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Sample records for sarcopenia age-related loss

  1. Sarcopenia and Age-Related Endocrine Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunihiro Sakuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle, is characterized by a deterioration of muscle quantity and quality leading to a gradual slowing of movement, a decline in strength and power, and an increased risk of fall-related injuries. Since sarcopenia is largely attributed to various molecular mediators affecting fiber size, mitochondrial homeostasis, and apoptosis, numerous targets exist for drug discovery. In this paper, we summarize the current understanding of the endocrine contribution to sarcopenia and provide an update on hormonal intervention to try to improve endocrine defects. Myostatin inhibition seems to be the most interesting strategy for attenuating sarcopenia other than resistance training with amino acid supplementation. Testosterone supplementation in large amounts and at low frequency improves muscle defects with aging but has several side effects. Although IGF-I is a potent regulator of muscle mass, its therapeutic use has not had a positive effect probably due to local IGF-I resistance. Treatment with ghrelin may ameliorate the muscle atrophy elicited by age-dependent decreases in growth hormone. Ghrelin is an interesting candidate because it is orally active, avoiding the need for injections. A more comprehensive knowledge of vitamin-D-related mechanisms is needed to utilize this nutrient to prevent sarcopenia.

  2. Models of accelerated sarcopenia: critical pieces for solving the puzzle of age-related muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas W; Anton, Stephen D; Judge, Andrew R; Marzetti, Emanuele; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E; Carter, Christy S; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M

    2010-10-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass, is a significant public health concern that continues to grow in relevance as the population ages. Certain conditions have the strong potential to coincide with sarcopenia to accelerate the progression of muscle atrophy in older adults. Among these conditions are co-morbid diseases common to older individuals such as cancer, kidney disease, diabetes, and peripheral artery disease. Furthermore, behaviors such as poor nutrition and physical inactivity are well-known to contribute to sarcopenia development. However, we argue that these behaviors are not inherent to the development of sarcopenia but rather accelerate its progression. In the present review, we discuss how these factors affect systemic and cellular mechanisms that contribute to skeletal muscle atrophy. In addition, we describe gaps in the literature concerning the role of these factors in accelerating sarcopenia progression. Elucidating biochemical pathways related to accelerated muscle atrophy may allow for improved discovery of therapeutic treatments related to sarcopenia.

  3. Mitochondrial theory of aging in human age-related sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Gianni; De Lisio, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Understanding age-related sarcopenia and, more importantly, devising counterstrategies require an intimate knowledge of the underlying mechanism(s) of sarcopenia. The mitochondrial theory of aging (MTA) has been a leading theory on aging for the last decade; however, there is relatively little information from human tissue to support or rebut the involvement of the MTA in aging skeletal muscle. It is believed that mitochondria may contribute to sarcopenia in a stochastic fashion where regions of fibers containing dysfunctional mitochondria are forced to atrophy. Resistance exercise, a known hypertrophic stimulus, has been shown to improve the mitochondrial phenotype of aged skeletal muscle. Furthermore, activation of skeletal muscle stem cells by resistance exercise may attenuate sarcopenia in two ways. First by inducing nuclear addition to postmitotic fibers, and, second, by increasing the proportion of functional mitochondria donated by muscle stem cells in a process termed 'gene shifting'. In this chapter we review the evidence supporting the MTA, the potential to attenuate the MTA with a known hypertrophic stimuli and explore the role of muscle stem cells in gene shifting to determine the connection between mitochondrial dysfunction and age-related sarcopenia. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Models of Accelerated Sarcopenia: Critical Pieces for Solving the Puzzle of Age-Related Muscle Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas W.; Anton, Stephen D.; Judge, Andrew R.; Marzetti, Emanuele; Wohlgemuth, Stephanie E; Carter, Christy S.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Pahor, Marco; Manini, Todd M.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass, is a significant public health concern that continues to grow in relevance as the population ages. Certain conditions have the strong potential to coincide with sarcopenia to accelerate the progression of muscle atrophy in older adults. Among these conditions are co-morbid diseases common to older individuals such as cancer, kidney disease, diabetes, and peripheral artery disease. Furthermore, behaviors such as poor nutrition and physical inactivity are well-known to contribute to sarcopenia development. However, we argue that these behaviors are not inherent to the development of sarcopenia but rather accelerate its progression. In the present review, we discuss how these factors affect systemic and cellular mechanisms that contribute to skeletal muscle atrophy. In addition, we describe gaps in the literature concerning the role of these factors in accelerating sarcopenia progression. Elucidating biochemical pathways related to accelerated muscle atrophy may allow for improved discovery of therapeutic treatments related to sarcopenia. PMID:20438881

  5. The impact of sleep on age-related sarcopenia: Possible connections and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovezan, Ronaldo D; Abucham, Julio; Dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Mello, Marco Tulio; Tufik, Sergio; Poyares, Dalva

    2015-09-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric condition that comprises declined skeletal muscle mass, strength and function, leading to the risk of multiple adverse outcomes, including death. Its pathophysiology involves neuroendocrine and inflammatory factors, unfavorable nutritional habits and low physical activity. Sleep may play a role in muscle protein metabolism, although this hypothesis has not been studied extensively. Reductions in duration and quality of sleep and increases in prevalence of circadian rhythm and sleep disorders with age favor proteolysis, modify body composition and increase the risk of insulin resistance, all of which have been associated with sarcopenia. Data on the effects of age-related slow-wave sleep decline, circadian rhythm disruptions and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA), hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG), somatotropic axes, and glucose metabolism indicate that sleep disorder interventions may affect muscle loss. Recent research associating OSA with the risk of conditions closely related to the sarcopenia process, such as frailty and sleep quality impairment, indirectly suggest that sleep can influence skeletal muscle decline in the elderly. Several protein synthesis and degradation pathways are mediated by growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone, cortisol and insulin, which act on the cellular and molecular levels to increase or reestablish muscle fiber, strength and function. Age-related sleep problems potentially interfere intracellularly by inhibiting anabolic hormone cascades and enhancing catabolic pathways in the skeletal muscle. Specific physical exercises combined or not with nutritional recommendations are the current treatment options for sarcopenia. Clinical studies testing exogenous administration of anabolic hormones have not yielded adequate safety profiles. Therapeutic approaches targeting sleep disturbances to normalize circadian rhythms and sleep homeostasis may

  6. Age-related hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiny hair cells inside your inner ear help you hear. They pick up sound waves and change them into the nerve signals that the brain interprets as sound. Hearing loss occurs when the tiny hair cells are damaged or die. The hair cells DO NOT regrow, so most ...

  7. Sarcopenia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dodds, Richard; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the loss of muscle mass and function with age, is highly relevant to clinical practice as it has been associated with a wide range of ageing outcomes including disability and shorter survival times...

  8. Evaluation of Age-Related Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is characterized by an increased hearing threshold and poor speech understanding in a noisy environment, slowed central processing of acoustic information, and impaired localization of sound sources. Presbycusis seriously affects the older people's quality of life. Particularly, hearing loss in the elderly contributes to social isolation, depression, and loss of self-esteem. Current amplification methods related to auditory rehabilitation can provide imp...

  9. The role of physical activity in counteracting age-related sarcopenia and cancer cachexia: A brief literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scalabrin Mattia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle tissue plays several important health functions . In addition to the important mechanical functions, it represents the biggest reserve of body proteins and it is also able to produce several myokines that are able to induce important beneficial effects, through the interaction with different organs. The loss of muscle mass has a tremendous impact on health and it is not surprising that a great interest has raised on two degenerative, irreversible and unstoppable conditions known as sarcopenia and cachexia. Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass, is not a disease or a syndrome, it is not even a medical sign sometimes. Indeed, a general consensus among scientists does not exist regarding the definition and the identification criteria of this condition. On the other hand, cachexia is a wasting syndrome characterized by an uncontrolled and unstoppable loss of muscle mass, associated with fatigue and weakness. It is often associated with a disease like cancer, AIDS, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, multiple sclerosis, tuberculosis etc. Given the complexity of these muscle conditions and considering that during aging and cancer there is an increased risk of comorbidities, regular physical activity might be a crucial point to be carefully evaluated on a single patient basis. The aim of this review is to highlight the impact on society and the etiology of sarcopenia and cancer cachexia, with particular regard to the role played by physical activity in preventing and counteracting these muscle-wasting conditions, focusing attention also on the limitation factors that must be considered during the prescription of physical activity to sarcopenic and cachectic patients.

  10. Evaluation of age-related hearing loss.

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    Kim, Tae Su; Chung, Jong Woo

    2013-09-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) is characterized by an increased hearing threshold and poor speech understanding in a noisy environment, slowed central processing of acoustic information, and impaired localization of sound sources. Presbycusis seriously affects the older people's quality of life. Particularly, hearing loss in the elderly contributes to social isolation, depression, and loss of self-esteem. Current amplification methods related to auditory rehabilitation can provide improved communication ability to users. But, simple auditory rehabilitation is ineffective in managing the central auditory processing disorder and the psychosocial problem of presbycusis. The evaluation of central auditory processing disorder and psychosocial disorder in presbycusis should not be overlooked while providing auditory rehabilitation.

  11. Age-related hearing loss or presbycusis.

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    Huang, Qi; Tang, Jianguo

    2010-08-01

    Aging is a natural consequence of a society developing process. Although many adults retain good hearing as they aging, hearing loss related with age-presbycusis which can vary in severity from mild to substantial is common among elderly persons. There are a number of pathophysiological processes underlying age-related changes in the auditory system as well as in the central nervous systems. Many studies have been dedicated to the illustration of risk factors accumulating presbycusis such as heritability, environment factors, medical conditions, free radical (reactive oxygen species, ROS) and damage of mitochondrial DNA. Left untreated, presbycusis can not only lead sufferers to reduced quality of life, isolation, dependence and frustration, but also affect the healthy people around. These can be partly corrected using hearing aids, but it is not enough, more and more strategies of treatment based on the findings associating with presbycusis should be added rather than using single hearing aids. We review here the pathophysiology; heritability, susceptibility genes and other risk factors including environmental, medical, especially free radical (ROS) and damage of mitochondrial DNA; and some strategies of treatment, as well as promising rehabilitations associating with presbycusis.

  12. New Clues to Age-Related Hearing Loss

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    ... fullstory_161359.html New Clues to Age-Related Hearing Loss Older people's brains have a harder time processing ... conversation, many older people chalk it up to hearing loss. But a new, small study finds that the ...

  13. Mouse models of age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss.

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    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2013-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. Overall, 10% of the population has a hearing loss in the US, and this age-related hearing disorder is projected to afflict more than 28 million Americans by 2030. Age-related hearing loss is associated with loss of sensory hair cells (sensory hearing loss) and/or spiral ganglion neurons (neuronal hearing loss) in the cochlea of the inner ear. Many lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress and associated mitochondrial dysfunction play a central role in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and are a cause of age-related neurosensory hearing loss. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of how oxidative stress and/or mitochondrial dysfunction lead to hearing loss during aging remain unclear, and currently there is no treatment for this age-dependent disorder. Several mouse models of aging and age-related diseases have been linked to age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss. Evaluation of these animal models has offered basic knowledge of the mechanism underlying hearing loss associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and aging. Here we review the evidence that specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that affect mitochondrial function result in increased oxidative damage and associated loss of sensory hair cells and/or spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea during aging, thereby causing hearing loss in these mouse models. Future studies comparing these models will provide further insight into fundamental knowledge about the disordered process of hearing and treatments to improve the lives of individuals with communication disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pathophysiology of Age-Related Hearing Loss (Peripheral and Central)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2013-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) refers to bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss resulting from aging process. Presbycusis is a complex phenomenon characterized by audiometric threshold shift, deterioration in speech-understanding and speech-perception difficulties in noisy environments. Factors contributing to presbycusis include mitochondria DNA mutation, genetic disorders including Ahl, hypertension, diabetes, metabolic disease and other systemic diseases in the intrinsic aspects. Ext...

  15. Sarcopenia: designing phase IIb trials: international working group on sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcopenia is the age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and functionality that can lead to the development of disability, frailty and increased health care costs. The development of interventions aimed at preventing and/or treating sarcopenia is complex, requiring the adoption of assu...

  16. Comprehensive approach to sarcopenia treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Sakuma, Kunihiro

    2014-05-01

    Sarcopenia is characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength with a risk of adverse outcomes such as physical disability, poor quality of life, and death. Primary sarcopenia is considered to be age-related when no other cause is evident, other than ageing itself. Secondary sarcopenia should be considered when one or more other causes are evident, such as activity-, disease-, or nutrition-related sarcopenia. In this narrative review that focused on human studies, we summarize the pharmaceutical therapies (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, estrogen, growth hormone, ghrelin, vitamin D, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and eicosapentaenoic acid) and nonpharmaceutical therapies (resistance training, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking) for counteracting primary sarcopenia. Testosterone and growth hormone improve muscle mass and muscle strength, but have several side effects. Although there are some intriguing pharmaceutical therapies to combat sarcopenia, resistance training combined with supplements containing amino acids are the most effective for preventing and treating age-related muscle wasting and weakness. The etiology of sarcopenia in the elderly is multi-factorial. Patients with disuse syndrome and deconditioning often complicate the diagnosis, of not only activity-related sarcopenia, but also age-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia. In these cases a comprehensive approach to sarcopenia treatment should include pharmaceutical therapies for age-related sarcopenia and comorbid chronic diseases, resistance training, early ambulation, nutrition management, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking. The effect of pharmaceutical therapies for sarcopenia can be enhanced by this comprehensive approach. Future research on pharmaceutical therapies for counteracting sarcopenia should consider non-pharmaceutical therapies and also the causes of sarcopenia.

  17. Age-Related Neurodegeneration and Memory Loss in Down Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P. Lockrow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a condition where a complete or segmental chromosome 21 trisomy causes variable intellectual disability, and progressive memory loss and neurodegeneration with age. Many research groups have examined development of the brain in DS individuals, but studies on age-related changes should also be considered, with the increased lifespan observed in DS. DS leads to pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD by 40 or 50 years of age. Progressive age-related memory deficits occurring in both AD and in DS have been connected to degeneration of several neuronal populations, but mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Inflammation and oxidative stress are early events in DS pathology, and focusing on these pathways may lead to development of successful intervention strategies for AD associated with DS. Here we discuss recent findings and potential treatment avenues regarding development of AD neuropathology and memory loss in DS.

  18. Pathophysiology of age-related hearing loss (peripheral and central).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Yup

    2013-09-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) refers to bilaterally symmetrical hearing loss resulting from aging process. Presbycusis is a complex phenomenon characterized by audiometric threshold shift, deterioration in speech-understanding and speech-perception difficulties in noisy environments. Factors contributing to presbycusis include mitochondria DNA mutation, genetic disorders including Ahl, hypertension, diabetes, metabolic disease and other systemic diseases in the intrinsic aspects. Extrinsic factors include noise, ototoxic medication and diet. However, presbycusis may not be related to the intrinsic and extrinsic factors separately. Presbycusis affects not only the physical, cognitive and emotional activities of patients, but also their social functioning. As a result, patients' quality of life deteriorates, compounded by various symptoms including depression, social isolation and lower self-esteem. Presbycusis is classified into six categories, as based on results of audiometric tests and temporal bone pathology, established by Schuknecht (1993): sensory, neural, metabolic or strial, cochlear conductive, mixed and indeterminate types. Among these, metabolic presbycusis is the mainstay of presbycusis types. Age-related changes also develop in the central hearing system. Functional decline of the central auditory system, caused by aging, reduces speech-understanding in noisy background and increase temporal processing deficits in gap-detection measures. This study reviews the literature on the age-related hearing loss.

  19. SARCOPENIA: DIAGNOSIS, STAGES AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasca Luminita Aurelia

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is defined as the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and decline of function. The causes of sarcopenia are multi-factorial. The diagnosis of sarcopenia should be considered in all older patients who present with declines in physical function, because of potential consequences for the development of frailty and disability. There are numerous techniques to assess muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance. Treatment consists of nutritional (macro- and micronutrients and physical activity (resistance exercise regimens adapted to person. There is an emerging role for testosterone and anabolic steroids in severe sarcopenia.

  20. The Neural Consequences of Age-Related Hearing Loss.

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    Peelle, Jonathan E; Wingfield, Arthur

    2016-07-01

    During hearing, acoustic signals travel up the ascending auditory pathway from the cochlea to auditory cortex; efferent connections provide descending feedback. In human listeners, although auditory and cognitive processing have sometimes been viewed as separate domains, a growing body of work suggests they are intimately coupled. Here, we review the effects of hearing loss on neural systems supporting spoken language comprehension, beginning with age-related physiological decline. We suggest that listeners recruit domain general executive systems to maintain successful communication when the auditory signal is degraded, but that this compensatory processing has behavioral consequences: even relatively mild levels of hearing loss can lead to cascading cognitive effects that impact perception, comprehension, and memory, leading to increased listening effort during speech comprehension.

  1. Activity loss and depression in age-related macular degeneration.

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    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J

    2002-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of severe vision loss in older persons and is associated with high rates of disability and depression. The authors evaluated 51 patients with bilateral AMD to investigate the interrelationships of disease severity, disability, and depression and focused on loss of valued activities as an emblematic disabling consequence of AMD. They characterized depression by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) score, a syndromal state based on the CES-D, and as a level of distress (Index of Affective Suffering; IAS). Thirty subjects (58.8%) had loss of a valued, discretionary activity. They had worse visual acuity and more depressive symptoms and were represented in higher IAS levels than other subjects. Visual acuity was significantly correlated with IAS levels, but not with CES-D scores or syndromal depression. A regression model demonstrated that activity loss mediated the relationship between visual acuity and IAS level. Affective distress occurs in AMD, largely to the extent that valued activities are relinquished because of vision loss. IAS levels best illuminated this relationship, suggesting the value of this dimension of affective functioning in studies of the consequences of chronic disease.

  2. Age-related hearing loss increases cross-modal distractibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puschmann, Sebastian; Sandmann, Pascale; Bendixen, Alexandra; Thiel, Christiane M

    2014-10-01

    Recent electrophysiological studies have provided evidence that changes in multisensory processing in auditory cortex cannot only be observed following extensive hearing loss, but also in moderately hearing-impaired subjects. How the reduced auditory input affects audio-visual interactions is however largely unknown. Here we used a cross-modal distraction paradigm to investigate multisensory processing in elderly participants with an age-related high-frequency hearing loss as compared to young and elderly subjects with normal hearing. During the experiment, participants were simultaneously presented with independent streams of auditory and visual input and were asked to categorize either the auditory or visual information while ignoring the other modality. Unisensory sequences without any cross-modal input served as control conditions to assure that all participants were able to perform the task. While all groups performed similarly in these unisensory conditions, hearing-impaired participants showed significantly increased error rates when confronted with distracting cross-modal stimulation. This effect could be observed in both the auditory and the visual task. Supporting these findings, an additional regression analysis indicted that the degree of high-frequency hearing loss significantly modulates cross-modal visual distractibility in the auditory task. These findings provide new evidence that already a moderate sub-clinical hearing loss, a common phenomenon in the elderly population, affects the processing of audio-visual information.

  3. Counteracting age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechshøft, Rasmus; Reitelseder, Søren; Højfeldt, Grith;

    2016-01-01

    at both societal and individual levels. Only a few longitudinal studies have been reported, but whey protein supplementation seems to improve muscle mass and function, and its combination with heavy strength training appears even more effective. However, heavy resistance training may reduce adherence...... to training, thereby attenuating the overall benefits of training. We hypothesize that light load resistance training is more efficient when both adherence and physical improvement are considered longitudinally. We launched the interdisciplinary project on Counteracting Age-related Loss of Skeletal Muscle....... Moreover, we will evaluate changes in physical performance, muscle fiber type and acute anabolic response to whey protein ingestion, sensory adaptation, gut microbiome, and a range of other measures, combined with questionnaires on life quality and qualitative interviews with selected subjects. The CALM...

  4. Age-related loss of orexin/hypocretin neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Brice A.; Stanley, Emily M.; Frederick-Duus, Danielle; Fadel, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Aging is associated with many physiological alterations—such as changes in sleep patterns, metabolism and food intake—suggestive of hypothalamic dysfunction, but the effects of senescence on specific hypothalamic nuclei and neuronal groups that mediate these alterations is unclear. The lateral hypothalamus and contiguous perifornical area (LH/PFA) contains several populations of neurons, including those that express the neuropeptides orexin (hypocretin) or melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). Collectively, orexin and MCH neurons influence many integrative homeostatic processes related to wakefulness and energy balance. Here, we determined the effect of aging on numbers of orexin and MCH neurons in young adult (3–4 months) and old (26–28 months) Fisher 344/Brown Norway F1 hybrid rats. Aged rats exhibited a loss of greater than 40% of orexin-immunoreactive neurons in both the medial and lateral (relative to the fornix) sectors of the LH/PFA. MCH-immunoreactive neurons were also lost in aged rats, primarily in the medial LH/PFA. Neuronal loss in this area was not global as no change in cells immunoreactive for the pan-neuronal marker, NeuN, was observed in aged rats. Combined with other reports of altered receptor expression or behavioral responses to exogenously-administered neuropeptide, these data suggest that compromised orexin (and, perhaps, MCH) function is an important mediator of age-related homeostatic disturbances of hypothalamic origin. The orexin system may represent a crucial substrate linking homeostatic and cognitive dysfunction in aging, as well as a novel therapeutic target for pharmacological or genetic restoration approaches to preventing or ameliorating these disturbances. PMID:21262323

  5. Sarcopenia and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviano, Alessandro; Gori, Chiara; Rianda, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Preserving or restoring adequate nutritional status is a key factor to delay the onset of chronic diseases and to accelerate recovery from acute illnesses. In particular, consistent and robust data show the loss of muscle mass, that is, sarcopenia, is clinically relevant since it is closely related to increased morbidity and mortality in healthy individuals and patients. Sarcopenia is defined as the age-related loss of muscle mass and function. International study groups have recently proposed separate definitions and diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia. Unfortunately, the rate of agreement in assessing the prevalence of sarcopenia is just fair, which highlights the need for a common effort to harmonize definitions and diagnostic criteria. Sarcopenia should be distinct from myopenia, which is the disease-associated loss of muscle mass, although in clinical practice it may be impossible to separate them (i.e., in old cancer patients). The pathogenesis of sarcopenia is complex and multifactorial. Consequently, its treatment should target the different factors involved, including quantitatively and qualitatively inappropriate food intake and reduced physical activity.

  6. Age-related synaptic loss of the medial olivocochlear efferent innervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrader Angela

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related functional decline of the nervous system is consistently observed, though cellular and molecular events responsible for this decline remain largely unknown. One of the most prevalent age-related functional declines is age-related hearing loss (presbycusis, a major cause of which is the loss of outer hair cells (OHCs and spiral ganglion neurons. Previous studies have also identified an age-related functional decline in the medial olivocochlear (MOC efferent system prior to age-related loss of OHCs. The present study evaluated the hypothesis that this functional decline of the MOC efferent system is due to age-related synaptic loss of the efferent innervation of the OHCs. To this end, we used a recently-identified transgenic mouse line in which the expression of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP, under the control of neuron-specific elements from the thy1 gene, permits the visualization of the synaptic connections between MOC efferent fibers and OHCs. In this model, there was a dramatic synaptic loss between the MOC efferent fibers and the OHCs in older mice. However, age-related loss of efferent synapses was independent of OHC status. These data demonstrate for the first time that age-related loss of efferent synapses may contribute to the functional decline of the MOC efferent system and that this synaptic loss is not necessary for age-related loss of OHCs.

  7. Neural Alterations in Acquired Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raksha Anand Mudar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss is one of the most prevalent chronic health conditions in older adults. Growing evidence suggests that hearing loss is associated with reduced cognitive functioning and incident dementia. In this mini-review, we briefly examine literature on anatomical and functional alterations in the brains of adults with acquired age-associated hearing loss, which may underlie the cognitive consequences observed in this population, focusing on studies that have used structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and event-related electroencephalography. We discuss structural and functional alterations observed in the temporal and frontal cortices and the limbic system. These neural alterations are discussed in the context of common cause, information-degradation, and sensory-deprivation hypotheses, and we suggest possible rehabilitation strategies. Although we are beginning to learn more about changes in neural architecture and functionality related to age-associated hearing loss, much work remains to be done. Understanding the neural alterations will provide objective markers for early identification of neural consequences of age-associated hearing loss and for evaluating benefits of intervention approaches.

  8. The etiology and exercise implications of sarcopenia in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An increasing aging population greatly impacts health care services worldwide. A large percentage of healthcare expenditures for seniors arise from the negative outcomes of muscle loss, also known as sarcopenia. Aging-related losses of muscle strength and quality impair balance, walking ability and endurance and cause negative events such as falls, incident disability and frailty. This review systemically explores the significance of sarcopenia in the elderly and addresses several important physiological mechanisms of sarcopenia. The implications of crucial exercise regimens that improve muscle strength and delay the onset of sarcopenia are also discussed.

  9. Muscle loss and obesity: the health implications of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannamethee, S Goya; Atkins, Janice L

    2015-11-01

    This paper reviews the health implications of obesity, sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity on CVD and mortality in older adults and discusses the obesity paradox seen in patients with CVD. Obesity is a major public health problem with increasing prevalence worldwide. It is an established risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adult populations. However, there is controversy surrounding the effects of obesity as measured by BMI in older people, and overweight and obesity (BMI ⩾ 25 kg/m2) are apparently associated with increased survival in those with CVD (obesity paradox). Ageing is associated with an increase in visceral fat and a progressive loss of muscle mass which have opposing effects on mortality. Thus BMI is not a good indicator of obesity in older adults. Sarcopenia, the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass, is a major concern in ageing populations and has been associated with metabolic impairment, CVD risk factors, physical disability and mortality. Sarcopenia often coexists with obesity. Sarcopenic obesity is a new category of obesity in older adults who have high adiposity coupled with low muscle mass. To fully understand the effect of obesity on mortality in the elderly it is important to take muscle mass into account. The evidence suggests that sarcopenia with obesity may be associated with higher levels of metabolic disorders and an increased risk of mortality than obesity or sarcopenia alone. Efforts to promote healthy ageing should focus on both preventing obesity and maintaining or increasing muscle mass.

  10. Age-related hearing loss: ear and brain mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Robert D

    2009-07-01

    Loss of sensory function in the aged has serious consequences for economic productivity, quality of life, and healthcare costs in the billions each year. Understanding the neural and molecular bases will pave the way for biomedical interventions to prevent, slow, or reverse these conditions. This chapter summarizes new information regarding age changes in the auditory system involving both the ear (peripheral) and brain (central). A goal is to provide findings that have implications for understanding some common biological underpinnings that affect sensory systems, providing a basis for eventual interventions to improve overall sensory functioning, including the chemical senses.

  11. Comparative study of oxidative stress in individuals with and without age related hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeth VK

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: We found an association between the level of Glutathione and Super Oxide Dismutase in age related hearing loss. Thus the serum Glutathione and Super Oxide Dismutase level can be used as a biomarker for the assessment of age related hearing loss. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 2020-2023

  12. SARCOPENIA: DESIGNING PHASE IIB TRIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHUMLEA, WM.C.; CESARI, M.; EVANS, W.J.; FERRUCCI, L.; FIELDING, R.A.; PAHOR, M.; STUDENSKI, S.; VELLAS, B.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and functionality that can lead to the development of disability, frailty and increased health care costs. The development of interventions aimed at preventing and/or treating sarcopenia is complex, requiring the adoption of assumptions and standards that are not well established scientifically or clinically. A number of investigators and clinicians (both from academia and industry) met in Rome (Italy) in 2009 to develop a consensus definition of sarcopenia. Subsequently, in Albuquerque (New Mexico, USA) in 2010, the same group met again to consider the complex issues necessary for designing Phase II clinical trials for sarcopenia. Current clinical trial data indicate that fat-free mass (FFM) parameters are responsive to physical activity/nutritional treatment modalities over short time periods, but pharmacological trials of sarcopenia have yet to show significant efficacy. In order to conduct a clinical trial within a reasonable time frame, groups that model or display accelerated aging and loss of FFM are necessary. Few studies have used acceptable designs for testing treatment effects, sample sizes or primary outcomes that could provide interpretable findings or effects across studies. Dual energy x ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the measure of choice for assessing FFM, but sufficient time is needed for changes to be detected accurately and reliably. A tool set that would allow clinical, basic and epidemiological research on sarcopenia to advance rapidly toward diagnosis and treatment phases should be those reflecting function and strength. PMID:21623466

  13. Sarcopenia and Hearing Loss in Older Koreans: Findings from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES 2010.

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    Jieun Lee

    Full Text Available Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI is becoming a more significant issue as geriatric population increases. Sarcopenia in older people is known to have a diverse health problem in various circumstances in recent studies. We assessed whether the decrease in muscle mass is related to ARHI. We used the 2010 data of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES to examine the associations between sarcopenia and ARHI. A total number of participants was 1,622 including 746 males and 876 females aged 60 years or older. Muscle mass was assessed as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass, and hearing loss was defined as the pure-tone averages (PTA of test frequencies 0.5, 1, 2, 4 kHz at a threshold of 40 dB or higher in worse hearing side of the ear. Among 1,622 participants, 298 men and 256 women had hearing loss. Appendicular muscle mass (ASM, expressed as kg, was categorized in tertiles. In female population, after adjusting for age, smoking, drinking, amount of exercise, total body fat, education level, income level, and tinnitus, the odds ratio (OR for hearing loss was 1.57 (95% confidence interval (CI = 0.92-2.68 in the middle tertile and 1.79 (1.03-3.08 in the lowest tertile, compared with the highest tertile. P for trend in this model was 0.036. Controlling further for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and three types of noise exposure did not change the association. Larger muscle mass is associated with lower prevalence of hearing loss in elderly Korean females.

  14. Age-Related Hearing Loss: Quality of Care for Quality of Life

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    Li-Korotky, Ha-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), known as presbycusis, is characterized by progressive deterioration of auditory sensitivity, loss of the auditory sensory cells, and central processing functions associated with the aging process. ARHL is the third most prevalent chronic condition in older Americans, after hypertension and arthritis, and is a…

  15. Accelerated features of age-related bone loss in zmpste24 metalloproteinase-deficient mice.

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    Rivas, Daniel; Li, Wei; Akter, Rahima; Henderson, Janet E; Duque, Gustavo

    2009-10-01

    Age-related bone loss is associated with changes in bone cellularity, which include marrow fat infiltration and decreasing levels of osteoblastogenesis. The mechanisms that explain these changes remain unclear. Although nuclear lamina alterations occur in premature aging syndromes that include changes in body fat and severe osteoporosis, the role of proteins of the nuclear lamina in age-related bone loss remains unknown. Using the Zmpste24-null progeroid mice (Zmpste24(-/-)), which exhibit nuclear lamina defects and accumulate unprocessed prelamin A, we identified several alterations in bone cellularity in vivo. We found that defective prelamin A processing induced accelerated features of age-related bone loss including lower osteoblast and osteocyte numbers and higher levels of marrow adipogenesis. In summary, processing of prelamin A could become a new approach to regulate osteoblastogenesis and bone turnover and thus for the prevention and treatment of senile osteoporosis.

  16. Sarcopenia in the elderly: basic and clinical issues.

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    Wang, Cuiying; Bai, Li

    2012-07-01

    The original definition of sarcopenia refers to the age-related loss of muscle mass. The literature suggests that the prevalence of sarcopenia in 60- to 70-year-olds is in the range of 5-13%. Prevalence estimates increase to 11-50% for the population aged 80 years or older. Estimates by the World Health Organization suggest that there were 600 million people aged 60 years or older in the year 2000, and that this number will increase to 1.2 billion by the year 2025. There are, however, limited published data on serial measures of muscle mass in older subjects to establish the age-related changes in muscle mass and to relate this change with adverse health consequences. This review is focused on the definition, prevalence, symptoms, pharmacy and physical therapy of sarcopenia in older subjects with the aim of promoting the recognition and treatment of age-related sarcopenia in the clinical setting.

  17. Sarcopenia and its associated factors in Iranian older individuals: Results of SARIR study.

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    Hashemi, Rezvan; Shafiee, Gita; Motlagh, Ahmadreza Dorosty; Pasalar, Parvin; Esmailzadeh, Ahmad; Siassi, Fereydoun; Larijani, Bagher; Heshmat, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia, an age- related loss of muscle mass, is a significant associating factor for functional impairment among older adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and associated factors for sarcopenia and severe sarcopenia among older adults in Iran. A total of 300 individuals aged over 55 years were randomly selected from the 6th district of Tehran, Iran, in 2011. Sarcopenia was defined according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) algorithm. The skeletal muscle mass was assessed using DXA. Muscle strength and muscle performance were assessed according to hand grip strength and 4-m usual walking gait speed test. A logistic regression analysis was performed. The prevalence values of presarcopenia, sarcopenia, and severe sarcopenia were 52.7%, 20.7%, and 6%, in men and 25.3%, 15.3%, and 5.3% in women, respectively. The prevalence of sarcopenia was higher in men older than 75 years than women in the same age range (36.7% versus 20%, respectively). Using multiple logistic regression models, age, sex, smoking, and body mass index (BMI) were independently associated with different stages of sarcopenia. The prevalence of sarcopenia is high in Iranian older adults. The older age, male sex, smoking and lower BMI were independently associated with presarcopenia, sarcopenia and severe sarcopenia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Modeling the Mechanical Consequences of Age-Related Trabecular Bone Loss by XFEM Simulation

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    Fan, Ruoxun; Zhang, Xianbin; Liu, Jun; Jia, Zhengbin; Zhu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    The elderly are more likely to suffer from fracture because of age-related trabecular bone loss. Different bone loss locations and patterns have different effects on bone mechanical properties. Extended finite element method (XFEM) can simulate fracture process and was suited to investigate the effects of bone loss on trabecular bone. Age-related bone loss is indicated by trabecular thinning and loss and may occur at low-strain locations or other random sites. Accordingly, several ideal normal and aged trabecular bone models were created based on different bone loss locations and patterns; then, fracture processes from crack initiation to complete failure of these models were observed by XFEM; finally, the effects of different locations and patterns on trabecular bone were compared. Results indicated that bone loss occurring at low-strain locations was more detrimental to trabecular bone than that occurring at other random sites; meanwhile, the decrease in bone strength caused by trabecular loss was higher than that caused by trabecular thinning, and the effects of vertical trabecular loss on mechanical properties were more severe than horizontal trabecular loss. This study provided a numerical method to simulate trabecular bone fracture and distinguished different effects of the possible occurrence of bone loss locations and patterns on trabecular bone. PMID:27403206

  19. Age-related hearing impairment and the triad of acquired hearing loss

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    Yang, Chao-Hui; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof) of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise. PMID:26283913

  20. Age-related Hearing Impairment and the Triad of Acquired Hearing Loss

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    Chao-Hui eYang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss ¬¬displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise.

  1. The endocrine system and sarcopenia: potential therapeutic benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntire, Kevin L; Hoffman, Andrew R

    2011-12-01

    Age related muscle loss, known as sarcopenia, is a major factor in disability, loss of mobility and quality of life in the elderly. There are many proposed mechanisms of age-related muscle loss that include the endocrine system. A variety of hormones regulate growth, development and metabolism throughout the lifespan. Hormone activity may change with age as a result of reduced hormone secretion or decreased tissue responsiveness. This review will focus on the complex interplay between the endocrine system, aging and skeletal muscle and will present possible benefits of therapeutic interventions for sarcopenia.

  2. Role of Osteoblast Gi Signaling in Age-Related Bone Loss in Female Mice.

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    Millard, Susan M; Wang, Liping; Wattanachanya, Lalita; O'Carroll, Dylan; Fields, Aaron J; Pang, Joyce; Kazakia, Galateia; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Nissenson, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Age-related bone loss is an important risk factor for fractures in the elderly; it results from an imbalance in bone remodeling mainly due to decreased bone formation. We have previously demonstrated that endogenous G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-driven Gi signaling in osteoblasts (Obs) restrains bone formation in mice during growth. Here, we launched a longitudinal study to test the hypothesis that Gi signaling in Obs restrains bone formation in aging mice, thereby promoting bone loss. Our approach was to block Gi signaling in maturing Obs by the induced expression of the catalytic subunit of pertussis toxin (PTX) after the achievement of peak bone mass. In contrast to the progressive cancellous bone loss seen in aging sex-matched littermate control mice, aging female Col1(2.3)+/PTX+ mice showed an age-related increase in bone volume. Increased bone volume was associated with increased bone formation at both trabecular and endocortical surfaces as well as increased bending strength of the femoral middiaphyses. In contrast, male Col1(2.3)+/PTX+ mice were not protected from age-related bone loss. Our results indicate that Gi signaling markedly restrains bone formation at cancellous and endosteal bone surfaces in female mice during aging. Blockade of the relevant Gi-coupled GPCRs represents an approach for the development of osteoporosis therapies-at least in the long bones of aging women.

  3. Middle ear impedance studies in elderly patients implications on age-related hearing loss

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    Olusola Ayodele Sogebi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Controversies arise with respect to functioning of the middle ear over time.OBJECTIVE: To assess changes in middle ear impedance that may be related to aging, and/or if there was an association of these changes with those of the inner ear in the elderly patients.METHODS: Cross-sectional, comparative study of elderly patients managed in ear, nose and throat clinics. A structured questionnaire was administered to obtain clinical information. Pure tone audiometry, tympanometry, and acoustic reflexes were performed. Comparative analyses were performed to detect intergroup differences between clinico-audiometric findings and middle ear measures, viz. tympanograms and acoustic reflexes.RESULTS: One hundred and three elderly patients participated in the study; 52.4% were male, averagely 70.0 ± 6.3 years old, age-related hearing loss in 59.2%, abnormal tympanograms in 39.3%, absent acoustic reflex in 37.9%. There was no association between age and gender in patients with abnormal tympanograms and absent acoustic reflex. Significantly more patients with different forms and grades of age-related hearing loss had abnormal tympanometry and absent acoustic reflex.CONCLUSION: Some abnormalities were observed in the impedance audiometric measures of elderly patients, which were significantly associated with parameters connected to age-related hearing loss.

  4. Developing consensus criteria for sarcopenia: an update.

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    McLean, Robert R; Kiel, Douglas P

    2015-04-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, is a major cause of impaired physical function, which contributes to mobility disability, falls and hospitalizations in older adults. Lower muscle mass and strength are also associated with lower bone mineral density and greater risk for osteoporotic fractures. Thus, identification of sarcopenia could be important for fracture prevention as it may help improve fracture risk assessment, and muscle mass and strength can be improved with exercise, even among the frailest older adults. Unfortunately, there are no consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia. Consequently there is no guidance to help clinicians identify older adults with clinically meaningful low muscle mass or weakness. Further, development of novel sarcopenia therapies is hindered not only due to the difficulty in identifying participants for clinical trials, and but also because there are no validated, clinically appropriate endpoints for assessment of treatment efficacy. There is currently a major push to establish a consensus definition of sarcopenia, and recent work holds promise that this goal may be within reach. This article discusses the evolution of the definition of sarcopenia, and focuses on the latest recommended diagnostic criteria proposed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project. While these empirically-based cut-points for clinically important low muscle mass and weakness are a significant step forward for the sarcopenia field, important questions remain to be answered before consensus diagnostic criteria can be definitively established. Ongoing work to refine sarcopenia criteria will further advance the field and bring this important contributor to falls, fractures and disability into the mainstream of clinical care and ultimately lead to better quality of life with aging. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  5. Obesity and medicare expenditure: accounting for age-related height loss.

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    Onwudiwe, Nneka C; Stuart, Bruce; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Sorkin, John D

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between BMI and Medicare expenditure for adults 65-years and older and determine whether this relationship changes after accounting for misclassification due to age-related height loss. Using a cross sectional study design, the relationship between BMI and fee-for-service Medicare expenditure was examined among beneficiaries who completed the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) in 2002, were not enrolled in Medicare Health Maintenance Organization, had a self-reported height and weight, and were 65 and older (n = 7,706). Subjects were classified as underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese (obese I), and severely obese (obese II/III). To adjust BMI for the artifactual increase associated with age-related height loss, the reported height was transformed by adding the sex-specific age-associated height loss to the reported height in MCBS. The main outcome variable was total Medicare expenditure. There was a significant U-shaped pattern between unadjusted BMI and Medicare expenditure: underweight $4,581 (P accounting for height loss: underweight $4,640 (P cost is not found at "normal" BMI, but rather in overweight subjects with higher spending in the obese and underweight categories. Adjusting for loss-of-height with aging had little affect on cost estimates.

  6. Novel Intriguing Strategies Attenuating to Sarcopenia

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    Kunihiro Sakuma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass, is characterized by a deterioration of muscle quantity and quality leading to a gradual slowing of movement, a decline in strength and power, increased risk of fall-related injury, and, often, frailty. Since sarcopenia is largely attributed to various molecular mediators affecting fiber size, mitochondrial homeostasis, and apoptosis, the mechanisms responsible for these deleterious changes present numerous therapeutic targets for drug discovery. Resistance training combined with amino acid-containing supplements is often utilized to prevent age-related muscle wasting and weakness. In this review, we summarize more recent therapeutic strategies (myostatin or proteasome inhibition, supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA or ursolic acid, etc. for counteracting sarcopenia. Myostatin inhibitor is the most advanced research with a Phase I/II trial in muscular dystrophy but does not try the possibility for attenuating sarcopenia. EPA and ursolic acid seem to be effective as therapeutic agents, because they attenuate the degenerative symptoms of muscular dystrophy and cachexic muscle. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α in skeletal muscle by exercise and/or unknown supplementation would be an intriguing approach to attenuating sarcopenia. In contrast, muscle loss with age may not be influenced positively by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor or antioxidant.

  7. Anti-apoptotic treatment in mouse models of age-related hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengchan Han; Oumei Wang; Quanxiang Cai

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (AHL), or presbycusis, is the most common neurodegenerative disorder and top communication deficit of the aged population. Genetic predisposition is one of the major factors in the development of AHL. Generally, AHL is associated with an age-dependent loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons and stria vascularis cells in the inner ear. Although the mechanisms leading to genetic hearing loss are not completely understood, caspase-family proteases function as important signals in the inner ear pathology. It is now accepted that mouse models are the best tools to study the mechanism of genetic hearing loss or AHL. Here, we provide a brief review of recent studies on hearing improvement in mouse models of AHL by anti-apoptotic treatment.

  8. Superoxide Dismutase 1 Loss Disturbs Intracellular Redox Signaling, Resulting in Global Age-Related Pathological Changes

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    Kenji Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is characterized by increased oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and organ dysfunction, which occur in a progressive and irreversible manner. Superoxide dismutase (SOD serves as a major antioxidant and neutralizes superoxide radicals throughout the body. In vivo studies have demonstrated that copper/zinc superoxide dismutase-deficient (Sod1−/− mice show various aging-like pathologies, accompanied by augmentation of oxidative damage in organs. We found that antioxidant treatment significantly attenuated the age-related tissue changes and oxidative damage-associated p53 upregulation in Sod1−/− mice. This review will focus on various age-related pathologies caused by the loss of Sod1 and will discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis in Sod1−/− mice.

  9. Loss of muscle mass: Current developments in cachexia and sarcopenia focused on biomarkers and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Cathleen; Konishi, Masaaki; Ebner, Nicole; Springer, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass arises from an imbalance of protein synthesis and protein degradation. Potential triggers of muscle wasting and function are immobilization, loss of appetite, dystrophies and chronic diseases as well as aging. All these conditions lead to increased morbidity and mortality in patients, which makes it a timely matter to find new biomarkers to get a fast clinical diagnosis and to develop new therapies. This mini-review covers current developments in the field of biomarkers and drugs on cachexia and sarcopenia. Here, we reported about promising markers, e.g. tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5a (TRACP5a), and novel substances like Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg). In summary, the progress to combat muscle wasting is in full swing and perhaps diagnosis of muscle atrophy and of course patient treatments could be soon supported by improved and more helpful strategies.

  10. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. The application of life style diseases-animal models to the research for sarcopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Ken; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2014-10-01

    Sarcopenia can be developed based on loss of skeletal muscle mass induced by various age-related factors, and suitable animal models must be needed to elucidate the mechanism of sarcopenia. Since loss of skeletal muscle mass is observed earlier in the elderly with lifestyle-related diseases than in the health elderly, animal models for lifestyle-related diseases can be applicable to the research for sarcopenia. Several reports using animal models for diabetes or specific diet-fed animals show that insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, increase of glucocorticoids, low-grade inflammation and accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can accelerate loss of skeletal muscle mass. Thus, the application of these animal models to further investigations on prevention or intervention for sarcopenia will be widely expected.

  11. A clinical study of age related hearing loss among diabetes patients

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    Sheetal Krishnappa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Age related hearing loss is one of the most common chronic health conditions affecting the elderly people. With aging, risk of presbycusis and diabetes increases. Our study aims at evaluating auditory dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus aged above 50 years as compared to non-diabetic patient. We also tried to find the relation between duration of diabetes and severity of hearing loss and whether HbA1c and blood sugars levels affected the type and severity of hearing loss. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study on 106 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 90 non-diabetic patients with age and sex matched (controls was carried out during November 2011 to October 2013. All patients were evaluated for hearing loss by subjecting to pure tone audiometry and blood investigations like glycated hemoglobin, fasting and postprandial blood sugars and serum creatinine levels. Results: A prevalence of 73% hearing loss was seen in diabetics. The degree of hearing loss increased with age. There was bilateral progressive sensory neural hearing loss with right sloping curve in both diabetics as well as controls but with significantly (P < 0.001 higher loss in diabetics (at 4 KHz and 8 KHz. A significant relationship between duration of the diabetes, HbA1c and severity of hearing loss was observed. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus was associated with higher hearing loss compared to presbycusis and hearing threshold was seen to affect all frequencies, but significantly the higher frequencies in diabetics. As duration of diabetes increased, the severity also increased. Poorer the HbA1c, more severe was the hearing loss.

  12. Classifying human audiometric phenotypes of age-related hearing loss from animal models.

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    Dubno, Judy R; Eckert, Mark A; Lee, Fu-Shing; Matthews, Lois J; Schmiedt, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbyacusis) has a complex etiology. Results from animal models detailing the effects of specific cochlear injuries on audiometric profiles may be used to understand the mechanisms underlying hearing loss in older humans and predict cochlear pathologies associated with certain audiometric configurations ("audiometric phenotypes"). Patterns of hearing loss associated with cochlear pathology in animal models were used to define schematic boundaries of human audiograms. Pathologies included evidence for metabolic, sensory, and a mixed metabolic + sensory phenotype; an older normal phenotype without threshold elevation was also defined. Audiograms from a large sample of older adults were then searched by a human expert for "exemplars" (best examples) of these phenotypes, without knowledge of the human subject demographic information. Mean thresholds and slopes of higher frequency thresholds of the audiograms assigned to the four phenotypes were consistent with the predefined schematic boundaries and differed significantly from each other. Significant differences in age, gender, and noise exposure history provided external validity for the four phenotypes. Three supervised machine learning classifiers were then used to assess reliability of the exemplar training set to estimate the probability that newly obtained audiograms exhibited one of the four phenotypes. These procedures classified the exemplars with a high degree of accuracy; classifications of the remaining cases were consistent with the exemplars with respect to average thresholds and demographic information. These results suggest that animal models of age-related hearing loss can be used to predict human cochlear pathology by classifying audiograms into phenotypic classifications that reflect probable etiologies for hearing loss in older humans.

  13. Age-related bone loss in the LOU/c rat model of healthy ageing.

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    Duque, Gustavo; Rivas, Daniel; Li, Wei; Li, Ailian; Henderson, Janet E; Ferland, Guylaine; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2009-03-01

    Inbred albino Louvain (LOU) rats are considered a model of healthy aging due to their increased longevity in the absence of obesity and with a low incidence of common age-related diseases. In this study, we characterized the bone phenotype of male and female LOU rats at 4, 20 and 27 months of age using quantitative micro computed tomographic (mCT) imaging, histology and biochemical analysis of circulating bone biomarkers. Bone quality and morphometry of the distal femora, assessed by mCT, was similar in male and female rats at 4 months of age and deteriorated over time. Histochemical staining of undecalcified bone showed a significant reduction in cortical and trabecular bone by 20 months of age. The reduction in mineralized tissue was accompanied by reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts and a significant increase in marrow adiposity. Biochemical markers of bone turnover, C-telopeptide and osteocalcin, correlated with the age-related bone loss whereas the calciotropic hormones PTH and vitamin D remained unchanged over time. In summary, aged LOU rats exhibit low-turnover bone loss and marrow fat infiltration, which are the hallmarks of senile osteoporosis, and thus represent a novel model in which to study the molecular mechanisms leading to this disorder.

  14. Age-related hearing loss in sea lions and their scientists

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    Schusterman, Ronald J.; Southall, Brandon; Kastak, David; Reichmuth Kastak, Colleen

    2002-05-01

    Interest in the hearing capabilities of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) was first stimulated by the echolocation hypothesis and more recently by rising concern about coastal noise pollution. During a series of audiometric tests, we measured the absolute hearing sensitivity of two sea lions and two of their human investigators. Aerial hearing curves for each subject were obtained with a go/no-go procedure and standard psychophysics. Additionally, underwater hearing curves were obtained for the sea lions using the same procedures. Underwater, the older sea lion (22-25 years of age) showed hearing losses relative to the younger sea lion (13-16 years) that ranged from 10 dB at lower frequencies to 50 dB near the upper frequency limit. The older sea lions' hearing losses in air were consistent with those measured underwater. The older human (69 years) tested also showed losses relative to the younger human (22 years). These differences ranged from 15 dB at lower frequencies up to 35 dB at the highest frequency tested. The results obtained in this study document age-related hearing losses in sea lions and humans. The findings are consistent with data on presbycusis in other mammalian species, showing that maximum hearing loss occurs at the highest frequencies.

  15. Loss of peripheral right-ear advantage in age-related hearing loss.

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    Tadros, Sherif F; Frisina, Susan T; Mapes, Frances; Kim, SungHee; Frisina, D Robert; Frisina, Robert D

    2005-01-01

    In young adults with normal hearing, the right ear is more sensitive than the left to simple sounds (peripheral right-ear advantage) and to processing complex sounds such as speech (central right-ear advantage). In the present investigation, the effects of hearing loss and aging on this auditory asymmetry were examined at both peripheral and central levels. Audiograms and transient evoked otoacoustic emission (TEOAE) and distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitudes were used to assess cochlear function. The contralateral suppression of TEOAEs was measured to assess the medial olivocochlear efferent system. The Hearing in Noise Test (HINT; binaural speech) was conducted to assess higher central auditory function. A group of aged subjects with normal hearing (flat audiograms) were compared to a group of aged subjects with sloping audiograms (presbycusis). At the cochlear (peripheral) level, the normal hearing group showed significantly higher otoacoustic emission amplitudes for the right ear compared to the left ear, which is consistent with the right-ear dominance normally seen in young adults. However, this finding was reversed in the presbycusic group that showed higher left-ear emission amplitudes. At the brainstem level, the amplitudes of TEOAE contralateral suppression were small and no significant difference was found between the right and left ears in both groups. On the contrary, HINT results showed a continuous dominance of the right ear (left hemisphere) in both groups, which was consistent with previous reports showing that the right hemisphere is more affected by age than the left hemisphere.

  16. MicroRNA-Regulated Proinflammatory Cytokines in Sarcopenia

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    Jingjing Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia has been defined as the aging-related disease with the declined mass, strength, and function of skeletal muscle, which is the major cause of frailty and falls in elders. The activation of inflammatory signal pathways due to diseases and aging is suggested to reveal the critical impact on sarcopenia. Several proinflammatory cytokines, especially interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, play crucial roles in modulation of inflammatory signaling pathway during the aging-related loss of skeletal muscle. MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as the important regulators for the mass and functional maintenance of skeletal muscle through regulating gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines. In this paper, we have systematically discussed regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs for the expression and secretion of inflammatory cytokines during sarcopenia, which will provide some novel targets and therapeutic strategies for controlling aging-related atrophy of skeletal muscle and corresponding chronic inflammatory diseases.

  17. Long-term treatment with aldosterone slows the progression of age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halonen, Joshua; Hinton, Ashley S; Frisina, Robert D; Ding, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P

    2016-06-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), clinically referred to as presbycusis, is one of the three most prevalent chronic medical conditions of our elderly, with the majority of persons over the age of 60 suffering from some degree of ARHL. The progressive loss of auditory sensitivity and perceptual capability results in significant declines in workplace productivity, quality of life, cognition and abilities to communicate effectively. Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone produced in the adrenal glands and plays a role in the maintenance of key ion pumps, including the Na-K(+)-Cl co-transporter 1 or NKCC1, which is involved in homeostatic maintenance of the endocochlear potential. Previously we reported that aldosterone (1 μM) increases NKCC1 protein expression in vitro and that this up-regulation of NKCC1 was not dose-dependent (dosing range from 1 nM to 100 μM). In the current study we measured behavioral and electrophysiological hearing function in middle-aged mice following long-term systemic treatment with aldosterone. We also confirmed that blood pressure remained stable during treatment and that NKCC1 protein expression was upregulated. Pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response was used as a functional measure of hearing, and the auditory brainstem response was used as an objective measure of peripheral sensitivity. Long-term treatment with aldosterone improved both behavioral and physiological measures of hearing (ABR thresholds). These results are the first to demonstrate a protective effect of aldosterone on age-related hearing loss and pave the way for translational drug development, using aldosterone as a key component to prevent or slow down the progression of ARHL.

  18. Quantification of visual field loss in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Acton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An evaluation of standard automated perimetry (SAP and short wavelength automated perimetry (SWAP for the central 10-2 visual field test procedure in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD is presented in order to determine methods of quantifying the central sensitivity loss in patients at various stages of AMD. METHODS: 10-2 SAP and SWAP Humphrey visual fields and stereoscopic fundus photographs were collected in 27 eyes of 27 patients with AMD and 22 eyes of 22 normal subjects. RESULTS: Mean Deviation and Pattern Standard Deviation (PSD varied significantly with stage of disease in SAP (both p<0.001 and SWAP (both p<0.001, but post hoc analysis revealed overlap of functional values among stages. In SWAP, indices of focal loss were more sensitive to detecting differences in AMD from normal. SWAP defects were greater in depth and area than those in SAP. Central sensitivity (within 1° changed by -3.9 and -4.9 dB per stage in SAP and SWAP, respectively. Based on defect maps, an AMD Severity Index was derived. CONCLUSIONS: Global indices of focal loss were more sensitive to detecting early stage AMD from normal. The SWAP sensitivity decline with advancing stage of AMD was greater than in SAP. A new AMD Severity Index quantifies visual field defects on a continuous scale. Although not all patients are suitable for SWAP examinations, it is of value as a tool in research studies of visual loss in AMD.

  19. Role of antioxidants in prevention of age-related hearing loss: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavanai, Elham; Mohammadkhani, Ghassem

    2017-04-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), also known as presbycusis, is one of the most prevalent chronic degenerative conditions. It is characterized by a decline in auditory function. ARHL is caused by the interaction of multiple factors, including cochlear aging, environment, genetic predisposition, and health comorbidities. The primary pathology of ARHL includes the hair cells loss, stria vascularis atrophy, and loss of spiral ganglion neurons as well as the changes in central auditory pathways. The research to date suggests that oxidative stress and mitochondrial DNA deletion (mtDNA) play a major role in pathophysiology of ARHL. Therefore, similar to other otological conditions, several studies have also showed that antioxidants can slow ARHL, but some also indicate that antioxidant therapy is not a magic elixir that will prevent or treat hearing loss associated with aging completely, but why? All available clinical trials, including animal and human studies, in English language that examined the protective effects of antioxidants against ARHL were reviewed. Materials were obtained by searching ELSEVIER, PubMed, Scopus, Web of knowledge, Google Scholar databases, Clinical trials, and Cochrane database of systematic reviews. Although ARHL has been shown to be slowed by supplementation with antioxidants, particularly in laboratory animals, a few studies have investigated the effect of interventions against ARHL in humans. High-quality clinical trials are needed to investigate if ARHL can be delayed or prevented in humans. However, it seems that targeting several cell-death pathways is better than targeting the only oxidative stress pathway.

  20. Aging-related gains and losses associated with word production in connected speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Paul A; Hess, Thomas M

    2016-11-01

    Older adults have been observed to use more nonnormative, or atypical, words than younger adults in connected speech. We examined whether aging-related losses in word-finding abilities or gains in language expertise underlie these age differences. Sixty younger and 60 older adults described two neutral photographs. These descriptions were processed into word types, and textual analysis was used to identify interrupted speech (e.g., pauses), reflecting word-finding difficulty. Word types were assessed for normativeness, with nonnormative word types defined as those used by six (5%) or fewer participants to describe a particular picture. Accuracy and precision ratings were provided by another sample of 48 high-vocabulary younger and older adults. Older adults produced more interrupted and, as predicted, nonnormative words than younger adults. Older adults were more likely than younger adults to use nonnormative language via interrupted speech, suggesting a compensatory process. However, older adults' nonnormative words were more precise and trended for having higher accuracy, reflecting expertise. In tasks offering response flexibility, like connected speech, older adults may be able to offset instances of aging-related deficits by maximizing their expertise in other instances.

  1. Sarcopenia in Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokshan, Steven L; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a loss of skeletal muscle mass in the elderly that is an independent risk factor for falls, disability, postoperative complications, and mortality. Although its cause is not completely understood, sarcopenia generally results from a complex bone-muscle interaction in the setting of chronic disease and aging. Sarcopenia cannot be diagnosed by muscle mass alone. Diagnosis requires 2 of the following 3 criteria: low skeletal muscle mass, inadequate muscle strength, and inadequate physical performance. Forty-four percent of elderly patients undergoing orthopedic surgery and 24% of all patients 65 to 70 years old are sarcopenic. Although dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and bioelectrical impedance analysis may be used to measure sarcopenia and are relatively inexpensive and accessible, they are generally considered less specific for sarcopenia compared with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Sarcopenia has been shown to predict poor outcomes within the medical and surgical populations and has been directly correlated with increases in taxpayer costs. Strengthening therapy and nutritional supplementation have become the mainstays of sarcopenia treatment. Specifically, the American Medical Directors Association has released guidelines for nutritional supplementation. Although sarcopenia frequently occurs with osteoporosis, it is an independent predictor of fragility fractures. Initiatives to diagnose, treat, and prevent sarcopenia in orthopedic patients are needed. Further investigation must also explore sarcopenia as a predictor of surgical outcomes in orthopedic patients.

  2. Association of Vision Loss in Glaucoma and Age-Related Macular Degeneration with IADL Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Chad; Maul, Eugenio; Chan, Emilie S.; Van Landingham, Suzanne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedman, David S.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To determine if glaucoma and/or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are associated with disability in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs). Methods. Glaucoma subjects (n = 84) with bilateral visual field (VF) loss and AMD subjects (n = 47) with bilateral or severe unilateral visual acuity (VA) loss were compared with 60 subjects with normal vision (controls). Subjects completed a standard IADL disability questionnaire, with disability defined as an inability to perform one or more IADLs unassisted. Results. Disability in one or more IADLs was present in 18.3% of controls as compared with 25.0% of glaucoma subjects (P = 0.34) and 44.7% of AMD subjects (P = 0.003). The specific IADL disabilities occurring more frequently in both AMD and glaucoma subjects were preparing meals, grocery shopping, and out-of-home travelling (P AMD (odds ratio [OR] = 3.4, P = 0.02) but not glaucoma (OR = 1.4, P = 0.45) was associated with IADL disability. However, among glaucoma and control patients, the odds of IADL disability increased 1.6-fold with every 5 dB of VF loss in the better-seeing eye (P = 0.001). Additionally, severe glaucoma subjects (better-eye MD worse than −13.5 dB) had higher odds of IADL disability (OR = 4.2, P = 0.02). Among AMD and control subjects, every Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study line of worse acuity was associated with a greater likelihood of IADL disability (OR = 1.3). Conclusions. VA loss in AMD and severe VF loss in glaucoma are associated with self-reported difficulties with IADLs. These limitations become more likely with increasing magnitude of VA or VF loss. PMID:22491415

  3. Rate of vision loss in neovascular age-related macular degeneration explored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, Juan P; Granero, Gladys E; De Santis, Mariana O; Juarez, Claudio P; Palma, Santiago D; Kelly, Simon P; Luna, José D

    2015-11-01

    To explore decline in visual acuity in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (n-AMD) awaiting intravitreal bevacizumab or ranibizumab treatment following initial diagnosis and after disease reactivation. Retrospective analysis of 74 treatment-naïve patients (84 eyes) in two centers in Córdoba, Argentina. The time between treatment indication and intravitreal injection, and the changes in BCVA produced during this delay were studied in both periods. A linear regression model to search the impact of time on progression visual impairment was conducted. In both periods, a significant reduction in vision occurred awaiting intravitreal injection. The longer the delay, the greater the vision loss (R2 = 0.55 p < 0.01) and the less improvement following treatment (Pearson coefficient -0.26). The result of the model shows that the change in vision as a function of initial delay were best described by a polynomic model with a mean loss of 5 letters in the first 3 weeks, a slowdown in the rate of change of VA, and a dependence of visual acuity at the moment of diagnosis . The loss of visual acuity after reactivation shows the same behavior as at the onset of the disease but independent of visual acuity prior to reactivation. Visual loss awaiting injection intravitreal anti-VEGF is clinically significant and with an asymptotic pattern, with early rapid loss of vision in both the onset of the disease and the reactivation. Initiation of anti-VEGF treatment must be undertaken urgently, as should retreatment of disease activation to reduce visual loss.

  4. Relationships Among Factors Relevant to Abdominal Fat and Age-Related Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young; Park, Mina

    2017-05-11

    Metabolic syndrome is related with abdominal fat and with age-related hearing loss (ARHL). In this study, we evaluated the association between a variety of factors relevant to abdominal fat (FRAs) and hearing thresholds. We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of 2,602 subjects aged over 40 years with symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss who underwent abdominal fat computed tomography (CT) scans. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were used to demonstrate the association between each FRA and hearing thresholds at low and high frequencies. Four of 5 FRAs were associated with hearing thresholds at high frequencies in males. All FRAs examined showed a relationship with hearing thresholds at low frequencies in females. Diabetes mellitus (DM) among clinical factors and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) among the 5 FRAs were the most reflective of hearing thresholds in both males and females. We found that FRAs were associated with hearing loss with frequency specific characteristics according to sex and reinforced that DM and VAT is particularly an important role for hearing.

  5. GRM7 variants associated with age-related hearing loss based on auditory perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Dina L; Fisher, Laurel M; Ohmen, Jeffrey; Parody, Robert; Fong, Chin-To; Frisina, Susan T; Mapes, Frances; Eddins, David A; Robert Frisina, D; Frisina, Robert D; Friedman, Rick A

    2012-12-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is a common condition of the elderly that results in significant communication difficulties in daily life. Clinically, it has been defined as a progressive loss of sensitivity to sound, starting at the high frequencies, inability to understand speech, lengthening of the minimum discernable temporal gap in sounds, and a decrease in the ability to filter out background noise. The causes of presbycusis are likely a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Previous research into the genetics of presbycusis has focused solely on hearing as measured by pure-tone thresholds. A few loci have been identified, based on a best ear pure-tone average phenotype, as having a likely role in susceptibility to this type of hearing loss; and GRM7 is the only gene that has achieved genome-wide significance. We examined the association of GRM7 variants identified from the previous study, which used an European cohort with Z-scores based on pure-tone thresholds, in a European-American population from Rochester, NY (N = 687), and used novel phenotypes of presbycusis. In the present study mixed modeling analyses were used to explore the relationship of GRM7 haplotype and SNP genotypes with various measures of auditory perception. Here we show that GRM7 alleles are associated primarily with peripheral measures of hearing loss, and particularly with speech detection in older adults.

  6. Communicating with assistive listening devices and age-related hearing loss: Perceptions of older Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberdeen, Lucinda; Fereiro, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Age-related hearing loss can impact adversely on the delivery of primary care and cannot necessarily be remedied by hearing aid technology. A study of 20 older Australians living in a Queensland retirement village and residential hostel complex was undertaken to investigate how communication might be advanced through an assistive listening device (ALD). Most participants were women aged over 85 years; almost all had hearing loss and wore hearing aids. Tests with an ALD found very high levels of satisfaction with understanding speech and sound quality amongst participants. However, few had heard previously of ALDs, all required individualised assistance to fit and use the device and rated ease of use less highly. The findings affirm those of previous studies that ALD technology has a role in communication for older hearing impaired people and for hearing rehabilitation. Its potential to enhance quality of life can be facilitated and promoted through nursing practice, but requires professional and consumer education so that it is not overlooked as a communication option.

