WorldWideScience

Sample records for sarcomere control mechanisms

  1. Build it up-Tear it down: protein quality control in the cardiac sarcomere

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willis, Monte S; Schisler, Jonathan C; Portbury, Andrea L; Patterson, Cam

    .... A host of new factors have been identified that play a role in the regulation of protein quality control in the sarcomere, including chaperones that mediate the assembly of sarcomere components...

  2. Interactions between connected half-sarcomeres produce emergent mechanical behavior in a mathematical model of muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth S

    2009-11-01

    Most reductionist theories of muscle attribute a fiber's mechanical properties to the scaled behavior of a single half-sarcomere. Mathematical models of this type can explain many of the known mechanical properties of muscle but have to incorporate a passive mechanical component that becomes approximately 300% stiffer in activating conditions to reproduce the force response elicited by stretching a fast mammalian muscle fiber. The available experimental data suggests that titin filaments, which are the mostly likely source of the passive component, become at most approximately 30% stiffer in saturating Ca2+ solutions. The work described in this manuscript used computer modeling to test an alternative systems theory that attributes the stretch response of a mammalian fiber to the composite behavior of a collection of half-sarcomeres. The principal finding was that the stretch response of a chemically permeabilized rabbit psoas fiber could be reproduced with a framework consisting of 300 half-sarcomeres arranged in 6 parallel myofibrils without requiring titin filaments to stiffen in activating solutions. Ablation of inter-myofibrillar links in the computer simulations lowered isometric force values and lowered energy absorption during a stretch. This computed behavior mimics effects previously observed in experiments using muscles from desmin-deficient mice in which the connections between Z-disks in adjacent myofibrils are presumably compromised. The current simulations suggest that muscle fibers exhibit emergent properties that reflect interactions between half-sarcomeres and are not properties of a single half-sarcomere in isolation. It is therefore likely that full quantitative understanding of a fiber's mechanical properties requires detailed analysis of a complete fiber system and cannot be achieved by focusing solely on the properties of a single half-sarcomere.

  3. Interactions between connected half-sarcomeres produce emergent mechanical behavior in a mathematical model of muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth S Campbell

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Most reductionist theories of muscle attribute a fiber's mechanical properties to the scaled behavior of a single half-sarcomere. Mathematical models of this type can explain many of the known mechanical properties of muscle but have to incorporate a passive mechanical component that becomes approximately 300% stiffer in activating conditions to reproduce the force response elicited by stretching a fast mammalian muscle fiber. The available experimental data suggests that titin filaments, which are the mostly likely source of the passive component, become at most approximately 30% stiffer in saturating Ca2+ solutions. The work described in this manuscript used computer modeling to test an alternative systems theory that attributes the stretch response of a mammalian fiber to the composite behavior of a collection of half-sarcomeres. The principal finding was that the stretch response of a chemically permeabilized rabbit psoas fiber could be reproduced with a framework consisting of 300 half-sarcomeres arranged in 6 parallel myofibrils without requiring titin filaments to stiffen in activating solutions. Ablation of inter-myofibrillar links in the computer simulations lowered isometric force values and lowered energy absorption during a stretch. This computed behavior mimics effects previously observed in experiments using muscles from desmin-deficient mice in which the connections between Z-disks in adjacent myofibrils are presumably compromised. The current simulations suggest that muscle fibers exhibit emergent properties that reflect interactions between half-sarcomeres and are not properties of a single half-sarcomere in isolation. It is therefore likely that full quantitative understanding of a fiber's mechanical properties requires detailed analysis of a complete fiber system and cannot be achieved by focusing solely on the properties of a single half-sarcomere.

  4. Hypothesis and theory: Mechanical instabilities and non-uniformities in hereditary sarcomere myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alf eMansson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, due to point mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins such as myosin, occurs in 1/500 people and is the most common cause of sudden death in young individuals. Similar mutations in skeletal muscle, e.g. in the MYH7 gene for slow myosin found in both the cardiac ventricle and slow skeletal muscle, may also cause severe disease but the severity and the morphological changes are often different. In HCM, the modified protein function leads, over years to decades, to secondary remodeling with substantial morphological changes, such as hypertrophy, myofibrillar disarray and extensive fibrosis associated with severe functional deterioration. Despite intense studies, it is unclear how the moderate mutation-induced changes in protein function cause the long-term effects. In hypertrophy of the heart due to pressure overload (e.g. hypertension, mechanical stress in the myocyte is believed to be major initiating stimulus for activation of relevant cell signaling cascades. Here it is considered how expression of mutated proteins, such as myosin or regulatory proteins, could have similar consequences through one or both of the following mechanisms: 1. contractile instabilities within each sarcomere (with more than one stable velocity for a given load, 2. different tension generating capacities of cells in series. These mechanisms would have the potential to cause increased tension and/or stretch of certain cells during parts of the cardiac cycle. Modeling studies are used to illustrate these ideas and experimental tests are proposed. The applicability of similar ideas to skeletal muscle is also postulated, and differences between heart and skeletal muscle are discussed.

  5. Hand-Held Model of a Sarcomere to Illustrate the Sliding Filament Mechanism in Muscle Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jittivadhna, Karnyupha; Ruenwongsa, Pintip; Panijpan, Bhinyo

    2009-01-01

    From our teaching of the contractile unit of the striated muscle, we have found limitations in using textbook illustrations of sarcomere structure and its related dynamic molecular physiological details. A hand-held model of a striated muscle sarcomere made from common items has thus been made by us to enhance students' understanding of the…

  6. The mechanisms of the residual force enhancement after stretch of skeletal muscle: non-uniformity in half-sarcomeres and stiffness of titin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassier, Dilson E.

    2012-01-01

    When activated skeletal muscles are stretched, the force increases significantly. After the stretch, the force decreases and reaches a steady-state level that is higher than the force produced at the corresponding length during purely isometric contractions. This phenomenon, referred to as residual force enhancement, has been observed for more than 50 years, but the mechanism remains elusive, generating considerable debate in the literature. This paper reviews studies performed with single muscle fibres, myofibrils and sarcomeres to investigate the mechanisms of the stretch-induced force enhancement. First, the paper summarizes the characteristics of force enhancement and early hypotheses associated with non-uniformity of sarcomere length. Then, it reviews new evidence suggesting that force enhancement can also be associated with sarcomeric structures. Finally, this paper proposes that force enhancement is caused by: (i) half-sarcomere non-uniformities that will affect the levels of passive forces and overlap between myosin and actin filaments, and (ii) a Ca2+-induced stiffness of titin molecules. These mechanisms are compatible with most observations in the literature, and can be tested directly with emerging technologies in the near future. PMID:22535786

  7. Tetanic contraction induces enhancement of fatigability and sarcomeric damage in atrophic skeletal muscle and its underlying molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2013-11-01

    Muscle unloading due to long-term exposure of weightlessness or simulated weightlessness causes atrophy, loss of functional capacity, impaired locomotor coordination, and decreased resistance to fatigue in the antigravity muscles of the lower limbs. Besides reducing astronauts' mobility in space and on returning to a gravity environment, the molecular mechanisms for the adaptation of skeletal muscle to unloading also play an important medical role in conditions such as disuse and paralysis. The tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate the effects of weightlessness on skeletal muscles and to induce muscle unloading in the rat hindlimb. Our series studies have shown that the maximum of twitch tension and the twitch duration decreased significantly in the atrophic soleus muscles, the maximal tension of high-frequency tetanic contraction was significantly reduced in 2-week unloaded soleus muscles, however, the fatigability of high-frequency tetanic contraction increased after one week of unloading. The maximal isometric tension of intermittent tetanic contraction at optimal stimulating frequency did not alter in 1- and 2-week unloaded soleus, but significantly decreased in 4-week unloaded soleus. The 1-week unloaded soleus, but not extensor digitorum longus (EDL), was more susceptible to fatigue during intermittent tetanic contraction than the synchronous controls. The changes in K+ channel characteristics may increase the fatigability during high-frequency tetanic contraction in atrophic soleus muscles. High fatigability of intermittent tetanic contraction may be involved in enhanced activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) and switching from slow to fast isoform of myosin heavy chain, tropomyosin, troponin I and T subunit in atrophic soleus muscles. Unloaded soleus muscle also showed a decreased protein level of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and the reduction in nNOS-derived NO increased frequency of calcium sparks and elevated

  8. The sarcomeric cytoskeleton: from molecules to motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautel, Mathias; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Highly ordered organisation of striated muscle is the prerequisite for the fast and unidirectional development of force and motion during heart and skeletal muscle contraction. A group of proteins, summarised as the sarcomeric cytoskeleton, is essential for the ordered assembly of actin and myosin filaments into sarcomeres, by combining architectural, mechanical and signalling functions. This review discusses recent cell biological, biophysical and structural insight into the regulated assembly of sarcomeric cytoskeleton proteins and their roles in dissipating mechanical forces in order to maintain sarcomere integrity during passive extension and active contraction. α-Actinin crosslinks in the Z-disk show a pivot-and-rod structure that anchors both titin and actin filaments. In contrast, the myosin crosslinks formed by myomesin in the M-band are of a ball-and-spring type and may be crucial in providing stable yet elastic connections during active contractions, especially eccentric exercise. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Circadian regulation of myocardial sarcomeric Titin-cap (Tcap, telethonin: identification of cardiac clock-controlled genes using open access bioinformatics data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter S Podobed

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important for healthy cardiovascular physiology and are regulated at the molecular level by a circadian clock mechanism. We and others previously demonstrated that 9-13% of the cardiac transcriptome is rhythmic over 24 h daily cycles; the heart is genetically a different organ day versus night. However, which rhythmic mRNAs are regulated by the circadian mechanism is not known. Here, we used open access bioinformatics databases to identify 94 transcripts with expression profiles characteristic of CLOCK and BMAL1 targeted genes, using the CircaDB website and JTK_Cycle. Moreover, 22 were highly expressed in the heart as determined by the BioGPS website. Furthermore, 5 heart-enriched genes had human/mouse conserved CLOCK:BMAL1 promoter binding sites (E-boxes, as determined by UCSC table browser, circadian mammalian promoter/enhancer database PEDB, and the European Bioinformatics Institute alignment tool (EMBOSS. Lastly, we validated findings by demonstrating that Titin cap (Tcap, telethonin was targeted by transcriptional activators CLOCK and BMAL1 by showing 1 Tcap mRNA and TCAP protein had a diurnal rhythm in murine heart; 2 cardiac Tcap mRNA was rhythmic in animals kept in constant darkness; 3 Tcap and control Per2 mRNA expression and cyclic amplitude were blunted in Clock(Δ19/Δ19 hearts; 4 BMAL1 bound to the Tcap promoter by ChIP assay; 5 BMAL1 bound to Tcap promoter E-boxes by biotinylated oligonucleotide assay; and 6 CLOCK and BMAL1 induced tcap expression by luciferase reporter assay. Thus this study identifies circadian regulated genes in silico, with validation of Tcap, a critical regulator of cardiac Z-disc sarcomeric structure and function.

  10. Dynamic Alterations to α-Actinin Accompanying Sarcomere Disassembly and Reassembly during Cardiomyocyte Mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Fan

    Full Text Available Although mammals are thought to lose their capacity to regenerate heart muscle shortly after birth, embryonic and neonatal cardiomyocytes in mammals are hyperplastic. During proliferation these cells need to selectively disassemble their myofibrils for successful cytokinesis. The mechanism of sarcomere disassembly is, however, not understood. To study this, we performed a series of immunofluorescence studies of multiple sarcomeric proteins in proliferating neonatal rat ventricular myocytes and correlated these observations with biochemical changes at different cell cycle stages. During myocyte mitosis, α-actinin and titin were disassembled as early as prometaphase. α-actinin (representing the sarcomeric Z-disk disassembly precedes that of titin (M-line, suggesting that titin disassembly occurs secondary to the collapse of the Z-disk. Sarcomere disassembly was concurrent with the dissolution of the nuclear envelope. Inhibitors of several intracellular proteases could not block the disassembly of α-actinin or titin. There was a dramatic increase in both cytosolic (soluble and sarcomeric α-actinin during mitosis, and cytosolic α-actinin exhibited decreased phosphorylation compared to sarcomeric α-actinin. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 induced the quick reassembly of the sarcomere. Sarcomere dis- and re-assembly in cardiomyocyte mitosis is CDK1-dependent and features dynamic differential post-translational modifications of sarcomeric and cytosolic α-actinin.

  11. Breaking sarcomeres by in vitro exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, Zacharias; Gödderz, Markus P O; Soroka, Ekaterina; Gödderz, Tobias; Rumyantseva, Anastasia; van der Ven, Peter F M; Hawke, Thomas J; Fürst, Dieter O

    2016-01-25

    Eccentric exercise leads to focal disruptions in the myofibrils, referred to as "lesions". These structures are thought to contribute to the post-exercise muscle weakness, and to represent areas of mechanical damage and/or remodelling. Lesions have been investigated in human biopsies and animal samples after exercise. However, this approach does not examine the mechanisms behind lesion formation, or their behaviour during contraction. To circumvent this, we used electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) to simulate exercise in C2C12 myotubes, combined with live microscopy. EPS application led to the formation of sarcomeric lesions in the myotubes, resembling those seen in exercised mice, increasing in number with the time of application or stimulation intensity. Furthermore, transfection with an EGFP-tagged version of the lesion and Z-disc marker filamin-C allowed us to observe the formation of lesions using live cell imaging. Finally, using the same technique we studied the behaviour of these structures during contraction, and observed them to be passively stretching. This passive behaviour supports the hypothesis that lesions contribute to the post-exercise muscle weakness, protecting against further damage. We conclude that EPS can be reliably used as a model for the induction and study of sarcomeric lesions in myotubes in vitro.

  12. Breaking sarcomeres by in vitro exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, Zacharias; Gödderz, Markus P. O.; Soroka, Ekaterina; Gödderz, Tobias; Rumyantseva, Anastasia; van der Ven, Peter F. M.; Hawke, Thomas J.; Fürst, Dieter O.

    2016-01-01

    Eccentric exercise leads to focal disruptions in the myofibrils, referred to as “lesions”. These structures are thought to contribute to the post-exercise muscle weakness, and to represent areas of mechanical damage and/or remodelling. Lesions have been investigated in human biopsies and animal samples after exercise. However, this approach does not examine the mechanisms behind lesion formation, or their behaviour during contraction. To circumvent this, we used electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) to simulate exercise in C2C12 myotubes, combined with live microscopy. EPS application led to the formation of sarcomeric lesions in the myotubes, resembling those seen in exercised mice, increasing in number with the time of application or stimulation intensity. Furthermore, transfection with an EGFP-tagged version of the lesion and Z-disc marker filamin-C allowed us to observe the formation of lesions using live cell imaging. Finally, using the same technique we studied the behaviour of these structures during contraction, and observed them to be passively stretching. This passive behaviour supports the hypothesis that lesions contribute to the post-exercise muscle weakness, protecting against further damage. We conclude that EPS can be reliably used as a model for the induction and study of sarcomeric lesions in myotubes in vitro. PMID:26804343

  13. Contractile Dysfunction in Sarcomeric Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIver, David H; Clark, Andrew L

    2016-09-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the clinical phenotype of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are controversial. The development of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension and aortic stenosis is usually described as a compensatory mechanism that normalizes wall stress. We suggest that an important abnormality in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is reduced contractile stress (the force per unit area) generated by myocardial tissue secondary to abnormalities such as cardiomyocyte disarray. In turn, a progressive deterioration in contractile stress provokes worsening hypertrophy and disarray. A maintained or even exaggerated ejection fraction is explained by the increased end-diastolic wall thickness producing augmented thickening. We propose that the nature of the hemodynamic load in an individual with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy could determine its phenotype. Hypertensive patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are more likely to develop exaggerated concentric hypertrophy; athletic individuals an asymmetric pattern; and inactive individuals a more apical hypertrophy. The development of a left ventricular outflow tract gradient and mitral regurgitation may be explained by differential regional strain resulting in mitral annular rotation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Analysis of the ACTN3 heterozygous genotype suggests that α-actinin-3 controls sarcomeric composition and muscle function in a dose-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Marshall W; Garton, Fleur C; Houweling, Peter J; Tukiainen, Taru; Lek, Monkol; Macarthur, Daniel G; Seto, Jane T; Quinlan, Kate G R; Yang, Nan; Head, Stewart I; North, Kathryn N

    2016-03-01

    A common null polymorphism (R577X) in ACTN3 causes α-actinin-3 deficiency in ∼ 18% of the global population. There is no associated disease phenotype, but α-actinin-3 deficiency is detrimental to sprint and power performance in both elite athletes and the general population. However, despite considerable investigation to date, the functional consequences of heterozygosity for ACTN3 are unclear. A subset of studies have shown an intermediate phenotype in 577RX individuals, suggesting dose-dependency of α-actinin-3, while others have shown no difference between 577RR and RX genotypes. Here, we investigate the effects of α-actinin-3 expression level by comparing the muscle phenotypes of Actn3(+/-) (HET) mice to Actn3(+/+) [wild-type (WT)] and Actn3(-/-) [knockout (KO)] littermates. We show reduction in α-actinin-3 mRNA and protein in HET muscle compared with WT, which is associated with dose-dependent up-regulation of α-actinin-2, z-band alternatively spliced PDZ-motif and myotilin at the Z-line, and an incremental shift towards oxidative metabolism. While there is no difference in force generation, HET mice have an intermediate endurance capacity compared with WT and KO. The R577X polymorphism is associated with changes in ACTN3 expression consistent with an additive model in the human genotype-tissue expression cohort, but does not influence any other muscle transcripts, including ACTN2. Overall, ACTN3 influences sarcomeric composition in a dose-dependent fashion in mouse skeletal muscle, which translates directly to function. Variance in fibre type between biopsies likely masks this phenomenon in human skeletal muscle, but we suggest that an additive model is the most appropriate for use in testing ACTN3 genotype associations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Sarcomere neutralization in inherited cardiomyopathy: small-molecule proof-of-concept to correct hyper-Ca2+-sensitive myofilaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Brian R; Martindale, Joshua; Metzger, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    The sarcomere is the functional unit of the heart. Alterations in sarcomere activation lead to disease states such as hypertrophic and restrictive cardiomyopathy (HCM/RCM). Mutations in many of the sarcomeric genes are causal for HCM/RCM. In most cases, these mutations result in increased Ca(2+) sensitivity of the sarcomere, giving rise to altered systolic and diastolic function. There is emerging evidence that small-molecule sarcomere neutralization is a potential therapeutic strategy for HCM/RCM. To pursue proof-of-concept, W7 was used here because of its well-known Ca(2+) desensitizer biochemical effects at the level of cardiac troponin C. Acute treatment of adult cardiac myocytes with W7 caused a dose-dependent (1-10 μM) decrease in contractility in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. Alkalosis was used as an in vitro experimental model of acquired heightened Ca(2+) sensitivity, resulting in increased live cell contractility and decreased baseline sarcomere length, which were rapidly corrected with W7. As an inherited cardiomyopathy model, R193H cardiac troponin I (cTnI) transgenic myocytes showed significant decreased baseline sarcomere length and slowed relaxation that were rapidly and dose-dependently corrected by W7. Langendorff whole heart pacing stress showed that R193H cTnI transgenic hearts had elevated end-diastolic pressures at all pacing frequencies compared with hearts from nontransgenic mice. Acute treatment with W7 rapidly restored end-diastolic pressures to normal values in R193H cTnI hearts, supporting a sarcomere intrinsic mechanism of dysfunction. The known off-target effects of W7 notwithstanding, these results provide further proof-of-concept that small-molecule-based sarcomere neutralization is a potential approach to remediate hyper-Ca(2+)-sensitive sarcomere function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardiff, Jil C; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-04-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Targets for therapy in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardiff, Jil C.; Carrier, Lucie; Bers, Donald M.; Poggesi, Corrado; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Coppini, Raffaele; Maier, Lars S.; Ashrafian, Houman; Huke, Sabine; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    To date, no compounds or interventions exist that treat or prevent sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Established therapies currently improve the outcome, but novel therapies may be able to more fundamentally affect the disease process and course. Investigations of the pathomechanisms are generating molecular insights that can be useful for the design of novel specific drugs suitable for clinical use. As perturbations in the heart are stage-specific, proper timing of drug treatment is essential to prevent initiation and progression of cardiac disease in mutation carrier individuals. In this review, we emphasize potential novel therapies which may prevent, delay, or even reverse hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric gene mutations. These include corrections of genetic defects, altered sarcomere function, perturbations in intracellular ion homeostasis, and impaired myocardial energetics. PMID:25634554

  18. A mathematical model of muscle containing heterogeneous half-sarcomeres exhibits residual force enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stuart G; Hatfield, P Chris; Campbell, Kenneth S

    2011-09-01

    A skeletal muscle fiber that is stimulated to contract and then stretched from L₁ to L₂ produces more force after the initial transient decays than if it is stimulated at L₂. This behavior has been well studied experimentally, and is known as residual force enhancement. The underlying mechanism remains controversial. We hypothesized that residual force enhancement could reflect mechanical interactions between heterogeneous half-sarcomeres. To test this hypothesis, we subjected a computational model of interacting heterogeneous half-sarcomeres to the same activation and stretch protocols that produce residual force enhancement in real preparations. Following a transient period of elevated force associated with active stretching, the model predicted a slowly decaying force enhancement lasting >30 seconds after stretch. Enhancement was on the order of 13% above isometric tension at the post-stretch muscle length, which agrees well with experimental measurements. Force enhancement in the model was proportional to stretch magnitude but did not depend strongly on the velocity of stretch, also in agreement with experiments. Even small variability in the strength of half-sarcomeres (2.1% standard deviation, normally distributed) was sufficient to produce a 5% force enhancement over isometric tension. Analysis of the model suggests that heterogeneity in half-sarcomeres leads to residual force enhancement by storing strain energy introduced during active stretch in distributions of bound cross-bridges. Complex interactions between the heterogeneous half-sarcomeres then dissipate this stored energy at a rate much slower than isolated cross-bridges would cycle. Given the variations in half-sarcomere length that have been observed in real muscle preparations and the stochastic variability inherent in all biological systems, half-sarcomere heterogeneity cannot be excluded as a contributing source of residual force enhancement.

  19. A mathematical model of muscle containing heterogeneous half-sarcomeres exhibits residual force enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart G Campbell

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A skeletal muscle fiber that is stimulated to contract and then stretched from L₁ to L₂ produces more force after the initial transient decays than if it is stimulated at L₂. This behavior has been well studied experimentally, and is known as residual force enhancement. The underlying mechanism remains controversial. We hypothesized that residual force enhancement could reflect mechanical interactions between heterogeneous half-sarcomeres. To test this hypothesis, we subjected a computational model of interacting heterogeneous half-sarcomeres to the same activation and stretch protocols that produce residual force enhancement in real preparations. Following a transient period of elevated force associated with active stretching, the model predicted a slowly decaying force enhancement lasting >30 seconds after stretch. Enhancement was on the order of 13% above isometric tension at the post-stretch muscle length, which agrees well with experimental measurements. Force enhancement in the model was proportional to stretch magnitude but did not depend strongly on the velocity of stretch, also in agreement with experiments. Even small variability in the strength of half-sarcomeres (2.1% standard deviation, normally distributed was sufficient to produce a 5% force enhancement over isometric tension. Analysis of the model suggests that heterogeneity in half-sarcomeres leads to residual force enhancement by storing strain energy introduced during active stretch in distributions of bound cross-bridges. Complex interactions between the heterogeneous half-sarcomeres then dissipate this stored energy at a rate much slower than isolated cross-bridges would cycle. Given the variations in half-sarcomere length that have been observed in real muscle preparations and the stochastic variability inherent in all biological systems, half-sarcomere heterogeneity cannot be excluded as a contributing source of residual force enhancement.

  20. Mechanical properties of non-sarcomeric cytoskeleton of mice cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibers after 30-day spaceflight biosatellite BION-M1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogneva, Irina; Maximova, Maria; Larina, Irina

    The aim of this study was to determine transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton and cytoskeletal protein desmin content of the left ventricle cardiomyocytes, soleus and tibialis anterior muscle fibers of the mice after 30-days space flight biosatellite «BION-M1» (Russia, 2013). The dissection was made after 13-16.5 hours after landing. Transversal stiffness was measured in relaxed and calcium activated state by atomic force microscope. Desmin content was estimated by using western-blot, expression level of the gene, coding desmin, - by real time PCR. The transversal stiffness of the cortical cytoskeleton of the cardiomyocytes and fibers of the skeletal muscles (as measured using the atomic force microscopy) did not differ significantly within the study groups in comparison to the vivarium control group, except for its slight increase in tibialis anterior fibers muscle in the post-flight group of animals. The content of beta- and gamma-actin in the membranous fraction of proteins in the left ventricular cardiomyocytes (as detected using the western blot technique) did not differ significantly within all study groups and correlated with the transversal stiffness. Similar situation was revealed in fibers of the soleus muscle and tibialis anterior muscle, as well as correlation with the transversal stiffness of their cortical cytoskeleton was noted. At the same time, the content of beta-actin in the cytoplasmic fraction of proteins was found to be decreased in all types of studied tissues in comparison to the control levels in the post-flight group, as well as lowered beta-actin gene expression rates in the post-flight group of animals (as detected using the RT-PCR technique). After completion of the space flight, content of alpha-actinin-4 was found to be reduced in the membranous fraction of proteins of mouse cardiomyocytes, while its content in the cytoplasmic fraction of proteins did not change significantly. Furthermore, gene expression rates of this

  1. Disruption of a GATA4/Ankrd1 signaling axis in cardiomyocytes leads to sarcomere disarray: implications for anthracycline cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Chen

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin (Adriamycin is an effective anti-cancer drug, but its clinical usage is limited by a dose-dependent cardiotoxicity characterized by widespread sarcomere disarray and loss of myofilaments. Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP, ANKRD1 is a transcriptional regulatory protein that is extremely susceptible to doxorubicin; however, the mechanism(s of doxorubicin-induced CARP depletion and its specific role in cardiomyocytes have not been completely defined. We report that doxorubicin treatment in cardiomyocytes resulted in inhibition of CARP transcription, depletion of CARP protein levels, inhibition of myofilament gene transcription, and marked sarcomere disarray. Knockdown of CARP with small interfering RNA (siRNA similarly inhibited myofilament gene transcription and disrupted cardiomyocyte sarcomere structure. Adenoviral overexpression of CARP, however, was unable to rescue the doxorubicin-induced sarcomere disarray phenotype. Doxorubicin also induced depletion of the cardiac transcription factor GATA4 in cardiomyocytes. CARP expression is regulated in part by GATA4, prompting us to examine the relationship between GATA4 and CARP in cardiomyocytes. We show in co-transfection experiments that GATA4 operates upstream of CARP by activating the proximal CARP promoter. GATA4-siRNA knockdown in cardiomyocytes inhibited CARP expression and myofilament gene transcription, and induced extensive sarcomere disarray. Adenoviral overexpression of GATA4 (AdV-GATA4 in cardiomyocytes prior to doxorubicin exposure maintained GATA4 levels, modestly restored CARP levels, and attenuated sarcomere disarray. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated depletion of CARP completely abolished the Adv-GATA4 rescue of the doxorubicin-induced sarcomere phenotype. These data demonstrate co-dependent roles for GATA4 and CARP in regulating sarcomere gene expression and maintaining sarcomeric organization in cardiomyocytes in culture. The data further suggests that concurrent

  2. Nonholonomic mechanics and control

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, RM

    2015-01-01

    This book explores some of the connections between control theory and geometric mechanics; that is, control theory is linked with a geometric view of classical mechanics in both its Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations and in particular with the theory of mechanical systems subject to motion constraints. The synthesis of the topic is appropriate as there is a particularly rich connection between mechanics and nonlinear control theory. The book provides a unified treatment of nonlinear control theory and constrained mechanical systems and illustrates the elegant mathematics behind many simple, interesting, and useful mechanical examples. It is intended for graduate students who wish to learn this subject and researchers in the area who want to enhance their techniques. The book contains sections focusing on physical examples and elementary terms, as well as theoretical sections that use sophisticated analysis and geometry. The first four chapters offer preliminaries and background information, while the...

  3. Adaptation of physiological cross-sectional area and serial number of sarcomeres after tendon transfer of rat muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijing, P A; Maas, H

    2016-03-01

    Tendon transfer surgery to a new extensor insertion was performed for musculus flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) of young adult rats, after which animals were allowed to recover. Mechanical properties and adaptive effects on body mass, bone growth, serial number of sarcomeres, and muscle physiological cross-sectional area were studied. Between the transfer and control groups, no differences were found for body mass and forearm length growth. In contrast, transferred muscles had a 19% smaller physiological cross-sectional area and 25% fewer sarcomeres in series within its muscle fibers than control muscles, i.e., a deficit in muscle belly growth is present. Our present results confirm our the length of previous work showing a limited capability of changing the adapted transferred FCU muscle belly, as the muscle-tendon complex is stretched, so that most of the acute FCU length change must originate from the tendon. This should most likely be attributed to surgery-related additional and/or altered connective tissue linkages at the muscle-tendon boundary. The substantially increased FCU tendon length found, after recovery from surgery and adaptation to the conditions of the transferred position, is likely to be related to such enhanced stretching of the FCU tendon. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. REACTOR CONTROL MECHANISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, J.A.; Engberg, R.E.; Welch, J.M.

    1959-05-12

    A quick-releasing mechanism is described which may be used to rapidiy drop a device supported from beneath during normal use, such as a safety rod in a nuclear reactor. In accordance with this invention an electrical control signal, such as may be provided by radiation detection or other alarm condition sensing devices, is delivered to an electromagnetic solenoid, the armature of which is coupled to an actuating mechanism. The solenoid is energized when the mechanism is in its upper or cocked position. In such position, the mechanism engages a plurality of retaining balls, forcing them outward into engagement with a shoulder or recess in a corresponding section of a tubular extension on the upheld device. When the control signal to the solenoid suddenly ceases, the armature drops out, allowing the actuating mechanism to move slightly but rapidly under the force of a compressed spring. The weight of the device will urge the balls inward against a beveled portion of the actuating mechanism and away from the engaging section on the tubular extension, thus allowing the upheld device to fall freely under the influence of gravity.

  5. Expression of various sarcomeric tropomyosin isoforms in equine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hence, we undertook a comprehensive exploratory study of various TPM isoforms from horse heart and skeletal muscle. We have cloned and sequenced two sarcomeric isoforms of the TPM1 gene called TPM1α and TPM1κ, one sarcomeric isoform of the TPM2 and one of the TPM3 gene, TPM2α and TPM3α respectively.

  6. Role of common sarcomeric gene polymorphisms in genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Mutations in sarcomeric genes are common genetic cause of cardiomyopathies. An intronic 25-bp deletion in cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) at 3 region is associated with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies in Southeast Asia. However, the frequency of sarcomeric gene polymorphisms and ...

  7. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Carolyn Y.; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic

  8. T1 measurements identify extracellular volume expansion in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy sarcomere mutation carriers with and without left ventricular hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Abbasi, Siddique A; Neilan, Tomas G; Shah, Ravi V; Chen, Yucheng; Heydari, Bobak; Cirino, Allison L; Lakdawala, Neal K; Orav, E John; González, Arantxa; López, Begoña; Díez, Javier; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2013-05-01

    Myocardial fibrosis is a hallmark of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and a potential substrate for arrhythmias and heart failure. Sarcomere mutations seem to induce profibrotic changes before left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) develops. To further evaluate these processes, we used cardiac magnetic resonance with T1 measurements on a genotyped HCM population to quantify myocardial extracellular volume (ECV). Sarcomere mutation carriers with LVH (G+/LVH+, n=37) and without LVH (G+/LVH-, n=29), patients with HCM without mutations (sarcomere-negative HCM, n=11), and healthy controls (n=11) underwent contrast cardiac magnetic resonance, measuring T1 times pre- and postgadolinium infusion. Concurrent echocardiography and serum biomarkers of collagen synthesis, hemodynamic stress, and myocardial injury were also available in a subset. Compared with controls, ECV was increased in patients with overt HCM, as well as G+/LVH- mutation carriers (ECV=0.36±0.01, 0.33±0.01, 0.27±0.01 in G+/LVH+, G+/LVH-, controls, respectively; P≤0.001 for all comparisons). ECV correlated with N-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide levels (r=0.58; P60% of overt patients with HCM but absent from G+/LVH- subjects. Both ECV and late gadolinium enhancement were more extensive in sarcomeric HCM than sarcomere-negative HCM. Myocardial ECV is increased in HCM sarcomere mutation carriers even in the absence of LVH. These data provide additional support that fibrotic remodeling is triggered early in disease pathogenesis. Quantifying ECV may help characterize the development of myocardial fibrosis in HCM and ultimately assist in developing novel disease-modifying therapy, targeting interstitial fibrosis.

  9. Defining phenotypes and disease progression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: contemporary role of clinical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivotto, Iacopo; d'Amati, Giulia; Basso, Cristina; Van Rossum, Albert; Patten, Monica; Emdin, Michele; Pinto, Yigal; Tomberli, Benedetta; Camici, Paolo G; Michels, Michelle

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in cardiac sarcomere protein genes are associated with a variety of clinical phenotypes, including hypertrophic (HCM), dilated (DCM), and restrictive (RCM) cardiomyopathy as well as left ventricular non-compaction, with the overlap of morpho-functional manifestations in individual patients and families. Over time, initial phenotypes may undergo profound changes which determine clinical course and disease progression. Although genetic defects causing HCM and DCM have opposite effects at the myofilament level, a number of downstream maladaptive mechanisms, ranging from microvascular dysfunction and ischaemia to myocardial fibrosis and from diastolic dysfunction to abnormal sympathetic activation and arrhythmogenesis, seem to recur in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies, independent of the presenting phenotype. The extent and rate at which each of these features occur and evolve may be radically different in each form of cardiomyopathy, determining a clinical heterogeneity that is not only cross-sectional, but also longitudinal, i.e. time-related. Timely and sensitive detection of these long-term modifications in the clinical setting is a key to preventing advanced disease and identifying novel therapeutic targets. The present review evaluates the contribution of contemporary technology to pre-clinical diagnosis, characterization of phenotypes, and assessment of disease progression in sarcomere cardiomyopathies, including echocardiography, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance, pathology, and circulating biomarkers. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Elastic Energy Storage and Radial Forces in the Myofilament Lattice Depend on Sarcomere Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C. David; Regnier, Michael; Daniel, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    We most often consider muscle as a motor generating force in the direction of shortening, but less often consider its roles as a spring or a brake. Here we develop a fully three-dimensional spatially explicit model of muscle to isolate the locations of forces and energies that are difficult to separate experimentally. We show the strain energy in the thick and thin filaments is less than one third the strain energy in attached cross-bridges. This result suggests the cross-bridges act as springs, storing energy within muscle in addition to generating the force which powers muscle. Comparing model estimates of energy consumed to elastic energy stored, we show that the ratio of these two properties changes with sarcomere length. The model predicts storage of a greater fraction of energy at short sarcomere lengths, suggesting a mechanism by which muscle function shifts as force production declines, from motor to spring. Additionally, we investigate the force that muscle produces in the radial or transverse direction, orthogonal to the direction of shortening. We confirm prior experimental estimates that place radial forces on the same order of magnitude as axial forces, although we find that radial forces and axial forces vary differently with changes in sarcomere length. PMID:23166482

  11. Sarcomeric lesions and remodeling proximal to intercalated disks in overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebir, Sied; Orfanos, Zacharias; Schuld, Julia; Linhart, Markus; Lamberz, Christian; van der Ven, Peter F M; Schrickel, Jan; Kirfel, Gregor; Fürst, Dieter O; Meyer, Rainer

    2016-10-15

    Pressure overload induces cardiac remodeling involving both the contractile machinery and intercalated disks (IDs). Filamin C (FlnC) and Xin actin-binding repeat-containing proteins (XIRPs) are multi-adapters localizing in IDs of higher vertebrates. Knockout of the gene encoding Xin (Xirp1) in mice leads to a mild cardiac phenotype with ID mislocalization. In order to amplify this phenotype, we performed transverse aortic constriction (TAC) on control and Xirp1-deficient mice. TAC induced similar left ventricular hypertrophy in both genotypes, suggesting that the lack of Xin does not lead to higher susceptibility to cardiac overload. However, in both genotypes, FlnC appeared in "streaming" localizations across multiple sarcomeres proximal to the IDs, suggesting a remodeling response. Furthermore, FlnC-positive areas of remodeling, reminiscent of sarcomeric lesions previously described for skeletal muscles (but so far unreported in the heart), were also observed. These adaptations reflect a similarly strong effect of the pressure induced by TAC in both genotypes. However, 2 weeks post-operation TAC-treated knockout hearts had reduced levels of connexin43 and slightly increased incidents of ventricular tachycardia compared to their wild-type (WT) counterparts. Our findings highlight the FlnC-positive sarcomeric lesions and ID-proximal streaming as general remodeling responses in cardiac overload-induced hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intramuscular connective tissue differences in spastic and control muscle: a mechanical and histological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije de Bruin

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP of the spastic type is a neurological disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks. Secondary to the spasticity, muscle adaptation is presumed to contribute to limitations in the passive range of joint motion. However, the mechanisms underlying these limitations are unknown. Using biopsies, we compared mechanical as well as histological properties of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU from CP patients (n = 29 and healthy controls (n = 10. The sarcomere slack length (mean 2.5 µm, SEM 0.05 and slope of the normalized sarcomere length-tension characteristics of spastic fascicle segments and single myofibre segments were not different from those of control muscle. Fibre type distribution also showed no significant differences. Fibre size was significantly smaller (1933 µm2, SEM 190 in spastic muscle than in controls (2572 µm2, SEM 322. However, our statistical analyses indicate that the latter difference is likely to be explained by age, rather than by the affliction. Quantities of endomysial and perimysial networks within biopsies of control and spastic muscle were unchanged with one exception: a significant thickening of the tertiary perimysium (3-fold, i.e. the connective tissue reinforcement of neurovascular tissues penetrating the muscle. Note that this thickening in tertiary perimysium was shown in the majority of CP patients, however a small number of patients (n = 4 out of 23 did not have this feature. These results are taken as indications that enhanced myofascial loads on FCU is one among several factors contributing in a major way to the aetiology of limitation of movement at the wrist in CP and the characteristic wrist position of such patients.

  13. Sarcomere lattice geometry influences cooperative myosin binding in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand C W Tanner

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In muscle, force emerges from myosin binding with actin (forming a cross-bridge. This actomyosin binding depends upon myofilament geometry, kinetics of thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and kinetics of cross-bridge cycling. Binding occurs within a compliant network of protein filaments where there is mechanical coupling between myosins along the thick-filament backbone and between actin monomers along the thin filament. Such mechanical coupling precludes using ordinary differential equation models when examining the effects of lattice geometry, kinetics, or compliance on force production. This study uses two stochastically driven, spatially explicit models to predict levels of cross-bridge binding, force, thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and ATP utilization. One model incorporates the 2-to-1 ratio of thin to thick filaments of vertebrate striated muscle (multi-filament model, while the other comprises only one thick and one thin filament (two-filament model. Simulations comparing these models show that the multi-filament predictions of force, fractional cross-bridge binding, and cross-bridge turnover are more consistent with published experimental values. Furthermore, the values predicted by the multi-filament model are greater than those values predicted by the two-filament model. These increases are larger than the relative increase of potential inter-filament interactions in the multi-filament model versus the two-filament model. This amplification of coordinated cross-bridge binding and cycling indicates a mechanism of cooperativity that depends on sarcomere lattice geometry, specifically the ratio and arrangement of myofilaments.

  14. Subtle abnormalities in contractile function are an early manifestation of sarcomere mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens J; Colan, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    Sarcomere mutations cause both dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM); however, the steps leading from mutation to disease are not well described. By studying mutation carriers before a clinical diagnosis develops, we characterize the early manifestations of sarcomere...

  15. Sarcomeric model of stretch-induced stress fiber reorganization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rol

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Roland Kaunas1, Hui-Ju Hsu1, Shinji Deguchi21Department of Biomedical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA; 2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, JapanAbstract: Actin stress fibers (SFs are mechanosensitive structural elements that respond to applied stress and strain to regulate cell morphology, signal transduction, and cell function. Results from various studies indicate that SFs tend to maintain stress or strain at a constant level. We developed a simple quantitative sarcomeric model of SFs to predict the role of actomyosin crossbridge cycling in SF tension regulation and reorientation in response to cyclic stretching. Under static conditions, the steady-state levels of SF tension were determined by the fiber passive stiffness and the stall force of the constituent myosin II filaments. When subject to cyclic changes in length at low frequencies, SFs change their unloaded reference length levels through myosin sliding to maintain tension at the original level. At high stretch frequencies, myosin cannot respond quickly enough and the SF behaves elastically. Myosin sliding also contributes to SF turnover, resulting in SF reorientation away from the direction of stretching at high, but not low, stretch frequencies. Using model parameters extracted from the literature, our model describes the dependence of cyclic stretch-induced SF alignment on stretch frequency and pattern consistent with experimental findings. This analysis predicts that myosin II plays multiple roles in regulating the ability of SFs to adapt to a dynamic mechanical environment.Keywords: mechanical stretch, cytoskeletal dynamics, myosin, mechanotransduction

  16. Cardiac alpha-myosin (MYH6 is the predominant sarcomeric disease gene for familial atrial septal defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian G Posch

    Full Text Available Secundum-type atrial septal defects (ASDII account for approximately 10% of all congenital heart defects (CHD and are associated with a familial risk. Mutations in transcription factors represent a genetic source for ASDII. Yet, little is known about the role of mutations in sarcomeric genes in ASDII etiology. To assess the role of sarcomeric genes in patients with inherited ASDII, we analyzed 13 sarcomeric genes (MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TCAP, TNNI3, MYH6, TPM1, MYL2, CSRP3, ACTC1, MYL3, TNNC1, and TTN kinase region in 31 patients with familial ASDII using array-based resequencing. Genotyping of family relatives and control subjects as well as structural and homology analyses were used to evaluate the pathogenic impact of novel non-synonymous gene variants. Three novel missense mutations were found in the MYH6 gene encoding alpha-myosin heavy chain (R17H, C539R, and K543R. These mutations co-segregated with CHD in the families and were absent in 370 control alleles. Interestingly, all three MYH6 mutations are located in a highly conserved region of the alpha-myosin motor domain, which is involved in myosin-actin interaction. In addition, the cardiomyopathy related MYH6-A1004S and the MYBPC3-A833T mutations were also found in one and two unrelated subjects with ASDII, respectively. No mutations were found in the 11 other sarcomeric genes analyzed. The study indicates that sarcomeric gene mutations may represent a so far underestimated genetic source for familial recurrence of ASDII. In particular, perturbations in the MYH6 head domain seem to play a major role in the genetic origin of familial ASDII.

  17. Overstretching of sarcomeres may not cause cerebral palsy muscle contracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulders, Mark J. C.; Kreulen, Michiel; Hage, J. Joris; Huijing, Peter A.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.

    2004-01-01

    To answer the question whether the muscle contracture in patients with cerebral palsy is caused by overstretching of in-series sarcomeres we studied the active and passive force-length relationship of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) in relation to its operating length range in 14 such patients

  18. Diaphragm weakness in pulmonary arterial hypertension: role of sarcomeric dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manders, E.; Man, F.S. de; Handoko, M.L.; Westerhof, N.; Hees, H.W.H. van; Stienen, G.J.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A.; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that diaphragm muscle weakness is present in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH). However, the nature of this diaphragm weakness is still unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether changes at the sarcomeric level contribute to

  19. Optimal Control of Mechanical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Azhmyakov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we consider a class of nonlinear optimal control problems, which can be called “optimal control problems in mechanics.” We deal with control systems whose dynamics can be described by a system of Euler-Lagrange or Hamilton equations. Using the variational structure of the solution of the corresponding boundary-value problems, we reduce the initial optimal control problem to an auxiliary problem of multiobjective programming. This technique makes it possible to apply some consistent numerical approximations of a multiobjective optimization problem to the initial optimal control problem. For solving the auxiliary problem, we propose an implementable numerical algorithm.

  20. Sarcomere length-dependence of activity-dependent twitch potentiation in mouse skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacIntosh Brian R

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been reported that potentiation of a skeletal muscle twitch response is proportional to muscle length with a negative slope during staircase, and a positive slope during posttetanic potentiation. This study was done to directly compare staircase and posttetanic responses with measurement of sarcomere length to compare their length-dependence. Methods Mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscles were dissected to small bundles of fibers, which permit measurement of sarcomere length (SL, by laser diffraction. In vitro fixed-end contractions of EDL fiber bundles were elicited at 22°C and 35°C at sarcomere lengths ranging from 2.35 μm to 3.85 μm. Twitch contractions were assessed before and after 1.5 s of 75 Hz stimulation at 22°C or during 10 s of 10 Hz stimulation at 22°C or 35°C. Results Staircase potentiation was greater at 35°C than 22°C, and the relative magnitude of the twitch contraction (Pt*/Pt was proportional to sarcomere length with a negative slope, over the range 2.3 μm – 3.7 μm. Linear regression yielded the following: Pt*/Pt = -0.59·SL+3.27 (r2 = 0.74; Pt*/Pt = -0.39·SL+2.34 (r2 = 0.48; and Pt*/Pt = -0.50·SL+2.45 (r2 = 0.80 for staircase at 35°C, and 22°C and posttetanic response respectively. Posttetanic depression rather than potentiation was present at long SL. This indicates that there may be two processes operating in these muscles to modulate the force: one that enhances and a second that depresses the force. Either or both of these processes may have a length-dependence of its mechanism. Conclusion There is no evidence that posttetanic potentiation is fundamentally different from staircase in these muscles.

  1. Genetic advances in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Charron, Philippe; Richard, Pascale; Girolami, Francesca; Van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y; Pinto, Yigal

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s led to landmark discoveries that sarcomere mutations cause both hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere mutations also likely play a role in more complex phenotypes and overlap cardiomyopathies with features of hypertrophy, dilation, diastolic abnormalities, and non-compaction. Identification of the genetic cause of these important conditions provides unique opportunities to interrogate and characterize disease pathogenesis and pathophysiology, starting from the molecular level and expanding from there. With such insights, there is potential for clinical translation that may transform management of patients and families with inherited cardiomyopathies. If key pathways for disease development can be identified, they could potentially serve as targets for novel disease-modifying or disease-preventing therapies. By utilizing gene-based diagnostic testing, we can identify at-risk individuals prior to the onset of clinical disease, allowing for disease-modifying therapy to be initiated early in life, at a time that such treatment may be most successful. In this section, we review the current application of genetics in clinical management, focusing on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy as a paradigm; discuss state-of-the-art genetic testing technology; review emerging knowledge of gene expression in sarcomeric cardiomyopathies; and discuss both the prospects, as well as the challenges, of bringing genetics to medicine. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  2. Effects of strain on contractile force and number of sarcomeres in series of Xenopus laevis single muscle fibres during long-term culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, R.T.; Feenstra, Hiske; Verheyen, A.K.; van der Laarse, W.J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to test whether mechanical strain uniquely regulates muscle fibre atrophy/hypertrophy and adaptation of the number of sarcomeres in series within mature muscle fibres in vitro. Mature single muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis illiofibularis muscle were cultured (4--97

  3. Effects of strain on contractile force and number of sarcomeres in series of Xenopus laevis single muscle fibres during long-term culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, R.T.; Feenstra, H.M.; Verheyen, A.K.; van der Laarse, W.J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to test whether mechanical strain uniquely regulates muscle fibre atrophy/hypertrophy and adaptation of the number of sarcomeres in series within mature muscle fibres in vitro. Mature single muscle fibres from Xenopus laevis illiofibularis muscle were cultured (4 - 97

  4. Cellular mechanisms that control mistranslation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynolds, Noah M; Lazazzera, Beth A; Ibba, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Mistranslation broadly encompasses the introduction of errors during any step of protein synthesis, leading to the incorporation of an amino acid that is different from the one encoded by the gene. Recent research has vastly enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms that control mistranslation...... at the molecular level and has led to the discovery that the rates of mistranslation in vivo are not fixed but instead are variable. In this Review we describe the different steps in translation quality control and their variations under different growth conditions and between species though a comparison...

  5. Mechanisms of HIV-1 Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mary; Srikrishna, Geetha; Balagopal, Ashwin

    2017-06-01

    HIV-1 infection is of global importance, and still incurs substantial morbidity and mortality. Although major pharmacologic advances over the past two decades have resulted in remarkable HIV-1 control, a cure is still forthcoming. One approach to a cure is to exploit natural mechanisms by which the host restricts HIV-1. Herein, we review past and recent discoveries of HIV-1 restriction factors, a diverse set of host proteins that limit HIV-1 replication at multiple levels, including entry, reverse transcription, integration, translation of viral proteins, and packaging and release of virions. Recent studies of intracellular HIV-1 restriction have offered unique molecular insights into HIV-1 replication and biology. Studies have revealed insights of how restriction factors drive HIV-1 evolution. Although HIV-1 restriction factors only partially control the virus, their importance is underscored by their effect on HIV-1 evolution and adaptation. The list of host restriction factors that control HIV-1 infection is likely to expand with future discoveries. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms of regulation by these factors will uncover new targets for therapeutic control of HIV-1 infection.

  6. Control mechanisms for ecological-economic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Burkov, Vladimir N; Shchepkin, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents and analyzes the optimization, game-theoretic and simulation models of control mechanisms for ecological-economic systems. It is devoted to integrated assessment mechanisms for total risks and losses, penalty mechanisms, risk payment mechanisms, financing and costs compensation mechanisms for risk level reduction, sales mechanisms for risk level quotas, audit mechanisms, mechanisms for expected losses reduction, economic motivation mechanisms, optimization mechanisms for regional environmental (risk level reduction) programs, and mechanisms for authorities' interests coordination. The book is aiming at undergraduate and postgraduate students, as well as at experts in mathematical modeling and control of ecological economic, socioeconomic and organizational systems.

  7. M line-deficient titin causes cardiac lethality through impaired maturation of the sarcomere.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weinert, S.; Bergmann, N.; Luo, X.; Erdmann, B.; Gotthardt, M.

    2006-01-01

    Titin, the largest protein known to date, has been linked to sarcomere assembly and function through its elastic adaptor and signaling domains. Titin's M-line region contains a unique kinase domain that has been proposed to regulate sarcomere assembly via its substrate titin cap (T-cap). In this

  8. Double-band sarcomeric SHG pattern induced by adult skeletal muscles alteration during myofibrils preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recher, G; Rouède, D; Tascon, C; D'Amico, L-A; Tiaho, F

    2011-02-01

    To understand the reported difference between double band, sarcomeric second harmonic generation pattern of isolated myofibril and predominant single band pattern found in thick muscle tissues, we studied the effect of myofibril preparation on the second harmonic generation pattern. We found that double band sarcomeric second harmonic generation pattern usually observed in myofibrils (prepared from fresh tissue) is due to muscle alteration during the mixing and triton treatment processes. Single band sarcomeric second harmonic generation pattern could be observed in isolated myofibrils when this alteration is previously prevented using paraformaldehyd fixed tissue. We conclude that single band sarcomeric second harmonic generation pattern is a signature of adult muscle myofibrils in normal physiological condition, suggesting that sarcomeric second harmonic generation patterns could be used as a valuable diagnosis tool of muscle health. © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Control mechanisms in corporate governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović-Zattila Milena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of corporate governance is determined by the distribution of rights and responsibilities among different actors in the company structure. Organizationally complex structure of corporate entities, established as a reflection of composite forms of business corporations, give rise to the conflict of interest between the owners, the board of directors and managers, which is generally known as the principal-agency problem. Given the fact that operations of modern companies include interaction with a large number of stakeholders, matters of ethics and accountability to the owners, employees, creditors and the state are the basic postulates which have been subject to re-examination lately. The reasons for reassessing these issues are to be sought in numerous abuses by companies, which are on the other hand highly active in their effors to protect themselves from similar abuses (mainy cyber crime. In order to respond to new challenges and requirements, which include providing for the interests of both shareholders and stakeholders, corporate management is required to establish an adequate system of internal control covering all company activities. Contemporary trends in the development of internal audit, as a mechanism of good corporate governance, are reflected in providing advice in respect of anticipated future risks and risk management.

  10. Modeling of supramolecular centrosymmetry effect on sarcomeric SHG intensity pattern of skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouède, Denis; Recher, Gaëlle; Bellanger, Jean-Jacques; Lavault, Marie-Thérèse; Schaub, Emmanuel; Tiaho, François

    2011-07-20

    A theoretical far-field second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging radiation pattern is calculated for muscular myosin taking into account both Gouy effect and light diffraction under high focusing excitation. Theoretical analysis, in agreement with experimental results obtained on healthy Xenopus muscles, shows that the increase on intensity at the middle of the sarcomeric SHG intensity pattern is generated by an off-axis constructive interference related to the specific antipolar distribution of myosin molecules within the sarcomere. The best fit of the experimental sarcomeric SHG intensity pattern was obtained with an estimated size of antiparallel, intrathick filaments' packing-width of 115 ± 25 nm localized at the M-band. During proteolysis, experimental sarcomeric SHG intensity pattern exhibits decrease on intensity at the center of the sarcomere. An effective intra- and interthick filaments centrosymmetry of 320 ± 25 nm, in agreement with ultrastructural disorganization observed at the electron microscopy level, was necessary to fit the experimental sarcomeric SHG intensity pattern. Our results show that sarcomeric SHG intensity pattern is very sensitive to misalignment of thick filaments and highlights the potential usefulness of SHG microscopy to diagnose proteolysis-induced muscular disorders. Copyright © 2011 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human soleus sarcomere lengths measured using in vivo microendoscopy at two ankle flexion angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuefeng; Delp, Scott L

    2016-12-08

    The forces generated by the soleus muscle play an important role in standing and locomotion. The lengths of the sarcomeres of the soleus affect its force-generating capacity, yet it is unknown how sarcomere lengths in the soleus change as a function of ankle flexion angle. In this study, we used microendoscopy to measure resting sarcomere lengths at 10° plantarflexion and 20° dorsiflexion in 7 healthy individuals. Mean sarcomere lengths at 10° plantarflexion were 2.84±0.09µm (mean±S.E.M.), near the optimal length for sarcomere force generation. Sarcomere lengths were 3.43±0.09µm at 20° dorsiflexion, indicating that they were longer than optimal length when the ankle was in dorsiflexion and the muscle was inactive. Our results indicate a smaller sarcomere length difference between two ankle flexion angles compared to estimates from musculoskeletal models and suggest why these models frequently underestimate the force-generating capacity of the soleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Different actions of salt and pyrophosphate on protein extraction from myofibrils reveal the mechanism controlling myosin dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Qingwu W; Swartz, Darl R; Wang, Zhenyu; Liu, Yue; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Dequan

    2016-04-01

    Myosin is the major functional protein in muscle foods for water retention, protein binding/gelation and fat holding/emulsification. To maximize its functionality, myosin needs to be released from thick filaments. Understanding of the mechanism controlling myosin extraction will help improve quality traits of meat products. The data obtained show that actomyosin binding is the rate-limiting constraint for myosin release in rigor condition. Magnesium pyrophosphate (MgPPi) increased myosin extraction by weakening actomyosin interaction and maximized myosin extraction at 0.4 mol L(-1) NaCl, which was not attained at 1.0 mol L(-1) NaCl in the absence of PPi. Interaction between myosin rod domains is another critical constraint for myosin extraction, which is, rather than PPi, salt dependent. Further, our data suggest that MyBP-C (myosin binding protein C) and M-line might not be of significance in the process of NaCl-induced myosin extraction, though further study was needed. Our study provides new insight into the mechanism that controls myosin extraction from intact sarcomere, which could be applied to maximize myosin function and to improve meat quality in practice. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Mechanical engineers' handbook, design, instrumentation, and controls

    CERN Document Server

    Kutz, Myer

    2015-01-01

    Full coverage of electronics, MEMS, and instrumentation andcontrol in mechanical engineering This second volume of Mechanical Engineers' Handbookcovers electronics, MEMS, and instrumentation and control, givingyou accessible and in-depth access to the topics you'll encounterin the discipline: computer-aided design, product design formanufacturing and assembly, design optimization, total qualitymanagement in mechanical system design, reliability in themechanical design process for sustainability, life-cycle design,design for remanufacturing processes, signal processing, dataacquisition and dis

  14. Muscle contraction phenotypic analysis enabled by optogenetics reveals functional relationships of sarcomere components in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyundoo; Barnes, Dawn E.; Matsunaga, Yohei; Benian, Guy M.; Ono, Shoichiro; Lu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    The sarcomere, the fundamental unit of muscle contraction, is a highly-ordered complex of hundreds of proteins. Despite decades of genetics work, the functional relationships and the roles of those sarcomeric proteins in animal behaviors remain unclear. In this paper, we demonstrate that optogenetic activation of the motor neurons that induce muscle contraction can facilitate quantitative studies of muscle kinetics in C. elegans. To increase the throughput of the study, we trapped multiple worms in parallel in a microfluidic device and illuminated for photoactivation of channelrhodopsin-2 to induce contractions in body wall muscles. Using image processing, the change in body size was quantified over time. A total of five parameters including rate constants for contraction and relaxation were extracted from the optogenetic assay as descriptors of sarcomere functions. To potentially relate the genes encoding the sarcomeric proteins functionally, a hierarchical clustering analysis was conducted on the basis of those parameters. Because it assesses physiological output different from conventional assays, this method provides a complement to the phenotypic analysis of C. elegans muscle mutants currently performed in many labs; the clusters may provide new insights and drive new hypotheses for functional relationships among the many sarcomere components.

  15. Logical Access Control Mechanisms in Computer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, David K.

    The subject of access control mechanisms in computer systems is concerned with effective means to protect the anonymity of private information on the one hand, and to regulate the access to shareable information on the other hand. Effective means for access control may be considered on three levels: memory, process and logical. This report is a…

  16. Damper mechanism for nuclear reactor control elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taft, William Elwood

    1976-01-01

    A damper mechanism which provides a nuclear reactor control element decelerating function at the end of the scram stroke. The total damping function is produced by the combination of two assemblies, which operate in sequence. First, a tapered dashram assembly decelerates the control element to a lower velocity, after which a spring hydraulic damper assembly takes over to complete the final damping.

  17. Contribution of Post-translational Phosphorylation to Sarcomere-linked Cardiomyopathy Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret V Westfall

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary shifts develop in post-translational phosphorylation of sarcomeric proteins in multi¬ple animal models of inherited cardiomyopathy. These signaling alterations together with the primary mutation are predicted to contribute to the overall cardiac phenotype. As a result, identification and integration of post-translational myofilament signaling responses are identified as priorities for gaining insights into sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. However, significant questions remain about the nature and contribution of post-translational phosphorylation to structural remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in animal models and human patients. This perspective essay discusses specific goals for filling critical gaps about post-translational signaling in response to these inherited mutations, especially within sarcomeric proteins. The discussion focuses primarily on pre-clinical analysis of animal models and defines challenges and future directions in this field.

