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  1. Oncogenic viruses and cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangxiang; George; Luo; Jing-hsiung; James; Ou

    2015-01-01

    <正>This special issue of the journal is dedicated to the important topic of oncogenic viruses and cancer.It contains seven review articles covering all known oncogenic viruses except for human T-lymphotropic virus type1(HTLV-1).These review articles are contributed by experts on specific viruses and their associated human cancers.Viruses account for about 20%of total human cancer cases.Although many viruses can cause various tumors in animals,only seven of them

  2. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and the Importance of Considering the Oncogenic and Immune-Suppressant Role of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: A Case Report

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    Sergio Lupo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSoft-tissue sarcomas account for 0.7% of all malignant tumors, with an incidence rate of 3 per 100,000 persons/year. The undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS with giant cells, a high grade tumor of soft tissue, is very unusual, especially in young adults before the age of 40. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus, classified as group 1 human carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, that causes an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and a progressive chronic inflammatory neurological disease named HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-1 causes accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome that could contribute to cellular transformation, one of the oncogenic features of HTLV-1.Case reportWe describe a case of a young woman with UPS who suffered from HAM/TSP with 3 years of evolution. In 2013, the patient started with neurological symptoms: weakness in the legs and bladder dysfunction. One year later, the patient developed a mild paraparesis in both extremities, anti-HTLV-1 antibodies were detected in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid, and HAM/TSP was confirmed. In November 2015, a benign ganglion cyst was first suspected without intervention and by March 2016 a sarcoma was diagnosed. Three weeks after surgical resection, the tumor aroused in deep tissue and behaved aggressively, implicating a curative wide resection of the fibula, joint reconstruction, and soft-tissue graft. Histopathological examination confirmed UPS with giant cells.Concluding remarksThe unapparent subclinical immunodeficiency state due to HTLV-1 infection deserves to be considered in order to carefully monitor the possibility of developing any type of cancer. Besides, reaching an accurate and timely diagnosis of UPS can be challenging due to the difficulty in diagnosis/classification and delayed consultation. In this particular case

  3. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUSONCOGENIC VIRUS

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    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  4. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

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    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  5. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV-8.

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    Jackson, Carolyn C; Dickson, Mark A; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single-gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV-8.

  6. FOXM1 is an oncogenic mediator in Ewing Sarcoma.

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    Laura Christensen

    Full Text Available Ewing Family Tumors (Ewing Sarcoma and peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor are common bone and soft tissue malignancies of childhood, adolescence and young adulthood. Chromosomal translocation in these tumors produces fusion oncogenes of the EWS/ETS class, with EWS/FLI1 being by far the most common. EWS/ETS chimera are the only well established driver mutations in these tumors and they function as aberrant transcription factors. Understanding the downstream genes whose expression is modified has been a central approach to the study of these tumors. FOXM1 is a proliferation associated transcription factor which has increasingly been found to play a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of human cancers. Here we demonstrate that FOXM1 is expressed in Ewing primary tumors and cell lines. Reduction in FOXM1 expression in Ewing cell lines results in diminished potential for anchorage independent growth. FOXM1 expression is enhanced by EWS/FLI1, though, unlike other tumor systems, it is not driven by expression of the EWS/FLI1 target GLI1. Thiostrepton is a compound known to inhibit FOXM1 by direct binding. We show that Thiostrepton diminishes FOXM1 expression in Ewing cell lines and this reduction reduces cell viability through an apoptotic mechanism. FOXM1 is involved in Ewing tumor pathogenesis and may prove to be a useful therapeutic target in Ewing tumors.

  7. Comparative analysis of the human and feline c-sis proto-oncogenes : Identification of 5' human c-sis coding sequences that are not homologous to the transforming gene of simian sarcoma virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, Ans M.W. van den; Breuer, M.L.; Steenbergh, P.H.; Schalken, Jack A.; Bloemers, H.P.J.; Ven, Wim J.M. Van de

    1985-01-01

    Feline and human genetic sequences, homologous to the v-sis gene of simian sarcoma virus, have been isolated from cosmid gene libraries and characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis. Comparison of the two loci revealed their related structural organization. In both loci, similar unique gene

  8. Variable expression of PIK3R3 and PTEN in Ewing Sarcoma impacts oncogenic phenotypes.

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    Brian F Niemeyer

    Full Text Available Ewing Sarcoma is an aggressive malignancy of bone and soft tissue affecting children and young adults. Ewing Sarcoma is driven by EWS/Ets fusion oncoproteins, which cause widespread alterations in gene expression in the cell. Dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, particularly involving IGF-1R, also plays an important role in Ewing Sarcoma pathogenesis. However, the basis of this dysregulation, including the relative contribution of EWS/Ets-dependent and independent mechanisms, is not well understood. In the present study, we identify variable expression of two modifiers of PI3K signaling activity, PIK3R3 and PTEN, in Ewing Sarcoma, and examine the consequences of this on PI3K pathway regulation and oncogenic phenotypes. Our findings indicate that PIK3R3 plays a growth-promotional role in Ewing Sarcoma, but suggest that this role is not strictly dependent on regulation of PI3K pathway activity. We further show that expression of PTEN, a well-established, potent tumor suppressor, is lost in a subset of Ewing Sarcomas, and that this loss strongly correlates with high baseline PI3K pathway activity in cell lines. In support of functional importance of PTEN loss in Ewing Sarcoma, we show that re-introduction of PTEN into two different PTEN-negative Ewing Sarcoma cell lines results in downregulation of PI3K pathway activity, and sensitization to the IGF-1R small molecule inhibitor OSI-906. Our findings also suggest that PTEN levels may contribute to sensitivity of Ewing Sarcoma cells to the microtubule inhibitor vincristine, a relevant chemotherapeutic agent in this cancer. Our studies thus identify PIK3R3 and PTEN as modifiers of oncogenic phenotypes in Ewing Sarcoma, with potential clinical implications.

  9. Analysis of multiple sarcoma expression datasets: implications for classification, oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy resistance.

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    Panagiotis A Konstantinopoulos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diagnosis of soft tissue sarcomas (STS is challenging. Many remain unclassified (not-otherwise-specified, NOS or grouped in controversial categories such as malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH, with unclear therapeutic value. We analyzed several independent microarray datasets, to identify a predictor, use it to classify unclassifiable sarcomas, and assess oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed 5 independent datasets (325 tumor arrays. We developed and validated a predictor, which was used to reclassify MFH and NOS sarcomas. The molecular "match" between MFH and their predicted subtypes was assessed using genome-wide hierarchical clustering and Subclass-Mapping. Findings were validated in 15 paraffin samples profiled on the DASL platform. Bayesian models of oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response were applied to individual STS samples. A 170-gene predictor was developed and independently validated (80-85% accuracy in all datasets. Most MFH and NOS tumors were reclassified as leiomyosarcomas, liposarcomas and fibrosarcomas. "Molecular match" between MFH and their predicted STS subtypes was confirmed both within and across datasets. This classification revealed previously unrecognized tissue differentiation lines (adipocyte, fibroblastic, smooth-muscle and was reproduced in paraffin specimens. Different sarcoma subtypes demonstrated distinct oncogenic pathway activation patterns, and reclassified MFH tumors shared oncogenic pathway activation patterns with their predicted subtypes. These patterns were associated with predicted resistance to chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in sarcomas. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: STS profiling can aid in diagnosis through a predictor tracking distinct tissue differentiation in unclassified tumors, and in therapeutic management via oncogenic pathway activation and chemotherapy response assessment.

  10. Oncogenic viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Ben Ari, Ziv; Weitzman, Ella; Safran, Michal

    2015-05-01

    About 80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections especially in the setting of established cirrhosis or advanced fibrosis, making HCC prevention a major goal of antiviral therapy. HCC tumors are highly complex and heterogeneous resulting from the aberrant function of multiple molecular pathways. The roles of HCV or HBV in promoting HCC development are still either directly or indirectly are still speculative, but the evidence for both effects is compelling. In patients with chronic hepatitis viral infection, cirrhosis is not a prerequisite for tumorigenesis.

  11. Fujinami sarcoma virus: An avian RNA tumor virus with a unique transforming gene

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    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Pawson, Anthony; Robins, Terry; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1980-01-01

    The oncogenic properties and RNA of the Fujinami avian sarcoma virus (FSV) and the protein it encodes were investigated and compared to those of other avian tumor viruses with sarcomagenic properties such as Rous sarcoma virus and the acute leukemia viruses MC29 and erythroblastosis virus. Cloned stocks of FSV caused sarcomas in all chickens inoculated and were found to contain a 4.5-kilobase (kb) and an 8.5-kb RNA species. The 4.5-kb RNA was identified as the genome of defective FSV because it was absent from nondefective FSV-associated helper virus and because the titer of focus-forming units increased with the ratio of 4.5-kb to 8.5-kb RNA in virus preparations. This is, then, the smallest known tumor virus RNA with a transforming function. Comparisons with other viral RNAs, based on oligonucleotide mapping and molecular hybridization, indicated that 4.5-kb FSV RNA contains a 5′ gag gene-related sequence of 1 kb, an internal specific sequence of about 3 kb that is unrelated to Rous sarcoma virus, MC29, and erythroblastosis virus, and a 3′-terminal sequence of about 0.5 kb related to the conserved C region of avian tumor viruses. The lack of some or all nucleotide sequences of the essential virion genes, gag, pol, and env, and the isolation of FSV-transformed nonproducer cell clones indicated that FSV is replication defective. A 140,000-dalton, gag-related non-structural protein was found in FSV-transformed producer and nonproducer cells and was translated in vitro from full-length FSV RNA. This protein is expected to have a transforming function both because its intracellular concentration showed a positive correlation with the percentage of transformed cells in a culture and because FSV is unlikely to code for major additional proteins since the genetic complexities of FSV RNA and the FSV protein are almost the same. It is concluded that the transforming onc gene of FSV is distinct from that of Rous sarcoma virus and other avian tumor viruses with

  12. Polyoma BK Virus: An Oncogenic Virus?

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    Syed Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 65-year-old gentleman with a history of end stage renal disease who underwent a successful cadaveric donor kidney transplant four years ago. He subsequently developed BK virus nephropathy related to chronic immunosuppressant therapy. Three years later, misfortune struck again, and he developed adenocarcinoma of the bladder.

  13. An Interaction with Ewing's Sarcoma Breakpoint Protein EWS Defines a Specific Oncogenic Mechanism of ETS Factors Rearranged in Prostate Cancer.

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    Kedage, Vivekananda; Selvaraj, Nagarathinam; Nicholas, Taylor R; Budka, Justin A; Plotnik, Joshua P; Jerde, Travis J; Hollenhorst, Peter C

    2016-10-25

    More than 50% of prostate tumors have a chromosomal rearrangement resulting in aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS family transcription factor. However, mechanisms that differentiate the function of oncogenic ETS factors expressed in prostate tumors from non-oncogenic ETS factors expressed in normal prostate are unknown. Here, we find that four oncogenic ETS (ERG, ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5), and no other ETS, interact with the Ewing's sarcoma breakpoint protein, EWS. This EWS interaction was necessary and sufficient for oncogenic ETS functions including gene activation, cell migration, clonogenic survival, and transformation. Significantly, the EWS interacting region of ERG has no homology with that of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5. Therefore, this finding may explain how divergent ETS factors have a common oncogenic function. Strikingly, EWS is fused to various ETS factors by the chromosome translocations that cause Ewing's sarcoma. Therefore, these findings link oncogenic ETS function in both prostate cancer and Ewing's sarcoma. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Viral oncogene-induced DNA damage response is activated in Kaposi sarcoma tumorigenesis.

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    Sonja Koopal

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma is a tumor consisting of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV-infected tumor cells that express endothelial cell (EC markers and viral genes like v-cyclin, vFLIP, and LANA. Despite a strong link between KSHV infection and certain neoplasms, de novo virus infection of human primary cells does not readily lead to cellular transformation. We have studied the consequences of expression of v-cyclin in primary and immortalized human dermal microvascular ECs. We show that v-cyclin, which is a homolog of cellular D-type cyclins, induces replicative stress in ECs, which leads to senescence and activation of the DNA damage response. We find that antiproliferative checkpoints are activated upon KSHV infection of ECs, and in early-stage but not late-stage lesions of clinical Kaposi sarcoma specimens. These are some of the first results suggesting that DNA damage checkpoint response also functions as an anticancer barrier in virally induced cancers.

  15. Molecular Interactions of High Energy Fuels and Jet Fuels with Oncogenic Viruses and Endogenous Viruses.

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    1983-02-01

    furam failed to abrogate the inhibitory effect of MAMA , the ultimate carcinogen of SDMH. Detailed methodology required to ascertain effect of chemicals...and 25 S. Duesberg (4) has also reported on the melting behavior of certain RNA molecules of such RFNA tumor viruses as Pous sarcoma virus (RSV) arid...mouse mammary tumor virus (.MNMTV). The melted FPA.s all were 19 Lo 1io FTITYN Figure 6 A) ~ V~i4 ~i±7!~’’tii~ ~7rA) Profile occasionally seen A)il of

  16. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV Induces the Oncogenic miR-17-92 Cluster and Down-Regulates TGF-β Signaling.

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    Hong Seok Choi

    Full Text Available KSHV is a DNA tumor virus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma. Upon KSHV infection, only a limited number of latent genes are expressed. We know that KSHV infection regulates host gene expression, and hypothesized that latent genes also modulate the expression of host miRNAs. Aberrant miRNA expression contributes to the development of many types of cancer. Array-based miRNA profiling revealed that all six miRNAs of the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster are up-regulated in KSHV infected endothelial cells. Among candidate KSHV latent genes, we found that vFLIP and vCyclin were shown to activate the miR-17-92 promoter, using luciferase assay and western blot analysis. The miR-17-92 cluster was previously shown to target TGF-β signaling. We demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster to strongly inhibit the TGF-β signaling pathway by down-regulating SMAD2. Moreover, TGF-β activity and SMAD2 expression were fully restored when antagomirs (inhibitors of miR-17-92 cluster were transfected into cells expressing either vFLIP or vCyclin. In addition, we utilized viral genetics to produce vFLIP or vCyclin knock-out viruses, and studied the effects in infected TIVE cells. Infection with wildtype KSHV abolished expression of SMAD2 protein in these endothelial cells. While single-knockout mutants still showed a marked reduction in SMAD2 expression, TIVE cells infected by a double-knockout mutant virus were fully restored for SMAD2 expression, compared to non-infected TIVE cells. Expression of either vFLIP or vCycIin was sufficient to downregulate SMAD2. In summary, our data demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster in endothelial cells and thereby interfere with the TGF-β signaling pathway. Manipulation of the TGF-β pathway via host miRNAs represents a novel mechanism that may be important for KSHV tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, a hallmark of KS.

  17. Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Induces the Oncogenic miR-17-92 Cluster and Down-Regulates TGF-β Signaling

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    Choi, Hong Seok; Jain, Vaibhav; Krueger, Brian; Marshall, Vickie; Kim, Chang Hee; Shisler, Joanna L.; Whitby, Denise; Renne, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    KSHV is a DNA tumor virus that causes Kaposi’s sarcoma. Upon KSHV infection, only a limited number of latent genes are expressed. We know that KSHV infection regulates host gene expression, and hypothesized that latent genes also modulate the expression of host miRNAs. Aberrant miRNA expression contributes to the development of many types of cancer. Array-based miRNA profiling revealed that all six miRNAs of the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster are up-regulated in KSHV infected endothelial cells. Among candidate KSHV latent genes, we found that vFLIP and vCyclin were shown to activate the miR-17-92 promoter, using luciferase assay and western blot analysis. The miR-17-92 cluster was previously shown to target TGF-β signaling. We demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster to strongly inhibit the TGF-β signaling pathway by down-regulating SMAD2. Moreover, TGF-β activity and SMAD2 expression were fully restored when antagomirs (inhibitors) of miR-17-92 cluster were transfected into cells expressing either vFLIP or vCyclin. In addition, we utilized viral genetics to produce vFLIP or vCyclin knock-out viruses, and studied the effects in infected TIVE cells. Infection with wildtype KSHV abolished expression of SMAD2 protein in these endothelial cells. While single-knockout mutants still showed a marked reduction in SMAD2 expression, TIVE cells infected by a double-knockout mutant virus were fully restored for SMAD2 expression, compared to non-infected TIVE cells. Expression of either vFLIP or vCycIin was sufficient to downregulate SMAD2. In summary, our data demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster in endothelial cells and thereby interfere with the TGF-β signaling pathway. Manipulation of the TGF-β pathway via host miRNAs represents a novel mechanism that may be important for KSHV tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, a hallmark of KS. PMID:26545119

  18. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) Induces the Oncogenic miR-17-92 Cluster and Down-Regulates TGF-β Signaling.

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    Choi, Hong Seok; Jain, Vaibhav; Krueger, Brian; Marshall, Vickie; Kim, Chang Hee; Shisler, Joanna L; Whitby, Denise; Renne, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    KSHV is a DNA tumor virus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma. Upon KSHV infection, only a limited number of latent genes are expressed. We know that KSHV infection regulates host gene expression, and hypothesized that latent genes also modulate the expression of host miRNAs. Aberrant miRNA expression contributes to the development of many types of cancer. Array-based miRNA profiling revealed that all six miRNAs of the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster are up-regulated in KSHV infected endothelial cells. Among candidate KSHV latent genes, we found that vFLIP and vCyclin were shown to activate the miR-17-92 promoter, using luciferase assay and western blot analysis. The miR-17-92 cluster was previously shown to target TGF-β signaling. We demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the expression of the miR-17-92 cluster to strongly inhibit the TGF-β signaling pathway by down-regulating SMAD2. Moreover, TGF-β activity and SMAD2 expression were fully restored when antagomirs (inhibitors) of miR-17-92 cluster were transfected into cells expressing either vFLIP or vCyclin. In addition, we utilized viral genetics to produce vFLIP or vCyclin knock-out viruses, and studied the effects in infected TIVE cells. Infection with wildtype KSHV abolished expression of SMAD2 protein in these endothelial cells. While single-knockout mutants still showed a marked reduction in SMAD2 expression, TIVE cells infected by a double-knockout mutant virus were fully restored for SMAD2 expression, compared to non-infected TIVE cells. Expression of either vFLIP or vCycIin was sufficient to downregulate SMAD2. In summary, our data demonstrate that vFLIP and vCyclin induce the oncogenic miR-17-92 cluster in endothelial cells and thereby interfere with the TGF-β signaling pathway. Manipulation of the TGF-β pathway via host miRNAs represents a novel mechanism that may be important for KSHV tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, a hallmark of KS.

  19. Global metabolic profiling of infection by an oncogenic virus: KSHV induces and requires lipogenesis for survival of latent infection.

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    Tracie Delgado

    Full Text Available Like cancer cells, virally infected cells have dramatically altered metabolic requirements. We analyzed global metabolic changes induced by latent infection with an oncogenic virus, Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. KSHV is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS, the most common tumor of AIDS patients. Approximately one-third of the nearly 200 measured metabolites were altered following latent infection of endothelial cells by KSHV, including many metabolites of anabolic pathways common to most cancer cells. KSHV induced pathways that are commonly altered in cancer cells including glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, amino acid production and fatty acid synthesis. Interestingly, over half of the detectable long chain fatty acids detected in our screen were significantly increased by latent KSHV infection. KSHV infection leads to the elevation of metabolites involved in the synthesis of fatty acids, not degradation from phospholipids, and leads to increased lipid droplet organelle formation in the infected cells. Fatty acid synthesis is required for the survival of latently infected endothelial cells, as inhibition of key enzymes in this pathway led to apoptosis of infected cells. Addition of palmitic acid to latently infected cells treated with a fatty acid synthesis inhibitor protected the cells from death indicating that the products of this pathway are essential. Our metabolomic analysis of KSHV-infected cells provides insight as to how oncogenic viruses can induce metabolic alterations common to cancer cells. Furthermore, this analysis raises the possibility that metabolic pathways may provide novel therapeutic targets for the inhibition of latent KSHV infection and ultimately KS tumors.

  20. Iatrogenic colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis in a human immunodeficiency negative-virus patient.

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    Hamzaoui, Lamine; Kilani, Houda; Bouassida, Mahdi; Mahmoudi, Moufida; Chalbi, Emna; Siai, Karima; Ezzine, Heykel; Touinsi, Hassen; Azzouz, Mohamed M'saddak; Sassi, Sadok

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a mesenchymal tumor associated to a human herpes virus-8. It often occurs in human immunodeficiency virus-positive subjects. Colorectal localization is rare. We report the case of a colorectal Kaposi sarcoma complicating a refractory ulcerative colitis treated with surgery after the failure of immunomodulator therapy in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative heterosexual man.

  1. Human nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of a murine sarcoma virus: studies with cloned viral and cellular DNAs.

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    Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Kisselev, L L

    1982-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid, pI26, has been constructed by cloning into pBR322 a transforming gene of murine sarcoma virus (a Moloney strain, clone 124, MSV) synthesized by detergent-treated virions. From this plasmid a XbaI-HindIII fragment has been isolated which contains only mos-specific sequences. This mos-specific probe has been used for screening a human gene library cloned in bacteriophage lambda Charon 4A. Of these, 19 clones have been isolated containing mos-related sequences. By physical mapping and molecular hybridization it has been shown that these sequences are neighboured by DNA regions related to Moloney murine leukemia virus. Recombinant phages have also been found containing human inserts related to MLV, not to the mos gene. The possible existence of murine-like endogenous retroviruses in the normal human genome, including that of a sarcoma type, is discussed. By Northern blotting, expression of the cellular c-mos gene has been detected in mouse liver treated with a hepatocarcinogen. The general significance of the suggested model for evaluating the relationship between chemical carcinogenesis and oncogene expression is discussed.

  2. When viruses were not in style: parallels in the histories of chicken sarcoma viruses and bacteriophages.

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    Sankaran, Neeraja

    2014-12-01

    The discovery that cancer may be caused by viruses occurred in the early twentieth century, a time when the very concept of viruses as we understand it today was in a considerable state of flux. Although certain features were agreed upon, viruses, more commonly referred to as 'filterable viruses' were not considered much different from other microbes such as bacteria except for their extremely small size, which rendered them ultramicroscopic and filterable. For a long time, in fact, viruses were defined rather by what they were not and what they could not do, rather than any known properties that set them apart from other microbes. Consequently when Peyton Rous suggested in 1912 that the causative agent of a transmissible sarcoma tumor of chickens was a virus, the medical research community was reluctant to accept his assessment on the grounds that cancer was not infectious and was caused by a physiological change within the cells. This difference in the bacteriological and physiological styles of thinking appears to have been prevalent in the wider research community, for when in 1917 Felix d'Herelle suggested that a transmissible lysis in bacteria, which he called bacteriophagy, was caused by a virus, his ideas were also opposed on similar grounds. It was not until the 1950s when when André Lwoff explained the phenomenon of lysogeny through his prophage hypothesis that the viral identities of the sarcoma-inducing agent and the bacteriophages were accepted. This paper examines the trajectories of the curiously parallel histories of the cancer viruses and highlights the similarities and differences between the ways in which prevailing ideas about the nature of viruses, heredity and infection drove researchers from disparate disciplines and geographic locations to develop their ideas and achieve some consensus about the nature of cancer viruses and bacteriophages.

  3. Synonymous codon changes in the oncogenes of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus lead to increased oncogenicity and immunogenicity of the virus

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    Cladel, Nancy M.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Hu, Jiafen; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses use rare codons with respect to the host. The reasons for this are incompletely understood but among the hypotheses is the concept that rare codons result in low protein production and this allows the virus to escape immune surveillance. We changed rare codons in the oncogenes E6 and E7 of the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus to make them more mammalian-like and tested the mutant genomes in our in vivo animal model. While the amino acid sequences of the proteins remained unchanged, the oncogenic potential of some of the altered genomes increased dramatically. In addition, increased immunogenicity, as measured by spontaneous regression, was observed as the numbers of codon changes increased. This work suggests that codon usage may modify protein production in ways that influence disease outcome and that evaluation of synonymous codons should be included in the analysis of genetic variants of infectious agents and their association with disease. PMID:23433866

  4. Multistep process of neoplastic transformation of normal human fibroblasts by 60Co gamma rays and Harvey sarcoma viruses

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    Namba, M.; Nishitani, K.; Fukushima, F.; Kimoto, T.; Nose, K.

