, Uwe; Hirt, Bernhard; Singer, Wibke; Rüttiger, Lukas; Zimmermann, Ulrike; Knipper, Marlies

    2015-10-01

    The unconventional myosin VI, a member of the actin-based motor protein family of myosins, is expressed in the retina. Its deletion was previously shown to reduce amplitudes of the a- and b-waves of the electroretinogram. Analyzing wild-type and myosin VI-deficient Snell's Waltzer mice in more detail, the expression pattern of myosin VI in retinal pigment epithelium, outer limiting membrane, and outer plexiform layer could be linked with differential progressing ocular deficits. These encompassed reduced a-waves and b-waves and disturbed oscillatory potentials in the electroretinogram, photoreceptor cell death, retinal microglia infiltration, and formation of basal laminar deposits. A phenotype comprising features of glaucoma (neurodegeneration) and age-related macular degeneration could thus be uncovered that suggests dysfunction of myosin VI and its variable cargo adaptor proteins for membrane sorting and autophagy, as possible candidate mediators for both disease forms.

  12. A heavy load for heavy ions

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 25 September, the two large coils for the dipole magnet of ALICE, the LHC experiment dedicated to heavy ions, arrived at Point 2 on two heavy load trucks after a 1200 km journey from their assembly in Vannes, France.

  13. Heavy hadron decays with conserved heavy flavour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas [Theoretische Physik 1, Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultaet, Universitaet Siegen, Walter-Flex-Strasse 3, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the decays of heavy hadrons where the heavy quark acts as a spectator and the light quark decays in a weak transition. For these s → u or d → u decays we show that the decay rates can be reliably computed.

  14. Inhibition of skeletal muscle S1-myosin ATPase by peroxynitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Teresa; Simão, Sónia; Aureliano, Manuel; Martín-Romero, Francisco Javier; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2006-03-21

    Exposure of myosin subfragment 1 (S1) to 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) produced a time-dependent inhibition of the F-actin-stimulated S1 Mg(2+)-ATPase activity, reaching 50% inhibition with 46.7 +/- 8.3 microM SIN-1 for 8.7 microM S1, that is, at a SIN-1/S1 molar ratio of approximately 5.5. The inhibition was due to the peroxynitrite produced by SIN-1 decomposition because (1) decomposed SIN-1 was found to have no effect on S1 ATPase activity, (2) addition of SIN-1 in the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase fully prevented inhibition by SIN-1, and (3) micromolar pulses of chemically synthesized peroxynitrite produced inhibition of F-actin-stimulated S1 Mg(2+)-ATPase activity. In parallel, SIN-1 produced the inhibition of the nonphysiological Ca(2+)-dependent and K(+)/EDTA-dependent S1 ATPase activity of S1 and, therefore, suggested that the inhibition of F-actin-stimulated S1 Mg(2+)-ATPase activity is produced by the oxidation of highly reactive cysteines of S1 (Cys(707) and Cys(697)), located close to the catalytic center. This point was further confirmed by the titration of S1 cysteines with 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and by the parallel decrease of Cys(707) labeling by 5-(iodoacetamido)fluorescein, and it was reinforced by the fact that other common protein modifications produced by peroxynitrite, for example, protein carbonyl and nitrotyrosine formation, were barely detected at the concentrations of SIN-1 that produced more than 50% inhibition of the F-actin-stimulated S1 Mg(2+)-ATPase activity. Differential scanning calorimetry of S1 (untreated and treated with different SIN-1 concentrations) pointed out that SIN-1, at concentrations that generate micromolar peroxynitrite fluxes, impaired the ability of ADP.V(1) to induce the intermediate catalytic transition state and also produced the partial unfolding of S1 that leads to an enhanced susceptibility of S1 to trypsin digestion, which can be fully protected by 2 mM GSH.

  15. Does Interaction between the Motor and Regulatory Domains of the Myosin Head Occur during ATPase Cycle? Evidence from Thermal Unfolding Studies on Myosin Subfragment 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria S Logvinova

    Full Text Available Myosin head (myosin subfragment 1, S1 consists of two major structural domains, the motor (or catalytic domain and the regulatory domain. Functioning of the myosin head as a molecular motor is believed to involve a rotation of the regulatory domain (lever arm relative to the motor domain during the ATPase cycle. According to predictions, this rotation can be accompanied by an interaction between the motor domain and the C-terminus of the essential light chain (ELC associated with the regulatory domain. To check this assumption, we applied differential scanning calorimetry (DSC combined with temperature dependences of fluorescence to study changes in thermal unfolding and the domain structure of S1, which occur upon formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx that mimic S1 ATPase intermediate states S1**-ADP-Pi and S1*-ATP, respectively. To identify the thermal transitions on the DSC profiles (i.e. to assign them to the structural domains of S1, we compared the DSC data with temperature-induced changes in fluorescence of either tryptophan residues, located only in the motor domain, or recombinant ELC mutants (light chain 1 isoform, which were first fluorescently labeled at different positions in their C-terminal half and then introduced into the S1 regulatory domain. We show that formation of the ternary complexes S1-ADP-AlF4- and S1-ADP-BeFx significantly stabilizes not only the motor domain, but also the regulatory domain of the S1 molecule implying interdomain interaction via ELC. This is consistent with the previously proposed concepts and also adds some new interesting details to the molecular mechanism of the myosin ATPase cycle.

  16. Ryanodine receptor fragmentation and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak after one session of high-intensity interval exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, Nicolas; Ivarsson, Niklas; Venckunas, Tomas; Neyroud, Daria; Brazaitis, Marius; Cheng, Arthur J; Ochala, Julien; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Girard, Sebastien; Volungevičius, Gintautas; Paužas, Henrikas; Mekideche, Abdelhafid; Kayser, Bengt; Martinez-Redondo, Vicente; Ruas, Jorge L; Bruton, Joseph; Truffert, Andre; Lanner, Johanna T; Skurvydas, Albertas; Westerblad, Håkan

    2015-12-15

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient way of improving physical performance in healthy subjects and in patients with common chronic diseases, but less so in elite endurance athletes. The mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of HIIT are uncertain. Here, recreationally active human subjects performed highly demanding HIIT consisting of 30-s bouts of all-out cycling with 4-min rest in between bouts (≤3 min total exercise time). Skeletal muscle biopsies taken 24 h after the HIIT exercise showed an extensive fragmentation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release channel, the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1). The HIIT exercise also caused a prolonged force depression and triggered major changes in the expression of genes related to endurance exercise. Subsequent experiments on elite endurance athletes performing the same HIIT exercise showed no RyR1 fragmentation or prolonged changes in the expression of endurance-related genes. Finally, mechanistic experiments performed on isolated mouse muscles exposed to HIIT-mimicking stimulation showed reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS)-dependent RyR1 fragmentation, calpain activation, increased SR Ca(2+) leak at rest, and depressed force production due to impaired SR Ca(2+) release upon stimulation. In conclusion, HIIT exercise induces a ROS-dependent RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of recreationally active subjects, and the resulting changes in muscle fiber Ca(2+)-handling trigger muscular adaptations. However, the same HIIT exercise does not cause RyR1 fragmentation in muscles of elite endurance athletes, which may explain why HIIT is less effective in this group.

  17. Comparative studies of cardiac and skeletal sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPases. Effect of a phospholamban antibody on enzyme activation by Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantilina, T; Sagara, Y; Inesi, G; Jones, L R

    1993-08-15

    Vesicular fragments of skeletal (LSR) and cardiac (CSR) sarcoplasmic reticulum were compared with the aim of defining the effect of a monoclonal phospholamban (Pl) antibody (Ab). The Pl Ab has no effect on LSR, while enhancing the Ca2+ transport rates of CSR at Ca2+ concentrations below saturation. We found no direct effect of the Pl Ab on Ca2+ binding by the ATPase in the absence of ATP. Equilibrium measurements of Ca2+ binding yield positively cooperative isotherms which are best fit with a two-interacting sites equation. LSR and CSR display nearly identical affinities for Ca2+, and no effect of the Pl Ab is observed. Taking advantage of a stable CrATP-enzyme complex, we demonstrated that the stoichiometric ratio of occluded Ca2+ to catalytic sites is 2 in either LSR or CSR and that the addition of Pl Ab does not affect the Ca2+ concentration dependence of Ca2+ occluded after equilibration of the system. Interestingly, the cooperative interaction between the two Ca2+ sites is lost in the occluded state, with only one of the two sites acquiring lumenal exposure. The concentration dependence of Ca2+ inhibition of CSR ATPase phosphorylation with Pi is also unaffected by the Pl Ab. Contrary to the lack of Pl Ab effect on reactions measured at equilibrium, enhancement of phosphorylated intermediate formation by the Pl Ab is obtained in kinetic experiments in which nonsaturating Ca2+ and ATP are added to CSR preincubated with EGTA. Therefore, Ab binding to Pl reduces specifically the activation energy for a slow transition triggered by Ca2+ binding, with consequent enhancement of overall kinetics under conditions enhancing the rate-limiting contribution of this transition.