  18. Mutations in MYH7 reduce the force generating capacity of sarcomeres in human familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witjas-Paalberends, E Rosalie; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Stam, Kelly; van Dijk, Sabine J; Oliviera, Vasco Sequeira; Ferrara, Claudia; Scellini, Beatrice; Hazebroek, Mark; ten Cate, Folkert J; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; dos Remedios, Cris; Niessen, Hans W M; Tesi, Chiara; Stienen, Ger J M; Heymans, Stephane; Michels, Michelle; Poggesi, Corrado; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2013-08-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), frequently caused by sarcomeric gene mutations, is characterized by cellular dysfunction and asymmetric left-ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. We studied whether cellular dysfunction is due to an intrinsic sarcomere defect or cardiomyocyte remodelling. Cardiac samples from 43 sarcomere mutation-positive patients (HCMmut: mutations in thick (MYBPC3, MYH7) and thin (TPM1, TNNI3, TNNT2) myofilament genes) were compared with 14 sarcomere mutation-negative patients (HCMsmn), eight patients with secondary LV hypertrophy due to aortic stenosis (LVHao) and 13 donors. Force measurements in single membrane-permeabilized cardiomyocytes revealed significantly lower maximal force generating capacity (Fmax) in HCMmut (21 ± 1 kN/m²) and HCMsmn (26 ± 3 kN/m²) compared with donor (36 ± 2 kN/m²). Cardiomyocyte remodelling was more severe in HCMmut compared with HCMsmn based on significantly lower myofibril density (49 ± 2 vs. 63 ± 5%) and significantly higher cardiomyocyte area (915 ± 15 vs. 612 ± 11 μm²). Low Fmax in MYBPC3mut, TNNI3mut, HCMsmn, and LVHao was normalized to donor values after correction for myofibril density. However, Fmax was significantly lower in MYH7mut, TPM1mut, and TNNT2mut even after correction for myofibril density. In accordance, measurements in single myofibrils showed very low Fmax in MYH7mut, TPM1mut, and TNNT2mut compared with donor (respectively, 73 ± 3, 70 ± 7, 83 ± 6, and 113 ± 5 kN/m²). In addition, force was lower in MYH7mut cardiomyocytes compared with MYBPC3mut, HCMsmn, and donor at submaximal [Ca²⁺]. Low cardiomyocyte Fmax in HCM patients is largely explained by hypertrophy and reduced myofibril density. MYH7 mutations reduce force generating capacity of sarcomeres at maximal and submaximal [Ca²⁺]. These hypocontractile sarcomeres may represent the primary abnormality in patients with MYH7 mutations.

  19. Nonsmooth mechanics models, dynamics and control

    CERN Document Server

    Brogliato, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Now in its third edition, this standard reference is a comprehensive treatment of nonsmooth mechanical systems refocused to give more prominence to control and modelling. It covers Lagrangian and Newton–Euler systems, detailing mathematical tools such as convex analysis and complementarity theory. The ways in which nonsmooth mechanics influence and are influenced by well-posedness analysis, numerical analysis and simulation, modelling and control are explained. Contact/impact laws, stability theory and trajectory-tracking control are given in-depth exposition connected by a framework formed from complementarity systems and measure-differential inclusions. Links are established with electrical circuits with set-valued nonsmooth elements and with other nonsmooth dynamical systems like impulsive and piecewise linear systems. Nonsmooth Mechanics (third edition) has been substantially rewritten, edited and updated to account for the significant body of results that have emerged in the twenty-first century—incl...

  20. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-12

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from 'electrochemical' to 'mechanical', which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  1. Dynamics of micromechanisms controlling the mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    The goal of fundamental studies in plasticity is to correlate the elementary micromechanisms controlling the movement of defects with the observed macroscopic mechanical behaviour. Using classical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations, the different steps involved in such micromechanisms are frequently ...

  2. Stress controls the mechanics of collagen networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licup, Albert James; Münster, Stefan; Sharma, Abhinav; Sheinman, Michael; Jawerth, Louise M.; Fabry, Ben; Weitz, David A.; MacKintosh, Fred C.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural and load-bearing element of various connective tissues, where it forms the extracellular matrix that supports cells. It has long been known that collagenous tissues exhibit a highly nonlinear stress–strain relationship, although the origins of this nonlinearity remain unknown. Here, we show that the nonlinear stiffening of reconstituted type I collagen networks is controlled by the applied stress and that the network stiffness becomes surprisingly insensitive to network concentration. We demonstrate how a simple model for networks of elastic fibers can quantitatively account for the mechanics of reconstituted collagen networks. Our model points to the important role of normal stresses in determining the nonlinear shear elastic response, which can explain the approximate exponential relationship between stress and strain reported for collagenous tissues. This further suggests principles for the design of synthetic fiber networks with collagen-like properties, as well as a mechanism for the control of the mechanics of such networks. PMID:26195769

  3. Immunophenotyping of congenital myopathies: disorganization of sarcomeric, cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ven, P. F.; Jap, P. H.; ter Laak, H. J.; Nonaka, I.; Barth, P. G.; Sengers, R. C.; Stadhouders, A. M.; Ramaekers, F. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the expression and distribution patterns of the intermediate filament proteins desmin and vimentin, the sarcomere components titin, nebulin and myosin, the basement membrane constituents collagen type IV and laminin, and the reticular layer component collagen type VI in skeletal

  4. Echocardiographic strain imaging to assess early and late consequences of sarcomere mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Carlsen, Christian; Thune, Jens Jakob

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic testing identifies sarcomere mutation carriers (G+) before clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), allowing characterization of initial disease manifestations. Previous studies demonstrated that impaired relaxation develops before left ventricular hypertrophy...... to reshape the clinical paradigm for treatment, based on early diagnosis and disease prevention....

  5. Electrocardiographic features of sarcomere mutation carriers with and without clinically overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens Jakob; Maron, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), electrocardiographic (ECG) changes have been postulated to be an early marker of disease, detectable in sarcomere mutation carriers when left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is still normal. However, the ECG features of mutation carriers have not been fully...

  6. Sallimus and the dynamics of sarcomere assembly in Drosophila flight muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, Zacharias; Leonard, Kevin; Elliott, Chris; Katzemich, Anja; Bullard, Belinda; Sparrow, John

    2015-06-19

    The Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFM) can be used as a model for the study of sarcomere assembly. Here we use a transgenic line with a green fluorescent protein (GFP) exon inserted into the Z-disc-proximal portion of sallimus (Sls), also known as Drosophila titin, to observe sarcomere assembly during IFM development. Firstly, we confirm that Sls-GFP can be used in the heterozygote state without an obvious phenotype in IFM and other muscles. We then use Sls-GFP in the IFM to show that sarcomeres grow individually and uniformly throughout the fibre, growing linearly in length and in diameter. Finally, we show that limiting the amounts of Sls in the IFM using RNAi leads to sarcomeres with smaller Z-discs in their core, whilst the thick/thin filament lattice can form peripherally without a Z-disc. Thick filament preparations from those muscles show that although the Z-disc-containing core has thick filaments of a regular length, filaments from the peripheral lattice are longer and asymmetrical around the bare zone. Therefore, the Z-disc and Sls are required for thick filament length specification but not for the assembly of the thin/thick filament lattice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Electrocardiographic features of sarcomere mutation carriers with and without clinically overt hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakdawala, Neal K; Thune, Jens Jakob; Maron, Barry J

    2011-01-01

    In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), electrocardiographic (ECG) changes have been postulated to be an early marker of disease, detectable in sarcomere mutation carriers when left ventricular (LV) wall thickness is still normal. However, the ECG features of mutation carriers have not been fully ch...

  8. Intermittent stretch training of rabbit plantarflexor muscles increases soleus mass and serial sarcomere number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jaeger, Dominique; Joumaa, Venus; Herzog, Walter

    2015-06-15

    In humans, enhanced joint range of motion is observed after static stretch training and results either from an increased stretch tolerance or from a change in the biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. We investigated the effects of an intermittent stretch training on muscle biomechanical and structural variables. The left plantarflexors muscles of seven anesthetized New Zealand (NZ) White rabbits were passively and statically stretched three times a week for 4 wk, while the corresponding right muscles were used as nonstretched contralateral controls. Before and after the stretching protocol, passive torque produced by the left plantarflexor muscles as a function of the ankle angle was measured. The left and right plantarflexor muscles were harvested from dead rabbits and used to quantify possible changes in muscle structure. Significant mass and serial sarcomere number increases were observed in the stretched soleus but not in the plantaris or medial gastrocnemius. This difference in adaptation between the plantarflexors is thought to be the result of their different fiber type composition and pennation angles. Neither titin isoform nor collagen amount was modified in the stretched compared with the control soleus muscle. Passive torque developed during ankle dorsiflexion was not modified after the stretch training on average, but was decreased in five of the seven experimental rabbits. Thus, an intermittent stretching program similar to those used in humans can produce a change in the muscle structure of NZ White rabbits, which was associated in some rabbits with a change in the biomechanical properties of the muscle-tendon unit. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Macro-mechanics controls quantum mechanics: mechanically controllable quantum conductance switching of an electrochemically fabricated atomic-scale point contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Torben; Wertz, Florian; Xie, Fangqing; Heinze, Marcel; Schmieder, Philipp; Lutzweiler, Christian; Schimmel, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Here, we present a silver atomic-scale device fabricated and operated by a combined technique of electrochemical control (EC) and mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). With this EC-MCBJ technique, we can perform mechanically controllable bistable quantum conductance switching of a silver quantum point contact (QPC) in an electrochemical environment at room temperature. Furthermore, the silver QPC of the device can be controlled both mechanically and electrochemically, and the operating mode can be changed from ‘electrochemical’ to ‘mechanical’, which expands the operating mode for controlling QPCs. These experimental results offer the perspective that a silver QPC may be used as a contact for a nanoelectromechanical relay.

  10. Control mechanisms for Nordic ship emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinsen, K. [DNV, Oslo (Norway); Torvanger, A. [Cicero, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-04-15

    Shipping today operates under a complex set of international and domestic regulations. However, the environmental regulations have lagged behind those of other industries. This situation is now changing quite dramatically. The increased focus on environmental issues, combined with the growing realisation of the actual pollution burden imposed by shipping, has led to an upsurge in both international and national regulations. Some are ready and will enter into force in the near future, while others are still being developed. On behalf of the Nordic Council of Ministers DNV has carried out a study on possible control mechanisms for Nordic ship emission. The aim is to assess the baseline shipping emissions and reduction potential and the possible controlling mechanisms (both incentives and regulations) available for reducing the emissions to air from shipping within the Nordic region. (Author)

  11. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  12. Mechanics of human voice production and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyan

    2016-01-01

    As the primary means of communication, voice plays an important role in daily life. Voice also conveys personal information such as social status, personal traits, and the emotional state of the speaker. Mechanically, voice production involves complex fluid-structure interaction within the glottis and its control by laryngeal muscle activation. An important goal of voice research is to establish a causal theory linking voice physiology and biomechanics to how speakers use and control voice to communicate meaning and personal information. Establishing such a causal theory has important implications for clinical voice management, voice training, and many speech technology applications. This paper provides a review of voice physiology and biomechanics, the physics of vocal fold vibration and sound production, and laryngeal muscular control of the fundamental frequency of voice, vocal intensity, and voice quality. Current efforts to develop mechanical and computational models of voice production are also critically reviewed. Finally, issues and future challenges in developing a causal theory of voice production and perception are discussed. PMID:27794319

  13. Probability-based TCP congestion control mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Changbiao; Yang, Shizhong; Xian, Yongju

    2005-11-01

    To mitigate TCP global synchronization and improve network throughput, an improved TCP congestion control mechanism is proposed, namely P-TCP, which adopts the probability-based way to adjust congestion window independently when the network occurs congestion. Therefore, some P-TCP connections may decrease the congestion window greatly while other P-TCP connections may decrease the congestion window lightly. Simulation results show that TCP global synchronization can be effectively mitigated, which leads to efficient utilization of network resources as well as the effective mitigation for network congestion. Simulation results also give some valuable references for determining the related parameters in P-TCP.

  14. Frictionless segmented mechanics for controlled space closure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildeu Andrade Jr

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Extraction spaces may be needed to achieve specific orthodontic goals of positioning the dentition in harmony with the craniofacial complex. However, the fundamental reality that determines the occlusion final position is the control exerted by the orthodontist while closing the extraction spaces. A specific treatment objective may require the posterior teeth to remain in a constant position anteroposteriorly as well as vertically, while the anterior teeth occupy the entire extraction site. Another treatment objective may require the opposite, or any number of intentional alternatives of extraction site closure. The present case report describes a simple controlled segmented mechanic system that permitted definable and predictable force systems to be applied and allowed to predict the treatment outcome with confidence. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Diplomate certification.

  15. Changes of trabecular bone under control of biologically mechanical mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Zhang, C. Q.; Dong, X.; Wu, H.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, a biological process of bone remodeling was considered as a closed loop feedback control system, which enables bone to optimize and renew itself over a lifetime. A novel idea of combining strain-adaptive and damage-induced remodeling algorithms at Basic Multicellular Unit (BMU) level was introduced. In order to make the outcomes get closer to clinical observation, the stochastic occurrence of microdamage was involved and a hypothesis that remodeling activation probability is related to the value of damage rate was assumed. Integrated with Finite Element Analysis (FEA), the changes of trabecular bone in morphology and material properties were simulated in the course of five years. The results suggest that deterioration and anisotropy of trabecluar bone are inevitable with natural aging, and that compression rather than tension can be applied to strengthen the ability of resistance to fracture. This investigation helps to gain more insight the mechanism of bone loss and identify improved treatment and prevention for osteoporosis or stress fracture.

  16. The role of sarcomere gene mutations in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Andersen, Paal Skytt; Hedley, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We investigated a Danish cohort of 31 unrelated patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC), to assess the role that mutations in sarcomere protein genes play in IDC. Patients were genetically screened by capillary electrophoresis single strand conformation polymorphism and subsequently...... by bidirectional DNA sequencing of conformers in the coding regions of MYH7, MYBPC3, TPM1, ACTC, MYL2, MYL3, TNNT2, CSRP3 and TNNI3. Eight probands carried disease-associated genetic variants (26%). In MYH7, three novel mutations were found; in MYBPC3, one novel variant and two known mutations were found...... DCM as well as one case with left ventricular non-compaction. Disease-causing sarcomere gene mutations were found in about one-quarter of IDC patients, and seem to play an important role in the causation of the disease. The genetics is as complex as seen in HCM. Thus, our data suggest that a genetic...

  17. Effects of anisosmotic stress on cardiac muscle cell length, diameter, area, and sarcomere length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, R.; Barnes, M. A.; Cooper, G. 4th; Zile, M. R.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of anisosmotic stress on adult mammalian cardiac muscle cell (cardiocyte) size. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length were measured in cardiocytes isolated from 10 normal rats and 10 normal cats. Superfusate osmolarity was decreased from 300 +/- 6 to 130 +/- 5 mosM and increased to 630 +/- 8 mosM. Cardiocyte size and sarcomere length increased progressively when osmolarity was decreased, and there were no significant differences between cat and rat cardiocytes with respect to percent change in cardiocyte area or diameter; however, there were significant differences in cardiocyte length (2.8 +/- 0.3% in cat vs. 6.1 +/- 0.3% in rat, P cell size relation is useful in assessing the cardiocyte response to anisosmotic stress and may in future studies be useful in assessing changes in relative passive cardiocyte stiffness produced by pathological processes.

  18. Gain control mechanisms in spinal motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael David Johnson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Motoneurons provide the only conduit for motor commands to reach muscles. For many years, motoneurons were in fact considered to be little more than passive wires. Systematic studies in the past 25 years however have clearly demonstrated that the intrinsic electrical properties of motoneurons are under strong neuromodulatory control via multiple sources. The discovery of potent neuromodulation from the brainstem and its ability to change the gain of motoneurons shows that the passive view of the motor output stage is no longer tenable. A mechanism for gain control at the motor output stage makes good functional sense considering our capability of generating an enormous range of forces, from very delicate (e.g. putting in a contact lens to highly forceful (emergency reactions. Just as sensory systems need gain control to deal with a wide dynamic range of inputs, so to might motor output need gain control to deal with the wide dynamic range of the normal movement repertoire. Two problems emerge from the potential use of the brainstem monoaminergic projection to motoneurons for gain control. First, the projection is highly diffuse anatomically, so that independent control of the gains of different motor pools is not feasible. In fact, the system is so diffuse that gain for all the motor pools in a limb likely increases in concert. Second, if there is a system that increases gain, probably a system to reduce gain is also needed. In this review, we summarize recent studies that show local inhibitory circuits within the spinal cord, especially reciprocal and recurrent inhibition, have the potential to solve both of these problems as well as constitute another source of gain modulation.

  19. Ozz-E3 ubiquitin ligase targets sarcomeric embryonic myosin heavy chain during muscle development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvan Campos

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle contractile proteins are expressed as a series of developmental isoforms that are in constant dynamic remodeling during embryogenesis, but how obsolete molecules are recognized and removed is not known. Ozz is a developmentally regulated protein that functions as the adaptor component of a RING-type ubiquitin ligase complex specific to striated muscle. Ozz(-/- mutants exhibit defects in myofibrillogenesis and myofiber differentiation. Here we show that Ozz targets the rod portion of embryonic myosin heavy chain and preferentially recognizes the sarcomeric rather than the soluble pool of myosin. We present evidence that Ozz binding to the embryonic myosin isoform within sarcomeric thick filaments marks it for ubiquitination and proteolytic degradation, allowing its replacement with neonatal or adult isoforms. This unique function positions Ozz within a system that facilitates sarcomeric myosin remodeling during muscle maturation and regeneration. Our findings identify Ozz-E3 as the ubiquitin ligase complex that interacts with and regulates myosin within its fully assembled cytoskeletal structure.

  20. Clinical outcomes associated with sarcomere mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a meta-analysis on 7675 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Kayvanpour, Elham; Tugrul, Oguz Firat; Lai, Alan; Amr, Ali; Haas, Jan; Proctor, Tanja; Ehlermann, Philipp; Jensen, Katrin; Katus, Hugo A; Meder, Benjamin

    2017-08-24

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic cardiovascular disease, which goes along with increased risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Despite the knowledge about the different causal genes, the relationship between individual genotypes and phenotypes is incomplete. We retrieved PubMed/Medline literatures on genotype-phenotype associations in patients with HCM and mutations in MYBPC3, MYH7, TNNT2, and TNNI3. Altogether, 51 studies with 7675 HCM patients were included in our meta-analysis. The average frequency of mutations in MYBPC3 (20%) and MYH7 (14%) was higher than TNNT2 and TNNI3 (2% each). The mean age of HCM onset for MYH7 mutation positive patients was the beginning of the fourth decade, significantly earlier than patients without sarcomeric mutations. A high male proportion was observed in TNNT2 (69%), MYBPC3 (62%) and mutation negative group (64%). Cardiac conduction disease, ventricular arrhythmia and heart transplantation (HTx) rate were higher in HCM patients with MYH7 mutations in comparison to MYBPC3 (p MYH7 is earlier and leads to a more severe phenotype than in patient without such mutations. Furthermore, patients with sarcomeric mutations are more susceptible to SCD. The present study further supports the clinical interpretation of sarcomeric mutations in HCM patients.

  1. Animal and in silico models for the study of sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Dirk J; Bakkers, Jeroen; Brundel, Bianca J; Robbins, Jeff; Tardiff, Jil C; Carrier, Lucie

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, our understanding of cardiomyopathies has improved dramatically, due to improvements in screening and detection of gene defects in the human genome as well as a variety of novel animal models (mouse, zebrafish, and drosophila) and in silico computational models. These novel experimental tools have created a platform that is highly complementary to the naturally occurring cardiomyopathies in cats and dogs that had been available for some time. A fully integrative approach, which incorporates all these modalities, is likely required for significant steps forward in understanding the molecular underpinnings and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies. Finally, novel technologies, including CRISPR/Cas9, which have already been proved to work in zebrafish, are currently being employed to engineer sarcomeric cardiomyopathy in larger animals, including pigs and non-human primates. In the mouse, the increased speed with which these techniques can be employed to engineer precise 'knock-in' models that previously took years to make via multiple rounds of homologous recombination-based gene targeting promises multiple and precise models of human cardiac disease for future study. Such novel genetically engineered animal models recapitulating human sarcomeric protein defects will help bridging the gap to translate therapeutic targets from small animal and in silico models to the human patient with sarcomeric cardiomyopathy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Animal and in silico models for the study of sarcomeric cardiomyopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncker, Dirk J.; Bakkers, Jeroen; Brundel, Bianca J.; Robbins, Jeff; Tardiff, Jil C.; Carrier, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, our understanding of cardiomyopathies has improved dramatically, due to improvements in screening and detection of gene defects in the human genome as well as a variety of novel animal models (mouse, zebrafish, and drosophila) and in silico computational models. These novel experimental tools have created a platform that is highly complementary to the naturally occurring cardiomyopathies in cats and dogs that had been available for some time. A fully integrative approach, which incorporates all these modalities, is likely required for significant steps forward in understanding the molecular underpinnings and pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies. Finally, novel technologies, including CRISPR/Cas9, which have already been proved to work in zebrafish, are currently being employed to engineer sarcomeric cardiomyopathy in larger animals, including pigs and non-human primates. In the mouse, the increased speed with which these techniques can be employed to engineer precise ‘knock-in’ models that previously took years to make via multiple rounds of homologous recombination-based gene targeting promises multiple and precise models of human cardiac disease for future study. Such novel genetically engineered animal models recapitulating human sarcomeric protein defects will help bridging the gap to translate therapeutic targets from small animal and in silico models to the human patient with sarcomeric cardiomyopathy. PMID:25600962

  3. Coexistence of Digenic Mutations in Both Thin (TPM1) and Thick (MYH7) Filaments of Sarcomeric Genes Leads to Severe Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in a South Indian FHCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvi Rani, Deepa; Nallari, Pratibha; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Rani, Jhansi; Meraj, Khunza; Ganesan, Mala; Narasimhan, Calambur; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in sarcomeric genes are the leading cause for cardiomyopathies. However, not many genetic studies have been carried out on Indian cardiomyopathy patients. We performed sequence analyses of a thin filament sarcomeric gene, α-tropomyosin (TPM1), in 101 hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients and 147 dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients against 207 ethnically matched healthy controls, revealing 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Of these, one mutant, S215L, was identified in two unrelated HCM cases-patient #1, aged 44, and patient #2, aged 65-and was cosegregating with disease in these families as an autosomal dominant trait. In contrast, S215L was completely absent in 147 DCM and 207 controls. Patient #1 showed a more severe disease phenotype, with poor prognosis and a family history of sudden cardiac death, than patient #2. Therefore, these two patients and the family members positive for S215L were further screened for variations in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, MYL2, MYL3, and ACTC. Interestingly, two novel thick filaments, D896N (homozygous) and I524K (heterozygous) mutations, in the MYH7 gene were identified exclusively in patient #1 and his family members. Thus, we strongly suggest that the coexistence of these digenic mutations is rare, but leads to severe hypertrophy in a South Indian familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHCM).

  4. Access control mechanism of wireless gateway based on open flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rong; Ding, Lei

    2017-08-01

    In order to realize the access control of wireless gateway and improve the access control of wireless gateway devices, an access control mechanism of SDN architecture which is based on Open vSwitch is proposed. The mechanism utilizes the features of the controller--centralized control and programmable. Controller send access control flow table based on the business logic. Open vSwitch helps achieve a specific access control strategy based on the flow table.

  5. Mechanism of glyphosate control of Phelipanche aegyptiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Tal; Zygier, Lilach; Rubin, Baruch; Wolf, Shmuel; Eizenberg, Hanan

    2016-11-01

    Despite its total reliance on its host plant, the holoparasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca suffers from a deficiency of aromatic amino acids upon exposure to glyphosate. The herbicide glyphosate inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids. However, the functionality of the EPSPS pathway in the obligate root holoparasite Phelipanche aegyptiaca is not straightforward because of the parasite's total dependence on the host plant. Despite the importance of glyphosate as a means of controlling P. aegyptiaca, the mechanism of action of the herbicide in this parasite is not clearly understood. We characterized glyphosate control of P. aegyptiaca by using a glyphosate-resistant tomato (GRT) genotype as the host plant and evaluating the activity of EPSPS and the levels of free aromatic amino acids in the parasite. The viability of the parasite's tissues deteriorated within the first 40 h after treatment (HAT) with glyphosate. In parallel, shikimate accumulation in the parasite was first detected at 24 HAT and increased over time. However, shikimate levels in the GRT host did not increase, indicating that the host was indeed glyphosate tolerant. Free phenylalanine and tyrosine levels decreased by 48 HAT in the parasite, indicating a deficiency of aromatic amino acids. The use of GRT as the host enabled us to observe, in an in situ experimental system, both endogenous EPSPS inhibition and a deficiency of aromatic amino acids in the parasite. We thus provided evidence for the presence of an active EPSPS and aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathway in P. aegyptiaca and pinpointed this pathway as the target of glyphosate action in this parasite.

  6. Adaptive mechanically controlled lubrication mechanism found in articular joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, George W.; Banquy, Xavier; Lee, Dong Woog; Lowrey, Daniel D.; Yu, Jing; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage is a highly efficacious water-based tribological system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads (pressures) and sliding velocities that must last over a lifetime. Although many different lubrication mechanisms have been proposed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the tribological performance of cartilage cannot be attributed to a single mechanism acting alone but on the synergistic action of multiple “modes” of lubrication that are adapted to provide optimum lubrication as the normal loads, shear stresses, and rates change. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is abundant in cartilage and synovial fluid and widely thought to play a principal role in joint lubrication although this role remains unclear. HA is also known to complex readily with the glycoprotein lubricin (LUB) to form a cross-linked network that has also been shown to be critical to the wear prevention mechanism of joints. Friction experiments on porcine cartilage using the surface forces apparatus, and enzymatic digestion, reveal an “adaptive” role for an HA-LUB complex whereby, under compression, nominally free HA diffusing out of the cartilage becomes mechanically, i.e., physically, trapped at the interface by the increasingly constricted collagen pore network. The mechanically trapped HA-LUB complex now acts as an effective (chemically bound) “boundary lubricant”—reducing the friction force slightly but, more importantly, eliminating wear damage to the rubbing/shearing surfaces. This paper focuses on the contribution of HA in cartilage lubrication; however, the system as a whole requires both HA and LUB to function optimally under all conditions. PMID:21383143

  7. Mechanically and optically controlled graphene valley filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Fenghua; Jin, Guojun, E-mail: gjin@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the valley-dependent electronic transport through a graphene monolayer modulated simultaneously by a uniform uniaxial strain and linearly polarized light. Within the Floquet formalism, we calculate the transmission probabilities and conductances of the two valleys. It is found that valley polarization can appear only if the two modulations coexist. Under a proper stretching of the sample, the ratio of the light intensity and the light frequency squared is important. If this quantity is small, the electron transport is mainly contributed by the valley-symmetric central band and the conductance is valley unpolarized; but when this quantity is large, the valley-asymmetric sidebands also take part in the transport and the valley polarization of the conductance appears. Furthermore, the degree of the polarization can be tuned by the strain strength, light intensity, and light frequency. It is proposed that the detection of the valley polarization can be realized utilizing the valley beam splitting. Thus, a graphene monolayer can be used as a mechanically and optically controlled valley filter.

  8. Brain mechanisms that control sleep and waking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jerome

    This review paper presents a brief historical survey of the technological and early research that laid the groundwork for recent advances in sleep-waking research. A major advance in this field occurred shortly after the end of World War II with the discovery of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) as the neural source in the brain stem of the waking state. Subsequent research showed that the brain stem activating system produced cortical arousal via two pathways: a dorsal route through the thalamus and a ventral route through the hypothalamus and basal forebrain. The nuclei, pathways, and neurotransmitters that comprise the multiple components of these arousal systems are described. Sleep is now recognized as being composed of two very different states: rapid eye movements (REMs) sleep and non-REM sleep. The major findings on the neural mechanisms that control these two sleep states are presented. This review ends with a discussion of two current views on the function of sleep: to maintain the integrity of the immune system and to enhance memory consolidation.

  9. Control mechanisms for a nonlinear model of international relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentek, A.; Kadtke, J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Inst. for Pure and Applied Physical Sciences; Lenhart, S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Mathematics Dept.; Protopopescu, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

    1997-07-15

    Some issues of control in complex dynamical systems are considered. The authors discuss two control mechanisms, namely: a short range, reactive control based on the chaos control idea and a long-term strategic control based on an optimal control algorithm. They apply these control ideas to simple examples in a discrete nonlinear model of a multi-nation arms race.

  10. MAINTAINING VEHICLE SPEED USING A MECHANICAL CRUISE CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter GIROVSKÝ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we would like to present cruise control realization. This cruise control is presented as mechanical device for vehicle speed maintenance and has been proposed as a low cost solution. Principle of function in mechanical cruise control is based on a position control of throttle. For the right action of mechanical cruise control it was need to solve some particular tasks related with speed sensing, construct of device for control of throttle position and design of control system of whole mechanical cruise control. Information about car velocity we have gained using Hall sensor attached on a magnetic ring of car tachometer. For control of the throttle was used a small servo drive and as the control unit was used Arduino. The designed solution of mechanical cruise control have been realized for car Škoda Felicia.

  11. Mechanical Properties of Respiratory Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, Gary C.; Ferreira, Leonardo F.; Reid, Michael B.; Mantilla, Carlos B.

    2014-01-01

    Striated respiratory muscles are necessary for lung ventilation and to maintain the patency of the upper airway. The basic structural and functional properties of respiratory muscles are similar to those of other striated muscles (both skeletal and cardiac). The sarcomere is the fundamental organizational unit of striated muscles and sarcomeric proteins underlie the passive and active mechanical properties of muscle fibers. In this respect, the functional categorization of different fiber types provides a conceptual framework to understand the physiological properties of respiratory muscles. Within the sarcomere, the interaction between the thick and thin filaments at the level of cross-bridges provides the elementary unit of force generation and contraction. Key to an understanding of the unique functional differences across muscle fiber types are differences in cross-bridge recruitment and cycling that relate to the expression of different myosin heavy chain isoforms in the thick filament. The active mechanical properties of muscle fibers are characterized by the relationship between myoplasmic Ca2+ and cross-bridge recruitment, force generation and sarcomere length (also cross-bridge recruitment), external load and shortening velocity (cross-bridge cycling rate), and cross-bridge cycling rate and ATP consumption. Passive mechanical properties are also important reflecting viscoelastic elements within sarcomeres as well as the extracellular matrix. Conditions that affect respiratory muscle performance may have a range of underlying pathophysiological causes, but their manifestations will depend on their impact on these basic elemental structures. PMID:24265238

  12. Still Heart Encodes a Structural HMT, SMYD1b, with Chaperone-Like Function during Fast Muscle Sarcomere Assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal Prill

    Full Text Available The vertebrate sarcomere is a complex and highly organized contractile structure whose assembly and function requires the coordination of hundreds of proteins. Proteins require proper folding and incorporation into the sarcomere by assembly factors, and they must also be maintained and replaced due to the constant physical stress of muscle contraction. Zebrafish mutants affecting muscle assembly and maintenance have proven to be an ideal tool for identification and analysis of factors necessary for these processes. The still heart mutant was identified due to motility defects and a nonfunctional heart. The cognate gene for the mutant was shown to be smyd1b and the still heart mutation results in an early nonsense codon. SMYD1 mutants show a lack of heart looping and chamber definition due to a lack of expression of heart morphogenesis factors gata4, gata5 and hand2. On a cellular level, fast muscle fibers in homozygous mutants do not form mature sarcomeres due to the lack of fast muscle myosin incorporation by SMYD1b when sarcomeres are first being assembled (19hpf, supporting SMYD1b as an assembly protein during sarcomere formation.

  13. Controlling mechanisms of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seroussi, H. L.; Morlighem, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Larour, E. Y.; Mouginot, J.; Khazendar, A.

    2013-12-01

    Ice shelves play a major role in the stability of fast flowing ice streams in Antarctica, by exerting buttressing on inland ice and controlling the discharge of ice into the ocean. However, the mechanisms at work remain poorly understood and interactions between floating and grounded ice need to be better characterized in order to estimate the impact of climate change on the ice sheets. Thwaites glacier, in West Antarctica, features a small and heavily fractured ice shelf that provides limited back stress pressure on inland ice but is pinned on the eastern part on a prominent ridge. Thwaites glacier has maintained a consistently high velocity and negative mass balance for at least 20 years. Recent observations show a widening of its fast flowing area as well as a sustained acceleration since 2006 and a rapid retreat of its grounding line in the center of the glacier. The objective of this work is to characterize the dynamic response of Thwaites glacier to changes in its floating tongue on decadal to centennial time scales. To achieve this objective, we rely on high resolution ice flow modeling and grounding line dynamics using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM). We will focus on the complex interplay between the main floating tongue of Thwaites Glacier and its eastern, slow moving ice shelf, which is pinned down by an ice rumple. The speed of the eastern ice shelf is strongly affected by the coupling with the main floating ice tongue, which results in significant fluctuations in speed of the eastern ice shelf the formation of ice shelf cracks at the grounding line during acceleration phases. Our results show that ice rigidity at the junction between the eastern and western part of the shelf controls the dynamic regime of the ice shelf and suggest that Thwaites Glacier is likely to undergo substantial changes in the coming decades. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of California Irvine

  14. Ebstein's anomaly may be caused by mutations in the sarcomere protein gene MYH7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engelen, K; Postma, A V; van de Meerakker, J B A; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Helderman-van den Enden, A T J M; Vliegen, H W; Rahman, T; Baars, M J H; Sels, J-W; Bauer, U; Pickardt, T; Sperling, S R; Moorman, A F M; Keavney, B; Goodship, J; Klaassen, S; Mulder, B J M

    2013-03-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation characterised by adherence of the septal and posterior leaflets of the tricuspid valve to the underlying myocardium. Associated abnormalities of left ventricular morphology and function including left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) have been observed. An association between Ebstein's anomaly with LVNC and mutations in the sarcomeric protein gene MYH7, encoding β-myosin heavy chain, has been shown by recent studies. This might represent a specific subtype of Ebstein's anomaly with a Mendelian inheritance pattern. In this review we discuss the association of MYH7 mutations with Ebstein's anomaly and LVNC and its implications for the clinical care for patients and their family members.

  15. Group Theoretical Approach for Controlled Quantum Mechanical Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this research is the study of controllability of quantum mechanical systems and feedback control of de-coherence in order to gain an insight on the structure of control of quantum systems...

  16. Cardiac MRI assessed left ventricular hypertrophy in differentiating hypertensive heart disease from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy attributable to a sarcomeric gene mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipola, Petri [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kuopio (Finland); Magga, Jarkko; Peuhkurinen, Keijo [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Husso, Minna [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Jaeaeskelaeinen, Pertti; Kuusisto, Johanna [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Medicine, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Heart Center, P.O. Box 1777, Kuopio (Finland)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI)-assessed left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in differentiating between hypertensive heart disease and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). 95 unselected subjects with mild-to-moderate hypertension, 24 patients with HCM attributable to the D175N mutation of the {alpha}-tropomyosin gene and 17 control subjects were studied by cine CMRI. Left ventricular (LV) quantitative and qualitative characteristics were evaluated. LV maximal end-diastolic wall thickness, wall thickness-to-LV volume ratio, end-diastolic septum thickness and septum-to-lateral wall thickness ratio were useful measures for differentiating between LVH due to hypertension and HCM. The most accurate measure for identifying patients with HCM was the LV maximal wall thickness {>=}17 mm, with a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy of 90%, 93%, 86%, 95% and 91%, respectively. LV maximal wall thickness in the anterior wall, or regional bulging in left ventricular wall was found only in patients with HCM. LV mass index was not discriminant between patients with HCM and those with LVH due to hypertension. LV maximal thickness measured by CMRI is the best anatomical parameter in differentiating between LVH due to mild-to-moderate hypertension and HCM attributable to a sarcomeric mutation. CMRI assessment of location and quality of LVH is also of value in differential diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. Analysis and control of underactuated mechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Choukchou-Braham, Amal; Djemaï, Mohamed; Busawon, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    This monograph provides readers with tools for the analysis, and control of systems with fewer control inputs than degrees of freedom to be controlled, i.e., underactuated systems. The text deals with the consequences of a lack of a general theory that would allow methodical treatment of such systems and the ad hoc approach to control design that often results, imposing a level of organization whenever the latter is lacking. The authors take as their starting point the construction of a graphical characterization or control flow diagram reflecting the transmission of generalized forces through the degrees of freedom. Underactuated systems are classified according to the three main structures by which this is found to happen—chain, tree, and isolated vertex—and control design procedures proposed. The procedure is applied to several well-known examples of underactuated systems: acrobot; pendubot; Tora system; ball and beam; inertia wheel; and robotic arm with elastic joint. The text is illustrated with MATL...

  18. Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Diaz-Calderon

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of the Mechanism Model paradigm. The mechanism model paradigm provides a framework to modeling mechanisms for robotic control. The emphasis is on the unification of mathematical models of kinematics/dynamics, geometric information and control system parameters for a variety of robotic systems (including serial manipulators, wheeled and legged locomotors, with algorithms that are needed for typical robot control applications.

  19. Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Diaz-Calderon

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of the Mechanism Model paradigm. The mechanism model paradigm provides a framework to modeling mechanisms for robotic control. The emphasis is on the unification of mathematical models of kinematics/dynamics, geometric information and control system parameters for a variety of robotic systems (including serial manipulators, wheeled and legged locomotors, with algorithms that are needed for typical robot control applications.

  20. Towards a Unified Representation of Mechanisms for Robotic Control Software

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Calderon, Antonio; Nesnas, Issa A. D.; Nayar, Hari Das; Kim, Won S.

    2006-01-01

    This article gives an overview of the Mechanism Model paradigm. The mechanism model paradigm provides a framework to modeling mechanisms for robotic control. The emphasis is on the unification of mathematical models of kinematics/dynamics, geometric information and control system parameters for a variety of robotic systems (including serial manipulators, wheeled and legged locomotors), with algorithms that are needed for typical robot control applications.

  1. Dynamics of micromechanisms controlling the mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    When deforming bulk material, micromechanisms involving moving defects result in mechanical characteristics observed at a macroscopic scale. In situ straining of microsamples in a Transmission Electron Microscope. provides the unique advantage of observing the dislocation dynamics involved in such microdeformation ...

  2. Anticoagulant Control Results among Patients with Mechanical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients with mechanical heart valves receive life long, oral anticoagulant therapy to prevent thromboembolic complications, but this treatment is associated with an increased risk of bleeding (1). However no study in Tanzania has been done to review the adequacy of anticoagulation monitoring and risk factors ...

  3. Posttranscriptional mechanisms in controlling eukaryotic circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Weng, Wenya; Guo, Jinhu

    2011-05-20

    The circadian clock is essential in almost all living organisms to synchronise biochemical, metabolic, physiological and behavioural cycles to daily changing environmental factors. In a highly conserved fashion, the circadian clock is primarily controlled by multiple positive and negative molecular circuitries that control gene expression. More recently, research in Neurospora and other eukaryotes has uncovered the involvement of additional regulatory components that operate at the posttranslational level to fine tune the circadian system. Though it remains poorly understood, a growing body of evidence has shown that posttranscriptional regulation controls the expression of both circadian oscillator and output gene transcripts at a number of different steps. This regulation is crucial for driving and maintaining robust circadian rhythms. Here we review recent advances in circadian rhythm research at the RNA level. Copyright © 2011 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cellular mechanism of eccentric-induced muscle injury and its relationship with sarcomere heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Seung Jun

    2014-01-01

    Activity-induced muscle injury and dysfunction have been identified as key components of musculoskeletal injuries. These injuries often occur following eccentric contractions, when the muscle is under tension and stretched by a force that is greater than the force generated by the muscle. Many daily activities require muscles to perform eccentric contractions, including walking (or running) downhill or down stairs, lowering heavy objects, and landing from a jump. Injuries often occur when the...

  5. The myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) gene product zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) is associated with sarcomeres and normally localized in DM2 patients' muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, R; Panico, M B; Caldarola, S; Fusco, F R; Sabatelli, P; Terracciano, C; Botta, A; Novelli, G; Bernardi, G; Loreni, F

    2010-06-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) is caused by a [CCTG]n intronic expansion in the zinc finger protein 9 (ZNF9) gene. As for DM1, sharing with DM2 a similar phenotype, the pathogenic mutation involves a transcribed but untranslated genomic region, suggesting that RNA toxicity may have a role in the pathogenesis of these multisystem disorders by interfering with common cellular mechanisms. However, haploinsufficiency has been described in DM1 and DM2 animal models, and might contribute to pathogenesis. The aim of the present work was therefore to assess ZNF9 protein expression in rat tissues and in human muscle, and ZNF9 subcellular distribution in normal and DM2 human muscles. Polyclonal anti-ZNF9 antibodies were obtained in rabbit, high pressure liquid chromatography-purified, and used for Western blot, standard and confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling electron microscopy on a panel of normal rat tissues and on normal and DM2 human muscles. Western blot analysis showed that ZNF9 is ubiquitously expressed in mammalian tissues, and that its signal is not substantially modified in DM2 muscles. Immunofluorescence studies showed a myofibrillar distribution of ZNF9, and double staining with two non-repetitive epitopes of titin located it in the I bands. This finding was confirmed by the visualization of ZNF9 in close relation with sarcomeric thin filaments by immunogold labelling electron microscopy. ZNF9 distribution was unaltered in DM2 muscle fibres. ZNF9 is abundantly expressed in human myofibres, where it is located in the sarcomeric I bands, and no modification of this pattern is observed in DM2 muscles.

  6. Finite element modeling of aponeurotomy: altered intramuscular myofascial force transmission yields complex sarcomere length distributions determining acute effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yucesoy, C.A.; Koopman, B.H.; Grootenboer, H.J.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.

    2007-01-01

    Finite element modeling of aponeurotomized rat extensor digitorium longus muscle was performed to investigate the acute effects of proximal aponeurotomy. The specific goal was to assess the changes in lengths of sarcomeres within aponeurotomized muscle and to explain how the intervention leads to

  7. Dynamics and control of a class of underactuated mechanical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; van der Schaft, Arjan; McClamroch, N. Harris; Kolmanovsky, Ilya

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for the dynamics and control of underactuated mechanical systems, defined as systems with fewer inputs than degrees of freedom. Control system formulation of underactuated mechanical systems is addressed and a class of underactuated systems characterized

  8. Cutaneous mechanisms of isometric ankle force control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Leukel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The sense of force is critical in the control of movement and posture. Multiple factors influence our perception of exerted force, including inputs from cutaneous afferents, muscle afferents and central commands. Here, we studied the influence of cutaneous feedback on the control of ankle force...... output. We used repetitive electrical stimulation of the superficial peroneal (foot dorsum) and medial plantar nerves (foot sole) to disrupt cutaneous afferent input in 8 healthy subjects. We measured the effects of repetitive nerve stimulation on (1) tactile thresholds, (2) performance in an ankle force......-matching and (3) an ankle position-matching task. Additional force-matching experiments were done to compare the effects of transient versus continuous stimulation in 6 subjects and to determine the effects of foot anesthesia using lidocaine in another 6 subjects. The results showed that stimulation decreased...

  9. Improving Control Mechanism at Routers in TCP/IP Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Kim Quoc

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing control mechanisms at the network nodes have a good active and very effective at each local router, but they do not still strong enough to control nonlinear and dynamical behaviour of the network. Therefore, the control system requirements must be designed to be flexible to fully grasp the important status information of the variation and intelligent control methods to control network congestion in nonlinear network. To solve this problem, we propose a solution combined fuzzy reasoning with neural network control put on active queue management mechanisms at the network nodes.

  10. SEX DETERMINATION AND CONTROL MECHANISMS IN BIRDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Tagirov

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The modern conception of genetic bases of bird’s sex determination is considered. Following the genotypic mechanism of sex determination, birds implement a complex system of sex chromosome relationships. Z chromosome contains a dose-dependent male sex determinant — gene DMTR1 ensuring the testicles development upon two copy availability in the ZZ combination. Some factors on the W hromosome are not yet identified. On the one hand, they suppress the activity of the DMTR1 gene and on the other hand they activate aromatase enzyme, which in ZW combination promotes the female sex development. It was suggested that while a number of different classes of animal adaptations are appeared ensuring stable embryo development, the dependence of sex determination upon environment and inner signals at the later stages of embryogenesis is reduced. At the same time, sex determinants fixed on genetic level are appeared that are active at the very early stages of development.

  11. Muscleblind, BSF and TBPH are mislocalized in the muscle sarcomere of a Drosophila myotonic dystrophy model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Llamusi

    2013-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is a genetic disease caused by the pathological expansion of a CTG trinucleotide repeat in the 3′ UTR of the DMPK gene. In the DMPK transcripts, the CUG expansions sequester RNA-binding proteins into nuclear foci, including transcription factors and alternative splicing regulators such as MBNL1. MBNL1 sequestration has been associated with key features of DM1. However, the basis behind a number of molecular and histological alterations in DM1 remain unclear. To help identify new pathogenic components of the disease, we carried out a genetic screen using a Drosophila model of DM1 that expresses 480 interrupted CTG repeats, i(CTG480, and a collection of 1215 transgenic RNA interference (RNAi fly lines. Of the 34 modifiers identified, two RNA-binding proteins, TBPH (homolog of human TAR DNA-binding protein 43 or TDP-43 and BSF (Bicoid stability factor; homolog of human LRPPRC, were of particular interest. These factors modified i(CTG480 phenotypes in the fly eye and wing, and TBPH silencing also suppressed CTG-induced defects in the flight muscles. In Drosophila flight muscle, TBPH, BSF and the fly ortholog of MBNL1, Muscleblind (Mbl, were detected in sarcomeric bands. Expression of i(CTG480 resulted in changes in the sarcomeric patterns of these proteins, which could be restored by coexpression with human MBNL1. Epistasis studies showed that Mbl silencing was sufficient to induce a subcellular redistribution of TBPH and BSF proteins in the muscle, which mimicked the effect of i(CTG480 expression. These results provide the first description of TBPH and BSF as targets of Mbl-mediated CTG toxicity, and they suggest an important role of these proteins in DM1 muscle pathology.

  12. Monitoring of mechanical sugarcane harvesting through control charts

    OpenAIRE

    Voltarelli,Murilo A.; Silva,Rouverson P. da; Zerbato,Cristiano; Paixão,Carla S. S.; Tavares,Tiago de O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Statistical process control in mechanized farming is a new way to assess operation quality. In this sense, we aimed to compare three statistical process control tools applied to losses in sugarcane mechanical harvesting to determine the best control chart template for this quality indicator. Losses were daily monitored in farms located within Triângulo Mineiro region, in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. They were carried over a period of 70 days in the 2014 harvest. At the end of the eval...

  13. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  14. Gate-controlled shutter mechanism for DEPFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Felix; Koffmane, Christian; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Ninkovic, Jelena; Richter, Rainer; Andricek, Ladislav; Wassatsch, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    DEPFET pixel detectors offer excellent signal to noise ratio, resolution and low power consumption with few material. They will be used in Belle 2. In addition, it is a candidate for the ILC. Due to the rolling shutter read-out they have integration times in the order of several tens of microseconds which can create problems in applications with temporary high background, for instance during the injection of noisy bunches. In order to overcome this we study a new operation mode which allows a gated or shutter controlled operation of the detector. This makes the detector blind for a certain time interval in which noise is expected whereas the charge of the previous signal will not be removed. Simulations and first measurements are presented.

  15. Urgent epidemic control mechanism for aviation networks

    KAUST Repository

    Peng, Chengbin

    2011-01-01

    In the current century, the highly developed transportation system can not only boost the economy, but also greatly accelerate the spreading of epidemics. While some epidemic diseases may infect quite a number of people ahead of our awareness, the health care resources such as vaccines and the medical staff are usually locally or even globally insufficient. In this research, with the network of major aviation routes as an example, we present a method to determine the optimal locations to allocate the medical service in order to minimize the impact of the infectious disease with limited resources. Specifically, we demonstrate that when the medical resources are insufficient, we should concentrate our efforts on the travelers with the objective of effectively controlling the spreading rate of the epidemic diseases. © 2011 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  16. Financing and delivery mechanisms for mosquito control tools in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: SWOT analysis revealed critical issues with financing and delivery of the different malaria vector control interventions. These issues need to be resolved for optimal malaria control activities in Sudan. Keywords: Financing and delivery mechanisms; mosquito control tools; SWOT analysis; Sudan.

  17. Mechanical design and control of a new myoelectric hand prosthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peerdeman, B.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Hekman, Edsko E.G.; Brouwer, Dannis Michel; Misra, Sarthak

    2011-01-01

    The development of modern, myoelectrically controlled hand prostheses can be difficult, due to the many requirements its mechanical design and control system need to fulfill [1]. The hand should be controllable with few input signals, while being able to perform a wide range of motions. It should be

  18. Chemical and mechanical weed control in soybean (Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Jonas Felix

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the possibility of chemical and mechanical weed control strategies in soybean. Soybean field experiments were carried out in 2013 and 2014 in Southern Germany. Five treatments including common herbicide mixtures and four mechanical weed control treatments, implementing a harrow and a hoe, were tested at different locations. In the herbicide experiments two treatments were applied by PRE emergence herbicides (metribuzin, clomazone, dimethenamid and metribuzin, flufenacet, clomazone and another two treatments were sprayed with a combination of PRE + POST emergence herbicides (metribuzin, flufenacet, thifensulfuron and pendimethalin, thifensulfuron, bentazone, cycloxydim. Furthermore, a POST herbicide treatment was implemented (thifensulfuron, bentazone, thifensulfuron and fluazifop-P-butyl. In the mechanical weed control experiments, treatments were: three times hoeing, PRE emergence harrowing plus three times hoeing, hoeing and harrowing in rotation or three times harrowing. In both experiments an untreated control was included. A 90% weed control efficacy and 23% yield increase was observed in the POST herbicide treatment. PRE + POST treatments resulted in 92% to 99% weed control efficiency and 15% yield increase compared to the untreated control. In the mechanical weed control experiments the combination of PRE emergence harrowing and POST emergence hoeing resulted in 82% weed control efficiency and 34% higher yield compared to the untreated control. Less weed control efficiency (72% was observed in the harrow treatment, leading to 20% higher yield compared to the control. The suitability of both strategies for implementation in “Integrated Weed Management” has been investigated.

  19. Temporal control mechanism in equaled interval tapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M

    1996-05-01

    Subjects who were at intermediate levels of musical performance made equaled interval tapping in several tempos. The temporal fluctuation for the tapping was observed and analysed. The power spectrum of the fluctuation showed a critical phenomenon at around a frequency which corresponds to the period of 20 taps, for all tempos and all subjects, i.e., the slope of the spectrum was flat or had a positive value in the high frequency region above the critical frequency but it increased as the frequency decreased in the low frequency region below the critical frequency. Moreover, auto-regressive models and Akaike's information criterion were introduced to determine the critical tap number. The order of the best auto-regressive model for the temporal fluctuation data was distributed around 20 taps. These results show that the memory capacity of 20 taps governs the control of equaled interval tapping. To interpret the critical phenomenon of 20 taps with the memory capacity of the short term memory, the so called magic number seven, a simple chunking assumption was introduced; subjects might have unconsciously chunked every three taps during the tapping. If the chunking assumption is true, when subjects consciously chunk every seven taps, the memory capacity of taps should shift to about 50 taps. To test if the assumption is true or not, subjects made a three-beat rhythm tapping and a seven-beat rhythm tapping with equaled intervals. As a result, the memory capacity for these accented tappings were also estimated as 20 taps. This suggests that the critical phenomenon cannot be explained by the chunking assumption and the magic number seven, rather this finding suggests that there exists a memory capacity of 20 taps and this is used for equaled interval tapping.

  20. Mechanical systems a unified approach to vibrations and controls

    CERN Document Server

    Gans, Roger F

    2015-01-01

    This essential textbook covers analysis and control of engineering mechanisms, which include almost any apparatus with moving parts used in daily life, from musical instruments to robots. The text  presents both vibrations and controls with considerable breadth and depth using a unified notation. It strikes a nice balance between the analytical and the practical.  This text contains enough material for a two semester sequence, but it can also be used in a single semester course combining the two topics. Mechanical Systems: A Unified Approach to Vibrations and Controls presents a common notation and approach to these closely related areas. Examples from the both vibrations and controls components are integrated throughout this text. This book also: ·         Presents a unified approach to vibrations and controls, including an excellent diagram that simultaneously discusses embedding classical vibrations (mechanical systems) in a discussion of models, inverse models, and open and closed loop control ...

  1. Control of a mechanical gripper with a fuzzy controller; Control de una garra robotizada mediante un controlador borroso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberdi, J.; Barcala, J.M.; Gamero, E.; Navarrete, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    A fuzzy logic system is used to control a mechanical gripper. System is based in a NLX230 fuzzy micro controller. Control rules are programmed by a 68020 microprocessor in the micro controller memory. Stress and its derived are used as feedback signals in the control. This system can adapt its effort to the mechanical resistance of the object between the fingers. (Author)

  2. Towards a Market Mechanism for Airport Traffic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, G.; Meyer, J-J.Ch.; Dignum, F.P.M.

    2005-01-01

    We present a multiagent decision mechanism for the airport traffic control domain. It enables airlines to jointly decide on propos- als for plan conflict solutions. The mechanism uses weighted voting for maximizing global utility and Clarke Tax to discourage manipulation. We introduce accounts

  3. Mechanics and model-based control of advanced engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Irschik, Hans; Krommer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanics and Model-Based Control of Advanced Engineering Systems collects 32 contributions presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines, which took place in St. Petersburg, Russia in July 2012. The workshop continued a series of international workshops, which started with a Japan-Austria Joint Workshop on Mechanics and Model Based Control of Smart Materials and Structures and a Russia-Austria Joint Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines. In the present volume, 10 full-length papers based on presentations from Russia, 9 from Austria, 8 from Japan, 3 from Italy, one from Germany and one from Taiwan are included, which represent the state of the art in the field of mechanics and model based control, with particular emphasis on the application of advanced structures and machines.

  4. Analysis of mechanical-hydraulic bedload deposition control measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, S.; Franca, M. J.; De Cesare, G.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2017-10-01

    During floods, the bedload transport of steep headwaters can exceed the hydraulic transport capacity of milder downstream reaches where settlements are often situated. Therefore, sediment retention barriers are typically installed upstream of such sensible areas. These barriers trigger bedload trapping via two control mechanisms, either hydraulic or mechanical. Both deposition controls, pertaining to instream sediment trapping structures, are analyzed experimentally in this study. Bedload trapping by hydraulically controlled barriers is prone to sediment flushing, i.e., the remobilization of formerly deposited sediment, in particular when the barrier is simultaneously under- and overflown. In this case, the remobilization rate is close to the bedload transport capacity of the nonconstricted channel. Mechanical deposition control by screens is in turn sensible to the grain size. Thus, both deposition control concepts may fail, and bedload may be transported downstream at a rate corresponding to the transport capacity of headwaters, thereby endangering urban areas. This study shows that the combination of both deposition control concepts is suitable for improving the control of bedload retention. With this combination, undesired sediment flushing of upstream deposits in the channel caused by insufficient hydraulic control is prevented. Furthermore, the uncertainty related to the estimation of the representative grain size in the design of mechanical control barriers is reduced.

  5. Furthering the link between the sarcomere and primary cardiomyopathies: restrictive cardiomyopathy associated with multiple mutations in genes previously associated with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleshu, Colleen; Sakhuja, Rahul; Nussbaum, Robert L; Schiller, Nelson B; Ursell, Philip C; Eng, Celeste; De Marco, Teresa; McGlothlin, Dana; Burchard, Esteban González; Rame, J Eduardo

    2011-09-01

    Mutations in genes that encode components of the sarcomere are well established as the cause of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathies. Sarcomere genes, however, are increasingly being associated with other cardiomyopathies. One phenotype more recently recognized as a disease of the sarcomere is restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). We report on two patients with RCM associated with multiple mutations in sarcomere genes not previously associated with RCM. Patient 1 presented with NYHA Class III/IV heart failure at 22 years of age. She was diagnosed with RCM and advanced heart failure requiring heart transplantation. Sequencing of sarcomere genes revealed previously reported homozygous p.Glu143Lys mutations in MYL3, and a novel heterozygous p.Gly57Glu mutation in MYL2. The patient's mother is a double heterozygote for these mutations, with no evidence of cardiomyopathy. Patient 2 presented at 35 years of age with volume overload while hospitalized for oophorectomy. She was diagnosed with RCM and is being evaluated for heart transplantation. Sarcomere gene sequencing identified homozygous p.Asn279His mutations in TPM1. The patient's parents are consanguineous and confirmed heterozygotes. Her father was diagnosed with HCM at 42 years of age. This is the first report of mutations in TPM1, MYL3, and MYL2 associated with primary, non-hypertrophied RCM. The association of more sarcomere genes with RCM provides further evidence that mutations in the various sarcomere genes can cause different cardiomyopathy phenotypes. These cases also contribute to the growing body of evidence that multiple mutations have an additive effect on the severity of cardiomyopathies. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Soft Time-Suboptimal Controlling Structure for Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulczycki, Piotr; Wisniewski, Rafal; Kowalski, Piotr

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents conception of a soft control structure based on the time-optimal approach. Its parameters are selected in accordance with the rules of the statistical decision theory and additionally it allows to eliminate rapid changes in control values. The object is a basic mechanical system......, with uncertain (also non-stationary) mass treated as a stochastic process. The methodology proposed here is of a universal nature and may easily be applied with respect to other uncertainty elements of timeoptimal controlled mechanical systems....

  7. New dimensions in mechanical plaque control: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Mandal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plaque control is the daily removal of dental plaque, oral biofilm and also prevention of their accumulation on the teeth and other parts of oral cavity. Dental plaque is the major etiology of maximum gingival and periodontal diseases. It is also related with various dental problems. Mechanical plaque control is a very effective method to get rid of plaque accumulation in oral cavity. In 3000 BC there was the first toothbrush invented by human beings. With time several modifications came in toothbrushes to make mechanical plaque control more effective in day to day oral hygiene practice. This article emphasizes on the advanced and emerging tools in mechanical plaque control methods in attaining an optimal level of oral hygiene standards and maintenance of oral health.

  8. Properties of single FDB fibers following a collagenase digestion for studying contractility, fatigue, and pCa-sarcomere shortening relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, David; Hesse, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the approach to obtain viable single flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) fibers following a collagenase digestion. A first aim was to determine the culture medium conditions for the collagenase digestion. The MEM yielded better fibers in terms of morphology and contractility than the DMEM. The addition of FBS to culture media was crucial to prevent fiber supercontraction. The addition of FBS to the physiological solution used during an experiment was also beneficial, especially during fatigue. Optimum FBS concentration in MEM was 10% (vol/vol), and for the physiological solution, it ranged between 0.2 and 1.0%. A second aim was to document the stability of single FDB fibers. If tested the day of the preparation, most fibers (∼80%) had stable contractions for up to 3 h, normal stimulus duration strength to elicit contractions, and normal and stable resting membrane potential during prolonged microelectrode penetration. A third aim was to document their fatigue kinetics. Major differences in fatigue resistance were observed between fibers as expected from the FDB fiber-type composition. All sarcoplasmic [Ca2+] and sarcomere length parameters returned to their prefatigue levels after a short recovery. The pCa-sarcomere shortening relationship of unfatigued fibers is very similar to the pCa-force curve reported in other studies. The pCa-sarcomere shortening from fatigue data is complicated by large decreases in sarcomere length between contractions. It is concluded that isolation of single fibers by a collagenase digestion is a viable preparation to study contractility and fatigue kinetics. PMID:25568074

  9. Transmural heterogeneity of myofilament function and sarcomeric protein phosphorylation in remodelled myocardium of pigs with a recent myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanda evan der Velden

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Transmural differences in sarcomeric protein composition and function across the left ventricular (LV wall have been reported. We studied sarcomeric function and protein phosphorylation in subepicardial (EPI and subendocardial (ENDO layers of remote LV pig myocardium after infarction (MI, induced by left circumflex coronary artery ligation. EPI and ENDO samples were taken 3 weeks after sham surgery (n=12 or induction of MI (n=12 at baseline and after β-adrenergic receptor (βAR stimulation with dobutamine. Isometric force was measured in single cardiomyocytes at various [Ca2+] and 2.2 μm sarcomere length. In sham hearts, no significant transmural differences were observed in myofilament function or protein phosphorylation. Myofilament Ca2+-sensitivity was significantly higher in both EPI and ENDO of MI compared to sham hearts. Maximal force was significantly reduced in MI compared to sham, but solely in ENDO cells. A higher passive force was observed in MI hearts, but only in EPI cells. The proportion of stiff N2B isoform was higher in EPI than in ENDO in both sham and MI hearts, and a trend towards increased N2B-proportion appeared in MI EPI, but not MI Endo. Analysis of myofilament protein phosphorylation did not reveal significant transmural differences in phosphorylation of myosin binding protein C, desmin, troponin T, troponin I (cTnI and myosin light chain 2 (MLC-2 both at baseline and after βAR stimulation with dobutamine infusion. A significant increase in MLC-2 phosphorylation was observed during dobutamine only in sham. In addition, the increase in cTnI phosphorylation upon dobutamine was 2-fold lower in MI than in sham.Myofilament dysfunction is present in both EPI and ENDO in post-MI remodelled myocardium, but shows a high degree of qualitative heterogeneity across the LV wall. These heterogeneous transmural changes in sarcomeric properties likely contribute differently to systolic versus diastolic global LV dysfunction after MI.