    1986-03-15

    As reported previously (Namba et al., 1985), normal human fibroblasts were transformed by 60Co gamma-ray irradiation into immortal cells with abnormal karyotypes. These transformed cells (KMST-6), however, showed a low cloning efficiency in soft agar and no transplantability. However, upon treatment with Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MSV), the cells acquired elevated clonability in soft agar and transplantability in nude mice. Ha-MSV alone, however, did not convert normal human fibroblasts into either immortal or tumorigenic cells. The Ha-MSV-transformed KMST-6 cells showed an enhanced expression of the ras oncogene, but normal and 60Co gamma-ray-transformed cells did not. Our current data suggest that gamma rays worked against normal human cells as an initiator, giving rise to chromosome aberrations and immortality, and that Ha-MSV, probably through its ras oncogene, played a role in the progression of the malignant cell population to a more malignant one showing enhanced colony formation in soft agar and tumorigenicity in nude mice.

  5. Oncogenicity of human N-ras oncogene and proto-oncogene introduced into retroviral vectors

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    Souyri, M.; Vigon, I.; Charon, M.; Tambourin, P. (Hopital Cochin, Paris (France))

    1989-09-01

    The N-ras gene is the only member of the ras family which has never been naturally transduced into a retrovirus. In order to study the in vitro and in vivo oncogenicity of N-ras and to compare its pathogenicity to that of H-ras, the authors have inserted an activated or a normal form of human N-ras cDNA into a slightly modified Harvey murine sarcoma virus-derived vector in which the H-ras p21 coding region had been deleted. The resulting constructions were transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. The activated N-ras-containing construct (HSN) induced 10{sup 4} foci per {mu}g of DNA and was found to be as transforming as H-ras was. After infection of the transfected cells by either the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus or the amphotropic 4070A helper viruses, rescued transforming viruses were injected into newborn mice. Both pseudotypes of HSN virus containing activated N-ras induced the typical Harvey disease with similar latency. However, they found that the virus which contained normal N-ras p21 (HSn) was also pathogenic and induced splenomegaly, lymphadenopathies, and sarcoma in mice after a latency of 3 to 7 weeks. In addition, Moloney murine leukemia virus pseudotypes of N-ras caused neurological disorders in 30% of the infected animals. These results differed markedly from those of previous experiments in which the authors had inserted the activated form of N-ras in the pSV(X) vector: the resulting SVN-ras virus was transforming on NIH 3T3 cells but was poorly oncogenic in vivo. Altogether, these data demonstrated unequivocally that N-ras is potentially as oncogenic as H-ras and that such oncogenic effect could depend on the vector environment.

  6. DNA Oncogenic Virus-Induced Oxidative Stress, Genomic Damage, and Aberrant Epigenetic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankgopo Magdeline Kgatle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of human cancers is attributable to DNA oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Unrepaired DNA damage is the most common and overlapping feature of these DNA oncogenic viruses and a source of genomic instability and tumour development. Sustained DNA damage results from unceasing production of reactive oxygen species and activation of inflammasome cascades that trigger genomic changes and increased propensity of epigenetic alterations. Accumulation of epigenetic alterations may interfere with genome-wide cellular signalling machineries and promote malignant transformation leading to cancer development. Untangling and understanding the underlying mechanisms that promote these detrimental effects remain the major objectives for ongoing research and hope for effective virus-induced cancer therapy. Here, we review current literature with an emphasis on how DNA damage influences HPV, HVB, and EBV replication and epigenetic alterations that are associated with carcinogenesis.

  7. Viral Oncogenes, Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Splicing in Human Tumor Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ming Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral oncogenes are responsible for oncogenesis resulting from persistent virus infection. Although different human tumor viruses express different viral oncogenes and induce different tumors, their oncoproteins often target similar sets of cellular tumor suppressors or signal pathways to immortalize and/or transform infected cells. Expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes in papillomavirus, E1A and E1B oncogenes in adenovirus, large T and small t antigen in polyomavirus, and Tax oncogene in HTLV-1 are regulated by alternative RNA splicing. However, this regulation is only partially understood. DNA tumor viruses also encode noncoding RNAs, including viral microRNAs, that disturb normal cell functions. Among the determined viral microRNA precursors, EBV encodes 25 from two major clusters (BART and BHRF1, KSHV encodes 12 from a latent region, human polyomavirus MCV produce only one microRNA from the late region antisense to early transcripts, but HPVs appears to produce no viral microRNAs.

  8. Preclinical evaluation of oncolytic vaccinia virus for therapy of canine soft tissue sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Gentschev

    Full Text Available Virotherapy using oncolytic vaccinia virus (VACV strains is one promising new strategy for canine cancer therapy. In this study we describe the establishment of an in vivo model of canine soft tissue sarcoma (CSTS using the new isolated cell line STSA-1 and the analysis of the virus-mediated oncolytic and immunological effects of two different Lister VACV LIVP1.1.1 and GLV-1h68 strains against CSTS. Cell culture data demonstrated that both tested VACV strains efficiently infected and destroyed cells of the canine soft tissue sarcoma line STSA-1. In addition, in our new canine sarcoma tumor xenograft mouse model, systemic administration of LIVP1.1.1 or GLV-1h68 viruses led to significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to control mice. Furthermore, LIVP1.1.1 mediated therapy resulted in almost complete tumor regression and resulted in long-term survival of sarcoma-bearing mice. The replication of the tested VACV strains in tumor tissues led to strong oncolytic effects accompanied by an intense intratumoral infiltration of host immune cells, mainly neutrophils. These findings suggest that the direct viral oncolysis of tumor cells and the virus-dependent activation of tumor-associated host immune cells could be crucial parts of anti-tumor mechanism in STSA-1 xenografts. In summary, the data showed that both tested vaccinia virus strains and especially LIVP1.1.1 have great potential for effective treatment of CSTS.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus negative Kaposi sarcoma and lymphoproliferative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fossati, S; Boneschi, [No Value; Ferrucci, S; Brambilla, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The concomitant occurrence of more than one primary neoplasm in the same individual has led researchers to seek possible common etiopathogenetic factors. Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a multicentric neoplasm of vascular origin and perhaps viral etiology. Four forms of KS are known: classic or M

  10. Comparative studies in Rous sarcoma with virus, tumor cells, and chick embryo cells transformed in vitro by virus. II. Response of normal and immunized chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOUGHERTY, R M; MORGAN, H R

    1962-01-01

    Chick embryo fibroblasts infected in vitro with Rous sarcoma virus have properties similar to tumor cells when injected into virus-immune chickens. When such virus-transformed fibroblasts are injected into normal chickens, they apparently participate in the production of tumors independent of their release of virus and are thus apparently malignant in vivo.

  11. In vitro proteolytic cleavage of Gazdar murine sarcoma virus p65gag.

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, S.; Arlinghaus, R B

    1981-01-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus, disrupted in concentrations of 0.1 to 0.5% Nonidet P-40, catalyzed the cleavage of p65, the gag gene polyprotein of the Gazdar strain of murine sarcoma virus, into polypeptides with sizes and antigenic determinants of murine leukemia virus-specified p30, p15, pp12, and p10. Cleavage performed in the presence of 0.15% Nonidet P-40 in water yielded polypeptides of approximately 40,000 (P40) and 25,000 (P25) Mr. In vitro cleavage performed in a buffered solution co...

  12. The Biology of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus and the Infection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di QIN; Chun LU

    2008-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV),also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8),is discovered in 1994 from Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) lesion of an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)patient.In addition to its association with KS,KSHV has also been implicated as the causative agent of two other AIDS-associated malignancies:primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD).KSHV is a complex DNA virus that not only has the ability to promote cellular growth and survival for tumor development,but also can provoke deregulated angiogenesis,inflammation,and modulate the patient's immune system in favor of tumor growth.As KSHV is a necessary but not sufficient etiological factor for KS,human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a very important cofactor.Here we review the basic information about the biology of KSHV,development of pathogenesis and interaction between KSHV and HIV.

  13. Importance of Basic Residues in Binding of Rous Sarcoma Virus Nucleocapsid to the RNA Packaging Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Gyung; Alidina, Annie; May, Cynthia; Linial, Maxine L.

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the Rous sarcoma virus Gag polyprotein, only the nucleocapsid (NC) domain is required to mediate the specificity of genomic RNA packaging. We have previously showed that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae three-hybrid system provides a rapid genetic assay to analyze the RNA and protein components of the avian retroviral RNA-Gag interactions necessary for specific encapsidation. In this study, using both site-directed mutagenesis and in vivo random screening in the yeast three-hybr...

  14. Detection of Human Herpes Virus 8 in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembo, Rabecca; Kaile, Trevor; Kafita, Doris; Chisanga, Chrispin; Kalonda, Annie; Zulu, Ephraim; Samutela, Mulemba; Polepole, Pascal; Kwenda, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Human herpes virus-8, a γ2-herpes virus, is the aetiological agent of Kaposi sarcoma. Recently, Kaposi's sarcoma cases have increased in Zambia. However, the diagnosis of this disease is based on morphological appearance of affected tissues using histological techniques, and the association with its causative agent, Human Herpes virus 8 is not sought. This means poor prognosis for affected patients since the causative agent is not targeted during diagnosis and KS lesions may be mistaken for other reactive and neoplastic vascular proliferations when only histological techniques are used. Therefore, this study was aimed at providing evidence of Human Herpes virus 8 infection in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. One hundred and twenty suspected Kaposi's sarcoma archival formalin-fixed paraffin-wax embedded tissues stored from January 2013 to December 2014 in the Histopathology Laboratory at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia were analysed using histology and Polymerase Chain Reaction targeting the ORF26 gene of Human Herpes virus 8. The predominant histological type of Kaposi's sarcoma detected was the Nodular type (60.7%) followed by the plaque type (22.6%) and patch type (16.7%). The nodular lesion was identified mostly in males (40.5%, 34/84) than females (20.2%, 17/84) (p=0.041). Human Herpes virus 8 DNA was detected in 53.6% (45/84) and mostly in the nodular KS lesions (60%, 27/84) (p=0.035). The findings in this study show that the Human Herpes virus-8 is detectable in Kaposi's sarcoma tissues, and, as previously reported in other settings, is closely associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. The study has provided important baseline data for use in the diagnosis of this disease and the identification of the virus in the tissues will aid in targeted therapy.

  15. [Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV-8)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Harutaka

    2010-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus 8, HHV-8) are members of gamma-herpes virus family. Both viruses infect to B cells and cause malignancies such as lymphoma. Since EBV and HHV-8 are so-called 'oncovirus', their oncogenecities have been focused in the researches on EBV and KSHV for a long time. EBV was discovered in 1964, whereas KSHV was identified in 1994. However, KSHV was analyzed rapidly in these fifteen years. One of the recent progresses in the research on EBV and KSHV is that virus-encoded small RNAs were identified in their genomes and characterized. EBV is the first human virus in whose genome microRNA was identified. The oncogenecity of EBV and KSHV remains unclear. Here, I discuss the pathogenesis by EBV and KSHV with special reference to recent progress in this field.

  16. Identification of ALV-J associated acutely transforming virus Fu-J carrying complete v-fps oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Fang, Lichun; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-06-01

    Transduction of oncogenes by ALVs and generation of acute transforming viruses is common in natural viral infections. In order to understand the molecular basis for the rapid oncogenicity of Fu-J, an acutely transforming avian leukosis virus isolated from fibrosarcomas in crossbreed broilers infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) in China, complete genomic structure of Fu-J virus was determined by PCR amplification and compared with those of Fu-J1, Fu-J2, Fu-J3, Fu-J4, and Fu-J5 reported previously. The results showed that the genome of Fu-J was defective, with parts of gag gene replaced by the complete v-fps oncogene and encoded a 137 kDa Gag-fps fusion protein. Sequence analysis revealed that Fu-J and Fu-J1 to Fu-J5 were related quasi-species variants carrying different lengths of v-fps oncogenes generated from recombination between helper virus and c-fps gene. Comparison of virus carrying v-fps oncogene also gave us a glimpse of the molecular characterization and evolution process of the acutely transforming ALV.

  17. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G;

    2005-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus or human herpes virus 8 is considered the etiological agent of KS, a highly vascularized neoplasm that is the most common tumor affecting HIV/AIDS patients. The KS-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 open reading frame 74 encodes a constitutively...

  18. Systematic analysis of human oncogenic viruses in colon cancer revealed EBV latency in lymphoid infiltrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorina, Loretta; Ricotti, Mattia; Vanoli, Alessandro; Luinetti, Ombretta; Dallera, Elena; Riboni, Roberta; Paolucci, Stefania; Brugnatelli, Silvia; Paulli, Marco; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Baldanti, Fausto; Perfetti, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors may play a role in colon cancer. In this view, several studies investigated tumor samples for the presence of various viral DNA with conflicting results. We undertook a systematic DNA analysis of 44 consecutive, prospectively collected primary tumor samples by real time and qualitative PCR for viruses of known or potential oncogenic role in humans, including polyomavirus (JCV, BKV, Merkel cell polyomavirus), HPV, HTLV, HHV-8 and EBV. Negative controls consisted of surgical resection margins. No evidence of genomic DNA fragments from tested virus were detected, except for EBV, which was found in a significant portion of tumors (23/44, 52%). Real-time PCR showed that EBV DNA was present at a highly variable content (median 258 copies in 10(5) cells, range 15-4837). Presence of EBV DNA had a trend to be associated with high lymphocyte infiltration (p = 0.06, χ2 test), and in situ hybridization with EBER1-2 probes revealed latency in a fraction of these lymphoid cells, with just a few scattered plasma cells positive for BZLF-1, an immediate early protein expressed during lytic replication. LMP-1 expression was undetectable by immunohistochemistry. These results argue against a significant involvement of the tested oncogenic viruses in established colon cancer.

  19. Cell-specific targeting of lentiviral vectors mediated by fusion proteins derived from Sindbis virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, or avian sarcoma/leukosis virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to efficiently and selectively target gene delivery vectors to specific cell types in vitro and in vivo remains one of the formidable challenges in gene therapy. We pursued two different strategies to target lentiviral vector delivery to specific cell types. In one of the strategies, vector particles bearing a membrane-bound stem cell factor sequence plus a separate fusion protein based either on Sindbis virus strain TR339 glycoproteins or the vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein were used to selectively transduce cells expressing the corresponding stem cell factor receptor (c-kit. An alternative approach involved soluble avian sarcoma/leukosis virus receptors fused to cell-specific ligands including stem cell factor and erythropoietin for targeting lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus envelope proteins to cells that express the corresponding receptors. Results The titers of unconcentrated vector particles bearing Sindbis virus strain TR339 or vesicular stomatitis virus G fusion proteins plus stem cell factor in the context of c-kit expressing cells were up to 3.2 × 105 transducing units per ml while vector particles lacking the stem cell factor ligand displayed titers that were approximately 80 fold lower. On cells that lacked the c-kit receptor, the titers of stem cell factor-containing vectors were approximately 40 times lower compared to c-kit-expressing cells. Lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B envelope proteins and bearing bi-functional bridge proteins encoding erythropoietin or stem cell factor fused to the soluble extracellular domains of the avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subgroup A or B receptors resulted in efficient transduction of erythropoietin receptor or c-kit-expressing cells. Transduction of erythropoietin receptor-expressing cells mediated by bi-functional bridge proteins was found to be dependent on the dose, the

  20. FOXO1 is a direct target of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liu, E-mail: lyang@u.washington.edu [Department of Orthopedics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Medical Research Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108 (United States); Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Chansky, Howard A. [Department of Orthopedics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Medical Research Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108 (United States)

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Inducible and reversible siRNA knockdown of an oncogenic fusion protein such as EWS-Fli1 is feasible and more advantageous than other siRNA methods. {yields} The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 is a new EWS-Fli1 target. {yields} While trans-activators are known for the FOXO1 gene, there has been no report on negative regulators of FOXO1 transcription. {yields} This study provides first evidence that the EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein can function as a transcriptional repressor of the FOXO1 gene. -- Abstract: Ewing's family tumors are characterized by a specific t(11;22) chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein. To investigate the effects of EWS-Fli1 on gene expression, we carried out DNA microarray analysis after specific knockdown of EWS-Fli1 through transfection of synthetic siRNAs. EWS-Fli1 knockdown increased expression of genes such as DKK1 and p57 that are known to be repressed by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein. Among other potential EWS-Fli1 targets identified by our microarray analysis, we have focused on the FOXO1 gene since it encodes a potential tumor suppressor and has not been previously reported in Ewing's cells. To better understand how EWS-Fli1 affects FOXO1 expression, we have established a doxycycline-inducible siRNA system to achieve stable and reversible knockdown of EWS-Fli1 in Ewing's sarcoma cells. Here we show that FOXO1 expression in Ewing's cells has an inverse relationship with EWS-Fli1 protein level, and FOXO1 promoter activity is increased after doxycycline-induced EWS-Fli1 knockdown. In addition, we have found that direct binding of EWS-Fli1 to FOXO1 promoter is attenuated after doxycycline-induced siRNA knockdown of the fusion protein. Together, these results suggest that suppression of FOXO1 function by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein may contribute to cellular transformation in Ewing's family tumors.

  1. Transformation of chicken embryo fibroblasts by direct DNA transfection of single oncogenes: comparative analyses of src, erbB, myc, and ras.

    OpenAIRE

    Antczak, M; Kung, H J

    1990-01-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) have been used extensively to study the transformation parameters of a number of avian sarcoma-leukemia viruses. Previously, oncogene transformation of CEF has been conducted almost exclusively with replicating viruses, because of perceived difficulties with direct DNA transfection. Here, we show that CEF can be efficiently and stably transfected by selection for the neomycin resistance gene (neo). Cotransfection of neo with various oncogenes resulted in CEF t...

  2. Sensitivity to. gamma. rays of avian sarcoma and murine leukemia viruses. [/sup 60/Co, uv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoshima, K. (Osaka Univ., Japan); Niwa, O.; Yutsudo, M.; Sugiyama, H.; Tahara, S.; Sugahara, T.

    1980-09-01

    The direct inactivation of avian and murine oncoviruses by ..gamma.. rays was examined using /sup 60/Co as a ..gamma..-ray source. The inactivation of murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) followed single-hit kinetics while the subgroup D Schmidt-Ruppin strain of avian sarcoma virus (SR-RSV D) showed multihit inactivation kinetics with an extrapolation number of 5. The two viruses showed similar uv-inactivation kinetics. The genomic RNA of the SR-RSV D strain was degraded by ..gamma.. irradiation faster than its infectivity, but viral clones isolated from the foci formed after ..gamma.. irradiation had a complete genome. These results suggest that SR-RSV D has a strong repair function, possibly connected with reverse transcriptase activity.

  3. Association between malaria exposure and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus seropositivity in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalwoga, Angela; Cose, Stephen; Wakeham, Katie; Miley, Wendell; Ndibazza, Juliet; Drakeley, Christopher; Elliott, Alison; Whitby, Denise; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Unlike other herpes viruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is not ubiquitous worldwide and is most prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. The reasons for this are unclear. As part of a wider investigation of factors that facilitate transmission in Uganda, a high prevalence country, we examined the association between antimalaria antibodies and seropositivity against KSHV. Methods Antibodies against P. falciparum merozoite surface protein (PfMSP)-1, P. falciparum apical membrane antigen (PfAMA)-1 and KSHV antigens (ORF73 and K8.1) were measured in samples from 1164 mothers and 1227 children. Results Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus seroprevalence was 69% among mothers and 15% children. Among mothers, KSHV seroprevalence increased with malaria antibody titres: from 60% to 82% and from 54% to 77%, comparing those with the lowest and highest titres for PfMSP-1 and PfAMA-1, respectively (P < 0.0001). Among children, only antibodies to PfAMA-1 were significantly associated with KSHV seropositivity, (P < 0.0001). In both mothers and children, anti-ORF73 antibodies were more strongly associated with malaria antibodies than anti-K8.1 antibodies. Conclusion The association between malaria exposure and KSHV seropositivity suggests that malaria is a cofactor for KSHV infection or reactivation. PMID:25611008

  4. Development of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-based vector-packaging cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoker, A.W.; Bissell, M.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1988-03-01

    The authors have constructed an avian leukosis virus derivative with a 5{prime} deletion extending from within the tRNA primer binding site to a SacI site in the leader region. The aim was to remove cis-acting replicative and/or encapsidation sequences and to use this derivative, RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}}, to develop vector-packaging cell lines. They show that RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}} can be stably expressed in the quail cell line QT6 and chicken embryo fibroblasts and that it is completely replication deficient in both cell types. Moreover, they have demonstrated that QT6-derived lines expressing RAV-1{Psi}{sup {minus}} can efficiently package four structurally different replication-defective v-src expression vectors into infectious virus, with very low or undetectable helper virus release. These RAV-{Psi}{sup {minus}}-expressing cell lines comprise the first prototype avian sarcoma and leukosis virus-based vector-packaging system. The construction of our vectors has also shown us that a sequence present within gag, thought to facilitate virus packaging, is not necessary for efficient vector expression and high virus production. They show that quantitation and characterization of replication-defective viruses can be achieved with a sensitive immunocytochemical procedure, presenting an alternative to internal selectable vector markers.

  5. Further genetic localization of the transforming sequences of the p21 v-ras gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Ellis, R W; Scolnick, E M

    1984-01-01

    The sequences encoding the 21-kilodalton transforming protein (p21 ras) of Harvey murine sarcoma virus have previously been localized genetically to a 1.3-kilobase segment of the viral DNA (E. H. Chang, R. W. Ellis, E. M. Scolnick, and D. R. Lowy, Science 210:1249-1251, 1980). Within this segment...... of this open reading frame. By constructing a mutant of Harvey murine sarcoma virus DNA from which the first two ATG codons of this open reading frame have been deleted, we now show by transfection of the mutant viral DNA into NIH 3T3 cells that only the third ATG codon is necessary and sufficient...

  6. The Epidemiology of Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burningham Zachary

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, and an interaction between the two. HIV-positive individuals are at an increased risk for Kaposi’s sarcoma, even though HHV8 is the causative virus. Radiation exposure from radiotherapy has been strongly associated with secondary sarcoma development in certain cancer patients. In fact, the risk of malignant bone tumors increases as the cumulative dose of radiation to the bone increases (p for trend

  7. Harvey murine sarcoma virus p21 ras protein: biological and biochemical significance of the cysteine nearest the carboxy terminus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Norris, K; Papageorge, A G

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies of premature chain termination mutants and in frame deletion mutants of the p21 ras transforming protein encoded by the transforming gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus (Ha-MuSV) have suggested that the C terminus is required for cellular transformation, lipid binding, and membrane...

  8. Human herpes virus-8 DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage samples from patients with AIDS-associated pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Dodt, K K; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1997-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent AIDS-associated neoplasm, and often disseminates to visceral organs, including the lungs. An ante-mortem diagnosis of pulmonary KS is difficult. Recently, DNA sequences resembling a new human herpes virus (HHV-8), have been identified in various forms...

  9. Molecular cloning of the avian erythroblastosis virus genome and recovery of oncogenic virus by transfection of chicken cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennström, B; Fanshier, L; Moscovici, C; Bishop, J M

    1980-01-01

    Avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) causes erythroblastosis and sarcomas in birds and transforms both erythroblasts and fibroblasts to neoplastic phenotypes in culture. The viral genetic locus required for oncogenesis by AEV is at present poorly defined; moreover, we know very little of the mechanism of tumorigenesis by the virus. To facilitate further analysis of these problems, we used molecular cloning to isolate the genome of AEV as recombinant DNA in a procaryotic vector. The identity of the isolated DNA was verified by mapping with restriction endonucleases and by tests for biological activity. The circular form of unintegrated AEV DNA was purified from synchronously infected quail cells and cloned into the EcoRI site of lambda gtWES x B. A restriction endonuclease cleavage map was established. By hybridization with complementary DNA probes representing specific parts of avian retrovirus genomes, the restriction map of the cloned AEV DNAs was correlated with a genetic map. These data show that nucleotide sequences unique to AEV comprise at least 50% of the genome and are located approximately in the middle of the AEV genome. Our data confirm and extend previous descriptions of the AEV genome obtained by other procedures. We studied in detail two recombinant clones containing AEV DNA: the topography of the viral DNA in the two clones was virtually identical, except that one clone apparently contained two copies of the terminal redundancy that occurs in linear viral DNA isolated from infected cells; the other clone probably contained only one copy of the redundant sequence. To recover infectious virus from the cloned DNA, we developed a procedure for transfection that compensated for the defectiveness of AEV in replication. We accomplished this by ligating cloned AEV DNA to the cloned DNA of a retrovirus (Rous-associated virus type 1) whose genome could complement the deficiencies of AEV. Ligation of the two viral DNAs was facilitated by using a neutral fragment

  10. Regional prevalence and transmission route of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus in Zhejiang, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Hong-zhen; ZHU Biao; WANG Ying-jie; SHENG Zi-ke; SHENG Ji-fang

    2012-01-01

    Background The infection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is most likely the cause of clinical Kaposi's sarcoma,primary effusion lymphoma,and multi-center Castleman's disease.KSHV infection has very limited epidemiological survey data in China,and its definite mode of transmission remains controversial.This study aimed to determine the infection status and the main transmission route of KSHV in Chinese population.Methods An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing KSHV ORF65 recombinant protein was employed to analyze the antibody response to KSHV ORF65 in sera from 122 healthy physical examination people,107intravenous drug users,135 non-intravenous drug users,211 hepatitis B (HBV) patients infected via blood transmission,107 kidney transplant recipients,and 72 female sex workers in Zhejiang Province in Southeast China.Results KSHV infection occurred relatively common (13.1%) in healthy population in Zhejiang,China.Infection rate was 16.7% in female sex workers,but significantly elevated in intravenous drug addicts (58.9%),blood-transmitted HBV patients (28.0%) and kidney transplant patients (41.1%).Conclusion Blood borne transmission of KSHV is probably the main route of infection in Zhejiang Province.