  7. Melatonin dietary supplement as an anti-aging therapy for age-related bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Isabel F; Tamimi, Faleh; Eimar, Hazem; Barralet, Jake E; Prieto, Santiago; Torres, Jesús; Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that melatonin, an anti-oxidant molecule secreted from the pineal gland, is a positive regulator of bone mass. However, the potential effects of melatonin on bone mass have never been investigated in an old population. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of dietary melatonin supplementation on mass accrual and biomechanical properties of old rat femora. Twenty 22-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two randomly assigned groups. The first group was treated for 10 weeks with melatonin, whereas the second group was untreated (control). Rat femurs were collected, and their phenotypes and biomechanical properties were investigated by micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry, and a three-point-bending test. Statistical analyses were performed by the Student two-tailed unpaired t-test. In all experiments, a value of p<0.05 was considered significant. Rats treated with melatonin had higher bone volume, bone trabecular number, trabecular thickness, and cortical thickness in comparison to the control group. Histomorphometric analyses confirmed the increase of bone volume in melatonin-treated rats. In agreement with these findings, melatonin-treated rats showed higher bone stiffness, flexural modulus, and ultimate load compared to controls. These compelling results are the first evidence indicating that dietary melatonin supplementation is able to exert beneficial effects against age-related bone loss in old rats, improving the microstructure and biomechanical properties of aged bones.

  8. Sarcopenia: Prevalence and associated factors based on different suggested definitions in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hunkyung; Hirano, Hirohiko; Edahiro, Ayako; Ohara, Yuki; Watanabe, Yutaka; Kojima, Narumi; Kim, Miji; Hosoi, Erika; Yoshida, Yuko; Yoshida, Hideyo; Shinkai, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    The age-related loss of muscle mass and/or strength and performance, sarcopenia, has been associated with geriatric syndromes, morbidity and mortality. Although sarcopenia has been researched for many years, currently there is a lack of consensus on its definition. Some studies define sarcopenia as low muscle mass alone, whereas other studies have recently combined low muscle mass, strength and physical performance suggested by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People, as well as the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. The arbitrary use of various available sarcopenia definitions within the literature can cause discrepancies in the prevalence and associated risk factors. The application of population-specific cut-off values in any sample population can be problematic, particularly among different ethnicities. Using commonly used cut-off points to define sarcopenia, including solely muscle mass and combined definitions, on a community-dwelling elderly Japanese population, the prevalence of sarcopenia ranged from 2.5 to 28.0% in men and 2.3 to 11.7% in women, with muscle mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and 7.1-98.0% in men and 19.8-88.0% in women measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Body mass index was the most prominent related factor for sarcopenia across the definitions in this Japanese sample. However, other associated hematological and chronic condition factors varied depending on the definition. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Age-related hearing loss: prevention of threshold declines, cell loss and apoptosis in spiral ganglion neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) -presbycusis - is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease and number one communication disorder of our aged population; and affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Its prevalence is close to that of cardiovascular disease and arthritis, and can be a precursor to dementia. The auditory perceptual dysfunction is well understood, but knowledge of the biological bases of ARHL is still somewhat lacking. Surprisingly, there are no FDA-approved drugs for treatment. Based on our previous studies of human subjects, where we discovered relations between serum aldosterone levels and the severity of ARHL, we treated middle age mice with aldosterone, which normally declines with age in all mammals. We found that hearing thresholds and suprathreshold responses significantly improved in the aldosterone-treated mice compared to the non-treatment group. In terms of cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this therapeutic effect, additional experiments revealed that spiral ganglion cell survival was significantly improved, mineralocorticoid receptors were upregulated via post-translational protein modifications, and age-related intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were blocked by the aldosterone therapy. Taken together, these novel findings pave the way for translational drug development towards the first medication to prevent the progression of ARHL. PMID:27667674

  10. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy reduces body weight without accelerating age-related bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Russell T; Dube, Michael; Branscum, Adam J; Wong, Carmen P; Olson, Dawn A; Zhong, Xiaoying; Kweh, Mercedes F; Larkin, Iske V; Wronski, Thomas J; Rosen, Clifford J; Kalra, Satya P; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2015-12-01

    Excessive weight gain in adults is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes. Unfortunately, dieting, exercise, and pharmacological interventions have had limited long-term success in weight control and can result in detrimental side effects, including accelerating age-related cancellous bone loss. We investigated the efficacy of using hypothalamic leptin gene therapy as an alternative method for reducing weight in skeletally-mature (9 months old) female rats and determined the impact of leptin-induced weight loss on bone mass, density, and microarchitecture, and serum biomarkers of bone turnover (CTx and osteocalcin). Rats were implanted with cannulae in the 3rd ventricle of the hypothalamus and injected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding the gene for rat leptin (rAAV-Leptin, n=7) or a control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP, n=10) and sacrificed 18 weeks later. A baseline control group (n=7) was sacrificed at vector administration. rAAV-Leptin-treated rats lost weight (-4±2%) while rAAV-GFP-treated rats gained weight (14±2%) during the study. At study termination, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats weighed 17% less than rAAV-GFP-treated rats and had lower abdominal white adipose tissue weight (-80%), serum leptin (-77%), and serum IGF1 (-34%). Cancellous bone volume fraction in distal femur metaphysis and epiphysis, and in lumbar vertebra tended to be lower (PLeptin and rAAV-GFP rats. In summary, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats maintained a lower body weight compared to baseline and rAAV-GFP-treated rats with minimal effects on bone mass, density, microarchitecture, or biochemical markers of bone turnover.

  11. One size may not fit all: anti-aging therapies and sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Tyesha N; Cohn, Ronald D

    2011-12-01

    Sarcopenia refers to age-related loss of muscle mass and function. Several age-related changes occur in skeletal muscle including a decrease in myofiber size and number and a diminished ability of satellite cells to activate and proliferate upon injury leading to impaired muscle remodeling. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying sarcopenia are unknown, it is tempting to hypothesize that interplay between biological and environmental factors cooperate in a positive feedback cycle contributing to the progression of sarcopenia. Indeed many essential biological mechanisms such as apoptosis and autophagy and critical signaling pathways involved in skeletal muscle homeostasis are altered during aging and have been linked to loss of muscle mass. Moreover, the environmental effects of the sedentary lifestyle of older people further promote and contribute the loss of muscle mass. There are currently no widely accepted therapeutic strategies to halt or reverse the progression of sarcopenia. Caloric restriction has been shown to be beneficial as a sarcopenia and aging antagonist. Such results have made the search for caloric restriction mimetics (CRM) a priority. However given the mechanisms of action, some of the currently investigated CRMs may not combat sarcopenia. Thus, sarcopenia may represent a unique phenotypic feature of aging that requires specific and individually tailored therapeutic strategies.

  12. Plasma very long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and age-related hearing loss in older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullemeijer, C.; Verhoef, P.; Brouwer, I.A.; Kok, F.J.; Brummer, R.J.; Durga, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Age-related hearing loss is a common social and health problem in the older adult population. Up until now, very little scientific attention has been given to the potential role of fatty acids in agerelated hearing loss. In this study we investigated whether plasma very long-chain n-3 po

  13. Plasma very long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and age-related hearing loss in older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullemeijer, C.; Verhoef, P.; Brouwer, I.A.; Kok, F.J.; Brummer, R.J.; Durga, J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Age-related hearing loss is a common social and health problem in the older adult population. Up until now, very little scientific attention has been given to the potential role of fatty acids in agerelated hearing loss. In this study we investigated whether plasma very long-chain n-3

  14. Resveratrol as anti-aging therapy for age-related bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Isabel F; Tamimi, Faleh; Eimar, Hazem; Barralet, Jake; Torres, Jesús; Blanco, Luis; Tresguerres, Jesús A F

    2014-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated that resveratrol, a natural phytoestrogen, can act as an anti-aging therapy to resist age-related changes of several body tissues. However, the anti-aging effects of resveratrol on bone have been poorly investigated in this natural aging population. Accordingly, this study was design to evaluate the effects of resveratrol on bone mass and biomechanical properties in old rat femora. Twenty 22-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two randomly assigned groups (n=10). The first group was treated for 10 weeks with resveratrol (10 mg/kg per day) and the second group was left untreated (control). Rat femora were collected. Bone mass and bone microestructure were investigated by microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Biomechanical properties were determined by a three-point bending test. Plasma levels of CTX (carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen) and osteocalcin were also determined. Statistical analyses were performed by a Student two-tailed unpaired t-test. In all experiments, a value of p<0.05 was considered significant. Microcomputed tomography analyses demonstrated that resveratrol-treated rats had significant higher bone volume, bone trabecular number, and cortical thickness and lower spacing between trabeculae in comparison to the control group. Histomorphometric analyses confirmed the increase of bone volume in resveratrol-treated rats compared to controls. Resveratrol-treated rats had significant higher bone flexural modulus, stiffness, and ultimate load compared to control group. Treatment was not associated with changes in plasma CTX or osteocalcin. These findings demonstrate that resveratrol increases bone microstructure and bone mechanical properties in old male rats, suggesting that resveratrol might be used as anti-aging therapy to resist age-induced bone loss.

  15. Sarcopenia in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilarslanoglu, Muhammet C; Kuyumcu, Mehmet E; Yesil, Yusuf; Halil, Meltem

    2016-10-01

    Sarcopenia occurring as a primary consequence of aging and secondary due to certain medical problems including chronic disease, malnutrition and inactivity is a progressive generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and function. The prevalence of sarcopenia increases with aging (approximately 5-13 % in the sixth and seventh decades). However, data showing the prevalence and clinical outcomes of sarcopenia in intensive care units (ICUs) are limited. A similar condition to sarcopenia in the ICU, called ICU-acquired weakness (ICU-AW), has been reported more frequently. Here, we aim to examine the importance of sarcopenia, especially ICU-AW, in ICU patients via related articles in Medline.

  16. Auditory perceptual learning in adults with and without age-related hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanin eKarawani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Speech recognition in adverse listening conditions becomes more difficult as we age, particularly for individuals with age-related hearing loss (ARHL. Whether these difficulties can be eased with training remains debated, because it is not clear whether the outcomes are sufficiently general to be of use outside of the training context. The aim of the current study was to compare training-induced learning and generalization between normal-hearing older adults and those with ARHL.Methods: 56 listeners (60-72 y/o, 35 participants with ARHL and 21 normal hearing adults participated in the study. The study design was a cross over design with three groups (immediate-training, delayed-training and no-training group. Trained participants received 13 sessions of home-based auditory training over the course of 4 weeks. Three adverse listening conditions were targeted: (1 Speech-in-noise (2 time compressed speech and (3 competing speakers, and the outcomes of training were compared between normal and ARHL groups. Pre- and post-test sessions were completed by all participants. Outcome measures included tests on all of the trained conditions as well as on a series of untrained conditions designed to assess the transfer of learning to other speech and non-speech conditions. Results: Significant improvements on all trained conditions were observed in both ARHL and normal-hearing groups over the course of training. Normal hearing participants learned more than participants with ARHL in the speech-in-noise condition, but showed similar patterns of learning in the other conditions. Greater pre- to post-test changes were observed in trained than in untrained listeners on all trained conditions. In addition, the ability of trained listeners from the ARHL group to discriminate minimally different pseudowords in noise also improved with training. Conclusions: ARHL did not preclude auditory perceptual learning but there was little generalization to

  17. Auditory Perceptual Learning in Adults with and without Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karawani, Hanin; Bitan, Tali; Attias, Joseph; Banai, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction : Speech recognition in adverse listening conditions becomes more difficult as we age, particularly for individuals with age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Whether these difficulties can be eased with training remains debated, because it is not clear whether the outcomes are sufficiently general to be of use outside of the training context. The aim of the current study was to compare training-induced learning and generalization between normal-hearing older adults and those with ARHL. Methods : Fifty-six listeners (60–72 y/o), 35 participants with ARHL, and 21 normal hearing adults participated in the study. The study design was a cross over design with three groups (immediate-training, delayed-training, and no-training group). Trained participants received 13 sessions of home-based auditory training over the course of 4 weeks. Three adverse listening conditions were targeted: (1) Speech-in-noise, (2) time compressed speech, and (3) competing speakers, and the outcomes of training were compared between normal and ARHL groups. Pre- and post-test sessions were completed by all participants. Outcome measures included tests on all of the trained conditions as well as on a series of untrained conditions designed to assess the transfer of learning to other speech and non-speech conditions. Results : Significant improvements on all trained conditions were observed in both ARHL and normal-hearing groups over the course of training. Normal hearing participants learned more than participants with ARHL in the speech-in-noise condition, but showed similar patterns of learning in the other conditions. Greater pre- to post-test changes were observed in trained than in untrained listeners on all trained conditions. In addition, the ability of trained listeners from the ARHL group to discriminate minimally different pseudowords in noise also improved with training. Conclusions : ARHL did not preclude auditory perceptual learning but there was little generalization to

  18. Age-related hearing loss and ear morphology affect vertical but not horizontal sound-localization performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, R.J.; Agterberg, M.J.H.; Wanrooij, M.M. van; Snik, A.F.M.; Opstal, A.J. van

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have attributed deterioration of sound localization in the horizontal (azimuth) and vertical (elevation) planes to an age-related decline in binaural processing and high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL). The latter might underlie decreased elevation performance of older adults. However,

  19. Age-related hearing loss and ear morphology affect vertical but not horizontal sound-localization performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, R.J.; Agterberg, M.J.H.; Wanrooij, M.M. van; Snik, A.F.M.; Opstal, A.J. van

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have attributed deterioration of sound localization in the horizontal (azimuth) and vertical (elevation) planes to an age-related decline in binaural processing and high-frequency hearing loss (HFHL). The latter might underlie decreased elevation performance of older adults. However,

  20. Auditory sensitivity and the outer hair cell system in the CBA mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Robert D; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2010-06-01

    Age-related hearing loss is a highly prevalent sensory disorder, from both the clinical and animal model perspectives. Understanding of the neurophysiologic, structural, and molecular biologic bases of age-related hearing loss will facilitate development of biomedical therapeutic interventions to prevent, slow, or reverse its progression. Thus, increased understanding of relationships between aging of the cochlear (auditory portion of the inner ear) hair cell system and decline in overall hearing ability is necessary. The goal of the present investigation was to test the hypothesis that there would be correlations between physiologic measures of outer hair cell function (otoacoustic emission levels) and hearing sensitivity (auditory brainstem response thresholds), starting in middle age. For the CBA mouse, a useful animal model of age-related hearing loss, it was found that correlations between these two hearing measures occurred only for high sound frequencies in middle age. However, in old age, a correlation was observed across the entire mouse range of hearing. These findings have implications for improved early detection of progression of age-related hearing loss in middle-aged mammals, including mice and humans, and distinguishing peripheral etiologies from central auditory system decline.

  1. Presbyphagia and Sarcopenic Dysphagia: Association between Aging, Sarcopenia, and Deglutition Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, H

    2014-01-01

    Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Age-related loss of swallowing muscle mass becomes evident in the geniohyoid muscle and tongue. Elderly subjects with both sarcopenia and dysphagia may have not only disease-related dysphagia but also sarcopenic dysphagia. In cases of aspiration pneumonia, deterioration in activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles may develop into sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of sarcopenic dysphagia includes evaluation of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and a water test combined with pulse oximetry are useful for dysphagia screening. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of sarcopenia including nutritional review is important, because rehabilitation of sarcopenic dysphagia differs depending on its etiology. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. Rehabilitation for sarcopenic dysphagia includes treatment of both dysphagia and sarcopenia. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. The causes of adult malnutrition may also contribute to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Therefore, nutrition management is indispensable for sarcopenic dysphagia rehabilitation. In cases of sarcopenia with numerous complicating causes, treatment should include pharmaceutical therapies for age-related sarcopenia and comorbid chronic diseases, resistance training, early ambulation, nutrition management, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking.

  2. Sarcopenia and its determinants among Iranian elderly (SARIR: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Rezvan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elderly populations increase in world because of improved health status in communities, so health and independency of seniors has become and will be one of the main priorities of public health systems. Ageing have been associated with changes in body composition, including loss of muscle mass, loss of bone mass and increase fat mass. Involuntary age related loss of muscle mass, sarcopenia,has been linked to functional impairment and physical disability. Several definitions for sarcopenia have been presented based on the method of measuring body composition, but an internationally accepted definition doesn’t presently exist yet. In 2010, the European working group on sarcopenia developed a new definition for sarcopenia according to measure muscle mass and muscle function. Several studies have been done about sarcopenia in world, but to our knowledge this study is the first in Iran which is one of the largest countries of the Middle East that faces a fast growing elderly population. The aim of this study is to evaluate sarcopenia and related risk factors in Iran according new definition of sarcopenia. Methods This study will be conducted in two phase among elderly men and women over 55 years in the 6th district of TehranThe first phase will be a population-based cross-sectional study to determine the frequency of sarcopenia in the study population, and to conduct case finding for the second phase. The second phase will be a case–control study to comparison the metabolic and inflammatory factors in sarcopenic and non sarcopenic groups. The association between sarcopenia and major dietary pattern will be evaluated using factor analysis. Conclusion This study is the first study that evaluates sarcopenia and its risk factor in Iranian elderlies. We discuss details of how we collect the data and appropriate instruments to measure muscle mass, muscle power and muscle strength, and suitable cut- off to define sarcopenia in

  3. Sarcopenia and androgens: A link between pathology and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eBasualto-Alarcón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, is becoming more prevalent as the lifespan continues to increase in most populations. As sarcopenia is highly disabling, being associated with increased risk of dependence, falls, fractures, weakness, disability, and death, development of approaches to its prevention and treatment are required. Androgens are the main physiologic anabolic steroid hormones and normal testosterone levels are necessary for a range of developmental and biological processes, including maintenance of muscle mass. Testosterone concentrations decline as age increase, suggesting that low plasma testosterone levels can cause or accelerate muscle- and age-related diseases, as sarcopenia. Currently, there is increasing interest on the anabolic properties of testosterone for therapeutic use in muscle diseases including sarcopenia. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this muscle syndrome and its relationship with plasma level of androgens are not completely understood. This review discusses the recent findings regarding sarcopenia, the intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of this disease and the treatment approaches that have been developed based on testosterone deficiency and their implications.

  4. No dramatic age-related loss of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons in Bcl-2 over-expression mice or Bax null mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlemiller Kevin K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related decline of neuronal function is associated with age-related structural changes. In the central nervous system, age-related decline of cognitive performance is thought to be caused by synaptic loss instead of neuronal loss. However, in the cochlea, age-related loss of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs is consistently observed in a variety of species, including humans. Since age-related loss of these cells is a major contributing factor to presbycusis, it is important to study possible molecular mechanisms underlying this age-related cell death. Previous studies suggested that apoptotic pathways were involved in age-related loss of hair cells and SGNs. In the present study, we examined the role of Bcl-2 gene in age-related hearing loss. In one transgenic mouse line over-expressing human Bcl-2, there were no significant differences between transgenic mice and wild type littermate controls in their hearing thresholds during aging. Histological analysis of the hair cells and SGNs showed no significant conservation of these cells in transgenic animals compared to the wild type controls during aging. These data suggest that Bcl-2 overexpression has no significant effect on age-related loss of hair cells and SGNs. We also found no delay of age-related hearing loss in mice lacking Bax gene. These findings suggest that age-related hearing loss is not through an apoptotic pathway involving key members of Bcl-2 family.

  5. Sarcopenia: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Calvani, Riccardo; Tosato, Matteo; Cesari, Matteo; Di Bari, Mauro; Cherubini, Antonio; Collamati, Agnese; D'Angelo, Emanuela; Pahor, Marco; Bernabei, Roberto; Landi, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-dependent loss of muscle mass and function, is a common condition among older adults, and is associated with several adverse health outcomes. Owing to the impact of sarcopenia on quality of life, disability and mortality, a greater awareness is necessary in order to correctly identify the condition both in community and geriatric settings. Research on sarcopenia prevention and treatment is developing quickly, but many questions are still unanswered. The core of the sarcopenia condition involves quantitative and qualitative losses of skeletal muscle. These two dimensions should therefore be considered when designing and testing preventive and therapeutic interventions. The recently released operationalization of sarcopenia by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project allows for the framing of an objective, standardized, and clinically relevant condition, which should facilitate its translation into the clinical arena as well as its adoption by public health and regulatory agencies. Such a conceptualization might eventually encourage key stakeholders to combine their efforts in approaching the sarcopenia condition. Bearing these considerations in mind, the "Sarcopenia and Physical fRailty IN older people: multi-componenT Treatment strategies" project has operationalized a specific condition, named physical frailty and sarcopenia (PF&S), characterized by the combination of low physical performance (based on the Short Physical Performance Battery) and low muscle mass (according to the FNIH cut-points). A randomized controlled trial will be conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a multi-component intervention for preventing mobility disability and other adverse health outcomes in older adults with PF&S.

  6. Therapies for sarcopenia and regeneration of old skeletal muscles: More a case of old tissue architecture than old stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Grounds, Miranda D

    2014-01-01

    Age related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function (sarcopenia) reduces independence and the quality of life for individuals, and leads to falls and fractures with escalating health costs for the rapidly aging human population. Thus there is much interest in developing interventions to reduce sarcopenia. One area that has attracted recent attention is the proposed use of myogenic stem cells to improve regeneration of old muscles. This mini-review challenges the fundamental need for myogeni...

  7. Sarcopenia, a Neurogenic Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is an aging-associated condition, which is currently characterized by the loss of muscle mass and muscle strength. However, there is no consensus regarding its characterization hitherto. As the world older adult population is on the rise, the impact of sarcopenia becomes greater. Due to the lack of effective treatments, sarcopenia is still a persisting problem among the global older adults and should not be overlooked. As a result, it is vital to investigate deeper into the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of sarcopenia in order to develop more effective therapeutic interventions and to inscribe a more uniform characterization. The etiology of sarcopenia is currently found to be multifactorial, and most of the pharmacological researches are focused on the muscular factors in aging. Although the complete mechanism underlying the development of sarcopenia is still waiting to be elucidated, we propose in this article that the primary trigger of sarcopenia may be neurogenic in origin based on the intimate relationship between the nervous and muscular system, namely, the motor neuron and its underlying muscle fibers. Both of them are affected by the cellular environment and their physiological activity.

  8. Sarcopenia and functional decline: pathophysiology, prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautmans, Ivan; Van Puyvelde, Katrien; Mets, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Twenty years ago, the term 'sarcopenia' has been introduced to describe the ageing related loss of skeletal muscle mass. Since then, sarcopenia has been intensively studied and prevalence values have been reported in fifteen papers covering several continents and races. However, consistency regarding the outcome measures and corresponding cut-off values defining sarcopenia is lacking. Most approaches are based on estimations of muscle mass and proposed cut-off values might be too strict, thus reducing their use in daily practice. From a clinical viewpoint, the assessment of muscle performance (grip strength and endurance) can be proposed as a screening tool showing sufficient sensitivity. The pathophysiology of sarcopenia is multifactorial, and important changes at the tissue level have been identified. Close relationships with inflammatory processes have been demonstrated and there is strong evidence for the involvement of a chronic low-grade inflammatory activity. Sarcopenia is aggravated by a complex interaction of several factors among which aging, disuse, immobilization, disease and malnutrition. A comprehensive geriatric assessment should allow the clinician to estimate the relative contribution of these factors and to elaborate appropriate management. From all interventions studied, intensive resistance training seems the most efficient to counter sarcopenia, even in the very old geriatric patients. Significant ameliorations (up to >50% strength gain) can be expected after six weeks of training at a rhythm of 2-3 sessions per week. From a preventive viewpoint, all elderly patients should be advised to start such an exercise program and continue it as long as possible. To date, most pharmacological interventions to counter sarcopenia include drugs with anabolic effects. Unfortunately, their effect is questionable and no clear guidelines exist for the prescription of these products in the context of sarcopenia.

  9. Age-related hearing loss in dogs and treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge middle ear implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, Gert ter

    Hearing loss is a common disorder in many breeds of dogs and auditory dysfunction and its clinical consequences can vary from mild to severe. Dogs with bilateral hearing loss are unable to anticipate dangers such as motor vehicles and they may consequently fall victim to serious or fatal injury. It

  10. Age-related hearing loss in dogs and treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge middle ear implant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, Gert ter

    2010-01-01

    Hearing loss is a common disorder in many breeds of dogs and auditory dysfunction and its clinical consequences can vary from mild to severe. Dogs with bilateral hearing loss are unable to anticipate dangers such as motor vehicles and they may consequently fall victim to serious or fatal injury. It

  11. Influence of age-related loss of otolith function on gait: Data from the Baltimore Longitudinal Study on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Andrew J.; Li, Carol; Carey, John P.; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between otolith function and age-related gait impairment. Study design Cross-sectional analysis within the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), a longitudinal prospective cohort study. Setting Vestibular testing and gait laboratory within an acute care teaching hospital. Patients Community-dwelling participants, who did not use assistive devices. Intervention(s) Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) as measures of saccular and utricular function respectively, and gait speed as a measure of age-related gait impairment. Main outcome measure(s) Cervical and ocular VEMP latency and amplitude responses, and usual, rapid, and narrow walk gait speed assessment over a 6 meter course. Results We analyzed 246 subjects (mean age 73.2, range 26–98). Significant decreases in gait speed with age were observed for all three gait types (p=0.000). Age-related vestibular losses were noted for both men and women. After age adjustment, cervical VEMP latencies were associated with lower usual (p=0.029), rapid (p=0.005), and narrow (p=0.012) gait speeds in women. In men, increases in cVEMP latency were associated with increased rapid gait speed (p=0.009). Ocular VEMPs were not associated with gait speed in men or women. Conclusions These findings suggest that age-related declines in saccular function are associated with changes in gait in a cohort of community-dwelling individuals. Additionally, these data suggest that males and females with age-related saccular loss make opposite adjustments to their gait: males increase gait speed while women decrease gait speed. PMID:25569369

  12. The relevance of mouse models for investigating age-related bone loss in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilka, Robert L

    2013-10-01

    Mice are increasingly used for investigation of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis because their genome is easily manipulated, and their skeleton is similar to that of humans. Unlike the human skeleton, however, the murine skeleton continues to grow slowly after puberty and lacks osteonal remodeling of cortical bone. Yet, like humans, mice exhibit loss of cancellous bone, thinning of cortical bone, and increased cortical porosity with advancing age. Histologic evidence in mice and humans alike indicates that inadequate osteoblast-mediated refilling of resorption cavities created during bone remodeling is responsible. Mouse models of progeria also show bone loss and skeletal defects associated with senescence of early osteoblast progenitors. Additionally, mouse models of atherosclerosis, which often occurs in osteoporotic participants, also suffer bone loss, suggesting that common diseases of aging share pathophysiological pathways. Knowledge of the causes of skeletal fragility in mice should therefore be applicable to humans if inherent limitations are recognized.

  13. Effects of Age and Age-Related Hearing Loss on the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Kelly; Ross, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    It is well documented that aging adversely affects the ability to perceive time-varying acoustic cues. Here we review how physiological measures are being used to explore the effects of aging (and concomitant hearing loss) on the neural representation of temporal cues. Also addressed are the implications of current research findings on the…

  14. Effects of Age-Related Hearing Loss and Background Noise on Neuromagnetic Activityfrom Auditory Cortex

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    Claude eAlain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aging is often accompanied by hearing loss, which impacts how sounds are processed and represented along the ascending auditory pathways and within the auditory cortices. Here, we assess the impact of mild binaural hearing loss on the older adults’ ability to both process complex sounds embedded in noise and segregate a mistuned harmonic in an otherwise periodic stimulus. We measured auditory evoked fields (AEFs using magnetoencephalography while participants were presented with complex tones that had either all harmonics in tune or had the third harmonic mistuned by 4 or 16% of its original value. The tones (75 dB sound pressure level, SPL were presented without, with low (45 dBA, SPL or with moderate (65 dBA SPL Gaussian noise. For each participant, we modeled the AEFs with a pair of dipoles in the superior temporal plane. We then examined the effects of hearing loss and noise on the amplitude and latency of the resulting source waveforms. In the present study, results revealed that similar noise-induced increases in N1m were present in older adults with and without hearing loss. Our results also showed that the P1m amplitude was larger in the hearing impaired than normal-hearing adults. In addition, the object-related negativity (ORN elicited by the mistuned harmonic was larger in hearing impaired listeners. The enhanced P1m and ORN amplitude in the hearing impaired older adults suggests that hearing loss increased neural excitability in auditory cortices, which could be related to deficits in inhibitory control.

  15. Physical activity as intervention for age-related loss of muscle mass and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Christian Skou; Garde, Ellen; Reislev, Nina Linde

    2016-01-01

    to maintain or even improve muscle power as well as physical function in older adults, but the optimal type of training for beneficial long-term training effects over several years is unknown. Moreover, the impact of muscle strength training on cognitive function and brain structure remains speculative......INTRODUCTION: Physical and cognitive function decline with age, accelerating during the 6th decade. Loss of muscle power (force×velocity product) is a dominant physical determinant for loss of functional ability, especially if the lower extremities are affected. Muscle strength training is known...... and cognitive function, mental well-being, health-related quality of life and brain morphology. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: The study includes 450 home-dwelling men and women (62-70 years). Participants are randomly allocated to (1) 1 year of supervised, centre-based heavy resistance training, (2) home-based moderate...

  16. Borderlines between sarcopenia and mild late-onset muscle disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna ePalmio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerous natural or disease-related alterations occur in different tissues of the body with advancing age. Sarcopenia is defined as age-related decrease of muscle mass and strength beginning in mid-adulthood and accelerating in people older than 60 years. Pathophysiology of sarcopenia involves both neural and muscle dependent mechanisms and is enhanced by multiple factors. Aged muscles show loss in fiber number, fiber atrophy and gradual increase in the number of ragged red fibers and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. Generalized loss of muscle tissue and increased amount of intramuscular fat is seen on muscle imaging. However, the degree of these changes vary greatly between individuals and the distinction between normal age-related weakening of muscle strength and clinically significant muscle disease is not always obvious. Because some of the genetic myopathies can present at a very late age and be mild in severity, the correct diagnosis is easily missed. We highlight this difficult borderline zone between sarcopenia and muscle disease by two examples: LGMD1D and myotonic dystrophy type 2. Muscle MRI is a useful tool to help differentiate myopathies from sarcopenia and to reach the correct diagnosis also in the elderly.

  17. Coffee treatment prevents the progression of sarcopenia in aged mice in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yinting; Niu, Kaijun; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Wu, Hongmei; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Ohrui, Takashi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Ichinose, Masakazu; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Huang, Guowei; Nagatomi, Ryoichi

    2014-02-01

    Sarcopenia is characterized by the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, which results in higher mortality in aged people. One of the mechanisms of the sarcopenia is the loss in the function and number of muscle satellite cells. Chronic low-grade inflammation plays a central role in the pathogenesis of age-related sarcopenia. Accumulating evidence suggests that coffee, one of the most widely consumed beverages in the world, has potential pharmacological benefits such as anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. Since these effects may improve sarcopenia and the functions of satellite cells, we examined the effects of coffee on the skeletal muscles in an animal model using aged mice. In vivo, coffee treatment attenuated the decrease in the muscle weight and grip strength, increased the regenerating capacity of injured muscles, and decreased the serum pro-inflammatory mediator levels compared to controls. In vitro, using satellite cells isolated from aged mice, coffee treatment increased the cell proliferation rate, augmented the cell cycle, and increased the activation level of Akt intra-cellular signaling pathway compared to controls. These findings suggest that the coffee treatment had a beneficial effect on age-related sarcopenia.

  18. Age-related loss of calcium binding proteins in rabbit hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    deJong, GI; Naber, PA; VANDERZEE, EA; Thompson, LT; Disterhoft, JF; Luiten, PGM

    1996-01-01

    Using immunocytochemistry hippocampal levels of the calcium binding proteins calbindin 28K (CB) and parvalbumin (PV) was studied in young (1 month) to very old (60 month) Albino rabbits. Young (3 month) and senescent (30 month) Wistar rats were also examined to compare the distribution and age dependency of PV and CB in both species. The distribution of PV-ir is similar in the rabbit and rat hippocampus. Aging in both species yielded a small loss of PV-ir in axon terminals. The presence of CB...

  19. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung Mook

    2016-11-01

    Sarcopenia is an age-associated loss of muscle mass and decline in muscle strength; it is common in older adults and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite its prevalence, there is currently no universally adopted definition of sarcopenia. In addition to low muscle mass measurements, recent research has recognized the importance of muscle strength and physical performance. Aging induces changes in body composition, such as an increase in visceral fat and reduced muscle mass. Recently, the new concept of sarcopenic obesity has emerged, reflecting a combination of sarcopenia and obesity. The rapidly increasing prevalence and serious consequences of sarcopenic obesity are recognized as a critical public health risk in the aging society. Sarcopenia and obesity share several pathophysiological mechanisms, and they may potentiate each other. The present paper reviews the definitions and techniques used to measure sarcopenia, as well as the health outcomes of sarcopenic obesity. It also highlights the role of diminished muscle mass and strength in cardiometabolic disease mortality. Additional research may be needed to promote the identification and management of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in the elderly population.

  20. Shortening-induced torque depression in old men: implications for age-related power loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Geoffrey A; Makrakos, Demetri P; Stevens, Daniel E; Herzog, Walter; Rice, Charles L; Vandervoort, Anthony A

    2014-09-01

    Following active muscle shortening, the steady-state isometric torque at the final muscle length is lower than the steady-state torque obtained for a purely isometric contraction at that same final muscle length. This well-documented property of skeletal muscle is termed shortening-induced torque depression (TD). Despite many investigations into the mechanisms of weakness and power loss in old age, the influence of muscle shortening on the history dependence of isometric torque production remains to be elucidated. Thus, it is unclear whether older adults are disadvantaged for torque and power production following a dynamic shortening contraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate shortening-induced TD in older adults, and to determine whether shortening-induced TD is related to power loss. Maximal voluntary isometric dorsiflexion contractions (MVC; 10s) in 8 young (25.5±3.7years) and 9 old (76.1±5.4years) men were performed on a HUMAC NORM dynamometer as a reference, and then again following an active shortening of 40° joint excursion (40°PF-0°PF) at angular velocities of 15°/s and 120°/s. Work and instantaneous power were derived during shortening. Shortening-induced TD was calculated and expressed as a percentage by determining the mean torque value over 1s during the isometric steady state of the MVC following shortening, divided by the mean torque value for the same 1s time period during the isometric reference MVC. To assess muscle activation, electromyography (root mean square; EMGRMS) of the tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) was calculated at identical time points used in assessing shortening-induced TD, and voluntary activation (VA) was assessed using the interpolated twitch technique. Old were 18% weaker than young for MVC, and ~40% less powerful for 15°/s and 120°/s of shortening. Old produced 37% and 21% less work for 15°/s and 120°/s than young, respectively. Furthermore, old experienced 60% and 70% greater shortening-induced TD

  1. Identifying microRNAs involved in degeneration of the organ of corti during age-related hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, a class of short non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of mRNA targets, are important regulators of cellular senescence and aging. We questioned which miRNAs are involved in age-related degeneration of the organ of Corti (OC, the auditory sensory epithelium that transduces mechanical stimuli to electrical activity in the inner ear. Degeneration of the OC is generally accepted as the main cause of age-related hearing loss (ARHL, a progressive loss of hearing in individuals as they grow older. To determine which miRNAs are involved in the onset and progression of ARHL, miRNA gene expression in the OC of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and CBA/J, was compared at three different ages using GeneChip miRNA microarray and was validated by real-time PCR. We showed that 111 and 71 miRNAs exhibited differential expression in the C57 and CBA mice, respectively, and that downregulated miRNAs substantially outnumbered upregulated miRNAs during aging. miRNAs that had approximately 2-fold upregulation included members of miR-29 family and miR-34 family, which are known regulators of pro-apoptotic pathways. In contrast, miRNAs that were downregulated by about 2-fold were members of the miR-181 family and miR-183 family, which are known to be important for proliferation and differentiation, respectively. The shift of miRNA expression favoring apoptosis occurred earlier than detectable hearing threshold elevation and hair cell loss. Our study suggests that changes in miRNA expression precede morphological and functional changes, and that upregulation of pro-apoptotic miRNAs and downregulation of miRNAs promoting proliferation and differentiation are both involved in age-related degeneration of the OC.

  2. Likely Age-Related Hearing Loss (Presbycusis) in a Stranded Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphin (Sousa chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songhai; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Hoffmann-Kuhnt, Matthias; Fernando, Nimal; Taylor, Elizabeth A; Lin, Wenzhi; Chen, Jialin; Ng, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in Zhuhai, China, was measured. The age of this animal was estimated to be ~40 years. The animal's hearing was measured using a noninvasive auditory evoked potential (AEP) method. The results showed that the high-frequency hearing cutoff frequency of the studied dolphin was ~30-40 kHz lower than that of a conspecific younger individual ~13 year old. The lower high-frequency hearing range in the older dolphin was explained as a likely result of age-related hearing loss (presbycusis).

  3. Wnt16 Is Associated with Age-Related Bone Loss and Estrogen Withdrawal in Murine Bone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Todd

    Full Text Available Genome Wide Association Studies suggest that Wnt16 is an important contributor to the mechanisms controlling bone mineral density, cortical thickness, bone strength and ultimately fracture risk. Wnt16 acts on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and, in cortical bone, is predominantly derived from osteoblasts. This led us to hypothesize that low bone mass would be associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression and that Wnt16 expression would be increased by anabolic factors, including mechanical loading. We therefore investigated Wnt16 expression in the context of ageing, mechanical loading and unloading, estrogen deficiency and replacement, and estrogen receptor α (ERα depletion. Quantitative real time PCR showed that Wnt16 mRNA expression was lower in cortical bone and marrow of aged compared to young female mice. Neither increased nor decreased (by disuse mechanical loading altered Wnt16 expression in young female mice, although Wnt16 expression was decreased following ovariectomy. Both 17β-estradiol and the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen increased Wnt16 expression relative to ovariectomy. Wnt16 and ERβ expression were increased in female ERα-/- mice when compared to Wild Type. We also addressed potential effects of gender on Wnt16 expression and while the expression was lower in the cortical bone of aged males as in females, it was higher in male bone marrow of aged mice compared to young. In the kidney, which we used as a non-bone reference tissue, Wnt16 expression was unaffected by age in either males or females. In summary, age, and its associated bone loss, is associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression whereas bone loss associated with disuse has no effect on Wnt16 expression. In the artificially loaded mouse tibia we observed no loading-related up-regulation of Wnt16 expression but provide evidence that its expression is influenced by estrogen receptor signaling. These findings suggest that while Wnt16 is not an

  4. Wnt16 Is Associated with Age-Related Bone Loss and Estrogen Withdrawal in Murine Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Henry; Galea, Gabriel L.; Meakin, Lee B.; Delisser, Peter J.; Lanyon, Lance E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome Wide Association Studies suggest that Wnt16 is an important contributor to the mechanisms controlling bone mineral density, cortical thickness, bone strength and ultimately fracture risk. Wnt16 acts on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and, in cortical bone, is predominantly derived from osteoblasts. This led us to hypothesize that low bone mass would be associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression and that Wnt16 expression would be increased by anabolic factors, including mechanical loading. We therefore investigated Wnt16 expression in the context of ageing, mechanical loading and unloading, estrogen deficiency and replacement, and estrogen receptor α (ERα) depletion. Quantitative real time PCR showed that Wnt16 mRNA expression was lower in cortical bone and marrow of aged compared to young female mice. Neither increased nor decreased (by disuse) mechanical loading altered Wnt16 expression in young female mice, although Wnt16 expression was decreased following ovariectomy. Both 17β-estradiol and the Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator Tamoxifen increased Wnt16 expression relative to ovariectomy. Wnt16 and ERβ expression were increased in female ERα-/- mice when compared to Wild Type. We also addressed potential effects of gender on Wnt16 expression and while the expression was lower in the cortical bone of aged males as in females, it was higher in male bone marrow of aged mice compared to young. In the kidney, which we used as a non-bone reference tissue, Wnt16 expression was unaffected by age in either males or females. In summary, age, and its associated bone loss, is associated with low levels of Wnt16 expression whereas bone loss associated with disuse has no effect on Wnt16 expression. In the artificially loaded mouse tibia we observed no loading-related up-regulation of Wnt16 expression but provide evidence that its expression is influenced by estrogen receptor signaling. These findings suggest that while Wnt16 is not an obligatory contributor to

  5. Neuronal erythropoietin overexpression protects mice against age-related hearing loss (presbycusis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Arianne Monge; Belfrage, Celina; Jain, Neha; Wei, Eric T; Martorell, Belén Canto; Gassmann, Max; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    So far, typical causes of presbycusis such as degeneration of hair cells and/or primary auditory (spiral ganglion) neurons cannot be treated. Because erythropoietin's (Epo) neuroprotective potential has been shown previously, we determined hearing thresholds of juvenile and aged mice overexpressing Epo in neuronal tissues. Behavioral audiometry revealed in contrast to 5 months of age, that 11-month-old Epo-transgenic mice had up to 35 dB lower hearing thresholds between 1.4 and 32 kHz, and at the highest frequencies (50-80 kHz), thresholds could be obtained in aged Epo-transgenic only but not anymore in old C57BL6 control mice. Click-evoked auditory brainstem response showed similar results. Numbers of spiral ganglion neurons in aged C57BL6 but not Epo-transgenic mice were dramatically reduced mainly in the basal turn, the location of high frequencies. In addition, there was a tendency to better preservation of inner and outer hair cells in Epo-transgenic mice. Hence, Epo's known neuroprotective action effectively suppresses the loss of spiral ganglion cells and probably also hair cells and, thus, development of presbycusis in mice.

  6. Prevalence of sarcopenia in older patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughman, James R; Williams, Grant R; Deal, Allison M; Yu, Hyeon; Nyrop, Kirsten A; Alston, Shani M; Gordon, Brittaney-Belle; Sanoff, Hanna K; Muss, Hyman B

    2015-11-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass, strength, and function. It is a common finding in older patients and is associated with decreased life expectancy and potentially higher susceptibility to chemotherapy toxicity. This study describes the prevalence of sarcopenia in older adults with early stage colorectal cancer. Patients ≥70 years old who underwent surgical resection for stage I-III colorectal cancer between 2008 and 2013 were identified from the medical record. Sarcopenia was assessed by measuring the total muscle area on computerized tomography (CT) images obtained prior to surgery. Total muscle area was measured at the level of L3 and normalized using each patient's height to produce a skeletal muscle index (SMI). Sarcopenia was defined using sex- and body mass index (BMI)-specific threshold values of SMI. Eighty-seven patients were included, with a median age of 77 years (70-96). Twenty-five men (60% of 42) and 25 women (56% of 45) had sarcopenia. Sarcopenic patients had significantly lower BMI (p=0.03) compared to non-sarcopenic patients. There was a positive correlation between BMI and SMI for both men (r=0.44) and women (r=0.16). Sarcopenia is highly prevalent among older patients with early stage colorectal cancer. BMI alone is a poor indicator of lean body mass and improved methods of screening for sarcopenia are necessary. CT scans are a viable option for identifying sarcopenic patients in whom timely interventions may improve survival, quality of life, and functional outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Age-related striatal BOLD changes without changes in behavioral loss aversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans C Breiter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Loss aversion (LA, the idea that negative valuations have a higher psychological impact than positive ones, is considered an important variable in consumer research. The literature on aging and behavior suggests older individuals may show more LA, although it is not clear if this is an effect of aging in general (as in the continuum from age 20 and 50 years, or of the state of older age (e.g., past age 65 years. We also have not yet identified the potential biological effects of aging on the neural processing of LA. In the current study we used a cohort of subjects with a 30 year range of ages, and performed whole brain functional MRI (fMRI to examine the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens (VS/NAc response during a passive viewing of affective faces with model-based fMRI analysis incorporating behavioral data from a validated approach/avoidance task with the same stimuli. Our a priori focus on the VS/NAc was based on (1 the VS/NAc being a central region for reward/aversion processing, (2 its activation to both positive and negative stimuli, (3 its reported involvement with tracking LA. LA from approach/avoidance to affective faces showed excellent fidelity to published measures of LA. Imaging results were then compared to the behavioral measure of LA using the same affective faces. Although there was no relationship between age and LA, we observed increasing neural differential sensitivity (NDS of the VS/NAc to avoidance responses (negative valuations relative to approach responses (positive valuations with increasing age. These findings suggest that a central region for reward/aversion processing changes with age, and may require more activation to produce the same LA behavior as in younger individuals, consistent with the idea of neural efficiency observed with high IQ individuals showing less brain activation to complete the same task.

  8. Age-related Hearing Loss: GABA, Nicotinic Acetylcholine and NMDA Receptor Expression Changes in Spiral Ganglion Neurons of the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaolan; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Ding, Bo; Walton, Joseph P.; Frisina, Robert D.; Su, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss – presbycusis – is the number one communication disorder and most prevalent neurodegenerative condition of our aged population. Although speech understanding in background noise is quite difficult for those with presbycusis, there are currently no biomedical treatments to prevent, delay or reverse this condition. A better understanding of the cochlear mechanisms underlying presbycusis will help lead to future treatments. Objectives of the present study were to investigate gamma-amino butyric acid A (GABAA) receptor subunit α1, nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptor subunit β2, and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA and protein expression changes in spiral ganglion neurons of the CBA/CaJ mouse cochlea, that occur in age-related hearing loss, utilizing quantitative immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR techniques. We found that auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds shifted over 40 dB from 3–48 kHz in old mice compared to young adults. DPOAE thresholds also shifted over 40 dB from 6–49 kHz in old mice, and their amplitudes were significantly decreased or absent in the same frequency range. Spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) density decreased with age in basal, middle and apical turns, and SGN density of the basal turn declined the most. A positive correlation was observed between SGN density and ABR wave 1 amplitude. mRNA and protein expression of GABAAR α1 and AChR β2 decreased with age in SGNs in the old mouse cochlea. mRNA and protein expression of NMDAR NR1 increased with age in SGNs of the old mice. These findings demonstrate that there are functionally-relevant age-related changes of GABAAR, nAChR, NMDAR expression in CBA mouse SGNs reflecting their degeneration, which may be related to functional changes in cochlear synaptic transmission with age, suggesting biological mechanisms for peripheral age-related hearing loss. PMID:24316061

  9. Translational studies in older men using testosterone to treat sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Randall J; Dillon, E L; Choudhary, S; Zhao, Y; Horstman, A M; Tilton, R G; Sheffield-Moore, M

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that occurs with aging. Our research group has found an efficacious administration paradigm using testosterone to combat sarcopenia in humans. In addition, our research has uncovered an important regulatory enzyme of inflammation, nuclear factor-κB-inducing kinase that may regulate human skeletal muscle catabolism, and that appears to be counter-regulated by administration of standard doses of testosterone. This is important because a number of age-related clinical circumstances trigger acute and chronic muscle loss including cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hospitalization, acute and chronic illness, and diseases in which systemic inflammation occurs. Moreover, it is often the treatment itself that can induce muscle loss. For example, glucocorticoids are tremendously effective at reducing inflammation and are a frontline therapy for many inflammatory-based diseases, yet paradoxically trigger muscle loss. We will discuss our research findings and the clinical significance of our human clinical translational research with testosterone.

  10. Auditory efferent feedback system deficits precede age-related hearing loss: contralateral suppression of otoacoustic emissions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxia; Vasilyeva, Olga N; Kim, Sunghee; Jacobson, Michael; Romney, Joshua; Waterman, Marjorie S; Tuttle, David; Frisina, Robert D

    2007-08-10

    The C57BL/6J mouse has been a useful model of presbycusis, as it displays an accelerated age-related peripheral hearing loss. The medial olivocochlear efferent feedback (MOC) system plays a role in suppressing cochlear outer hair cell (OHC) responses, particularly for background noise. Neurons of the MOC system are located in the superior olivary complex, particularly in the dorsomedial periolivary nucleus (DMPO) and in the ventral nucleus of the trapezoid body (VNTB). We previously discovered that the function of the MOC system declines with age prior to OHC degeneration, as measured by contralateral suppression (CS) of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) in humans and CBA mice. The present study aimed to determine the time course of age changes in MOC function in C57s. DPOAE amplitudes and CS of DPOAEs were collected for C57s from 6 to 40 weeks of age. MOC responses were observed at 6 weeks but were gone at middle (15-30 kHz) and high (30-45 kHz) frequencies by 8 weeks. Quantitative stereological analyses of Nissl sections revealed smaller neurons in the DMPO and VNTB of young adult C57s compared with CBAs. These findings suggest that reduced neuron size may underlie part of the noteworthy rapid decline of the C57 efferent system. In conclusion, the C57 mouse has MOC function at 6 weeks, but it declines quickly, preceding the progression of peripheral age-related sensitivity deficits and hearing loss in this mouse strain.

  11. A multi-method assessment of bone maintenance and loss in an Imperial Roman population: Implications for future studies of age-related bone loss in the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchesne, Patrick; Agarwal, Sabrina C

    2017-09-01

    One of the hallmarks of contemporary osteoporosis and bone loss is dramatically higher prevalence of loss and fragility in females post-menopause. In contrast, bioarchaeological studies of bone loss have found a greater diversity of age- and sex-related patterns of bone loss in past populations. We argue that the differing findings may relate to the fact that most studies use only a single methodology to quantify bone loss and do not account for the heterogeneity and complexity of bone maintenance across the skeleton and over the life course. We test the hypothesis that bone mass and maintenance in trabecular bone sites versus cortical bone sites will show differing patterns of age-related bone loss, with cortical bone sites showing sex difference in bone loss that are similar to contemporary Western populations, and trabecular bone loss at earlier ages. We investigated this hypothesis in the Imperial Roman population of Velia using three methods: radiogrammetry of the second metacarpal (N = 71), bone histology of ribs (N = 70), and computerized tomography of trabecular bone architecture (N = 47). All three methods were used to explore sex and age differences in patterns of bone loss. The suite of methods utilized reveal differences in the timing of bone loss with age, but all methods found no statistically significant differences in age-related bone loss. We argue that a multi-method approach reduces the influence of confounding factors by building a reconstruction of bone turnover over the life cycle that a limited single-method project cannot provide. The implications of using multiple methods beyond studies of bone loss are also discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Sex differences of sarcopenia in Asian populations: The implications in diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hui Wu, MD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, a well-known geriatric syndrome, is defined as the age-related loss of muscle mass plus declined muscle function (muscle strength and/or physical performance. Sarcopenia is associated with a number of adverse outcomes, including poor quality of life, falls, disability, and mortality. The clinical impact of sarcopenia on older people will escalate along with the rapid growth of elderly population in Asia. Moreover, the differences of ethnic backgrounds between Asian people and Westerners have trigger the need for specific diagnostic criteria for Asian populations. After the publication of Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia consensus, sarcopenia has gained even more extensive research attention in Asia. In general, the reported prevalence of sarcopenia in Asia was lower than Western countries, ranging from 2.5% to 45.7%. Asian people tend to have lower muscle mass, weaker grip strength, slower gait speed, and higher body fat mass with central distribution. Compared to Western populations, the rate of age-related muscle mass decline in older Asian people remain relatively unchanged, but the decline rate in muscle strength or physical performance was more significant along with aging. With aging, Asian people presented with greater increase in fat mass and higher prevalence of central obesity, especially in women. Due to the great impact of sarcopenia, a life course program for good nutrition and physical activities would be of great benefit. However, various research challenges remain to be resolved in the future and more outcome-based trials are needed to formulate the most optimal strategy for sarcopenia in Asia.

  13. DESIGNING DRUG TRIALS FOR SARCOPENIA IN OLDER ADULTS WITH HIP FRACTURE - A TASK FORCE FROM THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ONFRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA RESEARCH (ICFSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellas, B; Fielding, R; Miller, R; Rolland, Y; Bhasin, S; Magaziner, J; Bischoff-Ferrari, H

    2014-01-01

    In May 2012, a Sarcopenia Consensus Summit was convened by the Foundation of the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), National Institute of Aging (NIA), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA); and co-sponsored by five pharmaceutical companies. At this summit, sarcopenia experts from around the world worked to develop agreement on a working definition of sarcopenia, building on the work of previous efforts to generate a consensus. With the ultimate goal of improving function and independence in individuals with sarcopenia, the Task Force focused its attention on people at greatly increased risk of muscle atrophy as a consequence of hip fracture. The rationale for looking at this population is that since hip fracture is a recognized condition, there is a clear regulatory path forward for developing interventions. Moreover, patients with hip fracture may provide an appropriate population to advance understanding of sarcopenia, for example helping to define diagnostic criteria, develop biomarkers, understand the mechanisms that underlie the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, and identify endpoints for clinical trials that are reliable, objective, and clinically meaningful. Task Force members agreed that progress in treating sarcopenia will require strengthening of partnerships between academia, industry, and government agencies, and across continents to reach consensus on diagnostic criteria, optimization of clinical trials design, and identification of improved treatment and preventive strategies. In this report, the main results of the Task Force discussion are presented.

  14. Perfil lipídico de la sordera ligada al envejecimiento Lipid profile and hearing-loss aged-related

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Martín Villares

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo y antecedentes: La sordera ligada al envejecimiento es la causa más frecuente de sordera a partir de los 65 años, pero su patogenia es aún mal conocida. El objetivo de este estudio es valorar el impacto de la hiperlipemia en su patogenia. Ámbito del estudio: Población mayor de 65 años del área de Salud de El Bierzo. Pacientes: Incluimos en el estudio 180 pacientes con hipoacusia neurosensorial bilateral, sin antecedentes de patología renal, neurológica, tiroidea o de oído medio. Intervenciones: Se realizó audiometría tonal y estudio de lípidos plasmáticos (colesterol, HDL, LDL y triglicéridos. Se utilizan métodos estadísticos. Resultados: Los más destacados fueron: 1 el 71% de los pacientes presentaban niveles altos de lípidos en sangre, sobre todo las mujeres entre 65-69 años (media 256 mg/dl; 2 los hombres entre 65-69 años presentaban un alto índice aterogénico (media 5,27; 3 los pacientes con hiperlipemia presentaban peor audición (p Objectives/hypothesis: Presbycusis is the most prevalent cause of hearing-loss in the older, but pathogenesis is not well-know. The premise of this study is that hyperlipemia increase risk of age-related hearing-loss. Patients and methods: 180 patient more than 65 years-old were studied. All patients had bilateral hearing-loss and no renal, neurological, thyriod or middle-ear pathology. We explored serum levels of cholesterol, HDL, LDL and triglycerides. We performed tonal audimetry in all patients. Results: The 71% of patients has hypercholesteremia and the higest serum levels were detected in 65-69 yearsold men (mean media 5,27. Patients with hypercholesteremia had worse hearing-loss than patients with normal lipid serum levels (p < .05. Conclusions: Our study sugest that hypercholesteremia are associated to age-related hearing-loss, possibly by an atherosclerosis mechanism.

  15. Cognitive self-consciousness--a predictor of increased anxiety following first-time diagnosis of age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohlman, Jan

    2009-03-01

    This study tested prospective models of anxiety and depression following a first time diagnosis of age-related hearing loss, also known as presbycusis, which is one of the most common and disabling health problems in the world. The predictor of interest was cognitive self-consciousness (CSC; Cartwright-Hatton & Wells (1997). Beliefs about worry and intrusions: The Meta-Cognitions Questionnaire and its correlates. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 11, 276-279.), or the tendency to closely attend to and monitor the content and process of one's own thoughts. Sixty-seven older adults were assessed at a university-based audiology clinic at three timepoints: at the time of diagnosis (T1), six (T2), and 12 months later (T3). Measures of anxiety, depression, and CSC were collected. It was hypothesized that a subset of older adults with hearing loss would report increased CSC at T2. Additionally, the interaction of CSC and anxiety and depression symptoms at T2 was expected to predict significant variance in measures of anxiety and depression at T3, even after baseline levels of distress were controlled in regression models. Finally, it was hypothesized that consistent use of a hearing aid by T3 would act as a palliative to reduce distress in response to hearing loss at T3. Results were partially consistent with hypotheses and point to a new direction in preventing anxiety and depression following a first time diagnosis of presbycusis.

  16. Sarcopenia in Asia: consensus report of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Kung; Liu, Li-Kuo; Woo, Jean; Assantachai, Prasert; Auyeung, Tung-Wai; Bahyah, Kamaruzzaman Shahrul; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Chen, Liang-Yu; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Krairit, Orapitchaya; Lee, Jenny S W; Lee, Wei-Ju; Lee, Yunhwan; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Limpawattana, Panita; Lin, Chu-Sheng; Peng, Li-Ning; Satake, Shosuke; Suzuki, Takao; Won, Chang Won; Wu, Chih-Hsing; Wu, Si-Nan; Zhang, Teimei; Zeng, Ping; Akishita, Masahiro; Arai, Hidenori

    2014-02-01

    Sarcopenia, a newly recognized geriatric syndrome, is characterized by age-related decline of skeletal muscle plus low muscle strength and/or physical performance. Previous studies have confirmed the association of sarcopenia and adverse health outcomes, such as falls, disability, hospital admission, long term care placement, poorer quality of life, and mortality, which denotes the importance of sarcopenia in the health care for older people. Despite the clinical significance of sarcopenia, the operational definition of sarcopenia and standardized intervention programs are still lacking. It is generally agreed by the different working groups for sarcopenia in the world that sarcopenia should be defined through a combined approach of muscle mass and muscle quality, however, selecting appropriate diagnostic cutoff values for all the measurements in Asian populations is challenging. Asia is a rapidly aging region with a huge population, so the impact of sarcopenia to this region is estimated to be huge as well. Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia (AWGS) aimed to promote sarcopenia research in Asia, and we collected the best available evidences of sarcopenia researches from Asian countries to establish the consensus for sarcopenia diagnosis. AWGS has agreed with the previous reports that sarcopenia should be described as low muscle mass plus low muscle strength and/or low physical performance, and we also recommend outcome indicators for further researches, as well as the conditions that sarcopenia should be assessed. In addition to sarcopenia screening for community-dwelling older people, AWGS recommends sarcopenia assessment in certain clinical conditions and healthcare settings to facilitate implementing sarcopenia in clinical practice. Moreover, we also recommend cutoff values for muscle mass measurements (7.0 kg/m(2) for men and 5.4 kg/m(2) for women by using dual X-ray absorptiometry, and 7.0 kg/m(2) for men and 5.7 kg/m(2) for women by using bioimpedance analysis

  17. Muscle contractile and metabolic dysfunction is a common feature of sarcopenia of aging and chronic diseases: from sarcopenic obesity to cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biolo, Gianni; Cederholm, Tommy; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant body tissue accounting for many physiological functions. However, muscle mass and functions are not routinely assessed. Sarcopenia is defined as skeletal muscle loss and dysfunction in aging and chronic diseases. Inactivity, inflammation, age-related factors, anorexia and unbalanced nutrition affect changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms are difficult to distinguish in individual subjects due to the multifactorial character of the condition. Sarcopenia includes both muscle loss and dysfunction which induce contractile impairment and metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, affecting whole-body metabolism and immune/inflammatory response. There are different metabolic trajectories for muscle loss versus fat changes in aging and chronic diseases. Appetite regulation and physical activity affect energy balance and changes in body fat mass. Appetite regulation by inflammatory mediators is poorly understood. In some patients, inflammation induces anorexia and fat loss in combination with sarcopenia. In others, appetite is maintained, despite activation of systemic inflammation, leading to sarcopenia with normal or increased BMI. Inactivity contributes to sarcopenia and increased fat tissue in aging and diseases. At the end of the metabolic trajectories, cachexia and sarcopenic obesity are paradigms of the two patient categories. Pre-cachexia and cachexia are observed in patients with cancer, chronic heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Sarcopenic obesity and sarcopenia with normal/increased BMI are observed in rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and in most of patients with COPD or chronic kidney disease. In these conditions, sarcopenia is a powerful prognostic factor for morbidity and mortality, independent of BMI.

  18. Reshaping understandings of disability associated with age-related vision loss (ARVL): incorporating critical disability perspectives into research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Colleen; Rudman, Debbie Laliberte; Trentham, Barry; Polgar, Jan; Spafford, Marlee M

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we have sought to stimulate a critical dialog regarding the ways in which disability has been largely conceptualized and studied in literature addressing age-related vision loss (ARVL). We suggest an expansion of this largely biomedically informed research area to include alternative frameworks, namely critical disability perspectives. To demonstrate the potential contributions of adopting a critical disability approach to enhance understandings of ARVL, this article outlined the primary tenets of the biomedical and social models of disability; the key aims, emphases, and assumptions of critical disability perspectives; and provided examples of how such an approach would lead to new research foci in the study of ARVL. The paper highlighted four qualities of critical disability perspectives that future ARVL research should ascribe to, including (a) a focus on interdependence over traditional notions of independence; (b) a broader conceptualization of 'normalcy'; (c) the influence of language as a means of describing or labeling disabled persons; and (d) the influence of the socio-political environment in the creation and sustainment of disability. This paper encouraged the incorporation of critical disability perspectives to provide new ways of conceptualizing, researching, writing about, and practicing in relation to ARVL. Implications for Rehabilitation The application of critical disability perspectives to expand the boundaries of low vision research can broaden low vision rehabilitation services (LVRS) in ways that more effectively attend to environmental features shaping and perpetuating disability for clients with age-related vision loss (ARVL). Low vision research, informed by critical disability perspectives, would inform a shift away from the exclusive focus on independence towards an acknowledgment of interdependence. The integration of participatory research approaches in ARVL research could generate new insights to inform rehabilitation by

  19. Membrane lipid rafts and neurobiology: age-related changes in membrane lipids and loss of neuronal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Junji; Pearn, Matthew L; Lemkuil, Brian P; Patel, Piyush M; Head, Brian P

    2016-08-15

    A better understanding of the cellular physiological role that plasma membrane lipids, fatty acids and sterols play in various cellular systems may yield more insight into how cellular and whole organ function is altered during the ageing process. Membrane lipid rafts (MLRs) within the plasma membrane of most cells serve as key organizers of intracellular signalling and tethering points of cytoskeletal components. MLRs are plasmalemmal microdomains enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and scaffolding proteins; they serve as a platform for signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization and vesicular trafficking. Within MLRs are the scaffolding and cholesterol binding proteins named caveolin (Cav). Cavs not only organize a multitude of receptors including neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA and AMPA receptors), signalling proteins that regulate the production of cAMP (G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, phosphodiesterases (PDEs)), and receptor tyrosine kinases involved in growth (Trk), but also interact with components that modulate actin and tubulin cytoskeletal dynamics (e.g. RhoGTPases and actin binding proteins). MLRs are essential for the regulation of the physiology of organs such as the brain, and age-related loss of cholesterol from the plasma membrane leads to loss of MLRs, decreased presynaptic vesicle fusion, and changes in neurotransmitter release, all of which contribute to different forms of neurodegeneration. Thus, MLRs provide an active membrane domain that tethers and reorganizes the cytoskeletal machinery necessary for membrane and cellular repair, and genetic interventions that restore MLRs to normal cellular levels may be exploited as potential therapeutic means to reverse the ageing and neurodegenerative processes.

  20. Synergistic effects of free radical scavengers and cochlear vasodilators: a new otoprotective strategy for age-related hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Juan Carlos; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; Valero, María Llanos; Gabaldón-Ull, María Cruz; Miller, Josef M.; Juiz, José M.

