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Sample records for sarcoma virus sequences

  1. Further genetic localization of the transforming sequences of the p21 v-ras gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Ellis, R W; Scolnick, E M

    1984-01-01

    The sequences encoding the 21-kilodalton transforming protein (p21 ras) of Harvey murine sarcoma virus have previously been localized genetically to a 1.3-kilobase segment of the viral DNA (E. H. Chang, R. W. Ellis, E. M. Scolnick, and D. R. Lowy, Science 210:1249-1251, 1980). Within this segment...... of this open reading frame. By constructing a mutant of Harvey murine sarcoma virus DNA from which the first two ATG codons of this open reading frame have been deleted, we now show by transfection of the mutant viral DNA into NIH 3T3 cells that only the third ATG codon is necessary and sufficient...

  2. Analysis of the src gene of sarcoma viruses generated by recombination between transformation-defective mutants and quail cellular sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L H; Moscovici, C; Karess, R E; Hanafusa, H

    1979-01-01

    Tumors were produced in quails about 2 months after injection with a transformation-defective mutant of the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus, subgroup A (SR-A), that retains a small portion of the src gene. Sarcoma viruses were isolated from each of five such tumors. A transformation-defective mutant which has a nearly complete deletion of the src gene was unable to induce tumors. The avian sarcoma viruses recovered from quail tumors (rASV-Q) had biological properties similar to those of the avian sarcoma viruses previously acquired from chicken tumors (rASV-C); these chicken tumors had been induced by the same transformation-defective mutants. Both rASV-Q and rASV-C transformed cells in culture with similar focus morphology and produced tumors within 7 to 14 days after injection into chickens or quails. The size of rASV-Q genomic RNA was indistinguishable from that of SR-A by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequences of rASV-Q RNA genomes were analyzed and compared with those of the parental transformation-defective virus, SR-A and of rASV-C by RNase T1 fingerprinting and oligonucleotide mapping. We found that the src sequences of all five isolates of rASV-Q were identical to each other but different from those of SR-A and rASV-C. Of 13 oligonucleotides of rASV-Q identified as src specific, two were not found in either SR-A or rASV-C RNA. Furthermore, some oligonucleotides present in SR-A or rASV-C or both were absent in rASV-Q. No differences were found for the sequences outside the src region in any of the viruses examined. In addition, rASV-Q-infected cells possessed a 60,000-dalton protein specifically precipitable by rabbit serum raised against SR-D-induced tumors. The facts that the src sequences are essentially the same for rASV's recovered from one animal species and different for rASV's obtained from different species provide conclusive evidence that cellular sequences of normal birds were inserted into the viral genome and supplied to

  3. Human nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of a murine sarcoma virus: studies with cloned viral and cellular DNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Kisselev, L L

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pI26, has been constructed by cloning into pBR322 a transforming gene of murine sarcoma virus (a Moloney strain, clone 124, MSV) synthesized by detergent-treated virions. From this plasmid a XbaI-HindIII fragment has been isolated which contains only mos-specific sequences. This mos-specific probe has been used for screening a human gene library cloned in bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A. Of these, 19 clones have been isolated containing mos-related sequences. By physical mapping and molecular hybridization it has been shown that these sequences are neighboured by DNA regions related to Moloney murine leukemia virus. Recombinant phages have also been found containing human inserts related to MLV, not to the mos gene. The possible existence of murine-like endogenous retroviruses in the normal human genome, including that of a sarcoma type, is discussed. By Northern blotting, expression of the cellular c-mos gene has been detected in mouse liver treated with a hepatocarcinogen. The general significance of the suggested model for evaluating the relationship between chemical carcinogenesis and oncogene expression is discussed.

  4. Nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of avian sarcoma virus are present in DNA of uninfected vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, D H; Varmus, H E; Bishop, J M

    1978-09-01

    We have detected nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of avian sarcoma vius (ASV) in the DNA of uninfected vertebrates. Purified radioactive DNA (cDNAsarc) complementary to most of all of the gene (src) required for transformation of fibroblasts by ASV was annealed with DNA from a variety of normal species. Under conditions that facilitate pairing of partially matched nucleotide sequences (1.5 M NaCl, 59 degrees), cDNAsarc formed duplexes with chicken, human, calf, mouse, and salmon DNA but not with DNA from sea urchin, Drosophila, or Escherichia coli. The kinetics of duplex formation indicated that cDNAsarc was reacting with nucleotide sequences present in a single copy or at most a few copies per cell. In contrast to the preceding findings, nucleotide sequences complementary to the remainder of the ASV genome were observed only in chicken DNA. Thermal denaturation studies of the duplexes formed with cDNAsarc indicated a high degree of conservation of the nucleotide sequences related to src in vertebrate DNAs; the reductions in melting temperature suggested about 3--4% mismatching of cDNAsarc with chicken DNA and 8--10% mismatching of cDNAsarc with the other vertebrate DNAs.

  5. The effects of alternate polypurine tracts (PPTs) and mutations of sequences adjacent to the PPT on viral replication and cleavage specificity of the Rous sarcoma virus reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kevin W; Oh, Jangsuk; Alvord, W Gregory; Hughes, Stephen H

    2008-09-01

    We previously reported that a mutant Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) with an alternate polypurine tract (PPT), DuckHepBFlipPPT, had unexpectedly high titers and that the PPT was miscleaved primarily at one position following a GA dinucleotide by the RNase H of reverse transcriptase (RT). This miscleavage resulted in a portion of the 3' end of the PPT (5'-ATGTA) being added to the end of U3 of the linear viral DNA. To better understand the RNase H cleavage by RSV RT, we made a number of mutations within the DuckHepBFlipPPT and in the sequences adjacent to the PPT. Deleting the entire ATGTA sequence from the DuckHepBFlipPPT increased the relative titer to wild-type levels, while point mutations within the ATGTA sequence reduced the relative titer but had minimal effects on the cleavage specificity. However, mutating a sequence 5' of ATGTA affected the relative titer of the virus and caused the RNase H of RSV RT to lose the ability to cleave the PPT specifically. In addition, although mutations in the conserved stretch of thymidine residues upstream of the PPT did not affect the relative titer or cleavage specificity, the mutation of some of the nucleotides immediately upstream of the PPT did affect the titer and cleavage specificity. Taken together, our studies show that the structure of the PPT in the context of the cognate RT, rather than a specific sequence, is important for the proper cleavage by RSV RT.

  6. Comparative analysis of the human and feline c-sis proto-oncogenes : Identification of 5' human c-sis coding sequences that are not homologous to the transforming gene of simian sarcoma virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, Ans M.W. van den; Breuer, M.L.; Steenbergh, P.H.; Schalken, Jack A.; Bloemers, H.P.J.; Ven, Wim J.M. Van de

    1985-01-01

    Feline and human genetic sequences, homologous to the v-sis gene of simian sarcoma virus, have been isolated from cosmid gene libraries and characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis. Comparison of the two loci revealed their related structural organization. In both loci, similar unique gene

  7. Fujinami sarcoma virus: An avian RNA tumor virus with a unique transforming gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Pawson, Anthony; Robins, Terry; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1980-01-01

    The oncogenic properties and RNA of the Fujinami avian sarcoma virus (FSV) and the protein it encodes were investigated and compared to those of other avian tumor viruses with sarcomagenic properties such as Rous sarcoma virus and the acute leukemia viruses MC29 and erythroblastosis virus. Cloned stocks of FSV caused sarcomas in all chickens inoculated and were found to contain a 4.5-kilobase (kb) and an 8.5-kb RNA species. The 4.5-kb RNA was identified as the genome of defective FSV because it was absent from nondefective FSV-associated helper virus and because the titer of focus-forming units increased with the ratio of 4.5-kb to 8.5-kb RNA in virus preparations. This is, then, the smallest known tumor virus RNA with a transforming function. Comparisons with other viral RNAs, based on oligonucleotide mapping and molecular hybridization, indicated that 4.5-kb FSV RNA contains a 5′ gag gene-related sequence of 1 kb, an internal specific sequence of about 3 kb that is unrelated to Rous sarcoma virus, MC29, and erythroblastosis virus, and a 3′-terminal sequence of about 0.5 kb related to the conserved C region of avian tumor viruses. The lack of some or all nucleotide sequences of the essential virion genes, gag, pol, and env, and the isolation of FSV-transformed nonproducer cell clones indicated that FSV is replication defective. A 140,000-dalton, gag-related non-structural protein was found in FSV-transformed producer and nonproducer cells and was translated in vitro from full-length FSV RNA. This protein is expected to have a transforming function both because its intracellular concentration showed a positive correlation with the percentage of transformed cells in a culture and because FSV is unlikely to code for major additional proteins since the genetic complexities of FSV RNA and the FSV protein are almost the same. It is concluded that the transforming onc gene of FSV is distinct from that of Rous sarcoma virus and other avian tumor viruses with

  8. Alternate polypurine tracts (PPTs) affect the rous sarcoma virus RNase H cleavage specificity and reveal a preferential cleavage following a GA dinucleotide sequence at the PPT-U3 junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kevin W; Julias, John G; Alvord, W Gregory; Oh, Jangsuk; Hughes, Stephen H

    2005-11-01

    Retroviral polypurine tracts (PPTs) serve as primers for plus-strand DNA synthesis during reverse transcription. The generation and removal of the PPT primer requires specific cleavages by the RNase H activity of reverse transcriptases; removal of the PPT primer defines the left end of the linear viral DNA. We replaced the endogenous PPT from RSVP(A)Z, a replication-competent shuttle vector based on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), with alternate retroviral PPTs and the duck hepatitis B virus "PPT." Viruses in which the endogenous RSV PPT was replaced with alternate PPTs had lower relative titers than the wild-type virus. 2-LTR circle junction analysis showed that the alternate PPTs caused significant decreases in the fraction of viral DNAs with complete (consensus) ends and significant increases in the insertion of part or all of the PPT at the 2-LTR circle junctions. The last two nucleotides in the 3' end of the RSV PPT are GA. Examination of the (mis)cleavages of the alternate PPTs revealed preferential cleavages after GA dinucleotide sequences. Replacement of the terminal 3' A of the RSV PPT with G caused a preferential miscleavage at a GA sequence spanning the PPT-U3 boundary, resulting in the deletion of the terminal adenine normally present at the 5' end of the U3. A reciprocal G-to-A substitution at the 3' end of the murine leukemia virus PPT increased the relative titer of the chimeric RSV-based virus and the fraction of consensus 2-LTR circle junctions.

  9. Human herpes virus-8 DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage samples from patients with AIDS-associated pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Dodt, K K; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1997-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent AIDS-associated neoplasm, and often disseminates to visceral organs, including the lungs. An ante-mortem diagnosis of pulmonary KS is difficult. Recently, DNA sequences resembling a new human herpes virus (HHV-8), have been identified in various forms...

  10. Cell-specific targeting of lentiviral vectors mediated by fusion proteins derived from Sindbis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, or avian sarcoma/leukosis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to efficiently and selectively target gene delivery vectors to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. We pursued two different strategies to target lentiviral vector delivery to specific cell types. In one of the strategies, vector particles bearing a membrane-bound stem cell factor sequence plus a separate fusion protein based either on Sindbis virus strain TR339 glycoproteins or the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein were used to selectively transduce cells expressing the corresponding stem cell factor receptor (c-kit. An alternative approach involved soluble avian sarcoma/leukosis virus receptors fused to cell-specific ligands including stem cell factor and erythropoietin for targeting lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus envelope proteins to cells that express the corresponding receptors. Results The titers of unconcentrated vector particles bearing Sindbis virus strain TR339 or vesicular stomatitis virus G fusion proteins plus stem cell factor in the context of c-kit expressing cells were up to 3.2 × 105 transducing units per ml while vector particles lacking the stem cell factor ligand displayed titers that were approximately 80 fold lower. On cells that lacked the c-kit receptor, the titers of stem cell factor-containing vectors were approximately 40 times lower compared to c-kit-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B envelope proteins and bearing bi-functional bridge proteins encoding erythropoietin or stem cell factor fused to the soluble extracellular domains of the avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B receptors resulted in efficient transduction of erythropoietin receptor or c-kit-expressing cells. Transduction of erythropoietin receptor-expressing cells mediated by bi-functional bridge proteins was found to be dependent on the dose, the

  11. Development of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-based vector-packaging cell lines

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    Stoker, A.W.; Bissell, M.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1988-03-01

    The authors have constructed an avian leukosis virus derivative with a 5{prime} deletion extending from within the tRNA primer binding site to a SacI site in the leader region. The aim was to remove cis-acting replicative and/or encapsidation sequences and to use this derivative, RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}}, to develop vector-packaging cell lines. They show that RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}} can be stably expressed in the quail cell line QT6 and chicken embryo fibroblasts and that it is completely replication deficient in both cell types. Moreover, they have demonstrated that QT6-derived lines expressing RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}} can efficiently package four structurally different replication-defective v-src expression vectors into infectious virus, with very low or undetectable helper virus release. These RAV-{Psi}{sup {minus}}-expressing cell lines comprise the first prototype avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-based vector-packaging system. The construction of our vectors has also shown us that a sequence present within gag, thought to facilitate virus packaging, is not necessary for efficient vector expression and high virus production. They show that quantitation and characterization of replication-defective viruses can be achieved with a sensitive immunocytochemical procedure, presenting an alternative to internal selectable vector markers.

  12. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man.

  13. When viruses were not in style: parallels in the histories of chicken sarcoma viruses and bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Neeraja

    2014-12-01

    The discovery that cancer may be caused by viruses occurred in the early twentieth century, a time when the very concept of viruses as we understand it today was in a considerable state of flux. Although certain features were agreed upon, viruses, more commonly referred to as 'filterable viruses' were not considered much different from other microbes such as bacteria except for their extremely small size, which rendered them ultramicroscopic and filterable. For a long time, in fact, viruses were defined rather by what they were not and what they could not do, rather than any known properties that set them apart from other microbes. Consequently when Peyton Rous suggested in 1912 that the causative agent of a transmissible sarcoma tumor of chickens was a virus, the medical research community was reluctant to accept his assessment on the grounds that cancer was not infectious and was caused by a physiological change within the cells. This difference in the bacteriological and physiological styles of thinking appears to have been prevalent in the wider research community, for when in 1917 Felix d'Herelle suggested that a transmissible lysis in bacteria, which he called bacteriophagy, was caused by a virus, his ideas were also opposed on similar grounds. It was not until the 1950s when when André Lwoff explained the phenomenon of lysogeny through his prophage hypothesis that the viral identities of the sarcoma-inducing agent and the bacteriophages were accepted. This paper examines the trajectories of the curiously parallel histories of the cancer viruses and highlights the similarities and differences between the ways in which prevailing ideas about the nature of viruses, heredity and infection drove researchers from disparate disciplines and geographic locations to develop their ideas and achieve some consensus about the nature of cancer viruses and bacteriophages.

  14. An avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolate with a Rous sarcoma virus-like 5'-LTR shows enhanced replication capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanni; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-producing chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis. However, ALV-J infections associated with hemangiomas have occurred in egg-producing (layer) flocks in China. In this study, we identified an ALV-J layer isolate (HLJ13SH01) as a recombinant of ALV-J and a Rous sarcoma virus Schmidt-Ruppin B strain (RSV-SRB), which contained the RSV-SRB 5'-LTR and the other genes of ALV-J. Replication kinetic testing indicated that the HLJ13SH01 strain replicated faster than other ALV-J layer isolates in vitro. Sequence analysis indicated that the main difference between the two isolates was the 5'-LTR sequences, particularly the U3 sequences. A 19 nt insertion was uniquely found in the U3 region of the HLJ13SH01 strain. The results of a Dual-Glo luciferase assay revealed that the 19 nt insertion in the HLJ13SH01 strain increased the enhancer activity of the U3 region. Moreover, an additional CCAAT/enhancer element was found in the 19 nt insertion and the luciferase assay indicated that this element played a key role in increasing the enhancer activity of the 5'-U3 region. To confirm the potentiation effect of the 19 nt insertion and the CCAAT/enhancer element on virus replication, three infectious clones with 5'-U3 region variations were constructed and rescued. Replication kinetic testing of the rescued viruses demonstrated that the CCAAT/enhancer element in the 19 nt insertion enhanced the replication capacity of the ALV-J recombinant in vitro.

  15. Preclinical evaluation of oncolytic vaccinia virus for therapy of canine soft tissue sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus negative Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoproliferative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fossati, S; Boneschi, [No Value; Ferrucci, S; Brambilla, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The concomitant occurrence of more than one primary neoplasm in the same individual has led researchers to seek possible common etiopathogenetic factors. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a multicentric neoplasm of vascular origin and perhaps viral etiology. Four forms of KS are known: classic or M

  17. Comparative studies in Rous sarcoma with virus, tumor cells, and chick embryo cells transformed in vitro by virus. II. Response of normal and immunized chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOUGHERTY, R M; MORGAN, H R

    1962-01-01

    Chick embryo fibroblasts infected in vitro with Rous sarcoma virus have properties similar to tumor cells when injected into virus-immune chickens. When such virus-transformed fibroblasts are injected into normal chickens, they apparently participate in the production of tumors independent of their release of virus and are thus apparently malignant in vivo.

  18. In vitro proteolytic cleavage of Gazdar murine sarcoma virus p65gag.

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, S.; Arlinghaus, R B

    1981-01-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus, disrupted in concentrations of 0.1 to 0.5% Nonidet P-40, catalyzed the cleavage of p65, the gag gene polyprotein of the Gazdar strain of murine sarcoma virus, into polypeptides with sizes and antigenic determinants of murine leukemia virus-specified p30, p15, pp12, and p10. Cleavage performed in the presence of 0.15% Nonidet P-40 in water yielded polypeptides of approximately 40,000 (P40) and 25,000 (P25) Mr. In vitro cleavage performed in a buffered solution co...

  19. The structure and function of the rous sarcoma virus RNA stability element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Johanna B; Beemon, Karen L

    2011-11-01

    For simple retroviruses, such as the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), post-transcriptional control elements regulate viral RNA splicing, export, stability, and packaging into virions. These RNA sequences interact with cellular host proteins to regulate and facilitate productive viral infections. One such element, known as the RSV stability element (RSE), is required for maintaining stability of the full-length unspliced RNA. This viral RNA serves as the mRNA for the Gag and Pol proteins and also as the genome packaged in progeny virions. When the RSE is deleted from the viral RNA, the unspliced RNA becomes unstable and is degraded in a Upf1-dependent manner. Current evidence suggests that the RSE inhibits recognition of the viral gag termination codon by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. We believe that the RSE acts as an insulator to NMD, thereby preventing at least one of the required functional steps that target an mRNA for degradation. Here, we discuss the history of the RSE and the current model of how the RSE is interacting with cellular NMD factors.

  20. Human herpes virus-8 DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage samples from patients with AIDS-associated pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Dodt, K K; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1997-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent AIDS-associated neoplasm, and often disseminates to visceral organs, including the lungs. An ante-mortem diagnosis of pulmonary KS is difficult. Recently, DNA sequences resembling a new human herpes virus (HHV-8), have been identified in various forms...... of KS. We hypothesized that these sequences are present in samples obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patients with pulmonary KS. Utilizing a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 7/12 BAL cell samples from HIV-infected patients with endobronchial KS were positive for HHV-8 DNA. In contrast......, only 2/39 samples from HIV-infected patients without evidence of KS were positive (p = 0.007). Detection of HHV-8 in BAL cells of patients with pulmonary KS was highly specific (95%), with a sensitivity of 58% and a positive predictive value of 78%. In conclusion, HHV-8 is associated with pulmonary KS...

  1. The Biology of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and the Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di QIN; Chun LU

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV),also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8),is discovered in 1994 from Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesion of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)patient.In addition to its association with KS,KSHV has also been implicated as the causative agent of two other AIDS-associated malignancies:primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD).KSHV is a complex DNA virus that not only has the ability to promote cellular growth and survival for tumor development,but also can provoke deregulated angiogenesis,inflammation,and modulate the patient's immune system in favor of tumor growth.As KSHV is a necessary but not sufficient etiological factor for KS,human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a very important cofactor.Here we review the basic information about the biology of KSHV,development of pathogenesis and interaction between KSHV and HIV.

  2. Importance of Basic Residues in Binding of Rous Sarcoma Virus Nucleocapsid to the RNA Packaging Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Alidina, Annie; May, Cynthia; Linial, Maxine L.

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein, only the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is required to mediate the specificity of genomic RNA packaging. We have previously showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae three-hybrid system provides a rapid genetic assay to analyze the RNA and protein components of the avian retroviral RNA-Gag interactions necessary for specific encapsidation. In this study, using both site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo random screening in the yeast three-hybr...

  3. Detection of Human Herpes Virus 8 in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembo, Rabecca; Kaile, Trevor; Kafita, Doris; Chisanga, Chrispin; Kalonda, Annie; Zulu, Ephraim; Samutela, Mulemba; Polepole, Pascal; Kwenda, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Human herpes virus-8, a γ2-herpes virus, is the aetiological agent of Kaposi sarcoma. Recently, Kaposi's sarcoma cases have increased in Zambia. However, the diagnosis of this disease is based on morphological appearance of affected tissues using histological techniques, and the association with its causative agent, Human Herpes virus 8 is not sought. This means poor prognosis for affected patients since the causative agent is not targeted during diagnosis and KS lesions may be mistaken for other reactive and neoplastic vascular proliferations when only histological techniques are used. Therefore, this study was aimed at providing evidence of Human Herpes virus 8 infection in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. One hundred and twenty suspected Kaposi's sarcoma archival formalin-fixed paraffin-wax embedded tissues stored from January 2013 to December 2014 in the Histopathology Laboratory at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia were analysed using histology and Polymerase Chain Reaction targeting the ORF26 gene of Human Herpes virus 8. The predominant histological type of Kaposi's sarcoma detected was the Nodular type (60.7%) followed by the plaque type (22.6%) and patch type (16.7%). The nodular lesion was identified mostly in males (40.5%, 34/84) than females (20.2%, 17/84) (p=0.041). Human Herpes virus 8 DNA was detected in 53.6% (45/84) and mostly in the nodular KS lesions (60%, 27/84) (p=0.035). The findings in this study show that the Human Herpes virus-8 is detectable in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues, and, as previously reported in other settings, is closely associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. The study has provided important baseline data for use in the diagnosis of this disease and the identification of the virus in the tissues will aid in targeted therapy.

  4. [Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV-8)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Harutaka

    2010-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus 8, HHV-8) are members of gamma-herpes virus family. Both viruses infect to B cells and cause malignancies such as lymphoma. Since EBV and HHV-8 are so-called 'oncovirus', their oncogenecities have been focused in the researches on EBV and KSHV for a long time. EBV was discovered in 1964, whereas KSHV was identified in 1994. However, KSHV was analyzed rapidly in these fifteen years. One of the recent progresses in the research on EBV and KSHV is that virus-encoded small RNAs were identified in their genomes and characterized. EBV is the first human virus in whose genome microRNA was identified. The oncogenecity of EBV and KSHV remains unclear. Here, I discuss the pathogenesis by EBV and KSHV with special reference to recent progress in this field.

  5. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G;

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...

  6. Sensitivity to. gamma. rays of avian sarcoma and murine leukemia viruses. [/sup 60/Co, uv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoshima, K. (Osaka Univ., Japan); Niwa, O.; Yutsudo, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Tahara, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1980-09-01

    The direct inactivation of avian and murine oncoviruses by ..gamma.. rays was examined using /sup 60/Co as a ..gamma..-ray source. The inactivation of murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) followed single-hit kinetics while the subgroup D Schmidt-Ruppin strain of avian sarcoma virus (SR-RSV D) showed multihit inactivation kinetics with an extrapolation number of 5. The two viruses showed similar uv-inactivation kinetics. The genomic RNA of the SR-RSV D strain was degraded by ..gamma.. irradiation faster than its infectivity, but viral clones isolated from the foci formed after ..gamma.. irradiation had a complete genome. These results suggest that SR-RSV D has a strong repair function, possibly connected with reverse transcriptase activity.

  7. Association between malaria exposure and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus seropositivity in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalwoga, Angela; Cose, Stephen; Wakeham, Katie; Miley, Wendell; Ndibazza, Juliet; Drakeley, Christopher; Elliott, Alison; Whitby, Denise; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Unlike other herpes viruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is not ubiquitous worldwide and is most prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. The reasons for this are unclear. As part of a wider investigation of factors that facilitate transmission in Uganda, a high prevalence country, we examined the association between antimalaria antibodies and seropositivity against KSHV. Methods Antibodies against P. falciparum merozoite surface protein (PfMSP)-1, P. falciparum apical membrane antigen (PfAMA)-1 and KSHV antigens (ORF73 and K8.1) were measured in samples from 1164 mothers and 1227 children. Results Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus seroprevalence was 69% among mothers and 15% children. Among mothers, KSHV seroprevalence increased with malaria antibody titres: from 60% to 82% and from 54% to 77%, comparing those with the lowest and highest titres for PfMSP-1 and PfAMA-1, respectively (P < 0.0001). Among children, only antibodies to PfAMA-1 were significantly associated with KSHV seropositivity, (P < 0.0001). In both mothers and children, anti-ORF73 antibodies were more strongly associated with malaria antibodies than anti-K8.1 antibodies. Conclusion The association between malaria exposure and KSHV seropositivity suggests that malaria is a cofactor for KSHV infection or reactivation. PMID:25611008

  8. The Epidemiology of Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burningham Zachary

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and an interaction between the two. HIV-positive individuals are at an increased risk for Kaposi’s sarcoma, even though HHV8 is the causative virus. Radiation exposure from radiotherapy has been strongly associated with secondary sarcoma development in certain cancer patients. In fact, the risk of malignant bone tumors increases as the cumulative dose of radiation to the bone increases (p for trend

  9. Harvey murine sarcoma virus p21 ras protein: biological and biochemical significance of the cysteine nearest the carboxy terminus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Norris, K; Papageorge, A G

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies of premature chain termination mutants and in frame deletion mutants of the p21 ras transforming protein encoded by the transforming gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MuSV) have suggested that the C terminus is required for cellular transformation, lipid binding, and membrane...

  10. Complete genome sequence of arracacha mottle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orílio, Anelise F; Lucinda, Natalia; Dusi, André N; Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice K

    2013-01-01

    Arracacha mottle virus (AMoV) is the only potyvirus reported to infect arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhiza) in Brazil. Here, the complete genome sequence of an isolate of AMoV was determined to be 9,630 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3' poly-A tail, and encoding a polyprotein of 3,135 amino acids and a putative P3N-PIPO protein. Its genomic organization is typical of a member of the genus Potyvirus, containing all conserved motifs. Its full genome sequence shared 56.2 % nucleotide identity with sunflower chlorotic mottle virus and verbena virus Y, the most closely related viruses.

  11. Regional prevalence and transmission route of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus in Zhejiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Hong-zhen; ZHU Biao; WANG Ying-jie; SHENG Zi-ke; SHENG Ji-fang

    2012-01-01

    Background The infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is most likely the cause of clinical Kaposi's sarcoma,primary effusion lymphoma,and multi-center Castleman's disease.KSHV infection has very limited epidemiological survey data in China,and its definite mode of transmission remains controversial.This study aimed to determine the infection status and the main transmission route of KSHV in Chinese population.Methods An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing KSHV ORF65 recombinant protein was employed to analyze the antibody response to KSHV ORF65 in sera from 122 healthy physical examination people,107intravenous drug users,135 non-intravenous drug users,211 hepatitis B (HBV) patients infected via blood transmission,107 kidney transplant recipients,and 72 female sex workers in Zhejiang Province in Southeast China.Results KSHV infection occurred relatively common (13.1%) in healthy population in Zhejiang,China.Infection rate was 16.7% in female sex workers,but significantly elevated in intravenous drug addicts (58.9%),blood-transmitted HBV patients (28.0%) and kidney transplant patients (41.1%).Conclusion Blood borne transmission of KSHV is probably the main route of infection in Zhejiang Province.

  12. In vivo interference of Rous sarcoma virus budding by cis expression of a WW domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Akash; Wills, John W

    2002-03-01

    For all enveloped viruses, the actual mechanism by which nascent virus particles separate or "pinch off" from the cell surface is largely unknown. In the case of retroviruses, the Gag protein drives the budding process, and the virus release step is directed by the late (L) assembly domain within Gag. A PPPPY motif within the L domain of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) was previously characterized as being critical for the release of virions and shown to interact in vitro with the WW domain of Yes-associated protein (Yap). To determine whether WW domain-L domain interactions can occur in vivo, we attempted to interfere with the host cell machinery normally recruited to the site of budding by inserting this WW domain in different locations within Gag. At a C-terminal location, the WW(Yap) domain had no effect on budding, suggesting that the intervening I domains (which provide the major region of Gag-Gag interaction) prevent its access to the L domain. When positioned on the other side of the I domains closer to the L domain, the WW(Yap) domain resulted in a dramatic interference of particle release, and confocal microscopy revealed a block to budding on the plasma membrane. Budding was restored by attachment of the heterologous L domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag, which does not bind WW(Yap). These findings suggest that cis expression of WW domains can interfere with RSV particle release in vivo via specific, high-affinity interactions at the site of assembly on the plasma membrane, thus preventing host factor accessibility to the L domain and subsequent virus-cell separation. In addition, they suggest that L domain-specific host factors function after Gag proteins begin to interact.

  13. In vitro proteolytic cleavage of Gazdar murine sarcoma virus p65gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, S; Arlinghaus, R B

    1981-09-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus, disrupted in concentrations of 0.1 to 0.5% Nonidet P-40, catalyzed the cleavage of p65, the gag gene polyprotein of the Gazdar strain of murine sarcoma virus, into polypeptides with sizes and antigenic determinants of murine leukemia virus-specified p30, p15, pp12, and p10. Cleavage performed in the presence of 0.15% Nonidet P-40 in water yielded polypeptides of approximately 40,000 (P40) and 25,000 (P25) Mr. In vitro cleavage performed in a buffered solution containing dithiothreitol in addition to 0.1% Nonidet P-40 allowed the efficient processing of P40 to p30 and a band migrating with p10. Immunoprecipitation with monospecific sera indicated that P40 contained p30 and p10, whereas P25 contained p15 and pp12 determinants. P40 and P25 are similar in size and antigenic properties to Pr40gag and Pr25gag observed in infected cells (Naso et al, J. Virol. 32:187-198, 1979).

  14. Properties of a ribonucleoprotein particle isolated from Nonidet P-40-treated Rous sarcoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, N L; Rueckert, R R

    1972-11-01

    A ribonucleoprotein particle containing about 20% ribonucleic acid (RNA), and containing little if any phospholipid or glucosamine, was recovered in high yield after treatment of Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus and B77 virus with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. This structure, which probably derives from the internal ribonucleoprotein filament described in electron microscopy studies, contained 80 to 90% of the viral 60 to 70S RNA and only about 10% of the protein present in intact virions. It sedimented in glycerol density gradients at approximately 130S and had a buoyant density in sucrose of about 1.34 g/ml. Studies with (32)P-labeled virus indicated that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained approximately 30 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight viral RNA. Intact virions contained about 70 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight RNA. Electrophoretic studies in dodecyl sulfate-containing polyacrylamide gels showed that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained only 5 of the 11 polypeptides found in the virion; of these the major component was a polypeptide weighing 14,000 daltons.

  15. Rous Sarcoma Virus RNA Stability Element Inhibits Deadenylation of mRNAs with Long 3′UTRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagopal, Vidya; Beemon, Karen L.

    2017-01-01

    All retroviruses use their full-length primary transcript as the major mRNA for Group-specific antigen (Gag) capsid proteins. This results in a long 3′ untranslated region (UTR) downstream of the termination codon. In the case of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), there is a 7 kb 3′UTR downstream of the gag terminator, containing the pol, env, and src genes. mRNAs containing long 3′UTRs, like those with premature termination codons, are frequently recognized by the cellular nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) machinery and targeted for degradation. To prevent this, RSV has evolved an RNA stability element (RSE) in the RNA immediately downstream of the gag termination codon. This 400-nt RNA sequence stabilizes premature termination codons (PTCs) in gag. It also stabilizes globin mRNAs with long 3′UTRs, when placed downstream of the termination codon. It is not clear how the RSE stabilizes the mRNA and prevents decay. We show here that the presence of RSE inhibits deadenylation severely. In addition, the RSE also impairs decapping (DCP2) and 5′-3′ exonucleolytic (XRN1) function in knockdown experiments in human cells. PMID:28763028

  16. The complete DNA sequence of vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, S J; Johnson, G P; Perkus, M E; Davis, S W; Winslow, J P; Paoletti, E

    1990-11-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the genome of vaccinia virus has been determined. The genome consisted of 191,636 bp with a base composition of 66.6% A + T. We have identified 198 "major" protein-coding regions and 65 overlapping "minor" regions, for a total of 263 potential genes. Genes encoded by the virus were located by examination of DNA sequence characteristics and compared with existing vaccinia virus mapping analyses, sequence data, and transcription data. These genes were found to be compactly organized along the genome with relatively few regions of noncoding sequences. Whereas several similarities to proteins of known function were discerned, the function of the majority of proteins encoded by these open reading frames is as yet undetermined.

  17. Varicella Zoster Virus Promoter Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    71:2999-3003 . Dumas AM. Geelen JLMC. Maris W, and van der Noordaa J . 1980. Infectivity and molecular weight of varicella-zoster virus DNA. J. Gen...zusammenhang der 164 varizelen mit gewissenfallen von herpes zoster. weinklin. Wchschr. 22,1323-1327. Vonsover A, Leventon- Kriss S, Langer A, Smetana Z

  18. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Apple Infecting Viruses in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    In-Sook Cho; Davaajargal Igori; Seungmo Lim; Gug-Seoun Choi; John Hammond; Hyoun-Sub Lim; Jae Sun Moon

    2016-01-01

    Deep sequencing has generated 52 contigs derived from five viruses; Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple green crinkle associated virus (AGCaV), and Apricot latent virus (ApLV) were identified from eight apple samples showing small leaves and/or growth retardation. Nucleotide (nt) sequence identity of the assembled contigs was from 68% to 99% compared to the reference sequences of the five respective viral genomes. S...

  19. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Mimics Hypoxia Gene Expression Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Coralie; Davis, David A.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Reczko, Martin; Pezzella, Francesco; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several tumors and hyperproliferative disorders. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) activate latent and lytic KSHV genes, and several KSHV proteins increase the cellular levels of HIF. Here, we used RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, Taqman assays, and pathway analysis to explore the miRNA and mRNA response of uninfected and KSHV-infected cells to hypoxia, to compare this with the genetic changes seen in chronic latent KSHV infection, and to explore the degree to which hypoxia and KSHV infection interact in modulating mRNA and miRNA expression. We found that the gene expression signatures for KSHV infection and hypoxia have a 34% overlap. Moreover, there were considerable similarities between the genes up-regulated by hypoxia in uninfected (SLK) and in KSHV-infected (SLKK) cells. hsa-miR-210, a HIF-target known to have pro-angiogenic and anti-apoptotic properties, was significantly up-regulated by both KSHV infection and hypoxia using Taqman assays. Interestingly, expression of KSHV-encoded miRNAs was not affected by hypoxia. These results demonstrate that KSHV harnesses a part of the hypoxic cellular response and that a substantial portion of hypoxia-induced changes in cellular gene expression are induced by KSHV infection. Therefore, targeting hypoxic pathways may be a useful way to develop therapeutic strategies for KSHV-related diseases. PMID:28046107

  20. Simian sarcoma virus-encoded gag-related protein: in vitro cleavage by Friend leukemia virus-associated proteolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafenrichter, R; Thiel, H J

    1985-05-01

    The simian sarcoma virus (SSV) encodes a gag-related 65,000-Da protein (SSV p65) which is not processed in SSV nonproducer cells (SSV-NP cells) (H.-J. Thiel, T. J. Matthews, E. M. Broughton, K. J. Weinhold, D. P. Bolognesi, T. Graf, and H. Beug (1981a), Virology 114, 124-131). In order to cleave SSV p65, retroviral particles containing this antigen were incubated with extracts from the heterologous helper virus Friend leukemia virus (FLV). Superinfection of SSV-NP cells by FLV has been previously shown to result in processing of SSV p65 in vivo (H.-J. Thiel, F. Weiland, R. Hafenrichter, T. J. Matthews, and K. J. Weinhold (1982), Virology 123, 229-234). In vitro cleavage was most efficient in the presence of a nonionic detergent (greater than 0.1% Nonidet-P40) and a reducing agent (greater than 5 mM dithiothreitol) at a pH of 7.0. The products, termed SSV p55 (p15, p12, p30), SSV p30, SSV p25 (p15, p12), and SSV p10, were characterized by (1) molecular weight, (2) kinetics experiments, (3) incorporation of different radiolabeled amino acids, and (4) comparison with SSAV structural proteins. Kinetics experiments with two amino acids ([3H]leucine, [35S]cysteine) revealed that initial processing of SSV p65 produced SSV p55 and SSV p10, with subsequent processing of SSV p55 occurring thereafter. In contrast to the Moloney system, the major intermediate p40 (p30, p10) could not be clearly demonstrated. A direct comparison of SSAV p10 and the cleavage product SSV p10 by SDS-PAGE suggests that SSAV pr65gag and SSV p65 differ slightly by molecular weight.

  1. GROWTH REGULATION IN ROUS SARCOMA VIRUS INFECTED CHICKEN EMBRYO FIBROBLASTS: THE ROLE OF THE src GENE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, G.; Bartholomew, J.A.; Blssell, M.J.

    1980-07-01

    We report here a study of the mechanisms leading to loss of growth control in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). We have been particularly concerned with the role of the src gene in this process, and have used RSV mutants temperature sensitive (ts) for transformation to investigate the nature of the growth regulatory lesion. The two principal findings were (1) the stationary phase of the cell cycle (G{sub 1}) in chick embryo fibroblasts seems to have two distinct regulatory compartments (using the terminology of Brooks et al. we refer to these as 'Q' and 'A' states). When rendered stationary at 41.5 C by serum deprivation, normal cells enter a Q state, but cells infected with the ts-mutant occupy an A state. (2) Whereas normal cells can occupy either state depending on culture conditions, the ts-infected cells, at 41.5 C, do not seem to enter Q even though a known src gene product, a kinase, is reported to be inactive at this temperature. We discuss the possibility that viral factors other than the active src protein kinase influence growth control in infected cultures.

  2. Structural Model of the Tubular Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jaekyun; Qiao, Xin; Hung, Ivan; Mitra, Alok K; Desfosses, Ambroise; Huang, Daniel; Gor'kov, Peter L; Craven, Rebecca C; Kingston, Richard L; Gan, Zhehong; Zhu, Fangqiang; Chen, Bo

    2017-02-08

    The orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA) assembles into polymorphic capsids, whose architecture, assembly, and stability are still being investigated. The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CA (NTD and CTD, respectively) engage in both homotypic and heterotypic interactions to create the capsid. Hexameric turrets formed by the NTD decorate the majority of the capsid surface. We report nearly complete solid-state NMR (ssNMR) resonance assignments of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA, assembled into hexamer tubes that mimic the authentic capsid. The ssNMR assignments show that, upon assembly, large conformational changes occur in loops connecting helices, as well as the short 310 helix initiating the CTD. The interdomain linker becomes statically disordered. Combining constraints from ssNMR and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we establish an atomic resolution model of the RSV CA tubular assembly using molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) simulations. On the basis of comparison of this MDFF model with an earlier-derived crystallographic model for the planar assembly, the induction of curvature into the RSV CA hexamer lattice arises predominantly from reconfiguration of the NTD-CTD and CTD trimer interfaces. The CTD dimer and CTD trimer interfaces are also intrinsically variable. Hence, deformation of the CA hexamer lattice results from the variable displacement of the CTDs that surround each hexameric turret. Pervasive H-bonding is found at all interdomain interfaces, which may contribute to their malleability. Finally, we find helices at the interfaces of HIV and RSV CA assemblies have very different contact angles, which may reflect differences in the capsid assembly pathway for these viruses.

  3. Cellular and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus microRNAs in sepsis and surgical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, S; Giza, D E; Lin, H Y; Fabris, L; Yoshiaki, K; D'Abundo, L; Toale, K M; Shimizu, M; Ferracin, M; Challagundla, K B; Cortez, M Angelica; Fuentes-Mattei, E; Tulbure, D; Gonzalez, C; Henderson, J; Row, M; Rice, T W; Ivan, C; Negrini, M; Fabbri, M; Morris, J S; Yeung, S-C J; Vasilescu, C; Calin, G A

    2014-12-04

    Once a patient is in septic shock, survival rates drop by 7.6% for every hour of delay in antibiotic therapy. Biomarkers based on the molecular mechanism of sepsis are important for timely diagnosis and triage. Here, we study the potential roles of a panel of cellular and viral miRNAs as sepsis biomarkers. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling in leukocytes from septic patients and nonseptic controls, combined with quantitative RT-PCR in plasmas from two cohorts of septic patients, two cohorts of nonseptic surgical patients and healthy volunteers. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, miRNA transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to study the effects of Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) miRNAs on interleukin's secretion. Differences related to sepsis etiology were noted for plasma levels of 10 cellular and 2 KSHV miRNAs (miR-K-10b and miR-K-12-12*) between septic and nonseptic patients. All the sepsis groups had high KSHV miRNAs levels compared with controls; Afro-American patients had higher levels of KSHV-miR-K12-12* than non-Afro-American patients. Both KSHV miRNAs were increased on postoperative day 1, but returned to baseline on day 7; they acted as direct agonists of Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8), which might explain the increased secretion of the IL-6 and IL-10. Cellular and KSHV miRNAs are differentially expressed in sepsis and early postsurgical patients and may be exploited for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Increased miR-K-10b and miR-K12-12* are functionally involved in sepsis as agonists of TLR8, forming a positive feedback that may lead to cytokine dysregulation.

  4. KSHV 2.0: a comprehensive annotation of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus genome using next-generation sequencing reveals novel genomic and functional features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Arias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Productive herpesvirus infection requires a profound, time-controlled remodeling of the viral transcriptome and proteome. To gain insights into the genomic architecture and gene expression control in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, we performed a systematic genome-wide survey of viral transcriptional and translational activity throughout the lytic cycle. Using mRNA-sequencing and ribosome profiling, we found that transcripts encoding lytic genes are promptly bound by ribosomes upon lytic reactivation, suggesting their regulation is mainly transcriptional. Our approach also uncovered new genomic features such as ribosome occupancy of viral non-coding RNAs, numerous upstream and small open reading frames (ORFs, and unusual strategies to expand the virus coding repertoire that include alternative splicing, dynamic viral mRNA editing, and the use of alternative translation initiation codons. Furthermore, we provide a refined and expanded annotation of transcription start sites, polyadenylation sites, splice junctions, and initiation/termination codons of known and new viral features in the KSHV genomic space which we have termed KSHV 2.0. Our results represent a comprehensive genome-scale image of gene regulation during lytic KSHV infection that substantially expands our understanding of the genomic architecture and coding capacity of the virus.

  5. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Robert A.; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M. (NCI); (Cornell); (CM); (NIST)

    2016-05-06

    Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactionsin vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particlesin vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interactionin vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization.

    Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our

  6. Primary effusion lymphoma: a distinct clinicopathologic entity associated with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, R G; Cesarman, E; Chadburn, A; Dawson, D B; Ansari, M Q; Sald, J; Knowles, D M

    1996-07-15

    We recently discovered the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8) in an uncommon and unusual subset of AIDS-related lymphomas that grow mainly in the body cavities as lymphomatous effusions without an identifiable contiguous tumor mass. The consistent presence of KSHV and certain other distinctive features of these body cavity-based lymphomas suggest that they represent a distinct entity. We tested this hypothesis by investigating 19 malignant lymphomatous effusions occurring in the absence of a contiguous tumor mass for their clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, viral, and molecular characteristics, KSHV was present in 15 of 19 lymphomas. All four KSHV-negative lymphomatous effusions exhibited Burkitt or Burkitt-like morphology and c-myc gene rearrangements and, therefore, appeared to be Burkitt-type lymphomas occurring in the body cavities. In contrast, all 15 KSHV-positive lymphomatous effusions exhibited a distinctive morphology bridging large-cell immunoblastic lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and all 12 cases studied lacked c-myc gene rearrangements. In addition, these lymphomas occurred in men (15/15), frequently but not exclusively in association with HIV infection (13/15), in which homosexuality was a risk factor (13/13), presented initially as a lymphomatous effusion (14/15), remained localized to the body cavity of origin (13/15), expressed CD45 (15/15) and one or more activation-associated antigens (9/10) in the frequent absence of B-cell-associated antigens (11/15), exhibited clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangements (13/13), contained Epstein-Barr virus (14/15), and lacked bcl-2, bcl-6, ras and p53 gene alterations (13/15). These findings strongly suggest that the KSHV-positive malignant lymphomatous effusions represent a distinct clinicopathologic and biologic entity and should be distinguished from other malignant lymphomas occurring in the body cavities. Therefore, we recommend that these malignant lymphomas be

  7. Detecting overlapping coding sequences in virus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Chris M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting new coding sequences (CDSs in viral genomes can be difficult for several reasons. The typically compact genomes often contain a number of overlapping coding and non-coding functional elements, which can result in unusual patterns of codon usage; conservation between related sequences can be difficult to interpret – especially within overlapping genes; and viruses often employ non-canonical translational mechanisms – e.g. frameshifting, stop codon read-through, leaky-scanning and internal ribosome entry sites – which can conceal potentially coding open reading frames (ORFs. Results In a previous paper we introduced a new statistic – MLOGD (Maximum Likelihood Overlapping Gene Detector – for detecting and analysing overlapping CDSs. Here we present (a an improved MLOGD statistic, (b a greatly extended suite of software using MLOGD, (c a database of results for 640 virus sequence alignments, and (d a web-interface to the software and database. Tests show that, from an alignment with just 20 mutations, MLOGD can discriminate non-overlapping CDSs from non-coding ORFs with a typical accuracy of up to 98%, and can detect CDSs overlapping known CDSs with a typical accuracy of 90%. In addition, the software produces a variety of statistics and graphics, useful for analysing an input multiple sequence alignment. Conclusion MLOGD is an easy-to-use tool for virus genome annotation, detecting new CDSs – in particular overlapping or short CDSs – and for analysing overlapping CDSs following frameshift sites. The software, web-server, database and supplementary material are available at http://guinevere.otago.ac.nz/mlogd.html.

  8. Full sequence analysis of the original Sapporo virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Kaori; Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Kinoshita-Numata, Kazuko; Tsugawa, Takeshi; Nakata, Shuji; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the full-length genome sequence of the prototype of sapovirus, namely Sapporo virus (SV82), was identified. Sapporo virus RNA was extracted from a fecal sample, amplified by RT-PCR and the PCR products sequenced directly and analyzed. Sequence analysis showed that Sapporo virus consists of 7433 nucleotides and has three open reading frames. The Sapporo strain shows 91.7% nucleotide sequence identity to the Manchester virus. Phylogenic analysis has also revealed the closeness of Sapporo virus to other sapovirus/genogroup I strains. Basic information on the evolutionary history of sapovirus analysis is provided here.

  9. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed...

  10. The hr1 and fusion peptide regions of the subgroup B avian sarcoma and leukosis virus envelope glycoprotein influence low pH-dependent membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Rose Babel

    Full Text Available The avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV envelope glycoprotein (Env is activated to trigger fusion by a two-step mechanism involving receptor-priming and low pH fusion activation. In order to identify regions of ASLV Env that can regulate this process, a genetic selection method was used to identify subgroup B (ASLV-B virus-infected cells resistant to low pH-triggered fusion when incubated with cells expressing the cognate TVB receptor. The subgroup B viral Env (envB genes were then isolated from these cells and characterized by DNA sequencing. This led to identification of two frequent EnvB alterations which allowed TVB receptor-binding but altered the pH-threshold of membrane fusion activation: a 13 amino acid deletion in the host range 1 (hr1 region of the surface (SU EnvB subunit, and the A32V amino acid change within the fusion peptide of the transmembrane (TM EnvB subunit. These data indicate that these two regions of EnvB can influence the pH threshold of fusion activation.

  11. Identifying actionable variants using next generation sequencing in patients with a historical diagnosis of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Jeremy; Garg, Swati; Lau, Beatrice Y; Dickson, Brendan C; Traub, Frank; Gokgoz, Nalan; Griffin, Anthony M; Ferguson, Peter C; Andrulis, Irene L; Sim, Hao-Wen; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Stockley, Tracy L; Siu, Lillian L; Wunder, Jay S; Razak, Albiruni R A

    2017-09-10

    There are limited data regarding the molecular characterization of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcomas (UPS; formerly malignant fibrous histiocytoma). This study aimed to investigate the utility of next generation sequencing (NGS) in UPS to identify subsets of patients who harbour actionable mutations. Patients diagnosed with UPS underwent pathological re-evaluation by a pathologist specializing in sarcoma. Tumor DNA was isolated from archived fresh frozen tissue samples and genotyped using NGS with the Illumina MiSeq TruSeq Amplicon Cancer Panel (48 genes, 212 amplicons). In total, 95 patients initially classified with UPS were identified. Following pathology re-review the histological subtypes were reclassified to include: Myxofibrosarcoma (MFS, N = 44); UPS(N = 18); and Others (N = 27; including undifferentiated spindle cell sarcoma (N = 15) and dedifferentiated liposarcoma (N = 6)). Seven cases were excluded from further analysis for other reasons. Baseline demographics of the finalized cohort (N = 88) showed a median age of 66 years (32-95), primarily with stage I-III disease (92%) and high-grade (86%) lesions. Somatic mutations were identified in 31 cases (35%)(Total mutations = 36: solitary mutation(n = 27); two mutations( =n = 3); three mutations(n = 1)). The most commonly identified mutations were in TP53 (n = 24), ATM (n = 3) and PIK3CA (n = 2). Three of 43 patients with MFS and one of 18 patients with UPS had clinically relevant mutations, mainly related to biomarkers of prediction of response; however few had targetable driver mutations. Somatic mutation status did not influence disease free or overall survival. Based on the small number of clinically relevant mutations, these data do not support the routine use of targeted NGS panels outside of research protocols in UPS. © 2017 UICC.

  12. Monoclonal antibody against IFN-gamma inhibits Moloney murine sarcoma virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanovello, P.; Vallerani, E.; Biasi, G.; Landolfo, S.; Collavo, D.

    1988-02-15

    The role of autochthonous IFN- production was evaluated in immune reactions to Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV)-induced tumors which are characterized by spontaneous regression mainly caused by virus-specific CTL activity. A functional IFN- depletion, induced by repeated administration of mAb anti-IFN- at the site of virus inoculation, prevented tumor regression in M-MSV-injected mice. Moreover, this antibody inhibited in vitro both proliferation and differentiation of M-MSV-specific T lymphocytes obtained in bulk cultures, but not growth and lytic activity of the already differentiated virus-specific CTL clone CHM-14 stimulated with rIL-2 and relevant tumor Ag. In addition, in mice receiving mAb treatment the frequency of M-MSV-specific CTL precursors, evaluated by means of limiting dilution analysis, was strongly reduced in comparison with that of control mice injected only with virus. Because CTL secrete IFN- following antigenic stimulation, the possibility that non-T effector cells recruited by this lymphokine might mediate tumor regression was also considered. Adoptive immunotherapy experiments, performed in T cell-deficient (Tx + BM) and in sublethally irradiated mice, demonstrated that transfer of CHM-14 CTL clone, which secretes IFN-, was able to counteract M-MSV tumor growth despite the local mAb anti-IFN- treatment which may have prevented host cell recruitment. Moreover, repeated local rIFN- inoculations in Tx + BM mice did not counteract M-MSV tumor progression, thus confirming that other IFN- properties such as non-T cell recruitment, antiviral or anti-proliferative IFN- activities have little or no relevance when M-MSV-specific CTL are lacking. On the whole, these results indicate that in M-MSV-injected mice, tumor enhancement after mAb anti-IFN- treatment is principally caused by impaired differentiation of virus-specific CTL precursors.

  13. Complete genome sequence of the alfalfa latent virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa latent virus (ALV) is a member of the carlavirus group and occurs symptomlessly in alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In the US it is prevalent in Nebraska and Wisconsin. The virus is recognized as a strain of Pea streak virus (PeSV) So far, no complete genomic sequence of PSV or ALV is availab...

  14. Complete sequence of a cryptic virus from hemp (Cannabis sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Angelika; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Steger, Gerhard; Schubert, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa) was found to be a useful propagation host for hop latent virus, a carlavirus. However, when virus preparations were analysed by electron microscopy, along with the expected filamentous particles, spherical particles with a diameter of around 34 nm were found. RNA from virus preparations was purified, and cDNA was prepared and cloned. Sequence information was used to search databases, and the greatest similarity was found with Primula malacoides virus 1, a putative new member of the genus Partitivirus. The full sequences of RNA 1 and RNA 2 of this new hemp cryptic virus were obtained.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Vaccinia Virus Strain L-IVP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvalov, Alexander N.; Sivolobova, Galina F.; Kuligina, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the live vaccine doses of vaccinia virus donated to the Intensified Smallpox Eradication Programme after 1971 were prepared using the L-IVP strain. A mixture of three clones of the L-IVP strain was sequenced using MySEQ. Consensus sequence similarity with the vaccinia virus Lister strain is 99.5%. PMID:27174282

  16. Complete Genomic Sequence of Issyk-Kul Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Barry; Marston, Denise A; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2015-07-02

    Issyk-Kul virus (ISKV) is an ungrouped virus tentatively assigned to the Bunyaviridae family and is associated with an acute febrile illness in several central Asian countries. Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we report here the full-genome sequence for this novel unclassified arboviral pathogen circulating in central Asia.

  17. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus.

  18. Antibodies against lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus antigens and lymphoma in the European EpiLymph case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Y; Mbisa, G; Labo, N; Casabonne, D; Becker, N; Maynadie, M; Foretova, L; Cocco, P L; Nieters, A; Staines, A; Bofetta, P; Brennan, P; Whitby, D; de Sanjosé, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus is associated with primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. Methods: Seropositivity to lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) antigens were examined in 2083 lymphomas and 2013 controls from six European countries. Results: Antibodies against KSHV latent and lytic antigens were detectable in 4.5% and 3.4% of controls, respectively, and 3.6% of cases (P>0.05). The KSHV seropositivity was associated with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) (odds ratio (OR)=4.11, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.57–10.83) and multiple myeloma (OR=0.31, 95% CI=0.11–0.85). Conclusion: The KSHV is unlikely to contribute importantly to lymphomagenesis among immunocompetent subjects. However, the observed association with SMZL may underline a chronic antigen mechanism in its aetiology. PMID:21952625

  19. The Cancer-Associated Virus Landscape in HIV Patients with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia, Kaposi's Sarcoma, and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Burbelo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although HIV-positive patients are at higher risk for developing a variety of infection-related cancers, the prevalence of infections with the seven known cancer-associated viruses has not been studied. Luciferase immunoprecipitation systems were used to evaluate antiviral antibodies in four 23-person groups: healthy blood donors and HIV-infected patients with oral hairy leukoplakia (OLP, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL. Antibody profiling revealed that all HIV-positive individuals were strongly seropositive for anti-gp41 and antireverse transcriptase antibodies. However, anti-p24 HIV antibody levels were highly variable and some OLP and KS patients demonstrated weak or negative responses. Profiling two EBV antigens revealed no statistical difference in antibody levels among the three HIV-infected groups. A high frequency of KSHV infection was detected in HIV patients including 100% of KS, 78% of OLP, and 57% of NHL patients. Most HIV-infected subjects (84% showed anti-HBV core antibodies, but only a few showed antibodies against HCV. MCV seropositivity was also common (94% in the HIV-infected individuals and KS patients showed statistically higher antibody levels compared to the OLP and NHL patients. Overall, 68% of the HIV-infected patients showed seropositivity with at least four cancer-associated viruses. Antibody profiles against these and other infectious agents could be useful for enhancing the clinical management of HIV patients.