  11. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Fujinami Sarcoma Virus: Tumorigenicity and Reversible Phosphorylation of the Transforming p140 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1981-01-01

    Several clones of Fujinami sarcoma virus (FSV) isolated from a laboratory stock or from mutagenized virus were temperature sensitive (ts) in transformation of cells in culture. When shifted from the permissive (37°C) to the nonpermissive (41.5°C) temperature, the cellular phenotype reverted to normal within 2 h, but it required about 48 h at 37°C to revert back to the transformed morphology. A temperature-resistant (tr) FSV clone was isolated from a tumor of an animal. All ts mutants were tumorigenic in animals but induced tumors only after latent periods of 12 to 25 days, compared to 5 to 6 days with tr virus. The ts lesions of the FSV mutants affected 90% of the phosphorylation of the nonstructural, gag-related 140,000-kilodalton phosphoprotein coded by FSV (p140), but did not affect virus replication or the synthesis of p140. Upon shifting from the permissive to the nonpermissive temperature, p140 was 90% dephosphorylated with an approximate 32P half-life of 20 min. When shifted back to the permissive temperature, the preexisting p140 was rephosphorylated in the absence of protein synthesis within a 90-min test period. Likewise, most of the phosphate of fully phosphorylated p140 was exchanged at the permissive temperature within 30 to 90 min even when protein synthesis was inhibited. However, the protein structure of p140 had a half-life of 5 h at both temperatures. These results prove p140 to be a substrate of reversible phosphorylation. Superinfection and transformation of ts FSV-infected cells maintained at the nonpermissive temperature with acute leukemia virus MC29 failed to phosphorylate p140. It would follow that in vivo phosphorylation of ts p140 is controlled by an FSV-specific mechanism and is a prerequisite, not a consequence, of transformation. p140 of ts FSV recovered from cells maintained at 41.5°C with anti-gag serum was over 10 times less phosphorylated by associated kinase than the same protein recovered from cells at 37°C if assayed in

  12. In vivo interference of Rous sarcoma virus budding by cis expression of a WW domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Akash; Wills, John W

    2002-03-01

    For all enveloped viruses, the actual mechanism by which nascent virus particles separate or "pinch off" from the cell surface is largely unknown. In the case of retroviruses, the Gag protein drives the budding process, and the virus release step is directed by the late (L) assembly domain within Gag. A PPPPY motif within the L domain of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) was previously characterized as being critical for the release of virions and shown to interact in vitro with the WW domain of Yes-associated protein (Yap). To determine whether WW domain-L domain interactions can occur in vivo, we attempted to interfere with the host cell machinery normally recruited to the site of budding by inserting this WW domain in different locations within Gag. At a C-terminal location, the WW(Yap) domain had no effect on budding, suggesting that the intervening I domains (which provide the major region of Gag-Gag interaction) prevent its access to the L domain. When positioned on the other side of the I domains closer to the L domain, the WW(Yap) domain resulted in a dramatic interference of particle release, and confocal microscopy revealed a block to budding on the plasma membrane. Budding was restored by attachment of the heterologous L domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag, which does not bind WW(Yap). These findings suggest that cis expression of WW domains can interfere with RSV particle release in vivo via specific, high-affinity interactions at the site of assembly on the plasma membrane, thus preventing host factor accessibility to the L domain and subsequent virus-cell separation. In addition, they suggest that L domain-specific host factors function after Gag proteins begin to interact.

  13. Multiple oncogenic viruses identified in Ocular surface squamous neoplasia in HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisson Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN is a rare cancer that has increased in incidence with the HIV pandemic in Africa. The underlying cause of this cancer in HIV-infected patients from Botswana is not well defined. Results Tissues were obtained from 28 OSSN and 8 pterygia patients. The tissues analyzed from OSSN patients were 83% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 70% were KSHV positive, 75% were HSV-1/2 positive, and 61% were CMV positive by PCR. Tissues from pterygium patients were 88% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 50% were KSHV positive, and 60% were CMV positive. None of the patients were JC or BK positive. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry analyses further identified HPV, EBV, and KSHV in a subset of the tissue samples. Conclusion We identified the known oncogenic viruses HPV, KSHV, and EBV in OSSN and pterygia tissues. The presence of these tumor viruses in OSSN suggests that they may contribute to the development of this malignancy in the HIV population. Further studies are necessary to characterize the molecular mechanisms associated with viral antigens and their potential role in the development of OSSN.

  14. In vitro proteolytic cleavage of Gazdar murine sarcoma virus p65gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, S; Arlinghaus, R B

    1981-09-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus, disrupted in concentrations of 0.1 to 0.5% Nonidet P-40, catalyzed the cleavage of p65, the gag gene polyprotein of the Gazdar strain of murine sarcoma virus, into polypeptides with sizes and antigenic determinants of murine leukemia virus-specified p30, p15, pp12, and p10. Cleavage performed in the presence of 0.15% Nonidet P-40 in water yielded polypeptides of approximately 40,000 (P40) and 25,000 (P25) Mr. In vitro cleavage performed in a buffered solution containing dithiothreitol in addition to 0.1% Nonidet P-40 allowed the efficient processing of P40 to p30 and a band migrating with p10. Immunoprecipitation with monospecific sera indicated that P40 contained p30 and p10, whereas P25 contained p15 and pp12 determinants. P40 and P25 are similar in size and antigenic properties to Pr40gag and Pr25gag observed in infected cells (Naso et al, J. Virol. 32:187-198, 1979).

  15. Properties of a ribonucleoprotein particle isolated from Nonidet P-40-treated Rous sarcoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, N L; Rueckert, R R

    1972-11-01

    A ribonucleoprotein particle containing about 20% ribonucleic acid (RNA), and containing little if any phospholipid or glucosamine, was recovered in high yield after treatment of Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus and B77 virus with the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. This structure, which probably derives from the internal ribonucleoprotein filament described in electron microscopy studies, contained 80 to 90% of the viral 60 to 70S RNA and only about 10% of the protein present in intact virions. It sedimented in glycerol density gradients at approximately 130S and had a buoyant density in sucrose of about 1.34 g/ml. Studies with (32)P-labeled virus indicated that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained approximately 30 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight viral RNA. Intact virions contained about 70 4S RNA molecules per 10(7) daltons of high-molecular-weight RNA. Electrophoretic studies in dodecyl sulfate-containing polyacrylamide gels showed that the ribonucleoprotein particle contained only 5 of the 11 polypeptides found in the virion; of these the major component was a polypeptide weighing 14,000 daltons.

  16. Marek’s disease herpesvirus vaccines integrate into chicken host chromosomes yet lack a virus-host phenotype associated with oncogenic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphotrophic and oncogenic disease of chickens that can lead to death in susceptible and unimmunized host birds. The causative pathogen, Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, integrates into host genome near the telomeres during viral latency an...

  17. [Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1 oncogene variants in cell lines of different origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, L S; Senyuta, N B; Goncharova, E V; Scherback, L N; Smirnova, R V; Pavlish, O A; Gurtsevitch, V E

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a widespread infection in the human population. Typically, infection occurs in early childhood without serious consequences for infected people. At the same time, a secondary infection with an additional EBV strain occurs quite often. During the in vitro cultivation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from persons infected with multiple strains of the virus, only one of these strains with higher transforming potential becomes dominant, while the others are eliminated. Under certain conditions, such a highly transforming EBV strain apparently is able to be the etiologic agent of EBVassociated diseases. To find out the range of highly transforming EBV strains prevalent among Russians, cell lines from patients with EBV-associated and non-associated tumors, as well as healthy individuals, were established. The structural analysis of the latent membrane protein 1 gene (LMP1), a key oncogene of the virus, isolated from established cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes of blood donors was carried out, and data obtained were compared with the respective data for LMP1 isolates, amplified from cell lines established from African and Japanese patients with Burkitt's lymphoma. The data obtained show a genetic relationship between Russian LMP1 isolates regardless the fact whether they come from patients with tumors or healthy individuals and differ significantly from LMP1 isolates from Burkitt's lymphoma patients. Thus, the results of the study suggest that in nonendemic region for EBV-associated pathology, Russia, any strain of EBV with any structure of LMP1 with concomitant effect of additional factors may become an etiologic agent for EBV-associated neoplasia.

  18. Comparative sequence analysis of a highly oncogenic but horizontal spread-defective clone of Marek's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Stephen J; Zhao, Yuguang; Petherbridge, Lawrence; Smith, Lorraine P; Baigent, Susan J; Nair, Venugopal

    2007-12-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a cell-associated alphaherpesvirus that induces rapid-onset T-cell lymphomas in poultry. MDV isolates vary greatly in pathogenicity. While some of the strains such as CVI988 are non-pathogenic and are used as vaccines, others such as RB-1B are highly oncogenic. Molecular determinants associated with differences in pathogenicity are not completely understood. Comparison of the genome sequences of phenotypically different strains could help to identify molecular determinants of pathogenicity. We have previously reported the construction of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones of RB-1B from which fully infectious viruses could be reconstituted upon DNA transfection into chicken cells. MDV reconstituted from one of these clones (pRB-1B-5) showed similar in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics and oncogenicity as the parental virus. However, unlike the parental RB-1B virus, the BAC-derived virus showed inability to spread between birds. In order to identify the unique determinants for oncogenicity and the ''non-spreading phenotype'' of MDV derived from this clone, we determined the full-length sequence of pRB-1B-5. Comparative sequence analysis with the published sequences of strains such as Md5, Md11, and CVI988 identified frameshift mutations in RLORF1, protein kinase (UL13), and glycoproteins C (UL44) and D (US6). Comparison of the sequences of these genes with the parental virus indicated that the RLORF1, UL44, and US6 mutations were also present in the parental RB-1B stock of the virus. However with regard to UL13 mutation, the parental RB-1B stock appeared to be a mixture of wild type and mutant viruses, indicating that the BAC cloning has selected a mutant clone. Although further studies are needed to evaluate the role of these genes in the horizontal-spreading defective phenotype, our data clearly indicate that mutations in these genes do not affect the oncogenicity of MDV.

  19. An avian leukosis virus subgroup J isolate with a Rous sarcoma virus-like 5'-LTR shows enhanced replication capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanni; Guan, Xiaolu; Liu, Yongzhen; Li, Xiaofei; Yun, Bingling; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Cui, Hongyu; Liu, Changjun; Zhang, Yanping; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) was first isolated from meat-producing chickens that had developed myeloid leukosis. However, ALV-J infections associated with hemangiomas have occurred in egg-producing (layer) flocks in China. In this study, we identified an ALV-J layer isolate (HLJ13SH01) as a recombinant of ALV-J and a Rous sarcoma virus Schmidt-Ruppin B strain (RSV-SRB), which contained the RSV-SRB 5'-LTR and the other genes of ALV-J. Replication kinetic testing indicated that the HLJ13SH01 strain replicated faster than other ALV-J layer isolates in vitro. Sequence analysis indicated that the main difference between the two isolates was the 5'-LTR sequences, particularly the U3 sequences. A 19 nt insertion was uniquely found in the U3 region of the HLJ13SH01 strain. The results of a Dual-Glo luciferase assay revealed that the 19 nt insertion in the HLJ13SH01 strain increased the enhancer activity of the U3 region. Moreover, an additional CCAAT/enhancer element was found in the 19 nt insertion and the luciferase assay indicated that this element played a key role in increasing the enhancer activity of the 5'-U3 region. To confirm the potentiation effect of the 19 nt insertion and the CCAAT/enhancer element on virus replication, three infectious clones with 5'-U3 region variations were constructed and rescued. Replication kinetic testing of the rescued viruses demonstrated that the CCAAT/enhancer element in the 19 nt insertion enhanced the replication capacity of the ALV-J recombinant in vitro.

  20. Role of the ubiquitin system and tumor viruses in AIDS-related cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Julia; Pagano, Joseph S

    2007-11-22

    Tumor viruses are linked to approximately 20% of human malignancies worldwide. This review focuses on examples of human oncogenic viruses that manipulate the ubiquitin system in a subset of viral malignancies; those associated with AIDS. The viruses include Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus and human papilloma virus, which are causally linked to Kaposi's sarcoma, certain B-cell lymphomas and cervical cancer, respectively. We discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these viruses subvert the ubiquitin system and potential viral targets for anti-cancer therapy from the perspective of this system. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com).

  1. Analysis of the src gene of sarcoma viruses generated by recombination between transformation-defective mutants and quail cellular sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L H; Moscovici, C; Karess, R E; Hanafusa, H

    1979-01-01

    Tumors were produced in quails about 2 months after injection with a transformation-defective mutant of the Schmidt-Ruppin strain of Rous sarcoma virus, subgroup A (SR-A), that retains a small portion of the src gene. Sarcoma viruses were isolated from each of five such tumors. A transformation-defective mutant which has a nearly complete deletion of the src gene was unable to induce tumors. The avian sarcoma viruses recovered from quail tumors (rASV-Q) had biological properties similar to those of the avian sarcoma viruses previously acquired from chicken tumors (rASV-C); these chicken tumors had been induced by the same transformation-defective mutants. Both rASV-Q and rASV-C transformed cells in culture with similar focus morphology and produced tumors within 7 to 14 days after injection into chickens or quails. The size of rASV-Q genomic RNA was indistinguishable from that of SR-A by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The sequences of rASV-Q RNA genomes were analyzed and compared with those of the parental transformation-defective virus, SR-A and of rASV-C by RNase T1 fingerprinting and oligonucleotide mapping. We found that the src sequences of all five isolates of rASV-Q were identical to each other but different from those of SR-A and rASV-C. Of 13 oligonucleotides of rASV-Q identified as src specific, two were not found in either SR-A or rASV-C RNA. Furthermore, some oligonucleotides present in SR-A or rASV-C or both were absent in rASV-Q. No differences were found for the sequences outside the src region in any of the viruses examined. In addition, rASV-Q-infected cells possessed a 60,000-dalton protein specifically precipitable by rabbit serum raised against SR-D-induced tumors. The facts that the src sequences are essentially the same for rASV's recovered from one animal species and different for rASV's obtained from different species provide conclusive evidence that cellular sequences of normal birds were inserted into the viral genome and supplied to

  2. Simian sarcoma virus-encoded gag-related protein: in vitro cleavage by Friend leukemia virus-associated proteolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafenrichter, R; Thiel, H J

    1985-05-01

    The simian sarcoma virus (SSV) encodes a gag-related 65,000-Da protein (SSV p65) which is not processed in SSV nonproducer cells (SSV-NP cells) (H.-J. Thiel, T. J. Matthews, E. M. Broughton, K. J. Weinhold, D. P. Bolognesi, T. Graf, and H. Beug (1981a), Virology 114, 124-131). In order to cleave SSV p65, retroviral particles containing this antigen were incubated with extracts from the heterologous helper virus Friend leukemia virus (FLV). Superinfection of SSV-NP cells by FLV has been previously shown to result in processing of SSV p65 in vivo (H.-J. Thiel, F. Weiland, R. Hafenrichter, T. J. Matthews, and K. J. Weinhold (1982), Virology 123, 229-234). In vitro cleavage was most efficient in the presence of a nonionic detergent (greater than 0.1% Nonidet-P40) and a reducing agent (greater than 5 mM dithiothreitol) at a pH of 7.0. The products, termed SSV p55 (p15, p12, p30), SSV p30, SSV p25 (p15, p12), and SSV p10, were characterized by (1) molecular weight, (2) kinetics experiments, (3) incorporation of different radiolabeled amino acids, and (4) comparison with SSAV structural proteins. Kinetics experiments with two amino acids ([3H]leucine, [35S]cysteine) revealed that initial processing of SSV p65 produced SSV p55 and SSV p10, with subsequent processing of SSV p55 occurring thereafter. In contrast to the Moloney system, the major intermediate p40 (p30, p10) could not be clearly demonstrated. A direct comparison of SSAV p10 and the cleavage product SSV p10 by SDS-PAGE suggests that SSAV pr65gag and SSV p65 differ slightly by molecular weight.

  3. Concomitant occurrence of EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) and KRAS (V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) mutations in an ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive lung adenocarcinoma patient with acquired resistance to crizotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Henrik H; Grauslund, Morten; Urbanska, Edyta M;

    2013-01-01

    , the events behind crizotinib-resistance currently remain largely uncharacterized. Thus, we report on an anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung carcinoma patient with concomitant occurrence of epidermal growth factor receptor and V-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog mutations......Anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung carcinoma patients are generally highly responsive to the dual anaplastic lymphoma kinase and MET tyrosine kinase inhibitor crizotinib. However, they eventually acquire resistance to this drug, preventing the anaplastic lymphoma kinase...... inhibitors from having a prolonged beneficial effect. The molecular mechanisms responsible for crizotinib resistance are beginning to emerge, e.g., in some anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive non-small cell lung carcinomas the development of secondary mutations in this gene has been described. However...

  4. Piracy of prostaglandin E2/EP receptor-mediated signaling by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (HHV-8) for latency gene expression: strategy of a successful pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George Paul, Arun; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Kerur, Nagaraj; White, Carl; Chandran, Bala

    2010-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) is implicated in the pathogenesis of KS, a chronic inflammation-associated malignancy. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), two pivotal proinflammatory/oncogeneic molecules, are proposed to play roles in the expression of major KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen-1 (LANA-1). Microsomal PGE2 synthase, PGE2, and its receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) were detected in KS lesions with the distinct staining of EP2/EP4 in KS lesions. In latently infected endothelial TIVE-LTC cells, EP receptor antagonists downregulated LANA-1 expression as well as Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB, which are also some of the signal molecules proposed to be important in KS pathogenesis. Exogenous PGE2 and EP receptor agonists induced the LANA-1 promoter in 293 cells, and YY1, Sp1, Oct-1, Oct-6, C/EBP, and c-Jun transcription factors seem to be involved in this induction. PGE2/EP receptor-induced LANA-1 promoter activity was downregulated significantly by the inhibition of Ca(2+), p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCzeta/lambda, and p-NF-kappaB. These findings implicate the inflammatory PGE2/EP receptors and the associated signal molecules in herpes virus latency and uncover a novel paradigm that shows the evolution of KSHV genome plasticity to use inflammatory response for its survival advantage of maintaining latent gene expression. These data also suggest that potential use of anti-COX-2 and anti-EP receptor therapy may not only ameliorate the chronic inflammation associated with KS but could also lead to elimination of the KSHV latent infection and the associated KS lesions.

  5. GROWTH REGULATION IN ROUS SARCOMA VIRUS INFECTED CHICKEN EMBRYO FIBROBLASTS: THE ROLE OF THE src GENE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, G.; Bartholomew, J.A.; Blssell, M.J.

    1980-07-01

    We report here a study of the mechanisms leading to loss of growth control in chicken embryo fibroblasts transformed by Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). We have been particularly concerned with the role of the src gene in this process, and have used RSV mutants temperature sensitive (ts) for transformation to investigate the nature of the growth regulatory lesion. The two principal findings were (1) the stationary phase of the cell cycle (G{sub 1}) in chick embryo fibroblasts seems to have two distinct regulatory compartments (using the terminology of Brooks et al. we refer to these as 'Q' and 'A' states). When rendered stationary at 41.5 C by serum deprivation, normal cells enter a Q state, but cells infected with the ts-mutant occupy an A state. (2) Whereas normal cells can occupy either state depending on culture conditions, the ts-infected cells, at 41.5 C, do not seem to enter Q even though a known src gene product, a kinase, is reported to be inactive at this temperature. We discuss the possibility that viral factors other than the active src protein kinase influence growth control in infected cultures.

  6. The structure and function of the rous sarcoma virus RNA stability element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Johanna B; Beemon, Karen L

    2011-11-01

    For simple retroviruses, such as the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), post-transcriptional control elements regulate viral RNA splicing, export, stability, and packaging into virions. These RNA sequences interact with cellular host proteins to regulate and facilitate productive viral infections. One such element, known as the RSV stability element (RSE), is required for maintaining stability of the full-length unspliced RNA. This viral RNA serves as the mRNA for the Gag and Pol proteins and also as the genome packaged in progeny virions. When the RSE is deleted from the viral RNA, the unspliced RNA becomes unstable and is degraded in a Upf1-dependent manner. Current evidence suggests that the RSE inhibits recognition of the viral gag termination codon by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. We believe that the RSE acts as an insulator to NMD, thereby preventing at least one of the required functional steps that target an mRNA for degradation. Here, we discuss the history of the RSE and the current model of how the RSE is interacting with cellular NMD factors.

  7. Virus como inductores de neoplasias cutáneas

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic role of viruses in cutaneous neoplasms has been known by humankind for more than a century, when the origin of the common wart, or verruca vulgaris, was attributed to the human papilloma virus (HPV). Currently, virus-induced cutaneous neoplasms may be grouped into solid tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. HPV, from which various serotypes are now known, each being linked to a specific neoplasm, the human herpes virus type 8 producing Kaposi sarcoma, and the Merkel cell pol...

  8. Structural Model of the Tubular Assembly of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jaekyun; Qiao, Xin; Hung, Ivan; Mitra, Alok K; Desfosses, Ambroise; Huang, Daniel; Gor'kov, Peter L; Craven, Rebecca C; Kingston, Richard L; Gan, Zhehong; Zhu, Fangqiang; Chen, Bo

    2017-02-08

    The orthoretroviral capsid protein (CA) assembles into polymorphic capsids, whose architecture, assembly, and stability are still being investigated. The N-terminal and C-terminal domains of CA (NTD and CTD, respectively) engage in both homotypic and heterotypic interactions to create the capsid. Hexameric turrets formed by the NTD decorate the majority of the capsid surface. We report nearly complete solid-state NMR (ssNMR) resonance assignments of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) CA, assembled into hexamer tubes that mimic the authentic capsid. The ssNMR assignments show that, upon assembly, large conformational changes occur in loops connecting helices, as well as the short 310 helix initiating the CTD. The interdomain linker becomes statically disordered. Combining constraints from ssNMR and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), we establish an atomic resolution model of the RSV CA tubular assembly using molecular dynamics flexible fitting (MDFF) simulations. On the basis of comparison of this MDFF model with an earlier-derived crystallographic model for the planar assembly, the induction of curvature into the RSV CA hexamer lattice arises predominantly from reconfiguration of the NTD-CTD and CTD trimer interfaces. The CTD dimer and CTD trimer interfaces are also intrinsically variable. Hence, deformation of the CA hexamer lattice results from the variable displacement of the CTDs that surround each hexameric turret. Pervasive H-bonding is found at all interdomain interfaces, which may contribute to their malleability. Finally, we find helices at the interfaces of HIV and RSV CA assemblies have very different contact angles, which may reflect differences in the capsid assembly pathway for these viruses.