  10. Introduction to Aerial Vehicle Flight Mechanics, Stability and Control

    OpenAIRE

    Knowles, K.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to Section 5.1 on flight mechanics and dynamics, stability and control, and navigation. It introduces some basic concepts of flight control, and static and dynamic stability. Some particular features of vertical or short take-off and landing (V/STOL) aircraft flight control, not covered elsewhere in this Section, are discussed briefly. The other articles in this Section are introduced.

  11. The mechanics of elevation control in locust jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, G P; Burrows, M

    2008-06-01

    How do animals control the trajectory of ballistic motions like jumping? Targeted jumps by a locust, which are powered by a rapid extension of the tibiae of both hind legs, require control of the take-off angle and speed. To determine how the locust controls these parameters, we used high speed images of jumps and mechanical analysis to reach three conclusions: (1) the extensor tibiae muscle applies equal and opposite torques to the femur and tibia, which ensures that tibial extension accelerates the centre of mass of the body along a straight line; (2) this line is parallel to a line drawn from the distal end of the tibia through the proximal end of the femur; (3) the slope of this line (the angle of elevation) is not affected if the two hind legs extend asynchronously. The mechanics thus uncouple the control of elevation and speed, allowing simplified and independent control mechanisms. Jump elevation is controlled mechanically by the initial positions of the hind legs and jump speed is determined by the energy stored within their elastic processes, which allows us to then propose which proprioceptors are involved in controlling these quantities.

  12. [Mutations in sarcomeric genes MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, and TPM1 in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castro, Mónica; Coto, Eliecer; Reguero, Julián R; Berrazueta, José R; Alvarez, Victoria; Alonso, Belén; Sainz, Rocío; Martín, María; Morís, Cesar

    2009-01-01

    Mutation of a sarcomeric gene is the most frequent cause of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. For each such gene, however, previous studies have reported a range of different mutation frequencies, and clinical manifestations have been highly heterogeneous, both of which limit the use of genetic information in clinical practice. Our aim was to determine the frequency of mutations in the sarcomeric genes MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2, TNNI3, and TPM1 in a cohort of Spanish patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. We used sequencing to analyze the coding regions of these five genes in 120 patients (29% with a family history) and investigated how the patient phenotype varied with the gene mutated. In total, 32 patients were found to have mutations: 10 in MYH7 (8%), 20 in MYBPC3 (16%), 2 in TNNT2, 1 in TPM1 and none in TNNI3. Overall, 61% of mutations had not been described before. Two patients had two mutations (i.e., double mutants). There was no difference in the mean age at diagnosis or the extent of the hypertrophy between those with MYH7 mutations and those with MYBPC3 mutations. Some 26% of patients had a mutation in one of the five sarcomeric genes investigated. More than half of the mutations had not been described before. The MYBPC3 gene was the most frequently mutated, followed by MYH7. No phenotypic differences were observed between carriers of the various mutations, which makes it difficult to use genetic information to stratify risk in these patients.

  13. Synthesis of dissipative output feedback controllers. Application to mechanical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannessen, Erling Aarsand

    1997-12-31

    This thesis presents new results on the synthesis of linear controllers with passivity, or more general, dissipativity properties. These methods may be applied to obtain more accurate control over mechanical systems and in the control of chemical processes that involve dissipative subsystems. The thesis presents two different approaches for synthesis of dissipative controllers: (1) A method that exploits the Riccati equation solution to the state space formulation of the H{sub {infinity}} control problem is investigated, illustrated by synthesising a controller for damping of flexible modes in a beam. (2) A more general method for dissipative control synthesis is developed that retains the well-known techniques of loop-shaping and frequency weighting in H{sub {infinity}}. A method is also presented for controller synthesis directly from frequency response data. 82 refs., 34 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Cloning, Sequencing, and the Expression of the Elusive Sarcomeric TPM4α Isoform in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipak K. Dube

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, tropomyosin is encoded by four known TPM genes (TPM1, TPM2, TPM3, and TPM4 each of which can generate a number of TPM isoforms via alternative splicing and/or using alternate promoters. In humans, the sarcomeric isoform(s of each of the TPM genes, except for the TPM4, have been known for a long time. Recently, on the basis of computational analyses of the human genome sequence, the predicted sequence of TPM4α has been posted in GenBank. We designed primer-pairs for RT-PCR and showed the expression of the transcripts of TPM4α and a novel isoform TPM4δ in human heart and skeletal muscle. qRT-PCR shows that the relative expression of TPM4α and TPM4δ is higher in human cardiac muscle. Western blot analyses using CH1 monoclonal antibodies show the absence of the expression of TPM4δ protein (~28 kDa in human heart muscle. 2D western blot analyses with the same antibody show the expression of at least nine distinct tropomyosin molecules with a mass ~32 kD and above in adult heart. By Mass spectrometry, we determined the amino acid sequences of the extracted proteins from these spots. Spot “G” reveals the putative expression of TPM4α along with TPM1α protein in human adult heart.

  15. Control mechanism of double-rotator-structure ternary optical computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, SONG; Liping, YAN

    2017-03-01

    Double-rotator-structure ternary optical processor (DRSTOP) has two characteristics, namely, giant data-bits parallel computing and reconfigurable processor, which can handle thousands of data bits in parallel, and can run much faster than computers and other optical computer systems so far. In order to put DRSTOP into practical application, this paper established a series of methods, namely, task classification method, data-bits allocation method, control information generation method, control information formatting and sending method, and decoded results obtaining method and so on. These methods form the control mechanism of DRSTOP. This control mechanism makes DRSTOP become an automated computing platform. Compared with the traditional calculation tools, DRSTOP computing platform can ease the contradiction between high energy consumption and big data computing due to greatly reducing the cost of communications and I/O. Finally, the paper designed a set of experiments for DRSTOP control mechanism to verify its feasibility and correctness. Experimental results showed that the control mechanism is correct, feasible and efficient.

  16. Mechanisms for control of biological electron transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Heather R; Dow, Brian A; Davidson, Victor L

    2014-12-01

    Electron transfer (ET) through and between proteins is a fundamental biological process. The rates and mechanisms of these ET reactions are controlled by the proteins in which the redox centers that donate and accept electrons reside. The protein influences the magnitudes of the ET parameters, the electronic coupling and reorganization energy that are associated with the ET reaction. The protein can regulate the rates of the ET reaction by requiring reaction steps to optimize the system for ET, leading to kinetic mechanisms of gated or coupled ET. Amino acid residues in the segment of the protein through which long range ET occurs can also modulate the ET rate by serving as staging points for hopping mechanisms of ET. Specific examples are presented to illustrate these mechanisms by which proteins control rates of ET reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Active Control of Mixing and Combustion, from Mechanisms to Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2001-11-01

    Implementation of active control in complex processes, of the type encountered in high Reynolds number mixing and combustion, is predicated upon the identification of the underlying mechanisms and the construction of reduced order models that capture their essential characteristics. The mechanisms of interest must be shown to be amenable to external actuations, allowing optimal control strategies to exploit the delicate interactions that lead to the desired outcome. Reduced order models are utilized in defining the form and requisite attributes of actuation, its relationship to the monitoring system and the relevant control algorithms embedded in a feedforward or a feedback loop. The talk will review recent work on active control of mixing in combustion devices in which strong shear zones concur with mixing, combustion stabilization and flame anchoring. The underlying mechanisms, e.g., stability of shear flows, formation/evolution of large vortical structures in separating and swirling flows, their mutual interactions with acoustic fields, flame fronts and chemical kinetics, etc., are discussed in light of their key roles in mixing, burning enhancement/suppression, and combustion instability. Subtle attributes of combustion mechanisms are used to suggest the requisite control strategies.

  18. Output feedback control of a mechanical system using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran-Carbajal, F; Valderrabano-Gonzalez, A; Rosas-Caro, J C; Favela-Contreras, A

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an application of a nonlinear magnetic levitation system to the problem of efficient active control of mass-spring-damper mechanical systems. An output feedback control scheme is proposed for reference position trajectory tracking tasks on the flexible mechanical system. The electromagnetically actuated system is shown to be a differentially flat nonlinear system. An extended state estimation approach is also proposed to obtain estimates of velocity, acceleration and disturbance signals. The differential flatness structural property of the system is then employed for the synthesis of the controller and the signal estimation approach presented in this work. Some experimental and simulation results are included to show the efficient performance of the control approach and the effective estimation of the unknown signals. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Design and control of a high precision drive mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bo; He, Yongqiang; Wang, Haowei; Zhang, Shuyang; Zhang, Donghua; Wei, Xiaorong; Jiang, Zhihong

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a high precision drive mechanism (HPDM) for space application, such as the directional antenna, the laser communication device, the mobile camera and other pointing mechanisms. In view of the great practical significance of high precision drive system, control technology for permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) servo system is also studied and a PMSM servo controller is designed in this paper. And the software alignment was applied to the controller to eliminate the steady error of the optical encoder, which helps to realize the 1 arcsec (1σ) control precision. To assess its capabilities, the qualification environment testing including the thermal vacuum cycling testing, and the sinusoidal and random vibration were carried out. The testing results show that the performance of the HPDM is almost the same between the former and the end of each testing.

  20. [Controlled mechanical lung ventilation with guaranteed volume in newborns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriakvina, O A; Grebennikov, V A; Tsypin, L E; Volodin, N N

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with guaranteed volumes combines advantages of time-cyclic ventilation with limitation of pressure and constant flow, with volume control ventilation. This symbiosis allows to choose the optimal, stable breathing volume of the newborn, while maintaining pressure control. The review presents the principles of work, the main advantages and limitations of ventilation systems with the guaranteed volumes, as well as results and analysis of studies.

  1. Quality control of injection moulded micro mechanical parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasparin, Stefania; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2009-01-01

    Quality control of micro components is an increasing challenge. Smaller mechanical parts are characterized by smaller tolerance to be verified. This paper focuses on the dimensional verification of micro injection moulded components selected from an industrial application. These parts are measured...... using an Optical Coordinate Measuring Machine (OCMM), which guarantees fast surface scans suitable for in line quality control. The uncertainty assessment of the measurements is calculated following the substitution method. To investigate the influence parameters in optical coordinate metrology two...

  2. Control of a perturbed under-actuated mechanical system

    KAUST Repository

    Zayane, Chadia

    2015-11-05

    In this work, the trajectory tracking problem for an under-actuated mechanical system in presence of unknown input disturbances is addressed. The studied inertia wheel inverted pendulum falls in the class of non minimum phase systems. The proposed high order sliding mode control architecture including a controller and differentiator allows to track accurately the predefined trajectory and to stabilize the internal dynamics. The robustness of the proposed approach is illustrated through different perturbation and output noise configurations.

  3. Fluid Mechanics of Wing Adaptation for Separation Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhara, M. S.; Wilder, M. C.; Carr, L. W.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The unsteady fluid mechanics associated with use of a dynamically deforming leading edge airfoil for achieving compressible flow separation control has been experimentally studied. Changing the leading edge curvature at rapid rates dramatically alters the flow vorticity dynamics which is responsible for the many effects observed in the flow.

  4. Controlled synchronization of mechanical systems with a unilateral constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, Michael; Biemond, J. J Benjamin; Leine, Remco I.; van de Wouw, N.; Teel, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the controlled synchronization problem of mechanical systems subjected to a geometric unilateral constraint as well as the design of a switching coupling law to obtain synchronization. To define the synchronization problem, we propose a distance function induced by the

  5. Predictive mechanisms in the control of contour following

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tramper, J.J.; Flanders, M.

    2013-01-01

    In haptic exploration, when running a fingertip along a surface, the control system may attempt to anticipate upcoming changes in curvature in order to maintain a consistent level of contact force. Such predictive mechanisms are well known in the visual system, but have yet to be studied in the

  6. Eye mechanics and their implications for eye movement control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, Ansgar Roald

    2002-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is the investigation of the mechanical properties of the oculomotor system and the implications of these properties for eye movement control. The investigation was conducted by means of computer models and simulations. This allowed us to combine data from anatomy, physiology

  7. Three-dimensional stochastic model of actin–myosin binding in the sarcomere lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijailovich, Srboljub M.; Kayser-Herold, Oliver; Stojanovic, Boban; Nedic, Djordje; Irving, Thomas C.; Geeves, MA (Harvard); (IIT); (U. Kent); (Kragujevac)

    2016-11-18

    The effect of molecule tethering in three-dimensional (3-D) space on bimolecular binding kinetics is rarely addressed and only occasionally incorporated into models of cell motility. The simplest system that can quantitatively determine this effect is the 3-D sarcomere lattice of the striated muscle, where tethered myosin in thick filaments can only bind to a relatively small number of available sites on the actin filament, positioned within a limited range of thermal movement of the myosin head. Here we implement spatially explicit actomyosin interactions into the multiscale Monte Carlo platform MUSICO, specifically defining how geometrical constraints on tethered myosins can modulate state transition rates in the actomyosin cycle. The simulations provide the distribution of myosin bound to sites on actin, ensure conservation of the number of interacting myosins and actin monomers, and most importantly, the departure in behavior of tethered myosin molecules from unconstrained myosin interactions with actin. In addition, MUSICO determines the number of cross-bridges in each actomyosin cycle state, the force and number of attached cross-bridges per myosin filament, the range of cross-bridge forces and accounts for energy consumption. At the macroscopic scale, MUSICO simulations show large differences in predicted force-velocity curves and in the response during early force recovery phase after a step change in length comparing to the two simplest mass action kinetic models. The origin of these differences is rooted in the different fluxes of myosin binding and corresponding instantaneous cross-bridge distributions and quantitatively reflects a major flaw of the mathematical description in all mass action kinetic models. Consequently, this new approach shows that accurate recapitulation of experimental data requires significantly different binding rates, number of actomyosin states, and cross-bridge elasticity than typically used in mass action kinetic models to

  8. Intrinsic Optimal Control for Mechanical Systems on Lie Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic infinite horizon optimal control problem of mechanical systems on Lie group is investigated. The geometric optimal control problem is built on the intrinsic coordinate-free model, which is provided with Levi-Civita connection. In order to obtain an analytical solution of the optimal problem in the geometric viewpoint, a simplified nominal system on Lie group with an extra feedback loop is presented. With geodesic distance and Riemann metric on Lie group integrated into the cost function, a dynamic programming approach is employed and an analytical solution of the optimal problem on Lie group is obtained via the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. For a special case on SO(3, the intrinsic optimal control method is used for a quadrotor rotation control problem and simulation results are provided to show the control performance.

  9. Sliding mode control on electro-mechanical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkin Vadim I.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The first sliding mode control application may be found in the papers back in the 1930s in Russia. With its versatile yet simple design procedure the methodology is proven to be one of the most powerful solutions for many practical control designs. For the sake of demonstration this paper is oriented towards application aspects of sliding mode control methodology. First the design approach based on the regularization is generalized for mechanical systems. It is shown that stability of zero dynamics should be taken into account when the regular form consists of blocks of second-order equations. Majority of applications in the paper are related to control and estimation methods of automotive industry. New theoretical methods are developed in the context of these studies: sliding made nonlinear observers, observers with binary measurements, parameter estimation in systems with sliding mode control.

  10. Control of autoresonance in mechanical and physical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, A.

    2017-03-01

    Autoresonant energy transfer has been considered as one of the most effective methods of excitation and control of high-energy oscillations for a broad range of physical and engineering systems. Nonlinear time-invariant feedback control provides effective self-tuning and self-adaptation mechanisms targeted at preserving resonance oscillations under variations of the system parameters but its implementation may become extremely complicated. A large class of systems can avoid nonlinear feedback, still producing the required state due to time-variant feed-forward frequency control. This type of control in oscillator arrays employs an intrinsic property of a nonlinear oscillator to vary both its amplitude and the frequency when the driving frequency changes. This paper presents a survey of recently published and new results studying possibilities and limitations of time-variant frequency control in nonlinear oscillator arrays. This article is part of the themed issue 'Horizons of cybernetical physics'.

  11. Overview: Mechanism and Control of a Prosthetic Arm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Tushar; Uddanwadiker, Rashmi

    2015-09-01

    Continuous growth in industrialization and lack of awareness in safety parameters the cases of amputations are growing. The search of safer, simpler and automated prosthetic arms for managing upper limbs is expected. Continuous efforts have been made to design and develop prosthetic arms ranging from simple harness actuated to automated mechanisms with various control options. However due the cost constraints, the automated prosthetic arms are still out of the reach of needy people. Recent data have shown that there is a wide scope to develop a low cost and light weight upper limb prosthesis. This review summarizes the various designs methodologies, mechanisms and control system developed by the researchers and the advances therein. Educating the patient to develop acceptability to prosthesis and using the same for the most basic desired functions of human hand, post amputation care and to improve patient's independent life is equally important. In conclusion it can be interpreted that there is a wide scope in design in an adaptive mechanism for opening and closing of the fingers using other methods of path and position synthesis. Simple mechanisms and less parts may optimize the cost factor. Reduction in the weight of the prosthesis may be achieved using polymers used for engineering applications. Control system will remain never ending challenge for the researchers, but it is essential to maintain the simplicity from the patients perspective.

  12. Advance of Mechanically Controllable Break Junction for Molecular Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Xiang, Dong

    2017-06-01

    Molecular electronics stands for the ultimate size of functional elements, keeping up with an unstoppable trend over the past few decades. As a vital component of molecular electronics, single molecular junctions have attracted significant attention from research groups all over the world. Due to its pronounced superiority, the mechanically controllable break junctions (MCBJ) technique has been widely applied to characterize the dynamic performance of single molecular junctions. This review presents a system analysis for single-molecule junctions and offers an overview of four test-beds for single-molecule junctions, thus offering more insight into the mechanisms of electron transport. We mainly focus on the development of state-of-the-art mechanically controlled break junctions. The three-terminal gated MCBJ approaches are introduced to manipulate the electron transport of molecules, and MCBJs are combined with characterization techniques. Additionally, applications of MCBJs and remarkable properties of single molecules are addressed. Finally, the challenges and perspective for the mechanically controllable break junctions technique are provided.

  13. Mechanical control of floating aquatic weed: Kainji Lake experience

    OpenAIRE

    F.Daddy; Ladu, B.M.B.; Salzwedel, H.; Isa, A.U.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the uniqueness and invasiveness of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) on Lake Kainji (Nigeria). The mechanical blocking device design concept based on the Kainji Lake flooding regime is also highlighted. Water hyacinth coverage, that was over 23% at high water in level in 1994, was reduced to 0.75% in the same period in 2000. Although this feat cannot be wholly ascribed to mechanical control effort alone, the first year of the device's full operation more than 1.04 mill...

  14. Mechanical systems versus smoking bans for secondhand smoke control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh; Amick, Benjamin C; Gimeno, David; Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz M; Delclos, George L; Harrist, Ronald B; Kelder, Steven H; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernandez-Ávila, Mauricio

    2012-03-01

    Despite international efforts to implement smoking bans, several national legislations still allow smoking and recommend mechanical systems, such as ventilation and air extraction, to eliminate secondhand smoke (SHS) health-related risks. We aimed to quantify the relative contribution of mechanical systems and smoking bans to SHS elimination. A cross-sectional study was conducted in randomly selected establishments from 4 Mexican cities (3 with no ban). SHS exposure was assessed using nicotine passive monitors. Establishment characteristics, presence of mechanical systems, and enforcement of smoking policies were obtained through direct observation and self-report. Multilevel models were used to assess relative contributions to SHS reduction. Compared with Mexico City, nicotine concentrations were 3.8 times higher in Colima, 5.4 in Cuernavaca, and 6.4 in Toluca. Mechanical systems were not associated with reduced nicotine concentrations. Concentration differences between cities were largely explained by the presence of smoking bans (69.1% difference reduction) but not by mechanical systems (-5.7% difference reduction). Smoking bans represent the only effective approach to reduce SHS. Tobacco control regulations should stop considering mechanical systems as advisable means for SHS reduction and opt for complete smoking bans in public places.

  15. Controlled invasive mechanical ventilation strategies in obese patients undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Lígia de Albuquerque; Silva, Pedro Leme; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia Rieken Macedo

    2017-06-01

    The obesity prevalence is increasing in surgical population. As the number of obese surgical patients increases, so does the demand for mechanical ventilation. Nevertheless, ventilatory strategies in this population are challenging, since obesity results in pathophysiological changes in respiratory function. Areas covered: We reviewed the impact of obesity on respiratory system and the effects of controlled invasive mechanical ventilation strategies in obese patients undergoing surgery. To date, there is no consensus regarding the optimal invasive mechanical ventilation strategy for obese surgical patients, and no evidence that possible intraoperative beneficial effects on oxygenation and mechanics translate into better postoperative pulmonary function or improved outcomes. Expert commentary: Before determining the ideal intraoperative ventilation strategy, it is important to analyze the pathophysiology and comorbidities of each obese patient. Protective ventilation with low tidal volume, driving pressure, energy, and mechanical power should be employed during surgery; however, further studies are required to clarify the most effective ventilation strategies, such as the optimal positive end-expiratory pressure and whether recruitment maneuvers minimize lung injury. In this context, an ongoing trial of intraoperative ventilation in obese patients (PROBESE) should help determine the mechanical ventilation strategy that best improves clinical outcome in patients with body mass index≥35kg/m2.

  16. Disorder profile of nebulin encodes a vernierlike position sensor for the sliding thin and thick filaments of the skeletal muscle sarcomere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Chya; Forbes, Jeffrey G.; Wang, Kuan

    2016-06-01

    Nebulin is an about 1 μ m long intrinsically disordered scaffold for the thin filaments of skeletal muscle sarcomere. It is a multifunctional elastic protein that wraps around actin filament, stabilizes thin filaments, and regulates Ca-dependent actomyosin interactions. This study investigates whether the disorder profile of nebulin might encode guidelines for thin and thick filament interactions in the sarcomere of the skeletal muscle. The question was addressed computationally by analyzing the predicted disorder profile of human nebulin (6669 residues, ˜200 actin-binding repeats) by pondr and the periodicity of the A-band stripes (reflecting the locations of myosin-associated proteins) in the electron micrographs of the sarcomere. Using the detrended fluctuation analysis, a scale factor for the A-band stripe image data with respect to the nebulin disorder profile was determined to make the thin and thick filaments aligned to have maximum correlation. The empirical mode decomposition method was then applied to identify hidden periodicities in both the nebulin disorder profile and the rescaled A-band data. The decomposition reveals three characteristic length scales (45 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm) that are relevant for correlational analysis. The dynamical cross-correlation analyses with moving windows at various sarcomere lengths depict a vernierlike design for both periodicities, thus enabling nebulin to sense position and fine tune sarcomere overlap. This shows that the disorder profile of scaffolding proteins may encode a guideline for cellular architecture.

  17. Differential Sarcomere and Electrophysiological Maturation of Human iPSC-Derived Cardiac Myocytes in Monolayer vs. Aggregation-Based Differentiation Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Jeziorowska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs represent a powerful human model to study cardiac disease in vitro, notably channelopathies and sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. Different protocols for cardiac differentiation of iPSCs have been proposed either based on embroid body formation (3D or, more recently, on monolayer culture (2D. We performed a direct comparison of the characteristics of the derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs on day 27 ± 2 of differentiation between 3D and 2D differentiation protocols with two different Wnt-inhibitors were compared: IWR1 (inhibitor of Wnt response or IWP2 (inhibitor of Wnt production. We firstly found that the level of Troponin T (TNNT2 expression measured by FACS was significantly higher for both 2D protocols as compared to the 3D protocol. In the three methods, iPSC-CM show sarcomeric structures. However, iPSC-CM generated in 2D protocols constantly displayed larger sarcomere lengths as compared to the 3D protocol. In addition, mRNA and protein analyses reveal higher cTNi to ssTNi ratios in the 2D protocol using IWP2 as compared to both other protocols, indicating a higher sarcomeric maturation. Differentiation of cardiac myocytes with 2D monolayer-based protocols and the use of IWP2 allows the production of higher yield of cardiac myocytes that have more suitable characteristics to study sarcomeric cardiomyopathies.

  18. Malignant effects of multiple rare variants in sarcomere genes on the prognosis of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jizheng; Wang, Yilu; Zou, Yubao; Sun, Kai; Wang, Zhimin; Ding, Hu; Yuan, Jinqing; Wei, Wei; Hou, Qing; Wang, Hu; Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Hongju; Ji, Yun; Zhou, Xianliang; Sharma, Ravi K; Wang, Daowen; Ahmad, Ferhaan; Hui, Rutai; Song, Lei

    2014-09-01

    Although genetic testing has been recommended in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) in current clinical practice, its utility in prognostic prediction remains to be ascertained. We assessed the dosage effect of rare variants in sarcomere genes on the long-term outcomes of HCM. A total of 529 unrelated HCM patients were prospectively recruited and followed for 4.7 ± 3.2 years. Eight sarcomere genes were screened with targeted resequencing and identified variants were validated through Sanger sequencing. After polymorphisms and likely neutral rare variants were excluded, the patients were segregated into three groups based on the dosage of rare variants: no rare variant, a single rare variant, and multiple rare variants. Multiple rare variants were identified in 7.2% (38/529) of the study patients. Patients with multiple rare variants were younger at diagnosis, and had greater maximum LV wall thicknesses and larger left atria. The risk for cardiovascular death in patients with multiple rare variants was higher than in those without rare variants (P =10⁻⁵) or in those with a single rare variant (P = 2 × 10⁻⁵). Multivariable analysis revealed that multiple rare variants were a risk factor for cardiovascular death [hazard ratio (HR) 3.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.84-7.58, P = 0.0003], as well as sudden cardiac death (HR 3.57, 95% CI 1.23-10.35, P = 0.019) and heart failure-related death (HR 4.62, 95% CI 1.67-12.76, P = 0.003). The presence of multiple rare variants in sarcomere genes is a risk factor for malignant outcomes in HCM, and may be appropriate to consider as a criterion in the risk stratification of HCM patients. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2014 European Society of Cardiology.

  19. Comparative Study on New AQM Mechanisms for Congestion Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna B B

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As usage of network goes increasing day by day, managing network traffic becomes a very difficult task. It is important to avoid high packet loss rates in the Internet. Congestion is the one of the major issue in the present networks. Congestion Control is one of the solutions adopted to solve the congestion issue and to control it. Numbers of queue management algorithms are proposed for congestion control and to reduce high packet loss rates. Active Queue Management (AQM is one such mechanism which provides better control over congestion. In this paper a study is made on recent load based AQM techniques that are proposed and its merits and shortfall is presented.

  20. Motivation and cognitive control: from behavior to neural mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botvinick, Matthew; Braver, Todd

    2015-01-03

    Research on cognitive control and executive function has long recognized the relevance of motivational factors. Recently, however, the topic has come increasingly to center stage, with a surge of new studies examining the interface of motivation and cognitive control. In the present article we survey research situated at this interface, considering work from cognitive and social psychology and behavioral economics, but with a particular focus on neuroscience research. We organize existing findings into three core areas, considering them in the light of currently vying theoretical perspectives. Based on the accumulated evidence, we advocate for a view of control function that treats it as a domain of reward-based decision making. More broadly, we argue that neuroscientific evidence plays a critical role in understanding the mechanisms by which motivation and cognitive control interact. Opportunities for further cross-fertilization between behavioral and neuroscientific research are highlighted.

  1. Altered neuromuscular control mechanisms of the trapezius muscle in fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Stefan J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background fibromyalgia is a relatively common condition with widespread pain and pressure allodynia, but unknown aetiology. For decades, the association between motor control strategies and chronic pain has been a topic for debate. One long held functional neuromuscular control mechanism is differential activation between regions within a single muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in neuromuscular control, i.e. differential activation, between myalgic trapezius in fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls. Methods 27 fibromyalgia patients and 30 healthy controls performed 3 minutes bilateral shoulder elevations with different loads (0-4 Kg with a high-density surface electromyographical (EMG grid placed above the upper trapezius. Differential activation was quantified by the power spectral median frequency of the difference in EMG amplitude between the cranial and caudal parts of the upper trapezius. The average duration of the differential activation was described by the inverse of the median frequency of the differential activations. Results the median frequency of the differential activations was significantly lower, and the average duration of the differential activations significantly longer in fibromyalgia compared with controls at the two lowest load levels (0-1 Kg (p Conclusion these findings illustrate a different neuromuscular control between fibromyalgia patients and healthy controls during a low load functional task, either sustaining or resulting from the chronic painful condition. The findings may have clinical relevance for rehabilitation strategies for fibromyalgia.

  2. Revolving Vernier Mechanism Controls Size of Linear Homomultimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takeo; Abe, Keita; Endo, Yuma; Ichiseki, Shosei; Akita, Satoru; Liu, Shiyun; Aradachi, Sho; Saito, Masataka; Fukuchi, Akihiko; Kikkawa, Taiyo; Dammaretz, Theo; Kawamata, Ibuki; Suzuki, Yuki; Nomura, Shin-Ichiro M; Murata, Satoshi

    2017-11-01

    A new kind of the Vernier mechanism that is able to control the size of linear assembly of DNA origami nanostructures is proposed. The mechanism is realized by mechanical design of DNA origami, which consists of a hollow cylinder and a rotatable shaft in it connected through the same scaffold. This nanostructure stacks with each other by the shape complementarity at its top and bottom surfaces of the cylinder, while the number of stacking is limited by twisting angle of the shaft. Experiments have shown that the size distribution of multimeric assembly of the origami depends on the twisting angle of the shaft; the average lengths of the multimer are decamer, hexamer, and tetramer for 0°, 10°, and 20° twist, respectively. In summary, it is possible to affect the number of polymerization by adjusting the precise shape and movability of a molecular structure. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Diagnostic yield, interpretation, and clinical utility of mutation screening of sarcomere encoding genes in Danish hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients and relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Paal Skytt; Havndrup, Ole; Hougs, Lotte

    2008-01-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends family screening for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We assessed the outcome of family screening combining clinical evaluation and screening for sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of 90 Danish HCM patients and their close relatives, in all 451......, and in 37.5% of relatives without a mutation, one or more criteria was fulfilled. A total of 60% of family members had no mutation and could be reassured and further follow-up ceased. Genetic diagnosis may be established in approximately 40% of families with the highest yield in familial HCM with clinical...

  4. Transmural heterogeneity of myofilament function and sarcomeric protein phosphorylation in remodeled myocardium of pigs with a recent myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Jolanda; Merkus, Daphne; de Beer, Vincent; Hamdani, Nazha; Linke, Wolfgang A; Boontje, Nicky M; Stienen, Ger J M; Duncker, Dirk J

    2011-01-01

    Transmural differences in sarcomeric protein composition and function across the left ventricular (LV) wall have been reported. We studied in pigs sarcomeric function and protein phosphorylation in subepicardial (EPI) and subendocardial (ENDO) layers of remote LV myocardium after myocardial infarction (MI), induced by left circumflex coronary artery ligation. EPI and ENDO samples were taken 3 weeks after sham surgery (n = 12) or induction of MI (n = 12) at baseline (BL) and during β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulation with dobutamine. Isometric force was measured in single cardiomyocytes at various [Ca(2+)] and 2.2 μm sarcomere length. In sham hearts, no significant transmural differences were observed in myofilament function or protein phosphorylation. Myofilament Ca(2+)-sensitivity was significantly higher in both EPI and ENDO of MI compared to sham hearts. Maximal force was significantly reduced in MI compared to sham, but solely in ENDO cells. A higher passive force was observed in MI hearts, but only in EPI cells. The proportion of stiff N2B isoform was higher in EPI than in ENDO in both sham and MI hearts, and a trend toward increased N2B-proportion appeared in MI EPI, but not MI Endo. Analysis of myofilament protein phosphorylation did not reveal significant transmural differences in phosphorylation of myosin binding protein C, desmin, troponin T, troponin I (cTnI), and myosin light chain 2 (MLC-2) both at BL and during βAR stimulation with dobutamine infusion. A significant increase in MLC-2 phosphorylation was observed during dobutamine only in sham. In addition, the increase in cTnI phosphorylation upon dobutamine was twofold lower in MI than in sham. Myofilament dysfunction is present in both EPI and ENDO in post-MI remodeled myocardium, but shows a high degree of qualitative heterogeneity across the LV wall. These heterogeneous transmural changes in sarcomeric properties likely contribute differently to systolic vs. diastolic global LV

  5. Molecular and regulatory mechanisms controlling floral organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Darragh; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2016-05-01

    The genetic and molecular mechanisms that underlie the formation of angiosperm flowers have been studied extensively for nearly three decades. This work has led to detailed insights into the gene regulatory networks that control this vital developmental process in plants. Here, we review some of the key findings in the field of flower development and discuss open questions that must be addressed in order to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of flower formation. In particular, we focus on the specification of the different types of floral organs and on how the morphogenesis of these organs is controlled to give rise to mature flowers. Central to this process are the floral organ identity genes, which encode members of the family of MADS-domain transcription factors. We summarize what is currently known about the functions of these master regulators and discuss a working model for the molecular mechanism that may underlie their activities. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Pubertal control mechanisms as revealed from human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, J J

    1980-05-15

    Human puberty is thought to be regulated by a central nervous system (CNS) program. Strong presumptive evidence for this thesis has been drawn from the augmented gonadotropin secretion that occurs synchronously with sleep in early puberty and serves as a biologic index to CNS puberty. In response to wake/sleep gonadotropin patterns, sex steroids are also secreted in circadian-like patterns during puberty. In disorders such as precocious puberty, anorexia nervosa, and gonadal dysgenesis, the physiological mechanisms that control wake/sleep differences in gonadotropin secretion appear to be intact. Studies in such patients suggest that the primary sex hormones have a quantitative but not qualitative modulating effect on the CNS program. Possible additional control mechanisms include adrenal androgen secretion and body composition.

  7. Antenna mechanism of length control of actin cables

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Lishibanya; Kondev, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Actin cables are linear cytoskeletal structures that serve as tracks for myosin-based intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles in both yeast and mammalian cells. In a yeast cell undergoing budding, cables are in constant dynamic turnover yet some cables grow from the bud neck toward the back of the mother cell until their length roughly equals the diameter of the mother cell. This raises the question: how is the length of these cables controlled? Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for cable length control inspired by recent experimental observations in cells. This antenna mechanism involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. We compute the probability distribution of cable lengths as a function of several experimentally tuneable parameters such as the formin-binding affinity of Smy1 and the concentra...

  8. Are Articulatory Settings Mechanically Advantageous for Speech Motor Control?

    OpenAIRE

    Vikram Ramanarayanan; Adam Lammert; Louis Goldstein; Shrikanth Narayanan

    2014-01-01

    We address the hypothesis that postures adopted during grammatical pauses in speech production are more "mechanically advantageous" than absolute rest positions for facilitating efficient postural motor control of vocal tract articulators. We quantify vocal tract posture corresponding to inter-speech pauses, absolute rest intervals as well as vowel and consonant intervals using automated analysis of video captured with real-time magnetic resonance imaging during production of read and spontan...

  9. Immunosensor with Fluid Control Mechanism for Salivary Cortisol Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Masaki; Matsuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Shohei; Sasaki, Makoto; Kadoma, Yoshihiro; Imai, Yoshikatsu; Niwa, Daisuke; Shetty, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to demonstrate a new design for a cortisol immunosensor for the noninvasive and quantitative analysis of salivary cortisol. We propose a cortisol immunosensor with a fluid control mechanism which has both a vertical flow and a lateral flow. The detected current resulting from a competitive reaction between the sample cortisol and a glucose oxidase (GOD)-labeled cortisol conjugate was found to be inversely related to the concentration of cortisol in the sample s...

  10. Microcontrollers for Mechanical Engineers: From Assembly Language to Controller Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Salzman, Noah; Meckl, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of a graduate and advanced undergraduate mechanical engineering course on microcontrollers and electromechanical control systems. The course begins with developing an understanding of the architecture of the microcontroller, and low-level programming in assembly language. It then proceeds to working with various functions of the microcontroller, including serial communications, interrupts, analog to digital conversion, and digital to analog conversion. Final...

  11. Mechanical design and optimal control of humanoid robot (TPinokio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teck Chew Wee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical structure and the control of the locomotion of bipedal humanoid is an important and challenging domain of research in bipedal robots. Accurate models of the kinematics and dynamics of the robot are essential to achieve bipedal locomotion. Toe-foot walking produces a more natural and faster walking speed and it is even possible to perform stretch knee walking. This study presents the mechanical design of a toe-feet bipedal, TPinokio and the implementation of some optimal walking gait generation methods. The optimality in the gait trajectory is achieved by applying augmented model predictive control method and the pole-zero cancellation method, taken into consideration of a trade-off between walking speed and stability. The mechanism of the TPinokio robot is designed in modular form, so that its kinematics can be modelled accurately into a multiple point-mass system, its dynamics is modelled using the single and double mass inverted pendulum model and zero-moment-point concept. The effectiveness of the design and control technique is validated by simulation testing with the robot walking on flat surface and climbing stairs.

  12. Edge Mechanisms for Power Excursion Control in Burning Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M. D.; Stacey, W. M.

    2017-10-01

    ITER must have active and preferably also passive control mechanisms that will limit inadvertent plasma power excursions which could trigger runaway fusion heating. We are identifying and investigating the potential of ion-orbit loss, impurity seeding, and various divertor ``choking'' phenomena to control or limit sudden increases in plasma density or temperature by reducing energy confinement, increasing radiation loss, etc., with the idea that such mechanisms could be tested on DIII-D and other existing tokamaks. We are assembling an edge-divertor code (GTEDGE-2) with a neutral transport model and a burn dynamics code, for this purpose. One potential control mechanism is the enhanced ion orbit loss from the thermalized ion distribution that would result from heating of the thermalized plasma ion distribution. Another possibility is impurity seeding with ions whose emissivity would increase sharply if the edge temperature increased. Enhanced radiative losses should also reduce the thermal energy flux across the separatrix, perhaps dropping the plasma into the poorer L-mode confinement regime. We will present some initial calculations to quantify these ideas. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  13. Antenna Mechanism of Length Control of Actin Cables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishibanya Mohapatra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Actin cables are linear cytoskeletal structures that serve as tracks for myosin-based intracellular transport of vesicles and organelles in both yeast and mammalian cells. In a yeast cell undergoing budding, cables are in constant dynamic turnover yet some cables grow from the bud neck toward the back of the mother cell until their length roughly equals the diameter of the mother cell. This raises the question: how is the length of these cables controlled? Here we describe a novel molecular mechanism for cable length control inspired by recent experimental observations in cells. This "antenna mechanism" involves three key proteins: formins, which polymerize actin, Smy1 proteins, which bind formins and inhibit actin polymerization, and myosin motors, which deliver Smy1 to formins, leading to a length-dependent actin polymerization rate. We compute the probability distribution of cable lengths as a function of several experimentally tuneable parameters such as the formin-binding affinity of Smy1 and the concentration of myosin motors delivering Smy1. These results provide testable predictions of the antenna mechanism of actin-cable length control.

  14. Contouring control of ball screw mechanism using a practical control method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasim, Norhaslinda; Chong, Shin Horng; Keat Hee, Wai; Ibrahim, Zulkifilie

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an improved practical controller for enhancing the contouring motion of a ball screw mechanism. Practically, a high motion control performance and ease of controller design are desired. A continuous motion nominal characteristic trajectory following (CM NCTF) control has been considered to fulfill the desired performance. The NCTF controller comprises of a nominal characteristic trajectory (NCT) and a PI compensator where the controller parameters are easily determined and it is free from exact modeling. In the present paper, the CM NCTF controller has been proposed in order to enhance the continuous motion performance such as tracking and contouring accuracies of the system. In order to justify the advantages, the CM NCTF controller was examined in tracking motion performances using an AC driven X-Y ball screw mechanism. The bandwidth of the CM NCTF controller is larger compared to the PID controller, therefore, it proved that the CM NCTF controller has fast response as compared with the PID controller. The experimental results proved that the CM NCTF controller achieves better contouring motion performances than the PID controller by showing a two times smaller motion error.

  15. Dynamics and control of mechanical systems in offshore engineering

    CERN Document Server

    He, Wei; How, Bernard Voon Ee; Choo, Yoo Sang

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics and Control of Mechanical Systems in Offshore Engineering is a comprehensive treatment of marine mechanical systems (MMS) involved in processes of great importance such as oil drilling and mineral recovery. Ranging from nonlinear dynamic modeling and stability analysis of flexible riser systems, through advanced control design for an installation system with a single rigid payload attached by thrusters, to robust adaptive control for mooring systems, it is an authoritative reference on the dynamics and control of MMS. Readers will gain not only a complete picture of MMS at the system level, but also a better understanding of the technical considerations involved and solutions to problems that commonly arise from dealing with them. The text provides:                                                                                                                                 ...

  16. Bilingualism modulates dual mechanisms of cognitive control: Evidence from ERPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Julia; Yudes, Carolina; Gómez-Ariza, Carlos J; Bajo, M Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Recent behavioral findings with the AX-Continous Performance Task (AX-CPT; Morales et al., 2013) show that bilinguals only outperform monolinguals under conditions that require the highest adjustment between monitoring (proactive) and inhibitory (reactive) control, which supports the idea that bilingualism modulates the coordination of different control mechanisms. In an ERP experiment we aimed to further investigate the role that bilingualism plays in the dynamic combination of proactive and reactive control in the AX-CPT. Our results strongly indicate that bilingualism facilitates an effective adjustment between both components of cognitive control. First, we replicated previous behavioral results. Second, ERP components indicated that bilingualism influences the conflict monitoring, response inhibition and error monitoring components of control (as indexed by the N2 and P3a elicited by the probe and the error-related negativity following incorrect responses, respectively). Thus, bilinguals exerted higher reactive control than monolinguals but only when they needed to overcome the competing cue-information. These findings join others in suggesting that a better understanding of the cognitive benefits of bilingualism may require consideration of a multi-component perspective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Model Predictive Vibration Control Efficient Constrained MPC Vibration Control for Lightly Damped Mechanical Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Takács, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    Real-time model predictive controller (MPC) implementation in active vibration control (AVC) is often rendered difficult by fast sampling speeds and extensive actuator-deformation asymmetry. If the control of lightly damped mechanical structures is assumed, the region of attraction containing the set of allowable initial conditions requires a large prediction horizon, making the already computationally demanding on-line process even more complex. Model Predictive Vibration Control provides insight into the predictive control of lightly damped vibrating structures by exploring computationally efficient algorithms which are capable of low frequency vibration control with guaranteed stability and constraint feasibility. In addition to a theoretical primer on active vibration damping and model predictive control, Model Predictive Vibration Control provides a guide through the necessary steps in understanding the founding ideas of predictive control applied in AVC such as: ·         the implementation of ...

  18. Pressure and volume controlled mechanical ventilation in anaesthetized pregnant sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J; Musk, G C

    2014-10-01

    Optimal mechanical ventilation of the pregnant ewe during anaesthesia is of vital importance for maintaining fetal viability. This study aimed to compare peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), oxygenation and cardiovascular parameters with pressure-control (PCV) or volume-control (VCV) mechanical ventilation of anaesthetized pregnant sheep. Twenty ewes at 110 days gestation underwent general anaesthesia in dorsal recumbency for fetal surgery in a research setting. All the sheep were mechanically ventilated; one group with PCV (n = 10) and another with VCV (n = 10) to maintain normocapnia. PIP, direct arterial blood pressure, heart rate, arterial pH and arterial oxygen tension were recorded. PIP was lower in the PCV group (P < 0.001). Arterial oxygen tension was higher in the PCV group (P = 0.013). Mean and diastolic pressures were lower in the PCV group (P = 0.029 and P = 0.047, respectively). Both VCV and PCV provide adequate oxygenation of pregnant sheep anaesthetized in dorsal recumbency, though PCV may provide superior oxygenation at a lower PIP. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. Muscular tissues of the squid Doryteuthis pealeii express identical myosin heavy chain isoforms: an alternative mechanism for tuning contractile speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Justin F; Kier, William M

    2012-01-15

    The speed of muscle contraction is largely controlled at the sarcomere level by the ATPase activity of the motor protein myosin. Differences in amino acid sequence in catalytically important regions of myosin yield different myosin isoforms with varying ATPase activities and resulting differences in cross-bridge cycling rates and interfilamentary sliding velocities. Modulation of whole-muscle performance by changes in myosin isoform ATPase activity is regarded as a universal mechanism to tune contractile properties, especially in vertebrate muscles. Invertebrates such as squid, however, may exhibit an alternative mechanism to tune contractile properties that is based on differences in muscle ultrastructure, including variable myofilament and sarcomere lengths. To determine definitively whether contractile properties of squid muscles are regulated via different myosin isoforms (i.e. different ATPase activities), the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the myosin heavy chain from the squid Doryteuthis pealeii were determined from the mantle, arm, tentacle, fin and funnel retractor musculature. We identified three myosin heavy chain isoforms in squid muscular tissues, with differences arising at surface loop 1 and the carboxy terminus. All three isoforms were detected in all five tissues studied. These results suggest that the muscular tissues of D. pealeii express identical myosin isoforms, and it is likely that differences in muscle ultrastructure, not myosin ATPase activity, represent the most important mechanism for tuning contractile speeds.

  20. Controlling Mechanical Properties of Bis-leucine Oxalyl Amide Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, William; Carvajal, Daniel; Shull, Kenneth

    2011-03-01

    is-leucine oxalyl amide is a low molecular weight gelator capable of gelling polar and organic solvents. A fundamental understanding of self-assembled systems can lead to new methods in drug delivery and the design of new soft material systems. An important feature of self-assembled systems are the intermolecular forces between solvent and gelator molecule; by changing the environment the gel is in, the mechanical properties also change. In this project two variables were considered: the degree of neutralization present for the gelator molecule from neutral to completely ionized, and the concentration of the gelator molecule, from 1 weight percent to 8 weight percent in 1-butanol. Mechanical properties were studied using displacement controlled indentation techniques and temperature sweep rheometry. It has been found that properties such as the storage modulus, gelation temperature and maximum stress allowed increase with bis-leucine oxalyl amide concentration. The results from this study establish a 3-d contour map between the gelator concentration, the gelator degree of ionization and mechanical properties such as storage modulus and maximum stress allowed. The intermolecular forces between the bis-leucine low molecular weight gelator and 1-butanol govern the mechanical properties of the gel system, and understanding these interactions will be key to rationally designed self-assembled systems.

  1. Unaffected contractility of diaphragm muscle fibers in humans on mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijman, Pleuni E.; Paul, Marinus A.; Stienen, Ger J. M.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Van Hees, Hieronymus W. H.; Singhal, Sunil; Bashir, Muhammad; Budak, Murat T.; Morgen, Jacqueline; Barsotti, Robert J.; Levine, Sanford

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that diaphragm dysfunction develops in patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the contractility of sarcomeres, i.e., the smallest contractile unit in muscle, is affected in humans on MV. To this end, we compared diaphragm muscle fibers of nine brain-dead organ donors (cases) that had been on MV for 26 ± 5 h with diaphragm muscle fibers from nine patients (controls) undergoing surgery for lung cancer that had been on MV for less than 2 h. In each diaphragm specimen we determined 1) muscle fiber cross-sectional area in cryosections by immunohistochemical methods and 2) the contractile performance of permeabilized single muscle fibers by means of maximum specific force, kinetics of cross-bridge cycling by rate of tension redevelopment, myosin heavy chain content and concentration, and calcium sensitivity of force of slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fibers. In case subjects, we noted no statistically significant decrease in outcomes compared with controls in slow-twitch or fast-twitch muscle fibers. These observations indicate that 26 h of MV of humans is not invariably associated with changes in the contractile performance of sarcomeres in the diaphragm. PMID:25038190

  2. A cognitive intersensory interaction mechanism in human postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blümle, A; Maurer, C; Schweigart, G; Mergner, T

    2006-08-01

    Human control of upright body posture involves inputs from several senses (visual, vestibular, proprioceptive, somatosensory) and their central interactions. We recently studied visual effects on posture control and their intersensory interactions and found evidence for the existence of an indirect and presumably cognitive mode of interaction, in addition to a direct interaction (we found, e.g., that a 'virtual reality' visual stimulus has a weaker postural effect than a 'real world' scene, because of its illusory character). Here we focus on the presumed cognitive interaction mechanism. We report experiments in healthy subjects and vestibular loss patients. We investigated to what extent a postural response to lateral platform tilt is modulated by tilt of a visual scene in an orthogonal rotational plane (anterior-posterior, a-p, direction). The a-p visual stimulus did not evoke a lateral postural response on its own. But it enhanced the response to the lateral platform tilt (i.e., it increased the evoked body excursion). The effect was related to the velocity of the visual stimulus, showed a threshold at 0.31 degrees /s, and increased monotonically with increasing velocity. These characteristics were similar in normals and patients, but body excursions were larger in patients. In conclusion, the orthogonal stimulus arrangement in our experiments allowed us to selectively assess a cognitive intersensory interaction that upon co-planar stimulation tends to be merged with direct interaction. The observed threshold corresponds to the conscious perceptual detection threshold of the visual motion, which is clearly higher than the visual postural response threshold. This finding is in line with our notion of a cognitive phenomenon. We postulate that the cognitive mechanism in normals interferes with a central visual-vestibular interaction mechanism. This appears to be similar in vestibular loss patients, but patients use less effective somatosensory instead of vestibular

  3. Design and Control of Nonlinear Mechanical Systems for Minimum Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Cardoso

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an integrated methodology for optimal design and control of nonlinear flexible mechanical systems, including minimum time problems. This formulation is implemented in an optimum design code and it is applied to the nonlinear behavior dynamic response. Damping and stiffness characteristics plus control driven forces are considered as decision variables. A conceptual separation between time variant and time invariant design parameters is presented, this way including the design space into the control space and considering the design variables as control variables not depending on time. By using time integrals through all the derivations, design and control problems are unified. In the optimization process we can use both types of variables simultaneously or by interdependent levels. For treating minimum time problems, a unit time interval is mapped onto the original time interval, then treating equally time variant and time invariant problems. The dynamic response and its sensitivity are discretized via space-time finite elements, and may be integrated either by at-once integration or step-by-step. Adjoint system approach is used to calculate the sensitivities.

  4. Exercise and Hypertension: Uncovering the Mechanisms of Vascular Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbahi, Ahmad; Arena, Ross; Elokda, Ahmed; Phillips, Shane A

    Hypertension (HTN) has recently been determined to be the number one overall risk factor of disease. With direct and indirect costs amounting to $46.4 billion in 2011 and projections of six-fold increases by 2030, the importance of low-cost nonpharmacological interventions can be appreciated. Vascular structural changes, endothelial dysfunction, and sympathetic overstimulation are major contributing factors to the pathophysiology of HTN. Exercise training (ET) for blood pressure (BP) control has been shown to be an effective and integral component of nonpharmacological interventions for BP control. Different ET modalities (aerobic, resistance, and concurrent training) have contributed differently to BP reduction and control, driving scientific discourse regarding the optimum ET prescription (modality, volume, and intensity) for such effects; ET results in a multitude of physiological effects, with vascular and autonomic adaptations providing major contributions to BP control. Despite widespread acceptance of the role and importance of ET for BP reduction, only 15% of US adults have been found to meet ET/physical activity recommendations. The purpose of this review is to explore BP lowering effects of aerobic and resistance ET and the underlying physiological mechanisms that result in such effects. Further research is required to enhance our understanding of the proper ET prescription for BP control across different age groups and racial ethnicities. Furthermore, research into methods of improving awareness and adherence to ET recommendations proves to be equally important. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Modelling and Simulation of Volume Controlled Mechanical Ventilation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volume controlled mechanical ventilation system is a typical time-delay system, which is applied to ventilate patients who cannot breathe adequately on their own. To illustrate the influences of key parameters of the ventilator on the dynamics of the ventilated respiratory system, this paper firstly derived a new mathematical model of the ventilation system; secondly, simulation and experimental results are compared to verify the mathematical model; lastly, the influences of key parameters of ventilator on the dynamics of the ventilated respiratory system are carried out. This study can be helpful in the VCV ventilation treatment and respiratory diagnostics.

  6. Mechanically controlled quantum interference in individual π-stacked dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisenda, Riccardo; Janssen, Vera A E C; Grozema, Ferdinand C; van der Zant, Herre S J; Renaud, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    Recent observations of destructive quantum interference in single-molecule junctions confirm the role of quantum effects in the electronic conductance properties of molecular systems. These effects are central to a broad range of chemical and biological processes and may be beneficial for the design of single-molecule electronic components to exploit the intrinsic quantum effects that occur at the molecular scale. Here we show that destructive interference can be turned on or off within the same molecular system by mechanically controlling its conformation. Using a combination of ab initio calculations and single-molecule conductance measurements, we demonstrate the existence of a quasiperiodic destructive quantum-interference pattern along the breaking traces of π-stacked molecular dimers. The results demonstrate that it is possible to control the molecular conductance over more than one order of magnitude and with a sub-ångström resolution by exploiting the subtle structure-property relationship of π-stacked dimers.

  7. Central chemoreceptors and neural mechanisms of cardiorespiratory control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Moreira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial partial pressure (P CO2 of carbon dioxide is virtually constant because of the close match between the metabolic production of this gas and its excretion via breathing. Blood gas homeostasis does not rely solely on changes in lung ventilation, but also to a considerable extent on circulatory adjustments that regulate the transport of CO2 from its sites of production to the lungs. The neural mechanisms that coordinate circulatory and ventilatory changes to achieve blood gas homeostasis are the subject of this review. Emphasis will be placed on the control of sympathetic outflow by central chemoreceptors. High levels of CO2 exert an excitatory effect on sympathetic outflow that is mediated by specialized chemoreceptors such as the neurons located in the retrotrapezoid region. In addition, high CO2 causes an aversive awareness in conscious animals, activating wake-promoting pathways such as the noradrenergic neurons. These neuronal groups, which may also be directly activated by brain acidification, have projections that contribute to the CO2-induced rise in breathing and sympathetic outflow. However, since the level of activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus is regulated by converging inputs from wake-promoting systems, behavior-specific inputs from higher centers and by chemical drive, the main focus of the present manuscript is to review the contribution of central chemoreceptors to the control of autonomic and respiratory mechanisms.

  8. Mechanism of controlled release kinetics from medical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Raval

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of biodegradable polymers for controlled drug delivery has gained immense attention in the pharmaceutical and medical device industry to administer various drugs, proteins and other bio-molecules both systematically and locally to cure several diseases. The efficacy and toxicity of this local therapeutics depends upon drug release kinetics, which will further decide drug deposition, distribution, and retention at the target site. Drug Eluting Stent (DES presently possesses clinical importance as an alternative to Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting due to the ease of the procedure and comparable safety and efficacy. Many models have been developed to describe the drug delivery from polymeric carriers based on the different mechanisms which control the release phenomenon from DES. Advanced characterization techniques facilitate an understanding of the complexities behind design and related drug release behavior of drug eluting stents, which aids in the development of improved future drug eluting systems. This review discusses different drug release mechanisms, engineering principles, mathematical models and current trends that are proposed for drug-polymer coated medical devices such as cardiovascular stents and different analytical methods currently utilized to probe diverse characteristics of drug eluting devices.

  9. Neural mechanisms of attentional control in mindfulness meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eMalinowski

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The scientific interest in meditation and mindfulness practice has recently seen an unprecedented surge. After an initial phase of presenting beneficial effects of mindfulness practice in various domains, research is now seeking to unravel the underlying psychological and neurophysiological mechanisms. Advances in understanding these processes are required for improving and fine-tuning mindfulness-based interventions that target specific conditions such as eating disorders or attention deficit hyperactivity disorders. This review presents a theoretical framework that emphasizes the central role of attentional control mechanisms in the development of mindfulness skills. It discusses the phenomenological level of experience during meditation, the different attentional functions that are involved, and relates these to the brain networks that subserve these functions. On the basis of currently available empirical evidence specific processes as to how attention exerts its positive influence are considered and it is concluded that meditation practice appears to positively impact attentional functions by improving resource allocation processes. As a result, attentional resources are allocated more fully during early processing phases which subsequently enhance further processing. Neural changes resulting from a pure form of mindfulness practice that is central to most mindfulness programs are considered from the perspective that they constitute a useful reference point for future research. Furthermore, possible interrelations between the improvement of attentional control and emotion regulation skills are discussed.

  10. Species diversity and the evolution of behavioral controlling mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, D

    1997-01-15

    One of the first things that we are impressed by is the great variety of animals, particularly their behaviors and their physiologies. With so many differences, are there any generalities? With the establishment of evolutionary theory, evidence of "unity in diversity" comes with discoveries of common anatomical features, the cell cycle, conservation of intermediary metabolism, and the genetic code, to name but a few. In vertebrates there appears to be a conservation of the neural circuits underlying sexual behavior, but it is still too early to state the extent to which this concept can be extended to the hormonal mechanisms underlying behavior. Much of our conceptual understanding of behavioral neuroendocrinology stems from extensive studies on relatively few species. When an evolutionary perspective is applied to behavioral neuroscience, the breadth and validity of our assumptions about the mechanisms that control species-typical behaviors are challenged. This is not the same thing as saying that there are few unitary explanations that apply to all mammals, amniotes, or even vertebrates. Considerable information has been gathered about the neuroendocrine bases of behavior in a few species, but to uncover truly broad generalizations, we must look with equal intensity and rigor at other organisms. The pattern of evolution is best illustrated in the diversity of organisms, and the ecological and evolutionary perspective illuminates the utility of various "experiments of nature." By studying (1) closely related species that live in different habitats, we can see if the adaptational responses are similar, and (2) distantly related species that live in the same habitat, we can see if the solutions are analogous. The unique qualities of each species also give us a deeper understanding of the constraints in fundamental processes. When basic conflicts exist, control mechanisms adapt or the species goes extinct. Interestingly, although the neural circuits themselves do not

  11. Modeling Human Error Mechanism for Soft Control in Advanced Control Rooms (ACRs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aljneibi, Hanan Salah Ali [Khalifa Univ., Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ha, Jun Su; Kang, Seongkeun; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To achieve the switch from conventional analog-based design to digital design in ACRs, a large number of manual operating controls and switches have to be replaced by a few common multi-function devices which is called soft control system. The soft controls in APR-1400 ACRs are classified into safety-grade and non-safety-grade soft controls; each was designed using different and independent input devices in ACRs. The operations using soft controls require operators to perform new tasks which were not necessary in conventional controls such as navigating computerized displays to monitor plant information and control devices. These kinds of computerized displays and soft controls may make operations more convenient but they might cause new types of human error. In this study the human error mechanism during the soft controls is studied and modeled to be used for analysis and enhancement of human performance (or human errors) during NPP operation. The developed model would contribute to a lot of applications to improve human performance (or reduce human errors), HMI designs, and operators' training program in ACRs. The developed model of human error mechanism for the soft control is based on assumptions that a human operator has certain amount of capacity in cognitive resources and if resources required by operating tasks are greater than resources invested by the operator, human error (or poor human performance) is likely to occur (especially in 'slip'); good HMI (Human-machine Interface) design decreases the required resources; operator's skillfulness decreases the required resources; and high vigilance increases the invested resources. In this study the human error mechanism during the soft controls is studied and modeled to be used for analysis and enhancement of human performance (or reduction of human errors) during NPP operation.

  12. Respiratory mechanics in infants with severe bronchiolitis on controlled mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, Pablo; González-Dambrauskas, Sebastián; Quilodrán, Julio; Valenzuela, Jorge; Martínez, Javier; Rivero, Natalia; Arias, Pablo; Díaz, Franco

    2017-10-06

    Analysis of respiratory mechanics during mechanical ventilation (MV) is able to estimate resistive, elastic and inertial components of the working pressure of the respiratory system. Our aim was to discriminate the components of the working pressure of the respiratory system in infants on MV with severe bronchiolitis admitted to two PICU's. Infants younger than 1 year old with acute respiratory failure caused by severe bronchiolitis underwent neuromuscular blockade, tracheal intubation and volume controlled MV. Shortly after intubation studies of pulmonary mechanics were performed using inspiratory and expiratory breath hold. The maximum inspiratory and expiratory flow (QI and QE) as well as peak inspiratory (PIP), plateau (PPL) and total expiratory pressures (tPEEP) were measured. Inspiratory and expiratory resistances (RawI and RawE) and Time Constants (KTI and KTE) were calculated. We included 16 patients, of median age 2.5 (1-5.8) months. Bronchiolitis due to respiratory syncytial virus was the main etiology (93.8%) and 31.3% had comorbidities. Measured respiratory pressures were PIP 29 (26-31), PPL 24 (20-26), tPEEP 9 [8-11] cmH2O. Elastic component of the working pressure was significantly higher than resistive and both higher than threshold (tPEEP - PEEP) (P mechanics of infants with severe bronchiolitis receiving MV shows that the elastic component of the working pressure of the respiratory system is the most important. The elastic and resistive components in conjunction with flow profile are characteristic of restrictive diseases. A better understanding of lung mechanics in this group of patients may lead to change the traditional ventilatory approach to severe bronchiolitis.