  18. Calcium-sensing receptors regulate cardiomyocyte Ca2+ signaling via the sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrion interface during hypoxia/reoxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fang-hao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Communication between the SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum, SR and mitochondria is important for cell survival and apoptosis. The SR supplies Ca2+ directly to mitochondria via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs at close contacts between the two organelles referred to as mitochondrion-associated ER membrane (MAM. Although it has been demonstrated that CaR (calcium sensing receptor activation is involved in intracellular calcium overload during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/Re, the role of CaR activation in the cardiomyocyte apoptotic pathway remains unclear. We postulated that CaR activation plays a role in the regulation of SR-mitochondrial inter-organelle Ca2+ signaling, causing apoptosis during H/Re. To investigate the above hypothesis, cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to H/Re. We examined the distribution of IP3Rs in cardiomyocytes via immunofluorescence and Western blotting and found that type 3 IP3Rs were located in the SR. [Ca2+]i, [Ca2+]m and [Ca2+]SR were determined using Fluo-4, x-rhod-1 and Fluo 5N, respectively, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was detected with JC-1 during reoxygenation using laser confocal microscopy. We found that activation of CaR reduced [Ca2+]SR, increased [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]m and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential during reoxygenation. We found that the activation of CaR caused the cleavage of BAP31, thus generating the pro-apoptotic p20 fragment, which induced the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and the translocation of bak/bax to mitochondria. Taken together, these results reveal that CaR activation causes Ca2+ release from the SR into the mitochondria through IP3Rs and induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  19. Calcium-sensing receptors regulate cardiomyocyte Ca2+ signaling via the sarcoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrion interface during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang-hao; Tian, Zhiliang; Zhang, Wei-hua; Zhao, Ya-jun; Li, Hu-lun; Ren, Huan; Zheng, Hui-shuang; Liu, Chong; Hu, Guang-xia; Tian, Ye; Yang, Bao-feng; Wang, Rui; Xu, Chang-qing

    2010-06-17

    Communication between the SR (sarcoplasmic reticulum, SR) and mitochondria is important for cell survival and apoptosis. The SR supplies Ca2+ directly to mitochondria via inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) at close contacts between the two organelles referred to as mitochondrion-associated ER membrane (MAM). Although it has been demonstrated that CaR (calcium sensing receptor) activation is involved in intracellular calcium overload during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/Re), the role of CaR activation in the cardiomyocyte apoptotic pathway remains unclear. We postulated that CaR activation plays a role in the regulation of SR-mitochondrial inter-organelle Ca2+ signaling, causing apoptosis during H/Re. To investigate the above hypothesis, cultured cardiomyocytes were subjected to H/Re. We examined the distribution of IP3Rs in cardiomyocytes via immunofluorescence and Western blotting and found that type 3 IP3Rs were located in the SR. [Ca2+]i, [Ca2+]m and [Ca2+]SR were determined using Fluo-4, x-rhod-1 and Fluo 5N, respectively, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was detected with JC-1 during reoxygenation using laser confocal microscopy. We found that activation of CaR reduced [Ca2+]SR, increased [Ca2+]i and [Ca2+]m and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential during reoxygenation. We found that the activation of CaR caused the cleavage of BAP31, thus generating the pro-apoptotic p20 fragment, which induced the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria and the translocation of bak/bax to mitochondria. Taken together, these results reveal that CaR activation causes Ca2+ release from the SR into the mitochondria through IP3Rs and induces cardiomyocyte apoptosis during hypoxia/reoxygenation.

  20. Decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content, not myofilament function, contributes to muscle twitch force decline in isolated cardiac trabeculae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Brunello, Lucia; Gyorke, Sándor; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to determine the factors responsible for twitch force decline in isolated intact rat cardiac trabeculae. The contractile force of trabeculae declined over extended periods of isometric twitch contractions. The force-frequency relationship within the frequency range of 4–8 Hz, at 37 °C, became more positive and the frequency optimum shifted to higher rates with this decline in baseline twitch tensions. The post-rest potentiation (37 °C), a phenomenon highly dependent on calcium handling mechanisms, became more pronounced with decrease in twitch tensions. We show that the main abnormality during muscle run-down was not due to a deficit in the myofilaments; maximal tension achieved using a K+ contracture protocol was either unaffected or only slightly decreased. Conversely, the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium content, as assessed by rapid cooling contractures (from 27 °C to 0 °C), decreased, and had a close association with the declining twitch tensions (R2 ~ 0.76). SR Ca2+-ATPase, relative to Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity, was not altered as there was no significant change in paired rapid cooling contracture ratios. Furthermore, confocal microscopy detected no abnormalities in the overall structure of the cardiomyocytes and t-tubules in the cardiac trabeculae (~23 °C). Overall, the data indicates that the primary mechanism responsible for force run-down in multi-cellular cardiac preparations is a decline in the SR calcium content and not the maximal tension generation capability of the myofilaments. PMID:25056841

  1. Phospholamban Modulates the Functional Coupling between Nucleotide Domains in Ca-ATPase Oligomeric Complexes in Cardiac Sarcoplasmic Reticulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L.; Yao, Qing; Soares, Thereza A.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2009-03-24

    Oligomeric interactions between Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains and their modulation by phospholamban (PLB) were measured in native cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) microsomes. Progressive modification of Lys514 with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate (FITC), which physically blocks access to the nucleotide binding site by ATP, demonstrates that Ca-ATPase active sites function independently of one another prior to the phosphorylation of PLB. However, upon PKA-dependent phosphorylation of PLB, a second-order dependence between enzyme activity and the fraction of active sites is observed, consistent with a dimeric functional complex. Complementary distance measurements were made using FITC or 5-iodoacetamido-fluorescein (IAF) bound to Cys674 within the N- or P-domains respectively, to detect structural coupling within oligomeric complexes. Accompanying the phosphorylation of PLB, neighboring Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains exhibit a 4 ± 2 Å decrease in the proximity between FITC sites within the N-domain and a 9 ± 3 Å increase in the proximity between IAF sites within P-domains. Thus, the phosphorylation of PLB induces spatial rearrangements between the N- and P-domain elements of proximal Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains which restore functional interactions between neighboring polypeptide chains and, in turn, result in increased rates of catalytic turnover. These results are interpreted in terms of a structural model, calculated through optimization of shape complementarity, desolvation, and electrostatic energies, which suggests a dimeric arrangement of Ca-ATPase polypeptide chains through the proximal association of N-domains. We suggest that the phosphorylation of PLB acts to release constraints involving interdomain subunit interactions that enhance catalytically important N-domain motions.

  2. Reduced junctional Na+/Ca2+-exchanger activity contributes to sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak in junctophilin-2-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Wang, Qiongling; Munro, Michelle L.; Beavers, David; Ackerman, Michael J.; Soeller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Expression silencing of junctophilin-2 (JPH2) in mouse heart leads to ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2)-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ leak and rapid development of heart failure. The mechanism and physiological significance of JPH2 in regulating RyR2-mediated SR Ca2+ leak remains elusive. We sought to elucidate the role of JPH2 in regulating RyR2-mediated SR Ca2+ release in the setting of cardiac failure. Cardiac myocytes isolated from tamoxifen-inducible conditional knockdown mice of JPH2 (MCM-shJPH2) were subjected to confocal Ca2+ imaging. MCM-shJPH2 cardiomyocytes exhibited an increased spark frequency width with altered spark morphology, which caused increased SR Ca2+ leakage. Single channel studies identified an increased RyR2 open probability in MCM-shJPH2 mice. The increase in spark frequency and width was observed only in MCM-shJPH2 and not found in mice with increased RyR2 open probability with native JPH2 expression. Na+/Ca2+-exchanger (NCX) activity was reduced by 50% in MCM-shJPH2 with no detectable change in NCX expression. Additionally, 50% inhibition of NCX through Cd2+ administration alone was sufficient to increase spark width in myocytes obtained from wild-type mice. Additionally, superresolution analysis of RyR2 and NCX colocalization showed a reduced overlap between RyR2 and NCX in MCM-shJPH2 mice. In conclusion, decreased JPH2 expression causes increased SR Ca2+ leakage by directly increasing open probability of RyR2 and by indirectly reducing junctional NCX activity through increased dyadic cleft Ca2+. This demonstrates two novel and independent cellular mechanisms by which JPH2 regulates RyR2-mediated SR Ca2+ leak and heart failure development. PMID:25193470