  20. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Apple Infecting Viruses in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, In-Sook; Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Choi, Gug-Seoun; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-10-01

    Deep sequencing has generated 52 contigs derived from five viruses; Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple green crinkle associated virus (AGCaV), and Apricot latent virus (ApLV) were identified from eight apple samples showing small leaves and/or growth retardation. Nucleotide (nt) sequence identity of the assembled contigs was from 68% to 99% compared to the reference sequences of the five respective viral genomes. Sequences of ASPV and ASGV were the most abundantly represented by the 52 contigs assembled. The presence of the five viruses in the samples was confirmed by RT-PCR using specific primers based on the sequences of each assembled contig. All five viruses were detected in three of the samples, whereas all samples had mixed infections with at least two viruses. The most frequently detected virus was ASPV, followed by ASGV, ApLV, ACLSV, and AGCaV which were withal found in mixed infections in the tested samples. AGCaV was identified in assembled contigs ID 1012480 and 93549, which showed 82% and 78% nt sequence identity with ORF1 of AGCaV isolate Aurora-1. ApLV was identified in three assembled contigs, ID 65587, 1802365, and 116777, which showed 77%, 78%, and 76% nt sequence identity respectively with ORF1 of ApLV isolate LA2. Deep sequencing assay was shown to be a valuable and powerful tool for detection and identification of known and unknown virome in infected apple trees, here identifying ApLV and AGCaV in commercial orchards in Korea for the first time.

  1. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Apple Infecting Viruses in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Sook Cho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep sequencing has generated 52 contigs derived from five viruses; Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV, Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV, Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV, Apple green crinkle associated virus (AGCaV, and Apricot latent virus (ApLV were identified from eight apple samples showing small leaves and/or growth retardation. Nucleotide (nt sequence identity of the assembled contigs was from 68% to 99% compared to the reference sequences of the five respective viral genomes. Sequences of ASPV and ASGV were the most abundantly represented by the 52 contigs assembled. The presence of the five viruses in the samples was confirmed by RT-PCR using specific primers based on the sequences of each assembled contig. All five viruses were detected in three of the samples, whereas all samples had mixed infections with at least two viruses. The most frequently detected virus was ASPV, followed by ASGV, ApLV, ACLSV, and AGCaV which were withal found in mixed infections in the tested samples. AGCaV was identified in assembled contigs ID 1012480 and 93549, which showed 82% and 78% nt sequence identity with ORF1 of AGCaV isolate Aurora-1. ApLV was identified in three assembled contigs, ID 65587, 1802365, and 116777, which showed 77%, 78%, and 76% nt sequence identity respectively with ORF1 of ApLV isolate LA2. Deep sequencing assay was shown to be a valuable and powerful tool for detection and identification of known and unknown virome in infected apple trees, here identifying ApLV and AGCaV in commercial orchards in Korea for the first time.

  2. Ewing sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone cancer - Ewing sarcoma; Ewing family of tumors; Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET); Bone neoplasm - Ewing sarcoma ... this tissue to help determine how aggressive the cancer is and what treatment may be best.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Lunyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Sarah; Horton, Daniel L; Marston, Denise A; Johnson, Nicholas; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2016-04-14

    Using next-generation sequencing technologies, the first complete genome sequence of Rift Valley fever virus strain Lunyo is reported here. Originally reported as an attenuated antigenic variant strain from Uganda, genomic sequence analysis shows that Lunyo clusters together with other Ugandan isolates.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  5. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Tsai, Wan-Hua; Chen, Yu-Lian; Ko, Ying-Chieh; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Jen-Yang; Lin, Su-Fang

    2011-03-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1) an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2) a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  6. Sequence analysis reveals mosaic genome of Aichi virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xiaohong

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aichi virus is a positive-sense and single-stranded RNA virus, which demonstrated to be related to diarrhea of Children. In the present study, phylogenetic and recombination analysis based on the Aichi virus complete genomes available in GenBank reveal a mosaic genome sequence [GenBank: FJ890523], of which the nt 261-852 region (the nt position was based on the aligned sequence file shows close relationship with AB010145/Japan with 97.9% sequence identity, while the other genomic regions show close relationship with AY747174/German with 90.1% sequence identity. Our results will provide valuable hints for future research on Aichi virus diversity. Aichi virus is a member of the Kobuvirus genus of the Picornaviridae family 12 and belongs to a positive-sense and single-stranded RNA virus. Its presence in fecal specimens of children suffering from diarrhea has been demonstrated in several Asian countries 3456, in Brazil and German 7, in France 8 and in Tunisia 9. Some reports showed the high level of seroprevalence in adults 710, suggesting the widespread exposure to Aichi virus during childhood. The genome of Aichi virus contains 8,280 nucleotides and a poly(A tail. The single large open reading frame (nt 713-8014 according to the strain AB010145 encodes a polyprotein of 2,432 amino acids that is cleaved into the typical picornavirus structural proteins VP0, VP3, VP1, and nonstructural proteins 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, 3C and 3D 211. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 519-bp sequences at the 3C-3D (3CD junction, Aichi viruses can be divided into two genotypes A and B with approximately 90% sequence homology 12. Although only six complete genomes of Aichi virus were deposited in GenBank at present, mosaic genomes can be found in strains from different countries.

  7. Sequencing of Ebola Virus Genomes Using Nanopore Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Sequencing of virus genomes during disease outbreaks can provide valuable information for diagnostics, epidemiology, and evaluation of potential countermeasures. However, particularly in remote areas logistical and technical challenges can be significant. Nanopore sequencing provides an alternative to classical Sanger and next-generation sequencing methods, and was successfully used under outbreak conditions (Hoenen et al., 2016; Quick et al., 2016). Here we describe a protocol used for sequencing of Ebola virus under outbreak conditions using Nanopore technology, which we successfully implemented at the CDC/NIH diagnostic laboratory (de Wit et al., 2016) located at the ELWA-3 Ebola virus Treatment Unit in Monrovia, Liberia, during the recent Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa.

  8. High sequence conservation among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from Lily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.K.; Derks, A.F.L.M.; Langeveld, S.; Goldbach, R.; Prins, M.

    2001-01-01

    For classification of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates from ornamental crops of different geographical areas, these were characterized by comparing the nucleotide sequences of RNAs 4 and the encoded coat proteins. Within the ornamental-infecting CMV viruses both subgroups were represented. CMV i

  9. Multistep process of neoplastic transformation of normal human fibroblasts by 60Co gamma rays and Harvey sarcoma viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, M.; Nishitani, K.; Fukushima, F.; Kimoto, T.; Nose, K.

    1986-03-15

    As reported previously (Namba et al., 1985), normal human fibroblasts were transformed by 60Co gamma-ray irradiation into immortal cells with abnormal karyotypes. These transformed cells (KMST-6), however, showed a low cloning efficiency in soft agar and no transplantability. However, upon treatment with Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MSV), the cells acquired elevated clonability in soft agar and transplantability in nude mice. Ha-MSV alone, however, did not convert normal human fibroblasts into either immortal or tumorigenic cells. The Ha-MSV-transformed KMST-6 cells showed an enhanced expression of the ras oncogene, but normal and 60Co gamma-ray-transformed cells did not. Our current data suggest that gamma rays worked against normal human cells as an initiator, giving rise to chromosome aberrations and immortality, and that Ha-MSV, probably through its ras oncogene, played a role in the progression of the malignant cell population to a more malignant one showing enhanced colony formation in soft agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice.

  10. A role for MALT1 activity in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus latency and growth of primary effusion lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, L; Passelli, K; Pelzer, C; Perroud, M; Konrad, A; Thurau, M; Stürzl, M; Dai, L; Trillo-Tinoco, J; Del Valle, L; Qin, Z; Thome, M

    2017-03-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an incurable malignancy that develops in immunodeficient patients as a consequence of latent infection of B-cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV). Malignant growth of KSHV-infected B cells requires the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which controls maintenance of viral latency and suppression of the viral lytic program. Here we show that the KSHV proteins K13 and K15 promote NF-κB activation via the protease mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein-1 (MALT1), a key driver of NF-κB activation in lymphocytes. Inhibition of the MALT1 protease activity induced a switch from the latent to the lytic stage of viral infection, and led to reduced growth and survival of PEL cell lines in vitro and in a xenograft model. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in PEL, and provide a rationale for the pharmacological targeting of MALT1 in PEL therapy.

  11. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  12. Coevolution between simple sequence repeats (SSRs and virus genome size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xiangyan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relationship between the level of repetitiveness in genomic sequence and genome size has been investigated by making use of complete prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, but relevant studies have been rarely made in virus genomes. Results In this study, a total of 257 viruses were examined, which cover 90% of genera. The results showed that simple sequence repeats (SSRs is strongly, positively and significantly correlated with genome size. Certain repeat class is distributed in a certain range of genome sequence length. Mono-, di- and tri- repeats are widely distributed in all virus genomes, tetra- SSRs as a common component consist in genomes which more than 100 kb in size; in the range of genome  Conclusions We conducted this research standing on the height of the whole virus. We concluded that genome size is an important factor in affecting the occurrence of SSRs; hosts are also responsible for the variances of SSRs content to a certain degree.

  13. Complete genome sequence of arracacha virus B: a novel cheravirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, I P; Glover, R; Souza-Richards, R; Bennett, S; Hany, U; Boonham, N

    2013-04-01

    The complete genome sequences of RNA1 and RNA2 of the oca strain of the potato virus arracacha virus B were determined using next-generation sequencing. The RNA1 molecule is predicted to encode a 259-kDa polyprotein with homology to proteins of the cheraviruses apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) and cherry rasp leaf virus (CRLV). The RNA2 molecule is predicted to encode a 102-kDa polyprotein which also has homology to the corresponding protein of ALSV and, to a lesser degree, CRLV (30 % for RNA1, 24 % for RNA2). Detailed analysis of the genome sequence confirms that AVB is a distinct member of the genus Cheravirus.

  14. Deep sequencing in the management of hepatitis virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quer, Josep; Rodríguez-Frias, Francisco; Gregori, Josep; Tabernero, David; Soria, Maria Eugenia; García-Cehic, Damir; Homs, Maria; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa María; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2016-12-28

    The hepatitis viruses represent a major public health problem worldwide. Procedures for characterization of the genomic composition of their populations, accurate diagnosis, identification of multiple infections, and information on inhibitor-escape mutants for treatment decisions are needed. Deep sequencing methodologies are extremely useful for these viruses since they replicate as complex and dynamic quasispecies swarms whose complexity and mutant composition are biologically relevant traits. Population complexity is a major challenge for disease prevention and control, but also an opportunity to distinguish among related but phenotypically distinct variants that might anticipate disease progression and treatment outcome. Detailed characterization of mutant spectra should permit choosing better treatment options, given the increasing number of new antiviral inhibitors available. In the present review we briefly summarize our experience on the use of deep sequencing for the management of hepatitis virus infections, particularly for hepatitis B and C viruses, and outline some possible new applications of deep sequencing for these important human pathogens.

  15. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated from Semen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Victoria; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Dowall, Stuart D.; Pullan, Steven T.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogenic flavivirus currently circulating in numerous countries in South America, the Caribbean, and the Western Pacific Region. Using an unbiased metagenomic sequencing approach, we report here the first complete genome sequence of ZIKV isolated from a clinical semen sample. PMID:27738033

  17. The complete nucleotide sequence of chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dullemans, A.M.; Verhoeven, J.Th.J.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV) was determined using Roche 454 next-generation sequencing. CSNV is a tentative member of the genus Tospovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, whose members are arthropod-borne. This is the first report of the entire RNA genome

  18. High sequence conservation among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from lily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y K; Derks, A F; Langeveld, S; Goldbach, R; Prins, M

    2001-08-01

    For classification of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates from ornamental crops of different geographical areas, these were characterized by comparing the nucleotide sequences of RNAs 4 and the encoded coat proteins. Within the ornamental-infecting CMV viruses both subgroups were represented. CMV isolates of Alstroemeria and crocus were classified as subgroup II isolates, whereas 8 other isolates, from lily, gladiolus, amaranthus, larkspur, and lisianthus, were identified as subgroup I members. In general, nucleotide sequence comparisons correlated well with geographic distribution, with one notable exception: the analyzed nucleotide sequences of 5 lily isolates showed remarkably high homology despite different origins.

  19. Genome Sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Oat dwarf virus, Turnip curly top virus, and Wheat dwarf virus Identified in Leafhoppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamali, Mehdi; Pouramini, Najmeh; Masumi, Hossain; Farkas, Kata; Kraberger, Simona

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Implementation of a vector-enabled metagenomics approach resulted in the identification of various geminiviruses. We identified the genome sequences of Beet curly top Iran virus, Turnip curly top viruses, Oat dwarf viruses, the first from Iran, and Wheat dwarf virus from leafhoppers feeding on beet, parsley, pumpkin, and turnip plants. PMID:28232449

  20. Complete coding sequences of the rabbitpox virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Chen, N; Roper, R L; Feng, Z; Hunter, A; Danila, M; Lefkowitz, E J; Buller, R M L; Upton, C

    2005-11-01

    Rabbitpox virus (RPXV) is highly virulent for rabbits and it has long been suspected to be a close relative of vaccinia virus. To explore these questions, the complete coding region of the rabbitpox virus genome was sequenced to permit comparison with sequenced strains of vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses. The genome of RPXV strain Utrecht (RPXV-UTR) is 197 731 nucleotides long, excluding the terminal hairpin structures at each end of the genome. The RPXV-UTR genome has 66.5 % A + T content, 184 putative functional genes and 12 fragmented ORF regions that are intact in other orthopoxviruses. The sequence of the RPXV-UTR genome reveals that two RPXV-UTR genes have orthologues in variola virus (VARV; the causative agent of smallpox), but not in vaccinia virus (VACV) strains. These genes are a zinc RING finger protein gene (RPXV-UTR-008) and an ankyrin repeat family protein gene (RPXV-UTR-180). A third gene, encoding a chemokine-binding protein (RPXV-UTR-001/184), is complete in VARV but functional only in some VACV strains. Examination of the evolutionary relationship between RPXV and other orthopoxviruses was carried out using the central 143 kb DNA sequence conserved among all completely sequenced orthopoxviruses and also the protein sequences of 49 gene products present in all completely sequenced chordopoxviruses. The results of these analyses both confirm that RPXV-UTR is most closely related to VACV and suggest that RPXV has not evolved directly from any of the sequenced VACV strains, since RPXV contains a 719 bp region not previously identified in any VACV.

  1. Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated-Herpes Virus (KSHV Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malope-Kgokong Babatyi I

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors previously associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV transmission in Africa include sexual, familial, and proximity to river water. We measured the seroprevalence of KSHV in relation to HIV, syphilis, and demographic factors among pregnant women attending public antenatal clinics in the Gauteng province of South Africa. Methods We tested for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens in 1740 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics who contributed blood to the "National HIV and Syphilis Sero-Prevalence Survey - South Africa, 2001". Information on HIV and syphilis serology, age, education, residential area, gravidity, and parity was anonymously linked to evaluate risk factors for KSHV seropositivity. Clinics were grouped by municipality regions and their proximity to the two main river catchments defined. Results KSHV seropositivity (reactive to either lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 was nearly twice that of HIV (44.6% vs. 23.1%. HIV and syphilis seropositivity was 12.7% and 14.9% in women without KSHV, and 36.1% and 19.9% respectively in those with KSHV. Women who are KSHV seropositive were 4 times more likely to be HIV positive than those who were KSHV seronegative (AOR 4.1 95%CI: 3.4 - 5.7. Although, women with HIV infection were more likely to be syphilis seropositive (AOR 1.8 95%CI: 1.3 - 2.4, no association between KSHV and syphilis seropositivity was observed. Those with higher levels of education had lower levels of KSHV seropositivity compared to those with lower education levels. KSHV seropositivity showed a heterogeneous pattern of prevalence in some localities. Conclusions The association between KSHV and HIV seropositivity and a lack of common association with syphilis, suggests that KSHV transmission may involve geographical and cultural factors other than sexual transmission.

  2. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Fujinami Sarcoma Virus: Tumorigenicity and Reversible Phosphorylation of the Transforming p140 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1981-01-01

    Several clones of Fujinami sarcoma virus (FSV) isolated from a laboratory stock or from mutagenized virus were temperature sensitive (ts) in transformation of cells in culture. When shifted from the permissive (37°C) to the nonpermissive (41.5°C) temperature, the cellular phenotype reverted to normal within 2 h, but it required about 48 h at 37°C to revert back to the transformed morphology. A temperature-resistant (tr) FSV clone was isolated from a tumor of an animal. All ts mutants were tumorigenic in animals but induced tumors only after latent periods of 12 to 25 days, compared to 5 to 6 days with tr virus. The ts lesions of the FSV mutants affected 90% of the phosphorylation of the nonstructural, gag-related 140,000-kilodalton phosphoprotein coded by FSV (p140), but did not affect virus replication or the synthesis of p140. Upon shifting from the permissive to the nonpermissive temperature, p140 was 90% dephosphorylated with an approximate 32P half-life of 20 min. When shifted back to the permissive temperature, the preexisting p140 was rephosphorylated in the absence of protein synthesis within a 90-min test period. Likewise, most of the phosphate of fully phosphorylated p140 was exchanged at the permissive temperature within 30 to 90 min even when protein synthesis was inhibited. However, the protein structure of p140 had a half-life of 5 h at both temperatures. These results prove p140 to be a substrate of reversible phosphorylation. Superinfection and transformation of ts FSV-infected cells maintained at the nonpermissive temperature with acute leukemia virus MC29 failed to phosphorylate p140. It would follow that in vivo phosphorylation of ts p140 is controlled by an FSV-specific mechanism and is a prerequisite, not a consequence, of transformation. p140 of ts FSV recovered from cells maintained at 41.5°C with anti-gag serum was over 10 times less phosphorylated by associated kinase than the same protein recovered from cells at 37°C if assayed in

  3. Consensus of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases and Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology on the management and treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Arruda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifocal vascular lesion of low-grade potential that is most often present in mucocutaneous sites and usually also affects lymph nodes and visceral organs. The condition may manifest through purplish lesions, flat or raised with an irregular shape, gastrointestinal bleeding due to lesions located in the digestive system, and dyspnea and hemoptysis associated with pulmonary lesions. In the early 1980s, the appearance of several cases of Kaposi's sarcoma in homosexual men was the first alarm about a newly identified epidemic, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In 1994, it was finally demonstrated that the presence of a herpes virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma called HHV-8 or Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus and its genetic sequence was rapidly deciphered. The prevalence of this virus is very high (about 50% in some African populations, but stands between 2% and 8% for the entire world population. Kaposi's sarcoma only develops when the immune system is depressed, as in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which appears to be associated with a specific variant of the Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus. There are no treatment guidelines for Kaposi's sarcoma established in Brazil, and thus the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology and the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases developed the treatment consensus presented here.

  4. Salivary production of IgA and IgG to human herpes virus 8 latent and lytic antigens by patients in whom Kaposi's sarcoma has regressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Legoff, Jerome; Piketty, Christophe; Hocini, Hakim; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Inoue, Naoki; Scully, Crispian M; Porter, Stephen R; Teo, Chong-Gee; Belec, Laurent

    2004-01-23

    IgG and IgA antibodies with specificities to a latent and a lytic antigen of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) were detectable in the saliva and serum of eight patients whose Kaposi's sarcoma had regressed, seven of whom were HIV-1 infected. The measurement of antibody-specific activity and secretion rate, and the detection of secretory IgA all indicate anti-HHV-8 antibody activity in saliva. The specific humoral responses possibly influence mucosal replication of HHV-8, and in turn, that of HIV.

  5. Retroperitoneal Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porpiglia, Andrea S; Reddy, Sanjay S; Farma, Jeffrey M

    2016-10-01

    Retroperitoneal sarcomas are rare tumors, representing only 15% of all sarcomas. The mainstay of therapy is surgical resection with negative margins. However, this is challenging because of the late presentation of many of these tumors and involvement with adjacent structures. Decisions on radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be made in a multidisciplinary setting at a tertiary referral center.

  6. Synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucari S.C. Vlok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a malignant, predominantly juxta-articular, soft-tissue tumour representing approximately 10% of all soft-tissue sarcomas. Frequently initially incorrectly diagnosed as a benign lesion, it should be considered as a diagnosis when a young adult patient presents with a calcified juxta-articular soft-tissue mass of insidious onset.

  7. The complete nucleotide sequence of pelargonium leaf curl virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGavin, Wendy J; MacFarlane, Stuart A

    2016-05-01

    Investigation of a tombusvirus isolated from tulip plants in Scotland revealed that it was pelargonium leaf curl virus (PLCV) rather than the originally suggested tomato bushy stunt virus. The complete sequence of the PLCV genome was determined for the first time, revealing it to be 4789 nucleotides in size and to have an organization similar to that of the other, previously described tombusviruses. Primers derived from the sequence were used to construct a full-length infectious clone of PLCV that recapitulates the disease symptoms of leaf curling in systemically infected pelargonium plants.

  8. Library preparation for highly accurate population sequencing of RNA viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Ashley; Andino, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Circular resequencing (CirSeq) is a novel technique for efficient and highly accurate next-generation sequencing (NGS) of RNA virus populations. The foundation of this approach is the circularization of fragmented viral RNAs, which are then redundantly encoded into tandem repeats by ‘rolling-circle’ reverse transcription. When sequenced, the redundant copies within each read are aligned to derive a consensus sequence of their initial RNA template. This process yields sequencing data with error rates far below the variant frequencies observed for RNA viruses, facilitating ultra-rare variant detection and accurate measurement of low-frequency variants. Although library preparation takes ~5 d, the high-quality data generated by CirSeq simplifies downstream data analysis, making this approach substantially more tractable for experimentalists. PMID:24967624

  9. The nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Plasmopara halstedii virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göpfert Jens C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only very few viruses of Oomycetes have been studied in detail. Isometric virions were found in different isolates of the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii, the downy mildew pathogen of sunflower. However, complete nucleotide sequences and data on the genome organization were lacking. Methods Viral RNA of different P. halstedii isolates was subjected to nucleotide sequencing and analysis of the viral genome. The N-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein was determined using Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The complete nucleotide sequences of both single-stranded RNA segments (RNA1 and RNA2 were established. RNA1 consisted of 2793 nucleotides (nt exclusive its 3' poly(A tract and a single open-reading frame (ORF1 of 2745 nt. ORF1 was framed by a 5' untranslated region (5' UTR of 18 nt and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of 30 nt. ORF1 contained motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp and showed similarities to RdRp of Scleropthora macrospora virus A (SmV A and viruses within the Nodaviridae family. RNA2 consisted of 1526 nt exclusive its 3' poly(A tract and a second ORF (ORF2 of 1128 nt. ORF2 coded for the single viral coat protein (CP and was framed by a 5' UTR of 164 nt and a 3' UTR of 234 nt. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 was verified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS experiments. Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the N-terminal sequence of the CP. The N-terminal sequence represented a region within ORF2 suggesting a proteolytic processing of the CP in vivo. The CP showed similarities to CP of SmV A and viruses within the Tombusviridae family. Fragments of RNA1 (ca. 1.9 kb and RNA2 (ca. 1.4 kb were used to analyze the nucleotide sequence variation of virions in different P. halstedii isolates. Viral sequence variation was 0.3% or less regardless of their host's pathotypes, the geographical origin and the sensitivity towards the fungicide metalaxyl. Conclusions The results showed the presence of a single and new

  10. The nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Plasmopara halstedii virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Only very few viruses of Oomycetes have been studied in detail. Isometric virions were found in different isolates of the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii, the downy mildew pathogen of sunflower. However, complete nucleotide sequences and data on the genome organization were lacking. Methods Viral RNA of different P. halstedii isolates was subjected to nucleotide sequencing and analysis of the viral genome. The N-terminal sequence of the viral coat protein was determined using Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis. Results The complete nucleotide sequences of both single-stranded RNA segments (RNA1 and RNA2) were established. RNA1 consisted of 2793 nucleotides (nt) exclusive its 3' poly(A) tract and a single open-reading frame (ORF1) of 2745 nt. ORF1 was framed by a 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of 18 nt and a 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of 30 nt. ORF1 contained motifs of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRp) and showed similarities to RdRp of Scleropthora macrospora virus A (SmV A) and viruses within the Nodaviridae family. RNA2 consisted of 1526 nt exclusive its 3' poly(A) tract and a second ORF (ORF2) of 1128 nt. ORF2 coded for the single viral coat protein (CP) and was framed by a 5' UTR of 164 nt and a 3' UTR of 234 nt. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 was verified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS experiments. Top-Down MALDI-TOF analysis revealed the N-terminal sequence of the CP. The N-terminal sequence represented a region within ORF2 suggesting a proteolytic processing of the CP in vivo. The CP showed similarities to CP of SmV A and viruses within the Tombusviridae family. Fragments of RNA1 (ca. 1.9 kb) and RNA2 (ca. 1.4 kb) were used to analyze the nucleotide sequence variation of virions in different P. halstedii isolates. Viral sequence variation was 0.3% or less regardless of their host's pathotypes, the geographical origin and the sensitivity towards the fungicide metalaxyl. Conclusions The results showed the presence of a single and new virus type in

  11. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus contains G protein-coupled receptor and cyclin D homologs which are expressed in Kaposi's sarcoma and malignant lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    A new human herpesvirus was recently identified in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV] or human herpesvirus 8), as well as in primary effusion (body cavity-based) lymphomas (PELs). A 12.3-kb-long KSHV clone was obtained from a PEL genomic library. Sequencing of this clone revealed extensive homology and colinearity with the right end of the herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) genome and more limited homology to the left end of the Epstein-Barr virus genome. Fou...

  12. Genome Sequence of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Strain SC16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastrojo, Alberto; López-Muñoz, Alberto Domingo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), also known as Human herpesvirus 1, is a highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogen that causes a variety of diseases, including lethal encephalitis. Here, we report the genome sequence of the HSV-1 strain SC16. PMID:28126930

  13. Nucleotide sequence of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, T L; Abouhaidar, M G; Holy, S

    1989-09-01

    The RNA genome of papaya mosaic virus is 6656 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] with six open reading frames (ORFs) more than 200 nucleotides long. The four nearest the 5' end each overlap with adjacent ORFs and could code for proteins with Mr 176307, 26248, 11949 and 7224 (ORFs 1 to 4). The fifth ORF produces the capsid protein of Mr 23043 and the sixth ORF, located completely within ORF1, could code for a protein with Mr 14113. The translation products of ORFs 1 to 3 show strong similarity with those of other potexviruses but the ORF 4 protein has only limited similarity with the other potexvirus ORF 4 proteins of 7K to 11K.

  14. Clinical Sequencing Uncovers Origins and Evolution of Lassa Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shapiro, B Jesse; Matranga, Christian B; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E; Moses, Lina M; Folarin, Onikepe A; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M; Gire, Stephen K; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A; Lukens, Amanda K; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B; Lander, Eric S; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F; Okokhere, Peter O; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Akpede, George O; Asogun, Danny A; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Happi, Christian T; Garry, Robert F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-08-13

    The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us of how little is known about biosafety level 4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  15. Next generation sequencing of DNA-launched Chikungunya vaccine virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidajat, Rachmat; Nickols, Brian [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Forrester, Naomi [Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, GNL, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Tretyakova, Irina [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Weaver, Scott [Institute for Human Infections and Immunity, Sealy Center for Vaccine Development and Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, GNL, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) represents a pandemic threat with no approved vaccine available. Recently, we described a novel vaccination strategy based on iDNA® infectious clone designed to launch a live-attenuated CHIKV vaccine from plasmid DNA in vitro or in vivo. As a proof of concept, we prepared iDNA plasmid pCHIKV-7 encoding the full-length cDNA of the 181/25 vaccine. The DNA-launched CHIKV-7 virus was prepared and compared to the 181/25 virus. Illumina HiSeq2000 sequencing revealed that with the exception of the 3′ untranslated region, CHIKV-7 viral RNA consistently showed a lower frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphisms than the 181/25 RNA including at the E2-12 and E2-82 residues previously identified as attenuating mutations. In the CHIKV-7, frequencies of reversions at E2-12 and E2-82 were 0.064% and 0.086%, while in the 181/25, frequencies were 0.179% and 0.133%, respectively. We conclude that the DNA-launched virus has a reduced probability of reversion mutations, thereby enhancing vaccine safety. - Highlights: • Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an emerging pandemic threat. • In vivo DNA-launched attenuated CHIKV is a novel vaccine technology. • DNA-launched virus was sequenced using HiSeq2000 and compared to the 181/25 virus. • DNA-launched virus has lower frequency of SNPs at E2-12 and E2-82 attenuation loci.

  16. What Is Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment? Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma What Is Kaposi Sarcoma? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... the lungs may cause trouble breathing. Types of Kaposi sarcoma The different types of KS are defined by ...

  17. DNA and RNA from Uninfected Vertebrate Cells Contain Nucleotide Sequences Related to the Putative Transforming Gene of Avian Myelocytomatosis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiness, Diana; Bishop, J. Michael

    1979-01-01

    . Stehelin, H. E. Varmus, J. M. Bishop, and P. K. Vogt, Nature [London] 260:170-173, 1976), the gene responsible for tumorigenesis by avian sarcoma virus. Avian sarcoma virus, avian erythroblastosis virus, and MC29V, however, induce distinctly different spectra of tumors within their host. The putative transforming genes of these viruses share no detectable homology, although sequences homologous to all three types of putative transforming genes occur and are highly conserved in the genomes of several vertebrate species. These data suggest that evolution of oncogenic retroviruses has frequently involved a mechanism whereby incorporation and perhaps modification of different host genes provides each virus with the ability to induce its characteristic tumors. PMID:225569

  18. Kaposi sarcoma: review and medical management update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involved, the true nature of Kaposi sarcoma remains an enigma. Four clinical variants have been described for the disease, differing in natural history, site of predilection, and prognosis. All forms of Kaposi sarcoma may manifest in the oral cavity and Kaposi sarcoma-associated virus appears essential to development of all clinical variants. The spectrum of therapeutic strategies is broad and selection of appropriate intervention mandates a thorough understanding of disease spread and the patient's symptomatology, as well as risks and benefits of therapy. This article provides an overview of epidemiology, subtypes, clinical course, pathogenesis, and management strategies for Kaposi sarcoma.

  19. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Sun, Yu; Ruan, Jishou; Chen, Rui; Chen, Xin; Chen, Chengjie; Kreuze, Jan F; Fei, ZhangJun; Zhu, Xiao; Gao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq) can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  20. Using Small RNA Deep Sequencing Data to Detect Human Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA sequencing (sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in infected hosts without the necessity to have any prior knowledge or specialized sample preparation. The sRNA-seq method was initially used for viral detection and identification in plants and then in invertebrates and fungi. However, it is still controversial to use sRNA-seq in the detection of mammalian or human viruses. In this study, we used 931 sRNA-seq runs of data from the NCBI SRA database to detect and identify viruses in human cells or tissues, particularly from some clinical samples. Six viruses including HPV-18, HBV, HCV, HIV-1, SMRV, and EBV were detected from 36 runs of data. Four viruses were consistent with the annotations from the previous studies. HIV-1 was found in clinical samples without the HIV-positive reports, and SMRV was found in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma cells for the first time. In conclusion, these results suggest the sRNA-seq can be used to detect viruses in mammals and humans.

  1. Gene detection, virus isolation, and sequence analysis of avian leukosis viruses in Taiwan country chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Hsu, Meng-Fang; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) infection in Taiwan Country chickens (TCCs) was investigated by using gene detection, virus isolation, and sequence analysis. The blood samples of 61 TCC flocks at market ages from a slaughter house were screened for exogenous ALVs using polymerase chain reaction to investigate the ALV infection status. The buffy coats from three breeder and four commercial chicken flocks were cocultured with DF-1 cells to isolate the virus. The full proviral DNA genomes of two ALV isolates were sequenced, analyzed, and compared with reference ALV strains. The gene detection results showed that 60 and 43 of the 61 flocks were infected with subgroup A of ALV (ALV-A) and subgroup J of ALV (ALV-J), respectively. Virus isolation results showed that five ALV-As and two ALV-Js were isolated from those seven TCC flocks. The full sequences of the isolates showed that isolate TW-3577 possessed a myeloblastosis-associated virus 1 gp85 coding region and an ALV-J 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) and was similar to ordinary ALV-A. However, TW-3593 was unique. The 3'UTR of this isolate displayed high identity to endogenous counterpart sequence and its gp85 was different from all subgroups. This unique ALV is common in Taiwan.

  2. Evaluation ofA Single-reaction Method for Whole Genome Sequencing of Influenza A Virus using Next Generation Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Xiao Hui; CHEN Wen Bing; ZHAO Xiang; ZHU Wen Fei; YANG Lei; WANG Da Yan; SHU Yue Long

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate a single-reaction genome amplification method, the multisegment reverse transcription-PCR (M-RTPCR), for its sensitivity to full genome sequencing of influenza A virus, and the ability to differentiate mix-subtype virus, using the next generation sequencing (NGS) platform. MethodsVirus genome copy was quantified and serially diluted to different titers, followed by amplification with the M-RTPCR method and sequencing on the NGS platform. Furthermore, we manually mixed two subtype viruses to different titer rate and amplified the mixed virus with the M-RTPCR protocol, followed by whole genome sequencing on the NGS platform. We also used clinical samples to test the method performance. ResultsThe M-RTPCR method obtained complete genome of testing virus at 125 copies/reaction and determined the virus subtype at titer of 25 copies/reaction. Moreover, the two subtypes in the mixed virus could be discriminated, even though these two virus copies differed by 200-fold using this amplification protocol. The sensitivity of this protocol we detected using virus RNA was also confirmed with clinical samples containing low-titer virus. ConclusionThe M-RTPCR is a robust and sensitive amplification method for whole genome sequencing of influenza A virus using NGS platform.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the European sheatfish virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavian, Carla; López-Bueno, Alberto; Fernández Somalo, María Pilar; Alcamí, Antonio; Alejo, Alí

    2012-06-01

    Viral diseases are an increasing threat to the thriving aquaculture industry worldwide. An emerging group of fish pathogens is formed by several ranaviruses, which have been isolated at different locations from freshwater and seawater fish species since 1985. We report the complete genome sequence of European sheatfish ranavirus (ESV), the first ranavirus isolated in Europe, which causes high mortality rates in infected sheatfish (Silurus glanis) and in other species. Analysis of the genome sequence shows that ESV belongs to the amphibian-like ranaviruses and is closely related to the epizootic hematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), a disease agent geographically confined to the Australian continent and notifiable to the World Organization for Animal Health.

  4. The Epidemiology of Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Burningham Zachary; Hashibe Mia; Spector Logan; Schiffman Joshua D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, a...

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Largest Known Flavi-Like Virus, Diaphorina citri flavi-like virus, a Novel Virus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Emilyn E; Nerva, Luca; Nigg, Jared C; Falk, Bryce W; Nouri, Shahideh

    2016-09-08

    A novel flavi-like virus tentatively named Diaphorina citri flavi-like virus (DcFLV) was identified in field populations of Diaphorina citri through small RNA and transcriptome sequencing followed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of DcFLV, the largest flavi-like virus identified to date.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Largest Known Flavi-Like Virus, Diaphorina citri flavi-like virus, a Novel Virus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Emilyn E.; Nerva, Luca; Nigg, Jared C.; Falk, Bryce W.

    2016-01-01

    A novel flavi-like virus tentatively named Diaphorina citri flavi-like virus (DcFLV) was identified in field populations of Diaphorina citri through small RNA and transcriptome sequencing followed by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. We report here the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of DcFLV, the largest flavi-like virus identified to date. PMID:27609921

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated giant conjunctival Kaposi's sarcoma: complete remission with antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduardo-Sánchez, Y W; Fernández-Agrafojo, D

    2017-09-05

    A 35-year-old male patient with a large unilateral haemorrhagic conjunctival tumour lesion and another contralateral haemorrhagic conjunctival flat lesion associated with violaceous cutaneous macules on the extremities and angiomatous lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract as initial clinical manifestation of HIV-related immunodeficiency. Cutaneous, gastric mucosal and conjunctival biopsy was consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma with complete remission after highly active antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy. HIV-related conjunctival Kaposi's sarcoma, even a large one, can have a good response to antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy without any additional topical eye treatment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection and sequence analysis of TT virus in hemodialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Wu; REN Hao; MIAO Xiao-hui; QI Zhong-tian

    2001-01-01

    To study the prevalence and pathogenesis of transfusion-transmitted virus (TTV) in hemodialysis patients. Methods: Serum TTV DNA was tested in 69 hemodialysis patients from our hospital by nested-PCR using primers from a conservative region of TTV genenome, gene sequence analysis and detection of hepatitis C virus antibody (anti-HCV) and the levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) were determined simultaneously. Results: The overall prevalence of TTV viremia was 27.5%. The PCR-amplified gene fragment from one patient was sequenced, and its sequence homologies with TTV-GH1, TTV-TA278, TTVCHN1 and TTVCHN2 ranged from 89% to 100%, and its deduced amino acid sequence homologies with these 4 isolates ranged from 87% to 100%. There was no significant difference in TTV prevalence between anti-HCV positive and negative patients (P>0.05). No significant elevation of ALT is found in all patients. Conclusion: High prevalence of TTV infection is found among hemodialysis patients, and TTV infection has no significant association with HCV infection or elevation of ALT.

  9. Pulmonary Kaposi Sarcoma with Osseous Metastases in an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Patient: A Remarkable Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirweesh, Ahmed; Khan, Muhammad Yasir; Hamiz, Shaikh Fawad; Karabulut, Nigahus

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 34 Final Diagnosis: Pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma with bony metastatses Symptoms: Cough • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is known to involve the mucocutaneous tissues and the aero-digestive tracts. In acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, KS has an aggressive course and carries poor prognosis. We present a case of pulmonary KS with osseous metastases as the first presentation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a young male. The lesions impressively decreased in size and numbers following initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case Report: A 34-year-old heterosexual male presented with a one month history of cough and 15–20 pound weight loss within six months. Examination revealed oral thrush, decreased breath sounds and crackles on the right lower lung base. Imaging showed a large right perihilar mass with multiple lytic lesions involving thoracic and lumber vertebrae, ribs, sternum, and clavicles. Blood and sputum cultures, smears for acid fast bacilli, and a QUANTIferon gold test were all negative. He tested positive for HIV and his CD4 count was 7 cells/uL. Bronchoscopy with biopsy was unrevealing. Pathology of the right hilar mass was diagnostic of KS. Following initiation of antiretroviral therapy his condition dramatically improved; repeat chest CT scan showed marked regression of the bony and pulmonary lesions. Conclusions: The dual action of HAART on the recovery of the immune system and against human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) may essentially cause regression of KS lesions. PMID:28216610

  10. Prediction of HIV-1 virus-host protein interactions using virus and host sequence motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host protein-protein interaction networks are altered by invading virus proteins, which create new interactions, and modify or destroy others. The resulting network topology favors excessive amounts of virus production in a stressed host cell network. Short linear peptide motifs common to both virus and host provide the basis for host network modification. Methods We focused our host-pathogen study on the binding and competing interactions of HIV-1 and human proteins. We showed that peptide motifs conserved across 70% of HIV-1 subtype B and C samples occurred in similar positions on HIV-1 proteins, and we documented protein domains that interact with these conserved motifs. We predicted which human proteins may be targeted by HIV-1 by taking pairs of human proteins that may interact via a motif conserved in HIV-1 and the corresponding interacting protein domain. Results Our predictions were enriched with host proteins known to interact with HIV-1 proteins ENV, NEF, and TAT (p-value Conclusion A list of host proteins highly enriched with those targeted by HIV-1 proteins can be obtained by searching for host protein motifs along virus protein sequences. The resulting set of host proteins predicted to be targeted by virus proteins will become more accurate with better annotations of motifs and domains. Nevertheless, our study validates the role of linear binding motifs shared by virus and host proteins as an important part of the crosstalk between virus and host.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of an Ebola Virus Isolate Imported from Sierra Leone to Germany Determined by Circle Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, Jan Philipp; Lissin, Artur; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Schultze, Tilman; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Schudt, Gordian; Kann, Gerrit; Wolf, Timo; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We report here a complete genome sequence of Ebola virus Makona from a nonfatal patient sample that originated in Sierra Leone during the last Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa (species Zaire ebolavirus) using a highly accurate circle sequencing (Cir-seq) method.

  12. Scrutinizing virus genome termini by high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Li

    Full Text Available Analysis of genomic terminal sequences has been a major step in studies on viral DNA replication and packaging mechanisms. However, traditional methods to study genome termini are challenging due to the time-consuming protocols and their inefficiency where critical details are lost easily. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS have enabled it to be a powerful tool to study genome termini. In this study, using NGS we sequenced one iridovirus genome and twenty phage genomes and confirmed for the first time that the high frequency sequences (HFSs found in the NGS reads are indeed the terminal sequences of viral genomes. Further, we established a criterion to distinguish the type of termini and the viral packaging mode. We also obtained additional terminal details such as terminal repeats, multi-termini, asymmetric termini. With this approach, we were able to simultaneously detect details of the genome termini as well as obtain the complete sequence of bacteriophage genomes. Theoretically, this application can be further extended to analyze larger and more complicated genomes of plant and animal viruses. This study proposed a novel and efficient method for research on viral replication, packaging, terminase activity, transcription regulation, and metabolism of the host cell.

  13. Histiocytic sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Silva Machado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old white woman, SC, after being treated for pneumonia, presented with an increase in the size of lymph nodes. The immunohistochemical examination diagnosed histiocytic sarcoma. Relapse occurred 12 months after starting chemotherapy. The patient evolved with febrile neutropenia, septic shock and death.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Street Rabies Virus Isolated from a Dog in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Zutao; Kia, Grace S. N.; Gnanadurai, Clement W.; Leyson, Christina M.; Umoh, Jarlath U.; Kwaga, Jacob P.; Kazeem, Haruna M.

    2013-01-01

    A canine rabies virus (RABV) was isolated from a trade dog in Nigeria. Its entire genome was sequenced and found to be closely related to canine RABVs circulating in Africa. Sequence comparison indicates that the virus is closely related to the Africa 2 RABV lineage. The virus is now termed DRV-NG11. PMID:23469344

  15. Molecular diagnostics of aleutian mink disease virus: applied use of next generation sequencing and phylogenetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagberg, Emma Elisabeth

    such as next generation sequencing cheaper and more easily available. Whole genome sequencing and advanced phylogenetic analyses have successfully been applied to describe the molecular evolution and transmission patterns for viruses such as Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), Ebola, and avian influenza virus...

  16. Genome sequencing and characterization analysis of a Beijing isolate of chicken corona virus infectious bronchitis virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Weiwu; YU Jialin; LI Ning; GONG Yuanshi; SUN Qixin; CHEN Zhangliang; CHEN Chen; ZHANG Ying; ZHAO Yiqiang; FENG Jidong; CHEN Fuyong; WU Qingming; YANG Hanchun; WANG Ming

    2004-01-01

    Avian infectious bronchitis virus (AIBV) is lassified as a member of the genus coronavirus in the family coronaviridae. The enveloped virus has a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of approximately 28 kilo-bases,which has a 5′ cap structure and 3′ polyadenylation tract.The complete genome sequence of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), Beijing isolate, was determined by cloning sequencing and primer walking. The whole genome is 27733 nucleotides in length, has ten open reading frames: 5′-orfla-orflab-s-3a-3b-e-m- 6a-6b-n-3′. Alignments of the genome sequence of IBV Beijing isolate with those of two AIBV strains and one SARS coronavirus were performed respectively. The genome sequence of IBV Beijing isolate compared with that of the IBV strain LX4 (uncompleted, 19440 bp in size) was 91.2%similarity. However, the full-length genome sequence of IBV Beijing isolate was 85.2% identity to that of IBV Strain Beaudette, and was only 50.8% homology to that of SARS coronavirus. The results showed that the genome of IBV has remarkable variation. And IBV Beijing isolate is not closely related to SARS coronavirus. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole genome sequence, S protein, M protein and N protein, also showed that AIBV Beijing isolate is lone virus in group Ⅲ and is distant from SARS coronavirus. In conclusion, this study will contribute to the studies of diagnosis and diseases control on IBV in China.

  17. Cloning and sequence analysis of US1 gene in duck enteritis virus%Cloning and sequence analysis of US1gene in duck enteritis virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan; WANG Jun-wei; MA Bo; ZHAO Xiao-yan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a 1,860 bp sequence in IRs region of duck enteritis virus(DEV)was amplified by single oligonucleotide nested PCR with a single primer designed according to partial sequence of USI and then a pair of primers designed according to the 3' UTR of US8 gene and 5'end of the new getting sequence were used to amplify a 2,426 bp sequence toward the TRs region.Sequence analysis revealed that the both sequences contained an identical 990 bp open reading frame of DEV US1 gene.The two ORFs were in opposite transcription orientation.Sequence comparison of the nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of US1 gene showed relatively high identity to Mardivirus.Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that the eleven herpesviruses viruses were classified into three groups, and the duck enteritis virus was most closely related to Mardivirus.

  18. The complete genome sequence of shope (rabbit) fibroma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, D O; McFadden, G; Evans, D H

    1999-11-25

    We have determined the complete DNA sequence of the Leporipoxvirus Shope fibroma virus (SFV). The SFV genome spans 159.8 kb and encodes 165 putative genes of which 13 are duplicated in the 12.4-kb terminal inverted repeats. Although most SFV genes have homologs encoded by other Chordopoxvirinae, the SFV genome lacks a key gene required for the production of extracellular enveloped virus. SFV also encodes only the smaller ribonucleotide reductase subunit and has a limited nucleotide biosynthetic capacity. SFV preserves the Chordopoxvirinae gene order from S012L near the left end of the chromosome through to S142R (homologs of vaccinia F2L and B1R, respectively). The unique right end of SFV appears to be genetically unstable because when the sequence is compared with that of myxoma virus, five myxoma homologs have been deleted (C. Cameron, S. Hota-Mitchell, L. Chen, J. Barrett, J.-X. Cao, C. Macaulay, D. Willer, D. Evans, and G. McFadden, 1999, Virology 264, 298-318). Most other differences between these two Leporipoxviruses are located in the telomeres. Leporipoxviruses encode several genes not found in other poxviruses including four small hydrophobic proteins of unknown function (S023R, S119L, S125R, and S132L), an alpha 2, 3-sialyltransferase (S143R), a protein belonging to the Ig-like protein superfamily (S141R), and a protein resembling the DNA-binding domain of proteins belonging to the HIN-200 protein family S013L). SFV also encodes a type II DNA photolyase (S127L). Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus encodes a similar protein, but SFV is the first mammalian virus potentially capable of photoreactivating ultraviolet DNA damage.

  19. Kaposi's sarcoma following immune suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschênes, Isabelle; Dion, Louise; Beauchesne, Claude; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur

    2003-03-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma and infection with human herpesvirus 8 is now well recognized. Immunologic impairment is associated with 2 forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, epidemic [associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection] and iatrogenic (associated with immunosuppressive treatment); both forms have become more common during the last decade. We describe an HIV negative 54-year-old man who developed Kaposi's sarcoma 2 months after the beginning of immuno-suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). With tapering of medication, complete remission of Kaposi's sarcoma was achieved in one year. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of iatrogenic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with WG.

  20. Next Generation Sequencing of Classical Swine Fever Virus and Border Disease virus cloned in Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Höper, Dirk; Beer, martin

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing is a powerful tool for complete sequencing of large amounts of DNA. We have recently cloned full genome cDNA copies (obtained by long-range RT-PCR) of entire genomes of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) strain Koslov and Border disease virus strain Gifhorn into bacterial...

  1. Optimization and validation of sample preparation for metagenomic sequencing of viruses in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowska, Dagmara W; Zagordi, Osvaldo; Geissberger, Fabienne-Desirée; Kufner, Verena; Schmutz, Stefan; Böni, Jürg; Metzner, Karin J; Trkola, Alexandra; Huber, Michael

    2017-08-08

    Sequence-specific PCR is the most common approach for virus identification in diagnostic laboratories. However, as specific PCR only detects pre-defined targets, novel virus strains or viruses not included in routine test panels will be missed. Recently, advances in high-throughput sequencing allow for virus-sequence-independent identification of entire virus populations in clinical samples, yet standardized protocols are needed to allow broad application in clinical diagnostics. Here, we describe a comprehensive sample preparation protocol for high-throughput metagenomic virus sequencing using random amplification of total nucleic acids from clinical samples. In order to optimize metagenomic sequencing for application in virus diagnostics, we tested different enrichment and amplification procedures on plasma samples spiked with RNA and DNA viruses. A protocol including filtration, nuclease digestion, and random amplification of RNA and DNA in separate reactions provided the best results, allowing reliable recovery of viral genomes and a good correlation of the relative number of sequencing reads with the virus input. We further validated our method by sequencing a multiplexed viral pathogen reagent containing a range of human viruses from different virus families. Our method proved successful in detecting the majority of the included viruses with high read numbers and compared well to other protocols in the field validated against the same reference reagent. Our sequencing protocol does work not only with plasma but also with other clinical samples such as urine and throat swabs. The workflow for virus metagenomic sequencing that we established proved successful in detecting a variety of viruses in different clinical samples. Our protocol supplements existing virus-specific detection strategies providing opportunities to identify atypical and novel viruses commonly not accounted for in routine diagnostic panels.

  2. Sequence variability and geographic distribution of Lassa virus, Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leski, Tomasz A; Stockelman, Michael G; Moses, Lina M; Park, Matthew; Stenger, David A; Ansumana, Rashid; Bausch, Daniel G; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-04-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to parts of West Africa and causes highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) is the only known reservoir of LASV. Most human infections result from zoonotic transmission. The very diverse LASV genome has 4 major lineages associated with different geographic locations. We used reverse transcription PCR and resequencing microarrays to detect LASV in 41 of 214 samples from rodents captured at 8 locations in Sierra Leone. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein precursor (GPC), and polymerase (L) genes showed 5 separate clades within lineage IV of LASV in this country. The sequence diversity was higher than previously observed; mean diversity was 7.01% for nucleoprotein gene at the nucleotide level. These results may have major implications for designing diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents for LASV infections in Sierra Leone.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus from Lanzhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chuanfeng; Fu, Shengfang; Zhou, Xv; Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complete genome of human respiratory syncytial virus was sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the full-length human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) genome sequence belongs to gene type NA1. We sequenced the genome in order to create the full-length cDNA infectious clone and develop vaccines against HRSV.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Seneca Valley Virus CH-01-2015 Identified in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiwen; Zhao, Xiaoya; Chen, Yanshan; He, Xiaoming; Zhang, Guanqun; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-01-21

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus (SVV), a single-stranded RNA virus that causes porcine vesicular disease in China, has been sequenced and analyzed. This Chinese isolate shares 94.4 to 97.1% sequence identity to another 8 strains from Canada, Brazil, and the United States. This is the first report of SVV infecting swine in China.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato-Infecting Tomato Mottle Mosaic Virus in New York

    OpenAIRE

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Zheng, Yi; Li, Rugang; Martin, Gregory B.; Fei, Zhangjun; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of an isolate of tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) infecting tomatoes in New York was obtained using small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing. ToMMV_NY-13 shared 99% sequence identity with isolates from Mexico and Florida. Broader distribution of this emerging virus is a cause for concern to the tomato industry.

  6. Low pH is required for avian sarcoma and leukosis virus Env-dependent viral penetration into the cytosol and not for viral uncoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Richard J O; Narayan, Shakti; Dornadula, Geethanjali; Miller, Michael D; Young, John A T

    2004-10-01

    A novel entry mechanism has been proposed for the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV), whereby interaction with specific cell surface receptors activates or primes the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env), rendering it sensitive to subsequent low-pH-dependent fusion triggering in acidic intracellular organelles. However, ASLV fusion seems to proceed to a lipid mixing stage at neutral pH, leading to the suggestion that low pH might instead be required for a later stage of viral entry such as uncoating (L. J. Earp, S. E. Delos, R. C. Netter, P. Bates, and J. M. White. J. Virol. 77:3058-3066, 2003). To address this possibility, hybrid virus particles were generated with the core of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a known pH-independent virus, and with subgroups A or B ASLV Env proteins. Infection of cells by these pseudotyped virions was blocked by lysosomotropic agents, as judged by inhibition of HIV-1 DNA synthesis. Furthermore, by using HIV-1 cores that contain a Vpr-beta-lactamase fusion protein (Vpr-BlaM) to monitor viral penetration into the cytosol, we demonstrated that virions bearing ASLV Env, but not HIV-1 Env, enter the cytosol in a low-pH-dependent manner. This effect was independent of the presence of the cytoplasmic tail of ASLV Env. These studies provide strong support for the model, indicating that low pH is required for ASLV Env-dependent viral penetration into the cytosol and not for viral uncoating.

  7. Gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma with appendiceal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egwuonwu, Steve; Gatto-Weis, Cara; Miranda, Roberto; Casas, Luis De Las

    2011-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor manifesting as nodular lesions on skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs. This is a case of a 42-year-old human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV) positive bisexual male, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) since diagnosis four years ago. He presented with a three-day history of abdominal pains, fever, vomiting, and a one-week history of melena stools. Endoscopy revealed Kaposi sarcoma in the stomach and duodenum. Postendoscopy, he developed acute abdomen. Exploratory laparotomy revealed extensive Kaposi sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract with appendiceal involvement. The patient underwent appendectomy and had an uneventful recovery. A review of the literature discusses appendiceal Kaposi sarcoma with appendicitis, a rare but critical manifestation of gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma.

  8. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and the Importance of Considering the Oncogenic and Immune-Suppressant Role of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Lupo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSoft-tissue sarcomas account for 0.7% of all malignant tumors, with an incidence rate of 3 per 100,000 persons/year. The undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS with giant cells, a high grade tumor of soft tissue, is very unusual, especially in young adults before the age of 40. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus, classified as group 1 human carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, that causes an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and a progressive chronic inflammatory neurological disease named HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-1 causes accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome that could contribute to cellular transformation, one of the oncogenic features of HTLV-1.Case reportWe describe a case of a young woman with UPS who suffered from HAM/TSP with 3 years of evolution. In 2013, the patient started with neurological symptoms: weakness in the legs and bladder dysfunction. One year later, the patient developed a mild paraparesis in both extremities, anti-HTLV-1 antibodies were detected in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid, and HAM/TSP was confirmed. In November 2015, a benign ganglion cyst was first suspected without intervention and by March 2016 a sarcoma was diagnosed. Three weeks after surgical resection, the tumor aroused in deep tissue and behaved aggressively, implicating a curative wide resection of the fibula, joint reconstruction, and soft-tissue graft. Histopathological examination confirmed UPS with giant cells.Concluding remarksThe unapparent subclinical immunodeficiency state due to HTLV-1 infection deserves to be considered in order to carefully monitor the possibility of developing any type of cancer. Besides, reaching an accurate and timely diagnosis of UPS can be challenging due to the difficulty in diagnosis/classification and delayed consultation. In this particular case

  9. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA load in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects: correlation with the presence of Kaposi's sarcoma and response to anticytomegalovirus therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, G; Gaudreau, A; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Routy, J P; Murray, G; Handfield, J; Bergeron, M G

    1999-02-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 microgram of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed.

  10. Human Herpesvirus 8 DNA Load in Leukocytes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects: Correlation with the Presence of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Response to Anticytomegalovirus Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guy; Gaudreau, Annie; Toma, Emil; Lalonde, Richard; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Murray, Gilles; Handfield, Julie; Bergeron, Michel G.