    2015-01-01

    The growing increase in age-related hearing loss (ARHL), with its dramatic reduction in quality of life and significant increase in health care costs, is a catalyst to develop new therapeutic strategies to prevent or reduce this aging-associated condition. In this regard, there is extensive evidence that excessive free radical formation along with diminished cochlear blood flow are essential factors involved in mechanisms of other stress-related hearing loss, such as that associated with noise or ototoxic drug exposure. The emerging view is that both play key roles in ARHL pathogenesis. Therapeutic targeting of excessive free radical formation and cochlear blood flow regulation may be a useful strategy to prevent onset of ARHL. Supporting this idea, micronutrient-based therapies, in particular those combining antioxidants and vasodilators like magnesium (Mg2+), have proven effective in reducing the impact of noise and ototoxic drugs in the inner ear, therefore improving auditory function. In this review, the synergistic effects of combinations of antioxidant free radicals scavengers and cochlear vasodilators will be discussed as a feasible therapeutic approach for the treatment of ARHL. PMID:26029103

  1. Age-related hearing loss: aquaporin 4 gene expression changes in the mouse cochlea and auditory midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Nathan; D'Souza, Mary; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Frisina, Robert D

    2009-02-01

    Presbycusis -- age-related hearing loss, is the number one communication disorder, and one of the top three chronic medical conditions of our aged population. Aquaporins, particularly aquaporin 4 (Aqp4), are membrane proteins with important roles in water and ion flux across cell membranes, including cells of the inner ear and pathways of the brain used for hearing. To more fully understand the biological bases of presbycusis, 39 CBA mice, a well-studied animal model of presbycusis, underwent non-invasive hearing testing as a function of sound frequency (auditory brainstem response -- ABR thresholds, and distortion-product otoacoustic emission -- DPOAE magnitudes), and were clustered into four groups based on age and hearing ability. Aqp4 gene expression, as determined by genechip microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR, was compared to the young adult control group in the three older groups: middle aged with good hearing, old age with mild presbycusis, and old age with severe presbycusis. Linear regression and ANOVA showed statistically significant changes in Aqp4 gene expression and ABR and DPOAE hearing status in the cochlea and auditory midbrain -- inferior colliculus. Down-regulation in the cochlea was seen, and an initial down-, then up-regulation was discovered for the inferior colliculus Aqp4 expression. It is theorized that these changes in Aqp4 gene expression represent an age-related disruption of ion flux in the fluids of the cochlea that are responsible for ionic gradients underlying sound transduction in cochlear hair cells necessary for hearing. In regard to central auditory processing at the level of the auditory midbrain, aquaporin gene expression changes may affect neurotransmitter cycling involving supporting cells, thus impairing complex sound neural processing with age.

  2. Genomic and Proteomic Profiling Reveals Reduced Mitochondrial Function and Disruption of the Neuromuscular Junction Driving Rat Sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Chick, Joel M.; Kendall, Tracee; Eash, John K.; Li, Christine; Zhang, Yunyu; Vickers, Chad; Wu, Zhidan; Clarke, Brian A.; Shi, Jun; Cruz, Joseph; Fournier, Brigitte; Brachat, Sophie; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Ma, QiCheng; Markovits, Judit; Broome, Michelle; Steinkrauss, Michelle; Skuba, Elizabeth; Galarneau, Jean-Rene; Gygi, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, remain unclear. To identify molecular changes that correlated best with sarcopenia and might contribute to its pathogenesis, we determined global gene expression profiles in muscles of rats aged 6, 12, 18, 21, 24, and 27 months. These rats exhibit sarcopenia beginning at 21 months. Correlation of the gene expression versus muscle mass or age changes, and functional annotation analysis identified gene signatures of sarcopenia distinct from gene signatures of aging. Specifically, mitochondrial energy metabolism (e.g., tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation) pathway genes were the most downregulated and most significantly correlated with sarcopenia. Also, perturbed were genes/pathways associated with neuromuscular junction patency (providing molecular evidence of sarcopenia-related functional denervation and neuromuscular junction remodeling), protein degradation, and inflammation. Proteomic analysis of samples at 6, 18, and 27 months confirmed the depletion of mitochondrial energy metabolism proteins and neuromuscular junction proteins. Together, these findings suggest that therapeutic approaches that simultaneously stimulate mitochondrogenesis and reduce muscle proteolysis and inflammation have potential for treating sarcopenia. PMID:23109432

  3. Genomic and proteomic profiling reveals reduced mitochondrial function and disruption of the neuromuscular junction driving rat sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Chick, Joel M; Kendall, Tracee; Eash, John K; Li, Christine; Zhang, Yunyu; Vickers, Chad; Wu, Zhidan; Clarke, Brian A; Shi, Jun; Cruz, Joseph; Fournier, Brigitte; Brachat, Sophie; Gutzwiller, Sabine; Ma, QiCheng; Markovits, Judit; Broome, Michelle; Steinkrauss, Michelle; Skuba, Elizabeth; Galarneau, Jean-Rene; Gygi, Steven P; Glass, David J

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, remain unclear. To identify molecular changes that correlated best with sarcopenia and might contribute to its pathogenesis, we determined global gene expression profiles in muscles of rats aged 6, 12, 18, 21, 24, and 27 months. These rats exhibit sarcopenia beginning at 21 months. Correlation of the gene expression versus muscle mass or age changes, and functional annotation analysis identified gene signatures of sarcopenia distinct from gene signatures of aging. Specifically, mitochondrial energy metabolism (e.g., tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation) pathway genes were the most downregulated and most significantly correlated with sarcopenia. Also, perturbed were genes/pathways associated with neuromuscular junction patency (providing molecular evidence of sarcopenia-related functional denervation and neuromuscular junction remodeling), protein degradation, and inflammation. Proteomic analysis of samples at 6, 18, and 27 months confirmed the depletion of mitochondrial energy metabolism proteins and neuromuscular junction proteins. Together, these findings suggest that therapeutic approaches that simultaneously stimulate mitochondrogenesis and reduce muscle proteolysis and inflammation have potential for treating sarcopenia.

  4. [Transdisciplinary approach for sarcopenia. Sarcopenic Dysphagia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2014-10-01

    Sarcopenic dysphagia is difficulty swallowing due to sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles. Presbyphagia refers to age-related changes in the swallowing mechanism in the elderly associated with a frailty in swallowing. Presbyphagia is different from dysphagia. The most common cause of dysphagia is stroke. However, sarcopenic dysphagia may be common in the elderly with sarcopenia and dysphagia. Frail elderly with aspiration pneumonia can simultaneously experience activity-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia of generalized skeletal muscles and swallowing muscles, resulting in the development of sarcopenic dysphagia. Consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenic dysphagia were proposed at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Dysphagia Rehabilitation. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management is useful for treatment of sarcopenic dysphagia. Therapy for sarcopenic dysphagia includes dysphagia rehabilitation, nutrition improvement and sarcopenia treatment. The core components of dysphagia rehabilitation are oral health care, rehabilitative techniques, and food modification. Nutrition improvement is important, because malnutrition contributes to the etiology of secondary sarcopenia and sarcopenic dysphagia. Assessment of the multi-factorial causes of primary and secondary sarcopenia is important because rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia differs depending on its etiology. Treatment of age-related sarcopenia should include resistance training and dietary supplements of amino acids. Therapy for activity-related sarcopenia includes reduced bed rest time and early mobilization and physical activity. Treatment for disease-related sarcopenia requires therapies for advanced organ failure, inflammatory disease, or malignancy, while therapy for nutrition-related sarcopenia involves appropriate nutrition management to increase muscle mass.

  5. Glycinergic synaptic transmission in the cochlear nucleus of mice with normal hearing and age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ruili; Manis, Paul B

    2013-10-01

    The principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian cochlear nucleus (CN) is glycine. During age-related hearing loss (AHL), glycinergic inhibition becomes weaker in CN. However, it is unclear what aspects of glycinergic transmission are responsible for weaker inhibition with AHL. We examined glycinergic transmission onto bushy cells of the anteroventral CN in normal-hearing CBA/CaJ mice and in DBA/2J mice, a strain that exhibits an early onset AHL. Glycinergic synaptic transmission was examined in brain slices of mice at 10-15 postnatal days old, 20-35 days old, and at 6-7 mo old. Spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current (sIPSC) event frequency and amplitude were the same among all three ages in both strains of mice. However, the amplitudes of IPSCs evoked (eIPSC) from stimulating the dorsal CN were smaller, and the failure rate was higher, with increasing age due to decreased quantal content in both mouse strains, independent of hearing status. The coefficient of variation of the eIPSC amplitude also increased with age. The decay time constant (τ) of sIPSCs and eIPSCs were constant in CBA/CaJ mice at all ages, but were significantly slower in DBA/2J mice at postnatal days 20-35, following the onset of AHL, and not at earlier or later ages. Our results suggest that glycinergic inhibition at the synapses onto bushy cells becomes weaker and less reliable with age through changes in release. However, the hearing loss in DBA/2J mice is accompanied by a transiently enhanced inhibition, which could disrupt the balance of excitation and inhibition.

  6. Treatment of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Dogs with the Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant : Short-Term Results in 3 Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Haar, G.; Mulder, J. J.; Venker-van Haagen, A. J.; van Sluijs, F. J.; Snik, A. F.; Smoorenburg, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), or presbycusis, is the most common form of acquired hearing loss in dogs. Middle ear implants have been used successfully in people with ARHL who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. Hypothesis Audibility improves in dogs with ARHL after implanta

  7. Treatment of age-related hearing loss in dogs with the vibrant soundbridge middle ear implant: short-term results in 3 dogs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar, G. Ter; Mulder, J.J.S.; Venker-van Haagen, A.J.; Sluijs, F.J. van; Snik, A.F.M.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), or presbycusis, is the most common form of acquired hearing loss in dogs. Middle ear implants have been used successfully in people with ARHL who cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids. HYPOTHESIS: Audibility improves in dogs with ARHL after implan

  8. A high-fat diet delays age-related hearing loss progression in C57BL/6J mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Fujita

    Full Text Available Age-related hearing loss (AHL, or presbycusis, is the most common sensory disorder among the elderly. We used C57BL/6J mice as an AHL model to determine a possible association between AHL and a high-fat diet (HFD.Forty C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to a control or HFD group. Each group was divided into the following subgroups: 1-, 3-, 5- and 12-month groups (HFD, n = 5/subgroup; control, n = 5/subgroup. Nine CBA/N-slc mice were also used as a 12-month control (n = 5 or 12-month HFD (n = 4 group. The mice were fed a HFD or normal (control diet throughout this study. Hearing function was evaluated at 1, 3, 5 and 12 months using auditory evoked brainstem responses (ABRs. Spiral ganglion cells (SGCs were also counted.The elevation of ABR thresholds (at 4 and 32 kHz at 3 and 5 months was significantly suppressed in the HFD group compared with the control groups for C57BL/6J mice. After 12 months, the elevation of ABR thresholds was significantly suppressed in the HFD group at all frequencies for C57BL/6J mice. In contrast, CBA/N-slc mice displayed opposite outcomes, as ABR thresholds at all frequencies at 12 months were significantly elevated in the HFD group compared with the control group. For the C57BL/6J mice at 12 months, SGC numbers significantly decreased in all parts of the cochleae in the control group compared with the HFD groups. In contrast, for the CBA/N-slc mice, SGC numbers significantly decreased, particularly in the upper parts of the cochleae in the HFD group compared with the control groups.The elevation in ABR thresholds and SGC loss associated with aging in the HFD-fed C57BL/6J mice were significantly suppressed compared with those in the normal diet-fed mice. These results suggest that HFD delays AHL progression in the C57B/6J mice.

  9. Sarcopenia: European consensus on definition and diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonso J Cruz-Jentoft; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Jürgen M Bauer; Boirie, Yves; Cederholm, Tommy; Landi, Francesco; Martin, Finbarr C; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Rolland, Yves; Schneider, Stéphane M; Topinková, Eva; Vandewoude, Maurits; Zamboni, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) developed a practical clinical definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for age-related sarcopenia. EWGSOP included representatives from four participant organisations, i.e. the European Geriatric Medicine Society, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics—European Region and the International Association of Nutrition and Aging. These organisation...

  10. Severity and pattern of bone mineral loss in endocrine causes of osteoporosis as compared to age-related bone mineral loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Dutta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Data are scant on bone health in endocrinopathies from India. This study evaluated bone mineral density (BMD loss in endocrinopathies [Graves′ disease (GD, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM, hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (HypoH, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (HyperH, hypopituitarism, primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT] as compared to age-related BMD loss [postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO, andropause]. Materials and Methods: Retrospective audit of records of patients >30 years age attending a bone clinic from August 2014 to January 2016 was done. Results: Five-hundred and seven records were screened, out of which 420 (females:male = 294:126 were analyzed. A significantly higher occurrence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency was noted in T1DM (89.09%, HyperH (85%, and HypoH (79.59% compared to age-related BMD loss (60.02%; P < 0.001. The occurrence of osteoporosis among females and males was 55.41% and 53.97%, respectively, and of osteopenia among females and males was 28.91% and 32.54%, respectively. In females, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (92%, HyperH (85%, and HypoH (59.26% compared to PMO (49.34%; P < 0.001. Z score at LS, TF, NOF, and greater trochanter (GT was consistently lowest in T1DM women. Among men, osteoporosis was significantly higher in T1DM (76.67% and HypoH (54.55% compared to andropause (45.45%; P = 0.001. Z score at LS, TF, NOF, GT, and TR was consistently lowest in T1DM men. In GD, the burden of osteoporosis was similar to PMO and andropause. BMD difference among the study groups was not significantly different after adjusting for body mass index (BMI and vitamin D. Conclusion: Low bone mass is extremely common in endocrinopathies, warranting routine screening and intervention. Concomitant vitamin D deficiency compounds the problem. Calcium and vitamin D supplementations may improve bone health in this setting.

  11. Screening for sarcopenia in obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, R.; Marra, M.; Montagnese, C.; De Rosa, E.; Onufrio, M.; Amato, V.; Santarpia, L.; De Caprio, C.; Contaldo, F.; Pasanisi, F.

    2013-04-01

    Sarcopenia is a progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass (SM) and function which can also be found in obese adults. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of sarcopenia in 1 245 obese women (18 - 67 years, weight 114.7±24.5 kg; BMI 44.1±9.2 fat mass 49.0±6.2%) from Southern Italy. Body composition was evaluated by bioimpedance analysis (BIA) and SM calculated by using Janssen's equation; therefore the sex-specific cut-off points of percentage skeletal muscle index were used. The whole population was divided in two age groups: A (18-40 years; n. 808; weight 115.4±23.5 kg; BMI 43.8±8.8 kg/m2) and B (41-67 years; n. 438; weight 113.4±26.3 kg; BMI 44.8±9.9 kg/m2). In all the sample there was 2.7% moderate and 0.6% severe sarcopenia; in group A, 1.9% moderate and 0.6% severe sarcopenia whilst in group B 4.3% moderate and 0.7% severe sarcopenia. The results of our study suggest that, based on a screening examination by BIA, moderate/severe sarcopenia can be detected in an unselected middle-aged obese population. Further studies are required to clarify the diagnosis with functional tests.

  12. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  13. Memory Loss, Dementia, and Stroke: Implications for Rehabilitation of Older Adults with Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Older adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are not immune to the other diseases of aging. Although AMD is the leading cause of low vision in older Americans, stroke is the leading cause of disability, and dementias affect another 2.5 million older Americans. Each condition alone can significantly impair a person's ability to…

  14. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Haar, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828750

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to

  15. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Haar, G.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to de

  16. The contribution of GJB2 (Connexin 26) 35delG to age-related hearing impairment and noise-induced hearing loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyken, E. van; Laer, L. van; Fransen, E.; Topsakal, V.; Hendrickx, J.J.; Demeester, K.; Heyning, P. van de; Maki-Torkko, E.; Hannula, S.; Sorri, M.; Jensen, M.; Parving, A.; Bille, M.; Baur, M.; Pfister, M.; Bonaconsa, A.; Mazzoli, M.; Orzan, E.; Espeso, A.; Stephens, D.; Verbruggen, K.; Huyghe, J.; Dhooge, I.J.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Kremer, H.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kunst, S.J.W.; Manninen, M.; Pyykko, I.; Rajkowska, E.; Pawelczyk, M.; Sliwinska-Kowalska, M.; Steffens, M.; Wienker, T.F.; Camp, G. van

    2007-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: The common GJB2 (Connexin 26) 35delG mutation might contribute to the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). BACKGROUND: GJB2, a gene encoding a gap junction protein expressed in the inner ear, has been suggested to be involved in the

  17. Role of endocrine-immune dysregulation in osteoporosis, sarcopenia, frailty and fracture risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Cherian; Kenny, Anne M; Taxel, Pamela; Lorenzo, Joseph A; Duque, Gustavo; Kuchel, George A

    2005-06-01

    Osteoporosis, a key predictor of hip fractures can be treated using a variety of safe and effective interventions. Nevertheless, optimally effective strategies for the prevention of hip fractures must also incorporate efforts to address a broad range of other potentially reversible factors. Hyperthyroidism, anticonvulsants, caffeine and smoking may decrease bone mass and increase fracture risk at any age. In older individuals it is important to also consider additional risk factors, including long-acting benzodiazepines, poor vision and sarcopenia. The presence of sarcopenia, an age-related decline in muscle bulk and quality enhances the risk of frailty and possibly also hip fracture, particularly if associated with diminished functional mobility, lower quadriceps strength and poor balance or body sway. In this review we examine evidence which indicates the presence of endocrine-immune dysregulation in both osteoporosis and sarcopenia. Post-menopausal declines in serum estrogen and androgen levels contribute to increases in local bone levels of cytoclastic cytokines, followed by increased osteoclastogenesis and bone loss. Similarly, the presence of decreased gonadal hormones and IGF-1, combined with unusually high peripheral levels of cytokines, inflammatory mediators and coagulation markers all enhance the risk of sarcopenia and frailty. We propose that a translational research approach which emphasizes common pathophysiologic mechanisms in osteoporosis and sarcopenia could accelerate the speed of discovery of effective strategies for both frailty and hip fracture prevention.

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia of aging: from signaling pathways to clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Calvani, Riccardo; Cesari, Matteo; Buford, Thomas W.; Lorenzi, Maria; Behnke, Bradley J.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, imposes a dramatic burden on individuals and society. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against sarcopenia is therefore perceived as an urgent need by health professionals and has instigated intensive research on the pathophysiology of this syndrome. The pathogenesis of sarcopenia is multifaceted and encompasses lifestyle habits, systemic factors (e.g., chronic inflammation and hormonal alterations), local environment perturbations (e.g., vascular dysfunction), and intramuscular specific processes. In this scenario, derangements in skeletal myocyte mitochondrial function are recognized as major factors contributing to the age-dependent muscle degeneration. In this review, we summarize prominent findings and controversial issues on the contribution of specific mitochondrial processes – including oxidative stress, quality control mechanisms and apoptotic signaling – on the development of sarcopenia. Extramuscular alterations accompanying the aging process with a potential impact on myocyte mitochondrial function are also discussed. We conclude with presenting methodological and safety considerations for the design of clinical trials targeting mitochondrial dysfunction to treat sarcopenia. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of monitoring the effects of an intervention on muscle mitochondrial function and identifying the optimal target population for the trial. PMID:23845738

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia of aging: from signaling pathways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Calvani, Riccardo; Cesari, Matteo; Buford, Thomas W; Lorenzi, Maria; Behnke, Bradley J; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-10-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and function, imposes a dramatic burden on individuals and society. The development of preventive and therapeutic strategies against sarcopenia is therefore perceived as an urgent need by health professionals and has instigated intensive research on the pathophysiology of this syndrome. The pathogenesis of sarcopenia is multifaceted and encompasses lifestyle habits, systemic factors (e.g., chronic inflammation and hormonal alterations), local environment perturbations (e.g., vascular dysfunction), and intramuscular specific processes. In this scenario, derangements in skeletal myocyte mitochondrial function are recognized as major factors contributing to the age-dependent muscle degeneration. In this review, we summarize prominent findings and controversial issues on the contribution of specific mitochondrial processes - including oxidative stress, quality control mechanisms and apoptotic signaling - on the development of sarcopenia. Extramuscular alterations accompanying the aging process with a potential impact on myocyte mitochondrial function are also discussed. We conclude with presenting methodological and safety considerations for the design of clinical trials targeting mitochondrial dysfunction to treat sarcopenia. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of monitoring the effects of an intervention on muscle mitochondrial function and identifying the optimal target population for the trial. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of a new patient-reported outcome measure in sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Christopher J; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Fitzgerald, Kristina A; Evans, William J; Ferrell, Betty R; Dale, William; Fried, Linda P; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Dennee-Sommers, Brooke; Patrick, Donald L

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a patient-reported outcome (PRO) to assess reduced muscle strength in sarcopenia. Qualitative research study. University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Subjects with sarcopenia. Adults aged 55 years and older with sarcopenia (n = 12) attended open-ended, concept elicitation interviews to characterize the functional effects of reduced muscle strength on their lives. The resulting qualitative data were analyzed using a qualitative analysis software program (Atlas.ti [Atlas.ti GmbH, Berlin, Germany]) and a common set of codes was developed to summarize the data. Subsequently, the initial PRO measure was drafted. Cognitive interviews were then conducted with additional sarcopenia subjects (n = 12) to refine the measure. Qualitative interviews identified key concepts (eg, impacts) in the areas of activities of daily living, emotions, social activities, energy, balance, coordination, sleep, and strength. Based on data from the cognitive debriefing interviews (eg, understandability, relevance, suggestions to reword items), the PRO measure development team came to consensus on which items or parts of the instructions to retain, revise, or delete. The final measure included 14 items. The final PRO measure, the Age-Related Muscle Loss Questionnaire, can be used in both clinical practice and clinical trial settings to assess functional impacts of reduced muscle strength in sarcopenia. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sarcopenia: European consensus on definition and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.; Baeyens, Jean Pierre; Bauer, Jürgen M.; Boirie, Yves; Cederholm, Tommy; Landi, Francesco; Martin, Finbarr C.; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Rolland, Yves; Schneider, Stéphane M.; Topinková, Eva; Vandewoude, Maurits; Zamboni, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    The European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) developed a practical clinical definition and consensus diagnostic criteria for age-related sarcopenia. EWGSOP included representatives from four participant organisations, i.e. the European Geriatric Medicine Society, the European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, the International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics—European Region and the International Association of Nutrition and Aging. These organisations endorsed the findings in the final document. The group met and addressed the following questions, using the medical literature to build evidence-based answers: (i) What is sarcopenia? (ii) What parameters define sarcopenia? (iii) What variables reflect these parameters, and what measurement tools and cut-off points can be used? (iv) How does sarcopenia relate to cachexia, frailty and sarcopenic obesity? For the diagnosis of sarcopenia, EWGSOP recommends using the presence of both low muscle mass + low muscle function (strength or performance). EWGSOP variously applies these characteristics to further define conceptual stages as ‘presarcopenia’, ‘sarcopenia’ and ‘severe sarcopenia’. EWGSOP reviewed a wide range of tools that can be used to measure the specific variables of muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance. Our paper summarises currently available data defining sarcopenia cut-off points by age and gender; suggests an algorithm for sarcopenia case finding in older individuals based on measurements of gait speed, grip strength and muscle mass; and presents a list of suggested primary and secondary outcome domains for research. Once an operational definition of sarcopenia is adopted and included in the mainstream of comprehensive geriatric assessment, the next steps are to define the natural course of sarcopenia and to develop and define effective treatment. PMID:20392703

  2. Sarcopenia--The search for emerging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinkovich, Alexander; Livshits, Gregory

    2015-07-01

    Sarcopenia, an age-related decline in skeletal muscle mass and function, dramatically affects the life quality of elder people. In view of increasing life expectancy, sarcopenia renders a heavy burden on the health care system. However, although there is a consensus that sarcopenia is a multifactorial syndrome, its etiology, underlying mechanisms, and even definition remain poorly delineated, thus, preventing development of a precise treatment strategy. The main aim of our review is to critically analyze potential sarcopenia biomarkers in light of the molecular mechanisms of their involvement in sarcopenia pathogenesis. Normal muscle mass and function maintenance are proposed to be dependent on the dynamic balance between the positive regulators of muscle growth such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), follistatin (FST) and irisin, and negative regulators including TGFβ, myostatin, activins A and B, and growth and differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15). We hypothesize that the shift in this balance to muscle growth inhibitors, along with increased expression of the C- terminal agrin fragment (CAF) associated with age-dependent neuromuscular junction (NMJ) dysfunction, as well as skeletal muscle-specific troponin T (sTnT), a key component of contractile machinery, is a main mechanism underlying sarcopenia pathogenesis. Thus, this review proposes and emphasizes that these molecules are the emerging sarcopenia biomarkers.

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risks of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia in Chinese elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Taotao; Feng, Xiao; Zhou, Jingjing; Gong, Hongyan; Xia, Song; Wei, Qing; Hu, Xu; Tao, Ran; Li, Lei; Qian, Frank; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. In this study, we used a cross-sectional study with 1090 community-dwelling Chinese citizens aged 60 years and older to evaluate the association of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with the risk of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was defined using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia (AWGS) criteria that include both muscle mass and muscle function/physical activity. Pre-sarcopenia was defined as having low skeletal muscle index but with normal muscle/physical activity. The prevalence of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia was significantly higher in T2DM patients than in healthy controls (14.8% vs. 11.2%, p = 0.035 for sarcopenia, and 14.4% vs. 8.4%, p = 0.002 for pre-sarcopenia). In multivariate logistic regression analyses adjusting by age, gender, anti-diabetic medication, energy intake, protein intake, physical activity, and visceral fat area, we found that Chinese elderly with T2DM exhibited significantly increased risks of sarcopenia (OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.02–2.03) and pre-sarcopenia (OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.10–2.83) compared to non-diabetic individuals. This is the first study to evaluate the association of T2DM with the risks of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia in China. Among a group of community-dwelling Chinese elderly, T2DM was significantly associated with increased risks of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia. PMID:27958337

  4. Age-related hearing loss in dogs : Diagnosis with Brainstem-Evoked Response Audiometry and Treatment with Vibrant Soundbridge Middle Ear Implant.

    OpenAIRE

    ter Haar, G.

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common cause of acquired hearing impairment in dogs. Diagnosis requires objective electrophysiological tests (brainstem evoked response audiometry [BERA]) evaluating the entire audible frequency range in dogs. In our laboratory a method was developed to deliver tone bursts ranging in frequency from 1 - 32 kHz for frequency-specific assessment of the cochlea in dogs. Brainstem auditory evoked responses to a click (CS) and to 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24, a...

  5. Mineralization of the connective tissue: a complex molecular process leading to age-related loss of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Mkrtchyan, Garik V; Gneteeva, Tatiana; Buiucli, Sveatoslav; Tancowny, B; Kulka, M; Aliper, Alexander; Zhavoronkov, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Age-related metastatic mineralization of soft tissues has been considered a passive and spontaneous process. Recent data have demonstrated that calcium salt deposition in soft tissues could be a highly regulated process. Although calcification occurs in any tissue type, vascular calcification has been of particular interest due to association with atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and osteoporosis. Different mechanisms underlying calcium apatite accumulation are explored with these age-related disorders. In the case of atherosclerotic plaques, oxy-lipids trigger release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammation that activate calcification processes in aorta intimae. In CKD patients, renal failure alters the balance between calcium and phosphate levels usually regulated by fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), Klotho, and vitamin D, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) begin to explore an osteoblastosteoblast-like phenotype. Calcification could affect extracellular matrix along with VSMCs. Collagen is a major component of extracellular matrix and its modifications accumulate with age. The formation of cross-links between collagen fibers is regulated by the action of lysine hydroxylases and lysyl oxidase and could occur spontaneously. Oxidation-induced advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are a major type of spontaneous cross-links that accelerate with age and may result in tissue stiffness, problems with recycling, and potential accumulation of calcium apatite. Applying strategies for clearing the AGEs proposed by de Grey may be more difficult in the highly mineralized extracellular matrix. We performed bioinformatic analysis of the molecular pathways underlying calcification in atherosclerotic and CKD patients, signaling pathways of collagen cross-links formation, and bone mineralization, and we propose new potential targets and review drugs for calcification treatment.

  6. Prevalence of sarcopenia in older Brazilians: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz, Juliano Bergamaschine Mata; Leopoldino, Amanda Aparecida Oliveira; Moreira, Bruno de Souza; Henschke, Nicholas; Dias, Rosangela Correa; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo; Oliveira, Vinicius Cunha

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-related loss of muscle mass and function that evolves into disability, loss of independence and death. In Brazil the number of older people is rapidly growing, resulting in an increased prevalence of chronic conditions associated with old age. As prevalence estimates provide essential information to policymakers when developing healthcare strategies, this systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia in older Brazilians. Electronic database searches and hand-searching in relevant journals and reference lists were carried out without language restriction. Studies that reported the prevalence of sarcopenia in Brazilians aged 60 years or older were considered for inclusion. Sarcopenia was defined as low muscle mass, low muscle function or low muscle mass and function. Meta-analysis was carried out using a random-effects model. A total of 31 studies were included pooling 9416 participants. The overall prevalence of sarcopenia in older Brazilians was 17.0% (95% CI 13.0-22.0). Sensitivity analysis showed rates of 20.0% (95% CI 11.0-32.0) in women and 12.0% (95% CI 9.0-16.0) in men. Prevalence was 16.0% (95% CI 12.0-23.0) based on low muscle mass and function; and 17.0% (95% CI 9.0-31.0) based only on low muscle mass. The difference between these two criteria was not significant (P = 0.96). Sarcopenia is an emerging public health issue in Brazil. Attention should be paid to changes in prevalence rates over the next years because of the increase in the older population. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 5-16. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  7. The Effect of Physiological Stimuli on Sarcopenia; Impact of Notch and Wnt Signaling on Impaired Aged Skeletal Muscle Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Susan Tsivitse; Cooley, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that is associated with sarcopenia can result in ultimate consequences such as decreased quality of life. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial and include environmental and biological factors. The purpose of this review is to synthesize what the literature reveals in regards to the cellular regulation of sarcopenia, including impaired muscle regenerative capacity in the aged, and to discuss if physiological stimuli have the potential to slow the loss of myogenic potential that is associated with sarcopenia. In addition, this review article will discuss the effect of aging on Notch and Wnt signaling, and whether physiological stimuli have the ability to restore Notch and Wnt signaling resulting in rejuvenated aged muscle repair. The intention of this summary is to bring awareness to the benefits of consistent physiological stimulus (exercise) to combating sarcopenia as well as proclaiming the usefulness of contraction-induced injury models to studying the effects of local and systemic influences on aged myogenic capability. PMID:22701343

  8. Nigrostriatal rAAV-mediated GDNF Overexpression Induces Robust Weight Loss in a Rat Model of Age-related Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredsson, Fredric P; Tumer, Nihal; Erdos, Benedek; Landa, Tessa; Broxson, Christopher S; Sullivan, Layla F; Rising, Aaron C; Foust, Kevin D.; Zhang, Yi; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S.; Scarpace, Philip J.; Mandel, Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    Intraventricular administration of glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in primate and humans to study Parkinson's disease (PD) has revealed the potential for GDNF to induce weight loss. Our previous data indicate that bilateral continuous hypothalamic GDNF overexpression via recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) results in significant failure to gain weight in young rats and weight loss in aged rats. Based on these previous results, we hypothesized that because the nigrostr...

  9. Nutrition and Exercise in Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Stephen D; Hida, Azumi; Mankowski, Robert; Layne, Andrew; Solberg, Lawrence; Mainous, Arch G; Buford, Thomas W

    2016-12-27

    Sarcopenia is a debilitating condition that involves loss of muscle mass and function, which affects virtually everyone as they age, and can lead to frailty and ultimately disability. In growing recognition of the importance of both muscle strength and muscle mass relative to body size in contributing to functional decline, recent definitions have now incorporated grip strength and a correction for body mass as part of the key criteria that define sarcopenia. With this new definition, a much larger population of older adults are now at risk of sarcopenia. In the present article, we reviewed the literature for studies which tested the effects of diet or exercise interventions on changes in lean mass and/or functional outcomes in individuals with either sarcopenia and/or frailty and identified 19 clinical trials. There were a few key findings. First, dietary interventions involving protein supplementation improved functional and/or strength outcomes in a few trials, however, other dietary approaches were less effective. Exercise interventions and combined diet and exercise interventions produced consistent improvements in lower body muscle strength but had less consistent effects on walking speed and grip strength. Lifestyle interventions not involving calorie restriction generally did not induce significant changes in body composition. There were a limited number of trials in which participants with sarcopenia were specifically targeted, and thus there is an important need for more research to determine the appropriate types of intervention approaches for the high risk population of sarcopenic older adults.

  10. Noise-induced and age-related hearing loss:  new perspectives and potential therapies [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Charles Liberman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The classic view of sensorineural hearing loss has been that the primary damage targets are hair cells and that auditory nerve loss is typically secondary to hair cell degeneration. Recent work has challenged that view. In noise-induced hearing loss, exposures causing only reversible threshold shifts (and no hair cell loss nevertheless cause permanent loss of >50% of the synaptic connections between hair cells and the auditory nerve. Similarly, in age-related hearing loss, degeneration of cochlear synapses precedes both hair cell loss and threshold elevation. This primary neural degeneration has remained a “hidden hearing loss” for two reasons: 1 the neuronal cell bodies survive for years despite loss of synaptic connection with hair cells, and 2 the degeneration is selective for auditory nerve fibers with high thresholds. Although not required for threshold detection when quiet, these high-threshold fibers are critical for hearing in noisy environments. Research suggests that primary neural degeneration is an important contributor to the perceptual handicap in sensorineural hearing loss, and it may be key to the generation of tinnitus and other associated perceptual anomalies. In cases where the hair cells survive, neurotrophin therapies can elicit neurite outgrowth from surviving auditory neurons and re-establishment of their peripheral synapses; thus, treatments may be on the horizon.

  11. Loss of BMP receptor type 1A in murine adipose tissue attenuates age-related onset of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Tim J; Graja, Antonia; Huang, Tian Lian; Xue, Ruidan; An, Ding; Poehle-Kronawitter, Sophie; Lynes, Matthew D; Tolkachov, Alexander; O'Sullivan, Lindsay E; Hirshman, Michael F; Schupp, Michael; Goodyear, Laurie J; Mishina, Yuji; Tseng, Yu-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction is a prime risk factor for the development of metabolic disease. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have previously been implicated in adipocyte formation. Here, we investigate the role of BMP signalling in adipose tissue health and systemic glucose homeostasis. We employed the Cre/loxP system to generate mouse models with conditional ablation of BMP receptor 1A in differentiating and mature adipocytes, as well as tissue-resident myeloid cells. Metabolic variables were assessed by glucose and insulin tolerance testing, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and gene expression analysis. Conditional deletion of Bmpr1a using the aP2 (also known as Fabp4)-Cre strain resulted in a complex phenotype. Knockout mice were clearly resistant to age-related impairment of insulin sensitivity during normal and high-fat-diet feeding and showed significantly improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Moreover, knockouts displayed significant reduction of variables of adipose tissue inflammation. Deletion of Bmpr1a in myeloid cells had no impact on insulin sensitivity, while ablation of Bmpr1a in mature adipocytes partially recapitulated the initial phenotype from aP2-Cre driven deletion. Co-cultivation of macrophages with pre-adipocytes lacking Bmpr1a markedly reduced expression of proinflammatory genes. Our findings show that altered BMP signalling in adipose tissue affects the tissue's metabolic properties and systemic insulin resistance by altering the pattern of immune cell infiltration. The phenotype is due to ablation of Bmpr1a specifically in pre-adipocytes and maturing adipocytes rather than an immune cell-autonomous effect. Mechanistically, we provide evidence for a BMP-mediated direct crosstalk between pre-adipocytes and macrophages.

  12. Age-Related Benefits of Digital Noise Reduction for Short-Term Word Learning in Children with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the rate of word learning for children with hearing loss (HL) in quiet and in noise compared to normal-hearing (NH) peers. The effects of digital noise reduction (DNR) were examined for children with HL. Method: Forty-one children with NH and 26 children with HL were grouped by age (8-9 years and 11-12 years). The children…

  13. Understanding sarcopenia as a geriatric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Landi, Francesco; Topinková, Eva; Michel, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Highly prevalent in the population older than 65 years and leading to poor outcomes (functional decline and its related consequences), sarcopenia does not benefit yet either of a clear understanding of its pathophysiology or of precise clinical or biological markers allowing its identification. The new scientific definition of 'geriatric syndromes' challenges the authors to review the current sarcopenia literature, allowing them to affirm that sarcopenia cannot be considered as an age-related disease but as a true 'geriatric syndrome'. More than 50% of the population older than 80 years suffer from this medical condition, which is linked to multiple causations: the ageing process itself, genetic susceptibility, certain life habits, changes in living conditions and a number of chronic diseases. Moreover, sarcopenia favours poor outcomes such as mobility disorders, disability, poor quality of life and death. Considering sarcopenia as a geriatric syndrome allows us to request its recognition and assess its multiple risk factors, to implement a clinical and public health approach to the management of sarcopenic patients and population at risk and to disentangle the links among sarcopenia, frailty, disability and mortality.

  14. Comparison of Progression Rate of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Loss in Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treated with Ranibizumab and Aflibercept

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    Juliana Wons

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Retinal pigment epithelium (RPE loss in neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD seem to have a linear progression but might be influenced by the treatment. The purpose of the study is the comparison of RPE loss over three years in patients treated with intravitreal ranibizumab to patients who were switched to aflibercept. Methods. A retrospective analysis with 96 eyes switched to aflibercept was conducted. The progression rate of RPE loss was evaluated in patients who showed atrophy one year prior to switch (n=17 or on switch date (n=19. The RPE loss was evaluated by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT. Further, 22 eyes from patients treated with ranibizumab were compared. Results. The median yearly progression of RPE loss after square root transformation showed no significant difference in the year prior to switch compared to the year after switch (p=0.854. In patients who received only ranibizumab, the median yearly progression of RPE loss was 0.15 mm/y, for aflibercept patients, 0.13 mm/y. This difference was not statistically significant (p=0.172. Conclusions. There seems to be a linear progression rate of RPE loss in patients treated with ranibizumab as well as in patients with aflibercept. No significant increase of progression rate was found after switch to aflibercept.

  15.  Age-related changes of skeletal muscles: physiology, pathology and regeneration

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    Aleksandra Ławniczak

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  This review provides a short presentation of the aging-related changes of human skeletal muscles. The aging process is associated with the loss of skeletal muscle mass (sarcopenia and strength. This results from fibre atrophy and apoptosis, decreased regeneration capacity, mitochondrial dysfunction, gradual reduction of the number of spinal cord motor neurons, and local and systemic metabolic and hormonal alterations. The latter involve age-related decrease of the expression and activity of some mitochondrial and cytoplasmic enzymes, triacylglycerols and lipofuscin accumulation inside muscle fibres, increased proteolytic activity, insulin resistance and decreased serum growth hormone and IGF-1 concentrations. Aging of the skeletal muscles is also associated with a decreased number of satellite cells and their proliferative activity. The age-related reduction of skeletal muscle mass and function may be partially prevented by dietary restriction and systematic physical exercises.

  16. Stability against backward balance loss: Age-related modifications following slip-like perturbations of multiple amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Dario; Aprigliano, Federica; Tropea, Peppino; Pasquini, Guido; Micera, Silvestro; Monaco, Vito

    2017-03-01

    Falls are one of the most serious problems in the elderly. Although previous studies clearly link the increased risk of falls with ageing, the mechanisms responsible for the modifications of reactive motor behaviours in response to external perturbations are not yet fully understood. This study investigated how the stability against backward balance loss is affected by aging and intensity of perturbations. The Margin of Stability (MoS) was estimated while eight young and eight elderly adults managed three slip-like perturbations of different intensities while walking at the same normalized speed. A compensatory step was necessary to regain stability. The forward swing phase of the trailing leg was rapidly interrupted and reversed in direction. Results have shown that ageing significantly affects the time required to select the most appropriate biomechanical response: even if the characteristic of the backward step was similar between groups, elderly subjects took more time to reverse the movement of their swinging limb, thus achieving a less efficient action to counteract the backward balance loss (lower MoS both during and at the end of the early compensatory reaction). In addition, young and elderly subjects scaled their reactions with respect to the perturbations intensity in a similar way by increasing the length of their backward step, thus revealing a context-dependent tuning of the biomechanical response that was not affected by aging. These behavioural features can be helpful in identifying the causes of increased fall risk among the elderly in order to define more suited intervention in fall prevention programs.

  17. miR-29b overexpression induces cochlear hair cell apoptosis through the regulation of SIRT1/PGC-1α signaling: Implications for age-related hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Tao; Wei, Li; Zha, Ding-Jun; Qiu, Jian-Hua; Chen, Fu-Quan; Qiao, Li; Qiu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that the degeneration of cochlear hair cells is the typical cause of presbycusis (or age-related hearing loss). However, the molecular mechanisms that mediate cochlear hair cell apoptosis are not yet fully understood and there is no effective treatment for this disorder. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been increasingly shown to be associated with age-related diseases and are emerging as promising therapeutic targets. In this study, we investigated whether miR-29b is involved in the degeneration of cochlear hair cells. To examine our hypothesis, nuclear staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) were used to quantify the hair cell counts. RT-qPCR and western blot analysis were used to examine miR-29b/sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)/proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) signaling in cochlear hair cells. We found that there was a significant degeneration of cochlear hair cells and a higher expression of miR-29b in aged C57BL/6 mice compared with young mice. There was also an age-related decrease in the expression of SIRT1 and PGC-1α. In the inner ear cell line, HEI-OC1, miR-29b overexpression (by transfection with miR-29b mimic) inhibited SIRT1 and PGC-1α expression, leading to an increase in mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Moreover, the inhibition of miR-29b (by transfection with miR-29b inhibitor) increased SIRT1 and PGC-1α expression, while it decreased apoptosis. Taken together, our findings support a link between age-related cochlear hair cell apoptosis and miR-29b/SIRT1/PGC-1α signaling, which may present an attractive pharmacological target for the development of novel drugs for the treatment of age-related hearing loss. PMID:27635430

  18. A Comparative Study of Age-Related Hearing Loss in Wild Type and Insulin-Like Growth Factor I Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riquelme, Raquel; Cediel, Rafael; Contreras, Julio; Lourdes, Rodriguez-de la Rosa; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Hernandez-Sanchez, Catalina; Zubeldia, Jose M.; Cerdan, Sebastian; Varela-Nieto, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR) recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to prevent or

  19. A comparative study of age-related hearing loss in wild type and insulin-like growth factor I deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Riquelme

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I belongs to the family of insulin-related peptides that fulfils a key role during the late development of the nervous system. Human IGF1 mutations cause profound deafness, poor growth and mental retardation. Accordingly, Igf1−/− null mice are dwarfs that have low survival rates, cochlear alterations and severe sensorineural deafness. Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss is a common disorder associated with aging that causes social and cognitive problems. Aging is also associated with a decrease in circulating IGF-I levels and this reduction has been related to cognitive and brain alterations, although there is no information as yet regarding the relationship between presbycusis and IGF-I biodisponibility. Here we present a longitudinal study of wild type Igf1+/+ and null Igf1−/− mice from 2 to 12 months of age comparing the temporal progression of several parameters: hearing, brain morphology, cochlear cytoarchitecture, insulin-related factors and IGF gene expression and IGF-I serum levels. Complementary invasive and non-invasive techniques were used, including auditory brainstem-evoked response (ABR recordings and in vivo MRI brain imaging. Igf1−/− null mice presented profound deafness at all the ages studied, without any obvious worsening of hearing parameters with aging. Igf1+/+ wild type mice suffered significant age-related hearing loss, their auditory thresholds and peak I latencies augmenting as they aged, in parallel with a decrease in the circulating levels of IGF-I. Accordingly, there was an age-related spiral ganglion degeneration in wild type mice that was not evident in the Igf1 null mice. However, the Igf1−/− null mice in turn developed a prematurely aged stria vascularis reminiscent of the diabetic strial phenotype. Our data indicate that IGF-I is required for the correct development and maintenance of hearing, supporting the idea that IGF-I-based therapies could contribute to

  20. Vitamin E in Sarcopenia: Current Evidences on Its Role in Prevention and Treatment

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    Shy Cian Khor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies.

  1. Vitamin E in Sarcopenia: Current Evidences on Its Role in Prevention and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome that is characterized by gradual loss of muscle mass and strength with increasing age. Although the underlying mechanism is still unknown, the contribution of increased oxidative stress in advanced age has been recognized as one of the risk factors of sarcopenia. Thus, eliminating reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be a strategy to combat sarcopenia. In this review, we discuss the potential role of vitamin E in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia. Vitamin E is a lipid soluble vitamin, with potent antioxidant properties and current evidence suggesting a role in the modulation of signaling pathways. Previous studies have shown its possible beneficial effects on aging and age-related diseases. Although there are evidences suggesting an association between vitamin E and muscle health, they are still inconclusive compared to other more extensively studied chronic diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, we reviewed the role of vitamin E and its potential protective mechanisms on muscle health based on previous and current in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:25097722

  2. Age-related changes in auditory and cognitive abilities in elderly persons with hearing aids fitted at the initial stages of hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Obuchi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the relation between the use of hearing aids at the initial stages of hearing loss and age-related changes in the auditory and cognitive abilities of elderly persons. 12 healthy elderly persons participated in an annual auditory and cognitive longitudinal examination for three years. According to their hearing level, they were divided into 3 subgroups - the normal hearing group, the hearing loss without hearing aids group, and the hearing loss with hearing aids group. All the subjects underwent 4 tests: pure-tone audiometry, syllable intelligibility test, dichotic listening test (DLT, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R Short Forms. Comparison between the 3 groups revealed that the hearing loss without hearing aids group showed the lowest scores for the performance tasks, in contrast to the hearing level and intelligibility results. The other groups showed no significant difference in the WAIS-R subtests. This result indicates that prescription of a hearing aid during the early stages of hearing loss is related to the retention of cognitive abilities in such elderly people. However, there were no statistical significant correlations between the auditory and cognitive tasks.

  3. Age-Related Changes in Auditory and Cognitive Abilities in Elderly Persons with Hearing Aids Fitted at the Initial Stages of Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, C; Harashima, T; Shiroma, M

    2011-05-10

    In this study, we investigated the relation between the use of hearing aids at the initial stages of hearing loss and age-related changes in the auditory and cognitive abilities of elderly persons. 12 healthy elderly persons participated in an annual auditory and cognitive longitudinal examination for three years. According to their hearing level, they were divided into 3 subgroups - the normal hearing group, the hearing loss without hearing aids group, and the hearing loss with hearing aids group. All the subjects underwent 4 tests: pure-tone audiometry, syllable intelligibility test, dichotic listening test (DLT), and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R) Short Forms. Comparison between the 3 groups revealed that the hearing loss without hearing aids group showed the lowest scores for the performance tasks, in contrast to the hearing level and intelligibility results. The other groups showed no significant difference in the WAIS-R subtests. This result indicates that prescription of a hearing aid during the early stages of hearing loss is related to the retention of cognitive abilities in such elderly people. However, there were no statistical significant correlations between the auditory and cognitive tasks.

  4. Novel Insights on Nutrient Management of Sarcopenia in Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Mariangela Rondanelli; Milena Faliva; Francesca Monteferrario; Gabriella Peroni; Erica Repaci; Francesca Allieri; Simone Perna

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass and strength. The more rationale approach to delay the progression of sarcopenia is based on the combination of proper nutrition, possibly associated with the use of dietary supplements and a regular exercise program. We performed a narrative literature review to evaluate the till-now evidence regarding (1) the metabolic and nutritional correlates of sarcopenia; (2) the optimum diet therapy fo...

  5. Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Age-related Macular Degeneration About AMD Click for more ... a leading cause of vision loss among people age 60 and older. It causes damage to the ...

  6. The quality of life impact of peripheral versus central vision loss with a focus on glaucoma versus age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Evans

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Keith Evans1, Simon K Law2, John Walt3, Patricia Buchholz4, Jan Hansen31Global Health Outcomes, Wolters Kluwer Health, Chester, United Kingdom; 2Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Global Health Outcomes Strategy and Research, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 4Health Economics, Pricing, and Reimbursement, Allergan GmbH, Ettlingen, GermanyPurpose: It is well accepted that conditions that cause central vision loss (CVL have a negative impact on functional ability and quality of life (QoL, but the impact of diseases that cause peripheral vision loss (PVL is less well understood. Focusing on glaucoma and age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, the effects of CVL and PVL on QoL were compared. Methods: A systematic literature review of publications reporting QoL in patients with CVL or PVL identified 87 publications using four generic (Short-Form Health Survey-36 and -12, EuroQoL EQ-5D and Sickness Impact Profile and five vision-specific (National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire-51, -39, and -25, Impact of Vision Impairment and Visual Function-14 QoL instruments; 33 and 15 publications reported QoL in ARMD and glaucoma, respectively.Results: QoL was impaired to a similar extent by diseases associated with PVL and CVL, but different domains were affected. In contrast to ARMD, mental aspects appeared to be affected more than physical aspects in patients with glaucoma.Conclusions: The differential impact upon QoL might be a function of the pathology of the diseases, for example potential for blindness and better ability to perform physical tasks due to retention of central vision may explain these observations in glaucoma.Keywords: vision loss, quality of life, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic macular edema, cataracts

  7. Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eardrum. The eardrum vibrates from the incoming sound waves and sends these vibrations to three tiny bones in the middle ear. ... on which key hearing structures sit. Once the vibrations cause the fluid inside the cochlea to ripple, a traveling wave forms along the basilar membrane. Hair cells—sensory ...

  8. Compromised potassium recycling in the cochlea contributes to conservation of endocochlear potential in a mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Huang, Qiuhong; Pang, Jiaqi; Zheng, Xuqing; Chen, Lian; Yu, Rongjun; Zheng, Yiqing

    2013-10-25

    The C57BL/6 strain is considered an excellent model to study age-related hearing loss (AHL). Aging C57BL/6 mice are characterized by profound hearing loss but conservation of the endocochlear potential (EP). Here we show 12-month-old C57BL/6 mice display a notable hearing loss at 4, 8, 16 and 32kHz while the EP is maintained at normal level. Morphological examination shows significant outer hair cells loss in the cochlear basal turn and atrophy of the stria vascularis (SV). Fluorescence immunohistochemical studies reveal that potassium channel KCNJ10 and KCNQ1 expression dramatically decreased in the SV. Concomitant with this, mRNA levels of KCNJ10 and KCNQ1 are also reduced. In addition, three other potassium transporters, including α1-Na,K-ATPase, α2-Na,K-ATPase and NKCC1, reduce their expression at mRNA levels as well. These observations suggest that conservation of the EP in aging C57BL/6 mice is attributable to the SV generating a new balance for potassium influx and efflux at a relatively lower level.

  9. New diagnostic index for sarcopenia in patients with cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Haruhito; Kai, Hisashi; Shibata, Rei; Niiyama, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Murohara, Toyoaki; Yoshida, Noriko; Katoh, Atsushi; Ikeda, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is an aging and disease-related syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, with the risk of frailty and poor quality of life. Sarcopenia is diagnosed by a decrease in skeletal muscle index (SMI) and reduction of either handgrip strength or gait speed. However, measurement of SMI is difficult for general physicians because it requires special equipment for bioelectrical impedance assay or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to explore a novel, simple diagnostic method of sarcopenia evaluation in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We retrospectively investigated 132 inpatients with CVD (age: 72±12 years, age range: 27-93 years, males: 61%) Binomial logistic regression and correlation analyses were used to assess the associations of sarcopenia with simple physical data and biomarkers, including muscle-related inflammation makers and nutritional markers. Sarcopenia was present in 29.5% of the study population. Serum concentrations of adiponectin and sialic acid were significantly higher in sarcopenic than non-sarcopenic CVD patients. Stepwise multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis revealed that adiponectin, sialic acid, sex, age, and body mass index were independent factors for sarcopenia detection. Sarcopenia index, obtained from the diagnostic regression formula for sarcopenia detection including the five independent factors, indicated a high accuracy in ROC curve analysis (sensitivity 94.9%, specificity 69.9%) and the cutoff value for sarcopenia detection was -1.6134. Sarcopenia index had a significant correlation with the conventional diagnostic parameters of sarcopenia. Our new sarcopenia index using simple parameters would be useful for diagnosing sarcopenia in CVD patients.

  10. [Molecular mechanism maintaining muscle satellite cells and the roles in sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Yusei; Fukada, So-Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has its stem cell named satellite cell. The absence of satellite cells does not allow muscle regeneration, it is unquestionable that satellite cell is indispensable for muscle regeneration processes. A certain number of satellite cells appear to be necessary for the successful muscle regeneration, meaning the maintenance of the satellite cells is essential for the functional homeostasis of skeletal muscle. Recent studies have revealed the molecular mechanism underlying satellite cell maintenance in a steady state. A loss of those molecules responsible for the maintenance often results in decreased satellite cell pool and reduced regeneration ability. On the other hand, the contribution of satellite cells to muscle hypertrophy or aged-related atrophy(sarcopenia)is controversial. In this review, we will introduce the molecules that regulate satellite cells homeostasis in the dormant state and then further discuss the recent results on the roles of satellite cell in sarcopenia.

  11. Biomarkers of sarcopenia in clincal trials recommendations from the international working group on sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcopenia, the age-related skeletal muscle decline, is associated with relevant clinical and socioeconomic negative outcomes in older persons. The study of this phenomenon and the development of preventive/therapeutic strategies represent public health priorities. The present document reports the r...

  12. Retinal Nerve Fiber Loss in Anti-VEGF Therapy for Age-Related Macular Degeneration Can Be Decreased by Anterior Chamber Paracentesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Philip; Sitnilska, Vasilena; Altay, Lebriz; Schaub, Friederike; Muether, Philipp S; Fauser, Sascha

    2017-01-01

    To analyze peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT) change after long-term intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy. Patients with regular anterior chamber paracentesis (ACP) prior to intravitreal injections (IVIs) were compared to those without ACP. Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) was treated in a pro re nata regimen with a minimum of 9 IVIs. RNFLT change was determined in spectral domain optical coherence tomography. In 32 patients without ACP, mean RNFLT loss (-2.16 ± 3.60 µm) was significantly higher than in 44 patients with regular ACP (0.16 ± 3.60; p = 0.029). Both groups were comparable in age (75.0 vs. 76.8 years; p = 0.35), number of IVIs (16.2 vs. 16.6; p = 0.98), and observational time (30.0 vs. 32.3 months; p = 0.32). In patients without ACP, RNFLT loss was higher compared to IVI-naive fellow eyes (p = 0.005), whereas in ACP patients, no difference was detected (p = 0.5). A moderate RNFLT loss is found in nonglaucomatous patients after injection therapy for nAMD. As it is decreased with regular ACP, tight management of intraocular pressure seems advisable. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. MicroRNA-Regulated Proinflammatory Cytokines in Sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Jingjing Fan; Xianjuan Kou; Yi Yang; Ning Chen

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia has been defined as the aging-related disease with the declined mass, strength, and function of skeletal muscle, which is the major cause of frailty and falls in elders. The activation of inflammatory signal pathways due to diseases and aging is suggested to reveal the critical impact on sarcopenia. Several proinflammatory cytokines, especially interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), play crucial roles in modulation of inflammatory signaling pathway during the...

  14. Room temperature housing results in premature cancellous bone loss in growing female mice: implications for the mouse as a preclinical model for age-related bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniec, U T; Philbrick, K A; Wong, C P; Gordon, J L; Kahler-Quesada, A M; Olson, D A; Branscum, A J; Sargent, J L; DeMambro, V E; Rosen, C J; Turner, R T

    2016-10-01

    Room temperature housing (22 °C) results in premature cancellous bone loss in female mice. The bone loss was prevented by housing mice at thermoneutral temperature (32 °C). Thermogenesis differs markedly between mice and humans and mild cold stress induced by standard room temperature housing may introduce an unrecognized confounding variable into preclinical studies. Female mice are often used as preclinical models for osteoporosis but, in contrast to humans, mice exhibit cancellous bone loss during growth. Mice are routinely housed at room temperature (18-23 °C), a strategy that exaggerates physiological differences in thermoregulation between mice (obligatory daily heterotherms) and humans (homeotherms). The purpose of this investigation was to assess whether housing female mice at thermoneutral (temperature range where the basal rate of energy production is at equilibrium with heat loss) alters bone growth, turnover and microarchitecture. Growing (4-week-old) female C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ mice were housed at either 22 or 32 °C for up to 18 weeks. C57BL/6J mice housed at 22 °C experienced a 62 % cancellous bone loss from the distal femur metaphysis during the interval from 8 to 18 weeks of age and lesser bone loss from the distal femur epiphysis, whereas cancellous and cortical bone mass in 32 °C-housed mice were unchanged or increased. The impact of thermoneutral housing on cancellous bone was not limited to C57BL/6J mice as C3H/HeJ mice exhibited a similar skeletal response. The beneficial effects of thermoneutral housing on cancellous bone were associated with decreased Ucp1 gene expression in brown adipose tissue, increased bone marrow adiposity, higher rates of bone formation, higher expression levels of osteogenic genes and locally decreased bone resorption. Housing female mice at 22 °C resulted in premature cancellous bone loss. Failure to account for species differences in thermoregulation may seriously confound interpretation of studies

  15. Liraglutide and obesity in elderly: efficacy in fat loss and safety in order to prevent sarcopenia. A perspective case series study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Simone; Guido, Davide; Bologna, Chiara; Solerte, Sebastiano Bruno; Guerriero, Fabio; Isu, Antonio; Rondanelli, Mariangela

    2016-12-01

    For the growing numbers of obese elderly with diabetes, the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor analogue (liraglutide) appears a safe way to promote and maintain substantial weight loss. Given this background, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of the liraglutide treatment, at doses up to 3.0 mg per day, on the body composition, focusing on sarcopenia, in overweight and obese elderly with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A perspective study was carried out in overweight and obese T2DM patients with HbA1c equal to 7.0 % (53 mmol/mol) ~10.0 % (86), under 3-month treatment (at least) of maximal dose of metformin at stable regime, and additional liraglutide at doses up to 3.0 mg per day. Body composition markers such as skeletal muscle index (SMI), android and gynoid fat mass, and arms and legs fat free mass, was measured by dual-energy X-ray densitometry (DXA) at baseline and after 24 weeks of liraglutide treatment. Glucose control was also carried out by glucose and HbA1c. Nine subjects (male/female 6/3, mean age 68.22 ± 3.86 years, BMI 32.34 ± 4.89 kg/m(2)) were evaluated. We noted a median decrease in BMI (-0.78 kg/m(2)), weight (-2000 g), fat mass (-1498 g) and android fat (-0.9 %), and a increase in SMI (+0.03 kg/m(2)) from baseline. Glycemic control also improved, with a median change HbA1c of -0.80 %. Twenty-four weeks of liraglutide treatment was associated with reductions in fat mass and android fat. In addition, in order to prevent sarcopenia, it preserved the muscular tropism.

  16. Pharmacologic Options for the Treatment of Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia is now clinically defined as a loss of muscle mass coupled with functional deterioration (either walking speed or distance or grip strength). Based on the FRAX studies suggesting that the questions without bone mineral density can be used to screen for osteoporosis, there is now a valid simple questionnaire to screen for sarcopenia, i.e., the SARC-F. Numerous factors have been implicated in the pathophysiology of sarcopenia. These include genetic factors, mitochondrial defects, decreased anabolic hormones (e.g., testosterone, vitamin D, growth hormone and insulin growth hormone-1), inflammatory cytokine excess, insulin resistance, decreased protein intake and activity, poor blood flow to muscle and deficiency of growth derived factor-11. Over the last decade, there has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the molecular biology of muscle, resulting in a marked increase in potential future targets for the treatment of sarcopenia. At present, resistance exercise, protein supplementation, and vitamin D have been established as the basic treatment of sarcopenia. High-dose testosterone increases muscle power and function, but has a number of potentially limiting side effects. Other drugs in clinical development include selective androgen receptor molecules, ghrelin agonists, myostatin antibodies, activin IIR antagonists, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, beta antagonists, and fast skeletal muscle troponin activators. As sarcopenia is a major predictor of frailty, hip fracture, disability, and mortality in older persons, the development of drugs to treat it is eagerly awaited.

  17. Factors Associated With the Development of Sarcopenia in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanishi, M; Kimura, Y; Tsukaguchi, H; Koito, Y; Taniguchi, H; Mishima, T; Fukushima, Y; Sugi, M; Kinoshita, H; Matsuda, T

    2017-03-01

    Sarcopenia is characterized by an involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength, and function. Previous studies suggest that it is generally associated with aging and chronic kidney diseases. The focus of this study was on the association between sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia in kidney transplant recipients. Fifty-one patients who underwent kidney transplantation at Kansai Medical University Hospital were enrolled, and their sarcopenia status was evaluated between April and July 2016. Sarcopenia was defined according to the criteria for the Asia Working Group for Sarcopenia. Skeletal muscle mass index was measured by using dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry; the cutoff points were sarcopenia. In both sexes, the cutoff point for walking speed was sarcopenia, and 25 recipients (49.0%) had pre-sarcopenia; 20 (39.2%) did not have sarcopenia. There were significant differences in age, duration of dialysis, body mass index, and triglyceride levels between the subgroups of recipients with and without sarcopenia. Multivariate regression analysis showed that age and duration of dialysis were independent variables for sarcopenic status. Our observations indicate that age and duration of dialysis before transplantation were independent determinants of sarcopenia and pre-sarcopenia in these kidney transplant recipients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Age-related hearing loss in individuals and their caregivers: effects of coping on the quality of life among the dyads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazzarotto S

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sébastien Lazzarotto,1,2 Karine Baumstarck,1 Anderson Loundou,1 Zeinab Hamidou,1,3 Valérie Aghababian,1 Tanguy Leroy,1,4 Pascal Auquier1 1EA 3279, Self-Perceived Health Assessment Research Unit, School of Medicine, Aix Marseille Université, 2French Regional Institute for Prevention of Aging, Marseille, 3National Clinical Research Quality of Life in Oncology Platform, Marseille, 4Social Psychology Research Group (GRePS EA 4163, Université Lumière Lyon 2, Bron, France Objectives: Age-related hearing loss (ARHL impacts the daily living and quality of life (QoL of affected individuals and the functioning of family caregivers. In the specific context of voluntary medical checkups, we examined sample dyads (ARHL individual and the caregiver to determine whether QoL of patients and caregivers is influenced by coping strategies implemented either by themselves or their relatives.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study with a descriptive/correlative design performed in a French preventive health center (Regional Institute for Prevention of Aging, Marseille, France for the beneficiaries of pension funds of private sector employees. The samples included beneficiary–caregiver dyads. The beneficiaries had bilateral (mild to moderately severe ARHL. Self-reported data were collected as follows: QoL using the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, coping strategies using the Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Scale, and anxiety and mood using visual analog scales.Results: The final sample comprised 44 beneficiaries and 44 caregivers. The caregiver was the partner of the beneficiary in 73% of cases. The QoL scores of the social dimension were significantly lower for beneficiaries and caregivers compared with French age- and sex-matched controls. Among beneficiaries and caregivers, coping strategies based on problem solving were the most commonly used strategies. The use of positive thinking strategies was associated with

  19. Age-related hearing loss in individuals and their caregivers: effects of coping on the quality of life among the dyads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarotto, Sébastien; Baumstarck, Karine; Loundou, Anderson; Hamidou, Zeinab; Aghababian, Valérie; Leroy, Tanguy; Auquier, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) impacts the daily living and quality of life (QoL) of affected individuals and the functioning of family caregivers. In the specific context of voluntary medical checkups, we examined sample dyads (ARHL individual and the caregiver) to determine whether QoL of patients and caregivers is influenced by coping strategies implemented either by themselves or their relatives. This was a cross-sectional study with a descriptive/correlative design performed in a French preventive health center (Regional Institute for Prevention of Aging, Marseille, France) for the beneficiaries of pension funds of private sector employees. The samples included beneficiary-caregiver dyads. The beneficiaries had bilateral (mild to moderately severe) ARHL. Self-reported data were collected as follows: QoL using the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire, coping strategies using the Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Scale, and anxiety and mood using visual analog scales. The final sample comprised 44 beneficiaries and 44 caregivers. The caregiver was the partner of the beneficiary in 73% of cases. The QoL scores of the social dimension were significantly lower for beneficiaries and caregivers compared with French age- and sex-matched controls. Among beneficiaries and caregivers, coping strategies based on problem solving were the most commonly used strategies. The use of positive thinking strategies was associated with higher QoL scores. The more one member of the dyad used an avoidance coping strategy, the more the other member used a positive thinking strategy. This study emphasizes that QoL of individuals with age-related hearing impairment and their natural caregivers is related to the coping strategies that they use. This finding suggests that targeted interventions should be offered to help individuals who experience emotional difficulties to implement more efficient coping strategies.