  3. Pressure effects on the interactions of the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium transport enzyme with calcium and dinitrophenyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbach, W

    1988-01-01

    The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the calcium-dependent hydrolysis of dinitrophenyl phosphate by the sarcoplasmic calcium transport enzyme has been studied. The magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate complex is the true substrate of the enzyme (K = 7000 M-1) by which it is hydrolyzed at 20 degrees C with a turnover rate of 4 s-1. Activation by calcium ions occurs between 0.1 and 1 microM as observed for ATP hydrolysis. The activation volume of the enzyme saturated with both ligands exhibits pronounced pressure-dependence, rising from 25 ml/mol at atmospheric pressure to 80 ml/mol at 100 MPa. The apparent binding volumes for magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate and calcium are likewise pressure-dependent. The volume changes connected with the binding of magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate is quite small approaching zero at 100 MPa. The apparent binding volume for calcium greatly increases with pressure from 35 ml/mol at atmospheric pressure to 150 ml/mol at 70 MPa. A nearly constant binding volume of approximately 40 ml/mol results if the effect of pressure on the respective rate constants that contribute to the apparent binding constant, is taken into account. The pressure-dependence of enzyme activity at subsaturating calcium concentrations yields an activation volume of 250 ml/mol related to the rate of calcium binding indicating the occurrence of a transient large volume expansion of the enzyme complex. The volume changes observed for the calcium-dependent interaction of the enzyme with magnesium dinitrophenyl phosphate well agree with that found for magnesium p-nitrophenyl phosphate (W. Hasselbach and L. Stephan,Z. Naturforsch. 42 c, 641-652 (1987)) indicating that the found volume changes are intrinsic properties of the transport enzyme, independent of the respective energy donor.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Effects of Mg2+ on Ca2+ handling by the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skinned skeletal and cardiac muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbara, A A; Stephenson, D G

    1994-10-01

    The influence of myoplasmic Mg2+ (0.05-10 mM) on Ca2+ accumulation (net Ca2+ flux) and Ca2+ uptake (pump-driven Ca2+ influx) by the intact sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was studied in skinned fibres from the toad iliofibularis muscle (twitch portion), rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle (fast twitch), rat soleus muscle (slow twitch) and rat cardiac trabeculae. Ca2+ accumulation was optimal between 1 and 3 mM Mg2+ in toad fibres and reached a plateau between 1 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat EDL fibres and between 3 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat cardiac fibres. In soleus fibres, optimal Ca2+ accumulation occurred at 10 mM Mg2+. The same trend was obtained with all preparations at 0.3 and 1 microM Ca2+. Experiments with 2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone, a specific inhibitor of the Ca2+ pump, revealed a marked Ca2+ efflux from the SR of toad iliofibularis fibres in the presence of 0.2 microM Ca2+ and 1 mM Mg2+. Further experiments indicated that the SR Ca2+ leak could be blocked by 10 microM ruthenium red without affecting the SR Ca2+ pump and this allowed separation between SR Ca2+ uptake and SR Ca2+ accumulation. At 0.3 microM Ca2+, Ca2+ uptake was optimal with 1 mM Mg2+ in the toad iliofibularis and rat EDL fibres and between 1 and 10 mM Mg2+ in the rat soleus and trabeculae preparations. At higher [Ca2+] (1 microM), Ca2+ uptake was optimal with 1 mM Mg2+ in the iliofibularis fibres and between 1 and 3 mM Mg2+ in the EDL fibres.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Role of SERCA and the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium content on calcium waves propagation in rat ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Cantú, Ayleen; Pérez-Treviño, Perla; Montalvo-Parra, Dolores; Balderas-Villalobos, Jaime; Gómez-Víquez, Norma L; García, Noemí; Altamirano, Julio

    2016-08-15

    In Ca(2+)-overloaded ventricular myocytes, SERCA is crucial to steadily achieve the critical sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) level to trigger and sustain Ca(2+) waves, that propagate at constant rate (ʋwave). High luminal Ca(2+) sensitizes RyR2, thereby increasing Ca(2+) sparks frequency, and the larger RyR2-mediated SR Ca(2+) flux (dF/dt) sequentially activates adjacent RyR2 clusters. Recently, it was proposed that rapid SERCA Ca(2+) reuptake, ahead of the wave front, further sensitizes RyR2, increasing ʋwave. Nevertheless, this is controversial because rapid cytosolic Ca(2+) removal could instead impair RyR2 activation. We assessed whether rapid SR Ca(2+) uptake enhances ʋwave by changing SERCA activity (ҡDecay) over a large range (∼175%). We used normal (Ctrl) and hyperthyroid rat (HT; reduced phospholamban by ∼80%) myocytes treated with thapsigargin or isoproterenol (ISO). We found that ʋwave and dF/dt had a non-linear dependency with ҡDecay, while Ca(2+) waves amplitude was largely unaffected. Furthermore, SR Ca(2+) also showed a non-linear dependency with ҡDecay, however, the relationships ʋwave vs. SR Ca(2+) and ʋwave vs. dF/dt were linear, suggesting that high steady state SR Ca(2+) determines ʋwave, while rapid SERCA Ca(2+) uptake does not. Finally, ISO did not increase ʋwave in HT cells, therefore, ISO-enhanced ʋwave in Ctrl depended on high SR Ca(2+).

  6. Kinetics of calcium uptake by isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles using flash photolysis of caged adenosine 5'-triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D H; Scarpa, A; Topp, M R; Blasie, J K

    1983-11-08

    The kinetics of ATP-induced Ca2+ uptake by vesicular dispersions of sarcoplasmic reticulum were determined with a time resolution of about 10 ms, depending on the temperature. Ca2+ uptake was initiated by the addition of ATP through the flash photolysis of P3-1-(2-nitrophenyl)-ethyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate utilizing a frequency-doubled ruby laser and measured with two different detector systems that followed the absorbance changes of the metallochromic indicator arsenazo III sensitive to changes in the extravesicular [Ca2+]. The temperature range investigated was -2 to 26 degrees C. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was used to distinguish those features of the Ca2+ uptake kinetics associated with the formation of a transmembrane Ca2+ gradient. The acid-stable phosphorylated enzyme intermediate, E approximately P, was determined independently with a quenched-flow technique. Ca2+ uptake is characterized by at least two phases, a fast initial phase and a slow phase. The fast phase exhibits pseudo-first-order kinetics with a specific rate constant of 64 +/- 10 s-1 at 23-26 degrees C, an activation energy of 16 +/- 1 kcal mol-1, and a delta S* of approximately 5 cal deg-1 mol-1, is insensitive to the presence of a Ca2+ ionophore, and occurs simultaneously with the formation of the phosphorylated enzyme, E approximately P, with a stoichiometry of approximately 2 mol of Ca2+/mol of phosphorylated enzyme intermediate. The slow phase also exhibits pseudo-first-order kinetics with a specific rate constant of 0.60 +/- 0.09 s-1 at 25-26 degrees C, an activation energy of 22 +/- 1 kcal mol-1, and a delta S* of approximately 16 cal deg-1 mol-1, is inhibited by the presence of a Ca2+ ionophore, and has a stoichiometry of approximately 2 mol of Ca2+/mol of ATP hydrolyzed.

  7. Physics of heavy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gluza, J

    1996-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental situation in physics of heavy neutrinos (M_N>M_Z) is briefly presented. Various experimental bounds on heavy neutrino masses and mixings are shortly reviewed. Special attention is paid to possibility of detecting heavy neutrinos in future lepton linear colliders.