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogen homologue-specific amino acid substitutions are associated with different histopathological prognostic factors in resected non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitlinger, Joseph; Renaud, Stéphane; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Schaeffer, Mickaël; Olland, Anne; Reeb, Jérémie; Santelmo, Nicola; Legrain, Michèle; Voegeli, Anne-Claire; Weingertner, Noëlle; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Beau-Faller, Michèle; Massard, Gilbert

    2016-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (mEGFR) and v-Ki-ras2 Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogen homologue (mKRAS) mutations are the two main oncogenic drivers in resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to evaluate the correlation between histopathological prognostic factors and these mutations in resected NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed data from 841 patients who underwent a surgical resection with a curative intent for NSCLC between 2007 and 2012. KRAS mutations were observed in 255 patients (32%) and mEGFR in 103 patients (12%). A correlation was observed between mKRAS patients and lymph node involvement [Cramer's V: 0.451, P V: 0.235, P = 0.02, OR: 3.04 (95% CI: 1.5-6.3), P = 0.004]. High lymph node ratio and angioinvasion were also significantly more frequent in mKRAS [Cramer's V: 0.373, P V: 0.269, P V: 0.459, P V: 0.45, P < 0.001 OR: 21.14 (95% CI: 9.2-48.3), P < 0.001, respectively]. We observed a correlation between mKRAS and negative histopathological prognostic factors and between mEGFR and positive prognostic factors. One can wonder whether histopathological prognostic factors are only clinical reflections of molecular alterations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  10. Rescue of avian leukosis subgroup-J-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying different lengths of the v-fps oncogene and analysis of their tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Fang, Lichun; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Cui, Shuai; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-12-01

    In our previous study, six subgroup J strains of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J)-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying different lengths of the v-fps oncogene, designated as Fu-J and Fu-J1-5, were isolated and characterized from fibrosarcomas in ALV-J-infected chickens. In the present study, the oncogenic potential of Fu-J and Fu-J1-5 was investigated using a reverse genetics technique. Six replication-defective viruses, named rFu-J and rFu-J1-5, were rescued with the replication-competent rescued ALV-J strain rSDAU1005 as a helper virus by co-transfection of chicken embryo fibroblast monolayers with infectious clone plasmids. Experimental bird studies were performed, demonstrating that only the rescued rFu-J virus carrying the complete v-fps oncogene with rSDAU1005 as the helper virus could induce acute fibrosarcoma after inoculation in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. These results provide direct evidence that the replication-defective acutely transforming Fu-J virus, with the complete v-fps oncogene, was associated with acute fibrosarcoma in chickens infected with ALV-J in the field, as reported previously.

  11. Cellular and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus microRNAs in sepsis and surgical trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, S; Giza, D E; Lin, H Y; Fabris, L; Yoshiaki, K; D'Abundo, L; Toale, K M; Shimizu, M; Ferracin, M; Challagundla, K B; Cortez, M Angelica; Fuentes-Mattei, E; Tulbure, D; Gonzalez, C; Henderson, J; Row, M; Rice, T W; Ivan, C; Negrini, M; Fabbri, M; Morris, J S; Yeung, S-C J; Vasilescu, C; Calin, G A

    2014-12-04

    Once a patient is in septic shock, survival rates drop by 7.6% for every hour of delay in antibiotic therapy. Biomarkers based on the molecular mechanism of sepsis are important for timely diagnosis and triage. Here, we study the potential roles of a panel of cellular and viral miRNAs as sepsis biomarkers. We performed genome-wide microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling in leukocytes from septic patients and nonseptic controls, combined with quantitative RT-PCR in plasmas from two cohorts of septic patients, two cohorts of nonseptic surgical patients and healthy volunteers. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, miRNA transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation were used to study the effects of Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) miRNAs on interleukin's secretion. Differences related to sepsis etiology were noted for plasma levels of 10 cellular and 2 KSHV miRNAs (miR-K-10b and miR-K-12-12*) between septic and nonseptic patients. All the sepsis groups had high KSHV miRNAs levels compared with controls; Afro-American patients had higher levels of KSHV-miR-K12-12* than non-Afro-American patients. Both KSHV miRNAs were increased on postoperative day 1, but returned to baseline on day 7; they acted as direct agonists of Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8), which might explain the increased secretion of the IL-6 and IL-10. Cellular and KSHV miRNAs are differentially expressed in sepsis and early postsurgical patients and may be exploited for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Increased miR-K-10b and miR-K12-12* are functionally involved in sepsis as agonists of TLR8, forming a positive feedback that may lead to cytokine dysregulation.

  12. Plasma Epstein–Barr virus and Hepatitis B virus in non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Two lymphotropic, potentially oncogenic, latently occurring DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Sinha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: There is a need to study potential infective etiologies in lymphomas. Lymphocyte-transforming viruses can directly infect lymphocytes, disrupt normal cell functions, and promote cell division. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV is known to be associated with several lymphomas, especially Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs. And recently, the lymphocyte-transforming role of hepatitis B virus (HBV has been emphasized. Aims: The aim of this study was to elucidate the association of two potentially oncogenic, widely prevalent latent DNA viruses, EBV and HBV, in non-HL (NHL. Settings and Design: In this prospective study, we estimated plasma EBV and HBV DNA in NHL patients. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from newly diagnosed, treatment na ïve, histologically confirmed NHL patients. Plasma EBV DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR targeting Epstein–Barr Nucleic acid 1 while the plasma HBV DNA was detected using nested PCR targeting HBX gene. In a small subset of patients, follow-up plasma samples post-anticancer chemotherapy were available and retested for viral DNA. Results: Of the 110 NHL patients, ~79% were B-cell NHL and ~21% were T-cell NHL. Plasma EBV-DNA was detected in 10% NHLs with a higher EBV association in Burkitt lymphoma (33.3% than other subtypes. Pretherapy HBV DNA was detected in 21% NHLs; most of them being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Moreover, 42% of DLBCL patients had HBV DNA in plasma. Since all patients were HBV surface antigen seronegative at diagnosis, baseline plasma HBV-DNAemia before chemotherapy was indicative of occult hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Our findings indicate a significant association of HBV with newly diagnosed DLBCL.

  13. Hydrodynamic and Membrane Binding Properties of Purified Rous Sarcoma Virus Gag Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Robert A.; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Nanda, Hirsh; Fang, Xianyang; Wen, Yi; Barros, Marilia; Wang, Yun-Xing; Rein, Alan; Vogt, Volker M. (NCI); (Cornell); (CM); (NIST)

    2016-05-06

    Previously, no retroviral Gag protein has been highly purified in milligram quantities and in a biologically relevant and active form. We have purified Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein and in parallel several truncation mutants of Gag and have studied their biophysical properties and membrane interactionsin vitro. RSV Gag is unusual in that it is not naturally myristoylated. From its ability to assemble into virus-like particlesin vitro, we infer that RSV Gag is biologically active. By size exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering, Gag in solution appears extended and flexible, in contrast to previous reports on unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag, which is compact. However, by neutron reflectometry measurements of RSV Gag bound to a supported bilayer, the protein appears to adopt a more compact, folded-over conformation. At physiological ionic strength, purified Gag binds strongly to liposomes containing acidic lipids. This interaction is stimulated by physiological levels of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and by cholesterol. However, unlike HIV-1 Gag, RSV Gag shows no sensitivity to acyl chain saturation. In contrast with full-length RSV Gag, the purified MA domain of Gag binds to liposomes only weakly. Similarly, both an N-terminally truncated version of Gag that is missing the MA domain and a C-terminally truncated version that is missing the NC domain bind only weakly. These results imply that NC contributes to membrane interactionin vitro, either by directly contacting acidic lipids or by promoting Gag multimerization.

    Retroviruses like HIV assemble at and bud from the plasma membrane of cells. Assembly requires the interaction between thousands of Gag molecules to form a lattice. Previous work indicated that lattice formation at the plasma membrane is influenced by the conformation of monomeric HIV. We have extended this work to the more tractable RSV Gag. Our

  14. Primary effusion lymphoma: a distinct clinicopathologic entity associated with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nador, R G; Cesarman, E; Chadburn, A; Dawson, D B; Ansari, M Q; Sald, J; Knowles, D M

    1996-07-15

    We recently discovered the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8) in an uncommon and unusual subset of AIDS-related lymphomas that grow mainly in the body cavities as lymphomatous effusions without an identifiable contiguous tumor mass. The consistent presence of KSHV and certain other distinctive features of these body cavity-based lymphomas suggest that they represent a distinct entity. We tested this hypothesis by investigating 19 malignant lymphomatous effusions occurring in the absence of a contiguous tumor mass for their clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, viral, and molecular characteristics, KSHV was present in 15 of 19 lymphomas. All four KSHV-negative lymphomatous effusions exhibited Burkitt or Burkitt-like morphology and c-myc gene rearrangements and, therefore, appeared to be Burkitt-type lymphomas occurring in the body cavities. In contrast, all 15 KSHV-positive lymphomatous effusions exhibited a distinctive morphology bridging large-cell immunoblastic lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and all 12 cases studied lacked c-myc gene rearrangements. In addition, these lymphomas occurred in men (15/15), frequently but not exclusively in association with HIV infection (13/15), in which homosexuality was a risk factor (13/13), presented initially as a lymphomatous effusion (14/15), remained localized to the body cavity of origin (13/15), expressed CD45 (15/15) and one or more activation-associated antigens (9/10) in the frequent absence of B-cell-associated antigens (11/15), exhibited clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangements (13/13), contained Epstein-Barr virus (14/15), and lacked bcl-2, bcl-6, ras and p53 gene alterations (13/15). These findings strongly suggest that the KSHV-positive malignant lymphomatous effusions represent a distinct clinicopathologic and biologic entity and should be distinguished from other malignant lymphomas occurring in the body cavities. Therefore, we recommend that these malignant lymphomas be

  15. Activation and Repression of Epstein-Barr Virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Cycles by Short- and Medium-Chain Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorres, Kelly L.; Daigle, Derek; Mohanram, Sudharshan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The lytic cycles of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) are induced in cell culture by sodium butyrate (NaB), a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Valproic acid (VPA), another SCFA and an HDAC inhibitor, induces the lytic cycle of KSHV but blocks EBV lytic reactivation. To explore the hypothesis that structural differences between NaB and VPA account for their functional effects on the two related viruses, we investigated the capacity of 16 structurally related short- and medium-chain fatty acids to promote or prevent lytic cycle reactivation. SCFAs differentially affected EBV and KSHV reactivation. KSHV was reactivated by all SCFAs that are HDAC inhibitors, including phenylbutyrate. However, several fatty acid HDAC inhibitors, such as isobutyrate and phenylbutyrate, did not reactivate EBV. Reactivation of KSHV lytic transcripts could not be blocked completely by any fatty acid tested. In contrast, several medium-chain fatty acids inhibited lytic activation of EBV. Fatty acids that blocked EBV reactivation were more lipophilic than those that activated EBV. VPA blocked activation of the BZLF1 promoter by NaB but did not block the transcriptional function of ZEBRA. VPA also blocked activation of the DNA damage response that accompanies EBV lytic cycle activation. Properties of SCFAs in addition to their effects on chromatin are likely to explain activation or repression of EBV. We concluded that fatty acids stimulate the two related human gammaherpesviruses to enter the lytic cycle through different pathways. IMPORTANCE Lytic reactivation of EBV and KSHV is needed for persistence of these viruses and plays a role in carcinogenesis. Our direct comparison highlights the mechanistic differences in lytic reactivation between related human oncogenic gammaherpesviruses. Our findings have therapeutic implications, as fatty acids are found in the diet and produced by the human microbiota

  16. Intronic deletions of tva receptor gene decrease the susceptibility to infection by subgroup A avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A

    Science.gov (United States)

    The group of avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV) in chickens contains six highly related subgroups, A to E and J. Four genetic loci, tva, tvb, tvc and tvj, encode for corresponding receptors that determine the susceptibility to the ASLV subgroups. The prevalence of ASLV in hosts may have imposed...

  17. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders H; Kunder, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    to be associated with specific tumor diagnoses or individual viral mutants. CONCLUSION: We present here the first example of a doubly spliced transcript within the group of gammaretroviruses, and we show that mutation of the alternative splice sites that define this novel RNA product change the oncogenic potential......BACKGROUND: Mutations of an alternative splice donor site located within the gag region has previously been shown to broaden the pathogenic potential of the T-lymphomagenic gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus, while the equivalent mutations in the erythroleukemia inducing Friend murine...... leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. RESULTS...

  18. Changing faces in virology: the dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcaid, Zineb; Lamfers, Martine L M; van Beusechem, Victor W; Hoeben, Rob C

    2014-10-01

    Viruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transformation and cancer. On the other hand, viruses may provide hope: hope for an efficacious treatment of serious disease. Examples of the latter are the use of viruses as a vaccine, as transfer vector for therapeutic genes in a gene therapy setting, or, more directly, as therapeutic anticancer agent in an oncolytic-virus therapy setting. Already there is evidence for antitumor activity of oncolytic viruses. The antitumor efficacy seems linked to their capacity to induce a tumor-directed immune response. Here, we will provide an overview on the development of oncolytic viruses and their clinical evaluation from the Dutch perspective.

  19. BamHI-A rightward frame 1, an Epstein-Barr virus-encoded oncogene and immune modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebe, Eveline K; Le Large, Tessa Y S; Greijer, Astrid E; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2013-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes several benign and malignant disorders of lymphoid and epithelial origin. EBV-related tumors display distinct patterns of viral latent gene expression, of which the BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) is selectively expressed in carcinomas, regulated by cellular differentiation factors including ΔNp63α. BARF1 functions as a viral oncogene, immortalizing and transforming epithelial cells of different origin by acting as a mitogenic growth factor, inducing cyclin-D expression, and up-regulating antiapoptotic Bcl-2, stimulating host cell growth and survival. In addition, secreted hexameric BARF1 has immune evasive properties, functionally corrupting macrophage colony stimulating factor, as supported by recent functional and structural data. Therefore, BARF1, an intracellular and secreted protein, not only has multiple pathogenic functions but also can function as a target for immune responses. Deciphering the role of BARF1 in EBV biology will contribute to novel diagnostic and treatment options for EBV-driven carcinomas. Herein, we discuss recent insights on the regulation of BARF1 expression and aspects of structure-function relating to its oncogenic and immune suppressive properties.

  20. Acute leukemia viruses E26 and avian myeloblastosis virus have related transformation-specific RNA sequences but different genetic structures, gene products, and oncogenic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bister, Klaus; Nunn, Michael; Moscovici, Carlo; Perbal, Bernard; Baluda, Marcel A.; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1982-01-01

    Replication-defective acute leukemia viruses E26 and myeloblastosis virus (AMV) cause distinct leukemias although they belong to the same subgroup of oncogenic avian tumor viruses based on shared transformation-specific (onc) RNA sequences. E26 causes predominantly erythroblastosis in chicken and in quail, whereas AMV induces a myeloid leukemia. However, upon cultivation in vitro for >1 month, a majority of surviving hemopoietic cells of E26-infected animals bear myeloid markers similar to those of AMV-transformed cells. We have analyzed the genetic structure and gene products of E26 virus for a comparison with those of AMV. An E26/helper virus complex was found to contain two RNA species: a 5.7-kilobase (kb) RNA that hybridizes with cloned AMV-specific proviral DNA and hence is probably the E26 genome; and an 8.5-kb RNA that is unrelated to AMV and represents helper virus RNA. Thus, E26 RNA is smaller than 7.5-kb AMV RNA. Hybridization of size-selected poly(A)-terminating E26 RNA fragments with AMV-specific DNA indicated that the shared specific sequences are located in the 5′ half of the E26 genome as opposed to a 3′ location in AMV RNA. In nonproducer cells transformed in vitro by E26, a gag-related nonstructural 135,000-dalton protein (p135) was found. No gag(Pr76) or gag-pol (Pr180) precursors of essential virion proteins, which are present in AMV nonproducer cells, were observed. p135 was also found in cultured E26 virus producing cells of several leukemic chickens, and its intracellular concentration relative to that of the essential virion proteins encoded by the helper virus correlates with the ratio of E26 to helper RNA in virions released by these cells. p135 is phosphorylated but not glycosylated; antigenically it is not related to the pol or env gene products. It appears to be coded for by a partial gag gene and by E26-specific RNA sequences, presumably including those shared with AMV. Hence, AMV and E26 appear to use different strategies for the

  1. Changing faces in virology: The Dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Belcaid (Zineb); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); V.W. Beusechem (Victor); R.C. Hoeben (Rob)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractViruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular transform

  2. Presence of adenovirus species C in infiltrating lymphocytes of human sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Kosulin

    Full Text Available Human adenoviruses are known to persist in T-lymphocytes of tonsils, adenoids and intestinal tract. The oncogenic potential of different adenovirus types has been widely studied in rodents, in which adenovirus inoculation can induce multiple tumors such as undifferentiated sarcomas, adenocarcinomas and neuroectodermal tumors. However, the oncogenic potential of this virus has never been proven in human subjects. Using a highly sensitive broad-spectrum qRT-PCR, we have screened a set of different human sarcomas including leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and gastro intestinal stroma tumors. Primers binding the viral oncogene E1A and the capsid-coding gene Hexon were used to detect the presence of adenovirus DNA in tumor samples. We found that 18% of the tested leiomyosarcomas and 35% of the liposarcomas were positive for the presence of adenovirus DNA, being species C types the most frequently detected adenoviruses. However, only in one sample of the gastro intestinal stroma tumors the virus DNA could be detected. The occurrence of adenovirus in the tumor sections was confirmed by subsequent fluorescence in-situ-hybridization analysis and co-staining with the transcription factor Bcl11b gives evidence for the presence of the virus in infiltrating T-lymphocytes within the tumors. Together these data underline, for the first time, the persistence of adenovirus in T-lymphocytes infiltrated in muscular and fatty tissue tumor samples. If an impaired immune system leads to the viral persistence and reactivation of the virus is involved in additional diseases needs further investigation.

  3. Transformation with Oncogenic Ras and the Simian Virus 40 T Antigens Induces Caspase-Dependent Sensitivity to Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shihao; Spencer, Cody M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oncogenesis is frequently accompanied by the activation of specific metabolic pathways. One such pathway is fatty acid biosynthesis, whose induction is observed upon transformation of a wide variety of cell types. Here, we explored how defined oncogenic alleles, specifically the simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigens and oncogenic Ras12V, affect fatty acid metabolism. Our results indicate that SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation of fibroblasts induces fatty acid biosynthesis in the absence of significant changes in the concentration of fatty acid biosynthetic enzymes. This oncogene-induced activation of fatty acid biosynthesis was found to be mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) dependent, as it was attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Furthermore, SV40/Ras12V-mediated transformation induced sensitivity to treatment with fatty acid biosynthetic inhibitors. Pharmaceutical inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase (ACC), a key fatty acid biosynthetic enzyme, induced caspase-dependent cell death in oncogene-transduced cells. In contrast, isogenic nontransformed cells were resistant to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition. This oncogene-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the cells' growth rates and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Both the activation of fatty acid biosynthesis and the sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition could be conveyed to nontransformed breast epithelial cells through transduction with oncogenic Ras12V. Similar to what was observed in the transformed fibroblasts, the Ras12V-induced sensitivity to fatty acid biosynthetic inhibition was independent of the proliferative status and could be attenuated by supplementing the medium with unsaturated fatty acids. Combined, our results indicate that specific oncogenic alleles can directly confer sensitivity to inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis. IMPORTANCE Viral oncoproteins and cellular mutations

  4. Monoclonal antibody against IFN-gamma inhibits Moloney murine sarcoma virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanovello, P.; Vallerani, E.; Biasi, G.; Landolfo, S.; Collavo, D.

    1988-02-15

    The role of autochthonous IFN- production was evaluated in immune reactions to Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV)-induced tumors which are characterized by spontaneous regression mainly caused by virus-specific CTL activity. A functional IFN- depletion, induced by repeated administration of mAb anti-IFN- at the site of virus inoculation, prevented tumor regression in M-MSV-injected mice. Moreover, this antibody inhibited in vitro both proliferation and differentiation of M-MSV-specific T lymphocytes obtained in bulk cultures, but not growth and lytic activity of the already differentiated virus-specific CTL clone CHM-14 stimulated with rIL-2 and relevant tumor Ag. In addition, in mice receiving mAb treatment the frequency of M-MSV-specific CTL precursors, evaluated by means of limiting dilution analysis, was strongly reduced in comparison with that of control mice injected only with virus. Because CTL secrete IFN- following antigenic stimulation, the possibility that non-T effector cells recruited by this lymphokine might mediate tumor regression was also considered. Adoptive immunotherapy experiments, performed in T cell-deficient (Tx + BM) and in sublethally irradiated mice, demonstrated that transfer of CHM-14 CTL clone, which secretes IFN-, was able to counteract M-MSV tumor growth despite the local mAb anti-IFN- treatment which may have prevented host cell recruitment. Moreover, repeated local rIFN- inoculations in Tx + BM mice did not counteract M-MSV tumor progression, thus confirming that other IFN- properties such as non-T cell recruitment, antiviral or anti-proliferative IFN- activities have little or no relevance when M-MSV-specific CTL are lacking. On the whole, these results indicate that in M-MSV-injected mice, tumor enhancement after mAb anti-IFN- treatment is principally caused by impaired differentiation of virus-specific CTL precursors.

  5. Human herpes virus-8 DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage samples from patients with AIDS-associated pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, T L; Dodt, K K; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1997-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most frequent AIDS-associated neoplasm, and often disseminates to visceral organs, including the lungs. An ante-mortem diagnosis of pulmonary KS is difficult. Recently, DNA sequences resembling a new human herpes virus (HHV-8), have been identified in various forms...... of KS. We hypothesized that these sequences are present in samples obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in patients with pulmonary KS. Utilizing a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 7/12 BAL cell samples from HIV-infected patients with endobronchial KS were positive for HHV-8 DNA. In contrast......, only 2/39 samples from HIV-infected patients without evidence of KS were positive (p = 0.007). Detection of HHV-8 in BAL cells of patients with pulmonary KS was highly specific (95%), with a sensitivity of 58% and a positive predictive value of 78%. In conclusion, HHV-8 is associated with pulmonary KS...

  6. Oncogenic impact of human papilloma virus in head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, C B

    2012-02-01

    There is considerable debate within the literature about the significance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and its potential influence on the prevention, diagnosis, grading, treatment and prognosis of these cancers. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have traditionally been cited as the main risk factors for head and neck cancers. However, human papilloma virus, normally associated with cervical and other genital carcinomas, has emerged as a possible key aetiological factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers pose a significant financial burden on health resources and are increasing in incidence. The recent introduction of vaccines targeted against human papilloma virus types 16 and 18, to prevent cervical cancer, has highlighted the need for ongoing research into the importance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  7. Multiple oncogenic mutations related to targeted therapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhang; Hong-Yuan Zhao; Yu-Xiang Ma; Zhi-Huang Hu; Pei-Yu Huang; Li Zhang; Tao Qin; Shao-Dong Hong; Jing Zhang; Wen-Feng Fang; Yuan-Yuan Zhao; Yun-Peng Yang; Cong Xue; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Introduction:An increasing number of targeted drugs have been tested for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations have not been fully evaluated. This study aimed to detect targeted therapy-related oncogenic mutations in NPC and to determine which targeted therapy might be potentially effective in treating NPC. Methods:By using the SNaPshot assay, a rapid detection method, 19 mutation hotspots in 6 targeted therapy-related oncogenes were examined in 70 NPC patients. The associations between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic factors were analyzed. Results:Among 70 patients, 12 (17.1%) had mutations in 5 oncogenes:7 (10.0%) had v-kit Hardy-Zuckerman 4 feline sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KIT) mutation, 2 (2.8%) had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation, 1 (1.4%) had Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) mutation, and 1 (1.4%) had simultaneous EGFR and v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) mutations. No significant differences were observed between oncogenic mutations and clinicopathologic characteristics. Additionally, these oncogenic mutations were not associated with tumor recurrence and metastasis. Conclusions:Oncogenic mutations are present in NPC patients. The efficacy of targeted drugs on patients with the related oncogenic mutations requires further validation.