    1999-01-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 μg of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed. PMID:9925538

  11. Detection and identification of cancerous murine fibroblasts, transformed by murine sarcoma virus in culture, using Raman spectroscopy and advanced statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Zeiri, L; Huleihel, M

    2013-03-01

    Cancer is one of the leading worldwide causes of death. It may be induced by a variety of factors, including carcinogens, radiation, genetic factors, or DNA and RNA viruses. The early detection of cancer is critical for its successful therapy, which can result in complete recovery from some types of cancer. Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine and biology. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive, and water-insensitive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. In this study, Raman spectroscopy was used for the identification and characterization of murine fibroblast cell lines (NIH/3T3) and malignant fibroblast cells transformed by murine sarcoma virus (NIH-MuSV) cells. Using principal component analysis and LDA it was possible to differentiate between the NIH/3T3 and NIH-MuSV cells with an 80-85% success rate based on their Raman shift spectra. The best results for differentiation were achieved from spectra that were obtained from the rich membrane sites. Because of its homogeneity and complete control of most factors affecting its growth, cell culture is a preferred model for the detection and identification of specific biomarkers related to cancer transformation or other cellular modifications.

  12. Sarcoma Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouw, Launce G., E-mail: launce.gouw@hsc.utah.edu [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Jones, Kevin B. [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Randall, R. Lor [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    Much of our knowledge regarding cancer immunotherapy has been derived from sarcoma models. However, translation of preclinical findings to bedside success has been limited in this disease, though several intriguing clinical studies hint at the potential efficacy of this treatment modality. The rarity and heterogeneity of tumors of mesenchymal origin continues to be a challenge from a therapeutic standpoint. Nonetheless, sarcomas remain attractive targets for immunotherapy, as they can be characterized by specific epitopes, either from their mesenchymal origins or specific alterations in gene products. To date, standard vaccine trials have proven disappointing, likely due to mechanisms by which tumors equilibrate with and ultimately escape immune surveillance. More sophisticated approaches will likely require multimodal techniques, both by enhancing immunity, but also geared towards overcoming innate mechanisms of immunosuppression that favor tumorigenesis.

  13. Sequence recombination and conservation of Varroa destructor virus-1 and deformed wing virus in field collected honey bees (Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available We sequenced small (s RNAs from field collected honeybees (Apis mellifera and bumblebees (Bombuspascuorum using the Illumina technology. The sRNA reads were assembled and resulting contigs were used to search for virus homologues in GenBank. Matches with Varroadestructor virus-1 (VDV1 and Deformed wing virus (DWV genomic sequences were obtained for A. mellifera but not B. pascuorum. Further analyses suggested that the prevalent virus population was composed of VDV-1 and a chimera of 5'-DWV-VDV1-DWV-3'. The recombination junctions in the chimera genomes were confirmed by using RT-PCR, cDNA cloning and Sanger sequencing. We then focused on conserved short fragments (CSF, size > 25 nt in the virus genomes by using GenBank sequences and the deep sequencing data obtained in this study. The majority of CSF sites confirmed conservation at both between-species (GenBank sequences and within-population (dataset of this study levels. However, conserved nucleotide positions in the GenBank sequences might be variable at the within-population level. High mutation rates (Pi>10% were observed at a number of sites using the deep sequencing data, suggesting that sequence conservation might not always be maintained at the population level. Virus-host interactions and strategies for developing RNAi treatments against VDV1/DWV infections are discussed.

  14. Sequence recombination and conservation of Varroa destructor virus-1 and deformed wing virus in field collected honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Xie, Jiazheng; Shreeve, Tim G; Ma, Jinmin; Pallett, Denise W; King, Linda A; Possee, Robert D

    2013-01-01

    We sequenced small (s) RNAs from field collected honeybees (Apis mellifera) and bumblebees (Bombuspascuorum) using the Illumina technology. The sRNA reads were assembled and resulting contigs were used to search for virus homologues in GenBank. Matches with Varroadestructor virus-1 (VDV1) and Deformed wing virus (DWV) genomic sequences were obtained for A. mellifera but not B. pascuorum. Further analyses suggested that the prevalent virus population was composed of VDV-1 and a chimera of 5'-DWV-VDV1-DWV-3'. The recombination junctions in the chimera genomes were confirmed by using RT-PCR, cDNA cloning and Sanger sequencing. We then focused on conserved short fragments (CSF, size > 25 nt) in the virus genomes by using GenBank sequences and the deep sequencing data obtained in this study. The majority of CSF sites confirmed conservation at both between-species (GenBank sequences) and within-population (dataset of this study) levels. However, conserved nucleotide positions in the GenBank sequences might be variable at the within-population level. High mutation rates (Pi>10%) were observed at a number of sites using the deep sequencing data, suggesting that sequence conservation might not always be maintained at the population level. Virus-host interactions and strategies for developing RNAi treatments against VDV1/DWV infections are discussed.

  15. A comparison of virus genome sequences with their host silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xu-Dong; Yue, Ya-Jie; Wang, Wei; Li, Nan; Shen, Zhong-Yuan

    2016-01-15

    With the recent availability of the genomes of many viruses and the silkworm, Bombyx mori, as well as a variety of Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) programs, a new opportunity to gain insight into the interaction of viruses with the silkworm is possible. This study aims to determine the possible existence of sequence identities between the genomes of viruses and the silkworm and attempts to explain this phenomenon. BLAST searches of the genomes of viruses against the silkworm genome were performed using the resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. All studied viruses contained variable numbers of short regions with sequence identity to the genome of the silkworm. The short regions of sequence identity in the genome of the silkworm may be derived from the genomes of viruses in the long history of silkworm-virus interaction. This study is the first to compare these genomes, and may contribute to research on the interaction between viruses and the silkworm.

  16. Full-length sequencing and genomic characterization of Bagaza, Kedougou, and Zika viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, G; Chang, G-J J

    2007-01-01

    Many members of the genus Flavivirus are the agents of important diseases of humans, livestock, and wildlife. Currently, no complete genome sequence is available for the three African viruses, Bagaza, Zika, and Kedougou viruses, each representing a distinct virus subgroup according to the latest virus classification. In this study, we obtained a complete genome sequence of each of those three viruses and characterized the open reading frames (ORFs) with respect to gene sizes, cleavage sites, potential glycosylation sites, distribution of cysteine residues, and unique motifs. The sequences of the three viruses were then scanned across the entire length of the ORF against available sequences of other African flaviviruses and selected reference viruses for genetic relatedness. The data collectively indicated that Kedougou virus was close to dengue viruses but nonetheless distinct, while Bagaza virus shared genetic relatedness with West Nile virus in several genomic regions. In the non-coding regions, it was found that a particular organizational pattern of conserved sequences in the 3' terminal region generally correlated with the current virus grouping.

  17. Virus identification in unknown tropical febrile illness cases using deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan L Yozwiak

    Full Text Available Dengue virus is an emerging infectious agent that infects an estimated 50-100 million people annually worldwide, yet current diagnostic practices cannot detect an etiologic pathogen in ∼40% of dengue-like illnesses. Metagenomic approaches to pathogen detection, such as viral microarrays and deep sequencing, are promising tools to address emerging and non-diagnosable disease challenges. In this study, we used the Virochip microarray and deep sequencing to characterize the spectrum of viruses present in human sera from 123 Nicaraguan patients presenting with dengue-like symptoms but testing negative for dengue virus. We utilized a barcoding strategy to simultaneously deep sequence multiple serum specimens, generating on average over 1 million reads per sample. We then implemented a stepwise bioinformatic filtering pipeline to remove the majority of human and low-quality sequences to improve the speed and accuracy of subsequent unbiased database searches. By deep sequencing, we were able to detect virus sequence in 37% (45/123 of previously negative cases. These included 13 cases with Human Herpesvirus 6 sequences. Other samples contained sequences with similarity to sequences from viruses in the Herpesviridae, Flaviviridae, Circoviridae, Anelloviridae, Asfarviridae, and Parvoviridae families. In some cases, the putative viral sequences were virtually identical to known viruses, and in others they diverged, suggesting that they may derive from novel viruses. These results demonstrate the utility of unbiased metagenomic approaches in the detection of known and divergent viruses in the study of tropical febrile illness.

  18. Diagnostic dilemma in Kaposi′s sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Satish

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi′s sarcoma is described as cutaneous and extracutaneous neoplasm predominantly affecting older individuals. Though earlier uncommon and endemic to certain African areas, its incidence is on a rise due to infections with human immunodeficiency virus and also due to transplant-associated immunosuppression. Further, certain benign conditions like Pseudo Kaposi′s sarcoma, certain infective conditions like bacillary angiomatosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can mimic Kaposi′s sarcoma both clinically and histologically leading to a diagnostic dilemma. We report such a case here.

  19. Prevalence and predictors of kaposi sarcoma herpes virus seropositivity: a cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskew Mhairi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS is the most common AIDS-defining tumour in HIV-infected individuals in Africa. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV infection precedes development of KS. KSHV co-infection may be associated with worse outcomes in HIV disease and elevated KSHV viral load may be an early marker for advanced HIV disease among untreated patients. We examined the prevalence of KSHV among adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART and compared immunological, demographic and clinical factors between patients seropositive and seronegative for KSHV. Results We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from 404 HIV-infected treatment-naïve adults initiating ART at the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa between November 2008 and March 2009. Subjects were screened at ART initiation for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens. Seropositivity to KSHV was defined as positive to either lytic KSHV K8.1 or latent KSHV Orf73 antibodies. KSHV viremia was determined by quantitative PCR and CD3, 4 and 8 lymphocyte counts were determined with flow cytometry. Of the 404 participants, 193 (48% tested positive for KSHV at ART initiation; with 76 (39% reactive to lytic K8.1, 35 (18% to latent Orf73 and 82 (42% to both. One individual presented with clinical KS at ART initiation. The KSHV infected group was similar to those without KSHV in terms of age, race, gender, ethnicity, smoking and alcohol use. KSHV infected individuals presented with slightly higher median CD3 (817 vs. 726 cells/mm3 and CD4 (90 vs. 80 cells/mm3 counts than KSHV negative subjects. We found no associations between KSHV seropositivity and body mass index, tuberculosis status, WHO stage, HIV RNA levels, full blood count or liver function tests at initiation. Those with detectable KSHV viremia (n = 19, however, appeared to present with signs of more advanced HIV disease including anemia and WHO stage 3 or 4 defining conditions compared to those in whom

  20. Structure and sequence analysis of influenza A virus nucleoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NG; Andy; Ka-Leung; SHAW; Pang-Chui

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) forms homo-oligomers and multiple copies of NP wrap around genomic RNA, along with a trimeric polymerase making up ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Sequence comparison of more than 2500 influenza A NP showed that this protein contains 30.1 % of polymorphic residues. NP is composed of a head and a body domain and a tail loop/ linker region. The head domain is more conserved than the body domain, as revealed from the structure-based sequence alignment. NP oligomerization is mediated by the insertion of the non-polymorphic and structurally conserved tail loop of one NP molecule to a groove of another NP. The different form of NP oligomers is due to the flexibility of the polymorphic linkers that join the tail loop to the rest of the protein. The RNA binding property of NP is known to involve the protruding element and the flexible basic loop between the head and body domains, both having high degree of primary sequence conservation. To bind RNA, NP may first capture the RNA by the flexible basic loop and then the RNA is clamped by the protruding element.

  1. Sequencing ebola and marburg viruses genomes using microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardick, Justin; Woelfel, Roman; Gardner, Warren; Ibrahim, Sofi

    2016-08-01

    Periodic outbreaks of Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fevers have occurred in Africa over the past four decades with case fatality rates reaching as high as 90%. The latest Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014 raised concerns that these infections can spread across continents and pose serious health risks. Early and accurate identification of the causative agents is necessary to contain outbreaks. In this report, we describe sequencing-by-hybridization (SBH) technique using high density microarrays to identify Ebola and Marburg viruses. The microarrays were designed to interrogate the sequences of entire viral genomes, and were evaluated with three species of Ebolavirus (Reston, Sudan, and Zaire), and three strains of Marburgvirus (Angola, Musoke, and Ravn). The results showed that the consensus sequences generated with four or more hybridizations had 92.1-98.9% accuracy over 95-99% of the genomes. Additionally, with SBH microarrays it was possible to distinguish between different strains of the Lake Victoria Marburgvirus. J. Med. Virol. 88:1303-1308, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Structure and sequence analysis of influenza A virus nucleoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NG Andy Ka-Leung; WANG Jia-Huai; SHAW Pang-Chui

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A virus nucleoprotein (NP) forms homo-oligomenrs and multiple copies of NP wrap around genomic RNA, along with a trimeric polymerase making up ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Se-quence comparison of more than 2500 influenza A NP showed that this protein contains 30.1% of po-lymorphic residues. NP is composed of a head and a body domain and a tail loop/linker region. The head domain is more conserved than the body domain, as revealed from the structure-based sequence alignment. NP oligomerization is mediated by the insertion of the non-polymorphic and structurally conserved tail loop of one NP molecule to a groove of another NP. The different form of NP oligomers is due to the flexibility of the polymorphic linkers that join the tail loop to the rest of the protein. The RNA binding property of NP is known to involve the protruding element and the flexible basic loop between the head and body domains, both having high degree of primary sequence conservation. To bind RNA, NP may first capture the RNA by the flexible basic loop and then the RNA is clamped by the protruding element.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Mayaro Virus (Togaviridae, Alphavirus) Strain BeAr 20290 from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espósito, Danillo Lucas Alves; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2015-12-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Mayaro virus strain BeAr 20290 isolated from Haemagogus mosquitoes in 1960. The sequence presented here includes all nonstructural and structural proteins and the 5'- and 3'-untranslated (UTR) regions.

  4. Complete Genome Sequences of New Emerging Newcastle Disease Virus Strains Isolated from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hualei; Lv, Yan; Afonso, Claudio L.; Ge, Shengqiang; Zheng, Dongxia; Zhao, Yunling

    2013-01-01

    Five Newcastle disease virus strains isolated from geese were classified into a new genotype, designated genotype XII. The complete genome sequences of two strains indicated that these viruses were distinct from viruses of genotype VII. More investigations need to be conducted for us to understand the origin of these new strains. PMID:23469337

  5. Application of sequence-independent amplification (SIA) for the identification of RNA viruses in bioenergy crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agindotan, Bright O; Ahonsi, Monday O; Domier, Leslie L; Gray, Michael E; Bradley, Carl A

    2010-10-01

    Miscanthus x giganteus, energycane, and Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) are three potential biomass crops being evaluated for commercial cellulosic ethanol production. Viral diseases are potentially significant threats to these crops. Therefore, identification of viruses infecting these bioenergy crops is important for quarantine purposes, virus resistance breeding, and production of virus-free planting materials. The application is described of sequence-independent amplification, for the identification of RNA viruses in bioenergy crops. The method involves virus partial purification from a small amount of infected leaf tissue (miniprep), extraction of viral RNA, amplification of randomly primed cDNAs, cloning, sequencing, and BLAST searches for sequence homology in the GenBank. This method has distinct advantage over other virus characterization techniques in that it does not require reagent specific to target viruses. Using this method, a possible new species was identified in the genus Marafivirus in switchgrass related to Maize rayado fino virus, its closest relative currently in GenBank. Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), genus Potyvirus, was identified in M.xgiganteus, energycane, corn (Zea mays), and switchgrass. Other viruses identified were: Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), genus Potyvirus, in johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense); Soil borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV), genus Furovirus, in wheat (Triticum aestivum); and Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV), genus Comovirus, in soybean (Glycine max). The method was as sensitive as conventional RT-PCR. This is the first report of a Marafivirus infecting switchgrass, and SCMV infecting both energycane and M. x giganteus. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV) was first identified in tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum), a noxious weed, in Florida in 2002. This report provides the first full genome sequence of TSAMV. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional spec...

  7. Biological characterization and complete genomic sequence of Carrot thin leaf virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The host range of a cilantro isolate of Carrot thin leaf virus (CTLV-Cs) was determined to include 15 plant species. The virus was also transmitted to 9 of 11 tested apiaceous species by aphids. Complete genomic sequences of CTLV-Cs and a carrot isolate of CTLV were determined. Their genomic sequenc...

  8. Louping Ill Virus Genome Sequence Derived from the Spinal Cord of an Infected Lamb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Denise A.; Mansfield, Karen L.; Mearns, Rebecca; Ellis, Richard J.; Fooks, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Louping ill virus (LIV) is a zoonotic virus causing fatal encephalitis in young sheep and grouse. We have recovered the complete genome sequence from a spinal cord sample prepared from a lamb that was naturally infected with LIV. This is only the second LIV genome sequence reported and the first prepared from a clinical sample. PMID:23868122

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Border Disease Virus Genotype 3 Strain Gifhorn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the genotype 3 border disease virus strain Gifhorn has been determined; this strain was originally isolated from pigs. This represents the consensus sequence for the virus used to produce the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cDNA clone pBeloGif3, which yields...

  10. Complete nucleotide sequence of the new potexvirus "Alstroemeria virus X". Brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, S; Shinoda, K; Ikeda, M; Furuya, H; Naito, H; Fukumoto, F

    2005-11-01

    A flexuous virus was isolated in Japan from an alstroemeria plant showing mosaic symptoms. The virus had a broad host range but had systemically latent infectivity in alstroemeria. The virus was assigned to the genus Potexvirus based on morphology and physical properties and on an analysis of the complete nucleotide sequence. The genomic RNA of the virus was 7,009 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3'-terminal poly (A) tail. It contained five open reading frames (ORFs), which was consistent with other members of the genus Potexvirus. Although nucleotide sequences of the ORFs differ from previously reported potexviruses, a phylogenetic analysis placed it phylogenetically close to Narcissus mosaic virus and Scallion virus X. Therefore, we propose that this virus should be designated as Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX).

  11. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Chikungunya Virus Strain Isolated from a Patient Diagnosed with Dengue Virus Infection in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Han Ming; Rohani, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a chikungunya virus coinfection strain isolated from a dengue virus serotype 2-infected patient in Malaysia. This coinfection strain was determined to be of the Asian genotype and contains a novel insertion in the nsP3 gene. PMID:27563048

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Ornithogalum Mosaic Virus Infecting Gladiolus spp. in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Hongsup; Yi, Seung-In; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-11

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Ornithogalum mosaic virus (OrMV) isolated from Taean, South Korea, in 2011, which was obtained by next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The sequence information provided here may serve as a potential reference for other OrMV isolates.

  13. Elevation of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels, but not angiopoietin 2, in the plasma of human immunodeficiency virus-infected African women with clinical Kaposi sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Susan M; Rajwans, Nimerta; Richardson, Barbra A; Jaoko, Walter; McClelland, R Scott; Overbaugh, Julie; Liles, W Conrad

    2014-10-01

    Circulating levels of endothelial activation biomarkers are elevated in during infection with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and may also be increased in Kaposi sarcoma (KS). We compared 23 HIV-1-seropositive women with clinically diagnosed KS with 46 randomly selected controls matched for visit year, CD4 count, and antiretroviral therapy status. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify differences between cases and controls. The odds of clinical KS increased with increasing plasma viral load and with intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) levels above or equal to the median. There was a borderline association between increasing plasma angiopoietin 2 levels and KS. In multivariable modeling including plasma viral load, angiopoietin 2, and ICAM-1, plasma ICAM-1 levels above or equal to the median remained associated with clinical KS (odds ratio = 14.2, 95% confidence interval = 2.3-87.7). Circulating ICAM-1 levels should be evaluated as a potential biomarker for disease progression and treatment response among HIV-infected KS patients.

  14. Opposing regulation of PROX1 by interleukin-3 receptor and NOTCH directs differential host cell fate reprogramming by Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehyuk Yoo

    Full Text Available Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs are differentiated from blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs during embryogenesis and this physiological cell fate specification is controlled by PROX1, the master regulator for lymphatic development. When Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV infects host cells, it activates the otherwise silenced embryonic endothelial differentiation program and reprograms their cell fates. Interestingly, previous studies demonstrated that KSHV drives BECs to acquire a partial lymphatic phenotype by upregulating PROX1 (forward reprogramming, but stimulates LECs to regain some BEC-signature genes by downregulating PROX1 (reverse reprogramming. Despite the significance of this KSHV-induced bidirectional cell fate reprogramming in KS pathogenesis, its underlying molecular mechanism remains undefined. Here, we report that IL3 receptor alpha (IL3Rα and NOTCH play integral roles in the host cell type-specific regulation of PROX1 by KSHV. In BECs, KSHV upregulates IL3Rα and phosphorylates STAT5, which binds and activates the PROX1 promoter. In LECs, however, PROX1 was rather downregulated by KSHV-induced NOTCH signal via HEY1, which binds and represses the PROX1 promoter. Moreover, PROX1 was found to be required to maintain HEY1 expression in LECs, establishing a reciprocal regulation between PROX1 and HEY1. Upon co-activation of IL3Rα and NOTCH, PROX1 was upregulated in BECs, but downregulated in LECs. Together, our study provides the molecular mechanism underlying the cell type-specific endothelial fate reprogramming by KSHV.

  15. Role of natural killer cells in the mechanism of the antitumor effect of interferon on Moloney sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresa, K L; Murasko, D M

    1986-01-01

    The growth of tumors induced by inoculation of cells transformed by Moloney sarcoma virus can be inhibited by in situ administration of interferon (IFN) beginning one day after tumor challenge and continuing for 2 or 3 additional days. Inhibition of tumor growth by IFN was associated with a marked augmentation of natural killer (NK) cell activity, both in the spleen and at the site of tumor challenge, by day 5 after tumor challenge. However, using optimal conditions for IFN treatment, depletion of NK cells by in vivo treatment with anti-asialo GM1 prior to tumor challenge had no significant effect on inhibition of tumor growth by IFN. When the tumor load was greater or when IFN treatment was shorter, treatment with anti-asialo-GM1 partially abrogated the inhibition of tumor growth by IFN. In vitro assays gave no evidence of IFN enhancement of specific T-cell or activated macrophage antitumor effect. These results suggest that under optimal treatment conditions, the mechanism of the antitumor effect of IFN was independent of augmentation of NK activity, but under suboptimal conditions NK cells play a role in the mechanism of the antitumor effect of IFN.

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence of a virus associated with rusty mottle disease of sweet cherry (Prunus avium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamor, D V; Druffel, K L; Eastwell, K C

    2013-08-01

    Cherry rusty mottle is a disease of sweet cherries first described in 1940 in western North America. Because of the graft-transmissible nature of the disease, a viral nature of the disease was assumed. Here, the complete genomic nucleotide sequences of virus isolates from two trees expressing cherry rusty mottle disease symptoms are characterized; the virus is designated cherry rusty mottle associated virus (CRMaV). The biological and molecular characteristics of this virus in comparison to those of cherry necrotic rusty mottle virus (CNRMV) and cherry green ring mottle virus (CGRMV) are described. CRMaV was subsequently detected in additional sweet cherry trees expressing symptoms of cherry rusty mottle disease.

  17. Piracy of prostaglandin E2/EP receptor-mediated signaling by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (HHV-8) for latency gene expression: strategy of a successful pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Paul, Arun; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Kerur, Nagaraj; White, Carl; Chandran, Bala

    2010-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is implicated in the pathogenesis of KS, a chronic inflammation-associated malignancy. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), two pivotal proinflammatory/oncogeneic molecules, are proposed to play roles in the expression of major KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen-1 (LANA-1). Microsomal PGE2 synthase, PGE2, and its receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) were detected in KS lesions with the distinct staining of EP2/EP4 in KS lesions. In latently infected endothelial TIVE-LTC cells, EP receptor antagonists downregulated LANA-1 expression as well as Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB, which are also some of the signal molecules proposed to be important in KS pathogenesis. Exogenous PGE2 and EP receptor agonists induced the LANA-1 promoter in 293 cells, and YY1, Sp1, Oct-1, Oct-6, C/EBP, and c-Jun transcription factors seem to be involved in this induction. PGE2/EP receptor-induced LANA-1 promoter activity was downregulated significantly by the inhibition of Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB. These findings implicate the inflammatory PGE2/EP receptors and the associated signal molecules in herpes virus latency and uncover a novel paradigm that shows the evolution of KSHV genome plasticity to use inflammatory response for its survival advantage of maintaining latent gene expression. These data also suggest that potential use of anti-COX-2 and anti-EP receptor therapy may not only ameliorate the chronic inflammation associated with KS but could also lead to elimination of the KSHV latent infection and the associated KS lesions.

  18. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  19. Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treating Soft Tissue Sarcomas Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Chemotherapy (chemo) is the use of drugs given into ... Depending on the type and stage of sarcoma, chemotherapy may be given as the main treatment or ...

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2-prostaglandin E2-eicosanoid receptor inflammatory axis: a key player in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus associated malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Arun George; Chandran, Bala; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2013-08-01

    The role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), its lipid metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and Eicosanoid (EP) receptors (EP; 1-4) underlying the proinflammatory mechanistic aspects of Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, cervical cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an active area of investigation. The tumorigenic potential of COX-2 and PGE2 through EP receptors forms the mechanistic context underlying the chemotherapeutic potential of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although role of the COX-2 is described in several viral associated malignancies, the biological significance of the COX-2/PGE2/EP receptor inflammatory axis is extensively studied only in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8) associated malignancies such as KS, a multifocal endothelial cell tumor and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a B cell-proliferative disorder. The purpose of this review is to summarize the salient findings delineating the molecular mechanisms downstream of COX-2 involving PGE2 secretion and its autocrine and paracrine interactions with EP receptors (EP1-4), COX-2/PGE2/EP receptor signaling regulating KSHV pathogenesis and latency. KSHV infection induces COX-2, PGE2 secretion, and EP receptor activation. The resulting signal cascades modulate the expression of KSHV latency genes (latency associated nuclear antigen-1 [LANA-1] and viral-Fas (TNFRSF6)-associated via death domain like interferon converting enzyme-like- inhibitory protein [vFLIP]). vFLIP was also shown to be crucial for the maintenance of COX-2 activation. The mutually interdependent interactions between viral proteins (LANA-1/vFLIP) and COX-2/PGE2/EP receptors was shown to play key roles in the biological mechanisms involved in KS and PEL pathogenesis such as blockage of apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, transformation, proliferation, angiogenesis, adhesion, invasion, and immune-suppression. Understanding the COX-2/PGE2/EP axis is very important to

  1. Do We Know What Causes Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Kaposi Sarcoma? Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is caused by infection with a ... Sarcoma? Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented? More In Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  2. Genomic 3' terminal sequence comparison of three isolates of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, I D; Vlasak, R; Nowotny, N; Rodak, L; Carter, M J

    1992-05-15

    Comparison of sequence data is necessary in older to investigate virus origins, identify features common to virulent strains, and characterize genomic organization within virus families. A virulent caliciviral disease of rabbits recently emerged in China. We have sequenced 1100 bases from the 3' ends of two independent European isolates of this virus, and compared these with previously determined calicivirus sequences. Rabbit caliciviruses were closely related, despite the different countries in which isolation was made. This supports the rapid spread of a new virus across Europe. The capsid protein sequences of these rabbit viruses differ markedly from those determined for feline calicivirus, but a hypothetical 3' open reading frame is relatively well conserved between the caliciviruses of these two different hosts and argues for a functional role.

  3. [Genome sequencing and analysis of a peste des petits ruminants virus isolate, China/Tib/07].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Hua; Bao, Jing-Yue; Wu, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Zhi-Liang

    2010-07-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus is a member of Morbillivirus Paramyxoviridae. The complete genome of a Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) isolate, China/Tib/07 was sequenced and molecular characteristics was analyzed. The internal sequences of the virus genome were amplified by RT-PCR with primers designed according to the published data in GenBank, while the sequences of the 3' and 5' ends of the genome were determined by RACE. Amplification products were directly sequenced,assembled and analyzed with DNAStar4.0. Results showed that China/Tib/07 genome consisted of 15 948 nucleotides in length, encoding six structural proteins and two non-structural proteins just like other known PPRV genomes. Phylogenetically, the virus genome shared homology of 91.6%-98.1% with Southwest Asian isolates among PPRV strains and the highest homology of 64.3% with rinderpest virus among morbillivirus members.

  4. Cross-kingdom sequence similarities between human micro-RNAs and plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo-Mendez, Jovan D; Vaishnav, Radhika A; Cooper, Nigel G; Friedland, Robert P

    2013-09-01

    Micro-RNAs regulate the expression of cellular and tissue phenotypes at a post-transcriptional level through a complex process involving complementary interactions between micro-RNAs and messenger-RNAs. Similar nucleotide interactions have been shown to occur as cross-kingdom events; for example, between plant viruses and plant micro-RNAs and also between animal viruses and animal micro-RNAs. In this study, this view is expanded to look for cross-kingdom similarities between plant virus and human micro-RNA sequences. A method to identify significant nucleotoide sequence similarities between plant viruses and hsa micro-RNAs was created. Initial analyses demonstrate that plant viruses contain nucleotide sequences which exactly match the seed sequences of human micro-RNAs in both parallel and anti-parallel directions. For example, the bean common mosaic virus strain NL4 from Colombia contains sequences that match exactly the seed sequence for micro-RNA of the hsa-mir-1226 in the parallel direction, which suggests a cross-kingdom conservation. Similarly, the rice yellow stunt viral cRNA contains a sequence that is an exact match in the anti-parallel direction to the seed sequence of hsa-micro-RNA let-7b. The functional implications of these results need to be explored. The finding of these cross-kingdom sequence similarities is a useful starting point in support of bench level investigations.

  5. The avian retrovirus avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subtype A reaches the lipid mixing stage of fusion at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Laurie J; Delos, Sue E; Netter, Robert C; Bates, Paul; White, Judith M

    2003-03-01

    We previously showed that the envelope glycoprotein (EnvA) of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subtype A (ASLV-A) binds to liposomes at neutral pH following incubation with its receptor, Tva, at >or=22 degrees C. We also provided evidence that ASLV-C fuses with cells at neutral pH. These findings suggested that receptor binding at neutral pH and >or=22 degrees C is sufficient to activate Env for fusion. A recent study suggested that two steps are necessary to activate avian retroviral Envs: receptor binding at neutral pH, followed by exposure to low pH (W. Mothes et al., Cell 103:679-689, 2000). Therefore, we evaluated the requirements for intact ASLV-A particles to bind to target bilayers and fuse with cells. We found that ASLV-A particles bind stably to liposomes in a receptor- and temperature-dependent manner at neutral pH. Using ASLV-A particles biosynthetically labeled with pyrene, we found that ASLV-A mixes its lipid envelope with cells within 5 to 10 min at 37 degrees C. Lipid mixing was neither inhibited nor enhanced by incubation at low pH. Lipid mixing of ASLV-A was inhibited by a peptide designed to prevent six-helix bundle formation in EnvA; the same peptide inhibits virus infection and EnvA-mediated cell-cell fusion (at both neutral and low pHs). Bafilomycin and dominant-negative dynamin inhibited lipid mixing of Sindbis virus (which requires low pH for fusion), but not of ASLV-A, with host cells. Finally, we found that, although EnvA-induced cell-cell fusion is enhanced at low pH, a mutant EnvA that is severely compromised in its ability to support infection still induced massive syncytia at low pH. Our results indicate that receptor binding at neutral pH is sufficient to activate EnvA, such that ASLV-A particles bind hydrophobically to and merge their membranes with target cells. Possible roles for low pH at subsequent stages of viral entry are discussed.

  6. Activation and Repression of Epstein-Barr Virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycles by Short- and Medium-Chain Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorres, Kelly L.; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lytic cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are induced in cell culture by sodium butyrate (NaB), a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Valproic acid (VPA), another SCFA and an HDAC inhibitor, induces the lytic cycle of KSHV but blocks EBV lytic reactivation. To explore the hypothesis that structural differences between NaB and VPA account for their functional effects on the two related viruses, we investigated the capacity of 16 structurally related short- and medium-chain fatty acids to promote or prevent lytic cycle reactivation. SCFAs differentially affected EBV and KSHV reactivation. KSHV was reactivated by all SCFAs that are HDAC inhibitors, including phenylbutyrate. However, several fatty acid HDAC inhibitors, such as isobutyrate and phenylbutyrate, did not reactivate EBV. Reactivation of KSHV lytic transcripts could not be blocked completely by any fatty acid tested. In contrast, several medium-chain fatty acids inhibited lytic activation of EBV. Fatty acids that blocked EBV reactivation were more lipophilic than those that activated EBV. VPA blocked activation of the BZLF1 promoter by NaB but did not block the transcriptional function of ZEBRA. VPA also blocked activation of the DNA damage response that accompanies EBV lytic cycle activation. Properties of SCFAs in addition to their effects on chromatin are likely to explain activation or repression of EBV. We concluded that fatty acids stimulate the two related human gammaherpesviruses to enter the lytic cycle through different pathways. IMPORTANCE Lytic reactivation of EBV and KSHV is needed for persistence of these viruses and plays a role in carcinogenesis. Our direct comparison highlights the mechanistic differences in lytic reactivation between related human oncogenic gammaherpesviruses. Our findings have therapeutic implications, as fatty acids are found in the diet and produced by the human microbiota

  7. Osteosarcoma with apparent Ewing sarcoma gene rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias, Melissa; Chou, Alexander J; Meyers, Paul; Shukla, Neerav; Hameed, Meera; Agaram, Narasimhan; Wang, Lulu; Berger, Michael F.; Walsh, Michael; Kentsis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Poorly differentiated round cell sarcomas present diagnostic challenges due to their variable morphology and lack of specific immunophenotypic markers. We present a case of a 15-year-old female with a tibial tumor that exhibited features of Ewing-like sarcoma, including apparent rearrangement of the EWSR1 gene. Hybridization capture-based next-generation DNA sequencing showed evidence of complex genomic rearrangements, absence of known pathogenic Ewing-like chromosome translocations, and dele...

  8. Genome Sequence of Southern tomato virus in Asymptomatic Tomato ‘Sweet Hearts’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá-Briseño, Ricardo I.; Coşkan, Sevgi; Londoño, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genome sequence of Southern tomato virus in asymptomatic Solanum lycopersicum ‘Sweet Hearts’ (STV-Florida) in Florida was assembled from small RNAs sequenced by Illumina RNA-seq. The STV-Florida genome shared 99.0 to 99.9% similarity with full genome sequences from Bangladesh, China, Mexico, and the United States (Mississippi and North Carolina). PMID:28209810

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Rehmannia Mosaic Virus Infecting Rehmannia glutinosa in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-28

    The complete genome sequence of a South Korean isolate of Rehmannia mosaic virus (ReMV) infecting Rehmannia glutinosa was determined through next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural infection of R. glutinosa by ReMV in South Korea.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato Isolate of Parietaria Mottle Virus from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Aramburu, José; Rubio, Luis; Galipienso, Luis

    2015-12-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence of isolate T32 of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) infecting tomato plants in Turin, Italy, obtained by Sanger sequencing. T32 shares 90.48 to 96.69% nucleotide identity with other two PoMV isolates, CR8 and Pe1, respectively, whose complete genome sequences are available.

  11. First complete genome sequence of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus isolate in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nt) of an emerging Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of sRNA and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity to the Asian genotype, but only 90% t...

  12. Identification of hepatotropic viruses from plasma using deep sequencing: a next generation diagnostic tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Law

    Full Text Available We conducted an unbiased metagenomics survey using plasma from patients with chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and patients without liver disease (control. RNA and DNA libraries were sequenced from plasma filtrates enriched in viral particles to catalog virus populations. Hepatitis viruses were readily detected at high coverage in patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and C, but only a limited number of sequences resembling other viruses were found. The exception was a library from a patient diagnosed with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection that contained multiple sequences matching GB virus C (GBV-C. Abundant GBV-C reads were also found in plasma from patients with AIH, whereas Torque teno virus (TTV was found at high frequency in samples from patients with AIH and NASH. After taxonomic classification of sequences by BLASTn, a substantial fraction in each library, ranging from 35% to 76%, remained unclassified. These unknown sequences were assembled into scaffolds along with virus, phage and endogenous retrovirus sequences and then analyzed by BLASTx against the non-redundant protein database. Nearly the full genome of a heretofore-unknown circovirus was assembled and many scaffolds that encoded proteins with similarity to plant, insect and mammalian viruses. The presence of this novel circovirus was confirmed by PCR. BLASTx also identified many polypeptides resembling nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV proteins. We re-evaluated these alignments with a profile hidden Markov method, HHblits, and observed inconsistencies in the target proteins reported by the different algorithms. This suggests that sequence alignments are insufficient to identify NCLDV proteins, especially when these alignments are only to small portions of the target protein. Nevertheless, we have now established a reliable protocol for the identification of viruses in plasma that can also be

  13. Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceline Juillard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV has an etiologic role in Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA. LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA’s role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease.

  14. Risk of classical Kaposi sarcoma by plasma levels of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies, sCD26, sCD23 and sCD30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviano Enza

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To clarify the immunological alterations leading to classical Kaposi sarcoma (cKS among people infected with KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. Methods In a population-based study of 119 cKS cases, 105 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 155 KSHV-seronegative controls, we quantified plasma soluble cluster of differentiation (sCD levels and antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (anti-EBNA-1 and viral capsid antigen (anti-VCA. Differences between groups in prevalence of low-tertile anti-EBNA-1 and high-tertile anti-VCA were compared by logistic regression. Continuous levels between groups and by presence of cKS co-factors among controls were compared by linear regression and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon methods. Results Comparisons of cKS cases to seropositive controls and of seropositive to seronegative controls revealed no significant differences. However, controls with known cKS cofactors (male sex, nonsmoking, diabetes and cortisone use had significantly lower levels of anti-EBNA (P = 0.0001 - 0.07 and anti-VCA (P = 0.0001 - 0.03. Levels of sCD26 were significantly lower for male and non-smoking controls (Padj ≤ 0.03, and they were marginally lower with older age and cortisone use (Padj ≤ 0.09. Conclusions Anti-EBV and sCD26 levels were associated with cofactors for cKS, but they did not differ between cKS cases and matched controls. Novel approaches and broader panels of assays are needed to investigate immunological contributions to cKS.

  15. SYNOVIAL CELL SARCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farzan

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten cases of synovial cell sarcoma are reported. The youngest patient was a 2'A years old boy with synovial cell sarcoma of the knee and the oldest one was a man with synovial cell sarcoma of the elbow.

  16. Complete genome sequence of bean leaf crumple virus, a novel begomovirus infecting common bean in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Yepes, Monica; Zambrano, Leidy; Bueno, Juan M; Raatz, Bodo; Cuellar, Wilmer J

    2017-02-10

    A copy of the complete genome of a novel bipartite begomovirus infecting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Colombia was obtained by rolling-circle amplification (RCA), cloned, and sequenced. The virus is associated with leaf crumple symptoms and significant yield losses in Andean and Mesoamerican beans. Such symptoms have been reported increasingly in Colombia since at least 2002, and we detected the virus in leaf material collected since 2008. Sequence analysis showed that the virus is a member of a distinct species, sharing 81% and 76% nucleotide (nt) sequence identity (in DNA-A and DNA-B, respectively) to other begomoviruses infecting common bean in the Americas. The data obtained support the taxonomic status of this virus (putatively named 'bean leaf crumple virus', BLCrV) as a member of a novel species in the genus Begomovirus.

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence of wound tumor virus genomic segments encoding nonstructural polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzola, J V; Dall, D J; Xu, Z K; Nuss, D L

    1989-07-01

    Sequence analysis of the genomic segments which encode the five wound tumor virus nonstructural polypeptides has been completed. The complete nucleotide sequence of segments S4 (2565 bp), S6 (1700 bp), S9 (1182 bp), and S10 (1172 bp) are presented in this report while the sequence of segment S12 (851 bp) has been described previously (T. Asamizu, D. Summers, M. B. Motika, J. V. Anzola, and D. L. Nuss, 1985, Virology 144, 398-409). Comparison of the only published sequence for another member of the genus Phytoreovirus, that of rice dwarf virus segment S10, with the combined available wound tumor virus sequence data revealed similarity with WTV segment S10: 54.9 and 30.6% at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. Although wound tumor virus and rice dwarf virus differ in plant host range, tissue specificity, vector range, and disease symptom expression, the level of sequence similarity shared by the two segments suggests a common origin for these viruses. The potential use of a phytoreovirus sequence database for predicting functions of viral encoded gene products is considered.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Classical Swine Fever Virus Genotype 2.2 Strain Bergen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Lohse, Louise; Becher, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the genotype 2.2 classical swine fever virus strain Bergen has been determined; this strain was originally isolated from persistently infected domestic pigs in the Netherlands and is characterized to be of low virulence....

  19. Complete genome sequence of Colocasia bobone disease-associated virus, a putative cytorhabdovirus infecting taro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Colleen M; Bejerman, Nicolas; Li, Ming; James, Anthony P; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Pearson, Michael N; Revill, Peter A; Harding, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    We report the first genome sequence of a Colocasia bobone disease-associated virus (CBDaV) derived from bobone-affected taro [Colocasia esculenta L. Schott] from Solomon Islands. The negative-strand RNA genome is 12,193 nt long, with six major open reading frames (ORFs) with the arrangement 3'-N-P-P3-M-G-L-5'. Typical of all rhabdoviruses, the 3' leader and 5' trailer sequences show complementarity to each other. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CBDaV is a member of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, supporting previous reports of virus particles within the cytoplasm of bobone-infected taro cells. The availability of the CBDaV genome sequence now makes it possible to assess the role of this virus in bobone, and possibly alomae disease of taro and confirm that this sequence is that of Colocasia bobone disease virus (CBDV).

  20. Pea enation mosaic virus genoma RNA contains no polyadenylate sequences and cannot be aminoacylated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, T L; De Zoeten, G A; Hall, T C

    1978-01-01

    An active synthetase enzyme preparation from peas (Pisum sativum L.) did not catalyze the aminoacylation of pea enation mosaic virus RNA. The viral RNA was shown not to contain polyadenylic acid sequences.

  1. Current impact and future directions of high throughput sequencing in plant virus diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massart, Sebastien; Olmos, Antonio; Jijakli, Haissam; Candresse, Thierry

    2014-08-08

    The ability to provide a fast, inexpensive and reliable diagnostic for any given viral infection is a key parameter in efforts to fight and control these ubiquitous pathogens. The recent developments of high-throughput sequencing (also called Next Generation Sequencing - NGS) technologies and bioinformatics have drastically changed the research on viral pathogens. It is now raising a growing interest for virus diagnostics. This review provides a snapshot vision on the current use and impact of high throughput sequencing approaches in plant virus characterization. More specifically, this review highlights the potential of these new technologies and their interplay with current protocols in the future of molecular diagnostic of plant viruses. The current limitations that will need to be addressed for a wider adoption of high-throughput sequencing in plant virus diagnostics are thoroughly discussed.

  2. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Simian Foamy Virus Isolate from a Cynomolgus Macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Koji; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete proviral genome sequence (DDBJ/ENA/GenBank accession no. LC094267) of a simian foamy virus, SFVmfa/Cy5061, isolated from a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis). This proviral genome consists of 12,965 nucleotides and has five open reading frames, gag, pol, env, tas, and bet, as with other foamy viruses. PMID:27908992

  3. Complete coding sequence of Zika virus from Martinique outbreak in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Piorkowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus is an Aedes-borne Flavivirus causing fever, arthralgia, myalgia rash, associated with Guillain–Barré syndrome and suspected to induce microcephaly in the fetus. We report here the complete coding sequence of the first characterized Caribbean Zika virus strain, isolated from a patient from Martinique in December, 2015.

  4. Genome Sequence of Lassa Virus Isolated from the First Domestically Acquired Case in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Svenja; Schultze, Tilman; Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Mengel, Jan Philipp; Kann, Gerrit; Wolf, Timo; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is a zoonotic, hemorrhagic fever-causing virus endemic in West Africa, for which no approved vaccines or specific treatment options exist. Here, we report the genome sequence of LASV isolated from the first case of acquired Lassa fever disease outside of Africa. PMID:27660771

  5. Exploring the use of influenza virus sequence diversity for the identification and characterization of transmission events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jonges (Marcel)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In this thesis we evaluate the use of influenza sequence diversity to support outbreak control measures. Specifically, we investigated the possibility of identifying clustered influenza virus cases as well as chains of influenza virus transmission, and thereby gain informat

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Carnation Mottle Virus Infecting Hop Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Yeonhwa; Choi, Hoseong; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-01-01

    The Carnation mottle virus (CarMV) is a single positive-strand RNA virus belonging to the genus Carmovirus. The major natural host for CarMV is the carnation. In this study, using transcriptome data, we provide for the first time a nearly complete genome sequence of CarMV infecting hop plants.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of White Spot Syndrome Virus Isolated from Cultured Litopenaeus vannamei in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Anaya, Libia Zulema; Gonzalez-Galaviz, Jose Reyes; Casillas-Hernandez, Ramón; Lares-Villa, Fernando; Estrada, Karel

    2016-01-01

    The first genome sequence of a Mexican white spot syndrome virus is presented here. White spot syndrome is a shrimp pandemic virus that has devastated production in Mexico for more than 10 years. The availability of this genome will greatly aid epidemiological studies worldwide, contributing to the molecular diagnostic and disease prevention in shrimp farming. PMID:26966222

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of an African Swine Fever Virus Isolate from Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, Claudia; Oggiano, Annalisa; Malmberg, Maja; Iscaro, Carmen; De Mia, Gian Mario; Belák, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Previous genetic characterization of African swine fever virus isolates from the Italian island of Sardinia, where the virus has been present since 1978, has largely been limited to a few selected genomic regions. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the isolate 47/Ss/08 collected during an outbreak in 2008. PMID:27856577

  9. Full-Genome Sequence of a Novel Varicella-Zoster Virus Clade Isolated in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Castillo, Araceli; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna María; Gonzalez-Durán, Elizabeth; Segura-Candelas, José Miguel; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra Ivette; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a member of the Herpesviridae family, which causes varicella (chicken pox) and herpes zoster (shingles) in humans. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of varicella-zoster virus, isolated from a vesicular fluid sample, revealing the circulation of VZV clade VIII in Mexico. PMID:26159533

  10. Whole transcriptome sequencing enables discovery and analysis of viruses in archived primary central nervous system lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher DeBoever

    Full Text Available Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL have a dramatically increased prevalence among persons living with AIDS and are known to be associated with human Epstein Barr virus (EBV infection. Previous work suggests that in some cases, co-infection with other viruses may be important for PCNSL pathogenesis. Viral transcription in tumor samples can be measured using next generation transcriptome sequencing. We demonstrate the ability of transcriptome sequencing to identify viruses, characterize viral expression, and identify viral variants by sequencing four archived AIDS-related PCNSL tissue samples and analyzing raw sequencing reads. EBV was detected in all four PCNSL samples and cytomegalovirus (CMV, JC polyomavirus (JCV, and HIV were also discovered, consistent with clinical diagnoses. CMV was found to express three long non-coding RNAs recently reported as expressed during active infection. Single nucleotide variants were observed in each of the viruses observed and three indels were found in CMV. No viruses were found in several control tumor types including 32 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. This study demonstrates the ability of next generation transcriptome sequencing to accurately identify viruses, including DNA viruses, in solid human cancer tissue samples.

  11. Whole transcriptome sequencing enables discovery and analysis of viruses in archived primary central nervous system lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBoever, Christopher; Reid, Erin G; Smith, Erin N; Wang, Xiaoyun; Dumaop, Wilmar; Harismendy, Olivier; Carson, Dennis; Richman, Douglas; Masliah, Eliezer; Frazer, Kelly A

    2013-01-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSL) have a dramatically increased prevalence among persons living with AIDS and are known to be associated with human Epstein Barr virus (EBV) infection. Previous work suggests that in some cases, co-infection with other viruses may be important for PCNSL pathogenesis. Viral transcription in tumor samples can be measured using next generation transcriptome sequencing. We demonstrate the ability of transcriptome sequencing to identify viruses, characterize viral expression, and identify viral variants by sequencing four archived AIDS-related PCNSL tissue samples and analyzing raw sequencing reads. EBV was detected in all four PCNSL samples and cytomegalovirus (CMV), JC polyomavirus (JCV), and HIV were also discovered, consistent with clinical diagnoses. CMV was found to express three long non-coding RNAs recently reported as expressed during active infection. Single nucleotide variants were observed in each of the viruses observed and three indels were found in CMV. No viruses were found in several control tumor types including 32 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma samples. This study demonstrates the ability of next generation transcriptome sequencing to accurately identify viruses, including DNA viruses, in solid human cancer tissue samples.

  12. Full Genome Sequence of Egg Drop Syndrome Virus Strain FJ12025 Isolated from Muscovy Duckling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guanghua; Chen, Hongmei; Huang, Yu; Cheng, Longfei; Fu, Qiuling; Shi, Shaohua; Wan, Chunhe; Chen, Cuiteng; Lin, Jiansheng

    2013-08-22

    Egg drop syndrome virus (EDSV) strain FJ12025 was isolated from a 9-day-old Muscovy duckling. The results of the sequence showed that the genome of strain FJ12025 is 33,213 bp in length, with a G+C content of 43.03%. When comparing the genome sequence of strain FJ12025 to that of laying duck original strain AV-127, we found 50 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between the two viral genome sequences. A genomic sequence comparison of FJ12025 and AV-127 will help to understand the phenotypic differences between the two viruses.

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Zika Virus Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Jason T; Wiley, Michael R; Prieto, Karla; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Nagle, Elyse; Kasper, Matthew R; Reyes, Daniel; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Heang, Vireak; Weaver, Scott C; Haddow, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B; Sovann, Ly; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-05-12

    Zika virus is an emerging human pathogen of great concern due to putative links to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Here, we report the complete genomes, including the 5' and 3' untranslated regions, of five Zika virus isolates, one from the Asian lineage and four from the African lineage.

  14. Deletion analysis of the 5' untranslated leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Takamatsu, N; Watanabe, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Shiba, T.; Meshi, T; Okada, Y.

    1991-01-01

    To determine the sequences essential for viral multiplication in the 5' untranslated leader sequence of tobacco mosaic virus RNA, mutant TMV-L (a tomato strain) RNAs which carry several deletions in this 71-nucleotide sequence were constructed by an in vitro transcription system and their multiplication was analyzed by introducing mutant RNA into tobacco protoplasts by electroporation. Large deletions of the sequence from nucleotides 9 to 47 or 25 to 71 abolished viral multiplication; when ab...

  15. Complete genome sequence of the San Miguel sea lion virus-8 reveals that it is not a member of the vesicular exanthema of swine virus/San Miguel Sea Lion virus species of the Caliciviridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of the San Miguel sea lion virus-8 (SMSV-8) was determined. Comparison of this sequence to other calicivirus sequences in GenBank showed that this virus was genetically distinct from the VESV/SMSV viruses and belonged to a novel clade within the Vesivirus genus....

  16. Chylothorax in a patient with metastatic Kaposi sarcoma: Differential diagnostic considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Alexander, DO; Magda Rizer, DO; William Burke, MD; Lawrence Ciment, MD

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a low-grade mesenchymal tumor involving blood and lymphatic vessels. There are four types, based on clinical presentation: classic, endemic (Africana), iatrogenic (typically, involving renal allograft recipients), and AIDS-associated (epidemic). Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus infection has been linked along with other factors to the development of KS. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus interacts and encodes for numerous molecular proteins that play a...

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Diaphorina citri-associated C virus, a Novel Putative RNA Virus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Shahideh; Salem, Nidà; Falk, Bryce W

    2016-07-21

    We present here the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a novel putative RNA virus identified in field populations of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri, through sequencing of the transcriptome followed by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). We tentatively named this virus Diaphorina citri-associated C virus (DcACV). DcACV is an unclassified positive-sense RNA virus.

  18. Genome sequence of a virus isolate from tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) in Colombia: evidence for a new potyvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Pablo A; Alzate, Juan F; Marín Montoya, Mauricio

    2015-02-01

    Based on the results of a deep sequencing transcriptome study of tamarillo (Solanum betaceum), we report the genome sequence of a virus from this host plant. Since this probably represents a new member of the genus Potyvirus, the name tamarillo leaf malformation virus (TaLMV) has been proposed. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that TaLMV is the closest relative of Colombian datura virus (CDV), followed by three other potyviruses: tobacco etch virus, potato virus A and tobacco vein mottling virus. This is the first sequence of a potyvirus infecting Solanum betaceum containing the complete polyprotein coding region.

  19. Human herpesvirus 8 open reading frame 26 and open reading frame 65 sequences from multiple myeloma patients: a shared pattern not found in Kaposi's sarcoma or primary effusion lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H J; Sjak-Shie, N N; Vescio, R A; Kaminsky, M; Mikail, A; Pold, M; Parker, K; Beksac, M; Belson, D; Moss, T J; Wu, C H; Zhou, J; Zhang, L; Chen, G; Said, J W; Berenson, J R

    2000-11-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), multicentric Castleman's disease, and recently multiple myeloma (MM). DNA sequence analyses of HHV-8 suggest that multiple HHV-8 strains exist. We extracted DNA from 24 patients with MM and 3 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and compared HHV-8 open reading frames (ORFs) 26 and 65 sequences with those derived from patients with KS, PEL, and two HHV-8-positive PEL cell lines KS-1 and BC-1. ORF26 sequence data suggest that MM patients are consistently carriers of HHV-8 strain subtype C3. All MM patients also consistently revealed either a single bp deletion or substitution at position 112197 in ORF65. This unique alteration is not present in patients with KS or PEL or in PEL cell lines. It occurs in the portion of ORF65 that is known to be responsible for a serological response to HHV-8.

  20. Near-complete genome sequencing of swine vesicular disease virus using the Roche GS FLX sequencing platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra C Abel Nielsen

    Full Text Available Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV is an enterovirus that is both genetically and antigenically closely related to human coxsackievirus B5 within the Picornaviridae family. SVDV is the causative agent of a highly contagious (though rarely fatal vesicular disease in pigs. We report a rapid method that is suitable for sequencing the complete protein-encoding sequences of SVDV isolates in which the RNA is relatively intact. The approach couples a single PCR amplification reaction, using only a single PCR primer set to amplify the near-complete SVDV genome, with deep-sequencing using a small fraction of the capacity of a Roche GS FLX sequencing platform. Sequences were initially verified through one of two criteria; either a match between a de novo assembly and a reference mapping, or a match between all of five different reference mappings performed against a fixed set of starting reference genomes with significant genetic distances within the same species of viruses. All reference mappings used an iterative method to avoid bias. Further verification was achieved through phylogenetic analysis against published SVDV genomes and additional Enterovirus B sequences. This approach allows high confidence in the obtained consensus sequences, as well as provides sufficiently high and evenly dispersed sequence coverage to allow future studies of intra-host variation.

  1. Mayaro virus: complete nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic relationships with other alphaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Anne; de Thoisy, Benoît; Lacoste, Vincent; Pascalis, Hervé; Pouliquen, Jean-François; Mercier, Véronique; Tolou, Hugues; Dussart, Philippe; Morvan, Jacques; Talarmin, Antoine; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2006-05-01

    Mayaro (MAY) virus is a member of the genus Alphavirus in the family Togaviridae. Alphaviruses are distributed throughout the world and cause a wide range of diseases in humans and animals. Here, we determined the complete nucleotide sequence of MAY from a viral strain isolated from a French Guianese patient. The deduced MAY genome was 11,429 nucleotides in length, excluding the 5' cap nucleotide and 3' poly(A) tail. Nucleotide and amino acid homologies, as well as phylogenetic analyses of the obtained sequence confirmed that MAY is not a recombinant virus and belongs to the Semliki Forest complex according to the antigenic complex classification. Furthermore, analyses based on the E1 region revealed that MAY is closely related to Una virus, the only other South American virus clustering with the Old World viruses. On the basis of our results and of the alphaviruses diversity and pathogenicity, we suggest that alphaviruses may have an Old World origin.