  8. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase increases caffeine- and halothane-induced contractures in muscle bundles of malignant hyperthermia susceptible and healthy individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Frank; Müller, Rainer; Hartung, Edmund; Roewer, Norbert; Anetseder, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Background Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is triggered by halogenated anaesthetics and depolarising muscle relaxants, leading to an uncontrolled hypermetabolic state of skeletal muscle. An uncontrolled sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release is mediated via the ryanodine receptor. A compensatory mechanism of increased sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase activity was described in pigs and in transfected cell lines. We hypothesized that inhibition of Ca2+ reuptake via the sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced muscle contractures in MH susceptible more than in non-susceptible skeletal muscle. Methods With informed consent, surplus muscle bundles of 7 MHS (susceptible), 7 MHE (equivocal) and 16 MHN (non-susceptible) classified patients were mounted to an isometric force transducer, electrically stimulated, preloaded and equilibrated. Following 15 min incubation with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) 25 μM, the European MH standard in-vitro-contracture test protocol with caffeine (0.5; 1; 1.5; 2; 3; 4 mM) and halothane (0.11; 0.22; 0.44; 0.66 mM) was performed. Data as median and quartiles; Friedman- and Wilcoxon-test for differences with and without CPA; p muscle bundles did not differ between groups. CPA increased halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures significantly. This increase was more pronounced in MHS and MHE than in MHN muscle bundles. Conclusion Inhibition of the SERCA activity by CPA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures especially in MHS and MHE skeletal muscle and may help for the diagnostic assignment of MH susceptibility. The status of SERCA activity may play a significant but so far unknown role in the genesis of malignant hyperthermia. PMID:15946384

  9. Inhibition of sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase increases caffeine- and halothane-induced contractures in muscle bundles of malignant hyperthermia susceptible and healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roewer Norbert

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant hyperthermia (MH is triggered by halogenated anaesthetics and depolarising muscle relaxants, leading to an uncontrolled hypermetabolic state of skeletal muscle. An uncontrolled sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release is mediated via the ryanodine receptor. A compensatory mechanism of increased sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase activity was described in pigs and in transfected cell lines. We hypothesized that inhibition of Ca2+ reuptake via the sarcoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced muscle contractures in MH susceptible more than in non-susceptible skeletal muscle. Methods With informed consent, surplus muscle bundles of 7 MHS (susceptible, 7 MHE (equivocal and 16 MHN (non-susceptible classified patients were mounted to an isometric force transducer, electrically stimulated, preloaded and equilibrated. Following 15 min incubation with cyclopiazonic acid (CPA 25 μM, the European MH standard in-vitro-contracture test protocol with caffeine (0.5; 1; 1.5; 2; 3; 4 mM and halothane (0.11; 0.22; 0.44; 0.66 mM was performed. Data as median and quartiles; Friedman- and Wilcoxon-test for differences with and without CPA; p Results Initial length, weight, maximum twitch height, predrug resting tension and predrug twitch height of muscle bundles did not differ between groups. CPA increased halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures significantly. This increase was more pronounced in MHS and MHE than in MHN muscle bundles. Conclusion Inhibition of the SERCA activity by CPA enhances halothane- and caffeine-induced contractures especially in MHS and MHE skeletal muscle and may help for the diagnostic assignment of MH susceptibility. The status of SERCA activity may play a significant but so far unknown role in the genesis of malignant hyperthermia.

  10. Functional properties of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes: intracellular Ca2+ handling and the role of sarcoplasmic reticulum in the contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolnikov, Katya; Shilkrut, Mark; Zeevi-Levin, Naama; Gerecht-Nir, Sharon; Amit, Michal; Danon, Asaf; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Binah, Ofer

    2006-02-01

    Since cardiac transplantation is limited by the small availability of donor organs, regeneration of the diseased myocardium by cell transplantation is an attractive therapeutic modality. To determine the compatibility of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) (7 to 55 days old) with the myocardium, we investigated their functional properties regarding intracellular Ca2+ handling and the role of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in the contraction. The functional properties of hESC-CMs were investigated by recording simultaneously [Ca2+]i transients and contractions. Additionally, we performed Western blot analysis of the Ca2+-handling proteins SERCA2, calsequestrin, phospholamban, and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX). Our major findings are, first, that hESC-CMs displayed temporally related [Ca2+]i transients and contractions, negative force-frequency relations, and lack of post-rest potentiation. Second, ryanodine, thapsigargin, and caffeine did not affect the [Ca2+]i transient and contraction, indicating that at this developmental stage, contraction depends on transsarcolemmal Ca2+ influx rather than on sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release. Third, in agreement with the notion that a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current is present in hESC-CMs and contributes to the mechanical function, verapamil completely blocked contraction. Fourth, whereas hESC-CMs expressed SERCA2 and NCX at levels comparable to those of the adult porcine myocardium, calsequestrin and phospholamban were not expressed. Our study shows for the first time that functional properties related to intracellular Ca2+ handling of hESC-CMs differ markedly from the adult myocardium, probably due to immature sarcoplasmic reticulum capacity.

  11. Specific Myosins Control Actin Organization, Cell Morphology, and Migration in Prostate Cancer Cells

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    Katarzyna A. Makowska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the myosin expression profile in prostate cancer cell lines and found that Myo1b, Myo9b, Myo10, and Myo18a were expressed at higher levels in cells with high metastatic potential. Moreover, Myo1b and Myo10 were expressed at higher levels in metastatic tumors. Using an siRNA-based approach, we found that knockdown of each myosin resulted in distinct phenotypes. Myo10 knockdown ablated filopodia and decreased 2D migration speed. Myo18a knockdown increased circumferential non-muscle myosin 2A-associated actin filament arrays in the lamella and reduced directional persistence of 2D migration. Myo9b knockdown increased stress fiber formation, decreased 2D migration speed, and increased directional persistence. Conversely, Myo1b knockdown increased numbers of stress fibers but did not affect 2D migration. In all cases, the cell spread area was increased and 3D migration potential was decreased. Therefore, myosins not only act as molecular motors but also directly influence actin organization and cell morphology, which can contribute to the metastatic phenotype.

  12. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Antonio; Riva, Nilo; Pesca, Mariasabina; Iannaccone, Sandro; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Corbo, Massimo; Previtali, Stefano C; Quattrini, Angelo; Alessio, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS's pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS.

  13. Increased expression of Myosin binding protein H in the skeletal muscle of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients

    KAUST Repository

    Conti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a severe and fatal neurodegenerative disease of still unknown pathogenesis. Recent findings suggest that the skeletal muscle may play an active pathogenetic role. To investigate ALS\\'s pathogenesis and to seek diagnostic markers, we analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies with the differential expression proteomic approach. We studied skeletal muscle biopsies from healthy controls (CN), sporadic ALS (sALS), motor neuropathies (MN) and myopathies (M). Pre-eminently among several differentially expressed proteins, Myosin binding protein H (MyBP-H) expression in ALS samples was anomalously high. MyBP-H is a component of the thick filaments of the skeletal muscle and has strong affinity for myosin, but its function is still unclear. High MyBP-H expression level was associated with abnormal expression of Rho kinase 2 (ROCK2), LIM domain kinase 1 (LIMK1) and cofilin2, that might affect the actin-myosin interaction. We propose that MyBP-H expression level serves, as a putative biomarker in the skeletal muscle, to discriminate ALS from motor neuropathies, and that it signals the onset of dysregulation in actin-myosin interaction; this in turn might contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Invertebrate and vertebrate class III myosins interact with MORN repeat-containing adaptor proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk L Mecklenburg

    Full Text Available In Drosophila photoreceptors, the NINAC-encoded myosin III is found in a complex with a small, MORN-repeat containing, protein Retinophilin (RTP. Expression of these two proteins in other cell types showed NINAC myosin III behavior is altered by RTP. NINAC deletion constructs were used to map the RTP binding site within the proximal tail domain of NINAC. In vertebrates, the RTP ortholog is MORN4. Co-precipitation experiments demonstrated that human MORN4 binds to human myosin IIIA (MYO3A. In COS7 cells, MORN4 and MYO3A, but not MORN4 and MYO3B, co-localize to actin rich filopodia extensions. Deletion analysis mapped the MORN4 binding to the proximal region of the MYO3A tail domain. MYO3A dependent MORN4 tip localization suggests that MYO3A functions as a motor that transports MORN4 to the filopodia tips and MORN4 may enhance MYO3A tip localization by tethering it to the plasma membrane at the protrusion tips. These results establish conserved features of the RTP/MORN4 family: they bind within the tail domain of myosin IIIs to control their behavior.

  15. Drosophila protein kinase N (Pkn) is a negative regulator of actin-myosin activity during oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tânia; Prudêncio, Pedro; Martinho, Rui Gonçalo

    2014-10-15

    Nurse cell dumping is an actin-myosin based process, where 15 nurse cells of a given egg chamber contract and transfer their cytoplasmic content through the ring canals into the growing oocyte. We isolated two mutant alleles of protein kinase N (pkn) and showed that Pkn negatively-regulates activation of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton during the onset of dumping. Using live-cell imaging analysis we observed that nurse cell dumping rates sharply increase during the onset of fast dumping. Such rate increase was severely impaired in pkn mutant nurse cells due to excessive nurse cell actin-myosin activity and/or loss of tissue integrity. Our work demonstrates that the transition between slow and fast dumping is a discrete event, with at least a five to six-fold dumping rate increase. We show that Pkn negatively regulates nurse cell actin-myosin activity. This is likely to be important for directional cytoplasmic flow. We propose Pkn provides a negative feedback loop to help avoid excessive contractility after local activation of Rho GTPase.