  8. Comparative analysis of oncogenic genes revealed unique evolutionary features of field Marek's disease virus prevalent in recent years in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ping

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marek's disease (MD is an economically important viral disease of chickens caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV, an oncogenic herpesvirus. This disease was well controlled since the widespread use of commercial vaccines, but field MDVs have shown continuous increasing in virulence and acquired the ability to overcome the immune response induced by vaccines. Nowadays, MD continues to be a serious threat to poultry industry, isolation and characterization of MDVs are essential for monitoring changes of viruses and evaluating the effectiveness of existing vaccines. Results Between 2008 and 2010, 18 field MDV strains were isolated from vaccinated chicken flocks in Sichuan province, China. Three oncogenic genes including Meq, pp38 and vIL-8 genes of the 18 isolates were amplified and sequenced. Homology analysis showed that the deduced amino acid sequences of these three genes exhibit 95.0-98.8%, 99.3-100% and 97.0-98.5% homology respectively with these of other reference strains published in GenBank. Alignment analysis of the nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences showed that four amino acid mutations in Meq gene and two amino acid mutations in vIL-8 gene displayed perfect regularity in MDVs circulating in China, which could be considered as features of field MDVs prevalent in recent years in China. In addition, one amino acid mutation in pp38 gene can be considered as a feature of virulent MDVs from USA, and three amino acid mutations in Meq gene were identified and unique in very virulent plus (vv+ MDVs. Phylogenetic analysis based on Meq and vIL-8 protein sequences revealed that field MDVs in China evolved independently. Virulence studies showed that CVI988 could provide efficient protection against the field MDVs epidemic recently in China. Conclusions This study and other published data in the GenBank have demonstrated the features of Meq, pp38 and vIL-8 genes of MDVs circulating in recent years in Sichuan, China

  9. Antibodies against lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus antigens and lymphoma in the European EpiLymph case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Y; Mbisa, G; Labo, N; Casabonne, D; Becker, N; Maynadie, M; Foretova, L; Cocco, P L; Nieters, A; Staines, A; Bofetta, P; Brennan, P; Whitby, D; de Sanjosé, S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus is associated with primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. Methods: Seropositivity to lytic and latent Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) antigens were examined in 2083 lymphomas and 2013 controls from six European countries. Results: Antibodies against KSHV latent and lytic antigens were detectable in 4.5% and 3.4% of controls, respectively, and 3.6% of cases (P>0.05). The KSHV seropositivity was associated with splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) (odds ratio (OR)=4.11, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.57–10.83) and multiple myeloma (OR=0.31, 95% CI=0.11–0.85). Conclusion: The KSHV is unlikely to contribute importantly to lymphomagenesis among immunocompetent subjects. However, the observed association with SMZL may underline a chronic antigen mechanism in its aetiology. PMID:21952625

  10. The Cancer-Associated Virus Landscape in HIV Patients with Oral Hairy Leukoplakia, Kaposi's Sarcoma, and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter D. Burbelo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although HIV-positive patients are at higher risk for developing a variety of infection-related cancers, the prevalence of infections with the seven known cancer-associated viruses has not been studied. Luciferase immunoprecipitation systems were used to evaluate antiviral antibodies in four 23-person groups: healthy blood donors and HIV-infected patients with oral hairy leukoplakia (OLP, Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL. Antibody profiling revealed that all HIV-positive individuals were strongly seropositive for anti-gp41 and antireverse transcriptase antibodies. However, anti-p24 HIV antibody levels were highly variable and some OLP and KS patients demonstrated weak or negative responses. Profiling two EBV antigens revealed no statistical difference in antibody levels among the three HIV-infected groups. A high frequency of KSHV infection was detected in HIV patients including 100% of KS, 78% of OLP, and 57% of NHL patients. Most HIV-infected subjects (84% showed anti-HBV core antibodies, but only a few showed antibodies against HCV. MCV seropositivity was also common (94% in the HIV-infected individuals and KS patients showed statistically higher antibody levels compared to the OLP and NHL patients. Overall, 68% of the HIV-infected patients showed seropositivity with at least four cancer-associated viruses. Antibody profiles against these and other infectious agents could be useful for enhancing the clinical management of HIV patients.

  11. Ewing sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone cancer - Ewing sarcoma; Ewing family of tumors; Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET); Bone neoplasm - Ewing sarcoma ... this tissue to help determine how aggressive the cancer is and what treatment may be best.

  12. Development of a nested polymerase chain reaction method to detect oncogenic Marek's disease virus from feather tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Shiro; Chang, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Sung-Il; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2007-09-01

    For the easy survey of Marek's disease virus (MDV), feather tip-derived DNA from MDV-infected chickens can be used because feather tips are easy to collect and feather follicle epithelium is known to be the only site of productive replication of cell-free MDV. To develop a diagnostic method to differentiate highly virulent strains of MDV from the attenuated MDV vaccine strain, CVI988, which is widely used, nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect a segment of the meq gene in feather tip samples of chickens experimentally infected with MDV. In chickens infected with Md5, a strain of oncogenic MDV, the meq gene was consistently detected, whereas the L-meq gene, in which a 180-base pair (180-bp) sequence is inserted into the meq gene, was detected in CVI988-infected chickens. Moreover, the meq gene was mainly detected even in chickens co-infected with both Md5 and CVI988. These results suggest that this method is appropriate for the surveillance of the highly virulent MDV infection in the field.

  13. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Tsai, Wan-Hua; Chen, Yu-Lian; Ko, Ying-Chieh; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Chen, Jen-Yang; Lin, Su-Fang

    2011-03-10

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1) an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2) a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  15. A role for MALT1 activity in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus latency and growth of primary effusion lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignore, L; Passelli, K; Pelzer, C; Perroud, M; Konrad, A; Thurau, M; Stürzl, M; Dai, L; Trillo-Tinoco, J; Del Valle, L; Qin, Z; Thome, M

    2017-03-01

    Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an incurable malignancy that develops in immunodeficient patients as a consequence of latent infection of B-cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV). Malignant growth of KSHV-infected B cells requires the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which controls maintenance of viral latency and suppression of the viral lytic program. Here we show that the KSHV proteins K13 and K15 promote NF-κB activation via the protease mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein-1 (MALT1), a key driver of NF-κB activation in lymphocytes. Inhibition of the MALT1 protease activity induced a switch from the latent to the lytic stage of viral infection, and led to reduced growth and survival of PEL cell lines in vitro and in a xenograft model. These results demonstrate a key role for the proteolytic activity of MALT1 in PEL, and provide a rationale for the pharmacological targeting of MALT1 in PEL therapy.

  16. Rous Sarcoma Virus RNA Stability Element Inhibits Deadenylation of mRNAs with Long 3′UTRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagopal, Vidya; Beemon, Karen L.

    2017-01-01

    All retroviruses use their full-length primary transcript as the major mRNA for Group-specific antigen (Gag) capsid proteins. This results in a long 3′ untranslated region (UTR) downstream of the termination codon. In the case of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), there is a 7 kb 3′UTR downstream of the gag terminator, containing the pol, env, and src genes. mRNAs containing long 3′UTRs, like those with premature termination codons, are frequently recognized by the cellular nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) machinery and targeted for degradation. To prevent this, RSV has evolved an RNA stability element (RSE) in the RNA immediately downstream of the gag termination codon. This 400-nt RNA sequence stabilizes premature termination codons (PTCs) in gag. It also stabilizes globin mRNAs with long 3′UTRs, when placed downstream of the termination codon. It is not clear how the RSE stabilizes the mRNA and prevents decay. We show here that the presence of RSE inhibits deadenylation severely. In addition, the RSE also impairs decapping (DCP2) and 5′-3′ exonucleolytic (XRN1) function in knockdown experiments in human cells. PMID:28763028

  17. Heptad repeat 2-based peptides inhibit avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup a infection and identify a fusion intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netter, Robert C; Amberg, Sean M; Balliet, John W; Biscone, Mark J; Vermeulen, Arwen; Earp, Laurie J; White, Judith M; Bates, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Fusion proteins of enveloped viruses categorized as class I are typified by two distinct heptad repeat domains within the transmembrane subunit. These repeats are important structural elements that assemble into the six-helix bundles characteristic of the fusion-activated envelope trimer. Peptides derived from these domains can be potent and specific inhibitors of membrane fusion and virus infection. To facilitate our understanding of retroviral entry, peptides corresponding to the two heptad repeat domains of the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus subgroup A (ASLV-A) TM subunit of the envelope protein were characterized. Two peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (HR2), offset from one another by three residues, were effective inhibitors of infection, while two overlapping peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (HR1) were not. Analysis of envelope mutants containing substitutions within the HR1 domain revealed that a single amino acid change, L62A, significantly reduced sensitivity to peptide inhibition. Virus bound to cells at 4 degrees C became sensitive to peptide within the first 5 min of elevating the temperature to 37 degrees C and lost sensitivity to peptide after 15 to 30 min, consistent with a transient intermediate in which the peptide binding site is exposed. In cell-cell fusion experiments, peptide inhibitor sensitivity occurred prior to a fusion-enhancing low-pH pulse. Soluble receptor for ASLV-A induces a lipophilic character in the envelope which can be measured by stable liposome binding, and this activation was found to be unaffected by inhibitory HR2 peptide. Finally, receptor-triggered conformational changes in the TM subunit were also found to be unaffected by inhibitory peptide. These changes are marked by a dramatic shift in mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, from a subunit of 37 kDa to a complex of about 80 kDa. Biotinylated HR2 peptide bound specifically to the 80-kDa complex

  18. Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated-Herpes Virus (KSHV Seroprevalence in Pregnant Women in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malope-Kgokong Babatyi I

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Factors previously associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV transmission in Africa include sexual, familial, and proximity to river water. We measured the seroprevalence of KSHV in relation to HIV, syphilis, and demographic factors among pregnant women attending public antenatal clinics in the Gauteng province of South Africa. Methods We tested for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens in 1740 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics who contributed blood to the "National HIV and Syphilis Sero-Prevalence Survey - South Africa, 2001". Information on HIV and syphilis serology, age, education, residential area, gravidity, and parity was anonymously linked to evaluate risk factors for KSHV seropositivity. Clinics were grouped by municipality regions and their proximity to the two main river catchments defined. Results KSHV seropositivity (reactive to either lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 was nearly twice that of HIV (44.6% vs. 23.1%. HIV and syphilis seropositivity was 12.7% and 14.9% in women without KSHV, and 36.1% and 19.9% respectively in those with KSHV. Women who are KSHV seropositive were 4 times more likely to be HIV positive than those who were KSHV seronegative (AOR 4.1 95%CI: 3.4 - 5.7. Although, women with HIV infection were more likely to be syphilis seropositive (AOR 1.8 95%CI: 1.3 - 2.4, no association between KSHV and syphilis seropositivity was observed. Those with higher levels of education had lower levels of KSHV seropositivity compared to those with lower education levels. KSHV seropositivity showed a heterogeneous pattern of prevalence in some localities. Conclusions The association between KSHV and HIV seropositivity and a lack of common association with syphilis, suggests that KSHV transmission may involve geographical and cultural factors other than sexual transmission.

  19. E6 and E7 oncogene expression by human papilloma virus (HPV) and the aggressive behavior of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Bahig M; Otto, Kristen J; Sobol, Steven E; Stockwell, Christina A; Foulks, Cora; Lancaster, Wayne; Gregoire, Lucie; Hill, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP), a chronic disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV), requires serial surgical procedures for debulking, resulting in debilitating long-term dysphonia, laryngeal scarring, and rarely malignant degeneration. Human papilloma virus 11 tumors have been widely accepted as more aggressive than HPV 6 tumors; however, the clinical course has been difficult to predict at disease onset, and the biologic mediators of proliferation have not been well characterized. A retrospective case review of 43 patients (4 months to 10 years at diagnosis) was performed on children treated for recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, age at RLP diagnosis, approximate frequency of surgical intervention, and absolute number of surgical procedures performed. Human papilloma virus subtyping was performed. Expression analysis of the HPV-encoded E6 and E7 oncogenes was performed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen patients had subtype 11 (33%) and 29 patients had subtype 6 (67%). As expected, HPV 11 patients showed a more aggressive clinical course than HPV 6 patients. However, 38% of patients with subtype 6 (11 patients) followed a clinical course that mirrored the more severe subtype 11 patients. These patients expressed the disease at a younger age (P < 0.0002) and showed higher levels of E6 and E7 oncogenes compared to the patients with the more indolent course. Although HPV subtype and early onset of RLP are well characterized prognostic factors, our study documents the significance of E6 and E7 oncogene expression as potential biologic mediators of proliferation and thereby clinical behavior.

  20. Salivary production of IgA and IgG to human herpes virus 8 latent and lytic antigens by patients in whom Kaposi's sarcoma has regressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Legoff, Jerome; Piketty, Christophe; Hocini, Hakim; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Inoue, Naoki; Scully, Crispian M; Porter, Stephen R; Teo, Chong-Gee; Belec, Laurent

    2004-01-23

    IgG and IgA antibodies with specificities to a latent and a lytic antigen of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) were detectable in the saliva and serum of eight patients whose Kaposi's sarcoma had regressed, seven of whom were HIV-1 infected. The measurement of antibody-specific activity and secretion rate, and the detection of secretory IgA all indicate anti-HHV-8 antibody activity in saliva. The specific humoral responses possibly influence mucosal replication of HHV-8, and in turn, that of HIV.

  1. Retroperitoneal Sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porpiglia, Andrea S; Reddy, Sanjay S; Farma, Jeffrey M

    2016-10-01

    Retroperitoneal sarcomas are rare tumors, representing only 15% of all sarcomas. The mainstay of therapy is surgical resection with negative margins. However, this is challenging because of the late presentation of many of these tumors and involvement with adjacent structures. Decisions on radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be made in a multidisciplinary setting at a tertiary referral center.

  2. Synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucari S.C. Vlok

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma is a malignant, predominantly juxta-articular, soft-tissue tumour representing approximately 10% of all soft-tissue sarcomas. Frequently initially incorrectly diagnosed as a benign lesion, it should be considered as a diagnosis when a young adult patient presents with a calcified juxta-articular soft-tissue mass of insidious onset.

  3. Role of the ubiquitin system and tumor viruses in AIDS-related cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pagano Joseph S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor viruses are linked to approximately 20% of human malignancies worldwide. This review focuses on examples of human oncogenic viruses that manipulate the ubiquitin system in a subset of viral malignancies; those associated with AIDS. The viruses include Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus and human papilloma virus, which are causally linked to Kaposi's sarcoma, certain B-cell lymphomas and cervical cancer, respectively. We discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these viruses subvert the ubiquitin system and potential viral targets for anti-cancer therapy from the perspective of this system. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com.

  4. What Is Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment? Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma What Is Kaposi Sarcoma? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... the lungs may cause trouble breathing. Types of Kaposi sarcoma The different types of KS are defined by ...

  5. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA) is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC), hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC), and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior of public microarray data sets from Ewing sarcoma (“Ewing family tumors,” EFT) cell lines and biopsies in GEMusicA after prefiltering DNA microarray data for the probe sets from the stem cell signature. Our results demonstrate that individual Ewing sarcoma cell lines have a high similarity to ESC or EC. Ewing sarcoma cell lines with inhibited Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1) oncogene retained the similarity to ESC and EC. However, correlation coefficients between GEMusicA-processed expression data between EFT and ESC decreased whereas correlation coefficients between EFT and EC as well as between EFT and MSC increased after knockdown of EWSR1-FLI1. Our data support the concept of EFT being derived from cells with features of embryonic and endothelial cells. PMID:27446218

  6. Gene Expression Music Algorithm-Based Characterization of the Ewing Sarcoma Stem Cell Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sebastian Staege

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene Expression Music Algorithm (GEMusicA is a method for the transformation of DNA microarray data into melodies that can be used for the characterization of differentially expressed genes. Using this method we compared gene expression profiles from endothelial cells (EC, hematopoietic stem cells, neuronal stem cells, embryonic stem cells (ESC, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and defined a set of genes that can discriminate between the different stem cell types. We analyzed the behavior of public microarray data sets from Ewing sarcoma (“Ewing family tumors,” EFT cell lines and biopsies in GEMusicA after prefiltering DNA microarray data for the probe sets from the stem cell signature. Our results demonstrate that individual Ewing sarcoma cell lines have a high similarity to ESC or EC. Ewing sarcoma cell lines with inhibited Ewing sarcoma breakpoint region 1-Friend leukemia virus integration 1 (EWSR1-FLI1 oncogene retained the similarity to ESC and EC. However, correlation coefficients between GEMusicA-processed expression data between EFT and ESC decreased whereas correlation coefficients between EFT and EC as well as between EFT and MSC increased after knockdown of EWSR1-FLI1. Our data support the concept of EFT being derived from cells with features of embryonic and endothelial cells.

  7. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Schäfer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV, high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  8. Kaposi sarcoma: review and medical management update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms involved, the true nature of Kaposi sarcoma remains an enigma. Four clinical variants have been described for the disease, differing in natural history, site of predilection, and prognosis. All forms of Kaposi sarcoma may manifest in the oral cavity and Kaposi sarcoma-associated virus appears essential to development of all clinical variants. The spectrum of therapeutic strategies is broad and selection of appropriate intervention mandates a thorough understanding of disease spread and the patient's symptomatology, as well as risks and benefits of therapy. This article provides an overview of epidemiology, subtypes, clinical course, pathogenesis, and management strategies for Kaposi sarcoma.

  9. Characterization of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Related Lymphomas by DNA Microarray Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Ueda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Among herpesviruses, γ-herpesviruses are supposed to have typical oncogenic activities. Two human γ-herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, are putative etiologic agents for Burkitt lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and some cases of gastric cancers, and Kaposi's sarcoma, multicentric Castleman's disease, and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL especially in AIDS setting for the latter case, respectively. Since such two viruses mentioned above are highly species specific, it has been quite difficult to prove their oncogenic activities in animal models. Nevertheless, the viral oncogenesis is epidemiologically and/or in vitro experimentally evident. This time, we investigated gene expression profiles of KSHV-oriented lymphoma cell lines, EBV-oriented lymphoma cell lines, and T-cell leukemia cell lines. Both KSHV and EBV cause a B-cell-originated lymphoma, but the gene expression profiles were typically classified. Furthermore, KSHV could govern gene expression profiles, although PELs are usually coinfected with KSHV and EBV.

  10. Cell Transformation by RNA Viruses: An Overview

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    Hung Fan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies of oncogenic viruses have made seminal contributions to the molecular biology of cancer. Key discoveries include the identification of viral oncogenes and cellular proto-oncogenes, elucidation of signal transduction pathways, and identification of tumor suppressor genes. The origins of cancer virology began almost exactly one hundred years ago with the discovery of avian sarcoma and acute leukemia viruses—RNA-containing viruses of the retrovirus family. The study of animal cancer viruses accelerated beginning in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with the discovery of DNA viruses that could transform cells in culture, and the development of quantitative assays for transformation by DNA and RNA-containing tumor viruses. The discovery of reverse transcriptase in retroviruses in 1970 also greatly accelerated research on these viruses. Indeed RNA and DNA tumor viruses led the way in cancer molecular biology during this era before molecular cloning. It was possible to physically purify virus particles and generate specific hybridization probes for viral DNA and RNA at a time when it was not possible to analyze cellular genes in the same manner. [...

  11. Oncogenic signaling pathways and origins of tumor-initiating stem-like cells of hepatocellular carcinomas induced by hepatitis C virus, alcohol and/or obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Lin; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Machida, Keigo

    2014-07-01

    This review article discusses the importance and oncogenic signaling pathways of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) in several etiologies of hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) induced by hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcohol, obesity and/or chemicals. Stem cells may be present in cancer tissue, and a hierarchy of cells is formed, as is the case for normal tissue. Tumor formation, growth and propagation are maintained by a small proportion of cells with stem cell-like properties. TICs are present in alcohol-fed HCV transgenic mice, diethylnitrosamine/phenobarbital-treated mice (chemical carcinogenesis) and Spnb2 +/- mice (defective TGF-β signal). Alcohol/obesity-associated endotoxemia induces the stem cell marker Nanog through TLR4 signaling to generate TICs and liver tumors in several HCC models. The oncogenic pathway (such as the STAT3 and TLR4-NANOG pathway) and mechanism of generation of TICs of HCCs associated with HCV, alcohol and obesity are discussed. Understanding the molecular stemness signaling and cellular hierarchy and defining key TIC-specific genes will accelerate the development of novel biomarkers and treatment strategies. This review highlights recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of liver TICs and discusses unanswered questions about the concept of liver TICs. (This project was supported by NIH grants 1R01AA018857 and P50AA11999).

  12. Involvement of V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 in regulation of transcription activity of MDR1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Xiaoqing Zeng; Tiancheng Luo; Wei Jin; Shiyao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Over-expression of MDR1 confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancers and remains a major cause for the failure of chemotherapy.In the present study,we found that V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2(ETS2) could activate MDR1 transcription and P-glyco-protein (P-gp) expression in SGC7901 cells.Knockdown of ETS2 attenuated MDR1 transcription and P-gp expression,and increased the sensitivity of MDR cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs that were transported by P-gp in SGC7901/VCR cells.ETS2 could bind to the ETS2 sites on the MDR1 promoter and activate its transcription.The regulation of MDR1 expression by ETS2 may provide potential ways to overcome MDR in cancer treatment.

  13. Increase in proto-oncogene mRNA transcript levels in bovine lymphoid cells infected with a cytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2008-08-01

    Infection of susceptible animals with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) can result in an array of disease symptoms that are dependent in part on the strain of infecting virus and the physiological status of the host. BVDV are lymphotrophic and exist as two biotypes. Cytopathic BVDV kill cells outright while noncytopathic strains can readily establish persistent infections. The molecular mechanisms behind these different affects are unknown. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a powerful method for global gene expression analysis, was employed to examine gene expression changes in BVDV-infected BL3 cells, a bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma cell line. SAGE libraries were constructed from mRNA derived from BL3 cells that were noninfected or infected with the cytopathic BVDV2 strain 296c. Annotation of the SAGE data showed the expression of many genes that are characteristic of B cells and integral to their function. Comparison of the SAGE databases also revealed a number of genes that were differentially expressed. Of particular interest was the increased numbers of transcripts encoding proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, junB, junD) in 296c-infected cells, all of which are constituents of the AP-1 transcriptional activation complex. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed these results and indicated that the actual increases were larger than that predicted by SAGE. In contrast, there was no corresponding increase in protein levels, but instead a significant decrease of c-jun and junB protein levels in the infected BL3 cells was observed. Rather than an increase in transcription of these genes, it appeared that these proto-oncogenes transcripts accumulated in the BVDV2-infected cells.

  14. The Epidemiology of Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Burningham Zachary; Hashibe Mia; Spector Logan; Schiffman Joshua D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Sarcomas account for over 20% of all pediatric solid malignant cancers and less than 1% of all adult solid malignant cancers. The vast majority of diagnosed sarcomas will be soft tissue sarcomas, while malignant bone tumors make up just over 10% of sarcomas. The risks for sarcoma are not well-understood. We evaluated the existing literature on the epidemiology and etiology of sarcoma. Risks for sarcoma development can be divided into environmental exposures, genetic susceptibility, a...

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus-associated giant conjunctival Kaposi's sarcoma: complete remission with antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduardo-Sánchez, Y W; Fernández-Agrafojo, D

    2017-09-05

    A 35-year-old male patient with a large unilateral haemorrhagic conjunctival tumour lesion and another contralateral haemorrhagic conjunctival flat lesion associated with violaceous cutaneous macules on the extremities and angiomatous lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract as initial clinical manifestation of HIV-related immunodeficiency. Cutaneous, gastric mucosal and conjunctival biopsy was consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma with complete remission after highly active antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy. HIV-related conjunctival Kaposi's sarcoma, even a large one, can have a good response to antiretroviral therapy and systemic chemotherapy without any additional topical eye treatment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulmonary Kaposi Sarcoma with Osseous Metastases in an Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Patient: A Remarkable Response to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirweesh, Ahmed; Khan, Muhammad Yasir; Hamiz, Shaikh Fawad; Karabulut, Nigahus

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 34 Final Diagnosis: Pulmonary Kaposi’s sarcoma with bony metastatses Symptoms: Cough • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is known to involve the mucocutaneous tissues and the aero-digestive tracts. In acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients, KS has an aggressive course and carries poor prognosis. We present a case of pulmonary KS with osseous metastases as the first presentation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a young male. The lesions impressively decreased in size and numbers following initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Case Report: A 34-year-old heterosexual male presented with a one month history of cough and 15–20 pound weight loss within six months. Examination revealed oral thrush, decreased breath sounds and crackles on the right lower lung base. Imaging showed a large right perihilar mass with multiple lytic lesions involving thoracic and lumber vertebrae, ribs, sternum, and clavicles. Blood and sputum cultures, smears for acid fast bacilli, and a QUANTIferon gold test were all negative. He tested positive for HIV and his CD4 count was 7 cells/uL. Bronchoscopy with biopsy was unrevealing. Pathology of the right hilar mass was diagnostic of KS. Following initiation of antiretroviral therapy his condition dramatically improved; repeat chest CT scan showed marked regression of the bony and pulmonary lesions. Conclusions: The dual action of HAART on the recovery of the immune system and against human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) may essentially cause regression of KS lesions. PMID:28216610

  17. Histiocytic sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Silva Machado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old white woman, SC, after being treated for pneumonia, presented with an increase in the size of lymph nodes. The immunohistochemical examination diagnosed histiocytic sarcoma. Relapse occurred 12 months after starting chemotherapy. The patient evolved with febrile neutropenia, septic shock and death.