  20. The influence of sarcopenia on survival and surgical complications in ovarian cancer patients undergoing primary debulking surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, I.J.; Ubachs, J.; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Dijk, D.P. van; Beets-Tan, R.G.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Oude Damink, S.W.; Gorp, T. Van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sarcopenia, severe skeletal muscle loss, has been identified as a prognostic factor in various malignancies. This study aims to investigate whether sarcopenia is associated with overall survival (OS) and surgical complications in patients with advanced ovarian cancer undergoing primary

  1. Physical activity energy expenditure and sarcopenia in black South African urban women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, Herculina S.; Havemann-Nel, Lize; Ravyse, Chrisna; Moss, Sarah J.; Tieland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Black women are believed to be genetically less predisposed to age-related sarcopenia. The objective of this study was to investigate lifestyle factors associated with sarcopenia in black South African (SA) urban women. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 247 women (mean age 57 y)

  2. Physical activity energy expenditure and sarcopenia in black South African urban women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruger, Herculina S.; Havemann-Nel, Lize; Ravyse, Chrisna; Moss, Sarah J.; Tieland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Black women are believed to be genetically less predisposed to age-related sarcopenia. The objective of this study was to investigate lifestyle factors associated with sarcopenia in black South African (SA) urban women. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 247 women (mean age 57 y) we

  3. The definition of sarcopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Astrid Y.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia in old age has been associated with a higher mortality, poor physical functioning, poor outcome of surgery and higher drug toxicity. There is no general consensus on the definition of sarcopenia. The aim of the research presented in this thesis was to assess the implications of the use of

  4. The definition of sarcopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Astrid Y.

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia in old age has been associated with a higher mortality, poor physical functioning, poor outcome of surgery and higher drug toxicity. There is no general consensus on the definition of sarcopenia. The aim of the research presented in this thesis was to assess the implications of the use of

  5. Nutrition, frailty, and sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Kiesswetter, Eva; Drey, Michael; Sieber, Cornel C

    2017-02-01

    Frailty and sarcopenia are important concepts in the quest to prevent physical dependence, as geriatrics are shifting towards identifications of early stages of disability. Definitions of both sarcopenia and frailty are still developing, and both concepts clearly overlap in their physical aspects. Malnutrition (both undernutrition and obesity) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of frailty and sarcopenia. The quality of the diet along the lifespan has a close relation with the incidence of both entities, and nutritional interventions may be able to reduce the incidence or revert either of them. This brief review explores the role of energy and protein intake and other key nutrients on muscle function. Nutrition may be a key element of multimodal interventions for frailty and sarcopenia. The results of the "Sarcopenia and Physical fRailty IN older people: multi-componenT Treatment strategies" (SPRINTT) trial will offer key insights on the effect of such interventions in frail, sarcopenic older individuals.

  6. Sarcopenia Impairs Prognosis of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: The Role of Liver Functional Reserve and Tumor-Related Factors in Loss of Skeletal Muscle Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Imai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia impairs survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. This study aimed to clarify the factors that contribute to decreased skeletal muscle volume in patients with HCC. The third lumbar vertebra skeletal muscle index (L3 SMI in 351 consecutive patients with HCC was calculated to identify sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was defined as an L3 SMI value ≤ 29.0 cm2/m2 for women and ≤ 36.0 cm2/m2 for men. The factors affecting L3 SMI were analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis and tree-based models. Of the 351 HCC patients, 33 were diagnosed as having sarcopenia and showed poor prognosis compared with non-sarcopenia patients (p = 0.007. However, this significant difference disappeared after the adjustments for age, sex, Child–Pugh score, maximum tumor size, tumor number, and the degree of portal vein invasion by propensity score matching analysis. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age (p = 0.015 and sex (p < 0.0001 were significantly correlated with a decrease in L3 SMI. Tree-based models revealed that sex (female is the most significant factor that affects L3 SMI. In male patients, L3 SMI was decreased by aging, increased Child–Pugh score (≥56 years, and enlarged tumor size (<56 years. Maintaining liver functional reserve and early diagnosis and therapy for HCC are vital to prevent skeletal muscle depletion and improve the prognosis of patients with HCC.

  7. Therapies for sarcopenia and regeneration of old skeletal muscles: more a case of old tissue architecture than old stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grounds, Miranda D

    2014-01-01

    Age related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function (sarcopenia) reduces independence and the quality of life for individuals, and leads to falls and fractures with escalating health costs for the rapidly aging human population. Thus there is much interest in developing interventions to reduce sarcopenia. One area that has attracted recent attention is the proposed use of myogenic stem cells to improve regeneration of old muscles. This mini-review challenges the fundamental need for myogenic stem cell therapy for sarcopenia. It presents evidence that demonstrates the excellent capacity of myogenic stem cells from very old rodent and human muscles to form new muscles after experimental myofiber necrosis. The many factors required for successful muscle regeneration are considered with a strong focus on integration of components of old muscle bioarchitecture. The fundamental role of satellite cells in homeostasis of normal aging muscles and the incidence of endogenous regeneration in old muscles is questioned. These issues, combined with problems for clinical myogenic stem cell therapies for severe muscle diseases, raise fundamental concerns about the justification for myogenic stem cell therapy for sarcopenia.

  8. Possible age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) and corresponding change in echolocation parameters in a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songhai; Wang, Ding; Wang, Kexiong; Hoffmann-Kuhnt, Matthias; Fernando, Nimal; Taylor, Elizabeth A; Lin, Wenzhi; Chen, Jialin; Ng, Timothy

    2013-11-15

    The hearing and echolocation clicks of a stranded Indo-Pacific humpback dolphin (Sousa chinensis) in Zhuhai, China, were studied. This animal had been repeatedly observed in the wild before it was stranded and its age was estimated to be ~40 years. The animal's hearing was measured using a non-invasive auditory evoked potential (AEP) method. Echolocation clicks produced by the dolphin were recorded when the animal was freely swimming in a 7.5 m (width)×22 m (length)×4.8 m (structural depth) pool with a water depth of ~2.5 m. The hearing and echolocation clicks of the studied dolphin were compared with those of a conspecific younger individual, ~13 years of age. The results suggested that the cut-off frequency of the high-frequency hearing of the studied dolphin was ~30-40 kHz lower than that of the younger individual. The peak and centre frequencies of the clicks produced by the older dolphin were ~16 kHz lower than those of the clicks produced by the younger animal. Considering that the older dolphin was ~40 years old, its lower high-frequency hearing range with lower click peak and centre frequencies could probably be explained by age-related hearing loss (presbycusis).

  9. Auditory Brainstem Gap Responses Start to Decline in Middle Age Mice: A Novel Physiological Biomarker for Age-Related Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanika T.; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P.; Frisina, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The CBA/CaJ mouse strain's auditory function is normal during the early phases of life and gradually declines over its lifespan, much like human age-related hearing loss (ARHL), but on a mouse life cycle “time frame”. This pattern of ARHL is relatively similar to that of most humans: difficult to clinically diagnose at its onset, and currently not treatable medically. To address the challenge of early diagnosis, CBA mice were used for the present study to analyze the beginning stages and functional onset biomarkers of ARHL. The results from Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) audiogram and Gap-in-noise (GIN) ABR tests were compared for two groups of mice of different ages, young adult and middle age. ABR peak components from the middle age group displayed minor changes in audibility, but had a significantly higher prolonged peak latency and decreased peak amplitude in response to temporal gaps in comparison to the young adult group. The results for the younger subjects revealed gap thresholds and recovery rates that were comparable to previous studies of auditory neural gap coding. Our findings suggest that age-linked degeneration of the peripheral and brainstem auditory system is already beginning in middle age, allowing for the possibility of preventative biomedical or hearing protection measures to be implemented as a possibility for attenuating further damage to the auditory system due to ARHL. PMID:25307161

  10. Auditory brainstem gap responses start to decline in mice in middle age: a novel physiological biomarker for age-related hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Tanika T; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P; Frisina, Robert D

    2015-07-01

    The auditory function of the CBA/CaJ mouse strain is normal during the early phases of life and gradually declines over its lifespan, much like human age-related hearing loss (ARHL) but within the "time frame" of a mouse life cycle. This pattern of ARHL is similar to that of most humans: difficult to diagnose clinically at its onset and currently not treatable medically. To address the challenge of early diagnosis, we use CBA mice to analyze the initial stages and functional onset biomarkers of ARHL. The results from Auditory Brainstem Response (ABR) audiogram and Gap-in-noise (GIN) ABR tests were compared for two groups of mice of different ages, namely young adult and middle age. ABR peak components from the middle age group displayed minor changes in audibility but had a significantly higher prolonged peak latency and decreased peak amplitude in response to temporal gaps in comparison with the young adult group. The results for the younger subjects revealed gap thresholds and recovery rates that were comparable with previous studies of auditory neural gap coding. Our findings suggest that age-linked degeneration of the peripheral and brainstem auditory system begins in middle age, allowing for the possibility of preventative biomedical or hearing protection measures to be implemented in order to attenuate further damage to the auditory system attributable to ARHL.

  11. Identification and treatment of older persons with sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauretani, Fulvio; Bautmans, Ivan; De Vita, Francesca; Nardelli, Anna; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Maggio, Marcello

    2014-12-01

    In the last decades, sarcopenia in older persons has been operationalized by the assessment of lean body mass, muscle strength and/or physical performance. Several definitions of sarcopenia, using different parameters and cut-offs, have been proposed. However, which is the best definition to describe and to assess this condition is still matter of debate. Hand grip strength has been suggested as better predictor of incident mobility impairment and mortality, than skeletal muscle mass. In the light of the current knowledge, we sought to propose an operative approach for identifying and treating sarcopenic older persons according to main categories of sarcopenia: the age-related or primary sarcopenia and disease-related or secondary sarcopenia. We suggest that a quantitative assessment of grip strength alone might be sufficient to identify patients with primary sarcopenia. When chronic diseases accompany the ageing process, the combined assessment of muscle strength plus a balance test could be more appropriate. The identification of tests and pathological relevant cut-offs that facilitates the entry of sarcopenia into the clinical practice, could step forward researchers and physicians. This could be important for planning multidisciplinary models to maximize the maintenance of locomotive abilities especially in older persons affected by chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  12. Melatonin as a Potential Agent in the Treatment of Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coto-Montes, Ana; Boga, Jose A; Tan, Dun X; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-10-24

    Considering the increased speed at which the world population is aging, sarcopenia could become an epidemic in this century. This condition currently has no means of prevention or treatment. Melatonin is a highly effective and ubiquitously acting antioxidant and free radical scavenger that is normally produced in all organisms. This molecule has been implicated in a huge number of biological processes, from anticonvulsant properties in children to protective effects on the lung in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the data which suggest that melatonin may be beneficial in attenuating, reducing or preventing each of the symptoms that characterize sarcopenia. The findings are not limited to sarcopenia, but also apply to osteoporosis-related sarcopenia and to age-related neuromuscular junction dysfunction. Since melatonin has a high safety profile and is drastically reduced in advanced age, its potential utility in the treatment of sarcopenic patients and related dysfunctions should be considered.

  13. Melatonin as a Potential Agent in the Treatment of Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Coto-Montes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the increased speed at which the world population is aging, sarcopenia could become an epidemic in this century. This condition currently has no means of prevention or treatment. Melatonin is a highly effective and ubiquitously acting antioxidant and free radical scavenger that is normally produced in all organisms. This molecule has been implicated in a huge number of biological processes, from anticonvulsant properties in children to protective effects on the lung in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the data which suggest that melatonin may be beneficial in attenuating, reducing or preventing each of the symptoms that characterize sarcopenia. The findings are not limited to sarcopenia, but also apply to osteoporosis-related sarcopenia and to age-related neuromuscular junction dysfunction. Since melatonin has a high safety profile and is drastically reduced in advanced age, its potential utility in the treatment of sarcopenic patients and related dysfunctions should be considered.

  14. Increased Mortality in Elderly Patients with Sarcopenia and Acetabular Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deren, Matthew E; Babu, Jacob; Cohen, Eric M; Machan, Jason; Born, Christopher T; Hayda, Roman

    2017-02-01

    Sarcopenia is a condition of clinically relevant loss of muscle mass and function. Acetabular fractures in elderly patients are common and difficult to treat. This study aimed to determine if sarcopenia is common in elderly patients with acetabular fractures and correlates with lower-energy mechanisms of injury, higher rates of complications, and higher mortality than patients with normal muscle mass. The Rhode Island Hospital Trauma Database was queried for patients who were ≥60 years of age from 2005 to 2014 using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code for closed acetabular fracture, 808.0. Charts were retrospectively reviewed for demographic data, operative intervention, mechanism of injury, mortality, comorbidities, and other factors. Computed tomography (CT) was used to determine the muscle cross-sectional area and to calculate the skeletal muscle index. The database revealed 192 patients coded for acetabular fracture; of these, 181 were correctly diagnosed. Ninety-nine patients had recorded body mass index (BMI) and adequate CT scans to measure the skeletal muscle index. Forty-two patients (42.4%) had sarcopenia, and 57 patients (57.6%) did not have sarcopenia. There were no significant differences in demographic characteristics between the groups with the exception of BMI and sex. BMI was higher in patients who did not have sarcopenia (31.7 kg/m) than it was in patients with sarcopenia (23.6 kg/m) (p sarcopenia at 76.2% (32 of 42 patients) than in patients without sarcopenia at 50.9% (29 of 57 patients). Fractures in patients without sarcopenia were associated with a higher-energy mechanism of injury in 78.9% of cases compared with 52.4% of cases of patients with sarcopenia (p = 0.005). Sarcopenia was significantly associated (p = 0.0419) with increased 1-year mortality (28.6%) compared with the absence of sarcopenia (12.3%). This association was even stronger if in-hospital mortality was excluded (p = 0.00074). Finally

  15. The wasting continuum in heart failure: from sarcopenia to cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haehling, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Sarcopenia (muscle wasting) and cachexia share some pathophysiological aspects. Sarcopenia affects approximately 20 %, cachexia cachexia means loss of muscle and fat tissue that leads to weight loss. The wasting continuum in HF implies that skeletal muscle is lost earlier than fat tissue and may lead from sarcopenia to cachexia. Both tissues require conservation, and therapies that stop the wasting process have tremendous therapeutic appeal. The present paper reviews the pathophysiology of muscle and fat wasting in HF and discusses potential treatments, including exercise training, appetite stimulants, essential amino acids, growth hormone, testosterone, electrical muscle stimulation, ghrelin and its analogues, ghrelin receptor agonists and myostatin antibodies.

  16. Sarcopenia in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindapasirt, Jarin

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia, characterized by a decline of skeletal muscle plus low muscle strength and/or physical performance, has emerged to be an important prognostic factor for advanced cancer patients. It is associated with poor performance status, toxicity from chemotherapy, and shorter time of tumor control. There is limited data about sarcopenia in cancer patients and associated factors. Moreover, the knowledge about the changes of muscle mass during chemotherapy and its impact to response and toxicity to chemotherapy is still lacking. This review aimed to provide understanding about sarcopenia and to emphasize its importance to cancer treatment.

  17. The NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to sarcopenia and lower muscle glycolytic potential in old mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Marin Jane; Foley, Kevin P; D'Souza, Donna M; Li, Yujin E; Lau, Trevor C; Hawke, Thomas J; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    The mechanisms underpinning decreased skeletal muscle strength and slowing of movement during aging are ill-defined. "Inflammaging," increased inflammation with advancing age, may contribute to aspects of sarcopenia, but little is known about the participatory immune components. We discovered that aging was associated with increased caspase-1 activity in mouse skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that the caspase-1-containing NLRP3 inflammasome contributes to sarcopenia in mice. Male C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) and NLRP3(-/-) mice were aged to 10 (adult) and 24 mo (old). NLRP3(-/-) mice were protected from decreased muscle mass (relative to body mass) and decreased size of type IIB and IIA myofibers, which occurred between 10 and 24 mo of age in WT mice. Old NLRP3(-/-) mice also had increased relative muscle strength and endurance and were protected from age-related increases in the number of myopathic fibers. We found no evidence of age-related or NLRP3-dependent changes in markers of systemic inflammation. Increased caspase-1 activity was associated with GAPDH proteolysis and reduced GAPDH enzymatic activity in skeletal muscles from old WT mice. Aging did not alter caspase-1 activity, GAPDH proteolysis, or GAPDH activity in skeletal muscles of NLRP3(-/-) mice. Our results show that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in age-related loss of muscle glycolytic potential. Deletion of NLRP3 mitigates both the decline in glycolytic myofiber size and the reduced activity of glycolytic enzymes in muscle during aging. We propose that the etiology of sarcopenia involves direct communication between immune responses and metabolic flux in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. The Impact of Sarcopenia on Survival and Complications in Surgical Oncology: A Review of the Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    JOGLEKAR, SAVITA; NAU, PETER N.; MEZHIR, JAMES J.

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the subclinical loss of skeletal muscle and strength and has been extensively studied in both the cancer and surgical literature. Specifically, sarcopenia has gained significant recognition as an important prognostic factor for both complications and survival in cancer patients. Herein, we review the current literature to date highlighting the specific impact of sarcopenia in patients undergoing oncologic procedures. PMID:26310812

  19. The impact of sarcopenia on survival and complications in surgical oncology: A review of the current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, Savita; Nau, Peter N; Mezhir, James J

    2015-10-01

    Sarcopenia is the subclinical loss of skeletal muscle and strength and has been extensively studied in both the cancer and surgical literature. Specifically, sarcopenia has gained significant recognition as an important prognostic factor for both complications and survival in cancer patients. Herein, we review the current literature to date highlighting the specific impact of sarcopenia in patients undergoing oncologic procedures.

  20. Sarcopenia and liver transplant: The relevance of too little muscle mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallwitz, Eric R

    2015-10-21

    Loss of muscle mass and function is a common occurrence in both patients with decompensated cirrhosis and those undergoing liver transplantation. Sarcopenia is associated with morbidity and mortality before and after liver transplantation. The ability of skeletal muscle mass to recover after transplant is questionable, and long term adverse events associated with persistent sarcopenia have not been well studied. Limited data is available examining mechanisms by which decreased muscle mass might develop. It is not clear which interventions might reduce the prevalence of sarcopenia and associated health burdens. However, measures to either decrease portal hypertension or improve nutrition appear to have benefit. Research on sarcopenia in the liver transplant setting is hampered by differing methodology to quantify muscle mass and varied thresholds determining the presence of sarcopenia. One area highlighted in this review is the heterogeneity used when defining sarcopenia. The health consequences, clinical course and potential pathophysiologic mechanisms of sarcopenia in the setting of cirrhosis and liver transplantation are further discussed.

  1. The Epidemiology of Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Richard Matthew; Roberts, Helen Clare; Cooper, Cyrus; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review is to describe the epidemiology of sarcopenia, specifically prevalence, health outcomes, and factors across the life course that have been linked to its development. Sarcopenia definitions involve a range of measures (muscle mass, strength, and physical performance), which tend to decline with age, and hence sarcopenia becomes increasingly prevalent with age. Less is known about prevalence in older people in hospital and care homes, although it is likely to be higher than in community settings. The range of measures used, and the cutpoints suggested for each, presents a challenge for comparing prevalence estimates between studies. The importance of sarcopenia is highlighted by the range of adverse health outcomes that strength and physical performance (and to a lesser extent, muscle mass) have been linked to. This is shown most strikingly by the finding of increased all-cause mortality rates among those with weaker grip strength and slower gait speed. A life course approach broadens the window for our understanding of the etiology of sarcopenia and hence the potential intervention. An example is physical activity, with increased levels across midadulthood appearing to increase muscle mass and strength in early old age. Epidemiologic studies will continue to make an important contribution to our understanding of sarcopenia and possible avenues for intervention and prevention.

  2. Predicting sarcopenia from functional measures among community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Michelle; Glenn, Jordan M; Binns, Ashley

    2016-02-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as age-related lean tissue mass (LTM) loss resulting in reduced muscular strength, physical function, and mobility. Up to 33 % of older adults currently are sarcopenic, with likely many more undiagnosed. The purpose of this investigation was to predict sarcopenia status from easily accessible functional measures of community-dwelling older adults. Forty-three community-dwelling older adults (n = 32 females and n = 11 males) participated in the present investigation. Inclusion criteria included ≥65 years of age, mini-mental state examination score ≥24, and no falls within previous 12 months. All subjects completed their appendicular skeletal mass (ASM) assessment via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and were categorized as either sarcopenic or non-sarcopenic. Physical assessments included 10-m usual walk, hand-grip (HG) strength, 6-min walk, 8-ft up-and-go, 30-s chair stand, 30-s arm curl, and sit-to-stand muscular power. A forward, stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that age, sex, weight, height, 10-m walk, HG, and sit-to-stand muscular power account for 96.1 % of the variance in ASM. The area under the curve was 0.92 for correctly identifying sarcopenic participants compared to their actual classification. This is the first prediction model used to identify sarcopenia based on parameters of demographic and functional fitness measures in community-dwelling older adults. The ability to accurately identify sarcopenia in older adults is imperative to their quality of life and ability to perform activities of daily living.

  3. Role and potential mechanisms of anabolic resistance in sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a pressing need to understand the aging process to better cope with its associated physical and societal costs. The age-related muscle wasting known as sarcopenia is a major contributor to the problems faced by the elderly. By hindering mobility and reducing strength, it greatly diminishes ...

  4. Advantages of dietary, exercise-related, and therapeutic interventions to prevent and treat sarcopenia in adult patients: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DL Waters

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available DL Waters1, RN Baumgartner2, PJ Garry3, B Vellas41Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA; 3Department of Pathology, University of New Mexico School of Medicine, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA; 4Department of Internal Medicine and Geriatric Medicine, University Hospital Center of Toulouse, Gerontopole, Toulouse, FranceAbstract: Sarcopenia is the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with aging. Although the term sarcopenia was first coined in 1989, its etiology is still poorly understood. Moreover, a consensus for defining sarcopenia continues to elude us. Sarcopenic changes in the muscle include losses in muscle fiber quantity and quality, alpha-motor neurons, protein synthesis rates, and anabolic and sex hormone production. Other factors include basal metabolic rate, increased protein dietary requirements, and chronic inflammation secondary to age-related changes in cytokines and oxidative stress. These changes lead to decreased overall physical functioning, increased frailty, falls risk, and ultimately the loss of independent living. Because the intertwining relationships of these factors are complex, effective treatment options are still under investigation. The published data on sarcopenia are vast, and this review is not intended to be exhaustive. The aim of this review is to provide an update on the current knowledge of the definition, etiology, consequences, and current clinical trials that may help address this pressing public health problem for our aging populations.Keywords: aging, muscle loss, nutrition, physical activity

  5. Sarcopenia: what should a pharmacist know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso J. Cruz-Jentoft

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia (or muscle insufficiency is a geriatric syndrome characterized by a progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function which has adverse consequences, particularly physical disability, falls and death. It can develop slowly, as a chronic condition that emerges over many years, or acutely, generally due to immobilization associated with an acute disease. The physiopathology of sarcopenia is complex, and affects both the muscle and its neurological and hormonal regulation. The prevalence of sarcopenia increases with age and in certain healthcare settings (nursing homes, hospitals, rehabilitation centres. Its diagnosis is based on the documentation of a low muscle mass associated with low muscle strength and/or low physical performance. Once confirmed, a syndromic approach is needed, based on a comprehensive geriatric assessment in order to determine its causes and prepare a treatment plan which addresses the treatment of symptoms as well as the etiology. Prevention of sarcopenia starts in the adult age, through the promotion of adequate nutritional habits, an increase in physical activity and, ideally, resistance exercise. Sarcopenia treatment must necessarily include resistance exercises (that can be associated with other types of exercise and an improvement in diet, increasing protein intake up to 1.2-1.5 g/kg/day and covering caloric requirements. In some cases, this will require the use of nutritional supplements, which can contain leucine, beta-hydroxy beta-methylbutyrate acid (HMB and vitamin D, in order to optimize its effects on the muscle. There are still no medications available to treat sarcopenia

  6. Impact of sarcopenia in the management of urological cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Koga, Fumitaka

    2017-05-01

    Sarcopenia, the degenerative and systemic loss of skeletal muscle mass, develops as a consequence of the progression of cancer cachexia. Recent studies suggest that sarcopenia may be used as a biomarker in the management of patients with several cancers. Areas covered: In this article, the authors review 1) the methods to simply and optimally evaluate and define sarcopenia using computed tomography images in daily clinical practice and 2) the impact of sarcopenia in the management of urological cancers, specifically focusing on the usefulness in predicting treatment-related complications and prognosis. The authors also discuss the prognostic importance of changes in skeletal muscle mass in the course of treatment and the potential roles of nutritional support and exercise to prevent progression of sarcopenia. Expert commentary: Sarcopenia is associated with treatment-related complications and unfavorable prognosis in urological cancer patients. Nutritional support and exercise might be helpful in improving sarcopenia. The impact of these interventions on clinical outcomes would be elucidated by ongoing or future clinical studies.

  7. Sarcopenia and physical function in overweight patients with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Carla M M; Lieffers, Jessica R; Bowthorpe, Lindsay; Baracos, Vickie E; Mourtzakis, Marina; McCargar, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    Advanced cancer is associated with numerous metabolic abnormalities that may lead to significant body composition changes, particularly muscle loss or sarcopenia. Sarcopenia in cancer has been associated with poor clinical outcomes, including poor physical function. Accurate tools to assess body composition are expensive and not readily available in clinical settings. Unfortunately, little is known about the efficacy of affordable and portable techniques to assess functional status in patients with cancer. We investigated the prevalence of sarcopenia and its association with different portable and low-cost functional status measurement tools (i.e., handgrip strength testing, a two-minute walking test, and a self-report questionnaire) in overweight/obese patients (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m²) with advanced cancer. Twenty-eight patients (68% men) aged 64.5 ± 9.5 years with advanced lung or colorectal cancer were included. Sarcopenia was assessed by measuring appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM) adjusted by height (ASM index), using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Approximately 36% of patients had sarcopenia. Average handgrip strength was greater in men without sarcopenia than in men with it (p=0.035). In men, ASM index was positively correlated with average (r=0.535, p=0.018) and peak handgrip strength (r=0.457, p=0.049). No differences were observed among female patients. Handgrip strength was associated with sarcopenia in male patients with advanced cancer, and therefore it may be used as a portable and simple nutritional screening tool.

  8. Carotenoids as protection against sarcopenia in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Sarcopenia, or loss of muscle mass and strength, plays a major role in the disablement process in older adults and increases the risk of impaired physical performance, falls, physical disability, frailty, and death. Oxidative stress is a major mechanism implicated in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia; aging muscle shows increased oxidative damage to DNA, protein, and lipids. Carotenoids quench free radicals, reduce damage from reactive oxygen species, and appear to modulate redox-sensitive trans...

  9. Role of Protein and Amino Acids in the Pathophysiology and Treatment of Sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Dreyer, Hans C.; Volpi, Elena

    2005-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with aging, is a multifactorial condition that slowly develops over decades and becomes a significant contributor to disability in the older population. Malnutrition and alterations in the muscle anabolic response to nutritional stimuli have been identified as potentially preventable factors that may significantly contribute to sarcopenia. Thus, nutritional interventions may be useful for the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia.

  10. Resistance training, sarcopenia, and the mitochondrial theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Adam P W; De Lisio, Michael; Parise, Gianni

    2008-02-01

    Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a significant loss of muscle mass, strength, function, and quality of life. In addition, the healthcare cost of aging and age-related disease is growing, and will continue to grow as a larger proportion of our population reaches retirement age and beyond. The mitochondrial theory of aging has been identified as a leading explanation of the aging process and describes a path leading to cellular senescence that includes electron transport chain deficiency, reactive oxygen species production, and the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions and mutations. It is also quite clear that regular resistance exercise is a potent and effective countermeasure for skeletal muscle aging. In this review, we discuss age-related sarcopenia, the mitochondrial theory of aging, and how resistance exercise may directly affect key components of the mitochondrial theory. It is clear from the data discussed that regular resistance training can effectively disturb processes that contribute to the progression of aging as it pertains to the mitochondrial theory.

  11. A simple sarcopenia screening test predicts future adverse events in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Yoshiro; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Hanatani, Shinsuke; Tanaka, Tomoko; Yamamura, Satoru; Kimura, Yuichi; Araki, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Kenji; Tsujita, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Yamamuro, Megumi; Kojima, Sunao; Kaikita, Koichi; Hokimoto, Seiji

    2016-07-15

    Progressive loss of skeletal muscle termed "sarcopenia" is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with cardiovascular diseases. A simple screening test that can identify sarcopenia using three variables (age, grip strength and calf circumference) was recently developed. We evaluated the clinical utility of this screening test in patients with heart failure (HF). HF patients were divided into the sarcopenia (n=82) and non-sarcopenia (n=37) groups based on the sarcopenia score. Circulating BNP and high-sensitive cardiac troponin T levels were significantly higher, and left ventricular ejection fraction was lower in the sarcopenia group than non-sarcopenia group. Kaplan-Meier curve showed that HF event-free survival rate was significantly lower in the sarcopenia group. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis identified BNP (ln[BNP]) (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.58; 95% CI: 1.09-2.29, p=0.02), hs-CRP (ln[CRP]) (HR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.23-2.68; psarcopenia score (HR: 1.03; 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, psarcopenia score to BNP levels increased an area under the curve for future HF events (sarcopenia score alone, 0.77; BNP alone, 0.82; combination, 0.89). The sarcopenia screening test can be used to predict future adverse events in patients with HF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recovery of immune competence following sublethal X irradiation of young and old mice: a model for studying age-related loss of immunologic homeostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, W.J. (VA Wadsworth Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA); Perkins, E.H.; Makinodan, T.

    1982-01-01

    Age-related alteration in lymphohematopoietic homeostasis was assessed kinetically by determining immunologic and stem-cell regenerating capacities of young (5-7 months), middle-aged (13 months), and old (23-24 months) C3H and C57BL/6 mice following their exposure to 500 R. Immunologic activities were based on the ability of spleen cells to respond to sheep erythrocytes, phytohemagglutinin, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Stem-cell activity was based on the ability of splenic and bone marrow cells to form colonies in vivo. Reflective of age-related homeostatic imbalance was alteration in the (a) time of recovery, (b) rate of regeneration, and (c) capacity of the regenerating system to overshoot the preirradition steady-state level. Most of the immunologic parameters showed a delay in the time of recovery in old mice. In contrast, the time of recovery of stem cells in old mice was equal to or faster than that in young mice. Furthermore, the magnitude of regeneration of stem cells was greater in old than young mice. These results suggest that recovery of immunologic activities in old mice is delayed partly because of the inability of their stem cells to rapidly generate immunocompetent progenies.

  13. Sarcopenia in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease: Can It Be Altered by Diet and Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Matthew R; Mendoza, Mardeli Saire; Nguyen, Douglas; Medici, Valentina; McClave, Stephen A

    2016-08-01

    Sarcopenia, a loss of muscle mass, is being increasingly recognized to have a deleterious effect on outcomes in patients with chronic liver disease. Factors related to diet and the inflammatory nature of chronic liver disease contribute to the occurrence of sarcopenia in these patients. Sarcopenia adversely influences quality of life, performance, morbidity, success of transplantation, and even mortality. Specific deficiencies in macronutrients (protein, polyunsaturated fatty acids) and micronutrients (vitamins C, D, and E, carotenoids, and selenium) have been linked to sarcopenia. Lessons learned from nutritional therapy in geriatric patient populations may provide strategies to manage sarcopenia in patients with liver disease. Combining diet modification and nutrient supplementation with an organized program of exercise may help ameliorate or even reverse the effects of sarcopenia on an already complex disease process.

  14. The Association between Parameters of Malnutrition and Diagnostic Measures of Sarcopenia in Geriatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnierse, Esmee M.; Trappenburg, Marijke C.; Leter, Morena J.; Blauw, Gerard Jan; de van der Schueren, Marian A. E.; Meskers, Carel G. M.; Maier, Andrea B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia include measures of muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance. Consensus on the definition of sarcopenia has not been reached yet. To improve insight into the most clinically valid definition of sarcopenia, this study aimed to compare the association between parameters of malnutrition, as a risk factor in sarcopenia, and diagnostic measures of sarcopenia in geriatric outpatients. Material and Methods This study is based on data from a cross-sectional study conducted in a geriatric outpatient clinic including 185 geriatric outpatients (mean age 82 years). Parameters of malnutrition included risk of malnutrition (assessed by the Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire), loss of appetite, unintentional weight loss and underweight (body mass index malnutrition (independent variables) and diagnostic measures of sarcopenia (dependent variables) were analysed using multivariate linear regression models adjusted for age, body mass, fat mass and height in separate models. Results None of the parameters of malnutrition was consistently associated with diagnostic measures of sarcopenia. The strongest associations were found for both relative and absolute muscle mass; less stronger associations were found for muscle strength and physical performance. Underweight (p = malnutrition relate differently to diagnostic measures of sarcopenia in geriatric outpatients. The association between parameters of malnutrition and diagnostic measures of sarcopenia was strongest for both relative and absolute muscle mass, while less strong associations were found with muscle strength and physical performance. PMID:26284368

  15. The Cooccurrence of Obesity, Osteoporosis, and Sarcopenia in the Ovariectomized Rat: A Study for Modeling Osteosarcopenic Obesity in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Ezzat-Zadeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity, osteoporosis, and sarcopenia may individually occur due to age-related gradual alterations in body composition. This study investigates the cooccurrence of these age-related diseases in female animals with low levels of ovarian hormone in the absence of complex multifactorial process of chronological aging. Methods. Thirty-six 5- and 10-month-old female rats were chosen to model pre- and postmenopausal women, respectively. Rats were divided into three treatment groups in each age category—sham, ovariectomized (ovx, and ovx + E2 (17β-estradiol, 10 μg/kg—and were pair-fed. Volunteer wheel running activity, body composition, bone microstructure, serum C-telopeptides of type I collagen, bone specific alkaline phosphatase, E2, and gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed. Results. The cooccurrence of osteoporosis, sarcopenia, and obesity was observed in the older ovx rats associated with a significant (p<0.05 increased fat mass (30%, bone loss (9.6%, decreased normalized muscle mass-to-body-weight ratio (10.5%, and a significant decrease in physical activity (57%. The ratio of tibial bone mineral density to combined muscle mass was significantly decreased in both ovx age categories. Conclusion. Ovariectomized rat could be used as an experimental model to examine the effect of loss of ovarian hormones, while controlling for energy intake and expenditure, to conduct obesity and body composition translational research in females without the confounding effect of genetic background.

  16. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Sarcopenia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaanse, Luc P.; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; Echteld, Michael A.; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as a syndrome characterised by progressive and generalised loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. It has hardly been studied in older people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In this study 884 persons with borderline to profound ID aged 50 years and over, were investigated to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia in…

  17. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Sarcopenia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaanse, Luc P.; Hilgenkamp, Thessa I. M.; Echteld, Michael A.; Evenhuis, Heleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as a syndrome characterised by progressive and generalised loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. It has hardly been studied in older people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In this study 884 persons with borderline to profound ID aged 50 years and over, were investigated to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia in…

  18. Novel insights on nutrient management of sarcopenia in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, Mariangela; Faliva, Milena; Monteferrario, Francesca; Peroni, Gabriella; Repaci, Erica; Allieri, Francesca; Perna, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass and strength. The more rationale approach to delay the progression of sarcopenia is based on the combination of proper nutrition, possibly associated with the use of dietary supplements and a regular exercise program. We performed a narrative literature review to evaluate the till-now evidence regarding (1) the metabolic and nutritional correlates of sarcopenia; (2) the optimum diet therapy for the treatment of these abnormalities. This review included 67 eligible studies. In addition to the well recognized link between adequate intake of proteins/amino acids and sarcopenia, the recent literature underlines that in sarcopenic elderly subjects there is an unbalance in vitamin D synthesis and in omega-6/omega-3 PUFA ratio. Given the detrimental effect of these metabolic abnormalities, a change in the lifestyle must be the cornerstone in the treatment of sarcopenia. The optimum diet therapy for the sarcopenia treatment must aim at achieving specific metabolic goals, which must be reached through accession of the elderly to specific personalized dietary program aimed at achieving and/or maintaining muscle mass; increasing their intake of fish (4 times/week) or taking omega-3 PUFA supplements; taking vitamin D supplementation, if there are low serum levels.

  19. Novel Insights on Nutrient Management of Sarcopenia in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Rondanelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is defined as a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass and strength. The more rationale approach to delay the progression of sarcopenia is based on the combination of proper nutrition, possibly associated with the use of dietary supplements and a regular exercise program. We performed a narrative literature review to evaluate the till-now evidence regarding (1 the metabolic and nutritional correlates of sarcopenia; (2 the optimum diet therapy for the treatment of these abnormalities. This review included 67 eligible studies. In addition to the well recognized link between adequate intake of proteins/amino acids and sarcopenia, the recent literature underlines that in sarcopenic elderly subjects there is an unbalance in vitamin D synthesis and in omega-6/omega-3 PUFA ratio. Given the detrimental effect of these metabolic abnormalities, a change in the lifestyle must be the cornerstone in the treatment of sarcopenia. The optimum diet therapy for the sarcopenia treatment must aim at achieving specific metabolic goals, which must be reached through accession of the elderly to specific personalized dietary program aimed at achieving and/or maintaining muscle mass; increasing their intake of fish (4 times/week or taking omega-3 PUFA supplements; taking vitamin D supplementation, if there are low serum levels.

  20. Treating sarcopenia in clinical practice: where are we now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Spiegeleer, Anton; Petrovic, Mirko; Boeckxstaens, Pauline; Van Den Noortgate, Nele

    2016-08-01

    Sarcopenia - or the loss of muscle mass, strength and function with ageing - represents an important health issue of the twenty-first century because of its devastating effects in addition to an increased prevalence of aged people. The devastating health effects of sarcopenia are multiple: an increased falls risk, a decreased physical ability and quality of life and an independent increase of all-cause mortality. Although the ultimate remedy for sarcopenia yet has to be found, some interventions have proven their merit and might be of practical use in clinical practice, especially for geriatricians, who deal most with sarcopenia. This review intends to summarize the current therapeutic interventions, their proposed mechanism of action as well as their clinical value. The results of our review highlight the importance of exercise (50% resistance training, 50% endurance training), nutrition (25-30 g proteins with essential amino acids every meal and long-chain ω-3 fatty acids) and limitation of alcohol and smoking. In addition, studies also suggest a place for vitamin D (aim serum levels >30 ng/L), testosterone (aim serum levels >300 ng/dL) and creatine (15-20 g/d for five days, thereafter 3-5 g/d). In conclusion, although more studies are needed to elucidate the exact effectiveness and safety of many sarcopenia interventions, the current evidence already provides clinically useful information, which might benefit the patient with (pre-)sarcopenia.

  1. [Age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayen, Alexandra; Hubert, Isabelle; Berrod, Jean-Paul

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a multifactorial disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. It is the first cause of blindness in patients over 50 in the western world. The disease has been traditionally classified into early and late stages with dry (atrophic) and wet (neovascular) forms: neovascular form is characterized by new blood vessels development under the macula (choroidal neovascularisation) which lead to a rapid decline of vision associated with metamorphopsia and requiring an urgent ophtalmological examination. Optical coherence tomography is now one of the most important part of the examination for diagnosis and treatment. Patient with age related maculopathy should consider taking a dietary supplement such that used in AREDS. The treatment of the wet ARMD has largely beneficied since year 2006 of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) molecules such as ranibizumab or bevacizumab given as repeated intravitreal injections. A systematic follow up each 4 to 8 week in required for several years. There is no effective treatment at the moment for dry AMD. For patients with binocular visual acuity under 60/200 rehabilitation includes low vision specialist, vision aids and psychological support.

  2. The quality of life impact of peripheral versus central vision loss with a focus on glaucoma versus age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Keith; Law, Simon; Walt, John; Buchholz, Patricia; Hansen,

    2009-01-01

    Keith Evans1, Simon K Law2, John Walt3, Patricia Buchholz4, Jan Hansen31Global Health Outcomes, Wolters Kluwer Health, Chester, United Kingdom; 2Jules Stein Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Global Health Outcomes Strategy and Research, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA; 4Health Economics, Pricing, and Reimbursement, Allergan GmbH, Ettlingen, GermanyPurpose: It is well accepted that conditions that cause central vision loss (CVL) have a negative impact on functional ability and quality of li...

  3. Diagnosing Patients with Age-Related Hearing Loss and Tinnitus: Supporting GP Clinical Engagement through Innovation and Pathway Redesign in Audiology Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Adrian; Smith, Pauline A.; Booth, Michelle; Martin, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The public health challenge of hearing impairment is growing, as age is the major determinant of hearing loss. Almost one in four (22.6%) over 75-year olds reports moderate or severe worry because of hearing problems. There is a 40% comorbidity of tinnitus and balance disorders. Good outcomes depend on early presentation and appropriate referral. This paper describes how the NHS Improvement Programme in England used service improvement methodologies to identify referral pathways and tools which were most likely to make significant improvements in diagnosing hearing loss, effective referrals and better patient outcomes. An audiometric screening device was used in GP surgeries to enable thresholds for effective referrals to be measured in the surgery. Revised referral criteria, the use of this device, new “assess and fit” technology in the audiology clinic, and direct access pathways can transform audiology service delivery so that patient outcomes are measurably better. This, in turn, changes the experience of GPs, so they are more likely to refer patients who can benefit from treatment. At the end of 2011, 51 GP practices in one of the audiology pilot areas had bought HearCheck screeners, a substantial development from the 4 practices who first engaged with the pilot. PMID:22829836

  4. Enfoque terapéutico global de la sarcopenia Global therapeutica approach to sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Burgos Peláez

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available La sarcopenia es la pérdida de masa muscular esquelética asociada al envejecimiento, y contribuye en gran medida a la discapacidad y la pérdida de independencia del anciano. En su etiopatogenia se incluyen diversos mecanismos tanto intrínsecos del propio músculo como cambios a nivel del sistema nervioso central, además de factores hormonales y de estilo de vida. Diversas hormonas y citoquinas afectan la función y la masa muscular. La reducción de testosterona y estrógenos que acompaña la vejez aceleran la pérdida de masa muscular. La hormonade crecimiento también se ha implicado en la pérdida de masa magra corporal. Aunque la sarcopenia no revierte completamente con el ejercicio, la inactividad física acelera la pérdida de la masa muscular. El diagnóstico de sarcopenia está dificultado por la falta de disponibilidad de los métodos más fiables para medir la masa muscular Se han ensayado diversas estrategias para su tratamiento: tratamiento sustitutivo con testosterona / otros andrógenos anabolizantes, estrógenos en mujeres, hormona de crecimiento, tratamiento nutricional y ejercicio físico. De todas las alternativas terapéuticas, sólo el ejercicio físico de resistencia ha demostrado su eficacia en incrementar la masa muscular esquelética, asociado o no a suplementación nutricional.Sarcopenia is the loss of skeletal muscle mass that occurs with ageing, and is a major contributing factor to disability and loss of independence in the elderly. The etiopathogenesis involves a number of underlying mechanisms including intrinsic changes in the muscle and central nervous system, and hormonal and lifestyle factors. Many hormones and cytokines affect muscle mass and function. Reductions in testosterone and estrogens that accompany ageing appear to accelerate loss of muscle mass. Growth hormone has been hypothesised to contribute to loss of lean body mass. Although sarcopenia is not completely reversed with exercise, physical

  5. Testosterone supplementation reverses sarcopenia in aging through regulation of myostatin, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, Notch, and Akt signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacheva, Ekaterina L; Hikim, Amiya P Sinha; Shen, Ruoqing; Sinha, Indranil; Sinha-Hikim, Indrani

    2010-02-01

    Aging in rodents and humans is characterized by loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia). Testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass in healthy older men. Here, using a mouse model, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which testosterone prevents sarcopenia and promotes muscle growth in aging. Aged mice of 22 months of age received a single sc injection of GnRH antagonist every 2 wk to suppress endogenous testosterone production and were implanted subdermally under anesthesia with 0.5 or 1.0 cm testosterone-filled implants for 2 months (n = 15/group). Young and old mice (n = 15/group), of 2 and 22 months of age, respectively, received empty implants and were used as controls. Compared with young animals, a significant (P muscle cell apoptosis coupled with a decrease in gastrocnemius muscles weight (by 16.7%) and muscle fiber cross-sectional area, of both fast and slow fiber types, was noted in old mice. Importantly, such age-related changes were fully reversed by higher dose (1 cm) of testosterone treatment. Testosterone treatment effectively suppressed age-specific increases in oxidative stress, processed myostatin levels, activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 in aged muscles. Furthermore, it restored age-related decreases in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase levels, phospho-Akt, and Notch signaling. These alterations were associated with satellite cell proliferation and differentiation. Collectively these results suggest involvement of multiple signal transduction pathways in sarcopenia. Testosterone reverses sarcopenia through stimulation of cellular metabolism and survival pathway together with inhibition of death pathway.

  6. Physical activity as intervention for age-related loss of muscle mass and function: protocol for a randomised controlled trial (the LISA study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Christian Skou; Garde, Ellen; Reislev, Nina Linde; Wimmelmann, Cathrine Lawaetz; Bieler, Theresa; Ziegler, Andreas Kraag; Gylling, Anne Theil; Dideriksen, Kasper Juel; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Physical and cognitive function decline with age, accelerating during the 6th decade. Loss of muscle power (force×velocity product) is a dominant physical determinant for loss of functional ability, especially if the lower extremities are affected. Muscle strength training is known to maintain or even improve muscle power as well as physical function in older adults, but the optimal type of training for beneficial long-term training effects over several years is unknown. Moreover, the impact of muscle strength training on cognitive function and brain structure remains speculative. The primary aim of this randomised controlled trial is to compare the efficacy of two different 1 year strength training regimens on immediate and long-lasting improvements in muscle power in retirement-age individuals. Secondary aims are to evaluate the effect on muscle strength, muscle mass, physical and cognitive function, mental well-being, health-related quality of life and brain morphology. Methods and analysis The study includes 450 home-dwelling men and women (62–70 years). Participants are randomly allocated to (1) 1 year of supervised, centre-based heavy resistance training, (2) home-based moderate intensity resistance training or (3) habitual physical activity (control). Changes in primary (leg extensor power) and secondary outcomes are analysed according to the intention to treat principle and per protocol at 1, 2, 4, 7 and 10 years. Ethics and dissemination The study is expected to generate new insights into training-induced promotion of functional ability and independency after retirement and will help to formulate national recommendations regarding physical activity schemes for the growing population of older individuals in western societies. Results will be published in scientific peer-reviewed journals, in PhD theses and at public meetings. The study is approved by the Regional Ethical Committee (Capital Region, Copenhagen, Denmark, number H-3

  7. 肌少症的发病机制%Pathogenesis of sarcopenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱亚琼; 彭楠; 周明

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia, also known as age-related sarcopenia,is defined as adegenerativesyndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass, strength and function. Sarcopeniainvolves complex mechanisms, including exercise lacking, neuromuscular function decline and motor unit restructuring, declining in adequate protein intake and synthesis, changingin hormonelevels,expansionoffattissue and chronic inflammation, apoptosis, skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction, and different genes and ethnics,et al.Further studyonthe mechanisms of sarcopeniais of greatsignificancein the prevention and treatment of geriatric sarcopenia.%肌少症,亦称骨骼肌减少症(sarcopenia)或者说是增龄性骨骼肌减少,是以骨骼肌质量、力量以及功能的降低为主要特征的退行性综合征。肌少症的发生机制复杂多样,包括运动量下降、神经-肌肉功能衰退及运动单位重组、蛋白质摄入与合成减少、激素水平变化、脂肪组织增加与慢性炎症反应、细胞凋亡、骨骼肌线粒体功能紊乱及基因与种族等。深入研究肌少症的发病机理对老年人肌少症的防治具有重要意义。

  8. Sarcopenia: origins and clinical relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    To a considerable extent, the advent of the term sarcopenia has contributed to the focus on this important condition and its effects on the quality of life and care of older persons. It is hoped that the advances in our understanding of the etiology and treatment of sarcopenia will further contribut...

  9. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. Appication of selective androgen receptor modulator to the therapy of sarcopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Tanabe, Makito; Nomiyama, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    The research to develop a drug, so called selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) , which shows beneficial androgenic action on bone and muscle, but hardly possesses the stimulatory action on prostate has been making a progress. However, no drug is available in the market at present. Most of such drugs are developed, aiming at the application to age-related muscle reduction (sarcopenia) and osteoporosis. Recently, in a clinical trial of SARM (enbosarm) administration to healthy elderly men, a promising data showing the increase of lean body mass and physical function has been reported. Future clinical applications of SARMs are expected.

  10. Age Related Change of Mitochondria Mediated Apoptotic Signaling Pathway in Sar-copenia Mice and Influence of Ladder Climbing Exercise%Sarcopenia关联的线粒体介导的细胞凋亡信号通路的增龄性变化及爬梯运动对其的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海鹏; 王立丰; 关尚一; 马景亮; 丁树哲; 卢健

    2010-01-01

    目的:探讨Sarcopenia关联的线粒体介导的细胞凋亡信号通路中各凋亡基因的增龄变化情况及爬梯运动对其的影响.方法:以快速老化(Senescence-accelerated mice prone/8,SAMP8)小鼠为衰老动物模型,将其分为青年安静组(YC组)、老年安静组(OC组)和老年爬梯运动组(OR组),采用实时荧光定量PCR的方法,分别对各组腓肠肌Caspase依赖性凋亡通路中相关基因(Cyt C、apaf-1、Caspase-9和Caspase-3)和Caspase非依赖性凋亡通路中相关基因(PARP、AIF和Endo G)进行检测.结果:OC组腓肠肌Sarcopenia Index (SI)值显著低于YC组;随增龄OC组腓肠肌中apaf-1、Caspase-3和PARP的表达均显著上调,而AIF却显著下调;爬梯运动能够下调OR组腓肠肌中Cyt C和Caspase-3的表达,而AIF和Endo G却未见显著性变化.结论:老年SAMP8小鼠腓肠肌可作为Sarcopenia研究模型;Sarcopenia关联的线粒体介导的细胞凋亡信号通路中Caspase依赖与Caspase非依赖两条凋亡途径发挥的作用存在一定差异,衰老骨骼肌质量衰减与否以及衰减程度最终有赖于两条途径之间的对抗;8周爬梯运动能够一定程度上弱化老年小鼠腓肠肌中的凋亡信号,避免其更大范围地进入凋亡程序而加剧Sarcopenia,对"脆弱"的骨骼肌起到一定的保护作用.

  11. Age-Related Loss in Bone Mineral Density of Rats Fed Lifelong on a Fish Oil-Based Diet Is Avoided by Coenzyme Q10 Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-López, Alfonso; Ochoa, Julio J.; Llamas-Elvira, José M.; López-Frías, Magdalena; Planells, Elena; Ramirez-Tortosa, MCarmen; Ramirez-Tortosa, Cesar L.; Giampieri, Francesca; Battino, Maurizio; Quiles, José L.

    2017-01-01

    During aging, bone mass declines increasing osteoporosis and fracture risks. Oxidative stress has been related to this bone loss, making dietary compounds with antioxidant properties a promising weapon. Male Wistar rats were maintained for 6 or 24 months on diets with fish oil as unique fat source, supplemented or not with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), to evaluate the potential of adding this molecule to the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA)-based diet for bone mineral density (BMD) preservation. BMD was evaluated in the femur. Serum osteocalcin, osteopontin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, ostroprotegerin, parathyroid hormone, urinary F2-isoprostanes, and lymphocytes DNA strand breaks were also measured. BMD was lower in aged rats fed a diet without CoQ10 respect than their younger counterparts, whereas older animals receiving CoQ10 showed the highest BMD. F2-isoprostanes and DNA strand breaks showed that oxidative stress was higher during aging. Supplementation with CoQ10 prevented oxidative damage to lipid and DNA, in young and old animals, respectively. Reduced oxidative stress associated to CoQ10 supplementation of this n-3 PUFA-rich diet might explain the higher BMD found in aged rats in this group of animals. PMID:28241421

  12. Age-Related Loss in Bone Mineral Density of Rats Fed Lifelong on a Fish Oil-Based Diet Is Avoided by Coenzyme Q10 Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Varela-López

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During aging, bone mass declines increasing osteoporosis and fracture risks. Oxidative stress has been related to this bone loss, making dietary compounds with antioxidant properties a promising weapon. Male Wistar rats were maintained for 6 or 24 months on diets with fish oil as unique fat source, supplemented or not with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, to evaluate the potential of adding this molecule to the n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA-based diet for bone mineral density (BMD preservation. BMD was evaluated in the femur. Serum osteocalcin, osteopontin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand, ostroprotegerin, parathyroid hormone, urinary F2-isoprostanes, and lymphocytes DNA strand breaks were also measured. BMD was lower in aged rats fed a diet without CoQ10 respect than their younger counterparts, whereas older animals receiving CoQ10 showed the highest BMD. F2-isoprostanes and DNA strand breaks showed that oxidative stress was higher during aging. Supplementation with CoQ10 prevented oxidative damage to lipid and DNA, in young and old animals, respectively. Reduced oxidative stress associated to CoQ10 supplementation of this n-3 PUFA-rich diet might explain the higher BMD found in aged rats in this group of animals.

  13. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed...... rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected...... during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related...

  14. Implications of combined ovariectomy/multi-deficiency diet on rat bone with age-related variation in bone parameters and bone loss at multiple skeletal sites by DEXA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Parameswari; Schlewitz, Gudrun; Schliefke, Nathalie; Weisweiler, David; Alt, Volker; Thormann, Ulrich; Lips, Katrin Susanne; Wenisch, Sabine; Langheinrich, Alexander C; Zahner, Daniel; Hemdan, Nasr Y; Böcker, Wolfgang; Schnettler, Reinhard; Heiss, Christian

    2013-02-28

    Osteoporosis is a multi-factorial, chronic, skeletal disease highly prevalent in post-menopausal women and is influenced by hormonal and dietary factors. Because animal models are imperative for disease diagnostics, the present study establishes and evaluates enhanced osteoporosis obtained through combined ovariectomy and deficient diet by DEXA (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) for a prolonged time period. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham (laparotomized) and OVX-diet (ovariectomized and fed with deficient diet) groups. Different skeletal sites were scanned by DEXA at the following time points: M0 (baseline), M12 (12 months post-surgery), and M14 (14 months post-surgery). Parameters analyzed included BMD (bone mineral density), BMC (bone mineral content), bone area, and fat (%). Regression analysis was performed to determine the interrelationships between BMC, BMD, and bone area from M0 to M14. BMD and BMC were significantly lower in OVX-diet rats at M12 and M14 compared to sham rats. The Z-scores were below -5 in OVX-diet rats at M12, but still decreased at M14 in OVX-diet rats. Bone area and percent fat were significantly lower in OVX-diet rats at M14 compared to sham rats. The regression coefficients for BMD vs. bone area, BMC vs. bone area, and BMC vs. BMD of OVX-diet rats increased with time. This is explained by differential percent change in BMD, BMC, and bone area with respect to time and disease progression. Combined ovariectomy and deficient diet in rats caused significant reduction of BMD, BMC, and bone area, with nearly 40% bone loss after 14 months, indicating the development of severe osteoporosis. An increasing regression coefficient of BMD vs. bone area with disease progression emphasizes bone area as an important parameter, along with BMD and BMC, for prediction of fracture risk.

  15. Long-term administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate fails to attenuate age-related oxidative damage or rescue the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P; Nye, Gareth A; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I; Griffiths, Richard D; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2016-11-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is the underlying cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 and over. Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the sarcopenic phenotype that occurs with aging. To examine this, we administered the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate {[10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cyclohexadien-1-yl)decyl] triphenylphosphonium; 100 μM} to wild-type C57BL/6 mice for 15 wk (from 24 to 28 mo of age) and investigated the effects on age-related loss of muscle mass and function, changes in redox homeostasis, and mitochondrial organelle integrity and function. We found that mitoquinone mesylate treatment failed to prevent age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with myofiber atrophy or alter a variety of in situ and ex vivo muscle function analyses, including maximum isometric tetanic force, decline in force after a tetanic fatiguing protocol, and single-fiber-specific force. We also found evidence that long-term mitoquinone mesylate administration did not reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or induce significant changes in muscle redox homeostasis, as assessed by changes in 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, protein carbonyl content, protein nitration, and DNA damage determined by the content of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Mitochondrial membrane potential, abundance, and respiration assessed in permeabilized myofibers were not significantly altered in response to mitoquinone mesylate treatment. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that long-term mitochondria-targeted mitoquinone mesylate administration failed to attenuate age-related oxidative damage in skeletal muscle of old mice or provide any protective effect in the context of muscle aging.-Sakellariou, G. K., Pearson, T., Lightfoot, A. P., Nye, G. A., Wells, N., Giakoumaki, I. I., Griffiths, R. D., McArdle, A., Jackson, M. J. Long-term administration of the

  16. Sarcopenia With Limited Mobility: An International Consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E.; Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Argiles, Josep M.; Baracos, Vickie; Bauer, Juergen; Bhasin, Shalender; Cederholm, Tommy; Stewart Coats, Andrew J.; Cummings, Steven R.; Evans, William J.; Fearon, Kenneth; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fielding, Roger A.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Inui, Akio; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kirwan, Bridget-Anne; Mantovani, Giovanni; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Newman, Anne B.; Rossi-Fanelli, Filippo; Rosano, Giuseppe M. C.; Roubenoff, Ronenn; Schambelan, Morris; Sokol, Gerald H.; Storer, Thomas W.; Vellas, Bruno; von Haehling, Stephan; Yeh, Shing-Shing; Anker, Stefan D.

    2016-01-01

    A consensus conference convened by the Society of Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders has concluded that “Sarcopenia, ie, reduced muscle mass, with limited mobility” should be considered an important clinical entity and that most older persons should be screened for this condition. “Sarcopenia with limited mobility” is defined as a person with muscle loss whose walking speed is equal to or less than 1 m/s or who walks less than 400 m during a 6-minute walk, and who has a lean appendicular mass corrected for height squared of 2 standard deviations or more below the mean of healthy persons between 20 and 30 years of age of the same ethnic group. The limitation in mobility should not clearly be a result of otherwise defined specific diseases of muscle, peripheral vascular disease with intermittent claudication, central and peripheral nervous system disorders, or cachexia. Clinically significant interventions are defined as an increase in the 6-minute walk of at least 50 meters or an increase of walking speed of at least 0.1 m/s. “A word is not a crystal, transparent and unchanged; it is the skin of a living thought and may vary greatly in color and content according to the circumstances and the time when it is used.”—Oliver Wendell Holmes PMID:21640657

  17. The role of sarcopenia in the risk of osteoporotic hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, A; Vaz, C

    2015-10-01

    Several common age-related mechanisms and factors influence muscle and bone, affecting functionality of both tissues. Sarcopenia is closely linked with osteoporosis, and their combined effect may exacerbate negative health outcomes. Fall-related fractures are some of the most serious consequences of these two systemic pathologies, with hip fracture being a major complication affecting osteoporotic and sarcopenic elderly. This work aims to review the literature on the current state of knowledge about the relations between sarcopenia and osteoporosis and to present the association between sarcopenia and osteoporosis and the risk of hip fracture. A literature search was performed in PubMed and Scopus databases for articles with the predefined terms "sarcopenia," "muscular atrophy," "femoral fractures," "hip fractures," "osteoporosis," and "bone density." There is a growing and significant interest being directed to sarcopenia and associated risk for osteoporotic hip fracture, but there still is a notorious heterogeneity in the methodology and cohort size of the available studies. Collectively, most of the studies herein analyzed indicate that sarcopenia could be a predictor of risk for hip fracture. The simultaneous evaluation of sarcopenia and osteoporosis may be of importance in identifying those patients in higher risk of suffering an osteoporotic hip fracture and who could benefit from preventive or therapeutic interventions, or both.

  18. Sex-specific differences in risk factors for sarcopenia amongst community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, L; Ding, Y Y; Leung, B P; Ismail, N H; Yeo, A; Yew, S; Tay, K S; Tan, C H; Chong, M S

    2015-12-01

    With considerable variation including potential sex-specific differential rate of skeletal muscle loss, identifying modifiable factors for sarcopenia will be pivotal to guide targeted interventions. This study seeks to identify clinical and biological correlates of sarcopenia in community-dwelling older adults, with emphasis on the role of anabolic and catabolic stimuli, and special reference to gender specificity. In this cross-sectional study involving 200 community-dwelling and functionally independent older adults aged ≥50 years, sarcopenia was defined using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia criteria. Comorbidities, cognitive and functional performance, physical activity and nutritional status were routinely assessed. Biochemical parameters included haematological indices, lipid panel, vitamin D level, anabolic hormones [insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), free testosterone (males only)] and catabolic markers [inflammatory markers (interleukin-6, C-reactive protein) and myostatin]. Multiple logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors for sarcopenia. Age was associated with sarcopenia in both genders. Malnutrition conferred significantly higher odds for sarcopenia in women (OR = 5.71, 95% CI 1.13-28.84.44, p = 0.035) while higher but acceptable range serum triglyceride was protective in men (OR = 0.05, 95% CI 0.00-0.52, p = 0.012). Higher serum myostatin independently associated with higher odds for sarcopenia in men (OR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.00-1.24, p = 0.041). Serum IGF-1 was significantly lower amongst female sarcopenic subjects, with demonstrable trend for protective effect against sarcopenia in multiple regression models, such that each 1 ng/ml increase in IGF-1 was associated with 1% decline in odds of sarcopenia in women (p = 0.095). Our findings support differential pathophysiological mechanisms for sarcopenia that, if corroborated, may have clinical utility in guiding sex-specific targeted

  19. Sarcopenia e envelhecimento

    OpenAIRE

    Brás, Rafael Duarte

    2014-01-01

    Trabalho final de mestrado integrado em Medicina (Geriatria), apresentado á Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Coimbra Sarcopenia pode ser considerada uma síndrome geriátrica caracterizada por perda de massa muscular e força e/ou performance física sendo que é necessário a documentação de dois dos três critérios anteriormente citados para se estabelecer o diagnóstico. Esta condição pode ter consequências muito graves, como é exemplo a síndrome de fragilidade no idoso. Atualmente a...

  20. Relationship Between Sarcopenia and Albuminuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Nyun; Lee, Eun Ju; Hong, Jae Won; Kim, Jung Min; Won, Jong Chul; Kim, Mi Kyung; Noh, Jung Hyun; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Studies have shown that albuminuria, obesity, and sarcopenia may share pathophysiological processes related to cardiovascular disease risk. Their direct relationships, however, have not been examined. This study investigated the association between albuminuria and sarcopenia in a representative fraction of the Korean population. Of the 10,589 people who participated in the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2158 participants aged over 19 years had been tested for albumin-to-creatinine ratio and for body composition data using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Albuminuria was defined as an albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g. Sarcopenia was defined as a skeletal muscle index (SMI) (SMI (%) = total appendicular skeletal muscle mass [kg]/weight [kg] × 100) of less than 1 standard deviation (SD) (grade 1) or 2 SD (grade 2) below the sex-specific mean for a younger reference group. The prevalence of albuminuria was higher in those with grade 2 sarcopenia than in those with a normal SMI or grade 1 sarcopenia (33.3% versus 8.4% and 8.9%; P sarcopenia was also more prevalent in participants with albuminuria than in those with the upper tertile of normoalbuminuria. In addition, multiple logistic regression analysis showed the odds ratio for albuminuria risk in the grade 2 sarcopenia group was 2.93 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46–5.88), compared with normal SMI after adjusting for potential confounding factors, including the presence of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Moreover, individuals with albuminuria had an odds ratio of 3.39 (95% [confidence interval], 1.38–8.37) for grade 2 sarcopenia compared with those in the lowest tertile of normoalbuminuria. This is the first study to demonstrate that individuals with sarcopenia exhibited increased risk of albuminuria and vice versa. PMID:26817888

  1. Prevalence of Sarcopenia and Associated Outcomes in the Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sarah J; Braunschweig, Carol A

    2016-02-01

    Sarcopenia refers to age-associated decrease in muscle mass and function. The condition was originally described in the elderly, but emerging evidence suggests that it is also a concern among the chronically ill nonelderly. Currently there are a number of definitions for diagnosing sarcopenia; however, in the clinical setting, abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans completed for diagnostic purposes can be utilized to identify CT-defined sarcopenia. Recent studies suggest that prevalence of CT-defined sarcopenia is high among chronically ill patients, ranging from 15%-50% in patients with cancer, 30%-45% with liver failure, and 60%-70% for critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Depleted muscle mass is associated with infectious complications, prolonged duration of mechanical ventilation, longer hospitalization, greater need for rehabilitation care after hospital discharge, and higher mortality. In consideration of the growing population of older adults with multiple comorbidities, more research is needed to identify sarcopenia and develop interventions that are directed at attenuating or reversal muscle loss.