  16. Study on the Tripolyphosphatase (TPPase) Property of Bighead Carp (Aristichthys nobilis) Myosin Subfragment-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Myosin subfragment-1 was prepared from the myofibrils of bighead carp (Aristichthys nobilis). The myosin subfragment-1 was proved to have the activity of tripolyphosphatase (TPPase) responding to the hydrolysis of sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP). The optimum temperature and pH for the TPPase of myosin subfragment-1 were 30C and pH 5.0, and at pH 8.0 the TPPase also showed a high activity. Mg2+ was necessary to TPPase. The TPPase activity of myosin subfragment-1 was activated by Mg2+ under low concentrations, but was inhibited when the concentration was over 17 mmolL-1. The TPPase activity was also affected by KCl. The optimum concentration of KCl for TPPase was 0.3molL-1 under the condition of 17mmolL-1 Mg2+. The TPPase activity was significantly inhibited by EDTA-Na2. Reagents such as KBr, KI and KIO3 could inhibit the TPPase effectively. K2Cr2O7 as well as KMnO7 and KNO3 exhibited weak inhibiting effects. The TPPase converted STPP to pyrophosphate (PP) and orthophosphate (Pi) stoichiometrically with a KM of 3.2 mmolL-1.

  17. Review: Ras GTPases and myosin: Qualitative conservation and quantitative diversification in signal and energy transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Matthias P; Goody, Roger S

    2016-08-01

    Most GTPases and many ATPases belong to the P-loop class of proteins with significant structural and mechanistic similarities. Here we compare and contrast the basic properties of the Ras family GTPases and myosin, and conclude that there are fundamental similarities but also distinct differences related to their specific roles. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 422-430, 2016.

  18. Myosin II does not contribute to wound repair in Dictyostelium cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiko Yumura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cells are always subjected to mechanical stresses, resulting in wounds of the cell membrane, but cells are able to repair and reseal their wounded membrane. Previous reports have shown that actin and myosin II accumulate around the wound and that the constriction of this purse-string closes the membrane pore. Here, we developed a microsurgical wound assay to assess wound repair in Dictyostelium cells. Fluorescent dye that had been incorporated into the cells leaked out for only 2–3 sec after wounding, and a GFP-derived, fluorescent Ca2+ sensor showed that intracellular Ca2+ transiently increased immediately after wounding. In the absence of external Ca2+, the cell failed to repair itself. During the repair process, actin accumulated at the wounded sites but myosin II did not. The wounds were repaired even in myosin II null cells to a comparable degree as the wild-type cells, suggesting that myosin II does not contribute to wound repair. Thus, the actomyosin purse-string constriction model is not a common mechanism for wound repair in eukaryotic cells, and this discrepancy may arise from the difference in cell size.

  19. Binding modes of decavanadate to myosin and inhibition of the actomyosin ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiago, Teresa; Martel, Paulo; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos; Aureliano, Manuel

    2007-04-01

    Decavanadate, a vanadate oligomer, is known to interact with myosin and to inhibit the ATPase activity, but the putative binding sites and the mechanism of inhibition are still to be clarified. We have previously proposed that the decavanadate (V(10)O(28)(6-)) inhibition of the actin-stimulated myosin ATPase activity is non-competitive towards both actin and ATP. A likely explanation for these results is that V(10) binds to the so-called back-door at the end of the Pi-tube opposite to the nucleotide-binding site. In order to further investigate this possibility, we have carried out molecular docking simulations of the V(10) oligomer on three different structures of the myosin motor domain of Dictyostelium discoideum, representing distinct states of the ATPase cycle. The results indicate a clear preference of V(10) to bind at the back-door, but only on the "open" structures where there is access to the phosphate binding-loop. It is suggested that V(10) acts as a "back-door stop" blocking the closure of the 50-kDa cleft necessary to carry out ATP-gamma-phosphate hydrolysis. This provides a simple explanation to the non-competitive behavior of V(10) and spurs the use of the oligomer as a tool to elucidate myosin back-door conformational changes in the process of muscle contraction.

  20. Solubilisation of myosin in a solution of low ionic strength L-histidine: Significance of the imidazole ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Zou, Yufeng; Han, Minyi; Pan, Lihua; Xing, Tong; Xu, Xinglian; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-04-01

    Myosin, a major muscle protein, can be solubilised in a low ionic strength solution containing L-histidine (His). To elucidate which chemical constituents in His are responsible for this solubilisation, we investigated the effects of 5mM His, imidazole (Imi), L-α-alanine (Ala), 1-methyl-L-histidine (M-his) and L-carnosine (Car) on particle properties of myosin suspensions and conformational characteristics of soluble myosin at low ionic strength (1 mM KCl, pH 7.5). His, Imi and Car, each containing an imidazole ring, were able to induce a myosin suspension, which had small particle size species and high absolute zeta potential, thus increasing the solubility of myosin. His, Imi and Car affected the tertiary structure and decreased the α-helix content of soluble myosin. Therefore, the imidazole ring of His appeared to be the significant chemical constituent in solubilising myosin at low ionic strength solution, presumably by affecting its secondary structure.

  1. X-ray diffraction from flight muscle with a headless myosin mutation: implications for interpreting reflection patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Trombitás, Károly; Yagi, Naoto; Suggs, Jennifer A.; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2014-01-01

    Fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is one of the most useful animal models to study the causes and effects of hereditary diseases because of its rich genetic resources. It is especially suitable for studying myopathies caused by myosin mutations, because specific mutations can be induced to the flight muscle-specific myosin isoform, while leaving other isoforms intact. Here we describe an X-ray-diffraction-based method to evaluate the structural effects of mutations in contractile proteins in Drosophila indirect flight muscle. Specifically, we describe the effect of the headless myosin mutation, Mhc10-Y97, in which the motor domain of the myosin head is deleted, on the X-ray diffraction pattern. The loss of general integrity of the filament lattice is evident from the pattern. A striking observation, however, is the prominent meridional reflection at d = 14.5 nm, a hallmark for the regularity of the myosin-containing thick filament. This reflection has long been considered to arise mainly from the myosin head, but taking the 6th actin layer line reflection as an internal control, the 14.5-nm reflection is even stronger than that of wild-type muscle. We confirmed these results via electron microscopy, wherein image analysis revealed structures with a similar periodicity. These observations have major implications on the interpretation of myosin-based reflections. PMID:25400584

  2. Motor-motor interactions in ensembles of muscle myosin: using theory to connect single molecule to ensemble measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Sam

    2013-03-01

    Interactions between the proteins actin and myosin drive muscle contraction. Properties of a single myosin interacting with an actin filament are largely known, but a trillion myosins work together in muscle. We are interested in how single-molecule properties relate to ensemble function. Myosin's reaction rates depend on force, so ensemble models keep track of both molecular state and force on each molecule. These models make subtle predictions, e.g. that myosin, when part of an ensemble, moves actin faster than when isolated. This acceleration arises because forces between molecules speed reaction kinetics. Experiments support this prediction and allow parameter estimates. A model based on this analysis describes experiments from single molecule to ensemble. In vivo, actin is regulated by proteins that, when present, cause the binding of one myosin to speed the binding of its neighbors; binding becomes cooperative. Although such interactions preclude the mean field approximation, a set of linear ODEs describes these ensembles under simplified experimental conditions. In these experiments cooperativity is strong, with the binding of one molecule affecting ten neighbors on either side. We progress toward a description of myosin ensembles under physiological conditions.

  3. Size and speed of the working stroke of cardiac myosin in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caremani, Marco; Pinzauti, Francesca; Reconditi, Massimo; Piazzesi, Gabriella; Stienen, Ger J M; Lombardi, Vincenzo; Linari, Marco

    2016-03-29

    The power in the myocardium sarcomere is generated by two bipolar arrays of the motor protein cardiac myosin II extending from the thick filament and pulling the thin, actin-containing filaments from the opposite sides of the sarcomere. Despite the interest in the definition of myosin-based cardiomyopathies, no study has yet been able to determine the mechanokinetic properties of this motor protein in situ. Sarcomere-level mechanics recorded by a striation follower is used in electrically stimulated intact ventricular trabeculae from the rat heart to determine the isotonic velocity transient following a stepwise reduction in force from the isometric peak force TP to a value T(0.8-0.2 TP). The size and the speed of the early rapid shortening (the isotonic working stroke) increase by reducing T from ∼3 nm per half-sarcomere (hs) and 1,000 s(-1) at high load to ∼8 nm⋅hs(-1) and 6,000 s(-1) at low load. Increases in sarcomere length (1.9-2.2 μm) and external [Ca(2+)]o (1-2.5 mM), which produce an increase of TP, do not affect the dependence on T, normalized for TP, of the size and speed of the working stroke. Thus, length- and Ca(2+)-dependent increase of TP and power in the heart can solely be explained by modulation of the number of myosin motors, an emergent property of their array arrangement. The motor working stroke is similar to that of skeletal muscle myosin, whereas its speed is about three times slower. A new powerful tool for investigations and therapies of myosin-based cardiomyopathies is now within our reach.