  2. Genome sequences and structures of two biologically distinct strains of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 and sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Baozhong; Li, Caihong; Goszczynski, Dariusz E; Gonsalves, Dennis

    2005-08-01

    Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 (GLRaV-2), a member of the genus Closterovirus within Closteroviridae, is implicated in several important diseases of grapevines including "leafroll", "graft-incompatibility", and "quick decline" worldwide. Several GLRaV-2 isolates have been detected from different grapevine genotypes. However, the genomes of these isolates were not sequenced or only partially sequenced. Consequently, the relationship of these viral isolates at the molecular level has not been determined. Here, we group the various GLRaV-2 isolates into four strains based on their coat protein gene sequences. We show that isolates "PN" (originated from Vitis vinifera cv. "Pinot noir"), "Sem" (from V. vinifera cv. "Semillon") and "94/970" (from V. vinifera cv. "Muscat of Alexandria") belong to the same strain, "93/955" (from hybrid "LN-33") and "H4" (from V. rupestris "St. George") each represents a distinct strain, while Grapevine rootstock stem lesion-associated virus.

  3. Full genome sequencing of the Newcastle disease viruses VS/GA and clone 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of the Villegas-Glisson/University of Georgia (VG/GA) strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and of a plaque purified clone (clone 5) exhibiting a different phenotype were sequenced and analyzed. The VG/GA strain, isolated from the intestine of healthy turkeys replicat...

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a South Korean Isolate of Habenaria mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Baek, Dasom; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-09-08

    Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, was first discovered from Habenaria radiata in Japan. The complete genomic sequence of a South Korean isolate (PA1) of HaMV infecting Plantago asiatica L. was determined with high-throughput RNA sequencing.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Mayaro Virus (Togaviridae, Alphavirus) Strain BeAr 20290 from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Espósito, Danillo Lucas Alves; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Mayaro virus strain BeAr 20290 isolated from Haemagogus mosquitoes in 1960. The sequence presented here includes all nonstructural and structural proteins and the 5′- and 3′-untranslated (UTR) regions.

  6. Combined DECS Analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing Enable Efficient Detection of Novel Plant RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Hironobu; Tomita, Reiko; Katsu, Koji; Uehara, Takuya; Atsumi, Go; Tateda, Chika; Kobayashi, Kappei; Sekine, Ken-Taro

    2016-03-07

    The presence of high molecular weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) within plant cells is an indicator of infection with RNA viruses as these possess genomic or replicative dsRNA. DECS (dsRNA isolation, exhaustive amplification, cloning, and sequencing) analysis has been shown to be capable of detecting unknown viruses. We postulated that a combination of DECS analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) would improve detection efficiency and usability of the technique. Here, we describe a model case in which we efficiently detected the presumed genome sequence of Blueberry shoestring virus (BSSV), a member of the genus Sobemovirus, which has not so far been reported. dsRNAs were isolated from BSSV-infected blueberry plants using the dsRNA-binding protein, reverse-transcribed, amplified, and sequenced using NGS. A contig of 4,020 nucleotides (nt) that shared similarities with sequences from other Sobemovirus species was obtained as a candidate of the BSSV genomic sequence. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR primer sets based on sequences from this contig enabled the detection of BSSV in all BSSV-infected plants tested but not in healthy controls. A recombinant protein encoded by the putative coat protein gene was bound by the BSSV-antibody, indicating that the candidate sequence was that of BSSV itself. Our results suggest that a combination of DECS analysis and NGS, designated here as "DECS-C," is a powerful method for detecting novel plant viruses.

  7. Genome sequences of nine vesicular stomatitis virus isolates from South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report nine full-genome sequences of vesicular stomatitis virus obtrained by Illumina next-generation sequencing of RNA, isolated from either cattle epithelial suspensions or cell culture supernatants. Seven of these viral genomes belonged to the New Jersey serotype/species, clade III, while two...

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1h Strain Isolated in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzucchi, Moira; Bertolotti, Luigi; Casciari, Cristina; Rossi, Elisabetta; Rosati, Sergio; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We sequenced the complete genome of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain UM/126/07. It belongs to subgenotype 1h. The complete genome is composed of 12,196 nucleotides organized as one open reading frame encoding 3,898 amino acids. This is the first report of a full-length sequence of BVDV-1h. PMID:28232427

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1h Strain Isolated in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzucchi, Moira; Bertolotti, Luigi; Giammarioli, Monica; Casciari, Cristina; Rossi, Elisabetta; Rosati, Sergio; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2017-02-23

    We sequenced the complete genome of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain UM/126/07. It belongs to subgenotype 1h. The complete genome is composed of 12,196 nucleotides organized as one open reading frame encoding 3,898 amino acids. This is the first report of a full-length sequence of BVDV-1h.

  10. Persistent viremia by a novel parvovirus in a slow loris (Nycticebus coucang with diffuse histiocytic sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eCanuti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading health concerns for human and animal health. Since the tumorigenesis process is not completely understood and it is known that some viruses can induce carcinogenesis, it is highly important to identify novel oncoviruses and extensively study underlying oncogenic mechanisms. Here, we investigated a case of diffuse histiocytic sarcoma in a 22 years old slow loris (Nycticebus coucang, using a broad spectrum virus discovery technique. A novel parvovirus was discovered and the phylogenetic analysis performed on its fully sequenced genome demonstrated that it represents the first member of a novel genus. The possible causative correlation between this virus and the malignancy was further investigated and 20 serum and 61 organ samples from 25 animals (N. coucang and N. pygmaeus were screened for the novel virus but only samples collected from the originally infected animal were positive. The virus was present in all tested organs (intestine, liver, spleen, kidneys and lungs and in all banked serum samples collected up to 8 years before death. All attempts to identify a latent viral form (integrated or episomal were unsuccessful and the increase of variation in the viral sequences during the years was consistent with absence of latency. Since it is well known that parvoviruses are dependent on cell division to successfully replicate, we hypothesized that the virus could have benefitted from the constantly dividing cancer cells and may not have been the cause of the histiocytic sarcoma. It is also possible to conjecture that the virus had a role in delaying the tumor progression and this report might bring new exciting opportunities in recognizing viruses to be used in cancer virotherapy.

  11. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forscher C

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Charles Forscher,1 Monica Mita,2 Robert Figlin3 1Sarcoma Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Experimental Therapeutics Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Academic Development Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and Division of Hematology/Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing's sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing's sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. Keywords: sarcoma, targeted agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mTor inhibition

  12. Analyses of Twelve New Whole Genome Sequences of Cassava Brown Streak Viruses and Ugandan Cassava Brown Streak Viruses from East Africa: Diversity, Supercomputing and Evidence for Further Speciation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Ndunguru

    Full Text Available Cassava brown streak disease is caused by two devastating viruses, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV which are frequently found infecting cassava, one of sub-Saharan Africa's most important staple food crops. Each year these viruses cause losses of up to $100 million USD and can leave entire families without their primary food source, for an entire year. Twelve new whole genomes, including seven of CBSV and five of UCBSV were uncovered in this research, doubling the genomic sequences available in the public domain for these viruses. These new sequences disprove the assumption that the viruses are limited by agro-ecological zones, show that current diagnostic primers are insufficient to provide confident diagnosis of these viruses and give rise to the possibility that there may be as many as four distinct species of virus. Utilizing NGS sequencing technologies and proper phylogenetic practices will rapidly increase the solution to sustainable cassava production.

  13. The sequence of camelpox virus shows it is most closely related to variola virus, the cause of smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Caroline; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2002-04-01

    Camelpox virus (CMPV) and variola virus (VAR) are orthopoxviruses (OPVs) that share several biological features and cause high mortality and morbidity in their single host species. The sequence of a virulent CMPV strain was determined; it is 202182 bp long, with inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) of 6045 bp and has 206 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). As for other poxviruses, the genes are tightly packed with little non-coding sequence. Most genes within 25 kb of each terminus are transcribed outwards towards the terminus, whereas genes within the centre of the genome are transcribed from either DNA strand. The central region of the genome contains genes that are highly conserved in other OPVs and 87 of these are conserved in all sequenced chordopoxviruses. In contrast, genes towards either terminus are more variable and encode proteins involved in host range, virulence or immunomodulation. In some cases, these are broken versions of genes found in other OPVs. The relationship of CMPV to other OPVs was analysed by comparisons of DNA and predicted protein sequences, repeats within the ITRs and arrangement of ORFs within the terminal regions. Each comparison gave the same conclusion: CMPV is the closest known virus to variola virus, the cause of smallpox.

  14. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of a Dengue-1 virus isolated on Easter Island, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, C; Yung, V; Araya, P; Tognarelli, J; Villagra, E; Vera, L; Fernández, J

    2008-01-01

    Dengue-1 viruses responsible for the dengue fever outbreak in Easter Island in 2002 were isolated from acute-phase sera of dengue fever patients. In order to analyze the complete genome sequence, we designed primers to amplify contiguous segments across the entire sequence of the viral genome. RT-PCR products obtained were cloned, and complete nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were determined. This report constitutes the first complete genetic characterization of a DENV-1 isolate from Chile. Phylogenetic analysis shows that an Easter Island isolate is most closely related to Pacific DENV-1 genotype IV viruses.

  15. Sequence-based identification and characterization of nosocomial influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonges, M.; Rahamat-Langendoen, J.; Meijer, A.; Niesters, H. G.; Koopmans, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Highly transmissible viruses such as influenza are a potential source of nosocomial infections and thereby cause increased patient morbidity and mortality. Aim: To assess whether influenza virus sequence data can be used to link nosocomial influenza transmission between individuals.

  16. Complete genome sequences of two biologically distinct isolates of Asparagus virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockus, S; Lesker, T; Maiss, E

    2015-02-01

    The complete genome sequences of two asparagus virus 1 (AV-1) isolates differing in their ability to cause systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana were determined. Their genomes had 9,741 nucleotides excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail, encoded a polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids, and shared 99.6 % nucleotide sequence identity. They differed at 37 nucleotide and 15 amino acid sequence positions (99.5 % identity) scattered over the polyprotein. The closest relatives of AV-1 in amino acid sequence identity were plum pox virus (54 %) and turnip mosaic virus (53 %), corroborating the classification of AV-1 as a member of a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus.

  17. The complete sequence of a sugarcane mosaic virus isolate causing maize dwarf mosaic disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程晔; 陈炯; 陈剑平

    2002-01-01

    The complete sequence of a potyvirus from maize in Zhejiang Province was determined. The RNA was 9596 nucleotides long, excluding the 3′-poly (A) tail, and there was a single long open reading frame (ORF) of 9192 nts encoding a 346.1 ku polyprotein. The polyprotein had substantial amino acid sequence homology with those encoded by the RNAs of a Chinese isolate of sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV-C) and a Bulgarian isolate of maize dwarf mosaic virus, but it was most closely related to sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) isolates, for which only partial sequences have been published. According to the published criteria for distinguishing potyviruses, the sequence reported here is clearly a strain of SCMV, but it also showed a surprisingly high amino acid homology with SrMV-C in the HC-Pro, P3 and CI proteins.

  18. [Sequencing and analysis of the complete genome of a rabies virus isolate from Sika deer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yun-Jiao; Guo, Li; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Li-Shi; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2008-05-01

    One DRV strain was isolated from Sika Deer brain and sequenced. Nine overlapped gene fragments were amplified by RT-PCR through 3'-RACE and 5'-RACE method, and the complete DRV genome sequence was assembled. The length of the complete genome is 11863bp. The DRV genome organization was similar to other rabies viruses which were composed of five genes and the initiation sites and termination sites were highly conservative. There were mutated amino acids in important antigen sites of nucleoprotein and glycoprotein. The nucleotide and amino acid homologies of gene N, P, M, G, L in strains with completed genomie sequencing were compared. Compared with N gene sequence of other typical rabies viruses, a phylogenetic tree was established . These results indicated that DRV belonged to gene type 1. The highest homology compared with Chinese vaccine strain 3aG was 94%, and the lowest was 71% compared with WCBV. These findings provided theoretical reference for further research in rabies virus.

  19. Molecular piracy of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J; Means, R E; Damania, B; Jung, J U

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most recently discovered human tumor virus and is associated with the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and Multicentric Casttleman's disease. KSHV contains numerous open reading frames with striking homology to cellular genes. These viral gene products play a variety of roles in KSHV-associated pathogenesis by disrupting cellular signal transduction pathways, which include interferon-mediated anti-viral responses, cytokine-regulated cell growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle control. In this review, we will attempt to cover our understanding of how viral proteins deregulate cellular signaling pathways, which ultimately contribute to the conversion of normal cells to cancerous cells.

  20. Phylogenetic lineage of Tobacco leaf curl virus in Korea and estimation of recombination events implicated in their sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungan; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll; Kim, Sunghan; Choi, Hong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan

    2011-08-01

    New strains of Tobacco leaf curl virus (TbLCV) were isolated from tomato plants in four different local communities of Korea, and hence were designated TbLCV-Kr. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of the whole genome and of individual ORFs of these viruses indicated that they are closely related to the Tobacco leaf curl Japan virus (TbLCJV) cluster, which includes Honeysuckle yellow vein virus (HYVV), Honeysuckle yellow vein mosaic virus (HYVMV), and TbLCJV isolates. Four putative recombination events were recognized within these virus sequences, suggesting that the sequence variations observed in these viruses may be attributable to intraspecific and interspecific recombination events involving some TbLCV-Kr isolates, Papaya leaf curl virus (PaLCV), and a local isolate of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV).

  1. Autoantigenic proteins that bind recombinogenic sequences in Epstein-Barr virus and cellular DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    We have identified conserved autoantigenic cellular proteins that bind to G-rich sequence motifs in recombinogenic regions of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA. This binding activity, called TRBP, recognizes the EBV terminal repeats, a locus responsible for interconversion of linear and circular EBV DNA. We found that TRBP also binds to EBV DNA sequences involved in deletion of EBNA2, a gene product required for immortalization. We show that TRBP binds sequences present in repetitive cellular DNA,...

  2. Reconstruction of putative DNA virus from endogenous rice tungro bacilliform virus-like sequences in the rice genome: implications for integration and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishima Yuji

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genomes contain various kinds of repetitive sequences such as transposable elements, microsatellites, tandem repeats and virus-like sequences. Most of them, with the exception of virus-like sequences, do not allow us to trace their origins nor to follow the process of their integration into the host genome. Recent discoveries of virus-like sequences in plant genomes led us to set the objective of elucidating the origin of the repetitive sequences. Endogenous rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV-like sequences (ERTBVs have been found throughout the rice genome. Here, we reconstructed putative virus structures from RTBV-like sequences in the rice genome and characterized to understand evolutionary implication, integration manner and involvements of endogenous virus segments in the corresponding disease response. Results We have collected ERTBVs from the rice genomes. They contain rearranged structures and no intact ORFs. The identified ERTBV segments were shown to be phylogenetically divided into three clusters. For each phylogenetic cluster, we were able to make a consensus alignment for a circular virus-like structure carrying two complete ORFs. Comparisons of DNA and amino acid sequences suggested the closely relationship between ERTBV and RTBV. The Oryza AA-genome species vary in the ERTBV copy number. The species carrying low-copy-number of ERTBV segments have been reported to be extremely susceptible to RTBV. The DNA methylation state of the ERTBV sequences was correlated with their copy number in the genome. Conclusions These ERTBV segments are unlikely to have functional potential as a virus. However, these sequences facilitate to establish putative virus that provided information underlying virus integration and evolutionary relationship with existing virus. Comparison of ERTBV among the Oryza AA-genome species allowed us to speculate a possible role of endogenous virus segments against its related disease.

  3. The Danish Sarcoma Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Holmberg; Lausten, Gunnar Schwarz; Pedersen, Alma B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the database is to gather information about sarcomas treated in Denmark in order to continuously monitor and improve the quality of sarcoma treatment in a local, a national, and an international perspective. STUDY POPULATION: Patients in Denmark diagnosed with a sarcoma, both...... skeletal and ekstraskeletal, are to be registered since 2009. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information about appearance of symptoms; date of receiving referral to a sarcoma center; date of first visit; whether surgery has been performed elsewhere before referral, diagnosis, and treatment; tumor...... of Diseases - tenth edition codes and TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, and date of death (after yearly coupling to the Danish Civil Registration System). Data quality and completeness are currently secured. CONCLUSION: The Danish Sarcoma Database is population based and includes sarcomas occurring...

  4. Construction and characterization of recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus carrying brainspecific miRNA target sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-yuan CAO

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct the recombinant Japanese encephalitis virus ( JEV carrying brain-specific miRNA targeting sequences. Methods The target sequences of brain-specific miR-124 and miR-125 were introduced into the infectious cDNA clone of JEV to generate recombinant plasmids based on reverse genetics technology. The recombinant plasmids were linearized with Xho Ⅰ and served as templates of transcription with SP6 RNA polymerase to generate infectious viral RNA. The RNA transcripts were then transfected into BHK-21 cells, and the supernatant was obtained after incubated at 37℃, 5% CO2 for 3 days. The cytopathic changes of BHK-21 cells inoculated with the supernatant were observed after one passage. The rescued viruses carrying miRNA target sequences were validated by RT-PCR, standard plaque forming test on BHK-21 cells and growth curves analysis. Results Two recombinant viruses carrying miR-124 or miR-125 target sequence were rescued, respectively. The insertion of miRNA target sequences was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The rescued viruses yielded similar plaque morphology and replication efficiency compared with wild type JEV. Conclusion The recombinant JEV containing brain-specific miRNA target sequences can be obtained by reverse genetics technique, which could be used in further studies of miRNA-mediated tissue-specific attenuation mechanism of JEV. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.06.01

  5. Proviral genomic sequence analysis of Chinese donkey leukocyte attenuated equine infectious anemia virus vaccine and its parental virus strain Liaoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王柳; 童光志; 刘红全; 杨志彪; 仇华吉; 孔宪刚; 王玫

    2002-01-01

    Proviral DNA was extracted from donkey leukocyte infected with Chinese donkey leukocyte attenuated equine infectious anemia virus(DLA-EIAV), and peripheral blood lymphocytes(PBL) from a horse infected with the virulent EIAV strain Liaoning(EIAV L). The entire proviral DNA from both viruses was cloned and sequenced. The lengths of complete genomic sequences of DLA-EIAV and EIAV L provirus were 8266 bp and 8235 bp, respectively. Sequence comparison indicated that DLA-EIAV shares 97.0% and 97.5% in sequence homology with EIAV L and donkey-adapted EIAV(DA-EIAV), respectively. Lots of variations occurred in long terminal repeat(LTR, consisting of U3, R, U5), ORF S2, and env regions between DLA-EIAV and EIAV L. The nucleotide sequence differences of the two viruses in U3, R, U5, ORF S2, and env are 13.2%, 7.5%, 5.1%, 3.9%, and 2.7%, respectively, and predicted amino acid sequence differences in env and S2 coding regions are 4.4% and 8.8%, respectively. Six conserved regions are characterized in Gp90. There is a cis-activating GATA motif in ENH of DLA-EIAV and EIAV L. Two N-linked glycosylation sites disappeared in DLA-EIAV Gp90 in comparison with that of EIAV L. A bHLH transcription factor binding consensus sequence was found in LTR of DLA-EIAV but not in EIAV L. Furthermore, there is a mutation in the stem of DLA-EIAV TAR resulting in formation of a uridine tuber. Further study is needed to uncover the relationship between sequence changes and their biological functions of DLA-EIAV and L.

  6. Virus Discovery and Characterization using Next-Generation Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Boheemen (Sander)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Infectious diseases can be caused by a wide variety of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa, fungi, helminths and prions. For numerous known pathogens, the disease incidence has increased over the last few decades. In addition, several previously unknown pat

  7. Virus Discovery and Characterization using Next-Generation Sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van Boheemen (Sander)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Infectious diseases can be caused by a wide variety of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa, fungi, helminths and prions. For numerous known pathogens, the disease incidence has increased over the last few decades. In addition, several previously unknown pat

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated in Mexico, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Alonso, Rocío; Mendieta-Condado, Edgar; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Torres-Rodríguez, María de la Luz; Núñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruíz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus belongs to the genus Flavivirus, and its spread remains an international public health emergency. In this report, we describe the obtainment and molecular characterization of a complete viral genome through the direct metagenomic analysis from saliva from an autochthonous transmission case in Mexico. PMID:27491989

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated in Mexico, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Peña-Alonso, Rocío; Mendieta-Condado, Edgar; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Torres-Rodríguez, María de la Luz; Núñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruíz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-08-04

    Zika virus belongs to the genus Flavivirus, and its spread remains an international public health emergency. In this report, we describe the obtainment and molecular characterization of a complete viral genome through the direct metagenomic analysis from saliva from an autochthonous transmission case in Mexico.

  10. Sequence analysis of a soil-borne wheat mosaic virus isolate from Italy shows that it is the same virus as European wheat mosaic virus and Soil-borne rye mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The complete sequence of the two RNAs of a furovirus isolate fromdurum wheat in Italy was determined. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis were done to compare the Italian virus with Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) from the USA and with furovirus sequences recently published as European wheat mosaic virus (EWMV), from wheat in France, and Soil-borne rye mosaic virus (SBRMV), from rye and wheat in Germany. Over the entire genome, the Italian isolate RNA1 and RNA2 had respectively 97.5% and 98.6% nucleotide identity with EWMV, 95.5% and 85.8% with SBRMV-G and 70.6% and 64.5% with SBWMV. The Italian isolate was therefore clearly distinct from SBWMV. The European isolates all appear to belong to the same virus and the name Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus may resolve earlier ambiguities.

  11. Sequence analysis for the complete proviral genome of avian leukosis virus subgroup J associated with haemangiomas, leiomyosarcomas and myelomas in layer flocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yue; Sun, Honglei; Sun, Meiyu; Li, Delong; Qin, Liting; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei; Liu, Sidang

    2012-09-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) can cause a variety of neoplasms, including mainly myeloid leukosis (myelocytomatosis) and nephromas. Other tumours, such as histiocytic sarcoma (HS), haemangiosarcoma and mesothelioma, may also develop. In a previous article we described a case in which myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas and leiomyosarcomas appeared simultaneously in a commercial layer flock with infection by ALV-J. The present research was completed to understand the molecular characteristics of the ALV-J strain that induced clinical myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas and leiomyosarcomas. Two strains of ALV-J (SDAU1001 and SDAU1002) were isolated and identified, and their full-length sequences were analysed. The complete genome nucleotide sequences of these two isolates were different in length, 7652 nt and 7636 nt, respectively. They shared 98.9% identity with each other, and 93.4% to 97.8% nucleotide identity to the reference ALV-J isolates. A 19-nucleotide repeat sequence was identified in the primer binding site (PBS) leader region of isolate SDAU1001. A base substitution mutation (base 15 C-T) in this insertion was identified. However, the identical insertion at the same site was not found in SDAU1002. The gag and pol genes of the two viruses were more conserved than the env gene. One key deletion in the E element was a common feature of SDAU1001 and SDAU1002. SDAU1001 and SDAU1002, possibly recombinants of ALV-J and another avian retrovirus, may share the same ancestor. Co-infection by SDAU1001 and SDAU1002 isolates is a possible explanation why myeloid leukosis, haemangiomas, and leiomyosarcomas appeared simultaneously in the same commercial layer flock.

  12. A complete sequence and comparative analysis of a SARS-associated virus (Isolate BJ01)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The genome sequence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)-associated virus provides essential information for the identification of pathogen(s), exploration of etiology and evolution, interpretation of transmission and pathogenesis, development of diagnostics, prevention by future vaccination, and treatment by developing new drugs. We report the complete genome sequence and comparative analysis of an isolate (BJ01) of the coronavirus that has been recognized as a pathogen for SARS. The genome is 29725 nt in size and has 11 ORFs (Open Reading Frames). It is composed of a stable region encoding an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (composed of 2 ORFs) and a variable region representing 4 CDSs (coding sequences) for viral structural genes (the S, E, M, N proteins) and 5 PUPs (putative uncharacterized proteins). Its gene order is identical to that of other known coronaviruses. The sequence alignment with all known RNA viruses places this virus as a member in the family of Coronaviridae. Thirty putative substitutions have been identified by comparative analysis of the 5 SARS- associated virus genome sequences in GenBank. Fifteen of them lead to possible amino acid changes (non-synonymousmutations) in the proteins. Three amino acid changes, with predicted alteration of physical and chemical features, have been detected in the S protein that is postulated to be involved in the immunoreactions between the virus and its host. Two amino acid changes have been detected in the M protein, which could be related to viral envelope formation. Phylogenetic analysis suggests the possibility of non-human origin of the SARS-associated viruses but provides no evidence that they are man-made. Further efforts should focus on identifying the etiology of the SARS-associated virus and ruling out conclusively the existence of other possible SARS-related pathogen(s).

  13. Genome sequence of SG33 strain and recombination between wild-type and vaccine myxoma viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus-Bouclainville, Christelle; Gretillat, Magalie; Py, Robert; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Guérin, Jean Luc; Bertagnoli, Stéphane

    2011-04-01

    Myxomatosis in Europe is the result of the release of a South America strain of myxoma virus in 1952. Several attenuated strains with origins in South America or California have since been used as vaccines in the rabbit industry. We sequenced the genome of the SG33 myxoma virus vaccine strain and compared it with those of other myxoma virus strains. We show that SG33 genome carries a large deletion in its right end. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that the virus isolate from which SG33 is derived results from an in vivo recombination between a wild-type South America (Lausanne) strain and a California MSD-derived strain. These findings raise questions about the use of insufficiently attenuated virus in vaccination.

  14. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a Cactus virus X strain from Hylocereus undatus (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, M R; Chen, Y R; Liou, R F

    2004-05-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a strain of Cactus virus X (CVX-Hu) isolated from Hylocereus undatus (Cactaceae) has been determined. Excluding the poly(A) tail, the sequence is 6614 nucleotides in length and contains seven open reading frames (ORFs). The genome organization of CVX is similar to that of other potexviruses. ORF1 encodes the putative viral replicase with conserved methyltransferase, helicase, and polymerase motifs. Within ORF1, two other ORFs were located separately in the +2 reading frame, we call these ORF6 and ORF7. ORF2, 3, and 4, which form the "triple gene block" characteristic of the potexviruses, encode proteins with molecular mass of 25, 12, and 7 KDa, respectively. ORF5 encodes the coat protein with an estimated molecular mass of 24 KDa. Sequence analysis indicated that proteins encoded by ORF1-5 display certain degree of homology to the corresponding proteins of other potexviruses. Putative product of ORF6, however, shows no significant similarity to those of other potexviruses. Phylogenetic analyses based on the replicase (the methyltransferase, helicase, and polymerase domains) and coat protein demonstrated a closer relationship of CVX with Bamboo mosaic virus, Cassava common mosaic virus, Foxtail mosaic virus, Papaya mosaic virus, and Plantago asiatica mosaic virus.

  15. Nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis of a new potexvirus: Malva mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Fabien; Paré, Christine; Majeau, Nathalie; Bolduc, Marilène; Leblanc, Eric; Bergeron, Michel G; Bernardy, Michael G; Leclerc, Denis

    2008-01-01

    A filamentous virus isolated from Malva neglecta Wallr. (common mallow) and propagated in Chenopodium quinoa was grown, cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined (GenBank accession # DQ660333). The genomic RNA is 6858 nt in length and contains five major open reading frames (ORFs). The genomic organization is similar to members and the viral encoded proteins shared homology with the group of the Potexvirus genus in the Flexiviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship with narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), scallion virus X (ScaVX) and, to a lesser extent, to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX) and pepino mosaic virus (PepMV). A novel putative pseudoknot structure is predicted in the 3'-UTR of a subgroup of potexviruses, including this newly described virus. The consensus GAAAA sequence is detected at the 5'-end of the genomic RNA and experimental data strongly suggest that this motif could be a distinctive hallmark of this genus. The name Malva mosaic virus is proposed.

  16. [Kaposi sarcoma and HHV-8: a model of cutaneous cancer in immunosuppressed patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Nicolas; Deleuze, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The virus HHV-8 will celebrate its twentieth birthday by the end of this year and its relationships with Kaposi sarcoma are not completely elucidated. HHV-8 is an enigmatic virus, with an inhomogeneous distribution, a salivary transmission while it is not an ubiquitous virus, at least in western countries. However, HHV-8 has a unique genetic equipment rending is role in Kaposi sarcoma more than plausible. While the virus is necessary, it appears that it is not sufficient as the development of Kaposi sarcoma is frequently associated with immunosuppression whatever the cause (iatrogenic, viral, age-related). Kaposi sarcoma should be more considered as an opportunistic tumour than a viral-induced cancer and the best treatment for Kaposi sarcoma is immune restoration at least when it is possible.

  17. Protein sequences clustering of herpes virus by using Tribe Markov clustering (Tribe-MCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamam, A.; Siswantining, T.; Febriyani, N. L.; Novitasari, I. D.; Cahyaningrum, R. D.

    2017-07-01

    The herpes virus can be found anywhere and one of the important characteristics is its ability to cause acute and chronic infection at certain times so as a result of the infection allows severe complications occurred. The herpes virus is composed of DNA containing protein and wrapped by glycoproteins. In this work, the Herpes viruses family is classified and analyzed by clustering their protein-sequence using Tribe Markov Clustering (Tribe-MCL) algorithm. Tribe-MCL is an efficient clustering method based on the theory of Markov chains, to classify protein families from protein sequences using pre-computed sequence similarity information. We implement the Tribe-MCL algorithm using an open source program of R. We select 24 protein sequences of Herpes virus obtained from NCBI database. The dataset consists of three types of glycoprotein B, F, and H. Each type has eight herpes virus that infected humans. Based on our simulation using different inflation factor r=1.5, 2, 3 we find a various number of the clusters results. The greater the inflation factor the greater the number of their clusters. Each protein will grouped together in the same type of protein.

  18. From Conventional to Next Generation Sequencing of Epstein-Barr Virus Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Hin; Chiang, Alan Kwok Shing

    2016-02-24

    Genomic sequences of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) have been of interest because the virus is associated with cancers, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and conditions such as infectious mononucleosis. The progress of whole-genome EBV sequencing has been limited by the inefficiency and cost of the first-generation sequencing technology. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and target enrichment strategies, increasing number of EBV genomes has been published. These genomes were sequenced using different approaches, either with or without EBV DNA enrichment. This review provides an overview of the EBV genomes published to date, and a description of the sequencing technology and bioinformatic analyses employed in generating these sequences. We further explored ways through which the quality of sequencing data can be improved, such as using DNA oligos for capture hybridization, and longer insert size and read length in the sequencing runs. These advances will enable large-scale genomic sequencing of EBV which will facilitate a better understanding of the genetic variations of EBV in different geographic regions and discovery of potentially pathogenic variants in specific diseases.

  19. Full genome sequence of a peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) from Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundon, W G; Adombi, C; Waqas, A; Otsyina, H R; Arthur, C T; Silber, R; Loitsch, A; Diallo, A

    2014-12-01

    The full genome of a peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) isolated from a sheep lung sample collected in Ghana, Western Africa, in 2010, has been sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the virus clustered within the lineage II clade while comparison of its full genome with those of other PPRV strains revealed the highest identity (96.6 %) at a nucleotide level with the PPRV strain Nigeria/76/1. This is the first full genome sequence generated for a PPRV lineage II isolated since 1976.

  20. Detection of novel sequences related to african Swine Fever virus in human serum and sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Joy; Zhao, Guoyan; Presti, Rachel M; Holtz, Lori R; Finkbeiner, Stacy R; Droit, Lindsay; Villasana, Zoilmar; Todd, Collin; Pipas, James M; Calgua, Byron; Girones, Rosina; Wang, David; Virgin, Herbert W

    2009-12-01

    The family Asfarviridae contains only a single virus species, African swine fever virus (ASFV). ASFV is a viral agent with significant economic impact due to its devastating effects on populations of domesticated pigs during outbreaks but has not been reported to infect humans. We report here the discovery of novel viral sequences in human serum and sewage which are clearly related to the asfarvirus family but highly divergent from ASFV. Detection of these sequences suggests that greater genetic diversity may exist among asfarviruses than previously thought and raises the possibility that human infection by asfarviruses may occur.

  1. The prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 genotypes in Kaposi\\\\\\'s sarcoma in Iran by using molecular technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shah Siah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Mediterranean region , Kaposi's sarcoma (KS has a high prevalence especially in patients with AIDS. Iran is located close to the Mediterranean region and the HIV prevalence is increasing in our country . In some stages, Kaposi's sarcoma is morphologically similar to other vascular tumors. Owing to the presence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 in all cases of Kaposi's sarcoma , detection of virus DNA by PCR method can help in the identification of non-diagnostic cases. Moreover, the prevalence of HHV-8 genotypes is different in various regions of the world and in different races. There are limited studies performed on the HHV-8 genotypes in Iranian population. Methods: Patients with Kaposi's sarcoma from 2001 to 2011 who refer to Tehran Razi Hospital were enrolled in this study. HHV-8 DNA was extracted from paraffin blocks and amplification of the virus genome was performed by PCR method . Finally, the target DNA fragment was used for sequencing and genotype determination. Results: PCR was performed on 53 cases. In 8 cases with suspicious morphology, PCR was negative and they were excluded from study. Of remaining 45 cases, 35 had positive PCR results, 7 had negative results and 3 had low PCR product. Samples from 28 cases that had positive PCR results, which were acceptable for genotyping, were chosen for sequencing. Twenty cases had genotype C, 7 cases had genotype A and one case was negative. The results are consistent with other studies in our geographical area. No correlation was found between the different microscopic stages and HHV-8 Genotypes. Conclusion: Since the HHV-8 is obtained in almost 100% of KS lesions and PCR s ensitivity in detection of the virus is close to 100 %, KS diagnosis can be confirmed in suspicious cases by detection of HHV-8 DNA on paraffin blocks. Moreover the prevalence of HHV-8 genotype was determined in Iran.

  2. Sequence and crystallization of influenza virus B/Beijing/1/87 neuraminidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, W.P.; Daniels, R.S.; Dayan, S.; Gagnon, J.; Cusack, S.; Ruigrok, R.W. (EMBL Grenoble Outstation c/o ILL (France))

    1991-01-01

    Influenza B/Beijing/1/87 neuraminidase heads were isolated from virus via trypsin digestion and characterized by PAGE, N-terminal sequencing, electron microscopy, and enzyme activity. The heads were crystallized into two crystal forms; tetragonal plates, like other neuraminidase crystals described before, that diffract to medium resolution (3 A) and a new form consisting of trigonal prisms or needles that diffract to high resolution (at least 2 A). The gene segment coding for neuraminidase was sequenced and compared with the neuraminidase sequence of B/Lee/40. The deduced amino acid sequences for neuraminidase showed only a 7% difference, whereas those for the NB proteins differed by 20%.

  3. Stages of Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor that forms from a certain kind of cell in bone or soft tissue . Ewing sarcoma may be found in the bones of the legs, arms, feet, hands, chest , pelvis , spine , or skull . Ewing sarcoma also may be found in the soft tissue of the trunk, arms, legs, head and neck, abdominal cavity , or ...

  4. Breast sarcomas. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Ryabchikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an overview of the literature about breast sarcomas (nonepithelial malignances. Primary sarcomas are extremely rare, with less than 1 % of all malignant tumors of the breast. Breast carcinomas cause an increased interest of the scientists due to their unique clinical and pathological features and unpredictable prognosis.

  5. Biological characterization and complete nucleotide sequence of a Tunisian isolate of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoubi, S; Desbiez, C; Fakhfakh, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Marrakchi, M; Lecoq, H

    2008-01-01

    During a survey conducted in October 2005, cucurbit leaf samples showing virus-like symptoms were collected from the major cucurbit-growing areas in Tunisia. DAS-ELISA showed the presence of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV, Potyvirus), detected for the first time in Tunisia, in samples from the region of Cap Bon (Northern Tunisia). MWMV isolate TN05-76 (MWMV-Tn) was characterized biologically and its full-length genome sequence was established. MWMV-Tn was found to have biological properties similar to those reported for the MWMV type strain from Morocco. Phylogenetic analysis including the comparison of complete amino-acid sequences of 42 potyviruses confirmed that MWMV-Tn is related (65% amino-acid sequence identity) to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolates but is a member of a distinct virus species. Sequence analysis on parts of the CP gene of MWMV isolates from different geographical origins revealed some geographic structure of MWMV variability, with three different clusters: one cluster including isolates from the Mediterranean region, a second including isolates from western and central Africa, and a third one including isolates from the southern part of Africa. A significant correlation was observed between geographic and genetic distances between isolates. Isolates from countries in the Mediterranean region where MWMV has recently emerged (France, Spain, Portugal) have highly conserved sequences, suggesting that they may have a common and recent origin. MWMV from Sudan, a highly divergent variant, may be considered an evolutionary intermediate between MWMV and PRSV.

  6. Full Genome Sequence and sfRNA Interferon Antagonist Activity of Zika Virus from Recife, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezelj, Veronica V.; Clark, Jordan J.; Cordeiro, Marli T.; Freitas de Oliveira França, Rafael; Pena, Lindomar J.; Wilkie, Gavin S.; Da Silva Filipe, Ana; Davis, Christopher; Hughes, Joseph; Varjak, Margus; Selinger, Martin; Zuvanov, Luíza; Owsianka, Ania M.; Patel, Arvind H.; McLauchlan, John; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Fall, Gamou; Sall, Amadou A.; Biek, Roman; Rehwinkel, Jan; Schnettler, Esther; Kohl, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background The outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas has transformed a previously obscure mosquito-transmitted arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family into a major public health concern. Little is currently known about the evolution and biology of ZIKV and the factors that contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Determining genomic sequences of clinical viral isolates and characterization of elements within these are an important prerequisite to advance our understanding of viral replicative processes and virus-host interactions. Methodology/Principal findings We obtained a ZIKV isolate from a patient who presented with classical ZIKV-associated symptoms, and used high throughput sequencing and other molecular biology approaches to determine its full genome sequence, including non-coding regions. Genome regions were characterized and compared to the sequences of other isolates where available. Furthermore, we identified a subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) in ZIKV-infected cells that has antagonist activity against RIG-I induced type I interferon induction, with a lesser effect on MDA-5 mediated action. Conclusions/Significance The full-length genome sequence including non-coding regions of a South American ZIKV isolate from a patient with classical symptoms will support efforts to develop genetic tools for this virus. Detection of sfRNA that counteracts interferon responses is likely to be important for further understanding of pathogenesis and virus-host interactions. PMID:27706161

  7. Fusion protein gene nucleotide sequence similarities, shared antigenic sites and phylogenetic analysis suggest that phocid distemper virus 2 and canine distemper virus belong to the same virus entity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.K.G. Visser (Ilona); R.W.J. van der Heijden (Roger); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); M.J.H. Kenter (Marcel); C. Örvell; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide sequencing of the fusion protein (F) gene of phocid distemper virus-2 (PDV-2), recently isolated from Baikal seals (Phoca sibirica), revealed an open reading frame (nucleotides 84 to 2075) with two potential in-frame ATG translation initiation codons. We suggest that the secon

  8. Evaluation of fusion protein cleavage site sequences of Newcastle disease virus in genotype matched vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Chen, Zongyan; Yoshida, Asuka; Paldurai, Anandan; Xiao, Sa; Samal, Siba K

    2017-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes a devastating poultry disease worldwide. Frequent outbreaks of NDV in chickens vaccinated with conventional live vaccines suggest a need to develop new vaccines that are genetically matched against circulating NDV strains, such as the genotype V virulent strains currently circulating in Mexico and Central America. In this study, a reverse genetics system was developed for the virulent NDV strain Mexico/01/10 strain and used to generate highly attenuated vaccine candidates by individually modifying the cleavage site sequence of fusion (F) protein. The cleavage site sequence of parental virus was individually changed to those of the avirulent NDV strain LaSota and other serotypes of avian paramyxoviruses (APMV serotype-2, -3, -4, -6, -7, -8, and -9). In general, these mutations affected cell-to-cell fusion activity in vitro and the efficiency of the F protein cleavage and made recombinant Mexico/01/10 (rMex) virus highly attenuated in chickens. When chickens were immunized with the rMex mutant viruses and challenged with the virulent parent virus, there was reduced challenge virus shedding compared to birds immunized with the heterologous vaccine strain LaSota. Among the vaccine candidates, rMex containing the cleavage site sequence of APMV-2 induced the highest neutralizing antibody titer and completely protected chickens from challenge virus shedding. These results show the role of the F protein cleavage site sequence of each APMV type in generating genotype V-matched vaccines and the efficacy of matched vaccine strains to provide better protection against NDV strains currently circulating in Mexico.

  9. Extraosseous Osteogenic Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Ying Lin

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Extraosseous osteogenic sarcoma is a very rare malignant neoplasm. Out of the more than 400 cases of soft tissue sarcomas on file in our hospital, only 2 were extraosseous osteogenic sarcomas. Both were situated in the thigh. The first case was initially diagnosed as a hematoma and treated by marginal excision. The diagnosis of high-grade osteosarcoma primarily arising in soft tissue was made from histopathologic examination. Radiotherapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was given postoperatively. The second patient, primarily diagnosed as having a soft tissue sarcoma, was treated by wide excision. The final pathologic report was high-grade extraosseous osteogenic sarcoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given postoperatively. Both patients are alive without local recurrence and distant metastasis at postoperative 90-month and 107-month follow-up, respectively.

  10. Sequence diversity and virulence in Zea mays of Maize streak virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D P; Willment, J A; Billharz, R; Velders, R; Odhiambo, B; Njuguna, J; James, D; Rybicki, E P

    2001-09-30

    Full genomic sequences were determined for 12 Maize streak virus (MSV) isolates obtained from Zea mays and wild grass species. These and 10 other publicly available full-length sequences were used to classify a total of 66 additional MSV isolates that had been characterized by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and/or partial nucleotide sequence analysis. A description is given of the host and geographical distribution of the MSV strain and subtype groupings identified. The relationship between the genotypes of 21 fully sequenced virus isolates and their virulence in differentially MSV-resistant Z. mays genotypes was examined. Within the only MSV strain grouping that produced severe symptoms in maize, highly virulent and widely distributed genotypes were identified that are likely to pose the most serious threat to maize production in Africa. Evidence is presented that certain of the isolates investigated may be the products of either intra- or interspecific recombination.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Influenza Virus H9N2 Associated with a Fatal Outbreak among Chickens in Dubai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Siu-Ying; Joseph, Sunitha; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chen, Honglin; Patteril, Nissy Annie Gerogy; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Muhammed, Rubeena; Baskar, Vijay; Lau, Susanna K P; Kinne, Joerg; Wernery, Ulrich; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-08-18

    We report the complete genome sequence of influenza virus H9N2 associated with a fatal outbreak among chickens in Dubai. All segments are clustered with avian H9N2 viruses circulating in the Middle East but distinct from those in southeast Asia. It is not a reassortant virus or transmitted from other regions.

  12. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin Barfred; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within...... adaptation and to identify key determinants of viral replication efficiency in cells and within host animals....

  13. Trial of Dasatinib in Advanced Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Rhabdomyosarcoma; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors; Chondrosarcoma; Sarcoma, Ewing's; Sarcoma, Alveolar Soft Part; Chordoma; Epithelioid Sarcoma; Giant Cell Tumor of Bone; Hemangiopericytoma; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST)

  14. Comparison of two Next Generation sequencing platforms for full genome sequencing of Classical Swine Fever Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Höper, Dirk;

    2013-01-01

    . In this study, we analyzed NGS data of virus rescued from a CSFV C-strain vaccine strain cDNA clone. The virus analyzed was obtained from a 4th and a 12th passage of rescued virus in SFT cell culture, which had shown a difference in growth kinetics between the passages, and NGS analysis was chosen in order...... to look for molecular differences. Identical RT-PCR products were run on both GS FLX and an Iontorrent PGM platform for comparison. The NGS data was compared by quality and the percentage mapped reads. Results showed good quality of reads for both platforms and a close to 100% of the reads mapped...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence and Phylogenetic Relatedness of Hepatitis B Virus Isolates in Papua, Indonesia▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Yano, Yoshihiko; Nugrahaputra, Victor Eka; Amin, Mochamad; Juniastuti,; Soetjipto; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Hotta, Hak

    2009-01-01

    Each hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype and subgenotype is associated with a particular geographic distribution, ethnicity, and anthropological history. Our previous study showed the novel HBV subgenotypes C6 (HBV/C6) and D6 (HBV/D6), based on the S gene sequences of isolates in Papua, Indonesia. The present study investigated the complete genome sequence of 22 strains from Papua and subjected them to molecular evolutionary analysis. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that 9 out of 22 strains wer...

  16. Complete Genome Sequencing of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 1, Subgenotypes 1n and 1o.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Asuka; Tateishi, Kentaro; Shinohara, Minami; Naoi, Yuki; Shiokawa, Mai; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Keitaro; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Shirai, Junsuke; Nagai, Makoto

    2016-02-18

    To gain further insight into the genomic features of bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) subgenotypes, we sequenced the complete genome of BVDV-1n Shitara/02/06 and BVDV-1o IS26NCP/01. The complete genome of Shitara/02/06 and IS26NCP/01 shared 77.7 to 79.3% and 78.0 to 85.7% sequence identities with other BVDV-1 subgenotype strains, respectively.

  17. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongyoung; Richards, Stephanie L; Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Smartt, Chelsea T

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL), including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW), FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI) and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs.

  18. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyoung Shin

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL, including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1 and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW, FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs.

  19. Genome sequence of erythromelalgia-related poxvirus identifies it as an ectromelia virus strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge D Mendez-Rios

    Full Text Available Erythromelagia is a condition characterized by attacks of burning pain and inflammation in the extremeties. An epidemic form of this syndrome occurs in secondary students in rural China and a virus referred to as erythromelalgia-associated poxvirus (ERPV was reported to have been recovered from throat swabs in 1987. Studies performed at the time suggested that ERPV belongs to the orthopoxvirus genus and has similarities with ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox. We have determined the complete genome sequence of ERPV and demonstrated that it has 99.8% identity to the Naval strain of ectromelia virus and a slighly lower identity to the Moscow strain. Small DNA deletions in the Naval genome that are absent from ERPV may suggest that the sequenced strain of Naval was not the immediate progenitor of ERPV.

  20. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of the gp41 Gene of Clanis bilineata Nuclear Polyhedrosis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shan-ying; WANG Wen-bing; ZHU Jiang

    2006-01-01

    Clanis bilineata Nucleo Polyhedro Virus (CbNPV) was purified from Clanis bilineata larva. To obtain the molecular information of the virus, the genomic DNA of CbNPV was extracted, and a DNA fragment library of the virus was constructed using shotgun. The positive clones were then sequenced and analyzed. An open-reading frame (ORF) that has high identity with the gp41 gene of most NPVs was found in the library. The gp41 gene of CbNPV is 933 base pair long and encodes a protein of 310 amino acids. The result of the amino acid sequence analysis showed that the CbNPV gp41 has 53-61 and 56-73% identities with Group Ⅰ and Ⅱ NPVs gp41 proteins, respectively. The result indicates that the isolated CbNPV is a novel baculovirus, and the CbNPV shares a much closer relationship with Group Ⅱ NPVs.

  1. Comparison of reverse hybridization, microarray, and sequence analysis for genotyping hepatitis B virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, Suzan D; Tran, Nathalie; de Man, Robert A; Burghoorn-Maas, C; Vernet, Guy; Niesters, Hubert G M

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotyping has become important in epidemiological and clinical diagnoses, given the relationship between the viral genotype and the progression of disease or the appearance of antiviral resistance. Since genotyping by sequence and phylogenetic analyses is not convenient in t

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the WHO International Standard for Hepatitis B Virus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Adrian; Minhas, Rehan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   The World Health Organization (WHO) international standard (IS) for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA for use in nucleic acid amplification assays was characterized by determining the complete genome sequence, which was assigned genotype A. This information will aid the design, development, and evaluation of HBV DNA amplification assays. PMID:28209818

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Variant CH/HNYF/2014

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Renfeng; Tian, Xiangqin; Qiao, Songlin; Guo, Junqing; Xie, Weitao; Zhang, Gaiping

    2015-01-01

    Sow’s milk is a potential route for the vertical transmission of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) from sow to suckling piglet. We report here the complete genome sequence of PEDV strain CH/HNYF/2014, which was isolated from milk samples. This information provides further understanding of the transmission mechanisms and genetic diversity of PEDV.

  4. Genome Sequence of Bluetongue virus Serotype 17 Isolated in Brazil in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Ana Carolina Diniz; Rosa, Júlio César Câmara; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Guimarães, Lorena Lima Barbosa; Costa, Érica Azevedo; Guedes, Maria Isabel Maldonado Coelho; Driemeier, David; Lobato, Zélia Inês Portela; Mertens, Peter Paul Clement

    2016-10-27

    The complete genome sequence of Bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 17 strain 17/BRA/2014/73, isolated from a sheep in Brazil in 2014, is reported here. All segments clustered with western topotype strains and indicated reassortment events with other BTV from the Americas. The strain 17/BRA/2014/73 represents a novel reference strain for BTV-17 from South America.

  5. Alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus isolates contain additional sequences in the RNA 3 segment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.K.; Prins, M.W.; Derks, A.F.L.M.; Langeveld, S.A.; Goldbach, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    The coat protein (CP) genes and flanking regions of three alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus isolates (CMV-ALS), denoted ALS-LBO, ALS-IPO, and ALS-NAK, were cloned and their nucleotide sequence determined and compared at both nucleic acid and deduced protein level with the published sequen

  6. Complete genome sequences of two highly divergent Japanese isolates of Plantago asiatica mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komatsu, Ken; Yamashita, Kazuo; Sugawara, Kota; Verbeek, Martin; Fujita, Naoko; Hanada, Kaoru; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Fuji, Shin Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV) is a member of the genus Potexvirus and has an exceptionally wide host range. It causes severe damage to lilies. Here we report on the complete nucleotide sequences of two new Japanese PlAMV isolates, one from the eudicot weed Viola grypoceras (PlAMV-Vi), and t

  7. Complete genome sequence of genotype VI Newcastle disease viruses isolated from pigeons in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two complete genome sequences of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are described here. Virulent isolates pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/21A/2015 and pigeon/Pakistan/Lahore/25A/2015 were obtained from racing pigeons sampled in the Pakistani province of Punjab during 2015. Phylogenetic analysis of the fusion prot...

  8. Complete genome sequence of a recent panzootic virulent Newcastle disease virus from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complete genome sequence of a new strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) (chicken/Pak/Lahore-611/2013) is reported. The strain was isolated from a vaccinated chicken flock in Pakistan in 2013 and has panzootic features. The genome is 15192 nucleotides in length and is classified as sub-genotype V...

  9. Guiding outbreak management by the use of influenza A(H7Nx) virus sequence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonges, M.; Meijer, A.; Fouchier, R.A.M.; Koch, G.; Li, J.; Pan, J.C.; Shu, Y.L.; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Chen, H.

    2013-01-01

    The recently identified human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses in China raise important questions regarding possible source and risk to humans. Sequence comparison with an influenza A(H7N7) outbreak in the Netherlands in 2003 and an A(H7N1) epidemic in Italy in 1999–2000 suggests that

  10. Guiding outbreak management by the use of influenza a(H7NX) virus sequence analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jonges (Marcel); A. Meijer (Adam); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G. Koch (Guus); J. Li; J.C. Pan; H. Chen (Hong); Y.L. Shu (Yue-Long); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe recently identified human infections with avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses in China raise important questions regarding possible source and risk to humans. Sequence comparison with an influenza A(H7N7) outbreak in the Netherlands in 2003 and an A(H7N1) epidemic in Italy in 1999-2000 s

  11. Identification and complete genome sequence analysis of a genotype XIV Newcastle disease virus from Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus from genotype XIV is reported here. Strain duck/Nigeria/NG-695/KG.LOM.11-16/2009 was isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck from a live bird market in Kogi State, Nigeria, in 2009. This strain is classified as a m...

  12. Evidence for a Complex Mosaic Genome Pattern in a Full-length Hepatitis C Virus Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Ross

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the hepatitis C virus (HCV exhibits a high genetic variability. This remarkable heterogeneity is mainly attributed to the gradual accumulation of mutational changes, whereas the contribution of recombination events to the evolution of HCV remains controversial so far. While performing phylogenetic analyses including a large number of sequences deposited in the GenBank, we encountered a full-length HCV sequence (AY651061 that showed evidence for inter-subtype recombination and was, therefore, subjected to a detailed analysis of its molecular structure. The obtained results indicated that AY651061 does not represent a “simple” HCV 1c isolate, but a complex 1a/1c mosaic genome, showing five putative breakpoints in the core to NS3 regions. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a mosaic HCV full- length sequence with multiple breakpoints. The molecular structure of AY651061 is reminiscent of complex homologous recombinant variants occurring among other members of the flaviviridae family, e.g. GB virus C, dengue virus, and Japanese encephalitis virus. Our finding of a mosaic HCV sequence may have important implications for many fields of current HCV research which merit careful consideration.

  13. Extensive sequence divergence among bovine respiratory syncytial viruses isolated during recurrent outbreaks in closed herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    2000-01-01

    . It is possible that a quasispecies variant swarm of BRSV persisted in some of the calves in each herd and that a new and different highly fit virus type (master and consensus sequence) became dominant and spread from a single animal in connection with each new outbreak. Based on the high level of diversity...

  14. Alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus isolates contain additional sequences in the RNA 3 segment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.K.; Prins, M.W.; Derks, A.F.L.M.; Langeveld, S.A.; Goldbach, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    The coat protein (CP) genes and flanking regions of three alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus isolates (CMV-ALS), denoted ALS-LBO, ALS-IPO, and ALS-NAK, were cloned and their nucleotide sequence determined and compared at both nucleic acid and deduced protein level with the published

  15. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member of the Family Potyviridae with an Unusually Long Leader Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides excluding the 3’-polyadenylated tail. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the ‘hall-mark proteins’ of potyviruses including a s...

  16. Complete genome sequence analysis of two Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV) isolates from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhen; LI Zhong-an; LIU Ke-hong; ZHOU Chang-yong

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand molecular characterization of Citrus tatter leaf virus (CTLV) isolated from China, ful-length cDNAs of CTLV-MTH and CTLV-XHC from Citrus reticulata and Citrus sinensis were cloned and sequenced based on whole-genome ampliifcation by RT-PCR. The complete nucleotide sequences of CTLV-MTH and CTLV-XHC were determined to be 6 497 nucleotides in length and shared 79.9–91.0%and 78.8–98.0%nucleotide sequence identity, respectively, with other Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) or CTLV strains available in GenBank. Unexpectedly, CTLV-MTH showed the highest nucleo-tide sequence identity (91%) with an apple isolate of ASGV, fol owed by 86.5%with ASGV-HH and 85.7%with ASGV-CHN. Furthermore, CTLV-MTH and three ASGV strains were grouped to a separate cluster in the phylogenetic tree, suggesting it has a closer relationship to ASGV than to CTLV. Therefore, it can be concluded roughly that CTLV may be not a distinct strains of ASGV. We proposed that Citrus tatter leaf virus should be renamed Apple stem grooving virus.

  17. RNA sequence and transcriptional properties of the 3' end of the Newcastle disease virus genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilla, M.G.; Stone, H.O.; Keene, J.D.