  2. Oral Drugs Related with Muscle Wasting and Sarcopenia. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Lluis; Camps, Marcella; Riera, Ariadna; Pleguezuelos, Eulogio; Yebenes, Juan Carlos; Serra-Prat, Mateu

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a geriatric syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. Reported prevalence of this geriatric syndrome, differs depending on the definition, the population and the method used to identify sarcopenia. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial, and can include genetic influence, immobility or disuse, endocrine factors, inflammation and nutritional deficiencies. These disorders involve an imbalance between anabolic and catabolic pathways that rules muscle mass. Many drugs taken regularly for common conditions may interact with some mechanisms that can alter the balance between protein synthesis and degradation. This may lead to a harmful or a beneficial effect on muscle mass and strength. Widely prescribed drugs could play an important role during the time of onset and development of sarcopenia. In this paper, we reviewed the current understanding of how can drugs contribute positively or negatively on sarcopenia and muscle wasting. We decided to focus this review on oral common drugs, which are usually prescribed in older adults, leaving aside other drugs as hormone therapy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Exercise and Protein Intake: A Synergistic Approach against Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martone, Anna Maria; Marzetti, Emanuele; Calvani, Riccardo; Picca, Anna; Tosato, Matteo; Santoro, Luca; Di Giorgio, Angela; Nesci, Antonio; Sisto, Alex; Santoliquido, Angelo; Landi, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-dependent loss of muscle mass and function/strength, is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for adverse outcomes in frail older people. As such, the skeletal muscle is a relevant target for interventions aimed at preventing or postponing the occurrence of negative health-related events in late life. The association among physical inactivity, insufficient intake of energy and protein, and poor muscle health in older adults suggests that physical exercise and targeted nutritional supplementation may offer substantial therapeutic gain against sarcopenia and its negative correlates. This view is supported by observational studies as well as by small-scale clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the available evidence on the beneficial effects of behavioral interventions on sarcopenia. We also briefly describe how the knowledge gathered so far has been used to design the "Sarcopenia and Physical fRailty IN older people: multicomponenT Treatment strategies" (SPRINTT) project. The randomized clinical trial conducted within SPRINTT will provide robust evidence on the effectiveness of exercise and nutrition at preventing negative outcomes associated with sarcopenia and physical frailty.

  4. Exercise and Protein Intake: A Synergistic Approach against Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Martone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia, the age-dependent loss of muscle mass and function/strength, is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for adverse outcomes in frail older people. As such, the skeletal muscle is a relevant target for interventions aimed at preventing or postponing the occurrence of negative health-related events in late life. The association among physical inactivity, insufficient intake of energy and protein, and poor muscle health in older adults suggests that physical exercise and targeted nutritional supplementation may offer substantial therapeutic gain against sarcopenia and its negative correlates. This view is supported by observational studies as well as by small-scale clinical trials. In this review, we summarize the available evidence on the beneficial effects of behavioral interventions on sarcopenia. We also briefly describe how the knowledge gathered so far has been used to design the “Sarcopenia and Physical fRailty IN older people: multicomponenT Treatment strategies” (SPRINTT project. The randomized clinical trial conducted within SPRINTT will provide robust evidence on the effectiveness of exercise and nutrition at preventing negative outcomes associated with sarcopenia and physical frailty.

  5. Sarcopenia: An Undiagnosed Condition in Older Adults. Current Consensus Definition: Prevalence, Etiology, and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, has considerable societal consequences for the development of frailty, disability and health care planning. A group of geriatricians and scientists from academia and industry met in Rome, Italy on November 18, 2009 to arrive at a consensus definition of sarcopenia. The current consensus definition was approved unanimously by the meeting participants and is as follows: Sarcopenia is defined as the age-associated loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. The causes of sarcopenia are multi-factorial and can include disuse, altered endocrine function, chronic diseases, inflammation, insulin resistance, and nutritional deficiencies. While cachexia may be a component of sarcopenia, the two conditions are not the same. The diagnosis of sarcopenia should be considered in all older patients who present with observed declines in physical function, strength, or overall health. Sarcopenia should specifically be considered in patients who are bedridden, cannot independently rise from a chair, or who have a measured gait speed less that 1.0 m·s−1. Patients who meet these criteria should further undergo body composition assessment using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) with sarcopenia being defined using currently validated definitions. A diagnosis of sarcopenia is consistent with a gait speed of less than 1 m·s−1 and an objectively measured low muscle mass (eg: appendicular mass relative to ht2 that is ≤ 7.23 kg/ m2 in men ≤ 5.67 kg/ m2 in men). Sarcopenia is a highly prevalent condition in older persons that leads to disability, hospitalization and death. PMID:21527165

  6. Mecanismos de perda muscular da sarcopenia Mechanisms of muscle wasting in sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian de Oliveira Nunes Teixeira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerca de 66% dos pacientes com artrite reumatoide (AR apresentam significativa perda de massa celular, denominada caquexia reumatoide, predominantemente de músculo esquelético (sarcopenia reumatoide. A sarcopenia é caracterizada por perda de massa muscular associada a prejuízos de função. Pacientes com AR apresentam uma redução significativa na força muscular, causada pela perda de proteínas musculares, alterando sua funcionalidade. As diversas condições que levam à perda de massa muscular envolvem distintas cascatas de sinalização intracelular, que podem levar: (i à morte celular programada (apoptose; (ii ao aumento da degradação proteica, por meio de autofagia, de proteases dependentes de cálcio (calpaínas e caspases e do sistema proteossomo; e (iii à diminuição da ativação das células-satélite responsáveis pela regeneração muscular. Este artigo tem como objetivo revisar esses mecanismos gerais de sarcopenia e seu envolvimento na AR. O melhor conhecimento desses mecanismos pode levar ao desenvolvimento de terapias inovadoras para essa debilitante complicação.Approximately 66% of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA have significant loss of cell mass (rheumatoid cachexia, mainly of skeletal muscle (rheumatoid sarcopenia. Sarcopenia is defined as muscle wasting associated with functional impairment. Patients with RA possess significant reduction in muscle strength, caused by muscle protein wasting, and loss of functionality. Various conditions leading to muscle wasting involve different pathways of intracellular signaling that trigger: (i programmed cell death (apoptosis; (ii increased protein degradation through autophagy, calcium-dependent proteases (calpains and caspases, and proteasome system; (iii decreased satellite cell activation, responsible for muscle regeneration. This article aimed at reviewing these general mechanisms of sarcopenia and their involvement in RA. Greater knowledge of these

  7. Prevalence of and interventions for sarcopenia in ageing adults: a systematic review. Report of the International Sarcopenia Initiative (EWGSOP and IWGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.; Landi, Francesco; Schneider, Stéphane M.; Zúñiga, Clemente; Arai, Hidenori; Boirie, Yves; Chen, Liang-Kung; Fielding, Roger A.; Martin, Finbarr C.; Michel, Jean-Pierre; Sieber, Cornel; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Studenski, Stephanie A.; Vellas, Bruno; Woo, Jean; Zamboni, Mauro; Cederholm, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to examine the clinical evidence reporting the prevalence of sarcopenia and the effect of nutrition and exercise interventions from studies using the consensus definition of sarcopenia proposed by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP). Methods: PubMed and Dialog databases were searched (January 2000–October 2013) using pre-defined search terms. Prevalence studies and intervention studies investigating muscle mass plus strength or function outcome measures using the EWGSOP definition of sarcopenia, in well-defined populations of adults aged ≥50 years were selected. Results: prevalence of sarcopenia was, with regional and age-related variations, 1–29% in community-dwelling populations, 14–33% in long-term care populations and 10% in the only acute hospital-care population examined. Moderate quality evidence suggests that exercise interventions improve muscle strength and physical performance. The results of nutrition interventions are equivocal due to the low number of studies and heterogeneous study design. Essential amino acid (EAA) supplements, including ∼2.5 g of leucine, and β-hydroxy β-methylbutyric acid (HMB) supplements, show some effects in improving muscle mass and function parameters. Protein supplements have not shown consistent benefits on muscle mass and function. Conclusion: prevalence of sarcopenia is substantial in most geriatric settings. Well-designed, standardised studies evaluating exercise or nutrition interventions are needed before treatment guidelines can be developed. Physicians should screen for sarcopenia in both community and geriatric settings, with diagnosis based on muscle mass and function. Supervised resistance exercise is recommended for individuals with sarcopenia. EAA (with leucine) and HMB may improve muscle outcomes. PMID:25241753

  8. Role of the nervous system in sarcopenia and muscle atrophy with aging: strength training as a countermeasure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, P; Suetta, C; Caserotti, P

    2010-01-01

    to elicit effective countermeasures in elderly individuals even at a very old age (>80 years) by evoking muscle hypertrophy along with substantial changes in neuromuscular function, respectively. Notably, the training-induced changes in muscle mass and nervous system function leads to an improved functional......Aging is characterized by loss of spinal motor neurons (MNs) due to apoptosis, reduced insulin-like growth factor I signaling, elevated amounts of circulating cytokines, and increased cell oxidative stress. The age-related loss of spinal MNs is paralleled by a reduction in muscle fiber number...... and size (sarcopenia), resulting in impaired mechanical muscle performance that in turn leads to a reduced functional capacity during everyday tasks. Concurrently, maximum muscle strength, power, and rate of force development are decreased with aging, even in highly trained master athletes. The impairment...

  9. Fisiología de la sarcopenia: Similitudes y diferencias con la caquexia neoplásica Psysiology of sarcopenia: Similarities and differences with neoplasic cachexia (muscle impairments in cancer and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Argilés

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Las alteraciones que acontecen durante el proceso canceroso y el envejecimiento comparten bastantes vías metabólicas así como también mediadores. Dado que afectan a gran cantidad de personas, la caquexia cancerosa y la sarcopenia del envejecimiento podrían ser dianas para futuras investigaciones clínicas. La caquexia cancerosa es un síndrome caracterizado por una gran pérdida de peso, anorexia, astenia y anemia. De hecho, muchos de los pacientes que mueren de cáncer avanzado sufren caquexia. El grado de caquexia está inversamente correlacionado con el tiempo de supervivencia de los pacientes y siempre implica una mala prognosis. En los últimos años, las enfermedades e incapacidades relacionadas con la edad han despertado un gran interés e importancia sanitaria. Concretamente, el desgaste muscular, también conocido como sarcopenia, disminuye la calidad de vida de la población geriátrica, aumentando la morbilidad y decreciendo la esperanza de vida. Deberían dedicarse más investigaciones al esclarecimiento de los factores/mediadores del proceso caquéctico (asociados a la pérdida de las reservas grasas y de tejido muscular tanto en caquexia como en sarcopenia, ya que podría ser una buena estrategia terapéutica para la prevención y el tratamiento de la pérdida de masa muscular tanto en la enfermedad como durante el envejecimiento sano.Muscle wasting during cancer and ageing share many common metabolic pathways and mediators. Due to the size of the population involved, both cancer cachexia and ageing sarcopenia may represent targets for future promising clinical investigations. Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by a marked weight loss, anorexia, asthenia and anemia. In fact, many patients who die with advanced cancer suffer from cachexia. The degree of cachexia is inversely correlated with the survival time of the patient and it always implies a poor prognosis. In recent years, age-related diseases and disabilities

  10. The Pubmed Bibliometric Analysis of Trend in the Research on Age-related Hearing Loss%老年性聋相关研究热点Pubmed的文献计量学分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭敏; 韦焘; 纳玉萍; 江超武; 叶聪俊; 高竞逾; 杨丽珠; 纳靖; 阮标

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to define research status of age -related hearing loss ,and provide the basis and direction for future research .Methods We have retrieved all relevant literatures on age -related hearing loss from Pubmed ,and conduct an objective analysis of the existing literatures by Bibliometric analytics and co -word analysis method using co -occurrence bibliographic information mining system and SPSS22 .0 software for data analysis .Results There were a large number of articles and journals about presbycusis and age -related hearing loss .Many countries were involved in the research .Literatures and core authors were mainly from developed coun‐tries such as Europe and the United States .The quantity and quality of Chinese literatures were in a leading position in Asia .The researches focused on the common characteristics of patients ,the epidemiology ,characteristics of hear‐ing ,treatment and laboratory studies .There were some new research directions in recent 5 years ,such as factors as‐sociated with the younger ages before developing presbycusis ,standard design and use of questionnaires ,prevention and control .Conclusion Age-related hearing loss will continue to be a hot topic with growing focus on micro and macro development of multi -disciplinary cooperation .The penetration will be the trend for the future research while the prevention will become a new focus of research .%目的:了解老年性聋的研究现状,为进一步的研究提供依据和方向。方法检索Pubmed数据库中所有老年性聋相关文献,通过文献计量分析学和共词分析方法进行客观分析,使用书目信息共现挖掘系统和SPSS22.0软件进行数据分析。分析内容包括文献年代分布、期刊分布、作者分布、国家和语言分布、相关高频主题词和共词分布。结果老年性聋的研究文献数量逐年增多,期刊分布广,全球多国均参与研究,欧美等发达国家是文献数量和

  11. Recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials for drugs to treat or prevent sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    PURPOSE: Sarcopenia is an age related muscle condition which is frequently a precursor of frailty, mobility disability and premature death. It has a high prevalence in older populations and presents a considerable social and economic burden. Potential treatments are under development but, as yet, no...

  12. The influence of sarcopenia on survival and surgical complications in ovarian cancer patients undergoing primary debulking surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, I J G; Ubachs, J; Kruitwagen, R F P M; van Dijk, D P J; Beets-Tan, R G H; Massuger, L F A G; Olde Damink, S W M; Van Gorp, T

    2017-04-01

    Sarcopenia, severe skeletal muscle loss, has been identified as a prognostic factor in various malignancies. This study aims to investigate whether sarcopenia is associated with overall survival (OS) and surgical complications in patients with advanced ovarian cancer undergoing primary debulking surgery (PDS). Ovarian cancer patients (n = 216) treated with PDS were enrolled retrospectively. Total skeletal muscle surface area was measured on axial computed tomography at the level of the third lumbar vertebra. Optimum stratification was used to find the optimal skeletal muscle index cut-off to define sarcopenia (≤38.73 cm(2)/m(2)). Cox-regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to analyse the relationship between sarcopenia and OS. The effect of sarcopenia on the development of major surgical complications was studied with logistic regression. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant survival disadvantage for patients with sarcopenia compared to patients without sarcopenia (p = 0.010). Sarcopenia univariably predicted OS (HR 1.536 (95% CI 1.105-2.134), p = 0.011) but was not significant in multivariable Cox-regression analysis (HR 1.362 (95% CI 0.968-1.916), p = 0.076). Significant predictors for OS in multivariable Cox-regression analysis were complete PDS, treatment in a specialised centre and the development of major complications. Sarcopenia was not predictive of major complications. Sarcopenia was not predictive of OS or major complications in ovarian cancer patients undergoing primary debulking surgery. However a strong trend towards a survival disadvantage for patients with sarcopenia was seen. Future prospective studies should focus on interventions to prevent or reverse sarcopenia and possibly increase ovarian cancer survival. Complete cytoreduction remains the strongest predictor of ovarian cancer survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights

  13. Association of anorexia with sarcopenia in a community-dwelling elderly population: results from the ilSIRENTE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Francesco; Liperoti, Rosa; Russo, Andrea; Giovannini, Silvia; Tosato, Matteo; Barillaro, Christian; Capoluongo, Ettore; Bernabei, Roberto; Onder, Graziano

    2013-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that anorexia of aging can cause physical and mental impairment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between anorexia and sarcopenia in elderly persons aged 80 years or older. Data are from the baseline evaluation of 354 subjects enrolled in the ilSIRENTE study. The ilSIRENTE study is a prospective cohort study performed in the mountain community living in the Sirente geographic area (L'Aquila, Abruzzo) in Central Italy. We defined anorexia as the presence of loss of appetite and/or lower food intake. According to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) criteria, diagnosis of sarcopenia required the documentation of low muscle mass plus the documentation of either low muscle strength or low physical performance. The relationship between anorexia and sarcopenia was estimated by deriving odds ratios from the multiple logistic regression models considering sarcopenia as the dependent variable. Nearly 21 % of the study sample showed symptoms of anorexia. Using the EWGSOP-suggested algorithm, 103 subjects (29.1 %) with sarcopenia were identified. Thirty-four (46.6 %) participants were affected by sarcopenia among subjects with anorexia compared to 69 subjects [24.6 %] without anorexia (p anorexia had a higher risk of sarcopenia compared with non-anorexic subjects (HR 1.88, 95 % CI 1.01-3.51). Anorexia is common among community-dwelling older subjects in Italy. Our results suggest that among old-old subjects, anorexia is independently associated with sarcopenia.

  14. Differences among skeletal muscle mass indices derived from height-, weight-, and body mass index-adjusted models in assessing sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2016-07-01

    Aging processes are inevitably accompanied by structural and functional changes in vital organs. Skeletal muscle, which accounts for 40% of total body weight, deteriorates quantitatively and qualitatively with aging. Skeletal muscle is known to play diverse crucial physical and metabolic roles in humans. Sarcopenia is a condition characterized by significant loss of muscle mass and strength. It is related to subsequent frailty and instability in the elderly population. Because muscle tissue is involved in multiple functions, sarcopenia is closely related to various adverse health outcomes. Along with increasing recognition of the clinical importance of sarcopenia, several international study groups have recently released their consensus on the definition and diagnosis of sarcopenia. In practical terms, various skeletal muscle mass indices have been suggested for assessing sarcopenia: appendicular skeletal muscle mass adjusted for height squared, weight, or body mass index. A different prevalence and different clinical implications of sarcopenia are highlighted by each definition. The discordances among these indices have emerged as an issue in defining sarcopenia, and a unifying definition for sarcopenia has not yet been attained. This review aims to compare these three operational definitions and to introduce an optimal skeletal muscle mass index that reflects the clinical implications of sarcopenia from a metabolic perspective.

  15. [Sarcopenia: a concept of growing importance in the management of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Maximilien; Berthaud, Constance; Taïeb, Julien

    2014-06-01

    Malnutrition in digestive oncology affects quality of life, increases postoperative complication rates, and results in increased chemotherapy toxicity and reduced survival. Loss of skeletal muscle or sarcopenia is not correlated to body mass index, and might play a major role in the complications of malnutrition in oncology. The diagnosis of sarcopenia can be made on routinely available CT scanner images using consensual cutoff numbers. Lean body mass may be useful in normalizing the doses of hydrophilic chemotherapy drugs, such as fluoropyrimidines. To date, neither nutritional intervention nor specific drugs have proven useful in preventing or treating sarcopenia in cancer patients.

  16. Sarcopenia as a prognostic biomarker of advanced urothelial carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fukushima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Sarcopenia, a novel concept reflecting the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, is an objective indicator of cancer cachexia. We investigated its role as a prognostic biomarker in advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC patients. METHODS: This retrospective study consisted of 88 UC patients with cT4 and/or metastases to lymph nodes/distant organs. Skeletal muscle index (SMI, an indicator of whole-body muscle mass, was measured from computed tomography (CT images at the diagnosis. Sarcopenia was defined as SMIs of <43 cm(2/m(2 for males with body mass index (BMI <25 cm(2/m(2, <53 cm(2/m(2 for males with BMI ≥ 25 cm(2/m(2, and <41 cm(2/m(2 for females. Predictors of overall survival (OS were examined using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: Sixty-seven patients (76% died during the median follow-up of 13 months. The median OS rate was 13 months. Multivariate analysis revealed that SMI was a significant and independent predictor of shorter OS (hazard ratio (HR 0.90, P <0.001. In the present cohort, 53 (60% were diagnosed with sarcopenia. The median OS rates were 11 and 31 months for sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients, respectively (P <0.001. On multivariate analysis, sarcopenia was a significant and independent predictor of shorter OS (HR 3.36, P <0.001, along with higher C-reactive protein (CRP (P = 0.001, upper urinary tract cancer (P = 0.007, higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH (P = 0.047, and higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP (P = 0.048. CONCLUSION: Sarcopenia, which is readily evaluated on routine CT scans, is a useful prognostic biomarker of advanced UC. Non-sarcopenic patients can expect long-term survival. Evaluating sarcopenia can be helpful for decision-making processes in the management of advanced UC patients.

  17. Sarcopenia and chemotherapy-mediated toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Maria Cecília Monteiro Dela; Laviano, Alessandro; Pimentel, Gustavo Duarte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This narrative review focuses on the role of sarcopenia and chemotherapy-induced toxicity in cancer patients. Consistent evidence shows that sarcopenia in cancer patients leads to decreased overall survival by influencing treatment discontinuation and dose reduction. Therefore, sarcopenia should be considered a robust prognostic factor of negative outcome as well as a determinant of increased healthcare costs. PMID:28076611

  18. Sarcopenia and chemotherapy-mediated toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Vega,Maria Cecília Monteiro Dela; Laviano, Alessandro; Pimentel, Gustavo Duarte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This narrative review focuses on the role of sarcopenia and chemotherapy-induced toxicity in cancer patients. Consistent evidence shows that sarcopenia in cancer patients leads to decreased overall survival by influencing treatment discontinuation and dose reduction. Therefore, sarcopenia should be considered a robust prognostic factor of negative outcome as well as a determinant of increased healthcare costs.

  19. Regulation of satellite cell function in sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Alway

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms contributing to sarcopenia include reduced satellite cell (myogenic stem cell function that is impacted by the environment (niche of these cells. Satellite cell function is affected by oxidative stress, which is elevated in aged muscles, and this along with changes in largely unknown systemic factors, likely contribute to the manner in which satellite cells respond to stressors such as exercise, disuse or rehabilitation in sarcopenic muscles. Nutritional intervention provides one therapeutic strategy to improve the satellite cell niche and systemic factors, with the goal of improving satellite cell function in aging muscles. Although many elderly persons consume various nutraceuticals with the hope of improving health, most of these compounds have not been thoroughly tested, and the impacts that they might have on sarcopenia, and satellite cell function are not clear. This review discusses data pertaining to the satellite cell responses and function in aging skeletal muscle, and the impact that three compounds: resveratrol, green tea catechins and β-Hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate have on regulating satellite cell function and therefore contributing to reducing sarcopenia or improving muscle mass after disuse in aging. The data suggest that these nutraceutical compounds improve satellite cell function during rehabilitative loading in animal models of aging after disuse (i.e., muscle regeneration. While these compounds have not been rigorously tested in humans, the data from animal models of aging provide a strong basis for conducting additional focused work to determine if these or other nutraceuticals can offset the muscle losses, or improve regeneration in sarcopenic muscles of older humans via improving satellite cell function.

  20. Alcohol consumption as a risk factor for sarcopenia - a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffl, Michal; Bohannon, Richard W; Petr, Miroslav; Kohlikova, Eva; Holmerova, Iva

    2016-05-11

    Sarcopenia, a loss of muscle strength and mass, has serious implications for older adults. Some risk factors for sarcopenia are well established. The role of other factors such as alcohol consumption is less certain. The main aim of this study was to explore the relationship between sarcopenia and alcohol consumption in people over 65 years old. Four electronic databases were searched to identify potentially relevant papers. Demographics and information on sarcopenia and alcohol consumption were extracted from relevant papers. The relationship between sarcopenia and alcohol consumption was described using odds ratios (ORs). Of 214 papers identified as potentially relevant, 13 were ultimately included in the meta-analyses. The papers provided data from 13,155 participants. The OR (95 % CI) for sarcopenia among alcohol drinkers was 0.67 (0.54-0.83) for males, 0.89 (0.73-1.08) for females, and 0.77 (0.67-0.88) for the overall population. The results of this meta-analysis do not support alcohol consumption as a risk factor for sarcopenia.

  1. Sarcopenia and liver transplant: The relevance of too little muscle mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallwitz, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass and function is a common occurrence in both patients with decompensated cirrhosis and those undergoing liver transplantation. Sarcopenia is associated with morbidity and mortality before and after liver transplantation. The ability of skeletal muscle mass to recover after transplant is questionable, and long term adverse events associated with persistent sarcopenia have not been well studied. Limited data is available examining mechanisms by which decreased muscle mass might develop. It is not clear which interventions might reduce the prevalence of sarcopenia and associated health burdens. However, measures to either decrease portal hypertension or improve nutrition appear to have benefit. Research on sarcopenia in the liver transplant setting is hampered by differing methodology to quantify muscle mass and varied thresholds determining the presence of sarcopenia. One area highlighted in this review is the heterogeneity used when defining sarcopenia. The health consequences, clinical course and potential pathophysiologic mechanisms of sarcopenia in the setting of cirrhosis and liver transplantation are further discussed. PMID:26494955

  2. The Intriguing Regulators of Muscle Mass in Sarcopenia and Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakuma, Kunihiro; Aoi, Wataru; Yamaguchi, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of muscle have led to new interest in the pharmacological treatment of muscle wasting. Loss of muscle mass and increased intramuscular fibrosis occur in both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. Several regulators (mammalian target of rapamycin, serum response factor, atrogin-1, myostatin, etc.) seem to modulate protein synthesis and degradation or transcription of muscle-specific genes during both sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy. This revie...

  3. Sarcopenia: current theories and the potential beneficial effect of creatine application strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candow, Darren G

    2011-08-01

    Sarcopenia, defined as the age-related loss of muscle mass, subsequently has a negative effect on strength, metabolic rate and functionality leading to a reduced quality of life. With the projected increase in life expectancy, the incidence of muscle loss may rise and further drain the health care system, with greater need for hospitalization, treatment, and rehabilitation. Without effective strategies to counteract aging muscle loss, a global health care crisis may be inevitable. Resistance training is well established to increase aging muscle mass and strength. However, muscle and strength loss is still evident in older adults who have maintained resistance training for most of their life, suggesting that other factors such as nutrition may affect aging muscle biology. Supplementing with creatine, a high-energy compound found in red meat and seafood, during resistance training has a beneficial effect on aging muscle. Emerging evidence now suggests that the timing and dosage of creatine supplementation may be important factors for aging muscle accretion. Unfortunately, the long-term effects of different creatine application strategies on aging muscle are relatively unknown.

  4. Sarcopenia is an independent risk factor of dysphagia in hospitalized older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keisuke; Akagi, Junji

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia can cause varying physical function disorders, including dysphagia. Malnutrition, a potential result of dysphagia, can also cause sarcopenia. However, the association between sarcopenia and dysphagia is not fully understood, despite evidence suggesting correlations between deglutition disorders and degenerative loss of muscle mass. The present study investigated the prevalence of dysphagia among patients with sarcopenia, and the association between the two conditions. We included 224 older adults (mean age 82.5 ± 8.4 years; 37.9% men). Individuals who had a stroke or other diseases that could directly cause dysphagia were excluded. Logistic regression analyses were carried out after adjusting for potential causes of sarcopenia, including malnutrition, a low activity of daily living levels and aging, to investigate the relationship between the skeletal muscle index (SMI), prevalence of sarcopenia diagnosed based on a low SMI and grip strength, and swallowing functions. The Mini-Nutritional Assessment short form was used to assess their nutritional status, and the Barthel Index was used to evaluate their activities of daily living. The prevalences of sarcopenia and dysphagia were 76.8% and 30.0%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that Barthel Index, SMI and presence of sarcopenia were significant independent factors for the prevalence of dysphagia, after adjusting for sex, age and nutritional status. Furthermore, subgroup analysis showed that SMI in males, and both hand-grip strength and SMI in females were lower in dysphagic subjects than in non-dysphagic subjects (P ≤ 0.01). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for dysphagia among older individuals. However, further studies are required to define causality. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Sarcopenia is a novel poor prognostic factor in male patients with pathological Stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukioka, Takuma; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Shinjiro; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Okada, Satoshi; Toda, Michihito; Hara, Kantaro; Ito, Ryuichi; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2017-04-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, and has a risk of adverse outcomes such as disability, poor quality of life and death. As prognosis depends not only on disease aggressiveness, but also on a patient's physical condition, sarcopenia can predict survival in patients with various cancer types. However, its effects on postoperative prognosis in patients with localized non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have never been reported. We retrospectively investigated 215 male patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC. L3 muscle index is defined as the cross-section area of muscle at the third lumbar vertebra level, normalized for height, and is a clinical measurement of sarcopenia. We then investigated the effect of preoperative sarcopenia on their postoperative prognosis. Our 215 subjects included 30 patients with sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was significantly associated with body mass index, nutritional condition, serum CYFRA 21-1 level and pathological stage, but not with preoperative respiratory function or performance status. Frequency of postoperative complications, length of postoperative hospital stay, thoracic drainage period or causes of death were not correlated with the presence of sarcopenia. The sarcopenia group had a significantly shorter median overall survival (32 months) than the no-sarcopenia group. Sarcopenia might not affect short-term outcomes in patients with early-stage lung cancer. Sarcopenia was a predictor of poor prognosis in male patients with Stage I NSCLC. As sarcopenic patients with NSCLC patients are at risk for significantly worse outcomes, their treatments require careful planning, even for those with Stage I disease.

  6. Sarcopenia and critical illness: a deadly combination in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Joseph S

    2015-03-01

    Sarcopenia is the age-associated loss of lean skeletal muscle mass. It is the result of multiple physiologic derangements, ultimately resulting in an insidious functional decline. Frailty, the clinical manifestation of sarcopenia and physical infirmity, is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. The underlying pathology results in a disruption of the individual's ability to tolerate internal and external stressors such as injury or illness. This infirmity results in a markedly increased risk of falls and subsequent morbidity and mortality from the resulting traumatic injury, as well as an inability to recover from medical insults, resulting in critical illness. The increasing prevalence of sarcopenia and critical illness in the elderly has resulted in a deadly intersection of disease processes. The lethality of this combination appears to be the result of altered muscle metabolism, decreased mitochondrial energetics needed to survive critical illness, and a chronically activated catabolic state likely mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, these underlying derangements are independently associated with an increased incidence of critical illness, resulting in a progressive downward spiral. Considerable evidence has been gathered supporting the role of aggressive nutrition support and physical therapy in improving outcomes. Critical care practitioners must consider sarcopenia and the resulting frailty phenotype a comorbid condition so that the targeted interventions can be instituted and research efforts focused.

  7. The implications of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity on cardiometabolic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Nyun; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2015-07-01

    The important changes in body composition associated with aging are a decline in skeletal muscle mass and an increase in body fat. Body fat distribution also changes with age; subcutaneous fat decreases and visceral abdominal fat increase, which contributes to numerous cardiometabolic diseases (CMDs) such as type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Sarcopenia often accompanied by an increase in body fat and vice versa, a scenario termed sarcopenic obesity (SO), which might lead to the cumulative risk of both sarcopenia and obesity. However, there is still no consensus regarding the definition and consequences of SO. The lack of a unified definition for SO might contribute to inconsistent findings about the association of SO with CMD. Complex etiologies are associated with development of SO. A vicious cycle between the loss of muscle and the accumulation of ectopic fat might be associated with CMD via an intricate interplay of factors including proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, insulin resistance, dietary energy, physical activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, and other factors that have yet to be identified. Moreover, recent epidemiological studies suggest that SO is related to CVD and mortality. This review focuses on the current literature with regard to the association between sarcopenia, dynapenia, and obesity, as well as their implications for CMD. The ultimate goal of this Prospects is to encourage conduct of well-designed future studies that elucidate the relationship among sarcopenia, SO, and CMD.

  8. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the ...

  9. [The emergent role of sarcopenia: Preliminary Report of the Observatory of Sarcopenia of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J; Triana, Federico Cuesta; Gómez-Cabrera, Mari Carmen; López-Soto, Alfonso; Masanés, Ferran; Martín, Pilar Matía; Rexach, José Antonio Serra; Hidalgo, Domingo Ruiz; Salvà, Antoni; Viña, José; Formiga, Francesc

    2011-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a common and prominent geriatric syndrome, of major interest for daily clinical practice of professionals working with older people. The number of affected individuals and its relation with disability, frailty, many chronic diseases, lifestyle and adverse outcomes are extremely relevant for geriatric care. Moreover, biological changes that lead to the loss of muscle mass and strength are intrinsically related to the mechanisms of aging. It is not therefore surprising that research in this field is growing exponentially in recent years, and sarcopenia has been placed in recent years in the forefront of research in geriatric medicine and gerontology. The Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology has recently created an Observatory of Sarcopenia, which aims to promote educational and research activities in this field. The first activity of the Observatory has been to offer the Spanish speaking scientific community a review of the current status of sarcopenia, that may allow unifying concepts and fostering interest in this promising field of geriatrics. Copyright © 2010 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Sarcopenia of aging and its nutritional intervention%老年性肌少症(Sarcopenia)与营养干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    关玮; 陶晔璇; 蔡骏

    2012-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a series of syndromes featured by the steady and involuntary loss of skeletal muscle mass and function with aging.It can lower the quality of life and increase the risk of disability and mortality.Deficiency in some nutrients such as amino acids and proteins and accordingly the decreased in the synthesis of muscle protein and changes in muscle tissues may contribute to the development of sarcopenia.Therefore,nutritional interventions may play a role in the prevention and treatment of sarcopenia.%肌少症(Sarcopenia)是老龄化进程中以骨骼肌质量及其力量下降为特征的一类临床综合征,可降低老年人生活质量,增加老年人残疾发生率和疾病死亡率.营养素缺乏及其导致的肌蛋白合成减少、肌肉组织的特殊变化等都是肌少症发生和进展的重要原因.因此,深入探讨营养干预对老年性肌少症的防治具有重要的理论和临床意义.

  11. Age-related differences in muscle fatigue vary by contraction type: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avin, Keith G; Law, Laura A Frey

    2011-08-01

    During senescence, despite the loss of strength (force-generating capability) associated with sarcopenia, muscle endurance may improve for isometric contractions. The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic meta-analysis of young versus older adults, considering likely moderators (ie, contraction type, joint, sex, activity level, and task intensity). A 2-stage systematic review identified potential studies from PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, EBSCOhost: ERIC, EBSCOhost: Sportdiscus, and The Cochrane Library. Studies reporting fatigue tasks (voluntary activation) performed at a relative intensity in both young (18-45 years of age) and old (≥ 55 years of age) adults who were healthy were considered. Sample size, mean and variance outcome data (ie, fatigue index or endurance time), joint, contraction type, task intensity (percentage of maximum), sex, and activity levels were extracted. Effect sizes were (1) computed for all data points; (2) subgrouped by contraction type, sex, joint or muscle group, intensity, or activity level; and (3) further subgrouped between contraction type and the remaining moderators. Out of 3,457 potential studies, 46 publications (with 78 distinct effect size data points) met all inclusion criteria. A lack of available data limited subgroup analyses (ie, sex, intensity, joint), as did a disproportionate spread of data (most intensities ≥ 50% of maximum voluntary contraction). Overall, older adults were able to sustain relative-intensity tasks significantly longer or with less force decay than younger adults (effect size=0.49). However, this age-related difference was present only for sustained and intermittent isometric contractions, whereas this age-related advantage was lost for dynamic tasks. When controlling for contraction type, the additional modifiers played minor roles. Identifying muscle endurance capabilities in the older adult may provide an avenue to improve functional capabilities, despite a clearly established decrement in

  12. Consecuencias clínicas de la sarcopenia Clinical consequences of sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Serra Rexah

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available El concepto de sarcopenia implica pérdida de masa y potencia muscular. Es un hecho que acompaña al envejecimiento aunque no siempre tiene consecuencias clínicas.Se produce por multitud de factores: sistema nervioso (pérdida de unidades motoras alfa de la médula espinal, musculares (pérdida de la calidad y masa muscular, humorales (descenso de hormonas anabolizantes como testosterona, estrógenos y GH y aumento de distintas interleukinas y de estilo de vida (actividad física.Las principales consecuencias clínicas de la sarcopenia tienen relación con la independencia funcional. Así los ancianos sarcopénicos tienen más dificultad para caminar o lo hacen más lentamente, para subir escaleras, para realizar las actividades básicas de la vida diaria. Estas dificultades aumentan el riesgo de caídas y por lo tanto de fracturas. También afecta a la formación de hueso, a la tolerancia a la glucosa y a la regulación de la temperatura corporal. Además la dependencia es un factor de riesgo de mortalidad.The concept of sarcopenia implies loss of muscle mass and function. It is a condition that accompanies aging, although it not always has clinical consequences. It is produced by many factors: nervous system (loss of alpha motor units in the spinal cord, muscular (loss of muscle quality and mass, humoral (decrease in anabolic hormones such as testosterone, estrogens, GH, and increase of several interleukines, and life style (physical activity. The main clinical consequences of sarcopenia relate with functional independence. Thus, the sarcopenic elderly has greater difficulty walking, or do it more slowly, climbing up stairs, or doing basic daily living activities. These difficulties increase the risk for falls and, thus, fractures. They also affect bone formation, glucose tolerance, and body temperature regulation. Besides, dependency is a mortality risk factor.

  13. Associations between Early Markers of Parkinson's Disease and Sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drey, Michael; Hasmann, Sandra E.; Krenovsky, Jan-Peter; Hobert, Markus A.; Straub, Stefanie; Elshehabi, Morad; von Thaler, Anna-Katharina; Fallgatter, Andreas J.; Eschweiler, Gerhard W.; Suenkel, Ulrike; Berg, Daniela; Maetzler, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Sarcopenia and Parkinson's disease (PD) are both common age-related syndromes, and there is preliminary evidence that the probability of the co-occurrence of these syndromes within one individual is higher than expected. However, it is unclear to date whether one of the syndromes induces the other, or whether there may be common underlying causes. This pilot study thus aimed at investigating the association of the features of increased risk for PD with early stage sarcopenia (ESS). Method: Two hundred and fifty-five community-dwelling individuals were recruited from the Tübinger evaluation of Risk factors for Early detection of NeuroDegeneration (TREND) study. The following features that are associated with an increased risk for future PD were evaluated: the motor part of the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS-III), hyperechogenicity of the substantia nigra, prevalence of lifetime depression, hyposmia, REM sleep behavior disorder and the recently introduced probability score for prodromal PD. Sarcopenia was defined according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People, which was adapted to this cohort of healthy adults. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to identify associations of PD-related features with ESS. Results: The UPDRS-III score was significantly associated with ESS. The result remained significant after the adjustment for age, gender and physical activity. No association was found between the other PD-related features and ESS. Conclusion: The significant association of the UPDRS-III score with ESS in this cohort might indicate a common and early pathway in both diseases and supports the existence of an “extended neurodegenerative overlap syndrome.” Moreover, the potential of EES to serve as a prodromal marker of PD should be evaluated in future studies. PMID:28326036

  14. Recommendations for the conduct of clinical trials for drugs to treat or prevent sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Cooper, Cyrus; Rizzoli, René; Kanis, John A; Appelboom, Geoff; Bautmans, Ivan; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A; Boers, Maarten; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Bruyère, Olivier; Cherubini, Antonio; Flamion, Bruno; Fielding, Roger A; Gasparik, Andrea Ildiko; Van Loon, Luc; McCloskey, Eugene; Mitlak, Bruce H; Pilotto, Alberto; Reiter-Niesert, Suzanne; Rolland, Yves; Tsouderos, Yannis; Visser, Marjolein; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J

    2016-02-01

    Sarcopenia is an age-related muscle condition which is frequently a precursor of frailty, mobility disability and premature death. It has a high prevalence in older populations and presents a considerable social and economic burden. Potential treatments are under development but, as yet, no guidelines support regulatory studies for new drugs to manage sarcopenia. The objective of this position paper is therefore to suggest a set of potential endpoints and target population definitions to stimulate debate and progress within the medico-scientific and regulatory communities. A multidisciplinary expert working group was hosted by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis, which reviewed and discussed the recent literature from a perspective of clinical experience and guideline development. Relevant parallels were drawn from the development of definition of osteoporosis as a disease and clinical assessment of pharmaceutical treatments for that indication. A case-finding decision tree is briefly reviewed with a discussion of recent prevalence estimations of different relevant threshold values. The selection criteria for patients in regulatory studies are discussed according to the aims of the investigation (sarcopenia prevention or treatment) and the stage of project development. The possible endpoints of such studies are reviewed and a plea is made for the establishment of a core outcome set to be used in all clinical trials of sarcopenia. The current lack of guidelines for the assessment of new therapeutic treatments for sarcopenia could potentially hinder the delivery of effective medicines to patients at risk.

  15. Sarcopenia and chemotherapy-mediated toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Maria Cecília Monteiro Dela; Laviano, Alessandro; Pimentel, Gustavo Duarte

    2016-01-01

    This narrative review focuses on the role of sarcopenia and chemotherapy-induced toxicity in cancer patients. Consistent evidence shows that sarcopenia in cancer patients leads to decreased overall survival by influencing treatment discontinuation and dose reduction. Therefore, sarcopenia should be considered a robust prognostic factor of negative outcome as well as a determinant of increased healthcare costs. RESUMO Esta revisão narrativa descreve o papel da sarcopenia e a toxicidade mediada pela quimioterapia em pacientes com câncer. Diversas evidências consistentes mostram que a sarcopenia em pacientes com câncer induz à menor sobrevida global, por influenciar na interrupção do tratamento e na redução da dose. Portanto, a sarcopenia pode ser considerada um importante fator de prognóstico de desfecho negativo, além de um determinante de maiores custos em saúde.

  16. Developing and Validating an Age-Independent Equation Using Multi-Frequency Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis for Estimation of Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Mass and Establishing a Cutoff for Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yosuke; Nishizawa, Miyuki; Uchiyama, Tomoka; Kasahara, Yasuhiro; Shindo, Mikio; Miyachi, Motohiko; Tanaka, Shigeho

    2017-07-19

    Background: Appendicular skeletal muscle (or lean) mass (ALM) estimated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is considered to be a preferred method for sarcopenia studies. However, DXA is expensive, has limited portability, and requires radiation exposure. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is inexpensive, easy to use, and portable; thus BIA might be useful in sarcopenia investigations. However, a large variety of models have been commercially supplied by different companies, and for most consumer products, the equations estimating ALM are not disclosed. It is therefore difficult to use these equations for research purposes. In particular, the BIA equation is often age-dependent, which leads to fundamental difficulty in examining age-related ALM loss. The aims of the current study were as follows: (1) to develop and validate an equation to estimate ALM using multi-frequency BIA (MF-BIA) based on theoretical models, and (2) to establish sarcopenia cutoff values using the equation for the Japanese population. Methods: We measured height (Ht), weight, and ALM obtained using DXA and a standing-posture 8-electrode MF-BIA (5, 50, 250 kHz) in 756 Japanese individuals aged 18 to 86-years-old (222 men and 301 women as developing equation group and 97 men and 136 women as a cross validation group). The traditional impedance index (Ht²/Z50) and impedance ratio of high and low frequency (Z250/Z₅) of hand to foot values were calculated. Multiple regression analyses were conducted with ALM as dependent variable in men and women separately. Results: We created the following equations: ALM = (0.6947 × (Ht²/Z50)) + (-55.24 × (Z250/Z₅)) + (-10,940 × (1/Z50)) + 51.33 for men, and ALM = (0.6144 × (Ht²/Z50)) + (-36.61 × (Z250/Z₅)) + (-9332 × (1/Z50)) + 37.91 for women. Additionally, we conducted measurements in 1624 men and 1368 women aged 18 to 40 years to establish sarcopenia cutoff values in the Japanese population. The mean values minus 2 standard

  17. C57BL/6J小鼠听力损失与认知功能下降的相关性%Correlation between age-related hearing loss and impairment of cognition in C57BL/6J mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于亚峰; 翟丰; 戴春富; 胡金家

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation of age-related hearing loss and cognition impairment in C57BL/6J mice by observing hearing, cognitive function and synapses. Methods C57BL/6J and CBA/CaJ mice were divided into 3 groups. The hearing and cognitive functions of each animal was tested. And the ultrastructure of synapses was simultaneously observed for C57BL/6J mice. Results The 24-26-week-old C57BL/6J mice developed moderate hearing loss while the 42- 44-week-old C57BL/6J counterparts suffered profound hearing loss. Whereas excellent hearing was maintained in 3 groups of CBA/CaJ mice within 44 weeks. During cognitive test, the performance of 42 -44-week-old C57BL/6J mice was significantly worse than CBA/CaJ mice. During probe test, the number of platform crossing of 42 - 44-week-old C57BL/6J mice was smaller than that of CBA/CaJ mice(0.5 ± 0.6 vs 1.9 ± 1.6; P < 0.05 ). The 42 -44-week-old C57BL/6J mice had a wider synaptic cleft and a thinner postsynaptic density than the 24 -26-week-old C57 BL/6J counterparts [synaptic cleft: ( 19.4 ± 0.5 ) nm vs ( 1 1. 9 ± 0.7 ) nm; postsynaptic density:(15.2 ±0. 5) nm vs (27.8 ±2.0) nm; both P <0.05]. Furthermore, the degeneration of synapses in hippocampus CA3 area of C57BL/6J mice were clearly observed at 42 -44 weeks of age, but not seen in CBA/CaJ mice. Conclusion Age-related hearing loss might impact on the cognition impairment in C57 BL/6J mice.%目的 通过对老年性聋模型鼠C57BL/6J和对照组CBA/CaJ小鼠听力检测,认知行为检测以及海马CA3区突触超微结构的观察,探讨C57BL/6J小鼠年龄相关性听力损失与认知功能下降的关系。方法 将C57BL/6J小鼠根据听力随年龄的变化,按年龄分为3组:6~8周、24~26周、42~44周,每组10只。CBA/CaJ小鼠按同样的年龄也分为3组,每组9只。以TDT-Ⅲ型ABR测试仪检测听力,Morris水迷宫实验检测认知行为,透射电镜观察海马突触超微结构。结果 C57 BL/6J小鼠24~ 26

  18. 14-year incidence, progression, and visual morbidity of age-related maculopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesgaard, Helena; Nielsen, Niels V; Vinding, Troels;

    2005-01-01

    To describe the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) lesions and the related visual loss.......To describe the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) lesions and the related visual loss....

  19. Prevalence of Sarcopenia in Community-Dwelling Chilean Elders According to an Adapted Version of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lera, L; Albala, C; Sánchez, H; Angel, B; Hormazabal, M J; Márquez, C; Arroyo, P

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of mass and skeletal muscle strength and has serious consequences on older people's health. The Chilean older population has a high life-expectancy, but the prevalence of functional dependence is also high. To determine the prevalence of sarcopenia in Chilean older adults and its relationship with age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). Cross-sectional study. Community. 1,006 non-disabled, community-dwelling subjects aged 60 years or older living in Santiago. Anthropometric measurements, handgrip strength, physical performance tests, and dual-energy-x-ray-absorptiometry (DXA) scan were performed. Sarcopenia was defined using the algorithm of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP). Muscle mass was measured with DXA scan; skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) and hand dynamometry were defined with cut-off points obtained for the Chilean population. For a 3m walking speed we used the cut-off point of the EWGSOP definition. Nutritional status and obesity were defined according to World Health Organization standards. Association between sarcopenia and age, gender, BMI and lean/fat mass ratio was estimated by logistic regression models. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 19.1% (95%CI: 16.8%-21.8%), similar in men and women. There was an increasing trend of sarcopenia by age group and a decreasing trend with nutritional status. After logistic regression, sarcopenia was positively associated with age (OR=1.10; 95%CI:1.06-1.15) and falls (OR=1.83; 95%CI:1.07-3.15) and negatively associated with overweight (OR=0.31; 95%CI:0.16-0.59), obesity (OR=0.02; 95%CI:0.004-0.11), lean mass/fat mass ratio (OR=0.69; 95%CI:0.48-0.9997), knee height (OR=0.78; 95%CI:0.68-0.89) and calf circumference (OR=0.87; 95%CI:0.77-0.97). The total prevalence of sarcopenia was 19.1% increasing with age reaching 39.6% in people of 80 or more years of age. A negative association of sarcopenia with overweight, obesity and lean/fat mass ratio was

  20. Age-related oral changes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mckenna, Gerald

    2010-10-01

    Age-related oral changes are seen in the oral hard and soft tissues as well as in bone, the temporomandibular joints and the oral mucosa. As older patients retain their natural teeth for longer, the clinical picture consists of normal physiological age changes in combination with pathological and iatrogenic effects. Clinical Relevance: With an ageing population retaining more of its natural teeth for longer, dental professionals should expect to observe oral age changes more frequently.

  1. Sarcopenia as a predictor of pulmonary complications after esophagectomy for thoracic esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigori, Tatsuto; Okabe, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Eiji; Tsunoda, Shigeru; Hisamori, Shigeo; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia or loss of skeletal muscle mass has been identified as a poor prognostic factor for a wide variety of diseases and conditions. We investigated whether preoperative sarcopenia is associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing esophagectomy for thoracic esophageal cancer. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who underwent esophagectomy between September 2005 and July 2014 at Kyoto University Hospital. Skeletal muscle mass was assessed using preoperative computed tomographic scans by measuring the cross-sectional muscle area at the third lumbar vertebral level. Among the 199 eligible patients, 149 (75%) were classified as having sarcopenia. There was no difference in the incidence of overall complications between the groups (risk ratio [RR]: 1.10, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.80-1.53, P = 0.54). However, pulmonary complications were significantly more frequent in the sarcopenia group than in the nonsarcopenia group (RR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.20-5.77, P = 0.007). Multivariate analyses demonstrated that sarcopenia was associated with a high adjusted risk of one or more pulmonary complications (odds ratio: 2.96, 95% CI: 1.14-7.69, P = 0.026). Sarcopenia independently predicts pulmonary complications after esophagectomy for thoracic esophageal cancer. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;113:678-684. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prevalence of Sarcopenia and Its Association with Socioeconomic Status among the Elderly in Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosty, Ahmadreza; Arero, Godana; Chamar, Maryam; Tavakoli, Sogand

    2016-07-01

    Sarcopenia is a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. It imposes significant costs on health care systems. Socioeconomic status is also the root cause of healthy challenges among the elderly. Therefore, investigating the association between sarcopenia and socioeconomic status is very important to improve healthy ageing of the elderly. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sarcopenia and its association with socioeconomic status among the elderly in Tehran. Cross-sectional and case-control studies were conducted from August 2014-July 2015 among 310 men and 334 women elderly (60 and over years old) in Tehran health centers. Randomization, restriction and matching were setting during study design to minimize selection bias. Then study participants were recruited via phone call. Participants' phone numbers were already recorded in a telephone book electronically. When there were two elderly people in the same house, only one person was invited randomly. Association between sarcopenia and socio-economic status was analyzed by SPSS version 22. The overall prevalence of sarcopenia in the elderly was 16.5%. Prevalenceamong the low-income elderly was relatively higher than (20.5%) that among those with middle income status (18.2%) while in the higher income, the proportion of sarcopenia was very low (12.8%). The findings indicated that 339(52.6%) were in low-income status, 304(47.1%) were in middle-income status and 1(.2%) in high-income class. There was a significant association between socioeconomic status and sarcopenia (P-value sarcopenia was 0.97 times more likely higher in low socioeconomic class than those who were in middle and high income classes.

  3. Prevalence of stroke-related sarcopenia and its association with poor oral status in post-acute stroke patients: Implications for oral sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Ai; Yoshimura, Yoshihiro; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Tsuji, Yuri

    2016-12-10

    The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of stroke-related sarcopenia and its association with poor oral status in post-acute stroke patients. This cross-sectional study included 202 consecutive stroke patients who were admitted to convalescent rehabilitation wards in Japan. The Revised Oral Assessment Guide (ROAG) was used to assess oral status. Sarcopenia was defined as a loss of skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) with bioelectrical impedance and decreased muscle strength as measured by handgrip strength; cut-off values were adopted from the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to examine the associations between oral status, SMI, and HG. Study participants included 107 males and 95 females with a mean age of 72 ± 12 years. According to the ROAG, 82.2% of participants had slight to severe oral problems (median score: 11 [9-14]). The prevalence of stroke-related sarcopenia was 53.5%. Both SMI (mean: 6.1 ± 1.3) and handgrip strength (median: 15 [7-25]) were significantly lower in the group with oral problems (SMI = 5.8 ± 1.2, handgrip strength = 12 [6-20]) compared to individuals without oral problems (SMI = 7.4 ± .8, handgrip strength = 27 [23-34]) (p stroke severity, activities of daily living, cognitive level, nutritional status, comorbidities, and time from stroke onset. Poor oral status was associated with sarcopenia, reduced muscle mass and strength in post-acute stroke patients. Poor oral status and stroke-related sarcopenia were very common among the patients in this study, suggesting that healthcare providers should monitor for oral sarcopenia in post-acute stroke patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent genetic discoveries in osteoporosis, sarcopenia and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Tomohiko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased susceptibility to fractures. Evidence from genetic studies indicates that BMD, a complex quantitative trait with a normal distribution, is genetically controlled. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) as well as studies using candidate gene approaches have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with BMD, osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. These SNPs have been mapped close to or within genes including those encoding WNT/β-catenin signaling proteins. Understanding the genetics of osteoporosis will help to identify novel candidates for diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Genetic factors are also important for the development of sarcopenia, which is characterized by a loss of lean body mass, and obesity, which is characterized by high fat mass. Hence, in this review, we discuss the genetic factors, identified by genetic studies, which regulate the body components related to osteoporosis, sarcopenia, and obesity.

  5. Sarcopenia and frailty: new challenges for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Richard; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2016-10-01

    Sarcopenia and frailty are important conditions that become increasingly prevalent with age. Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass and function, and frailty can be defined as multi-system impairment associated with increased vulnerability to stressors. There is overlap between the two conditions, especially in terms of the physical aspects of the frailty phenotype: low grip strength, gait speed and muscle mass. These measures have been associated with a wide range of ageing outcomes and can be assessed in the clinical setting. In terms of intervention, there is evidence for the benefit of resistance exercise programmes, although these may not always be feasible. Considerable research into the use of medicines, both existing and new, as well as dietary supplements is ongoing. Finally in order to prevent or delay the development of these conditions, an additional approach is to consider aetiological factors operating across the life course. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  6. Cachexia and sarcopenia: mechanisms and potential targets for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argilés, Josep M; Busquets, Silvia; Stemmler, Britta; López-Soriano, Francisco J

    2015-06-01

    Cachexia is a multi-organ syndrome associated with cancer and other chronic diseases, characterized by body weight loss, muscle and adipose tissue wasting and inflammation, being often associated with anorexia. Skeletal muscle tissue represents more than 40% of body weight and seems to be one of the main tissues involved in the wasting that occurs during cachexia. Sarcopenia is a degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with healthy ageing. The molecular mechanisms behind cachexia and sarcopenia share some common trends. Muscle wasting is the result of a combination of an imbalance between synthetic and degradative protein pathways together with increased myocyte apoptosis and decreased regenerative capacity. Oxidative pathways are also altered in skeletal muscle during muscle wasting and this seems to be a consequence of mitochondrial abnormalities that include altered morphology and function, decreased ATP synthesis and uncoupling. The aim of the present review is to analyse common molecular pathways between cachexia and sarcopenia in order to put forward potential targets for intervention.

  7. Cachexia and sarcopenia: emerging syndromes of importance in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, L M

    2012-01-01

    Cachexia is the loss of lean body mass (LBM) that affects a large proportion of dogs and cats with congestive heart failure (CHF), chronic kidney disease (CKD), cancer, and a variety of other chronic diseases. Sarcopenia, the loss of LBM that occurs with aging, is a related syndrome, although sarcopenia occurs in the absence of disease. As many of the diseases associated with muscle loss are more common in aging, cachexia and sarcopenia often are concurrent problems. Both cachexia and sarcopenia have important clinical implications because they are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The pathophysiology of these 2 syndromes is complex and multifactorial, but recent studies have provided new information that has helped to clarify mechanisms and identify potential new targets for treatment. Newly identified mechanisms and pathways that mediate cachexia appear to act by increasing energy requirements, decreasing energy intake, impairing nutrient absorption, and causing metabolic alterations. Whereas cachexia and sarcopenia are important areas of research for drug development in people, they are only beginning to be recognized in veterinary medicine. Greater awareness and earlier diagnosis will help provide practical approaches to managing body weight and lean tissue in dogs and cats, as well as more directed targets for treatment.

  8. Rotator cuff tear and sarcopenia: are these related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Yoon, Jong Pil; Oh, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Hyung Sup; Kim, Young Gun; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Jeong, Won-Ju; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Jong Soo; Yoon, Jee Wook

    2016-09-01

    Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass and consequent loss of muscle function with aging. Its prevalence among the general population is 12% to 30% in those aged >60 years. We evaluated (1) the difference in the prevalence of sarcopenia between patients with rotator cuff tear and controls and (2) the sarcopenia severity according to the size of the rotator cuff tear. Group 1 included 48 consecutive patients with chronic symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears (mean age, 60.1 ± 6.5 years; range, 46-76 years), and group 2 included 48 age- and sex-matched patients. The sarcopenic index was evaluated by using the grip strength of the asymptomatic contralateral side and the skeletal muscle mass. No significant differences were found in the baseline data and demographic factors between the groups. The sarcopenic index was significantly inferior in the rotator cuff tear group than in the age- and sex-matched control groups (P = .041, .007, and .05, respectively). Patients with large to massive tears had a significantly inferior sarcopenic index than those with small and medium tears. The results showed that sarcopenia was more severe in patients with a chronic symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tear than in the age- and sex-matched control population and was correlated with the size of the tear, with the numbers available. Despite the individual variance in the underlying medical condition and physical activities, this study suggests that clinicians should consider the sarcopenic condition of patients with a rotator cuff tear, especially in elderly patients with large to massive tears. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Considerations concerning the definition of sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this commentary, we describe the sarcopenia spectrum that results in frailty and consider the impact of several components of the frailty definition on its global prevalence. We review proposed operational definitions of sarcopenia the extent to which they have been shown to predict hard clinical...

  10. Publication trends in cachexia and sarcopenia in elderly heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Jochen; Anker, Stefan D

    2016-12-01

    The loss of skeletal mass - sarcopenia and cachexia - is considered to be a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in chronic heart failure (CHF). Unfortunately, sarcopenia is generally considered to be a geriatric syndrome, but not necessarily seen as a comorbidity in CHF, even though it has a wide range of adverse health outcomes. While there were 15,574 publication with the title word "heart failure" in PubMed in the 5‑year period from 1 June 2011 to 31 May 2016, only 22 or 71 publications were found with the search combination "sarcopenia" or "cachexia" (title word) and "heart failure" (all fields), respectively. This shows very clearly that loss of muscle quality and function due to heart failure is still an underappreciated problem in the medical field.

  11. Therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Lim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have focused on evidence-based interventions to prevent mobility decline and enhance physical performance in older adults. Several modalities, in addition to traditional strengthening programs, have been designed to manage age-related functional decline more effectively. In this study, we reviewed the current relevant literatures to assess the therapeutic potential of eccentric exercises for age-related muscle atrophy (sarcopenia. Age-related changes in human skeletal muscle, and their relationship with physical performance, are discussed with reference to in vitro physiologic and human biomechanics studies. An overview of issues relevant to sarcopenia is provided in the context of the recent consensus on the diagnosis and management of the condition. A decline in mobility among the aging population is closely linked with changes in the muscle force–velocity relationship. Interventions based specifically on increasing velocity and eccentric strength can improve function more effectively compared with traditional strengthening programs. Eccentric strengthening programs are introduced as a specific method for improving both muscle force and velocity. To be more effective, exercise interventions for older adults should focus on enhancing the muscle force–velocity relationship. Exercises that can be performed easily, and that utilize eccentric strength (which is relatively spared during the aging process, are needed to improve both muscle force and velocity.

  12. Sarcopenia is closely associated with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with pancreatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintakuya, Ryuta; Uemura, Kenichiro; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Naru; Nakagawa, Naoya; Urabe, Kazuhide; Okano, Keisuke; Awai, Kazuo; Higaki, Toru; Sueda, Taijiro

    The loss of skeletal muscle mass (sarcopenia) is associated with the poor prognosis of pancreatic cancer. It has been reported pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) is associated with serum nutritional markers in chronic pancreatitis. However, there has been no report about the relationship between sarcopenia and PEI. The aim of this study is to determine whether body composition, including skeletal muscle (SM), subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), intramuscular adipose tissue content (IMAC), and serum nutritional markers are associated with pancreatic exocrine function in patients with pancreatic disease. Data were collected prospectively on 132 patients with pancreatic disease. SM, SAT, VAT and IMAC were assessed by computed tomography. Patients underwent a (13)C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test to measure pancreatic exocrine function. Serum nutritional markers were measured at the same time of (13)C-labeled mixed triglyceride breath test. Patients were stratified by quartiles according to each body component, and for each component the lowest group was defined as the lowest quartile, treating men and women separately. The lowest group for SM was defined as sarcopenia. PEI was defined as a percentage (13)CO2 cumulative dose at 7 h below 5%. Sarcopenia was associated with PEI in both men (P sarcopenia (P = 0.001) and serum albumin (P = 0.058) were associated with PEI. On multivariate analysis, only sarcopenia remained independently associated with PEI (P Sarcopenia is independently associated with PEI in patients with pancreatic disease. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Age-related skin changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Božanić Snežana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related skin changes can be induced by chronological ageing, manifested in subcutaneous fat reduction, and photo-ageing eliciting increased elastotic substance in the upper dermis, destruction of its fibrilar structure, augmented intercellular substance and moderate inflammatory infiltrate. Forty-five biopsy skin samples of the sun-exposed and sun-protected skin were analyzed. The patients were both males and females, aged from 17 to 81 years. The thickness of the epidermal layers and the number of cellular living layers is greater in younger skin. The amount of keratohyaline granules is enlarged in older skin. Dermoepidermal junction is flattened and the presence of elastotic material in the dermis is pronounced with age. The amount of inflammatory infiltrate is increased, the fibrous trabeculae are thickened in older skin and the atrophy of the hypodermis is observed. Chronological ageing alters the fibroblasts metabolism by reducing their life span, capacity to divide and produce collagen. During ageing, the enlargement of collagen fibrils diminishes the skin elasticity.

  14. Sarcopenia of ageing: functional, structural and biochemical alterations Sarcopenia no envelhecimento: alterações funcionais, estruturais e bioquímicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Zhong

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a progressive decline of muscle mass, strength, and quality, a condition described as sarcopenia of aging. Despite the significance of skeletal muscle atrophy, the mechanisms responsible for the deterioration of muscle performance are only partially understood. The purpose of this review is to highlight cellular, molecular and biochemical changes that contribute to age-related muscle weakness.O envelhecimento está associado ao declínio progressivo da massa, força, e qualidade muscular, uma condição descrita como sarcopenia do envelhecimento. Apesar da importante atrofia do músculo esquelético, os mecanismos responsáveis pela deterioração do desempenho muscular são somente parcialmente conhecidos. A proposta desta revisão é ressaltar as alterações celulares, moleculares e bioquímicas que contribuem para a fraqueza muscular associada ao envelhecimento.