  4. Actin and nuclear myosin Ⅰ are associated with RNAP Ⅱ and function in gene transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU XiaoJuan; HUANG BaiQu; WANG XingZhi; HAO Shui; ZENG XianLu

    2007-01-01

    The presence of actin in the nucleus as well as its functions in various nuclear processes has been made clear in the past few years. Actin is known to be a part of chromatin-remodeling complexes BAF,which are required for maximal ATPase activity of the Brg1 component of the BAF complex. Moreover,the essential roles of acfin in transcription mediated by RNA polymerases Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ have been demonstrated recently. On the other hand, a myosin Ⅰ isoform, which contains a unique NH2-terminal extension for nucleus localization, has been specifically localized in nucleus. As is well known, myosin Ⅰis an actin-binding protein and plays an important role in various cellular activities. Though actin and nuclear myosin Ⅰ (NM Ⅰ) have been implicated to play distinct roles in gene expression, there has been no evidence for the actin-myosin interaction that might be involved in gene transcription mediated by RNA polymerase Ⅱ (RNAP Ⅱ). Here we show evidence that both actin and NM Ⅰ are associated with RNAP Ⅱ in nucleus by using co-localization and co-IP assays, and they may act together on gene transcription.The antibodies against β-actin or NM Ⅰ can block RNA synthesis in a eukaryotic in vitro transcription system with template DNA comprising the promoter and the coding region of human autocrine motility factor receptor (hAMFR) gene; the antibodies pre-adsorbed with purified actin and NM Ⅰ have no effect in transcriptional inhibition, indicating that the inhibition of transcription by anti-actin and anti-NM Ⅰ is specific. These results suggest a direct involvement of actin-myosin complexes in regulating transcription. It also implicates that actin and NM Ⅰ may co-exist in a same complex with RNAP Ⅱ and the interaction of RNAP Ⅱ with actin and NM Ⅰ functions in the RNAP Ⅱ-mediated transcription.

  5. Myosin VIIA, important for human auditory function, is necessary for Drosophila auditory organ development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokol V Todi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myosin VIIA (MyoVIIA is an unconventional myosin necessary for vertebrate audition [1]-[5]. Human auditory transduction occurs in sensory hair cells with a staircase-like arrangement of apical protrusions called stereocilia. In these hair cells, MyoVIIA maintains stereocilia organization [6]. Severe mutations in the Drosophila MyoVIIA orthologue, crinkled (ck, are semi-lethal [7] and lead to deafness by disrupting antennal auditory organ (Johnston's Organ, JO organization [8]. ck/MyoVIIA mutations result in apical detachment of auditory transduction units (scolopidia from the cuticle that transmits antennal vibrations as mechanical stimuli to JO. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using flies expressing GFP-tagged NompA, a protein required for auditory organ organization in Drosophila, we examined the role of ck/MyoVIIA in JO development and maintenance through confocal microscopy and extracellular electrophysiology. Here we show that ck/MyoVIIA is necessary early in the developing antenna for initial apical attachment of the scolopidia to the articulating joint. ck/MyoVIIA is also necessary to maintain scolopidial attachment throughout adulthood. Moreover, in the adult JO, ck/MyoVIIA genetically interacts with the non-muscle myosin II (through its regulatory light chain protein and the myosin binding subunit of myosin II phosphatase. Such genetic interactions have not previously been observed in scolopidia. These factors are therefore candidates for modulating MyoVIIA activity in vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that MyoVIIA plays evolutionarily conserved roles in auditory organ development and maintenance in invertebrates and vertebrates, enhancing our understanding of auditory organ development and function, as well as providing significant clues for future research.

  6. Modulating myosin restores muscle function in a mouse model of nemaline myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Johan; Levy, Yotam; Pati-Alam, Alisha; Hardeman, Edna C; Gregorevic, Paul; Ochala, Julien

    2016-02-17

    Nemaline myopathy, one of the most common congenital myopathies is associated with mutations in various genes including ACTA1. This disease is also characterised by various forms/degrees of muscle weakness with most cases being severe and resulting in death in infancy. Recent findings have provided valuable insight into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Mutations in ACTA1 directly disrupt binding interactions between actin and myosin, and consequently the intrinsic force-generating capacity of muscle fibres. ACTA1 mutations are also associated with variations in myofibre size, the mechanisms of which have been unclear. In the present study, we sought to test the hypotheses that the compromised functional and morphological attributes of skeletal muscles bearing ACTA1 mutations (i) would directly be due to the inefficient actomyosin complex, and (ii) could be restored by manipulating myosin expression. We used a knock-in mouse model expressing the ACTA1 His40Tyr actin mutation found in human patients. We then performed in vivo intramuscular injections of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors harbouring a myosin transgene known to facilitate muscle contraction. We observed that in presence of the transgene, the intrinsic force-generating capacity was restored and myofibre size was normal. This demonstrates a direct link between disrupted attachment of myosin molecules to actin monomers and muscle fibre atrophy. These data also suggest that further therapeutic interventions should primarily target myosin dysfunction to alleviate the pathology of ACTA1-related nemaline myopathy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  7. Regulation of jaw-specific isoforms of myosin-binding protein-C and tropomyosin in regenerating cat temporalis muscle innervated by limb fast and slow motor nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Lucia H D; Hoh, Joseph F Y

    2010-11-01

    Cat jaw-closing muscles are a distinct muscle allotype characterized by the expression of masticatory-specific myofibrillar proteins. Transplantation studies showed that expression of masticatory myosin heavy chain (m-MyHC) is promoted by fast motor nerves, but suppressed by slow motor nerves. We investigated whether masticatory myosin-binding protein-C (m-MBP-C) and masticatory tropomyosin (m-Tm) are similarly regulated. Temporalis muscle strips were transplanted into limb muscle beds to allow innervation by fast or slow muscle nerve during regeneration. Regenerated muscles were examined postoperatively up to 168 days by peroxidase IHC using monoclonal antibodies to m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm. Regenerates in both muscle beds expressed fetal and slow MyHCs, m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm during the first 4 weeks. Longer-term regenerates innervated by fast nerve suppressed fetal and slow MyHCs, retaining m-MyHC, m-MBP-C, and m-Tm, whereas fibers innervated by slow nerve suppressed fetal MyHCs and the three masticatory-specific proteins, induced slow MyHC, and showed immunohistochemical characteristics of jaw-slow fibers. We concluded that expression of m-MBP-C and m-Tm is coregulated by m-MyHC and that neural impulses to limb slow muscle are capable of suppressing masticatory-specific proteins and to channel gene expression along the jaw-slow phenotype unique to jaw-closing muscle.

  8. Chemical-genetic inhibition of a sensitized mutant myosin Vb demonstrates a role in peripheral-pericentriolar membrane traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provance, D William; Gourley, Christopher R; Silan, Colleen M; Cameron, L C; Shokat, Kevan M; Goldenring, James R; Shah, Kavita; Gillespie, Peter G; Mercer, John A

    2004-02-17

    Selective, in situ inhibition of individual unconventional myosins is a powerful approach to determine their specific physiological functions. Here, we report the engineering of a myosin Vb mutant that still hydrolyzes ATP, yet is selectively sensitized to an N(6)-substituted ADP analog that inhibits its activity, causing it to remain tightly bound to actin. Inhibition of the sensitized mutant causes inhibition of accumulation of transferrin in the cytoplasm and increases levels of plasma-membrane transferrin receptor, suggesting that myosin Vb functions in traffic between peripheral and pericentrosomal compartments.