  13. Aging interferes central control mechanism for eccentric muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wan X; Li, Jinqi; Jiang, Zhiguo; Gao, Jia-Hong; Franklin, Crystal G; Huang, Yufei; Lancaster, Jack L; Yue, Guang H

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies report greater activation in the cortical motor network in controlling eccentric contraction (EC) than concentric contraction (CC) despite lower muscle activation level associated with EC vs. CC in healthy, young individuals. It is unknown, however, whether elderly people exhibiting increased difficulties in performing EC than CC possess this unique cortical control mechanism for EC movements. To address this question, we examined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during EC and CC of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle in 11 young (20-32 years) and 9 old (67-73 years) individuals. During the fMRI experiment, all subjects performed 20 CC and 20 EC of the right FDI with the same angular distance and velocity. The major findings from the behavioral and fMRI data analysis were that (1) movement stability was poorer in EC than CC in the old but not the young group; (2) similar to previous electrophysiological and fMRI reports, the EC resulted in significantly stronger activation in the motor control network consisting of primary, secondary and association motor cortices than CC in the young and old groups; (3) the biased stronger activation towards EC was significantly greater in the old than the young group especially in the secondary and association cortices such as supplementary and premotor motor areas and anterior cingulate cortex; and (4) in the primary motor and sensory cortices, the biased activation towards EC was significantly greater in the young than the old group. Greater activation in higher-order cortical fields for controlling EC movement by elderly adults may reflect activities in these regions to compensate for aging-related impairments in the ability to control complex EC movements. Our finding is useful for potentially guiding the development of targeted therapies to counteract age-related movement deficits and to prevent injury.

  14. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart.

  15. Electrically-induced muscle fatigue affects feedforward mechanisms of control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjo, F; Forestier, N

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the effects of focal muscle fatigue induced by electromyostimulation (EMS) on Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APAs) during arm flexions performed at maximal velocity. Fifteen healthy subjects performed self-paced arm flexions at maximal velocity before and after the completion of fatiguing electromyostimulation programs involving the medial and anterior deltoids and aiming to degrade movement peak acceleration. APA timing and magnitude were measured using surface electromyography. Following muscle fatigue, despite a lower mechanical disturbance evidenced by significant decreased peak accelerations (-12%, p.11 for all analyses). The fatigue signals evoked by externally-generated contractions seem to be gated by the Central Nervous System and result in postural strategy changes which aim to increase the postural safety margin. EMS is widely used in rehabilitation and training programs for its neuromuscular function-related benefits. However and from a motor control viewpoint, the present results show that the use of EMS can lead to acute inaccuracies in predictive motor control. We propose that clinicians should investigate the chronic and global effects of EMS on motor control. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Altered diaphragm contractile properties with controlled mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Catherine S H; Caiozzo, Vincent J; Manka, Albana; Sieck, Gary C

    2002-06-01

    This study shows that, over time, diaphragm inactivity with controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV) decreases diaphragm force and produces myofibril damage contributing to the reduced force. We measured in vivo and in vitro diaphragm contractile and morphological properties in 30 sedated rabbits grouped (n = 6) as follows: 1 or 3 days of CMV, 1 or 3 days of 0 cmH(2)O continuous positive airway pressure, and control. The CMV rate was set sufficient to suppress diaphragm electrical activity. Compared with the control group, phrenic-stimulated maximum transdiaphragmatic pressure did not decrease with continuous positive airway pressure but decreased to 63% after 1 day of CMV and to 49% after 3 days of CMV. The in vitro tetanic force decreased to 86% after 1 day of CMV and to 44% after 3 days of CMV. After 3 days of CMV, significant myofibril damage occurred in the diaphragm but not in the soleus. The decrease in tetanic force correlated with the volume density of abnormal myofibrils. We conclude that CMV had a detrimental effect on diaphragm contractile properties.

  17. Atmospheric methane control mechanisms during the early Holocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Woong; Ahn, Jinho; Brook, Edward J.; Ryu, Yeongjun

    2017-09-01

    Understanding processes controlling the atmospheric methane (CH4) mixing ratio is crucial to predict and mitigate future climate changes in this gas. Despite recent detailed studies of the last ˜ 1000 to 2000 years, the mechanisms that control atmospheric CH4 still remain unclear, partly because the late Holocene CH4 budget may be comprised of both natural and anthropogenic emissions. In contrast, the early Holocene was a period when human influence was substantially smaller, allowing us to elucidate more clearly the natural controls under interglacial conditions more clearly. Here we present new high-resolution CH4 records from Siple Dome, Antarctica, covering from 11.6 to 7.7 thousands of years before 1950 AD (ka). We observe four local CH4 minima on a roughly 1000-year spacing, which correspond to cool periods in Greenland. We hypothesize that the cooling in Greenland forced the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to migrate southward, reducing rainfall in northern tropical wetlands. The inter-polar difference (IPD) of CH4 shows a gradual increase from the onset of the Holocene to ˜ 9.5 ka, which implies growth of boreal source strength following the climate warming in the northern extratropics during that period.

  18. Atmospheric methane control mechanisms during the early Holocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-W. Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding processes controlling the atmospheric methane (CH4 mixing ratio is crucial to predict and mitigate future climate changes in this gas. Despite recent detailed studies of the last  ∼  1000 to 2000 years, the mechanisms that control atmospheric CH4 still remain unclear, partly because the late Holocene CH4 budget may be comprised of both natural and anthropogenic emissions. In contrast, the early Holocene was a period when human influence was substantially smaller, allowing us to elucidate more clearly the natural controls under interglacial conditions more clearly. Here we present new high-resolution CH4 records from Siple Dome, Antarctica, covering from 11.6 to 7.7 thousands of years before 1950 AD (ka. We observe four local CH4 minima on a roughly 1000-year spacing, which correspond to cool periods in Greenland. We hypothesize that the cooling in Greenland forced the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ to migrate southward, reducing rainfall in northern tropical wetlands. The inter-polar difference (IPD of CH4 shows a gradual increase from the onset of the Holocene to  ∼  9.5 ka, which implies growth of boreal source strength following the climate warming in the northern extratropics during that period.

  19. Metallurgical Mechanisms Controlling Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Alloy 2219 Produced by Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domack, Marcia S.; Tainger, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) layer-additive manufacturing process has been developed to directly fabricate complex geometry components. EBF3 introduces metal wire into a molten pool created on the surface of a substrate by a focused electron beam. Part geometry is achieved by translating the substrate with respect to the beam to build the part one layer at a time. Tensile properties demonstrated for electron beam deposited aluminum and titanium alloys are comparable to wrought products, although the microstructures of the deposits exhibit cast features. Understanding the metallurgical mechanisms controlling mechanical properties is essential to maximizing application of the EBF3 process. Tensile mechanical properties and microstructures were examined for aluminum alloy 2219 fabricated over a range of EBF3 process variables. Unique microstructures were observed within the deposited layers and at interlayer boundaries, which varied within the deposit height due to microstructural evolution associated with the complex thermal history experienced during subsequent layer deposition. Microstructures exhibited irregularly shaped grains with interior dendritic structures, described based on overall grain size, morphology, distribution, and dendrite spacing, and were correlated with deposition parameters. Fracture features were compared with microstructural elements to define fracture paths and aid in definition of basic processing-microstructure-property correlations.

  20. Novel Sarcopenia-related Alterations in Sarcomeric Protein Post-translational Modifications in Skeletal Muscles Identified by Top-down Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liming; Gregorich, Zachery R; Lin, Ziqing; Cai, Wenxuan; Jin, Yutong; McKiernan, Susan H; McIlwain, Sean; Aiken, Judd M; Moss, Richard L; Diffee, Gary M; Ge, Ying

    2017-10-18

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, is a significant cause of morbidity in the elderly and is a major burden on health care systems. Unfortunately, the underlying molecular mechanisms in sarcopenia remain poorly understood. Herein, we utilized top-down proteomics to elucidate sarcopenia-related changes in the fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of aging rats with a focus on the sarcomeric proteome, which includes both myofilament and Z-disc proteins-the proteins that constitute the contractile apparatuses. Top-down quantitative proteomics identified significant changes in the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of critical myofilament proteins in the fast-twitch skeletal muscles of aging rats, in accordance with the vulnerability of fast-twitch muscles to sarcopenia. Surprisingly, age-related alterations in the phosphorylation of Cypher isoforms, proteins that localize to the Z-discs in striated muscles, were also noted in the fast-twitch skeletal muscle of aging rats. This represents the first report of changes in the phosphorylation of Z-disc proteins in skeletal muscle during aging. In addition, increased glutathionylation of slow skeletal troponin I, a novel modification that may help protect against oxidative damage, was observed in slow-twitch skeletal muscles. Furthermore, we have identified and characterized novel muscle type-specific proteoforms of myofilament proteins and Z-disc proteins, including a novel isoform of the Z-disc protein Enigma. The finding that the phosphorylation of Z-disc proteins is altered in response to aging in the fast-twitch skeletal muscles of aging rats opens new avenues for the investigation of the role of Z-discs in age-related muscle dysfunction. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. The inner-city Skater Facility - playground or control mechanism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, David Thore

    2016-01-01

    local children and young people an opportunity to use their leisure time stimulating their bodies, having a great time with friends and other urban dwellers. The gift is accompanied by a number of (more or less camouflaged) crime prevention- and social education agendas, carried out by the SSP (a......The inner-city Skater Facility - playground or control mechanism? In 2013, the municipality in Horsens, a medium-sized provincial town in Denmark, bestowed the city's children and young people a skater facility at the city's central squares. Officially, the municipality donated the facility to give...... in educational leisure clubs instead. In that perspective, seemingly some groups of adolescents are more entitled to use the facility, whereas groups that confront, interpret and exploit the facility in other ways than the municipality intended, are constructed as less authorized users. In my presentation I...

  2. Mitochondrial protein quality control: the mechanisms guarding mitochondrial health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohovych, Iryna; Chan, Sherine S L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2015-04-20

    Mitochondria are complex dynamic organelles pivotal for cellular physiology and human health. Failure to maintain mitochondrial health leads to numerous maladies that include late-onset neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, a decline in mitochondrial health is prevalent with aging. A set of evolutionary conserved mechanisms known as mitochondrial quality control (MQC) is involved in recognition and correction of the mitochondrial proteome. Here, we review current knowledge and latest developments in MQC. We particularly focus on the proteolytic aspect of MQC and its impact on health and aging. While our knowledge about MQC is steadily growing, critical gaps remain in the mechanistic understanding of how MQC modules sense damage and preserve mitochondrial welfare, particularly in higher organisms. Delineating how coordinated action of the MQC modules orchestrates physiological responses on both organellar and cellular levels will further elucidate the current picture of MQC's role and function in health, cellular stress, and degenerative diseases.

  3. Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquin Zuñiga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection is a major international public health problem. One-third of the world's population is thought to have latent tuberculosis, a condition where individuals are infected by the intracellular bacteria without active disease but are at risk for reactivation, if their immune system fails. Here, we discuss the role of nonspecific inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines and chemokines induced by interaction of innate receptors expressed in macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs. We also review current information regarding the importance of several cytokines including IL-17/IL-23 in the development of protective cellular and antibody-mediated protective responses against Mtb and their influence in containment of the infection. Finally, in this paper, emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of failure of Mtb control, including the immune dysregulation induced by the treatment with biological drugs in different autoimmune diseases. Further functional studies, focused on the mechanisms involved in the early host-Mtb interactions and the interplay between host innate and acquired immunity against Mtb, may be helpful to improve the understanding of protective responses in the lung and in the development of novel therapeutic and prophylactic tools in TB.

  4. Mechanisms controlling the distribution of two invasive Bromus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Bykova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to predict future range shifts for invasive species it is important to explore their ability to acclimate to the new environment and understand physiological and reproductive constraints controlling their distribution. My dissertation studied mechanisms by which temperature may affect the distribution of two aggressive plant invaders in North America, Bromus tectorum and Bromus rubens. I first evaluated winter freezing tolerance of Bromus species and demonstrated that the mechanism explaining their distinct northern range limits is different acquisition time of freezing tolerance. While B. rubens has a slower rate of freezing acclimation that leads to intolerance of sudden, late-autumn drops in temperature below -12°C, B. tectorum rapidly hardens and so is not impacted by the sudden onset of severe late-autumn cold. In addition, the analysis of male reproductive development and seed production showed that neither species produces seed at or above 36°C, due to complete pollen sterility, which might trigger climate-mediated range contractions at B. tectorum and B. rubens southern margins. Finally, a detailed gas-exchange analysis combined with biochemical modelling demonstrated that both species acclimate to a broad range of temperatures and photosynthetic response to temperature does not explain their current range separation.

  5. Lattice Metamaterials with Mechanically Tunable Poisson's Ratio for Vibration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanyu; Li, Tiantian; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Wang, Lifeng

    2017-02-01

    Metamaterials with artificially designed architectures are increasingly considered as new paradigmatic material systems with unusual physical properties. Here, we report a class of architected lattice metamaterials with mechanically tunable negative Poisson's ratios and vibration-mitigation capability. The proposed lattice metamaterials are built by replacing regular straight beams with sinusoidally shaped ones, which are highly stretchable under uniaxial tension. Our experimental and numerical results indicate that the proposed lattices exhibit extreme Poisson's-ratio variations between -0.7 and 0.5 over large tensile deformations up to 50%. This large variation of Poisson's-ratio values is attributed to the deformation pattern switching from bending to stretching within the sinusoidally shaped beams. The interplay between the multiscale (ligament and cell) architecture and wave propagation also enables remarkable broadband vibration-mitigation capability of the lattice metamaterials, which can be dynamically tuned by an external mechanical stimulus. The material design strategy provides insights into the development of classes of architected metamaterials with potential applications including energy absorption, tunable acoustics, vibration control, responsive devices, soft robotics, and stretchable electronics.

  6. Dynamic environmental control mechanisms for pneumatic foil constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flor, Jan-Frederik; Wu, Yupeng; Beccarelli, Paolo; Chilton, John

    2017-11-01

    Membrane and foil structures have become over the last decades an attractive alternative to conventional materials and building systems with increasing implementation in different typologies and scale. The development of transparent, light, flexible and resistant materials like Ethylene Tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) has triggered a rethinking of the building envelope in the building industry towards lightweight systems. ETFE foil cushions have proven to fulfil the design requirements in terms of structural efficiency and aesthetic values. But the strategies to satisfy increasing demands of energy efficiency and comfort conditions are still under development. The prediction and manipulation of the thermo-optical behaviour of ETFE foil cushion structures currently remain as one of the main challenges for designers and manufacturers. This paper reviews ongoing research regarding the control of the thermo-optical performance of ETFE cushion structures and highlights challenges and possible improvements. An overview of different dynamic and responsive environmental control mechanisms for multilayer foil constructions is provided and the state of the art in building application outlined by the discussion of case studies.

  7. Quality control mechanisms of protein biogenesis: proteostasis dies hard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Jan Bergmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The biosynthesis of proteins entails a complex series of chemical reactions that transform the information stored in the nucleic acid sequence into a polypeptide chain that needs to properly fold and reach its functional location in or outside the cell. It is of no surprise that errors might occur that alter the polypeptide sequence leading to a non-functional proteins or that impede delivery of proteins at the appropriate site of activity. In order to minimize such mistakes and guarantee the synthesis of the correct amount and quality of the proteome, cells have developed folding, quality control, degradation and transport mechanisms that ensure and tightly regulate protein biogenesis. Genetic mutations, harsh environmental conditions or attack by pathogens can subvert the cellular quality control machineries and perturb cellular proteostasis leading to pathological conditions. This review summarizes basic concepts of the flow of information from DNA to folded and active proteins and to the variable fidelity (from incredibly high to quite sloppy characterizing these processes. We will give particular emphasis on events that maintain or recover the homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, a major site of proteins synthesis and folding in eukaryotic cells. Finally, we will report on how cells can adapt to stressful conditions, how perturbation of ER homeostasis may result in diseases and how these can be treated.

  8. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  9. Diaphragm Unloading via Controlled Mechanical Ventilation Alters the Gene Expression Profile

    OpenAIRE

    DeRuisseau, Keith C.; Shanely, R. Andrew; Akunuri, Nagabhavani; Hamilton, Marc T.; Van Gammeren, Darin; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; McKenzie, Michael; Powers, Scott K.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Prolonged controlled mechanical ventilation results in diaphragmatic inactivity and promotes oxidative injury, atrophy, and contractile dysfunction in this important inspiratory muscle. However, the impact of controlled mechanical ventilation on global mRNA alterations in the diaphragm remains unknown.

  10. PLETHORA Genes Control Regeneration by a Two-step Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareem, Abdul; Durgaprasad, Kavya; Sugimoto, Kaoru; Du, Yujuan; Pulianmackal, Ajai J.; Trivedi, Zankhana B.; Abhayadev, Pazhoor V.; Pinon, Violaine; Meyerowitz, Elliot M.; Scheres, Ben; Prasad, Kalika

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Regeneration, a remarkable example of developmental plasticity displayed by both plants and animals, involves successive developmental events driven in response to environmental cues. Despite decades of study on the ability of the plant tissues to regenerate complete fertile shoot system after inductive cues, the mechanisms by which cells acquire pluripotency and subsequently regenerate complete organs remain unknown. Results Here we show that three PLETHORA (PLT) genes, PLT3, PLT5 and PLT7 regulate de novo shoot regeneration in Arabidopsis by controlling two distinct developmental events. Cumulative loss of function of these three genes causes the intermediate cell mass, callus, to be incompetent to form shoot progenitors, whereas induction of PLT5 or PLT7 can render shoot regeneration hormone-independent. We further show that PLT3, PLT5 and PLT7 establish pluripotency by activating root stem cell regulators PLT1 and PLT2, as reconstitution of either PLT1 or PLT2 in the plt3; plt5-2; plt7 mutant re-established the competence to regenerate shoot progenitor cells, but did not lead to the completion of shoot regeneration. PLT3, PLT5 and PLT7 additionally regulate and require the shoot-promoting factor CUP-SHAPED COTYLEDON2 to complete the shoot formation program. Conclusions Our findings uncouple the acquisition of competence to regenerate shoot progenitor cells from completion of shoot formation, indicating a two-step mechanism of de novo shoot regeneration that operates in all tissues irrespective of their origin. Our studies reveal intermediate developmental phases of regeneration and provide a deeper understanding into the mechanistic basis of regeneration. PMID:25819565

  11. Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, Richard G

    2005-11-30

    This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Brnsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with

  12. Structural controls and mechanisms of diffusion in natural silicate melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, P.; Nolan, J.; Cunningham, G. C.; Lowry, R. K.

    1985-04-01

    The diffusion properties of Na, Cs, Ba, Fe and Eu ions have been determined experimentally for a pantellerite melt and of these ions plus Li, Mn and Co in pitchstone melt, using the radiotracer residual-activity method, and narrow platinum capillaries, over the temperature range 1,200 1,400° C. In addition, Eu diffusion in a basaltic and an andesitic melt was determined. Diffusion of all cations follows an Arrhenius relationship, activation energy values being high for diffusion in the pantellerite melt (e.g. Eu: 100 kcal mol-1) except in the case of Na (24.3 kcal mol-1). Activation energies of diffusion in the pitchstone melt are similar to values recorded earlier for andesitic and basaltic melts. The new data are used, along with previously published data for diffusion in other composition melts, to examine the compositional and structural controls on diffusion. The range of diffusivities shows a marked change with melt composition; over two orders of magnitude for a basaltic melt, and nearly four orders for a pantellerite melt (both at 1,300° C). Diffusivity of all cations (except Li and Na) correlates positively with the proportion of network modifying cations. In the case of Li and Na the correlation is negative but the diffusivity of these ions correlates positively with the proportion of Na or of Na + K ions in the bulk melt. Diffusion behaviour in the pantellerite melt departs from the relationships shown by the data for other melt compositions, which could be partly explained by trivalent ions (such as Fe) occupying network forming positions. The diffusivity of alkali metal ions is strongly dependent on ionic radius, but this is not the case with the divalent and trivalent ions; diffusivity of these ions remains relatively constant with change in radius but decreases with increase in ionic charge. A compensation diagram shows four distinct but parallel trends for the majority of the cations in four melt types but the data for Li and Na plot on a separate

  13. Mechanical forces during muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Sandra B; Schnorrer, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Muscles are the major force producing tissue in the human body. While certain muscle types specialize in producing maximum forces, others are very enduring. An extreme example is the heart, which continuously beats for the entire life. Despite being specialized, all body muscles share similar contractile mini-machines called sarcomeres that are organized into regular higher order structures called myofibrils. The major sarcomeric components and their organizational principles are conserved throughout most of the animal kingdom. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the understanding of myofibril and sarcomere development largely obtained from in vivo models. We focus on the role of mechanical forces during muscle and myofibril development and propose a tension driven self-organization mechanism for myofibril formation. We discuss recent technological advances that allow quantification of forces across tissues or molecules in vitro and in vivo. Although their application towards muscle development is still in its infancy, these technologies are likely to provide fundamental new insights into the mechanobiology of muscle and myofibril development in the near future. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dimensionless study on dynamics of pressure controlled mechanical ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Yan; Niu, Jinglong; Cai, Maolin; Xu, Weiqing [Beihang University, Beijing (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Dynamics of mechanical ventilation system can be referred in pulmonary diagnostics and treatments. In this paper, to conveniently grasp the essential characteristics of mechanical ventilation system, a dimensionless model of mechanical ventilation system is presented. For the validation of the mathematical model, a prototype mechanical ventilation system of a lung simulator is proposed. Through the simulation and experimental studies on the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system, firstly, the mathematical model is proved to be authentic and reliable. Secondly, the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system are obtained. Last, the influences of key parameters on the dimensionless dynamics of the mechanical ventilation system are illustrated. The study provides a novel method to study the dynamic of mechanical ventilation system, which can be referred in the respiratory diagnostics and treatment.

  15. Mechanical aberrations in hypetrophic cardiomyopathy: emerging concepts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios eNtelios

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common monogenic disorder in cardiology. Despite important advances in understanding disease pathogenesis, it is not clear how flaws in individual sarcomere components are responsible for the observed phenotype. The aim of this article is to provide a brief interpretative analysis of some currently proposed pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with a special emphasis on alterations in the cardiac mechanical properties.

  16. Weathering controls on mechanisms of carbon storage in grassland soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiello, C.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Southon, J.; Torn, M.S.; Harden, J.W.

    2004-09-01

    On a sequence of soils developed under similar vegetation, temperature, and precipitation conditions, but with variations in mineralogical properties, we use organic carbon and 14C inventories to examine mineral protection of soil organic carbon. In these soils, 14C data indicate that the creation of slow-cycling carbon can be modeled as occurring through reaction of organic ligands with Al3+ and Fe3+ cations in the upper horizons, followed by sorption to amorphous inorganic Al compounds at depth. Only one of these processes, the chelation of Al3+ and Fe3+ by organic ligands, is linked to large carbon stocks. Organic ligands stabilized by this process traverse the soil column as dissolved organic carbon (both from surface horizons and root exudates). At our moist grassland site, this chelation and transport process is very strongly correlated with the storage and long-term stabilization of soil organic carbon. Our 14C results show that the mechanisms of organic carbon transport and storage at this site follow a classic model previously believed to only be significant in a single soil order (Spodosols), and closely related to the presence of forests. The presence of this process in the grassland Alfisol, Inceptisol, and Mollisol soils of this chronosequence suggests that this process is a more significant control on organic carbon storage than previously thought.

  17. Neural mechanisms of timing control in a coincident timing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Hiroaki; Sommer, Werner; Takasawa, Noriyoshi; Yamazaki, Katuo

    2012-04-01

    Many ball sports such as tennis or baseball require precise temporal anticipation of both sensory input and motor output (i.e., receptor anticipation and effector anticipation, respectively) and close performance monitoring. We investigated the neural mechanisms underlying timing control and performance monitoring in a coincident timing task involving both types of anticipations. Peak force for two time-to-peak force (TTP) conditions-recorded with a force-sensitive key-was required to coincide with a specific position of a stimulus rotating either slow or fast on a clock face while the contingent negative variation (CNV) and the motor-elicited negativity were recorded. Absolute timing error was generally smaller for short TTP (high velocity) conditions. CNV amplitudes increased with both faster stimulus velocity and longer TTPs possibly reflecting increased motor programming efforts. In addition, the motor-elicited negativity was largest in the slow stimulus/short TTP condition, probably representing some forms of performance monitoring as well as shorter response duration. Our findings indicate that the coincident timing task is a good model for real-life situations of tool use.

  18. Commercial antioxidants control lipid oxidation in mechanically deboned turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielnik, Maria B; Aaby, Kjersti; Skrede, Grete

    2003-11-01

    Effects of commercial rosemary antioxidants on oxidative stability of mechanically deboned turkey meat (MDTM) compared with Trolox C (vitamin E), ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and control without antioxidant were investigated. Antioxidants were added to meat at three levels. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) assay and dynamic headspace gas chromatography were used to assess the effects of commercial antioxidants on lipid stability of MDTM during 7 months of frozen storage. Increased levels of TBA-reactive substances (TBARS) and volatile carbonyl compounds were noticed in all meat samples during storage, however most distinctly in meat without antioxidants. Retarding effect of antioxidants on the development of oxidation depended on the level and type antioxidants. Trolox C-a water soluble, synthetic derivative of vitamin E possessed the greatest antioxidative activity reflected by the lowest values of TBARS and volatile compounds. Ascorbic acid was less efficient than Trolox C and Biolox HT-W (rosemary), but more potent than most rosemary extracts in suppressing lipid oxidation especially in the long term frozen storage MDTM. The DPPH() method confirmed that antioxidant activity depends on the concentration of active compounds present in the samples available to scavenge the free radicals formed during the storage period. Supplementation of MDTM with antioxidants could be an alternative method to prevent oxidative degradation of the meat during frozen storage when vacuum packaging is not practical.

  19. Antimicrobial agents used in the control of periodontal biofilms: effective adjuncts to mechanical plaque control?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Palmier Teles

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The control of biofilm accumulation on teeth has been the cornerstone of periodontal disease prevention for decades. However, the widespread prevalence of gingivitis suggests the inefficiency of self-performed mechanical plaque control in preventing gingival inflammation. This is particularly relevant in light of recent evidence suggesting that long standing gingivitis increases the risk of loss of attachment and that prevention of gingival inflammation might reduce the prevalence of mild to moderate periodontitis. Several antimicrobials have been tested as adjuncts to mechanical plaque control in order to improve the results obtained with oral home care. Recent studies, including meta-analyses, have indicated that home care products containing chemical antimicrobials can provide gingivitis reduction beyond what can be accomplished with brushing and flossing. Particularly, formulations containing chlorhexidine, mouthrinses containing essential oils and triclosan/copolymer dentifrices have well documented clinical antiplaque and antigingivitis effects. In vivo microbiological tests have demonstrated the ability of these antimicrobial agents to penetrate the biofilm mass and to kill bacteria growing within biofilms. In addition, chemical antimicrobials can reach difficult-to-clean areas such as interproximal surfaces and can also impact the growth of biofilms on soft tissue. These agents have a positive track record of safety and their use does not seem to increase the levels of resistant species. Further, no study has been able to establish a correlation between mouthrinses containing alcohol and oral cancer. In summary, the adjunct use of chemical plaque control should be recommended to subjects with well documented difficulties in achieving proper biofilm control using only mechanical means.

  20. Spatially explicit, nano-mechanical models of the muscle half-sarcomere: Implications for biomechanical tuning in atrophy and fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Aya; Tanner, Bertrand C. W.; Macpherson, J. Michael; Xu, Xiangrong; Wang, Qi; Regnier, Michael; Daniel, Thomas L.; Chase, P. Bryant

    2007-01-01

    Astronaut biomechanical performance depends on a wide variety of factors. Results from computational modelling suggest that muscle function—a key component of performance—could be modulated by compliance of the contractile filaments in muscle, especially when force is low such as transient Ca activation in a twitch, reduced activation in muscle fatigue encountered during EVA, or perhaps atrophy during prolonged space flight. We used Monte-Carlo models to investigate the hypotheses that myofilament compliance influences muscle function during a twitch, and also modulates the effects of cooperative interactions between contractile proteins on force generation. Peak twitch force and the kinetics of force decay were both decreased, while tension cost was increased, when myofilament compliance was increased relative to physiological values. Both the apparent Ca sensitivity and cooperativity of activation of steady-state isometric force were altered by myofilament compliance even when there were no explicit interactions included between binding sites. The effects of cooperative interactions between adjacent regulatory units were found to be greater than either the effect of myofilament compliance on apparent cooperativity of activation or that due to myosin cross-bridge-induced cooperativity. These results indicate that muscle function may be "tuned" at the molecular level, particularly under conditions of reduced Ca activation.

  1. N-Acetylcysteine protects the rat diaphragm from the decreased contractility associated with controlled mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agten, Anouk; Maes, Karen; Smuder, Ashley; Powers, Scott K; Decramer, Marc; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine

    2011-04-01

    Controlled mechanical ventilation results in diaphragmatic dysfunction, and oxidative stress has been shown to be an important contributor to ventilator-induced diaphragm dysfunction. We hypothesized that the administration of an antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, would restore the redox balance in the diaphragm and prevent against the deleterious effects of controlled mechanical ventilation. Randomized, controlled experiment. Basic science animal laboratory. Male Wistar rats, 14 wks old. Anesthetized rats were submitted for 24 hrs to either spontaneous breathing receiving 150 mg/kg N-acetylcysteine (SBNAC) or saline (SBSAL) or to controlled mechanical ventilation receiving 150 mg/kg N-acetylcysteine (MVNAC) or saline (MVSAL). After 24 hrs of controlled mechanical ventilation, diaphragmatic force production was significantly lower in MVSAL compared with all groups. Importantly, administration of N-acetylcysteine completely abolished this controlled mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic contractile dysfunction. Diaphragmatic protein oxidation was significantly increased after 24 hrs of controlled mechanical ventilation (+53%, p controlled mechanical ventilation-induced oxidative stress. Diaphragmatic 20S proteasome activity was increased in MVSAL (+62%, p controlled mechanical ventilation (+137%, p controlled mechanical ventilation. Specifically, N-acetylcysteine prevents against controlled mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic oxidative stress and proteolysis and abolishes controlled mechanical ventilation-induced diaphragmatic contractile dysfunction.

  2. Mechanical Engineering Design Project report: Enabler control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Christian; Delvecchio, Dave; Scarborough, Alan; Havics, Andrew A.

    1992-01-01

    The Controls Group was assigned the responsibility for designing the Enabler's control system. The requirement for the design was that the control system must provide a simple user interface to control the boom articulation joints, chassis articulation joints, and the wheel drive. The system required controlling hydraulic motors on the Enabler by implementing 8-bit microprocessor boards. In addition, feedback to evaluate positions and velocities must be interfaced to provide the operator with confirmation as well as control.

  3. Control mechanisms in the third-generation planning. Case study: Control to realize sustainable cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, A. D.

    2017-06-01

    Since the last few years, Indonesia has experienced important events that bring significant changes to the social, political and economic life. The changes directly or indirectly impact the field of planning. With the challenging condition which grows fast and is more complex ahead, and the greater demands on the role of planning, it is required that planning should have higher quality. This paper seeks to answer some questions as follows: (i) How are changes in paradigm and also the development of planning model for the current transition era?, (ii) What is the best way to improve the quality of planning control on the last generation planning model to realize sustainable city?. Analysis steps that will be used to achieve the paper objectives are: (i) Review of planning and sustainable cities theory, (ii) Pattern recognition, (iii) Identifying control mechanisms and sustainable urban forms, (iv) conceptualization. Based on discussion about sustainable cities and control mechanism, some conclusions can be generated as follows: (i) The third generation planning model is based on the theory of expanded system, emphasizing on the constraint of capacity and the ability of planners within the context of larger environment, (ii) There are various theoretical studies that recommend prescriptive model or solution for sustainable urban form and structure. The concepts of Sustainable Cities can be grouped in Neotraditional Development, Urban Containment, Compact City and The Eco-City. The four models above have criteria, namely (i) high density; (ii) a high level of diversity; (iii) mixed land use; (iv) compactness; (5) sustainable transport; (6) passive solar design; (7) Greening Ecological Design. The three main activities in control mechanisms are: Monitoring and Recommendation; a comparative review of the facts (conditions that exist or are developing) with the purpose (expected conditions, set out in urban planning) and recommendations; Evaluation, a review on the

  4. Matlab/simMechanics based control of four-bar passive lower-body mechanism for rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Singla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, use of wearable devices is becoming popular for providing precise ways of rehabilitation. The focus of this paper is to propose a passive lower body mechanism using a four-bar linkage, which can be actuated via the hip joint to move the other two joints at knee and ankle as well. Simulations are performed here by considering an average male human (height six feet by modelling the gait cycle in CAD software and executing the control strategy in the SimMechanics, which provides a convenient way to study without use of detailed computational mathematics. The study of the controller aspects of the passive mechanism is presented with both PD and PID controllers with auto- and manual-tuned gains. Significant reduction in actuator torques is observed with the manually-tuned PID controller over automatically-tuned PID controller with marginal degradation in the overshoot and settling time.

  5. Control of forced vibrations of mechanical structures by an electromagnetic controller with a permanent magnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, George Juraj; Darula, Radoslav; Sorokin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of an electromagnetic vibration controller is presented. The analyzed device consists of a pot-type iron core with a coil and a permanent magnet as a source of constant magnetic flux. The magnetic circuit is closed by a yoke, excited by an external harmonic mechanical force....... The so generated magnetic flux variation induces alternating voltage in the electric circuit, which is dissipated in a shunt resistor. The induced current driven through the coil generates magnetic force, which damps the excitation force and changes the damped natural frequency of the oscillatory system...

  6. Calculus of variations mechanics, control and other applications

    CERN Document Server

    MacCluer, Charles R

    2012-01-01

    First truly up-to-date treatment offers a simple introduction to optimal control, linear-quadratic control design, and more. Broad perspective features numerous exercises, hints, outlines, and appendixes, including a practical discussion of MATLAB. 2005 edition.

  7. Error-controlled adaptive finite elements in solid mechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stein, Erwin; Ramm, E

    2003-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Error-controlled Adaptive Finite-element-methods . . . . . . . . . . . . Missing Features and Properties of Today's General Purpose FE Programs for Structural...

  8. Is sarcomere lattice geometry optimal? Analysis of several potential virtual polygon cross-sectional patterns for actin and myosin myofilaments in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepner, Gordon R

    2014-09-01

    The hexagonal arrangement of actin filaments in skeletal muscle is not the fundamental geometrical or functioning myofilament unit. This analysis of several possible sarcomere lattice geometries for the arrangement of the actin and myosin filaments identifies several geometrical constraints that can be compared for their effect on muscle sarcomere functioning and efficiency. Three distinct virtual polygons, with myosins at their vertices and that tessellate the plane, are compared for both centered actin and perimeter actin arrangements. The analysis evaluates the optimal ratio of myosin to actin filaments, the packing density, and the effect on new myofilament formation in muscle hypertrophy for the various lattice geometries. The results support the view that no single measure of geometrical effectiveness can evaluate definitively the efficiency of any particular arrangement of the myofilaments. The analysis provides quantitative measures of several parameters that, taken overall, support the effectiveness of the myofilament arrangement in Nature. It provides a new definition of the fundamental myofilament unit (FMU). It is possible to calculate the number of actin and myosin myofilaments that need to be added to each polygon arrangement of the myofilaments to create a new FMU for that specific geometry. This leads to useful conclusions about the biochemical efficiency involved in where such units arise in the course of muscle hypertrophy. It supports the idea that the evolutionary endpoint for optimizing muscle's force-generating function can be better understood via the concepts of a FMU and the polygon arrangement of the sarcomere lattice geometry. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Neuronal Mechanisms and Bloodflow Control of Infrared Reception in Snakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Goris, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The infrared pit organs of pit vipers and pythons were studied with emphasis on bloodflow in the capillary bed and its possible role as a cooling mechanism for the pit receptors stimulated by infrared (= heat...

  10. Mechanisms of surgical control of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-01-01

    responsible for postprandial hypoglycemia sometimes observed after bypass. Other operations (biliopancreatic-diversion and or sleeve gastrectomy) appear to involve different and/or additional mechanisms, and so does experimental bariatric surgery in rodents. However, unlike bypass surgery in humans...

  11. Compound control strategy used in Electro-Mechanical Actuator (EMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongling; Yan, Meng

    2017-01-01

    This article briefly describes the overall structure of the loading test rig; establish mathematical model of loading EMA, analyze its stability, surplus force and other properties in MATLAB; propose a compound control strategy combined speed feedback, PID and feed-forward compensation based on structure invariance principle. To verify the effectiveness of the control strategy, do a co-simulation by designing a controller based on the control strategy above in MATLAB and building the EMA model in AMESim. The results show that the compound control strategy can significantly improve dynamic tracking accuracy and reduce surplus force.

  12. Development of an Outdoor Temperature-Based Control Algorithm for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Less, Brennan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tang, Yihuan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Smart ventilation systems use controls to ventilate more during those periods that provide either an energy or IAQ advantage (or both) and less during periods that provide a dis advantage. Using detailed building simulations, this study addresses one of the simplest and lowest cost types of smart controllers —outdoor temperature- based control. If the outdoor temperature falls below a certain cut- off, the fan is simply turned off. T he main principle of smart ventilation used in this study is to shift ventilation from time periods with large indoor -outdoor temperature differences, to periods where these differences are smaller, and their energy impacts are expected to be less. Energy and IAQ performance are assessed relative to a base case of a continuously operated ventilation fan sized to comply with ASHRAE 62.2-2013 whole house ventilation requirements. In order to satisfy 62.2-2013, annual pollutant exposure must be equivalent between the temperature controlled and continuous fan cases. This requires ventilation to be greater than 62.2 requirements when the ventilation system operates. This is achieved by increasing the mechanical ventilation system air flow rates.

  13. A dual flow bioreactor with controlled mechanical stimulation for cartilage tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitters, Tim; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Deus, F.D.; Costa, I.B.F.; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2013-01-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering bioreactors can create a controlled environment to study chondrocyte behavior under mechanical stimulation or produce chondrogenic grafts of clinically relevant size. Here we present a novel bioreactor, which combines mechanical stimulation with a two compartment

  14. Myocardial fibrosis in patients with symptomatic obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: correlation with echocardiographic measurements, sarcomeric genotypes, and pro-left ventricular hypertrophy polymorphisms involving the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauwet, Lori A; Ackerman, Michael J; Edwards, William D; Riehle, Darren L; Ommen, Steve R

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heterogeneous disorder of the cardiac sarcomere, resulting in myocyte hypertrophy and disarray, interstitial fibrosis, and cardiac dysfunction. Our aim was to determine whether the amount of fibrosis in HCM correlates with echocardiographic measures of diastolic dysfunction, presence of HCM-susceptibility mutations, or polymorphisms in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Surgical specimens from patients with obstructive HCM undergoing septal myectomy at the Mayo Clinic (2001-2004) were examined and compared with autopsy-derived tissues from age- and sex-matched normal controls. Digital image analysis was used to quantitate the fibrosis in representative microscopic sections. Genotyping was performed for myofilament-HCM using polymerase chain reaction, high-performance liquid chromatography, and direct DNA sequencing. RAAS polymorphism status was similarly established. The study included 59 HCM cases and 44 controls. Patients with HCM exhibited more fibrosis (mean 17%, range 3-45%) than controls (mean 8%, range 3-17%) (P or =1 C-encoding allele in CYP11B2-encoded aldosterone synthase. Patients with HCM undergoing septal myectomy had significantly more myocardial interstitial fibrosis than controls. The amount of fibrosis in HCM patients correlated with degree of septal hypertrophy and left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Notably, neither mutations in cardiac myofilament proteins or polymorphisms in RAAS exhibited strong associations with severity of myocardial fibrosis.

  15. SPRING DRIVEN ACTUATING MECHANISM FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, F.; Uecker, D.F.; Groh, E.F.

    1962-01-23

    l962. rod in a nuclear reactor to shut it down. The control rod or an extension thereof is wound on a drum as it is withdrawn from the reactor. When an emergency occurs requiring the reactor to be shut down, the drum is released so as to be free to rotate, and the tendency of the control rod or its extension coiled on the drum to straighten itself is used for quickly returning the control rod to the reactor. (AEC)

  16. Prognostics Enhanced Reconfigurable Control of Electro-Mechanical Actuators

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Actuator systems are employed widely in aerospace, transportation and industrial processes to provide power to critical loads, such as aircraft control surfaces....

  17. Deafferented controllers: a fundamental failure mechanism in cortical neuroprosthetic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferran eGalán

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interface (BMI research assumes that patients with disconnected neural pathways could naturally control a prosthetic device by volitionally modulating sensorimotor cortical activity usually responsible for movement coordination. However, computational approaches to motor control challenge this view. This article examines the predictions of optimal feedback control (OFC theory on the effects that loss of motor output and sensory feedback have on the normal generation of motor commands. Example simulations of unimpaired, totally disconnected and deafferented controllers illustrate that by neglecting the dynamic interplay between motor commands, state estimation, feedback and behavior, current BMI systems face translational challenges rooted in a debatable assumption and experimental models of limited validity.

  18. Effects of neonatal programming on hypothalamic mechanisms controlling energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, C; Novelle, M G; Leis, R; Diéguez, C; Skrede, S; López, M

    2013-12-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity in most developed countries has markedly increased during the last decades. In addition to genetic, hormonal, and metabolic influences, environmental factors like fetal and neonatal nutrition play key roles in the development of obesity. Interestingly, overweight during critical developmental periods of fetal and/or neonatal life has been demonstrated to increase the risk of obesity throughout juvenile life into adulthood. In spite of this evidence, the specific mechanisms underlying this fetal/neonatal programming are not perfectly understood. However, it is clear that circulating hormones such as insulin and leptin play a critical role in the development and programming of hypothalamic circuits regulating energy balance. Here, we review what is currently known about the impact of perinatal malnutrition on the mechanisms regulating body weight homeostasis. Understanding these molecular mechanisms may provide new targets for the treatment of obesity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Comparison of Work of Breathing During Mechanical Ventilation Using Assist Control and Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-19

    AD-A285 516 AD MIPR NO: 92MM2539 TITLE: COMPARISON OF WORK OF BREATHING DURING MECHANICAL VENTILATION USING ASSIST CONTROL AND INTERMITTENT MANDATORY...1993, for the subject MIPR, titled: Comparison of Work of Breathing During Mechanical Ventilation Using Assist Control and Intermittent Mandatory...MIPR 92MM2539, titled: Comparison of Work of Breathing During Mechanical Ventilation Using Assist Control and Intermittent Mandatory Ventilation . 2

  20. Balancing the balance: Self-control mechanisms and compulsive buying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horváth, C.; Büttner, O.B.; Belei, N.V.T.; Adigüzel, F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has mainly focused on identifying why compulsive buyers engage in excessive buying, while their attempts to control problematic buying behavior have largely been ignored. The present research examines the self-control attempts of compulsive buyers. Study 1 uses qualitative in-depth

  1. Mechanism of biological control of Rhizoctonia damping-off of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MOHSEN

    2014-01-29

    Jan 29, 2014 ... biocontrol agents. Among Rhizoctonia spp., binucleate. Rhizoctonia was effective in controlling diseases caused by Rhizoctonia spp. and Pythium spp. Although many studies have reported the role of binucleate Rhizoctonia in biological control of Rhizoctonia spp. and Pythium spp. in different plant species ...

  2. Neural networks for predictive control of the mechanism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we are interested in the study of the control of orientation of a wind turbine like means of optimization of his output/input ratio (efficiency). The approach suggested is based on the neural predictive control which is justified by the randomness of the wind on the one hand, and on the other hand by the capacity of ...

  3. Mechanism of biological control of Rhizoctonia damping-off of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction of binucleate Rhizoctonia (BNR) anastomosis group (AG)-A isolate W7, Rhizoctonia solani AG-4 and cucumber seedlings were investigated to elucidate the mechanism of biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani by BNR. Hypocotyls of Cucumis sativus L. cv. Jibai were inoculated with a virulent isolate of R. solani ...

  4. A novel mechanism controlling the growth of hemostatic thrombi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Lishko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge of the mechanisms of blood coagulation does not provide an answer to one pivotal question: why is, in contrast to a pathological thrombus, the growth of normal hemostatic clot after blood vessel injury suddenly terminated? In the present paper, we summarize the results of our investigations that give an answer to this question. We show that the surface of fibrin clot in the circulation is coated with a thin metastable layer of fibrinogen which is not able to support adhesion of blood cells. Consequently, platelets and leukocytes, the cells expressing adhesive integrins, are incapable of consolidating­ their grip on the surface and washed away by blood flow, thereby preventing the thrombus propagation. The cells that escaped this fibrinogen shield and reached a solid fibrin matrix use an additional mechanism – the ability to activate plasminogen bound either to the surface of cells or to fibrin. Plasmin formed at the interface between the cells and the clot locally degrades fibrin resulting in the fragmentation of the surface rendering it unstable, non-adhesive and therefore non-thrombogenic. Thus, the growth of hemostatic thrombus is halted by two mechanisms, fibrinogen- and plasminogen-dependent, both of which are based on the same principle – the generation of the mechanically unstable, non-adhesive surface.

  5. CONCEPTUAL APPROACHES TO CREATE CONTROL MECHANISM BY PASSENGER COMMUTATION SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Zadoya

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article the basic approaches of improving a management mechanism for passenger suburban railway transportations are considered, and the classification of reformation models for passenger suburban railway transportations depending on scales, degree of independence, department subordination and amount of proprietors of future company is offered.

  6. Development of an integrated engine-hydro-mechanical transmission control algorithm for a tractor

    OpenAIRE

    Sunghyun Ahn; Jingyu Choi; Suchul Kim; Jinwoong Lee; Changhyun Choi; Hyunsoo Kim

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an integrated engine-hydro-mechanical transmission control algorithm for a tractor considering the engine-hydro-mechanical transmission efficiency. First, the hydro-mechanical transmission efficiency was obtained by network analysis based on the hydrostatic unit efficiency constructed from the test. Using the hydro-mechanical transmission efficiency map and the thermal efficiency of the engine, an engine-hydro-mechanical transmission optimal operating line was obtained, ...

  7. Robust tracking control for linear vibrating mechanical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Beltrán-Carbajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se propone un enfoque de control novedoso para seguimiento por realimentación de la salida para sistemas mecánicos vibratorios del tipo masa-resorte-amortiguador lineales sub-actuados. La metodología de diseño de control que se presenta considera robustez con respecto de dinámicas no modeladas y fuerzas externas. El esquema de control propuesto solamente requiere mediciones de la variable de la salida de posición. Se utiliza compensación integral del error de seguimiento de manera apropiada para evitar la estimación en tiempo real de las perturbaciones. Resultado analíticos y numéricos muestran la efectividad del esquema de control activo de vibración para atenuación de vibraciones resonantes y caóticas afectando la respuesta de la variable de salida.

  8. The Application of LOGO! in Control System of a Transmission and Sorting Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Lv, Yuan-Jun

    Logic programming of general logic control module LOGO! has been recommended the application in transmission and sorting mechanism. First, the structure and operating principle of the mechanism had been introduced. Then the pneumatic loop of the mechanism had been plotted in the software of FluidSIM-P. At last, pneumatic loop and motors had been control by LOGO!, which makes the control process simple and clear instead of the complicated control of ordinary relay. LOGO! can achieve the complicated interlock control composed of inter relays and time relays. In the control process, the logic control function of LOGO! is fully used to logic programming so that the system realizes the control of air cylinder and motor. It is reliable and adjustable mechanism after application.

  9. Mechanisms controlling renal hemodynamics and electrolyte excretion during amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, L.L.; Mizelle, H.L.; Montani, J.P.; Hall, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the mechanisms by which increased plasma amino acids elevate renal blood flow (RBF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Since transport of amino acids and Na is linked in the proximal tubule, the authors hypothesized that increased amino acids might stimulate proximal tubular Na reabsorption (PR/sub Na/) and thus increase RBF and GFR by a macula densa feedback mechanism. A solution of four amino acids (Ala, Ser, Gly, Pro) was infused intravenously into anesthetized dogs with normal kidneys (NK) and with kidneys in which the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism was blunted by lowering renal artery pressure (LPK) or blocked by making the kidneys nonfiltering (NFK). In NK, RBF and GFR increased by 35 +/- 4% and 30 +/- 7% after 90 min of amino acid infusion, while PR/sub Na/ (estimated from lithium clearance) and O2 consumption increased by 31 +/- 5% and 29 +/- 5% and distal Na delivery remained relatively constant. Autoregulation of RBF and GFR in response to step deceases in renal artery pressure was impaired during amino acids in NK. The hemodynamic responses to amino acids were abolished in LPK and NFK. Infusion of the nonmetabolized -aminoisobutyric acid into NK produced changes in renal hemodynamics that were similar to the responses observed with the four metabolizable amino acids. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that elevation of plasma amino acids increases RBF and GFR by a mechanism that requires an intact macula densa feedback. Metabolism of the amino acids does not appear to be necessary for these changes to occur.

  10. Mechanical characterization of calcium pectinate hydrogel for controlled drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Jin Thau

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium pectinate beads, a paniculate hydrogel system, is an attractive drug carrier for oral delivery. In this study, a poorly water-soluble model drug indomethacin was incorporated into calcium pectinate beads made of different pectin concentrations, which were produced by an extrusion method. The effect of pectin concentration on bead size, circularity, swelling behavior, and mechanical properties, as well as in vitro drug release profile was investigated. The mechanical properties of calcium pectinate beads were determined by a micromanipulation technique. The drug release profile was measured using a standard British Pharmacopoeia method. It was found that the beads made of higher pectin concentration in general had a less permeable matrix structure and greater mechanical rigidity, although they swelled more after hydration. However, such an effect was not significant when the pectin concentration was increased to above 8%. Micromanipulation measurements showed that there was significant relaxation of the force being imposed on single hydrated beads when they were held, but this phenomenon did not occur on dry beads, which means that the force relaxation was dominated by liquid loss from the beads. The rate of the force relaxation was determined, and has been related to the release rate of the model drug entrapped in the calcium pectinate beads.

  11. Probable Mechanisms of Needling Therapies for Myofascial Pain Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wei Chou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS has been defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs clinically. MTrP is defined as the hyperirritable spot in a palpable taut band of skeletal muscle fibers. Appropriate treatment to MTrPs can effectively relieve the clinical pain of MPS. Needling therapies, such as MTrP injection, dry needling, or acupuncture (AcP can effectively eliminate pain immediately. AcP is probably the first reported technique in treating MPS patients with dry needling based on the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM theory. The possible mechanism of AcP analgesia were studied and published in recent decades. The analgesic effect of AcP is hypothesized to be related to immune, hormonal, and nervous systems. Compared to slow-acting hormonal system, nervous system acts in a faster manner. Given these complexities, AcP analgesia cannot be explained by any single mechanism. There are several principles for selection of acupoints based on the TCM principles: “Ah-Shi” point, proximal or remote acupoints on the meridian, and extra-meridian acupoints. Correlations between acupoints and MTrPs are discussed. Some clinical and animal studies of remote AcP for MTrPs and the possible mechanisms of remote effectiveness are reviewed and discussed.

  12. Probable Mechanisms of Needling Therapies for Myofascial Pain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Li-Wei; Kao, Mu-Jung; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) has been defined as a regional pain syndrome characterized by muscle pain caused by myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) clinically. MTrP is defined as the hyperirritable spot in a palpable taut band of skeletal muscle fibers. Appropriate treatment to MTrPs can effectively relieve the clinical pain of MPS. Needling therapies, such as MTrP injection, dry needling, or acupuncture (AcP) can effectively eliminate pain immediately. AcP is probably the first reported technique in treating MPS patients with dry needling based on the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory. The possible mechanism of AcP analgesia were studied and published in recent decades. The analgesic effect of AcP is hypothesized to be related to immune, hormonal, and nervous systems. Compared to slow-acting hormonal system, nervous system acts in a faster manner. Given these complexities, AcP analgesia cannot be explained by any single mechanism. There are several principles for selection of acupoints based on the TCM principles: “Ah-Shi” point, proximal or remote acupoints on the meridian, and extra-meridian acupoints. Correlations between acupoints and MTrPs are discussed. Some clinical and animal studies of remote AcP for MTrPs and the possible mechanisms of remote effectiveness are reviewed and discussed. PMID:23346211

  13. Chemical and mechanical control of corrosion product transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hede Larsen, O.; Blum, R. [I/S Fynsvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Odense (Denmark); Daucik, K. [I/S Skaerbaekvaerket, Faelleskemikerne, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The corrosion products formed in the condensate and feedwater system of once-through boilers are precipitated and deposited inside the evaporator tubes mainly in the burner zone at the highest heat flux. Depositions lead to increased oxidation rate and increased metal temperature of the evaporator tubes, hereby decreasing tube lifetime. This effect is more important in the new high efficiency USC boilers due to increased feedwater temperature and hence higher thermal load on the evaporator tubes. The only way to reduce the load on the evaporator tubes is to minimise corrosion product transport to the boiler. Two general methods for minimising corrosion product transport to the boiler have been evaluated through measurement campaigns for Fe in the water/steam cycle in supercritical boilers within the ELSAM area. One method is to reduce corrosion in the low temperature condensate system by changing conditioning mode from alkaline volatile treatment (AVT) to oxygenated treatment (OT). The other method is to filtrate part of the condensate with a mechanical filter at the deaerator. The results show, that both methods are effective at minimising Fe-transport to the boiler, but changing to OT has the highest effect and should always be used, whenever high purity condensate is maintained. Whether mechanical filtration also is required, depends on the boiler, specifically the load on the evaporator. A simplified calculation model for lifetime evaluation of evaporator tubes has been developed. This model has been used for evaluating the effect of corrosion product transport to the boiler on evaporator tube lifetime. Conventional supercritical boilers generally can achieve sufficient lifetime by AVT and even better by OT, whereas all measures to reduce Fe-content of feedwater, including OT and mechanical filtration, should be taken, to ensure sufficient lifetime for the new boilers with advanced steam data - 290 bar/580 deg. C and above. (au)

  14. Molecular mechanisms controlling proton pumping by bacteriorhodopsin. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crouch, Rosalie K.; Ebrey, Thomas G.

    2000-02-10

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is the simplest biological system for the transduction of light energy. Light energy is directly converted to transmembrane proton gradient by a single, small membrane protein. The extraordinary stability of bR makes it an outstanding subject for bioenergetic studies. This project has focused on the role of interactions between key residues of the pigment involved in light-induced proton transfer. Methods to estimate the strength of these interactions and their correlation with the rate and efficiency of proton transfer have been developed. The concept of the coupling of the protonation states of key groups has been applied to individual steps of the proton transfer with the ultimate goal of understanding on the molecular level the driving forces for proton transport and the pathway of the transported proton in bT. The mechanism of light-induced proton release, uptake and the mechanism of recovery of initial state of bT has been examined. The experiments were performed with genetically engineered, site-specific mutants of bR. This has enabled us to characterize the role of individual amino acid residues in bR. Time resolved and low temperature absorption spectroscopy and light-induced photocurrent measurements were used in order to study the photochemical cycle and proton transfer in mutant pigments. Chemical modification and crosslinking of both the specific amino acids to the chromophore or to other amino acids were used to elucidate the role of light-induced conformational changes in the photocycle and the structure of the protein in the ground state. The results of this project provided new knowledge on the architecture of the proton transfer pathways inside the protein, on the mechanism of proton release in bR, and on the role of specific amino acid residues in the structure and function of bR.

  15. Control of the LH surge mechanism in the female pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaesser, F; Parvizi, N; Foxcroft, G R

    1992-12-01

    The functionality of the oestrogen-positive feedback mechanism is the basis for the preovulatory LH surge and thus for regular cyclic activity in the sow. The LH surge mechanism (LH SM) gradually matures as a function of age, immature gilts display delayed, low amplitude LH surges in response to oestradiol benzoate (OB). The maturation of the LH SM apparently is ovarian oestrogen-dependent. Continuous ovarian secretions, probably oestrogens, also appear to be necessary for the final peripubertal maturation of the LH SM and to maintain the functionality of this mechanism in the sexually mature gilt. Superphysiological levels of oestrogens are, however, detrimental to the development of the LH SM. Failure of various infusions of the opioid antagonist naloxone during the surge period to enhance the magnitude of OB-induced LH surges in immature gilts does not support the idea, that central opioidergic systems are of major importance in preventing mature LH surge response at this age. However, opioids could be involved in the termination of the LH surge. Experiments using the opioid agonist morphine and the antagonist naloxone to demonstrate that opioids are involved in the generation of the LH surge in the mature gilt have so far provided equivocal data. Studies using pulsatile infusions of LHRH or of a potent LHRH-agonist during the surge period in OB-treated immature gilts, in which endogenous LHRH release was blocked by methallibure, suggest that oestradiol fails to generate mature LH surges because the gonadotrophs of the immature gilt are unable to respond to enhanced LHRH secretion during the surge period in an adult-like manner. During early lactation the LH SM cannot be activated by OB, while during late lactation a partial recovery of the LH SM occurs. Minor breed differences exist in the functionality of the LH SM during lactation between LW sows and highly fertile Chinese Meishan sows, in which lactational anoestrus is not obligatory.

  16. Control of Rock Mechanics in Underground Ore Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golik, V. I.; Efremenkov, A. B.