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma following immune suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschênes, Isabelle; Dion, Louise; Beauchesne, Claude; de Brum-Fernandes, Artur

    2003-03-01

    The association between Kaposi's sarcoma and infection with human herpesvirus 8 is now well recognized. Immunologic impairment is associated with 2 forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, epidemic [associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection] and iatrogenic (associated with immunosuppressive treatment); both forms have become more common during the last decade. We describe an HIV negative 54-year-old man who developed Kaposi's sarcoma 2 months after the beginning of immuno-suppressive therapy for Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). With tapering of medication, complete remission of Kaposi's sarcoma was achieved in one year. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of iatrogenic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with WG.

  19. Persistent viremia by a novel parvovirus in a slow loris (Nycticebus coucang with diffuse histiocytic sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eCanuti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading health concerns for human and animal health. Since the tumorigenesis process is not completely understood and it is known that some viruses can induce carcinogenesis, it is highly important to identify novel oncoviruses and extensively study underlying oncogenic mechanisms. Here, we investigated a case of diffuse histiocytic sarcoma in a 22 years old slow loris (Nycticebus coucang, using a broad spectrum virus discovery technique. A novel parvovirus was discovered and the phylogenetic analysis performed on its fully sequenced genome demonstrated that it represents the first member of a novel genus. The possible causative correlation between this virus and the malignancy was further investigated and 20 serum and 61 organ samples from 25 animals (N. coucang and N. pygmaeus were screened for the novel virus but only samples collected from the originally infected animal were positive. The virus was present in all tested organs (intestine, liver, spleen, kidneys and lungs and in all banked serum samples collected up to 8 years before death. All attempts to identify a latent viral form (integrated or episomal were unsuccessful and the increase of variation in the viral sequences during the years was consistent with absence of latency. Since it is well known that parvoviruses are dependent on cell division to successfully replicate, we hypothesized that the virus could have benefitted from the constantly dividing cancer cells and may not have been the cause of the histiocytic sarcoma. It is also possible to conjecture that the virus had a role in delaying the tumor progression and this report might bring new exciting opportunities in recognizing viruses to be used in cancer virotherapy.

  20. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus promotes tumorigenesis by modulating the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Yu, F-X; Kim, Y C; Meng, Z; Naipauer, J; Looney, D J; Liu, X; Gutkind, J S; Mesri, E A; Guan, K-L

    2015-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus and the culprit behind the human disease Kaposi sarcoma (KS), an AIDS-defining malignancy. KSHV encodes a viral G-protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) critical for the initiation and progression of KS. In this study, we identified that YAP/TAZ, two homologous oncoproteins inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, are activated in KSHV-infected cells in vitro, KS-like mouse tumors and clinical human KS specimens. The KSHV-encoded vGPCR acts through Gq/11 and G12/13 to inhibit the Hippo pathway kinases Lats1/2, promoting the activation of YAP/TAZ. Furthermore, depletion of YAP/TAZ blocks vGPCR-induced cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in a xenograft mouse model. The vGPCR-transformed cells are sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of YAP. Our study establishes a pivotal role of the Hippo pathway in mediating the oncogenic activity of KSHV and development of KS, and also suggests a potential of using YAP inhibitors for KS intervention.

  1. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Neilsen, Paul M.; Pishas, Kathleen I.; Callen, David F; Thomas, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downs...

  2. RNA helicase DDX3: a novel therapeutic target in Ewing sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilky, B A; Kim, C; McCarty, G; Montgomery, E A; Kammers, K; DeVine, L R; Cole, R N; Raman, V; Loeb, D M

    2016-05-19

    RNA helicase DDX3 has oncogenic activity in breast and lung cancers and is required for translation of complex mRNA transcripts, including those encoding key cell-cycle regulatory proteins. We sought to determine the expression and function of DDX3 in sarcoma cells, and to investigate the antitumor activity of a novel small molecule DDX3 inhibitor, RK-33. Utilizing various sarcoma cell lines, xenografts and human tissue microarrays, we measured DDX3 expression at the mRNA and protein levels, and evaluated cytotoxicity of RK-33 in sarcoma cell lines. To study the role of DDX3 in Ewing sarcoma, we generated stable DDX3-knockdown Ewing sarcoma cell lines using DDX3-specific small hairpin RNA (shRNA), and assessed oncogenic activity. DDX3-knockdown and RK-33-treated Ewing sarcoma cells were compared with wild-type cells using an isobaric mass-tag quantitative proteomics approach to identify target proteins impacted by DDX3 inhibition. Overall, we found high expression of DDX3 in numerous human sarcoma subtypes compared with non-malignant mesenchymal cells, and knockdown of DDX3 by RNA interference inhibited oncogenic activity in Ewing sarcoma cells. Treatment with RK-33 was preferentially cytotoxic to sarcoma cells, including chemotherapy-resistant Ewing sarcoma stem cells, while sparing non-malignant cells. Sensitivity to RK-33 correlated with DDX3 protein expression. Growth of human Ewing sarcoma xenografts expressing high DDX3 was inhibited by RK-33 treatment in mice, without overt toxicity. DDX3 inhibition altered the Ewing sarcoma cellular proteome, especially proteins involved in DNA replication, mRNA translation and proteasome function. These data support further investigation of the role of DDX3 in sarcomas, advancement of RK-33 to Ewing sarcoma clinical trials and development of RNA helicase inhibition as a novel anti-neoplastic strategy.

  3. Low pH is required for avian sarcoma and leukosis virus Env-dependent viral penetration into the cytosol and not for viral uncoating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Richard J O; Narayan, Shakti; Dornadula, Geethanjali; Miller, Michael D; Young, John A T

    2004-10-01

    A novel entry mechanism has been proposed for the avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV), whereby interaction with specific cell surface receptors activates or primes the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env), rendering it sensitive to subsequent low-pH-dependent fusion triggering in acidic intracellular organelles. However, ASLV fusion seems to proceed to a lipid mixing stage at neutral pH, leading to the suggestion that low pH might instead be required for a later stage of viral entry such as uncoating (L. J. Earp, S. E. Delos, R. C. Netter, P. Bates, and J. M. White. J. Virol. 77:3058-3066, 2003). To address this possibility, hybrid virus particles were generated with the core of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a known pH-independent virus, and with subgroups A or B ASLV Env proteins. Infection of cells by these pseudotyped virions was blocked by lysosomotropic agents, as judged by inhibition of HIV-1 DNA synthesis. Furthermore, by using HIV-1 cores that contain a Vpr-beta-lactamase fusion protein (Vpr-BlaM) to monitor viral penetration into the cytosol, we demonstrated that virions bearing ASLV Env, but not HIV-1 Env, enter the cytosol in a low-pH-dependent manner. This effect was independent of the presence of the cytoplasmic tail of ASLV Env. These studies provide strong support for the model, indicating that low pH is required for ASLV Env-dependent viral penetration into the cytosol and not for viral uncoating.

  4. Gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma with appendiceal involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egwuonwu, Steve; Gatto-Weis, Cara; Miranda, Roberto; Casas, Luis De Las

    2011-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor manifesting as nodular lesions on skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs. This is a case of a 42-year-old human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV) positive bisexual male, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) since diagnosis four years ago. He presented with a three-day history of abdominal pains, fever, vomiting, and a one-week history of melena stools. Endoscopy revealed Kaposi sarcoma in the stomach and duodenum. Postendoscopy, he developed acute abdomen. Exploratory laparotomy revealed extensive Kaposi sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract with appendiceal involvement. The patient underwent appendectomy and had an uneventful recovery. A review of the literature discusses appendiceal Kaposi sarcoma with appendicitis, a rare but critical manifestation of gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma.

  5. The effects of alternate polypurine tracts (PPTs) and mutations of sequences adjacent to the PPT on viral replication and cleavage specificity of the Rous sarcoma virus reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kevin W; Oh, Jangsuk; Alvord, W Gregory; Hughes, Stephen H

    2008-09-01

    We previously reported that a mutant Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) with an alternate polypurine tract (PPT), DuckHepBFlipPPT, had unexpectedly high titers and that the PPT was miscleaved primarily at one position following a GA dinucleotide by the RNase H of reverse transcriptase (RT). This miscleavage resulted in a portion of the 3' end of the PPT (5'-ATGTA) being added to the end of U3 of the linear viral DNA. To better understand the RNase H cleavage by RSV RT, we made a number of mutations within the DuckHepBFlipPPT and in the sequences adjacent to the PPT. Deleting the entire ATGTA sequence from the DuckHepBFlipPPT increased the relative titer to wild-type levels, while point mutations within the ATGTA sequence reduced the relative titer but had minimal effects on the cleavage specificity. However, mutating a sequence 5' of ATGTA affected the relative titer of the virus and caused the RNase H of RSV RT to lose the ability to cleave the PPT specifically. In addition, although mutations in the conserved stretch of thymidine residues upstream of the PPT did not affect the relative titer or cleavage specificity, the mutation of some of the nucleotides immediately upstream of the PPT did affect the titer and cleavage specificity. Taken together, our studies show that the structure of the PPT in the context of the cognate RT, rather than a specific sequence, is important for the proper cleavage by RSV RT.

  6. The hr1 and fusion peptide regions of the subgroup B avian sarcoma and leukosis virus envelope glycoprotein influence low pH-dependent membrane fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline Rose Babel

    Full Text Available The avian sarcoma and leukosis virus (ASLV envelope glycoprotein (Env is activated to trigger fusion by a two-step mechanism involving receptor-priming and low pH fusion activation. In order to identify regions of ASLV Env that can regulate this process, a genetic selection method was used to identify subgroup B (ASLV-B virus-infected cells resistant to low pH-triggered fusion when incubated with cells expressing the cognate TVB receptor. The subgroup B viral Env (envB genes were then isolated from these cells and characterized by DNA sequencing. This led to identification of two frequent EnvB alterations which allowed TVB receptor-binding but altered the pH-threshold of membrane fusion activation: a 13 amino acid deletion in the host range 1 (hr1 region of the surface (SU EnvB subunit, and the A32V amino acid change within the fusion peptide of the transmembrane (TM EnvB subunit. These data indicate that these two regions of EnvB can influence the pH threshold of fusion activation.

  7. Detection and identification of cancerous murine fibroblasts, transformed by murine sarcoma virus in culture, using Raman spectroscopy and advanced statistical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, A; Shufan, E; Zeiri, L; Huleihel, M

    2013-03-01

    Cancer is one of the leading worldwide causes of death. It may be induced by a variety of factors, including carcinogens, radiation, genetic factors, or DNA and RNA viruses. The early detection of cancer is critical for its successful therapy, which can result in complete recovery from some types of cancer. Raman spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine and biology. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive, and water-insensitive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. In this study, Raman spectroscopy was used for the identification and characterization of murine fibroblast cell lines (NIH/3T3) and malignant fibroblast cells transformed by murine sarcoma virus (NIH-MuSV) cells. Using principal component analysis and LDA it was possible to differentiate between the NIH/3T3 and NIH-MuSV cells with an 80-85% success rate based on their Raman shift spectra. The best results for differentiation were achieved from spectra that were obtained from the rich membrane sites. Because of its homogeneity and complete control of most factors affecting its growth, cell culture is a preferred model for the detection and identification of specific biomarkers related to cancer transformation or other cellular modifications.

  8. Sarcoma Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouw, Launce G., E-mail: launce.gouw@hsc.utah.edu [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Jones, Kevin B. [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Randall, R. Lor [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    Much of our knowledge regarding cancer immunotherapy has been derived from sarcoma models. However, translation of preclinical findings to bedside success has been limited in this disease, though several intriguing clinical studies hint at the potential efficacy of this treatment modality. The rarity and heterogeneity of tumors of mesenchymal origin continues to be a challenge from a therapeutic standpoint. Nonetheless, sarcomas remain attractive targets for immunotherapy, as they can be characterized by specific epitopes, either from their mesenchymal origins or specific alterations in gene products. To date, standard vaccine trials have proven disappointing, likely due to mechanisms by which tumors equilibrate with and ultimately escape immune surveillance. More sophisticated approaches will likely require multimodal techniques, both by enhancing immunity, but also geared towards overcoming innate mechanisms of immunosuppression that favor tumorigenesis.

  9. JAC, a direct target of oncogenic transcription factor Jun, is involved in cell transformation and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, M; Reiter, F; Bader, A G; Castellazzi, M; Bister, K

    2001-11-20

    Using subtractive hybridization techniques, we have isolated a gene termed JAC that is strongly and specifically activated in avian fibroblasts transformed by the v-jun oncogene of avian sarcoma virus 17 (ASV17), but not in cells transformed by other oncogenic agents. Furthermore, JAC is highly expressed in cell lines derived from jun-induced avian fibrosarcomas. Kinetic analysis using a doxycycline-controlled conditional cell transformation system showed that expression of the 0.8-kb JAC mRNA is induced rapidly upon activation of the oncogenic v-jun allele. Nucleotide sequence analysis and transcriptional mapping revealed that the JAC gene contains two exons, with the longest ORF confined to exon 2. The deduced 68-amino acid chicken JAC protein is rich in cysteine residues and displays 37% sequence identity to mammalian high-sulfur keratin-associated proteins. The promoter region of JAC contains a consensus (5'-TGACTCA-3') and a nonconsensus (5'-TGAGTAA-3') AP-1 binding site in tandem, which are both specifically bound by the Gag-Jun hybrid protein encoded by ASV17. Mutational analysis revealed that the two AP-1 sites confer strong transcriptional activation by Gag-Jun in a synergistic manner. Ectopic expression of JAC in avian fibroblasts leads to anchorage-independent growth, strongly suggesting that deregulation of JAC is an essential event in jun-induced cell transformation and tumorigenesis.

  10. Cancer angiogenesis induced by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus is mediated by EZH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meilan; Zhang, Wei; Bakken, Thomas; Schutten, Melissa; Toth, Zsolt; Jung, Jae U; Gill, Parkash; Cannon, Mark; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2012-07-15

    EZH2 is a component of the epigenetic regulator PRC2 that suppresses gene expression. Elevated expression of EZH2 is common in human cancers and is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. In this study, we show that EZH2 elevation is associated with epigenetic modifications of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), an oncogenic virus that promotes the development of Kaposi sarcoma and other malignancies that occur in patients with chronic HIV infections. KSHV induction of EZH2 expression was essential for KSHV-induced angiogenesis. High expression of EZH2 was observed in Kaposi sarcoma tumors. In cell culture, latent KSHV infection upregulated the expression of EZH2 in human endothelial cells through the expression of vFLIP and LANA, two KSHV-latent genes that activate the NF-κB pathway. KSHV-mediated upregulation of EZH2 was required for the induction of Ephrin-B2, an essential proangiogenic factor that drives endothelial cell tubule formation. Taken together, our findings indicate that KSHV regulates the host epigenetic modifier EZH2 to promote angiogenesis.

  11. The copy number of Epstein-Barr virus latent genome correlates with the oncogenicity by the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lielian; Yu, Haibo; Liu, Lingzhi; Tang, Yunlian; Wu, Hongzhuan; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Meijuan; Du, Shujuan; Zhao, Lian; Cao, Li; Li, Guiyuan; Lu, Jianhong

    2015-12-01

    A tumor model that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection facilitated the tumorigenicity was previously established using the Maxi-EBV system. In the present approach, EBV-lost cell clones demonstrated significantly decreased tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the LMP1 gene in Maxi-EBV genome was replaced by that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma origin. The resultant cell line, 293-1/NL showed much lower malignancy than the original 293-EBV. The result was opposite to our expectation. The change of 293 sublineage cells for EBV harboring also got similar result. To seek the underlying reason, the copy number of EBV genome in all the cell lines was detected. The result indicated that 293-EBV contained about 4.5-fold higher EBV copies than 293-1/NL did. Parallel EBV genomes led to relatively stable copies in different 293 sublineages, suggesting the viral genome structure is a factor for the sustainability of EBV's copy number. Moreover, the LMP1 transcription in high copy-containing cells showed abnormally high level. Furthermore, the main LMP1-driven pathway, transcription factor NF-κB, was highly activated in high-copy cells. Here we first manifest by experimental model that the copy number of EBV latent genome correlates with the viral pathogenesis, which depends on the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB. Overall, both the presence and amount of EBV genome are crucial for the viral oncogenicity.

  12. Diagnostic dilemma in Kaposi′s sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Satish

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi′s sarcoma is described as cutaneous and extracutaneous neoplasm predominantly affecting older individuals. Though earlier uncommon and endemic to certain African areas, its incidence is on a rise due to infections with human immunodeficiency virus and also due to transplant-associated immunosuppression. Further, certain benign conditions like Pseudo Kaposi′s sarcoma, certain infective conditions like bacillary angiomatosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome can mimic Kaposi′s sarcoma both clinically and histologically leading to a diagnostic dilemma. We report such a case here.

  13. Prevalence and predictors of kaposi sarcoma herpes virus seropositivity: a cross-sectional analysis of HIV-infected adults initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskew Mhairi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS is the most common AIDS-defining tumour in HIV-infected individuals in Africa. Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV infection precedes development of KS. KSHV co-infection may be associated with worse outcomes in HIV disease and elevated KSHV viral load may be an early marker for advanced HIV disease among untreated patients. We examined the prevalence of KSHV among adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART and compared immunological, demographic and clinical factors between patients seropositive and seronegative for KSHV. Results We analyzed cross-sectional data collected from 404 HIV-infected treatment-naïve adults initiating ART at the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa between November 2008 and March 2009. Subjects were screened at ART initiation for antibodies to KSHV lytic K8.1 and latent Orf73 antigens. Seropositivity to KSHV was defined as positive to either lytic KSHV K8.1 or latent KSHV Orf73 antibodies. KSHV viremia was determined by quantitative PCR and CD3, 4 and 8 lymphocyte counts were determined with flow cytometry. Of the 404 participants, 193 (48% tested positive for KSHV at ART initiation; with 76 (39% reactive to lytic K8.1, 35 (18% to latent Orf73 and 82 (42% to both. One individual presented with clinical KS at ART initiation. The KSHV infected group was similar to those without KSHV in terms of age, race, gender, ethnicity, smoking and alcohol use. KSHV infected individuals presented with slightly higher median CD3 (817 vs. 726 cells/mm3 and CD4 (90 vs. 80 cells/mm3 counts than KSHV negative subjects. We found no associations between KSHV seropositivity and body mass index, tuberculosis status, WHO stage, HIV RNA levels, full blood count or liver function tests at initiation. Those with detectable KSHV viremia (n = 19, however, appeared to present with signs of more advanced HIV disease including anemia and WHO stage 3 or 4 defining conditions compared to those in whom

  14. The role of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus in the pathogenesis of Kaposi sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramolelli, Silvia; Schulz, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an unusual vascular tumour caused by an oncogenic-herpesvirus, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), also known as human herpesvirus 8 (HHV 8). KS lesions are characterized by an abundant inflammatory infiltrate, the presence of KSHV-infected endothelial cells that show signs of aberrant differentiation, as well as faulty angiogenesis/ vascularization. Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of these histological features of KS, with an emphasis on the viral proteins that are responsible for their development.

  15. Elevation of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels, but not angiopoietin 2, in the plasma of human immunodeficiency virus-infected African women with clinical Kaposi sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Susan M; Rajwans, Nimerta; Richardson, Barbra A; Jaoko, Walter; McClelland, R Scott; Overbaugh, Julie; Liles, W Conrad

    2014-10-01

    Circulating levels of endothelial activation biomarkers are elevated in during infection with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and may also be increased in Kaposi sarcoma (KS). We compared 23 HIV-1-seropositive women with clinically diagnosed KS with 46 randomly selected controls matched for visit year, CD4 count, and antiretroviral therapy status. Conditional logistic regression was used to identify differences between cases and controls. The odds of clinical KS increased with increasing plasma viral load and with intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) levels above or equal to the median. There was a borderline association between increasing plasma angiopoietin 2 levels and KS. In multivariable modeling including plasma viral load, angiopoietin 2, and ICAM-1, plasma ICAM-1 levels above or equal to the median remained associated with clinical KS (odds ratio = 14.2, 95% confidence interval = 2.3-87.7). Circulating ICAM-1 levels should be evaluated as a potential biomarker for disease progression and treatment response among HIV-infected KS patients.

  16. Opposing regulation of PROX1 by interleukin-3 receptor and NOTCH directs differential host cell fate reprogramming by Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehyuk Yoo

    Full Text Available Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs are differentiated from blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs during embryogenesis and this physiological cell fate specification is controlled by PROX1, the master regulator for lymphatic development. When Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV infects host cells, it activates the otherwise silenced embryonic endothelial differentiation program and reprograms their cell fates. Interestingly, previous studies demonstrated that KSHV drives BECs to acquire a partial lymphatic phenotype by upregulating PROX1 (forward reprogramming, but stimulates LECs to regain some BEC-signature genes by downregulating PROX1 (reverse reprogramming. Despite the significance of this KSHV-induced bidirectional cell fate reprogramming in KS pathogenesis, its underlying molecular mechanism remains undefined. Here, we report that IL3 receptor alpha (IL3Rα and NOTCH play integral roles in the host cell type-specific regulation of PROX1 by KSHV. In BECs, KSHV upregulates IL3Rα and phosphorylates STAT5, which binds and activates the PROX1 promoter. In LECs, however, PROX1 was rather downregulated by KSHV-induced NOTCH signal via HEY1, which binds and represses the PROX1 promoter. Moreover, PROX1 was found to be required to maintain HEY1 expression in LECs, establishing a reciprocal regulation between PROX1 and HEY1. Upon co-activation of IL3Rα and NOTCH, PROX1 was upregulated in BECs, but downregulated in LECs. Together, our study provides the molecular mechanism underlying the cell type-specific endothelial fate reprogramming by KSHV.

  17. Role of natural killer cells in the mechanism of the antitumor effect of interferon on Moloney sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresa, K L; Murasko, D M

    1986-01-01

    The growth of tumors induced by inoculation of cells transformed by Moloney sarcoma virus can be inhibited by in situ administration of interferon (IFN) beginning one day after tumor challenge and continuing for 2 or 3 additional days. Inhibition of tumor growth by IFN was associated with a marked augmentation of natural killer (NK) cell activity, both in the spleen and at the site of tumor challenge, by day 5 after tumor challenge. However, using optimal conditions for IFN treatment, depletion of NK cells by in vivo treatment with anti-asialo GM1 prior to tumor challenge had no significant effect on inhibition of tumor growth by IFN. When the tumor load was greater or when IFN treatment was shorter, treatment with anti-asialo-GM1 partially abrogated the inhibition of tumor growth by IFN. In vitro assays gave no evidence of IFN enhancement of specific T-cell or activated macrophage antitumor effect. These results suggest that under optimal treatment conditions, the mechanism of the antitumor effect of IFN was independent of augmentation of NK activity, but under suboptimal conditions NK cells play a role in the mechanism of the antitumor effect of IFN.

  18. Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treating Soft Tissue Sarcomas Chemotherapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Chemotherapy (chemo) is the use of drugs given into ... Depending on the type and stage of sarcoma, chemotherapy may be given as the main treatment or ...

  19. Nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of avian sarcoma virus are present in DNA of uninfected vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, D H; Varmus, H E; Bishop, J M

    1978-09-01

    We have detected nucleotide sequences related to the transforming gene of avian sarcoma vius (ASV) in the DNA of uninfected vertebrates. Purified radioactive DNA (cDNAsarc) complementary to most of all of the gene (src) required for transformation of fibroblasts by ASV was annealed with DNA from a variety of normal species. Under conditions that facilitate pairing of partially matched nucleotide sequences (1.5 M NaCl, 59 degrees), cDNAsarc formed duplexes with chicken, human, calf, mouse, and salmon DNA but not with DNA from sea urchin, Drosophila, or Escherichia coli. The kinetics of duplex formation indicated that cDNAsarc was reacting with nucleotide sequences present in a single copy or at most a few copies per cell. In contrast to the preceding findings, nucleotide sequences complementary to the remainder of the ASV genome were observed only in chicken DNA. Thermal denaturation studies of the duplexes formed with cDNAsarc indicated a high degree of conservation of the nucleotide sequences related to src in vertebrate DNAs; the reductions in melting temperature suggested about 3--4% mismatching of cDNAsarc with chicken DNA and 8--10% mismatching of cDNAsarc with the other vertebrate DNAs.