  9. Conducting and voltage-dependent behaviors of potassium ion channels reconstituted from diaphragm sarcoplasmic reticulum: comparison with the cardiac isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher, M; Decrouy, A; Rousseau, E

    1996-02-21

    Sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) K+ channels from canine diaphragm were studied upon fusion of longitudinal and junctional membrane vesicles into planar lipid bilayers (PLB). The large-conductance cation selective channel (gamma(max) = 250 pS; Km = 33 mM) displays long-lasting open events which are much more frequent at positive than at negative voltages. A major subconducting state about 45% of the fully-open state current amplitude was occasionally observed at all voltages. The voltage-dependence of the open probability displays a sigmoid relationship that was fitted by the Boltzmann equation and expressed in terms of thermodynamic parameters, namely the free energy (delta Gi) and the effective gating charge (Zs): delta Gi = 0.27 kcal/mol and Zs = -1.19 in 250 mM potassium gluconate (K-gluconate). Kinetic analyses also confirmed the voltage-dependent gating behavior of this channel, and indicate the implication of at least two open and three closed states. The diaphragm SR K+ channel shares several biophysical properties with the cardiac isoform: g = 180 pS, delta Gi = 0.75 kcal/mol, Zs = -1.45 in 150 mM K-gluconate, and a similar sigmoid P(o)/voltage relationship. Little is known about the regulation of the diaphragm and cardiac SR K+ channels. The conductance and gating of these channels were not influenced by physiological concentrations of Ca2+ (0.1 microM-1 mM) or Mg2+ (0.25-1 mM), as well as by cGMP (25-100 microM), lemakalim (1-100 microM), glyburide (up to 10 microM) or charybdotoxin (45-200 nM), added either to the cis or to the trans chamber. The apparent lack of biochemical or pharmacological modulation of these channels implies that they are not related to any of the well characterized surface membrane K+ channels. On the other hand, their voltage sensitivity strongly suggests that their activity could be modulated by putative changes in SR membrane potential that might occur during calcium fluxes.

  10. Interaction of phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylserine with the Ca2+-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mechanism of inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, K A; East, J M; Mall, S; Oliver, S; Starling, A P; Lee, A G

    1998-02-01

    The sarcoplasmic reticulum of skeletal muscle contains anionic phospholipids as well as the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Here we study the effects of anionic phospholipids on the activity of the Ca2+-ATPase purified from the membrane. Reconstitution of the Ca2+-ATPase into dioleoylphosphatidylserine [di(C18:1)PS] or dioleoylphosphatidic acid [di(C18:1)PA] leads to a decrease in ATPase activity. Measurements of the quenching of the tryptophan fluorescence of the ATPase by brominated phospholipids give a relative binding constant for the anionic lipids compared with dioleoylphosphatidylcholine close to 1 and suggest that phosphatidic acid only binds to the ATPase at the bulk lipid sites around the ATPase. Addition of di(C18:1)PS or di(C18:1)PA to the ATPase in the short-chain dimyristoleoylphosphatidylcholine [di(C14:1)PC] reverse the effects of the short-chain lipid on ATPase activity and on Ca2+ binding, as revealed by the response of tryptophan fluorescence intensity to Ca2+ binding. It is concluded that the lipid headgroup and lipid fatty acyl chains have separate effects on the function of the ATPase. The anionic phospholipids have no significant effect on Ca2+ binding to the ATPase; the level of Ca2+ binding to the ATPase, the affinity of binding and the rate of dissociation of Ca2+ are unchanged by reconstitution into di(C18:1)PA. The major effect of the anionic lipids is a reduction in the maximal level of binding of MgATP. This is attributed to the formation of oligomers of the Ca2+-ATPase, in which only one molecule of the ATPase can bind MgATP dimers in di(C18:1)PS and trimers or tetramers in di(C18:1)PA. The rates of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for the proportion of the ATPase still able to bind ATP are unaffected by reconstitution. Larger changes were observed in the level of phosphorylation of the ATPase by Pi, which became very low in the anionic phospholipids. The fluorescence response to Mg2+ for the ATPase

  11. Sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release compared in slow-twitch and fast-twitch fibres of mouse muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, S M; Hollingworth, S

    2003-08-15

    Experiments were carried out to compare the amplitude and time course of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in intact slow-twitch and fast-twitch mouse fibres. Individual fibres within small bundles were injected with furaptra, a low-affinity, rapidly responding Ca2+ indicator. In response to a single action potential at 16 degrees C, the peak amplitude and half-duration of the change in myoplasmic free [Ca2+] (Delta[Ca2+]) differed significantly between fibre types (slow-twitch: peak amplitude, 9.4 +/- 1.0 microM (mean +/- S.E.M.); half-duration, 7.7 +/- 0.6 ms; fast-twitch: peak amplitude 18.5 +/- 0.5 microM; half-duration, 4.9 +/- 0.3 ms). SR Ca2+ release was estimated from Delta[Ca2+] with a computational model that calculated Ca2+ binding to the major myoplasmic Ca2+ buffers (troponin, ATP and parvalbumin); buffer concentrations and reaction rate constants were adjusted to reflect fibre-type differences. In response to an action potential, the total concentration of released Ca2+ (Delta[CaT]) and the peak rate of Ca2+ release ((d/dt)Delta[CaT]) differed about 3-fold between the fibre types (slow-twitch: Delta[CaT], 127 +/- 7 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 70 +/- 6 microM ms-1; fast-twitch: Delta[CaT], 346 +/- 6 microM; (d/dt)Delta[CaT], 212 +/- 4 microM ms-1). In contrast, the half-duration of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] was very similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 1.8 +/- 0.1 ms; fast-twitch, 1.6 +/- 0.0 ms). When fibres were stimulated with a 5-shock train at 67 Hz, the peaks of (d/dt)Delta[CaT] in response to the second and subsequent shocks were much smaller than that due to the first shock; the later peaks, expressed as a fraction of the amplitude of the first peak, were similar in the two fibre types (slow-twitch, 0.2-0.3; fast-twitch, 0.1-0.3). The results support the conclusion that individual SR Ca2+ release units function similarly in slow-twitch and fast-twitch mammalian fibres.

  12. Phosphorylation of anchoring protein by calmodulin protein kinase associated to the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rabbit fast-twitch muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, E; Sacchetto, R; Margreth, A

    2000-12-09

    Regulatory phosphorylation of phospholamban and of SR Ca(2+)-ATPase SERCA2a isoform by endogenous CaM-K II in slow-twitch skeletal and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is well documented, but much less is known of the exact functional role of CaM K II in fast-twitch muscle SR. Recently, it was shown that RNA splicing of brain-specific alpha CaM K II, gives rise to a truncated protein (alpha KAP), consisting mainly of the association domain, serving to anchor CaM K II to SR membrane in rat skeletal muscle [Bayer, K.-U., et al. (1998) EMBO J. 19, 5598-5605]. In the present study, we searched for the presence of alpha KAP in sucrose-density purified SR membrane fractions from representative fast-twitch and slow-twitch limb muscles, both of the rabbit and the rat, using immunoblot techniques and antibody directed against the association domain of alpha CaM K II. Putative alpha KAP was immunodetected as a 23-kDa electrophoretic component on SDS-PAGE of the isolated SR from fast-twitch but not from slow-twitch muscle, and was further identified as a specific substrate of endogenous CaM K II, in the rabbit. Immunodetected, (32)P-labeled, non-calmodulin binding protein, behaved as a single 23-kDa protein species under several electrophoretic conditions. The 23-kDa protein, with defined properties, was isolated as a complex with 60-kDa delta CaM K II isoform, by sucrose-density sedimentation analysis. Moreover, we show here that putative alphaKAP, in spite of its inability to bind CaM in ligand blot overlay, co-eluted with delta CaM K II from CaM-affinity columns. That raises the question of whether CaM K II-mediated phosphorylation of alpha KAP and triadin together might be involved in a molecular signaling pathway important for SR Ca(2+)-release in fast-twitch muscle SR.

  13. Effect of saponin treatment on the sarcoplasmic reticulum of rat, cane toad and crustacean (yabby) skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launikonis, B S; Stephenson, D G

    1997-10-15

    1. Mechanically skinned fibres from skeletal muscles of the rat, toad and yabby were used to investigate the effect of saponin treatment on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ loading properties. The SR was loaded submaximally under control conditions before and after treatment with saponin and SR Ca2+ was released with caffeine. 2. Treatment with 10 micrograms ml-1 saponin greatly reduced the SR Ca2+ loading ability of skinned fibres from the extensor digitorum longus muscle of the rat with a rate constant of 0.24 min-1. Saponin concentrations up to 150 micrograms ml-1 and increased exposure time up to 30 min did not further reduce the SR Ca2+ loading ability of the SR, which indicates that the inhibitory action of 10-150 micrograms ml-1 saponin is not dose dependent. The effect of saponin was also not dependent on the state of polarization of the transverse-tubular system. 3. Treatment with saponin at concentrations up to 100 micrograms ml-1 for 30 min did not affect the Ca2+ loading ability of SR in skinned skeletal muscle fibres from the twitch portion of the toad iliofibularis muscle but SR Ca2+ loading ability decreased markedly with a time constant of 0.22 min-1 in the presence of 150 micrograms ml-1 saponin. 4. The saponin dependent increase in permeability could be reversed in both rat and toad fibres by short treatment with 6 microM Ruthenium Red, a potent SR Ca2+ channel blocker, suggesting that saponin does affect the SR Ca2+ channel properties in mammalian and anuran skeletal muscle. 5. Treatment of skinned fibres of long sarcomere length (> 6 microns) from the claw muscle of the yabby (a freshwater decapod crustacean) with 10 micrograms ml-1 saponin for 30 min abolished the ability of the SR to load Ca2+, indicating that saponin affects differently the SR from skeletal muscles of mammals, anurans and crustaceans. 6. It is concluded that at relatively low concentrations, saponin causes inhibition of the skeletal SR Ca2+ loading ability in a species