    1985-09-01

    The 3' end of the genomic RNA of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been sequenced and the leader RNA defined. Using hybridization to a 3'-end-labeled genome, leader RNA species from in vitro transcription reactions and from infected cell extracts were found to be 47 and 53 nucleotides long. In addition, the start site of the 3'-proximal mRNA was determined by sequence analysis of in vitro (beta-32P)GTP-labeled transcription products. The genomic sequence extending beyond the leader region demonstrated an open reading frame for at least 42 amino acids and probably represents the amino terminus of the nucleocapsid protein (NP). The terminal 8 nucleotides of the NDV genome were identical to those of measles virus and Sendai virus while the sequence of the distal half of the leader region was more similar to that of vesicular stomatitis virus. These data argue for strong evolutionary relatedness between the paramyxovirus and rhabdovirus groups.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolate from an Outbreak in Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Polakshee; Morla, Sudhir; Kaore, Megha; Kurkure, Nitin Vasantrao

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain NDV/Chicken/Nagpur/01/12 was isolated from vaccinated chicken farms in India during outbreaks in 2012. The genome is 15,192 nucleotides in length and is classified as genotype VII in class II. PMID:25593257

  19. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, S.; Carrera, J.; Pullan, S. T.; Lewandowski, K.; Paz, V.; Loman, N.; Quick, J.; Bonsall, D.; Powell, R.; Thézé, J.; Pybus, O. G.; Klenerman, P.; Eisenberg, J.; Coloma, J.; Carroll, M. W.; Trueba, G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador. PMID:28232448

  20. Identification of sequence motifs involved in Dengue virus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnet Mary, J; Paramasivan, R; Shenbagarathai, R

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne virus infection, which remains a serious global public health problem. As there is no specific treatment or commercial vaccine available for effective control of the disease, the attempts on developing novel control strategies are underway. Viruses utilize the surface receptor proteins of host to enter into the cells. Though various proteins were said to be receptors of Dengue virus (DENV) using Virus Overlay Protein Binding Assay, the precise interaction between DENV and host is not explored. Understanding the structural features of domain III envelope glycoprotein would help in developing efficient antiviral inhibitors. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify the sequence motifs present in domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus. Computational analysis revealed that the NGR motif is present in the domain III envelope glycoprotein of DENV-1 and DENV-3. Similarly, DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-4 were found to contain Yxxphi motif which is a tyrosine-based sorting signal responsible for the interaction with a mu subunit of adaptor protein complex. High-throughput virtual screening resulted in five compounds as lead molecules based on glide score, which ranges from -4.664 to -6.52 kcal/Mol. This computational prediction provides an additional tool for understanding the virus-host interactions and helps to identify potential targets in the host. Further, experimental evidence is warranted to confirm the virus-host interactions and also inhibitory activity of reported lead compounds.

  1. Sequences locating the 5' ends of the major simian virus 40 late mRNA forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, M; Ghosh, P K; Norkin, L C; Weissman, S M

    1983-01-01

    The 5' sequences of late mRNA specified by several constructed or naturally occurring deletion or duplication mutants of simian virus 40 were examined. The mutants included viruses with various small deletions centered about 25 nucleotides upstream from the major transcription initiation site, as well as viruses containing tandem duplications of a sequence of 50 nucleotides or less embedding the major transcription initiation site. The results show that the sequences 25 to 30 nucleotides upstream from the major initiation site in the position of the TATA box of other polymerase II promoters are not essential for the precise localization of the initiation site of late mRNA. Rather, we deduce that the major late mRNA start site is determined primarily by sequences located very close to the initiation site, and that the relative abundance of the 5' ends with this initiation site is modulated by nearby downstream sequences. Modification of six nucleotides adjacent upstream to the initiation site almost completely prevents the utilization of this site. Various deletions and substitutions of sequences 21 nucleotides or more downstream from the major initiation site causes upstream shifts in the localization of the most abundantly utilized 5' ends. The sequences immediately downstream from the major simian virus 40 initiation sites contain inverted symmetries that could give rise to secondary structures in either single-stranded DNA or RNA; the possibility that these inverted symmetries function in transcription initiation at the level of DNA structure rather than in RNA stabilization is discussed. Finally, we present additional evidence that precursor species with certain 5' termini are selectively spliced to form 19S RNA, whereas other 5' termini are preferred for forming the 16S RNA splice. We discuss the possibility that this is a consequence of the influence of leader structure on downstream splicing events. Images PMID:6194314

  2. The Danish Sarcoma Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen PH

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peter Holmberg Jørgensen,1 Gunnar Schwarz Lausten,2 Alma B Pedersen3 1Tumor Section, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Tumor Section, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim: The aim of the database is to gather information about sarcomas treated in Denmark in order to continuously monitor and improve the quality of sarcoma treatment in a local, a national, and an international perspective. Study population: Patients in Denmark diagnosed with a sarcoma, both skeletal and ekstraskeletal, are to be registered since 2009. Main variables: The database contains information about appearance of symptoms; date of receiving referral to a sarcoma center; date of first visit; whether surgery has been performed elsewhere before referral, diagnosis, and treatment; tumor characteristics such as location, size, malignancy grade, and growth pattern; details on treatment (kind of surgery, amount of radiation therapy, type and duration of chemotherapy; complications of treatment; local recurrence and metastases; and comorbidity. In addition, several quality indicators are registered in order to measure the quality of care provided by the hospitals and make comparisons between hospitals and with international standards. Descriptive data: Demographic patient-specific data such as age, sex, region of living, comorbidity, World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases – tenth edition codes and TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, and date of death (after yearly coupling to the Danish Civil Registration System. Data quality and completeness are currently secured. Conclusion: The Danish Sarcoma Database is population based and includes sarcomas occurring in Denmark since 2009. It is a valuable tool for monitoring sarcoma incidence and quality of treatment and its improvement, postoperative

  3. Exploring the potential of next-generation sequencing in detection of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prachayangprecha, Slinporn; Schapendonk, Claudia M E; Koopmans, Marion P; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Schürch, Anita C; Pas, Suzan D; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Poovorawan, Yong; Haagmans, Bart L; Smits, Saskia L

    2014-10-01

    Efficient detection of human respiratory viral pathogens is crucial in the management of patients with acute respiratory tract infection. Sequence-independent amplification of nucleic acids combined with next-generation sequencing technology and bioinformatics analyses is a promising strategy for identifying pathogens in clinical and public health settings. It allows the characterization of hundreds of different known pathogens simultaneously and of novel pathogens that elude conventional testing. However, major hurdles for its routine use exist, including cost, turnaround time, and especially sensitivity of the assay, as the detection limit is dependent on viral load, host genetic material, and sequencing depth. To obtain insights into these aspects, we analyzed nasopharyngeal aspirates from a cohort of 81 Thai children with respiratory disease for the presence of respiratory viruses using a sequence-independent next-generation sequencing approach and routinely used diagnostic real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (real-time RT-PCR) assays. With respect to the detection of rhinovirus and human metapneumovirus, the next-generation sequencing approach was at least as sensitive as diagnostic real-time RT-PCR in this small cohort, whereas for bocavirus and enterovirus, next-generation sequencing was less sensitive than real-time RT-PCR. The advantage of the sequencing approach over real-time RT-PCR was the immediate availability of virus-typing information. Considering the development of platforms capable of generating more output data at declining costs, next-generation sequencing remains of interest for future virus diagnosis in clinical and public health settings and certainly as an additional tool when screening results from real-time RT-PCR are negative.

  4. MG-Digger: An Automated Pipeline to Search for Giant Virus-Related Sequences in Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verneau, Jonathan; Levasseur, Anthony; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard; Colson, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The number of metagenomic studies conducted each year is growing dramatically. Storage and analysis of such big data is difficult and time-consuming. Interestingly, analysis shows that environmental and human metagenomes include a significant amount of non-annotated sequences, representing a 'dark matter.' We established a bioinformatics pipeline that automatically detects metagenome reads matching query sequences from a given set and applied this tool to the detection of sequences matching large and giant DNA viral members of the proposed order Megavirales or virophages. A total of 1,045 environmental and human metagenomes (≈ 1 Terabase) were collected, processed, and stored on our bioinformatics server. In addition, nucleotide and protein sequences from 93 Megavirales representatives, including 19 giant viruses of amoeba, and 5 virophages, were collected. The pipeline was generated by scripts written in Python language and entitled MG-Digger. Metagenomes previously found to contain megavirus-like sequences were tested as controls. MG-Digger was able to annotate 100s of metagenome sequences as best matching those of giant viruses. These sequences were most often found to be similar to phycodnavirus or mimivirus sequences, but included reads related to recently available pandoraviruses, Pithovirus sibericum, and faustoviruses. Compared to other tools, MG-Digger combined stand-alone use on Linux or Windows operating systems through a user-friendly interface, implementation of ready-to-use customized metagenome databases and query sequence databases, adjustable parameters for BLAST searches, and creation of output files containing selected reads with best match identification. Compared to Metavir 2, a reference tool in viral metagenome analysis, MG-Digger detected 8% more true positive Megavirales-related reads in a control metagenome. The present work shows that massive, automated and recurrent analyses of metagenomes are effective in improving knowledge about the

  5. MG-Digger: an automated pipeline to search for giant virus-related sequences in metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eVerneau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of metagenomic studies conducted each year is growing dramatically. Storage and analysis of such big data is difficult and time-consuming. Interestingly, analysis shows that environmental and human metagenomes include a significant amount of non-annotated sequences, representing a ‘dark matter’. We established a bioinformatics pipeline that automatically detects metagenome reads matching query sequences from a given set and applied this tool to the detection of sequences matching large and giant DNA viral members of the proposed order Megavirales or virophages. A total of 1,045 environmental and human metagenomes (≈ 1 Terabase pairs were collected, processed and stored on our bioinformatics server. In addition, nucleotide and protein sequences from 93 Megavirales representatives, including 19 giant viruses of amoeba, and five virophages, were collected. The pipeline was generated by scripts written in Python language and entitled MG-Digger. Metagenomes previously found to contain megavirus-like sequences were tested as controls. MG-Digger was able to annotate hundreds of metagenome sequences as best matching those of giant viruses. These sequences were most often found to be similar to phycodnavirus or mimivirus sequences, but included reads related to recently available pandoraviruses, Pithovirus sibericum, and faustoviruses. Compared to other tools, MG-Digger combined stand-alone use on Linux or Windows operating systems through a user-friendly interface, implementation of ready-to-use customized metagenome databases and query sequence databases, adjustable parameters for BLAST searches, and creation of output files containing selected reads with best match identification. Compared to Metavir 2, a reference tool in viral metagenome analysis, MG-Digger detected 8% more true positive Megavirales-related reads in a control metagenome. The present work shows that massive, automated and recurrent analyses of metagenomes are

  6. Profile hidden Markov models for the detection of viruses within metagenomic sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Skewes-Cox

    Full Text Available Rapid, sensitive, and specific virus detection is an important component of clinical diagnostics. Massively parallel sequencing enables new diagnostic opportunities that complement traditional serological and PCR based techniques. While massively parallel sequencing promises the benefits of being more comprehensive and less biased than traditional approaches, it presents new analytical challenges, especially with respect to detection of pathogen sequences in metagenomic contexts. To a first approximation, the initial detection of viruses can be achieved simply through alignment of sequence reads or assembled contigs to a reference database of pathogen genomes with tools such as BLAST. However, recognition of highly divergent viral sequences is problematic, and may be further complicated by the inherently high mutation rates of some viral types, especially RNA viruses. In these cases, increased sensitivity may be achieved by leveraging position-specific information during the alignment process. Here, we constructed HMMER3-compatible profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs from all the virally annotated proteins in RefSeq in an automated fashion using a custom-built bioinformatic pipeline. We then tested the ability of these viral profile HMMs ("vFams" to accurately classify sequences as viral or non-viral. Cross-validation experiments with full-length gene sequences showed that the vFams were able to recall 91% of left-out viral test sequences without erroneously classifying any non-viral sequences into viral protein clusters. Thorough reanalysis of previously published metagenomic datasets with a set of the best-performing vFams showed that they were more sensitive than BLAST for detecting sequences originating from more distant relatives of known viruses. To facilitate the use of the vFams for rapid detection of remote viral homologs in metagenomic data, we provide two sets of vFams, comprising more than 4,000 vFams each, in the HMMER3

  7. Deep Sequencing Reveals the Complete Genome and Evidence for Transcriptional Activity of the First Virus-Like Sequences Identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Villacreses

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1. High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs: ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%–73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV, Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP; ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs, AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq. Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant.

  8. Deep sequencing reveals the complete genome and evidence for transcriptional activity of the first virus-like sequences identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacreses, Javier; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Sánchez, Carolina; Hewstone, Nicole; Undurraga, Soledad F; Alzate, Juan F; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Polanco, Victor

    2015-04-03

    Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1). High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs): ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%-73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV), Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP); ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT) and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs), AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq). Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant.

  9. The first complete sequence and genome structure of daphne virus Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igori, Davaajargal; Hwang, Un Sun; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-10-01

    From Daphne odora Thunb., an ornamental shrub in the Republic of Korea, a potyvirus was identified that has an RNA genome of 9,448 nucleotides (excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail) encoding a polyprotein of 3,065 amino acids, with nine putative protease cleavage sites producing ten proteins. Since this potyvirus shared the highest nucleotide sequence identity (91 %; query coverage 5 %) with the available partial sequence of daphne virus Y (DVY) from New Zealand (EU179854), it was considered a Korean isolate of DVY. This is the first molecular characterization of the complete genome sequence of a DVY isolate.

  10. Umatilla virus genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis: identification of stretch lagoon orbivirus as a new member of the Umatilla virus species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha N Belaganahalli

    Full Text Available The genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae, includes 22 species of viruses with genomes composed of ten segments of linear dsRNA that are transmitted between their vertebrate hosts by insects or ticks, or with no identified vectors. Full-genome sequence data are available for representative isolates of the insect borne mammalian orbiviruses (including bluetongue virus, as well as a tick borne avian orbivirus (Great Island virus. However, no sequence data are as yet available for the mosquito borne avian orbiviruses.We report full-length, whole-genome sequence data for Umatilla virus (UMAV, a mosquito borne avian orbivirus from the USA, which belongs to the species Umatilla virus. Comparisons of conserved genome segments 1, 2 and 8 (Seg-1, Seg-2 and Seg-8 - encoding the polymerase-VP1, sub-core 'T2' protein and core-surface 'T13' protein, respectively, show that UMAV groups with the mosquito transmitted mammalian orbiviruses. The highest levels of sequence identity were detected between UMAV and Stretch Lagoon orbivirus (SLOV from Australia, showing that they belong to the same virus species (with nt/aa identity of 76.04%/88.07% and 77.96%/95.36% in the polymerase and T2 genes and protein, respectively. The data presented here has assisted in identifying the SLOV as a member of the Umatilla serogroup. This sequence data reported here will also facilitate identification of new isolates, and epidemiological studies of viruses belonging to the species Umatilla virus.

  11. Nucleotide sequences of two Korean isolates of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Min; Lee, Jung-Myung; Yim, Kyu-Ock; Oh, Man-Ho; Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2003-12-31

    The nucleotide sequences of the genomic RNAs of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus Korean watermelon isolate (CGMMV-KW) and Korean oriental melon isolate (CGMMV-KOM) were determined and compared to the sequences of other tobamoviruses including CGMMV strains W and SH. Each CGMMV isolate had a genome of 6,424 nucleotides. Each also had 60 and 176 nucleotides of 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), respectively, and four open reading frames (ORF1-4). ORFs 1 to 4 encode proteins of 129, 186, 29, and 17.4 kDa, respectively. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of CGMMV-KOM and CGMMV-KW were more than 98.3% identical. When compared to other CGMMV strains in a phylogenetic analysis they were found to form a distinct virus clade, and were more distantly related to other tobamoviruses (23.5-56.7% identity).

  12. Analysis of nucleotide sequence of wheat yellow mosaic virus genomic RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于嘉林; 晏立英; 苏宁; 侯占军; 李大伟; 韩成贵; 杨莉莉; 蔡祝南; 刘仪

    1999-01-01

    Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) isolate HC was used for viral cDNA synthesis and sequencing. The results show that the viral RNA1 is 7629 nueleotides encoding a polyprotein with 2407 amino acids, from which seven putative proteins may be produced by an autolytie cleavage processing besides the viral coat protein. The RNA2 is 3639 nueleotides and codes for a polypretein of 903 amino acids, which may contain two putative non-structural proteins. Although WYMV shares a similarity in genetic organization to wheat spindle streak mosaic virus (WSSMV), the identities in their nucleotide sequences or deduced amino acid sequences are as low as 70% and 75 % respectively. Based on this result, it is confirmed that WYMV and WSSMV are different species within Bymovirus.

  13. Nucleotide sequencing and serologic analysis of Cache Valley virus isolates from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitvich, Bradley J; Loroño-Pino, Maria A; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Dorman, Karin S

    2012-08-01

    Nucleotide sequencing was performed on part of the medium and large genome segments of 17 Cache Valley virus (CVV) isolates from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Alignment of these sequences to all other sequences in the Genbank database revealed that they have greatest nucleotide identity (97-98 %) with the equivalent regions of Tlacotalpan virus (TLAV), which is considered to be a variety of CVV. Next, cross-plaque reduction neutralization tests (PRNTs) were performed using sera from mice that had been inoculated with a representative isolate from the Yucatan Peninsula (CVV-478) or the prototype TLAV isolate (61-D-240). The PRNT titers exhibited a twofold difference in one direction and no difference in the other direction suggesting that CVV-478 and 61-D-240 belong to the same CVV subtype. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the CVV isolates from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico are genetically and antigenically similar to the prototype TLAV isolate.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Brugmansia suaveolens mottle virus, a potyvirus from an ornamental shrub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucinda, Natalia; Inoue-Nagata, Alice K; Kitajima, Elliot W; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2010-10-01

    Brugmansia suaveolens mottle virus (BsMoV) was the first potyvirus isolated from "angel trumpet" (Brugmansia suaveolens), described in Brazil. In this study, the complete nucleotide (nt) genome sequence of BsMoV was determined, and the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence was analyzed. The BsMoV RNA genome consists of 9870 nt without a poly-A tail, encoding a putative typical potyviral polyprotein of 3090 aa. Pairwise comparisons of the complete BsMoV genome with those of the most closely related potyviruses revealed a maximum nucleotide identity of 63.7% with pepper mottle virus. These results and phylogenetic analyses based on the complete genome sequence of the most closely related potyviruses confirmed that BsMoV should be considered a member of a distinct species of the genus Potyvirus.

  15. Simultaneous identification of DNA and RNA viruses present in pig faeces using process-controlled deep sequencing.

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    Jana Sachsenröder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal faeces comprise a community of many different microorganisms including bacteria and viruses. Only scarce information is available about the diversity of viruses present in the faeces of pigs. Here we describe a protocol, which was optimized for the purification of the total fraction of viral particles from pig faeces. The genomes of the purified DNA and RNA viruses were simultaneously amplified by PCR and subjected to deep sequencing followed by bioinformatic analyses. The efficiency of the method was monitored using a process control consisting of three bacteriophages (T4, M13 and MS2 with different morphology and genome types. Defined amounts of the bacteriophages were added to the sample and their abundance was assessed by quantitative PCR during the preparation procedure. RESULTS: The procedure was applied to a pooled faecal sample of five pigs. From this sample, 69,613 sequence reads were generated. All of the added bacteriophages were identified by sequence analysis of the reads. In total, 7.7% of the reads showed significant sequence identities with published viral sequences. They mainly originated from bacteriophages (73.9% and mammalian viruses (23.9%; 0.8% of the sequences showed identities to plant viruses. The most abundant detected porcine viruses were kobuvirus, rotavirus C, astrovirus, enterovirus B, sapovirus and picobirnavirus. In addition, sequences with identities to the chimpanzee stool-associated circular ssDNA virus were identified. Whole genome analysis indicates that this virus, tentatively designated as pig stool-associated circular ssDNA virus (PigSCV, represents a novel pig virus. CONCLUSION: The established protocol enables the simultaneous detection of DNA and RNA viruses in pig faeces including the identification of so far unknown viruses. It may be applied in studies investigating aetiology, epidemiology and ecology of diseases. The implemented process control serves as quality control, ensures

  16. Complete Genomic Sequence of a Chinese Isolate of Duck Hepatitis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Duck hepatitis virus 1 (DHV-1) ZJ-V isolate was sequenced and determined to be 7 691 nucleotides (nt) in length with a 5'-terminal un-translated region (UTR) of 626 nt and a 3'-terminal UTR of 315 nt (not including the poly(A) tail). One large open reading frame (ORF) was found within the genome (nt 627 to 7 373) coding for a polypeptide of 2 249amino acids. Our data also showed that the poly (A) tail of DHV-1 has at least 22 A's. Sequence comparison revealed significant homology (from 91.9% to 95.7%) between the protein sequences of the virus in the Picornaviridae family, its genome showed some unique characteristics. DHV-1 contains 3copies of the 2A gene and only 1 copy of the 3B gene, and its 3'-NCR is longer than those of other picornaviruses. Phylogenetic analysis to do sequence homology based on the VP1 protein sequences showed that the ZJ-V isolate shares high sequence homology with the reported DHV-1 isolates (from 92.9% to 99.2%), indicating that DHV-1 is genetically stable.

  17. Ultra-deep sequencing of intra-host rabies virus populations during cross-species transmission.

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    Monica K Borucki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the hurdles to understanding the role of viral quasispecies in RNA virus cross-species transmission (CST events is the need to analyze a densely sampled outbreak using deep sequencing in order to measure the amount of mutation occurring on a small time scale. In 2009, the California Department of Public Health reported a dramatic increase (350 in the number of gray foxes infected with a rabies virus variant for which striped skunks serve as a reservoir host in Humboldt County. To better understand the evolution of rabies, deep-sequencing was applied to 40 unpassaged rabies virus samples from the Humboldt outbreak. For each sample, approximately 11 kb of the 12 kb genome was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Average coverage was 17,448 and this allowed characterization of the rabies virus population present in each sample at unprecedented depths. Phylogenetic analysis of the consensus sequence data demonstrated that samples clustered according to date (1995 vs. 2009 and geographic location (northern vs. southern. A single amino acid change in the G protein distinguished a subset of northern foxes from a haplotype present in both foxes and skunks, suggesting this mutation may have played a role in the observed increased transmission among foxes in this region. Deep-sequencing data indicated that many genetic changes associated with the CST event occurred prior to 2009 since several nonsynonymous mutations that were present in the consensus sequences of skunk and fox rabies samples obtained from 20032010 were present at the sub-consensus level (as rare variants in the viral population in skunk and fox samples from 1995. These results suggest that analysis of rare variants within a viral population may yield clues to ancestral genomes and identify rare variants that have the potential to be selected for if environment conditions change.

  18. Occurrence and sequences of Lily mottle virus and Lily symptomless virus in plants grown from imported bulbs in Zhejiang province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H-Y; Chen, J; Zhao, M-F; Lin, L; Chen, J-P; Antoniw, J F; Adams, M J

    2003-12-01

    Degenerate primers were used to amplify virus sequences from imported lilies in Zhejiang province, China. Two viruses, Lily mottle virus (LMoV, genus Potyvirus) and Lily symptomless virus (LSV, genus Carlavirus) were detected, purified and completely sequenced from a mixed infection in a plant raised from bulbs imported from the Netherlands. The sequence of LMoV was 9644 nt long and encoded a polyprotein of 3095 amino acids with a calculated M(r) of 351.0 kDa that had only 45.1-54.4% identity to other completely sequenced potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete polyproteins of members of the genus demonstrated that LMoV was distantly grouped with LYSV, BYMV and ClYVV. Two partial LMoV sequences from different cultivars were identical to one another and very similar (98.3% identical nucleotides) to the corresponding region of the complete sequence. Analysis of the coat protein sequences of LMoV isolates revealed two subgroups, corresponding to the earlier "Tulip breaking virus lily strain" and "Tulip band breaking virus" isolates. Our newly-determined isolates showed an extremely close relationship to the first of these. The LSV sequence was 8393 nucleotides long and had the typical carlavirus genome organization. The ORF1 protein was most closely related to that of Blueberry scorch virus (57.2% identical amino acids). Sequences of 1796 nt at the 3'-end of three additional LSV isolates from different cultivars were very similar (>98% identical nucleotides) to the corresponding region of the complete sequence. This is the first report of complete sequences for LMoV and LSV.

  19. Molecular identification based on coat protein sequences of the Barley yellow dwarf virus from Brazil

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    Talita Bernardon Mar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yellow dwarf disease, one of the most important diseases of cereal crops worldwide, is caused by virus species belonging to the Luteoviridae family. Forty-two virus isolates obtained from oat (Avena sativa L., wheat (Triticum aestivum L., barley (Hordeum vulgare L., corn (Zea mays L., and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam. collected between 2007 and 2008 from winter cereal crop regions in southern Brazil were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR with primers designed on ORF 3 (coat protein - CP for the presence of Barley yellow dwarf virus and Cereal yellow dwarf virus (B/CYDV. PCR products of expected size (~357 bp for subgroup II and (~831 bp for subgroup I were obtained for three and 39 samples, respectively. These products were cloned and sequenced. The subgroup II 3' partial CP amino acid deduced sequences were identified as BYDV-RMV (92 - 93 % of identity with "Illinois" Z14123 isolate. The complete CP amino acid deduced sequences of subgroup I isolates were confirmed as BYDV-PAV (94 - 99 % of identity and established a very homogeneous group (identity higher than 99 %. These results support the prevalence of BYDV-PAV in southern Brazil as previously diagnosed by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA and suggest that this population is very homogeneous. To our knowledge, this is the first report of BYDV-RMV in Brazil and the first genetic diversity study on B/CYDV in South America.

  20. First report of the complete sequence of Sida golden yellow vein virus from Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cheryl S; Kon, Tatsuya; Gilbertson, Robert L; Roye, Marcia E

    2011-08-01

    Begomoviruses are phytopathogens that threaten food security [18]. Sida spp. are ubiquitous weed species found in Jamaica. Sida samples were collected island-wide, DNA was extracted via a modified Dellaporta method, and the viral genome was amplified using degenerate and sequence-specific primers [2, 11]. The amplicons were cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed that a DNA-A molecule isolated from a plant in Liguanea, St. Andrew, was 90.9% similar to Sida golden yellow vein virus-[United States of America:Homestead:A11], making it a strain of SiGYVV. It was named Sida golden yellow vein virus-[Jamaica:Liguanea 2:2008] (SiGYVV-[JM:Lig2:08]). The cognate DNA-B, previously unreported, was successfully cloned and was most similar to that of Malvastrum yellow mosaic Jamaica virus (MaYMJV). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that this virus was most closely related to begomoviruses that infect malvaceous hosts in Jamaica, Cuba and Florida in the United States.

  1. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of grapevine asteroid mosaic associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Asencio, José; Wojciechowska, Klaudia; Baskerville, Maia; Gomez, Annika L; Perry, Keith L; Thompson, Jeremy R

    2017-01-02

    In analyzing grapevine clones infected with grapevine red blotch associated virus, we identified a small number of isometric particles of approximately 30nm in diameter from an enriched fraction of leaf extract. A dominant protein of 25kDa was isolated from this fraction using SDS-PAGE and was identified by mass spectrometry as belonging to grapevine asteroid mosaic associated virus (GAMaV). Using a combination of three methods RNA-Seq, sRNA-Seq, and Sanger sequencing of RT- and RACE-PCR products, we obtained a full-length genome sequence consisting of 6719 nucleotides without the poly(A) tail. The virus possesses all of the typical conserved functional domains concordant with the genus Marafivirus and lies evolutionarily between citrus sudden death associated virus and oat blue dwarf virus. A large shift in RNA-Seq coverage coincided with the predicted location of the subgenomic RNA involved in coat protein (CP) expression. Genus wide sequence alignments confirmed the cleavage motif LxG(G/A) to be dominant between the helicase and RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), and the RdRp and CP domains. A putative overlapping protein (OP) ORF lacking a canonical translational start codon was identified with a reading frame context more consistent with the putative OPs of tymoviruses and fig fleck associated virus than with those of marafiviruses. BLAST analysis of the predicted GAMaV OP showed a unique relatedness to the OPs of members of the genus Tymovirus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biological characterization and next-generation genome sequencing of the unclassified Cotia virus SPAn232 (Poxviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Priscila P; Silva, Patrícia M; Schnellrath, Laila C; Jesus, Desyreé M; Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Renne, Rolf; Attias, Marcia; Condit, Richard C; Moussatché, Nissin; Damaso, Clarissa R

    2012-05-01

    Cotia virus (COTV) SPAn232 was isolated in 1961 from sentinel mice at Cotia field station, São Paulo, Brazil. Attempts to classify COTV within a recognized genus of the Poxviridae have generated contradictory findings. Studies by different researchers suggested some similarity to myxoma virus and swinepox virus, whereas another investigation characterized COTV SPAn232 as a vaccinia virus strain. Because of the lack of consensus, we have conducted an independent biological and molecular characterization of COTV. Virus growth curves reached maximum yields at approximately 24 to 48 h and were accompanied by virus DNA replication and a characteristic early/late pattern of viral protein synthesis. Interestingly, COTV did not induce detectable cytopathic effects in BSC-40 cells until 4 days postinfection and generated viral plaques only after 8 days. We determined the complete genomic sequence of COTV by using a combination of the next-generation DNA sequencing technologies 454 and Illumina. A unique contiguous sequence of 185,139 bp containing 185 genes, including the 90 genes conserved in all chordopoxviruses, was obtained. COTV has an interesting panel of open reading frames (ORFs) related to the evasion of host defense, including two novel genes encoding C-C chemokine-like proteins, each present in duplicate copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the highest amino acid identity scores with Cervidpoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Suipoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, and Yatapoxvirus. However, COTV grouped as an independent branch within this clade, which clearly excluded its classification as an Orthopoxvirus. Therefore, our data suggest that COTV could represent a new poxvirus genus.

  3. Kaposi sarcoma incidence in Mozambique: national and regional estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Paula; Albuquerque, Gabriela; Vieira, Mariana; Foia, Severiano; Ferro, Josefo; Carrilho, Carla; Lunet, Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is expressed in four clinical variants, all associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection, namely, classic, endemic, immunosuppression-related and AIDS-related. The latter currently accounts for most of the burden of Kaposi sarcoma in sub-Saharan Africa, reflecting the frequency of HIV infection and its management. We aimed to estimate the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma in Mozambique and in its provinces. We estimated the number of incident cases of Kaposi sarcoma by adding up the expected number of endemic and AIDS-related cases. The former were estimated from the rates observed in Kyandondo, Uganda (1960-1971). The latter were computed from the number of AIDS-related deaths in each region, assuming that the ratio between the AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma incident cases and the number of AIDS-related deaths observed in the city of Beira applies to all regions. A total of 3862 Kaposi sarcoma cases were estimated to have occurred in Mozambique in 2007, mostly AIDS-related, in the age group 25-49 years, and in provinces from South/Centre. The age-standardized incidence rates were 36.1/100 000 in men and 11.5/100 000 in women, with a more than three-fold variation across provinces. We estimated a high incidence of Kaposi sarcoma in Mozambique, along with large regional differences. These results can be used to improve disease management and to sustain political decisions on health policies.

  4. Primary renal synovial sarcoma

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    Girish D. Bakhshi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary Renal Sarcoma is rare tumor comprising only 1% of all renal tumours. Synovial sarcomas are generally deep-seated tumors arising in the proximity of large joints of adolescents and young adults and account for 5-10% of all soft tissue tumours. Primary synovial sarcoma of kidney is rare and has poor prognosis. It can only be diagnosed by immunohistochemistry. It should be considered as a differential in sarcomatoid and spindle cell tumours. We present a case of 33-year-old female, who underwent left sided radical nephrectomy for renal tumour. Histopathology and genetic analysis diagnosed it to be primary renal synovial sarcoma. Patient underwent radiation therapy and 2 years follow up is uneventful. A brief case report with review of literature is presented.

  5. Complete genome sequence of a recombinant Marek's disease virus field strain with one reticuloendotheliosis virus long terminal repeat insert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shuai; Cui, Ning; Cui, Zhizhong; Zhao, Peng; Li, Yanpeng; Ding, Jiabo; Dong, Xuan

    2012-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) Chinese strain GX0101, isolated in 2001 from a vaccinated flock of layer chickens with severe tumors, was the first reported recombinant MDV field strain with one reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) long terminal repeat (LTR) insert. GX0101 belongs to very virulent MDV (vvMDV) but has higher horizontal transmission ability than the vvMDV strain Md5. The complete genome sequence of GX0101 is 178,101 nucleotides (nt) and contains only one REV-LTR insert at a site 267 nt upstream of the sorf2 gene. Moreover, GX0101 has 5 repeats of a 217-nt fragment in its terminal repeat short (TRS) region and 3 repeats in internal repeat short (IRS) region, compared to the other 10 strains with only 1 or 2 repeats in both TRS and IRS.

  6. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Kiran; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Smith, Neil A; Schumann, Ulrike; Fang, Yuan-Yuan; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Zhang, Ren; Guo, Hui-Shan; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS) transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat) sequence (35S-GUS:Sat) was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  7. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite RNAs (satRNAs are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat sequence (35S-GUS:Sat was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  8. What Are the Key Statistics about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kaposi Sarcoma What Are the Key Statistics About Kaposi Sarcoma? Before the AIDS epidemic, Kaposi sarcoma (KS) was ... in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment? More In Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  9. What's New in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma What’s New in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment? A great deal of research ... in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment? More In Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  10. Nucleotide sequence of XhoI O fragment of ectromelia virus DNA reveals significant differences from vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevich, T G; Muravnik, G L; Pozdnyakov, S G; Chizhikov, V E; Ryazankina, O I; Shchelkunov, S N; Koonin, E V; Chernos, V I

    1993-10-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the 3913 base pair XhoI O fragment located in an evolutionary variable region adjacent to the right end of the genome of ectromelia virus (EMV) was determined. The sequence contains two long open reading frames coding for putative proteins of 559 amino acid residues (p65) and 344 amino acid residues (p39). Amino acid database searches showed that p39 is closely related to vaccinia virus (VV), strain WR, B22R gene product (C12L gene product of strain Copenhagen), which belongs to the family of serine protease inhibitors (serpins). Despite the overall high conservation, differences were observed in the sequences of p39, B22R, and C12L in the site known to interact with proteases in other serpins, suggesting that the serpins of EMV and two strains of VV may all inhibit proteases with different specificities. The gene coding for the ortholog of p65 is lacking in the Copenhagen strain of vaccinia virus; the WR strain contains a truncated variant of this gene (B21R) potentially coding for a small protein (p16) corresponding to the C-terminal region of p65. p65 is a new member of the family of poxvirus proteins including vaccinia virus proteins A55R, C2L and F3L, and a group of related proteins of leporipoxviruses, Shope fibroma and myxoma viruses (T6, T8, T9, M9). These proteins are homologous to the Drosophila protein Kelch involved in egg development. Both Kelch protein and the related poxvirus proteins contain two distinct domains. The N-terminal domain is related to the similarly located domains of transcription factors Ttk, Br-C (Drosophila), and KUP (human), and GCL protein involved in early development in Drosophila. The C-terminal domain consists of an array of four to five imperfect repeats and is related to human placental protein MIPP. Phylogenetic analysis of the family of poxvirus proteins showed that their genes have undergone a complex succession of duplications, and complete or partial deletions.

  11. The complete genome sequence of Citrus vein enation virus from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ai-jun; SONG Zhen; CAO Meng-ji; CHEN Hong-ming; LI Zhong-an; ZHOU Chang-yong

    2015-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an isolate of Citrus vein enation virus (CVEV-XZG) from China has been determined for the ifrst time. The genome consisted of 5 983 nucleotides, coding for ifve open reading frames (ORFs), had a similar genomic organization features with Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV). Nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence identity of the ifve ORFs compared to isolate CVEV VE-1 range from 97.1 to 99.0% and 97.4 to 100.0%, these values compared to isolate PEMV-1 range from 45.2 to 51.6%and 31.1 to 45.2%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete genome sequence showed that the isolate CVEV-XZG had close relationship with Pea enation mosaic virus. The results supports CVEV may be a new member of genus Enamovirus. The ful sequence of CVEV-XZG presented here may serve as a basis for future study of CVEV in China.

  12. Deep-Sequence Identification and Role in Virus Replication of a JC Virus Quasispecies in Patients with Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kenta; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Fukumoto, Hitomi; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Suzuki, Tadaki; Sato, Yuko; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kuroda, Makoto; Katano, Harutaka

    2017-01-01

    JC virus (JCV) is a DNA virus causing progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in immunodeficient patients. In the present study, 22 genetic quasispecies with more than 1.5% variant frequency were detected in JCV genomes from six clinical samples of PML by next-generation sequencing. A mutation from A to C at nucleotide (nt) 3495 in JCV Mad1 resulting in a V-to-G amino acid substitution at amino acid (aa) position 392 of the large T antigen (TAg) was identified in all six cases of PML at 3% to 19% variant frequencies. Transfection of JCV Mad1 DNA possessing the V392G substitution in TAg into IMR-32 and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells resulted in dramatically decreased production of JCV-encoded proteins. The virus DNA copy number was also reduced in supernatants of the mutant virus-transfected cells. Transfection of the IMR-32 and HEK293 cells with a virus genome containing a revertant mutation recovered viral production and protein expression. Cotransfection with equal amounts of wild-type genome and mutated JCV genome did not reduce the expression of viral proteins or viral replication, suggesting that the mutation did not have any dominant-negative function. Finally, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TAg was expressed in all six pathological samples in which the quasispecies were detected. In conclusion, the V392G amino acid substitution in TAg identified frequently in PML lesions has a function in suppressing JCV replication, but the frequency of the mutation was restricted and its role in PML lesions was limited.

  13. Sequence analysis and genetic diversity of five new Indian isolates of cucumber mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Gautam, K K; Raj, S K

    2015-12-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is an important virus since it causes severe losses to many economically important crops worldwide. Five new isolates of CMV were isolated from naturally infected Hippeastrum hybridum, Dahlia pinnata, Hemerocallis fulva, Acorus calamus and Typhonium trilobatum plants, all exhibiting severe leaf mosaic symptoms. For molecular identification and sequence analyses, the complete coat protein (CP) gene of these isolates was amplified by RT-PCR. The resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced and isolates were designated as HH (KP698590), DP (JF682239), HF (KP698589), AC (KP698588) and TT (JX570732). For study of genetic diversity among these isolates, the sequence data were analysed by BLASTn, multiple alignment and generating phylogenetic trees along with the respective sequences of other CMV isolates available in GenBank Database were done. The isolates under study showed 82-99% sequence diversity among them at nucleotide and amino acid levels; however they showed close relationships with CMV isolates of subgroup IB. In alignment analysis of amino acid sequences of HH and AC isolates, we have found fifteen and twelve unique substitutions, compared to HF, DP and TT isolates, suggesting the cause of high genetic diversity.

  14. Recombination analysis of Soybean mosaic virus sequences reveals evidence of RNA recombination between distinct pathotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Mohan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract RNA recombination is one of the two major factors that create RNA genome variability. Assessing its incidence in plant RNA viruses helps understand the formation of new isolates and evaluate the effectiveness of crop protection strategies. To search for recombination in Soybean mosaic virus (SMV, the causal agent of a worldwide seed-borne, aphid-transmitted viral soybean disease, we obtained all full-length genome sequences of SMV as well as partial sequences encoding the N-terminal most (P1 protease and the C-terminal most (capsid protein; CP viral protein. The sequences were analyzed for possible recombination events using a variety of automatic and manual recombination detection and verification approaches. Automatic scanning identified 3, 10, and 17 recombination sites in the P1, CP, and full-length sequences, respectively. Manual analyses confirmed 10 recombination sites in three full-length SMV sequences. To our knowledge, this is the first report of recombination between distinct SMV pathotypes. These data imply that different SMV pathotypes can simultaneously infect a host cell and exchange genetic materials through recombination. The high incidence of SMV recombination suggests that recombination plays an important role in SMV evolution. Obtaining additional full-length sequences will help elucidate this role.

  15. Activation of PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signal pathways is required for the induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is causally linked to several acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and a subset of multicentric Castleman's disease. Regulation of viral lytic replication is critical to the initiation and progression of KS. Recently, we reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was an important cofactor that activated lytic cycle replication of KSHV. Here, we further investigated the possible signal pathways involved in HSV-1-induced reactivation of KSHV. Results By transfecting a series of dominant negative mutants and protein expressing constructs and using pharmacologic inhibitors, we found that either Janus kinase 1 (JAK1/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 or JAK1/STAT6 signaling failed to regulate HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. However, HSV-1 infection of BCBL-1 cells activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, also called AKT pathway and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β. PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway was found to be involved in HSV-1-induced KSHV reactivation. Additionally, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway also partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Conclusions HSV-1 infection stimulated PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signaling pathways that in turn contributed to KSHV reactivation, which provided further insights into the molecular mechanism controlling KSHV lytic replication, particularly in the context of HSV-1 and KSHV co-infection.

  16. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus targets the lymphotactin receptor with both a broad spectrum antagonist vCCL2 and a highly selective and potent agonist vCCL3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Johnsen, Anders H; Jurlander, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    Large DNA viruses such as herpesvirus and poxvirus encode proteins that target and exploit the chemokine system of their host. These proteins have the potential to block or change the orchestrated recruitment of leukocytes to sites of viral infection. The genome of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes...... virus (KSHV) encodes three chemokine-like proteins named vCCL1, vCCL2, and vCCL3. In this study vCCL3 was probed in parallel with vCCL1 and vCCL2 against a panel of the 18 classified human chemokine receptors. In calcium mobilization assays vCCL1 acted as a selective CCR8 agonist, whereas vCCL2...... was found to act as a broad spectrum chemokine antagonist of human chemokine receptors, including the lymphotactin receptor. In contrast vCCL3 was found to be a highly selective agonist for the human lymphotactin receptor XCR1. The potency of vCCL3 was found to be 10-fold higher than the endogenous human...

  17. Examination for double-stranded RNA viruses in Trichomonas gallinae and identification of a novel sequence of a Trichomonas vaginalis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Richard W; Allison, Andrew B; Sellers, Holly; Linnemann, Erich; Chang, T-H; Alderete, John F

    2009-09-01

    To determine if double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses exist and are potential virulence factors in Trichomonas gallinae, virus purification via ultracentrifugation was attempted for 12 T. gallinae isolates recovered from wild birds. Following purification, virus-like particles were not observed by transmission electron microscopy, nor were dsRNA segments visualized in agarose gels after electrophoresis of extracted RNA from any of the 12 T. gallinae isolates. However, virus particles and dsRNA segments were detected from a previously determined virus-infected T. vaginalis isolate as a control using identical purification procedures. Subsequent reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of the dsRNA of the virus in this isolate revealed a novel sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of T. vaginalis viruses.

  18. Simplified large-scale Sanger genome sequencing for influenza A/H3N2 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kai Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and the resultant lower costs of sequencing have enabled production of massive amounts of data, including the generation of full genome sequences of pathogens. However, the small genome size of the influenza virus arguably justifies the use of the more conventional Sanger sequencing technology which is still currently more readily available in most diagnostic laboratories. RESULTS: We present a simplified Sanger-based genome sequencing method for sequencing the influenza A/H3N2 virus in a large-scale format. The entire genome sequencing was completed with 19 reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs and 39 sequencing reactions. This method was tested on 15 native clinical samples and 15 culture isolates, respectively, collected between 2009 and 2011. The 15 native clinical samples registered quantification cycle values ranging from 21.0 to 30.56, which were equivalent to 2.4×10(3-1.4×10(6 viral copies/µL of RNA extract. All the PCR-amplified products were sequenced directly without PCR product purification. Notably, high quality sequencing data up to 700 bp were generated for all the samples tested. The completed sequence covered 408,810 nucleotides in total, with 13,627 nucleotides per genome, attaining 100% coding completeness. Of all the bases produced, an average of 89.49% were Phred quality value 40 (QV40 bases (representing an accuracy of circa one miscall for every 10,000 bases or higher, and an average of 93.46% were QV30 bases (one miscall every 1000 bases or higher. CONCLUSIONS: This sequencing protocol has been shown to be cost-effective and less labor-intensive in obtaining full influenza genomes. The constant high quality of sequences generated imparts confidence in extending the application of this non-purified amplicon sequencing approach to other gene sequencing assays, with appropriate use of suitably designed primers.

  19. Nucleotide sequence of an immediate-early frog virus 3 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, D; Foglesong, D; Granoff, A

    1984-12-01

    We have used "gene walking" with synthetic oligonucleotides and M13 dideoxynucleotide sequencing techniques to obtain the complete coding and flanking sequences of the gene encoding a major immediate-early RNA (molecular weight, 169,000) of frog virus 3. R-loop mapping of the cloned XbaI K fragment of frog virus 3 DNA with immediate-early RNA from infected cells showed that an RNA of approximately 500 to 600 nucleotides (the right size to code for the immediate-early viral 18-kilodalton protein of unknown function) hybridized to a region within 100 base pairs of one end of the XbaI K fragment; no evidence for splicing was observed in the electron microscope or by single-strand nuclease analysis. Further restriction mapping narrowed the location of the gene to the XbaI end of a 2-kilobase-pair XbaI-Bg/II fragment, which was bidirectionally subcloned into the bacteriophage pair mp10 and mp11 for sequencing. Mung bean nuclease mapping was used to identify both the 5' and the 3' ends of the mRNA. The 5' end mapped within an AT-rich region 19 base pairs upstream from two in-phase AUG start codons that were immediately followed by an open reading frame of 157 amino acids. Another AT-rich sequence was found at -29 base pairs from the 5' end of the mRNA start site; this sequence may function as a TATA box. The 3' end of the message displayed considerable microheterogeneity, but clearly terminated within a third AT-rich region 50 to 60 base pairs from the translation stop codon. The eucaryotic polyadenylic acid addition signal (AATAAA) was not present, a finding to be expected since frog virus 3 mRNA is not polyadenylated. Both the single-stranded mp10 clone of the XbaI-Bg/II fragment and a 15-base oligonucleotide complementary to the region flanking the two AUG translation start codons inhibited translation of the immediate-early 18-kilodalton protein in vitro, confirming the identity of the sequenced gene. As the regulatory sequences of this gene did not resemble those of

  20. SDT: a virus classification tool based on pairwise sequence alignment and identity calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brejnev Muhizi Muhire

    Full Text Available The perpetually increasing rate at which viral full-genome sequences are being determined is creating a pressing demand for computational tools that will aid the objective classification of these genome sequences. Taxonomic classification approaches that are based on pairwise genetic identity measures are potentially highly automatable and are progressively gaining favour with the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV. There are, however, various issues with the calculation of such measures that could potentially undermine the accuracy and consistency with which they can be applied to virus classification. Firstly, pairwise sequence identities computed based on multiple sequence alignments rather than on multiple independent pairwise alignments can lead to the deflation of identity scores with increasing dataset sizes. Also, when gap-characters need to be introduced during sequence alignments to account for insertions and deletions, methodological variations in the way that these characters are introduced and handled during pairwise genetic identity calculations can cause high degrees of inconsistency in the way that different methods classify the same sets of sequences. Here we present Sequence Demarcation Tool (SDT, a free user-friendly computer program that aims to provide a robust and highly reproducible means of objectively using pairwise genetic identity calculations to classify any set of nucleotide or amino acid sequences. SDT can produce publication quality pairwise identity plots and colour-coded distance matrices to further aid the classification of sequences according to ICTV approved taxonomic demarcation criteria. Besides a graphical interface version of the program for Windows computers, command-line versions of the program are available for a variety of different operating systems (including a parallel version for cluster computing platforms.

  1. Electrochemical direct immobilization of DNA sequences for label-free herpes virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Phuong Dinh; Trung, Tran; Tuan, Mai Anh; Chien, Nguyen Duc

    2009-09-01

    DNA sequences/bio-macromolecules of herpes virus (5'-AT CAC CGA CCC GGA GAG GGA C-3') were directly immobilized into polypyrrole matrix by using the cyclic voltammetry method, and grafted onto arrays of interdigitated platinum microelectrodes. The morphology surface of the obtained PPy/DNA of herpes virus composite films was investigated by a FESEM Hitachi-S 4800. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the PPy/DNA film and to study the specific interactions that may exist between DNA biomacromolecules and PPy chains. Attempts are made to use these PPy/DNA composite films for label-free herpes virus detection revealed a response time of 60 s in solutions containing as low as 2 nM DNA concentration, and self life of six months when immerged in double distilled water and kept refrigerated.

  2. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with elastic stockings and outpatient follow-up of a 90-year-old patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Flavia; Cunha, Paulo Rowilson; Pinto, Clovis Antonio Lopes; Alves, Celia Antonia Xavier de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifactorial angioproliferative disorder. The herpes virus 8 human contributes to its pathogenesis, but it is uncertain whether these lesions are only reactive hyperplasia to the virus or neoplasia. Four clinical types are described: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and HIV-associated. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma has no standard staging or treatment protocols. Some studies have shown the use of compression stockings in the treatment of lymphedema associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. We report the case of a 90 year-old patient with classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with compression stockings who showed a satisfactory response.

  3. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with elastic stockings and outpatient follow-up of a 90-year-old patient*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Flavia; Cunha, Paulo Rowilson; Pinto, Clovis Antonio Lopes; Alves, Celia Antonia Xavier de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifactorial angioproliferative disorder. The herpes virus 8 human contributes to its pathogenesis, but it is uncertain whether these lesions are only reactive hyperplasia to the virus or neoplasia. Four clinical types are described: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and HIV-associated. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma has no standard staging or treatment protocols. Some studies have shown the use of compression stockings in the treatment of lymphedema associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. We report the case of a 90 year-old patient with classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with compression stockings who showed a satisfactory response. PMID:24346919

  4. Incorporation of the influenza A virus NA segment into virions does not require cognate non-coding sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo-Chaigne, Bernadette; Barbezange, Cyril V. S.; Léandri, Stéphane; Roquin, Camille; Berthault, Camille; van der Werf, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    For each influenza virus genome segment, the coding sequence is flanked by non-coding (NC) regions comprising shared, conserved sequences and specific, non-conserved sequences. The latter and adjacent parts of the coding sequence are involved in genome packaging, but the precise role of the non-conserved NC sequences is still unclear. The aim of this study is to better understand the role of the non-conserved non-coding sequences in the incorporation of the viral segments into virions. The NA-segment NC sequences were systematically replaced by those of the seven other segments. Recombinant viruses harbouring two segments with identical NC sequences were successfully rescued. Virus growth kinetics and serial passages were performed, and incorporation of the viral segments was tested by real-time RT-PCR. An initial virus growth deficiency correlated to a specific defect in NA segment incorporation. Upon serial passages, growth properties were restored. Sequencing revealed that the replacing 5′NC sequence length drove the type of mutations obtained. With sequences longer than the original, point mutations in the coding region with or without substitutions in the 3′NC region were detected. With shorter sequences, insertions were observed in the 5′NC region. Restoration of viral fitness was linked to restoration of the NA segment incorporation. PMID:28240311

  5. Complete genome sequencing of two causative viruses of cassava mosaic disease in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oteng-Frimpong, R; Levy, Y; Torkpo, S K; Danquah, E Y; Offei, S K; Gafni, Y

    2012-01-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMV), caused by one or a combination of cassava mosaic geminiviruses, is ranked among the most important constraints to profitable and efficient production of cassava. Effective control measures require in-depth knowledge of the viral causative agent. Using rolling-circle amplification and unique enzymes, the full genome of two species of cassava mosaic geminivirus isolated from infected cassava plants in Ghana were cloned into pCambia 1300 and pET-28b. The sequences of the genome were determined on an ABI sequencer and a pairwise comparison was performed with other cassava-infecting geminiviruses from different countries. It was revealed that cassava grown in Ghana is attacked by two species of geminivirus in either single or mixed infections. These are the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and the East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV)-like, with high sequence similarity of 94% and 80%, respectively, between the DNA-A and DNA-B components of each virus, and 66% and 41% similarity of the common region (CR) (for A and B accordingly). The DNA-A of ACMV and EACMV-like contained 2781 and 2800 nucleotides, respectively, while their DNA-B components had 2725 and 2734 nucleotides, respectively. ACMV DNA-A was over 97% similar to those of other ACMVs from the continent. In contrast, EACMV-like DNA-A was over 98% similar to the isolates from Cameroon and other West African countries, and less than 88% similar to other EACMV species. Thus ACMV and EACMV-like were named African cassava mosaic virus-Ghana and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus-Ghana. Computer analysis revealed that their genome arrangement follows the typical old world bipartite begomovirus genome. The association of these two species and their interaction might account for the severe symptoms observed on infected plants in the field and in the greenhouse.

  6. The complete nucleotide sequence of the egg drop syndrome virus: an intermediate between mastadenoviruses and aviadenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, M; Blöcker, H; Brandt, P

    1997-11-10

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an avian adenovirus, the egg drop syndrome (EDS) virus, was determined. The total genome length is 33,213 nucleotides, resulting in a molecular weight of 21.9 x 10(6). The GC content is only 42.5%. Between map units 3.5 and 76.9, the distribution of open reading frames with homology to known genes is similar to that reported for other mammalian and avian adenoviruses. However, no homologies to adenovirus genes such as E1A, pIX, pV, and E3 could be found. Outside this region, several open reading frames were identified without any obvious homology to known adenovirus proteins. In the region organized similarly as other adenoviral genomes, most homologies were found to an ovine adenovirus (OAV strain 287). The highest level of amino acid identity was found for the hexon proteins of EDS and OAV. The virus-associated RNA (VA RNA) was identified thanks to the homology with the VA RNA of fowl adenovirus serotype 1 (FAV1). Similarities with FAV1 were also found in the fiber protein. Our results demonstrate that the avian EDS virus represents an intermediate between mammalian and avian adenoviruses. The nucleotide sequence and genomic organization of the EDS virus reflect the heterogeneity of the aviadenovirus genus and the Adenoviridae family.

  7. Hepatitis C virus whole genome sequencing: Current methods/issues and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trémeaux, Pauline; Caporossi, Alban; Thélu, Marie-Ange; Blum, Michael; Leroy, Vincent; Morand, Patrice; Larrat, Sylvie

    2016-10-01

    Therapy for hepatitis C is currently undergoing a revolution. The arrival of new antiviral agents targeting viral proteins reinforces the need for a better knowledge of the viral strains infecting each patient. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) whole genome sequencing provides essential information for precise typing, study of the viral natural history or identification of resistance-associated variants. First performed with Sanger sequencing, the arrival of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has simplified the technical process and provided more detailed data on the nature and evolution of viral quasi-species. We will review the different techniques used for HCV complete genome sequencing and their applications, both before and after the apparition of NGS. The progress brought by new and future technologies will also be discussed, as well as the remaining difficulties, largely due to the genomic variability.

  8. Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of Potato virus Y Liaoning Isolate in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fang; GAO Zheng-liang; AN Meng-nan; ZHOU Ben-guo; and WU Yuan-hua

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequence of Potato virus Y Liaoning isolate (PVY-LN) causing tobacco vein necrosis symptoms were isolated from Liaoning Province in China. Genome sequences of PVY-LN was 9 714 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3′-terminal poly (A) tail. PVY-LN encodes a single long open reading frame (ORF) of polyprotein that is predicted to be cleaved into ten mature proteins by three viral proteases. No recombination can be predicted in PVY-LN sequences compared with that of the other PVY strains using Recombination Detection Programe v. 4.16 (RDP4). Complete genome sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that PVY-LN is closely related to PVY necrosis strain (PVYN).

  9. Complete nucleotide sequence and genomic organization of Periplaneta fuliginosa densonucleosis virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    We have cloned the replicative form of the Periplaneta fuliginosa densonucleosis virus (Pf DNV) genome and determined its complete sequence.The sequence has 5454 nucleotides (nt),the genome consists of an internal unique sequence flanked by inverted terminal repeats (201 nt).The first 122 nt at the 5' end and the terminal 122 nt at the 3'end of both plus and minus strands can fold into a typical hairpin structure.The genome contains seven major open reading frames (ORFs).The plus strand has 4 ORFs occupying the 5' half of the plus strand,whereas the others span the 5' half of the minus strand.Two potential promoters were found at map units (m.u.) 3 and 97.Computer analysis of sequence homologies with other parvoviruses suggests that the plus strand of Pf DNV encodes very likely the nonstructural proteins and the minus strand probably encodes the structural proteins.