  20. Efficacy of ATR inhibitors as single agents in Ewing sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nieto-Soler, Maria; Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Lafarga, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    Ewing sarcomas (ES) are pediatric bone tumors that arise from a driver translocation, most frequently EWS/FLI1. Current ES treatment involves DNA damaging agents, yet the basis for the sensitivity to these therapies remains unknown. Oncogene-induced replication stress (RS) is a known source of en...

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2-prostaglandin E2-eicosanoid receptor inflammatory axis: a key player in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus associated malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Arun George; Chandran, Bala; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2013-08-01

    The role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), its lipid metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and Eicosanoid (EP) receptors (EP; 1-4) underlying the proinflammatory mechanistic aspects of Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, cervical cancer, prostate cancer, colon cancer, and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an active area of investigation. The tumorigenic potential of COX-2 and PGE2 through EP receptors forms the mechanistic context underlying the chemotherapeutic potential of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although role of the COX-2 is described in several viral associated malignancies, the biological significance of the COX-2/PGE2/EP receptor inflammatory axis is extensively studied only in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8) associated malignancies such as KS, a multifocal endothelial cell tumor and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), a B cell-proliferative disorder. The purpose of this review is to summarize the salient findings delineating the molecular mechanisms downstream of COX-2 involving PGE2 secretion and its autocrine and paracrine interactions with EP receptors (EP1-4), COX-2/PGE2/EP receptor signaling regulating KSHV pathogenesis and latency. KSHV infection induces COX-2, PGE2 secretion, and EP receptor activation. The resulting signal cascades modulate the expression of KSHV latency genes (latency associated nuclear antigen-1 [LANA-1] and viral-Fas (TNFRSF6)-associated via death domain like interferon converting enzyme-like- inhibitory protein [vFLIP]). vFLIP was also shown to be crucial for the maintenance of COX-2 activation. The mutually interdependent interactions between viral proteins (LANA-1/vFLIP) and COX-2/PGE2/EP receptors was shown to play key roles in the biological mechanisms involved in KS and PEL pathogenesis such as blockage of apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, transformation, proliferation, angiogenesis, adhesion, invasion, and immune-suppression. Understanding the COX-2/PGE2/EP axis is very important to

  2. Large-scale analysis of protein expression changes in human keratinocytes immortalized by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkley, Mark A; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Podolsky, Robert H; Arnouk, Hilal; Ferris, Daron G; Dynan, William S; Stöppler, Hubert

    2009-08-23

    Infection with high-risk type human papilloma viruses (HPVs) is associated with cervical carcinomas and with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes cooperate to achieve cell immortalization by a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Here, human keratinocytes were immortalized by long-term expression of HPV type 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or both. Proteomic profiling was used to compare expression levels for 741 discrete protein features. Six replicate measurements were performed for each group using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). The median within-group coefficient of variation was 19-21%. Significance of between-group differences was tested based on Significance Analysis of Microarray and fold change. Expression of 170 (23%) of the protein features changed significantly in immortalized cells compared to primary keratinocytes. Most of these changes were qualitatively similar in cells immortalized by E6, E7, or E6/7 expression, indicating convergence on a common phenotype, but fifteen proteins (~2%) were outliers in this regulatory pattern. Ten demonstrated opposite regulation in E6- and E7-expressing cells, including the cell cycle regulator p16INK4a; the carbohydrate binding protein Galectin-7; two differentially migrating forms of the intermediate filament protein Cytokeratin-7; HSPA1A (Hsp70-1); and five unidentified proteins. Five others had a pattern of expression that suggested cooperativity between the co-expressed oncoproteins. Two of these were identified as forms of the small heat shock protein HSPB1 (Hsp27). This large-scale analysis provides a framework for understanding the cooperation between E6 and E7 oncoproteins in HPV-driven carcinogenesis.

  3. Large-scale analysis of protein expression changes in human keratinocytes immortalized by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnouk Hilal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with high-risk type human papilloma viruses (HPVs is associated with cervical carcinomas and with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes cooperate to achieve cell immortalization by a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Here, human keratinocytes were immortalized by long-term expression of HPV type 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or both. Proteomic profiling was used to compare expression levels for 741 discrete protein features. Results Six replicate measurements were performed for each group using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. The median within-group coefficient of variation was 19–21%. Significance of between-group differences was tested based on Significance Analysis of Microarray and fold change. Expression of 170 (23% of the protein features changed significantly in immortalized cells compared to primary keratinocytes. Most of these changes were qualitatively similar in cells immortalized by E6, E7, or E6/7 expression, indicating convergence on a common phenotype, but fifteen proteins (~2% were outliers in this regulatory pattern. Ten demonstrated opposite regulation in E6- and E7-expressing cells, including the cell cycle regulator p16INK4a; the carbohydrate binding protein Galectin-7; two differentially migrating forms of the intermediate filament protein Cytokeratin-7; HSPA1A (Hsp70-1; and five unidentified proteins. Five others had a pattern of expression that suggested cooperativity between the co-expressed oncoproteins. Two of these were identified as forms of the small heat shock protein HSPB1 (Hsp27. Conclusion This large-scale analysis provides a framework for understanding the cooperation between E6 and E7 oncoproteins in HPV-driven carcinogenesis.

  4. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mediates the induction of pro-oncogenic and fibrogenic phenotypes in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisi, Anna; Arciello, Mario; Petrini, Stefania; Conti, Beatrice; Missale, Gabriele; Balsano, Clara

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common etiological factors involved in fibrosis development and its progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The pivotal role of hepatic stellate cells (HCSs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) in fibrogenesis is now certainly accepted, while the network of molecular interactions connecting HCV is emerging as a master regulator of several biological processes including proliferation, inflammation, cytoskeleton and ECM remodeling. In this study, the effects of HCV proteins expression on liver cancer cells, both pro-invasive and pro-fibrogenic phenotypes were explored. As a model of HCV infection, we used permissive Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells infected with JFH1-derived ccHCV. Conditioned medium from these cells was used to stimulate LX-2 cells, a line of HSCs. We found that the HCV infection of Huh7.5.1 cells decreased adhesion, increased migration and caused the delocalization of alpha-actinin from plasma membrane to cytoplasm and increased expression levels of paxillin. The treatment of LX-2 cells, with conditioned medium from HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells, caused an increase in cell proliferation, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, hyaluronic acid release and apoptosis rate measured as cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). These effects were accompanied in Huh7.5.1 cells by an HCV-dependent increasing of FAK activation that physically interacts with phosphorylated paxillin and alpha-actinin, and a rising of tumor necrosis factor alpha production/release. Silencing of FAK by siRNA reverted all effects of HCV infection, both those directed on Huh7.5.1 cells, and those indirect effects on the LX-2 cells. Moreover and interestingly, FAK inhibition enhances apoptosis in HCV-conditioned LX-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HCV, through FAK activation, may promote cytoskeletal reorganization and a pro-oncogenic phenotype in hepatocyte-like cells, and a fibrogenic phenotype in HSCs.

  5. Molecular piracy: manipulation of the ubiquitin system by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimuro, Masahiro; Hayward, S Diane; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitination, one of several post-translational protein modifications, plays a key role in the regulation of cellular events, including protein degradation, signal transduction, endocytosis, protein trafficking, apoptosis and immune responses. Ubiquitin attachment at the lysine residue of cellular factors acts as a signal for endocytosis and rapid degradation by the 26S proteasome. It has recently been observed that viruses, especially oncogenic herpesviruses, utilise molecular piracy by encoding their own proteins to interfere with regulation of cell signalling. Kaposi's sarcoma- associated herpesvirus (KSHV) manipulates the ubiquitin system to facilitate cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis and evasion from immunity. In this review, we will describe the strategies used by KSHV at distinct stages of the viral life-cycle to control the ubiquitin system and promote oncogenesis and viral persistence.

  6. Do We Know What Causes Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Prevention Do We Know What Causes Kaposi Sarcoma? Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is caused by infection with a ... Sarcoma? Can Kaposi Sarcoma Be Prevented? More In Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  8. The avian retrovirus avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subtype A reaches the lipid mixing stage of fusion at neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Laurie J; Delos, Sue E; Netter, Robert C; Bates, Paul; White, Judith M

    2003-03-01

    We previously showed that the envelope glycoprotein (EnvA) of avian sarcoma/leukosis virus subtype A (ASLV-A) binds to liposomes at neutral pH following incubation with its receptor, Tva, at >or=22 degrees C. We also provided evidence that ASLV-C fuses with cells at neutral pH. These findings suggested that receptor binding at neutral pH and >or=22 degrees C is sufficient to activate Env for fusion. A recent study suggested that two steps are necessary to activate avian retroviral Envs: receptor binding at neutral pH, followed by exposure to low pH (W. Mothes et al., Cell 103:679-689, 2000). Therefore, we evaluated the requirements for intact ASLV-A particles to bind to target bilayers and fuse with cells. We found that ASLV-A particles bind stably to liposomes in a receptor- and temperature-dependent manner at neutral pH. Using ASLV-A particles biosynthetically labeled with pyrene, we found that ASLV-A mixes its lipid envelope with cells within 5 to 10 min at 37 degrees C. Lipid mixing was neither inhibited nor enhanced by incubation at low pH. Lipid mixing of ASLV-A was inhibited by a peptide designed to prevent six-helix bundle formation in EnvA; the same peptide inhibits virus infection and EnvA-mediated cell-cell fusion (at both neutral and low pHs). Bafilomycin and dominant-negative dynamin inhibited lipid mixing of Sindbis virus (which requires low pH for fusion), but not of ASLV-A, with host cells. Finally, we found that, although EnvA-induced cell-cell fusion is enhanced at low pH, a mutant EnvA that is severely compromised in its ability to support infection still induced massive syncytia at low pH. Our results indicate that receptor binding at neutral pH is sufficient to activate EnvA, such that ASLV-A particles bind hydrophobically to and merge their membranes with target cells. Possible roles for low pH at subsequent stages of viral entry are discussed.

  9. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieisha Pentland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and human papillomavirus (HPV utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  10. Targeting CTCF to Control Virus Gene Expression: A Common Theme amongst Diverse DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentland, Ieisha; Parish, Joanna L

    2015-07-06

    All viruses target host cell factors for successful life cycle completion. Transcriptional control of DNA viruses by host cell factors is important in the temporal and spatial regulation of virus gene expression. Many of these factors are recruited to enhance virus gene expression and thereby increase virus production, but host cell factors can also restrict virus gene expression and productivity of infection. CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) is a host cell DNA binding protein important for the regulation of genomic chromatin boundaries, transcriptional control and enhancer element usage. CTCF also functions in RNA polymerase II regulation and in doing so can influence co-transcriptional splicing events. Several DNA viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) utilize CTCF to control virus gene expression and many studies have highlighted a role for CTCF in the persistence of these diverse oncogenic viruses. CTCF can both enhance and repress virus gene expression and in some cases CTCF increases the complexity of alternatively spliced transcripts. This review article will discuss the function of CTCF in the life cycle of DNA viruses in the context of known host cell CTCF functions.

  11. Risk of classical Kaposi sarcoma by plasma levels of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies, sCD26, sCD23 and sCD30

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviano Enza

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To clarify the immunological alterations leading to classical Kaposi sarcoma (cKS among people infected with KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. Methods In a population-based study of 119 cKS cases, 105 KSHV-seropositive controls, and 155 KSHV-seronegative controls, we quantified plasma soluble cluster of differentiation (sCD levels and antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (anti-EBNA-1 and viral capsid antigen (anti-VCA. Differences between groups in prevalence of low-tertile anti-EBNA-1 and high-tertile anti-VCA were compared by logistic regression. Continuous levels between groups and by presence of cKS co-factors among controls were compared by linear regression and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon methods. Results Comparisons of cKS cases to seropositive controls and of seropositive to seronegative controls revealed no significant differences. However, controls with known cKS cofactors (male sex, nonsmoking, diabetes and cortisone use had significantly lower levels of anti-EBNA (P = 0.0001 - 0.07 and anti-VCA (P = 0.0001 - 0.03. Levels of sCD26 were significantly lower for male and non-smoking controls (Padj ≤ 0.03, and they were marginally lower with older age and cortisone use (Padj ≤ 0.09. Conclusions Anti-EBV and sCD26 levels were associated with cofactors for cKS, but they did not differ between cKS cases and matched controls. Novel approaches and broader panels of assays are needed to investigate immunological contributions to cKS.

  12. SYNOVIAL CELL SARCOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Farzan

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten cases of synovial cell sarcoma are reported. The youngest patient was a 2'A years old boy with synovial cell sarcoma of the knee and the oldest one was a man with synovial cell sarcoma of the elbow.

  13. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK mediates the induction of pro-oncogenic and fibrogenic phenotypes in hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Alisi

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection is one of the most common etiological factors involved in fibrosis development and its progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The pivotal role of hepatic stellate cells (HCSs and extracellular matrix (ECM in fibrogenesis is now certainly accepted, while the network of molecular interactions connecting HCV is emerging as a master regulator of several biological processes including proliferation, inflammation, cytoskeleton and ECM remodeling. In this study, the effects of HCV proteins expression on liver cancer cells, both pro-invasive and pro-fibrogenic phenotypes were explored. As a model of HCV infection, we used permissive Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells infected with JFH1-derived ccHCV. Conditioned medium from these cells was used to stimulate LX-2 cells, a line of HSCs. We found that the HCV infection of Huh7.5.1 cells decreased adhesion, increased migration and caused the delocalization of alpha-actinin from plasma membrane to cytoplasm and increased expression levels of paxillin. The treatment of LX-2 cells, with conditioned medium from HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells, caused an increase in cell proliferation, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, hyaluronic acid release and apoptosis rate measured as cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. These effects were accompanied in Huh7.5.1 cells by an HCV-dependent increasing of FAK activation that physically interacts with phosphorylated paxillin and alpha-actinin, and a rising of tumor necrosis factor alpha production/release. Silencing of FAK by siRNA reverted all effects of HCV infection, both those directed on Huh7.5.1 cells, and those indirect effects on the LX-2 cells. Moreover and interestingly, FAK inhibition enhances apoptosis in HCV-conditioned LX-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HCV, through FAK activation, may promote cytoskeletal reorganization and a pro-oncogenic phenotype in hepatocyte-like cells, and a fibrogenic phenotype in

  14. A chimeric 18L1-45RG1 virus-like particle vaccine cross-protects against oncogenic alpha-7 human papillomavirus types.

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    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC, a subset of cervical cancer (CxC. Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7 includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18 targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1 of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1. Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent

  15. Lentivirus-Mediated Oncogene Introduction into Mammary Cells In Vivo Induces Tumors

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    Stefan K. Siwko

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported the introduction of oncogene-expressing avian retroviruses into somatic mammary cells in mice susceptible to infection by transgenic expression of tva, encoding the receptor for subgroup A avian leukosis-sarcoma virus (ALSV. Because ALSV-based vectors poorly infect nondividing cells, they are inadequate for studying carcinogenesis initiated from nonproliferative cells (e.g., stem cells. Lentivirus pseudotyped with the envelope protein of ALSV infects nondividing TVA-producing cells in culture but has not previously been tested for introducing genes in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that these vectors infected mammary cells in vivo when injected into the mammary ductal lumen of mice expressing tva under the control of the keratin 19 promoter. Furthermore, intraductal injection of this lentiviral vector carrying the polyoma middle T antigen gene induced atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ-like premalignant lesions in 30 days and palpable invasive tumors at a median latency of 3.3 months. Induced tumors were a mixed epithelial/myoepithelial histologic diagnosis, occasionally displayed squamous metaplasia, and were estrogen receptor-negative. This work demonstrates the first use of a lentiviral vector to introduce oncogenes for modeling cancer in mice, and this vector system may be especially suitable for introducing genetic alterations into quiescent cells in vivo.

  16. Chylothorax in a patient with metastatic Kaposi sarcoma: Differential diagnostic considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan Alexander, DO; Magda Rizer, DO; William Burke, MD; Lawrence Ciment, MD

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a low-grade mesenchymal tumor involving blood and lymphatic vessels. There are four types, based on clinical presentation: classic, endemic (Africana), iatrogenic (typically, involving renal allograft recipients), and AIDS-associated (epidemic). Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus infection has been linked along with other factors to the development of KS. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus interacts and encodes for numerous molecular proteins that play a...

  17. Multiplexed colorimetric detection of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus and Bartonella DNA using gold and silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Matthew; Jiang, Li; Cesarman, Ethel; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an infectious cancer occurring most commonly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients and in endemic regions, such as Sub-Saharan Africa, where KS is among the top four most prevalent cancers. The cause of KS is the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called HHV-8), an oncogenic herpesvirus that while routinely diagnosed in developed nations, provides challenges to developing world medical providers and point-of-care detection. A major challenge in the diagnosis of KS is the existence of a number of other diseases with similar clinical presentation and histopathological features, requiring the detection of KSHV in a biopsy sample. In this work we develop an answer to this challenge by creating a multiplexed one-pot detection system for KSHV DNA and DNA from a frequently confounding disease, bacillary angiomatosis. Gold and silver nanoparticle aggregation reactions are tuned for each target and a multi-color change system is developed capable of detecting both targets down to levels between 1 nM and 2 nM. The system developed here could later be integrated with microfluidic sample processing to create a final device capable of solving the two major challenges in point-of-care KS detection.

  18. Interplay between DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Karyn; Luftig, Micah A

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encounter many challenges within host cells in order to replicate their nucleic acid. In the case of DNA viruses, one challenge that must be overcome is recognition of viral DNA structures by the host DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. This is accomplished in elegant and unique ways by different viruses as each has specific needs and sensitivities dependent on its life cycle. In this review, we focus on three DNA tumor viruses and their interactions with the DDR. The viruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) account for nearly all of the virus-associated human cancers worldwide. These viruses have also been excellent models for the study of oncogenic virus-mediated cell transformation. In this review, we will discuss how each of these viruses engage and subvert aspects of the host DDR. The first level of DDR engagement is a result of the genetic linkage between the oncogenic potential of these viruses and their ability to replicate. Namely, the promotion of cells from quiescence into the cell cycle to facilitate virus replication can be sensed through aberrant cellular DNA replication structures which activate the DDR and hinder cell transformation. DNA tumor viruses subvert this growth-suppressive DDR through changes in viral oncoprotein expression which ultimately facilitate virus replication. An additional level of DDR engagement is through direct detection of replicating viral DNA. These interactions parallel those observed in other DNA virus systems in that the need to subvert these intrinsic sensors of aberrant DNA structure in order to replicate must be in place. DNA tumor viruses are no exception. This review will cover the molecular features of DNA tumor virus interactions with the host DDR and the consequences for virus replication.

  19. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forscher C

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Charles Forscher,1 Monica Mita,2 Robert Figlin3 1Sarcoma Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Experimental Therapeutics Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Academic Development Program, Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, and Division of Hematology/Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing's sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing's sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. Keywords: sarcoma, targeted agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mTor inhibition

  20. Viral Causes of Lymphoma: The History of Epstein-Barr Virus and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1

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    Daniel Esau

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1964, Epstein, Barr, and Achong published a report outlining their discovery of viral particles in lymphoblasts isolated from a patient with Burkitt lymphoma. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV was the first human cancer virus to be described, and its discovery paved the way for further investigations into the oncogenic potential of viruses. In the decades following the discovery of EBV, multinational research efforts led to the discovery of further viral causes of various human cancers. Lymphomas are perhaps the cancer type that is most closely associated with oncogenic viruses: infection with EBV, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8, and hepatitis C virus have all been associated with lymphomagenesis. Lymphomas have also played an important role in the history of oncoviruses, as both the first human oncovirus (EBV and the first human retrovirus (HTLV-1 were discovered through isolates taken from patients with unique lymphoma syndromes. The history of the discovery of these 2 key oncoviruses is presented here, and their impact on further medical research, using the specific example of HIV research, is briefly discussed.

  1. Viral Causes of Lymphoma: The History of Epstein-Barr Virus and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In 1964, Epstein, Barr, and Achong published a report outlining their discovery of viral particles in lymphoblasts isolated from a patient with Burkitt lymphoma. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was the first human cancer virus to be described, and its discovery paved the way for further investigations into the oncogenic potential of viruses. In the decades following the discovery of EBV, multinational research efforts led to the discovery of further viral causes of various human cancers. Lymphomas are perhaps the cancer type that is most closely associated with oncogenic viruses: infection with EBV, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8, and hepatitis C virus have all been associated with lymphomagenesis. Lymphomas have also played an important role in the history of oncoviruses, as both the first human oncovirus (EBV) and the first human retrovirus (HTLV-1) were discovered through isolates taken from patients with unique lymphoma syndromes. The history of the discovery of these 2 key oncoviruses is presented here, and their impact on further medical research, using the specific example of HIV research, is briefly discussed.

  2. Molecular piracy of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J; Means, R E; Damania, B; Jung, J U

    2001-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most recently discovered human tumor virus and is associated with the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and Multicentric Casttleman's disease. KSHV contains numerous open reading frames with striking homology to cellular genes. These viral gene products play a variety of roles in KSHV-associated pathogenesis by disrupting cellular signal transduction pathways, which include interferon-mediated anti-viral responses, cytokine-regulated cell growth, apoptosis, and cell cycle control. In this review, we will attempt to cover our understanding of how viral proteins deregulate cellular signaling pathways, which ultimately contribute to the conversion of normal cells to cancerous cells.

  3. The Danish Sarcoma Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Holmberg; Lausten, Gunnar Schwarz; Pedersen, Alma B

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the database is to gather information about sarcomas treated in Denmark in order to continuously monitor and improve the quality of sarcoma treatment in a local, a national, and an international perspective. STUDY POPULATION: Patients in Denmark diagnosed with a sarcoma, both...... skeletal and ekstraskeletal, are to be registered since 2009. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information about appearance of symptoms; date of receiving referral to a sarcoma center; date of first visit; whether surgery has been performed elsewhere before referral, diagnosis, and treatment; tumor...... of Diseases - tenth edition codes and TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, and date of death (after yearly coupling to the Danish Civil Registration System). Data quality and completeness are currently secured. CONCLUSION: The Danish Sarcoma Database is population based and includes sarcomas occurring...

  4. 抗鼠科肉瘤病毒癌基因同源物B1抗体的检测及其在类风湿关节炎诊断中的意义%Significance of the detection of anti-v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue B1 antibodies in the diagnostic practice of rheumatoid arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张霞; 赵金霞; 孙琳; 李茹; 刘湘源; 栗占国

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the clinical significance of the antibody against v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue Bl ( BRAF) in the diagnostic practice of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: In the study, 112 patients with RA, 112 patients with other rheumatic diseases,and 73 healthy individuals were recruited . With recombinant human BRAF protein as antigen, we examined the level of anti-BRAF antibody in all the patients by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA) , The clinical data of the RA patients were collected simultaneously, and analysed statistically by using SPSS 13. 0. Results: The positive rate of anti-BRAF antibody was 53. 6% in the RA patients, which was significantly higher than that of the normal control group(4. 1% ,P <0. 01 ) and other rheumatic diseases groups (P all <0. 01) except osteoarthritis group. The titer of anti-BRAF antibody was also notably higher in the patients with RA than in other rheumatic diseases and normal control groups(P all <0. 01). The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of anti-BRAF antibody for RA were 53. 6% and 84. 3% respectively. The positive rate of anti-BRAF antibody in rheumatoid factor, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibody, antikera-tin antibody,antiperinuclear factor negative groups were 52. 6% ,38. 2% , 30. 3% and 31.0% respectively. It showed significant negative correlation between the titer of anti-BRAF antibody and patient' s age, disease duration and the level of CRP. Conclusion: The anti-BRAF antibody contributes to the diagnosis of RA, and may act as a supplement of other autoantibodies.%目的:了解抗鼠科肉瘤病毒癌基因同源物B1( v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homologue B1,BRAF)抗体在类风湿关节炎( rheumatoid arthritis,RA)诊断中的临床意义.方法:纳入RA患者112例、健康对照73例、其他风湿病患者112例,以重组人BRAF蛋白为抗原,采用酶联免疫吸附法(enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays,ELISA)检测患者血清中的抗BRAF抗体水

  5. [Kaposi sarcoma and HHV-8: a model of cutaneous cancer in immunosuppressed patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Nicolas; Deleuze, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The virus HHV-8 will celebrate its twentieth birthday by the end of this year and its relationships with Kaposi sarcoma are not completely elucidated. HHV-8 is an enigmatic virus, with an inhomogeneous distribution, a salivary transmission while it is not an ubiquitous virus, at least in western countries. However, HHV-8 has a unique genetic equipment rending is role in Kaposi sarcoma more than plausible. While the virus is necessary, it appears that it is not sufficient as the development of Kaposi sarcoma is frequently associated with immunosuppression whatever the cause (iatrogenic, viral, age-related). Kaposi sarcoma should be more considered as an opportunistic tumour than a viral-induced cancer and the best treatment for Kaposi sarcoma is immune restoration at least when it is possible.