  14. Comparison of the kinetics of calcium transport in vesicular dispersions and oriented multilayers of isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D H; Scarpa, A; Trentham, D R; Topp, M R; Blasie, J K

    1983-12-01

    Knowledge of the functional properties of the protein in oriented multilayers, in addition to vesicular dispersions, of membranes such as the isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), extends the variety of techniques that can be effectively used in studies of the membrane protein's structure or structural changes associated with its function. One technique requiring the use of oriented multilayers to provide more direct time-averaged and time-resolved structural investigations of the SR membrane is x-ray diffraction. Therefore, the kinetics of ATP-induced calcium uptake by isolated SR vesicles in dispersions and hydrated, oriented multilayers were compared. Ca2+ uptake was necessarily initiated by the addition of ATP through flash photolysis of caged ATP, P3-1-(2-nitro)phenylethyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate, with either a frequency-doubled ruby laser or a 200 W Hg arc lamp, and measured with two different detector systems that followed the absorbance changes of the metallochromic indicator arsenazo III, which is sensitive to changes in the extravesicular [Ca2+]. The temperature range investigated was -2 degrees to 26 degrees C. The Ca2+ uptake kinetics of SR membranes in both the vesicular dispersions and oriented multilayers consist of at least two phases, an initial fast phase and a subsequent slow phase. The fast phase, generally believed to be associated with the formation of the phosphorylated enzyme, E approximately P, is kinetically comparable in both SR dispersions and multilayers. The slow phase mathematically follows first-order kinetics with specific rate constants of approximately 0.6 s-1 and approximately 1.2 s-1 for the dispersions at 26 degrees C and multilayers at 21 degrees C, respectively, with the given experimental conditions. The slow phase, generally believed to be associated with the translocation of Ca+2, across the membrane profile, appears to be the same process in SR dispersions and multilayers through their virtually identical rate constants

  15. Cooperation between the two heads of smooth muscle myosin is essential for full activation of the motor function by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rong-Na; Mabuchi, Katsuhide; Li, Jing; Lu, Zekuan; Wang, Chih-Lueh Albert; Li, Xiang-dong

    2013-09-10

    The motor function of smooth muscle myosin (SmM) is regulated by phosphorylation of the regulatory light chain (RLC) bound to the neck region of the SmM heavy chain. It is generally accepted that unphosphorylated RLC induces interactions between the two heads and between the head and the tail, thus inhibiting the motor activity of SmM, whereas phosphorylation of RLC interrupts those interactions, thus reversing the inhibition and restoring the motor activity to the maximal value. One assumption of this model is that single-headed SmM is fully active regardless of phosphorylation. To re-evaluate this model, we produced a number of SmM constructs with coiled coils of various lengths and examined their structure and regulation. With these constructs we identified the segment in the coiled-coil key for the formation of a stable double-headed structure. In agreement with the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of unphosphorylated SmM increased with shortening of the coiled-coil. However, contrary to the current model, we found that the actin-activated ATPase activity of phosphorylated SmM decreased with shortening coiled-coil and only the stable double-headed SmM was fully activated by phosphorylation. These results indicate that single-headed SmM is neither fully active nor fully inhibited. Based on our findings, we propose that cooperation between the two heads is essential, not only for the inhibition of unphosphorylated SmM, but also for the activation of phosphorylated SmM.

  16. Soil heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherameti, Irena [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik und Pflanzenphysiologie; Varma, Ajit (eds.) [Amity Univ., Uttar Pradesh (India). Amity Inst. of Microbial Technology; Amity Science, Technology and Innovation Foundation, Noida, UP (India)

    2010-07-01

    Human activities have dramatically changed the composition and organisation of soils. Industrial and urban wastes, agricultural application and also mining activities resulted in an increased concentration of heavy metals in soils. How plants and soil microorganisms cope with this situation and the sophisticated techniques developed for survival in contaminated soils is discussed in this volume. The topics presented include: the general role of heavy metals in biological soil systems; the relation of inorganic and organic pollutions; heavy metal, salt tolerance and combined effects with salinity; effects on abuscular mycorrhizal and on saprophytic soil fungi; heavy metal resistance by streptomycetes; trace element determination of environmental samples; the use of microbiological communities as indicators; phytostabilization of lead polluted sites by native plants; effects of soil earthworms on removal of heavy metals and the remediation of heavy metal contaminated tropical land. (orig.)

  17. Genotype phenotype correlations of cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain mutations in Indian patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Ahmad, Shamim; Bahl, Ajay;

    2009-01-01

    consecutive patients diagnosed with HCM or DCM (69 with HCM and 61 with DCM) attending the cardiology clinic of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research were screened for mutations in the MYH7 gene. The control group for genetic studies consisted of 100 healthy subjects. We report 14...

  18. Recombinant growth hormone enhances muscle myosin heavy-chain mRNA accumulation and amino acid accrual in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Y; M. Rosenbaum; Tracey, K J; Raman, G.; Hesse, D G; Matthews, D. E.; Leibel, R. L.; Gertner, J M; Fischman, D. A.; Lowry, S F

    1989-01-01

    A potentially lethal complication of trauma, malignancy, and infection is a progressive erosion of muscle protein mass that is not readily reversed by nutritional support. Growth hormone is capable of improving total body nitrogen balance, but its role in myofibrillar protein synthesis in humans is unknown. The acute, in situ muscle protein response to an infusion of methionyl human growth hormone was investigated in the limbs of nutritionally depleted subjects during a period of intravenous ...

  19. Effects of increased occlusal vertical dimension on daily activity and myosin heavy chain composition in rat jaw muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohnuki, Y.; Kawai, N.; Tanaka, E.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Tanne, K.; Saeki, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles change their contractile-protein phenotype in response to mechanical loading and/or chronic electrical stimulation, implying that the phenotypic changes in masticatory muscles might result from new masticatory-loading conditions. To analyze the effects of increased occlusa

  20. Heavy quark masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  1. Production of heavy water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Larry S.; Brown, Sam W.; Phillips, Michael R.

    2017-06-06

    Disclosed are methods and apparatuses for producing heavy water. In one embodiment, a catalyst is treated with high purity air or a mixture of gaseous nitrogen and oxygen with gaseous deuterium all together flowing over the catalyst to produce the heavy water. In an alternate embodiment, the deuterium is combusted to form the heavy water. In an alternate embodiment, gaseous deuterium and gaseous oxygen is flowed into a fuel cell to produce the heavy water. In various embodiments, the deuterium may be produced by a thermal decomposition and distillation process that involves heating solid lithium deuteride to form liquid lithium deuteride and then extracting the gaseous deuterium from the liquid lithium deuteride.

  2. Myosins 1 and 6, myosin light chain kinase, actin and microtubules cooperate during antibody-mediated internalisation and trafficking of membrane-expressed viral antigens in feline infectious peritonitis virus infected monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewerchin, Hannah L; Desmarets, Lowiese M; Noppe, Ytse; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-02-12

    Monocytes infected with feline infectious peritonitis virus, a coronavirus, express viral proteins in their plasma membranes. Upon binding of antibodies, these proteins are quickly internalised through a new clathrin- and caveolae-independent internalisation pathway. By doing so, the infected monocytes can escape antibody-dependent cell lysis. In the present study, we investigated which kinases and cytoskeletal proteins are of importance during internalisation and subsequent intracellular transport. The experiments showed that myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin 1 are crucial for the initiation of the internalisation. With co-localisation stainings, it was found that MLCK and myosin 1 co-localise with antigens even before internalisation started. Myosin 6 co-localised with the internalising complexes during passage through the cortical actin, were it might play a role in moving or disintegrating actin filaments, to overcome the actin barrier. One minute after internalisation started, vesicles had passed the cortical actin, co-localised with microtubules and association with myosin 6 was lost. The vesicles were further transported over the microtubules and accumulated at the microtubule organising centre after 10 to 30 min. Intracellular trafficking over microtubules was mediated by MLCK, myosin 1 and a small actin tail. Since inhibiting MLCK with ML-7 was so efficient in blocking the internalisation pathway, this target can be used for the development of a new treatment for FIPV.

  3. Changes in proteins during the ripening of Spanish dried beef 'Cecin