    2017-07-01

    Performance indicators in underground mining of thick iron fields can be insufficient since geo-mechanic specifics of ore-hosting fields might be considered inadequately, as a consequence, critical deformations and even earth’s surface destruction are possible, lowering the indicators of full subsurface use, this way. The reason for it is the available approach to estimating the performance of mining according to ore excavation costs, without assessing losses of valuable components and damage to the environment. The experimental approach to the problem is based on a combination of methods to justify technical capability and performance of mining technology improvement with regard to geomechanical factors. The main idea of decisions to be taken is turning geo-materials into the condition of triaxial compression via developing the support constructions of blocked up structural rock block. The study was carried out according to an integrated approach based on the analysis of concepts, field observations, and simulation with the photo-elastic materials in conditions of North Caucasus deposits. A database containing information on the deposit can be developed with the help of industrial experiments and performance indicators of the field can be also improved using the ability of ore-hosting fields to develop support constructions, keeping the geo-mechanical stability of the system at lower cost, avoiding ore contamination at the processing stage. The proposed model is a specific one because an adjustment coefficient of natural and anthropogenic stresses is used and can be adopted for local conditions. The relation of natural to anthropogenic factors can make more precise the standards of developed, prepared and ready to excavation ore reserves relying on computational methods. It is possible to minimize critical stresses and corresponding deformations due to dividing the ore field into sectors safe from the standpoint of geo-mechanics, and using less cost

  17. Insights into the epigenetic mechanisms controlling pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleary-Wheeler, Angela L; Lomberk, Gwen A; Weiss, Frank U; Schneider, Günter; Fabbri, Muller; Poshusta, Tara L; Dusetti, Nelson J; Baumgart, Sandra; Iovanna, Juan L; Ellenrieder, Volker; Urrutia, Raul; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E

    2013-01-28

    During the last couple decades, we have significantly advanced our understanding of mechanisms underlying the development of pancreatic ductual adenocarcinoma (PDAC). In the late 1990s into the early 2000s, a model of PDAC development and progression was developed as a multi-step process associated with the accumulation of somatic mutations. The correlation and association of these particular genetic aberrations with the establishment and progression of PDAC has revolutionized our understanding of this process. However, this model leaves out other molecular events involved in PDAC pathogenesis that contribute to its development and maintenance, specifically those being epigenetic events. Thus, a new model considering the new scientific paradigms of epigenetics will provide a more comprehensive and useful framework for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this disease. Epigenetics is defined as the type of inheritance not based on a particular DNA sequence but rather traits that are passed to the next generation via DNA and histone modifications as well as microRNA-dependent mechanisms. Key tumor suppressors that are well established to play a role in PDAC may be altered through hypermethylation, and oncogenes can be upregulated secondary to permissive histone modifications. Factors involved in tumor invasiveness can be aberrantly expressed through dysregulated microRNAs. A noteworthy characteristic of epigenetic-based inheritance is its reversibility, which is in contrast to the stable nature of DNA sequence-based alterations. Given this nature of epigenetic alterations, it becomes imperative that our understanding of epigenetic-based events promoting and maintaining PDAC continues to grow. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Automatic detection of AutoPEEP during controlled mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Quang-Thang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dynamic hyperinflation, hereafter called AutoPEEP (auto-positive end expiratory pressure with some slight language abuse, is a frequent deleterious phenomenon in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. Although not readily quantifiable, AutoPEEP can be recognized on the expiratory portion of the flow waveform. If expiratory flow does not return to zero before the next inspiration, AutoPEEP is present. This simple detection however requires the eye of an expert clinician at the patient’s bedside. An automatic detection of AutoPEEP should be helpful to optimize care. Methods In this paper, a platform for automatic detection of AutoPEEP based on the flow signal available on most of recent mechanical ventilators is introduced. The detection algorithms are developed on the basis of robust non-parametric hypothesis testings that require no prior information on the signal distribution. In particular, two detectors are proposed: one is based on SNT (Signal Norm Testing and the other is an extension of SNT in the sequential framework. The performance assessment was carried out on a respiratory system analog and ex-vivo on various retrospectively acquired patient curves. Results The experiment results have shown that the proposed algorithm provides relevant AutoPEEP detection on both simulated and real data. The analysis of clinical data has shown that the proposed detectors can be used to automatically detect AutoPEEP with an accuracy of 93% and a recall (sensitivity of 90%. Conclusions The proposed platform provides an automatic early detection of AutoPEEP. Such functionality can be integrated in the currently used mechanical ventilator for continuous monitoring of the patient-ventilator interface and, therefore, alleviate the clinician task.

  19. Bacterial transformation: distribution, shared mechanisms and divergent control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Calum; Martin, Bernard; Fichant, Gwennaele; Polard, Patrice; Claverys, Jean-Pierre

    2014-03-01

    Natural bacterial transformation involves the internalization and chromosomal integration of DNA and has now been documented in ~80 species. Recent advances have established that phylogenetically distant species share conserved uptake and processing proteins but differ in the inducing cues and regulatory mechanisms that are involved. In this Review, we highlight divergent and common principles that govern the transformation process in different bacteria. We discuss how this cumulative knowledge enables the prediction of new transformable species and supports the idea that the main role of internalized DNA is in the generation of genetic diversity or in chromosome repair rather than in nutrition.

  20. Preserving organelle vitality : peroxisomal quality control mechanisms in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksam, Eda Bener; de Vries, Bart; van der Klei, Ida J.; Kiel, Jan A. K. W.

    Cellular proteins and organelles such as peroxisomes are under continuous quality control. Upon synthesis in the cytosol, peroxisomal proteins are kept in an import-competent state by chaperones or specific proteins with an analogous function to prevent degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome

  1. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Sarcomere Contractility Acutely Relieves Left Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction in Feline Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Stern

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is an inherited disease of the heart muscle characterized by otherwise unexplained thickening of the left ventricle. Left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT obstruction is present in approximately two-thirds of patients and substantially increases the risk of disease complications. Invasive treatment with septal myectomy or alcohol septal ablation can improve symptoms and functional status, but currently available drugs for reducing obstruction have pleiotropic effects and variable therapeutic responses. New medical treatments with more targeted pharmacology are needed, but the lack of preclinical animal models for HCM with LVOT obstruction has limited their development. HCM is a common cause of heart failure in cats, and a subset exhibit systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leading to LVOT obstruction. MYK-461 is a recently-described, mechanistically novel small molecule that acts at the sarcomere to specifically inhibit contractility that has been proposed as a treatment for HCM. Here, we use MYK-461 to test whether direct reduction in contractility is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction in feline HCM. We evaluated mixed-breed cats in a research colony derived from a Maine Coon/mixed-breed founder with naturally-occurring HCM. By echocardiography, we identified five cats that developed systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and LVOT obstruction both at rest and under anesthesia when provoked with an adrenergic agonist. An IV MYK-461 infusion and echocardiography protocol was developed to serially assess contractility and LVOT gradient at multiple MYK-461 concentrations. Treatment with MYK-461 reduced contractility, eliminated systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve and relieved LVOT pressure gradients in an exposure-dependent manner. Our findings provide proof of principle that acute reduction in contractility with MYK-461 is sufficient to relieve LVOT obstruction. Further, these studies

  2. Rare and private variations in neural crest, apoptosis and sarcomere genes define the polygenic background of isolated Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Marcel; Dorn, Cornelia; Schueler, Markus; Dunkel, Ilona; Schlesinger, Jenny; Mebus, Siegrun; Alexi-Meskishvili, Vladimir; Perrot, Andreas; Wassilew, Katharina; Timmermann, Bernd; Hetzer, Roland; Berger, Felix; Sperling, Silke R

    2014-06-15

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common cyanotic congenital heart disease. Its genetic basis is demonstrated by an increased recurrence risk in siblings and familial cases. However, the majority of TOF are sporadic, isolated cases of undefined origin and it had been postulated that rare and private autosomal variations in concert define its genetic basis. To elucidate this hypothesis, we performed a multilevel study using targeted re-sequencing and whole-transcriptome profiling. We developed a novel concept based on a gene's mutation frequency to unravel the polygenic origin of TOF. We show that isolated TOF is caused by a combination of deleterious private and rare mutations in genes essential for apoptosis and cell growth, the assembly of the sarcomere as well as for the neural crest and secondary heart field, the cellular basis of the right ventricle and its outflow tract. Affected genes coincide in an interaction network with significant disturbances in expression shared by cases with a mutually affected TOF gene. The majority of genes show continuous expression during adulthood, which opens a new route to understand the diversity in the long-term clinical outcome of TOF cases. Our findings demonstrate that TOF has a polygenic origin and that understanding the genetic basis can lead to novel diagnostic and therapeutic routes. Moreover, the novel concept of the gene mutation frequency is a versatile measure and can be applied to other open genetic disorders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Unaffected contractility of diaphragm muscle fibers in humans on mechanical ventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijman, P.E.; Paul, M.A.; Stienen, G.J.M.; Beishuizen, A.; van Hees, H.W.H.; Singhal, S.; Bashir, M.; Budak, M.T.; Morgen, J.; Barsotti, R.J.; Levine, S.; Ottenheijm, C.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have indicated that diaphragm dysfunction develops in patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). Here, we tested the hypothesis that the contractility of sarcomeres, i.e., the smallest contractile unit in muscle, is affected in humans on MV. To this end, we compared diaphragm muscle

  4. Electrical impedance controls mechanical sensing in ionic polymer metal composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Youngsu; Cellini, Filippo; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs) are a class of soft electroactive materials that are recently finding extensive application as mechanical sensors and energy harvesters in liquids. In their most fundamental form, IPMCs are composed of a hydrated ionomeric membrane that is sandwiched between two electrochemically deposited metal electrodes. Ionomer swelling, counterion diffusion, and the formation of electric double layers are some of the physical phenomena underpinning energy transduction in IPMCs; however, a thorough understanding of the relative influence of such phenomena is yet to be established. Here, we propose a physics-based modeling framework, based on the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system, to describe IPMC chemoelectrical response to an imposed time-varying flexural deformation. We utilize the method of matched asymptotic expansions to compute a closed-form solution for the electric potential and counterion concentration in the IPMC. The model predicts that IPMC sensing is independent of the time rate of deformation and linearly correlated to the mechanical curvature, with a coefficient of proportionality that is a function of the ionomer thickness and the temperature. Thus, our results demonstrate that the characterization of IPMC electrical impedance suffices to identify all the parameters that are relevant to sensing, in contrast with the current state of knowledge. Theoretical results are validated through experiments on patterned in-house fabricated IPMC samples that are subject to time-varying flexural deformations.

  5. Control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plants

    KAUST Repository

    Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2017-01-05

    Various examples are provided that are related to boundary control in membrane distillation (MD) processes. In one example, a system includes a membrane distillation (MD) process comprising a feed side and a permeate side separated by a membrane boundary layer; and processing circuitry configured to control a water production rate of the MD process based at least in part upon a distributed heat transfer across the membrane boundary layer. In another example, a method includes determining a plurality of estimated temperature states of a membrane boundary layer separating a feed side and a permeate side of a membrane distillation (MD) process; and adjusting inlet flow rate or inlet temperature of at least one of the feed side or the permeate side to maintain a difference temperature along the membrane boundary layer about a defined reference temperature based at least in part upon the plurality of estimated temperature states.

  6. Mechanical design of an electronic control unit using axiomatic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazacu Vlad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available If the engine of the car can be considered as the heart, then the E.C.U’s represents the brain of the car. Electronic control units (E.C.U’s are electronic devices which control the way different components of a car (engine, windows, airbags, etc. react in some situations (overheating, button pressed by a passenger, crash, etc.. Axiomatic design is a set of principles that theorizes the act of conceiving a new project. Based on two axiom this method comes into designers help, giving them the option to reach in a short period of time a fully functional and compliant product without supporting the design of the product on chance, past experiences or “try and fail” principle.

  7. Physical mechanisms of control of gliding in flying snakes

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Farid

    2017-01-01

    Flying snakes possess a sophisticated gliding ability with a unique aerial behavior, in which they flatten their body to make a roughly triangular cross-sectional shape to produce lift and gain horizontal acceleration. Also, the snakes assume an S-like posture and start to undulate by sending traveling waves down the body. The present study aims to answer how the snakes are able to control their glide trajectory and remain stable without any specialized flight surfaces. Undulation is the most...

  8. Molecular Mechanisms to Control Post-Transplantation Hepatitis B Recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinobu Takaki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B often progresses to decompensated liver cirrhosis requiring orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT. Although newer nucleos(tide analogues result in >90% viral and hepatitis activity control, severely decompensated patients still need OLT because of drug-resistant virus, acute exacerbation, or hepatocellular carcinoma. Acute hepatitis B is also an indication for OLT, because it can progress to fatal acute liver failure. After OLT, the hepatitis B recurrence rate is >80% without prevention, while >90% of transplant recipients are clinically controlled with combined hepatitis B immunoglobulin (HBIG and nucleos(tide analogue treatment. However, long-term HBIG administration is associated with several unresolved issues, including limited availability and extremely high cost; therefore, several treatment protocols with low-dose HBIG, combined with nucleos(tide analogues, have been investigated. Another approach is to induce self-producing anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV antibodies using an HBV envelope (HBs antigen vaccine. Patients who are not HBV carriers, such as those with acutely infected liver failure, are good candidates for vaccination. For chronic HBV carrier liver cirrhosis patients, a successful vaccine response can only be achieved in selected patients, such as those treated with experimentally reduced immunosuppression protocols. The present protocol for post-OLT HBV control and the future prospects of newer treatment strategies are reviewed.

  9. Factors controlling alkalisalt deposition in recovery boiler- release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kylloenen, H.; Kurkela, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1996-12-01

    As part of a cooperative effort to develop a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers, an experimental investigation of the release of sulphur during black liquor pyrolysis has been undertaken. Previous to these studies, the mechanisms of sulphur release and the reasons for the observed effects of process conditions on sulphur release were very poorly understood. On the basis of the experimental results, the main reactions leading to sulphur release have been elucidated with a fair degree of certainty. Logical explanations for the variations of sulphur release with temperature and with liquor solids content have been proposed. The influence of pressure has been investigated in order to gain insights into the effects of mass transfer on the sulphur-release rate. In the near future, the research will be aimed at generating the kinetic data necessary for modelling the release of sulphur in the recovery furnace. (author)

  10. Intrapulmonary percussive ventilation superimposed on conventional mechanical ventilation: comparison of volume controlled and pressure controlled modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffard, Guillaume; Buzenet, Julien; Guérin, Claude

    2014-07-01

    Previous bench studies suggest that dynamic hyperinflation may occur if intrapulmonary percussive ventilation (IPV) is superimposed on mechanical ventilation in volume controlled continuous mandatory ventilation (VC-CMV) mode. We tested the hypothesis that pressure controlled continuous mandatory ventilation (PC-CMV) can protect against this risk. An ICU ventilator was connected to an IPV device cone adapter that was attached to a lung model (compliance 30 mL/cm H2O, resistance 20 cm H2O/L/s). We measured inspired tidal volume (VTI) and lung pressure (Plung). Measurements were first taken with IPV off and the ICU ventilator set to VC-CMV or PC-CMV mode with a targeted VTI of 500 mL. For each mode, an inspiratory time (TI) of 0.8 or 1.5 s and PEEP 7 or 15 cm H2O were selected. The experiments were repeated with the IPV set to either 20 or 30 psi. The dependent variables were differences in VTI (ΔVTI) and Plung with IPV off or on. The effect of VC-CMV or PC-CMV mode was tested with the ICU ventilators for TI, PEEP, and IPV working pressure using repeated measures of analysis of variance. At TI 0.8 s and 20 psi, ΔVTI was significantly higher in VC-CMV than in PC-CMV. PEEP had no effect on ΔVTI. At TI 1.5 s and 20 psi and at both TI values at each psi, mode and PEEP had a significant effect on ΔVTI. With the ICU ventilators at TI 1.5 s, PEEP 7 cm H2O, and 30 psi, ΔVTI (mean ± SD) ranged from -27 ± 25 to -176 ± 6 mL in PC-CMV and from 258 ± 369 to 369 ± 16 mL in VC-CMV. The corresponding ranges were -15 ± 17 to -62 ± 68 mL in PC-CMV and 26 ± 21 to 102 ± 95 mL in VC-CMV at TI 0.8 s, PEEP 7 cm H2O, and 20 psi. Similar findings pertained to Plung. When IPV is added to mechanical ventilation, the risk of hyperinflation is greater with VC-CMV than with PC-CMV. We recommend using PC-CMV to deliver IPV and adjusting the trigger variable to avoid autotriggering. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. Development of passive-controlled HUB (teetered brake & damper mechanism) of horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Yukimaru; Kamada, Yasunari; Maeda, Takao [Mie Univ. (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    For the purpose of the improvement of reliability of the Mega-Watt wind turbine, this paper indicates the development of an original mechanism for the passive-controlled hub, which has the effects of braking and damping on aerodynamic forces. This mechanism is useful for variable speed control of the large wind turbine. The passive-controlled hub is the combination of two mechanisms. One is the passive-teetered and damping mechanism, and the other is the passive-variable-pitch mechanism. These mechanism are carried out by the combination of the teetering and feathering motions. When the wind speed exceeds the rated wind speed, the blade is passively teetered in a downwind direction and, simultaneously, a feathering mechanism, which is linked to the teetering mechanism through a connecting rods, is activated. Testing of the model horizontal axis wind turbine in a wind tunnel showed that the passive-controlled hub mechanism can suppress the over-rotational speed of the rotor. By the application of the passive-controlled hub mechanism, the maximum rotor speed is reduced to about 60%.

  12. Brain mechanisms underlying automatic and unconscious control of motor action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eD'ostilio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose a theoretical model of motor control that may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.

  13. Mechanical Harvesting of Aquatic Plants. Report 2. Evaluation of Selected Handling Functions of Mechanical Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Test site locations 12 0 a ’-4 0 C𔃾 13 rI a. Topped out hydrilla north of Bonnet Lake (August 1977) b. Topped out hydrilla north of Highway 48 bridge...Towing test in submersed aquatics 25 cut in Bonnet Lake (see Figure 9). The pushing rake mounted on a flat-bottom boat was used in the tests (Figure 11...Laboratory Technical Publications, a facsimile catalog card in Library of Congress MARC format is reproduced below. Smith, Perry A Mechanical harvesting of

  14. Qualification tests for PWR control element drive mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Yong; Jin, Choon Eon; Choi Suhn [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    It is necessary to perform the qualification test for the magnetic jack type CEDM to show the design compatibility because the CEDM is composed of many mechanical and electrical components complicatedly. ABB-CE performed various qualification tests during the development of the System80 CEDM to which Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP) CEDM referred. The qualification test for the CEDM is classified into the performance test and the dynamic test. The performance test is to verify operability of the CEDM, and the dynamic test is to find dynamic characteristics and to verify the structural integrity if the CEDM for the seismic accidents. Described in this report are the test requirements, the test facilities and the test methods for the performance and the dynamic qualification tests of the PWR magnetic jack type CEDM. The impacts of the design changes in the Korea Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) on the KSNP CEDM were analyzed to present the necessity for the tests. This report also proposes the facilities to perform the tests in KAERI including reasonable schedule for the tests. Attached to this report is the summary of qualification tests of System 80 CEDM performed by ABB-CE. 20 figs., 16 tabs., 21 refs. (Author) .new.

  15. Cell size control - a mechanism for maintaining fitness and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Caldez, Matias J; Kaldis, Philipp; Björklund, Mikael

    2017-09-01

    The maintenance of cell size homeostasis has been studied for years in different cellular systems. With the focus on 'what regulates cell size', the question 'why cell size needs to be maintained' has been largely overlooked. Recent evidence indicates that animal cells exhibit nonlinear cell size dependent growth rates and mitochondrial metabolism, which are maximal in intermediate sized cells within each cell population. Increases in intracellular distances and changes in the relative cell surface area impose biophysical limitations on cells, which can explain why growth and metabolic rates are maximal in a specific cell size range. Consistently, aberrant increases in cell size, for example through polyploidy, are typically disadvantageous to cellular metabolism, fitness and functionality. Accordingly, cellular hypertrophy can potentially predispose to or worsen metabolic diseases. We propose that cell size control may have emerged as a guardian of cellular fitness and metabolic activity. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Adaptive Backstepping Control of Nonlinear Hydraulic-Mechanical System Including Valve Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Choux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main contribution of the paper is the development of an adaptive backstepping controller for a nonlinear hydraulic-mechanical system considering valve dynamics. The paper also compares the performance of two variants of an adaptive backstepping tracking controller with a simple PI controller. The results show that the backstepping controller considering valve dynamics achieves significantly better tracking performance than the PI controller, while handling uncertain parameters related to internal leakage, friction, the orifice equation and oil characteristics.

  17. A systematic review and meta-analysis of genotype-phenotype associations in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by sarcomeric protein mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Luís R; Rahman, M Shafiqur; Elliott, Perry M

    2013-12-01

    The genetic basis of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is well described, but the relation between genotype and clinical phenotype is still poorly characterised. To summarise and critically review the current literature on genotype-phenotype associations in patients with HCM and to perform a meta-analysis on selected clinical features. PubMed/Medline was searched up to January 2013. Retrieved articles were checked for additional publications. Observational, cross-sectional and prospectively designed English language human studies that analysed the relationship between the presence of mutations in sarcomeric protein genes and clinical parameters. The pooled analysis was confined to studies reporting on cohorts of unrelated and consecutive patients in which at least two sarcomere genes were sequenced. A random effect meta-regression model was used to determine the overall prevalence of predefined clinical features: age at presentation, gender, family history of HCM, family history of sudden cardiac death (SCD), and maximum left ventricular wall thickness (MLVWT). The I(2) statistic was used to estimate the proportion of total variability in the prevalence data attributable to the heterogeneity between studies. Eighteen publications (corresponding to a total of 2459 patients) were selected for the pooled analysis. The presence of any sarcomere gene mutation was associated with a younger age at presentation (38.4 vs 46.0 years, p<0.0005), a family history of HCM (50.6% vs 23.1%, p<0.0005), a family history of SCD (27.0% vs 14.9%, p<0.0005) and greater MLVWT (21.0 vs 19.3 mm, p=0.03). There were no differences when the two most frequently affected genes, MYBPC3 and MYH7, were compared. A total of 53 family studies were also included in the review. These were characterised by pronounced variability and the majority of studies reporting on outcomes analysed small cross-sectional cohorts and were unsuitable for pooled analyses. The presence of a mutation in any

  18. Differences in Contractile Function of Myofibrils within Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes vs. Adult Ventricular Myofibrils Are Related to Distinct Sarcomeric Protein Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Iorga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the contractile function of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hPSC-CMs is key for advancing their utility for cellular disease models, promoting cell based heart repair, or developing novel pharmacological interventions targeting cardiac diseases. The aim of the present study was to understand whether steady-state and kinetic force parameters of β-myosin heavy chain (βMyHC isoform-expressing myofibrils within human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs differentiated in vitro resemble those of human ventricular myofibrils (hvMFs isolated from adult donor hearts. Contractile parameters were determined using the same micromechanical method and experimental conditions for both types of myofibrils. We identified isoforms and phosphorylation of main sarcomeric proteins involved in the modulation of force generation of both, chemically demembranated hESC-CMs (d-hESC-CMs and hvMFs. Our results indicate that at saturating Ca2+ concentration, both human-derived contractile systems developed forces with similar rate constants (0.66 and 0.68 s−1, reaching maximum isometric force that was significantly smaller for d-hESC-CMs (42 kPa than for hvMFs (94 kPa. At submaximal Ca2+-activation, where intact cardiomyocytes normally operate, contractile parameters of d-hESC-CMs and hvMFs exhibited differences. Ca2+ sensitivity of force was higher for d-hESC-CMs (pCa50 = 6.04 than for hvMFs (pCa50 = 5.80. At half-maximum activation, the rate constant for force redevelopment was significantly faster for d-hESC-CMs (0.51 s−1 than for hvMFs (0.28 s−1. During myofibril relaxation, kinetics of the slow force decay phase were significantly faster for d-hESC-CMs (0.26 s−1 than for hvMFs (0.21 s−1, while kinetics of the fast force decay were similar and ~20x faster. Protein analysis revealed that hESC-CMs had essentially no cardiac troponin-I, and partially non-ventricular isoforms of some other sarcomeric proteins

  19. Development of an integrated engine-hydro-mechanical transmission control algorithm for a tractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunghyun Ahn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an integrated engine-hydro-mechanical transmission control algorithm for a tractor considering the engine-hydro-mechanical transmission efficiency. First, the hydro-mechanical transmission efficiency was obtained by network analysis based on the hydrostatic unit efficiency constructed from the test. Using the hydro-mechanical transmission efficiency map and the thermal efficiency of the engine, an engine-hydro-mechanical transmission optimal operating line was obtained, which provides higher total system efficiency. Based on the optimal operating line, an integrated engine-hydro-mechanical transmission control algorithm was proposed, which provides higher total powertrain system efficiency. To evaluate the performance of the proposed control algorithm, an AMESim-MATLAB/Simulink-based co-simulator was developed. From the simulation results for the plow working, it was found that the integrated engine-hydro-mechanical transmission control provides improved fuel economy by 7.5% compared with the existing engine optimal operating line control. The performance of the integrated engine-hydro-mechanical transmission control was also validated using the test bench.

  20. Radial basis function (RBF) neural network control for mechanical systems design, analysis and Matlab simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinkun

    2013-01-01

    Radial Basis Function (RBF) Neural Network Control for Mechanical Systems is motivated by the need for systematic design approaches to stable adaptive control system design using neural network approximation-based techniques. The main objectives of the book are to introduce the concrete design methods and MATLAB simulation of stable adaptive RBF neural control strategies. In this book, a broad range of implementable neural network control design methods for mechanical systems are presented, such as robot manipulators, inverted pendulums, single link flexible joint robots, motors, etc. Advanced neural network controller design methods and their stability analysis are explored. The book provides readers with the fundamentals of neural network control system design.   This book is intended for the researchers in the fields of neural adaptive control, mechanical systems, Matlab simulation, engineering design, robotics and automation. Jinkun Liu is a professor at Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronauti...

  1. Barrier Lyapunov function-based model-free constraint position control for mechanical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seong Ik; Ha, Hyun Uk; Lee, Jang Myung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    In this article, a motion constraint control scheme is presented for mechanical systems without a modeling process by introducing a barrier Lyapunov function technique and adaptive estimation laws. The transformed error and filtered error surfaces are defined to constrain the motion tracking error in the prescribed boundary layers. Unknown parameters of mechanical systems are estimated using adaptive laws derived from the Lyapunov function. Then, robust control used the conventional sliding mode control, which give rise to excessive chattering, is changed to finite time-based control to alleviate undesirable chattering in the control action and to ensure finite-time error convergence. Finally, the constraint controller from the barrier Lyapunov function is designed and applied to the constraint of the position tracking error of the mechanical system. Two experimental examples for the XY table and articulated manipulator are shown to evaluate the proposed control scheme.

  2. Chemical and Mechanical Control of Soybean (Glycin max L. Weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Gholamalipour Alamdari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate effects of the various concentrations of two herbicides of the trifluralin and Imazethapyr and weeding on weeds control, yield and yield components of soybean (Glycin max L., an experiment was carried out based on randomized complete block design with three replications at the Agriculture Land of Ghravolhaji Village in Kallale district of Golestan province in 2014. Treatments consisted of planting soybean under weeding, without weeding and application of trifluralin and Imazethapyr as 100% trifluralin, 75% trifluralin + 25% Imazethapyr, 50% trifluralin + 50% Imazethapyr, 25% trifluralin + 75% Imazethapyr, 100% pursuit, 100% Imazethapyr + 25% trifluralin, 25% Imazethapyr + 100% trifluralin, 100% Imazethapyr + 50% trifluralin and 50% Imazethapyr + 100% trifluralin. density of each weed, their total density and inhibition percentage were measured. Results showed that the effect of chemical weed control on all traits measured, except seed number per pot, 1000 seed weight, content of chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll, were significant. The highest leaf area, plant height, number of pods per plant, aerial plant dry weight, seed number per plant and seed weight per plant were observed in the treatment of the 100% Imazethapyr (238.67 cm2, weeding (57.69 cm, both treatments of weeding (33.10 and 25% Imazethapyr +100% trifluralin (28.3, both treatment of weeding (163.92 g and 100%  Imazethapyr (163.70 g, weeding (67.10 seed per plant, both treatment of weeding and 100%  Imazethapyr + 50% trifluralin (10.27 seed per plant respectively. The highest seed yield was obtained from weeding treatment (2383 kg/h. Based on the results, the highest content of protein and chlorophyll b in soybean were obtained from weeding treatment. The highest inhibition percentage of weeds was found in the additional treatment of 50% Imazethapyr + 100% trifluralin (75.19 and 100% Imazethapyr + 25% trifluralin (72.86. The lowest and highest total phenols content and

  3. Stochastic Optimal Control for Online Seller under Reputational Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bradonjić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we propose and analyze a model which addresses the pulsing behavior of sellers in an online auction (store. This pulsing behavior is observed when sellers switch between advertising and processing states. We assert that a seller switches her state in order to maximize her profit, and further that this switch can be identified through the seller’s reputation. We show that for each seller there is an optimal reputation, i.e., the reputation at which the seller should switch her state in order to maximize her total profit. We design a stochastic behavioral model for an online seller, which incorporates the dynamics of resource allocation and reputation. The design of the model is optimized by using a stochastic advertising model from [1] and used effectively in the Stochastic Optimal Control of Advertising [2]. This model of reputation is combined with the effect of online reputation on sales price empirically verified in [3]. We derive the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB differential equation, whose solution relates optimal wealth level to a seller’s reputation. We formulate both a full model, as well as a reduced model with fewer parameters, both of which have the same qualitative description of the optimal seller behavior. Coincidentally, the reduced model has a closed form analytical solution that we construct.

  4. Overflow control mechanism (OCM) for Ethernet passive optical networks (EPONs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduczenia, Marek; da Silva, Henrique J. A.; Monteiro, Paulo P.

    2007-05-01

    The nonfragmentable nature of Ethernet data frames, as well as operation of the priority oriented packet schedulers in the optical network units, in conjunction with heavy network load conditions and the lack of detailed knowledge about the queue's composition at the optical line terminal (OLT) level, result in the creation of upstream channel slot remainders. The existing methods, in the form of nonpreemptive packet schedulers and multithreshold reporting process defined vaguely by the IEEE 802.3-2005 standard, result in either increased packet delay or Ethernet passive optical network (EPON) system incompatibility, respectively, since threshold processing was never officially defined in the scope of the respective EPON standard. We propose an alternative approach, based on basic modifications of the standard and extended GATE multipoint control protocol data unit format and meaning, allowing for the OLT packet scheduling agent to grant always exactly the requested slot size, thus preventing creation of any upstream channel slot remainders. It is estimated that, on average, ˜3% of upstream channel bandwidth can be salvaged when slot remainders are absent in the upstream channel transmission.

  5. The statistical mechanics of kinetically-controlled RNA folding pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ariel

    By systematically assigning weights to kinetically-controlled folding pathways we introduce a novel scheme of statistical inference. We provide supporting experimental evidence to show that this approach is suitable to explain the expediency and robustness of RNA folding. The statistical scheme is constructed in four stages, the last of which leads to a suitable representation that allows for direct comparison with experiment: a) An appropriate space of folding histories is defined; b) The space is endowed with a measure and in this way an ensemble is defined; c) The ensemble is systematically simplified by coarse-graining each copy or replica of conformation space. This procedure entails lumping together rapidly-interconverting conformations; d) A base-pair probability matrix (BPPM) is introduced by representing all structures contributing to the ensemble at a given instant. Thus, we take a convenient cross-section of the ensemble by taking a fixed instant in time. The BPPM is contrasted vis-a-vis experimental information on biologically-competent conformations. This last procedure is paramount to verify the theory. Moreover, the essential properties of folding are captured by showing that the statistical weight is concentrated on a very limited domain of closely-related folding pathways whose biological competence has been established experimentally.

  6. Performance Analysis of Novel Overload Control with Threshold Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo Il Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel overload control method with hysteresis property; that is, we analyze the M/G/1/K queueing system where the service and arrival rates are varied depending on the queue-length. We use two threshold values: L1(≤L2 and L2(≤K. When the queue-length increases by an amount between L1 and L2, we apply one of the following two strategies to reduce the queue-length, either we decrease the mean service time or we decrease the arrival rate. If the queue-length exceeds L2 with one strategy, we apply the other; thus, there are two models that depend on the method that was applied first. We derive the queue-length distribution at departure and at arbitrary epochs using the embedded Markov chain method and the supplementary variable method. We investigate performance measures including the loss probability and mean waiting time using various numerical examples.

  7. Block backstepping design of nonlinear state feedback control law for underactuated mechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rudra, Shubhobrata; Maitra, Madhubanti

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a novel, generalized approach to the design of nonlinear state feedback control laws for a large class of underactuated mechanical systems based on application of the block backstepping method. The control law proposed here is robust against the effects of model uncertainty in dynamic and steady-state performance and addresses the issue of asymptotic stabilization for the class of underactuated mechanical systems. An underactuated system is defined as one for which the dimension of space spanned by the configuration vector is greater than that of the space spanned by the control variables. Control problems concerning underactuated systems currently represent an active field of research due to their broad range of applications in robotics, aerospace, and marine contexts. The book derives a generalized theory of block backstepping control design for underactuated mechanical systems, and examines several case studies that cover interesting examples of underactuated mechanical systems. The math...

  8. Decoupling congestion control and error control mechanisms in TCP and evaluating their performance over broadband satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lina; Gu, Xuemai

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to better evaluate the performance of TCP over broadband satellite networks. We decouple the most crucial parts of TCP that impact its performance in broadband satellite environments, namely congestion control and error control mechanisms. And then we re-design these two function blocks and make them become two individual parts. With these re-designed modules, we have investigated the interactions between various currently existing TCP congestion control and error control schemes, as well as their impact on TCP performance over a geostationary broadband satellite link with long propagation delay and high bit error rate. Simulation results have shown that some combinations of different congestion control and error control mechanisms can waste satellite link bandwidth with large numbers of retransmission packets and unnecessary retransmission packets. And the modified TCP NewReno implementation can avoid high amount of retransmissions and unnecessary retransmissions.

  9. Thermo-mechanically controlled processed ultrahigh strength steel: Microstructure, texture and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, S.; Tewary, N.K. [Department of Metallurgy & Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Ghosh, S.K., E-mail: skghosh@metal.iiests.ac.in [Department of Metallurgy & Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Chakrabarti, D. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Chatterjee, S. [Department of Metallurgy & Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)

    2016-04-29

    A low-carbon microalloyed steel containing high Ni and Cu content has been developed and subjected to thermo-mechanical processing by varying the finish rolling temperature (FRT∼850–750 °C) and cooling rates (air cooling and water quenching). Microstructures of air cooled samples consist of granular bainite and lath or plate-like bainite, whereas, water quenched samples exhibit a mixture of lower bainite and lath martensite. A refinement in microstructure has been noticed with the decrease in FRT and increase in cooling rate. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrates the presence of coarse (Ti, Nb)C precipitates (~90–160 nm) and fine Cu precipitates (<20 nm). Macro-texture and micro-texture results reveal the dominance of Goss and rotated Goss texture components, which strengthened with the decrease in FRT and increase in cooling rate. The proposed steel composition and TMCP schedule have offered YS ∼ 1000 MPa, UTS ∼ 1400 MPa, total elongation greater than 10% maintaining a low YS: UTS ratio (0.68–0.80). Such a satisfactory combination of tensile properties achieved in as-cooled or as-quenched conditions (without the need of any tempering treatment) makes the steel suitable for automotive application.

  10. Motion interference analysis and optimal control of an electronic controlled bamboo-dance mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohong; Xu, Liang; Hu, Xiaobin

    2017-08-01

    An electric bamboo-dance mechanism was designed and developed to realize mechanism of automation and mechanization. For coherent and fluent motion, ANSYS finite element analysis was applied on movement interference. Static structural method was used for analyzing dynamic deflection and deformation of the slender rod, while modal analysis was applied on frequency analysis to avoid second deformation caused by resonance. Therefore, the deformation in vertical and horizontal direction was explored and reasonable optimization was taken to avoid interference.

  11. Control of Bone Anabolism in Response to Mechanical Loading and PTH by Distinct Mechanisms Downstream of the PTH Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Calle, Jesus; Tu, Xiaolin; Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; McAndrews, Kevin; Edwards, Rachel; Pellegrini, Gretel G; Kuhlenschmidt, Kali; Olivos, Naomie; Robling, Alexander; Peacock, Munro; Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2017-03-01

    Osteocytes integrate the responses of bone to mechanical and hormonal stimuli by poorly understood mechanisms. We report here that mice with conditional deletion of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor 1 (Pth1r) in dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1)-8kb-expressing cells (cKO) exhibit a modest decrease in bone resorption leading to a mild increase in cancellous bone without changes in cortical bone. However, bone resorption in response to endogenous chronic elevation of PTH in growing or adult cKO mice induced by a low calcium diet remained intact, because the increased bone remodeling and bone loss was indistinguishable from that exhibited by control littermates. In contrast, the bone gain and increased bone formation in cancellous and cortical bone induced by daily injections of PTH and the periosteal bone apposition induced by axial ulna loading were markedly reduced in cKO mice compared to controls. Remarkably, however, wild-type (WT) control littermates and transgenic mice overexpressing SOST injected daily with PTH exhibit similar activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, increased bone formation, and cancellous and cortical bone gain. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Pth1r in DMP1-8kb-expressing cells is required to maintain basal levels of bone resorption but is dispensable for the catabolic action of chronic PTH elevation; and it is essential for the anabolic actions of daily PTH injections and mechanical loading. However, downregulation of Sost/sclerostin, previously shown to be required for bone anabolism induced by mechanical loading, is not required for PTH-induced bone gain, showing that other mechanisms downstream of the Pth1r in DMP1-8kb-expressing cells are responsible for the hormonal effect. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  12. Mechanisms of Morphology Development and Control in Polymer- Polymer Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macosko, Christopher W.

    1998-03-01

    Polymer-polymer blends continue to be the most important method for achieving optimization of properties in plastics products. Over 30 percent of all plastics are blends. While miscible blends generally give average properties between the components, immiscible blends offer synergistic possibilities such as high modulus with high toughness; high flow with high impact strength or diffusion barriers with good mechanical properties and low cost. The key to performance of these immiscible blends is their morphology. There are several important types of morphology which can lead to valuable property improvement: emulsion - small polymer spheres well dispersed in a polymer matrix. double emulsion - spheres inside spheres which are dispersed in another matrix. microlayer - thin, parallel layers of one polymer in a matrix. cocontinuous - two (or more) continuous, interpenetrating polymer phases. To be economical it is desirable to create these morphologies via melt mixing of powder or pellets in conventional compounding equipment. The melting stage during compounding is very important for morphology development. This presentation will demonstrate the role of melting or softening of each phase as well as their viscosity, elasticity and interfacial tension in morphology development. Interfacial modification with premade block copolymers or reactively formed copolymers can greatly alter morphology formation and stability. Experimental results will be presented which quantify the role of these additives. References to recent work in this area by our group are listed below: DeBrule, M. B., L. Levitt and C.W. Macosko, "The Rheology and Morphology of Layered Polymer Melts in Shear," Soc. Plastics Eng. Tech Papers (ANTEC), 84-89 (1996). Guegan, P., C. W. Macosko, T. Ishizone, A. Hirao and S. Nakahama, "Kinetics of Chain Coupling at Melt Interfaces, Macromol. 27, 4993-4997 (1994). Lee, M. S., T.P. Lodge, and C. W. Macosko, "Can Random Copolymers Serve as Effective Polymeric

  13. Molecular mechanisms in cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadson, Keith; Hauck, Ludger; Billia, Filio

    2017-07-01

    Cardiomyopathies represent a heterogeneous group of diseases that negatively affect heart function. Primary cardiomyopathies specifically target the myocardium, and may arise from genetic [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D), mitochondrial cardiomyopathy] or genetic and acquired [dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM)] etiology. Modern genomics has identified mutations that are common in these populations, while in vitro and in vivo experimentation with these mutations have provided invaluable insight into the molecular mechanisms native to these diseases. For example, increased myosin heavy chain (MHC) binding and ATP utilization lead to the hypercontractile sarcomere in HCM, while abnormal protein-protein interaction and impaired Ca2+ flux underlie the relaxed sarcomere of DCM. Furthermore, expanded access to genetic testing has facilitated identification of potential risk factors that appear through inheritance and manifest sometimes only in the advanced stages of the disease. In this review, we discuss the genetic and molecular abnormalities unique to and shared between these primary cardiomyopathies and discuss some of the important advances made using more traditional basic science experimentation. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. A Modified Model Reference Adaptive Control for a Single Motor of Latch Type Control Element Drive Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Bae Jeong [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A modified Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) for a single motor of latch type Control Element Drive Mechanism (CEDM) is described herein. The CEDM has complicated dynamic characteristics including electrical, mechanical, and magnetic effects. The previous control system has utilized a Proportional-Integral (PI) controller, and the control performance is limited according to nonlinear dynamic characteristics and environmental conditions. The modified MRAC using system identification (ID) technique improves the control performance in the operating condition such as model parameter variation and environmental condition change. The modified MRAC using the identified reference model with feed-forward gain and 180Hz noise reduction filter presents better performance under normal and/or abnormal condition. The simplified reference model can make H/W implementation more practical on the viewpoint of less computation and good performance. Actually, the CEDM controller shall be capable of controlling 101 control element assemblies (CEAs) individually in the nuclear power plant. Because the load conditions and the environmental condition around the 101 CEAs are all different minutely, the proposed modified MRAC can be a good practice. The modified MRAC controller will be applied in the real nuclear power plant later and this will overcome some weak point of PI controller.

  15. CONTROLLING AS A MECHANISM TO INCREASE THE EFFICIENCY OF MANAGEMENT ENTERPRISES OF FUEL-ENERGY COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ostashkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the possibility of application of controlling as mechanism of increasing the efficiency of management of enterprises of fuel- energy complex. The research was conducted on the materials of the JSC «Gazprom».

  16. Disentangling the Impact of Control-Enhancing Mechanisms on Firm Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zattoni, Alessandro; Pedersen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    shareholders to expropriate minority shareholders. The aim of this article is to contribute to the current debate investigating the implications of these control-enhancing mechanisms on firm performance. To reach this purpose, we collected ownership data on the (100) largest listed companies per capitalization...... in five European countries (i.e. France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK). Then we tested the consequences of control-enhancing mechanisms for firm performance using 2SLS regression models. Our results show that (i) mechanisms that lock-in control do have a direct and negative impact on firm performance......, and (ii) the negative impact on firm performance of mechanisms aimed at enhancing control by leveraging voting power is mediated by the divergence in voting and cash flow rights....

  17. Mechanization and new technologies for the control and the sustainability of agricultural and forestry systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Book of the Congress:Mechanization and new technologies for the control and the sustainability of agricultural and forestry systems Alghero, Italy, 29th May - 1st June 2016

  18. State of the Art Report for Development of Control Element Drive Mechanism of the APR+ Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Choi, Suhn; Song, Chul Hwa

    2008-10-15

    Recently newly-developed nuclear reactors with increased safety and enhanced performance by developed countries in the nuclear area are competing in the global nuclear market. Several reactors, for example AP600 and AP1000 by Westinghouse Electric Co. in USA, EPR by Areva in Europe, APWR by Mitsubishi Heavy Industry in Japan in the pressurized power reactor, are competing to preoccupy the nuclear market during Nuclear Renaissance. Dedicated control element drive mechanism with enhanced performance and increased safety are developed for these new reactors. And load follow capability is required, and it is estimated that load follow requirement make design requirement of a control element drive mechanism harsh. It is necessary to review the current technical state of a control element drive mechanism. This work is aimed to review the design characteristics of a past and current control element drive mechanism for a nuclear reactor and to check the direction and goal of CEDM design development recently.

  19. Pitch control for ships with diesel mechanical and hybrid propulsion : Modelling, validation and performance quantification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsma, R.D.; Negenborn, R.R.; Visser, K.; Loonstijn, M.A.; Hopman, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Ships, in particular service vessels, need to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and cavitation noise while maintaining manoeuvrability and preventing engine overloading. Diesel mechanical propulsion with controllable pitch propellers can provide high fuel efficiency with good manoeuvrability.

  20. Efficacy and mechanisms of non-antibacterial, chemical plaque control by dentifrices - An in vitro study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busscher, Henk J.; White, Don J.; Atema-Smit, Jelly; van der Mei, Henny C.

    Objectives: The provision of antiplaque benefits to dentifrices assists patients in improving hygiene and reducing susceptibility to gingivitis and caries. Chemical plaque control involves different mechanisms and is mostly associated with antibacterial effects, but also includes effects on pellicle

  1. ENGAGEMENT SLIP CONTROLLER DEVELOPMENT BASED ON ACTUATOR DISPLACEMENT FOR AN ELECTRO-MECHANICAL FRICTION CLUTCH SYSTEM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M S Che Kob; B Supriyo; K B Tawi; I I Mazali

    2015-01-01

    ...) controller algorithm to engage the dry friction clutch. The EMFC is electro-mechanically actuated using a DC motor system, such that a smooth engagement process can be performed satisfactorily...

  2. Assist-control mechanical ventilation attenuates ventilator-induced diaphragmatic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassoon, Catherine S H; Zhu, Ercheng; Caiozzo, Vincent J

    2004-09-15

    Controlled mechanical ventilation induced a profound diaphragm muscle dysfunction and atrophy. The effects of diaphragmatic contractions with assisted mechanical ventilation on diaphragmatic isometric, isotonic contractile properties, or the expression of muscle atrophy factor-box (MAF-box), the gene responsible for muscle atrophy, are unknown. We hypothesize that assisted mechanical ventilation will preserve diaphragmatic force and prevent overexpression of MAF-box. Studying sedated rabbits randomized equally into control animals, those with 3 days of assisted ventilation, and those with controlled ventilation, we assessed in vitro diaphragmatic isometric and isotonic contractile function. The concentrations of contractile proteins, myosin heavy chain isoform, and MAF-box mRNA were measured. Tetanic force decreased by 14% with assisted ventilation and 48% with controlled ventilation. Maximum shortening velocity tended to increase with controlled compared with assisted ventilation and control. Peak power output decreased 20% with assisted ventilation and 41% with controlled ventilation. Contractile proteins were unchanged with either modes of ventilation; myosin heavy chain 2X mRNA tended to increase and that of 2A to decrease with controlled ventilation. MAF-box gene was overexpressed with controlled ventilation. We conclude that preserving diaphragmatic contractions during mechanical ventilation attenuates the force loss induced by complete inactivity and maintains MAF-box gene expression in control.

  3. A methodology for identification and control of electro-mechanical actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutunji, Tarek A; Saleem, Ashraf

    2015-01-01

    Mechatronic systems are fully-integrated engineering systems that are composed of mechanical, electronic, and computer control sub-systems. These integrated systems use electro-mechanical actuators to cause the required motion. Therefore, the design of appropriate controllers for these actuators are an essential step in mechatronic system design. In this paper, a three-stage methodology for real-time identification and control of electro-mechanical actuator plants is presented, tested, and validated. First, identification models are constructed from experimental data to approximate the plants' response. Second, the identified model is used in a simulation environment for the purpose of designing a suitable controller. Finally, the designed controller is applied and tested on the real plant through Hardware-in-the-Loop (HIL) environment. The described three-stage methodology provides the following practical contributions: •Establishes an easy-to-follow methodology for controller design of electro-mechanical actuators.•Combines off-line and on-line controller design for practical performance.•Modifies the HIL concept by using physical plants with computer control (rather than virtual plants with physical controllers). Simulated and experimental results for two case studies, induction motor and vehicle drive system, are presented in order to validate the proposed methodology. These results showed that electromechanical actuators can be identified and controlled using an easy-to-duplicate and flexible procedure.

  4. The emergence of sarcomeric, graded-polarity and spindle-like patterns in bundles of short cytoskeletal polymers and two opposite molecular motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, E M; Dey, S; Mogilner, A, E-mail: ecraig@ucdavis.edu, E-mail: satarupa.dey@gmail.com, E-mail: mogilner@math.ucdavis.edu [Department of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior and Department of Mathematics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2011-09-21

    We use linear stability analysis and numerical solutions of partial differential equations to investigate pattern formation in the one-dimensional system of short dynamic polymers and one (plus-end directed) or two (one is plus-end, another minus-end directed) molecular motors. If polymer sliding and motor gliding rates are slow and/or the polymer turnover rate is fast, then the polymer-motor bundle has mixed polarity and homogeneous motor distribution. However, if motor gliding is fast, a sarcomeric pattern with periodic bands of alternating polymer polarity separated by motor aggregates evolves. On the other hand, if polymer sliding is fast, a graded-polarity bundle with motors at the center emerges. In the presence of the second, minus-end directed motor, the sarcomeric pattern is more ubiquitous, while the graded-polarity pattern is destabilized. However, if the minus-end motor is weaker than the plus-end directed one, and/or polymer nucleation is autocatalytic, and/or long polymers are present in the bundle, then a spindle-like architecture with a sorted-out polarity emerges with the plus-end motors at the center and minus-end motors at the edges. We discuss modeling implications for actin-myosin fibers and in vitro and meiotic spindles.

  5. Designing a delay-based adaptive congestion control mechanism using control theory and system identification for TCP/IP networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Mitsushige; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Murata, Masayuki

    2002-07-01

    In the Internet, TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) has been used as an end-to-end congestion control mechanism. Of all several TCP implementations, TCP Reno is the most popular implementation. TCP Reno uses a loss-based approach since it estimates the severity of congestion by detecting packet losses in the network. On the contrary, another implementation called TCP Vegas uses a delay-based approach. The main advantage of a delay-based approach is, if it is properly designed, packet losses can be prevented by anticipating impending congestion from increasing packet delays. However, TCP Vegas was designed using not a theoretical approach but an ad hock one. In this paper, we therefore design a delay-based congestion control mechanism by utilizing the classical control theory. Our rate-based congestion control mechanism dynamically adjusts the packet transmission rate to stabilize the round-trip time for utilizing the network resources and also for preventing packet losses in the network. Presenting several simulation results in two network configurations, we quantitatively show the robustness and the effectiveness of our delay-based congestion control mechanism.

  6. Modeling and Fuzzy Adaptive PID Control of a New Hydraulic Erecting Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the nonlinearity and solve the cooperation problem between erect cylinder and horizontal cylinder of a new hydraulic erecting mechanism, the combined simulation model is built based on AMESim/Simulink.The best cooperation time bteween erect cylinder and horizontal cylinder is confirmed. Further, the fuzzy adaptive PID controller is introduced to improve the control performance aiming to nonlinearity exist in the erecting mechanism.

  7. Stiffness-Controlled Thermoresponsive Hydrogels for Cell Harvesting with Sustained Mechanical Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xingliang; Zhu, Lu; Wang, Ke; Wang, Bingjie; Wu, Yaozu; Xie, Wei; Huang, Chengyu; Chan, Barbara Pui; Du, Yanan

    2017-03-01

    Most mechanobiological investigations focused on in situ mechanical regulation of cells on stiffness-controlled substrates with few downstream applications, as it is still challenging to harvest and expand mechanically primed cells by enzymatic digestion (e.g., trypsin) without interrupting cellular mechanical memory between passages. This study develops thermoresponsive hydrogels with controllable stiffness to generate mechanically primed cells with intact mechanical memory for augmented wound healing. No significant cellular property alteration of the fibroblasts primed on thermoresponsive hydrogels with varied stiffness has been observed through thermoresponsive harvesting. When reseeding the harvested cells for further evaluation, softer hydrogels are proven to better sustain the mechanical priming effects compared to rigid tissue culture plate, which indicates that both the stiffness-controlled substrate and thermoresponsive harvesting are required to sustain cellular mechanical memory between passages. Moreover, epigenetics analysis reveals that thermoresponsive harvesting could reduce the rearrangement and loss of chromatin proteins compared to that of trypsinization. In vivo wound healing using mechanically primed fibroblasts shows featured epithelium and sebaceous glands, which indicates augmented skin recovery compared with trypsinized fibroblasts. Thus, the thermoresponsive hydrogel-based cell harvesting system offers a powerful tool to investigate mechanobiology between cell passages and produces abundant cells with tailored mechanical priming properties for cell-based applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Effects of controlled mechanical ventilation on sepsis-induced diaphragm dysfunction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Karen; Stamiris, Angela; Thomas, Debby; Cielen, Nele; Smuder, Ashley; Powers, Scott K; Leite, Felipe S; Hermans, Greet; Decramer, Marc; Hussain, Sabah N; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine

    2014-12-01

    Diaphragm dysfunction develops during severe sepsis as a consequence of hemodynamic, metabolic, and intrinsic abnormalities. Similarly, 12 hours of controlled mechanical ventilation also promotes diaphragm dysfunction. Importantly, patients with sepsis are often treated with mechanical ventilation for several days. It is unknown if controlled mechanical ventilation exacerbates sepsis-induced diaphragm dysfunction, and this forms the basis for these experiments. We investigate the effects of 12-hour controlled mechanical ventilation on contractile function, fiber dimension, cytokine production, proteolysis, autophagy, and oxidative stress in the diaphragm of septic rats. Randomized controlled experiment. Animal research laboratory. Adult male Wistar rats. Treatment with a single intraperitoneal injection of either saline or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (5 mg/kg). After 12 hours, the saline-treated animals (controlled mechanical ventilation) and half of the septic animals (lipopolysaccharide + controlled mechanical ventilation) were submitted to 12 hours of controlled mechanical ventilation while the remaining septic animals (lipopolysaccharide) were breathing spontaneously for 12 hours. They were compared to a control group. All animals were studied 24 hours after saline or lipopolysaccharide administration. Twenty-four hours after saline or lipopolysaccharide administration, diaphragm contractility was measured in vitro. We also measured diaphragm muscle fiber dimensions from stained cross sections, and inflammatory cytokines were determined by proteome array. Activities of calpain, caspase-3, and proteasome, expression of 20S-proteasome α subunits, E2 conjugases, E3 ligases, and autophagy were measured with immunoblotting and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lipopolysaccharide and/or controlled mechanical ventilation independently decreased diaphragm contractility and fiber dimensions and increased diaphragm interleukin-6 production, protein

  10. Both high level pressure support ventilation and controlled mechanical ventilation induce diaphragm dysfunction and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Matthew B; Smuder, Ashley J; Nelson, W Bradley; Bruells, Christian S; Levine, Sanford; Powers, Scott K

    2012-04-01

    Previous workers have demonstrated that controlled mechanical ventilation results in diaphragm inactivity and elicits a rapid development of diaphragm weakness as a result of both contractile dysfunction and fiber atrophy. Limited data exist regarding the impact of pressure support ventilation, a commonly used mode of mechanical ventilation-that permits partial mechanical activity of the diaphragm-on diaphragm structure and function. We carried out the present study to test the hypothesis that high-level pressure support ventilation decreases the diaphragm pathology associated with CMV. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of the following five groups:1) control (no mechanical ventilation); 2) 12 hrs of controlled mechanical ventilation (12CMV); 3) 18 hrs of controlled mechanical ventilation (18CMV); 4) 12 hrs of pressure support ventilation (12PSV); or 5) 18 hrs of pressure support ventilation (18PSV). We carried out the following measurements on diaphragm specimens: 4-hydroxynonenal-a marker of oxidative stress, active caspase-3 (casp-3), active calpain-1 (calp-1), fiber type cross-sectional area, and specific force (sp F). Compared with the control, both 12PSV and 18PSV promoted a significant decrement in diaphragmatic specific force production, but to a lesser degree than 12CMV and 18CMV. Furthermore, 12CMV, 18PSV, and 18CMV resulted in significant atrophy in all diaphragm fiber types as well as significant increases in a biomarker of oxidative stress (4-hydroxynonenal) and increased proteolytic activity (20S proteasome, calpain-1, and caspase-3). Furthermore, although no inspiratory effort occurs during controlled mechanical ventilation, it was observed that pressure support ventilation resulted in large decrement, approximately 96%, in inspiratory effort compared with spontaneously breathing animals. High levels of prolonged pressure support ventilation promote diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Furthermore, similar to controlled

  11. Universal mechanisms of sound production and control in birds and mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, Coen; Rasmussen, Jeppe Have; Herbst, Christian T.

    2015-01-01

    -aerodynamic (MEAD) mechanism, the same mechanism used to produce human speech. Furthermore, we show substantial redundancy in the control of key vocal parameters ex vivo, suggesting that in vivo vocalizations may also not be specified by unique motor commands. We propose that such motor redundancy can aid vocal......As animals vocalize, their vocal organ transforms motor commands into vocalizations for social communication. In birds, the physical mechanisms by which vocalizations are produced and controlled remain unresolved because of the extreme difficulty in obtaining in vivo measurements. Here, we...

  12. Vortex Domain Structure in Ferroelectric Nanoplatelets and Control of its Transformation by Mechanical Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W. J.; Zheng, Yue; Wang, Biao

    2012-01-01

    Vortex domain patterns in low-dimensional ferroelectrics and multiferroics have been extensively studied with the aim of developing nanoscale functional devices. However, control of the vortex domain structure has not been investigated systematically. Taking into account effects of inhomogeneous electromechanical fields, ambient temperature, surface and size, we demonstrate significant influence of mechanical load on the vortex domain structure in ferroelectric nanoplatelets. Our analysis shows that the size and number of dipole vortices can be controlled by mechanical load, and yields rich temperature-stress (T-S) phase diagrams. Simulations also reveal that transformations between “vortex states” induced by the mechanical load are possible, which is totally different from the conventional way controlled on the vortex domain by the electric field. These results are relevant to application of vortex domain structures in ferroelectric nanodevices, and suggest a novel route to applications including memories, mechanical sensors and transducers. PMID:23150769

  13. Design of a Gear-Shifting Control Mechanism for 8-Speed Bicycle Drive Hub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-An Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The multi-speed drive hub stored on the rear wheel of a bicycle is an important speed-changing device to adjust the pedaling force and driving speed. This paper proposes a feasible gear-shifting control mechanism of an 8-speed distributed-flow-type transmission mechanism. A transmission mechanism consisting of two parallel-connected transmission units and one differential unit is introduced first. Then, based on the clutching sequence table, the embodiment design of a gear-shifting control mechanism is presented to selectively control the engagement of pawl-and-ratchet clutches and slot-with-block clutches as well as govern the power-flow path. The power-flow path at each speed-stage of this 8-speed drive hub is analyzed to verify the feasibility of the proposed design.

  14. Plant management in natural areas: balancing chemical, mechanical, and cultural control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven Manning; James. Miller

    2011-01-01

    After determining the best course of action for control of an invasive plant population, it is important to understand the variety of methods available to the integrated pest management professional. A variety of methods are now widely used in managing invasive plants in natural areas, including chemical, mechanical, and cultural control methods. Once the preferred...

  15. Robust Adaptive Backstepping Control Design for a Nonlinear Hydraulic-Mechanical System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choux, Martin; Karimi, Hamid Reza; Hovland, Geir

    2009-01-01

    The complex dynamics that characterize hydraulic systems make it difficult for the control design to achieve prescribed goals in an efficient manner. In this paper, we present the design and analysis of a robust nonlinear controller for a nonlinear hydraulic-mechanical (NHM) system. The system co...

  16. Engine Performance (Section C: Emission Control Systems). Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Module 3. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rains, Larry

    This engine performance (emission control systems) module is one of a series of competency-based modules in the Missouri Auto Mechanics Curriculum Guide. Topics of this module's five units are: positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) and evaporative emission control systems; exhaust gas recirculation (EGR); air injection and catalytic converters;…

  17. Engine Tune-up Service. Unit 6: Emission Control Systems. Student Guide. Automotive Mechanics Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, E. Miles

    This student guide is for Unit 6, Emission Control Systems, in the Engine Tune-Up Service portion of the Automotive Mechanics Curriculum. It deals with inspecting, testing, and servicing an emission control system. A companion review exercise book and posttests are available separately as CE 031 221-222. An introduction tells how this unit fits…

  18. Enhancing Security and Privacy in Video Surveillance through Role-Oriented Access Control Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood Rajpoot, Qasim

    the explicitly stated ones due to the hierarchical relations between the attributes of different entities. We implement a prototype of the proposed mechanism and demonstrate that the access control policies using our approach may be specified via eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML)....

  19. Microcontroller Based Proportional Derivative Plus Conditional Integral Controller for Electro-Mechanical Dual Acting Pulley Continuously Variable Transmission Ratio Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budianto, A.; Tawi, K. B.; Hussein, M.; Supriyo, B.; Ariyono, S.; Che Kob, M. S.; Ezlamy Zulkifli, Mohd; K, Khairuldean A.; Daraoh, Aishah

    2012-09-01

    Electro-Mechanical Dual Acting Pulley (EMDAP) Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) is a transmission utilized by electro-mechanical actuated system. It has a potential to reduce energy consumption because it only needs power during changing CVT ratio and no power is needed to maintain CVT ratio due to self lock mechanism design. This paper proposed simple proportional derivative plus conditional integral (PDCI) controller to control EMDAP CVT ratio which can be simply implemented on a microcontroller. This proposed controller used Astrom-Hagglund method and Ziegler-Nichols formula to tune PDCI gain. The Proportional Derivative controller is directly activated from the start but Integral controller is only activated when the error value reaches error value setting point. Simulation using Matlab/Simulink software was conducted to evaluate PDCI system performance. The simulation results showed PDCI controller has ability to perform maximum overshoot 0.1%, 0.001 steady state error and 0.5s settling time. For clamping condition, settling time is about 11.46s during changing ratio from 2.0 to 0.7, while for release condition, settling time is about 8.33s during changing ratio from 0.7 to 2.0.

  20. [Examination of the self-control mechanism focusing on autonomous motivation and competence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Miki; Ura, Mitsuhiro

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the self-control mechanism focusing on autonomous motivation and competence according to the self-control strength model. A laboratory experiment was conducted individually with 90 university students to investigate the impact of autonomous motivation and competence on self-control, and the effect of an interaction of autonomous motivation and competence on the depletion of self-control strength. The results showed that autonomous motivation and competence each had an impact on two important components of self-control: active goal pursuit and temptation resistance. Autonomous motivation influenced temptation resistance, and competence influenced active goal pursuit. Each factor had an exclusive role. Furthermore, the effect of their interaction influenced depletion of self-control strength by mechanisms indicating the different influences of each factor.