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Kaposi Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Kaposi Sarcoma ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  11. Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Nucleotide Sequences in Canine and Feline Mammary Tumors▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. Fo...

  12. Optimization of Substitution Matrix for Sequence Alignment of Major Capsid Proteins of Human Herpes Simplex Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipan Kumar Sohpal

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein sequence alignment has become an informative tool in modern molecular biology research. A number of substitution matrices have been readily available for sequence alignments, but it is challenging task to compute optimal matrices for alignment accuracy. Here, we used the parameter optimization procedure to select the optimal Q of substitution matrices for major viral capsid protein of human herpes simplex virus. Results predict that Blosum matrix is most accurate on alignment benchmarks, and Blosum 60 provides the optimal Q in all substitution matrices. PAM 200 matrices results slightly below than Blosum 60, while VTML matrices are intermediate of PAM and VT matrices under dynamic programming.

  13. Genome sequence diversity and clues to the evolution of variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Joseph J; Sammons, Scott A; Frace, A Michael; Osborne, John D; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Zhang, Ming; Govil, Dhwani; Damon, Inger K; Kline, Richard; Laker, Miriam; Li, Yu; Smith, Geoffrey L; Meyer, Hermann; Leduc, James W; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2006-08-11

    Comparative genomics of 45 epidemiologically varied variola virus isolates from the past 30 years of the smallpox era indicate low sequence diversity, suggesting that there is probably little difference in the isolates' functional gene content. Phylogenetic clustering inferred three clades coincident with their geographical origin and case-fatality rate; the latter implicated putative proteins that mediate viral virulence differences. Analysis of the viral linear DNA genome suggests that its evolution involved direct descent and DNA end-region recombination events. Knowing the sequences will help understand the viral proteome and improve diagnostic test precision, therapeutics, and systems for their assessment.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV). PMID:22205720

  15. Dobrava Virus as a New Hantavirus: Evidenced by Comparative Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-10

    Shu.Yuan Xiao, Gordana Diglisic, Tatjana Avsic- Zupanc , and James W. LeDuc Disease Assessment Division, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious...nu- Dobrava virus was isolated from the lungs of an Apo- cleotide sequence determined. Comparing the demus flavicollis [Avsic- Zupanc et al., 19921. The...buffer. The target band was cut mouse, Apodemus flavicollis, captured in Slovenia out and DNA recovered by using the GENECLEAN Kit 2[Avsic- Zupanc et

  16. Full-genome sequence of hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus from Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Neta; Reingold, Victoria; Lachman, Oded; Dombrovsky, Aviv

    2013-12-12

    Hibiscus rosa-sinensis is one of the most prevalent ornamental plants grown in private and public gardens. Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV) is a member of the Carmovirus genus, with a positive single-strand RNA that putatively encodes seven proteins. The complete genome of the first Israeli isolate of HCRSV, HCRSV-IL, comprises 3,908 nucleotides and shows 93% nucleotide sequence identity to the Singapore isolate and 87% identity to the Taiwanese isolate.

  17. Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus from Brazil: Sequencing, comparative analysis and PCR detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Douglas C D; Nunes, Allan R D; Teixeira, Dárlio I A; Lima, João Paulo M S; Lanza, Daniel C F

    2014-08-30

    A 3739 nucleotide fragment of Infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) from Brazil was amplified and sequenced. This fragment contains the entire coding sequences of viral proteins, the full 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) and a partial sequence of 5' untranslated region (5'UTR). The genome organization of IHHNV revealed the three typical major coding domains: a left ORF1 of 2001 bp that codes NS1, a left ORF2 (NS2) of 1091 bp that codes NS2 and a right ORF3 of 990 bp that codes VP. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the three viral proteins were compared with putative amino acid sequences of viruses reported from different regions. Comparisons among genomes from different geographic locations reveal 31 nucleotide regions that are 100% similar, distributed throughout the genome. An analysis of secondary structure of UTR regions, revealed regions with high probability to form hairpins, that may be involved in mechanisms of viral replication. Additionally, a maximum likelihood analysis indicates that Brazilian IHHNV belongs to lineage III, in the infectious IHHNV group, and is clustered with IHHNV isolates from Hawaii, China, Taiwan, Vietnam and South Korea. A new nested PCR targeting conserved nucleotide regions is proposed to detect IHHNV.

  18. Complete genome sequencing of Piper yellow mottle virus infecting black pepper, betelvine, and Indian long pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeshma, K P; Bhat, A I

    2015-02-01

    The complete genome of the Piper yellow mottle virus (PYMoV), a Badnavirus belonging to the family Caulimoviridae, was sequenced from three naturally infected hosts namely, black pepper, betelvine, and Indian long pepper. The genome length of the three virus strains (one from each of the three host species) varied from 7,559 to 7,584 nucleotides, and all the three strains possessed four open reading frames (ORFs) I to IV that potentially encode proteins of 15.67, 17.08, 218.6, and 17.22 kDa, respectively. ORF III encodes a polyprotein consisting of viral movement protein, trimeric dUTPase, zinc finger, aspartic protease, reverse transcriptase, and RNase H whereas ORF I, II, and IV encode proteins of unknown functions. The complete genome sequences at the nucleotide level were 89-99 % identical with one available sequence of PYMoV and 39-56 % identical with other badnaviruses, indicating that all three are strains of PYMoV. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of ORF I-IV and of the intergenic region (IR) were 80-100 % identical among PYMoV strains. Phylogenetic analysis of ORF III amino acid sequences showed the PYMoV strains forming a distinct cluster well separated from other badnaviruses. Among other badnaviruses, Fig badnavirus 1 (FBV-1) was the one most closely related to PYMoV.

  19. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Hsing-Yi; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chang, Chao-Chin; Wang, Szu-Pong; Lin, Kuan-Hsun; Chulakasian, Songkhla; Wong, Min-Liang; Chang, Shih-Chieh

    2010-12-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) has been speculated to be involved in human breast cancer. Companion animals, dogs, and cats with intimate human contacts may contribute to the transmission of MMTV between mouse and human. The aim of this study was to detect MMTV-like nucleotide sequences in canine and feline mammary tumors by nested PCR. Results showed that the presence of MMTV-like env and LTR sequences in canine malignant mammary tumors was 3.49% (3/86) and 18.60% (16/86), respectively. For feline malignant mammary tumors, the presence of both env and LTR sequences was found to be 22.22% (2/9). Nevertheless, the MMTV-like LTR and env sequences also were detected in normal mammary glands of dogs and cats. In comparisons of the MMTV-like DNA sequences of our findings to those of NIH 3T3 (MMTV-positive murine cell line) and human breast cancer cells, the sequence similarities ranged from 94 to 98%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that intermixing among sequences identified from tissues of different hosts, i.e., mouse, dog, cat, and human, indicated the MMTV-like DNA existing in these hosts. Moreover, the env transcript was detected in 1 of the 19 MMTV-positive samples by reverse transcription-PCR. Taken together, our study provides evidence for the existence and expression of MMTV-like sequences in neoplastic and normal mammary glands of dogs and cats.

  20. Mouse mammary tumor virus-like gene sequences are present in lung patient specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-Padilla Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have reported on the presence of Murine Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-like gene sequences in human cancer tissue specimens. Here, we search for MMTV-like gene sequences in lung diseases including carcinomas specimens from a Mexican population. This study was based on our previous study reporting that the INER51 lung cancer cell line, from a pleural effusion of a Mexican patient, contains MMTV-like env gene sequences. Results The MMTV-like env gene sequences have been detected in three out of 18 specimens studied, by PCR using a specific set of MMTV-like primers. The three identified MMTV-like gene sequences, which were assigned as INER6, HZ101, and HZ14, were 99%, 98%, and 97% homologous, respectively, as compared to GenBank sequence accession number AY161347. The INER6 and HZ-101 samples were isolated from lung cancer specimens, and the HZ-14 was isolated from an acute inflammatory lung infiltrate sample. Two of the env sequences exhibited disruption of the reading frame due to mutations. Conclusion In summary, we identified the presence of MMTV-like gene sequences in 2 out of 11 (18% of the lung carcinomas and 1 out of 7 (14% of acute inflamatory lung infiltrate specimens studied of a Mexican Population.

  1. Identification of 5' capped structure and 3' terminal sequence of hepatitis E virus isolated from Morocco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Bing Chen; Ji-Hong Meng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine 5' and 3' terminal sequences of hepatitis E virus (HEV) isolated from Morocco, to confirm 5' methylated cap structure of the genome, and to investigate whether the 3' UTR can be used to distinguish HEV genotypes instead of HEV complete genome sequence.METHODS: RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLM-RACE) was employed to obtain the 5' and 3' terminal sequences of HEV Morocco strain. The 3' UTR sequence of the Morocco strain was compared with that of the other 29 HEV strains using the DNAStar software.RESULTS: The 5' PCR product was obtained only from the RLM-RACE based on the capped RNA template. The 5' UTR of the Morocco strain had 26 nucleotides, and the 3' UTR had 65 nucleotides upstream to the polyA. The 5' UTR between HEV strains had only point mutations of nucleotides.The phylogenetic tree based on the sequences of 3' UTR was not the same as that based on the complete sequences.CONCLUSION: The genome of HEV Morocco strain was methylated cap structure. The 3' terminal sequence can not be used for distinguishing HEV genotype for all HEV strains in place of the whole HEV genome sequence.

  2. Sequences of Citrus Tristeza Virus Separated in Time and Space Are Essentially Identical†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiach-Martí, María R.; Mawassi, Munir; Gowda, Siddarame; Satyanarayana, Tatineni; Hilf, Mark E.; Shanker, Savita; Almira, Ernesto C.; Vives, María C.; López, Carmelo; Guerri, Jose; Flores, Ricardo; Moreno, Pedro; Garnsey, Steve M.; Dawson, William O.

    2000-01-01

    The first Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genomes completely sequenced (19.3-kb positive-sense RNA), from four biologically distinct isolates, are unexpectedly divergent in nucleotide sequence (up to 60% divergence). Understanding of whether these large sequence differences resulted from recent evolution is important for the design of disease management strategies, particularly the use of genetically engineered mild (essentially symptomless)-strain cross protection and RNA-mediated transgenic resistance. The complete sequence of a mild isolate (T30) which has been endemic in Florida for about a century was found to be nearly identical to the genomic sequence of a mild isolate (T385) from Spain. Moreover, samples of sequences of other isolates from distinct geographic locations, maintained in different citrus hosts and also separated in time (B252 from Taiwan, B272 from Colombia, and B354 from California), were nearly identical to the T30 sequence. The sequence differences between these isolates were within or near the range of variability of the T30 population. A possible explanation for these results is that the parents of isolates T30, T385, B252, B272, and B354 have a common origin, probably Asia, and have changed little since they were dispersed throughout the world by the movement of citrus. Considering that the nucleotide divergence among the other known CTV genomes is much greater than those expected for strains of the same virus, the remarkable similarity of these five isolates indicates a high degree of evolutionary stasis in some CTV populations. PMID:10888625

  3. Classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma and human herpesvirus 8 infection in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnur, P; Katano, H; Wang, Z H; Osakabe, Y; Kudo, M; Sata, T; Ebihara, Y

    2001-11-01

    We report 17 cases of the classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang, which is located in the north-western area of China surrounded by Mongolia in the east, Russia in the north and Kazakhstan in the west. Fifteen of the patients were of the Uygur people. All patients were male and did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Most of the lesions were found in the lower and/or upper extremities, with 16 patients showing multiple lesions. Immunohistochemical examination of the lesions revealed that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen was expressed in the nuclei of spindle-shaped tumor cells. HHV-8 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in all seven cases examined. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that DNA sequences of the HHV-8-encoded K1 gene in the seven Kaposi's sarcoma cases were classified as subtype C that was common in the Mediterranean, the Middle East and East Asian countries. In addition, using immunofluorescence we investigated the seroprevalence of HHV-8 in 73 Uygur patients with diseases other than Kaposi's sarcoma. Surprisingly, the serological study revealed that 34 of the patients (46.6%) were positive for antibodies against HHV-8, suggesting that HHV-8 infection is widespread in Xinjiang area. The occurrence of the classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma with a high seropositivity rate implies that Xinjiang is the most endemic area for HHV-8 infection in the world known to date. Considering that Xinjiang is located at the middle point of the Silk Road that used to extend from Rome to China, these data imply that the virus may have been in circulation in this area due to the migration of the people via the Silk Road.

  4. Complete genome sequence analysis of Seneca Valley virus-001, a novel oncolytic picornavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Laura M; Knowles, Nick J; Reddy, P Seshidar; Xu, Ling; Hay, Carl; Hallenbeck, Paul L

    2008-05-01

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus-001 (SVV-001), a small RNA virus, was determined and was shown to have typical picornavirus features. The 7280 nt long genome was predicted to contain a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 666 nt, followed by a single long open reading frame consisting of 6543 nt, which encodes a 2181 aa polyprotein. This polyprotein could potentially be cleaved into 12 polypeptides in the standard picornavirus L-4-3-4 layout. A 3' UTR of 71 nt was followed by a poly(A) tail of unknown length. Comparisons with other picornaviruses showed that the P1, 2C, 3C and 3D polypeptides of SVV-001 were related most closely to those of the cardioviruses, although they were not related as closely to those of encephalomyocarditis virus and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus as the latter were to each other. Most other regions of the polyprotein differed considerably from those of all other known picornaviruses. SVV-001 contains elements of an internal ribosome entry site reminiscent of that found in hepatitis C virus and a number of genetically diverse picornaviruses. SVV-001 is a novel picornavirus and it is proposed that it be classified as the prototype species in a novel genus named 'Senecavirus'.

  5. Fidelity of target site duplication and sequence preference during integration of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanggu Kim

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV is a new human retrovirus associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. The causal relationship of XMRV infection to human disease and the mechanism of pathogenicity have not been established. During retrovirus replication, integration of the cDNA copy of the viral RNA genome into the host cell chromosome is an essential step and involves coordinated joining of the two ends of the linear viral DNA into staggered sites on target DNA. Correct integration produces proviruses that are flanked by a short direct repeat, which varies from 4 to 6 bp among the retroviruses but is invariant for each particular retrovirus. Uncoordinated joining of the two viral DNA ends into target DNA can cause insertions, deletions, or other genomic alterations at the integration site. To determine the fidelity of XMRV integration, cells infected with XMRV were clonally expanded and DNA sequences at the viral-host DNA junctions were determined and analyzed. We found that a majority of the provirus ends were correctly processed and flanked by a 4-bp direct repeat of host DNA. A weak consensus sequence was also detected at the XMRV integration sites. We conclude that integration of XMRV DNA involves a coordinated joining of two viral DNA ends that are spaced 4 bp apart on the target DNA and proceeds with high fidelity.

  6. DNA sequence analysis of the Hind III M fragment from Chinese vaccine strain of vaccinia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, V J; Jin, Q; Jin, D Y; Hou, Y D

    1989-01-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the Hind III M fragment of vaccinia virus (VV) Tian Tan strain genome was determined by the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. Three open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the complementary strand of the sequence, comprised of 2218bp. Among them, ORF K1 initiates its transcription at -45 of the Hind III K fragment. The deduced peptide encoded by K1 contains 284 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 32.48 KDa. Its sequence is homologous to the host range protein of VV Copenhagen strain; the variation is only 2.46% at the amino acid level. ORF M2 could encode a peptide of 21.94 KDa with 196 amino acids. This gene was shown to be homologous to that of the 23 KDa peptide of herpes simplex virus type I. A non-coding region of 204bp located between K1 and M2 is rich in palindromic structures. ORF M1 extends its 3' terminus into the Hind III N fragment. Within the M fragment, M1 can only encode 212 amino acids. The major part of ORF M1 is very similar to the M portion of a possible alpha-amanitin resistance gene isolated from VV-WR strain. This work provides a molecular foundation in the construction of a new insertion vector for the preparation of a recombinant vaccinia virus to be used as a polyvalent live vaccine.

  7. Complete genome sequence of an isolate of Clerodendron yellow mosaic virus--a new begomovirus from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, P N; Satheesh, V; John, P; Chandramohan, S; Malathi, V G

    2011-01-01

    Clerodendron inerme, a common hedge plant grown in India, is affected by a yellow mosaic disease caused by a begomovirus. In the present study, the complete genome (DNA A) of this virus was cloned and sequenced. The total size of DNA A is 2760 nucleotides. The genome of this virus contains six open reading frames and a non-coding intergenic region of 293 nucleotides. Nucleotide sequence comparison analysis revealed maximum sequence identity with Papaya leaf curl virus-Pakistan [Pakistan:Cotton:2002] (73.9%). As this virus had less than 89% identity with other begomoviruses, it was identified as a new begomovirus species and tentatively, named as Clerodendron yellow mosaic virus-[India:New Delhi:2007] (ClYMV-[IN:ND:07]).

  8. Recombinant Parvoviruses Armed to Deliver CXCL4L1 and CXCL10 Are Impaired in Their Antiangiogenic and Antitumoral Effects in a Kaposi Sarcoma Tumor Model Due To the Chemokines' Interference with the Virus Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsart, Christiane; Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Stroh-Dege, Alexandra; Lavie, Muriel; Ronsse, Isabelle; Rommelaere, Jean; Van Damme, Jo; Van Raemdonck, Katrien; Struyf, Sofie

    2017-03-01

    Application of oncolytic viruses is a valuable option to broaden the armament of anticancer therapies, as these combine specific cytotoxic effects and immune-stimulating properties. The self-replicating H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV) is a prototypical oncolytic virus that, besides targeting tumor cells, also infects endothelial cells, thus combining oncolytic and angiostatic traits. To increase its therapeutic value, H-1PV can be armed with cytokines or chemokines to enhance the immunological response. Some chemokines-more specifically, the CXCR3 ligands CXCL4L1 and CXCL10-combine immune-stimulating properties with angiostatic activity. This study explores the therapeutic value of recombinant parvoviruses carrying CXCL4L1 or CXCL10 transgenes (Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10, respectively) to inhibit the growth of the human Kaposi sarcoma cell line KS-IMM. KS-IMM cells infected by Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10 released the corresponding chemokine and showed reduced migratory capacity. Therefore, the antitumoral capacity of Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10 was tested in mice. Either in vitro infected KS-IMM cells were injected or subcutaneously growing KS-IMM xenografts were treated by peritumoral injections of the different viruses. Surprisingly, the transgenes did not increase the antitumoral effect of natural H-1PV. Further experiments indicated that CXCL4L1 and CXCL10 interfered with the expression of the viral NS1 protein in KS-IMM cells. These results indicate that the outcome of parvovirus-based delivery of CXCR3 ligands might be tumor cell type dependent, and hence its application must be considered carefully.

  9. The complete genome sequence of a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus isolated from an endemic region in Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Darja; Nichol, Stuart T; Khristova, Marina L; Saksida, Ana; Hafner-Bratkovič, Iva; Petrovec, Miroslav; Dedushaj, Iusuf; Ahmeti, Salih; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    The Balkan region and Kosovo in particular, is a well-known Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) endemic region, with frequent epidemic outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring with a hospitalized case fatality of approximately 30%. Recent analysis of complete genome sequences of diverse CCHF virus strains showed that the genome plasticity of the virus is surprisingly high for an arthropod-borne virus. High levels of nucleotide and amino acid differences, frequent RNA segment reassortment and even RNA recombination have been recently described. This diversity illustrates the need to determine the complete genome sequence of CCHF virus representatives of all geographically distinct endemic areas, particularly in light of the high pathogenicity of the virus and its listing as a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we describe the first complete CCHF virus genome sequence of a virus (strain Kosova Hoti) isolated from a hemorrhagic fever case in the Balkans. This virus strain was isolated from a fatal CCHF case, and passaged only twice on Vero E6 cells prior to sequence analysis. The virus total genome was found to be 19.2 kb in length, consisting of a 1672 nucleotide (nt) S segment, a 5364 nt M segment and a 12150 nt L segment. Phylogenetic analysis of CCHF virus complete genomes placed the Kosova Hoti strain in the Europe/Turkey group, with highest similarity seen with Russian isolates. The virus M segments are the most diverse with up to 31 and 27% differences seen at the nt and amino acid levels, and even 1.9% amino acid difference found between the Kosova Hoti and another strain from Kosovo (9553-01). This suggests that distinct virus strains can coexist in highly endemic areas. PMID:18197964

  10. The complete genome sequence of a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus isolated from an endemic region in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedushaj Iusuf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Balkan region and Kosovo in particular, is a well-known Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF endemic region, with frequent epidemic outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring with a hospitalized case fatality of approximately 30%. Recent analysis of complete genome sequences of diverse CCHF virus strains showed that the genome plasticity of the virus is surprisingly high for an arthropod-borne virus. High levels of nucleotide and amino acid differences, frequent RNA segment reassortment and even RNA recombination have been recently described. This diversity illustrates the need to determine the complete genome sequence of CCHF virus representatives of all geographically distinct endemic areas, particularly in light of the high pathogenicity of the virus and its listing as a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we describe the first complete CCHF virus genome sequence of a virus (strain Kosova Hoti isolated from a hemorrhagic fever case in the Balkans. This virus strain was isolated from a fatal CCHF case, and passaged only twice on Vero E6 cells prior to sequence analysis. The virus total genome was found to be 19.2 kb in length, consisting of a 1672 nucleotide (nt S segment, a 5364 nt M segment and a 12150 nt L segment. Phylogenetic analysis of CCHF virus complete genomes placed the Kosova Hoti strain in the Europe/Turkey group, with highest similarity seen with Russian isolates. The virus M segments are the most diverse with up to 31 and 27% differences seen at the nt and amino acid levels, and even 1.9% amino acid difference found between the Kosova Hoti and another strain from Kosovo (9553-01. This suggests that distinct virus strains can coexist in highly endemic areas.

  11. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl-Emiliane Tien Chow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10m and oxygen-starved basin (200m waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n=5010 had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI’s non-redundant ‘nr’ database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  12. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Sequence Database: an expanded data model integrating natural language text and sequence analysis programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, R; Machekano, R; Gonzales, M J; Dupnik, K; Schapiro, J M; Shafer, R W

    2001-01-01

    The HIV Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Sequence Database is an on-line relational database that catalogs evolutionary and drug-related sequence variation in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease enzymes, the molecular targets of anti-HIV therapy (http://hivdb.stanford.edu). The database contains a compilation of nearly all published HIV RT and protease sequences, including submissions from International Collaboration databases and sequences published in journal articles. Sequences are linked to data about the source of the sequence sample and the antiretroviral drug treatment history of the individual from whom the isolate was obtained. During the past year 3500 sequences have been added and the data model has been expanded to include drug susceptibility data on sequenced isolates. Database content has also been integrated with didactic text and the output of two sequence analysis programs.

  13. Genomic sequences of human infection of avian-origin influenza A(H7N9) virus in Zhejiang province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈寅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the etiology and genomic sequences of human infection of avian-origin influenza A (H7N9) virus from Zhejiang province.Methods Viral RNA was extracted from patients of suspected H7N9

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Peste des Petits Ruminants Virus Recovered from Wild Bharal in Tibet, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jingyue; Wang, Qinghua; Parida, Satya; Liu, Chunju; Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Wenji

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, here we announce the complete genome sequence of a field isolate of Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) derived from macerated rectal tissue of a free living bharal (Pseudois nayaur) that displayed clinical disease consistent with severe infection with PPRV. Further, we compare the full genome of this isolate, termed PPRV Tibet/Bharal/2008, with previously available PPRV genomes, including those of virus isolates from domestic small ruminants local to the area where the reported isolate was collected. The current sequence is phylogenetically classified as a lineage IV virus, sharing high levels of sequence identity with previously described Tibetan PPRV isolates. Indeed, across the entire genome, only 26 nucleotide differences (0.16% nucleotide variation) and, consequently, 9 amino acid changes were present compared to sequences of locally derived viruses. PMID:22966182

  15. Sequence-based identification and characterization of nosocomial influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonges, M.; Rahamat-Langendoen, J.; Meijer, A.; Niesters, H. G.; Koopmans, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Highly transmissible viruses such as influenza are a potential source of nosocomial infections and thereby cause increased patient morbidity and mortality. Aim: To assess whether influenza virus sequence data can be used to link nosocomial influenza transmission between individuals. Meth

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Chikungunya Virus Strains Isolated in Mexico: First Detection of Imported and Autochthonous Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna; Fragoso-Fonseca, David Esaú; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Núñez-León, Alma; Torres-Rodríguez, María de la Luz; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruíz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus, an alphavirus of the Togaviridae family, is responsible for acute polyarthralgia epidemics. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two chikungunya virus strains, InDRE04 and InDRE51, identified in the Mexican states of Jalisco and Chiapas in 2014. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both strains belong to the Asian genotype. PMID:25953170

  17. Full-Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H1N1 Swine Influenza Virus Isolated from Pigs in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Baioni, Laura; Luppi, Andrea; Moreno, Ana; Castellan, Alberto; Foni, Emanuela

    2013-10-03

    In this study, the full-genome sequence of a novel reassortant H1N1 swine influenza virus (SIV) is reported. The isolate has a hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, but it carries the seven genome segments of the avian-origin H1N1 SIV currently circulating in European pig farms.

  18. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host.

  19. Identifying recombinants in human and primate immunodeficiency virus sequence alignments using quartet scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Darren P

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombination has a profound impact on the evolution of viruses, but characterizing recombination patterns in molecular sequences remains a challenging endeavor. Despite its importance in molecular evolutionary studies, identifying the sequences that exhibit such patterns has received comparatively less attention in the recombination detection framework. Here, we extend a quartet-mapping based recombination detection method to enable identification of recombinant sequences without prior specifications of either query and reference sequences. Through simulations we evaluate different recombinant identification statistics and significance tests. We compare the quartet approach with triplet-based methods that employ additional heuristic tests to identify parental and recombinant sequences. Results Analysis of phylogenetic simulations reveal that identifying the descendents of relatively old recombination events is a challenging task for all methods available, and that quartet scanning performs relatively well compared to the triplet based methods. The use of quartet scanning is further demonstrated by analyzing both well-established and putative HIV-1 recombinant strains. In agreement with recent findings, we provide evidence that the presumed circulating recombinant CRF02_AG is a 'pure' lineage, whereas the presumed parental lineage subtype G has a recombinant origin. We also demonstrate HIV-1 intrasubtype recombination, confirm the hybrid origin of SIV in chimpanzees and further disentangle the recombinant history of SIV lineages in a primate immunodeficiency virus data set. Conclusion Quartet scanning makes a valuable addition to triplet-based methods for identifying recombinant sequences without prior specifications of either query and reference sequences. The new method is available in the VisRD v.3.0 package http://www.cmp.uea.ac.uk/~vlm/visrd.

  20. Complete genome sequence and evolution analysis of Eimeria stiedai RNA virus 1, a novel member of the family Totiviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Caiyan; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianhua; Gong, Pengtao; Yang, Ju; Li, He; Cai, Xuepeng; Zhang, Xichen

    2016-12-01

    Eimeria stiedai (E. stiedai) is a coccidian that infects the liver of the domestic rabbit and may cause severe hepatic coccidiosis. Virus-like particles in E. stiedai were discovered by Revets et al. However, the complete genome sequence of the E. stiedai virus has yet to be determined. A novel virus was isolated from E. stiedai in the present study. The complete genome sequence of the E. stiedai virus was 6219 bp in length and contained two open reading frames (ORFs) with a tetranucleotide overlap (AUGA). ORF1 (2400 bp) encoded a putative coat protein of 799 amino acids (86.471 kDa) that exhibited a high level of amino acid sequence similarity to that of Eimeria tenella (E. tenella) RNA virus 1 (EtRV1; 43 % identity, NC_026140), whereas ORF2 (3303 bp) encoded a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of 1100 amino acids (118.850 kDa) that exhibited a high level of amino acid sequence similarity to that of the E. tenella RNA virus 1 (EtRV1; 51 % identity, NC_026140). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the E. stiedai virus was a new member of the family Totiviridae. The sequence data provided sufficient information for classification of eimeriaviruses.

  1. Enhanced methods for unbiased deep sequencing of Lassa and Ebola RNA viruses from clinical and biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matranga, Christian B; Andersen, Kristian G; Winnicki, Sarah; Busby, Michele; Gladden, Adrianne D; Tewhey, Ryan; Stremlau, Matthew; Berlin, Aaron; Gire, Stephen K; England, Eleina; Moses, Lina M; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Folarin, Onikepe; Goba, Augustine; Kahn, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Honko, Anna; Hensley, Lisa; Happi, Christian; Garry, Robert F; Malboeuf, Christine M; Birren, Bruce W; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a robust RNA sequencing method for generating complete de novo assemblies with intra-host variant calls of Lassa and Ebola virus genomes in clinical and biological samples. Our method uses targeted RNase H-based digestion to remove contaminating poly(rA) carrier and ribosomal RNA. This depletion step improves both the quality of data and quantity of informative reads in unbiased total RNA sequencing libraries. We have also developed a hybrid-selection protocol to further enrich the viral content of sequencing libraries. These protocols have enabled rapid deep sequencing of both Lassa and Ebola virus and are broadly applicable to other viral genomics studies.

  2. Isolation of a complete circular virus genome sequence from an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Zachary R.; Runckel, Charles; Fuchs, Jerome; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Mindell, David P.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.; Dumbacher, John P.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of a circular virus isolated from samples of an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract. The genome is 2,152 bp in length and is most similar (30 to 44.5% amino acid identity) to the genome sequences of other single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) circular viruses belonging to the gemycircularvirus group.

  3. Target-dependent enrichment of virions determines the reduction of high-throughput sequencing in virus discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi Holm Jensen

    Full Text Available Viral infections cause many different diseases stemming both from well-characterized viral pathogens but also from emerging viruses, and the search for novel viruses continues to be of great importance. High-throughput sequencing is an important technology for this purpose. However, viral nucleic acids often constitute a minute proportion of the total genetic material in a sample from infected tissue. Techniques to enrich viral targets in high-throughput sequencing have been reported, but the sensitivity of such methods is not well established. This study compares different library preparation techniques targeting both DNA and RNA with and without virion enrichment. By optimizing the selection of intact virus particles, both by physical and enzymatic approaches, we assessed the effectiveness of the specific enrichment of viral sequences as compared to non-enriched sample preparations by selectively looking for and counting read sequences obtained from shotgun sequencing. Using shotgun sequencing of total DNA or RNA, viral targets were detected at concentrations corresponding to the predicted level, providing a foundation for estimating the effectiveness of virion enrichment. Virion enrichment typically produced a 1000-fold increase in the proportion of DNA virus sequences. For RNA virions the gain was less pronounced with a maximum 13-fold increase. This enrichment varied between the different sample concentrations, with no clear trend. Despite that less sequencing was required to identify target sequences, it was not evident from our data that a lower detection level was achieved by virion enrichment compared to shotgun sequencing.

  4. Immunotherapeutic Intervention against Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Pedrazzoli, Simona Secondino, Vittorio Perfetti, Patrizia Comoli, Daniela Montagna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in systemic therapy for sarcoma have produced, over the last two decades, relatively short-term benefits for the majority of patient. Among the novel biologic therapeutics that will likely increase our ability to cure human cancer in the years to come, immunotherapy is one of the most promising approaches. While past attempts to use immunotherapy have failed to dramatically shift the paradigm of care for the treatment of patients with sarcoma, major advances in basic and translational research have resulted, in more recent years, in clinical trial activity that is now beginning to generate promising results. However, to move from “proof of principle” to large scale clinical applicability, we need well-designed, multi-institutional clinical trials, along with continuous laboratory research to explore further the immunological characteristics of individual sarcoma subtypes and the consequent tailoring of therapy.

  5. [Sarcoma of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberthür, F; Almendral, A C; Feichter, G; Torhorst, J K

    1992-05-01

    Sarcoma of the breast represents only 0.2-1% of all mammary malignancies. This study reports 5 such cases, including 2 osteosarcomas, 1 fibro-, 1 lipo-, and 1 malignant fibrous sarcoma. The treatment used was mastectomy in 3 cases with excision of axillary lymph nodes. The remaining 2 patients were treated by simple mastectomy whereby 1 of these received a immediate reconstruction with a prosthesis. 1 patient demonstrated local recurrence and died. The remaining 4 patients did not develop neither metastases nor local recurrence and are still alive after an observing period between 12 months up to 17 years. Today, first-line treatment is wide local excision or simple mastectomy. Excision of the axillary lymphatics, adjuvant radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have been disappointing in the treatment of breast sarcoma.

  6. Sequence analysis for the complete proviral genome of reticuloendotheliosis virus Chinese strain HA9901

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The genomic DNA extracted from chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) infected with a Chinese field isolate HA9901 of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) was used as the template to amplify the REV proviral genomic cDNA by PCR with 6 pairs of primers according to published sequences. Six overlapping fragments were amplified, cloned into the TA vector and sequenced, including a fragment which was amplified from the circular proviral cDNA and covering both 5'- and 3'-ends. The complete sequence of the whole genome was established and analyzed with a DNAstar software. Comparisons of the sequence with two other strains demonstrated that the genomes of REV were relatively conservative, the homogenecity for all genes or LTR fragments of the 3 strains was over 92%, no matter whether they were isolated from different species and regions in different years. But, the homology of Chinese strain HA9901 to a fowl pox virus-associated strain from Chickens was higher than that to strain SNV isolated from ducks.

  7. Oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing for genotyping of hepatitis B virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Zhong Wang; Guo-Xiang Wu; Li-Bo Luo; Min Chen; Li-Hua Ruan

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing for genotyping of hepatitis B virus in Chinese patients with chronic hepatitis B.METHODS: Mixture of samples with different genotypes and clinical serum samples from 126 chronic hepatitis B patients was tested for hepatitis B virus genotypes by oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing of PCR products, respectively. Clinical performances, time required and costs of the three assays were evaluated.RESULTS: Oligonucleotide chips and real-time PCR detected 1% and 0.1% genotypes, respectively, in mixed samples. Of the 126 clinical samples from patients with chronic hepatitis B, genotype B was detected in 41(33%), 41 (33%) and 45 (36%) samples, and genotype C in 76 (60%), 76 (60%) and 81 (64%) samples, by oligonucleotide chip, real-time PCR and sequencing,respectively. Oligonucleotide chip and real-time PCR detected mixed genotypes B and C in 9 samples. Realtime PCR was the rapidest and cheapest among the three assays.CONCLUSION: Oligonucleotide chip and real-time PCR are able to detect mixed genotypes, while sequencing only detects the dominant genotype in clinical samples.

  8. The complete genome sequences of a Peruvian and a Colombian isolate of Andean potato latent virus and partial sequences of further isolates suggest the existence of two distinct potato-infecting tymovirus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuze, Jan; Koenig, Renate; De Souza, Joao; Vetten, Heinrich Josef; Muller, Giovanna; Flores, Betty; Ziebell, Heiko; Cuellar, Wilmer

    2013-05-01

    The complete genomic RNA sequences of the tymovirus isolates Hu and Col from potato which originally had been considered to be strains of the same virus species, i.e. Andean potato latent virus (APLV), were determined by siRNA sequencing and assembly, and found to share only c. 65% nt sequence identity. This result together with those of serological tests and comparisons of the coat protein gene sequences of additional tymovirus isolates from potato suggest that the species Andean potato latent virus should be subdivided into two species, i.e. APLV and Andean potato mild mosaic virus (APMMV). Primers were designed for the broad specificity detection of both viruses.

  9. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein genes of alstroemeria mosaic virus and amazon lily mosaic virus, a tentative species of genus potyvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, S; Terami, F; Furuya, H; Naito, H; Fukumoto, F

    2004-09-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the 3' terminal region of the genomes of Alstroemeria mosaic virus (AlsMV) and the Amazon lily mosaic virus (ALiMV) have been determined. These sequences contain the complete coding region of the viral coat protein (CP) gene followed by a 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). AlsMV and ALiMV share 74.9% identity in the amino acid sequence of the CP, and 55.6% identity in the nucleotide sequence of the 3'-UTR. Phylogenetic analysis of these CP genes and 3'-UTRs in relation to those of 79 potyvirus species revealed that AlsMV and ALiMV should be assigned to the Potato virus Y (PVY) subgroup. AlsMV and ALiMV were concluded to have arisen independently within the PVY subgroup.

  10. Complete nucleotide sequences of two adjacent early vaccinia virus genes located within the inverted terminal repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, S; Gershowitz, A; Moss, B

    1982-11-01

    The proximal part of the 10,000-base pair (bp) inverted terminal repetition of vaccinia virus DNA encodes at least three early mRNAs. A 2,236-bp segment of the repetition was sequenced to characterize two of the genes. This task was facilitated by constructing a series of recombinants containing overlapping deletions; oligonucleotide linkers with synthetic restriction sites provided points for radioactive labeling before sequencing by the chemical degradation method of Maxam and Gilbert (Methods Enzymol. 65:499-560, 1980). The ends of the transcripts were mapped by hybridizing labeled DNA fragments to early viral RNA and resolving nuclease S1-protected fragments in sequencing gels, by sequencing cDNA clones, and from the lengths of the RNAs. The nucleotide sequences for at least 60 bp upstream of both transcriptional initiation sites are more than 80% adenine . thymine rich and contain long runs of adenines and thymines with some homology to procaryotic and eucaryotic consensus sequences. The gene transcribed in the rightward direction encodes an RNA of approximately 530 nucleotides with a single open reading frame of 420 nucleotides. Preceding the first AUG, there is a heptanucleotide that can hybridize to the 3' end of 18S rRNA with only one mismatch. The derived amino acid sequence of the protein indicated a molecular weight of 15,500. The gene transcribed in the leftward direction encodes an RNA 1,000 to 1,100 nucleotides long with an open reading frame of 996 nucleotides and a leader sequence of only 5 to 6 nucleotides. The derived amino acid sequence of this protein indicated a molecular weight of 38,500. The 3' ends of the two transcripts were located within 100 bp of each other. Although there are adenine . thymine-rich clusters near the putative transcriptional termination sites, specific AATAAA polyadenylic acid signal sequences are absent.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Mulberry Vein Banding Associated Virus, a New Tospovirus Infecting Mulberry.

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    Jiaorong Meng

    Full Text Available Mulberry vein banding associated virus (MVBaV that infects mulberry plants with typical vein banding symptoms had been identified as a tentative species of the genus Tospovirus based on the homology of N gene sequence to those of tospoviruses. In this study, the complete sequence of the tripartite RNA genome of MVBaV was determined and analyzed. The L RNA has 8905 nucleotides (nt and encodes the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of 2877 aa amino acids (aa in the viral complementary (vc strand. The RdRp of MVBaV shares the highest aa sequence identity (85.9% with that of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, and contains conserved motifs shared with those of the species of the genus Tospovirus. The M RNA contains 4731 nt and codes in ambisense arrangement for the NSm protein of 309 aa in the sense strand and the Gn/Gc glycoprotein precursor (GP of 1,124 aa in the vc strand. The NSm and GP of MVBaV share the highest aa sequence identities with those of Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV and Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV (83.2% and 84.3%, respectively. The S RNA is 3294 nt in length and contains two open reading frames (ORFs in an ambisense coding strategy, encoding a 439-aa non-structural protein (NSs and the 277-aa nucleocapsid protein (N, respectively. The NSs and N also share the highest aa sequence identity (71.1% and 74.4%, respectively with those of CaCV. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp, NSm, GP, NSs, and N proteins showed that MVBaV is most closely related to CaCV and GBNV and that these proteins cluster with those of the WSMoV serogroup, and that MVBaV seems to be a species bridging the two subgroups within the WSMoV serogroup of tospoviruses in evolutionary aspect, suggesting that MVBaV represents a distinct tospovirus. Analysis of S RNA sequence uncovered the highly conserved 5'-/3'-ends and the coding regions, and the variable region of IGR with divergent patterns among MVBaV isolates.

  12. [Moritz Kaposi and his sarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Anne; Quint, Koen D

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, Kaposi sarcoma is a multidisciplinary condition, not only observed by dermatologists. Since the HIV epidemic in the 80s and 90s of the last century, more insight into the aetiology of Kaposi sarcoma has been acquired. However, this sarcoma had already been described in 1872 by a Hungarian dermatologist named Moritz Kaposi (1832-1902). Kaposi described the entity as 'idiopathic multiple pigmented sarcoma of the skin'. This entity was an extraordinary diagnosis at that time, mostly observed in Jewish or Mediterranean men. In 1912, 10 years after the death of Moritz Kaposi, the entity name was changed to Kaposi sarcoma.

  13. DNase SISPA-next generation sequencing confirms Schmallenberg virus in Belgian field samples and identifies genetic variation in Europe.

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    Toon Rosseel

    Full Text Available In 2011, a novel Orthobunyavirus was identified in cattle and sheep in Germany and The Netherlands. This virus was named Schmallenberg virus (SBV. Later, presence of the virus was confirmed using real time RT-PCR in cases of congenital malformations of bovines and ovines in several European countries, including Belgium. In the absence of specific sequencing protocols for this novel virus we confirmed its presence in RT-qPCR positive field samples using DNase SISPA-next generation sequencing (NGS, a virus discovery method based on random amplification and next generation sequencing. An in vitro transcribed RNA was used to construct a standard curve allowing the quantification of viral RNA in the field samples. Two field samples of aborted lambs containing 7.66 and 7.64 log(10 RNA copies per µL total RNA allowed unambiguous identification of SBV. One sample yielded 192 SBV reads covering about 81% of the L segment, 56% of the M segment and 13% of the S segment. The other sample resulted in 8 reads distributed over the L and M segments. Three weak positive field samples (one from an aborted calf, two from aborted lambs containing virus quantities equivalent to 4.27-4.89 log(10 RNA copies per µL did not allow identification using DNase SISPA-NGS. This partial sequence information was compared to the whole genome sequence of SBV isolated from bovines in Germany, identifying several sequence differences. The applied viral discovery method allowed the confirmation of SBV in RT-qPCR positive brain samples. However, the failure to confirm SBV in weak PCR-positive samples illustrates the importance of the selection of properly targeted and fresh field samples in any virus discovery method. The partial sequences derived from the field samples showed several differences compared to the sequences from bovines in Germany, indicating sequence divergence within the epidemic.

  14. The feasibility of using high resolution genome sequencing of influenza A viruses to detect mixed infections and quasispecies.

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    Muthannan A Ramakrishnan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rapidly expanding availability of de novo sequencing technologies can greatly facilitate efforts to monitor the relatively high mutation rates of influenza A viruses and the detection of quasispecies. Both the mutation rates and the lineages of influenza A viruses are likely to play an important role in the natural history of these viruses and the emergence of phenotypically and antigenically distinct strains. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated quasispecies and mixed infections by de novo sequencing the whole genomes of 10 virus isolates, including eight avian influenza viruses grown in embryonated chicken eggs (six waterfowl isolates - five H3N2 and one H4N6; an H7N3 turkey isolate; and a bald eagle isolate with H1N1/H2N1 mixed infection, and two tissue cultured H3N2 swine influenza viruses. Two waterfowl cloacal swabs were included in the analysis. Full-length sequences of all segments were obtained with 20 to 787-X coverage for the ten viruses and one cloacal swab. The second cloacal swab yielded 15 influenza reads of approximately 230 bases, sufficient for bioinformatic inference of mixed infections or quasispecies. Genomic subpopulations or quasispecies of viruses were identified in four egg grown avian influenza isolates and one cell cultured swine virus. A bald eagle isolate and the second cloacal swab showed evidence of mixed infections with two (H1 and H2 and three (H1, H3, and H4 HA subtypes, respectively. Multiple sequence differences were identified between cloacal swab and the virus recovered using embryonated chicken eggs. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a new approach to comprehensively identify mixed infections and quasispecies in low passage influenza A isolates and cloacal swabs and add to the understanding of the ecology of influenza A virus populations.

  15. Nucleotide sequence of maize dwarf mosaic virus capsid protein gene and its expression in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赛吉庆; 康良仪; 黄忠; 史春霖; 田波; 谢友菊

    1995-01-01

    The 3’-terminal 1 279 nucleotide sequence of maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) genome has been determined. This sequence contains an open reading frame of 1023 nudeotides and a 3’ -non-coding region of 256 nucleotides. The open reading frame includes all of the coding regions for the viral capsid protein (CP) and part of the viral nuclear inclusion protein (Nib). The predicted viral CP consists of 313 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 35400. The amino acid sequence of the viral CP derived from MDMV cDNA shows about 47%-54% homology to that of 4 other potyviruses. The viral CP gene was constructed in frame with the lacZ gene in pUC19 plasmid and expressed in E. coli cells. The fusion polypeptide positively reacted in Western blot with an antiserum prepared against the native viral CP.

  16. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of chicken anaemia virus obtained from backyard and commercial chickens in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwayelu, D O; Todd, D; Olaleye, O D

    2008-12-01

    This work reports the first molecular analysis study of chicken anaemia virus (CAV) in backyard chickens in Africa using molecular cloning and sequence analysis to characterize CAV strains obtained from commercial chickens and Nigerian backyard chickens. Partial VP1 gene sequences were determined for three CAVs from commercial chickens and for six CAV variants present in samples from a backyard chicken. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the 6% and 4% nucleotide diversity obtained respectively for the commercial and backyard chicken strains translated to only 2% amino acid diversity for each breed. Overall, the amino acid composition of Nigerian CAVs was found to be highly conserved. Since the partial VP1 gene sequence of two backyard chicken cloned CAV strains (NGR/CI-8 and NGR/CI-9) were almost identical and evolutionarily closely related to the commercial chicken strains NGR-1, and NGR-4 and NGR-5, respectively, we concluded that CAV infections had crossed the farm boundary.

  17. Isolation and complete genome sequencing of Mimivirus bombay, a Giant Virus in sewage of Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirvan Chatterjee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the isolation and complete genome sequencing of a new Mimiviridae family member, infecting Acanthamoeba castellanii, from sewage in Mumbai, India. The isolated virus has a particle size of about 435 nm and a 1,182,200-bp genome. A phylogeny based on the DNA polymerase sequence placed the isolate as a new member of the Mimiviridae family lineage A and was named as Mimivirus bombay. Extensive presence of Mimiviridae family members in different environmental niches, with remarkably similar genome size and genetic makeup, point towards an evolutionary advantage that needs to be further investigated. The complete genome sequence of Mimivirus bombay was deposited at GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ under the accession number KU761889.

  18. Spectrum of Text Information Content in the RNA Sequence of the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filyukov, Alexander A.

    A new strategy to recognize patterns in the DNA sequences with functional significance is proposed. The strategy is based on the general definition of any individual organism as a Gibbsian ensemble of identical personal DNA molecules. This approach provides application of the methods of statistical thermodynamics of irreversible steady processes to genome informatics. The random processes theory and its Markov chains approximation lead in this approach directly to the definition of the generalized concept of evolution entropy and to the genuine measure of text information content in the sequences. Computer-assisted proofs of the existence of the nonequilibrium steady state conditions in genome molecule were obtained by investigation of the special type balance relations in the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) RNA sequence. The main maxima of the text information content were decoded and denominated. The established coding principles are connected with deviations from equilibrium conditions and from equipartition.

  19. Lymphangioma-Like Kaposi’s Sarcoma Presenting as Gangrene

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    Eitan R. Friedman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS is a multicentric vascular neoplasm associated with the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV. KS can occur in immunocompromised patients as well as certain populations in Africa or in the Mediterranean. Less than 5% of KS cases can present with lymphangioma-like kaposi sarcoma (LLKS, which can occur in all KS variants. KS presents with characteristic skin lesions that appear as brown, red, blue, or purple plaques and nodules. The lesions are initially flat and if untreated will become raised. LLKS presents similarly to KS but is associated with severe lymphedema and soft tissue swelling as well as bulla-like vascular lesions. We present the case of an 85-year-old Lebanese, HIV negative, man who presented with a swollen and painful right lower extremity accompanied by necrotic lesions. Wound cultures were positive, and we began the work-up for secondarily infected gangrene. However, skin biopsy results revealed that he in fact had lymphangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma, which allowed us to shift our management. Advanced Kaposi’s sarcoma can present similar to gangrene. It is important to recognize the typical skin lesions of KS and not to overlook Kaposi’s sarcoma or LLKS within the differential.

  20. dsRNA provides sequence-dependent protection against infectious myonecrosis virus in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, J Dustin; Mogler, Mark A; Loy, Duan S; Janke, Bruce; Kamrud, Kurt; Scura, Edward D; Harris, D L Hank; Bartholomay, Lyric C

    2012-04-01

    Viral diseases are significant impediments to the sustainability of shrimp aquaculture. In addition to endemic disease, new viral diseases continue to emerge and cause significant impact on the shrimp industry. Disease caused by infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV) has caused tremendous losses in farmed Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) since it emerged in Brazil and translocated to Indonesia. There are no existing antiviral interventions, outside of pathogen exclusion, to mitigate disease in commercial shrimp operations. Here, we describe an iterative process of panning the genome of IMNV to discover RNA interference trigger sequences that initiate a robust and long-lasting protective response against IMNV in L. vannamei. Using this process, a single, low dose (0.02 µg) of an 81 or 153 bp fragment, with sequence corresponding to putative cleavage protein 1 in ORF1, protected 100 % of animals from disease and mortality caused by IMNV. Furthermore, animals that were treated with highly efficacious dsRNA survived an initial infection and were resistant to subsequent infections over 50 days later with a 100-fold greater dose of virus. This protection is probably sequence dependent, because targeting the coding regions for the polymerase or structural genes of IMNV conferred lesser or no protection. Interestingly, non-sequence specific dsRNA did not provide any degree of protection to animals as had been described for other shrimp viruses. Our data indicate that the targeted region for dsRNA is a crucial factor in maximizing the degree of protection and lowering the dose required to induce a protective effect against IMNV infection in shrimp.

  1. HBVRegDB: Annotation, comparison, detection and visualization of regulatory elements in hepatitis B virus sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firth Andrew E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The many Hepadnaviridae sequences available have widely varied functional annotation. The genomes are very compact (~3.2 kb but contain multiple layers of functional regulatory elements in addition to coding regions. Key regions are subject to purifying selection, as mutations in these regions will produce non-functional viruses. Results These genomic sequences have been organized into a structured database to facilitate research at the molecular level. HBVRegDB is a comparative genomic analysis tool with an integrated underlying sequence database. The database contains genomic sequence data from representative viruses. In addition to INSDC and RefSeq annotation, HBVRegDB also contains expert and systematically calculated annotations (e.g. promoters and comparative genome analysis results (e.g. blastn, tblastx. It also contains analyses based on curated HBV alignments. Information about conserved regions – including primary conservation (e.g. CDS-Plotcon and RNA secondary structure predictions (e.g. Alidot – is integrated into the database. A large amount of data is graphically presented using the GBrowse (Generic Genome Browser adapted for analysis of viral genomes. Flexible query access is provided based on any annotated genomic feature. Novel regulatory motifs can be found by analysing the annotated sequences. Conclusion HBVRegDB serves as a knowledge database and as a comparative genomic analysis tool for molecular biologists investigating HBV. It is publicly available and complementary to other viral and HBV focused datasets and tools http://hbvregdb.otago.ac.nz. The availability of multiple and highly annotated sequences of viral genomes in one database combined with comparative analysis tools facilitates detection of novel genomic elements.

  2. Sequence-Specific Fidelity Alterations Associated with West Nile Virus Attenuation in Mosquitoes.

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    Greta A Van Slyke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High rates of error-prone replication result in the rapid accumulation of genetic diversity of RNA viruses. Recent studies suggest that mutation rates are selected for optimal viral fitness and that modest variations in replicase fidelity may be associated with viral attenuation. Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses are unique in their requirement for host cycling and may necessitate substantial genetic and phenotypic plasticity. In order to more thoroughly investigate the correlates, mechanisms and consequences of arbovirus fidelity, we selected fidelity variants of West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus utilizing selection in the presence of a mutagen. We identified two mutations in the WNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase associated with increased fidelity, V793I and G806R, and a single mutation in the WNV methyltransferase, T248I, associated with decreased fidelity. Both deep-sequencing and in vitro biochemical assays confirmed strain-specific differences in both fidelity and mutational bias. WNV fidelity variants demonstrated host-specific alterations to replicative fitness in vitro, with modest attenuation in mosquito but not vertebrate cell culture. Experimental infections of colonized and field populations of Cx. quinquefaciatus demonstrated that WNV fidelity alterations are associated with a significantly impaired capacity to establish viable infections in mosquitoes. Taken together, these studies (i demonstrate the importance of allosteric interactions in regulating mutation rates, (ii establish that mutational spectra can be both sequence and strain-dependent, and (iii display the profound phenotypic consequences associated with altered replication complex function of flaviviruses.

  3. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation. PMID:28165016

  4. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-02-06

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation.

  5. Cloning and Sequence of Glycoprotein H Gene of Duck Plague Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xian-jie; WANG Jun-wei; MA Bo

    2006-01-01

    The glycoprotein H (gH) gene homologue of duck plague virus (DPV) was cloned by degenerate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. It was located immediately downstream from the thymidine kinase gene (TK). In addition,the 3'-end of the gene homologue to herpesvirus UL21 was located downstream from the gH gene. DPV gH gene open reading frame (ORF) was 2 505 bp in length and its primary translation product was a polypeptide of 834 amino acids long.It possessed several characteristics of membrane glycoproteins, including an N-terminal hydrophobic signal sequence,an external domain containing eight putative N-linked glycosylation sites, a C-terminal transmembrane domain, and a charged cytoplasmic tail. Comparison with other herpesvirus revealed identities of 20.2, 25.1, 23.0, 23.0, 26.5 and 26.0% with the gH counterparts of the human herpesvirus virus 1 (HSV1), equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV4), bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1), pseudorabies virus (PRV), gallid herpesvirus 2 (GHV2) and gallid herpesvirus 3 (GHV3), respectively.

  6. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of tobacco mosaic virus isolated from Viciafaba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雪平; 薛朝阳; 陈青; 戚益军; 李德葆

    2000-01-01

    Based on reported TMV-U1 sequence, primers were designed and fragments covering the entire genome of TMV broad bean strain (TMV-B) were obtained with RT-PCR. These fragments were cloned and sequenced and the 5’ and 3’ end sequences of genome were confirmed with RACE. The complete sequence of TMV-B comprises 6 395 nucleotides (nt) and four open reading frames, which correspond to 126 ku (1 116 amino acids), 183 ku (1 616 amino acids), 30 ku (268 amino acids) and 17.5 ku proteins (159 amino acids). The complete nucleotide sequence of TMV-B is 99.4% identical to that of TMV-U1. The two virus isolates share the same sequence of 5’, 3’ non-coding region and 17.5 K ORF, and 6, 1 and 3 amino acid changes are found in 126 K protein, 54 K protein and 30 K protein, respectively. The possible mechanism on the infection of TMV-B in Vicia faba is discussed.

  7. Analysis of hepatitis B virus genotyping and drug resistance gene mutations based on massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yingxin; Zhang, Yinxin; Mei, Yanhua; Wang, Yuqi; Liu, Tao; Guan, Yanfang; Tan, Deming; Liang, Yu; Yang, Ling; Yi, Xin

    2013-11-01

    Drug resistance to nucleoside analogs is a serious problem worldwide. Both drug resistance gene mutation detection and HBV genotyping are helpful for guiding clinical treatment. Total HBV DNA from 395 patients who were treated with single or multiple drugs including Lamivudine, Adefovir, Entecavir, Telbivudine, Tenofovir and Emtricitabine were sequenced using the HiSeq 2000 sequencing system and validated using the 3730 sequencing system. In addition, a mixed sample of HBV plasmid DNA was used to determine the cutoff value for HiSeq-sequencing, and 52 of the 395 samples were sequenced three times to evaluate the repeatability and stability of this technology. Of the 395 samples sequenced using both HiSeq and 3730 sequencing, the results from 346 were consistent, and the results from 49 were inconsistent. Among the 49 inconsistent results, 13 samples were detected as drug-resistance-positive using HiSeq but negative using 3730, and the other 36 samples showed a higher number of drug-resistance-positive gene mutations using HiSeq 2000 than using 3730. Gene mutations had an apparent frequency of 1% as assessed by the plasmid testing. Therefore, a 1% cutoff value was adopted. Furthermore, the experiment was repeated three times, and the same results were obtained in 49/52 samples using the HiSeq sequencing system. HiSeq sequencing can be used to analyze HBV gene mutations with high sensitivity, high fidelity, high throughput and automation and is a potential method for hepatitis B virus gene mutation detection and genotyping.