  15. Sarcopenia correlates with systemic inflammation in COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Min Kwang; Cho, Eun Na; Chang, Joon; Ahn, Chul Min; Kim, Hyung Jung

    2017-01-01

    Background Muscle wasting and chronic inflammation are predominant features of patients with COPD. Systemic inflammation is associated with an accelerated decline in lung function. In this study, the prevalence of sarcopenia and the relationships between sarcopenia and systemic inflammations in patients with stable COPD were investigated. Materials and methods In a cross-sectional design, muscle strength and muscle mass were measured by handgrip strength (HGS) and bioelectrical impedance analysis in 80 patients with stable COPD. Patients (≥40 years old) diagnosed with COPD were recruited from outpatient clinics, and then COPD stages were classified. Sarcopenia was defined as the presence of both low muscle strength (by HGS) and low muscle mass (skeletal muscle mass index [SMMI]). Levels of circulating inflammatory biomarkers (IL-6 and high-sensitivity TNFα [hsTNFα]) were measured. Results Sarcopenia was prevalent in 20 (25%) patients. Patients with sarcopenia were older, had lower body mass index, and a higher percentage of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, they had significantly higher modified Medical Research Council scores and lower 6-minute walk distance than those without sarcopenia. HGS was significantly correlated with age, modified Medical Research Council score, and COPD Assessment Test scores. Both HGS and SMMI had associations with IL-6 and hsTNFα (HGS, r=−0.35, P=0.002; SMMI, r=−0.246, P=0.044) level. In multivariate analysis, old age, lower body mass index, presence of cardiovascular comorbidities, and higher hsTNFα levels were significant determinants for sarcopenia in patients with stable COPD. Conclusion Sarcopenia is very common in patients with stable COPD, and is associated with more severe dyspnea-scale scores and lower exercise tolerance. Systemic inflammation could be an important contributor to sarcopenia in the stable COPD population. PMID:28255238

  16. Psychophysical function in age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neelam, Kumari

    2012-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the late stage of age-related maculopathy (ARM), is the leading cause of blind registration in developed countries. The visual loss in AMD occurs due to dysfunction and death of photoreceptors (rods and cones) secondary to an atrophic or a neovascular event. The psychophysical tests of vision, which depend on the functional status of the photoreceptors, may detect subtle alterations in the macula before morphological fundus changes are apparent ophthalmoscopically, and before traditional measures of visual acuity exhibit deterioration, and may be a useful tool for assessing and monitoring patients with ARM. Furthermore, worsening of these visual functions over time may reflect disease progression, and some of these, alone or in combination with other parameters, may act as a prognostic indicator for identifying eyes at risk for developing neovascular AMD. Lastly, psychophysical tests often correlate with subjective and relatively undefined symptoms in patients with early ARM, and may reflect limitation of daily activities for ARM patients. However, clinical studies investigating psychophysical function have largely been cross-sectional in nature, with small sample sizes, and lack consistency in terms of the grading and classification of ARM. This article aims to comprehensively review the literature germane to psychophysical tests in ARM, and to furnish the reader with an insight into this complex area of research.

  17. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob; Barrows, Katherine M; Briggs, Robert A; Kwon, Oh Sung; Young, Laura M; Hopkins, Paul N; Volpi, Elena; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-09-15

    Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related to muscle proteolysis (MURF1, MAFBX, AMPKα, LC3II/I, Beclin1). We found that leg lean mass and strength decreased in older but not younger adults after bedrest (P protein synthesis increased before bed rest in both age groups (P protein synthesis rates and increased MAFBX mRNA, p-AMPKα and the LC3II/I ratio (P protein synthesis and a marginal increase in proteolytic markers. Finally, rehabilitation restored bed rest-induced deficits in lean mass and strength in older adults.

  18. Facts about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Degeneration (AMD) > Facts About Age-Related Macular Degeneration Facts About Age-Related Macular Degeneration This information was ... an Eye Care Professional Last Reviewed: September 2015 Fact Sheet Blurb The National Eye Institute (NEI) is ...

  19. Age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    2002-01-01

    (exudative cases); the remainder has only geographic atrophy. In cross-sectional population-based studies about 45% of eyes with AMD have visual acuity reduced to 20/200 or worse. This is true both for exudative AMD and pure geographic atrophy. Age and genetic predisposition are known risk factors for AMD...... a fluorescein angiographic study and a physician capable of interpreting it. For CNV not involving the foveal centre, the only evidence-based treatment is laser photocoagulation. For AMD cases with subfoveal CNV, good visual acuity, and predominantly classic fluorescence pattern on fluorescein angiography....... Smoking is probably also a risk factor. Preventive strategies using macular laser photocoagulation are under investigation, but their efficacy in preventing visual loss is as yet unproven. There is no treatment with proven efficacy for geographic atrophy. Optimal treatment for exudative AMD requires...

  20. Sarcopenia in daily practice: assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudart, Charlotte; McCloskey, Eugène; Bruyère, Olivier; Cesari, Matteo; Rolland, Yves; Rizzoli, René; Araujo de Carvalho, Islène; Amuthavalli Thiyagarajan, Jotheeswaran; Bautmans, Ivan; Bertière, Marie-Claude; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Burlet, Nansa; Cavalier, Etienne; Cerreta, Francesca; Cherubini, Antonio; Fielding, Roger; Gielen, Evelien; Landi, Francesco; Petermans, Jean; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Visser, Marjolein; Kanis, John; Cooper, Cyrus

    2016-10-05

    Sarcopenia is increasingly recognized as a correlate of ageing and is associated with increased likelihood of adverse outcomes including falls, fractures, frailty and mortality. Several tools have been recommended to assess muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance in clinical trials. Whilst these tools have proven to be accurate and reliable in investigational settings, many are not easily applied to daily practice. This paper is based on literature reviews performed by members of the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) working group on frailty and sarcopenia. Face-to-face meetings were afterwards organized for the whole group to make amendments and discuss further recommendations. This paper proposes some user-friendly and inexpensive methods that can be used to assess sarcopenia in real-life settings. Healthcare providers, particularly in primary care, should consider an assessment of sarcopenia in individuals at increased risk; suggested tools for assessing risk include the Red Flag Method, the SARC-F questionnaire, the SMI method or different prediction equations. Management of sarcopenia should primarily be patient centered and involve the combination of both resistance and endurance based activity programmes with or without dietary interventions. Development of a number of pharmacological interventions is also in progress. Assessment of sarcopenia in individuals with risk factors, symptoms and/or conditions exposing them to the risk of disability will become particularly important in the near future.

  1. Tools in the assessment of sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C; Fielding, R; Visser, M; van Loon, LJ; Rolland, Y; Orwoll, E; Reid, K; Boonen, S; Dere, W; Epstein, S; Mitlak, B; Tsouderos, Y; Sayer, AA; Rizzoli, R; Reginster, JY; Kanis, JA

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review provides a framework for development of an operational definition of sarcopenia and of the potential endpoints that might be adopted in clinical trials among older adults. Introduction While the clinical relevance of sarcopenia is widely recognized, there is currently no universally accepted definition of the disorder. The development of interventions to alter the natural history of sarcopenia also requires consensus on the most appropriate endpoints for determining outcomes of clinical importance which might be utilised in intervention studies. Methods and results We review current approaches to the definition of sarcopenia, and the methods used for the assessment of various aspects of physical function in older people. The potential endpoints of muscle mass, muscle strength, muscle power and muscle fatigue, as well as the relationships between them, are explored with reference to the availability and practicality of the available methods for measuring these endpoints in clinical trials. Conclusions Based on current evidence, none of the four potential outcomes in question is sufficiently comprehensive to recommend as a uniform single outcome in randomised clinical trials. We propose that sarcopenia may be optimally defined (for the purposes of clinical trial inclusion criteria, as well as epidemiological studies) using a combination of measures of muscle mass and physical performance. The choice of outcome measures for clinical trials in sarcopenia is more difficult; co-primary outcomes, tailored to the specific intervention in question, may be the best way forward in this difficult but clinically important area. PMID:23842964

  2. Prognostic value of sarcopenia in liver surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, M; Lim, C; Salloum, C; Lazzati, A; Compagnon, P; Pascal, G; Azoulay, D

    2015-11-01

    Current knowledge indicates that malnutrition increases the rate of post-operative complications, particularly respiratory and infectious, after major surgery. Almost all liver surgery is performed in patients with cancer, a factor that increases the risk of malnutrition. The primary risk factors for post-operative complications are pre-operative hypo-albuminemia and a body mass index less than 20 kg/m(2). To improve the prediction of complications in these patients, some teams have suggested measurement of muscle thickness by computed tomography. Muscular mass can thus be quantified by measuring the total surface of the psoas muscle or the total surface of all muscles (i.e. external and internal oblique, transverse, psoas and paravertebral muscles) seen on an axial CT slice at L3. As well, data exist suggesting that sarcopenia is an independent predictive factor of post-operative morbidity and poor long-term survival after resection for cancer. Nonetheless, the literature on the subject is limited, there are no standardized definitions for sarcopenia, and the need of special software to calculate the surfaces limits its usefulness. Lastly, there are little if any data concerning the nutritional or pharmacologic means to treat sarcopenia. This update, based on a literature review, deals with the value and the prognostic impact of sarcopenia in surgery for liver tumors. The current definition of sarcopenia, validated internationally, the methods of measurement, and the consequences of sarcopenia on the outcome of liver resections are detailed in this review.

  3. Sarcopenia in overweight and obese patients is a predictive factor for postoperative complication in gastric cancer: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, N; Chi, C-H; Chen, X-D; Zhou, C-J; Wang, S-L; Zhuang, C-L; Shen, X

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength. This study aims to explore the prevalence of sarcopenia in overweight and obese gastric cancer (GC) patients and figured out the impacts of sarcopenia on the postoperative complication of overweight and obese GC patients. According to the recommended body-mass index (BMI) for Asian populations by WHO, we conducted a prospective study of overweight and obese gastric cancer patients (BMI ≥ 23 kg/m(2)) under curative gastrectomy from August 2014 to December 2015. Including lumbar skeletal muscle index, handgrip strength and gait speed as the sarcopenic components were measured before surgery. Patients were followed up after gastrectomy to gain the actual clinical outcomes. Factors contributing to postoperative complications were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. Total of 206 overweight or obese patients were enrolled in this study, 14 patients were diagnosed sarcopenia and were demonstrated having significantly association with higher risk of postoperative complications, higher hospital costs, and higher rate of 30-days readmission compared with the non-sarcopenic ones. On the basis of univariate and multivariate analysis, sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for postoperative complication of overweight and obese patients with gastric cancer (P = 0.002). Sarcopenia is an independent predictor of postoperative complications in overweight or obese patients with gastric cancer after radical gastrectomy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  4. Current review of the SarQoL®: a health-related quality of life questionnaire specific to sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudart, Charlotte; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Geerinck, Anton; Locquet, Médéa; Bruyère, Olivier

    2017-08-01

    Sarcopenia, defined by a progressive and generalized loss of muscle mass and muscle function, is associated with many harmful clinical consequences. Several studies have reported the impact of sarcopenia on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) using generic quality of life (QoL) questionnaires. The results of these observational studies are quite heterogenous. Indeed, generic tools may not be able to detect subtle effects of sarcopenia on QoL. Recently, a sarcopenia-specific HRQoL questionnaire was developed and validated in a population of sarcopenic subjects to more accurately assess the impact of sarcopenia on QoL. Areas covered: The purpose of this review is to present evidence regarding the impact of sarcopenia on QoL and to introduce a new specific HRQoL questionnaire, the SarQoL®. Expert commentary: The self-administered SarQoL®, initially developed in French, comprises 55 items translated into 22 questions. The questionnaire has been shown to be understandable, valid, consistent, and reliable and can therefore be recommended for clinical and research purposes. The questionnaire is now available in 11 different languages with another 20 translations in progress. The instrument's sensitivity to change still needs to be assessed in future longitudinal studies.

  5. The Challenge of Appropriate Identification and Treatment of Starvation, Sarcopenia, and Cachexia: A Survey of Australian Dietitians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Yaxley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is an umbrella term that includes starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia; however, differentiating between these terms is infrequent in clinical practice. Given that the effectiveness of treatment depends on the aetiology of unintentional weight loss, it is important that clinicians are aware of the defining characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine whether Australian dietitians understand and use the terms starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia and provide targeted treatment strategies accordingly. Members of the Dietitians Association of Australia were surveyed to gain information on practices and attitudes to diagnosis and treatment of adult malnutrition. In addition, three case studies were provided to examine understanding of starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia. 221 dietitians accessed the survey. 81 respondents (43% indicated the use of at least one alternate term (starvation, sarcopenia, and/or cachexia. Muscle wasting was the most commonly used diagnostic criterion. High-energy high-protein diet was the most common therapy prescribed. Correct diagnoses for case studies were recorded by 6% of respondents for starvation, 46% for sarcopenia, and 21% for cachexia. There is a need for increased awareness of the existence of starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia amongst Australian dietitians and research into appropriate methods of identification and treatment for each condition.

  6. Sarcopenia as a Risk Factor for Cognitive Deterioration in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: A 1-Year Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Shu; Yamada, Minoru; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Fukutani, Naoto; Tashiro, Yuto; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Tasaka, Seishiro; Matsushita, Tomofumi; Matsubara, Keisuke; Tsuboyama, Tadao; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this 1-year prospective study was to determine whether sarcopenia is an independent risk factor of cognitive deterioration in community-dwelling older adults. One-year prospective study. Japanese community. A total of 131 community-dwelling older adults aged 65 years and older participated in this study. We defined sarcopenia using the diagnostic algorithm recommended by the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia, and the participants were classified into the sarcopenia and normal groups according to this definition. The participants' cognitive functions were assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) during pre- and postdata collection (after 1 year). The rate of change in pre- and post-MMSE scores during the follow-up term was significantly different between the 2 groups (normal group, -0.32 ± 8.39%; sarcopenia group, -5.86 ± 5.16%; P = .002). The analysis of covariance, adjusted for demographic data and the pre-MMSE scores, showed a significant change in the MMSE scores between the normal and sarcopenia group (F = 9.30, P = .003). Furthermore, in the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the cognitive function was significantly more likely to deteriorate (defined as a loss of at least 2 points of MMSE) in the sarcopenia group during the follow-up term (odds ratio: 7.86, 95% confidence interval: 1.53-40.5). Sarcopenia was identified as an independent risk factor of cognitive deterioration in community-dwelling older adults during the 1-year study period. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sarcopenia Is Associated With Lower Skeletal Muscle Capillarization and Exercise Capacity in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Steven J; Ryan, Alice S; Blumenthal, Jacob B; Watson, Jonathan M; Katzel, Leslie I; Goldberg, Andrew P

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle capillary rarefaction limits the transcapillary transport of nutrients and oxygen to muscle and may contribute to sarcopenia and functional impairment in older adults. We tested the hypothesis that skeletal muscle capillarization and exercise capacity (VO2max) are lower in sarcopenic than in nonsarcopenic older adults and that the degree of sarcopenia is related to lower skeletal muscle capillarization. Body composition, VO2max, and vastus lateralis capillarization were determined in 76 middle-aged and older men and women (age = 61±1 years, body mass index [BMI] = 30.7±0.5kg/m(2) [mean ± SEM]). Participants were classified as sarcopenic if appendicular lean mass divided by BMI (ALMBMI) was less than 0.789 for men or less than 0.512 for women. Sarcopenic subjects (ALMBMI = 0.65±0.04, n = 16) had 20% lower capillary-to-fiber ratio, as well as 13% and 15% lower VO2max expressed as mL/kg/min or L/min, respectively, compared with sex-, race-, and age-matched participants without sarcopenia (ALMBMI = 0.81±0.05, n = 16; p sarcopenia and reduced exercise capacity in older adults by limiting diffusion of substrates, oxygen, hormones, and nutrients. Strategies to prevent the aging-related decline in skeletal muscle capillarization may help to prevent or slow the progression of sarcopenia and its associated functional declines in generally healthy older adults. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2016.

  8. A rare functional haplotype of the P2RX4 and P2RX7 genes leads to loss of innate phagocytosis and confers increased risk of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ben J; Baird, Paul N; Vessey, Kirstan A; Skarratt, Kristen K; Fletcher, Erica L; Fuller, Stephen J; Richardson, Andrea J; Guymer, Robyn H; Wiley, James S

    2013-04-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of blindness in Western countries and is diagnosed by the clinical appearance of yellow subretinal deposits called drusen. Genetic changes in immune components are clearly implicated in the pathology of this disease. We have previously shown that the purinergic receptor P2X7 can act as a scavenger receptor, mediating phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and insoluble debris. We performed a genetic association study of functional polymorphisms in the P2RX7 and P2RX4 genes in a cohort of 744 patients with AMD and 557 age-matched Caucasian control subjects. The P2X4 Tyr315Cys variant was 2-fold more frequent in patients with AMD compared to control subjects, with the minor allele predicting susceptibility to disease. Pairwise linkage disequilibrium was observed between Tyr315Cys in the P2RX4 gene and Gly150Arg in the P2RX7 gene, and these two minor alleles formed a rare haplotype that was overrepresented in patients with AMD (n=17) compared with control subjects (n=3) (odds ratio 4.05, P=0.026). Expression of P2X7 (wild type or variant 150Arg) in HEK293 cells conferred robust phagocytosis toward latex beads, whereas coexpression of the P2X7 150Arg with P2X4 315Cys variants almost completely inhibited phagocytic capacity. Fresh human monocytes harboring this heterozygous 150Arg-315Cys haplotype showed 40% reduction in bead phagocytosis. In the primate eye, immunohistochemistry indicated that P2X7 and P2X4 receptors were coexpressed on microglia and macrophages, but neither receptor was seen on retinal pigment epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that a haplotype including two rare variants in P2RX7 and P2RX4 confers a functional interaction between these two variant receptors that impairs the normal scavenger function of macrophages and microglia. Failure of this P2X7-mediated phagocytic pathway may impair removal of subretinal deposits and predispose individuals toward AMD.

  9. Welcome to the ICD‐10 code for sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Anker, Stefan D.; Morley, John E.; von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The new ICD‐10‐CM (M62.84) code for sarcopenia represents a major step forward in recognizing sarcopenia as a disease. This should lead to an increase in availability of diagnostic tools and the enthusiasm for pharmacological companies to develop drugs for sarcopenia.

  10. Awareness, Knowledge, and Concern about Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimarolli, Verena R.; Laban-Baker, Allie; Hamilton, Wanda S.; Stuen, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)--a common eye disease causing vision loss--can be detected early through regular eye-health examinations, and measures can be taken to prevent visual decline. Getting eye examinations requires certain levels of awareness, knowledge, and concern related to AMD. However, little is known about AMD-related…

  11. Sarcopenia prevalence and factors associated with sarcopenia in older people living in a nursing home in Ankara Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Ahmet; Aras, Sevgi; Atmis, Volkan; Cengiz, Ozlem Karaarslan; Varli, Murat; Cinar, Esat; Atli, Teslime

    2016-08-01

    Sarcopenia is prevalent in older people, and is related to survival and disability. There are no data on sarcopenia evaluated according to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria for nursing home residents in Turkey. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of sarcopenia according to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria and associated factors with sarcopenia among nursing home residents in Turkey. The study cohort consisted of individuals aged over 65 years and living in the Seyranbağları Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center in Ankara, Turkey. Besides demographic and medical data, Mini-Mental State Examination, activities of daily living, Mini-Nutritional Assessment, body mass index, calf circumference, gait speed and handgrip strength were also investigated. Muscle mass was evaluated by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Sarcopenia was diagnosed according to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria. A total of 141 older individuals were evaluated. Sarcopenia was found in 29% (n = 41) of the participants. Participants with sarcopenia were older and had low scores for activities of daily living, low body mass index, greater cognitive dysfunction, high malnutrition risk and low calf circumference. Body mass index and calf circumference were found to be associated with sarcopenia in multivariate logistic regression analysis. Almost one-third of older nursing home residents were diagnosed with sarcopenia according to European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria in this study in Turkey. Calf circumference and body mass index were associated with increased risk of sarcopenia among nursing home residents. This is the first study evaluating sarcopenia using European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria in Turkey. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 903-910. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  12. Sarcopenia and cachexia in the era of obesity: clinical and nutritional impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, C M; Cushen, S J; Orsso, C E; Ryan, A M

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of body composition (BC) variability in contemporary populations has significantly increased with the use of imaging techniques. Abnormal BC such as sarcopenia (low muscle mass) and obesity (excess adipose tissue) are predictors of poorer prognosis in a variety of conditions or clinical situations. As a catabolic illness, a defining feature of cancer is muscle loss. Although the conceptual model of wasting in cancer is typically conceived as involuntary weight loss leading to low body weight, recent studies have shown that both sarcopenia and cachexia can be present with obesity. The combination of low muscle and high adipose tissue (sarcopenic obesity) is an emerging abnormal BC phenotype prevalent across the body weight, and hence BMI spectra. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in cancer are in most instances occult conditions, which have been independently associated with higher incidence of chemotherapy toxicity, shorter time to tumour progression, poorer outcomes of surgery, physical impairment and shorter survival. Although the mechanisms are yet to be fully understood, the associations with poorer clinical outcomes emphasise the value of nutritional assessment as well as the need to develop appropriate interventions to countermeasure abnormal BC. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity create diverse nutritional requirements, highlighting the compelling need for a more comprehensive and differentiated understanding of energy and protein requirements in this heterogeneous population.

  13. Pinpointing the Earliest Defects in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Magnusson, Kristinn P; Shan Duan; Haraldur Sigurdsson; Hjorvar Petursson; Zhenglin Yang; Yu Zhao; Bernstein, Paul S.; Jian Ge; Fridbert Jonasson; Einar Stefansson; Gudleif Helgadottir; Norman A Zabriskie; Thorlakur Jonsson; Asgeir Björnsson; Theodora Thorlacius

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy and neovascular AMD, represent different pathological processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft drusen, characterized by deposits in the macula without visual loss, are considered to be a precursor of advanced AMD. Recently, it has been proposed that a common missense variant, Y402H, in t...

  14. For patients with age -related hearing loss of hearing aid fit ing method is analyzed%对于老年性听力损失患者助听器的验配方法进行分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱美林

    2014-01-01

    objective:focus for senile patients with hearing loss of hearing aid fit ing method and ef ect.Methods:to select the research object is early January to the end of December 2013,2012 during accept hearing -aid with 60 cases of senile patients with hearing loss,al patients were accepted hearing -aid,and strengthen the rehabilitation training.Results:the fit ing ef ect for only 1 case with poor fit ing ef ect for a total of 9 cases,good fit ing ef ect for a total of 50 cases,was as high as 98.33%.Conclusion:the light of the specific conditions of the patients with hearing loss,for patients to choose the appropriate hearing AIDS fit ing,and strengthen the rehabilitation training,to improve success rate of hearing aid fit ing.%目的:重点探索老年性听力损失患者助听器的验配方法及效果。方法:选取的研究对象是2012年1月初至2013年12月底期间接受助听器验配的60例老年性听力损失患者,所有患者均接受助听器验配,并加强康复训练。结果:验配效果为差的仅有1例,验配效果为良的总共有9例,验配效果为优的总共有50例,优良率高达98.33%。结论:结合听力损失患者的具体情况,为患者选择合适的助听器进行验配,并加强康复训练,有利于提高助听器验配成功率。

  15. Osteoporosis and sarcopenia in older age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, M H; Dennison, E M; Aihie Sayer, A; Fielding, R; Cooper, C

    2015-11-01

    Osteoporosis and sarcopenia are common in older age and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Consequently, they are both attended by a considerable socioeconomic burden. Osteoporosis was defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) in 1994 as a bone mineral density of less than 2.5 standard deviations below the sex-specific young adult mean and this characterisation has been adopted globally. Subsequently, a further step forward was taken when bone mineral density was incorporated into fracture risk prediction algorithms, such as the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX®) also developed by the WHO. In contrast, for sarcopenia there have been several diagnostic criteria suggested, initially relating to low muscle mass alone and more recently low muscle mass and muscle function. However, none of these have been universally accepted. This has led to difficulties in accurately delineating the burden of disease, exploring geographic differences, and recruiting appropriate subjects to clinical trials. There is also uncertainty about how improvement in sarcopenia should be measured in pharmaceutical trials. Reasons for these difficulties include the number of facets of muscle health available, e.g. mass, strength, function, and performance, and the various clinical outcomes to which sarcopenia can be related such as falls, fracture, disability and premature mortality. It is imperative that a universal definition of sarcopenia is reached soon to facilitate greater progress in research into this debilitating condition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Muscle Bone Interactions". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Novel Approaches to the Diagnosis of Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark H; Buehring, Bjoern

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is common in older people and is associated with disability, reduced mobility, hospitalization, and various comorbidities. Although it has been recognized for over a quarter of a century, we do not currently have a universally adopted definition. This limits our ability to compare results from different studies and impedes the development of novel therapies. Although sarcopenia was initially defined purely based on low muscle mass, the importance of measures of muscle function has been realized and these have been included in recent operational definitions. These continue to evolve with some including an assessment of adiposity and others adding further components of musculoskeletal health in a score-based approach. This review describes the importance of reaching a widely accepted method to define sarcopenia in both research and clinical practice. It details the ways in which the definition has changed since its initial inception and explores how it may continue to evolve in the future. The different methods by which components of sarcopenia can be measured are described, and the various advantages and disadvantages of these techniques are evaluated. Clearly, there are several other similar syndromes in older people, such as frailty and cachexia; their relationships and overlap with sarcopenia are also explored.

  17. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations.

  18. Age related macular degeneration and visual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoforidis, John B; Tecce, Nicola; Dell'Omo, Roberto; Mastropasqua, Rodolfo; Verolino, Marco; Costagliola, Ciro

    2011-02-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of central blindness or low vision among the elderly in industrialized countries. AMD is caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among modifiable environmental risk factors, cigarette smoking has been associated with both the dry and wet forms of AMD and may increase the likelihood of worsening pre-existing AMD. Despite advances, the treatment of AMD has limitations and affected patients are often referred for low vision rehabilitation to help them cope with their remaining eyesight. The characteristic visual impairment for both forms of AMD is loss of central vision (central scotoma). This loss results in severe difficulties with reading that may be only partly compensated by magnifying glasses or screen-projection devices. The loss of central vision associated with the disease has a profound impact on patient quality of life. With progressive central visual loss, patients lose their ability to perform the more complex activities of daily living. Common vision aids include low vision filters, magnifiers, telescopes and electronic aids. Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a new subspecialty emerging from the traditional fields of ophthalmology, optometry, occupational therapy, and sociology, with an ever-increasing impact on the usual concepts of research, education, and services for visually impaired patients. Relatively few ophthalmologists practise LVR and fewer still routinely use prismatic image relocation (IR) in AMD patients. IR is a method of stabilizing oculomotor functions with the purpose of promoting better function of preferred retinal loci (PRLs). The aim of vision rehabilitation therapy consists in the achievement of techniques designed to improve PRL usage. The use of PRLs to compensate for diseased foveae has offered hope to these patients in regaining some function. However, in a recently published meta-analysis, prism spectacles were found to be unlikely to be of

  19. Role of frailty and sarcopenia in predicting outcomes amongpatients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    According to the United States census bureau 20%of Americans will be older than 65 years in 2030 andhalf of them will need an operation - equating to about36 million older surgical patients. Older adults areprone to complications during gastrointestinal cancertreatment and therefore may need to undergo specialpretreatment assessments that incorporate frailty andsarcopenia assessments. A focused, structured literaturereview on PubMed and Google Scholar was performedto identify primary research articles, review articles,as well as practice guidelines on frailty and sarcopeniaamong patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery.The initial search identified 450 articles; after eliminatingduplicates, reports that did not include surgical patients,case series, as well as case reports, 42 publicationson the impact of frailty and/or sarcopenia on outcomeof patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery wereincluded. Frailty is defined as a clinically recognizablestate of increased vulnerability to physiologic stressorsresulting from aging. Frailty is associated with adecline in physiologic reserve and function acrossmultiple physiologic systems. Sarcopenia is a syndromecharacterized by progressive and generalized loss ofskeletal muscle mass and strength. Unlike cachexia,which is typically associated with weight loss due tochemotherapy or a general malignancy-related cachexiasyndrome, sarcopenia relates to muscle mass ratherthan simply weight. As such, while weight reflectsnutritional status, sarcopenia - the loss of muscle mass- is a more accurate and quantitative global marker offrailty. While chronologic age is an important element inassessing a patient's peri-operative risk, physiologic ageis a more important determinant of outcomes. Geriatricassessment tools are important components of the preoperativework-up and can help identify patients whosuffer from frailty. Such data are important, as frailtyand sarcopenia have repeatedly been demonstratedamong the strongest

  20. Testosterone Supplementation Reverses Sarcopenia in Aging through Regulation of Myostatin, c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase, Notch, and Akt Signaling Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Aging in rodents and humans is characterized by loss of muscle mass (sarcopenia). Testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass in healthy older men. Here, using a mouse model, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which testosterone prevents sarcopenia and promotes muscle growth in aging. Aged mice of 22 months of age received a single sc injection of GnRH antagonist every 2 wk to suppress endogenous testosterone production and were implanted subdermally under anesthesia with 0.5 ...

  1. Genes, inflammation, and age-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trompet, Stella

    2010-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis was to investigate associations between genetic variants involved in inflammation and epigenetics and age-related diseases in an elderly cohort to get more insights in the patho-physiological mechanisms involved in age-related diseases, like cardiovascular diseas

  2. Sarcopenia, Osteoporosis and Its Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Povoroznyuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Today, the significant attention of scientists is paid to the study of associative changes in muscle and bone tissue with age. The reduction of muscle mass and its function is associated with reduced bone mineral density, increased risk of falls, deterioration in the quality of life, functionality and increased patient mortality. However, there is a small number of studies that have examined the relationship between sarcopenia and osteoporotic fractures. The aim of research: to study the particularities of body composition, structural and functional state of bone in women aged 65 and older depending on the presence of vertebral deformations. We have examined 171 women aged 65–89 years. Depending on the presence of vertebral deformations, the patients were divided into two groups: A — 105 women without vertebral deformations, B — 66 women with vertebral deformations. Lean and fat masses, bone mineral density and trabecular bone score, lateral vertebral assessment were performed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (Prodigy, GEHC Lunar, Madison, WI, USA. We determined that patients with vertebral deformations as compared to the women without deformations had significantly lower indices of bone mineral density, trabecular bone score, lean and fat masses (p < 0.05. The incidence of presarcopenia (reduced lean mass in women with vertebral deformations was 14.6 %, in women without vertebral deformations — 2.2 %.

  3. Sarcopenia, sarcopenic obesity and mortality in older adults: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsis, J A; Mackenzie, T A; Barre, L K; Lopez-Jimenez, F; Bartels, S J

    2014-09-01

    Sarcopenia is defined as the loss of skeletal muscle mass and quality, which accelerates with aging and is associated with functional decline. Rising obesity prevalence has led to a high-risk group with both disorders. We assessed mortality risk associated with sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in elders. A subsample of 4652 subjects ≥60 years of age was identified from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (1988-1994), a cross-sectional survey of non-institutionalized adults. National Death Index data were linked to this data set. Sarcopenia was defined using a bioelectrical impedance formula validated using magnetic resonance imaging-measured skeletal mass by Janssen et al. Cutoffs for total skeletal muscle mass adjusted for height(2) were sex-specific (men: ≤5.75 kg/m(2); females ≤10.75 kg/m(2)). Obesity was based on % body fat (males: ≥27%, females: ≥38%). Modeling assessed mortality adjusting for age, sex, ethnicity (model 1), comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure, osteoporosis, cancer, coronary artery disease and arthritis), smoking, physical activity, self-reported health (model 2) and mobility limitations (model 3). Mean age was 70.6±0.2 years and 57.2% were female. Median follow-up was 14.3 years (interquartile range: 12.5-16.1). Overall prevalence of sarcopenia was 35.4% in women and 75.5% in men, which increased with age. Prevalence of obesity was 60.8% in women and 54.4% in men. Sarcopenic obesity prevalence was 18.1% in women and 42.9% in men. There were 2782 (61.7%) deaths, of which 39.0% were cardiovascular. Women with sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity had a higher mortality risk than those without sarcopenia or obesity after adjustment (model 2, hazard ratio (HR): 1.35 (1.05-1.74) and 1.29 (1.03-1.60)). After adjusting for mobility limitations (model 3), sarcopenia alone (HR: 1.32 ((1.04-1.69) but not sarcopenia with obesity (HR: 1.25 (0.99-1.58)) was associated with mortality. For men, the

  4. Sarcopenia in lung transplantation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, Dmitry; Wickerson, Lisa; Singer, Lianne G; Mathur, Sunita

    2014-12-01

    Lung transplant candidates and recipients have significant impairments in skeletal muscle mass, strength and function--individual measures of sarcopenia. Skeletal muscle dysfunction has been observed in the pre-transplant and post-transplant period and could have an important effect on transplant outcomes. A systematic review was performed to characterize the techniques used to study sarcopenia and assess the level of impairment throughout the transplant process. Electronic databases were searched (inception to July 2013) for prospective studies measuring at least 1 element of sarcopenia (muscle mass, strength, or function) in lung transplant patients. Eighteen studies were included, and study quality was assessed using the Downs and Black scale. A variety of measurements were used to evaluate sarcopenia in 694 lung transplant patients. Muscle mass in 7 studies was assessed using bioelectrical impedance (n = 4), computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 2), or skin folds (n = 1), and was significantly reduced. Quadriceps strength was examined in 14 studies with computerized dynamometer (n = 10) and hand-held dynamometer (n = 4). Quadriceps strength was reduced in the pre-transplant period (mean range, 49%-86% predicted; n = 455 patients), further reduced immediately after transplant (51%-72%, n = 126), and improved beyond 3 months after transplant (58%-101%, n = 164). Only 2 studies measured lower extremity function (sit-to-stand test). A multitude of measurement techniques have been used to assess individual measures of sarcopenia, with reduced muscle mass and quadriceps strength observed in the pre-transplant and post-transplant period. Further standardization of measurement techniques is needed to assess the clinical effect of sarcopenia in lung transplantation.

  5. Nutrition and sarcopenia: evidence for an interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millward, D Joe

    2012-11-01

    Nutritional interventions that might influence sarcopenia, as indicated by literature reporting on sarcopenia per se as well as dynapenia and frailty, are reviewed in relation to potential physiological aetiological factors, i.e. inactivity, anabolic resistance, inflammation, acidosis and vitamin D deficiency. As sarcopenia occurs in physically active and presumably well-nourished populations, it is argued that a simple nutritional aetiology is unlikely and unequivocal evidence for any nutritional influence is extremely limited. Dietary protein is probably the most widely researched nutrient but only for frailty is there one study showing evidence of an aetiological influence and most intervention studies with protein or amino acids have proved ineffective with only a very few exceptions. Fish oil has been shown to attenuate anabolic resistance of muscle protein synthesis in one study. There is limited evidence for a protective influence of antioxidants and inducers of phase 2 proteins on sarcopenia, dynapenia and anabolic resistance in human and animal studies. Also fruit and vegetables may protect against acidosis-induced sarcopenia through their provision of dietary potassium. While severe vitamin D deficiency is associated with dynapenia and sarcopenia, the evidence for a beneficial influence of increasing vitamin D status above the severe deficiency level is limited and controversial, especially in men. On this basis there is insufficient evidence for any more specific nutritional advice than that contained in the general healthy lifestyle-healthy diet message: i.e. avoiding inactivity and low intakes of food energy and nutrients and maintain an active lifestyle with a diet providing a rich supply of fruit and vegetables and frequent oily fish.

  6. Prevention and optimal management of sarcopenia: a review of combined exercise and nutrition interventions to improve muscle outcomes in older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denison HJ

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hayley J Denison,1 Cyrus Cooper,1,2 Avan Aihie Sayer,1,2 Sian M Robinson1,2 1MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, UK; 2National Institute for Health Research Southampton Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK Abstract: The growing recognition of sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, has highlighted the need to understand more about its etiology. Declines in muscle mass and strength are expected aspects of aging, but there is significant variability between individuals in rates of loss. Although some of these differences can be explained by fixed factors, such as sex, much of the remaining variation is unexplained. This has led to increasing interest in the influence of adult lifestyle, particularly in the effects of modifiable factors such as physical activity and diet, and in identifying intervention opportunities both to prevent and manage sarcopenia. A number of trials have examined the separate effects of increased exercise or dietary supplementation on muscle mass and physical performance of older adults, but less is known about the extent to which benefits of exercise training could be enhanced when these interventions are combined. In a comprehensive review of the literature, we consider 17 studies of older adults (≥65 years in which combined nutrition and exercise interventions were used to increase muscle strength and/or mass, and achieve improvements in physical performance. The studies were diverse in terms of the participants included (nutritional status, degree of physical frailty, supplementation strategies (differences in nutrients, doses, exercise training (type, frequency, as well as design (duration, setting. The main message is that enhanced benefits of exercise training, when combined with dietary supplementation, have been shown in some

  7. Sarcopenia: A Major Challenge in Elderly Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Domański

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is a condition of multifaceted etiology arising in many elderly people. In patients with chronic kidney, the loss of muscle mass is much more intensive and the first signs of sarcopenia are observed in younger patients than it is expected. It is associated with the whole-body protein-energy deficiency called protein-energy wasting (PEW. It seems to be one of the major factors limiting patient's autonomy as well as decreasing the quality of life. If it cannot be treated with the simple methods requiring some knowledge and devotion, we will fail to save patients who die due to cardiovascular disease and infection, despite proper conduction of renal replacement therapy. Many factors influencing the risk of sarcopenia development have been evaluated in number of studies. Many studies also were conducted to assess the efficacy of different therapeutic strategies (diet, physical activity, hormones. Nevertheless, there is still no consensus on treatment the patients with PEW. Therefore, in the paper we present the reasons and pathophysiology of sarcopenia as an important element of protein energy wasting (PEW in elderly patients suffering from chronic kidney disease. We also analyze possible options for treatment according to up-to-date knowledge.

  8. Protein carbonylation and heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle: relationships to age and sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran Valls, Maria R; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Narici, Marco V; Smith, Kenneth; Phillips, Bethan E; Caporossi, Daniela; Atherton, Philip J

    2015-02-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual loss of muscle mass termed sarcopenia, which has significant impact on quality-of-life. Because oxidative stress is proposed to negatively impact upon musculoskeletal aging, we investigated links between human aging and markers of oxidative stress, and relationships to muscle mass and strength in young and old nonsarcopenic and sarcopenic adults. Sixteen young and 16 old males (further subdivided into "old" and "old sarcopenic") were studied. The abundance of protein carbonyl adducts within skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and mitochondrial protein subfractions from musculus vastus lateralis biopsies were determined using Oxyblot immunoblotting techniques. In addition, concentrations of recognized cytoprotective proteins (eg, heat shock proteins [HSP], αβ-crystallin) were also assayed. Aging was associated with increased mitochondrial (but not myofibrillar or sarcoplasmic) protein carbonyl adducts, independently of (stage-I) sarcopenia. Correlation analyses of all subjects revealed that mitochondrial protein carbonyl abundance negatively correlated with muscle strength ([1-repetition maximum], p = .02, r (2) = -.16), but not muscle mass (p = .13, r (2) = -.08). Abundance of cytoprotective proteins, including various HSPs (HSP 27 and 70), were unaffected by aging/sarcopenia. To conclude, these data reveal that mitochondrial protein carbonylation increases moderately with age, and that this increase may impact upon skeletal muscle function, but is not a hallmark of (stage-I) sarcopenia, per se. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.

  9. Genes, inflammation, and age-related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Trompet, Stella

    2010-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis was to investigate associations between genetic variants involved in inflammation and epigenetics and age-related diseases in an elderly cohort to get more insights in the patho-physiological mechanisms involved in age-related diseases, like cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline and cancer. For all analyses we used data of the participants of the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). We have shown that subjects carrying gen...

  10. Differences in body composition and physical functions associated with sarcopenia in Chinese elderly: reference values and prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ping; Wu, Sinan; Han, Yiwen; Liu, Jingmin; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Enyi; Zhang, Yan; Gong, Huan; Pang, Jing; Tang, Zhili; Liu, Hongxing; Zheng, Xiuyuan; Zhang, Tiemei

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the age-related differences in skeletal muscle mass (SM), muscle strength and physical performance in mainland Chinese. Based on available data, the reference values (criteria) for the definition of sarcopenia in elderly Chinese were explored. Body composition measurements were obtained using a bioelectrical impedance analyzer (BIA); muscle strength was determined by handgrip strength (HS); and physical function was evaluated by the subjects' 6-m gait speed (GS). In this study, HS and GS declined significantly after 55 years and very dramatically after 75 years. Appendicular SM index of Sarcopenia (AWGS) criteria in our population results in a very low prevalence of low SM and low GS. If Western criteria for sarcopenia were adopted, the prevalence of low GS and low HS would be 2-4 times higher in the studied population, also exhibiting significant gender differences. These findings indicate that it is necessary to establish an outcomes-based and ethnic-specific set of reference values for the diagnosis of sarcopenia in elderly Chinese.

  11. X-82 to Treat Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-12

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD); Macular Degeneration; Exudative Age-related Macular Degeneration; AMD; Macular Degeneration, Age-related, 10; Eye Diseases; Retinal Degeneration; Retinal Diseases

  12. ROLE OF AUTOPHAGY IN AGE-RELATED MUSCLE LOSS

    OpenAIRE

    Lo Verso, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is an ubiquitous degradation system, that is conserved through species. Cells activate autophagy to degrade long-lived proteins, damaged organelles or portions of cytoplasm, that are engulfed in double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes, that ultimately fuse to lysosomes, where the cargo is degraded and breakdown products are recycled to sustain cellular energetic demands. Skeletal muscle is the most abundant tissue in mammals and controls 80% of the blood glucose. We have r...

  13. Counteracting age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechshøft, Rasmus; Reitelseder, Søren; Højfeldt, Grith

    2016-01-01

    . Moreover, we will evaluate changes in physical performance, muscle fiber type and acute anabolic response to whey protein ingestion, sensory adaptation, gut microbiome, and a range of other measures, combined with questionnaires on life quality and qualitative interviews with selected subjects. The CALM...... at both societal and individual levels. Only a few longitudinal studies have been reported, but whey protein supplementation seems to improve muscle mass and function, and its combination with heavy strength training appears even more effective. However, heavy resistance training may reduce adherence...

  14. Endocrine determinants of incident sarcopenia in middle-aged and elderly European men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Evelien; O'Neill, Terence W; Pye, Stephen R; Adams, Judith E; Wu, Frederick C; Laurent, Michaël R; Claessens, Frank; Ward, Kate A; Boonen, Steven; Bouillon, Roger; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Verschueren, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    sarcopenia by any definition. Conclusions Low levels of T and 25OHD do not predict loss of muscle mass, gait speed, or grip strength in middle-aged and elderly community-dwelling European men. Low IGF-1 predicts change in gait speed in men aged ≥70 years. PMID:26401471

  15. Behavioural changes are a major contributing factor in the reduction of sarcopenia in caloric-restricted ageing mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norren, van K.; Rusli, F.; Dijk, van M.; Lute, C.; Nagel, J.C.; Dijk, F.J.; Dwarkasing, J.T.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Luiking, Y.; Witkamp, R.F.; Müller, M.R.; Steegenga, W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Background - In rodent models, caloric restriction (CR) with maintenance of adequate micronutrient supply has been reported to increase lifespan and to reduce age-induced muscle loss (sarcopenia) during ageing. In the present study, we further investigated effects of CR on the onset and severity of

  16. Early detection of age related macular degeneration: current status

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartz, Roy; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a main cause of severe vision loss in age related macular degeneration (AMD), is crucial in order to preserve vision and the quality of life of patients. This review summarizes current literature on the subject of early detection of CNV, both in the clinic setting and mainly in the patient’s home. New technologies are evolving to allow for earlier detection and thus vision preservation in AMD patients.

  17. Early detection of age related macular degeneration: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Roy; Loewenstein, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a main cause of severe vision loss in age related macular degeneration (AMD), is crucial in order to preserve vision and the quality of life of patients. This review summarizes current literature on the subject of early detection of CNV, both in the clinic setting and mainly in the patient's home. New technologies are evolving to allow for earlier detection and thus vision preservation in AMD patients.

  18. Results of submacular surgery in age-related macula degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Laue, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    Due to a disruption of barrier function of the membrane Bruch and a change of the phagocities retinal pigment epithelial (rpe), exists possibility for progress of pathologist invasion of new vessels from the choroidea under the retina. On the position of the macula it will cause quick loss of central visual acuity. The most frequent cause for a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) is age-related macula degeneration (AMD); further causes are based on idiopathic or postinflammable reasons. ...

  19. Mechanism of apoptosis of hair cell in the cochlea of age-related hearing loss%年龄相关听力损失小鼠耳蜗毛细胞的凋亡抑制剂治疗研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张正民; 李胜利

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察年龄相关听力损失耳蜗毛细胞的死亡方式,探讨防治老年性耳聋的分子机制.方法:将NMF308nmf/nmf小鼠做为年龄相关听力损失动物模型,每组随机选择7只28d,30d和60d的NMF308nmf/nmf小鼠,用ABR和DPOAE测定听觉功能,用免疫荧光染色组织化学技术TUNEL,Caspase-3和PI(碘化丙啶)染色标记耳蜗毛细胞.结果:NMF308nmf/nmf小鼠从1月龄开始发生听力减退和毛细胞功能改变,到2月龄时出现明显的TUNEL阳性标记,是毛细胞凋亡的最早表现;Caspase-3激活表达的毛细胞凋亡现象稍晚出现;PI标记可见毛细胞细胞核固缩和碎片出现的时间从2月龄开始;到3月龄时该种小鼠听力基本丧失,耳蜗毛细胞严重缺失.结论:在老年性耳聋早期,首先出现DNA单链断裂,随后有Caspase-3信号途径的激活,导致耳蜗毛细胞凋亡是老年性耳聋的主要分子机制.%Objective: Age-related hearing loss (Presbycusis) is the most common type of sensory impairment in human being. However, the molecular mechanisms of the presbycusis remain unclear. Apoptosis of outer hair cells (OHCs) in the cochlea has been found in aging animals. Methods: In this study,we investigated the apoptosis of hair cell in the cochlea of age-related hearing loss generated by ENU mutagenesis. Results: The results showed that the nmf308 mice with progressive hair cell loss along a base to apex gradientwith age-related hearing loss. The cochlear OHCs reduced from 5-10% at 1 month to 100% at 3 month in the basal region. Substantial amounts of TUNEL-postive OHCs nuclei appeared at 1 month age. And activated caspase-3 labeling demonstrated that most OHCs appeared at 2 months age. Conclusion; These result suggest that DNA single strand break is attributed primarily to apoptosis of cochlear lesion, whereas the later stage of lesion expansion leads to activation of caspase-3 activity reduced with further progression of nuclear condensation in age-related

  20. Age-related changes in triathlon performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepers, R; Sultana, F; Bernard, T; Hausswirth, C; Brisswalter, J

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was two-fold: i) to analyse age-related declines in swimming, cycling, and running performances for Olympic and Ironman triathlons, and ii) to compare age-related changes in these three disciplines between the Olympic and Ironman triathlons. Swimming, cycling, running and total time performances of the top 10 males between 20 and 70 years of age (in 5 years intervals) were analysed for two consecutive world championships (2006 and 2007) for Olympic and Ironman distances. There was a lesser age-related decline in cycling performance (ptriathlon in cycling (>55 years) and running (>50 years), respectively. In contrast, an age-related decline in swimming performance seemed independent of triathlon distance. The age-related decline in triathlon performance is specific to the discipline, with cycling showing less declines in performance with age than swimming and running. The magnitude of the declines in cycling and running performance at Ironman distance is greater than at Olympic distance, suggesting that task duration exerts an important influence on the magnitude of the age-associated changes in triathlon performance.

  1. Vision rehabilitation of persons with age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemsen, Dennis W; Brown, William L

    2011-05-01

    As the population of the United States ages, there is an increase in the number of persons with age related macular degeneration (ARMD). Even as new prevention and treatment techniques are developed, the vision loss associated with ARMD may lead to loss of independence and quality of life. Low vision is a rehabilitative process designed to improve visual function and restore independence. This paper is a review of the current research related to low vision in the areas of magnification, contrast and illumination, reading, training, driving and outcomes assessment.

  2. Vitamin D Signaling in Myogenesis: Potential for Treatment of Sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Akira Wagatsuma; Kunihiro Sakuma

    2014-01-01

    Muscle mass and strength progressively decrease with age, which results in a condition known as sarcopenia. Sarcopenia would lead to physical disability, poor quality of life, and death. Therefore, much is expected of an effective intervention for sarcopenia. Epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory evidence suggest an effect of vitamin D on muscle function. However, the precise molecular and cellular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Recent studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR) migh...

  3. [New aspects in age related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlea, C

    2012-01-01

    Being the leading cause of blindness in modern world Age Related Macular Degeneration has beneficiated in the last decade of important progress in diagnosis, classification and the discovery of diverse factors who contribute to the etiology of this disease. Treatments have arised who can postpone the irreversible evolution of the disease and thus preserve vision. Recent findings have identified predisposing genetic factors and also inflamatory and imunological parameters that can be modified trough a good and adequate prevention and therapy This articole reviews new aspects of patology of Age Related Macular Degeneration like the role of complement in maintaining inflamation and the role of oxidative stress on different structures of the retina.

  4. [Pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaarniranta, Kai; Seitsonen, Sanna; Paimela, Tuomas; Meri, Seppo; Immonen, Ilkka

    2009-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a multiform disease of the macula, the region responsible for detailed central vision. In recent years, plenty of new knowledge of the pathogenesis of this disease has been obtained, and the treatment of exudative macular degeneration has greatly progressed. The number of patients with age-related macular degeneration will multiply in the following decades, because knowledge of mechanisms of development of macular degeneration that could be subject to therapeutic measures is insufficient. Central underlying factors are genetic inheritance, exposure of the retina to chronic oxidative stress and accumulation of inflammation-inducing harmful proteins into or outside of retinal cells.

  5. Sarcopenia and Visceral Obesity in Esophageal and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Esophageal Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Sarcopenia; Sarcopenic Obesity; Obesity; Visceral Obesity; Quality of Life; Surgery; Complication of Treatment; Chemotherapeutic Toxicity; Physical Activity; Oncology

  6. Effectiveness of Cardiac Rehabilitation for Prevention and Treatment of Sarcopenia in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease - A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, H; Kai, H; Niiyama, H; Nishiyama, Y; Katoh, A; Yoshida, N; Fukumoto, Y; Ikeda, H

    2017-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a syndrome characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, with the risk of frailty and poor quality of life. This study aimed to clarify the clinical characteristics of sarcopenia and to investigate the effects of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CCR), including nutrition, physical exercise and medication, in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). We retrospectively studied 322 inpatients with CVD (age 72±12 years). Muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance were assessed before and after exercise training in patients with and without sarcopenia, which was defined as either a gait speed of Sarcopenia was identified in 28% of patients with CVD, these patients having a higher prevalence of symptomatic chronic heart failure and chronic kidney disease. SMI was significantly associated with protein intake and statin treatment. The ratio of peak VO2 and SMI was significantly higher in the statin treatment group. Handgrip strength, gait speed, leg weight bearing index, and nutritional intake improved after exercise training in patients both with and without sarcopenia. The present findings suggest that CCR is a promising strategy for prevention and treatment of sarcopenia in patients with CVD.

  7. Sarcopenia associada ao envelhecimento: aspectos etiológicos e opções terapêuticas Sarcopenia and aging: etiological aspects and therapeutic options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Alves de Araujo Silva

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A prevalência de incapacidade e dependência funcional é maior em idosos e está intimamente associada à redução da massa muscular, que ocorre, até mesmo, em indivíduos saudáveis. A sarcopenia parece decorrer da interação complexa de distúrbios da inervação, diminuição de hormônios, aumento de mediadores inflamatórios e alterações da ingestão protéico-calórica que ocorrem durante o envelhecimento. A perda de massa e força muscular é responsável pela redução de mobilidade e aumento da incapacidade funcional e dependência. Quando associada à fragilidade, esta perda gera custos econômicos e sociais. Neste artigo, pretende-se avaliar aspectos relacionados à gênese da sarcopenia, bem como analisar possíveis opções terapêuticas e de prevenção.The high prevalence of inability and functional dependence is an important problem in elderly people. It is closely related with aging decrease of lean muscle mass that occurs even in healthy subjects. Skeletal muscle mass deficiency, or sarcopenia, results from complex interactions between innervations disturbances, hormones deficiency, inflammatory cytokines and restriction in caloric-proteic ingestion. Loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength results in disability and functional dependency that are associated to frailty in many elderly people. These conditions represent enormous economic and social budget. In this article, we evaluate pathogenesis of sarcopenia and discuss potential therapies.

  8. Cancer-associated malnutrition, cachexia and sarcopenia: the skeleton in the hospital closet 40 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Aoife M; Power, Derek G; Daly, Louise; Cushen, Samantha J; Ní Bhuachalla, Ēadaoin; Prado, Carla M

    2016-05-01

    An awareness of the importance of nutritional status in hospital settings began more than 40 years ago. Much has been learned since and has altered care. For the past 40 years several large studies have shown that cancer patients are amongst the most malnourished of all patient groups. Recently, the use of gold-standard methods of body composition assessment, including computed tomography, has facilitated the understanding of the true prevalence of cancer cachexia (CC). CC remains a devastating syndrome affecting 50-80 % of cancer patients and it is responsible for the death of at least 20 %. The aetiology is multifactorial and complex; driven by pro-inflammatory cytokines and specific tumour-derived factors, which initiate an energy-intensive acute phase protein response and drive the loss of skeletal muscle even in the presence of adequate food intake and insulin. The most clinically relevant phenotypic feature of CC is muscle loss (sarcopenia), as this relates to asthenia, fatigue, impaired physical function, reduced tolerance to treatments, impaired quality of life and reduced survival. Sarcopenia is present in 20-70 % depending on the tumour type. There is mounting evidence that sarcopenia increases the risk of toxicity to many chemotherapy drugs. However, identification of patients with muscle loss has become increasingly difficult as 40-60 % of cancer patients are overweight or obese, even in the setting of metastatic disease. Further challenges exist in trying to reverse CC and sarcopenia. Future clinical trials investigating dose reductions in sarcopenic patients and dose-escalating studies based on pre-treatment body composition assessment have the potential to alter cancer treatment paradigms.

  9. Prevalence and Factors Associated With Sarcopenia in Suburb-dwelling Older Chinese Using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Peipei; Kang, Li; Guo, Qi; Wang, Jiazhong; Zhang, Wen; Shen, Suxing; Wang, Xiuyang; Dong, Renwei; Ma, Yixuan; Shi, Yu; Shi, Zhiyang; Li, Hongquan; Li, Chen; Ma, Yige; Wang, Liancheng; Niu, Kaijun

    2016-04-01

    Sarcopenia is a common condition in older people. The aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence and factors associated with sarcopenia in an elderly Chinese suburb-dwelling population. This study was conducted on 1,069 Chinese suburb-dwelling participants aged ≥60 years to evaluate sarcopenia using the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia criteria. Sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics, as well as medical conditions, were considered independent variables to determine factors associated with sarcopenia using a logistic regression model. The prevalence of sarcopenia was 6.4% in men and 11.5% in women. Age was a significant factor in both sexes. In addition, presence of sarcopenia was inversely associated with BMI for both sexes. The odds ration and 95% confidence interval for factors statistically significantly associated with sarcopenia were 5.04 (1.70-14.89) and 2.36 (1.06-5.25) for diabetes in males and females, respectively; 10.60 (1.75-64.24) for daily consumption of alcohol (daily drinkers), 5.58 (2.13-14.59) for peptic ulcer in female (not statistically significant in males). The Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia criterion is useful for defining sarcopenia, and our data suggest that the prevalence of sarcopenia in the general elderly suburb-dwelling Chinese population is high. Moreover, we find that high body mass index is inversely associated with the likelihood of being sarcopenic and that several others factors such as diabetes, peptic ulcer, and drinking habits increase the prevalence of sarcopenia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Folate and age-related disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durga, J.

    2004-01-01

    Aging is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders and an increase in their risk factors, such as decreased concentrations of folate and increased concentrations of homocysteine. The association of folate and homocysteine with age-related disease and, most impo

  11. Driving and Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on driving and age-related macular degeneration, which is motivated by the link between driving and the quality of life of older adults and their increased collision rate. It addresses the risk of crashes, driving performance, driving difficulty, self-regulation, and interventions to enhance, safety,…

  12. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casten, Robin; Rovner, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling…

  13. Nitroxide Pharmaceutical Development for Aging-Related Degeneration & Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob A. Zarling

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP, Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H, and TP-H prodrug (OT-551 are evaluated in (1 nonsmokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2 elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3 elderly smoker or nonsmoker Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and reducing low luminance deficit and night vision loss in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral or injectable drug formulations are discussed.

  14. Quality of Life in Sarcopenia and Frailty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzoli, René; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Arnal, Jean-François; Bautmans, Ivan; Beaudart, Charlotte; Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike; Biver, Emmanuel; Boonen, Steven; Brandi, Maria-Luisa; Chines, Arkadi; Cooper, Cyrus; Epstein, Sol; Fielding, Roger A.; Goodpaster, Bret; Kanis, John A.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Laslop, Andrea; Malafarina, Vincenzo; Mañas, Leocadio Rodriguez; Mitlak, Bruce H.; Oreffo, Richard O.; Petermans, Jean; Reid, Kieran; Rolland, Yves; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Tsouderos, Yannis; Visser, Marjolein; Bruyère, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The reduced muscle mass and impaired muscle performance that defines sarcopenia in older individuals is associated with increased risk of physical limitation and a variety of chronic diseases. It may also contribute to clinical frailty. A gradual erosion of quality of life (QoL) has been evidenced in these individuals, although much of this research has been done using generic QoL instruments, particularly the SF-36, which may not be ideal in older populations with significant comorbidities. This review and report of an expert meeting, presents the current definitions of these geriatric syndromes (sarcopenia and frailty). It then briefly summarises QoL concepts and specificities in older populations, examines the relevant domains of QoL and what is known concerning QoL decline with these conditions. It calls for a clearer definition of the construct of disability and argues that a disease-specific QoL instrument for sarcopenia/frailty would be an asset for future research and discusses whether there are available and validated components that could be used to this end and whether the psychometric properties of these instruments are sufficiently tested. It calls also for an approach using utility weighting to provide some cost estimates and suggests that a time trade off study could be appropriate. PMID:23828275

  15. Interventions for age-related diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueira, Inês; Fernandes, Adelaide; Mladenovic Djordjevic, Aleksandra;

    2016-01-01

    Over 60% of people aged over 65 are affected by multiple morbidities, which are more difficult to treat, generate increased healthcare costs and lead to poor quality of life compared to individual diseases. With the number of older people steadily increasing this presents a societal challenge. Age...... is the major risk factor for age-related diseases and recent research developments have led to the proposal that pharmacological interventions targeting common mechanisms of ageing may be able to delay the onset of multimorbidity. Here we review the state of the knowledge of multimorbidity, appraise...... the available evidence supporting the role of mechanisms of ageing in the development of the most common age-related diseases and assess potential molecules that may successfully target those key mechanisms....

  16. 谷胱甘肽S-转移酶GSTT1、GSTM1基因多态性与老年性耳聋遗传易感性的关联性分析%Association analysis of GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes with hereditary susceptibility to age-related hearing loss among Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉华; 戴朴; 袁慧军; 翟所强

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between GSTM1 and GSTT1 genetic polymorphisms and hereditary susceptibility to age-related hearing loss. Methods Specimens in this study were selected from the database at the Deafness Molecular Diagnosis Center, Institute of Otorhinolaryngology, Chinese PLA General Hospital for genomic DNA extraction. The genetic polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were detected by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. The results were compared to the control and x2 test was used to determine the frequency and association of genotype of GSTM1 and GSTT1. Results This study included 224 specimens, including those from cases of age-related hearing loss (n= 110, PTA = 51 ± 11 dB HL) and from age-matched controls(n= 114, PTA = 18±4dB HL) All subjects were between 60° to 80 years of age. The average age of the age related hearing loss group (77 males and 33 females) was 72.93 ± 5.08 years, and that of the control group (76 males and 38 females) was 73.10 ± 5.787 years. Cenotyping and statistical analysis revealed no difference between patients with age related hearing loss and the controls regarding GSTM1, GSTT1 genotype positive rate and frequencies of GSTT1+/GSTW+, GSTT1+/GSTM1-, GSTT1-/GSTT1+ and GSTT1-/GSTM1- genotypes (P> 0.05). Conclusion We are unable to detect a strong association between GSTM1, GSTT1 gene and age related hearing loss in this Chinese population.%目的 探讨谷胱甘肽S-转移酶(glutathione S-transferase,GST)GSTT1和GSTM1基因多态性是否与老年性耳聋遗传易感性相关.方法 在解放军总医院耳鼻咽喉科研究所聋病分子诊断中心样本库中选取本研究的研究对象,提取基因组DNA;利用多重PCR(Polymerase chain reaction,PCR)的方法 同时扩增所有研究对象GSTT/GSTM基因编码区并进行GSTM1和GSTT1基因多态性的分型;通过病例-对照关联性分析方法 进行统计学分析,明确GSTT1和GSTM1的多态性和老年性耳聋遗传易感性是否相关.结果

  17. Immunology of age related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kijlstra Aize; Yang Peizeng

    2011-01-01

    @@ Age-related macular degeneration(AMD)is the most important cause of blindness in persons over 55 years of age in the Western world.In view of the increasing life expectancy we can assume that the problem will increase dramatically over the coming decades unless preventive or therapeutic measures are developed.Towards this goal many groups all over the world have performed epidemiological studies to identify potential risk factors for AMD.

  18. Depression in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Casten,Robin; Rovner,Barry

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, substantially degrades the quality of their lives, and is a risk factor for depression. Rates of depression in AMD are substantially greater than those found in the general population of older people, and are on par with those of other chronic and disabling diseases. This article discusses the effect of depression on vision-related disability in patients with AMD, suggests methods for screening for depressio...

  19. The SARC-F Questionnaire: Diagnostic Overlap with Established Sarcopenia Definitions in Older German Men with Sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Sieber, Cornel; Freiberger, Ellen; von Stengel, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The high relevance of sarcopenia for the aging societies of most developed nations is emphasized by its recent inclusion in the ICD-10-CM (M62.84). However, diagnosing sarcopenia is a daunting task. Apart from varying definitions, the proper assessment of recognized sarcopenia criteria is time and cost consuming. A short and inexpensive screening tool may thus be welcome for clinicians and others working in the area of gerontology. Recently, a simple questionnaire was provided (SARC-F) that may adequately realize this aim. The purpose of this study is to compare established sarcopenia definitions (European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People [EWGSOP], Foundation National Institute of Health [FNIH], International Working Group on Sarcopenia [IWGS]) with the SARC-F. Our hypothesis was that the diagnostic overlap between the SARC-F and sarcopenia as determined by these recognized definitions was too low to reliably diagnose sarcopenia. Seventy-four community-dwelling German men aged 70 years and older with established sarcopenia according to EWGSOP and/or FNIH and/or IWGS were screened with the SARC-F questionnaire. Applying the definitions of EWGSOP, IWGS, and FNIH, 66.2, 43.2, and 50% of the cohort were classified sarcopenic, respectively. The SARC-F identified 33.5% of the cohort as sarcopenic. The predictive power of the SARC-F increased when men were classified as sarcopenic according to 2 (57.1%) or all (78.8%) sarcopenia definitions. The diagnostic overlap with the 3 sarcopenia definitions varied between 38.8% (SARC-F-FNIH) and 54.1% (SARC-F-IWGS). In comparison, the overlap of diagnosed sarcopenia ranged from 27.0% (FNIH-IWGS) to 49.0% (IWGS-EWGSOP) among the definitions themselves. Only 12.2% of the men met all 3 sarcopenia definitions. The diagnostic overlap with respect to sensitivity of the SARC-F and present sarcopenia definitions was at least as high as the range of the diagnostic overlap of these approaches themselves. Thus, although the

  20. PREVALENCE OF SARCOPENIA IN ELDERLY PATIENTS ON HEMODIALYSIS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lamarca

    2012-06-01

    In conclusion, sarcopenia is highly prevalent in elderly HD patients and the inflammatory profile of sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients is similar. In addition, these results show that sarcopenia does not exclude the occurrence of increased adiposity, as shown by the elevated frequency of obesity and abdominal obesity in the elderly sarcopenic group.