  1. Interior and exterior ballistics coupled optimization with constraints of attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin-xin; Zhang, Nai-min; Zhang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    For solid launch vehicle performance promotion, a modeling method of interior and exterior ballistics associated optimization with constraints of attitude control and mechanical-thermal condition is proposed. Firstly, the interior and external ballistic models of the solid launch vehicle are established, and the attitude control model of the high wind area and the stage of the separation is presented, and the load calculation model of the drag reduction device is presented, and thermal condition calculation model of flight is presented. Secondly, the optimization model is established to optimize the range, which has internal and external ballistic design parameters as variables selected by sensitivity analysis, and has attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions as constraints. Finally, the method is applied to the optimal design of a three stage solid launch vehicle simulation with differential evolution algorithm. Simulation results are shown that range capability is improved by 10.8%, and both attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions are satisfied.

  2. A Closed-Loop Proportional-Integral (PI) Control Software for Fully Mechanically Controlled Automated Electron Microscopic Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-06-23

    A closed-loop proportional-integral (PI) control software is provided for fully mechanically controlled automated electron microscopic tomography. The software is developed based on Gatan DigitalMicrograph, and is compatible with Zeiss LIBRA 120 transmission electron microscope. However, it can be expanded to other TEM instrument with modification. The software consists of a graphical user interface, a digital PI controller, an image analyzing unit, and other drive units (i.e.: image acquire unit and goniometer drive unit). During a tomography data collection process, the image analyzing unit analyzes both the accumulated shift and defocus value of the latest acquired image, and provides the results to the digital PI controller. The digital PI control compares the results with the preset values and determines the optimum adjustments of the goniometer. The goniometer drive unit adjusts the spatial position of the specimen according to the instructions given by the digital PI controller for the next tilt angle and image acquisition. The goniometer drive unit achieves high precision positioning by using a backlash elimination method. The major benefits of the software are: 1) the goniometer drive unit keeps pre-aligned/optimized beam conditions unchanged and achieves position tracking solely through mechanical control; 2) the image analyzing unit relies on only historical data and therefore does not require additional images/exposures; 3) the PI controller enables the system to dynamically track the imaging target with extremely low system error.

  3. Robust Regulation and Tracking Control of a Class of Uncertain 2DOF Underactuated Mechanical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I. Rosas Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A strategy to design and implement a robust controller for a class of underactuated mechanical systems, with two degrees of freedom, which solves the problems of regulation and trajectory tracking, is proposed. This control strategy considers the partial measurement of the state vector and the presence of parametric uncertainties in the plant; these conditions are common in the implementation of a control system. The strategy is based on the use of robust finite time convergence observers to estimate the unmeasured state variables, unknown disturbances, and other signals needed for the control system implementation. The performance of the control strategy is illustrated numerically and experimentally.

  4. The effect of combined mechanism ankle support on postural control of patients with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Ismaeil; Mousavi, Mohammad Ebrahim; Aminian, Gholamreza; Esteki, Ali; Rahgozar, Mehdi

    2017-02-01

    Chronic ankle instability is associated with neuromechanical changes and poor postural stability. Despite variety of mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses, almost none apply comprehensive mechanisms to improve postural control in all subgroups of chronic ankle instability patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an ankle support implementing combined mechanisms to improve postural control in chronic ankle instability patients. Cross-sectional study. An ankle support with combined mechanism was designed based on most effective action mechanisms of foot and ankle orthoses. The effect of this orthosis on postural control was evaluated in 20 participants with chronic ankle instability and 20 matched healthy participants. The single-limb stance balance test was measured in both groups with and without the new orthosis using a force platform. The results showed that application of combined mechanism ankle support significantly improved all postural sway parameters in chronic ankle instability patients. There were no differences in means of investigated parameters with and without the orthosis in the healthy group. No statistically significant differences were found in postural sway between chronic ankle instability patients and healthy participants after applying the combined mechanism ankle support. The combined mechanism ankle support is effective in improving static postural control of chronic ankle instability patients to close to the postural sway of healthy individual. the orthosis had no adverse effects on balance performance of healthy individuals. Clinical relevance Application of the combined mechanism ankle support for patients with chronic ankle instability is effective in improving static balance. This may be helpful in reduction of recurrence of ankle sprain although further research about dynamic conditions is needed.

  5. Incentive-Rewarding Mechanism for User-position Control in Mobile Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Makoto; Sato, Kenichiro; Shinkuma, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Tatsuro

    When the number of users in a service area increases in mobile multimedia services, no individual user can obtain satisfactory radio resources such as bandwidth and signal power because the resources are limited and shared. A solution for such a problem is user-position control. In the user-position control, the operator informs users of better communication areas (or spots) and navigates them to these positions. However, because of subjective costs caused by subjects moving from their original to a new position, they do not always attempt to move. To motivate users to contribute their resources in network services that require resource contributions for users, incentive-rewarding mechanisms have been proposed. However, there are no mechanisms that distribute rewards appropriately according to various subjective factors involving users. Furthermore, since the conventional mechanisms limit how rewards are paid, they are applicable only for the network service they targeted. In this paper, we propose a novel incentive-rewarding mechanism to solve these problems, using an external evaluator and interactive learning agents. We also investigated ways of appropriately controlling rewards based on user contributions and system service quality. We applied the proposed mechanism and reward control to the user-position control, and demonstrated its validity.

  6. Mechanical and energetic consequences of HCM-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrantini, Cecilia; Belus, Alexandra; Piroddi, Nicoletta; Scellini, Beatrice; Tesi, Chiara; Poggesi, Corrado

    2009-12-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was the first inherited heart disease to be characterized at the molecular genetic level with the demonstration that it is caused by mutations in genes that encode different components of the cardiac sarcomere. Early functional in vitro studies have concluded that HCM mutations cause a loss of sarcomere mechanical function. Hypertrophy would then follow as a compensatory mechanism to raise the work and power output of the affected heart. More recent in vitro and mouse model studies have suggested that HCM mutations enhance contractile function and myofilament Ca(2+) sensitivity and impair cardiac myocyte energetics. It has been hypothesized that these changes may result in cardiac myocyte energy depletion due to inefficient ATP utilization and also in altered myoplasmic Ca(2+) handling. The problems encountered in reaching a definitive answer on the effects of HCM mutations are discussed. Though direct analysis of the altered functional characteristics of HCM human cardiac sarcomeres has so far lagged behind the in vitro and mouse studies, recent work with mechanically isolated skinned myocytes and myofibrils from affected human hearts seem to support the energy depletion hypothesis. If further validated in the human heart, this hypothesis would identify tractable therapeutic targets that suggest that HCM, perhaps more than any other cardiomyopathy, will be amenable to disease-modifying therapy.

  7. Examination of mechanisms (E-MECHANIC) of exercise-induced weight compensation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candice A; Johnson, William D; Earnest, Conrad P; Rood, Jennifer C; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Johannsen, Neil M; Cocreham, Shannon; Harris, Melissa; Church, Timothy S; Martin, Corby K

    2014-06-07

    Weight loss induced only by exercise is frequently less than expected, possibly because of compensatory changes in energy intake and/or energy expenditure. The purpose of the Examination of Mechanisms (E-MECHANIC) of Exercise-Induced Weight Compensation trial is to examine whether increased energy intake and/or reduced spontaneous activity or energy expenditure (outside of structured exercise) account for the less than expected, exercise-associated weight loss. E-MECHANIC is a three-arm, 6-month randomized (1:1:1) controlled trial. The two intervention arms are exercise doses that reflect current recommendations for (1) general health (8 kcal/kg body weight per week (8 KKW), about 900 kcal/wk) and (2) weight loss (20 KKW, about 2,250 kcal/wk). The third arm, a nonexercise control group, will receive health information only. The sample will include a combined total of 198sedentary, overweight or obese (body mass index: ≥25 kg/m² to ≤45 kg/m²) men and women ages 18 to 65 years. The exercise dose will be supervised and tightly controlled in an exercise training laboratory. The primary outcome variables are energy intake, which will be measured using doubly labeled water (adjusted for change in energy stores) and laboratory-based food intake tests, and the discrepancy between expected weight loss and observed weight loss. Secondary outcomes include changes in resting metabolic rate (adjusted for change in body mass), activity levels (excluding structured exercise) and body composition. In an effort to guide the development of future interventions, the participants will be behaviorally phenotyped and defined as those who do compensate (that is, fail to lose the amount of weight expected) or do not compensate (that is, lose the amount of weight expected or more). In this study, we will attempt to identify underlying mechanisms to explain why exercise elicits less weight loss than expected. This information will guide the development of interventions to increase

  8. Ropivacaine alters the mechanical properties of hamstring tendons: In vitro controlled mechanical testing of tendons from living donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, M; Sbihi, J; Sbihi, A; Pithioux, M; Parratte, S; Argenson, J-N

    2017-11-01

    Intraarticular or periarticular injection of ropivacaine (RI) is an element of current knee surgery practices. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of RI on the mechanical properties of hamstring tendons. We hypothesized that RI would have a detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of periarticular soft tissues METHODS: A tensile test to failure was performed on 120 hamstring tendon segments harvested during ACL reconstruction surgery in 120 patients. Two sets of tensile tests were done. The first evaluated the effect of RI itself on the mechanical properties of tendons: 30 samples were soaked for 1hour in a 2% RI solution and compared to 30 samples soaked in a saline solution (control group). The second evaluated the effect of RI concentration on the mechanical properties of hamstring tendons: 30 samples were soaked for 1hour in a 2% RI solution and 30 samples were soaked in a 7.5% RI solution. In the first test, 29 samples from each group were analyzed as two samples (one in each group) failed at the grip interface. The specimens exposed to 2% RI had lower ultimate tensile strength (Δ=4.4MPa, P=0.001), strain energy (Δ=13MPa, P=0.001) and Young's modulus (Δ=1.6MPa, P=0.02) than the specimens in the control group. There was no significant difference in the strain at failure between groups (Δ=5%, P=0.3). In the second test, one specimen from the 7.5% RI group failed during the preloading and was excluded. There was no significant difference in terms of the load at failure and ultimate tensile stress (Δ=0.45MPa, P=0.6) and strain energy (Δ=0.49MPa, P=0.49) between the two groups. There were significant differences in terms of elongation at failure (Δ=28%, P=0.0003) and Young's modulus (Δ=2.6MPa, P=0.005), with the specimens exposed to 7.5% RI undergoing greater deformation and having a lower Young's modulus. While local RI injections are widely performed in clinical practice, the results of this in vitro study point to short

  9. Inner-Learning Mechanism Based Control Scheme for Manipulator with Multitasking and Changing Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangzheng Xue

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of robot technology and its application, manipulators may face complex tasks and dynamic environments in the coming future, which leads to two challenges of control: multitasking and changing load. In this paper, a novel multicontroller strategy is presented to meet such challenges. The presented controller is composed of three parts: subcontrollers, inner-learning mechanism, and switching rules. Each subcontroller is designed with self-learning skills to fit the changing load under a special task. When a new task comes, switching rule reselects the most suitable subcontroller as the working controller to handle current task instead of the older one. Inner-learning mechanism makes the subcontrollers learn from the working controller when load changes so that the switching action causes smaller tracking error than the traditional switch controller. The results of the simulation experiments on two-degree manipulator show the proposed method effect.

  10. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Electromechanical Coupling for Mechanical Elastic Energy Storage System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural scheme of mechanical elastic energy storage (MEES system served by permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM and bidirectional converters is designed. The aim of the research is to model and control the complex electromechanical system. The mechanical device of the complex system is considered as a node in generalized coordinate system, the terse nonlinear dynamic model of electromechanical coupling for the electromechanical system is constructed through Lagrange-Maxwell energy method, and the detailed deduction of the mathematical model is presented in the paper. The theory of direct feedback linearization (DFL is applied to decouple the nonlinear dynamic model and convert the developed model from nonlinear to linear. The optimal control theory is utilized to accomplish speed tracking control for the linearized system. The simulation results in three different cases show that the proposed nonlinear dynamic model of MEES system is correct; the designed algorithm has a better control performance in contrast with the conventional PI control.

  11. A novel auto-tuning PID control mechanism for nonlinear systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Meric; Iplikci, Serdar

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a novel Runge-Kutta (RK) discretization-based model-predictive auto-tuning proportional-integral-derivative controller (RK-PID) is introduced for the control of continuous-time nonlinear systems. The parameters of the PID controller are tuned using RK model of the system through prediction error-square minimization where the predicted information of tracking error provides an enhanced tuning of the parameters. Based on the model-predictive control (MPC) approach, the proposed mechanism provides necessary PID parameter adaptations while generating additive correction terms to assist the initially inadequate PID controller. Efficiency of the proposed mechanism has been tested on two experimental real-time systems: an unstable single-input single-output (SISO) nonlinear magnetic-levitation system and a nonlinear multi-input multi-output (MIMO) liquid-level system. RK-PID has been compared to standard PID, standard nonlinear MPC (NMPC), RK-MPC and conventional sliding-mode control (SMC) methods in terms of control performance, robustness, computational complexity and design issue. The proposed mechanism exhibits acceptable tuning and control performance with very small steady-state tracking errors, and provides very short settling time for parameter convergence. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Computation and Communication Evaluation of an Authentication Mechanism for Time-Triggered Networked Control Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncalo Martins

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In modern networked control applications, confidentiality and integrity are important features to address in order to prevent against attacks. Moreover, network control systems are a fundamental part of the communication components of current cyber-physical systems (e.g., automotive communications. Many networked control systems employ Time-Triggered (TT architectures that provide mechanisms enabling the exchange of precise and synchronous messages. TT systems have computation and communication constraints, and with the aim to enable secure communications in the network, it is important to evaluate the computational and communication overhead of implementing secure communication mechanisms. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the effects of adding a Hash-based Message Authentication (HMAC to TT networked control systems. The contributions of the paper include (1 the analysis and experimental validation of the communication overhead, as well as a scalability analysis that utilizes the experimental result for both wired and wireless platforms and (2 an experimental evaluation of the computational overhead of HMAC based on a kernel-level Linux implementation. An automotive application is used as an example, and the results show that it is feasible to implement a secure communication mechanism without interfering with the existing automotive controller execution times. The methods and results of the paper can be used for evaluating the performance impact of security mechanisms and, thus, for the design of secure wired and wireless TT networked control systems.

  13. Computation and Communication Evaluation of an Authentication Mechanism for Time-Triggered Networked Control Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Goncalo; Moondra, Arul; Dubey, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Koutsoukos, Xenofon D

    2016-07-25

    In modern networked control applications, confidentiality and integrity are important features to address in order to prevent against attacks. Moreover, network control systems are a fundamental part of the communication components of current cyber-physical systems (e.g., automotive communications). Many networked control systems employ Time-Triggered (TT) architectures that provide mechanisms enabling the exchange of precise and synchronous messages. TT systems have computation and communication constraints, and with the aim to enable secure communications in the network, it is important to evaluate the computational and communication overhead of implementing secure communication mechanisms. This paper presents a comprehensive analysis and evaluation of the effects of adding a Hash-based Message Authentication (HMAC) to TT networked control systems. The contributions of the paper include (1) the analysis and experimental validation of the communication overhead, as well as a scalability analysis that utilizes the experimental result for both wired and wireless platforms and (2) an experimental evaluation of the computational overhead of HMAC based on a kernel-level Linux implementation. An automotive application is used as an example, and the results show that it is feasible to implement a secure communication mechanism without interfering with the existing automotive controller execution times. The methods and results of the paper can be used for evaluating the performance impact of security mechanisms and, thus, for the design of secure wired and wireless TT networked control systems.

  14. A dual flow bioreactor with controlled mechanical stimulation for cartilage tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Spitters, Tim; Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Deus, F.D.; Costa, I.B.F.; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2013-01-01

    In cartilage tissue engineering bioreactors can create a controlled environment to study chondrocyte behavior under mechanical stimulation or produce chondrogenic grafts of clinically relevant size. Here we present a novel bioreactor, which combines mechanical stimulation with a two compartment system through which nutrients can be supplied solely by diffusion from opposite sides of a tissue engineered construct. This design is based on the hypothesis that creating gradients of nutrients, gro...

  15. A DCCP Congestion Control Mechanism for Wired- cum-Wireless Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Naqvi, Ijaz Haider; Pérennou, Tanguy

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Existing transport protocols, be it TCP, SCTP or DCCP, do not provide an efficient congestion control mechanism for heterogeneous wired-cum-wireless networks. Solutions involving implicit loss discrimination schemes have been proposed but were never implemented. Appropriate mechanisms can dramatically improve bandwidth usage over the Internet, especially for multimedia transport based on partial reliability. In this paper we have implemented and evaluated a congestion ...

  16. Control and regulatory mechanisms associated with thermogenesis in flying insects and birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loli, Denise; Bicudo, José Eduardo P W

    2005-01-01

    Most insects and birds are able to fly. The chitin made exoskeleton of insects poses them several constraints, and this is one the reasons they are in general small sized animals. On the other hand, because birds possess an endoskeleton made of bones they may grow much larger when compared to insects. The two taxa are quite different with regards to their general "design" platform, in particular with respect to their respiratory and circulatory systems. However, because they fly, they may share in common several traits, namely those associated with the control and regulatory mechanisms governing thermogenesis. High core temperatures are essential for animal flight irrespective of the taxa they belong to. Birds and insects have thus evolved mechanisms which allowed them to control and regulate high rates of heat fluxes. This article discusses possible convergent thermogenic control and regulatory mechanisms associated with flight in insects and birds.

  17. Cognitive Self-Scheduled Mechanism for Access Control in Noisy Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Manzano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the challenging environment of intelligent transportation systems (ITS, networked control systems such as platooning guidance of autonomous vehicles require innovative mechanisms to provide real-time communications. Although several proposals are currently under discussion, the design of a rapid, efficient, flexible, and reliable medium access control mechanism which meets the specific constraints of such real-time communications applications remains unsolved in this highly dynamic environment. However, cognitive radio (CR combines the capacity to sense the radio spectrum with the flexibility to adapt to transmission parameters in order to maximize system performance and has thus become an effective approach for the design of dynamic spectrum access (DSA mechanisms. This paper presents the enhanced noncooperative cognitive division multiple access (ENCCMA proposal combining time division multiple access (TDMA and frequency division multiple access (FDMA schemes with CR techniques to obtain a mechanism fulfilling the requirements of real-time communications. The analysis presented here considers the IEEE WAVE and 802.11p as reference standards; however, the proposed medium access control (MAC mechanism can be adapted to operate on the physical layer of different standards. The mechanism also offers the advantage of avoiding signaling, thus enhancing system autonomy as well as behavior in adverse scenarios.

  18. Limb and Trunk Mechanisms for Balance Control during Locomotion in Quadrupeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musienko, Pavel E.; Deliagina, Tatiana G.; Gerasimenko, Yury P.; Orlovsky, Grigori N.

    2014-01-01

    In quadrupeds, the most critical aspect of postural control during locomotion is lateral stability. However, neural mechanisms underlying lateral stability are poorly understood. Here, we studied lateral stability in decerebrate cats walking on a treadmill with their hindlimbs. Two destabilizing factors were used: a brief lateral push of the cat and a sustained lateral tilt of the treadmill. It was found that the push caused considerable trunk bending and twisting, as well as changes in the stepping pattern, but did not lead to falling. Due to postural reactions, locomotion with normal body configuration was restored in a few steps. It was also found that the decerebrate cat could keep balance during locomotion on the laterally tilted treadmill. This postural adaptation was based on the transformation of the symmetrical locomotor pattern into an asymmetrical one, with different functional lengths of the right and left limbs. Then, we analyzed limb and trunk neural mechanisms contributing to postural control during locomotion. It was found that one of the limb mechanisms operates in the transfer phase and secures a standard (relative to the trunk) position for limb landing. Two other limb mechanisms operate in the stance phase; they counteract distortions of the locomotor pattern by regulating the limb stiffness. The trunk configuration mechanism controls the body shape on the basis of sensory information coming from trunk afferents. We suggest that postural reactions generated by these four mechanisms are integrated, thus forming a response of the whole system to perturbation of balance during locomotion. PMID:24741060

  19. Control of Candida albicans morphology and pathogenicity by post-transcriptional mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major human fungal pathogen responsible for both systemic and mucosal infections in a wide variety of immunocompromised individuals. Because the ability of C. albicans to undergo a reversible morphological transition from yeast to filaments is important for virulence, significant research efforts have focused on mechanisms that control this transition. While transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms have been well-studied, considerably less is known about the role of post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, in recent years several discoveries have begun to shed light on this important, but understudied, area. Here, I will review a variety of post-transcriptional mechanisms that have recently been shown to control C. albicans morphology, virulence and/or virulence-related processes, including those involving alternative transcript localization, mRNA stability and translation. I will also discuss the role that these mechanisms play in other pathogens as well as the potential they may hold to serve as targets for new antifungal strategies. Ultimately, gaining a better understanding of C. albicans post-transcriptional mechanisms will significantly improve our knowledge of how morphogenesis and virulence are controlled in fungal pathogens and open new avenues for the development of novel and more effective antifungals. PMID:27312239

  20. Modeling and Control of the Redundant Parallel Adjustment Mechanism on a Deployable Antenna Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Tian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of developing multiple input and multiple output (MIMO coupling systems with a redundant parallel adjustment mechanism on the deployable antenna panel, a structural control integrated design methodology is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the modal information from the finite element model of the structure of the antenna panel is extracted, and then the mathematical model is established with the Hamilton principle; Secondly, the discrete Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR controller is added to the model in order to control the actuators and adjust the shape of the panel. Finally, the engineering practicality of the modeling and control method based on finite element analysis simulation is verified.

  1. Memristive port-Hamiltonian control : Path-dependent damping injection in control of mechanical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doria-Cerezo, A.; van der Heijden, L.; Scherpen, J. M. A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the use of the memristor as a new element for designing passivity-based controllers. From the port-Hamiltonian description of the electrical circuits with memristors, a target dynamics is assigned to the matching equation proposed by the methodology known as Interconnection and

  2. Similar Motor Cortical Control Mechanisms for Precise Limb Control during Reaching and Locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, Sergiy; Drew, Trevor

    2015-10-28

    Throughout the course of evolution there has been a parallel development of the complexity and flexibility of the nervous system and the skeletomuscular system that it controls. This development is particularly evident for the cerebral cortical areas and the transformation of the use of the upper limbs from a purely locomotor function to one including, or restricted to, reaching and grasping. This study addresses the issue of whether the control of reaching has involved the development of new cortical circuits or whether the same neurons are used to control both locomotion and reaching. We recorded the activity of pyramidal tract neurons in the motor cortex of the cat both during voluntary gait modifications and during reaching. All cells showed generally similar patterns of activity in both tasks. More specifically, we showed that, in many cases, cells maintained a constant temporal relationship to the activity of synergistic muscle groups in each task. In addition, in some cells the relationship between the intensity of the cell discharge activity and the magnitude of the EMG activity was equally constant during gait modifications and reaching. As such, the results are compatible with the hypothesis that the corticospinal circuits used to control reaching evolved from those used to precisely modify gait. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3514476-15$15.00/0.

  3. Coherent Control of a Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Spin Ensemble with a Diamond Mechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, F.; Macquarrie, E. R.; Gosavi, T. A.; Moehle, A. M.; Jungwirth, N. R.; Bhave, S. A.; Fuchs, G. D.

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the traditional coherent control of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond's triplet spin state with ac magnetic fields, we recently demonstrated that gigahertz-frequency lattice strain resonant with the ms= +1 to -1 spin state splitting can also be used to drive spin transitions. We present coherent spin control over NV center ensembles with a bulk-mode mechanical microresonator that generates large amplitude ac stress within the diamond substrate. Using these structures, we mechanically drive coherent Rabi oscillations between the -1 and +1 states. We also accurately model the Rabi dephasing with a combination of a spatially inhomogeneous mechanical driving field and magnetic noise from a fluctuating spin bath. Understanding mechanically driven dynamics in spin ensembles could have applications in sensing and quantum optomechanics where interactions can be enhanced by the number of spins. Moreover, these results demonstrate coherent mechanical control of the magnetically forbidden -1 to +1 spin transition, thus closing the loop on NV center ground state spin control and enabling the creation of a coherent Δ-system within the NV center ground state. We gratefully acknowledge support from the ONR.

  4. Research on Shifting Control Method of Positive Independent Mechanical Split Path Transmission for the Starting Gear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JunQiang Xi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To realize a smooth and quick shift of the positive independent mechanical split path transmission (PIMSPT equipped with automatic shifting control system (ASCS, the research on the feasibility of improving shift quality by dynamic and cooperative controlling engine, steering clutches, and brakes has been conducted. The shifting control method suited to starting gear of PIMSPT has been proposed. The control method is based on control parameters, such as the driving shaft speed and its derivative. The control laws of steering clutches and brakes are presented during each gear and stage of shifting. Bench and road test results show that the proposed shifting control method can not only shorten the shift time, but also decrease the jerk of shifting effectively.

  5. Chaos, control and synchronization of a fractional order rotational mechanical system with a centrifugal governor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge Zhengming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: zmg@cc.nctu.edu.tw; Jhuang Weiren [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2007-07-15

    Chaos, its control and synchronization for a fractional order rotational mechanical system with a centrifugal governor are studied for both the autonomous and the nonautonomous cases. It is found that chaos exists in the fractional order systems with order less than and more than the number of states of the system. Controlling the chaotic motion of a fractional order system to its equilibrium point is obtained for both the autonomous and the nonautonomous cases. The rotational mechanical systems with the same fractional order and with the different fractional orders are synchronized by linear coupling for both the autonomous and the nonautonomous cases.

  6. [The effects of endotracheal suction on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients under pressure-controlled or volume-controlled ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-wei; Liu, Zhi

    2007-10-01

    To compare the effects of endotracheal suction on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics in mechanically ventilated patients receiving pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) or volume-controlled ventilation (VCV). A randomized cross-over study was conducted. Twenty-three mechanically ventilated patients were randomly assigned to ventilation with either PCV or VCV at first, and then the other. Endotracheal suction was performed with an open suction system. Changes in gas exchange and respiratory mechanics after suctions under the two modes were compared. With PCV, the tidal volume (VT) and the compliance were (6.60+/-1.95) ml/kg and (18+/-7) ml/cm H2O (1 cm H2O=0.098 kPa) respectively at 30 minutes after suction, as compared to (9.05+/-0.22) ml/kg and (24+/-6) ml/cm H2O respectively at baseline; the difference being significant (F=8.47, 8.01, all P0.05). With PCV, the heart rate (HR) and the mean systemic arterial pressure (MAP) were (109+/-20) beats/min and (89+/-10) mm Hg respectively at 5 minutes after suction, as compared to (97+/-17) beats/min and (83+/-12) mm Hg respectively at baseline; the difference being significant (F=5.86, 9.49, all P<0.05). With VCV, HR and MAP were (110+/-17) beats/min and (87+/-11) mm Hg respectively at 5 minutes after suction, as compared to (96+/-17) beats/min and (79+/-11) mm Hg respectively at baseline; the difference being significant (F=7.33, 7.96, all P<0.05). Endotracheal suction causes lung collapse leading to impairment of gas exchange and decreased compliance both under PCV and VCV, but the effect on gas exchange was more severe and persistent under PCV than under VCV.

  7. Benefits of Precision Farming Technologies for Mechanical Weed Control in Soybean and Sugar Beet—Comparison of Precision Hoeing with Conventional Mechanical Weed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kunz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Weed infestations and associated yield losses require effective weed control measures in soybean and sugar beet. Besides chemical weed control, mechanical weeding plays an important role in integrated weed management systems. Field experiments were conducted at three locations for soybean in 2013 and 2014 and at four locations for sugar beet in 2014 to investigate if automatic steering technologies for inter-row weed hoeing using a camera or RTK-GNSS increase weed control efficacy, efficiency and crop yield. Treatments using precision farming technologies were compared with conventional weed control strategies. Weed densities in the experiments ranged from 15 to 154 plants m−2 with Chenopodium album, Polygonum convolvulus, Polygonum aviculare, Matricaria chamomilla and Lamium purpureum being the most abundant species. Weed hoeing using automatic steering technologies reduced weed densities in soybean by 89% and in sugar beet by 87% compared to 85% weed control efficacy in soybean and sugar beet with conventional weeding systems. Speed of weed hoeing could be increased from 4 km h−1 with conventional hoes to 7 and 10 km·h−1, when automatic steering systems were used. Precision hoeing technologies increased soybean yield by 23% and sugar beet yield by 37%. After conventional hoeing and harrowing, soybean yields were increased by 28% and sugar beet yield by 26%.

  8. Skeletal muscle contraction in protecting joints and bones by absorbing mechanical impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Tsyuryupa, S.; Sarvazyan, A.

    2016-09-01

    We have previously hypothesized that the dissipation of mechanical energy of external impact is a fundamental function of skeletal muscle in addition to its primary function to convert chemical energy into mechanical energy. In this paper, a mathematical justification of this hypothesis is presented. First, a simple mechanical model, in which the muscle is considered as a simple Hookean spring, is considered. This analysis serves as an introduction to the consideration of a biomechanical model taking into account the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction, kinetics of myosin bridges, sarcomere dynamics, and tension of muscle fibers. It is shown that a muscle behaves like a nonlinear and adaptive spring tempering the force of impact and increasing the duration of the collision. The temporal profiles of muscle reaction to the impact as functions of the levels of muscle contraction, durations of the impact front, and the time constants of myosin bridges closing, are obtained. The absorption of mechanical shock energy is achieved due to the increased viscoelasticity of the contracting skeletal muscle. Controlling the contraction level allows for the optimization of the stiffness and viscosity of the muscle necessary for the protection of the joints and bones.

  9. Expression and identification of 10 sarcomeric MyHC isoforms in human skeletal muscles of different embryological origin. Diversity and similarity in mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarello, Francesco; Toniolo, Luana; Cancellara, Pasqua; Reggiani, Carlo; Maccatrozzo, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    In the mammalian genome, among myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms a family can be identified as sarcomeric based on their molecular structure which allows thick filament formation. In this study we aimed to assess the expression of the 10 sarcomeric isoforms in human skeletal muscles, adopting this species as a reference for comparison with all other mammalian species. To this aim, we set up the condition for quantitative Real Time PCR assay to detect and quantify MyHC mRNA expression in a wide variety of human muscles from somitic, presomitic and preotic origin. Specific patterns of expression of the following genes MYH1, MYH2, MYH3, MYH4, MYH6, MYH7, MYH8, MYH13, MYH14/7b and MYH15 were demonstrated in various muscle samples. On the same muscle samples which were analysed for mRNA expression, the corresponding MyHC proteins were studied with SDS PAGE and Western blot. The mRNA-protein comparison allowed the identification of 10 distinct proteins based on the electrophoretic migration rate. Three groups were formed based on the migration rate: fast migrating comprising beta/slow/1, alpha cardiac and fast 2B, slow migrating comprising fast 2X, fast 2A and two developmental isoforms (NEO and EMB), intermediate migrating comprising EO MyHC, slow B (product of MYH15), slow tonic (product of MYH14/7b). Of special interest was the demonstration of a protein band corresponding to 2B-MyHC in laryngeal muscles and the finding that all 10 isoforms are expressed in extraocular muscles. These latter muscles are the unique localization for extraocular, slow B (product of MYH15) and slow tonic (product of MYH14/7b). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. A statistical model of uplink inter-cell interference with slow and fast power control mechanisms

    KAUST Repository

    Tabassum, Hina

    2013-09-01

    Uplink power control is in essence an interference mitigation technique that aims at minimizing the inter-cell interference (ICI) in cellular networks by reducing the transmit power levels of the mobile users while maintaining their target received signal quality levels at base stations. Power control mechanisms directly impact the interference dynamics and, thus, affect the overall achievable capacity and consumed power in cellular networks. Due to the stochastic nature of wireless channels and mobile users\\' locations, it is important to derive theoretical models for ICI that can capture the impact of design alternatives related to power control mechanisms. To this end, we derive and verify a novel statistical model for uplink ICI in Generalized-K composite fading environments as a function of various slow and fast power control mechanisms. The derived expressions are then utilized to quantify numerically key network performance metrics that include average resource fairness, average reduction in power consumption, and ergodic capacity. The accuracy of the derived expressions is validated via Monte-Carlo simulations. Results are generated for multiple network scenarios, and insights are extracted to assess various power control mechanisms as a function of system parameters. © 1972-2012 IEEE.

  11. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p mechanical ventilation support. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gait and balance of transfemoral amputees using passive mechanical and microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, K R; Levine, J A; Brey, R H; Iverson, B K; McCrady, S K; Padgett, D J; Joyner, M J

    2007-10-01

    Microprocessor-controlled knee joints appeared on the market a decade ago. These joints are more sophisticated and more expensive than mechanical ones. The literature is contradictory regarding changes in gait and balance when using these sophisticated devices. This study employed a crossover design to assess the comparative performance of a passive mechanical knee prosthesis compared to a microprocessor-controlled knee joint in 15 subjects with an above-knee amputation. Objective measurements of gait and balance were obtained. Subjects demonstrated significantly improved gait characteristics after receiving the microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (pknee to a flexed knee during loading response which resulted in a change from an internal knee flexor moment to a knee extensor moment. The participants' balance also improved (pmicroprocessor-controlled knee have significant improvements in gait and balance.

  13. Comparison and Research of the Mechanical Items of Standards for Controlled Door Closing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, X.; Wang, M.; Li, Z. K.; Ou, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper analyzes the standards of controlled door closing devices at home and abroad, compares the standards from test devices and items, and illustrates the backcheck function, delayed action and dead stop degree test in detail. In addition, experiments have been done to verify the influence of different door weights on closing time, opening and closing moment and efficiency. The results show that the door weight has significant influence on mechanical performance of controlled door closing devices.

  14. Gain Control in Predictive Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements: Evidence for an Acceleration-Based Predictive Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Brostek, Lukas; Eggert, Thomas; Glasauer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The smooth pursuit eye movement system incorporates various control features enabling adaptation to specific tracking situations. In this work, we analyzed the interplay between two of these mechanisms: gain control and predictive pursuit. We tested human responses to high-frequency perturbations during step-ramp pursuit, as well as the pursuit of a periodically moving target. For the latter task, we found a nonlinear interaction between perturbation response and carrier acceleration...

  15. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum group hormone in humans during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J. C.; Young, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Plasma growth hormone concentrations during sleep were determined experimentally. An elevated level of plasma growth hormone was observed during the initial phase of sleep and remained elevated for approximately 3 hr before returning to the steady-state level. Moreover, subsequent to a prolonged interruption of sleep, of the order of 2-3 hr, an elevated level of plasma growth hormone was again observed during the initial phase of resumed sleep. A control system formulation of the mechanism that controls the secretions of serum growth hormone in humans was used to account for the growth hormone responses observed.

  16. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  17. Coupling Mechanism and Decoupled Suspension Control Model of a Half Car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A structure decoupling control strategy of half-car suspension is proposed to fully decouple the system into independent front and rear quarter-car suspensions in this paper. The coupling mechanism of half-car suspension is firstly revealed and formulated with coupled damping force (CDF in a linear function. Moreover, a novel dual dampers-based controllable quarter-car suspension structure is proposed to realize the independent control of pitch and vertical motions of the half car, in which a newly added controllable damper is suggested to be installed between the lower control arm and connection rod in conventional quarter-car suspension structure. The suggested damper constantly regulates the half-car pitch motion posture in a smooth and steady operation condition meantime achieving the expected completely structure decoupled control of the half-car suspension, by compensating the evolved CDF.

  18. Nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms in membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a nonlinear Lyapunov-based boundary control for the temperature difference of a membrane distillation boundary layers. The heat transfer mechanisms inside the process are modeled with a 2D advection-diffusion equation. The model is semi-descretized in space, and a nonlinear state-space representation is provided. The control is designed to force the temperature difference along the membrane sides to track a desired reference asymptotically, and hence a desired flux would be generated. Certain constraints are put on the control law inputs to be within an economic range of energy supplies. The effect of the controller gain is discussed. Simulations with real process parameters for the model, and the controller are provided. © 2015 American Automatic Control Council.

  19. Examining the mechanisms of overgeneral autobiographical memory: capture and rumination, and impaired executive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jennifer A; Griffith, James W; Mineka, Susan

    2011-02-01

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) is an important cognitive phenomenon in depression, but questions remain regarding the underlying mechanisms. The CaR-FA-X model (Williams et al., 2007) proposes three mechanisms that may contribute to OGM, but little work has examined the possible additive and/or interactive effects among them. We examined two mechanisms of CaR-FA-X: capture and rumination, and impaired executive control. We analysed data from undergraduates (N=109) scoring high or low on rumination who were presented with cues of high and low self-relevance on the Autobiographical Memory Test (AMT). Executive control was operationalised as performance on both the Stroop Colour-Word Task and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT). Hierarchical generalised linear modelling was used to predict whether participants would generate a specific memory on a trial of the AMT. Higher COWAT scores, lower rumination, and greater cue self-relevance predicted a higher probability of a specific memory. There was also a rumination×cue self-relevance interaction: Higher (vs lower) rumination was associated with a lower probability of a specific memory primarily for low self-relevant cues. We found no evidence of interactions between these mechanisms. Findings are interpreted with respect to current autobiographical memory models. Future directions for OGM mechanism research are discussed. © 2011 Psychology Press, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa business

  20. Disentangling puberty: novel neuroendocrine pathways and mechanisms for the control of mammalian puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, M S; Vazquez, M J; Tena-Sempere, M

    2017-11-01

    Puberty is a complex developmental event, controlled by sophisticated regulatory networks that integrate peripheral and internal cues and impinge at the brain centers driving the reproductive axis. The tempo of puberty is genetically determined but is also sensitive to numerous modifiers, from metabolic and sex steroid signals to environmental factors. Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that the onset of puberty is advancing in humans, through as yet unknown mechanisms. In fact, while much knowledge has been gleaned recently on the mechanisms responsible for the control of mammalian puberty, fundamental questions regarding the intimate molecular and neuroendocrine pathways responsible for the precise timing of puberty and its deviations remain unsolved. By combining data from suitable model species and humans, we aim to provide a comprehensive summary of our current understanding of the neuroendocrine mechanisms governing puberty, with particular focus on its central regulatory pathways, underlying molecular basis and mechanisms for metabolic control. A comprehensive MEDLINE search of articles published mostly from 2003 to 2017 has been carried out. Data from cellular and animal models (including our own results) as well as clinical studies focusing on the pathophysiology of puberty in mammals were considered and cross-referenced with terms related with central neuroendocrine mechanisms, metabolic control and epigenetic/miRNA regulation. Studies conducted during the last decade have revealed the essential role of novel central neuroendocrine pathways in the control of puberty, with a prominent role of kisspeptins in the precise regulation of the pubertal activation of GnRH neurosecretory activity. In addition, different transmitters, including neurokinin-B (NKB) and, possibly, melanocortins, have been shown to interplay with kisspeptins in tuning puberty onset. Alike, recent studies have documented the role of epigenetic mechanisms, involving mainly

  1. Insulator-protected mechanically controlled break junctions for measuring single-molecule conductance in aqueous environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muthusubramanian, N.; Galan, E.; Maity, C.; Eelkema, R.; Grozema, F.C.; van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a method to fabricate insulated gold mechanically controlled break junctions (MCBJ) by coating the metal with a thin layer of aluminum oxide using plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition. The Al2O3 thickness deposited on the MCBJ devices was varied from 2 to 15 nm

  2. An adaptive resource control mechanism in multi-hop ad-hoc networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Heijenk, Geert; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Masip Bruin, Xavier; Verchere, Dominique; Tsaoussidis, Vassilis; Yannuzzi, Marcelo

    This paper presents an adaptive resource control mechanism for multi-hop ad-hoc network systems, which avoids bottleneck problems caused by the node-fairness property of IEEE 802.11. In our proposal, the feedback information from the downstream bottleneck, derived from Request-To-Send (RTS) and

  3. High efficiency and simple technique for controlling mechanisms by EMG signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarte, N.; Álvarez, A.; Balacco, J.; Mercado, G.; Gonzalez, A.; Dugarte, E.; Javier, F.; Ceballos, G.; Olivares, A.

    2016-04-01

    This article reports the development of a simple and efficient system that allows control of mechanisms through electromyography (EMG) signals. The novelty about this instrument is focused on individual control of each motion vector mechanism through independent electronic circuits. Each of electronic circuit does positions a motor according to intensity of EMG signal captured. This action defines movement in one mechanical axis considered from an initial point, based on increased muscle tension. The final displacement of mechanism depends on individual’s ability to handle the levels of muscle tension at different body parts. This is the design of a robotic arm where each degree of freedom is handled with a specific microcontroller that responds to signals taken from a defined muscle. The biophysical interaction between the person and the final positioning of the robotic arm is used as feedback. Preliminary tests showed that the control operates with minimal positioning error margins. The constant use of system with the same operator showed that the person adapts and progressively improves at control technique.

  4. Cascade Controller Including Back-stepping for Hydraulic-Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choux, Martin; Hovland, Geir; Blanke, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    Development of a cascade controller structure including adaptive backstepping for a nonlinear hydraulic-mechanical system is considered in this paper where a dynamic friction (LuGre) model is included to obtain the necessary accuracy. The paper compares the performance of two variants of an adapt...

  5. Genetics of mechanisms controlling responses to two major pathogens in broiler and layer chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamzic, Edin

    The objective of this thesis was to improve the understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling the response to two major pathogens, Eimeria maxima (coccidiosis) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), in broiler and layer chickens, respectively. Breeding for the improved response to the two...

  6. Non-mechanical beam control for entry, descent and landing laser radar (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, Jay E.; Kluttz, Kelly; Hosting, Lance; Serati, Steve; Bradley, Cullen P.; McManamon, Paul F.; Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2017-05-01

    Laser radar for entry, descent, and landing (EDL) applications as well as the space docking problem could benefit from a low size, weight, and power (SWaP) beam control system. Moreover, an inertia free approach employing non-mechanical beam control is also attractive for laser radar that is intended to be employed aboard space platforms. We are investigating a non-mechanical beam steering (NMBS) sub-system based on liquid crystal polarization grating (LCPG) technology with emphasis placed on improved throughput and significant weight reduction by combining components and drastically reducing substrate thicknesses. In addition to the advantages of non-mechanical, gimbal free beam control, and greatly improved SWaP, our approach also enables wide area scanning using a scalable architecture. An extraterrestrial application entails additional environmental constraints, consequently an environmental test plan tailored to an EDL mission will also be discussed. In addition, we will present advances in continuous fine steering technology which would complement the coarse steering LCPG technology. A low-SWaP, non-mechanical beam control system could be used in many laser radar remote sensing applications including meteorological studies and agricultural or environmental surveys in addition to the entry, descent, and landing application.

  7. ASTM E-2369 TMF: Inter Laboratory Study (ILS) on Strain Controlled Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Testing

    OpenAIRE

    RIPPLINGER Stefan; HAEHNER Peter; BRUCHHAUSEN MATTHIAS; DE HAAN Fredericus; AUSTIN TIMOTHY

    2016-01-01

    The document presents the results of the tests conducted at the JRC Petten site, under the frame of the Inter Laboratory Study (ILS) on Thermomechanical Fatigue (ASTM E-2368). The primary purpose of this study is to provide a precision and bias statement to be included in the revision of ASTM E-2368, Standard Practice for Strain Controlled Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue Testing.

  8. Investigating the Relationship between Governance Mechanisms and the Disclosure of IT Control Weaknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Basil

    2012-01-01

    The current research is concerned with exploring the quality of information technology (IT) control over financial reporting systems as reported under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. More specifically, this dissertation examines the association between organizational governance mechanisms and the occurrence and subsequent disclosure…

  9. Gain Control in Predictive Smooth Pursuit Eye Movements: Evidence for an Acceleration-Based Predictive Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostek, Lukas; Eggert, Thomas; Glasauer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The smooth pursuit eye movement system incorporates various control features enabling adaptation to specific tracking situations. In this work, we analyzed the interplay between two of these mechanisms: gain control and predictive pursuit. We tested human responses to high-frequency perturbations during step-ramp pursuit, as well as the pursuit of a periodically moving target. For the latter task, we found a nonlinear interaction between perturbation response and carrier acceleration. Responses to perturbations where the initial perturbation acceleration was contradirectional to carrier acceleration increased with carrier velocity, in a manner similar to that observed during step-ramp pursuit. In contrast, responses to perturbations with ipsidirectional initial perturbation and carrier acceleration were large for all carrier velocities. Modeling the pursuit system suggests that gain control and short-term prediction are separable elements. The observed effect may be explained by combining the standard gain control mechanism with a derivative-based short-term predictive mechanism. The nonlinear interaction between perturbation and carrier acceleration can be reproduced by assuming a signal saturation, which is acting on the derivative of the target velocity signal. Our results therefore argue for the existence of an internal estimate of target acceleration as a basis for a simple yet efficient short-term predictive mechanism.

  10. Control Engineering as a Part of Undergraduate Curriculum for Mechanical Engineering in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Shagil; Iqbal, Syed Muneeb; Bajpai, Shrish

    2016-01-01

    In this present study we have traced the genesis of control engineering in the scope of mechanical engineering and then some analysis on its recent developments, their increasing need and how this particular subject has evolved machines functioning nowadays specifically its standard of education in India. We have probed this field right from its…

  11. Initiation of home mechanical ventilation at home : A randomised controlled trial of efficacy, feasibility and costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, A; Kerstjens, H A M; Prins, S C L; Vermeulen, K M; Wijkstra, P J

    Introduction: Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) in the Netherlands is normally initiated in hospital, but this is expensive and often a burden for the patient. In this randomised controlled study we investigated whether initiation of HMV at home in patients with chronic respiratory failure is

  12. Quality control and process capability assessment for injection-moulded micro mechanical parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasparin, Stefania; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    Quality control of micro components is an increasing challenge. Smaller mechanical parts are characterized by smaller tolerance to be verified. This paper focuses on the dimensional verification of micro injection-moulded components selected from an industrial application. These parts are measure...

  13. Design issues of a back-pressure-based congestion control mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra, R.; Mandjes, M.R.H.; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.; van den Berg, Hans Leo

    2010-01-01

    Congestion control in packet-based networks is often realized by feedback protocols – in this paper we assess the performance under a back-pressure mechanism that has been proposed and standardized for Ethernet metropolitan networks. Relying on our earlier results for feedback fluid queues,we derive

  14. Genetic control and regulatory mechanisms of succinoglycan and curdlan biosynthesis in genus Agrobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Li, Ang; Ma, Fang; Yang, Jixian; Xie, Yutong

    2016-07-01

    Agrobacterium is a genus of gram-negative bacteria that can produce several typical exopolysaccharides with commercial uses in the food and pharmaceutical fields. In particular, succinoglycan and curdlan, due to their good quality in high yield, have been employed on an industrial scale comparatively early. Exopolysaccharide biosynthesis is a multiple-step process controlled by different functional genes, and various environmental factors cause changes in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis through regulatory mechanisms. In this mini-review, we focus on the genetic control and regulatory mechanisms of succinoglycan and curdlan produced by Agrobacterium. Some key functional genes and regulatory mechanisms for exopolysaccharide biosynthesis are described, possessing a high potential for application in metabolic engineering to modify exopolysaccharide production and physicochemical properties. This review may contribute to the understanding of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and exopolysaccharide modification by metabolic engineering methods in Agrobacterium.

  15. An Innovative Design of a Microtab Deployment Mechanism for Active Aerodynamic Load Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Chang Tsai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an innovative design of a microtab system for aerodynamic load control on horizontal-axis wind-turbine rotors. Microtabs are small devices located near the trailing edge of the rotor blades and enable a rapid increase or decrease of the lift force through deployment of the tabs on the pressure or suction side of the airfoil, respectively. The new system has been designed to replace an earlier linearly-actuated microtab mechanism whose performance was limited by space restrictions and stiction. The newly-designed microtab system is based on a four-bar linkage that overcomes the two drawbacks. Its improved kinematics allows for the tab height to increase from 1.0% to 1.7% of the airfoil chord when fully deployed, thereby making it more effective in terms of aerodynamic load control. Furthermore, the modified four-bar link mechanism provides a more robust and reliable mechanical structure.

  16. Limb dominance results from asymmetries in predictive and impedance control mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek; Sainburg, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Handedness is a pronounced feature of human motor behavior, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that motor lateralization results from asymmetries in predictive control of task dynamics and in control of limb impedance. To test this hypothesis, we present an experiment with two different force field environments, a field with a predictable magnitude that varies with the square of velocity, and a field with a less predictable magnitude that varies linearly with velocity. These fields were designed to be compatible with controllers that are specialized in predicting limb and task dynamics, and modulating position and velocity dependent impedance, respectively. Because the velocity square field does not change the form of the equations of motion for the reaching arm, we reasoned that a forward dynamic-type controller should perform well in this field, while control of linear damping and stiffness terms should be less effective. In contrast, the unpredictable linear field should be most compatible with impedance control, but incompatible with predictive dynamics control. We measured steady state final position accuracy and 3 trajectory features during exposure to these fields: Mean squared jerk, Straightness, and Movement time. Our results confirmed that each arm made straighter, smoother, and quicker movements in its compatible field. Both arms showed similar final position accuracies, which were achieved using more extensive corrective sub-movements when either arm performed in its incompatible field. Finally, each arm showed limited adaptation to its incompatible field. Analysis of the dependence of trajectory errors on field magnitude suggested that dominant arm adaptation occurred by prediction of the mean field, thus exploiting predictive mechanisms for adaptation to the unpredictable field. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that motor lateralization reflects asymmetries in specific motor control mechanisms associated

  17. Limb dominance results from asymmetries in predictive and impedance control mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Yadav

    Full Text Available Handedness is a pronounced feature of human motor behavior, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. We hypothesize that motor lateralization results from asymmetries in predictive control of task dynamics and in control of limb impedance. To test this hypothesis, we present an experiment with two different force field environments, a field with a predictable magnitude that varies with the square of velocity, and a field with a less predictable magnitude that varies linearly with velocity. These fields were designed to be compatible with controllers that are specialized in predicting limb and task dynamics, and modulating position and velocity dependent impedance, respectively. Because the velocity square field does not change the form of the equations of motion for the reaching arm, we reasoned that a forward dynamic-type controller should perform well in this field, while control of linear damping and stiffness terms should be less effective. In contrast, the unpredictable linear field should be most compatible with impedance control, but incompatible with predictive dynamics control. We measured steady state final position accuracy and 3 trajectory features during exposure to these fields: Mean squared jerk, Straightness, and Movement time. Our results confirmed that each arm made straighter, smoother, and quicker movements in its compatible field. Both arms showed similar final position accuracies, which were achieved using more extensive corrective sub-movements when either arm performed in its incompatible field. Finally, each arm showed limited adaptation to its incompatible field. Analysis of the dependence of trajectory errors on field magnitude suggested that dominant arm adaptation occurred by prediction of the mean field, thus exploiting predictive mechanisms for adaptation to the unpredictable field. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that motor lateralization reflects asymmetries in specific motor control

  18. Assessment of current practices in creating and using passwords as a control mechanism for information access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Wessels

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the critical issues in managing information within an organization is to ensure that proper controls exist and are applied in allowing people access to information. Passwords are used extensively as the main control mechanism to identify users wanting access to systems, applications, data files, network servers or personal information. In this article, the issues involved in selecting and using passwords are discussed and the current practices employed by users in creating and storing passwords to gain access to sensitive information are assessed. The results of this survey conclude that information managers cannot rely only on users to employ proper password control in order to protect sensitive information.

  19. Controlling Stiction in Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems Using Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchnev, Oleksandr; Podoliak, Nina; Frank, Thomas; Kaczmarek, Malgosia; Jiang, Liudi; Fedotov, Vassili A

    2016-12-27

    Stiction is one of the major reliability issues limiting practical application of nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS), an emerging device technology that exploits mechanical movements on the scale of an integrated electronic circuit. We report on a discovery that stiction can be eliminated by infiltrating NEMS with nematic liquid crystals. We demonstrate this experimentally using a NEMS-based tunable photonic metamaterial, where reliable switching of optical response was achieved for the entire range of nanoscopic structural displacements admitted by the metamaterial design. Being a more straightforward and easy-to-implement alternative to the existing antistiction solutions, our approach also introduces an active mechanism of stiction control, which enables toggling between stiction-free and the usual (stiction-limited) regimes of NEMS operation. It is expected to greatly expand the functionality of electro-mechanical devices and enable the development of adaptive and smart nanosystems.

  20. Modelling and Control of a Spherical Inverted Pendulum on a Five-Bar Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Soto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the kinematics and dynamics modelling of a mechanical system consisting of a spherical inverted pendulum whose base is mounted on a parallel planar mechanism, better known as a five-bar mechanism. The whole mechanism has four degrees of freedom, but it has only two actuators and so it is an under-actuated system. The nonlinear dynamics model of the complete system is first obtained using a non-minimal set of generalized coordinates, and then a reduced equivalent model is computed. To validate this approach, the reduced model is linearized and simulations are carried out, showing the stabilization of the system with a simple LQR controller. Experimental results on an academic prototype are also presented.

  1. Performance enhanced design of chaos controller for the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system via adaptive dynamic surface control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohua Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses chaos suppression of the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system with output constraint and fully unknown parameters via adaptive dynamic surface control. To have a certain understanding of chaotic nature of the mechanical centrifugal flywheel governor system and subsequently design its controller, the useful tools like the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are employed. By using tangent barrier Lyapunov function, a dynamic surface control scheme with neural network and tracking differentiator is developed to transform chaos oscillation into regular motion and the output constraint rule is not broken in whole process. Plugging second-order tracking differentiator into chaos controller tackles the “explosion of complexity” of backstepping and improves the accuracy in contrast with the first-order filter. Meanwhile, Chebyshev neural network with adaptive law whose input only depends on a subset of Chebyshev polynomials is derived to learn the behavior of unknown dynamics. The boundedness of all signals of the closed-loop system is verified in stability analysis. Finally, the results of numerical simulations illustrate effectiveness and exhibit the superior performance of the proposed scheme by comparing with the existing ADSC method.

  2. Neural mechanisms underlying cognitive control of men with lifelong antisocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Boris; Pawliczek, Christina; Mu Ller, Bernhard; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke; Leygraf, Norbert; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2014-04-30

    Results of meta-analyses suggested subtle deficits in cognitive control among antisocial individuals. Because almost all studies focused on children with conduct problems or adult psychopaths, however, little is known about cognitive control mechanisms among the majority of persistent violent offenders who present an antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). The present study aimed to determine whether offenders with ASPD, relative to non-offenders, display dysfunction in the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive control and to assess the extent to which these dysfunctions are associated with psychopathic traits and trait impulsivity. Participants comprised 21 violent offenders and 23 non-offenders who underwent event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a non-verbal Stroop task. The offenders, relative to the non-offenders, exhibited reduced response time interference and a different pattern of conflict- and error-related activity in brain areas involved in cognitive control, attention, language, and emotion processing, that is, the anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal, superior temporal and postcentral cortices, putamen, thalamus, and amygdala. Moreover, between-group differences in behavioural and neural responses revealed associations with core features of psychopathy and attentional impulsivity. Thus, the results of the present study confirmed the hypothesis that offenders with ASPD display alterations in the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive control and that those alterations relate, at least in part, to personality characteristics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. State-of-the-art robotic devices for ankle rehabilitation: Mechanism and control review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shahid; Jamwal, Prashant K; Ghayesh, Mergen H

    2017-12-01

    There is an increasing research interest in exploring use of robotic devices for the physical therapy of patients suffering from stroke and spinal cord injuries. Rehabilitation of patients suffering from ankle joint dysfunctions such as drop foot is vital and therefore has called for the development of newer robotic devices. Several robotic orthoses and parallel ankle robots have been developed during the last two decades to augment the conventional ankle physical therapy of patients. A comprehensive review of these robotic ankle rehabilitation devices is presented in this article. Recent developments in the mechanism design, actuation and control are discussed. The study encompasses robotic devices for treadmill and over-ground training as well as platform-based parallel ankle robots. Control strategies for these robotic devices are deliberated in detail with an emphasis on the assist-as-needed training strategies. Experimental evaluations of the mechanism designs and various control strategies of these robotic ankle rehabilitation devices are also presented.

  4. Self-Healing Nanocomposite Hydrogel with Well-Controlled Dynamic Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiaochu; Mishra, Sumeet; Chen, Pangkuan; Tracy, Joseph; Holten-Andersen, Niels

    Network dynamics is a crucial factor that determines the macroscopic self-healing rate and efficiency in polymeric hydrogel materials, yet its controllability is seldom studied in most reported self-healing hydrogel systems. Inspired by mussel's adhesion chemistry, we developed a novel approach to assemble inorganic nanoparticles and catechol-decorated PEG polymer into a hydrogel network. When utilized as reversible polymer-particle crosslinks, catechol-metal coordination bonds yield a unique gel network with dynamic mechanics controlled directly by interfacial crosslink structure. Taking advantage of this structure-property relationship at polymer-particle interfaces, we next designed a hierarchically structured hybrid gel with two distinct relaxation timescales. By tuning the relative contribution of the two hierarchical relaxation modes, we are able to finely control the gel's dynamic mechanical behavior from a viscoelastic fluid to a stiff solid, yet preserving its fast self-healing property without the need for external stimuli.

  5. Novel Hypothalamic Mechanisms in the Pathophysiological Control of Body Weight and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2017-05-01

    The incidence of obesity, with its impact on the development of comorbidities, including diabetes and cardiovascular disease, represents one of the greatest global health threats of the 21st century. This is particularly damning considering the vast progress that has been made in understanding the factors and molecular mechanisms playing a role in the control of energy balance by the central nervous system, especially during the past 3 decades. Despite the wealth of newfound knowledge, effective therapies for prevention of and/or intervention in obesity have not been forthcoming. That said, recent technological advances and the revisiting of previously discarded concepts have identified novel neural mechanisms involved in the control of energy homeostasis, thereby providing potential new targets and experimental approaches that may bring us closer to effective therapies to improve metabolic control. This review summarizes some of the most recent findings, with special emphasis on the role of neural circuits of the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  6. A Velocity-Based Impedance Control System for a Low Impact Docking Mechanism (LIDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanzhi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an impedance control algorithm based on velocity for capturing two low impact docking mechanisms (LIDMs is presented. The main idea of this algorithm is to track desired forces when the position errors of two LIDMs are random by designing the relationship between the velocity and contact forces measured by a load sensing ring to achieve low impact docking. In this paper, the governing equation of an impedance controller between the deviation of forces and velocity is derived, and simulations are designed to verify how impedance parameters affect the control characteristics. The performance of the presented control algorithm is validated by using the MATLAB and ADAMS software for capturing simulations. The results of capturing simulations demonstrate that the impedance control algorithm can respond fast and has excellent robustness when the environmental errors are random, and the contact forces and torques satisfy the low impact requirements.

  7. From Hopf Bifurcation to Limit Cycles Control in Underactuated Mechanical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khraief Haddad, Nahla; Belghith, Safya; Gritli, Hassène; Chemori, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of obtaining stable and robust oscillations of underactuated mechanical systems. It is concerned with the Hopf bifurcation analysis of a Controlled Inertia Wheel Inverted Pendulum (C-IWIP). Firstly, the stabilization was achieved with a control law based on the Interconnection, Damping, Assignment Passive Based Control method (IDA-PBC). Interestingly, the considered closed-loop system exhibits both supercritical and subcritical Hopf bifurcation for certain gains of the control law. Secondly, we used the center manifold theorem and the normal form technique to study the stability and instability of limit cycles emerging from the Hopf bifurcation. Finally, numerical simulations were conducted to validate the analytical results in order to prove that with IDA-PBC we can control not only the unstable equilibrium but also some trajectories such as limit cycles.

  8. [Likeness between respiratory responses on CO2 in conditions of natural breathing and voluntary-controlled mechanical ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogodin, M A; Granstrem, M P; Dimitrienko, A I

    2007-04-01

    We did Read CO2 rebreathing tests in 8 adult males. Both at natural breathing, and at self-controlled mechanical ventilation, volunteers increased ventilation proportionally to growth end-tidal PCO2. Inside individual distinctions of responses to CO2 during controlled mechanical ventilation are result of the voluntary motor control.