  8. Small RNA populations for two unrelated viruses exhibit different biases in strand polarity and proximity to terminal sequences in the insect host Homalodisca vitripennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing was used to analyze virus-derived small RNA (vsRNA) profiles for two taxonomically unrelated viruses infecting Homalodisca vitripennis, the glassy winged sharpshooter. Homalodisca coagulata virus-1 (HoCV-1), family Dicistroviridae, and Homalodisca vitripennis virus (HoVRV)...

  9. Serologic association of human herpesvirus eight with posttransplant Kaposi's sarcoma in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qunibi, W; Al-Furayh, O; Almeshari, K; Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Ross, D; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1998-02-27

    In Saudi Arabia, Kaposi's sarcoma occurs in 4.1% of renal transplant recipients and accounts for 70% of malignancies in this group. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) has been identified in the DNA of many of these patients. The association between HHV8 and Kaposi's sarcoma was investigated further in post-renal transplant Kaposi's sarcoma patients from a tertiary care hospital (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (n = 14), and non-Kaposi's sarcoma controls with renal transplant (n = 18), chronic renal failure (n = 14), other cancers that did not affect renal function (n = 15), and healthy volunteers (n = 15). The median time from transplant to Kaposi's sarcoma was 13 months. A serum sample was assumed to have antibodies to HHV8 if antibody to either p40 or sVCA was detected. The prevalence of HHV8 seroreactivity was 13/14 (93%) in cases, 5/18 (28%) in renal transplants without Kaposi's sarcoma, and 11/62 (18%) in the aggregate control group. HHV8 seroreactivity was significantly more common (p 0.001) among transplant patients with Kaposi's sarcoma than those without this cancer (odds ratio, 33.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.96-904). These findings suggest an etiologic link between HHV8 and Kaposi's sarcoma presumably due to immunologic or cellular factors that influence host-virus interactions.

  10. Infectivity and complete nucleotide sequence of cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus isolate Cm cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Sun-Ju; Hong, Jin-Sung; Lee, Gung Pyo

    2014-07-01

    Three isolates of cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus (CFMMV) were collected from melon, cucumber, and pumpkin plants in Korea. A full-length cDNA clone of CFMMV-Cm (melon isolate) was produced and evaluated for infectivity after T7 transcription in vitro (pT7CF-Cmflc). The complete CFMMV genome sequence of the infectious clone pT7CF-Cmflc was determined. The genome of CFMMV-Cm consisted of 6,571 nucleotides and shared high nucleotide sequence identity (98.8 %) with the Israel isolate of CFMMV. Based on the infectious clone pT7CF-Cmflc, a CaMV 35S-promoter driven cDNA clone (p35SCF-Cmflc) was subsequently constructed and sequenced. Mechanical inoculation with RNA transcripts of pT7CF-Cmflc and agro-inoculation with p35SCF-Cmflc resulted in systemic infection of cucumber and melon, producing symptoms similar to those produced by CFMMV-Cm. Progeny virus in infected plants was detected by RT-PCR, western blot assay, and transmission electron microscopy.

  11. Partial sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Soybean mosaic virus isolated in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polischuk V. P.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to compare the biological and molecular properties of Ukrainian soybean mosaic virus (SMV isolates with those of known strains or isolates from other countries, and to trace their possible origin. The methods of mechanical inoculation, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis have been used. Results. Five SMV isolates have been collected and biologically purified from breeding plots in Vinnitsa region of Ukraine. It has been found that all these isolates show the same reaction patterns when infecting 11 differential soybean cultivars. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences of the coat protein coding region and P1 coding region revealed strong genetic relationships between representative Ukrainian (UA1Gr and SMV-VA2 isolates which together were sorted in one clade with G2 strain. The investigation of sequence identity showed that different genomic regions of SMV were under different evolutionary constraints. Conclusions. SMV, isolated in Ukraine for the first time, belongs to the G2 strain group that is widespread in North America. The SMV isolates obtained in this work may be employed in the Ukrainian national breeding programs to create soybean with durable virus resistance.

  12. Complete nucleotide sequence of watermelon chlorotic stunt virus originating from Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Akhtar J; Akhtar, Sohail; Briddon, Rob W; Ammara, Um; Al-Matrooshi, Abdulrahman M; Mansoor, Shahid

    2012-07-01

    Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV) is a bipartite begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) that causes economic losses to cucurbits, particularly watermelon, across the Middle East and North Africa. Recently squash (Cucurbita moschata) grown in an experimental field in Oman was found to display symptoms such as leaf curling, yellowing and stunting, typical of a begomovirus infection. Sequence analysis of the virus isolated from squash showed 97.6-99.9% nucleotide sequence identity to previously described WmCSV isolates for the DNA A component and 93-98% identity for the DNA B component. Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation to Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in the development of symptoms fifteen days post inoculation. This is the first bipartite begomovirus identified in Oman. Overall the Oman isolate showed the highest levels of sequence identity to a WmCSV isolate originating from Iran, which was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. This suggests that WmCSV present in Oman has been introduced from Iran. The significance of this finding is discussed.

  13. Sequence analysis of peste des petits ruminants virus from ibexes in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J; Zheng, X G; Adili, G Z; Wei, Y R; Ma, W G; Xue, X M; Mi, X Y; Yi, Z; Chen, S J; Du, W; Muhan, M; Duhaxi, C; Han, T; Gudai, B; Huang, J

    2016-06-03

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is an infectious disease caused by peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). While PPR mainly affects domestic goats and sheep, it also affects wild ungulates such as ibex, blue sheep, and gazelle, although there are few reports regarding PPRV infection in wild animals. Between January 2015 and February 2015, it was found for the first time that wild ibexes died from PPRV infection in Bazhou, Xinjiang, China, where a total of 38 ibexes (including young and adult ibexes) were found to have died abnormally from PPR-related issues. First, we tested for the presence of the F gene of PPRV by RT-PCR. Then, we compared the sequence of the isolated F gene from the ibex strain, termed PPRV Xinjiang/Ibex/2015, with those previously identified from small domestic ruminants from local areas near where the reported isolate was collected as well as those from other regions. The current sequence was phylogenetically classified as a lineage IV virus, and shared a high level of sequence identity (99.7%) with a previously described Xinjiang PPRV isolate.

  14. Complete genome sequence of a novel extrachromosomal virus-like element identified in planarian Girardia tigrina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Loura L

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planarians are widely used as models for investigation of pattern formation and studies on genetic variation in populations. Despite extensive information on the biology and genetics of planaria, the occurrence and distribution of viruses in these animals remains an unexplored area of research. Results Using a combination of Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH and Mirror Orientation Selection (MOS, we compared the genomes of two strains of freshwater planarian, Girardia tigrina. The novel extrachromosomal DNA-containing virus-like element denoted PEVE (Planarian Extrachromosomal Virus-like Element was identified in one planarian strain. The PEVE genome (about 7.5 kb consists of two unique regions (Ul and Us flanked by inverted repeats. Sequence analyses reveal that PEVE comprises two helicase-like sequences in the genome, of which the first is a homolog of a circoviral replication initiator protein (Rep, and the second is similar to the papillomavirus E1 helicase domain. PEVE genome exists in at least two variant forms with different arrangements of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA stretches that correspond to the Us and Ul regions. Using PCR analysis and whole-mount in situ hybridization, we characterized PEVE distribution and expression in the planarian body. Conclusions PEVE is the first viral element identified in free-living flatworms. This element differs from all known viruses and viral elements, and comprises two potential helicases that are homologous to proteins from distant viral phyla. PEVE is unevenly distributed in the worm body, and is detected in specific parenchyma cells.

  15. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable ext

  16. Sarcoma Foundation of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Google+ Twitter LinkedIn YouTube © 2017 Sarcoma Foundation of America | All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Website Design & Hosting by 270net Technologies, Inc. X - Enter Your Location - - or - Get your current location Home About Us History People Public Filings News & Media SFA in the ...

  17. Epidemic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and its treatment, see the AIDSinfo website . Nonepidemic Gay-related Kaposi Sarcoma There is a type of ... better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artist, ...

  18. Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and its treatment, see the AIDSinfo website . Nonepidemic Gay-related Kaposi Sarcoma There is a type of ... better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artist, ...

  19. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable

  20. Synovial sarcoma mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    Human synovial sarcoma is caused by a chromosome translocation, which fuses DNA encoding SSX to that encoding the SS18 protein. Kadoch and Crabtree now show that the resulting cellular transformation stems from disruption of the normal architecture and function of the human SWI/SNF (BAF) complex....

  1. Microenvironmental targets in sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika eEhnman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are rare malignant tumors affecting all age groups. They are typically classified according to their resemblance to corresponding normal tissue. Their heterogeneous features, for example in terms of disease-driving genetic aberrations and body location, complicate both disease classification and development of novel treatment regimens. Many years of failure of improved patient outcome in clinical trials has lead to the conclusion that novel targeted therapies are likely needed in combination with current multimodality regimens. Sarcomas have not, in contrast to the common carcinomas, been the subject for larger systematic studies on how tumor behavior relates to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. There is consequently an urgent need for identifying suitable molecular targets, not only in tumor cells, but also in the tumor microenvironment. This review discusses preclinical and clinical data about potential molecular targets in sarcomas. Studies on targeted therapies involving the tumor microenvironment are prioritized. A greater understanding of the biological context is expected to facilitate more successful design of future clinical trials in sarcoma.

  2. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Because the expansion of the literature on this disease, it is no longer feasible to cite all relevant publications ...

  3. Management of Bone Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Christina J; Basu-Mallick, Atrayee; Abraham, John A

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of bone sarcoma requires careful planning and involvement of an experienced multidisciplinary team. Significant advancements in systemic therapy, radiation, and surgery in recent years have contributed to improved functional and survival outcomes for patients with these difficult tumors, and emerging technologies hold promise for further advancement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High-dose zidovudine plus valganciclovir for Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus-associated multicentric Castleman disease: a pilot study of virus-activated cytotoxic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Aleman, Karen; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Wang, Victoria; Marshall, Vickie; Pittaluga, Stefania; Steinberg, Seth M.; Tosato, Giovanna; Whitby, Denise; Little, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV)–associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder most commonly observed in HIV-infected patients. It is characterized by KSHV-infected plasmablasts that frequently express lytic genes. Patients manifest inflammatory symptoms attributed to overproduction of KSHV viral IL-6, human IL-6, and human IL-6. There is no standard therapy and no established response criteria. We investigated an approach targeting 2 KSHV lytic genes, ORF36 and ORF21, the protein of which, respectively, phosphorylate ganciclovir and zidovudine to toxic moieties. In a pilot study, 14 HIV-infected patients with symptomatic KSHV-MCD received high-dose zidovudine (600 mg orally every 6 hours) and the oral prodrug, valganciclovir (900 mg orally every 12 hours). Responses were evaluated using new response criteria. A total of 86% of patients attained major clinical responses and 50% attained major biochemical responses. Median progression-free survival was 6 months. With 43 months of median follow-up, overall survival was 86% at 12 months and beyond. At the time of best response, the patients showed significant improvements in C-reactive protein, albumin, platelets, human IL-6, IL-10, and KSHV viral load. The most common toxicities were hematologic. These observations provide evidence that therapy designed to target cells with lytic KSHV replication has activity in KSHV-MCD. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00099073. PMID:21487108

  5. 2b or Not 2b: Experimental Evolution of Functional Exogenous Sequences in a Plant RNA Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Mark P.; Ambrós, Silvia; Carrasco, José L.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is pervasive in viruses and thought to be a key mechanism in their evolution. On the other hand, strong selective constraints against increasing genome size are an impediment for HGT, rapidly purging horizontally transferred sequences and thereby potentially hindering evolutionary innovation. Here, we explore experimentally the evolutionary fate of viruses with simulated HGT events, using the plant RNA virus Tobacco etch virus (TEV), by separately introducing two functional, exogenous sequences to its genome. One of the events simulates the acquisition of a new function though HGT of a conserved AlkB domain, responsible for the repair of alkylation or methylation damage in many organisms. The other event simulates the acquisition of a sequence that duplicates an existing function, through HGT of the 2b RNA silencing suppressor from Cucumber mosaic virus. We then evolved these two viruses, tracked the maintenance of the horizontally transferred sequences over time, and for the final virus populations, sequenced their genome and measured viral fitness. We found that the AlkB domain was rapidly purged from the TEV genome, restoring fitness to wild-type levels. Conversely, the 2b gene was stably maintained and did not have a major impact on viral fitness. Moreover, we found that 2b is functional in TEV, as it provides a replicative advantage when the RNA silencing suppression domain of HC-Pro is mutated. These observations suggest a potentially interesting role for HGT of short functional sequences in ameliorating evolutionary constraints on viruses, through the duplication of functions. PMID:28137747

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joong-Hwan; Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-04

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

  7. New monoclonal antibodies to the Ebola virus glycoprotein: Identification and analysis of the amino acid sequence of the variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panina, A A; Aliev, T K; Shemchukova, O B; Dement'yeva, I G; Varlamov, N E; Pozdnyakova, L P; Bokov, M N; Dolgikh, D A; Sveshnikov, P G; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2016-03-01

    We determined the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of variable domains of three new monoclonal antibodies to the glycoprotein of Ebola virus capsid. The framework and hypervariable regions of immunoglobulin heavy and light chains were identified. The primary structures were confirmed using massspectrometry analysis. Immunoglobulin database search showed the uniqueness of the sequences obtained.

  8. The complete genome sequences of two isolates of potato black ringspot virus and their relationship to other isolates and nepoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza Richards, R.; Adams, I.P.; Kreuze, J.F.; Souza, de J.; Cuellar, W.; Dullemans, A.M.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.; Glover, R.; Hany, U.; Dickinson, M.; Boonham, N.

    2014-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of RNA 1 and RNA 2 of the nepovirus potato black ringspot virus (PBRSV) from two different isolates were determined, as well as partial sequences from two additional isolates. RNA1 is 7,579-7,598 nucleotides long and contains one single open reading frame (ORF), whi

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Chikungunya Viruses Isolated in the Central African Republic in the 1970s and 1980s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desdouits, Marion; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Gessain, Antoine; Kazanji, Mirdad; Berthet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Some arboviruses threaten human global health with potentially explosive emergence. Analysis of whole-genome sequences of decades-old isolates might contribute to the understanding of the complex dynamics which drive their circulation and emergence. Here, we report the whole-genome sequences of two Chikungunya viruses isolated in the Central African Republic in the 1970s and 1980s. PMID:28254965

  10. Next generation sequencing technology: a powerful tool for the genome characterization of sugarcane mosaic virus from Sorghum almum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to analyze the occurrence of viruses in Sorghum almum plants in Florida exhibiting mosaic symptoms. Total RNA was extracted from symptomatic leaves and used as a template for cDNA library preparation. The resulting library was sequenced on an Illu...

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence of little cherry virus 1 (LChV-1) infecting sweet cherry in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little cherry virus 1 (LChV-1), associated with little cherry disease (LCD), has a significant impact on fruit quality of infected sweet cherry trees. We report the full genome sequence of an isolate of LChV-1 from China, detected by small RNA deep sequencing and amplified by overlapping RT-PCR. The...

  12. Sequence analysis of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus of the American type collected from Danish swine herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K.G.; Hansen, C.M.; Madsen, E.S.;

    1998-01-01

    to artificial insemination centres and there brought together with unvaccinated boars already at the centres. The nucleotide sequences of three Danish viruses of American type PRRSV were compared to those of known PRRSV isolates. The nucleotide sequence identities of the atypical Danish isolates were between 99...

  13. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qicheng; Tian, Meijuan; Feng, Yi; Zhao, Kai; Xu, Jing; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV) as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT) was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1) viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1) and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs). ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH) strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector.

  14. The Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Biotype Variability of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoka, Tetsuo; Hataya, Tatsuji

    2005-02-01

    ABSTRACT The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) was determined. The viral RNA genome of strain LDM (leaf distortion mosaic) comprised 10,153 nucleotides, excluding the poly(A) tail, and contained one long open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3,269 amino acids (molecular weight 373,347). The polyprotein contained nine putative proteolytic cleavage sites and some motifs conserved in other potyviral polyproteins with 44 to 50% identities, indicating that PLDMV is a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus. Like the W biotype of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), the non-papaya-infecting biotype of PLDMV (PLDMV-C) was found in plants of the family Cucurbitaceae. The coat protein (CP) sequence of PLDMV-C in naturally infected-Trichosanthes bracteata was compared with those of three strains of the P biotype (PLDMV-P), LDM and two additional strains M (mosaic) and YM (yellow mosaic), which are biologically different from each other. The CP sequences of three strains of PLDMV-P share high identities of 95 to 97%, while they share lower identities of 88 to 89% with that of PLDMV-C. Significant changes in hydrophobicity and a deletion of two amino acids at the N-terminal region of the CP of PLDMV-C were observed. The finding of two biotypes of PLDMV implies the possibility that the papaya-infecting biotype evolved from the cucurbitaceae-infecting potyvirus, as has been previously suggested for PRSV. In addition, a similar evolutionary event acquiring infectivity to papaya may arise frequently in viruses in the family Cucurbitaceae.

  15. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qicheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1 viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1 and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs. ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector.

  16. Sequence analysis and quantitative detection of Norwalk-like viruses in cultured oysters of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Tang, Qingjuan; Yue, Zhiqin; Li, Zhaojie; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Changhu

    2008-05-01

    We isolated 4 Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs) contaminated oysters from 33 Chinese oysters collected from local commercial sources of Shandong Province. After amplification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) region of NLVs genomes with RT-PCR, the open reading frame 1 (ORF1) of the RdRp was sequenced and subjected to multiple-sequence alignment. The results showed that NLVs in the four isolates belong to genogroup II. The sequence comparison showed that the similarity between four Chinese oyster isolates were higher than 99.0%, which indicated that NLVs prevalent in close areas have high homogeneity in genome sequences. In addition, the most conserved sequences between diverse NLVs were used to design primers and TaqMan probes, then the real-time quantitative PCR assay was performed. According to the standard curve of GII NLVs, the original amounts (copies) of NLVs in positive patient’s fecal isolate, positive Japanese oyster isolate, and the Chinese oyster isolate were 8.9×108, 1.25×108 and 4.7×101 respectively. The detecting limit of NLVs was 1×101 copies. This study will be helpful for routine diagnosis of NLVs pathogens in foods and thus for avoiding food poisoning in the future.

  17. Sequence Analysis and Quantitative Detection of Norwalk-like Viruses in Cultured Oysters of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; TANG Qingjuan; YUE Zhiqin; LI Zhaojie; ZHANG Jin; XUE Changhu

    2008-01-01

    We isolated 4 Norwalk-like viruses (NLVs) contaminated oysters from 33 Chinese oysters collected from local commer-cial sources of Shandong Province. After amplification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) region of NLVs genomes with RT-PCR, the open reading frame 1 (ORF1) of the RdRp was sequenced and subjected to multiple-sequence alignment. The re-suits showed that NLVs in the four isolates belong to genogroup Ⅱ. The sequence comparison showed that the similarity between four Chinese oyster isolates were higher than 99.0%, which indicated that NLVs prevalent in close areas have high homogeneity in genome sequences. In addition, the most conserved sequences between diverse NLVs were used to design primers and TaqMan probes, then the real-time quantitative PCR assay was performed. According to the standard curve of GII NLVs, the original amounts (copies) of NLVs in positive patient's fecal isolate, positive Japanese oyster isolate, and the Chinese oyster isolate were 8.9×108, 1.25×108 and 4.7×101 respectively. The detecting limit of NLVs was 1×101 copies. This study will be helpful for routine diagnosis of NLVs pathogens in foods and thus for avoiding food poisoning in the future.

  18. cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of NIb gene of soybean mosaic virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊君; 彭学贤; 莽克强

    1995-01-01

    cDNA of soybean mosaic virus (Beijing isolate, SMV-BJ) has been synthesized, using viralgenomic RNA as template and random hexanucleotides as primers. Based on the sequences of SMV-BJ coat protein (CP) gene as well as SMV- and WMV-II-related regions, oligonucleotides were made as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR). NIb gene of SMV-BJ was amplified by PCR, and cloned into pBluescript SK. The complete sequence was determined. The comparison of NIb genes between SMV-BJ and WMV-II . (USA) shows that similarities for nucleotide sequence reach 80.3%, and the deduced amino acid sequence. 91 3%. In consideration of the high identities in between the CP gene and the 3’-non-coding region between them, WMV-II might be considered as a watermelon strain of SMV Besides, some unexpected sequences were found in the 3’-region of 2 NIb gene clones. Following modification and splicing, a binary vector of NIb gene has been constructed for its expression in higher plant for the purpose of studying the possible repl

  19. Sequence evolution of putative cytotoxic T cell epitopes in NS3 region of hepatitis C virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-Zhang Guo; Ying Yin; Wen-Liang Wang; Chuan-Shan Zhang; Tao Wang; Zhe Wang; Jing Zhang; Hong Cheng; Hai-Tao Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Quasispecies of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the foundation for rapid sequence evolution of HCV to evade immune surveillance of hosts. The consensus sequence evolution of a segment of HCV NS3 region, which encompasses putative cytotoxic T cell epitopes, was evaluated. METHODS: Three male patients, infected with HCV through multiple transfusions, were identified from clinical symptoms and monitored by aminotransferase for 60 months. Blood samples taken at months 0, 32, and 60 were used for viral RNA extraction. A segment of HCV NS3 region was amplified from the RNA extraction by RT-PCR and subjected to subcloning and sequencing. HLA types of these three patients were determined using complement-dependent microlymphocytotoxic assay. CTL epitopes were predicted using MHC binding motifs.RESULTS: No patient had clinical symptoms or elevation of aspartate/alanine aminotransferase. Two patients showed positive HCV PCR results at all 3 time points. The other one showed a positive HCV PCR result only at month O. A reported HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope had no alteration in the HLA-A2-negative carrier over 60 months. In the HLA-A2-positive individuals, all the sequences from O month Oshowed an amber mutation on the initial codon of the epitope. Most changes of consensus sequences in the samepatient occurred on predicted cytotoxic T cell epitopes. CONCLUSION: Amber mutation and changes of consensussequence in HCV NS3 region may be related to viral immune escape.

  20. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication with linear DNA sequences expressing antiviral micro-RNA shuttles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, Saket; Ely, Abdullah; Bloom, Kristie; Weinberg, Marc S. [Antiviral Gene Therapy Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa); Arbuthnot, Patrick, E-mail: Patrick.Arbuthnot@wits.ac.za [Antiviral Gene Therapy Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa)

    2009-11-20

    RNA interference (RNAi) may be harnessed to inhibit viral gene expression and this approach is being developed to counter chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Compared to synthetic RNAi activators, DNA expression cassettes that generate silencing sequences have advantages of sustained efficacy and ease of propagation in plasmid DNA (pDNA). However, the large size of pDNAs and inclusion of sequences conferring antibiotic resistance and immunostimulation limit delivery efficiency and safety. To develop use of alternative DNA templates that may be applied for therapeutic gene silencing, we assessed the usefulness of PCR-generated linear expression cassettes that produce anti-HBV micro-RNA (miR) shuttles. We found that silencing of HBV markers of replication was efficient (>75%) in cell culture and in vivo. miR shuttles were processed to form anti-HBV guide strands and there was no evidence of induction of the interferon response. Modification of terminal sequences to include flanking human adenoviral type-5 inverted terminal repeats was easily achieved and did not compromise silencing efficacy. These linear DNA sequences should have utility in the development of gene silencing applications where modifications of terminal elements with elimination of potentially harmful and non-essential sequences are required.

  1. Complete genome sequence of jacquemontia yellow vein virus, a novel begomovirus infecting Jacquemontia tamnifolia in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys T; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2017-08-01

    Wild plants of the family Convolvulaceae are hosts for a few New World begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae). In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of a new begomovirus infecting the wild convolvulaceous plant Jacquemontia tamnifolia in Venezuela. The cloned bipartite genome showed the organization of typical New World begomoviruses and was found to be phylogenetically related to those of begomoviruses from Venezuela and other Caribbean countries. Several recombination events have been shown to have occurred involving genome fragment exchange with related begomoviruses infecting crops such as tomato and cucurbits and wild plants, including Jacquemontia sp. We propose the name jacquemontia yellow vein virus (JacYVV) for this new begomovirus.

  2. Complete genome sequence of a J subgroup avian leukosis virus isolated from local commercial broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongxin; Xue, Chunyi; Ji, Jun; Chang, Shuang; Shang, Huiqin; Zhang, Lingjun; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2012-11-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) isolate GDKP1202 was isolated from a 50-day-old local yellow commercial broiler in the Guangdong province of China in 2012. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of the GDKP1202 isolate, which caused high mortality, serious growth suppression, thymic atrophy, and liver enlargement in commercial broilers. A novel potential binding site (5'-GGCACCTCC-3') for c-myb was identified in the GDKP1202 genome. These findings will provide additional insights into the molecular characteristics in the genomes and pathogenicity of ALV-J.

  3. Phylogenetic diversity and genotypical complexity of H9N2 influenza A viruses revealed by genomic sequence analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoying Dong

    Full Text Available H9N2 influenza A viruses have become established worldwide in terrestrial poultry and wild birds, and are occasionally transmitted to mammals including humans and pigs. To comprehensively elucidate the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of H9N2 influenza viruses, we performed a large-scale sequence analysis of 571 viral genomes from the NCBI Influenza Virus Resource Database, representing the spectrum of H9N2 influenza viruses isolated from 1966 to 2009. Our study provides a panoramic framework for better understanding the genesis and evolution of H9N2 influenza viruses, and for describing the history of H9N2 viruses circulating in diverse hosts. Panorama phylogenetic analysis of the eight viral gene segments revealed the complexity and diversity of H9N2 influenza viruses. The 571 H9N2 viral genomes were classified into 74 separate lineages, which had marked host and geographical differences in phylogeny. Panorama genotypical analysis also revealed that H9N2 viruses include at least 98 genotypes, which were further divided according to their HA lineages into seven series (A-G. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal genes showed that H9N2 viruses are closely related to H3, H4, H5, H7, H10, and H14 subtype influenza viruses. Our results indicate that H9N2 viruses have undergone extensive reassortments to generate multiple reassortants and genotypes, suggesting that the continued circulation of multiple genotypical H9N2 viruses throughout the world in diverse hosts has the potential to cause future influenza outbreaks in poultry and epidemics in humans. We propose a nomenclature system for identifying and unifying all lineages and genotypes of H9N2 influenza viruses in order to facilitate international communication on the evolution, ecology and epidemiology of H9N2 influenza viruses.

  4. Sequencing of the bicistronic genome segments S7 and S9 of Mal de Río Cuarto virus (Fijivirus, Reoviridae) completes the genome of this virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, F A; Distéfano, A J; Arneodo, J D; Hopp, H E; Lenardon, S L; del Vas, M; Conci, L R

    2007-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of genomic segments S7 and S9 of Mal de Río Cuarto virus (MRCV, Fijivirus group II) have been determined, thus completing the entire genome sequence of the virus. These segments showed a non-overlapping bicistronic structure, as in other members of the genus. MRCV S7 ORF-1 had a length of 1086 bp and encoded a 41.5 kDa putative polypeptide, whereas MRCV S7 ORF-2 had a length of 930 bp and encoded a 36.8 kDa putative polypeptide. Proteins of 39 and 20.5 kDa were predicted for the 1014 bp long MRCV S9 ORF-1 and the 537 bp long MRCV S9 ORF-2, respectively. The terminal 5' and 3' sequences of both segments were 5'AAGUUUUU3' and 5'CAGCUnnnGUC3', respectively. Specific imperfect inverted repeats of each segment were identified. Comparison of the predicted proteins with those of related virus genome segments counterparts in maize rough dwarf virus (MRDV) and rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), showed 64.5-44.3% identities. These values are lower than those resulting from comparisons between MRDV and RBSDV. The topology of the trees obtained using the complete nucleotide and amino acid sequences of MRCV S7 and MRCV S9 was consistent with the analysis of the other MRCV segments previously published.

  5. Targeting of highly conserved Dengue virus sequences with anti-Dengue virus trans-splicing group I introns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Tresa S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue viruses (DENV are one of the most important viral diseases in the world with approximately 100 million infections and 200,000 deaths each year. The current lack of an approved tetravalent vaccine and ineffective insecticide control measures warrant a search for alternatives to effectively combat DENV. The trans-splicing variant of the Tetrahymena thermophila group I intron catalytic RNA, or ribozyme, is a powerful tool for post-transcriptional RNA modification. The nature of the ribozyme and the predictability with which it can be directed makes it a powerful tool for modifying RNA in nearly any cell type without the need for genome-altering gene therapy techniques or dependence on native cofactors. Results Several anti-DENV Group I trans-splicing introns (αDENV-GrpIs were designed and tested for their ability to target DENV-2 NGC genomes in situ. We have successfully targeted two different uracil bases on the positive sense genomic strand within the highly conserved 5'-3' cyclization sequence (CS region common to all serotypes of DENV with our αDENV-GrpIs. Our ribozymes have demonstrated ability to specifically trans-splice a new RNA sequence downstream of the targeted site in vitro and in transfected insect cells as analyzed by firefly luciferase and RT-PCR assays. The effectiveness of these αDENV-GrpIs to target infecting DENV genomes is also validated in transfected or transformed Aedes mosquito cell lines upon infection with unattenuated DENV-2 NGC. Conclusions Analysis shows that our αDENV-GrpIs have the ability to effectively trans-splice the DENV genome in situ. Notably, these results show that the αDENV-GrpI 9v1, designed to be active against all forms of Dengue virus, effectively targeted the DENV-2 NGC genome in a sequence specific manner. These novel αDENV-GrpI introns provide a striking alternative to other RNA based approaches for the transgenic suppression of DENV in transformed mosquito cells and

  6. Reconstruction of the Transmission History of RNA Virus Outbreaks Using Full Genome Sequences: Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Bulgaria in 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valdazo-González, Begoña; Polihronova, Lilyana; Alexandrov, Tsviatko

    2012-01-01

    Improvements to sequencing protocols and the development of computational phylogenetics have opened up opportunities to study the rapid evolution of RNA viruses in real time. In practical terms, these results can be combined with field data in order to reconstruct spatiotemporal scenarios...... the origin and transmission history of the FMD outbreaks which occurred during 2011 in Burgas Province, Bulgaria, a country that had been previously FMD-free-without-vaccination since 1996. Nineteen full genome sequences (FGS) of FMD virus (FMDV) were generated and analysed, including eight representative...

  7. Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treating Soft Tissue Sarcomas Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Radiation therapy uses ... spread. This is called palliative treatment . Types of radiation therapy External beam radiation therapy: For this treatment, ...

  8. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of pea streak virus (genus Carlavirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Li, Zhengnan; Bernardy, Mike; Wiersma, Paul A; Cheng, Zhihui; Xiang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Pea streak virus (PeSV) is a member of the genus Carlavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Here, the first complete genome sequence of PeSV was determined by deep sequencing of a cDNA library constructed from dsRNA extracted from a PeSV-infected sample and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) PCR. The PeSV genome consists of 8041 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains six open reading frames (ORFs). The putative peptide encoded by the PeSV ORF6 has an estimated molecular mass of 6.6 kDa and shows no similarity to any known proteins. This differs from typical carlaviruses, whose ORF6 encodes a 12- to 18-kDa cysteine-rich nucleic-acid-binding protein.

  9. Effects of RNA sequence specificity in the electrostatic stabilization of viruses

    CERN Document Server

    Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; van der Schoot, Paul; Podgornik, Rudolf; Zandi, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Many single-stranded (ss) RNA viruses self assemble from capsid protein subunits and the nucleic acid to form an infectious virion. It is believed that the electrostatic interactions between the negatively charged RNA and the positively charged viral capsid proteins drive the encapsidation, although there is growing evidence that the sequence of the viral RNA also plays a role in packaging. In particular the sequence will determine the possible secondary structures that the ssRNA will take in solution. In this work, we use a mean field theory to investigate how the secondary structure of the RNA combined with electrostatic interactions affects the efficiency of assembly and stability of the assembled virions. We show that the secondary structure of RNA may result in negative osmotic pressures while a linear polymer causes positive osmotic pressures for the same conditions. This may suggest that the branched structure makes the RNA more effectively packaged and the virion more stable.

  10. [Cloning and sequence analysis of 55 K protein of egg drop syndrome virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; Jin, Q; Zeng, L

    1999-06-30

    For understanding the characteristics of genomic structure of egg drop syndrome virus(EDSV). Nucleic acid was extracted using routine method from weak virulent strain AA-2 of EDSV isolated from Chinese sick hens. Construction of the whole genomic library was by hydrolysis with Hind III, strand encoding 55 K gene locating in Hind III--A segment was sequenced and analyzed. The open reading frame has a length of 1,014 nt and codes a polypeptide of 337 amino acids with molecular weight of 38,200. Analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed a homology from 25.5%-32.4% to the 55 K protein of human adenovirus types 2, 12, 40, canine adenovirus and fowl adenoviruses of group 1, whereas to ovine adenovirus is 46.4%. The genomic structure of EDSV has some relationship with adenoviruses.

  11. [Clonning and sequencing of partial gene of hepatitis G virus (HGV) from Nanjing of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J; Zhou, Y; Xu, J; Ju, J; Wang, X; Chen, W; Wang, H

    1997-03-01

    Partial gene of hepatitis G virus (HGV) was cloned and sequenced from the serum of a patient with post-transfusion hepatitis C in Nanjing of China by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The sequence showed 89.09%, 92.12%, 87.27%, 93.94% nucleotide identity over the corresponding region of HGU44402, HGU45966, HGU36380 in America and HGV isolate in Hebei Province of China respectively. Forty patients with post-transfusion hepatitis C and thirty patients with hepatitis non A-E were detected for HGV RNA by RT-PCR, the HGV RNA positive rate were 10.00% and 6.67% respectively.

  12. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of a Newly Avirulent Newcastle Disease Virus Hubei 92(HB92) Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan Zi-shu; Chen Yu-dong; Shao Hua-bin; Yang Jun; Xiong Zhong-liang; Wen Guo-yuan; Zhang Chu-yu

    2004-01-01

    A new avirulent, heat-resistance HB92 strain of newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) was acquired from Australia V4 strain. Its complete nucleotides sequence was first determined. The entire genome of NDV HB92 consists of 15 186nucleotides (GenBank accession no. AY225110 ). It was demonstrated by sequence analysis that nucleotides homology of HB92 strain with virulent strain ZJ1 were 83.9%, and the homology compared with avirulent vaccine strain La Sota and BI were 94. 0% and 93. 5%, respectively. These results might be contributive to tbe study of the molecular mechanism of evolution of the NDV strain HB92 and to develop the engineered recombinant vaccine.

  13. Cloning of full genome sequence of hepatitis E virus of Shanghai swine isolate using RACE method

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    Mou Jing

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genotype 4 hepatitis E virus (HEV was reportedly transmitted freely between humans and swine in eastern China. The full-length genomic sequence of Shanghai swine isolate (SH-SW-zs1 recovered from feces sample of a pig which was infected with HEV RNA positive swine serum was determined using RT-PCR and RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends methods. The full genome of the SH-SW-zs1 isolate was 7265 nucleotides in length and phylogenetic analysis indicated that this isolate belonged to genotype 4. Comparison of the 3' UTR sequence with the corresponding regions of other 38 HEV strains from different region revealed that the Shanghai swine isolate is 21–49 bp longer than the other stains.

  14. Whole-genome sequence analysis of Zika virus, amplified from urine of traveler from the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Se Hun; Song, Dong Hyun; Lee, Daesang; Jang, Jeyoun; Kim, Min Young; Jung, Jaehun; Woo, Koung In; Kim, Mirang; Seog, Woong; Oh, Hong Sang; Choi, Byung Seop; Ahn, Jong-Seong; Park, Quehn; Jeong, Seong Tae

    2017-08-09

    Zika virus (ZIKV) (genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae) is an emerging pathogen associated with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The rapid spread of ZIKV disease in over 60 countries and the large numbers of travel-associated cases have caused worldwide concern. Thus, intensified surveillance of cases among immigrants and tourists from ZIKV-endemic areas is important for disease control and prevention. In this study, using Next Generation Sequencing, we reported the first whole-genome sequence of ZIKV strain AFMC-U, amplified from the urine of a traveler returning to Korea from the Philippines. Phylogenetic analysis showed geographic-specific clustering. Our results underscore the importance of examining urine in the diagnosis of ZIKV infection.

  15. Diagnosis and sequence analysis of avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolated from Chinese Partridge Shank chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuan; Zhao, Peng; Li, Weihua; Chang, Shuang; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Ju, Sidi; Sun, Peng; Meng, Fanfeng; Liu, Juan; Cui, Zhizhong

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) infection in Chinese Partridge Shank chickens was confirmed by necropsy, histopathological examinations, antibody tests, viral isolation, immunofluorescence assays, and sequence analysis. Myelocytoma, myeloma, and fibrosarcoma were simultaneously found in Partridge Shank flock with ALV-J infection. Sequence analysis of the env genes of ALV-J demonstrated that both gp85 and gp37 were highly homologous among the three strains from local chickens of those among ALV-J strains isolated from white meat-type chickens. The phylogenetic trees indicated that the three strains isolated in this study were closely related to reference strains isolated in so-called Chinese yellow chickens and some strains isolated from white meat-type chickens, both from the USA and China. The observed ALV-J infection was the first report on Partridge Shank chickens, and myelocytoma, myeloma, and fibrosarcoma were found at the same time in this batch of local chickens.

  16. Control of the rescue and replication of Semliki Forest virus recombinants by the insertion of miRNA target sequences.

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    Kaspar Ratnik

    Full Text Available Due to their broad cell- and tissue-tropism, alphavirus-based replication-competent vectors are of particular interest for anti-cancer therapy. These properties may, however, be potentially hazardous unless the virus infection is controlled. While the RNA genome of alphaviruses precludes the standard control techniques, host miRNAs can be used to down-regulate viral replication. In this study, target sites from ubiquitous miRNAs and those of miRNAs under-represented in cervical cancer cells were inserted into replication-competent DNA/RNA layered vectors of Semliki Forest virus. It was found that in order to achieve the most efficient suppression of recombinant virus rescue, the introduced target sequences must be fully complementary to those of the corresponding miRNAs. Target sites of ubiquitous miRNAs, introduced into the 3' untranslated region of the viral vector, profoundly reduced the rescue of recombinant viruses. Insertion of the same miRNA targets into coding region of the viral vector was approximately 300-fold less effective. Viruses carrying these miRNAs were genetically unstable and rapidly lost the target sequences. This process was delayed, but not completely prevented, by miRNA inhibitors. Target sites of miRNA under-represented in cervical cancer cells had much smaller but still significant effects on recombinant virus rescue in cervical cancer-derived HeLa cells. Over-expression of miR-214, one of these miRNAs, reduced replication of the targeted virus. Though the majority of rescued viruses maintained the introduced miRNA target sequences, genomes with deletions of these sequences were also detected. Thus, the low-level repression of rescue and replication of targeted virus in HeLa cells was still sufficient to cause genetic instability.

  17. Control of the rescue and replication of Semliki Forest virus recombinants by the insertion of miRNA target sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnik, Kaspar; Viru, Liane; Merits, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Due to their broad cell- and tissue-tropism, alphavirus-based replication-competent vectors are of particular interest for anti-cancer therapy. These properties may, however, be potentially hazardous unless the virus infection is controlled. While the RNA genome of alphaviruses precludes the standard control techniques, host miRNAs can be used to down-regulate viral replication. In this study, target sites from ubiquitous miRNAs and those of miRNAs under-represented in cervical cancer cells were inserted into replication-competent DNA/RNA layered vectors of Semliki Forest virus. It was found that in order to achieve the most efficient suppression of recombinant virus rescue, the introduced target sequences must be fully complementary to those of the corresponding miRNAs. Target sites of ubiquitous miRNAs, introduced into the 3' untranslated region of the viral vector, profoundly reduced the rescue of recombinant viruses. Insertion of the same miRNA targets into coding region of the viral vector was approximately 300-fold less effective. Viruses carrying these miRNAs were genetically unstable and rapidly lost the target sequences. This process was delayed, but not completely prevented, by miRNA inhibitors. Target sites of miRNA under-represented in cervical cancer cells had much smaller but still significant effects on recombinant virus rescue in cervical cancer-derived HeLa cells. Over-expression of miR-214, one of these miRNAs, reduced replication of the targeted virus. Though the majority of rescued viruses maintained the introduced miRNA target sequences, genomes with deletions of these sequences were also detected. Thus, the low-level repression of rescue and replication of targeted virus in HeLa cells was still sufficient to cause genetic instability.

  18. The amino acid sequences of eleven tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein by electron ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, A; Short, M N; Self, R; Parsley, K R

    1982-04-01

    Eleven of the fourteen tryptic peptides of papaya mosaic virus protein have been sequenced by electron ionization mass spectrometry using chemical and enzymic hydrolyses and mixture analysis as required. Mid-chain cleavages of N-C bonds produced secondary ion series which allowed up to 16 residues to be sequenced without further hydrolysis. Mixture analysis on hydrolysis products enabled a 24 residue tryptic peptide to be sequenced from the data recorded in a single mass spectrum.

  19. Stability of glycoprotein gene sequences of herpes simplex virus type 2 from primary to recurrent human infection, and diversity of the sequences among patients attending an STD clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is sexually transmitted, leading to blisters and ulcers in the genito-anal region. After primary infection the virus is present in a latent state in neurons in sensory ganglia. Reactivation and production of new viral particles can cause asymptomatic viral shedding or new lesions. Establishment of latency, maintenance and reactivation involve silencing of genes, continuous suppression of gene activities and finally gene activation and synthesis of viral DNA. The purpose of the present work was to study the genetic stability of the virus during these events. Methods HSV-2 was collected from 5 patients with true primary and recurrent infections, and the genes encoding glycoproteins B,G,E and I were sequenced. Results No nucleotide substitution was observed in any patient, indicating genetic stability. However, since the total number of nucleotides in these genes is only a small part of the total genome, we cannot rule out variation in other regions. Conclusions Although infections of cell cultures and animal models are useful for studies of herpes simplex virus, it is important to know how the virus behaves in the natural host. We observed that several glycoprotein gene sequences are stable from primary to recurrent infection. However, the virus isolates from the different patients were genetically different. PMID:24502528

  20. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  1. Distinctive sequence characteristics of subgenotype A1 isolates of hepatitis B virus from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbi, Gerald C; Kramvis, Anna; Kew, Michael C

    2004-05-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has led to its classification into eight genotypes, A to H. The dominant genotype in South Africa is genotype A, which consists of two subgenotypes, A1 and A2. Subgenotype A1 (previously subgroup A') predominates over subgenotype A2 (previously subgroup A minus A'). The complete genome of HBV isolated from 18 asymptomatic carriers of the virus and five acute hepatitis B patients was amplified; the resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced. All acute hepatitis isolates belonged to subgenotype A1 and had no distinguishing mutations relative to the isolates from asymptomatic carriers, which had a distribution of ten subgenotype A1, two subgenotype A2 and six genotype D. The presence of the previously described amino acid residues that distinguish subgenotype A1 (subgroup A') from the remainder of genotype A in the S and polymerase genes was confirmed. Moreover, the large number of subgenotype A1 isolates sequenced allowed identification in the other open reading frames of additional nucleotide and amino acid changes that are characteristic of subgenotype A1. In particular, nucleotide mutations at positions 1809-1812 that alter the Kozak sequence of the precore/core open reading frame, and A(1888) in the precore region, were found exclusively in subgenotype A1 isolates. Unique sequence alterations of the transcriptional regulatory elements were also found in subgenotype A1 isolates. The mean nucleotide divergence of subgenotype A1 was greater than that of subgenotype A2, suggesting that this subgenotype has been endemic for a longer time in the South African black population than had subgenotype A2.

  2. The nucleotide sequence and genome structure of the geminivirus miscanthus streak virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatani, M; Matsumoto, Y; Mizuta, H; Ikegami, M; Boulton, M I; Davies, J W

    1991-10-01

    A tandem dimer of miscanthus streak virus (MiSV) DNA was inserted into the T-DNA of the binary plasmid vector pBIN19 and agroinoculated into several monocotyledonous plants (monocots) using Agrobacterium tumefaciens or A. rhizogenes. Disease symptoms and geminate particles were produced in maize and Panicum milaceum plants, and MiSV-specific double-stranded and single-stranded DNAs were found in these plants. The nucleotide sequence of the infectious MiSV clone, consisting of 2672 nucleotides, was determined. Four open reading frames (ORFs) for proteins of Mr greater than 10K were identified, two (V0 and V2) in the virus (+) sense and two (C1 and C2) in the complementary (-) sense, although C2 did not have an ATG start codon. Unlike other geminiviruses infecting monocots, complementary-sense ORFs did not overlap. Potential splicing donor and acceptor sites were identified in the sequence of the border region between the C terminus of ORF C1 and the N terminus of ORF C2. Amino acid sequences predicted from three (V2, C1 and C2) of these ORFs showed significant homology with the corresponding ORFs of other geminiviruses infecting monocots. A fifth ORF (V1), which showed some homology with ORF V1 of other monocot-infecting geminiviruses despite having a coding capacity for a product of Mr 8.8K, was found just upstream of ORF V2 as observed in those geminiviruses. ORF V0 showed no significant homology with ORFs present in any other geminiviruses. A mutation of V0 indicated that the C-terminal 30% of this ORF was not necessary for infection in maize, but that sequences around the mutated LspI site might have some regulatory role.

  3. Determining the cellular diversity of hepatitis C virus quasispecies by single-cell viral sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliam Leitch, E Carol; McLauchlan, John

    2013-12-01

    Single-cell genomics is emerging as an important tool in cellular biology. We describe for the first time a system to investigate RNA virus quasispecies diversity at the cellular level utilizing hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicons. A high-fidelity nested reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay was developed, and validation using control transcripts of known copy number indicated a detection limit of 3 copies of viral RNA/reaction. This system was used to determine the cellular diversity of subgenomic JFH-1 HCV replicons constitutively expressed in Huh7 cells. Each cell contained a unique quasispecies that was much less diverse than the quasispecies of the bulk cell population from which the single cells were derived, suggesting the occurrence of independent evolution at the cellular level. An assessment of the replicative fitness of the predominant single-cell quasispecies variants indicated a modest reduction in fitness compared to the wild type. Real-time RT-PCR methods capable of determining single-cell viral loads were developed and indicated an average of 113 copies of replicon RNA per cell, correlating with calculated RNA copy numbers in the bulk cell population. This study introduces a single-cell RNA viral-sequencing method with numerous potential applications to explore host-virus interactions during infection. HCV quasispecies diversity varied greatly between cells in vitro, suggesting different within-cell evolutionary pathways. Such divergent trajectories in vivo could have implications for the evolution and establishment of antiviral-resistant variants and host immune escape mutants.

  4. Quasispecies structure, cornerstone of hepatitis B virus infection: mass sequencing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Buti, Maria; Tabernero, David; Homs, Maria

    2013-11-07

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a DNA virus with complex replication, and high replication and mutation rates, leading to a heterogeneous viral population. The population is comprised of genomes that are closely related, but not identical; hence, HBV is considered a viral quasispecies. Quasispecies variability may be somewhat limited by the high degree of overlapping between the HBV coding regions, which is especially important in the P and S gene overlapping regions, but is less significant in the X and preCore/Core genes. Despite this restriction, several clinically and pathologically relevant variants have been characterized along the viral genome. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches enable high-throughput analysis of thousands of clonally amplified regions and are powerful tools for characterizing genetic diversity in viral strains. In the present review, we update the information regarding HBV variability and present a summary of the various NGS approaches available for research in this virus. In addition, we provide an analysis of the clinical implications of HBV variants and their study by NGS.

  5. Modeling of the Ebola Virus Delta Peptide Reveals a Potential Lytic Sequence Motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Gallaher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses, such as Ebola and Marburg viruses, cause severe outbreaks of human infection, including the extensive epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD in West Africa in 2014. In the course of examining mutations in the glycoprotein gene associated with 2014 Ebola virus (EBOV sequences, a differential level of conservation was noted between the soluble form of glycoprotein (sGP and the full length glycoprotein (GP, which are both encoded by the GP gene via RNA editing. In the region of the proteins encoded after the RNA editing site sGP was more conserved than the overlapping region of GP when compared to a distant outlier species, Tai Forest ebolavirus. Half of the amino acids comprising the “delta peptide”, a 40 amino acid carboxy-terminal fragment of sGP, were identical between otherwise widely divergent species. A lysine-rich amphipathic peptide motif was noted at the carboxyl terminus of delta peptide with high structural relatedness to the cytolytic peptide of the non-structural protein 4 (NSP4 of rotavirus. EBOV delta peptide is a candidate viroporin, a cationic pore-forming peptide, and may contribute to EBOV pathogenesis.

  6. Primary hepatic sarcomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ri-Sheng; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Biao; Wang, Liu-Hong [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hangzhou (China); Xu, Xiu-Fang [Zhejiang Medical College, Teaching and Research Group of Radiology, Hangzhou (China)

    2008-10-15

    Primary hepatic sarcomas are rare tumors that are difficult to diagnose clinically. Different primary hepatic sarcomas may have different clinical, morphologic, and radiological features. In this pictorial review, we summarized computed tomography (CT) findings of some relatively common types of hepatic sarcomas, including angiosarcoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE), liposarcoma, undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma (UES), leiomyosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), and carcinosarcoma (including cystadenocarcinosarcoma). To our knowledge, hepatic cystadenocarcinosarcoma has not been described in the English literature. The CT findings in our case are similar to that of cystadenocarcinoma, a huge, multilocular cystic mass with a large mural nodule and solid portion. The advent of CT has allowed earlier detection of primary hepatic sarcomas as well as more accurate diagnosis and characterization. In addition, we briefly discuss the MRI findings and diagnostic value of primary hepatic sarcomas. (orig.)

  7. Imaging diagnosis--spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amanda; Eichelberger, Bunita; Hodo, Carolyn; Cooper, Jocelyn; Porter, Brian

    2015-01-01

    A 12-year-old mixed breed dog was presented for evaluation of progressive paraparesis and ataxia. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed and identified multifocal intradural spinal cord mass lesions. The lesions were hyperintense in T2-weighted sequences, isointense to mildly hyperintense in T1-weighted sequences with strong contrast enhancement of the intradural lesions and spinal cord meninges. Spinal cord neoplasia was suspected. A diagnosis of intramedullary spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma, confined to the central nervous system, was confirmed histopathologically. Spinal cord histiocytic sarcoma is a rare neoplasm, but should be included in the differential diagnosis for dogs with clinical signs of myelopathy.

  8. Determination of 5 '-leader sequences from radically disparate strains of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus reveals the presence of highly conserved sequence motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Bøtner, Anette; Nielsen, Jens;

    1999-01-01

    We determined the untranslated 5'-leader sequence for three different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV): pathogenic European- and American-types, as well as an American-type vaccine strain. 5'-leader from European- and American-type PRRSV differed in length...... a priori knowledge for mutational identification of virulence determinants in the 5' nontranslated part of the PRRSV genome....

  9. Nucleotide Sequence of the Coat Protein Gene of the Malaysian Passiflora Virus and its 3' Non-Coding Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norzihan Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: In this study, we identified the full length Coat Protein (CP gene of the Malaysian Passiflora Virus (MPV and its 3' non-coding region. The CP gene of the MPV contained 285 amino acid residues. Approach: Pairwise comparison of the MPV CP region with four other potyviruses, namely East Asian Passiflora Virus (EAPV, Passionfruit Woodiness Virus (PWV, Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV and Soyabean Mosaic Virus (SMV revealed amino acid sequence similarities ranging from 72-95%. Results: The 3' non-coding region of the MPV, which consists of 255 nucleotides, showed 69-95% nucleotide sequence identity when compared with the four potyviruses. The highest (95% sequence similarities were detected with PWV and EAPV. An analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed the presence of consensus motifs (DAG tripeptides characteristic of potyviruses. DAG tripeptides had been reported to be essential for aphid transmission. Conclusion: From the amino acid sequence alignment and identity level observed among the four other potyviruses, we concluded that MPV is a member of the genus Potyvirus and was closely related to both PWV and EAPV.

  10. Long terminal repeat sequences from virulent and attenuated equine infectious anemia virus demonstrate distinct promoter activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao; Yuan, Xiu-Fang; Hou, Shao-Hua; Tu, Ya-Bin; Peng, Jin-Mei; Wen, Jian-Xin; Qiu, Hua-Ji; Wu, Dong-Lai; Chen, Huan-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2007-09-01

    In the early 1970s, the Chinese Equine Infectious Anemia Virus (EIAV) vaccine, EIAV(DLA), was developed through successive passages of a wild-type virulent virus (EIAV(L)) in donkeys in vivo and then in donkey macrophages in vitro. EIAV attenuation and cell tropism adaptation are associated with changes in both envelope and long terminal repeat (LTR). However, specific LTR changes during Chinese EIAV attenuation have not been demonstrated. In this study, we compared LTR sequences from both virulent and attenuated EIAV strains and documented the diversities of LTR sequence from in vivo and in vitro infections. We found that EIAV LTRs of virulent strains were homologous, while EIAV vaccine have variable LTRs. Interestingly, experimental inoculation of EIAV(DLA) into a horse resulted in a restriction of the LTR variation. Furthermore, LTRs from EIAV(DLA) showed higher Tat transactivated activity than LTRs from virulent strains. By using chimeric clones of wild-type LTR and vaccine LTR, the main difference of activity was mapped to the changes of R region, rather than U3 region.

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of Parietaria mottle virus infecting tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipienso, Luis; Rubio, Luis; López, Luis; Soler, Salvador; Aramburu, José

    2009-10-01

    The genome of a Spanish isolate of Parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) obtained from tomato (strain PMoV-T) was completely sequenced. Protein motifs conserved for RNA viruses were identified: the p1 protein contained a metyltransferase domain in its N-terminal half and a triphosphatase/ helicase domain in its C-terminal half, the p2 protein contained a RNA polymerase domain; the 3a protein contained a RNA-binding domain with α-helix and β-sheet secondary structures. In addition, stem-loop structures with potential capacity of protein interactions were predicted on the untranslated terminal regions. Comparison with the other sequenced PMoV isolate showed nucleotide identities of 93, 90, and 93% for genomic RNAs 1, 2 and 3, respectively, and amino acid identities ranging from 88 to 97% for the different proteins. A cytosine deletion was detected at position 1,366 of RNA 3, involving a start codon for the coat protein (CP) gene different from the other PMoV isolate, resulting in a CP 16 amino acids shorter. Comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations revealed different selective constraints along the genome.