  1. Qualitative alteration of peripheral motor system begins prior to appearance of typical sarcopenia syndrome in middle-aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Hirata, Maki; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu

    2014-01-01

    Qualitative changes in the peripheral motor system were examined using young, adult, middle-aged, and old-aged rats in order to assess before and after the appearance of sarcopenia symptoms. Significant loss of muscle mass and strength, and slow-type fiber grouping with a loss of innervated nerve fibers were used as typical markers of sarcopenia. Dynamic twitch and tetanus tension and evoked electromyogram (EEMG) were measured via electrical stimulation through the sciatic nerve under anesthesia using our force-distance transducer system before and after sciatectomy. Digital and analog data sampling was performed and shortening and relaxing velocity of serial twitches was calculated with tension force. Muscle tenderness in passive stretching was also measured as stretch absorption ability, associated with histological quantitation of muscle connective tissues. The results indicated the validity of the present model, in which old-aged rats clearly showed the typical signs of sarcopenia, specifically in the fast-type plantaris muscles, while the slow-type soleus showed relatively mild syndromes. These observations suggest the following qualitative alterations as the pathophysiological mechanism of sarcopenia: (1) reduction of shortening and relaxing velocity of twitch; (2) decline of muscle tenderness following an increase in the connective tissue component; (3) impaired recruitment of motor units (MUs) (sudden depression of tetanic force and EEMG) in higher stimulation frequencies over 50-60 Hz; and (4) easy fatigability in the neuromuscular junctions. These findings are likely to be closely related to significant losses in fast-type MUs, muscle strength and contraction velocity, which could be a causative factor in falls in the elderly. Importantly, some of these symptoms began in middle-aged rats that showed no other signs of sarcopenia. Thus, prevention should be started in middle age that could be retained relatively higher movement ability.

  2. Qualitative alteration of peripheral motor system begins prior to appearance of typical sarcopenia syndrome in middle-aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro eTamaki

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative changes in the peripheral motor system were examined using Young, Adult, Middle-aged and Old-aged rats in order to assess before and after the appearance of sarcopenia symptoms. Significant loss of muscle mass and strength, and slow-type fiber grouping with a loss of innervated nerve fibers were used as typical markers of sarcopenia. Dynamic twitch and tetanus tension and evoked electromyogram (EEMG were measured via electrical stimulation through the sciatic nerve under anesthesia using our force-distance transducer system before and after sciatectomy. Digital and analogue data sampling was performed and shortening and relaxing velocity of serial twitches was calculated with tension force. Muscle tenderness in passive stretching was also measured as stretch absorption ability, associated with histological quantitation of muscle connective tissues. The results indicated the validity of the present model, in which Old-aged rats clearly showed the typical signs of sarcopenia, specifically in the fast-type plantaris muscles, while the slow-type soleus showed relatively mild syndromes. These observations suggest the following qualitative alterations as the pathophysiological mechanism of sarcopenia: 1 reduction of shortening and relaxing velocity of twitch; 2 decline of muscle tenderness following an increase in the connective tissue component; 3 impaired recruitment of motor units (sudden depression of tetanic force and EEMG in higher stimulation frequencies over 50-60 Hz; and 4 easy fatigability in the neuromuscular junctions. These findings are likely to be closely related to significant losses in fast-type motor units, muscle strength and contraction velocity, which could be a causative factor in falls in the elderly. Importantly, some of these symptoms began in Middle-aged rats that showed no other signs of sarcopenia. Thus, prevention should be started in middle age that could be retained relatively higher movement ability.

  3. Vitamin D Signaling in Myogenesis: Potential for Treatment of Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Wagatsuma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle mass and strength progressively decrease with age, which results in a condition known as sarcopenia. Sarcopenia would lead to physical disability, poor quality of life, and death. Therefore, much is expected of an effective intervention for sarcopenia. Epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory evidence suggest an effect of vitamin D on muscle function. However, the precise molecular and cellular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Recent studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR might be expressed in muscle fibers and vitamin D signaling via VDR plays a role in the regulation of myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Understanding how vitamin D signaling contributes to myogenesis will provide a valuable insight into an effective nutritional strategy to moderate sarcopenia. Here we will summarize the current knowledge about the effect of vitamin D on skeletal muscle and myogenic cells and discuss the potential for treatment of sarcopenia.

  4. NSAIDs may protect against age-related brain atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara B Bendlin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs in humans is associated with brain differences including decreased number of activated microglia. In animals, NSAIDs are associated with reduced microglia, decreased amyloid burden, and neuronal preservation. Several studies suggest NSAIDs protect brain regions affected in the earliest stages of AD, including hippocampal and parahippocampal regions. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the protective effect of NSAID use on gray matter volume in a group of middle-aged and older NSAID users (n = 25 compared to non-user controls (n = 50. All participants underwent neuropsychological testing and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Non-user controls showed smaller volume in portions of the left hippocampus compared to NSAID users. Age-related loss of volume differed between groups, with controls showing greater medial temporal lobe volume loss with age compared to NSAID users. These results should be considered preliminary, but support previous reports that NSAIDs may modulate age-related loss of brain volume.

  5. Soybean β-Conglycinin Prevents Age-Related Hearing Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Tanigawa

    Full Text Available Obesity-related complications are associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment. β-Conglycinin (β-CG, one of the main storage proteins in soy, offers multiple health benefits, including anti-obesity and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Here, to elucidate the potential therapeutic application of β-CG, we investigated the effect of β-CG on age-related hearing impairment. Male wild-type mice (age 6 months were randomly divided into β-CG-fed and control groups. Six months later, the body weight was significantly lower in β-CG-fed mice than in the controls. Consumption of β-CG rescued the hearing impairment observed in control mice. Cochlear blood flow also increased in β-CG-fed mice, as did the expression of eNOS in the stria vascularis (SV, which protects vasculature. β-CG consumption also ameliorated oxidative status as assessed by 4-HNE staining. In the SV, lipofuscin granules of marginal cells and vacuolar degeneration of microvascular pericytes were decreased in β-CG-fed mice, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. β-CG consumption prevented loss of spiral ganglion cells and reduced the frequencies of lipofuscin granules, nuclear invaginations, and myelin vacuolation. Our observations indicate that β-CG ameliorates age-related hearing impairment by preserving cochlear blood flow and suppressing oxidative stress.

  6. Research Advances of Whey Protein and Sarcopenia%乳清蛋白与老年肌肉衰减征研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋与刚; 杨亚丹; 李静

    2011-01-01

    Sarcopenia is the loss of muscle mass and muscle power that occurs with aging. The term sarcopenia is now often used to indicate the loss of muscle mass and function associated with chronic diseases. Exercise (both resistance and aerobic) in combination with adequate protein and energy intake is the key component of the prevention and management of sarcopenia. Whey protein plays an important role in preventing and treatmenting of sarcopenia.%肌肉衰减征(Sarcopenia)是伴随衰老而出现的一种以肌肉质明显减少、肌肉力量下降为特点的常见病征,同时伴随功能下降和多种慢性病发生.撮入充足的膳食蛋白质和能量,以及加强抗阻力运动和有氧运动是防治老年人肌肉衰减征的重要措施.乳清蛋白富含亮氨酸等支链氨基酸和谷氨酰胺,在防治老年肌肉衰减征中具有独特而重要的作用.

  7. Age-related perspectives and emotion processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynchard, Nicholas A; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2012-12-01

    Emotion is processed differently in younger and older adults. Older adults show a positivity effect, whereas younger adults show a negativity effect. Socioemotional selectivity theory suggests that these effects can be elicited in any age group when age-related perspectives are manipulated. To examine this, younger and older adults were oriented to actual and age-contrasting possible selves. Emotion activations were assessed using lexical decision. In line with socioemotional selectivity theory, shifts in emotion orientation varied according to perspective, with both younger and older adults showing a negativity effect when a younger adult perspective was taken and a positivity effect when an older adult perspective was taken.

  8. [Age-related macular degeneration (AMD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Stephan; Kurz-Levin, Malaika

    2009-03-01

    Today age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause for legal blindness in western industrialized countries. The prevalence of this disease rises with increasing age. A multifactorial pathogenesis of AMD is postulated including genetic predisposition and environmental risk factors. The most relevant modifiable risk factor is smoking. Up to today there is no cure of this chronic disease. Prophylaxis, including a healthy diet and antioxidants as nutrional supplements for selected patients, aims to slow down the disease progression. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of the neovascular form of the disease using inhibitors of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).

  9. Precursors of age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Inger Christine; Toft, Ulla; Linneberg, Allan;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate associations of very early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with daily intake of vitamin A, beta-carotene, vitamin E, vitamin C, zinc and copper and interactions with AMD-associated polymorphisms in complement factor H (CFHY402H) and ARMS2/LOC387715. METHODS: Cross......: In this cross-sectional study, a higher intake of vitamin A increased the risk of macular drusen >63 μm in subjects with CFHY402H. The study supports that vitamin A may be a risk factor for early AMD....

  10. Nutritional Considerations for Healthy Aging and Reduction in Age-Related Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlisky, Julie; Bloom, David E; Beaudreault, Amy R; Tucker, Katherine L; Keller, Heather H; Freund-Levi, Yvonne; Fielding, Roger A; Cheng, Feon W; Jensen, Gordon L; Wu, Dayong; Meydani, Simin N

    2017-01-01

    A projected doubling in the global population of people aged ≥60 y by the year 2050 has major health and economic implications, especially in developing regions. Burdens of unhealthy aging associated with chronic noncommunicable and other age-related diseases may be largely preventable with lifestyle modification, including diet. However, as adults age they become at risk of "nutritional frailty," which can compromise their ability to meet nutritional requirements at a time when specific nutrient needs may be high. This review highlights the role of nutrition science in promoting healthy aging and in improving the prognosis in cases of age-related diseases. It serves to identify key knowledge gaps and implementation challenges to support adequate nutrition for healthy aging, including applicability of metrics used in body-composition and diet adequacy for older adults and mechanisms to reduce nutritional frailty and to promote diet resilience. This review also discusses management recommendations for several leading chronic conditions common in aging populations, including cognitive decline and dementia, sarcopenia, and compromised immunity to infectious disease. The role of health systems in incorporating nutrition care routinely for those aged ≥60 y and living independently and current actions to address nutritional status before hospitalization and the development of disease are discussed. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. DIAGNÓSTICO Y PREVALENCIA DE SARCOPENIA: UN ESTUDIO INTERDISCIPLINARIO Y MULTICÉNTRICO CON ADULTOS MAYORES DE CIUDAD AUTÓNOMA DE BUENOS AIRES (CABA Y ÁREA METROPOLITANA, ARGENTINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemerovsky J

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sarcopenia is the loss of strength and muscle mass during aging, and it is a highly prevalent geriatric syndrome. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of sarcopenia in a group of elderly in the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires (Argentina, using the criteria proposed by the European Working Group on sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP. Methods: quantitative, descriptive, correlational, cross-sectional study. The sample was 82 adults, 65 and older, non-probabilistic by volunteers. Body Mass Index (BMI, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA, Muscle Mass Index (IMM (bioelectrical impedance equipment InBody 120, muscle strength (Jamar 5030J1 Integral Gerontological Rating (VGI, Depression (Test was evaluated Yesavage and protective factors for pathological aging (FAPREN were evaluated. For data analysis we used SPSS statistics 20. Results: A sample of 82 subjects divided as follows, 67 women (81.7% and 15 men (18.3% were evaluated; the average age was 75.37 ± 6.29 years. According to the criteria proposed by the EWGSOP: 55 volunteers (67.1% they had sarcopenia, 34.1% (n = 28 pre-sarcopenia, 28% (n = 23 sarcopenia and 4.9% (n = 4 severe sarcopenia. 54.5% of sarcopenic of overweight and obesity, significant relationship between IMM and BMI (p = 0.0004. No significant relationship between sarcopenia and cognitive impairment or depression was found. Conclusion: The prevalence of sarcopenia is significant in the studied sample. The travel speed, Rise and Walk Test and Barthel showed little functional impact on sarcopenic volunteers. Sarcopenic showed that obesity is significant in the studied sample.

  12. Risk factors for age-related maculopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connell, Paul P

    2012-02-01

    Age-related maculopathy (ARM) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Although beneficial therapeutic strategies have recently begun to emerge, much remains unclear regarding the etiopathogenesis of this disorder. Epidemiologic studies have enhanced our understanding of ARM, but the data, often conflicting, has led to difficulties with drawing firm conclusions with respect to risk for this condition. As a consequence, we saw a need to assimilate the published findings with respect to risk factors for ARM, through a review of the literature appraising results from published cross-sectional studies, prospective cohort studies, case series, and case control studies investigating risk for this condition. Our review shows that, to date, and across a spectrum of epidemiologic study designs, only age, cigarette smoking, and family history of ARM have been consistently demonstrated to represent risk for this condition. In addition, genetic studies have recently implicated many genes in the pathogenesis of age-related maculopathy, including Complement Factor H, PLEKHA 1, and LOC387715\\/HTRA1, demonstrating that environmental and genetic factors are important for the development of ARM suggesting that gene-environment interaction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition.

  13. Preventing depression in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovner, Barry W; Casten, Robin J; Hegel, Mark T; Leiby, Benjamin E; Tasman, William S

    2007-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a prevalent disease of aging that may cause irreversible vision loss, disability, and depression. The latter is rarely recognized or treated in ophthalmologic settings. To determine whether problem-solving treatment can prevent depressive disorders in patients with recent vision loss. Randomized, controlled trial. Outpatient ophthalmology offices in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Two hundred six patients aged 65 years or older with recent diagnoses of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in one eye and pre-existing age-related macular degeneration in the fellow eye. Patients were randomly assigned to problem-solving treatment (n = 105) or usual care (n = 101). Problem-solving treatment therapists delivered 6 sessions during 8 weeks in subjects' homes. Outcomes were assessed at 2 months for short-term effects and 6 months for maintenance effects. These included DSM-IV-defined diagnoses of depressive disorders, National Eye Institute Vision Function Questionnaire-17 scores, and rates of relinquishing valued activities. The 2-month incidence rate of depressive disorders in problem-solving-treated subjects was significantly lower than controls (11.6% vs 23.2%, respectively; odds ratio, 0.39; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.92; P = .03). Problem-solving treatment also reduced the odds of relinquishing a valued activity (odds ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.96; P = .04). This effect mediated the relationship between treatment group and depression. By 6 months, most earlier observed benefits had diminished, though problem-solving treatment subjects were less likely to suffer persistent depression (chi2(1,3) = 8.46; P = .04). Problem-solving treatment prevented depressive disorders and loss of valued activities in patients with age-related macular degeneration as a short-term treatment, but these benefits were not maintained over time. Booster or rescue treatments may be necessary to sustain problem-solving treatment

  14. The diagnosis and therapy of sarcopenia%肌肉减少症的诊断及治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢艳敏; 陈强谱

    2014-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a complex syndrome that is characterized by the loss of muscle mass and function. It has been demonstrated that sarcopenia, which was initially thought that occurs with aging, is critically associated with malnutrition and a variety of clinical conditions. However, the etiological factor, diagnosis and therapy underlying sarcopenia still remain unclear. The aim of this review was to summarise the current understanding of sarcopenia.%肌肉减少症是以骨骼肌质量减少及其功能减退为主要特点的一个复杂的综合征,已有研究证实,肌肉减少症除了发生在老年人外,还与营养不良及很多临床疾病相关。目前对肌肉减少症的研究还处于初期探索阶段,其发病原因及诊疗仍不十分清楚,本文将就目前肌肉减少症的研究进展作一综述。

  15. Sarcopenia in COPD: relationship with COPD severity and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Munhoz da Rocha Lemos Costa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of sarcopenia in COPD patients, as well as to determine whether sarcopenia correlates with the severity and prognosis of COPD. Methods: A cross-sectional study with COPD patients followed at the pulmonary outpatient clinic of our institution. The patients underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The diagnosis of sarcopenia was made on the basis of the skeletal muscle index, defined as appendicular lean mass/height2 only for low-weight subjects and adjusted for fat mass in normal/overweight subjects. Disease severity (COPD stage was evaluated with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD criteria. The degree of obstruction and prognosis were determined by the Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise capacity (BODE index. Results: We recruited 91 patients (50 females, with a mean age of 67.4 ± 8.7 years and a mean BMI of 25.8 ± 6.1 kg/m2. Sarcopenia was observed in 36 (39.6% of the patients, with no differences related to gender, age, or smoking status. Sarcopenia was not associated with the GOLD stage or with FEV1 (used as an indicator of the degree of obstruction. The BMI, percentage of body fat, and total lean mass were lower in the patients with sarcopenia than in those without (p < 0.001. Sarcopenia was more prevalent among the patients in BODE quartile 3 or 4 than among those in BODE quartile 1 or 2 (p = 0.009. The multivariate analysis showed that the BODE quartile was significantly associated with sarcopenia, regardless of age, gender, smoking status, and GOLD stage. Conclusions: In COPD patients, sarcopenia appears to be associated with unfavorable changes in body composition and with a poor prognosis.

  16. Sarcopenia in COPD: relationship with COPD severity and prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Tatiana Munhoz da Rocha Lemos; Costa, Fabio Marcelo; Moreira, Carolina Aguiar; Rabelo, Leda Maria; Boguszewski, César Luiz; Borba, Victória Zeghbi Cochenski

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of sarcopenia in COPD patients, as well as to determine whether sarcopenia correlates with the severity and prognosis of COPD. Methods: A cross-sectional study with COPD patients followed at the pulmonary outpatient clinic of our institution. The patients underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The diagnosis of sarcopenia was made on the basis of the skeletal muscle index, defined as appendicular lean mass/height2 only for low-weight subjects and adjusted for fat mass in normal/overweight subjects. Disease severity (COPD stage) was evaluated with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. The degree of obstruction and prognosis were determined by the Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, and Exercise capacity (BODE) index. Results: We recruited 91 patients (50 females), with a mean age of 67.4 ± 8.7 years and a mean BMI of 25.8 ± 6.1 kg/m2. Sarcopenia was observed in 36 (39.6%) of the patients, with no differences related to gender, age, or smoking status. Sarcopenia was not associated with the GOLD stage or with FEV1 (used as an indicator of the degree of obstruction). The BMI, percentage of body fat, and total lean mass were lower in the patients with sarcopenia than in those without (p < 0.001). Sarcopenia was more prevalent among the patients in BODE quartile 3 or 4 than among those in BODE quartile 1 or 2 (p = 0.009). The multivariate analysis showed that the BODE quartile was significantly associated with sarcopenia, regardless of age, gender, smoking status, and GOLD stage. Conclusions: In COPD patients, sarcopenia appears to be associated with unfavorable changes in body composition and with a poor prognosis. PMID:26578132

  17. [Treatment options for age-related infertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2010-06-20

    There has been a consistent trend towards delayed childbearing in most Western countries. Treatment options for age-related infertility includes controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). A sharp decline in pregnancy rate with advancing female age is noted with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) including IVF. Evaluation and treatment of infertility should not be delayed in women 35 years and older. No treatment other than oocyte donation has been shown to be effective for women over 40 and for those with compromised ovarian reserve, but its pratice is not easy in France hence the procreative tourism. As an increasing number of couples choose to postpone childbearing, they should be informed that maternal age is an important risk factor for failure to conceive.

  18. Prevalence of sarcopenia in community-dwelling older people in the UK using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) definition: findings from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Harnish P; Syddall, Holly Emma; Jameson, Karen; Robinson, Sian; Denison, Hayley; Roberts, Helen C; Edwards, Mark; Dennison, Elaine; Cooper, Cyrus; Aihie Sayer, Avan

    2013-01-01

    sarcopenia is associated with adverse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of sarcopenia in community-dwelling older people in the UK using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP...

  19. The beneficial effects of taurine to counteract sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicchitano, Bianca M; Sica, Gigliola

    2016-11-22

    Aging is a multifactorial process characterized by several features including low-grade inflammation, increased oxidative stress and reduced regenerative capacity, which ultimately lead to alteration in morpho-functional properties of skeletal muscle, thus promoting sarcopenia. This condition is characterized by a gradual loss of muscle mass due to an unbalance between protein synthesis and degradation, finally conveying in functional decline and disability. The development of specific therapeutic approaches able to block or reverse this condition may represent an invaluable tool for the promotion of a healthy aging among elderly. It is well established that changes in the quantity and the quality of dietary proteins, as well as the intake of specific amino acids, are able to counteract some of the physiopathological processes related to the progression of the loss of muscle mass and may have beneficial effects in improving the anabolic response of muscle in the elderly. Taurine is a non-essential amino acid expressed in high concentration in several mammalian tissues and particularly in skeletal muscle where it is involved in the modulation of intracellular calcium concentration and ion channel regulation and where it also acts as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory factor. The aim of this review is to summarize the pleiotropic effects of taurine on specific muscle targets and to discuss its role in regulating signaling pathways involved in the maintenance of muscle homeostasis. We also highlight the potential use of taurine as a therapeutic molecule for the amelioration of skeletal muscle function and performance severely compromised during aging.

  20. A phase IIA randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial to study the efficacy and safety of the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM), MK-0773 in female participants with sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, D A; Ather, S N; Zhu, H; Zhou, Y; Lutkiewicz, J; Scott, B B; Chandler, J

    2013-01-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass [defined as appendicular LBM/Height2 (aLBM/ht2) below peak value by>1SD], strength and function, is a major contributing factor to frailty in the elderly. MK-0773 is a selective androgen receptor modulator designed to improve muscle function while minimizing effects on other tissues. The primary objective of this study was to demonstrate an improvement in muscle strength and lean body mass (LBM) in sarcopenic frail elderly women treated with MK-0773 relative to placebo. This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-arm, placebo-controlled, multicenter, 6-month study. Participants were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive either MK-0773 50mg b.i.d. or placebo; all participants received Vitamin D and protein supplementation. General community. 170 Women aged ≥65 with sarcopenia and moderate physical dysfunction. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, muscle strength and power, physical performance measures. Participants receiving MK-0773 showed a statistically significant increase in LBM from baseline at Month 6 vs. placebo (p<0.001). Participants receiving both MK-0773 and placebo showed a statistically significant increase in strength from baseline to Month 6, but the mean difference between the two groups was not significant (p=0.269). Both groups showed significant improvement from baseline at Month 6 in physical performance measures, but there were no statistically significant differences between participants receiving MK-0773 and placebo. A greater number of participants experienced elevated transaminases in the MK-0773 group vs. placebo, which resolved after discontinuation of study therapy. MK-0773 was generally well-tolerated with no evidence of androgenization. The MK-0773-induced increase in LBM did not translate to improvement in strength or function vs. placebo. The improvement of strength and physical function in the placebo group could be at least partly attributed to protein and vitamin D supplementation.

  1. Age-Related Factors That Influence Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be found at the NICHD Pregnancy Loss topic page . Committee on Gynecologic Practice of American College of ... 2012, from http://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/pregnancyloss/researchinfo/Pages/default.aspx [top] « Lifestyle Factors That Influence Fertility ...

  2. Innate immunity and inflammation in ageing: a key for understanding age-related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colonna-Romano Giuseppina

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The process of maintaining life for the individual is a constant struggle to preserve his/her integrity. This can come at a price when immunity is involved, namely systemic inflammation. Inflammation is not per se a negative phenomenon: it is the response of the immune system to the invasion of viruses or bacteria and other pathogens. During evolution the human organism was set to live 40 or 50 years; today, however, the immune system must remain active for much a longer time. This very long activity leads to a chronic inflammation that slowly but inexorably damages one or several organs: this is a typical phenomenon linked to ageing and it is considered the major risk factor for age-related chronic diseases. Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes and even sarcopenia and cancer, just to mention a few – have an important inflammatory component, though disease progression seems also dependent on the genetic background of individuals. Emerging evidence suggests that pro-inflammatory genotypes are related to unsuccessful ageing, and, reciprocally, controlling inflammatory status may allow a better chance of successful ageing. In other words, age-related diseases are "the price we pay" for a life-long active immune system: this system has also the potential to harm us later, as its fine tuning becomes compromised. Our immune system has evolved to control pathogens, so pro-inflammatory responses are likely to be evolutionarily programmed to resist fatal infections with pathogens aggressively. Thus, inflammatory genotypes are an important and necessary part of the normal host responses to pathogens in early life, but the overproduction of inflammatory molecules might also cause immune-related inflammatory diseases and eventually death later. Therefore, low responder genotypes involved in regulation of innate defence mechanisms, might better control inflammatory responses and age-related disease development, resulting in an increased

  3. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damico, Francisco Max; Gasparin, Fabio; Scolari, Mariana Ramos; Pedral, Lycia Sampaio; Takahashi, Beatriz Sayuri

    2012-01-01

    Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and geographic atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification) and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  4. Inflammation and its role in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Anu; Paterno, Jussi J; Blasiak, Janusz; Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation is a cellular response to factors that challenge the homeostasis of cells and tissues. Cell-associated and soluble pattern-recognition receptors, e.g. Toll-like receptors, inflammasome receptors, and complement components initiate complex cellular cascades by recognizing or sensing different pathogen and damage-associated molecular patterns, respectively. Cytokines and chemokines represent alarm messages for leukocytes and once activated, these cells travel long distances to targeted inflamed tissues. Although it is a crucial survival mechanism, prolonged inflammation is detrimental and participates in numerous chronic age-related diseases. This article will review the onset of inflammation and link its functions to the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of severe vision loss in aged individuals in the developed countries. In this progressive disease, degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) results in the death of photoreceptors, leading to a loss of central vision. The RPE is prone to oxidative stress, a factor that together with deteriorating functionality, e.g. decreased intracellular recycling and degradation due to attenuated heterophagy/autophagy, induces inflammation. In the early phases, accumulation of intracellular lipofuscin in the RPE and extracellular drusen between RPE cells and Bruch's membrane can be clinically detected. Subsequently, in dry (atrophic) AMD there is geographic atrophy with discrete areas of RPE loss whereas in the wet (exudative) form there is neovascularization penetrating from the choroid to retinal layers. Elevations in levels of local and systemic biomarkers indicate that chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of both disease forms.

  5. Adherence to a standardized protocol for measuring grip strength and appropriate cut-off values in adults over 65 years with sarcopenia: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Benjamin; Henwood, Tim; Schaap, Laura; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Beaudart, Charlotte; Buckinx, Fanny; Roberts, Helen; Cooper, Cyrus; Cherubini, Antonio; dellʼAquilla, Giuseppina; Maggio, Marcello; Volpato, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this review is to examine the use of grip strength analysis in well and unwell populations in adults 65 years and over as a tool to establish muscle strength in sarcopenia.More specifically, the main review question is:1. What protocol, if any, is most commonly used among older adults with sarcopenia and does this match the standardized protocol suggested in 2011 by Roberts et al.1?Secondary review questions are:2. What are the reported cut-off values being used to determine sarcopenia in older adults, with consideration for ethnic and gender variability?3. Is grip strength, as a tool to measure muscle strength, suitable for people with common comorbidities and geriatric syndromes, such as osteoarthritis, often associated with sarcopenia? Sarcopenia, a commonly used concept in geriatrics and gerontology, is characterized by a loss of muscle mass, muscle strength and/or physical functioning. Prevalence rates vary between 1-39% in community dwelling older populations and 14-33% in long-term care populations. Several epidemiological studies have shown the association of sarcopenia with adverse health outcomes such as falls, disability, hospitalization and mortality. Originally, sarcopenia refers to the loss of muscle mass with aging, which was later complemented with loss of muscle strength and physical functioning.In 2010, the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) reported a consensus definition of sarcopenia, which included measurement of low muscle mass and low muscle function (strength or physical performance). This consensus definition can be used to identify sarcopenia patients in clinical practice and to select individuals for clinical trials. Well-designed clinical trials could ultimately lead to effective treatment and prevention strategies for sarcopenia. Since the publication of the consensus report, many studies have adopted this definition, which could potentially lead to better comparison of results between

  6. Neuron specific reduction in CuZnSOD is not sufficient to initiate a full sarcopenia phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavithalakshmi Sataranatarajan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that adult (8 month mice lacking CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, Sod1KO mice have neuromuscular changes resulting in dramatic accelerated muscle atrophy and weakness that mimics age-related sarcopenia. We have further shown that loss of CuZnSOD targeted to skeletal muscle alone results in only mild weakness and no muscle atrophy. In this study, we targeted deletion of CuZnSOD specifically to neurons (nSod1KO mice and determined the effect on muscle mass and weakness. The nSod1KO mice show a significant loss of CuZnSOD activity and protein level in brain and spinal cord but not in muscle tissue. The masses of the gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles were not reduced in nSod1KO compared to wild type mice, even at 20 months of age, although the quadriceps and soleus muscles showed small but statistically significant reductions in mass in the nSod1KO mice. Maximum isometric specific force was reduced by 8–10% in the gastrocnemius and EDL muscle of nSod1KO mice, while soleus was not affected. Muscle mitochondrial ROS generation and oxidative stress measured by levels of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (RONS regulatory enzymes, protein nitration and F2-isoprostane levels were not increased in muscle from the nSod1KO mice. Although we did not find evidence of denervation in the nSod1KO mice, neuromuscular junction morphology was altered and the expression of genes associated with denervation acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha (AChRα, the transcription factor, Runx1 and GADD45α was increased, supporting a role for neuronal loss of CuZnSOD initiating alterations at the neuromuscular junction. These results and our previous studies support the concept that CuZnSOD deficits in either the motor neuron or muscle alone are not sufficient to initiate a full sarcopenic phenotype and that deficits in both tissues are required to recapitulate the loss of muscle observed in Sod1KO mice.

  7. Dehydroepiandrosterone and age-related cognitive decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorwell, Krystina G; Urbanski, Henryk F

    2010-03-01

    In humans the circulating concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) decrease markedly during aging, and have been implicated in age-associated cognitive decline. This has led to the hypothesis that DHEA supplementation during aging may improve memory. In rodents, a cognitive anti-aging effect of DHEA and DHEAS has been observed but it is unclear whether this effect is mediated indirectly through conversion of these steroids to estradiol. Moreover, despite the demonstration of correlations between endogenous DHEA concentrations and cognitive ability in certain human patient populations, such correlations have yet to be convincingly demonstrated during normal human aging. This review highlights important differences between rodents and primates in terms of their circulating DHEA and DHEAS concentrations, and suggests that age-related changes within the human DHEA metabolic pathway may contribute to the relative inefficacy of DHEA replacement therapies in humans. The review also highlights the value of using nonhuman primates as a pragmatic animal model for testing the therapeutic potential of DHEA for age-associate cognitive decline in humans.

  8. Raspberry supplementation alleviates age-related motor dysfunction in select populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Age-related declines in balance, muscle strength and coordination often lead to a higher incidence of falling. Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of distress, pain, injury, loss of confidence, and ultimately, loss of independence and death. Previous studies in our laboratory have demons...

  9. Vision Loss, Sudden

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of age-related macular degeneration. Spotlight on Aging: Vision Loss in Older People Most commonly, vision loss ... Some Causes and Features of Sudden Loss of Vision Cause Common Features* Tests Sudden loss of vision ...

  10. Diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia relate differently to insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bijlsma, A. Y.; Meskers, C. G. M.; van Heemst, D.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; de Craen, A. J. M.; Maier, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is important in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Sarcopenia is, therefore, a possible risk factor for insulin resistance. Currently, different diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia include low muscle mass, muscle strength, and walking speed. We assessed these muscle characteristics in relation to insulin resistance in nondiabetics. This cross-sectional study included 301 nondiabetics, mean age 65.9 years. Area under curve (AUC) calculations of insulin and glucose from a 2-h ora...

  11. Exploring age-related brain degeneration in meditation practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luders, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of research suggests that meditation practices are associated with substantial psychological as well as physiological benefits. In searching for the biological mechanisms underlying the beneficial impact of meditation, studies have revealed practice-induced alterations of neurotransmitters, brain activity, and cognitive abilities, just to name a few. These findings not only imply a close link between meditation and brain structure, but also suggest possible modulating effects of meditation on age-related brain atrophy. Given that normal aging is associated with significant loss of brain tissue, meditation-induced growth and/or preservation might manifest as a seemingly reduced brain age in meditators (i.e., cerebral measures characteristic of younger brains). Surprisingly, there are only three published studies that have addressed the question of whether meditation diminishes age-related brain degeneration. This paper reviews these three studies with respect to the brain attributes studied, the analytical strategies applied, and the findings revealed. The review concludes with an elaborate discussion on the significance of existing studies, implications and directions for future studies, as well as the overall relevance of this field of research.

  12. Relationship between Aging-Related Skin Dryness and Aquaporins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutomo Ikarashi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin function deteriorates with aging, and the dermal water content decreases. In this study, we have analyzed the mechanism of aging-related skin dryness focusing on aquaporins (AQPs, which are the water channels. Mice aged 3 and 20 months were designated as young and aged mice, respectively, to be used in the experiments. No differences were observed in transepidermal water loss between the young mice and aged mice. However, the dermal water content in aged mice was significantly lower than that in young mice, thus showing skin dryness. The expression of AQP1, AQP3, AQP4, AQP7, and AQP9 was observed in the skin. All the mRNA expression levels of these AQPs were significantly lower in aged mice. For AQP3, which was expressed dominantly in the skin, the protein level was lower in aged mice than in young mice. The results of the study showed that the expression level of AQPs in the skin decreased with aging, suggesting the possibility that this was one of the causes of skin dryness. New targets for the prevention and treatment of aging-related skin dryness are expected to be proposed when the substance that increases the expression of AQP3 is found.

  13. Age-related vascular gene expression profiling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammos, Christos; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Deenen, Rene; Pohl, Julia; Stock, Pia; Hinzmann, Christian; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    Increasing age involves a number of detrimental changes in the cardiovascular system and particularly on the large arteries. It deteriorates vascular integrity and leads to increased vascular stiffness entailing hypertension with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The consequences of continuous oxidative stress and damages to biomolecules include altered gene expression, genomic instability, mutations, loss of cell division and cellular responses to increased stress. Many studies have been performed in aged C57BL/6 mice; however, analyses of the age-related changes that occur at a gene expression level and transcriptional profile in vascular tissue have not been elucidated in depth. To determine the changes of the vascular transcriptome, we conducted gene expression microarray experiments on aortas of adult and old mice, in which age-related vascular dysfunction was confirmed by increased stiffness and associated systolic hypertension. Our results highlight differentially expressed genes overrepresented in Gene Ontology categories. Molecular interaction and reaction pathways involved in vascular functions and disease, within the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway, the renin-angiotensin system and the detoxification systems are displayed. Our results provide insight to an altered gene expression profile related to age, thus offering useful clues to counteract or prevent vascular aging and its detrimental consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim Taskintuna; M.E. A. Abdalla Elsayed; Patrik Schatz

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age.related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age.Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniatu...

  15. Inflammation and sarcopenia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Giulia; Trevisan, Caterina; Carraro, Sara; Solmi, Marco; Luchini, Claudio; Stubbs, Brendon; Manzato, Enzo; Sergi, Giuseppe; Veronese, Nicola

    2017-02-01

    Inflammatory cytokines have been shown to prompt muscle wasting, ultimately stimulating protein catabolism and suppressing muscle synthesis. However, the possible association between inflammatory parameters and sarcopenia is poorly understood. We therefore aimed to summarize the current evidence about this topic with a meta-analysis of studies reporting serum inflammatory parameters in patients with sarcopenia vs. people without sarcopenia (controls). An electronic PubMed and Scopus search through to 09/01/2016 and meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies comparing serum levels of inflammatory cytokines between patients with sarcopenia and controls was made, calculating random-effects standardized mean differences (SMDs) ±95% confidence intervals (CIs) as the effect size. Out of 1370 initial hits, 17 studies with a total of 11249 participants (3072 with sarcopenia and 8177 without) were meta-analyzed. Sarcopenic participants had significantly higher levels of CRP (SMD=0.51; 95%CI 0.26, 0.77; psarcopenia versus controls. Sarcopenic people did not have higher levels of TNF-α than controls (SMD=0.28; 95%CI -0.26, 0.83; p=0.31; I(2)=97%). In conclusion, sarcopenia seems to be associated with elevated serum CRP levels; future longitudinal studies are needed to clarify this relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Age-related differences in walking stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Hylton B; Lord, Stephen R; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2003-03-01

    a large proportion of falls in older people occur when walking; however the mechanisms underlying impaired balance during gait are poorly understood. to evaluate acceleration patterns at the head and pelvis in young and older subjects when walking on a level and an irregular walking surface, in order to develop an understanding of how ageing affects postural responses to challenging walking conditions. temporo-spatial gait parameters and variables derived from acceleration signals were recorded in 30 young people aged 22-39 years (mean 29.0, SD 4.3), and 30 older people with a low risk of falling aged 75-85 years (mean 79.0, SD 3.0) while walking on a level and an irregular walking surface. Subjects also underwent tests of vision, sensation, strength, reaction time and balance. older subjects exhibited a more conservative gait pattern, characterised by reduced velocity, shorter step length and increased step timing variability. These differences were particularly pronounced when walking on the irregular surface. The magnitude of accelerations at the head and pelvis were generally smaller in older subjects; however the smoothness of the acceleration signals did not differ between the two groups. Older subjects performed worse on tests of vision, peripheral sensation, strength, reaction time and balance. the adoption of a more conservative basic gait pattern by older people with a low risk of falling reduces the magnitude of accelerations experienced by the head and pelvis when walking, which is likely to be a compensatory strategy to maintain balance in the presence of age-related deficits in physiological function, particularly reduced lower limb strength.

  17. Nut consumption and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosso, G; Estruch, R

    2016-02-01

    Current knowledge on the effects of nut consumption on human health has rapidly increased in recent years and it now appears that nuts may play a role in the prevention of chronic age-related diseases. Frequent nut consumption has been associated with better metabolic status, decreased body weight as well as lower body weight gain over time and thus reduce the risk of obesity. The effect of nuts on glucose metabolism, blood lipids, and blood pressure is still controversial. However, significant decreased cardiovascular risk has been reported in a number of observational and clinical intervention studies. Thus, findings from cohort studies show that increased nut consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality (especially that due to cardiovascular-related causes). Similarly, nut consumption has been also associated with reduced risk of certain cancers, such as colorectal, endometrial, and pancreatic neoplasms. Evidence regarding nut consumption and neurological or psychiatric disorders is scarce, but a number of studies suggest significant protective effects against depression, mild cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's disease. The underlying mechanisms appear to include antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions, particularly related to their mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and PUFA, as well as vitamin and polyphenol content). MUFA have been demonstrated to improve pancreatic beta-cell function and regulation of postprandial glycemia and insulin sensitivity. PUFA may act on the central nervous system protecting neuronal and cell-signaling function and maintenance. The fiber and mineral content of nuts may also confer health benefits. Nuts therefore show promise as useful adjuvants to prevent, delay or ameliorate a number of chronic conditions in older people. Their association with decreased mortality suggests a potential in reducing disease burden, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and cognitive impairments.

  18. Impact of different sarcopenia stages on the postoperative outcomes after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Dong; Zhou, Chong-Jun; Wang, Su-Lin; Mao, Shu-Ting; Zhou, Xuan-You; Lou, Neng; Zhang, Zhao; Yu, Zhen; Shen, Xian; Zhuang, Cheng-Le

    2017-03-01

    The association between sarcopenia and postoperative outcomes has been well reported. However, the impact of different sarcopenia stages on postoperative outcomes has never been investigated. We conducted a large, prospective study of patients who underwent radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer from August 2014 to December 2015. Sarcopenia was staged as "presarcopenia," "sarcopenia," and "severe sarcopenia" according to the definition of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluating the risk factors for total, surgical, and medical complications were performed. A total of 470 patients were included, in which 20.6%, 10%, and 6.8% of the patients were identified as having "presarcopenia," "sarcopenia," and "severe sarcopenia," respectively. Postoperative complications, duration of hospital stays, and costs increased with advancing sarcopenia stages. Severe sarcopenia, visceral fat area to total abdominal muscle area ratio, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade III, and tumor located at the cardia were independent risk factors for total complications. Visceral fat area to total abdominal muscle area ratio and tumor located at the cardia were independent risk factors for operative complications. Presarcopenia, sarcopenia, and severe sarcopenia were all identified as independent risk factors for medical complications, as well as age ≥75 years and Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients had worse postoperative outcomes after gastric cancer operation with advancing sarcopenia stages. Severe sarcopenia, but not presarcopenia or sarcopenia, was an independent risk factor for total postoperative complications. The 3 sarcopenia stages independently influence medical but not surgical complications. Recognizing sarcopenia stages is important for preoperative risk stratification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sarcopenia%肌肉减少症

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉斐; 余红兰; 石汉平

    2011-01-01

    @@ 骨骼肌是机体的蛋白质库,机体60%的蛋白质都以各种形式储存在骨骼肌内.肌肉减少症(Sarcopenia)最早由Evans WJ和Rosenberg IR于1991年提出,形容骨骼肌减少,同时泛指骨骼肌细胞去神经支配、线粒体功能障碍、炎性、激素合成及分泌改变以及由以上过程引发的一系列后果,如肌力下降、易疲劳、代谢紊乱、骨折等[1-2].

  20. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Vestibular Nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSmith

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that the normal aging process is associated with impaired vestibulo-ocular (VOR and vestibulo-spinal reflexes, causing reduced visual acuity and postural instability. Nonetheless, the available evidence is not entirely consistent, especially with respect to the VOR. Some recent studies have reported that VOR gain can be intact even above 80 years of age. Similarly, although there is evidence for age-related hair cell loss and neuronal loss in Scarpa’s ganglion and the vestibular nucleus complex (VNC, it is not entirely consistent. Whatever structural and functional changes occur in the VNC as a result of aging, either to cause vestibular impairment or to compensate for it, neurochemical changes must underlie them. However, the neurochemical changes that occur in the VNC with aging are poorly understood because the available literature is very limited. This review summarises and critically evaluates the available evidence relating to the noradrenaline, serotonin, dopamine, glutamate, GABA, glycine, and nitric oxide neurotransmitter systems in the aging VNC. It is concluded that, at present, it is difficult, if not impossible, to relate the neurochemical changes observed to the function of specific VNC neurons and whether the observed changes are the cause of a functional deficit in the VNC or an effect of it. A better understanding of the neurochemical changes that occur during aging may be important for the development of potential drug treatments for age-related vestibular disorders. However, this will require the use of more sophisticated methodology such as in vivo microdialysis with single neuron recording and perhaps new technologies such as optogenetics.

  1. Nitroxide pharmaceutical development for age-related degeneration and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarling, Jacob A; Brunt, Vienna E; Vallerga, Anne K; Li, Weixing; Tao, Albert; Zarling, David A; Minson, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    Nitroxide small molecule agents are in development as preventative or therapeutic pharmaceutical drugs for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cardiovascular disease, which are two major diseases of aging. These aging diseases are associated with patient genetics, smoking, diet, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammation. Nitroxide drugs preventing aging-, smoking-, high sugar or high fat diet-, or radiation- and other environmental-induced pathophysiological conditions in aging disease are reviewed. Tempol (TP), Tempol Hydroxylamine (TP-H), and TP-H prodrug (OT-551) are evaluated in (1) non-smokers versus smokers with cutaneous microvascular dysfunction, rapidly reversed by cutaneous TP; (2) elderly cancer patients at risk for radiation-induced skin burns or hair loss, prevented by topical TP; and (3) elderly smoker or non-smoker AMD patients at risk for vision loss, prevented by daily eye drops of OT-551. The human data indicates safety and efficacy for these nitroxide drugs. Both TP and TP-H topically penetrate and function in skin or mucosa, protecting and treating radiation burns and hair loss or smoking-induced cutaneous vascular dysfunction. TP and TP-H do not penetrate the cornea, while OT-551 does effectively penetrate and travels to the back of the eye, preserving visual acuity and preserving normal and low light luminance in dry AMD smokers and non-smoker patients. Topical, oral, or injectable drug formulations are discussed.

  2. PHARMACOLOGICAL INTERVENTIONS IN FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA: REPORT BY THE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FRAILTY AND SARCOPENIA RESEARCH TASK FORCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, M.; Fielding, R.; Bénichou, O.; Bernabei, R.; Bhasin, S.; Guralnik, J.M.; Jette, A.; Landi, F.; Pahor, M.; Rodriguez-Manas, L.; Rolland, Y.; Roubenoff, R.; Sinclair, A.J.; Studenski, S.; Travison, T.; Vellas, B.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia and frailty often co-exist and both have physical function impairment as a core component. Yet despite the urgency of the problem, the development of pharmaceutical therapies for sarcopenia and frailty has lagged, in part because of the lack of consensus definitions for the two conditions. A task force of clinical and basic researchers, leaders from the pharmaceutical and nutritional industries, and representatives from non-profit organizations was established in 2012 with the aim of addressing specific issues affecting research and clinical activities on frailty and sarcopenia. The task force came together on April 22, 2015 in Boston, Massachusetts, prior to the International Conference on Frailty and Sarcopenia Research (ICFSR). The theme of this meeting was to discuss challenges related to drugs designed to target the biology of frailty and sarcopenia as well as more general questions about designing efficient drug trials for these conditions. The present article reports the results of the task force’s deliberations based on available evidence and preliminary results of ongoing activities. Overall, the lack of a consensus definition for sarcopenia and frailty was felt as still present and severely limiting advancements in the field. However, agreement appears to be emerging that low mass alone provides insufficient clinical relevance if not combined with muscle weakness and/or functional impairment. In the next future, it will be important to build consensus on clinically meaningful functional outcomes and test/validate them in long-term observational studies. PMID:26366378

  3. Relationship of sarcopenia and body composition with osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, H; Liu, Y; Tian, Q; Papasian, C J; Hu, T; Deng, H-W

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the relationship between sarcopenia and body composition and osteoporosis in cohorts of three different races with a total of 17,891 subjects. Lean mass and grip strength were positively associated with bone mineral densities (BMDs). Subjects with sarcopenia were two times more likely to have osteoporosis compared with normal subjects. The relationship between sarcopenia and osteoporosis is not totally clear. First, the present study assessed this relationship by using two different definitions for sarcopenia. Second, we examined the associations of body composition (including muscle mass as a major and important component) and muscle strength on regional and whole-body BMDs. In total, 17,891 subjects of African American, Caucasian, and Chinese ethnicities were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined by relative appendicular skeletal muscle mass (RASM) cut points and also by the definition of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (low RASM plus low muscle function). Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine the association of fat mass, lean mass (including muscle mass), and grip strength with regional and whole-body BMDs. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to explore the association between sarcopenia and osteopenia/osteoporosis. BMDs were positively associated with lean mass and negatively associated with fat mass, after controlling for potential confounders. Grip strength was significantly associated with higher BMDs. Each standard deviation (SD) increase in RASM resulted in a ~37 % reduction in risk of osteopenia/osteoporosis (odds ratio (OR) = 0.63; 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 0.59, 0.66). Subjects with sarcopenia defined by RASM were two times more likely to have osteopenia/osteoporosis compared with the normal subjects (OR = 2.04; 95 % CI = 1.61, 2.60). Similarly, subjects with sarcopenia (low muscle mass and low grip strength) were ~1.8 times more

  4. Sarcopenia predicts postoperative infection in patients undergoing hepato-biliary-pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosei Takagi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Sarcopenia is an independent preoperative predictor of infection after BILI surgery. Earlier diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for patients with sarcopenia could be useful in the development of comprehensive approaches for perioperative care.

  5. Rehabilitation nutrition for sarcopenia with disability: a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management

    OpenAIRE

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Sakuma, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition and sarcopenia often occur in rehabilitation settings. The prevalence of malnutrition and sarcopenia in older patients undergoing rehabilitation is 49–67 % and 40–46.5 %, respectively. Malnutrition and sarcopenia are associated with poorer rehabilitation outcome and physical function. Therefore, a combination of both rehabilitation and nutrition care management may improve outcome in disabled elderly with malnutrition and sarcopenia. The concept of rehabilitation nutrition as a c...

  6. Insulinotropic and Muscle Protein Synthetic Effects of Branched-Chain Amino Acids: Potential Therapy for Type 2 Diabetes and Sarcopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren G. Candow

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The loss of muscle mass and strength with aging (i.e., sarcopenia has a negative effect on functional independence and overall quality of life. One main contributing factor to sarcopenia is the reduced ability to increase skeletal muscle protein synthesis in response to habitual feeding, possibly due to a reduction in postprandial insulin release and an increase in insulin resistance. Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA, primarily leucine, increases the activation of pathways involved in muscle protein synthesis through insulin-dependent and independent mechanisms, which may help counteract the “anabolic resistance” to feeding in older adults. Leucine exhibits strong insulinotropic characteristics, which may increase amino acid availability for muscle protein synthesis, reduce muscle protein breakdown, and enhance glucose disposal to help maintain blood glucose homeostasis.

  7. Sarcopenia and Sarcopenic Obesity in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Han, Jun; Jin, Dong San; Suh, Hyunseok; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Won, Ye-Yeon

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity among patients who underwent orthopedic surgery (OS). A total of 222 patients were reviewed immediately after or prior to OS. In the control group, 364 patients from outpatient departments (OPDs) who did not have any OS were enrolled. Whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was used to analyze body composition. Skeletal muscle mass was adjusted for height squared, total body weight, and height and fat mass (residuals). Obesity was defined as body mass index (BMI) > 25.0 kg/m(2). The prevalence of sarcopenia in the OS group was 25.7%, 44.1%, and 26.6%, respectively, according to the 3 different criteria. The prevalence was significantly lower in the OPD group (6.0%, 33.1%, and 14.8%, respectively). The highest rates of sarcopenia with height-adjusted definition were seen in patients with a femoral neck fracture. In the multivariate analysis, factors associated with sarcopenia were male gender, older age, and lower BMI (odds ratio [OR]: 28.38, 1.03, and 1.83, respectively) when muscle mass was adjusted for height, whereas male gender, older age, and higher BMI were associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.04, 2.57, and 1.83, respectively) when adjusted for weight. When residuals were used as a cutoff, decreased BMI and total hip bone mineral density (0.1 g/cm(2)) were independent risk factors associated with sarcopenia (OR: 1.09 and 1.05). The prevalence of sarcopenic obesity ranged from 1.8% to 21.2%. Our study demonstrated a high prevalence of sarcopenia among OS patients.

  8. Sarcopenia and Health Care Utilization in Older Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawthon, Peggy M; Lui, Li-Yung; McCulloch, Charles E; Cauley, Jane A; Paudel, Misti L; Taylor, Brent; Schousboe, John T; Ensrud, Kristine E

    2017-01-01

    Although there are several consensus definitions of sarcopenia, their association with health care utilization has not been studied. We included women from the prospective Study of Osteoporotic Fractures with complete assessment of sarcopenia by several definitions at the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Year 10 (Y10) exam (1997-1998) who also had available data from Medicare Fee- For-Service Claims (N = 566) or Kaiser Encounter data (N = 194). Sarcopenia definitions evaluated were: International Working Group, European Working Group for Sarcopenia in Older Persons, Foundation for the NIH Sarcopenia Project, Baumgartner, and Newman. Hurdle models and logistic regression were used to assess the relation between sarcopenia status (the summary definition and the components of slowness, weakness and/or lean mass) and outcomes that included hospitalizations, cumulative inpatient days/year, short-term (part A paid) skilled nursing facility stay in the 3 years following the Y10 visit. None of the consensus definitions, nor the definition components of weakness or low lean mass, was associated with increased risk of hospitalization or greater likelihood of short-term skilled nursing facility stay. Women with slowness by any criterion definition were about 50% more likely to be hospitalized; had a greater rate of hospitalization days amongst those hospitalized; and had 1.8 to 2.1 times greater likelihood of a short-term skilled nursing facility stay than women without slowness. There was the suggestion of a protective association of low lean mass by the various criterion definitions on short-term skilled nursing facility stay. Estimated effects of sarcopenia on health care utilization were negligible. However, slowness was associated with greater health care utilization. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. PTEN, Longevity and Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izak S. Tait

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of PTEN, this protein has been shown to be an effective suppressor of cancer and a contributor to longevity. This report will review, in depth, the associations between PTEN and other molecules, its mutations and regulations in order to present how PTEN can be used to increase longevity. This report will collect recent research of PTEN and use this to discuss PTEN’s role in caloric restriction, antioxidative defense of DNA-damage and the role it plays in suppressing tumors. The report will also discuss that variety of ways that PTEN can be compromised, through mutations, complete loss of alleles and its main antagonist, the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  10. Flying Blind: Aeromedical Certification and Undiagnosed Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    or becomes worse over time Vision loss may be severe and rapid with wet AMD compared to dry AMD Distorted vision (i.e., metamorphopsia) - A grid of...Although.vision.loss.can.occur,.it. is.usually.minimal.and.progresses.slowly.(12) . The.“ wet ”.form.of.macular.degeneration.is.responsible. for.10...564-72 . 14 .. Michels. S,. Kurz-Levin. M .. [Age-related. macu- lar. degeneration. ( AMD )]. Ther Umsch .. 2009. Mar;66(3):189-95 . 15 .. Age-Related

  11. Enfoque terapéutico global de la sarcopenia Global therapeutica approach to sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos Peláez, R.

    2006-01-01

    La sarcopenia es la pérdida de masa muscular esquelética asociada al envejecimiento, y contribuye en gran medida a la discapacidad y la pérdida de independencia del anciano. En su etiopatogenia se incluyen diversos mecanismos tanto intrínsecos del propio músculo como cambios a nivel del sistema nervioso central, además de factores hormonales y de estilo de vida. Diversas hormonas y citoquinas afectan la función y la masa muscular. La reducción de testosterona y estrógenos que acompaña la veje...

  12. Progress on retinal image analysis for age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasingam, Yogesan; Bhuiyan, Alauddin; Abràmoff, Michael D; Smith, R Theodore; Goldschmidt, Leonard; Wong, Tien Y

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss in those over the age of 50 years in the developed countries. The number is expected to increase by ∼1.5 fold over the next ten years due to an increase in aging population. One of the main measures of AMD severity is the analysis of drusen, pigmentary abnormalities, geographic atrophy (GA) and choroidal neovascularization (CNV) from imaging based on color fundus photograph, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and other imaging modalities. Each of these imaging modalities has strengths and weaknesses for extracting individual AMD pathology and different imaging techniques are used in combination for capturing and/or quantification of different pathologies. Current dry AMD treatments cannot cure or reverse vision loss. However, the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) showed that specific anti-oxidant vitamin supplementation reduces the risk of progression from intermediate stages (defined as the presence of either many medium-sized drusen or one or more large drusen) to late AMD which allows for preventative strategies in properly identified patients. Thus identification of people with early stage AMD is important to design and implement preventative strategies for late AMD, and determine their cost-effectiveness. A mass screening facility with teleophthalmology or telemedicine in combination with computer-aided analysis for large rural-based communities may identify more individuals suitable for early stage AMD prevention. In this review, we discuss different imaging modalities that are currently being considered or used for screening AMD. In addition, we look into various automated and semi-automated computer-aided grading systems and related retinal image analysis techniques for drusen, geographic atrophy and choroidal neovascularization detection and/or quantification for measurement of AMD severity using these imaging modalities. We also review the existing telemedicine studies which

  13. Physical frailty and sarcopenia: taking advantage of their commonalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Cesari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical frailty and sarcopenia are two agerelated conditions indicated as key risk factors for incident disability and health-related negative events in the elderly. Nevertheless, to date, their clinical implementation is still limited, largely because of methodological ambiguities and disagreement about their operationalizations. In order to bypass the current stall-position in the field and try to identify an objective, standardized, and clinically relevant target for interventions, it might be hypothesized to redesign the limits of a pre-disability physical risk condition around the inner core shared by both physical frailty and sarcopenia. Thus, preliminary research initiatives [like the sarcopenia and physical frailty in older people: multicomponent treatment strategies (SPRINTT project] are proposing to explore whether physical frailty (or poor physical performance may represent the clinical manifestation of a specific biological substratum (i.e., low muscle mass on which build up novel interventions against disability in the elderly.

  14. A Simple Model to Identify Risk of Sarcopenia and Physical Disability in HIV-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinatti, Paulo; Paes, Lorena; Harris, Elizabeth A; Lopes, Gabriella O; Borges, Juliana P

    2017-09-01

    Farinatti, P, Paes, L, Harris, EA, Lopes, GO, and Borges, JP. A simple model to identify risk of sarcopenia and physical disability in HIV-infected patients. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2542-2551, 2017-Early detection of sarcopenia might help preventing muscle loss and disability in HIV-infected patients. This study proposed a model for estimating appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) to calculate indices to identify "sarcopenia" (SA) and "risk for disability due to sarcopenia" (RSA) in patients with HIV. An equation to estimate ASM was developed in 56 patients (47.2 ± 6.9 years), with a cross-validation sample of 24 patients (48.1 ± 6.6 years). The model validity was determined by calculating, in both samples: (a) Concordance between actual vs. estimated ASM; (b) Correlations between actual/estimated ASM vs. peak torque (PT) and total work (TW) during isokinetic knee extension/flexion; (c) Agreement of patients classified with SA and RSA. The predictive equation was ASM (kg) = 7.77 (sex; F = 0/M = 1) + 0.26 (arm circumference; cm) + 0.38 (thigh circumference; cm) + 0.03 (Body Mass Index; kg·m) - 8.94 (R = 0.74; Radj = 0.72; SEE = 3.13 kg). Agreement between actual vs. estimated ASM was confirmed in validation (t = 0.081/p = 0.94; R = 0.86/p < 0.0001) and cross-validation (t = 0.12/p = 0.92; R = 0.87/p < 0.0001) samples. Regression characteristics in cross-validation sample (Radj = 0.80; SEE = 3.65) and PRESS (RPRESS = 0.69; SEEPRESS = 3.35) were compatible with the original model. Percent agreements for the classification of SA and RSA from indices calculated using actual and estimated ASM were of 87.5% and 77.2% (gamma correlations 0.72-1.0; p < 0.04) in validation, and 95.8% and 75.0% (gamma correlations 0.98-0.97; p < 0.001) in cross-validation sample, respectively. Correlations between actual/estimated ASM vs. PT (range 0.50-0.73, p ≤ 0.05) and TW (range 0.59-0.74, p ≤ 0.05) were similar in both samples. In conclusion, our model correctly estimated ASM

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and its association with sarcopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto Neto, Lauro Ferreira da Silva; Sales, Marina Cerqueira; Scaramussa, Eduarda Sobral; da Paz, Clara Junia Calazans; Morelato, Renato Lirio

    2016-01-01

    Presarcopenia and sarcopenia were evaluated in HIV-infected individuals and in healthy elderly controls according to the consensus definitions of the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Bioelectrical impedance, a hydraulic hand dynamometer, and gait speed were used to evaluate muscle mass, muscle strength, and physical performance, respectively. Adjusted and unadjusted binary logistic regression predicted the risk of sarcopenia. Predictor contribution was assessed by the Wald test. Significance was established at p≤0.05. The HIV-infected group consisted of 33 patients on treatment (42.4% women; mean age 59±7 years; mean BMI 25±6kg/m(2); viral load undetectable in 30 cases). The HIV-uninfected group consisted of 60 individuals (71.7% women; mean age 70±7 years; mean BMI 28±6kg/m(2)). Of the controls, 4 (6.7%) individuals had presarcopenia and 4 (6.7%) sarcopenia compared to 4 (12.1%) and 8 (24.2%), respectively, in the HIV-infected group. The HIV-infected patients had a 4.95 higher risk (95% CI: 1.34-18.23) for sarcopenia compared to the controls. It should be pointed out that the control group was on average 10 years older. This risk increased further (RR=5.20; 95% CI: 1.40-19.20) after adjusting for age and BMI. HIV-infected patients were shown to be at a greater risk of sarcopenia, an indicator of frailty, even following adjustment for age and BMI.

  16. Zooming in on the hippocampus in aging and age-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisse, L.E.M.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure important for memory and emotion regulation. The hippocampal formation is susceptible to aging and age-related diseases, which is manifested as volume loss, visible on MRI scans. The hippocampal formation consists of several subfields with different cel

  17. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Max Damico; Fabio Gasparin; Mariana Ramos Scolari; Lycia Sampaio Pedral; Beatriz Sayuri Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and geographi c atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification) and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources (3 links) BrightFocus Foundation: Macular Degeneration Treatment Macular Degeneration Partnership: Low Vision Rehabilitation Prevent Blindness America: Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) ...

  19. Respiratory muscle strength in relation to sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oka, Koichiro; Kasahara, Yusuke; Morio, Yuji; Hiraki, Koji; Hirano, Yasuyuki; Omori, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norio; Kida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2016-12-01

    Little information exists on the relation between respiratory muscle strength such as maximum inspiratory muscle pressure (MIP) and sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients. The present study aimed to determine the differences in MIP, and cutoff values for MIP according to sarcopenia in elderly cardiac patients. We enrolled 63 consecutive elderly male patients aged ≥65 years with cardiac disease in this cross-sectional study. Sarcopenia was defined based on the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People algorithm, and, accordingly, the patients were divided into two groups: the sarcopenia group (n = 24) and non-sarcopenia group (n = 39). The prevalence of sarcopenia in cardiac patients and MIP in the patients with and without sarcopenia were assessed to determine cutoff values of MIP. After adjustment for body mass index, the MIP in the sarcopenia group was significantly lower than that in the non-sarcopenia group (54.7 ± 36.8 cmH2O; 95 % CI 42.5-72.6 vs. 80.7 ± 34.7 cmH2O; 95 % CI 69.5-92.0; F = 4.89, p = 0.029). A receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis of patients with and without sarcopenia identified a cutoff value for MIP of 55.6 cmH2O, with a sensitivity of 0.76, 1-specificity of 0.37, and AUC of 0.70 (95 % CI 0.56-0.83; p = 0.01) in the study patients. Compared with elderly cardiac patients without sarcopenia, MIP in those with sarcopenia may be negatively affected. The MIP cutoff value reported here may be a useful minimum target value for identifying elderly male cardiac patients with sarcopenia.

  20. Oxidative modification of proteins: age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Bulbul; Chakravarti, Deb N

    2007-01-01

    Aging is a complex biological phenomenon which involves progressive loss of different physiological functions of various tissues of living organisms. It is the inevitable fate of life and is a major risk factor for death and different pathological disorders. Based on a wide variety of studies performed in humans as well as in various animal models and microbial systems, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are believed to play a key role in the aging process. The production of ROS is influenced by cellular metabolic activities as well as environmental factors. ROS can react with all major biological macromolecules such as carbohydrates, nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins. Since, in general, proteins are the key molecules that play the ultimate role in various structural and functional aspects of living organisms, this review will focus on the age-related oxidative modifications of proteins as well as on mechanism for removal or repair of the oxidized proteins. The topics covered include protein oxidation as a marker of oxidative stress, experimental evidence indicating the role of ROS in protein oxidation, protein carbonyl content, enzymatic degradation of oxidized proteins, and effects of caloric restriction on protein oxidation in the context of aging. Finally, we will discuss different strategies which have been or can be undertaken to slow down the oxidative damage of proteins and the aging process.

  1. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: Current therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert J Augustin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Albert J Augustin, Stefan Scholl, Janna KirchhofDepartment of Ophthalmology, Klinikum Karlsruhe, GermanyAbstract: Choroidal neovascularization (CNV secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD is now the leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss among people over the age of 40 in the Western world. Its prevalence is certain to increase substantially as the population ages. Treatments currently available for the disease include laser photocoagulation, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and intravitreal injections of corticosteroids and anti-angiogenic agents. Many studies have reported the benefits of each of these treatments, although none is without its risks. No intervention actually cures AMD, nor the neovascularization associated with it. However, its symptoms are treated with varying degrees of success. Some treatments stabilize or arrest the progress of the disease. Others have been shown to reverse some of the damage that has already been done. These treatments can even lead to visual improvement. This paper will review the major classes of drugs and therapies designed to treat this condition.Keywords: wet AMD, neovascularization, PDT, steroids, anti-angiogenesis

  2. Effect of NCAM on aged-related deterioration in vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Margaret Po-Shan; LeVatte, Terry L; O'Reilly, Amanda M; Smith, Benjamin J; Tremblay, François; Brown, Richard E; Clarke, David B

    2016-05-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is involved in developmental processes and age-associated cognitive decline; however, little is known concerning the effects of NCAM in the visual system during aging. Using anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays, we analyzed age-related changes in visual function of NCAM deficient (-/-) and wild-type mice. Anatomical analyses indicated that aging NCAM -/- mice had fewer retinal ganglion cells, thinner retinas, and fewer photoreceptor cell layers than age-matched controls. Electroretinogram testing of retinal function in young adult NCAM -/- mice showed a 2-fold increase in a- and b-wave amplitude compared with wild-type mice, but the retinal activity dropped dramatically to control levels when the animals reached 10 months. In behavioral tasks, NCAM -/- mice had no visual pattern discrimination ability and showed premature loss of vision as they aged. Together, these findings demonstrate that NCAM plays significant roles in the adult visual system in establishing normal retinal anatomy, physiology and function, and in maintaining vision during aging.