  9. Control Engineering as a Part of Undergraduate Curriculum for Mechanical Engineering in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Shagil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this present study we have traced the genesis of control engineering in the scope of mechanical engineering and then some analysis on its recent developments, their increasing need and how this particular subject has evolved machines functioning nowadays specifically its standard of education in India. We have probed this field right from its starting. We have examined how it is required as a proper course for mechanical engineering students and in which order the evolution in this field is expanding and, at the same time, its level of education in India and where we are in confronting the business need in terms of quality and quantity of students. The point is that it holds significance in near future. Over the years control engineering has been expanding its perimeter in various branches such mechanics, electronics, instrumentation, electrics, chemistry, aeronautics, mechatronics, etc. As a result, numerous interactive feedback structure from the output and the ability to alter the input accordingly have given the world a new era of equipment commonly termed as “smart devices” which have changed the lifestyle of common people. Furthermore, its various applications in different industry have also favored its development. So, some views from the industry prospective have been included to find out about the skills that are required for aspiring and practicing control engineers having mechanical engineering background.

  10. Potential mechanisms mediating improved glycemic control after bariatric/metabolic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kaida, Sachiko; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Murata, Satoshi; Tani, Masaji; Tani, Tohru

    2016-03-01

    Conservative medical treatment for morbid obesity generally fails to sustain weight loss. On the other hand, surgical operations, so-called bariatric surgery, have evolved due to their long-term effects. The global increase in the overweight population and the introduction of laparoscopic surgery have resulted in the use of bariatric surgery spreading quickly worldwide in recent years. Recent clinical evidence suggests that bariatric surgery not only reduces body weight, but also improves secondary serious diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus, in so-called metabolic surgery. Moreover, several potential mechanisms mediating the improvement in glycemic control after bariatric/metabolic surgery have been proposed based on the animal and human studies. These mechanisms include changes in the levels of gastrointestinal hormones, bacterial flora, bile acids, intestinal gluconeogenesis and gastrointestinal motility as well as adipose tissue and inflammatory mediators after surgery. The mechanisms underlying improved glycemic control are expected to accelerate the promotion of both metabolic and bariatric surgery. This article describes the current status of bariatric surgery worldwide and in Japan, reviews the accumulated data for weight loss and diabetic improvements after surgery and discusses the potential mechanisms mediating improved glycemic control.

  11. Field and Laboratory Testing of Approaches to Smart Whole-House Mechanical Ventilation Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Eric [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Fenaughty, Karen [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Parker, Danny [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Whole-house mechanical ventilation is a critical component to a comprehensive strategy for good indoor air quality (IAQ). However, due to lack of integration with standard heating and cooling systems, and perceptions from a portion of the homebuilding industry about risks related to increased energy use, increased cost, and decreased comfort, voluntary and code-required adoption varies amongst regions. Smart ventilation controls (SVC) balance energy consumption, comfort, and IAQ by optimizing mechanical ventilation operation to reduce the heating and/or cooling loads, improve management of indoor moisture, and maintain IAQ equivalence according to ASHRAE 62.2.

  12. Field and Laboratory Testing of Approaches to Smart Whole-House Mechanical Ventilation Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Eric; Fenaughty, Karen; Parker, Danny; Lubiner, Michael : Howard, Luke

    2018-01-29

    Whole-house mechanical ventilation is a critical component to a comprehensive strategy for good indoor air quality (IAQ). However, due to lack of integration with standard heating and cooling systems, and perceptions from a portion of the homebuilding industry about risks related to increased energy use, increased cost, and decreased comfort, voluntary and code-required adoption varies among regions. Smart ventilation controls (SVC) balance energy consumption, comfort, and IAQ by optimizing mechanical ventilation operation to reduce the heating and/or cooling loads, improve management of indoor moisture, and maintain IAQ equivalence according to ASHRAE 62.2.

  13. Understanding the mechanism of nanotube synthesis for controlled production of specific (n,m) structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-02-11

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  14. Mechanism of the polarization control in intracavity- contacted VCSEL with rhomboidal oxide current aperture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, M. A.; Maleev, N. A.; Blokhin, S. A.; Kuzmenkov, A. G.; Vasil'ev, A. P.; Blokhin, A. A.; Kulagina, M. M.; Guseva, Yu A.; Troshkov, S. I.; Ustinov, V. M.

    2016-08-01

    The possible mechanisms of the polarization control in single-mode intracavity- contacted vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (IC-VCSELs) with the rhomboidal selectively- oxidized current aperture were investigated. It was found that the lasing emission polarization of all single-mode VCSELs is fixed along the minor diagonal of the rhomboidal-shape aperture (the [110] direction). Numerical modelling of carrier transport did not reveal any sufficient injection anisotropy in the laser active region, while the transverse optical confinement factors calculated for the fundamental mode with two orthogonal polarizations are identical. Optical loss anisotropy and/or gain anisotropy are the most likely mechanisms of inducing the polarization fixation.

  15. Spread and Control of Mobile Benign Worm Based on Two-Stage Repairing Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Both in traditional social network and in mobile network environment, the worm is a serious threat, and this threat is growing all the time. Mobile smartphones generally promote the development of mobile network. The traditional antivirus technologies have become powerless when facing mobile networks. The development of benign worms, especially active benign worms and passive benign worms, has become a new network security measure. In this paper, we focused on the spread of worm in mobile environment and proposed the benign worm control and repair mechanism. The control process of mobile benign worms is divided into two stages: the first stage is rapid repair control, which uses active benign worm to deal with malicious worm in the mobile network; when the network is relatively stable, it enters the second stage of postrepair and uses passive mode to optimize the environment for the purpose of controlling the mobile network. Considering whether the existence of benign worm, we simplified the model and analyzed the four situations. Finally, we use simulation to verify the model. This control mechanism for benign worm propagation is of guiding significance to control the network security.

  16. The comparison of manual and LabVIEW-based fuzzy control on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Hasan; Ata, Fikret

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this article is to develop a knowledge-based therapy for management of rats with respiratory distress. A mechanical ventilator was designed to achieve this aim. The designed ventilator is called an intelligent mechanical ventilator since fuzzy logic was used to control the pneumatic equipment according to the rat's status. LabVIEW software was used to control all equipments in the ventilator prototype and to monitor respiratory variables in the experiment. The designed ventilator can be controlled both manually and by fuzzy logic. Eight female Wistar-Albino rats were used to test the designed ventilator and to show the effectiveness of fuzzy control over manual control on pressure control ventilation mode. The anesthetized rats were first ventilated for 20 min manually. After that time, they were ventilated for 20 min by fuzzy logic. Student's t-test for p < 0.05 was applied to the measured minimum, maximum and mean peak inspiration pressures to analyze the obtained results. The results show that there is no statistical difference in the rat's lung parameters before and after the experiments. It can be said that the designed ventilator and developed knowledge-based therapy support artificial respiration of living things successfully. © IMechE 2014.

  17. Size control mechanism of ZnO nanoparticles obtained in microwave solvothermal synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarowicz, Jacek; Chudoba, Tadeusz; Koltsov, Iwona; Gierlotka, Stanislaw; Dworakowska, Sylwia; Lojkowski, Witold

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to explain the mechanism of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) size control, which enables the size control of ZnO NPs obtained in microwave solvothermal synthesis (MSS) within the size range between circa 20 and 120 nm through the control of water content in the solution of zinc acetate in ethylene glycol. Heavy water was used in the tests. The mechanism of ZnO NPs size control was explained, discussed and experimentally verified. The discovery and investigation of this mechanism was possible by tracking the fate of water molecules during the whole synthesis process. All the synthesis products were identified. It was indicated that the MSS of ZnO NPs proceeded through the formation and conversion of intermediates such as Zn5(OH)8(CH3COO)2 · xH2O. Esters and H2O were the by-products of the MSS reaction of ZnO NPs. We justified that the esterification reaction is the decisive stage that is a prerequisite of the formation of ZnO NPs. The following parameters of the obtained ZnO NPs and of the intermediate were determined: pycnometric density, specific surface area, phase purity, average particles size, particles size distribution and chemical composition. The ZnO NPs morphology and structure were determined using scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Efficacy and possible mechanisms of perillaldehyde in control of Aspergillus niger causing grape decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun; Wang, Yanzhen; Zeng, Hong; Li, Zongyun; Zhang, Peng; Tessema, Akalate; Peng, Xue

    2015-06-02

    A variety of plant products have been recognized for their antifungal activity and recently have attracted food industry attention for their efficacy in controlling postharvest fungal decay of fruits. The antifungal activity of perillaldehyde (PAE) was evaluated against Aspergillus niger, a known cause of grape spoilage, and possible mechanisms were explored. PAE showed notable antifungal activity against A. niger, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and a minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) of 0.25 and 1 μl/ml, respectively. The accumulation of mycelial biomass was also inhibited by PAE in a dose-dependent manner, completely inhibiting mycelial growth at 1 μl/ml. In vivo data confirmed that the vapour treatment of grapes with various concentrations of PAE markedly improved control of A. niger and suppressed natural decay. Concentrations of PAE of 0.075 μl/ml air showed the greatest inhibition of fungal growth compared to the controls. Further experiments indicated that PAE activated a membrane-active mechanism that inhibits ergosterol synthesis, increases membrane permeability (as evidenced by extracellular pH and conductivity measurements), and disrupts membrane integrity, leading to cell death. Our findings suggest that this membrane-active mechanism makes PAE a promising potential antifungal agent for postharvest control of grape spoilage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. On the Control of Social Approach-Avoidance Behavior: Neural and Endocrine Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldewaij, Reinoud; Koch, Saskia B J; Volman, Inge; Toni, Ivan; Roelofs, Karin

    The ability to control our automatic action tendencies is crucial for adequate social interactions. Emotional events trigger automatic approach and avoidance tendencies. Although these actions may be generally adaptive, the capacity to override these emotional reactions may be key to flexible behavior during social interaction. The present chapter provides a review of the neuroendocrine mechanisms underlying this ability and their relation to social psychopathologies. Aberrant social behavior, such as observed in social anxiety or psychopathy, is marked by abnormalities in approach-avoidance tendencies and the ability to control them. Key neural regions involved in the regulation of approach-avoidance behavior are the amygdala, widely implicated in automatic emotional processing, and the anterior prefrontal cortex, which exerts control over the amygdala. Hormones, especially testosterone and cortisol, have been shown to affect approach-avoidance behavior and the associated neural mechanisms. The present chapter also discusses ways to directly influence social approach and avoidance behavior and will end with a research agenda to further advance this important research field. Control over approach-avoidance tendencies may serve as an exemplar of emotional action regulation and might have a great value in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the development of affective disorders.

  20. Mechanisms controlling the impact of multi-year drought on mountain hydrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Roger C; Goulden, Michael L; Hunsaker, Carolyn T; Conklin, Martha H; Hartsough, Peter C; O'Geen, Anthony T; Hopmans, Jan W; Safeeq, Mohammad

    2018-01-12

    Mountain runoff ultimately reflects the difference between precipitation (P) and evapotranspiration (ET), as modulated by biogeophysical mechanisms that intensify or alleviate drought impacts. These modulating mechanisms are seldom measured and not fully understood. The impact of the warm 2012-15 California drought on the heavily instrumented Kings River basin provides an extraordinary opportunity to enumerate four mechanisms that controlled the impact of drought on mountain hydrology. Two mechanisms intensified the impact: (i) evaporative processes have first access to local precipitation, which decreased the fractional allocation of P to runoff in 2012-15 and reduced P-ET by 30% relative to previous years, and (ii) 2012-15 was 1 °C warmer than the previous decade, which increased ET relative to previous years and reduced P-ET by 5%. The other two mechanisms alleviated the impact: (iii) spatial heterogeneity and the continuing supply of runoff from higher elevations increased 2012-15 P-ET by 10% relative to that expected for a homogenous basin, and iv) drought-associated dieback and wildfire thinned the forest and decreased ET, which increased 2016 P-ET by 15%. These mechanisms are all important and may offset each other; analyses that neglect one or more will over or underestimate the impact of drought and warming on mountain runoff.

  1. A control strategy for electro-magneto-mechanical system based on virtual system model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong Youn; Heo, Hoon [Dept. of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Young Min [TPC Mechatronics Co., Ltd., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    A new approach to the control of electro-magneto-mechanical system is proposed in this paper. Conventionally, these systems are controlled based on the Maxwell system model via an on-off or PID control technique, which displays acceptable performance in the low frequency region, but not in the high frequency region where position control performance is greatly degraded. In order to improve the performance, a newly developed virtual 2nd order system modeling technique, SSID, is adopted for a complex electro-magnetomechanical system in the study. This technique states that any unknown system exposed to a random disturbance with unknown intensity can be identified in terms of a virtual 2nd order system model via the inverse process of a certain stochastic analysis. As a typical hybrid system, a solenoid valve is used as the target electro-magneto-mechanical system to study the modeling of the virtual 2nd order system. In order to confirm the performance of the proposed control strategy, autotuning PID controller in PWM mode is utilized. Simulations based on the conventional Maxwell system model with control via the bang-bang, autotuning PID, and the proposed virtual 2nd order system model approaches are conducted using MATLAB Simulink. Performance of these three systems in the low and high frequency bands is also compared. The simulation results reveal that the control performance of the virtual 2nd order system model is much improved compared with that of the Maxwell system model under autotuning PID and bang-bang controls in both low and high frequency regions, where the error is drastically reduced to approximately 1/5 of the original value.

  2. Enhancing the Mechanical Properties of Electrospun Nanofiber Mats through Controllable Welding at the Cross Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoxuan; Zhu, Chunlei; Xue, Jiajia; Ke, Qinfei; Xia, Younan

    2017-05-01

    This communication describes a simple and effective method for welding electrospun nanofibers at the cross points to enhance the mechanical properties of their nonwoven mats. The welding is achieved by placing a nonwoven mat of the nanofibers in a capped vial with the vapor of a proper solvent. For polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers, the solvent is dichloromethane (DCM). The welding can be managed in a controllable fashion by simply varying the partial pressure of DCM and/or the exposure time. Relative to the pristine nanofiber mat, the mechanical strength of the welded PCL nanofiber mat can be increased by as much as 200%. Meanwhile, such a treatment does not cause any major structural changes, including morphology, fiber diameter, and pore size. This study provides a generic method for improving the mechanical properties of nonwoven nanofiber mats, holding great potential in various applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Controlling Self-Renewal and Differentiation of Stem Cells via Mechanical Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele M. Nava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The control of stem cell response in vitro, including self-renewal and lineage commitment, has been proved to be directed by mechanical cues, even in the absence of biochemical stimuli. Through integrin-mediated focal adhesions, cells are able to anchor onto the underlying substrate, sense the surrounding microenvironment, and react to its properties. Substrate-cell and cell-cell interactions activate specific mechanotransduction pathways that regulate stem cell fate. Mechanical factors, including substrate stiffness, surface nanotopography, microgeometry, and extracellular forces can all have significant influence on regulating stem cell activities. In this paper, we review all the most recent literature on the effect of purely mechanical cues on stem cell response, and we introduce the concept of “force isotropy” relevant to cytoskeletal forces and relevant to extracellular loads acting on cells, to provide an interpretation of how the effects of insoluble biophysical signals can be used to direct stem cells fate in vitro.

  4. [INR Self-management after mechanical heart valve replacement: ESCAT (Early Self-Controlled Anticoagulation Trial)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körtke, H; Minami, K; Breymann, T; Seifert, D; Baraktaris, A; Wagner, O; Kleikamp, G; El-Banayosy, A; Mirow, N; Körfer, R

    2001-12-01

    Severe thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications following mechanical heart valve replacement essentially occur due to intense oral anticoagulation and fluctuating individual INR values around the target range. INR self-management can help to minimize these fluctuations. Beginning this therapeutic control immediately after mechanical heart valve replacement further reduces anticoagulant-induced complications. Included in the study were 1200 patients. The quality of oral anticoagulation also improved through INR self-management. Over an observation period of two years, nearly 80 % of INR values recorded by the patients themselves were within the target therapeutic range of 2.5-4.5. This corresponds to a high significance of p grammar with or without university). Of patients trained in INR self-management following mechanical heart valve replacement, 91.7 % maintained their competence in this technique throughout the entire follow-up period. Only 8.3 % of those trained immediately after surgery were unable to continue with INR self-management.

  5. Rethinking motor lateralization: specialized but complementary mechanisms for motor control of each arm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik K Mutha

    Full Text Available Motor lateralization in humans has primarily been characterized as "handedness", resulting in the view that one arm-hemisphere system is specialized for all aspects of movement while the other is simply a weaker analogue. We have proposed an alternative view that motor lateralization reflects proficiency of each arm for complementary functions that arises from a specialization of each hemisphere for distinct movement control mechanisms. However, before this idea of hemispheric specialization can be accepted, it is necessary to precisely identify these distinct, lateralized mechanisms. Here we show in right-handers that dominant arm movements rely on predictive mechanisms that anticipate and account for the dynamic properties of the arm, while the non-dominant arm optimizes positional stability by specifying impedance around equilibrium positions. In a targeted-reaching paradigm, we covertly and occasionally shifted the hand starting location either orthogonal to or collinear with a particular direction of movement. On trials on which the start positions were shifted orthogonally, we did not notice any strong interlimb differences. However, on trials on which start positions were shifted orthogonally, the dominant arm largely maintained the direction and straightness of its trajectory, while the non-dominant arm deviated towards the previously learned goal position, consistent with the hypothesized control specialization of each arm-hemisphere system. These results bring together two competing theories about mechanisms of movement control, and suggest that they coexist in the brain in different hemispheres. These findings also question the traditional view of handedness, because specialized mechanisms for each arm-hemisphere system were identified within a group of right-handers. It is likely that such hemispheric specialization emerged to accommodate increasing motor complexity during evolution.

  6. Methodology to assess quality of estimated disturbances in active disturbance rejection control structure for mechanical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, A David; Velazquez, V Karla; Olivares, F Luz; Camacho, T Adrian; Williams, Ivan

    2017-09-01

    A methodology to assess the quality of estimation of disturbances in mechanical systems, by state observers, in the control structure with active compensation of disturbances (ADRC) is presented. Evaluation is carried out by four performance indices that depend on the steady-state error between reference signals and output of the plant. These indices are related with the accuracy and precision of the closed loop system in the sense of norms L2 and L∞, for a set of reference signals representing the typical operating conditions of the mechanism. The effectiveness of the methodology is illustrated with the quality assessment of the estimated disturbance of five state observers to control of a simple pendulum and validated on a SCARA robot arm. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Energy expenditure and activity of transfemoral amputees using mechanical and microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenton R; Levine, James A; Brey, Robert H; McCrady, Shelly K; Padgett, Denny J; Joyner, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    To quantify the energy efficiency of locomotion and free-living physical activity energy expenditure of transfemoral amputees using a mechanical and microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee. Repeated-measures design to evaluate comparative functional outcomes. Exercise physiology laboratory and community free-living environment. Subjects (N=15; 12 men, 3 women; age, 42+/-9 y; range, 26-57 y) with transfemoral amputation. Research participants were long-term users of a mechanical prosthesis (20+/-10 y as an amputee; range, 3-36 y). They were fitted with a microprocessor-controlled knee prosthesis and allowed to acclimate (mean time, 18+/-8 wk) before being retested. Objective measurements of energy efficiency and total daily energy expenditure were obtained. The Prosthetic Evaluation Questionnaire was used to gather subjective feedback from the participants. Subjects demonstrated significantly increased physical activity-related energy expenditure levels in the participant's free-living environment (P=.04) after wearing the microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint. There was no significant difference in the energy efficiency of walking (P=.34). When using the microprocessor-controlled knee, the subjects expressed increased satisfaction in their daily lives (P=.02). People ambulating with a microprocessor-controlled knee significantly increased their physical activity during daily life, outside the laboratory setting, and expressed an increased quality of life.

  8. Clastic patterned ground in Lomonosov crater, Mars: examining fracture controlled formation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Alexander M.; Balme, Matthew R.; Patel, Manish R.; Hagermann, Axel

    2017-10-01

    The area surrounding Lomonosov crater on Mars has a high density of seemingly organised boulder patterns. These form seemingly sorted polygons and stripes within kilometre scale blockfields, patches of boulder strewn ground which are common across the Martian high latitudes. Several hypotheses have been suggested to explain the formation of clastic patterned ground on Mars. It has been proposed that these structures could have formed through freeze-thaw sorting, or conversely by the interaction of boulders with underlying fracture polygons. In this investigation a series of sites were examined to evaluate whether boulder patterns appear to be controlled by the distribution of underlying fractures and test the fracture control hypotheses for their formation. It was decided to focus on this suite of mechanisms as they are characterised by a clear morphological relationship, namely the presence of an underlying fracture network which can easily be evaluated over a large area. It was found that in the majority of examples at these sites did not exhibit fracture control. Although fractures were present at many sites there were very few sites where the fracture network appeared to be controlling the boulder distribution. In general these were not the sites with the best examples of organization, suggesting that the fracture control mechanisms are not the dominant geomorphic process organising the boulders in this area.

  9. The Design of Intelligent Repair Welding Mechanism and Relative Control System of Big Gear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yu LIU

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective repair of worn big gear has large influence on ensuring safety production and enhancing economic benefits. A kind of intelligent repair welding method was put forward mainly aimed at the big gear restriction conditions of high production cost, long production cycle and high- intensity artificial repair welding work. Big gear repair welding mechanism was designed in this paper. The work principle and part selection of big gear repair welding mechanism was introduced. The three dimensional mode of big gear repair welding mechanism was constructed by Pro/E three dimensional design software. Three dimensional motions can be realized by motor controlling ball screw. According to involute gear feature, the complicated curve motion on curved gear surface can be transformed to linear motion by orientation. By this way, the repair welding on worn gear area can be realized. In the design of big gear repair welding mechanism control system, Siemens S7-200 series hardware was chosen. Siemens STEP7 programming software was chosen as system design tool. The entire repair welding process was simulated by experiment simulation. It provides a kind of practical and feasible method for the intelligent repair welding of big worn gear.

  10. Mechanical Impedance and Its Relations to Motor Control, Limb Dynamics, and Motion Biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Joseph

    The concept of mechanical impedance represents the interactive relationship between deformation kinematics and the resulting dynamics in human joints or limbs. A major component of impedance, stiffness, is defined as the ratio between the force change to the displacement change and is strongly related to muscle activation. The set of impedance components, including effective mass, inertia, damping, and stiffness, is important in determining the performance of the many tasks assigned to the limbs and in counteracting undesired effects of applied loads and disturbances. Specifically for the upper limb, impedance enables controlling manual tasks and reaching motions. In the lower limb, impedance is responsible for the transmission and attenuation of impact forces in tasks of repulsive loadings. This review presents an updated account of the works on mechanical impedance and its relations with motor control, limb dynamics, and motion biomechanics. Basic questions related to the linearity and nonlinearity of impedance and to the factors that affect mechanical impedance are treated with relevance to upper and lower limb functions, joint performance, trunk stability, and seating under dynamic conditions. Methods for the derivation of mechanical impedance, both those for within the system and material-structural approaches, are reviewed. For system approaches, special attention is given to methods aimed at revealing the correct and sufficient degree of nonlinearity of impedance. This is particularly relevant in the design of spring-based artificial legs and robotic arms. Finally, due to the intricate relation between impedance and muscle activity, methods for the explicit expression of impedance of contractile tissue are reviewed.

  11. An Innovative Design of a Microtab Deployment Mechanism for Active Aerodynamic Load Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo-Chang Tsai; Cheng-Tang Pan; Aubryn M. Cooperman; Johnson, Scott J.; C. P. van Dam

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an innovative design of a microtab system for aerodynamic load control on horizontal-axis wind-turbine rotors. Microtabs are small devices located near the trailing edge of the rotor blades and enable a rapid increase or decrease of the lift force through deployment of the tabs on the pressure or suction side of the airfoil, respectively. The new system has been designed to replace an earlier linearly-actuated microtab mechanism whose performance was limited by space restr...

  12. Capabilities and Limitations of Tissue Size Control through Passive Mechanical Forces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Kursawe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Embryogenesis is an extraordinarily robust process, exhibiting the ability to control tissue size and repair patterning defects in the face of environmental and genetic perturbations. The size and shape of a developing tissue is a function of the number and size of its constituent cells as well as their geometric packing. How these cellular properties are coordinated at the tissue level to ensure developmental robustness remains a mystery; understanding this process requires studying multiple concurrent processes that make up morphogenesis, including the spatial patterning of cell fates and apoptosis, as well as cell intercalations. In this work, we develop a computational model that aims to understand aspects of the robust pattern repair mechanisms of the Drosophila embryonic epidermal tissues. Size control in this system has previously been shown to rely on the regulation of apoptosis rather than proliferation; however, to date little work has been done to understand the role of cellular mechanics in this process. We employ a vertex model of an embryonic segment to test hypotheses about the emergence of this size control. Comparing the model to previously published data across wild type and genetic perturbations, we show that passive mechanical forces suffice to explain the observed size control in the posterior (P compartment of a segment. However, observed asymmetries in cell death frequencies across the segment are demonstrated to require patterning of cellular properties in the model. Finally, we show that distinct forms of mechanical regulation in the model may be distinguished by differences in cell shapes in the P compartment, as quantified through experimentally accessible summary statistics, as well as by the tissue recoil after laser ablation experiments.

  13. A QoS-Oriented Congestion Control Mechanism for Satellite Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Heyu Liu; Fuchun Sun

    2014-01-01

    The sharply increasing amount of data, which are transferred by the satellite network, requires the satellite network to provide quality-of-service (QoS). However, the upsurge in the data flow leads to the network congestion, impeding its ability to offer QoS. Congestion control mechanisms, deployed in the ground networks, have been thoroughly studied. But those deployed in the satellite networks have not been studied yet. As satellite networks are now important supplements to the ground back...

  14. NEW METHODS AND FACILITIES OF MAGNETIC CONTROL OF THE MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Matjuk

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are given the results of development in the State scientific university ''Institute of applied physics of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus” of the facilities for magnetic control of the steels mechanical characteristics - coercimeter KIPF-1, impulse magnetic analyzers IMA- 4M, IMA-5B, impulse magnetic installations IMPOK-IB and facilities of their metrological support. The information about the scale of , using IS given.

  15. Myofascial trigger points in subjects presenting with mechanical neck pain: a blinded, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, C; Alonso-Blanco, C; Miangolarra, J C

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the differences in the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) in the upper trapezius,sternocleidomastoid, levator scapulae and suboccipital muscles between patients presenting with mechanical neck pain and control healthy subjects. Twenty subjects with mechanical neck pain and 20 matched healthy controls participated in this study. TrPs were identified, by an assessor blinded to the subjects' condition, when there was a hypersensible tender spot in a palpable taut band, local twitch response elicited by the snapping palpation of the taut band, and reproduction of the referred pain typical of each TrP. The mean number of TrPs present on each neck pain patient was 4.3 (SD: 0.9), of which 2.5 (SD: 1.3) were latent and 1.8 (SD: 0.8) were active TrPs. Control subjects also exhibited TrPs (mean: 2; SD: 0.8). All were latent TrPs. Differences in the number of TrPs between both study groups were significant for active TrPs (P latent TrPs (P > 0.5). Moreover, differences in the distribution of TrPs within the analysed cervical muscles were also significant (P Active TrPs were more frequent in patients presenting with mechanical neck pain than in healthy subjects. ©2006 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Mechanisms and effective control of physiological browning phenomena in plant cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan-Shan; Fu, Chun-Hua; Su, Peng; Xu, Xiang-Ping; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Chun-Fang; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Browning phenomena are ubiquitous in plant cell cultures that severely hamper scientific research and widespread application of plant cell cultures. Up to now, this problem still has not been well controlled due to the unclear browning mechanisms in plant cell cultures. In this paper, the mechanisms were investigated using two typical materials with severe browning phenomena, Taxus chinensis and Glycyrrhiza inflata cells. Our results illustrated that the browning is attributed to a physiological enzymatic reaction, and phenolic biosynthesis regulated by sugar plays a decisive role in the browning. Furthermore, to confirm the specific compounds which participate in the enzymatic browning reaction, transcriptional profile and metabolites of T. chinensis cells, and UV scanning and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) profile of the browning compounds extracted from the brown-turned medium were analyzed, flavonoids derived from phenylpropanoid pathway were found to be the main compounds, and myricetin and quercetin were deduced to be the main substrates of the browning reaction. Inhibition of flavonoid biosynthesis can prevent the browning occurrence, and the browning is effectively controlled via blocking flavonoid biosynthesis by gibberellic acid (GA3 ) as an inhibitor, which further confirms that flavonoids mainly contribute to the browning. On the basis above, a model elucidating enzymatic browning mechanisms in plant cell cultures was put forward, and effective control approaches were presented. © 2015 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  17. Boron stress activates the general amino acid control mechanism and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irem Uluisik

    Full Text Available Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance.

  18. Boron stress activates the general amino acid control mechanism and inhibits protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E; Karakaya, Huseyin C; Carlson, Bradley A; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance.

  19. Boron Stress Activates the General Amino Acid Control Mechanism and Inhibits Protein Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluisik, Irem; Kaya, Alaattin; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Carlson, Bradley A.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for plants, and it is beneficial for animals. However, at high concentrations boron is toxic to cells although the mechanism of this toxicity is not known. Atr1 has recently been identified as a boron efflux pump whose expression is upregulated in response to boron treatment. Here, we found that the expression of ATR1 is associated with expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis. These mechanisms are strictly controlled by the transcription factor Gcn4 in response to boron treatment. Further analyses have shown that boron impaired protein synthesis by promoting phosphorylation of eIF2α in a Gcn2 kinase dependent manner. The uncharged tRNA binding domain (HisRS) of Gcn2 is necessary for the phosphorylation of eIF2α in the presence of boron. We postulate that boron exerts its toxic effect through activation of the general amino acid control system and inhibition of protein synthesis. Since the general amino acid control pathway is conserved among eukaryotes, this mechanism of boron toxicity may be of general importance. PMID:22114689

  20. Lever arms and sliding mechanics - A biomechanical approach for torque control in lingual orthodontics: Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Aravind

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the introduction of fixed appliance, a constant search is in progress to develop an appliance which can effectively control the anterior teeth during orthodontic treatment. As it is difficult to meet the requisites of all cases with a standard appliance, several biomechanical principles are being thought of, to overcome the difficulties. Controlling the torque is one of the toughest challenges a clinician faces during lingual sliding mechanics. The challenge posed may be attributed to the moment generated in the maxillary anterior teeth during lingual retraction, considering the biomechanical correlation between the center of resistance of maxillary anterior teeth and the resultant retraction force vector in lingual orthodontics. There are several ways to counteract the torque loss and at the same time effectively retract the maxillary anterior teeth. This can be achieved either by customizing the lingual bracket base or biomechanically by optimizing the retraction force vector. This article is an effort to emphasize the role of lever arms in optimizing retraction mechanics and torque control in lingual sliding mechanics.

  1. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  2. Project calculation of the steering mechanism hydraulic servo control in motor vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Đukan Majkić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic servo controls are designed to facilitate rotation in place without providing increased ppower to steering wheels. In the initial design phase, the dimensions required for control systems are usually obtained through the calculation of their load when wheels rotate in place, where the torque is calculated empirically. The starting point in the project calculation is thus to determine the hydraulic power steering torque torsional resistance which is then used to determine the maximum value of force i.e. the torque on the stering wheel. The calculation of the control system servo control consists of determining the basic parameters, the required pump capacity, the main dimensions of the hub and the  pipeline and the conditions for the stability of the system control mechanism. Introduction The aim of the calculation of the steering control system is to determine the basic parameters of its components which ensure the fulfilment of requirements of the control system. Calculations are performed in several stages with a simultaneous  detailed constructive analysis of the control system leading to the best variant. At each stage, design and control calculations of the hydraulic servo of the steering mechanism are performed. The design allows the computation to complete the selection of basic dimensions of the amplifer elements, starting from the approved scheme and the basic building loads of approximate values. Calculations control is carried out to clarify the structural solution and to obtain the output characteristics of the control amplifier which are applied in the  estimation of  potential properties of the structure. Project calculation Baseline data must be sufficiently reliable, ie. must correspond to the construction characteristics of the vehicle design and the control system as well as to service conditions..A proper deterimination of the torque calculation of torsional resistance in wheels is of utmost importance. Moment of

  3. Respiratory mechanics and ventilatory control in overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbraecken, Johan; McNicholas, Walter T

    2013-11-20

    The overlap syndrome of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in addition to obesity hypoventilation syndrome, represents growing health concerns, owing to the worldwide COPD and obesity epidemics and related co-morbidities. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to a considerable health burden. The coexistence OSA and COPD seems to occur by chance, but the combination can contribute to worsened symptoms and oxygen desaturation at night, leading to disrupted sleep architecture and decreased sleep quality. Alveolar hypoventilation, ventilation-perfusion mismatch and intermittent hypercapnic events resulting from apneas and hypopneas contribute to the final clinical picture, which is quite different from the "usual" COPD. Obesity hypoventilation has emerged as a relatively common cause of chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure. Its pathophysiology results from complex interactions, among which are respiratory mechanics, ventilatory control, sleep-disordered breathing and neurohormonal disturbances, such as leptin resistance, each of which contributes to varying degrees in individual patients to the development of obesity hypoventilation. This respiratory embarrassment takes place when compensatory mechanisms like increased drive cannot be maintained or become overwhelmed. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis of both disorders is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious cycle. This review outlines the major pathophysiological mechanisms believed to contribute to the development of these specific clinical entities. Knowledge of shared mechanisms in the overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation may help to identify these patients and guide therapy.

  4. Respiratory mechanics and ventilatory control in overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The overlap syndrome of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in addition to obesity hypoventilation syndrome, represents growing health concerns, owing to the worldwide COPD and obesity epidemics and related co-morbidities. These disorders constitute the end points of a spectrum with distinct yet interrelated mechanisms that lead to a considerable health burden. The coexistence OSA and COPD seems to occur by chance, but the combination can contribute to worsened symptoms and oxygen desaturation at night, leading to disrupted sleep architecture and decreased sleep quality. Alveolar hypoventilation, ventilation-perfusion mismatch and intermittent hypercapnic events resulting from apneas and hypopneas contribute to the final clinical picture, which is quite different from the “usual” COPD. Obesity hypoventilation has emerged as a relatively common cause of chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure. Its pathophysiology results from complex interactions, among which are respiratory mechanics, ventilatory control, sleep-disordered breathing and neurohormonal disturbances, such as leptin resistance, each of which contributes to varying degrees in individual patients to the development of obesity hypoventilation. This respiratory embarrassment takes place when compensatory mechanisms like increased drive cannot be maintained or become overwhelmed. Although a unifying concept for the pathogenesis of both disorders is lacking, it seems that these patients are in a vicious cycle. This review outlines the major pathophysiological mechanisms believed to contribute to the development of these specific clinical entities. Knowledge of shared mechanisms in the overlap syndrome and obesity hypoventilation may help to identify these patients and guide therapy. PMID:24256627

  5. A quality control mechanism linking meiotic success to release of ascospores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Guo

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic organisms employ a variety of mechanisms during meiosis to assess and ensure the quality of their gametes. Defects or delays in successful meiotic recombination activate conserved mechanisms to delay the meiotic divisions, but many multicellular eukaryotes also induce cell death programs to eliminate gametes deemed to have failed during meiosis. It is generally thought that yeasts lack such mechanisms. Here, we show that in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defects in meiotic recombination lead to the activation of a checkpoint that is linked to ascus wall endolysis--the process by which spores are released in response to nutritional cues for subsequent germination. Defects in meiotic recombination are sensed as unrepaired DNA damage through the canonical ATM and ATR DNA damage response kinases, and this information is communicated to the machinery that stimulates ascus wall breakdown. Viability of spores that undergo endolysis spontaneously is significantly higher than that seen upon chemical endolysis, demonstrating that this checkpoint contributes to a selective mechanism for the germination of high quality progeny. These results provide the first evidence for the existence of a checkpoint linking germination to meiosis and suggest that analysis solely based on artificial, enzymatic endolysis bypasses an important quality control mechanism in this organism and potentially other ascomycota, which are models widely used to study meiosis.

  6. Automated control of mechanical ventilation during general anaesthesia: study protocol of a bicentric observational study (AVAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Dirk; Miestinger, Georg; Becher, Tobias; Frerichs, Inéz; Weiler, Norbert; Hörmann, Christoph

    2017-05-10

    Automated control of mechanical ventilation during general anaesthesia is not common. A novel system for automated control of most of the ventilator settings was designed and is available on an anaesthesia machine. The 'Automated control of mechanical ventilation during general anesthesia study' (AVAS) is an international investigator-initiated bicentric observational study designed to examine safety and efficacy of the system during general anaesthesia. The system controls mechanical breathing frequency, inspiratory pressure, pressure support, inspiratory time and trigger sensitivity with the aim to keep a patient stable in user adoptable target zones. Adult patients, who are classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I, II or III, scheduled for elective surgery of the upper or lower limb or for peripheral vascular surgery in general anaesthesia without any additional regional anaesthesia technique and who gave written consent for study participation are eligible for study inclusion. Primary endpoint of the study is the frequency of specifically defined adverse events. Secondary endpoints are frequency of normoventilation, hypoventilation and hyperventilation, the time period between switch from controlled ventilation to assisted ventilation, achievement of stable assisted ventilation of the patient, proportion of time within the target zone for tidal volume, end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide as individually set up for each patient by the user, frequency of alarms, frequency distribution of tidal volume, inspiratory pressure, inspiration time, expiration time, end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide and the number of re-intubations. AVAS will be the first clinical study investigating a novel automated system for the control of mechanical ventilation on an anaesthesia machine. The study was approved by the ethics committees of both participating study sites. In case that safety and efficacy are acceptable, a randomised

  7. Temporally Dissociable Mechanisms of Self-Control: Early Attentional Filtering Versus Late Value Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Todd; Rangel, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Optimal decision-making often requires exercising self-control. A growing fMRI literature has implicated the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) in successful self-control, but due to the limitations inherent in BOLD measures of brain activity, the neurocomputational role of this region has not been resolved. Here we exploit the high temporal resolution and whole-brain coverage of event-related potentials (ERPs) to test the hypothesis that dlPFC affects dietary self-control through two different mechanisms: attentional filtering and value modulation. Whereas attentional filtering of sensory input should occur early in the decision process, value modulation should occur later on, after the computation of stimulus values begins. Hungry human subjects were asked to make food choices while we measured neural activity using ERP in a natural condition, in which they responded freely and did not exhibit a tendency to regulate their diet, and in a self-control condition, in which they were given a financial incentive to lose weight. We then measured various neural markers associated with the attentional filtering and value modulation mechanisms across the decision period to test for changes in neural activity during the exercise of self-control. Consistent with the hypothesis, we found evidence for top-down attentional filtering early on in the decision period (150–200 ms poststimulus onset) as well as evidence for value modulation later in the process (450–650 ms poststimulus onset). We also found evidence that dlPFC plays a role in the deployment of both mechanisms. PMID:24285897

  8. Training approaches for the deployment of a mechanical chest compression device: a randomised controlled manikin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Velho, Rochelle M; Quinn, Tom; Devrell, Anne; Lall, Ranjit; Orriss, Barry; Yeung, Joyce; Perkins, Gavin D

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of training strategy on team deployment of a mechanical chest compression device. Randomised controlled manikin trial. Large teaching hospital in the UK. Twenty teams, each comprising three clinicians. Participating individuals were health professionals with intermediate or advanced resuscitation training. Teams were randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive either standard mechanical chest compression device training or pit-crew device training. Training interventions lasted up to 1 h. Performance was measured immediately after training in a standardised simulated cardiac arrest scenario in which teams were required to deploy a mechanical chest compression device. Primary outcome was chest compression flow fraction in the minute preceding the first mechanical chest compression. Secondary outcomes included cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality and mechanical device deployment metrics, and non-technical skill performance. Outcomes were assessed using video recordings of the test scenario. In relation to the primary outcome of chest compression flow fraction in the minute preceding the first mechanical chest compression, we found that pit-crew training was not superior to standard training (0.76 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.79) vs 0.77 (95% CI 0.73 to 0.82), mean difference -0.01 (95% CI -0.06 to 0.03), P=0.572). There was also no difference between groups in performance in relation to any secondary outcome. Pit-crew training, compared with standard training, did not improve team deployment of a mechanical chest device in a simulated cardiac arrest scenario. ISRCTN43049287; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Error correcting mechanisms during antisaccades: contribution of online control during primary saccades and offline control via secondary saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Harleen; Goltz, Herbert C; Wong, Agnes M F; Chandrakumar, Manokaraananthan; Niechwiej-Szwedo, Ewa

    2013-01-01

    Errors in eye movements can be corrected during the ongoing saccade through in-flight modifications (i.e., online control), or by programming a secondary eye movement (i.e., offline control). In a reflexive saccade task, the oculomotor system can use extraretinal information (i.e., efference copy) online to correct errors in the primary saccade, and offline retinal information to generate a secondary corrective saccade. The purpose of this study was to examine the error correction mechanisms in the antisaccade task. The roles of extraretinal and retinal feedback in maintaining eye movement accuracy were investigated by presenting visual feedback at the spatial goal of the antisaccade. We found that online control for antisaccade is not affected by the presence of visual feedback; that is whether visual feedback is present or not, the duration of the deceleration interval was extended and significantly correlated with reduced antisaccade endpoint error. We postulate that the extended duration of deceleration is a feature of online control during volitional saccades to improve their endpoint accuracy. We found that secondary saccades were generated more frequently in the antisaccade task compared to the reflexive saccade task. Furthermore, we found evidence for a greater contribution from extraretinal sources of feedback in programming the secondary "corrective" saccades in the antisaccade task. Nonetheless, secondary saccades were more corrective for the remaining antisaccade amplitude error in the presence of visual feedback of the target. Taken together, our results reveal a distinctive online error control strategy through an extension of the deceleration interval in the antisaccade task. Target feedback does not improve online control, rather it improves the accuracy of secondary saccades in the antisaccade task.

  10. On the Optimally Controlled Hydrostatic Mechanical Drive in Case of Flywheel Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Korsunskii

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An improving dynamic quality of vehicles and enhanced fuel efficiency are gained thanks to the combined power system (CPS, comprising a main energy source - internal combustion engine (ICE with an attained level of the power source - and an auxiliary energy source, i.e. an energy storage device (a flywheel.To solve this problem was developed a mathematical model of CPS comprising internal combustion engine and flywheel energy storage (FES with stepless drive.The stepless drive of the flywheel is made to be hydrostatic mechanical to raise the system efficiency. To reduce the drive weight and simplify the control system in the hydraulic part of the flywheel drive is used only one hydraulic unit being controlled.The paper presents a kinematic diagram of the track-type vehicle equipped with the CPS that has a hydrostatic mechanical drive of the flywheel and a mechanical transmission.A mathematical model of the system comprising an ICE, hydrostatic mechanical drive, and FES with stepless drive has been developed. This mathematical model was used to study the influence of ICE and flywheel drive parameters on the dynamic characteristics of the system.The paper estimates the impact of flywheel energy consumption, pressure in the hydraulic system, and control parameter of hydrostatic mechanical drive on the charging time of FES.The obtained piecewise linear law to control the regulation parameter of the hydraulic unit allows us to minimize the charging time of the flywheel at the short-term stops and in the parking area of a tracked vehicle equipped with a CPS.The causes affecting the performance of ‘ICE – drive – flywheel’ system in the course of the flywheel acceleration are a restricted maximum power of the engine, as well as a limited generating capacity, and a maximum flywheel drive hydro-system pressure.The obtained results allow us to determine rational parameters of the flywheel and the laws of drive control to provide their further

  11. Manufacturing of hydrogel biomaterials with controlled mechanical properties for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedadghavami, Armin; Minooei, Farnaz; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein; Khetani, Sultan; Rezaei Kolahchi, Ahmad; Mashayekhan, Shohreh; Sanati-Nezhad, Amir

    2017-10-15

    Hydrogels have been recognized as crucial biomaterials in the field of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery applications due to their specific characteristics. These biomaterials benefit from retaining a large amount of water, effective mass transfer, similarity to natural tissues and the ability to form different shapes. However, having relatively poor mechanical properties is a limiting factor associated with hydrogel biomaterials. Controlling the biomechanical properties of hydrogels is of paramount importance. In this work, firstly, mechanical characteristics of hydrogels and methods employed for characterizing these properties are explored. Subsequently, the most common approaches used for tuning mechanical properties of hydrogels including but are not limited to, interpenetrating polymer networks, nanocomposites, self-assembly techniques, and co-polymerization are discussed. The performance of different techniques used for tuning biomechanical properties of hydrogels is further compared. Such techniques involve lithography techniques for replication of tissues with complex mechanical profiles; microfluidic techniques applicable for generating gradients of mechanical properties in hydrogel biomaterials for engineering complex human tissues like intervertebral discs, osteochondral tissues, blood vessels and skin layers; and electrospinning techniques for synthesis of hybrid hydrogels and highly ordered fibers with tunable mechanical and biological properties. We finally discuss future perspectives and challenges for controlling biomimetic hydrogel materials possessing proper biomechanical properties. Hydrogels biomaterials are essential constituting components of engineered tissues with the applications in regenerative medicine and drug delivery. The mechanical properties of hydrogels play crucial roles in regulating the interactions between cells and extracellular matrix and directing the cells phenotype and genotype. Despite

  12. Degradation Mechanisms and Lifetime Prediction for Lithium-Ion Batteries -- A Control Perspective: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kandler; Shi, Ying; Santhanagopalan, Shriram

    2015-07-29

    Predictive models of Li-ion battery lifetime must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal, and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. To complicate matters, Li-ion batteries can experience different degradation trajectories that depend on storage and cycling history of the application environment. Rates of degradation are controlled by factors such as temperature history, electrochemical operating window, and charge/discharge rate. We present a generalized battery life prognostic model framework for battery systems design and control. The model framework consists of trial functions that are statistically regressed to Li-ion cell life datasets wherein the cells have been aged under different levels of stress. Degradation mechanisms and rate laws dependent on temperature, storage, and cycling condition are regressed to the data, with multiple model hypotheses evaluated and the best model down-selected based on statistics. The resulting life prognostic model, implemented in state variable form, is extensible to arbitrary real-world scenarios. The model is applicable in real-time control algorithms to maximize battery life and performance. We discuss efforts to reduce lifetime prediction error and accommodate its inevitable impact in controller design.

  13. [Feedback control mechanisms of plant cell expansion]. Progress report, [June 1989--June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, D.J.

    1992-12-31

    We have generated considerable evidence for the significance of wall stress relaxation in the control of plant growth and found that several agents (gibberellin, light, genetic loci for dwarf stature) influence growth rate via alteration of wall relaxation. We have refined our methods for measuring wall relaxation and, moreover, have found that wall relaxation properties bear only a distance relationship to wall mechanical properties. We have garnered novel insights into the nature of cell expansion mechanisms by analyzing spontaneous fluctuations of plant growth rate in seedlings. These experiments involved the application of mathematical techniques for analyzing growth rate fluctuations and the development of new instrumentation for measuring and forcing plant growth in a controlled fashion. These studies conclude that growth rate fluctuations generated by the plant as consequence of a feedback control system. This conclusion has important implications for the nature of wall loosening processes and demands a different framework for thinking about growth control. It also implies the existence of a growth rate sensor.

  14. Driving pressure during assisted mechanical ventilation: Is it controlled by patient brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Xirouchaki, Nectaria; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Younes, Magdy

    2016-07-01

    Tidal volume (VT) is the controlled variable during passive mechanical ventilation (CMV) in order to avoid ventilator-induced-lung-injury. However, recent data indicate that the driving pressure [ΔP; VT to respiratory system compliance (Crs) ratio] is the parameter that best stratifies the risk of death. In order to study which variable (VT or ΔP) is controlled by critically ill patients, 108 previously studied patients were assigned to receive PAV+ (a mode that estimates Crs and permits the patients to select their own breathing pattern) after CMV, were re-analyzed. When patients were switched from CMV to PAV+ they controlled ΔP without constraining VT to narrow limits. VT was increased when the resumption of spontaneous breathing was associated with an increase in Crs. When ΔP was high during CMV, the patients (n=12) decreased it in 58 out of 67 measurements. We conclude that critically ill patients control the driving pressure by sizing the tidal volume to individual respiratory system compliance using appropriate feedback mechanisms aimed at limiting the degree of lung stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms driving pre- and post-stressor repetitive negative thinking: metacognitions, cognitive avoidance, and thought control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Peter M; Moulds, Michelle L; Mahoney, Alison E J

    2013-03-01

    Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is common to multiple emotional disorders and occurs before, during, and following a stressor. One replicated difference between common forms of RNT such as worry and rumination is temporal orientation towards a stressor, with worry being more future-oriented and rumination more past-oriented. Different mechanisms may drive RNT at these different time points. The aim of Study 1 was to examine whether previously demonstrated relationships between post-stressor RNT and mechanisms theorized to drive engagement in RNT, including metacognitive beliefs, cognitive avoidance strategies, and thought control strategies, would be replicated with anticipatory (pre-stressor) RNT. The aim of Study 2 was to replicate these associations in a new sample that completed measures of both pre- and post-stressor RNT. Participants in Study 1 (N = 175) completed the RNT-L in anticipation of a stressor, along with measures of metacognitive beliefs, cognitive avoidance strategies, and thought control strategies. Participants in Study 2 (N = 91) completed the measures both before and after a stressor. Pre- and post-stressor RNT were significantly correlated with all three mechanism measures. Metacognitive beliefs that RNT is uncontrollable and dangerous, and the thought control strategy of punishment, were most consistently and uniquely associated with RNT at both time-points. Replication with clinical samples and with reference to a broader array of stressors is required. The correlational design precluded causal conclusions. Common and possibly some distinct mechanisms drive RNT before and after a stressor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanisms and Control of Self-Emulsification upon Freezing and Melting of Dispersed Alkane Drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkova, Zhulieta; Cholakova, Diana; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Smoukov, Stoyan K

    2017-10-19

    Emulsification requires drop breakage and creation of a large interfacial area between immiscible liquid phases. Usually, high-shear or high-pressure emulsification devices that generate heat and increase the emulsion temperature are used to obtain emulsions with micrometer and submicrometer droplets. Recently, we reported a new, efficient procedure of self-emulsification (Tcholakova et al. Nat. Commun. 2017, 8, 15012), which consists of one to several cycles of freezing and melting of predispersed alkane drops in a coarse oil-in-water emulsion. Within these freeze-thaw cycles of the dispersed drops, the latter burst spontaneously into hundreds and thousands of smaller droplets without using any mechanical agitation. Here, we clarify the main factors and mechanisms, which drive this self-emulsification process, by exploring systematically the effects of the oil and surfactant types, the cooling rate, and the initial drop size. We show that the typical size of the droplets, generated by this method, is controlled by the size of the structural domains formed in the cooling-freezing stage of the procedure. Depending on the leading mechanism, these could be the diameter of the fibers formed upon drop self-shaping or the size of the crystal domains formed at the moment of drop-freezing. Generally, surfactant tails that are 0-2 carbon atoms longer than the oil molecules are most appropriate to observe efficient self-emulsification. The specific requirements for the realization of different mechanisms are clarified and discussed. The relative efficiencies of the three different mechanisms, as a function of the droplet size and cooling procedure, are compared in controlled experiments to provide guidance for understanding and further optimization and scale-up of this self-emulsification process.

  17. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Distributed Heat Transfer Mechanisms: Application to a Membrane Distillation Module

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable desalination technologies are the smart solution for producing fresh water and preserve the environment and energy by using sustainable renewable energy sources. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology which can be driven by renewable energy. It is an innovative method for desalinating seawater and brackish water with high quality production, and the gratitude is to its interesting potentials. MD includes a transfer of water vapor from a feed solution to a permeate solution through a micro-porous hydrophobic membrane, rejecting other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. The process is driven by the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries. Different control applications and supervision techniques would improve the performance and the efficiency of the MD process, however controlling the MD process requires comprehensive mathematical model for the distributed heat transfer mechanisms inside the process. Our objective is to propose a dynamic mathematical model that accounts for the time evolution of the involved heat transfer mechanisms in the process, and to be capable of hosting intermittent energy supplies, besides managing the production rate of the process, and optimizing its energy consumption. Therefore, we propose the 2D Advection-Diffusion Equation model to account for the heat diffusion and the heat convection mechanisms inside the process. Furthermore, experimental validations have proved high agreement between model simulations and experiments with less than 5% relative error. Enhancing the MD production is an anticipated goal, therefore, two main control strategies are proposed. Consequently, we propose a nonlinear controller for a semi-discretized version of the dynamic model to achieve an asymptotic tracking for a desired temperature difference. Similarly, an observer-based feedback control is used to track sufficient temperature difference for better productivity. The second control strategy

  18. Top-Down Control of Visual Alpha Oscillations: Sources of Control Signals and Their Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Rajagovindan, Rajasimhan; Han, Sahng-Min; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    Alpha oscillations (8-12 Hz) are thought to inversely correlate with cortical excitability. Goal-oriented modulation of alpha has been studied extensively. In visual spatial attention, alpha over the region of visual cortex corresponding to the attended location decreases, signifying increased excitability to facilitate the processing of impending stimuli. In contrast, in retention of verbal working memory, alpha over visual cortex increases, signifying decreased excitability to gate out stimulus input to protect the information held online from sensory interference. According to the prevailing model, this goal-oriented biasing of sensory cortex is effected by top-down control signals from frontal and parietal cortices. The present study tests and substantiates this hypothesis by (a) identifying the signals that mediate the top-down biasing influence, (b) examining whether the cortical areas issuing these signals are task-specific or task-independent, and (c) establishing the possible mechanism of the biasing action. High-density human EEG data were recorded in two experimental paradigms: a trial-by-trial cued visual spatial attention task and a modified Sternberg working memory task. Applying Granger causality to both sensor-level and source-level data we report the following findings. In covert visual spatial attention, the regions exerting top-down control over visual activity are lateralized to the right hemisphere, with the dipoles located at the right frontal eye field (FEF) and the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) being the main sources of top-down influences. During retention of verbal working memory, the regions exerting top-down control over visual activity are lateralized to the left hemisphere, with the dipoles located at the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) being the main source of top-down influences. In both experiments, top-down influences are mediated by alpha oscillations, and the biasing effect is likely achieved via an inhibition

  19. Top-down Control of Visual Alpha Oscillations: Sources of Control Signals and Their Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eWang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha oscillations (8 to 12 Hz are thought to inversely correlate with cortical excitability. Goal-oriented modulation of alpha has been studied extensively. In visual spatial attention, alpha over the region of visual cortex corresponding to the attended location decreases, signifying increased excitability to facilitate the processing of impending stimuli. In contrast, in retention of verbal working memory, alpha over visual cortex increases, signifying decreased excitability to gate out stimulus input to protect the information held online from sensory interference. According to the prevailing model, this goal-oriented biasing of sensory cortex is effected by top-down control signals from frontal and parietal cortices. The present study tests and substantiates this hypothesis by (a identifying the signals that mediate the top-down biasing influence, (b examining whether the cortical areas issuing these signals are task-specific or task-independent, and (c establishing the possible mechanism of the biasing action. High-density human EEG data were recorded in two experimental paradigms: a trial-by-trial cued visual spatial attention task and a modified Sternberg working memory task. Applying Granger causality to both sensor-level and source-level data we report the following findings. In covert visual spatial attention, the regions exerting top-down control over visual activity are lateralized to the right hemisphere, with the dipoles located at the right frontal eye field (FEF and the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG being the main sources of top-down influences. During retention of verbal working memory, the regions exerting top-down control over visual activity are lateralized to the left hemisphere, with the dipoles located at the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG being the main source of top-down influences. In both experiments, top-down influences are mediated by alpha oscillations, and the biasing effect is likely achieved via an

  20. Possibilities for Automatic Control of Hydro-Mechanical Transmission and Birotating Electric Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Mikhailov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents mathematical models and results of virtual investigations pertaining to the selected motion parameters of a mobile machine equipped with hydro mechanical and modernized transmissions. The machine has been tested in similar technological cycles and it has been equipped with a universal automatic control system. Changes in structure and type of power transmission have been obtained with the help of a control algorithm including an extra reversible electric machine which is switched in at some operational modes.Implementation of the proposed  concept makes it possible to obtain and check the improved C-code of the control system and enhance operational parameters of the transmission and machine efficiency, reduce slippage and tire wear while using braking energy for its later beneficial use which is usually considered as a consumable element.

  1. Controlled membrane translocation provides a mechanism for signal transduction and amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J.; Keymeulen, Flore; Ciaccia, Maria; Williams, Nicholas H.; Hunter, Christopher A.

    2017-05-01

    Transmission and amplification of chemical signals across lipid bilayer membranes is of profound significance in many biological processes, from the development of multicellular organisms to information processing in the nervous system. In biology, membrane-spanning proteins are responsible for the transmission of chemical signals across membranes, and signal transduction is often associated with an amplified signalling cascade. The ability to reproduce such processes in artificial systems has potential applications in sensing, controlled drug delivery and communication between compartments in tissue-like constructs of synthetic vesicles. Here we describe a mechanism for transmitting a chemical signal across a membrane based on the controlled translocation of a synthetic molecular transducer from one side of a lipid bilayer membrane to the other. The controlled molecular motion has been coupled to the activation of a catalyst on the inside of a vesicle, which leads to a signal-amplification process analogous to the biological counterpart.

  2. Modal control of mechanically coupled NEMS arrays for tunable RF filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharrat, Chady; Colinet, Eric; Duraffourg, Laurent; Hentz, Sebastien; Andreucci, Philippe; Voda, Alina

    2010-06-01

    A novel tuning strategy of nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS)-based filters is proposed based on the modal control of mechanically coupled NEMS arrays. This is done by adjusting separately addressed distributed actuation and detection configurations proportionally to desired modal vectors. This control scheme enhances the global output signal, raising the power handling of the filter on all channels. Although the modal control of 1-D arrays exhibits narrow-band responses with adjustable resonance frequency, its application to 2-D arrays produces filters with both adjustable bandwidth and central frequency. One possible realization scheme is suggested by using electrostatically driven coupled NEMS arrays whose transduction gains are adjusted by changing the electrodes¿ bias voltages. Dispersion effects on both 1-D array and 2-D array frequency response are analytically expressed using eigenvalues perturbation theory. Based on these results, we show how to reduce their impact by appropriately choosing the coupling stiffness and the number of resonators.

  3. New Insights into Mechanisms Controlling the NLRP3 Inflammasome and Its Role in Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nardo, Dominic; De Nardo, Christine M.; Latz, Eicke

    2015-01-01

    Inflammasomes are large macromolecular signaling complexes that control the proteolytic activation of two highly proinflammatory IL-1 family cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18. The NLRP3 inflammasome is of special interest because it can assemble in response to a diverse array of stimuli and because the inflammation it triggers has been implicated in a wide variety of disease pathologies. To avoid aberrant activation, the NLRP3 inflammasome is modulated on multiple levels, ranging from transcriptional control to post-translational protein modifications. Emerging genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests that NLRP3 inflammasome activation may also be involved in acute lung inflammation after viral infection and during progression of several chronic pulmonary diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma. Here, we review the most recent contributions to our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome and discuss the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome to the pathology of lung diseases. PMID:24183846

  4. Coupling characteristics and control of dual mechanical port machine with spoke type permanent magnet arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Xingming; Song, Qiang; Wen, Xuhui; Zhao, Feng; Fan, Tao

    2014-11-01

    Dual mechanical port machine(DMPM), as a novel electromechanical energy conversion device, has attracted widespread attention. DMPM with spoke type permanent magnet arrangements(STPM-DMPM), which is one of several types of DMPM, has been of interest recently. The unique coupling characteristics of STPM-DMPM are beneficial to improving system performance, but these same characteristics increase the difficulties of control. Now there has been little research about the control of STPM-DMPM, and this has hindered its practical application. Based on a mathematical model of STPM-DMPM, the coupling characteristics and the merits and demerits of such devices are analyzed as applied to a hybrid system. The control strategies for improving the disadvantages and for utilizing the advantage of coupling are researched. In order to weaken the interaction effect of torque outputs in the inner motor and the outer motor that results from coupling in STPM-DMPM, a decoupling control method based on equivalent current control is proposed, and independent torque control for the inner motor and outer motor is achieved. In order to solve address the problem of adequately utilization of coupling, minimizing the overall copper loss of the inner motor and the outer motor of STPM-DMPM is taken as the optimization objective for optimal control, and the purpose of utilizing the coupling adequately and reasonably is achieved. The verification tests of the proposed decoupling control and optimal control strategies are carried out on a prototype STPM-DMPM, and the experimental results show that the interaction effect of torque outputs in the inner motor and the outer motor can be markedly weakened through use of the control method. The overall copper loss of the inner motor and the outer motor can be markedly reduced through use of the optimal control method, while the power output remains unchanged. A breakthrough in the control problem of STPM-DMPM is accomplished by combining the control

  5. Nonlinear observer-based Lyapunov boundary control of distributed heat transfer mechanisms for membrane distillation plant

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2016-09-19

    This paper presents a nonlinear observer-based Lyapunov control for a membrane distillation (MD) process. The control considers the inlet temperatures of the feed and the permeate solutions as inputs, transforming it to boundary control process, and seeks to maintain the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries around a sufficient level to promote water production. MD process is modeled with advection diffusion equation model in two dimensions, where the diffusion and convection heat transfer mechanisms are best described. Model analysis, effective order reduction and parameters physical interpretation, are provided. Moreover, a nonlinear observer has been designed to provide the control with estimates of the temperature evolution at each time instant. In addition, physical constraints are imposed on the control to have an acceptable range of feasible inputs, and consequently, better energy consumption. Numerical simulations for the complete process with real membrane parameter values are provided, in addition to detailed explanations for the role of the controller and the observer. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. System identification of closed-loop cardiovascular control mechanisms: diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, R.; Mathias, J. M.; Mullen, T. J.; Cohen, R. J.; Freeman, R.