  12. Full genome sequence of peste des petits ruminants virus, a member of the Morbillivirus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Dalan; Banyard, Ashley; Dash, Pradyot; Ozkul, Aykut; Barrett, Tom

    2005-06-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) causes an acute febrile illness in small ruminant species, mostly sheep and goats. PPRV is a member of the Morbillivirus genus which includes measles, rinderpest (cattle plague), canine distemper, phocine distemper and the morbilliviruses found in whales, porpoises and dolphins. Full length genome sequences for these morbilliviruses are available and reverse genetic rescue systems have been developed for the viruses of terrestrial mammals, with the exception of PPRV. This paper presents the first published full length genome sequence for PPRV. The genome was found to be consistent with the rule-of-six and open reading frames (ORFs) were identified that encoded the eight proteins characteristic of morbilliviruses. At the nucleotide (nt) level, the full length genome of PPRV was most similar to that of rinderpest, the other ruminant morbillivirus. However, at the protein level five of the six structural proteins and the V protein showed a greater similarity to the dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) while only the C and L proteins showed a high relationship to rinderpest.

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of a new satellite RNA associated with cucumber mosaic virus inducing tomato necrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程宁辉; 方荣祥; 濮祖芹; 方中达

    1997-01-01

    A new strain (TN strain) of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was isolated from tomato plants with necrotic symptoms and proved to carry a necrogenic satellite RNA (TN-Sat RNA). Double-strand cDNA of the TN-Sat RNA was synthesized by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction using primers designed according to the conserved terminal sequences of known CMV satellite RNAs. Sequence analysis indicated that the TN-Sat RNA consisted of 390 nucleotides (nt). Comparison of the sequence of the TN-Sat RNA with those of other CMV satellite RNAs revealed four homologous regions ( I . 1-81 nt; II . 216-261 nt; III. 278-338 nt; IV . 349-390 nt) and one hypervarible domain in the region of 82-215 nt. Moreover, the TN-Sat RNA contained a characteristic necro-genic consensus sequence at the 3’ end (339-367 nt) as reported in the known necrosis-inducing CMV satellite RNAs.

  14. Frequency of Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences in human gliomas

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    Renata Fragelli Fonseca

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is the most common cause of infectious mononucleosis and is also associated with several human tumors, including Burkitt's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, some cases of gastric carcinoma and nasopharyngeal carcinoma, among other neoplasms. The aim of this study was to screen 75 primary gliomas for the presence of specific EBV DNA sequences by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR, with confirmation by direct sequencing. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prevalence study on EBV molecular genetics at a molecular pathology laboratory in a university hospital and at an applied genetics laboratory in a national institution. METHODS: A total of 75 primary glioma biopsies and 6 others from other tumors from the central nervous system were obtained. The tissues were immediately frozen for subsequent DNA extraction by means of traditional methods using proteinase K digestion and extraction with a phenol-chloroform-isoamyl alcohol mixture. DNA was precipitated with ethanol, resuspended in buffer and stored. The PCRs were carried out using primers for amplification of the EBV BamM region. Positive and negative controls were added to each reaction. The PCR products were used for direct sequencing for confirmation. RESULTS: The viral sequences were positive in 11/75 (14.7% of our samples. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of EBV DNA was 11/75 (14.7% in our glioma collection. Further molecular and epidemiological studies are needed to establish the possible role played by EBV in the tumorigenesis of gliomas.

  15. Sequence analysis and location of capsid proteins within RNA 2 of strawberry latent ringspot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiah, S; Strunk, G; Cooper, J I

    1994-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the RNA 2 of a strawberry isolate (H) of strawberry latent ringspot virus (SLRSV) comprised 3824 nucleotides and contained one long open reading frame with a theoretical coding capacity of 890 amino acids equivalent to a protein of 98.8K. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of virion-derived proteins were determined by Edman degradation allowing the capsid coding regions to be located and serine/glycine cleavage sites to be identified within the polyprotein. The amino acid sequence in the capsid coding region of an isolate of SLRSV from flowering cherry in New Zealand was 97% identical to that of SLRSV-H. Except in the 3' and 5' terminal non-coding sequences, computer-based alignment and comparison algorithms did not reveal any substantial homologies between RNA 2 of SLRSV-H and the equivalent genomic segments in the nepoviruses arabis mosaic, cherry leaf roll, grapevine fanleaf, raspberry ringspot, grapevine hungarian chrome mosaic, tomato blackring, tomato ringspot, tobacco ringspot, or in the comoviruses cowpea mosaic and red clover mottle. Despite the similarities in overall genome organization, data from RNA 2 remain insufficient for unambiguous positioning of SLRSV in relation to species/genera in the Comoviridae.

  16. Isolation and sequence analysis of a canine distemper virus from a raccoon dog in Jilin Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuening; Wang, Jianke; Zhang, Miao; Zhao, Jianjun; Shao, Xiqun; Ma, Zengjun; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Wu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a major pathogen not only in raccoon dogs but also in a variety of carnivorous animals, including domesticated animals, particularly if they have not been vaccinated. In this study, a wild-type strain of CDV was isolated from lung tissue from a raccoon dog kept at a fur farm in Jilin Province, China. Cytopathic effects typical of CDV infection were observed after three blind passages in Vero cells, yielding a virus titer of 10(4.6) TCID50/mL. Virus identification was carried out by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, electron microscopy, and genome sequencing. The results showed that the isolated virus, termed the SY strain, corresponded to the Asia-1 genotype of CDV and has a genome of 15,690 nucleotides. This represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of a CDV strain circulating in raccoon dogs in China.

  17. Establishment of reference sequences of hepatitis B virus genotype C subgenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H L; Wang, C T; Xia, J B; Li, X; Zhang, Z H

    2015-12-09

    Hepatitis B virus genotype C (HBV/C) has the largest number of subgenotypes (C1-C16) that vary with geography and isolates. HBV/C prevails in Southeast Asia (C1, C5-C16), East Asia (C2), Oceania (C3), and Australia (C4). Suitable reference strains for different subgenotypes could greatly facilitate research into HBV/C, but unfortunately they are scarce. We retrieved 974 HBV/C full-length sequences from the GenBank database and subgenotyped them by phylogenetic analysis. Reference sequences of each subgenotype from different locations were established with the most frequent nucleotide present at each position of the isolates that belonged to the same subgenotype. The reference sequences of subgenotypes C1, C2, C5, and C6 have been constructed and deposited in GenBank (KM999990-KM999993). The homology between the reference sequences and almost all the isolates belonging to the corresponding subgenotype was higher than 96%. Similarly, bootstrap values in phylogenetic trees supported clustering of reference strains with isolates belonging to the same subgenotypes. Moreover, both homology and phylogeny analyses showed that reference sequences had significant heterogeneity with isolates from other genotypes and subgenotypes. Sequence analysis further revealed that the mutation rate in the basal core promoter (BCP) region was extremely high in HBV/C2, relatively high in HBV/C1, but lower in HBV/C5 and HBV/C6. Mutations in the pre-core (Pre-C) region were common in HBV/C but the mutation rate was lower than in the BCP. HBV/ C5 has the oldest ancestral age, followed by C6, which is much more ancient than C1 and C2. This study successfully established references for HBV/C subgenotypes.

  18. Comparative analysis of full genomic sequences among different genotypes of dengue virus type 3

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    Lin Ting-Hsiang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the previous study demonstrated the envelope protein of dengue viruses is under purifying selection pressure, little is known about the genetic differences of full-length viral genomes of DENV-3. In our study, complete genomic sequencing of DENV-3 strains collected from different geographical locations and isolation years were determined and the sequence diversity as well as selection pressure sites in the DENV genome other than within the E gene were also analyzed. Results Using maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, our phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Taiwan's indigenous DENV-3 isolated from 1994 and 1998 dengue/DHF epidemics and one 1999 sporadic case were of the three different genotypes – I, II, and III, each associated with DENV-3 circulating in Indonesia, Thailand and Sri Lanka, respectively. Sequence diversity and selection pressure of different genomic regions among DENV-3 different genotypes was further examined to understand the global DENV-3 evolution. The highest nucleotide sequence diversity among the fully sequenced DENV-3 strains was found in the nonstructural protein 2A (mean ± SD: 5.84 ± 0.54 and envelope protein gene regions (mean ± SD: 5.04 ± 0.32. Further analysis found that positive selection pressure of DENV-3 may occur in the non-structural protein 1 gene region and the positive selection site was detected at position 178 of the NS1 gene. Conclusion Our study confirmed that the envelope protein is under purifying selection pressure although it presented higher sequence diversity. The detection of positive selection pressure in the non-structural protein along genotype II indicated that DENV-3 originated from Southeast Asia needs to monitor the emergence of DENV strains with epidemic potential for better epidemic prevention and vaccine development.

  19. Sequence variations of the hypervariable region of hepatitis C virus and their clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To understand the clinical significance of sequence variations in the hypervariable region (HVR) of hepatitis C virus during infection. Methods Eight patients with acute hepatitis C and 20 patients with chronic hepatitis C were followed up for two years. Blood samples were taken at intervals of six months for analysis of HCV-HVR sequences by reverse transcription-pelymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct sequencing methods. Results HCV-HVR sequences of the 28 patients changed in various degrees. 92% of these nuclentide substitutions led to changes of corresponding amino acid sequence. Only 8% of changed nucleotide were synonymous substitutions. Of 27 amino acids variation of amino acid ranged from 1 to 20 (mean 8, 30%). The most common nucleotide substitution (62%) occurred in the first position of codon, 31% in the second and the rest in the third. HVR variation rate wes 0.89×10-1 per genome site per year in acute hepatitis C, compared with 2.31×10-1 per genome site per year in chronic hepatitis C (P<0.05), but had no relafian to HCV subtype. Variation of HVR in the flare up type (ALT>150 μ/L) was much more than that in the quiescent type (ALT<100 μ/L). Conclusion Our results suggested that sequence variation of HVR during HCV chronic infection seems to be an adaptive response to HCV to evade the host immune pressure and might play a major role in the establishment of persistent infection as well as in the flare-up of hepatitis.

  20. Molecular biology of sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, M C

    1996-07-01

    There has been a virtual explosion of information relating to the biology of sarcomas with which we as orthopaedists deal. Much more is yet to be learned. These findings will teach us more about the etiology of these tumors. More important, the findings will alter the way in which these tumors are treated. It is unlikely that we will continue to treat osteosarcoma or Ewing's sarcoma patients with currently available drug regimens and surgery or make treatment decisions based on the histologic classification of tumors we know today. If we are to remain active in the management of these patients we must be aware of the findings as they occur. That will ensure both that we remain the primary caretakers of these patients, and that we will continue to be stimulated intellectually by these intriguing scientific investigations.

  1. Nucleotide Sequence of the Hantaan Virus S RNA Segment and Expression of Encoded Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-03

    stomatitis virus and influenza virus) has been shown to be important in generating cytotoxic T cells in response to viral infection (Townsend et al...termination-polyadenylation signal common to other negative-strand RNA viruses (Sendai virus: 5’-TAAGAAAA and vesicular stomatitis virus: TATGAAAA...codon also occurs in the two retroviruses, murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus, to produce a precursor polyprotein larger than normal 191

  2. Pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma: correlation between imaging and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Zanetti, Gláucia; Vianna, Alberto Domingues; Santos, Alair A S M D; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2009-07-14

    Kaposi sarcoma is a low-grade mesenchymal tumor involving blood and lymphatic vessels. There are four variants of this disease, each presenting a different clinical manifestation: classic or sporadic, African or endemic, organ transplant-related or iatrogenic, and AIDS-related or epidemic. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common tumor among patients with HIV infection, occurring predominantly in homosexual or bisexual men. The pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma occurs commonly in critically immunosupressed patients who commonly have had preceding mucocutaneous or digestive involvement.The etiology of Kaposi sarcoma is not precisely established; genetic, hormonal, and immune factors, as well as infectious agents, have all been implicated. There is evidence from epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular studies that Kaposi sarcoma is associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection. The disease starts as a reactive polyclonal angioproliferative response towards this virus, in which polyclonal cells change to form oligoclonal cell populations that expand and undergo malignant transformation.The diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma usually can be made by a combination of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings, together with the results of bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy. Chest high-resolution computed tomography scans commonly reveal peribronchovascular and interlobular septal thickening, bilateral and symmetric ill-defined nodules in a peribronchovascular distribution, fissural nodularity, mediastinal adenopathies, and pleural effusions. Correlation between the high-resolution computed tomography findings and the pathology revealed by histopathological analysis demonstrate that the areas of central peribronchovascular infiltration represent tumor growth involving the bronchovascular bundles, with nodules corresponding to proliferations of neoplastic cells into the pulmonary parenchyma. The interlobular septal thickening may represent

  3. Pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma: correlation between imaging and pathology

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    Vianna Alberto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kaposi sarcoma is a low-grade mesenchymal tumor involving blood and lymphatic vessels. There are four variants of this disease, each presenting a different clinical manifestation: classic or sporadic, African or endemic, organ transplant-related or iatrogenic, and AIDS-related or epidemic. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common tumor among patients with HIV infection, occurring predominantly in homosexual or bisexual men. The pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma occurs commonly in critically immunosupressed patients who commonly have had preceding mucocutaneous or digestive involvement. The etiology of Kaposi sarcoma is not precisely established; genetic, hormonal, and immune factors, as well as infectious agents, have all been implicated. There is evidence from epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular studies that Kaposi sarcoma is associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection. The disease starts as a reactive polyclonal angioproliferative response towards this virus, in which polyclonal cells change to form oligoclonal cell populations that expand and undergo malignant transformation. The diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma usually can be made by a combination of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings, together with the results of bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy. Chest high-resolution computed tomography scans commonly reveal peribronchovascular and interlobular septal thickening, bilateral and symmetric ill-defined nodules in a peribronchovascular distribution, fissural nodularity, mediastinal adenopathies, and pleural effusions. Correlation between the high-resolution computed tomography findings and the pathology revealed by histopathological analysis demonstrate that the areas of central peribronchovascular infiltration represent tumor growth involving the bronchovascular bundles, with nodules corresponding to proliferations of neoplastic cells into the pulmonary parenchyma. The interlobular

  4. Kaposi´s sarcoma, epidemic type. Case presentation

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    Gilberto Serrano Ocaña

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Before the AIDS epidemic, Kaposi's sarcoma was found mainly in elderly men of Mediterranean coast, eastern European background and Jewish ancestry (rarely in older women and is a slow growing skin tumor. In AIDS patients, the KS tends to develop more rapidly compromising the skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and other organs. In people with AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma is caused by an interaction between HIV, a weakened immune system and human herpes virus 8. It affects approximately 20% of people with HIV that don’t take antiretroviral drugs. It is more common in homosexual’s patients, but may appear in any HIV positive individual, in Africa where heterosexual HIV transmission route is the most important can also be found in children and women. We are presenting a case of Kaposi sarcoma in a young female admitted at the Internal Medicine Department of Dora Nginza Hospital.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Sapporo Virus GV.2 Variant from a 2016 Outbreak of Gastroenteritis in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallström, Björn; Lagerqvist, Nina; Lind-Karlberg, Maria; Helgesson, Sofia; Follin, Per; Hergens, Maria-Pia; Nederby-Öhd, Joanna; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT During an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in Sweden when laboratory routine diagnostics failed to detect a causative agent, Sapporo virus was detected in stool specimens using electron microscopy (M.-P. Hergens, J. Nederby Öhd, E. Alm, H. Hervius Askling, S. Helgesson, M. Insulander, N. Lagerkvist, B. Svennungsson, M. Tihane, T. Tolfvenstam, P. Follin, unpublished data). Whole-genome sequencing revealed a Sapporo virus variant clustering with genogroup V. PMID:28153884

  6. Zucchini yellow mosaic virus: biological properties, detection procedures and comparison of coat protein gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, B A; Kehoe, M A; Webster, C G; Wylie, S J; Jones, R A C

    2011-12-01

    Between 2006 and 2010, 5324 samples from at least 34 weed, two cultivated legume and 11 native species were collected from three cucurbit-growing areas in tropical or subtropical Western Australia. Two new alternative hosts of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) were identified, the Australian native cucurbit Cucumis maderaspatanus, and the naturalised legume species Rhyncosia minima. Low-level (0.7%) seed transmission of ZYMV was found in seedlings grown from seed collected from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) fruit infected with isolate Cvn-1. Seed transmission was absent in >9500 pumpkin (C. maxima and C. moschata) seedlings from fruit infected with isolate Knx-1. Leaf samples from symptomatic cucurbit plants collected from fields in five cucurbit-growing areas in four Australian states were tested for the presence of ZYMV. When 42 complete coat protein (CP) nucleotide (nt) sequences from the new ZYMV isolates obtained were compared to those of 101 complete CP nt sequences from five other continents, phylogenetic analysis of the 143 ZYMV sequences revealed three distinct groups (A, B and C), with four subgroups in A (I-IV) and two in B (I-II). The new Australian sequences grouped according to collection location, fitting within A-I, A-II and B-II. The 16 new sequences from one isolated location in tropical northern Western Australia all grouped into subgroup B-II, which contained no other isolates. In contrast, the three sequences from the Northern Territory fitted into A-II with 94.6-99.0% nt identities with isolates from the United States, Iran, China and Japan. The 23 new sequences from the central west coast and two east coast locations all fitted into A-I, with 95.9-98.9% nt identities to sequences from Europe and Japan. These findings suggest that (i) there have been at least three separate ZYMV introductions into Australia and (ii) there are few changes to local isolate CP sequences following their establishment in remote growing areas. Isolates from A-I and B

  7. The genome sequence of Lone Star virus, a highly divergent bunyavirus found in the Amblyomma americanum tick.

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    Andrea Swei

    Full Text Available Viruses in the family Bunyaviridae infect a wide range of plant, insect, and animal hosts. Tick-borne bunyaviruses in the Phlebovirus genus, including Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome virus (SFTSV in China, Heartland virus (HRTV in the United States, and Bhanja virus in Eurasia and Africa have been associated with acute febrile illness in humans. Here we sought to characterize the growth characteristics and genome of Lone Star virus (LSV, an unclassified bunyavirus originally isolated from the lone star tick Amblyomma americanum. LSV was able to infect both human (HeLa and monkey (Vero cells. Cytopathic effects were seen within 72 h in both cell lines; vacuolization was observed in infected Vero, but not HeLa, cells. Viral culture supernatants were examined by unbiased deep sequencing and analysis using an in-house developed rapid computational pipeline for viral discovery, which definitively identified LSV as a phlebovirus. De novo assembly of the full genome revealed that LSV is highly divergent, sharing <61% overall amino acid identity with any other bunyavirus. Despite this sequence diversity, LSV was found by phylogenetic analysis to be part of a well-supported clade that includes members of the Bhanja group viruses, which are most closely related to SFSTV/HRTV. The genome sequencing of LSV is a critical first step in developing diagnostic tools to determine the risk of arbovirus transmission by A. americanum, a tick of growing importance given its expanding geographic range and competence as a disease vector. This study also underscores the power of deep sequencing analysis in rapidly identifying and sequencing the genomes of viruses of potential clinical and public health significance.

  8. Antigenic characterisation of influenza B virus with a new microneutralisation assay: comparison to haemagglutination and sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldi, Filippo; Bacilieri, Sabrina; Amicizia, Daniela; Valle, Laura; Banfi, Federica; Durando, Paolo; Sticchi, Laura; Gasparini, Roberto; Icardi, Giancarlo; Crovari, Pietro

    2004-09-01

    Although the haemagglutination inhibition assay is considered the "gold standard" for antigenic characterisation of influenza viruses, some limitations of this technique are well known. A new microneutralisation assay, as a tool for antigenic characterisation of influenza B viruses, has been standardised and its performance evaluated in comparison with the haemagglutination inhibition test in the light of molecular characterisation of the haemagglutinin. Twelve B viruses belonging to the two lineages and the four sub-lineages discriminated by phylogenetic analysis of HA were tested. The microneutralisation assay clearly distinguishes viruses belonging to different lineages and, in addition, discriminates strains belonging to different sub-lineages that are poorly or not discriminated using the haemagglutination inhibition test. This new microneutralisation assay could provide a useful tool for antigenic characterisation of circulating influenza viruses and contribute, together with the haemagglutination inhibition test and sequence analysis of the haemagglutinin and neuraminidase, in the choice of the strain for use in vaccine composition.

  9. Identification of viruses and viroids by next-generation sequencing and homology-dependent and homology-independent algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingfa; Ding, Shou-Wei; Zhang, Yongjiang; Zhu, Shuifang

    2015-01-01

    A fast, accurate, and full indexing of viruses and viroids in a sample for the inspection and quarantine services and disease management is desirable but was unrealistic until recently. This article reviews the rapid and exciting recent progress in the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies for the identification of viruses and viroids in plants. A total of four viroids/viroid-like RNAs and 49 new plant RNA and DNA viruses from 18 known or unassigned virus families have been identified from plants since 2009. A comparison of enrichment strategies reveals that full indexing of RNA and DNA viruses as well as viroids in a plant sample at single-nucleotide resolution is made possible by one NGS run of total small RNAs, followed by data mining with homology-dependent and homology-independent computational algorithms. Major challenges in the application of NGS technologies to pathogen discovery are discussed.

  10. S1 gene sequence analysis of a nephropathogenic strain of avian infectious bronchitis virus in Egypt

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    Ladman Brian S

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious bronchitis is highly contagious and constitutes one of the most common and difficult poultry diseases to control. IBV is endemic in probably all countries that raise chickens. It exists as dozens of serotypes/genotypes. Only a few amino acid differences in the S1 protein of vaccine and challenge strains of IBV may result in poor protection. Tropism of IBV includes the respiratory tract tissues, proventriculus and caecal tonsils of the alimentary tract, the oviduct and the kidney. Results Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV strain closely related to Massachusetts (Mass serotype was isolated from broiler chickens suffering from severe renal and respiratory distresses. The isolate was serologically identified by Dot-ELISA and further characterized by RT-PCR then genotyped using S1 gene sequence analysis. Alignment of the S1 sequence of the isolate with 16 IBV strains revealed high homology to isolates related to Mass serotype. Inoculation with the strain reproduced the disease in experimental 1-day-old chickens and resulted in 20% mortality, severe renal and moderate respiratory distresses. Marked histopathological changes in both kidney and trachea were observed in experimentally infected chickens. A protection study using the H120 live attenuated vaccine showed low protection rate in spite of high S1 sequence homology (97%. Protection based criteria were: virus re-isolation attempts from trachea, tracheal and renal histopathology as well as IBV antigens detection by immunofluorescent antibody technique in kidney sections. Conclusion Periodical evaluation of cross-protective capabilities of IBV vaccine(s versus recently recovered field isolates should be performed to ensure optimum control of IBV.

  11. Sequence Conservation and Differential Expression of Marek's Disease Virus MicroRNAs▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robin; Anderson, Amy; Bernberg, Erin; Kamboj, Sachin; Huang, Emily; Lagasse, Grace; Isaacs, Grace; Parcells, Mark; Meyers, Blake C.; Green, Pamela J.; Burnside, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV), a herpesvirus that causes a lymphoproliferative disorder in chickens, encodes a number of microRNAs derived primarily from two locations in the MDV genome. One cluster of microRNA genes flanks the meq oncogene, and a second cluster is found within the latency-associated transcript (LAT) region. The sequences of MDV microRNAs from a collection of field and reference strains with various levels of virulence were compared and found to be highly conserved. However, microRNAs from the meq cluster were detected at higher levels in lymphomas caused by a form of the virus designated very virulent plus (vv+; strain 615K, also known as T. King) than in those caused by a less virulent (very virulent [vv]) form (RB1B). For example, levels of mdv1-miR-M4, which shares a seed sequence with miR-155, a microRNA implicated in B-cell lymphoma, were threefold higher and levels of mdv1-miR-M2*/3p were more than sixfold higher in vv+ MDV-induced tumors than in vv MDV-induced tumors. In contrast, levels of the microRNAs from the LAT cluster were equivalent in tumors produced by vv and vv+ strains. Additionally, mdv1-miR-M4 is the MDV microRNA most highly expressed in tumors, where it accounts for 72% of all MDV microRNAs, as determined by deep sequencing. These data suggest that the meq cluster microRNAs play an important role in the pathogenicity of MDV. PMID:18842708

  12. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a nucleoprotein gene sequence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, C.K.; Deering, R.E.; Higman, K.H.; Oshima, K.H.; O'Hara, P.J.; Winton, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction [PCR) was used to amplify a portion of the nucleoprotein [NI gene of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). Using a published sequence for the Round Butte isolate of IHNV, a pair of PCR pnmers was synthesized that spanned a 252 nucleotide region of the N gene from residue 319 to residue 570 of the open reading frame. This region included a 30 nucleotide target sequence for a synthetic oligonucleotide probe developed for detection of IHNV N gene messenger RNA. After 25 cycles of amplification of either messenger or genomic RNA, the PCR product (DNA) of the expected size was easily visible on agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. The specificity of the amplified DNA was confirmed by Southern and dot-blot analysis using the biotinylated oligonucleotide probe. The PCR was able to amplify the N gene sequence of purified genomic RNA from isolates of IHNV representing 5 different electropherotypes. Using the IHNV primer set, no PCR product was obtained from viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus RNA, but 2 higher molecular weight products were synthesized from hirame rhabdovirus RNA that did not hybridize with the biotinylated probe. The PCR could be efficiently performed with all IHNV genomic RNA template concentrations tested (1 ng to 1 pg). The lowest level of sensitivity was not determined. The PCR was used to amplify RNA extracted from infected cell cultures and selected tissues of Infected rainbow trout. The combination of PCR and nucleic acid probe promises to provide a detection method for IHNV that is rapid, h~ghly specific, and sensitive.

  13. Remarkable sequence similarity between the dinoflagellate-infecting marine girus and the terrestrial pathogen African swine fever virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heterocapsa circularisquama DNA virus (HcDNAV; previously designated as HcV is a giant virus (girus with a ~356-kbp double-stranded DNA (dsDNA genome. HcDNAV lytically infects the bivalve-killing marine dinoflagellate H. circularisquama, and currently represents the sole DNA virus isolated from dinoflagellates, one of the most abundant protists in marine ecosystems. Its morphological features, genome type, and host range previously suggested that HcDNAV might be a member of the family Phycodnaviridae of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDVs, though no supporting sequence data was available. NCLDVs currently include two families found in aquatic environments (Phycodnaviridae, Mimiviridae, one mostly infecting terrestrial animals (Poxviridae, another isolated from fish, amphibians and insects (Iridoviridae, and the last one (Asfarviridae exclusively represented by the animal pathogen African swine fever virus (ASFV, the agent of a fatal hemorrhagic disease in domestic swine. In this study, we determined the complete sequence of the type B DNA polymerase (PolB gene of HcDNAV. The viral PolB was transcribed at least from 6 h post inoculation (hpi, suggesting its crucial function for viral replication. Most unexpectedly, the HcDNAV PolB sequence was found to be closely related to the PolB sequence of ASFV. In addition, the amino acid sequence of HcDNAV PolB showed a rare amino acid substitution within a motif containing highly conserved motif: YSDTDS was found in HcDNAV PolB instead of YGDTDS in most dsDNA viruses. Together with the previous observation of ASFV-like sequences in the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling metagenomic datasets, our results further reinforce the ideas that the terrestrial ASFV has its evolutionary origin in marine environments.

  14. The full genome sequence of three strains of Jamestown Canyon virus and their pathogenesis in mice or monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Brian R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV, family Bunyaviridae, is a mosquito-borne pathogen endemic in the United States and Canada that can cause encephalitis in humans and is considered an emerging threat to public health. The virus is genetically similar to Inkoo virus circulating in Europe, suggesting that much of the northern hemisphere contains JCV or similar variants. Results We have completed the sequence of three isolates of JCV collected in geographically diverse locations over a 57 year time span. The nucleotide identity for the three strains is 90, 83, and 85% for the S, M, and L segments respectively whereas the percent identify for the predicted amino acid sequences of the N, NSS, M poly, GN, NSM, GC, and L proteins was 97, 91, 94, 98, 91, 94, and 97%, respectively. In Swiss Webster mice, each JCV isolate exhibits low neuroinvasiveness but high infectivity. Two of the three JCV isolates were highly neurovirulent after IC inoculation whereas one isolate, JCV/03/CT, exhibited low neurovirulence. In rhesus monkeys, JCV infection is accompanied by a low-titered viremia, lack of clinical disease, but a robust neutralizing antibody response. Conclusions The first complete sequence of JCV is reported for three separate isolates, and a relatively high level of amino acid sequence conservation was observed even for viruses isolated 57 years apart indicating that the virus is in relative evolutionary stasis. JCV is highly infectious for mice and monkeys, and these animals, especially mice, represent useful experimental hosts for further study.

  15. Development of Bean pod mottle virus-based vectors for stable protein expression and sequence-specific virus-induced gene silencing in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunquan; Ghabrial, Said A

    2006-01-20

    Plant virus-based vectors provide valuable tools for expression of foreign proteins in plants and for gene function studies. None of the presently available virus vectors is suitable for use in soybean. In the present study, we produced Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV)-based vectors that are appropriate for gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in soybean. The genes of interest were inserted into the RNA2-encoded polyprotein open reading frame between the movement protein (MP) and the large coat protein (L-CP) coding regions. Additional proteinase cleavage sites were created to flank the foreign protein by duplicating the MP/L-CP cleavage site. To minimize the chances of homologous recombination and thus insert instability, we took advantage of the genetic code degeneracy and altered the nucleotide sequence of the duplicated regions without affecting amino acid sequences. The recombinant BPMV constructs were stable following several serial passages in soybean and relatively high levels of protein expression were attained. Successful expression of several proteins with different biological activities was demonstrated from the BPMV vector. These included the reporter proteins GFP and DsRed, phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (encoded by the herbicide resistance bar gene), and the RNA silencing suppressors encoded by Tomato bushy stunt virus, Turnip crinkle virus, Tobacco etch virus, and Soybean mosaic virus. The possible use of BPMV as a VIGS vector to study gene function in soybean was also demonstrated with the phytoene desaturase gene. Our results suggest that the BPMV-based vectors are suitable for expression of foreign proteins in soybean and for functional genomics applications.

  16. Complete Sequence of Proviral DNA of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Strain L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-quan; WANG Liu; YANG Zhi-biao; KONG Xian-gang; TONG Guang-Zhi

    2002-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus strain L (EIAV-L) is the parental virulent virus of equine infectious anemia donkey leukocyte attenuated vaccine (DLA EIAV ). In this study, peripheral blood leukocytes(PBL) were collected from a horse infected with EIAV-L. The PBL DNAs were extracted. The EIAV-L proviral DNA was amplified in four parts covering the entire proviral genomic sequence by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Each of the four parts was cloned into the plasmid pBluescript SK, and the recombinant plasmids were designated as p2.8, p2.4, p3.1, and p1.2 respectively. After identification with restriction digestion, the inserts within the four plasmids were sequenced. The complete nucleotide sequence of EIAV-L provirus was determined by analyzing each of the four parts and connecting them as a whole. The genome of EIAV-L is 8235 bp in length, and G + C content is 38%. The comparison analysis by the computer software DNASIS showed that the sequence of EIAV-L shares 98.4% and 96.9% identities with that of D-A EIAV and DLA EIAV respectively. The high homology between these strains showed that they were genetically related.The homology between EIAV-L and D-A EIAV is higher than that between EIAV-L and DLA EIAV, and this is consistent with the derivation progress of DLA EIAV. At both ends of EIAV-L provirus, there is an identical long terminal repeat (LTR) sequence of 316bp in length. The LTR consists of U3, R, and U5 regions. The genome of EIAV-L provirus has three long open reading frames(ORF) corresponding to gag, pol and env genes respectively. The gag gene is 1200bp and located at position 613-1912nt. The pol gene is 3402bp and located at position 1708-5109nt. There is a termination codon within the env dividing it into two parts,env1 of 699bp (position 5305-6003nt)and env2 of 1827bp (position 6073-7899nt). The provirus has three additional small ORFs: S1, S2 and S3 with sizes of 153bp (position 5113-5265nt), 204bp (position 5279-5482nt) and 402bp ( position 7245

  17. Sequence variation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) BCRF1 in lymphomas in non-endemic areas of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lu; Sun, Lingling; Zhao, Zhenzhen; Chao, Yan; Sun, Zhifu; Li, Hui; Luo, Bing

    2015-02-01

    To characterize the sequence variation and the potential implication of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) oncogene in lymphoma, BamHI-C fragment rightward reading frame 1 (BCRF1) was sequenced in different types of EBV-positive lymphoma in northern China, and polymorphisms were compared with previous variation data from other malignancies. The dominate subtype of BCRF1 in EBV-positive lymphoma was the B95-8 prototype, and a mutation in the signal peptide was more strongly associated with Hodgkin's lymphoma. The high conservation of BCRF1 in EBV-positive lymphoma suggests its important role in maintaining the basic biological activity and immunosuppressive functions of the virus.

  18. Amplification of complete gag gene sequences from geographically distinct equine infectious anemia virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Bazartseren, Tsevel; Koba, Ryota; Murakami, Hironobu; Oguma, Keisuke; Murakami, Kenji; Sentsui, Hiroshi

    2013-04-01

    In the current study, primers described previously and modified versions of these primers were evaluated for amplification of full-length gag genes from different equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) strains from several countries, including the USA, Germany and Japan. Each strain was inoculated into a primary horse leukocyte culture, and the full-length gag gene was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Each amplified gag gene was cloned into a plasmid vector for sequencing, and the detectable copy numbers of target DNA were determined. Use of a mixture of two forward primers and one reverse primer in the polymerase chain reaction enabled the amplification of all EIAV strains used in this study. However, further study is required to confirm these primers as universal for all EIAV strains. The nucleotide sequence of gag is considered highly conserved, as evidenced by the use of gag-encoded capsid proteins as a common antigen for the detection of EIAV in serological tests. However, significant sequence variation in the gag genes of different EIAV strains was found in the current study.

  19. Molecular cloning, sequencing, and expression in Escherichia coli of the potato virus Y cytoplasmic inclusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, K; Inoue, A K; Shikata, E

    1993-01-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of cytoplasmic inclusion (CI) genes of two strains of potato virus Y (PVY) were determined from six polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified cDNA clones. The size of the CI genes of both ordinary (PVY-O) and necrotic strains (PVY-T13) was 1902 nucleotides, with a sequence homology of 83.4%. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences showed more than 90% homology. When these were compared with those of other potyviruses, the homology ranged from 53 to 61%. cDNAs of all or a part of the PVY-O CI gene containing an additional initiation codon (ATG) at the 5' end and a stop codon at the 3' end were constructed by PCR amplification and cloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector, pKK 223-3. Complete and truncated PVY-O CI proteins were successfully produced in E. coli as judged by reactivities with PVY-O CI protein-specific antiserum. To our knowledge, this is the first report on expression of PVY CI proteins in E. coli.

  20. Complete genome sequence of a novel Plum pox virus strain W isolate determined by 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Speranskaya, Anna; Belenikin, Maxim; Melnikova, Natalia; Chirkov, Sergei

    2013-10-01

    The near-complete (99.7 %) genome sequence of a novel Russian Plum pox virus (PPV) isolate Pk, belonging to the strain Winona (W), has been determined by 454 pyrosequencing with the exception of the thirty-one 5'-terminal nucleotides. This region was amplified using 5'RACE kit and sequenced by the Sanger method. Genomic RNA released from immunocaptured PPV particles was employed for generation of cDNA library using TransPlex Whole transcriptome amplification kit (WTA2, Sigma-Aldrich). The entire Pk genome has identity level of 92.8-94.5 % when compared to the complete nucleotide sequences of other PPV-W isolates (W3174, LV-141pl, LV-145bt, and UKR 44189), confirming a high degree of variability within the PPV-W strain. The isolates Pk and LV-141pl are most closely related. The Pk has been found in a wild plum (Prunus domestica) in a new region of Russia indicating widespread dissemination of the PPV-W strain in the European part of the former USSR.

  1. Phylogeographic analysis of African swine fever virus based on the p72 gene sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangkram, Y; Sukmak, M; Wajjwalku, W

    2015-05-04

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) outbreak has been considered as an emerging and re-emerging disease for almost a century. Diagnostically, simple polymerase chain reaction and sequencing-based molecular detection could be employed for both viral identification and genotyping. This study established a novel phylogenetic analysis and epidemiology comparison based on 205 bp of p72 gene sequences. Based on this partial p72 fragment, an updated list of 44 different genotypes from a total of 516 ASFV sequences compiled from GenBank was generated. Nucleotide diversity was 0.04325 ± 0.00231. The analysis of spatial genetic variation divided the ASFV populations of the African continent into four clades (clade A: central and upper eastern Africa; clade B: eastern Africa; clade C: eastern and southern Africa; and clade D: southern Africa). These results and the developed protocol could serve as useful molecular tools for ASFV diagnosis from degraded DNA or putrefied samples, and also provide the phylogeographic perspective to identify the origin of viral outbreaks, facilitating the decision planning to limit their spread.

  2. Mapping vaccinia virus DNA replication origins at nucleotide level by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senkevich, Tatiana G; Bruno, Daniel; Martens, Craig; Porcella, Stephen F; Wolf, Yuri I; Moss, Bernard

    2015-09-01

    Poxviruses reproduce in the host cytoplasm and encode most or all of the enzymes and factors needed for expression and synthesis of their double-stranded DNA genomes. Nevertheless, the mode of poxvirus DNA replication and the nature and location of the replication origins remain unknown. A current but unsubstantiated model posits only leading strand synthesis starting at a nick near one covalently closed end of the genome and continuing around the other end to generate a concatemer that is subsequently resolved into unit genomes. The existence of specific origins has been questioned because any plasmid can replicate in cells infected by vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototype poxvirus. We applied directional deep sequencing of short single-stranded DNA fragments enriched for RNA-primed nascent strands isolated from the cytoplasm of VACV-infected cells to pinpoint replication origins. The origins were identified as the switching points of the fragment directions, which correspond to the transition from continuous to discontinuous DNA synthesis. Origins containing a prominent initiation point mapped to a sequence within the hairpin loop at one end of the VACV genome and to the same sequence within the concatemeric junction of replication intermediates. These findings support a model for poxvirus genome replication that involves leading and lagging strand synthesis and is consistent with the requirements for primase and ligase activities as well as earlier electron microscopic and biochemical studies implicating a replication origin at the end of the VACV genome.

  3. Complete genomic sequence analysis of infectious bronchitis virus Ark DPI strain and its evolution by recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammayappan, Arun; Upadhyay, Chitra; Gelb, Jack; Vakharia, Vikram N

    2008-12-22

    An infectious bronchitis virus Arkansas DPI (Ark DPI) virulent strain was sequenced, analyzed and compared with many different IBV strains and coronaviruses. The genome of Ark DPI consists of 27,620 nucleotides, excluding poly (A) tail, and comprises ten open reading frames. Comparative sequence analysis of Ark DPI with other IBV strains shows striking similarity to the Conn, Gray, JMK, and Ark 99, which were circulating during that time period. Furthermore, comparison of the Ark genome with other coronaviruses demonstrates a close relationship to turkey coronavirus. Among non-structural genes, the 5'untranslated region (UTR), 3C-like proteinase (3CLpro) and the polymerase (RdRp) sequences are 100% identical to the Gray strain. Among structural genes, S1 has 97% identity with Ark 99; S2 has 100% identity with JMK and 96% to Conn; 3b 99%, and 3C to N is 100% identical to Conn strain. Possible recombination sites were found at the intergenic region of spike gene, 3'end of S1 and 3a gene. Independent recombination events may have occurred in the entire genome of Ark DPI, involving four different IBV strains, suggesting that genomic RNA recombination may occur in any part of the genome at number of sites. Hence, we speculate that the Ark DPI strain originated from the Conn strain, but diverged and evolved independently by point mutations and recombination between field strains.

  4. Complete genomic sequence analysis of infectious bronchitis virus Ark DPI strain and its evolution by recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelb Jack

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An infectious bronchitis virus Arkansas DPI (Ark DPI virulent strain was sequenced, analyzed and compared with many different IBV strains and coronaviruses. The genome of Ark DPI consists of 27,620 nucleotides, excluding poly (A tail, and comprises ten open reading frames. Comparative sequence analysis of Ark DPI with other IBV strains shows striking similarity to the Conn, Gray, JMK, and Ark 99, which were circulating during that time period. Furthermore, comparison of the Ark genome with other coronaviruses demonstrates a close relationship to turkey coronavirus. Among non-structural genes, the 5'untranslated region (UTR, 3C-like proteinase (3CLpro and the polymerase (RdRp sequences are 100% identical to the Gray strain. Among structural genes, S1 has 97% identity with Ark 99; S2 has 100% identity with JMK and 96% to Conn; 3b 99%, and 3C to N is 100% identical to Conn strain. Possible recombination sites were found at the intergenic region of spike gene, 3'end of S1 and 3a gene. Independent recombination events may have occurred in the entire genome of Ark DPI, involving four different IBV strains, suggesting that genomic RNA recombination may occur in any part of the genome at number of sites. Hence, we speculate that the Ark DPI strain originated from the Conn strain, but diverged and evolved independently by point mutations and recombination between field strains.

  5. [Sequence analysis of the phosphoprotein gene of peste des petits ruminants virus of Chinese origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jing-yue; Zhao, Wen-ji; Li, Lin; Wang, Zhi-liang; Wu, Guo-zhen; Wu, Xiao-dong; Liu, Chun-ju; Wang, Qing-hua; Wang, Jun-wei; Liu, Yu-tian; Li, Jin-ming; Wang, Ying-li

    2011-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of P gene from a field strain of peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) ("China/Tib/Gej/07-30") was firstly determined. The P gene is 1,655 nucleotides long with two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs). The first ORF is 1530 nucleotides long and would produce P protein of 509 amino acid residues. The second ORF is 534 nucleotides long and would produce C protein of 177 amino acid residues. The first ORF produces a second mRNA transcript of 897 nucleotides long with an extra G nucleotide at position 751. Translation from this mRNA would produce V protein of 298 amino acid residues. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence were compared with the homologous region of other PPRV isolates. At the amino acid level, the "China/Tib/Gej/07-30" shares homology of 86.10%-97.3%, 84.3%-94.9%, and 82.9%-96.3% for P, C, and V proteins respectively. Several sequence motifs in the P genes were identified on the basis of conservation in the PPRVs and the morbilliviruses.

  6. Kaposi′s sarcoma: HIV-negative man with isolated penile localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufiane Mellas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi′s sarcoma is the malignant proliferation of the endothelial cell vessels. Its genesis is still unclear; however, it seems to be related to the herpes virus infection (HHV-8. This neoplasia usually affects the lower limbs and the affected persons are mostly from the Mediterranean region. The exclusive penile localization of the Kaposi′s sarcoma in a patient with a negative HIV serologia is exceptional. Our case is of a 73-year old patient with a negative HIV serology presenting an exclusive penile localization of the Kaposi′s sarcoma treated by radiotherapy.

  7. Discovery and complete genome sequence of a novel circovirus-like virus in the endangered rowi kiwi, Apteryx rowi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Daniel J; Hall, Richard J; Wang, Jing; Moore, Nicole E; Park, Duckchul; McInnes, Kate; Gartrell, Brett D; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2016-10-01

    Circoviruses are circular, non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA viruses around 2000 nucleotides (nt) in length and include the pathogenic species, Porcine circovirus 1 and Beak and feather disease virus, capable of causing significant morbidity and mortality. This group of viruses may be robust to degradation by external environments, and avian circoviruses are known to move between closely related hosts. Using a de novo metagenomic approach, followed by confirmatory PCR, we identify for the first time a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA virus in New Zealand kiwi, Apteryx spp., derived from faecal matter of the rowi kiwi (A. rowi) showing signs of verminous dermatitis. The entire 2085 nt genome was cloned and sequenced and contains both capsid and replicase genes, as well as a conserved 9 nt motif. Phylogenetic analyses place it within Circoviridae, adjacent to other environmental CRESS-DNA viruses, and most closely related to badger circovirus-like virus (Meles meles circovirus-like virus). As the rowi is the most critically endangered kiwi, it is vital to understand the role of rowi kiwi circovirus-like virus as a possible pathogen and also any potential cross-species transmission.

  8. General Information about Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor that forms from a certain kind of cell in bone or soft tissue . Ewing sarcoma may be found in the bones of the legs, arms, feet, hands, chest , pelvis , spine , or skull . Ewing sarcoma also may be found in the soft tissue of the trunk, arms, legs, head and neck, abdominal cavity , or ...

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Ewing Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor that forms from a certain kind of cell in bone or soft tissue . Ewing sarcoma may be found in the bones of the legs, arms, feet, hands, chest , pelvis , spine , or skull . Ewing sarcoma also may be found in the soft tissue of the trunk, arms, legs, head and neck, abdominal cavity , or ...

  10. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of a coat protein of an Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y: comparison with homologous sequences of other isolates and phylogenetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budzanivska I. G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Identification of the widespread Ukrainian isolate(s of PVY (Potato virus Y in different potato cultivars and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of detected PVY isolates based on NA and AA sequences of coat protein. Methods. ELISA, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Results. PVY has been identified serologically in potato cultivars of Ukrainian selection. In this work we have optimized a method for total RNA extraction from potato samples and offered a sensitive and specific PCR-based test system of own design for diagnostics of the Ukrainian PVY isolates. Part of the CP gene of the Ukrainian PVY isolate has been sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. It is demonstrated that the Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y (CP gene has a higher percentage of homology with the recombinant isolates (strains of this pathogen (approx. 98.8– 99.8 % of homology for both nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the CP gene. The Ukrainian isolate of PVY is positioned in the separate cluster together with the isolates found in Syria, Japan and Iran; these isolates possibly have common origin. The Ukrainian PVY isolate is confirmed to be recombinant. Conclusions. This work underlines the need and provides the means for accurate monitoring of Potato virus Y in the agroecosystems of Ukraine. Most importantly, the phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the recombinant nature of this PVY isolate which has been attributed to the strain group O, subclade N:O.

  11. Multimodality Local Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paryani, Nitesh N.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Hochwald, Steven N. [Department of General Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Marcus, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Soft-tissue sarcomas of the retroperitoneum are rare tumors comprising less than 1% of all malignancies. Although surgery continues as the mainstay of treatment, the large size of these tumors coupled with their proximity to critical structures make resection with wide margins difficult to achieve. The role and timing of radiotherapy are controversial. This study updates our institutional experience using multimodality local therapy for resectable retroperitoneal sarcoma and identifies prognostic factors impacting disease control and survival. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 2007, 58 patients with nonmetastatic retroperitoneal sarcoma were treated with surgery and radiation at University of Florida. The median age at radiotherapy was 57 years old (range, 18-80 years). Forty-two patients received preoperative radiotherapy and 16 received postoperative radiotherapy. Nineteen patients received 1.8 Gy once daily and 39 patients received 1.2 Gy twice daily. Variables analyzed for prognostic value included age, grade, kidney involvement, histology, de novo versus recurrent presentation, tumor diameter, margin status, radiotherapy sequencing (preoperative vs. postoperative), total radiation dose, fractionation scheme, and treatment era. Results: The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rates were 49%, 58%, and 62%, respectively. Nearly two-thirds of disease failures involved a component of local progression. On multivariate analysis, only margin status was significantly associated with improved 5-year local control (85%, negative margins; 63%, microscopic positive margins; 0%, gross positive margins; p < 0.0001) and 5-year overall survival (64%, negative margins; 56%, microscopic positive margins; 13%, gross positive margins; p = 0.0012). Thirty-one Grade 3 or greater toxicities were observed in 22 patients, including two treatment-related deaths (3%). Conclusion: For retroperitoneal sarcoma, local control remains a

  12. Peptide motifs of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule explain the striking MHC-determined response to Rous sarcoma virus in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallny, Hans-Joachim; Avila, David; Hunt, Lawrence G.

    2006-01-01

    pulse-labeled cells to show that there is only one heavy chain spot for the B4 and B15 haplotypes, and one major spot for the B12 haplotype. Fourth, we determine the peptide motifs for B4, B12, and B15 cells in detail, including pool sequences and individual peptides, and show that the motifs...

  13. Preparation of genosensor for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorato Castro, Ana C.; França, Erick G.; de Paula, Lucas F.; Soares, Marcia M. C. N.; Goulart, Luiz R.; Madurro, João M.; Brito-Madurro, Ana G.

    2014-09-01

    An electrochemical genosensor was constructed for detection of specific DNA sequence of the hepatitis B virus, based on graphite electrodes modified with poly(4-aminophenol) and incorporating a specific oligonucleotide probe. The modified electrode containing the probe was evaluated by differential pulse voltammetry, before and after incubation with the complementary oligonucleotide target. Detection was performed by monitoring oxidizable DNA bases (direct detection) or using ethidium bromide as indicator of the hybridization process (indirect detection). The device showed a detection limit for the oligonucleotide target of 2.61 nmol L-1. Indirect detection using ethidium bromide was promising in discriminating mismatches, which is a very desirable attribute for detection of disease-related point mutations. In addition, it was possible to observe differences between hybridized and non-hybridized surfaces by atomic force microscopy.

  14. Detection of hepatitis C virus RNA sequences in cholangiocarcinomas in Chinese and American patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    ObjecUve To iovestigate the role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the malignant transformation of bile duct celle. Tissues from 6Chinese patients and 6 American patients wtiJl cholengienarcinoma were studied. Mammals RNA was extracted from the selected tumor areas eq formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded sections, followed by reverse transcription double polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Southern blotting. Results Positive and negative strand HCV RNA sequences were detected in seven out of tweive patients witn choiangiocarcinorna. A high positive rate was found in Chinese patients (83%) as compared to US patients (38%). Coaclualon Our finding suggests HCV may play a role in the malignent transformation of bile duct cells.

  15. First complete genome sequence of parainfluenza virus 5 isolated from lesser panda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Jun-Qiong; Zhai, Shao-Lun; Lin, Tao; Liu, Jian-Kui; Wang, He-Xing; Li, Bing; Zhang, He; Zou, Shu-Zhan; Zhou, Xia; Wu, Meng-Fan; Chen, Wu; Luo, Man-Lin

    2017-05-01

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is widespread in mammals and humans. Up to now, there is little information about PIV5 infection in lesser pandas. In this study, a PIV5 variant (named ZJQ-221) was isolated from a lesser panda with respiratory disease in Guangzhou zoo in Guangdong province, southern China. The full-length genome of ZJQ-221 was found to be 15,246 nucleotides and consisted of seven non-overlapping genes encoding eight proteins (i.e., NP, V, P, M, F, SH, HN and L). Sequence alignment and genetic analysis revealed that ZJQ-221 shared a close relationship with a PIV5 strain of canine-origin (1168-1) from South Korea. The findings of this study confirm the presence of PIV5 in lesser panda and indicate this mammal as a possible natural reservoir. Furthermore they highlight the urgent need to strengthen viral surveillance and control of PIV5 in zoo animals.

  16. [GnRH analogues containing SV-40 virus T-antigen nuclear localization sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, S V; Iablokova, T V; Dorosh, M Iu; Kriviziuk, E V; Efremov, A M; Orlov, S V

    2010-01-01

    To improve the efficiency of anticancer drugs due to their delivery to intracellular targets a set of GnRH analogues containing nuclear localization signal (NLS) of SV-40 virus large T-antigen have been synthesized. NLS was attached to the parent molecule via ε-amino group of D-Lysine in position 1 or 6 of peptide sequence using orthogonal protection strategy. The biological activity studies revealed that incorporation of NLS moiety significantly increases cytotoxic activity of palmitoyl-containing GnRH analogues in vitro. The influence of tested peptides on tumor cells does not accompanied by the destruction of cell membrane, as confirmed in experiments with normal fibroblasts, used as a control.

  17. Sarcoma risk after radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrington de Gonzalez Amy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sarcomas were one of the first solid cancers to be linked to ionizing radiation exposure. We reviewed the current evidence on this relationship, focusing particularly on the studies that had individual estimates of radiation doses. There is clear evidence of an increased risk of both bone and soft tissue sarcomas after high-dose fractionated radiation exposure (10 + Gy in childhood, and the risk increases approximately linearly in dose, at least up to 40 Gy. There are few studies available of sarcoma after radiotherapy in adulthood for cancer, but data from cancer registries and studies of treatment for benign conditions confirm that the risk of sarcoma is also increased in this age-group after fractionated high-dose exposure. New findings from the long-term follow-up of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors suggest, for the first time, that sarcomas can be induced by acute lower-doses of radiation (

  18. Detection of virus in CSF from the cases with meningoencephalitis by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hongzhi; Shen, Ao; Lv, Xia; Yang, Xunzhe; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Yanhuan; Zhang, Yinxin; Gong, Yanping; Ni, Peixiang; Wu, Honglong; Zhu, Yicheng; Cui, Liying

    2016-04-01

    We screened for viral DNA in cerebrospinal fluid samples using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology to diagnose CNS viral infections. We collected CSF samples from four cases with clinically suspected viral meningoencephalitis. DNA extracted from the samples was analyzed with NGS, and the results were further validated using PCR. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) was detected in the CSF of two patients, HSV-2 and human herpes virus type 3 (HHV-3, VZV) in the CSF of two other patients separately. The number of unique reads of the identified viral genes ranged from 144 to 44205 (93.51 to 99.57%). The coverage of identified viral genes ranged from 12 to 98% with a depth value of 1.1 to 35, respectively. The results were further confirmed using PCR in three cases. The clinical presentation and outcomes of these four cases were consistent with the diagnostic results of NGS. NGS of CSF samples can be used as a diagnostic assay for CNS viral infection. Its further application for "pan-viral" or even "pan-microbial" screening of CSF might influence the diagnosis of CNS infectious diseases.

  19. Molecular characterisation of lineage IV peste des petits ruminants virus using multi gene sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Senthil; Babu, Aravindh; Sundarapandian, G; Roy, Parimal; Thangavelu, A; Kumar, K Siva; Arumugam, R; Chandran, N D J; Muniraju, Murali; Mahapatra, Mana; Banyard, Ashley C; Manohar, B Murali; Parida, Satya

    2014-11-07

    Peste des petits ruminants is responsible for an economically important plague of small ruminants that is endemic across much of the developing world. Here we describe the detection and characterisation of a PPR virus from a recent outbreak in Tamil Nadu, India. We demonstrate the isolation of PPR virus from rectal swab and highlight the potential spread of disease to in-contact animals through faecal materials and use of faecal material as non-invasive method of sampling for susceptible wild ruminants. Finally we have performed a comprehensive 'multi-gene' assessment of lineage IV isolates of PPRV utilising sequence data from our study and publically available partial N, partial F and partial H gene data. We describe the effects of grouping PPRV isolates utilising different gene loci and conclude that the variable part of N gene at C terminus gives the best phylogenetic assessment of PPRV isolates with isolates generally clustering according to geographical isolation. This assessment highlights the importance of careful gene targeting with RT-PCR to enable thorough phylogenetic analysis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Preliminary Evaluation of the Effect of Investigational Ebola Virus Disease Treatments on Viral Genome Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Shannon L M; Albariño, César; Shepard, Samuel S; Dudas, Gytis; Sheth, Mili; Brown, Shelley C; Cannon, Deborah; Erickson, Bobbie R; Gibbons, Aridth; Schuh, Amy; Sealy, Tara; Ervin, Elizabeth; Frace, Mike; Uyeki, Timothy M; Nichol, Stuart T; Ströher, Ute

    2016-10-15

     Several patients with Ebola virus disease (EVD) managed in the United States have received ZMapp monoclonal antibodies, TKM-Ebola small interfering RNA, brincidofovir, and/or convalescent plasma as investigational therapeutics.  To investigate whether treatment selected for Ebola virus (EBOV) mutations conferring resistance, viral sequencing was performed on RNA extracted from clinical blood specimens from patients with EVD following treatment, and putative viral targets were analyzed.  We observed no major or minor EBOV mutations within regions targeted by therapeutics.  This small subset of patients and clinical specimens suggests that evolution of resistance is not a direct consequence of antiviral treatment. As EVD antiviral treatments are introduced into wider use, it is essential that continuous viral full-genome surveillance is performed, to monitor for the emergence of escape mutations. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.