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy in neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mahdy; Kurz, Maximilian; Holzhey, Annekatrin; Melchert, Corinna; Rades, Dirk; Grisanti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) is a new approach to treat neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). The INTREPID trial suggested that SRT could reduce the frequency of regular intravitreal injections (IVIs) with antivascular endothelial growth factor drugs, which are necessary to control disease activity. However, the efficacy of SRT in nAMD and resulting morphological changes have not been validated under real-life circumstances, an issue, which we would like to address in this retrospective analysis. Patients who met the INTREPID criteria for best responders were eligible for SRT. A total of 32 eyes of 32 patients were treated. Thereafter, patients were examined monthly for 12 months and received pro re nata IVI of aflibercept or ranibizumab. Outcome measures were: mean number of injections, best-corrected visual acuity, and morphological changes of the outer retina-choroid complex as well as patient safety. Mean number of IVI decreased by almost 50% during the 12 months after SRT compared to the year before, whereas visual acuity increased by one line (logMAR). Morphological evaluation showed that most changes affect outer retinal layers. Stereotactic radiotherapy significantly reduced IVI retreatment in nAMD patients under real-life circumstances. Therefore, SRT might be the first step to stop visual loss as a result of IVI undertreatment, which is a major risk. PMID:28033280

  4. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  5. Mechanism of inflammation in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmeggiani, Francesco; Romano, Mario R; Costagliola, Ciro; Semeraro, Francesco; Incorvaia, Carlo; D'Angelo, Sergio; Perri, Paolo; De Palma, Paolo; De Nadai, Katia; Sebastiani, Adolfo

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multifactorial disease that represents the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over the age of 50 in Europe, the United States, and Australia, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of central blindness. Risk factors of AMD are heterogeneous, mainly including increasing age and different genetic predispositions, together with several environmental/epigenetic factors, that is, cigarette smoking, dietary habits, and phototoxic exposure. In the aging retina, free radicals and oxidized lipoproteins are considered to be major causes of tissue stress resulting in local triggers for parainflammation, a chronic status which contributes to initiation and/or progression of many human neurodegenerative diseases such as AMD. Experimental and clinical evidences strongly indicate the pathogenetic role of immunologic processes in AMD occurrence, consisting of production of inflammatory related molecules, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation within those structures that compose an essential area of the retina known as macula lutea. This paper reviews some attractive aspects of the literature about the mechanisms of inflammation in AMD, especially focusing on those findings or arguments more directly translatable to improve the clinical management of patients with AMD and to prevent the severe vision loss caused by this disease.

  6. Wet age related macular degeneration management and follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandru, Malciolu Radu; Alexandra, Nica Maria

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is referred to as the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in developed countries, with a profound effect on the quality of life. The neovascular form of AMD is characterized by the formation of subretinal choroidal neovascularization, leading to sudden and severe visual loss. Research has identified the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as an important pathophysiological component in neovascular AMD and its intraocular inhibition as one of the most efficient therapies in medicine. The introduction of anti-VEGF as a standard treatment in wet AMD has led to a great improvement in the prognosis of patients, allowing recovery and maintenance of visual function in the vast majority of cases. However, the therapeutic benefit is accompanied by a difficulty in maintaining the treatment schedule due to the increase in the amount of patients, stress of monthly assessments, as well as the associated economic burden. Therefore, treatment strategies have evolved from fixed monthly dosing, to individualized regimens, aiming for comparable results, with fewer injections. One such protocol is called "pro re nata", or "treat and observe". Patients are given a loading dose of 3 monthly injections, followed by an as-needed decision to treat, based on the worsening of visual acuity, clinical evidence of the disease activity on fundoscopy, or OCT evidence of retinal thickening in the presence of intra or subretinal fluid. A different regimen is called "treat and extend", in which the interval between injections is gradually increased, once the disease stabilization is achieved. This paper aims to review the currently available anti-VEGF agents--bevacizumab, ranibizumab, aflibercept, and the aforementioned treatment strategies.

  7. Age-related effects in the neocortical organization of chimpanzees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrey, Michelle M; Reamer, Lisa A; Mareno, Mary Catherine

    2014-01-01

    -significant with the exception of one negative correlation between age and the fronto-orbital sulcus. In short, results showed that chimpanzees exhibit few age-related changes in global cortical organization, sulcus folding and sulcus width. These findings support previous studies and the theory that the age-related changes...

  8. Prevalence of age-related macular degeneration in elderly Caucasians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erke, Maja G; Bertelsen, Geir; Peto, Tunde;

    2012-01-01

    To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD).......To describe the sex- and age-specific prevalence of drusen, geographic atrophy, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD)....

  9. Effects of Electroacupuncture at Tinggong and Yifeng on MDA Expression in Auditory Center of Guinea Pigs with Age-related Hearing Loss by D-galactose%电针耳穴对D-半乳糖致年龄相关性听力损失豚鼠听觉中枢丙二醛表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢仕津; 殷泽登; 李君梅; 赖丹; 欧小毅; 黎万荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of maiondiaidchydc (MDA) , and the effects and mechanisms of clcctroacupuncturc on auditory center of guinea pigs with age-related hearing loss (AHL) by D-galactosc. Methods Thirty of 2- month -old guinea pigs were divided into 3 groups. The guinea pigs of the D - galactosc and clcctroacupuncturc (DE, n=10), and D-galactosc groups (n=10) were subcutancously injected D-galactosc (300 mg/kg. Day) , and the DE group were clcctroacupuncturcd at Tingggong and Yifcng for 6wccks. The control group (CG, n=10) was injected the same dose of physiological saline. The fourth group included 10 of 2-year -old guinea pigs. After 6 weeks, ABR were tested, and MDA expression in auditory cortex, inferior colliculus and cochlcar nucleus of all guinea pigs were quantitatcd by the TBA method. The data were analyzed using analysis of variance. Results 1. There was a significant increase in the average latent period of the third wave of ABR of the DG (P<0. 05 , compared with the CG) , and decrease in the DEG (P<0. 05 , compared with the DG). 2. There was an increase in MDA expression of the auditory cortex, inferior colliculus and cochlcar nucleus in the DG and 2 - year -old group (P<0. 05 , compared with the CG) , a decrease in the DEG (P<0. 05 , compared with the DG) , and nosignificant changes in the 2-year -old group (P<0. 05 , compared with the DG). Conclusion The aging of the auditory center would be related with the lipid pcroxidation induced by the increase of MDA. Klcctroacupuncturc at Tingggong and Yifcng of the guinea pig maybe effective partly inhibit the aging process of the auditory center.%目的 探讨丙二醛在豚鼠年龄相关性听力损失发病中的作用和电针对年龄相关性听力损失的防治作用及机制.方法 4月龄豚鼠30只分为三组,每组10只,D-半乳糖模型组:豚鼠颈背部皮下注射D-半乳糖300 mg·kg-1·d-1,每日1次,连续注射6周;D-半乳糖+电针组:D-半乳糖的用法用量同模型

  10. The Effects of Electroacupuncture at Tinggong and Yifeng on β-catenin Expression in Auditory Center of Guinea Pig with Age-related Hearing Loss%电针耳穴对年龄相关性听力损失豚鼠听觉中枢β-catenin表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘淑云; 邓力强; 杨烨; 殷泽登

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨电针耳穴对D -半乳糖所致的年龄相关性听力损失豚鼠模型听觉中枢β-链蛋白(β-catenin)表达的影响。方法取3月龄豚鼠30只,随机分成三组:D -半乳糖模型组、D -半乳糖+电针组和对照组,每组各10只;18月龄豚鼠10只作为自然老化组。D-半乳糖模型组给予D -半乳糖(300 mg · kg -1· d-1)颈背部皮下注射,每天1次,连续6周;对照组给予等量生理盐水注射相同部位、相同频次、持续相同时间;D -半乳糖+电针组给予相同剂量的D -半乳糖颈背部皮下注射,30 min后给予电针听宫穴和翳风穴治疗15分钟,每日1次,共6周。自然老化组豚鼠常规饲养。上述实验结束后采用蛋白质印迹(Western blot)方法检测四组豚鼠下丘和听皮层β-catenin蛋白的表达变化。结果①与对照组相比,D-半乳糖模型组和自然老化组豚鼠下丘β-catenin蛋白表达量下降;与D-半乳糖模型组相比,D -半乳糖+电针组下丘β-catenin蛋白表达量增加;②D -半乳糖模型和自然老化组豚鼠听皮层β-catenin蛋白表达量下降,D-半乳糖+电针组其表达量增加。结论β-catenin蛋白可能通过Wnt/β-catenin信号通路,调控细胞生长、分化及凋亡,参与下丘和听皮层的老化过程;电针听宫穴和翳风穴可能通过增加下丘和听皮层β-catenin蛋白表达,经Wnt/β-catenin信号通路延缓豚鼠年龄相关性听力损失的发生。%Objective To explore the effects of the application of electroacupuncture at Tinggong and Yifeng to theβ-catenin expression in auditory center of guinea pigs with age -related hearing loss (AHL) induced by D -galactose .Methods There were four groups .Thirty 3 -month -old guinea pigs were randomly divided into three groups including the D -galactose group (DG ,n=10) ,D-galactose and electroacupuncture group (DEG ,n=10) , and

  11. C57 BL/6J小鼠听力及耳蜗毛细胞活性的年龄相关性研究%Study of the Correction between the Age Related Hearing Loss and the Cytoactivity Factors of the Cochlear Hair Cell in C57BL/6J Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周良强; 吴绍苓; 王燕; 褚汉启; 崔永华

    2009-01-01

    Objective To establish the mice model of AHL, to investigate the relationship between AHL and the cytoactive factors of the cochlear hair cells in C57BL/6J mice, and to classify the presbycusis models of the C57BL/6J mice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were divided into 6 experimental groups by age (A: 3 months old(m), B: 8 m, C: 9 m, D: 10 m, F: 17 m, G: 18 m) . The auditory functions mice were measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) with the stimulus click and toneburst at 6 kHz and 8 kHz. 3 months later, Groups C , G, E and H were tested again for ABR. After ABR testing, the cytoactive of the hair cells was detected by succinate dehydrogenase staining and surface preparation technique(two mice from each group except groups C and G). Results The ABR thresholds elevated with age, and the marked change of the cochlea was the degeneration of the cytoactive of the cochlear hair cells, especially those of the outer hair cells. In the beginning, the basement of the basal membrane suffered from the mitochondrion degeneration in the outer hair cells, then it spread to the top region. Subsequently, the inner hair cells were involved. Conclusion C57BL/6J mouse was a typical animal model for the AHL,and the main change of the cochlea was the degeneration of the hair cells, especially the outer hair cells. Thus, C57BL/6J mice can be used as a suitable animal model for the study of presbycusis.%目的 建立年龄相关性听力损失(age-related hearing loss,AHL)的小鼠动物模型,探讨C57BL/6J小鼠发生AHL与毛细胞活性变化的关系,并初步对C57BL/6J小鼠AHL模型进行AHL的病理分类.方法 按3、8、9、10、17、18月龄段分6组培育C57BL/6J小鼠,各组分别进行听性脑干反应(ABR)测试,对耳蜗毛细胞行琥珀酸脱氢酶染色并作基底膜硬铺片,观察各年龄段小鼠内外毛细胞线粒体琥珀酸脱氢酶的活性.结果 C57BL/6J小鼠随年龄增大,ABR阈值明显增高,在3月龄到9月龄期间ABR平均反应阈值增大

  12. Low Hemoglobin Concentrations Are Associated With Sarcopenia, Physical Performance, and Disability in Older Australian Men in Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Analysis: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Vasant; Naganathan, Vasi; Blyth, Fiona; Le Couteur, David G; Seibel, Markus J; Waite, Louise M; Handelsman, David J; Hsu, Ben; Cumming, Robert G

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine associations between Hb levels and sarcopenia, low muscle strength, functional measures, and activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL) disabilities in older Australian men. Men aged 70 years and older (2005-2007) from the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project were assessed at baseline (n = 1,705), 2 years (n = 1,367), and 5 years (n = 958). The main outcome measurements were walking speed, muscle strength, ADL and IADL disabilities, and sarcopenia using the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health criteria (low appendicular lean mass adjusted for body mass index sarcopenia, slow walking speed, poor grip strength, inability to perform chair stands, and ADL and IADL disabilities in unadjusted, age-adjusted, and multivariate-adjusted analysis. The highest value of the Youden Index for Hb was 14.2g/dL for sarcopenia and grip strength, 14.5g/dL for walking speed, and 14.4g/dL for all other outcomes. Declines in Hb levels over time are associated with poor functional outcomes. The risks and benefits of interventions to increase Hb among older men warrant further investigation to differentiate whether this is an active contributor to age-related debility or a passive biomarker of it. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Resistance Exercise to Prevent and Manage Sarcopenia and Dynapenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Timothy D; Clark, Leatha A; Clark, Brian C

    For well over twenty centuries the muscle wasting (sarcopenia) and weakness (dynapenia) that occurs with old age has been a predominant concern of mankind. Exercise has long been suggested as a treatment to combat sarcopenia and dynapenia, as it exerts effects on both the nervous and muscular systems that are critical to positive physiological and functional adaptations (e.g., enhanced muscle strength). For more than two decades scientists have recognized the profound role that progressive resistance exercise training can have on increasing muscle strength, muscle size and functional capacity in older adults. In this review article we discuss how resistance exercise training can be used in the management and prevention of sarcopenia and dynapenia. We first provide an overview of the evidence for this notion and highlight certain critical factors- namely exercise intensity, volume and progression- that are key to optimizing the resistance exercise prescription. We then highlight how many, if not most, of the commonly prescribed exercise programs for seniors are not the 'best practices', and subsequently present easy-to-read guidelines for a well-rounded resistance exercise training program designed for the management and prevention of sarcopenia and dynapenia, including example training programs for the beginner through the advanced senior resistance exerciser. These guidelines have been written for the academician as well as the student and health care provider across a variety of disciplines, including those in the long term care industry, such as wellness instructors or activity directors.

  14. Sarcopenia is associated with an increased risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youn Su; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Lee, Jae Kyung; Kim, Joo Sung; Koh, Seong-Joon

    2017-04-01

    Although sarcopenia is associated with an increased risk for mortality after the curative resection of colorectal cancer, its influence on the development of advanced colonic neoplasia remains unclear. This study included 1270 subjects aged 40 years or older evaluated with first-time screening colonoscopy at Seoul National University Boramae Health Care Center from January 2010 to February 2015. Skeletal muscle mass was measured with a body composition analyzer (direct segmental multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis method). Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to determine whether sarcopenia is associated with advanced colorectal neoplasia. Of 1270 subjects, 139 (10.9%) were categorized into the sarcopenia group and 1131 (89.1%) into the non-sarcopenia group. In the non-sarcopenia group, 55 subjects (4.9%) had advanced colorectal neoplasia. However, in the sarcopenia group, 19 subjects (13.7%) had advanced colorectal neoplasia, including 1 subject with invasive colorectal cancer (0.7%). In addition, subjects with sarcopenia had a higher prevalence of advanced adenoma (P sarcopenia. According to the multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for variable confounders, age (odds ratio 1.062, 95% confidence interval 1.032-1.093; P sarcopenia (odds ratio 2.347, 95% confidence interval 1.311-4.202; P = 0.004) were associated with an advanced colorectal neoplasia. Sarcopenia is associated with an increased risk of advanced colorectal neoplasia.

  15. Relationship between sarcopenia and physical activity in older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffl, Michal; Bohannon, Richard W; Sontakova, Lenka; Tufano, James J; Shiells, Kate; Holmerova, Iva

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) has been identified as beneficial for many diseases and health disorders, including sarcopenia. The positive influence of PA interventions on sarcopenia has been described previously on many occasions. Current reviews on the topic include studies with varied PA interventions for sarcopenia; nevertheless, no systematic review exploring the effects of PA in general on sarcopenia has been published. The main aim of this study was to explore the relationship between PA and sarcopenia in older people on the basis of cross-sectional and cohort studies. We searched PubMed, Scopus, EBSCOhost, and ScienceDirect for articles addressing the relationship between PA and sarcopenia. Twenty-five articles were ultimately included in the qualitative and quantitative syntheses. A statistically significant association between PA and sarcopenia was documented in most of the studies, as well as the protective role of PA against sarcopenia development. Furthermore, the meta-analysis indicated that PA reduces the odds of acquiring sarcopenia in later life (odds ratio [OR] =0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37-0.55). The results of this systematic review and meta-analysis confirm the beneficial influence of PA in general for the prevention of sarcopenia.

  16. Sarcopenia Defined by Combining Height- and Weight-Adjusted Skeletal Muscle Indices is Closely Associated With Poor Physical Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Nai-Hsin; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Chang, Chin-Kai; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-10-01

    To compare muscle strength and physical performance among subjects with and without sarcopenia of different definitions. A population-based cross-sectional study. 857 community residents aged 65 years or older. Sarcopenia was defined according to the European Working Group of Sarcopenia in Older People consensus criteria. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measured lean soft tissue mass. Sarcopenic participants with low height-adjusted or weight-adjusted skeletal muscle index (SMI) were classified as having h-sarcopenia or w-sarcopenia, respectively. Combined sarcopenia (c-sarcopenia) was defined as having either h- or w-sarcopenia. The participants underwent six physical performance tests: walking speed, timed up-and-go, six-minute walk, single-leg stance, timed chair stands, and flexibility test. The strength of five muscle groups was measured. Participants with h-sarcopenia had lower weight, body mass index (BMI), fat mass, and absolute muscle strength (p ≤ .001); those with w-sarcopenia had higher weight, BMI, fat mass (p performance in all physical performance tests, whereas h-sarcopenia and w-sarcopenia were associated with poor performance in four tests. Subjects with h- and w-sarcopenia differ significantly in terms of obesity indicators. Combining height- and weight-adjusted SMIs can be a feasible method to define sarcopenia.

  17. The rapidly evolving diagnosis and treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Breakthrough research on age-related macular degeneration is stimulating the development of treatments, improving diagnosis, facilitating prevention through proper nutrition, and providing long-sought documentation on the effectiveness of low vision rehabilitation.Optometrists must take the lead in ensuring that patients reap the benefits. The February observance of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD)/Low Vision Awareness Month provides a good time for optometrists to review their approach to age-related vision loss,ensure that they are ready to provide, or refer patients for, the best possible care, and prepare to conduct education efforts to ensure that their patients, communities, and other healthcare providers are aware of recent advancements.

  18. The relevance of aging-related changes in brain function to rehabilitation in aging-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, Bruce; McGregor, Keith M; Nocera, Joe R; Drucker, Jonathan H; Tran, Stella M; Butler, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging on rehabilitation of aging-related diseases are rarely a design consideration in rehabilitation research. In this brief review we present strong coincidental evidence from these two fields suggesting that deficits in aging-related disease or injury are compounded by the interaction between aging-related brain changes and disease-related brain changes. Specifically, we hypothesize that some aphasia, motor, and neglect treatments using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in stroke patients may address the aging side of this interaction. The importance of testing this hypothesis and addressing the larger aging by aging-related disease interaction is discussed. Underlying mechanisms in aging that most likely are relevant to rehabilitation of aging-related diseases also are covered.

  19. The relevance of aging-related changes in brain function to rehabilitation in aging-related disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eCrosson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aging on rehabilitation of aging-related diseases are rarely a design consideration in rehabilitation research. In this brief review we present strong coincidental evidence from these two fields suggesting that deficits in aging-related disease or injury are compounded by the interaction between aging-related brain changes and disease-related brain changes. Specifically, we hypothesize that some aphasia, motor, and neglect treatments using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS in stroke patients may address the aging side of this interaction. The importance of testing this hypothesis and addressing the larger aging by aging-related disease interaction is discussed. Underlying mechanisms in aging that most likely are relevant to rehabilitation of aging-related diseases also are covered.

  20. Attenuating age-related learning deficits: emotional valenced feedback interacts with task complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlick, Marissa A; Giguère, Gyslain; Glass, Brian D; Nix, Brittany N; Mather, Mara; Maddox, W Todd

    2013-04-01

    Previous research reveals that older adults sometimes show enhanced processing of emotionally positive stimuli relative to negative stimuli, but that this positivity bias reverses to become a negativity bias when cognitive control resources are less available. In this study, we test the hypothesis that emotionally positive feedback will attenuate well-established age-related deficits in rule learning whereas emotionally negative feedback will amplify age deficits-but that this pattern will reverse when the task involves a high cognitive load. Experiment 1 used emotional face feedback and revealed an interaction among age, valence of the feedback, and task load. When the task placed minimal load on cognitive control resources, happy-face feedback attenuated age-related deficits in initial rule learning and angry-face feedback led to age-related deficits in initial rule learning and set shifting. However, when the task placed a high load on cognitive control resources, we found that angry-face feedback attenuated age-related deficits in initial rule learning and set shifting whereas happy-face feedback led to age-related deficits in initial rule learning and set shifting. Experiment 2 used less emotional point feedback and revealed age-related deficits in initial rule learning and set shifting under low and high cognitive load for point-gain and point-loss conditions. The research presented here demonstrates that emotional feedback can attenuate age-related learning deficits-but only positive feedback for tasks with a low cognitive load and negative feedback for tasks with high cognitive load. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Dizziness and Imbalance in the Elderly: Age-related Decline in the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Dizziness and imbalance are amongst the most common complaints in older people, and are a growing public health concern since they put older people at a significantly higher risk of falling. Although the causes of dizziness in older people are multifactorial, peripheral vestibular dysfunction is one of the most frequent causes. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction in the elderly, followed by Meniere’s disease. Every factor associated with the maintenance of postural stability deteriorates during aging. Age-related deterioration of peripheral vestibular function has been demonstrated through quantitative measurements of the vestibulo-ocular reflex with rotational testing and of the vestibulo-collic reflex with testing of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials. Age-related decline of vestibular function has been shown to correlate with the age-related decrease in the number of vestibular hair cells and neurons. The mechanism of age-related cellular loss in the vestibular endorgan is unclear, but it is thought that genetic predisposition and cumulative effect of oxidative stress may both play an important role. Since the causes of dizziness in older people are multi-factorial, management of this disease should be customized according to the etiologies of each individual. Vestibular rehabilitation is found to be effective in treating both unilateral and bilateral vestibular dysfunction. Various prosthetic devices have also been developed to improve postural balance in older people. Although there have been no medical treatments improving age-related vestibular dysfunction, new medical treatments such as mitochondrial antioxidants or caloric restriction, which have been effective in preventing age-related hearing loss, should be ienvestigated in the future. PMID:25657851

  2. New approaches and potential treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Max Damico

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging treatments for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD and geographi c atrophy focus on two strategies that target components involved in physiopathological pathways: prevention of photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelium loss (neuroprotection induction, oxidative damage prevention, and visual cycle modification and suppression of inflammation. Neuroprotective drugs, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor, brimonidine tartrate, tandospirone, and anti-amyloid β antibodies, aim to prevent apoptosis of retinal cells. Oxidative stress and depletion of essential micronutrients are targeted by the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS formulation. Visual cycle modulators reduce the activity of the photoreceptors and retinal accumulation of toxic fluorophores and lipofuscin. Eyes with dry age-related macular degeneration present chronic inflammation and potential treatments include corticosteroid and complement inhibition. We review the current concepts and rationale of dry age-related macular degeneration treatment that will most likely include a combination of drugs targeting different pathways involved in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration.

  3. Peak muscle mass in young men and sarcopenia in the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Nielsen, T L; Brixen, K

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of sarcopenia increases with age. The diagnosis of sarcopenia relies in part on normative data on muscle mass, but these data are lacking. This study provides population-based reference data on muscle mass in young men, and these results may be used clinically for the diagnosis...... of sarcopenia in men. INTRODUCTION: The ageing population increases the prevalence of sarcopenia. Estimation of normative data on muscle mass in young men during the peak of anabolic hormones is necessary for the diagnosis of sarcopenia in ageing males. The purposes of this study were to provide population......-based reference data on lean body mass (LBM) in young men during the time of peak levels of GH/IGF-1 and testosterone and further to apply the reference data on a population-based sample of men aged 60-74 years to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional, population-based single...

  4. Slowing down: age-related neurobiological predictors of processing speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Eckert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Processing speed, or the rate at which tasks can be performed, is a robust predictor of age-relatedcognitive decline and an indicator of independence among older adults. This review examines evidence for neurobiological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, which is guided in part by our source based morphometry findings that unique patterns of frontal and cerebellar gray matter predict age-related variation in processing speed. These results, together with the extant literature on morphological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, suggest that specific neural systems undergo declines and as a result slow processing speed. Future studies of processing speed - dependent neural systems will be important for identifying the etiologies for processing speed change and the development of interventions that mitigate gradual age-related declines in cognitive functioning and enhance healthy cognitive aging.

  5. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD. Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory

  6. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Peter X; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer's disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  7. [Depression in Patients with Age-Related Macular Degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Yamile Reveiz; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is a cause for disability in the elderly since it greatly affects their quality of life and increases depression likelihood. This article discusses the negative effect depression has on patients with age-related macular degeneration and summarizes the interventions available for decreasing their depression index. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. CKD Increases the Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Liew, Gerald; Mitchell, Paul; Wong, Tien Yin; Iyengar, Sudha K; Wang, Jie Jin

    2008-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the United States and often coexists with chronic kidney disease. Both conditions share common genetic and environmental risk factors. A total of 1183 participants aged 54+ were examined in the population-based, prospective cohort Blue Mountains Eye Study (Australia) to determine if chronic kidney disease increases the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Moderate chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerul...

  9. Influence of Age-Related Versus Non-Age-Related Renal Dysfunctionon Survival in Patients with Left Ventricular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testani, Jeffrey M.; Brisco, Meredith A.; Han, Gang; Laur, Olga; Kula, Alexander J.; Cheng, Susan J.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Parikh, Chirag R.

    2013-01-01

    Normal aging results in a predictable decline in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and low GFR is associated with worsened survival. If this survival disadvantage is directly caused by the low GFR, as opposed to the disease causing the low GFR, the risk should be similar regardless of the underlying mechanism. Our objective was to determine if age related declines in estimated GFR (eGFR) carry the same prognostic importance as disease attributable losses in patients with ventricular dysfunction. We analyzed the Studies Of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD) limited data set (n=6337). The primary analysis focused on determining if the eGFR mortality relationship differed by the extent the eGFR was consistent with normal ageing. Mean eGFR was 65.7 ± 19.0ml/min/1.73m2. Across the range of age in the population (27 to 80 years), baseline eGFR decreased by 0.67 ml/min/1.73m2 per year (95% CI 0.63 to 0.71). The risk of death associated with eGFR was strongly modified by the degree to which the low eGFR could be explained by aging (p interaction <0.0001). For example, in a model incorporating the interaction, uncorrected eGFR was no longer significantly related to mortality (adjusted HR=1.0 per 10 ml/min/1.73m2, 95% CI 0.97–1.1, p=0.53) whereas a disease attributable decrease in eGFR above the median carried significant risk (adjusted HR=2.8, 95% CI 1.6–4.7, p<0.001). In conclusion, in the setting of LV dysfunction, renal dysfunction attributable to normal aging had a limited risk for mortality, suggesting that the mechanism underlying renal dysfunction is critical in determining prognosis. PMID:24216124

  10. Sarcopenia en pacientes ancianos atendidos ambulatoriamente: prevalencia y factores asociados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyne Dayana Almeida dos Santos

    Full Text Available Introducción: la sarcopenia se define como un síndrome geriátrico, multifactorial, caracterizado por la pérdida progresiva de masa muscular esquelética, asociada a consecuencias graves, tales como comorbideces, mala calidad de vida y mortandad. Objetivo: identificar la prevalencia y los factores asociados a la sarcopenia en ancianos atendidos ambulatoriamente. Métodos: estudio transversal y observacional realizado con pacientes ancianos de ambos sexos atendidos en ambulatorio geriátrico, entre junio y diciembre de 2014, en un hospital universitario ubicado en el nordeste brasileño. Se determinó la sarcopenia a través de la masa muscular (circunferencia de la pantorrilla < 31 cm, fuerza muscular (evaluada por la fuerza de prensión palmar < 30 kg para hombres y < 20 kg para mujeres y velocidad de marcha (< 0,8 metros/segundo. Entre las variables de asociación, se consideraron aspectos socioeconómicos y demográficos, variables clínicas, estilo de vida y antropometría. La tabulación y análisis de los datos se realizaron por medio del paquete estadístico SPSS versión 13.0. Resultados: la muestra se compuso de 50 pacientes, con promedio de edad de 73,9 (± 7,4 años, en la que se verificó una prevalencia de sarcopenia del 18%. La sarcopenia fue más prevalente en individuos con edad ≥ 80 años (p = 0,012, en los ancianos con bajo peso según el IMC (p < 0,001, con desnutrición de acuerdo con la CB (p = 0,004 y en los pacientes sin hipertensión arterial (p = 0,027, no encontrándose asociación con variables socioeconómicas, clínicas y del estilo de vida. Conclusiones: la prevalencia de la sarcopenia fue significativa y semejante a la descrita por otros autores, encontrándose asociación con la edad avanzada, desnutrición y ausencia de hipertensión.

  11. Sarcopenia and impairment in cognitive and physical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolea MI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magdalena I Tolea,1 James E Galvin1–3 1Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Department of Neurology, 2Department of Psychiatry, 3Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Background: Whether older adults with sarcopenia who underperform controls on tests of physical performance and cognition also have a higher likelihood of combined cognitive-physical impairment is not clear. We assessed the impact of sarcopenia on impairment in both aspects of functionality and the relative contribution of its components, muscle mass and strength.Methods: Two hundred and twenty-three community-dwelling adults aged 40 years and older (mean age =68.1±10.6 years; 65% female were recruited and underwent physical functionality, anthropometry, and cognitive testing. Participants with low muscle mass were categorized as pre-sarcopenic; those with low muscle mass and muscle strength as sarcopenic; those with higher muscle mass and low muscle strength only were categorized as non-sarcopenic and were compared on risk of cognitive impairment (Montreal Cognitive Assessment <26; Ascertaining Dementia 8 ≥2, physical impairment (Mini Physical Performance Test <12, both, or neither by ordinal logistic regression. Results: Compared to controls, those with sarcopenia were six times more likely to have combined cognitive impairment/physical impairment with a fully adjusted model showing a three-fold increased odds ratio. The results were consistent across different measures of global cognition (odds ratio =3.46, 95% confidence interval =1.07–11.45 for the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; odds ratio =3.61, 95% confidence interval =1.11–11.72 for Ascertaining Dementia 8. Pre-sarcopenic participants were not different from controls. The effect of sarcopenia on cognition is related to low muscle strength rather than low muscle mass. Conclusion: Individuals with sarcopenia are not only more likely to have single but also to have dual

  12.  Sarcopenia predicts reduced survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma at first diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begini, Paola; Gigante, Elia; Antonelli, Giulio; Carbonetti, Francesco; Iannicelli, Elsa; Anania, Giulia; Imperatrice, Barbara; Pellicelli, Adriano Maria; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Marignani, Massimo

     Background. Sarcopenia is a complication and independent risk factor for mortality in patients with liver cirrhosis. To assess the prevalence and influence of sarcopenia on overall survival in a cohort of cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma managed in a tertiary center. Abdominal computed tomography of 92 consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma cirrhotic patients, enrolled and followed from 2004 to 2014, were retrospectively studied with a software analyzing the cross-sectional areas of muscles at third lumbar vertebra level. Data was normalized for height, skeletal muscle index (SMI) calculated and presence of Sarcopenia measured. Sarcopenia was defined by SMI ≤ 41 cm2/m2 for women and ≤ 53 cm2/m2 for men with body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25, and ≤ 43 cm2/m2 for men and women with BMI Sarcopenia was present in 40.2% of cases, mostly in females (62.9%; p = 0.005). Mean overall survival was reduced in sarcopenic patients, 66 (95% CI 47 to 84) vs. 123 (95% CI 98 to 150) weeks (p = 0.001). At multivariate analysis, sarcopenia was a predictor of reduced overall survival, independent of age (p = 0.0027). This retrospective study shows high prevalence of sarcopenia among cirrhotic patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. Presence of sarcopenia was identified as independent predictor of reduced overall survival. As easily measurable by CT, sarcopenia should be determined for prognostic purposes in this patient population.

  13. Sarcopenia Adversely Impacts Postoperative Complications Following Resection or Transplantation in Patients with Primary Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Vicente; Amini, Neda; Spolverato, Gaya; Weiss, Matthew J.; Hirose, Kenzo; Dagher, Nabil N.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Cameron, Andrew A.; Philosophe, Benjamin; Kamel, Ihab R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sarcopenia is a surrogate marker of patient frailty that estimates the physiologic reserve of an individual patient. We sought to investigate the impact of sarcopenia on short- and long-term outcomes in patients having undergone surgical intervention for primary hepatic malignancies. Methods Ninety-six patients who underwent hepatic resection or liver transplantation for HCC or ICC at the John Hopkins Hospital between 2000 and 2013 met inclusion criteria. Sarcopenia was assessed by the measurement of total psoas major volume (TPV) and total psoas area (TPA). The impact of sarcopenia on perioperative complications and survival was assessed. Results Mean age was 61.9 years and most patients were men (61.4 %). Mean adjusted TPV was lower in women (23.3 cm3/m) versus men (34.9 cm3/m) (Psarcopenia. The incidence of a postoperative complication was 40.4 % among patients with sarcopenia versus 18.4 % among patients who did not have sarcopenia (P=0.01). Of note, all Clavien grade ≥3 complications (n=11, 23.4 %) occurred in the sarcopenic group. On multivariable analysis, the presence of sarcopenia was an independent predictive factor of postoperative complications (OR=3.06). Sarcopenia was not associated with long-term survival (HR=1.23; P=0.51). Conclusions Sarcopenia, as assessed by TPV, was an independent factor predictive of postoperative complications following surgical intervention for primary hepatic malignancies. PMID:25389056

  14. Sarcopenia is associated with disability status-results from the KORA-Age study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A; Strobl, R; Vogt, S; Ladwig, K-H; Thorand, B; Grill, E

    2017-07-01

    We estimated the prevalence of sarcopenia and its impact on disability in older people. Sarcopenia was found to contribute to higher disability scores. However, our study was not able to show any influence of sarcopenia on the rate of functional decline. This directs attention to an accurate diagnosis of sarcopenia as the onset may be influenced, but its rate may not. The objectives of this study using data from a population-based cohort were to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia in older people in Germany and to test the hypothesis that sarcopenia is associated with disability in older adults. Cross-sectional (n = 927) and longitudinal analyses (n = 859) of participants aged ≥65 years at baseline from southern Germany enrolled in the Cooperative Health Research in the Region Augsburg (KORA)-Age study (2009-2012). Sarcopenia was defined based on the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) algorithm which includes the presence of both low muscle mass and low muscle function (strength or performance). Disability status was measured by the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI). The presence of disability was defined as HAQ-DI >0. Directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) were constructed to identify potential confounders. The effect of sarcopenia on disability was analyzed using linear mixed effect models with disability values as a continuous outcome. The overall prevalence of sarcopenia was 5.7% (men 4.0%, women 7.5%) and increased with age. The 3-year incidence of disability was 32.7%. After adjustment for potential confounders, presence of sarcopenia was significantly associated with higher disability scores (0.142 [confidence interval 0.029-0.254]). The prevalence of sarcopenia is consistent with estimates from other European studies using this algorithm. Our results suggest that sarcopenia can contribute to higher disability scores in older adults. However, our study was not able to show any influence of sarcopenia on the

  15. Risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia Nano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To assess the risk factors of age-related macular degeneration in Argentina using a case-control study. METHODS: Surveys were used for subjects' antioxidant intake, age/gender, race, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes (and type of treatment, smoking, sunlight exposure, red meat consumption, fish consumption, presence of age-related macular degeneration and family history of age-related macular degeneration. Main effects models for logistic regression and ordinal logistic regression were used to analyze the results. RESULTS: There were 175 cases and 175 controls with a mean age of 75.4 years and 75.5 years, respectively, of whom 236 (67.4% were female. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration, 159 (45.4% had age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 154 (44.0% in their right eyes, and 138 (39.4% in both eyes. Of the cases with age-related macular degeneration in their left eyes, 47.8% had the dry type, 40.3% had the wet type, and the type was unknown for 11.9%. The comparable figures for right eyes were: 51.9%, 34.4%, and 13.7%, respectively. The main effects model was dominated by higher sunlight exposure (OR [odds ratio]: 3.3 and a family history of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 4.3. Other factors included hypertension (OR: 2.1, smoking (OR: 2.2, and being of the Mestizo race, which lowered the risk of age-related macular degeneration (OR: 0.40. Red meat/fish consumption, body mass index, and iris color did not have an effect. Higher age was associated with progression to more severe age-related macular degeneration. CONCLUSION: Sunlight exposure, family history of age-related macular degeneration, and an older age were the significant risk factors. There may be other variables, as the risk was not explained very well by the existing factors. A larger sample may produce different and better results.

  16. The Difference that Age Makes: Cultural Factors that Shape Older Adults' Responses to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, Marja

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that approaching vision loss from age-related macular degeneration from a sociocultural perspective, specifically considering perceptions of aging, blindness, disability, and generational viewpoints and norms, may be critical to understanding older adults' responses to vision loss and visual rehabilitation.

  17. Assessment of sarcopenia and changes in body composition after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and associations with clinical outcomes in oesophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Connie [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Singapore (Singapore); Imaging 2, Level 1, Lambeth Wing, St Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davies, Andrew; Gossage, James; Mason, Robert [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Upper Gastrointestinal and General Surgery, London (United Kingdom); Mitchell-Hay, Rosalind; Griffin, Nyree [Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hynes, Orla [Department of Dietetics, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Maisey, Nick; Ross, Paul; Gaya, Andrew [Department of Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Landau, David B. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Department of Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    Sarcopenia and changes in body composition following neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) may affect clinical outcome. We assessed the associations between CT body composition changes following NAC and outcomes in oesophageal cancer. A total of 35 patients who received NAC followed by oesophagectomy, and underwent CT assessment pre- and post-NAC were included. Fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), subcutaneous fat to muscle ratio (FMR) and visceral to subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio (VA/SA) were derived from CT. Changes in FM, FFM, FMR, VA/SA and sarcopenia were correlated to chemotherapy dose reductions, postoperative complications, length of hospital stay (LOS), circumferential resection margin (CRM), pathological chemotherapy response, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Nine (26 %) patients were sarcopenic before NAC and this increased to 15 (43 %) after NAC. Average weight loss was 3.7 % ± 6.4 (SD) in comparison to FM index (-1.2 ± 4.2), FFM index (-4.6 ± 6.8), FMR (-1.2 ± 24.3) and VA/SA (-62.3 ± 12.7). Changes in FM index (p = 0.022), FMR (p = 0.028), VA/SA (p = 0.024) and weight (p = 0.007) were significant univariable factors for CRM status. There was no significant association between changes in body composition and survival. Loss of FM, differential loss of VA/SA and skeletal muscle were associated with risk of CRM positivity. (orig.)

  18. Management of neovascular Age-related macular degeneration: A review on landmark randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Aniruddha Agarwal; Kanika Aggarwal; Vishali Gupta

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, a number of prospective clinical trials with carefully designed study protocols have been conducted for the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). These landmark clinical trials such as ANCHOR and MARINA and, more recently, the Comparison of AMD Treatment Trials and VIEW studies have revolutionized the management of neovascular AMD. While AMD continues to remain a leading cause of severe visual loss worldwide, advances in pharmacotherapeutics have...

  19. Economic Burden of Bilateral Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Multi-Country Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Alan F. Cruess; Gergana Zlateva; Xiao Xu; Gisele Soubrane; Daniel Pauleikhoff; Andrew Lotery; Jordi Mones; Ronald Buggage; Caroline Schaefer; Tyler Knight; Goss, Thomas F

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is limited previous research examining the healthcare costs of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NV-AMD), which constrains our understanding of the economic impact of this condition. With aging populations, this leading cause of rapid vision loss in Western countries is expected to become a pressing health predicament, requiring decision makers to evaluate alternative treatment strategies for AMD. Objective: To document the economic burden of bilateral NV-AMD, th...

  20. Oxidative Stress, Hypoxia, and Autophagy in the Neovascular Processes of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Blasiak, Janusz; Petrovski, Goran; Veréb, Zoltán; Facskó, Andrea; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe and irreversible loss of vision in the elderly in developed countries. AMD is a complex chronic neurodegenerative disease associated with many environmental, lifestyle, and genetic factors. Oxidative stress and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seem to play a pivotal role in AMD pathogenesis. It is known that the macula receives the highest blood flow of any tissue in the body when related to size, and anythin...

  1. Genetics of Immunological and Inflammatory Components in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Tuo, Jingsheng; Grob, Seanna; Zhang, Kang; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), affecting 30 to 50 million elder individuals worldwide, is a disease affecting the macular retina and choroid that can lead to irreversible central vision loss and blindness. Recent findings support a role for immunologic processes in AMD pathogenesis, including generation of inflammatory related molecules in the Bruch’s membrane, recruitment of macrophages, complement activation, microglial activation and accumulation in the macular lesions. Pro-inflam...

  2. Cellular and Molecular Pathology of Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Potential Role for Proteoglycans

    OpenAIRE

    Othman Al Gwairi; Lyna Thach; Wenhua Zheng; Narin Osman; Little, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a retinal disease evident after the age of 50 that damages the macula in the centre of retina. It leads to a loss of central vision with retained peripheral vision but eventual blindness occurs in many cases. The initiation site of AMD development is Bruch’s membrane (BM) where multiple changes occur including the deposition of plasma derived lipids, accumulation of extracellular debris, changes in cell morphology, and viability and the formation of d...

  3. Pharmacogenetics and nutritional supplementation in age-related macular degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampton BM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blake M Hampton, Jaclyn L Kovach, Stephen G Schwartz Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: The Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS recommended treatment with antioxidants plus zinc in patients with intermediate or advanced age-related macular degeneration in order to reduce progression risks. Recent pharmacogenetic studies have reported differences in treatment outcomes with respect to variants in genes for CFH and ARMS2, although the treatment recommendations based on these differences are controversial. Different retrospective analyses of subsets of patients from the same AREDS trial have drawn different conclusions. The practicing clinician, who is not an expert on genetics, clinical trial design, or statistical analysis, may be uncertain how to interpret these results. Based on the balance of the available literature, we suggest not changing established practice recommendations until additional evidence from clinical trials becomes available. Keywords: Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS, age-related macular degeneration, age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2, complement factor H (CFH, pharmacogenetics, randomized clinical trial (RCT

  4. Age-related structural and functional changes in the cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, Robert D; Walton, Joseph P

    2006-01-01

    Presbycusis - age-related hearing loss - is a key communication disorder and chronic medical condition of our aged population. The cochlear nucleus is the major site of projections from the auditory portion of the inner ear. Relative to other levels of the peripheral and central auditory systems, relatively few studies have been conducted examining age-related changes in the cochlear nucleus. The neurophysiological investigations suggest declines in glycine-mediated inhibition, reflected in increased firing rates in cochlear nucleus neurons from old animals relative to young adults. Biochemical investigations of glycine inhibition in the cochlear nucleus are consistent with the functional aging declines of this inhibitory neurotransmitter system that affect complex sound processing. Anatomical reductions in neurons of the cochlear nucleus and their output pathways can occur due to aging changes in the brain, as well as due to age-dependent plasticity of the cochlear nucleus in response to the age-related loss of inputs from the cochlea, particularly from the basal, high-frequency regions. Novel preventative and curative biomedical interventions in the future aimed at alleviating the hearing loss that comes with age, will likely emanate from increasing our knowledge and understanding of its neural and molecular bases. To the extent that this sensory deficit resides in the central auditory system, including the cochlear nucleus, future neural therapies will be able to improve hearing in the elderly.

  5. Sarcopenia according to the european working group on sarcopenia in older people (EWGSOP) versus Dynapenia as a risk factor for disability in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Alexandre, T; de Oliveira Duarte, Y A; Ferreira Santos, J L; Wong, R; Lebrão, M L

    2014-05-01

    Sarcopenia, defined as low muscle mass (LMM), and dynapenia have been associated with adverse outcomes in elderly. Contrast the association of sarcopenia versus dynapenia with incidence of disability. A four-year prospective study (2006-2010). São Paulo, Brazil. 478 individuals aged 60 and older from the Saúde, Bem-Estar e Envelhecimento (SABE) study who were non-disabled at baseline. Sarcopenia, measured according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), includes: LMM assessed by skeletal muscle mass index ≤8.90kg/m2 (men) and ≤6.37kg/m2 (women); low muscle strength (LMS) assessed by handgrip strength hearing and body mass index. Disability in mobility or instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) or disability in activities of daily living (ADL) and IADL. The incidence density of mobility or IADL disability was 43.4/1000 person/year and 22.6/1000 person/year for IADL and ADL disability. There was no significant difference in incidence density according sarcopenia or dynapenia status. After controlling for all covariates, sarcopenia was associated with mobility or IADL disability (relative risk ratio = 2.23, 95%Confidence Interval: 1.03-4.85). Dynapenia was not associated with disability. Sarcopenia according to the EWGSOP definition can be used in clinical practice as a screening tool for early functional decline (mobility or IADL disability).

  6. Association of sarcopenia with swallowing problems, related to nutrition and activities of daily living of elderly individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Shiozu, Hiroyasu; Higashijima, Misako; Koga, Tomoshige

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the current study was to clarify problems associated with swallowing, related to nutrition and activities of daily living (ADL), in elderly individuals with sarcopenia. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-seven subjects were assigned to a sarcopenia or a non-sarcopenia group according to a definition used by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Analyses were conducted including and excluding subjects with a central nervous system disorders in order to ...

  7. Sarcopenia and sarcopenic obesity in patients with muscular dystrophy

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    Luciano eMerlini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aging sarcopenia and muscular dystrophy are two conditions characterized by lower skeletal muscle quantity, lower muscle strength, and lower physical performance. Aging is associated with a peculiar alteration in body composition called sarcopenic obesity characterized by a decrease in lean body mass and increase in fat mass. To evaluate the presence of sarcopenia and obesity in a cohort of adult patients with muscular dystrophy we have used the measurement techniques considered golden standard for sarcopenia that is for muscle mass dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, for muscle strength hand held dynamometry, and for physical performance gait speed. The study involved 14 adult patients with different types of muscular dystrophy. We were able to demonstrate that all patient were sarcopenic-obese. We showed in fact that all were sarcopenic based on appendicular lean, fat & bone free, mass index (ALMI. In addition all resulted obese according to the % of body fat determined by DXA in contrast with their body mass index ranging from underweight to obese. Skeletal muscle mass determined by DXA was markedly reduced in all patients and correlated with residual muscle strength determined by hand held dynamometry, and physical performances determined by gait speed and respiratory function. Finally we showed that ALMI was the best linear explicator of muscle strength and physical function. Altogether, our study suggest the relevance of a proper evaluation of body composition in muscular dystrophy and we propose to use, both in research and practice, the measurement techniques that has already been demonstrated effective in aging sarcopenia.

  8. The ERCC6 gene and age-related macular degeneration.

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    Dominique C Baas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible visual loss in the developed countries and is caused by both environmental and genetic factors. A recent study (Tuo et al., PNAS reported an association between AMD and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP (rs3793784 in the ERCC6 (NM_000124 gene. The risk allele also increased ERCC6 expression. ERCC6 is involved in DNA repair and mutations in ERCC6 cause Cockayne syndrome (CS. Amongst others, photosensitivity and pigmentary retinopathy are hallmarks of CS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Separate and combined data from three large AMD case-control studies and a prospective population-based study (The Rotterdam Study were used to analyse the genetic association between ERCC6 and AMD (2682 AMD cases and 3152 controls. We also measured ERCC6 mRNA levels in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells of healthy and early AMD affected human donor eyes. Rs3793784 conferred a small increase in risk for late AMD in the Dutch population (The Rotterdam and AMRO-NL study, but this was not replicated in two non-European studies (AREDS, Columbia University. In addition, the AMRO-NL study revealed no significant association for 9 other variants spanning ERCC6. Finally, we determined that ERCC6 expression in the human RPE did not depend on rs3793784 genotype, but, interestingly, on AMD status: Early AMD-affected donor eyes had a 50% lower ERCC6 expression than healthy donor eyes (P = 0.018. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our meta-analysis of four Caucasian cohorts does not replicate the reported association between SNPs in ERCC6 and AMD. Nevertheless, our findings on ERCC6 expression in the RPE suggest that ERCC6 may be functionally involved in AMD. Combining our data with those of the literature, we hypothesize that the AMD-related reduced transcriptional activity of ERCC6 may be caused by diverse, small and heterogeneous genetic and/or environmental determinants.

  9. Prevalence and incidence of sarcopenia in the very old: findings from the Newcastle 85+ Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granic, Antoneta; Davies, Karen; Kirkwood, Thomas B. L.; Jagger, Carol; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Recognition that an older person has sarcopenia is important because this condition is linked to a range of adverse outcomes. Sarcopenia becomes increasingly common with age, and yet there are few data concerning its descriptive epidemiology in the very old (aged 85 years and above). Our aims were to describe risk factors for sarcopenia and estimate its prevalence and incidence in a British sample of the very old. Methods We used data from two waves (2006/07 and 2009/10) of the Newcastle 85+ Study, a cohort born in 1921 and registered with a Newcastle/North Tyneside general practice. We assessed sarcopenia status using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) definition. Grip strength was measured using a Takei digital dynamometer (Takei Scientific Instruments Ltd., Niigata, Japan), gait speed was calculated from the Timed Up and Go test, and lean mass was estimated using a Tanita‐305 body fat analyzer. We used logistic regression to examine associations between risk factors for prevalent sarcopenia at baseline and incident sarcopenia at follow‐up. Results European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People sarcopenia was present in 21% of participants at baseline [149/719 participants, mean age 85.5 (0.4) years]. Many participants had either slow gait speed or weak grip strength (74.3%), and hence measurement of muscle mass was frequently indicated by the EWGSOP definition. Incidence data were available for 302 participants, and the incident rate was 3.7 cases per 100 person years at risk. Low Standardized Mini‐Mental State Examination, lower occupational social class, and shorter duration of education were associated with sarcopenia at baseline, while low muscle mass was associated with incident sarcopenia. Low body mass index (BMI) was a risk factor for both in a graded fashion, with each unit decrease associated with increased odds of prevalent [odds ratio (OR) 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.21, 1

  10. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatment and future options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutray, Tanya; Chakravarthy, Usha

    2011-09-01

    Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of visual impairment among older adults in the developed world. Epidemiological studies have revealed a number of genetic, ocular and environmental risk factors for this condition, which can be addressed by disease reduction strategies. We discuss the various treatment options for dry and exudative age-related macular degeneration available and explain how the recommended treatment depends on the exact type, location and extent of the degeneration. Currently, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition therapy is the best available treatment for exudative age-related macular degeneration but is limited by the need for repeated intravitreal injections. The current treatment regime is being refined through research on optimal treatment frequency and duration and type of anti-VEGF drug. Different modes of drug delivery are being developed and in the future other methods of VEGF inhibition may be used.

  11. Sarcopenia is a risk factor for cardiovascular events experienced by patients with critical limb ischemia.

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    Matsubara, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Takuya; Inoue, Kentaro; Matsuda, Daisuke; Yoshiga, Ryosuke; Yoshiya, Keiji; Furuyama, Tadashi; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-05-01

    Prognosis is poor for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI), and the most frequent cause of death is cardiovascular disease. Low grip strength is a risk factor for cardiovascular events, and sarcopenia may be associated as well. Thus, we hypothesized that sarcopenia is a risk factor for cardiovascular events experienced by patients with CLI. If this is true and appropriate therapy becomes available, the prognosis of patients with CLI will improve with appropriate risk management strategies to prevent cardiovascular events. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify this hypothesis. We studied 114 patients who underwent revascularization and computed tomography between January 2002 and December 2012 in the Department of Surgery and Sciences at Kyushu University in Japan. Sarcopenia was defined as skeletal muscle area measured by L3-level computed tomography scan sarcopenia were investigated. We identified 53 (46.5%) patients with sarcopenia. Three-year cardiovascular event-free survival rates were 43.1% and 91.2% for patients with and without sarcopenia, respectively (P sarcopenia (P sarcopenia (P sarcopenia who received SAPT, dual antiplatelet therapies, and no antiplatelet therapy were 75.3%, 21.1%, and 29.5%, respectively (P Sarcopenia is a risk factor for worse cardiovascular event-free survival, and SAPT and statin therapy reduced this risk for patients with CLI. Furthermore, SAPT but not dual antiplatelet therapy increased cardiovascular event-free survival in patients with sarcopenia. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sarcopenia and post-hospital outcomes in older adults: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Zepeda, Mario Ulises; Sgaravatti, Aldo; Dent, Elsa

    Sarcopenia poses a significant problem for older adults, yet very little is known about this medical condition in the hospital setting. The aims of this hospital-based study were to determine: (i) the prevalence of sarcopenia; (ii) factors associated with sarcopenia; and (iii) the association of sarcopenia with adverse clinical outcomes post-hospitalisation. This is a longitudinal analysis of consecutive patients aged ≥70 years admitted to a Geriatric Management and Evaluation Unit (GEMU) ward. Sarcopenia was classified using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) algorithm, which included: handgrip strength, gait speed, and muscle mass using Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA). Outcomes were assessed at 12-months post-hospital discharge, and included both mortality and admission to a hospital Emergency Department (ED). Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate survival, with Cox proportion hazard models then applied. All regression analyses controlled for age, sex, and co-morbidity. 172 patients (72% female) with a mean (SD) age of 85.2 (6.4) years were included. Sarcopenia was present in 69 (40.1%) of patients. Patients with sarcopenia were twice as likely to die in the 12-months post-hospitalisation (HR, 95% CI=2.23, 1.15-4.34), but did not have an increased likelihood of ED admission. Sarcopenia showed an independent association with 12-month post-hospital mortality in older adults. With the new recognition of sarcopenia as a medical condition with its own unique ICD-10-CM code, awareness and diagnosis of sarcopenia in clinical settings is paramount. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship between sarcopenia and physical activity in older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffl M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Michal Steffl,1 Richard W Bohannon,2 Lenka Sontakova,1 James J Tufano,1 Kate Shiells,3 Iva Holmerova3 1Department of Physiology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Charles University Prague, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Department of Physical Therapy, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, NC, USA; 3Faculty of Humanities, Centre of Gerontology, Charles University Prague, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Physical activity (PA has been identified as beneficial for many diseases and health disorders, including sarcopenia. The positive influence of PA interventions on sarcopenia has been described previously on many occasions. Current reviews on the topic include studies with varied PA interventions for sarcopenia; nevertheless, no systematic review exploring the effects of PA in general on sarcopenia has been published. The main aim of this study was to explore the relationship between PA and sarcopenia in older people on the basis of cross-sectional and cohort studies. We searched PubMed, Scopus, EBSCOhost, and ScienceDirect for articles addressing the relationship between PA and sarcopenia. Twenty-five articles were ultimately included in the qualitative and quantitative syntheses. A statistically significant association between PA and sarcopenia was documented in most of the studies, as well as the protective role of PA against sarcopenia development. Furthermore, the meta-analysis indicated that PA reduces the odds of acquiring sarcopenia in later life (odds ratio [OR] =0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37–0.55. The results of this systematic review and meta-analysis confirm the beneficial influence of PA in general for the prevention of sarcopenia. Keywords: aging, sarcopenia, physical activity 

  14. Age-related changes in task related functional network connectivity.

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    Jason Steffener

    Full Text Available Aging has a multi-faceted impact on brain structure, brain function and cognitive task performance, but the interaction of these different age-related changes is largely unexplored. We hypothesize that age-related structural changes alter the functional connectivity within the brain, resulting in altered task performance during cognitive challenges. In this neuroimaging study, we used independent components analysis to identify spatial patterns of coordinated functional activity involved in the performance of a verbal delayed item recognition task from 75 healthy young and 37 healthy old adults. Strength of functional connectivity between spatial components was assessed for age group differences and related to speeded task performance. We then assessed whether age-related differences in global brain volume were associated with age-related differences in functional network connectivity. Both age groups used a series of spatial components during the verbal working memory task and the strength and distribution of functional network connectivity between these components differed across the age groups. Poorer task performance, i.e. slower speed with increasing memory load, in the old adults was associated with decreases in functional network connectivity between components comprised of the supplementary motor area and the middle cingulate and between the precuneus and the middle/superior frontal cortex. Advancing age also led to decreased brain volume; however, there was no evidence to support the hypothesis that age-related alterations in functional network connectivity were the result of global brain volume changes. These results suggest that age-related differences in the coordination of neural activity between brain regions partially underlie differences in cognitive performance.

  15. Subfoveal choroidal thickness changes after intravitreal bevacizumab therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cihan; ünlü; Gurkan; Erdogan; Betul; Onal; Gunay; Betul; Ilkay; Sezgin; Akcay; Esra; Kardes

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Sir,Iam Dr.Cihanünlü,from the Department of Opthalmology,ümraniye Training and Research Hospital,Istanbul,Turkey.I write to present our study findings on subfoveal choroidal thickness(SFCT)changes after intravitreal bevacizumab(IVB)therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration(AMD).AMD is the leading cause of severe visual loss in adults older than 60y[1].Visual loss in late stages of AMD may be the result of one of the two processes:geographic atrophy(GA)or choroidal neovascularization(CNV).Many types of

  16. Novel gene function revealed by mouse mutagenesis screens for models of age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Paul K; Bowl, Michael R; Jeyarajan, Prashanthini; Wisby, Laura; Blease, Andrew; Goldsworthy, Michelle E; Simon, Michelle M; Greenaway, Simon; Michel, Vincent; Barnard, Alun; Aguilar, Carlos; Agnew, Thomas; Banks, Gareth; Blake, Andrew; Chessum, Lauren; Dorning, Joanne; Falcone, Sara; Goosey, Laurence; Harris, Shelley; Haynes, Andy; Heise, Ines; Hillier, Rosie; Hough, Tertius; Hoslin, Angela; Hutchison, Marie; King, Ruairidh; Kumar, Saumya; Lad, Heena V; Law, Gemma; MacLaren, Robert E; Morse, Susan; Nicol, Thomas; Parker, Andrew; Pickford, Karen; Sethi, Siddharth; Starbuck, Becky; Stelma, Femke; Cheeseman, Michael; Cross, Sally H; Foster, Russell G; Jackson, Ian J; Peirson, Stuart N; Thakker, Rajesh V; Vincent, Tonia; Scudamore, Cheryl; Wells, Sara; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine; Acevedo-Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M; Cox, Roger; Mallon, Anne-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2016-08-18

    Determining the genetic bases of age-related disease remains a major challenge requiring a spectrum of approaches from human and clinical genetics to the utilization of model organism studies. Here we report a large-scale genetic screen in mice employing a phenotype-driven discovery platform to identify mutations resulting in age-related disease, both late-onset and progressive. We have utilized N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis to generate pedigrees of mutagenized mice that were subject to recurrent screens for mutant phenotypes as the mice aged. In total, we identify 105 distinct mutant lines from 157 pedigrees analysed, out of which 27 are late-onset phenotypes across a range of physiological systems. Using whole-genome sequencing we uncover the underlying genes for 44 of these mutant phenotypes, including 12 late-onset phenotypes. These genes reveal a number of novel pathways involved with age-related disease. We illustrate our findings by the recovery and characterization of a novel mouse model of age-related hearing loss.

  17. Severe Sarcopenia and Increased Fat Stores in Pediatric Patients With Liver, Kidney, or Intestine Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangus, Richard S; Bush, Weston J; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A; Miller, Christina

    2017-06-09

    Malnutrition and wasting predict clinical outcomes in children with severe chronic illness. Objectively calculated malnutrition in children with end-stage organ failure has not been well studied. This analysis compares children with kidney, liver or intestine failure to healthy controls to quantitate the disparity in muscle and fat stores. Children younger than age 19 with end stage liver, kidney or intestine failure and with pre-transplant computed tomography (CT) imaging were selected from the transplant database. Age and gender-matched healthy controls were selected from the trauma database. Measures of nutrition status included a scaled scoring of core muscle mass, and visceral and subcutaneous fat stores. Analysis was conducted using the pooled and individually matched subject-control differences. There were 81 subjects included in the final analysis (liver (n = 35), kidney (n = 20) and intestine (n = 26)). Children with end-stage liver disease had a 23% reduction in muscle mass, a 69% increase in visceral fat and a 29% increase in subcutaneous fat. End-stage renal disease patients had a 19% reduction in muscle mass and a 258% increase in subcutaneous fat. Intestine failure patients had a 24% reduction in muscle mass, a 30% increase in visceral fat and a 46% increase in subcutaneous fat. These results demonstrate significant sarcopenia and increased fat stores in end-stage organ failure patients which supports the idea of an active physiologic mechanism to store fat while losing muscle mass. Sarcopenia may be related to total protein loss from a catabolic state, or from decreased synthesis (liver), wasting (kidney) or malabsorption (intestine).

  18. Fat Modulates the Relationship between Sarcopenia and Physical Function in Nonobese Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin L. Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is intuitive to think that sarcopenia should be associated with declines in physical function though recent evidence questions this assertion. This study investigated the relationship between absolute and relative sarcopenia, with physical performance in 202 nonobese (mean BMI =26.6 kg/ht2 community-dwelling older (mean age = 73.8±5.9 years adults. While absolute sarcopenia (appendicular skeletal mass (ASM/ht2 was either not associated, or weakly associated with physical performance, relative sarcopenia (ASM/kg demonstrated moderate (r=0.31 to r=0.51, P<0.01 relationships with performance outcomes in both males and females. Knee extension strength (r=0.27 and leg extension power (r=0.41 were both related to absolute sarcopenia (P<0.001 in females and not in males. Strength and power were associated with relative sarcopenia in both sexes (from r=0.47 to r=0.67, P<0.001. The ratio of lean mass to total body mass, that is, relative sarcopenia, is an important consideration relative to physical function in older adults even in the absence of obesity. Stratifying these individuals into equal tertiles of total body fat revealed a trend of diminished regression coefficients across each incrementally higher fat grouping for performance measures, providing further evidence that total body fat modulates the relationship between sarcopenia and physical function.

  19. Sarcopenia in the prognosis of cirrhosis: Going beyond the MELD score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Yeon; Jang, Jeong Won

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the prognosis of patients with cirrhosis remains challenging, because the natural history of cirrhosis varies according to the cause, presence of portal hypertension, liver synthetic function, and the reversibility of underlying disease. Conventional prognostic scoring systems, including the Child-Turcotte-Pugh score or model for end-stage liver diseases are widely used; however, revised models have been introduced to improve prognostic performance. Although sarcopenia is one of the most common complications related to survival of patients with cirrhosis, the newly proposed prognostic models lack a nutritional status evaluation of patients. This is reflected by the lack of an optimal index for sarcopenia in terms of objectivity, reproducibility, practicality, and prognostic performance, and of a consensus definition for sarcopenia in patients with cirrhosis in whom ascites and edema may interfere with body composition analysis. Quantifying skeletal muscle mass using cross-sectional abdominal imaging is a promising tool for assessing sarcopenia. As radiological imaging provides direct visualization of body composition, it is useful to evaluate sarcopenia in patients with cirrhosis whose body mass index, anthropometric measurements, or biochemical markers are inaccurate on a nutritional assessment. Sarcopenia defined by cross-sectional imaging-based muscular assessment is prevalent and predicts mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Sarcopenia alone or in combination with conventional prognostic systems shows promise for a cirrhosis prognosis. Including an objective assessment of sarcopenia with conventional scores to optimize the outcome prediction for patients with cirrhosis needs further research. PMID:26167066

  20. Clinical Implications of Sarcopenia on Decreased Bone Density in Men With COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji An; Kim, Young Sam; Leem, Ah Young; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Jung, Ji Ye

    2017-05-01

    Sarcopenia and osteoporosis are systemic features of COPD. The present study investigated the association between sarcopenia and osteopenia/osteoporosis and the factors associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) in men with COPD. Data from 777 men with COPD who underwent both pulmonary function test and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry were extracted from the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey database between 2008 and 2011. Sarcopenia was assessed with the appendicular skeletal mass index (ASMI) and osteopenia/osteoporosis with the T-score. As the severity of airflow limitation increased, the prevalence of sarcopenia increased (Ptrend sarcopenia became severe, the prevalence of osteopenia/osteoporosis increased (Ptrend Sarcopenia was independently associated with an increased risk of low BMD in men with COPD (OR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.53-3.46; P Sarcopenia is closely correlated with osteopenia/oste