    1999-01-01

    We applied cardiovascular system identification (CSI) to characterize closed-loop cardiovascular regulation in patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). The CSI method quantitatively analyzes beat-to-beat fluctuations in noninvasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV) to characterize four physiological coupling mechanisms, two of which are autonomically mediated (the heart rate baroreflex and the coupling of respiration, measured in terms of ILV, to heart rate) and two of which are mechanically mediated (the coupling of ventricular contraction to the generation of the ABP wavelet and the coupling of respiration to ABP). We studied 37 control and 60 diabetic subjects who were classified as having minimal, moderate, or severe DAN on the basis of standard autonomic tests. The autonomically mediated couplings progressively decreased with increasing severity of DAN, whereas the mechanically mediated couplings were essentially unchanged. CSI identified differences between the minimal DAN and control groups, which were indistinguishable based on the standard autonomic tests. CSI may provide a powerful tool for assessing DAN.

  7. A dual flow bioreactor with controlled mechanical stimulation for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitters, Tim W G M; Leijten, Jeroen C H; Deus, Filipe D; Costa, Ines B F; van Apeldoorn, Aart A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Karperien, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    In cartilage, tissue engineering bioreactors can create a controlled environment to study chondrocyte behavior under mechanical stimulation or produce chondrogenic grafts of clinically relevant size. Here we present a novel bioreactor that combines mechanical stimulation with a two compartment system through which nutrients can be supplied solely by diffusion from opposite sides of a tissue-engineered construct. This design is based on the hypothesis that creating gradients of nutrients, growth factors, and growth factor antagonists can aid in the generation of zonal tissue-engineered cartilage. Computational modeling predicted that the design facilitates the creation of a biologically relevant glucose gradient. This was confirmed by quantitative glucose measurements in cartilage explants. In this system, it is not only possible to create gradients of nutrients, but also of anabolic or catabolic factors. Therefore, the bioreactor design allows control over nutrient supply and mechanical stimulation useful for in vitro generation of cartilage constructs that can be used for the resurfacing of articulated joints or as a model for studying osteoarthritis disease progression.

  8. Implementation of Statistical Process Control: Evaluating the Mechanical Performance of a Candidate Silicone Elastomer Docking Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravec, Heather Ann; Daniels, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been developing a novel docking system to meet the requirements of future exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and beyond. A dynamic gas pressure seal is located at the main interface between the active and passive mating components of the new docking system. This seal is designed to operate in the harsh space environment, but is also to perform within strict loading requirements while maintaining an acceptable level of leak rate. In this study, a candidate silicone elastomer seal was designed, and multiple subscale test articles were manufactured for evaluation purposes. The force required to fully compress each test article at room temperature was quantified and found to be below the maximum allowable load for the docking system. However, a significant amount of scatter was observed in the test results. Due to the stochastic nature of the mechanical performance of this candidate docking seal, a statistical process control technique was implemented to isolate unusual compression behavior from typical mechanical performance. The results of this statistical analysis indicated a lack of process control, suggesting a variation in the manufacturing phase of the process. Further investigation revealed that changes in the manufacturing molding process had occurred which may have influenced the mechanical performance of the seal. This knowledge improves the chance of this and future space seals to satisfy or exceed design specifications.

  9. Prickle isoforms control the direction of tissue polarity by microtubule independent and dependent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Sharp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity signaling directs the polarization of cells within the plane of many epithelia. While these tissues exhibit asymmetric localization of a set of core module proteins, in Drosophila, more than one mechanism links the direction of core module polarization to the tissue axes. One signaling system establishes a polarity bias in the parallel, apical microtubules upon which vesicles containing core proteins traffic. Swapping expression of the differentially expressed Prickle isoforms, Prickle and Spiny-legs, reverses the direction of core module polarization. Studies in the proximal wing and the anterior abdomen indicated that this results from their differential control of microtubule polarity. Prickle and Spiny-legs also control the direction of polarization in the distal wing (D-wing and the posterior abdomen (P-abd. We report here that this occurs without affecting microtubule polarity in these tissues. The direction of polarity in the D-wing is therefore likely determined by a novel mechanism independent of microtubule polarity. In the P-abd, Prickle and Spiny-legs interpret at least two directional cues through a microtubule-polarity-independent mechanism.

  10. Control of Mechanical Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethane Elastomers by Restriction of Crystallization of Soft Segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadaharu Nakamura

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers based on either polyether or polycarbonate (PC-glycols, 4,4’-dipheylmethane diisocyanate (1,1’-methylenebis(4-isocyanatobenzene, 1,4-butanediol, were controlled by restriction of crystallization of polymer glycols. For the polyether glycol based-polyurethane elastomers (PUEs, poly(oxytetramethylene glycol (PTMG, and PTMG incorporating dimethyl groups (PTG-X and methyl side groups (PTG-L were employed as a polymer glycol. For the PC-glycol, the randomly copolymerized PC-glycols with hexamethylene (C6 and tetramethylene (C4 units between carbonate groups with various composition ratios (C4/C6 = 0/100, 50/50, 70/30 and 90/10 were employed. The degree of microphase separation and mechanical properties of both the PUEs were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic viscoelastic property measurements and tensile testing. Mechanical properties could be controlled by changing the molar ratio of two different monomer components.

  11. Dexmedetomidine vs midazolam or propofol for sedation during prolonged mechanical ventilation: two randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Stephan M; Ruokonen, Esko; Grounds, R Michael; Sarapohja, Toni; Garratt, Chris; Pocock, Stuart J; Bratty, J Raymond; Takala, Jukka

    2012-03-21

    Long-term sedation with midazolam or propofol in intensive care units (ICUs) has serious adverse effects. Dexmedetomidine, an α(2)-agonist available for ICU sedation, may reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and enhance patient comfort. To determine the efficacy of dexmedetomidine vs midazolam or propofol (preferred usual care) in maintaining sedation; reducing duration of mechanical ventilation; and improving patients' interaction with nursing care. Two phase 3 multicenter, randomized, double-blind trials carried out from 2007 to 2010. The MIDEX trial compared midazolam with dexmedetomidine in ICUs of 44 centers in 9 European countries; the PRODEX trial compared propofol with dexmedetomidine in 31 centers in 6 European countries and 2 centers in Russia. Included were adult ICU patients receiving mechanical ventilation who needed light to moderate sedation for more than 24 hours (midazolam, n = 251, vs dexmedetomidine, n = 249; propofol, n = 247, vs dexmedetomidine, n = 251). Sedation with dexmedetomidine, midazolam, or propofol; daily sedation stops; and spontaneous breathing trials. For each trial, we tested whether dexmedetomidine was noninferior to control with respect to proportion of time at target sedation level (measured by Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale) and superior to control with respect to duration of mechanical ventilation. Secondary end points were patients' ability to communicate pain (measured using a visual analogue scale [VAS]) and length of ICU stay. Time at target sedation was analyzed in per-protocol population (midazolam, n = 233, vs dexmedetomidine, n = 227; propofol, n = 214, vs dexmedetomidine, n = 223). Dexmedetomidine/midazolam ratio in time at target sedation was 1.07 (95% CI, 0.97-1.18) and dexmedetomidine/propofol, 1.00 (95% CI, 0.92-1.08). Median duration of mechanical ventilation appeared shorter with dexmedetomidine (123 hours [IQR, 67-337]) vs midazolam (164 hours [IQR, 92-380]; P = .03) but not with dexmedetomidine

  12. Probing cell structure by controlling the mechanical environment with cell-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chao-Min; Steward, Robert L; LeDuc, Philip R

    2009-01-19

    Recent results demonstrate the exquisite sensitivity of cell morphology and structure to mechanical stimulation. Mechanical stimulation is often coupled with cell-substrate interactions that can, in turn, influence molecular response and determine cellular fates including apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. To understand these effects as they specifically relate to compressive mechanical stimulation and topographic control, we developed a microfabricated system to grow cells on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel surfaces where we maintained compression stimulation. We also probed cellular response following compressive mechanical stimulation to PDMS substrates of varying stiffness. In these instances, we examined cytoskeletal and morphologic changes in living cells attached to our substrate following the application of localized compressive stimulation. We found that the overall morphology and cell structure, including the actin cytoskeleton, oriented in the direction of the compressive strain applied and along the topographic microchannels. Furthermore by comparing topographic response to material stiffness, we found a 40% increase in cell area for cells cultured on the microchannels versus softer PDMS as well as a decreased cell area of 30% when using softer PDMS over unmodified PDMS. These findings have implications for research in a diversity of fields including cell-material interactions, mechanotransduction, and tissue engineering.

  13. In Situ Dual Cross-Linking of Neat Biogel with Controlled Mechanical and Delivery Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmansky, Regina; Shagan, Alona; Rozenblit, Boris; Omar, Rawan; Lufton, Maayan; Mizrahi, Boaz

    2017-10-02

    Injectable biomaterials play a critical role in many biomedical applications. These materials, however, often have limitations in mechanical and drug-eluting properties attributed to their high water content and the weak secondary forces holding them together. Here we describe a new injectable material based on two complementary water-free, prepolymers modified with succinimidyl carbonate (SC) or with NH 2 end groups that form a stiff matrix upon mixing. Cross-linking involves an immediate reaction between PEG 4 -SC and PEG 4 -NH 2 that forms carbamate bonds and a delayed reaction of PEG 4 -SC with hydroxyl functional groups that forms carbonate bonds. The mechanical properties, swelling, and erosion kinetics of this biomaterial can be fine-tuned by varying the ratio between the two prepolymers. Bovine serum albumin and poorly water-soluble free base doxorubicin were readily loaded into this system, resulting in a high drug loading content attributed to the absence of water in the formulation. Controlled release over a period of 1 to 30 days was observed, depending on mixture composition and drug properties. The injectable nature of the formulation, its tailored mechanical properties, the fact that it can be cross-linked by two separate mechanisms, and its ability to incorporate and release hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs make it very attractive as a drug delivery system.

  14. Mechanically strengthened new Hagi porcelain developed by controlling the chemical environment of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubuki, Shiro; Iwanuma, Jun; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Mikuni, Akira; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2012-05-01

    In order to enhance the mechanical strength of Hagi Porcelain (Hagiyaki), one of the oldest and famous potteries in Japan, new preparation condition was examined. Tempered Hagi porcelain, denominated as ` Hagi Porcelain B', was prepared with the Porcelain clay originating from Daido district, Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. Structural change of ` Hagi Porcelain B' was investigated by means of 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and three-point bending test. Mechanical strength of the ` original Hagi Porcelain B' was estimated to be 43.1 MPa by means of the three-point bending test, while much larger value of 104.5 MPa could be achieved when tempered by a chemical modification. Mössbauer spectrum of the ` original Hagi porcelain B' was composed of a paramagnetic doublet and a magnetic sextet due to Fe(III) of γ-Fe2O3(maghemite), while only one paramagnetic doublet due to to octahedral Fe(II)O6 was observed for the ` tempered Hagi Porcelain B' with isomer shift and quadrupole splitting values of 1.13 and 2.15 mm s-1, respectively. It is considered that the absence of magnetic phase causes an increase of the mechanical strength because the maghemite phase has a defect spinel structure. These results indicate that mechanical strength of the ` Hagi porcelain B' could be enhanced by controlling the sintering condition.

  15. Control of Natural Zeolite Properties by Mechanical Activation in Stirred Media Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohács K.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the special characteristics of zeolites, they can be applied in a very wide range of industries, i.e. agricultural, environmental or water treatment purposes. Generally, high added value zeolite products are manufactured by micro- or nanogrinding. However, these processes require high energy input and cause significant wearing of the mill parts. Therefore, the optimization of zeolite grinding, as well as the control of its properties are of a great importance. In the present paper a Hungarian natural zeolite was mechanically activated in stirred media mill for various residence times in distilled water, meanwhile the particle size distribution and the grinding energy were measured. Additionally, on-line tube rheometer was used to study the rheology of the suspension during the grinding process. The particle interaction and the suspension aggregation stability were detected by zeta-potential measurements. Structural changes due to the mechanical activation process were monitored by FTIR. It was found that the material structure of the zeolite, as well as the rheological behaviour of the zeolite suspension and its aggregation stability had been altered due to the mechanical activation in the stirred media mill. It can be concluded that the zeolite product properties can be modified by mechanical activation in order to produce a high added value tailored material.

  16. Quaternion regularization and trajectory motion control in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics: II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelnokov, Yu. N.

    2014-07-01

    Problems of regularization in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are considered, and basic regular quaternion models for celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are presented. It is shown that the effectiveness of analytical studies and numerical solutions to boundary value problems of controlling the trajectory motion of spacecraft can be improved by using quaternion models of astrodynamics. In this second part of the paper, specific singularity-type features (division by zero) are considered. They result from using classical equations in angular variables (particularly in Euler variables) in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics and can be eliminated by using Euler (Rodrigues-Hamilton) parameters and Hamilton quaternions. Basic regular (in the above sense) quaternion models of celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are considered; these include equations of trajectory motion written in nonholonomic, orbital, and ideal moving trihedrals whose rotational motions are described by Euler parameters and quaternions of turn; and quaternion equations of instantaneous orbit orientation of a celestial body (spacecraft). New quaternion regular equations are derived for the perturbed three-dimensional two-body problem (spacecraft trajectory motion). These equations are constructed using ideal rectangular Hansen coordinates and quaternion variables, and they have additional advantages over those known for regular Kustaanheimo-Stiefel equations.

  17. Quaternion regularization in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics and trajectory motion control. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelnokov, Yu. N.

    2013-09-01

    Regularization problems in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are considered. The fundamental regular quaternion models of celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are presented. It is shown that the efficiency of analytical investigation and numerical solution of boundary problems of optimal trajectory motion control of spacecraft may be increased using quaternion astrodynamics models. The regularization problem of celestial mechanics and astrodynamics that implies eliminating the feature, which arises in the equations of the two-body problem in case of impact of the second body with the central body, is considered in the first section of the paper. The quaternion method for regularizing the equations of the perturbed spatial two-body problem suggested by the author is presented; the method is compared with Kustaanheimo-Stiefel (KS) regularization. Demonstrative geometric and kinematic interpretations of regularizing transformations are provided. Regular quaternion equations for the two-body problem, which generalize the regular Kustaanheimo-Stiefel equations, as well as regular equations in quaternion osculating elements and quaternion regular equations for perturbed central motion of a material point, are considered. The papers on quaternion regularization in celestial mechanics and astrodynamics are briefly analyzed.

  18. Matrix mechanics and fluid shear stress control stem cells fate in three dimensional microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guobao; Lv, Yonggang; Guo, Pan; Lin, Chongwen; Zhang, Xiaomei; Yang, Li; Xu, Zhiling

    2013-07-01

    Stem cells have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple mature cell types during early life and growth. Stem cells adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation are affected by biochemical, mechanical and physical surface properties of the surrounding matrix in which stem cells reside and stem cells can sensitively feel and respond to the microenvironment of this matrix. More and more researches have proven that three dimensional (3D) culture can reduce the gap between cell culture and physiological environment where cells always live in vivo. This review summarized recent findings on the studies of matrix mechanics that control stem cells (primarily mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)) fate in 3D environment, including matrix stiffness and extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness. Considering the exchange of oxygen and nutrients in 3D culture, the effect of fluid shear stress (FSS) on fate decision of stem cells was also discussed in detail. Further, the difference of MSCs response to matrix stiffness between two dimensional (2D) and 3D conditions was compared. Finally, the mechanism of mechanotransduction of stem cells activated by matrix mechanics and FSS in 3D culture was briefly pointed out.

  19. Effectiveness of procedures for the chemical-mechanical control of dental biofilm in orthodontic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Karla Magalhães; Goursand, Daniela; Zenobio, Elton Gonçalves; Cruz, Roberval Almeida

    2010-03-01

    Assess the effectiveness of chemical-mechanical control associated with orientation and motivation for the control of dental biofilm in orthodontic patients. Thirty patients between 12 and 21 years of age wearing a fixed orthodontic appliance were divided into three groups. The control group (G1) received orientation regarding oral hygiene. The experimental groups (G2 and G3) received orientation regarding oral hygiene and diet as well as a hygiene kit and mouthwash; the mouthwash given to G2 was a placebo and that given to G3 contained essential oils (Listerine). In the comparison between T0 and T60, vestibular gingivitis was worse in G1 (p<0.05), with no statistically significant differences regarding lingual gingivitis and biofilm. G2 and G3 exhibited a significant improvement in clinical conditions. In the comparison between groups, G3 had undergone a significantly greater improvement than the other groups. The use of the commercial mouthwash, together with mechanical oral hygiene, orientation, and motivation, proved to be adequate conduct for the maintenance of oral health in orthodontic patients. The present study contributes toward the maintenance of oral health in patients who wear a fixed orthodontic appliance through the prevention of dental biofilm buildup.

  20. Gait asymmetry of transfemoral amputees using mechanical and microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Kenton R; Frittoli, Serena; Frigo, Carlo A

    2012-06-01

    Amputees walk with an asymmetrical gait, which may lead to future musculoskeletal degenerative changes. The purpose of this study was to compare the gait asymmetry of active transfemoral amputees while using a passive mechanical knee joint or a microprocessor-controlled knee joint. Objective 3D gait measurements were obtained in 15 subjects (12 men and 3 women; age 42, range 26-57). Research participants were longtime users of a mechanical prosthesis (mean 20 years, range 3-36 years). Joint symmetry was calculated using a novel method that includes the entire waveform throughout the gait cycle. There was no significant difference in hip, knee and ankle kinematics symmetry when using the different knee prostheses. In contrast, the results demonstrated a significant improvement in lower extremity joint kinetics symmetry when using the microprocessor-controlled knee. Use of the microprocessor-controlled knee joint resulted in improved gait symmetry. These improvements may lead to a reduction in the degenerative musculoskeletal changes often experienced by amputees. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nitrogen availability as a control mechanism of secondary succession within a semiarid shrubland ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redente, E.F.; McLendon, T.

    1992-09-25

    Three experiments were conducted within a semiarid shrubland to test the role of nitrogen availability as a control mechanism in secondary succession. Secondary succession patterns were documented for seven years and effects of increased and decreased N availability levels, fumigation, and competition by early-seral species were tested. Differential responses by seral species were determined and related to successional patterns. Nitrogen availability was found to be a primary mechanism controlling the rate of succession. Relative growth rate was an important factor determining which species initially dominated and N availability became the primary control factor by the third year. As N availability increased, the rate of succession decreased. Conversely, as N availability was decreased, the rate of succession increased. The abundance of annuals was increased and abundance of perennials decreased by increased N availability. Tissue N concentration was related to lifeform and seral position, and these relationships were important in the transition from early- to mid-seral stages. Decomposer subsystem dynamics were correlated with seral community dynamics. The effect of fumigation was minimized by initially planting with late-seral species. A conceptual model of secondary succession is presented based on N availability, relative growth rate, lifeform, and decomposition dynamics.

  2. [Central Pattern Generators: Mechanisms of the Activity and Their Role in the Control of "Automatic" Movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshavsky, I; Deliagina, T G; Orlovsky, G N

    2015-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are a set of interconnected neurons capable of generating a basic pattern of motor output underlying "automatic" movements (breathing, locomotion, chewing, swallowing, and so on) in the absence of afferent signals from the executive motor apparatus. They can be divided into the constitutive CPGs active throughout the entire lifetime (respiratory CPGs) and conditional CPGs controlling episodic movements (locomotion, chewing, swallowing, and others). Since a motor output of CPGs is determined by their internal organization, the activities of the conditional CPGs are initiated by simple commands coming from higher centers. We describe the structural and functional organization of the locomotor CPGs in the marine mollusk Clione limacina, lamprey, frog embryo, and laboratory mammals (cat, mouse, and rat), CPGs controlling the respiratory and swallowing movements in mammals, and CPGs controlling discharges of the electric organ in the gymnotiform fish. It is shown that in all these cases, the generation of rhythmic motor output is based both on the endogenous (pacemaker) activity of specific groups of interneurons and on interneural interactions. These two interrelated mechanisms complement each other, ensuring the high reliability of CPG functionality. We discuss how the experience obtained in studying CPGs can be used to understand mechanisms of more complex functions of the brain, including its cognitive functions.

  3. Research on the business QoS and trustworthy and controllable strategies mechanism for energy internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Geng; Lu, Meiling; Zhang, Dahua; Zhou, Liang; Li, Likang

    2017-01-01

    Energy internet is a kind of power sharing network, which can realize the bidirectional flow of energy information on the basis of the existing power grid. It puts forward higher requirements for reliability and controllability of information communication, and all kinds of business QoS of the backbone network. So the research of business QoS and trustworthy and controllable strategies mechanism have an important significance for the development of energy internet. This paper mainly studies how to use the software defined network (SDN) to achieve business QoS, and provide QoS support for all kinds of business of the energy internet. Combined with the current development situation of the energy internet in our country, this paper researches the trustworthy and controllable strategies mechanism for energy internet, and proposes the transition scheme of the IPv6 credible network architecture based on SDN. This coordinates the contradiction between the growing demand for energy internet applications and the limitations of the energy internet technology itself.

  4. Tendon-Sheath Mechanisms in Flexible Membrane Wing Mini-UAVs: Control and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tegoeh Tjahjowidodo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible membrane wings (FMWs are known for two inherent advantages, that is, adaptability to gusty airflow as the wings can flex according to the gust load to reduce the effective angle of attack and the ability to be folded for compact storage purposes. However, the maneuverability of UAV with FMWs is rather limited as it is impossible to install conventional ailerons. The maneuver relies only on the rudders. Some applications utilize torque rods to warp the wings, but this approach makes the FMW become unfoldable. In this research, we proposed the application of a tendon-sheath mechanism to manipulate the wing shape of UAV. Tendon-sheath mechanism is relatively flexible; thus, it can also be folded together with the wings. However, its severe nonlinearity in its dynamics makes the wing warping difficult to control. To compensate for the nonlinearity, a dedicated adaptive controller is designed and implemented. The proposed approach is validated experimentally in a wind tunnel facility with imitated gusty condition and subsequently tested in a real flight condition. The results demonstrate a stable and robust wing warping actuation, while the adaptive washout capability is also validated. Accurate wing warping is achieved and the UAV is easily controlled in a real flight test.

  5. Local control of the resistivity of graphene through mechanically induced switching of a ferroelectric superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humed Yusuf, Mohammed; Gura, Anna; Du, Xu; Dawber, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    We exploit nanoscale mechanically induced switching of an artificially layered ferroelectric material, used as an active substrate, to achieve the local manipulation of the electrical transport properties of graphene. In Graphene Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistors (GFeFETs), the graphene channel’s charge state is controlled by an underlying ferroelectric layer. The tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) can be used to mechanically ‘write’ nanoscale regions of the graphene channel and ‘read’ off the modulation in the transport behavior. The written features associated with the switching of ferroelectric domains remain polarized until an electrical reset operation is carried out. Our result provides a method for flexible and reversible nano-scale manipulation of the transport properties of a broad class of 2D materials.

  6. External control of anodic dissolution mechanisms of 100Cr6 in nitrate/chloride mixed electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREAS LESCH

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The anodic dissolution of 100Cr6 steel in neutral electrolytes containing sodium chloride and sodium nitrate was investigated potentiodynamically and galvanodynamically with a rotating disc electrode at room temperature. The total concentration of the mixed electrolyte was 3 mol L-1 with variation of chloride/nitrate mole ratios. The potentiodynamic linear sweep voltammograms (LSVs in mixed electrolytes are similar to the LSVs in pure chloride electrolyte at lower current densities and switch to behaviour observed in pure nitrate electrolytes at higher current densities. Provided that both anions are present, it seems that the dissolution reactions at the steel anode are determined by the interface layer only. The effect of these layers on surface quality and current efficiency was also investigated in a flow channel applying galvanostatic pulses. An evidence for different dissolution mechanisms can be seen with an important influence of duty cycle and flow conditions. This allows external control of the desired dissolution mechanism in mixed electrolytes.

  7. A Novel Nonsurgical Treatment for Pincer Nail That Involves Mechanical Force Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi Sano, MD, PhD

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We hypothesize that nails have an automatic curvature feature and that their flat shape is maintained by the daily upward mechanical forces from the finger/toe pad. Thus, nail deformities, such as pincer nail, spoon nail, and koilonychias, may be caused by an imbalance between these forces and can be treated by controlling these forces. Here, we report the case of a 55-year-old man whose severe pincer nail was effectively treated by thinning the nail, which reduced the automatic curvature force. This is the first report to show that pincer nail can be treated by a nonsurgical method that reduces the automatic curvature force, thus obviating the need for surgery. This supports the notion that mechanical stimulus–based treatments have high therapeutic potential for nail deformities.

  8. Controllable fatigue cracking mechanisms of copper bicrystals with a coherent twin boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L L; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, P; Wang, Z G; Zhang, Z F

    2014-03-26

    High-angle grain boundaries are always the preferential fatigue cracking sites, while the intrinsic fatigue cracking mechanism of coherent twin boundary remains elusive. Here we systematically investigate the fatigue cracking behaviours of copper bicrystals with a coherent twin boundary as their sole internal boundary. It is found with direct experimental evidence for the first time that, unlike the random grain boundaries, the cracking behaviour of the twin boundary strongly depends on its orientation with respect to the loading direction. When the twin boundary is parallel or perpendicular to the loading direction, the fatigue cracks nucleate along the slip bands preferentially; when it is inclined at an angle to the loading direction, the fatigue crack is especially apt to nucleate along the twin boundary first. The controllable fatigue cracking mechanisms of the twin boundary may provide new and important implications for the optimized interfacial design of the high-performance materials.

  9. Regulatory RNAs and control of epigenetic mechanisms: expectations for cognition and cognitive dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Anderson A; Webb, William M; Lubin, Farah D

    2016-01-01

    The diverse functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can influence virtually every aspect of the transcriptional process including epigenetic regulation of genes. In the CNS, regulatory RNA networks and epigenetic mechanisms have broad relevance to gene transcription changes involved in long-term memory formation and cognition. Thus, it is becoming increasingly clear that multiple classes of ncRNAs impact neuronal development, neuroplasticity, and cognition. Currently, a large gap exists in our knowledge of how ncRNAs facilitate epigenetic processes, and how this phenomenon affects cognitive function. In this review, we discuss recent findings highlighting a provocative role for ncRNAs including lncRNAs and piRNAs in the control of epigenetic mechanisms involved in cognitive function. Furthermore, we discuss the putative roles for these ncRNAs in cognitive disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26366811

  10. Regulatory RNAs and control of epigenetic mechanisms: expectations for cognition and cognitive dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Anderson A; Webb, William M; Lubin, Farah D

    2016-01-01

    The diverse functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) can influence virtually every aspect of the transcriptional process including epigenetic regulation of genes. In the CNS, regulatory RNA networks and epigenetic mechanisms have broad relevance to gene transcription changes involved in long-term memory formation and cognition. Thus, it is becoming increasingly clear that multiple classes of ncRNAs impact neuronal development, neuroplasticity, and cognition. Currently, a large gap exists in our knowledge of how ncRNAs facilitate epigenetic processes, and how this phenomenon affects cognitive function. In this review, we discuss recent findings highlighting a provocative role for ncRNAs including lncRNAs and piRNAs in the control of epigenetic mechanisms involved in cognitive function. Furthermore, we discuss the putative roles for these ncRNAs in cognitive disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.

  11. Photosynthesis Control: An underrated short-term regulatory mechanism essential for plant viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Monica; Suorsa, Marjaana; Rossi, Fabio; Ferrari, Roberto; Tadini, Luca; Barbato, Roberto; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of photosynthetic electron transport provides efficient performance of oxygenic photosynthesis in plants. During the last 15 years, the molecular bases of various photosynthesis short-term regulatory processes have been elucidated, however the wild type-like phenotypes of mutants lacking of State Transitions, Non Photochemical Quenching, or Cyclic Electron Transport, when grown under constant light conditions, have also raised doubts about the acclimatory significance of these short-regulatory mechanisms on plant performance. Interestingly, recent studies performed by growing wild type and mutant plants under field conditions revealed a prominent role of State Transitions and Non Photochemical Quenching on plant fitness, with almost no effect on vegetative plant growth. Conversely, the analysis of plants lacking the regulation of electron transport by the cytochrome b6f complex, also known as Photosynthesis Control, revealed the fundamental role of this regulatory mechanism in the survival of young, developing seedlings under fluctuating light conditions.

  12. Dynamic Analysis and Control of Lightweight Manipulators with Flexible Parallel Link Mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeh Won

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the theoretical analysis and the experimental verification of dynamics and control of a two link flexible manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism. Nonlinear equations of motion of the lightweight manipulator are derived by the Lagrangian method in symbolic form to better understand the structure of the dynamic model. The resulting equation of motion have a structure which is useful to reduce the number of terms calculated, to check correctness, or to extend the model to higher order. A manipulator with a flexible parallel link mechanism is a constrained dynamic system whose equations are sensitive to numerical integration error. This constrained system is solved using singular value decomposition of the constraint Jacobian matrix. Elastic motion is expressed by the assumed mode method. Mode shape functions of each link are chosen using the load interfaced component mode synthesis. The discrepancies between the analytical model and the experiment are explained using a simplified and a detailed finite element model.

  13. Control of Pan-tilt Mechanism Angle using Position Matrix Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendri Maja Saputra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Control of a Pan-Tilt Mechanism (PTM angle for the bomb disposal robot Morolipi-V2 using inertial sensor measurement unit, x-IMU, has been done. The PTM has to be able to be actively controlled both manually and automatically in order to correct the orientation of the moving Morolipi-V2 platform. The x-IMU detects the platform orientation and sends the result in order to automatically control the PTM. The orientation is calculated using the quaternion combined with Madwick and Mahony filter methods. The orientation data that consists of angles of roll (α, pitch (β, and yaw (γ from the x-IMU are then being sent to the camera for controlling the PTM motion (pan & tilt angles after calculating the reverse angle using position matrix method. Experiment results using Madwick and Mahony methods show that the x-IMU can be used to find the robot platform orientation. Acceleration data from accelerometer and flux from magnetometer produce noise with standard deviation of 0.015 g and 0.006 G, respectively. Maximum absolute errors caused by Madgwick and Mahony method with respect to Xaxis are 48.45º and 33.91º, respectively. The x-IMU implementation as inertia sensor to control the Pan-Tilt Mechanism shows a good result, which the probability of pan angle tends to be the same with yaw and tilt angle equal to the pitch angle, except a very small angle shift due to the influence of roll angle..

  14. Control of Hyperbolic Heat Transfer Mechanisms Application to the Distributed Concentrated Solar Collectors

    KAUST Repository

    Elmetennani, Shahrazed

    2017-04-01

    This dissertation addresses the flow control problem in hyperbolic heat transfer mechanisms. It raises in concentrated distributed solar collectors to enhance their production efficiency under the unpredictable variations of the solar energy and the external disturbances. These factors which are either locally measured (the solar irradiance) or inaccessible for measurement (the collectors’ cleanliness) affect the source term of the distributed model and represent a major difficulty for the control design. Moreover, the temperature in the collector can only be measured at the boundaries. In this dissertation, we propose new adaptive control approaches to provide the adequate level of heat while coping with the unpredictable varying disturbances. First, we design model based control strategies for a better efficiency, in terms of accuracy and response time, with a relatively reduced complexity. Second, we enhance the controllers with on-line adaptation laws to continuously update the efficient value of the external conditions. In this study, we approach the control problem using both, the infinite dimensional model (late lumping) and a finite dimensional approximate representation (early lumping). For the early lumping approach, we introduce a new reduced order bilinear approximate model for system analysis and control design. This approximate state representation is then used to derive a nonlinear state feedback resorting to Lyapunov stability theory. To compensate for the external disturbances and the approximation uncertainties, an adaptive controller is developed based on a phenomenological representation of the system dynamics. For the late lumping approach, we propose two PDE based controllers by stabilization of the reference tracking error distributed profile. The control laws are explicitly defined as functions of the available measurement. The first one is obtained using a direct approach for error stabilization while the second one is derived through a

  15. Integrating a piezoelectric actuator with mechanical and hydraulic devices to control camless engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercorelli, Paolo; Werner, Nils

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with some interdisciplinary aspects and problems concerning the actuation control which occur in the integration of a piezoelectric structure in an aggregate actuator consisting of a piezoelectric, a stroke ratio displacement, a mechanical and a hydraulic part. Problems like compensation of the piezo hysteresis effect, scaling force-position to obtain an adequate displacement of the actuator and finally the control of such a complex aggregate system are considered and solved. Even though this work considers a particular application, the solutions proposed in the paper are quite general. In fact, the considered technical aspects occurring in systems which utilize piezoelectric technologies can be used in a variegated gamma of actuators integrating piezoelectric technologies. A cascade controller is proposed to combine a Feedforward action with an internal and an external PI-Controller. The Feedforward Controller is based on the model of the whole actuator, so particular attention is paid to the model structure. The resulting Feedforward action is an adaptive one to compensate hydraulic pressure faults. Real measurements are shown.

  16. Design and control of a novel two-speed Uninterrupted Mechanical Transmission for electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shengnan; Song, Jian; Song, Haijun; Tai, Yuzhuo; Li, Fei; Sinh Nguyen, Truong

    2016-06-01

    Conventional all-electric vehicles (EV) adopt single-speed transmission due to its low cost and simple construction. However, with the adoption of this type of driveline system, development of EV technology leads to the growing performance requirements of drive motor. Introducing a multi-speed or two-speed transmission to EV offers the possibility of efficiency improvement of the whole powertrain. This paper presents an innovative two-speed Uninterrupted Mechanical Transmission (UMT), which consists of an epicyclic gearing system, a centrifugal clutch and a brake band, allowing the seamless shifting between two gears. Besides, driver's intention is recognized by the control system which is based on fuzzy logic controller (FLC), utilizing the signals of vehicle velocity and accelerator pedal position. The novel UMT shows better dynamic and comfort performance in compare with the optimized AMT with the same gear ratios. Comparison between the control strategy with recognition of driver intention and the conventional two-parameter gear shifting strategy is presented. And the simulation and analysis of the middle layer of optimal gearshift control algorithm is detailed. The results indicate that the UMT adopting FLC and optimal control method provides a significant improvement of energy efficiency, dynamic performance and shifting comfort for EV.

  17. Bilingual Language Control in Perception versus Action: MEG Reveals Comprehension Control Mechanisms in Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Domain-General Control of Production in Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Elorrieta, Esti; Pylkkänen, Liina

    2016-01-13

    For multilingual individuals, adaptive goal-directed behavior as enabled by cognitive control includes the management of two or more languages. This work used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate the degree of neural overlap between language control and domain-general cognitive control both in action and perception. Highly proficient Arabic-English bilingual individuals participated in maximally parallel language-switching tasks in production and comprehension as well as in analogous tasks in which, instead of the used language, the semantic category of the comprehended/produced word changed. Our results indicated a clear dissociation of language control mechanisms in production versus comprehension. Language-switching in production recruited dorsolateral prefrontal regions bilaterally and, importantly, these regions were similarly recruited by category-switching. Conversely, effects of language-switching in comprehension were observed in the anterior cingulate cortex and were not shared by category-switching. These results suggest that bilingual individuals rely on adaptive language control strategies and that the neural involvement during language-switching could be extensively influenced by whether the switch is active (e.g., in production) or passive (e.g., in comprehension). In addition, these results support that humans require high-level cognitive control to switch languages in production, but the comprehension of language switches recruits a distinct neural circuitry. The use of MEG enabled us to obtain the first characterization of the spatiotemporal profile of these effects, establishing that switching processes begin ∼ 400 ms after stimulus presentation. This research addresses the neural mechanisms underlying multilingual individuals' ability to successfully manage two or more languages, critically targeting whether language control is uniform across linguistic domains (production and comprehension) and whether it is a subdomain of general

  18. A tunable mechanism to control photo-dissociation with invariant tori with variable energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlevesi, M. D.; Egydio de Carvalho, R.; de Lima, E. F.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the classical dynamics of a polar diatomic molecule under the action of a space and time-dependent laser field. In the absence of laser fields, the phase space consists of a bound and an unbound region divided by a separatrix. When an interacting laser field is present, some surviving invariant tori are deformed. Therefore, the initial conditions in the bound region which are over the surviving tori may visit the unbound region but still undergoing a bounded motion. Based on this analysis, we propose a mechanism to control the photo-dissociation process using the driven Morse oscillator as a model.

  19. Multistage Mechanical Transmissions with Automatic Control for Advanced Trucks and Buses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blokhin Aleksandr

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study considers the basic trends of development of modern mechanical transmissions of trucks and buses. It provides the developed various series of multispeed transmissions with automatic control and a number of transmissions from 6 to 16 for trucks and buses. The paper shows the basic parameters of the standard series of new transmissions received on the basis of innovative technical solutions. It provides the results of experimental studies of 16-speed transmissions on a special test stand and on the road as part of a truck transmission. Theoretical and experimental data on the gear change time are compared.

  20. Mechanisms of improved glycaemic control after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirksen, C; Jørgensen, N B; Bojsen-Møller, K N

    2012-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) greatly improves glycaemic control in morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes, in many even before significant weight loss. Understanding the responsible mechanisms may contribute to our knowledge of the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes and help identify new...... in hepatic insulin sensitivity induced, at least in part, by energy restriction and (2) improved beta cell function associated with an exaggerated postprandial glucagon-like peptide 1 secretion owing to the altered transit of nutrients. Later a weight loss induced improvement in peripheral insulin...

  1. The mechanisms of muscle wasting in COPD and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Vescovo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the mechanisms leading to skeletal muscle wasting in COPD and heart failure are common to both conditions. These encompass neurohormonal activation and systemic inflammation. The mechanisms leading to muscle dysfunction are both qualitative and quantitative. Qualitative changes comprise the transition from aerobic metabolism and prevalent slow fibers composition toward anaerobic metabolism and fast fibers synthesis. Quantitative changes are mainly linked to muscle loss. These changes occur not only in the major muscles bulks of the body but also in respiratory muscles. The mechanisms leading to muscle wastage include cytokine-triggered skeletal muscle apoptosis and ubiquitin-proteasomeand non-ubiquitin-dependent pathways. The regulation of fiber type involves the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1/calcineurin/transcriptional coactivator PGC1 cascade. The imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation plays an important role. Protein degradation can occur through ubiquitin-dependent and non-ubiquitin-dependent pathways. Very recently, two systems controlling ubiquitin-proteasome activation have been described: FOXO-ubiquitin ligase and NFkB ubiquitin ligase. These are triggered by TNFα and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1. Moreover, apoptosis, which is triggered by tumor necrosis factor α, plays an important role. Another mechanism acting on muscle wastage is malnutrition, with an imbalance between catabolic and anabolic factors toward the catabolic component. Catabolism is also worsened by the activation of the adrenergic system and alteration of the cortisol/DEHA ratio toward cortisol production. Sarcomeric protein oxidation and its consequent contractile impairment can be another cause of skeletal muscle dysfunction in CHF.

  2. Soil moisture controlled runoff mechanisms in a small agricultural catchment in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenhil, Mariette; Szeles, Borbala; Silasari, Rasmiaditya; Hogan, Patrick; Oismueller, Markus; Strauss, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Bloeschl, Guenter

    2017-04-01

    Understanding runoff generation mechanisms is pivotal for improved estimation of floods in small catchments. However, this requires in situ measurements with a high spatial and temporal resolution of different land surface parameters, which are rarely available distributed over the catchment scale and for a long period. The Hydrological Open Air Laboratory (HOAL) is a hydrological observatory which comprises a complex agricultural catchment, covering 66 ha. Due to the agricultural land use and low permeability of the soil part of the catchment was tile drained in the 1940s. The HOAL is equipped with an extensive soil moisture network measuring at 31 locations, 4 rain gauges and 12 stream gauges. By measuring with so many sensors in a complex catchment, the collected data enables the investigation of multiple runoff mechanisms which can be observed simultaneously in different parts of the catchment. The aim of this study is to identify and characterize different runoff mechanisms and the control soil moisture dynamics exert on them. As a first step 72 rainfall events were identified within the period 2014-2015. By analyzing event discharge response, measured at the different stream gauges, and root zone soil moisture, four different runoff mechanisms are identified. The four mechanisms exhibit contrasting soil moisture-discharge relationships. In the presented study we characterize the runoff response types by curve-fitting the discharge response to the soil moisture state. The analysis provides insights in the main runoff processes occurring in agricultural catchments. The results of this study a can be of assistance in other catchments to identify catchment hydrologic response.

  3. Mechanical weed control on small-size dry bean and its response to cross-flaming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martelloni, L.; Frasconi, C.; Fontanelli, M.; Raffaelli, M.; Peruzzi, A.

    2016-11-01

    Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can be a profitable crop for farmers; however controlling weeds effectively without a decrease in yield remains a problem. An example where mechanical weed control is difficult to conduct is dry bean ‘Toscanello’, which is a small sized high-income niche product growing low to the ground. Concerning intra-row weed control, also flame weeding could be an opportunity but the dry bean heat tolerance needs to be studied. The aims of this research were to study the weed control efficacy of a spring-tine harrow and an inter-row cultivator in this bean variety, and to test the tolerance of dry bean cultivated under weed-free conditions to cross-flaming applied with different liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) doses. Flame weeding was applied at BBCH 13 and BBCH 14 bean growth stages by pairs of burners producing direct double flame acting into the intra-row space, with bean plants placed in the middle. The results suggest that the spring-tine harrow used two times at BBCH 13 and 14, respectively, lead to a yield similar to that of the weedy control. The inter-row cultivator could be an opportunity for small-sized dry bean crops producers, enabling them to obtain a similar yield compared to the hand-weeded control. Concerning the bean tolerance to cross-flaming the results showed that bean flamed at BBCH 13 stage had little tolerance to cross-flaming. Bean flamed at BBCH 14 stage was tolerant until an LPG dose of 39 kg/ha, giving yield responses similar to those observed in the non-flamed control. (Author)

  4. Hysteresis mechanism and control in pentacene organic field-effect transistors with polymer dielectric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hysteresis mechanism of pentacene organic field-effect transistors (OFETs with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and/or polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA dielectrics is studied. Through analyzing the electrical characteristics of OFETs with various PVA/PMMA arrangements, it shows that charge, which is trapped in PVA bulk and at the interface of pentacene/PVA, is one of the origins of hysteresis. The results also show that memory window is proportional to both trap amount in PVA and charge density at the gate/PVA or PVA/pentacene interfaces. Hence, the controllable memory window of around 0 ∼ 10 V can be realized by controlling the thickness and combination of triple-layer polymer dielectrics.

  5. Understanding the neural mechanisms involved in sensory control of voice production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Amy L; Flagmeier, Sabina G; Manes, Jordan L; Larson, Charles R; Rogers, Bill; Robin, Donald A

    2012-05-15

    Auditory feedback is important for the control of voice fundamental frequency (F0). In the present study we used neuroimaging to identify regions of the brain responsible for sensory control of the voice. We used a pitch-shift paradigm where subjects respond to an alteration, or shift, of voice pitch auditory feedback with a reflexive change in F0. To determine the neural substrates involved in these audio-vocal responses, subjects underwent fMRI scanning while vocalizing with or without pitch-shifted feedback. The comparison of shifted and unshifted vocalization revealed activation bilaterally in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) in response to the pitch shifted feedback. We hypothesize that the STG activity is related to error detection by auditory error cells located in the superior temporal cortex and efference copy mechanisms whereby this region is responsible for the coding of a mismatch between actual and predicted voice F0. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Amplitude and frequency modulation control of sound production in a mechanical model of the avian syrinx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elemans, Coen; Muller, Mees; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2009-01-01

    properties of the distal tube, most likely because of its reflective properties to sound waves. Our model is a gross simplification of the complex morphology found in birds, and more closely resembles mathematical models of the syrinx. Our results confirm several assumptions underlying existing mathematical...... of combining experimental data and mathematical modelling has greatly improved the understanding of neural control and peripheral motor dynamics of sound generation in birds. Here, we present a simple mechanical model of the syrinx that facilitates detailed study of vibrations and sound production. Our model...... for sound production of the model in its control space. The fundamental frequency of the sound increases with tension in three membranes with different stiffness and mass. The lowerbound fundamental frequency increases with membrane mass. The membrane vibrations are strongly coupled to the resonance...

  7. A mechanical nanogate based on a carbon nanotube for reversible control of ion conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhongjin; Corry, Ben; Lu, Xiaohua; Zhou, Jian

    2014-03-01

    Control of mass transport through nanochannels is of critical importance in many nanoscale devices and nanofiltration membranes. The gates in biological channels, which control the transport of substances across cell membranes, can provide inspiration for this purpose. Gates in many biological channels are formed by a constriction ringed with hydrophobic residues which can prevent ion conduction even when they are not completely physically occluded. In this work, we use molecular dynamics simulations to design a nanogate inspired by this hydrophobic gating mechanism. Deforming a carbon nanotube (12,12) with an external force can form a hydrophobic constriction in the centre of the tube that controls ion conduction. The simulation results show that increasing the magnitude of the applied force narrows the constriction and lowers the fluxes of K+ and Cl- found under an electric field. With the exerted force larger than 5 nN, the constriction blocks the conduction of K+ and Cl- due to partial dehydration while allowing for a noticeable water flux. Ion conduction can revert back to the unperturbed level upon force retraction, suggesting the reversibility of the nanogate. The force can be exerted by available experimental facilities, such as atomic force microscope (AFM) tips. It is found that partial dehydration in a continuous water-filled hydrophobic constriction is enough to close the channel, while full dewetting is not necessarily required. This mechanically deformed nanogate has many potential applications, such as a valve in nanofluidic systems to reversibly control ion conduction and a high-performance nanomachine for desalination and water treatment.Control of mass transport through nanochannels is of critical importance in many nanoscale devices and nanofiltration membranes. The gates in biological channels, which control the transport of substances across cell membranes, can provide inspiration for this purpose. Gates in many biological channels are formed

  8. QoS-Guaranteed Power Control Mechanism Based on the Frame Utilization for Femtocells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mach Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on a power control mechanism and proposes a novel approach for dynamic adaptation of femtocells' transmitting power. The basic idea is to adapt the transmitting power of femtocells according to current traffic load and signal quality between user equipments and the femtocell in order to fully utilize radio resources allocated to the femtocell. The advantage of the proposed scheme is in provisioning of high quality of service level to the femtocell users, while interference to users attached to macrobase station is minimized. The paper proposes the power adaptation algorithm and evaluates its performance in terms of mobility events, achieved throughput, and FAPs transmitting power. Performed simulations show that the proposed scheme can significantly reduce the number of mobility events caused by passerby users and thus to minimize signaling overhead generated in the network. In addition, our proposal enhances overall throughput for most of the investigated scenarios in comparison to other power control schemes.

  9. Integrating the lightweight authentication protocol (LAP) with access control mechanisms in wireless health care information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chousiadis, C; Georgiadis, C K; Pangalos, G

    2002-01-01

    Health information networks are expected to support information exchange that is authentic, accurate, private and available when, where and to whom is needed. With the increase of the shared medical information and resources in healthcare wireless information systems, unauthorized access to the information by illegal users also increases. The security of the transmitted information is a vital issue. In this paper, we report on the development of the Lightweight Authentication Protocol (LAP), which makes a mobile and distributed system more secure and flexible and we implement it in a Health Care Environment where the clinicians use mobile and wireless devices like PDAs. We also provide an indicative example of integrating the LAP with access control mechanisms. Context-based Team Access Control (C-TMAC) model is used in this example, since it provides great flexibility on user-permissions management in collaborative healthcare environments. LAP is indeed capable to support efficiently the advanced authorization procedures of such demanding active security models.

  10. Mathematical Description of an Asynchronous Motor with the Indirect Control of the Output Mechanical Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glazachev A.V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives the mathematical description of an asynchronous motor with the indirect control of the output mechanical variables of an asynchronous motor in the electric drive. To determine the electromagnetic torque and angular velocity of the asynchronous motor in the electric drive the mathematical description is used in which the values are determined by the readings of the motor and easily measured values by means of known in practice devices. The proposed in the article the mathematical description for the indirect measuring the electromagnetic torque and angular velocity of the asynchronous motor in the electric drive does not contain the integral components that introduce the great error into the value of the controlled electromagnetic torque and angular velocity.

  11. A Review of Tribological Coatings for Control Drive Mechanisms in Space Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CJ Larkin; JD Edington; BJ Close

    2006-02-21

    Tribological coatings must provide lubrication for moving components of the control drive mechanism for a space reactor and prevent seizing due to friction or diffusion welding to provide highly reliable and precise control of reflector position over the mission lifetime. Several coatings were evaluated based on tribological performance at elevated temperatures and in ultrahigh vacuum environments. Candidates with proven performance in the anticipated environment are limited primarily to disulfide materials. Irradiation data for these coatings is nonexistent. Compatibility issues between coating materials and structural components may require the use of barrier layers between the solid lubricant and structural components to prevent deleterious interactions. It would be advisable to consider possible lubricant interactions prior to down-selection of structural materials. A battery of tests was proposed to provide the necessary data for eventual solid lubricant/coating selection.

  12. Hysteresis mechanism and control in pentacene organic field-effect transistors with polymer dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Shi, Wei; Han, Shijiao; Yu, Junsheng

    2013-05-01

    Hysteresis mechanism of pentacene organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and/or polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) dielectrics is studied. Through analyzing the electrical characteristics of OFETs with various PVA/PMMA arrangements, it shows that charge, which is trapped in PVA bulk and at the interface of pentacene/PVA, is one of the origins of hysteresis. The results also show that memory window is proportional to both trap amount in PVA and charge density at the gate/PVA or PVA/pentacene interfaces. Hence, the controllable memory window of around 0 ˜ 10 V can be realized by controlling the thickness and combination of triple-layer polymer dielectrics.

  13. Roles of Transcriptional and Translational Control Mechanisms in Regulation of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Hector L; O'Connor, Kevin; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Gourse, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial ribosome biogenesis is tightly regulated to match nutritional conditions and to prevent formation of defective ribosomal particles. In Escherichia coli, most ribosomal protein (r-protein) synthesis is coordinated with rRNA synthesis by a translational feedback mechanism: when r-proteins exceed rRNAs, specific r-proteins bind to their own mRNAs and inhibit expression of the operon. It was recently discovered that the second messenger nucleotide guanosine tetra and pentaphosphate (ppGpp), which directly regulates rRNA promoters, is also capable of regulating many r-protein promoters. To examine the relative contributions of the translational and transcriptional control mechanisms to the regulation of r-protein synthesis, we devised a reporter system that enabled us to genetically separate the cis-acting sequences responsible for the two mechanisms and to quantify their relative contributions to regulation under the same conditions. We show that the synthesis of r-proteins from the S20 and S10 operons is regulated by ppGpp following shifts in nutritional conditions, but most of the effect of ppGpp required the 5' region of the r-protein mRNA containing the target site for translational feedback regulation and not the promoter. These results suggest that most regulation of the S20 and S10 operons by ppGpp following nutritional shifts is indirect and occurs in response to changes in rRNA synthesis. In contrast, we found that the promoters for the S20 operon were regulated during outgrowth, likely in response to increasing nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) levels. Thus, r-protein synthesis is dynamic, with different mechanisms acting at different times.IMPORTANCE Bacterial cells have evolved complex and seemingly redundant strategies to regulate many high-energy-consuming processes. In E. coli, synthesis of ribosomal components is tightly regulated with respect to nutritional conditions by mechanisms that act at both the transcription and translation steps. In this

  14. Molecular Mechanisms Controlling Vascular Lumen Formation in Three-Dimensional Extracellular Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacharidou, Anastasia; Stratman, Amber N.; Davis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made toward a molecular understanding of how cells form lumen and tube structures in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices (ECM). This progress has occurred through work performed with endothelial and epithelial cell models using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. Despite the apparent similarities between endothelial and epithelial cell lumen and tube formation mechanisms, there are clear distinctions that directly relate to their functional differences. This review will focus on endothelial cell (EC) lumen formation mechanisms which control blood vessel formation during development and postnatal life. Of great interest is that an EC lumen signaling complex has been identified which controls human EC lumen and tube formation in 3D matrices and which coordinates integrin-ECM contacts, cell surface proteolysis, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and cell polarity. This complex consists of the collagen-binding integrin α2β1, the collagen-degrading membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP), junction adhesion molecule (Jam)C, JamB, polarity proteins Par3 and Par6b, and the Rho GTPase Cdc42-GTP. These interacting proteins are necessary to stimulate 3D matrix-specific signaling events (including activation of protein kinase cascades that regulate the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons) to control the formation of EC lumens and tube networks. Also, EC lumen formation is directly coupled to the generation of vascular guidance tunnels, enzymatically generated ECM conduits that facilitate EC tube remodeling and maturation. Mural cells such as pericytes are recruited along EC tubes within these tunnel spaces to control ECM remodeling events resulting in vascular basement membrane matrix assembly, a key step in tube maturation and stabilization. PMID:21997121

  15. Family controlled firm, governance mechanisms and corporate performance: Evidence from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Suyono

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates, firstly, the influence of family-controlled firm on corporate performance, and secondly, the influences of corporate governance mechanisms including control variable on corporate performance in the companies listed on the Indonesian Stock Exchange. By using five years (2009-2013 company data, this study used Ordinary Least Square (OLS regression to test the hypotheses. The results based on OLS, indicate that family controlled firms tend to have better performance than non Family controlled firms. Moreover, in regard to the link between governance variables and corporate performance, only managerial ownership exhibits a positive relation with corporate performance, for both proxies, i.e. Tobins Q and ROA. Yet, the rests of governance variables (i.e. institutional ownership, audit committee, board of directors and independent board of commissioners do not confirm the relationship with corporate performance. These findings have significant policy implications for the government, regulatory bodies, companies and other stakeholders including the investors in Indonesia to shape and implement an optimal governance system that can improve corporate performance.

  16. A Fully Distributed Resource Allocation Mechanism for CRNs without Using a Common Control Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations in the available spectrum for cognitive devices add additional complexity in designing a medium access strategy for cognitive radio (CR networks. To ease this complication, a common control channel (CCC is often used as a common platform to exchange control messages, so the CR users can make decisions concerning resource allocation. Much of the literature in this area opts for forming groups and negotiating a CCC from the available channels rather than considering a dedicated common control channel. However, if a primary user appears on the CCC, all the CR users have to vacate that channel and negotiate another CCC, and thus overhead continues to grow with an agile primary network. We propose a medium access control protocol that can work in the absence of a CCC and reduce the possible overhead to a greater extent. In our proposed protocol, CR users take advantage of similar spectrum availability in their neighborhood for resource utilization. We also propose a contention-based spectrum allocation mechanism that works in a distributed manner over different available channels. Simulation results show that this approach can reduce broadcast overhead significantly while maintaining connectivity success similar to its counterparts.

  17. Decentralized Framework for Optimal Price-Based Power System Operation Using Feedback Control Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Gyu Jin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Future power systems are expected to have distributed energy resources (DERs. A price-based operation (PBO, where dynamic prices are used as the control signal, can be an alternative scheme to address challenging operational issues in the future power systems. In this paper, a decentralized framework for optimal PBO using a feedback control mechanism is proposed to determine the nodal prices for power balance and congestion management. The substructures and feedback controllers of the proposed framework are derived based on the optimal power flow (OPF method. Thus, the framework guarantees optimality for all situations in real-time and enables the use of various types of controllers. The effectiveness of the proposed framework is verified with the IEEE 39 bus network under some scenarios, such as the failure of a generator and a transmission line. The results clearly demonstrate that the proposed framework successfully resolves the balance and congestion problems by generating appropriate nodal prices in the PBO and provides a solution similar to the optimal solution determined by the conventional OPF method.

  18. Thermal, mechanical and chemical control of ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia in different habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sölter, Ulrike

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A small plot field experiment with transplanted ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia into gravel and grassland and a large scale field experiment on a roadside banquette in Brandenburg with a natural ragweed infestation were carried out. Thermal control treatments were hot air (gravel and grassland and hot water (roadside and flaming, the mechanical treatment was mowing and the chemical treatment was the application of the herbicide combination MCPA and Dicamba. The gravel and grassland experiment was conducted at two growth stages of ragweed (BBCH 16-18 and 22-29, at the roadside ragweed was at BBCH 50-65. Dry matter yield of ragweed was assessed 9 weeks after the treatments were conducted in gravel and grassland and 4 weeks after the treatment at the roadside. In gravel and grassland the best eradication at both growth stages by thermal control was achieved by hot air in comparison to the untreated plots (significant at P <0.05. And at the roadside significant lower dry matter was determined by hot water and flaming in comparison to the untreated plots (significant at P <0.05. The results of these experiments demonstrated the efficiency of thermal control methods based on hot air and hot water as an alternative to herbicide control and mowing in habitats where herbicide application is not allowed or mowing gives no sufficient eradication results, like on roadside banquettes.

  19. TCP Congestion Control Mechanisms for Achieving Predictable Throughput Using Inline Network Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Go; Yamanegi, Kana; Murata, Masayuki

    Recently, real-time media delivery services such as video streaming and VoIP have rapidly become popular. For these applications requiring high-level QoS guarantee, our research group has proposed a transport-layer approach to provide predictable throughput for upper-layer applications. In the present paper, we propose a congestion control mechanism of TCP for achieving predictable throughput. It does not mean we can guarantee the throughput, while we can provide the throughput required by an upper-layer application at high probability when network congestion level is not so high by using the inline network measurement technique for available bandwidth of the network path. We present the evaluation results for the proposed mechanism obtained in simulation and implementation experiments, and confirm that the proposed mechanism can assure a TCP throughput if the required bandwidth is not so high compared to the physical bandwidth, even when other ordinary TCP (e.g., TCP Reno) connections occupy the link.

  20. Synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism for controlling large scale reversible deformation of liquid metal objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Reversible deformation of a machine holds enormous promise across many scientific areas ranging from mechanical engineering to applied physics. So far, such capabilities are still hard to achieve through conventional rigid materials or depending mainly on elastomeric materials, which however own rather limited performances and require complicated manipulations. Here, we show a basic strategy which is fundamentally different from the existing ones to realize large scale reversible deformation through controlling the working materials via the synthetically chemical-electrical mechanism (SCHEME). Such activity incorporates an object of liquid metal gallium whose surface area could spread up to five times of its original size and vice versa under low energy consumption. Particularly, the alterable surface tension based on combination of chemical dissolution and electrochemical oxidation is ascribed to the reversible shape transformation, which works much more flexible than many former deformation principles through converting electrical energy into mechanical movement. A series of very unusual phenomena regarding the reversible configurational shifts are disclosed with dominant factors clarified. This study opens a generalized way to combine the liquid metal serving as shape-variable element with the SCHEME to compose functional soft machines, which implies huge potential for developing future smart robots to fulfill various complicated tasks.