  6. Distinct and Overlapping Sarcoma Subtypes Initiated from Muscle Stem and Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Blum

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is the most common soft tissue sarcoma in children, whereas undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS is one of the most common soft tissue sarcomas diagnosed in adults. To investigate the myogenic cell(s of origin of these sarcomas, we used Pax7-CreER and MyoD-CreER mice to transform Pax7+ and MyoD+ myogenic progenitors by expressing oncogenic KrasG12D and deleting Trp53 in vivo. Pax7-CreER mice developed RMS and UPS, whereas MyoD-CreER mice developed UPS. Using gene set enrichment analysis, RMS and UPS each clustered specifically within their human counterparts. These results suggest that RMS and UPS have distinct and overlapping cells of origin within the muscle lineage. Taking them together, we have established mouse models of soft tissue sarcoma from muscle stem and progenitor cells.

  7. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enara eAguirre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  8. Stages of Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor that forms from a certain kind of cell in bone or soft tissue . Ewing sarcoma may be found in the bones of the legs, arms, feet, hands, chest , pelvis , spine , or skull . Ewing sarcoma also may be found in the soft tissue of the trunk, arms, legs, head and neck, abdominal cavity , or ...

  9. Breast sarcomas. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Ryabchikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an overview of the literature about breast sarcomas (nonepithelial malignances. Primary sarcomas are extremely rare, with less than 1 % of all malignant tumors of the breast. Breast carcinomas cause an increased interest of the scientists due to their unique clinical and pathological features and unpredictable prognosis.

  10. Construction of recombinant Marek's disease virus (MDV) lacking the meq oncogene and co-expressing AIV-H9N2 HA and NA genes under control of exogenous promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenjie; Chen, Wenqing; Ma, Chengtai; Zhao, Peng; Duan, Luntao; Zhang, Fushou; Sun, Aijun; Li, Yanpeng; Su, Hongqin; Li, Sifei; Cui, He; Cui, Zhizhong

    2014-07-10

    To develop a recombinant Marek's disease virus (rMDV1) co-expressing the hemagglutinin gene (HA) and neuramidinase gene (NA) from a low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H9N2 strain and lacking the meq oncogene that shares homology with the Jun/Fos family of transcriptional factors, a wild strain of MDV GX0101 was used as parental virus, the HA and NA genes co-expression cassette under control of the CMV and SV40 early promoters was inserted at two meq sites of GX0101 to form a new meq knock-out mutant MDV (MZC12HA/NA) through homologous recombination. MZC12HA/NA was reconstituted by transfection of recombinant BAC-MDV DNA into the secondary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. Highly purified MZC12HA/NA was obtained after four rounds of plaque purification and proliferation. In vitro growth properties of recombinant virus were also inspected and concluded that the MZC12HA/NA had the same growth kinetics in CEF cultures as its parental wild type virus GX0101. Southern blot indicated that co-expression cassette was successfully inserted at two copies sites of meq gene, so two meq genes were knocked-out completely. RT-qPCR showed transcription and expression levels of the HA and NA genes were both significantly higher than that of GX0101 own pp38 gene. Indirect fluorescence antibody (IFA) test, and Western blot analyses indicated that HA and NA genes were co-expressed simultaneously under control of the different promoters but meq genes were not. These results herald a new and effective recombinant meq-deleted MDV-based AIV-H9N2 vaccine may be useful in protecting chickens from very virulent MDV and H9N2 challenges.

  11. Alternate polypurine tracts (PPTs) affect the rous sarcoma virus RNase H cleavage specificity and reveal a preferential cleavage following a GA dinucleotide sequence at the PPT-U3 junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kevin W; Julias, John G; Alvord, W Gregory; Oh, Jangsuk; Hughes, Stephen H

    2005-11-01

    Retroviral polypurine tracts (PPTs) serve as primers for plus-strand DNA synthesis during reverse transcription. The generation and removal of the PPT primer requires specific cleavages by the RNase H activity of reverse transcriptases; removal of the PPT primer defines the left end of the linear viral DNA. We replaced the endogenous PPT from RSVP(A)Z, a replication-competent shuttle vector based on Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), with alternate retroviral PPTs and the duck hepatitis B virus "PPT." Viruses in which the endogenous RSV PPT was replaced with alternate PPTs had lower relative titers than the wild-type virus. 2-LTR circle junction analysis showed that the alternate PPTs caused significant decreases in the fraction of viral DNAs with complete (consensus) ends and significant increases in the insertion of part or all of the PPT at the 2-LTR circle junctions. The last two nucleotides in the 3' end of the RSV PPT are GA. Examination of the (mis)cleavages of the alternate PPTs revealed preferential cleavages after GA dinucleotide sequences. Replacement of the terminal 3' A of the RSV PPT with G caused a preferential miscleavage at a GA sequence spanning the PPT-U3 boundary, resulting in the deletion of the terminal adenine normally present at the 5' end of the U3. A reciprocal G-to-A substitution at the 3' end of the murine leukemia virus PPT increased the relative titer of the chimeric RSV-based virus and the fraction of consensus 2-LTR circle junctions.

  12. Extraosseous Osteogenic Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Ying Lin

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Extraosseous osteogenic sarcoma is a very rare malignant neoplasm. Out of the more than 400 cases of soft tissue sarcomas on file in our hospital, only 2 were extraosseous osteogenic sarcomas. Both were situated in the thigh. The first case was initially diagnosed as a hematoma and treated by marginal excision. The diagnosis of high-grade osteosarcoma primarily arising in soft tissue was made from histopathologic examination. Radiotherapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was given postoperatively. The second patient, primarily diagnosed as having a soft tissue sarcoma, was treated by wide excision. The final pathologic report was high-grade extraosseous osteogenic sarcoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given postoperatively. Both patients are alive without local recurrence and distant metastasis at postoperative 90-month and 107-month follow-up, respectively.

  13. Induction of histiocytic sarcoma in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Liu

    Full Text Available Myeloid sarcomas are extramedullary accumulations of immature myeloid cells that may present with or without evidence of pathologic involvement of the bone marrow or peripheral blood, and often coincide with or precede a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. A dearth of experimental models has hampered the study of myeloid sarcomas and led us to establish a new system in which tumor induction can be evaluated in an easily accessible non-hematopoietic tissue compartment. Using ex-vivo transduction of oncogenic Kras(G12V into p16/p19(-/- bone marrow cells, we generated transplantable leukemia-initiating cells that rapidly induced tumor formation in the skeletal muscle of immunocompromised NOD.SCID mice. In this model, murine histiocytic sarcomas, equivalent to human myeloid sarcomas, emerged at the injection site 30-50 days after cell implantation and consisted of tightly packed monotypic cells that were CD48+, CD47+ and Mac1+, with low or absent expression of other hematopoietic lineage markers. Tumor cells also infiltrated the bone marrow, spleen and other non-hematopoietic organs of tumor-bearing animals, leading to systemic illness (leukemia within two weeks of tumor detection. P16/p19(-/-; Kras(G12V myeloid sarcomas were multi-clonal, with dominant clones selected during secondary transplantation. The systemic leukemic phenotypes exhibited by histiocytic sarcoma-bearing mice were nearly identical to those of animals in which leukemia was introduced by intravenous transplantation of the same donor cells. Moreover, murine histiocytic sarcoma could be similarly induced by intramuscular injection of MLL-AF9 leukemia cells. This study establishes a novel, transplantable model of murine histiocytic/myeloid sarcoma that recapitulates the natural progression of these malignancies to systemic disease and indicates a cell autonomous leukemogenic mechanism.

  14. Imaging oncogene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Archana [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: Archana.Mukherjee@jefferson.edu; Wickstrom, Eric [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, 233S, 10th street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu; Thakur, Mathew L. [Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)], E-mail: Mathew.Thakur@jefferson.edu

    2009-05-15

    This review briefly outlines the importance of molecular imaging, particularly imaging of endogenous gene expression for noninvasive genetic analysis of radiographic masses. The concept of antisense imaging agents and the advantages and challenges in the development of hybridization probes for in vivo imaging are described. An overview of the investigations on oncogene expression imaging is given. Finally, the need for further improvement in antisense-based imaging agents and directions to improve oncogene mRNA targeting is stated.

  15. Microsatellites with Macro-Influence in Ewing Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Lessnick

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous molecular abnormalities contribute to the genetic derangements involved in tumorigenesis. Chromosomal translocations are a frequent source of these derangements, producing unique fusion proteins with novel oncogenic properties. EWS/ETS fusions in Ewing sarcoma are a prime example of this, resulting in potent chimeric oncoproteins with novel biological properties and a unique transcriptional signature essential for oncogenesis. Recent evidence demonstrates that EWS/FLI, the most common EWS/ETS fusion in Ewing sarcoma, upregulates gene expression using a GGAA microsatellite response element dispersed throughout the human genome. These GGAA microsatellites function as enhancer elements, are sites of epigenetic regulation and are necessary for EWS/FLI DNA binding and upregulation of principal oncogenic targets. An increasing number of GGAA motifs appear to substantially enhance EWS/FLI-mediated gene expression, which has compelling biological implications as these GGAA microsatellites are highly polymorphic within and between ethnically distinct populations. Historically regarded as junk DNA, this emerging evidence clearly demonstrates that microsatellite DNA plays an instrumental role in EWS/FLI-mediated transcriptional regulation and oncogenesis in Ewing sarcoma. This unprecedented role of GGAA microsatellite DNA in Ewing sarcoma provides a unique opportunity to expand our mechanistic understanding of how EWS/ETS fusions influence cancer susceptibility, prognosis and transcriptional regulation.

  16. Trial of Dasatinib in Advanced Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    Rhabdomyosarcoma; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors; Chondrosarcoma; Sarcoma, Ewing's; Sarcoma, Alveolar Soft Part; Chordoma; Epithelioid Sarcoma; Giant Cell Tumor of Bone; Hemangiopericytoma; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST)

  17. Oncogenes and human cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.P. Heisterkamp (Nora); J.H.C. Groffen (John)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe first demonstrations that cancer could have an infectious nature was by Ellerman and Bang (1) ~ who showed that leukemia in chickens was transmissible with cell-free extracts and by Rous (2), who found in a similar fashion that naturally occurring chicken sarcomas were transmissible.

  18. Development of genetically flexible mouse models of sarcoma using RCAS-TVA mediated gene delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Kabaroff

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal malignancies and unfortunately there are limited functional genomics platforms to assess the molecular pathways contributing to sarcomagenesis. Thus, novel model systems are needed to validate which genes should be targeted for therapeutic intervention. We hypothesized that delivery of oncogenes into mouse skeletal muscle using a retroviral (RCAS-TVA system would result in sarcomagenesis. We also sought to determine if the cell type transformed (mesenchymal progenitors vs. terminally differentiated tissues would influence sarcoma biology. Cells transduced with RCAS vectors directing the expression of oncoproteins KrasG12D, c-Myc and/or Igf2 were injected into the hindlimbs of mice that expressed the retroviral TVA receptor in neural/mesenchymal progenitors, skeletal/cardiac muscle or ubiquitously (N-tva, AKE and BKE strains respectively. Disrupting the G1 checkpoint CDKN2 (p16/p19-/- resulted in sarcoma in 30% of p16/p19-/- xN-tva mice with a median latency of 23 weeks (range 8-40 weeks. A similar incidence occurred in p16/p19-/- xBKE mice (32%, however, a shorter median latency (10.4 weeks was observed. p16/p19-/- xAKE mice also developed sarcomas (24% incidence; median 9 weeks yet 31% of mice also developed lung sarcomas. Gene-anchored PCR demonstrated retroviral DNA integration in 86% of N-tva, 93% of BKE and 88% of AKE tumors. KrasG12D was the most frequent oncogene isolated. Oncogene delivery by the RCAS-TVA system can generate sarcomas in mice with a defective cell cycle checkpoint. Sarcoma biology differed between the different RCAS models we created, likely due to the cell population being transformed. This genetically flexible system will be a valuable tool for sarcoma research.

  19. The Danish Sarcoma Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgensen PH

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peter Holmberg Jørgensen,1 Gunnar Schwarz Lausten,2 Alma B Pedersen3 1Tumor Section, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Tumor Section, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim: The aim of the database is to gather information about sarcomas treated in Denmark in order to continuously monitor and improve the quality of sarcoma treatment in a local, a national, and an international perspective. Study population: Patients in Denmark diagnosed with a sarcoma, both skeletal and ekstraskeletal, are to be registered since 2009. Main variables: The database contains information about appearance of symptoms; date of receiving referral to a sarcoma center; date of first visit; whether surgery has been performed elsewhere before referral, diagnosis, and treatment; tumor characteristics such as location, size, malignancy grade, and growth pattern; details on treatment (kind of surgery, amount of radiation therapy, type and duration of chemotherapy; complications of treatment; local recurrence and metastases; and comorbidity. In addition, several quality indicators are registered in order to measure the quality of care provided by the hospitals and make comparisons between hospitals and with international standards. Descriptive data: Demographic patient-specific data such as age, sex, region of living, comorbidity, World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases – tenth edition codes and TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours, and date of death (after yearly coupling to the Danish Civil Registration System. Data quality and completeness are currently secured. Conclusion: The Danish Sarcoma Database is population based and includes sarcomas occurring in Denmark since 2009. It is a valuable tool for monitoring sarcoma incidence and quality of treatment and its improvement, postoperative

  20. Nuclear Localization and Cleavage of STAT6 Is Induced by Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus for Viral Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liming; Li, Yuhong; Feng, Yanling; Xu, Jianqing; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Zhenghong; Robertson, Erle S.; Cai, Qiliang

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence implies that STAT6 plays an important role in both the adaptive and innate immune responses to virus infection. Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic γ-herpesvirus agent associated with several human malignancies, including Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphomas (PELs). Previously, we demonstrated that KSHV blocks IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation and retains a basal IL-13/STAT6 constitutive activation for cell survival and proliferation. However, the mechanism by which KSHV regulates STAT6 remains largely unknown. Here, we found that KSHV-encoded LANA interacts with STAT6 and promotes nuclear localization of STAT6 independent of the tyrosine 641-phosphorylation state. Moreover, nuclear localization of STAT6 is also dramatically increased in KS tissue. The latent antigen LANA induces serine protease-mediated cleavage of STAT6 in the nucleus, where the cleaved STAT6 lacking transactivation domain functions as a dominant-negative regulator to repress transcription of Replication and Transcription Activator (RTA) and in turn shut off viral lytic replication. Blockade of STAT6 by small interference RNA dramatically enhances expression of RTA, and in turn reduces KSHV-infected endothelial cell growth and colony formation. Taken together, these results suggest that nuclear localization and cleavage of STAT6 is important for modulating the viral latency and pathogenesis of KSHV. PMID:28099521

  1. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Neilsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downstream signaling pathways and DNA-damage cell cycle checkpoints remain functionally intact in these sarcomas. This paper summarizes recent insights into the functional capabilities and regulation of p53 in Ewing Sarcoma, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between p53 and the EWS-FLI1 gene rearrangement frequently associated with this disease. The development of several activators of p53 is discussed, with recent evidence demonstrating the potential of small molecule p53 activators as a promising systemic therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ewing Sarcomas with wild-type p53.

  2. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations.

  3. Kaposi sarcoma incidence in Mozambique: national and regional estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meireles, Paula; Albuquerque, Gabriela; Vieira, Mariana; Foia, Severiano; Ferro, Josefo; Carrilho, Carla; Lunet, Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is expressed in four clinical variants, all associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection, namely, classic, endemic, immunosuppression-related and AIDS-related. The latter currently accounts for most of the burden of Kaposi sarcoma in sub-Saharan Africa, reflecting the frequency of HIV infection and its management. We aimed to estimate the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma in Mozambique and in its provinces. We estimated the number of incident cases of Kaposi sarcoma by adding up the expected number of endemic and AIDS-related cases. The former were estimated from the rates observed in Kyandondo, Uganda (1960-1971). The latter were computed from the number of AIDS-related deaths in each region, assuming that the ratio between the AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma incident cases and the number of AIDS-related deaths observed in the city of Beira applies to all regions. A total of 3862 Kaposi sarcoma cases were estimated to have occurred in Mozambique in 2007, mostly AIDS-related, in the age group 25-49 years, and in provinces from South/Centre. The age-standardized incidence rates were 36.1/100 000 in men and 11.5/100 000 in women, with a more than three-fold variation across provinces. We estimated a high incidence of Kaposi sarcoma in Mozambique, along with large regional differences. These results can be used to improve disease management and to sustain political decisions on health policies.

  4. Primary renal synovial sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish D. Bakhshi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary Renal Sarcoma is rare tumor comprising only 1% of all renal tumours. Synovial sarcomas are generally deep-seated tumors arising in the proximity of large joints of adolescents and young adults and account for 5-10% of all soft tissue tumours. Primary synovial sarcoma of kidney is rare and has poor prognosis. It can only be diagnosed by immunohistochemistry. It should be considered as a differential in sarcomatoid and spindle cell tumours. We present a case of 33-year-old female, who underwent left sided radical nephrectomy for renal tumour. Histopathology and genetic analysis diagnosed it to be primary renal synovial sarcoma. Patient underwent radiation therapy and 2 years follow up is uneventful. A brief case report with review of literature is presented.

  5. What Are the Key Statistics about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kaposi Sarcoma What Are the Key Statistics About Kaposi Sarcoma? Before the AIDS epidemic, Kaposi sarcoma (KS) was ... in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment? More In Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  6. What's New in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma What’s New in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment? A great deal of research ... in Kaposi Sarcoma Research and Treatment? More In Kaposi Sarcoma About Kaposi Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Activation of PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signal pathways is required for the induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is causally linked to several acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and a subset of multicentric Castleman's disease. Regulation of viral lytic replication is critical to the initiation and progression of KS. Recently, we reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was an important cofactor that activated lytic cycle replication of KSHV. Here, we further investigated the possible signal pathways involved in HSV-1-induced reactivation of KSHV. Results By transfecting a series of dominant negative mutants and protein expressing constructs and using pharmacologic inhibitors, we found that either Janus kinase 1 (JAK1/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 or JAK1/STAT6 signaling failed to regulate HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. However, HSV-1 infection of BCBL-1 cells activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, also called AKT pathway and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β. PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway was found to be involved in HSV-1-induced KSHV reactivation. Additionally, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway also partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Conclusions HSV-1 infection stimulated PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signaling pathways that in turn contributed to KSHV reactivation, which provided further insights into the molecular mechanism controlling KSHV lytic replication, particularly in the context of HSV-1 and KSHV co-infection.

  8. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus targets the lymphotactin receptor with both a broad spectrum antagonist vCCL2 and a highly selective and potent agonist vCCL3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Johnsen, Anders H; Jurlander, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    Large DNA viruses such as herpesvirus and poxvirus encode proteins that target and exploit the chemokine system of their host. These proteins have the potential to block or change the orchestrated recruitment of leukocytes to sites of viral infection. The genome of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes...... virus (KSHV) encodes three chemokine-like proteins named vCCL1, vCCL2, and vCCL3. In this study vCCL3 was probed in parallel with vCCL1 and vCCL2 against a panel of the 18 classified human chemokine receptors. In calcium mobilization assays vCCL1 acted as a selective CCR8 agonist, whereas vCCL2...... was found to act as a broad spectrum chemokine antagonist of human chemokine receptors, including the lymphotactin receptor. In contrast vCCL3 was found to be a highly selective agonist for the human lymphotactin receptor XCR1. The potency of vCCL3 was found to be 10-fold higher than the endogenous human...

  9. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with elastic stockings and outpatient follow-up of a 90-year-old patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Flavia; Cunha, Paulo Rowilson; Pinto, Clovis Antonio Lopes; Alves, Celia Antonia Xavier de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifactorial angioproliferative disorder. The herpes virus 8 human contributes to its pathogenesis, but it is uncertain whether these lesions are only reactive hyperplasia to the virus or neoplasia. Four clinical types are described: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and HIV-associated. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma has no standard staging or treatment protocols. Some studies have shown the use of compression stockings in the treatment of lymphedema associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. We report the case of a 90 year-old patient with classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with compression stockings who showed a satisfactory response.

  10. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with elastic stockings and outpatient follow-up of a 90-year-old patient*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Flavia; Cunha, Paulo Rowilson; Pinto, Clovis Antonio Lopes; Alves, Celia Antonia Xavier de Moraes

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifactorial angioproliferative disorder. The herpes virus 8 human contributes to its pathogenesis, but it is uncertain whether these lesions are only reactive hyperplasia to the virus or neoplasia. Four clinical types are described: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and HIV-associated. Classic Kaposi's sarcoma has no standard staging or treatment protocols. Some studies have shown the use of compression stockings in the treatment of lymphedema associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. We report the case of a 90 year-old patient with classic Kaposi's sarcoma treated with compression stockings who showed a satisfactory response. PMID:24346919

  11. Oncogene v-jun modulates DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasylyk, C; Schneikert, J; Wasylyk, B

    1990-07-01

    Cell transformation leads to alterations in both transcription and DNA replication. Activation of transcription by the expression of a number of transforming oncogenes is mediated by the transcription factor AP1 (Herrlich & Ponta, 1989; Imler & Wasylyk, 1989). AP1 is a composite transcription factor, consisting of members of the jun and fos gene-families. c-jun and c-fos are progenitors of oncogenes, suggestion that an important transcriptional event in cell transformation is altered activity of AP1, which may arise either indirectly by oncogene expression or directly by structural modification of AP1. We report here that the v-jun oncogene and its progenitor c-jun, as fusion proteins with the lex-A-repressor DNA binding domain, can activate DNA replication from the Polyoma virus (Py) origin of replication, linked to the lex-A operator. The transcription-activation region of v-jun is required for activation of replication. When excess v-jun is expressed in the cell, replication is inhibited or 'squelched'. These results suggest that one consequence of deregulated jun activity could be altered DNA replication and that there are similarities in the way v-jun activates replication and transcription.

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Kaposi Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Childhood Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Kaposi Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Kaposi Sarcoma ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  13. Recombinant Parvoviruses Armed to Deliver CXCL4L1 and CXCL10 Are Impaired in Their Antiangiogenic and Antitumoral Effects in a Kaposi Sarcoma Tumor Model Due To the Chemokines' Interference with the Virus Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinsart, Christiane; Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Stroh-Dege, Alexandra; Lavie, Muriel; Ronsse, Isabelle; Rommelaere, Jean; Van Damme, Jo; Van Raemdonck, Katrien; Struyf, Sofie

    2017-03-01

    Application of oncolytic viruses is a valuable option to broaden the armament of anticancer therapies, as these combine specific cytotoxic effects and immune-stimulating properties. The self-replicating H-1 parvovirus (H-1PV) is a prototypical oncolytic virus that, besides targeting tumor cells, also infects endothelial cells, thus combining oncolytic and angiostatic traits. To increase its therapeutic value, H-1PV can be armed with cytokines or chemokines to enhance the immunological response. Some chemokines-more specifically, the CXCR3 ligands CXCL4L1 and CXCL10-combine immune-stimulating properties with angiostatic activity. This study explores the therapeutic value of recombinant parvoviruses carrying CXCL4L1 or CXCL10 transgenes (Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10, respectively) to inhibit the growth of the human Kaposi sarcoma cell line KS-IMM. KS-IMM cells infected by Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10 released the corresponding chemokine and showed reduced migratory capacity. Therefore, the antitumoral capacity of Chi-H1/CXCL4L1 or Chi-H1/CXCL10 was tested in mice. Either in vitro infected KS-IMM cells were injected or subcutaneously growing KS-IMM xenografts were treated by peritumoral injections of the different viruses. Surprisingly, the transgenes did not increase the antitumoral effect of natural H-1PV. Further experiments indicated that CXCL4L1 and CXCL10 interfered with the expression of the viral NS1 protein in KS-IMM cells. These results indicate that the outcome of parvovirus-based delivery of CXCR3 ligands might be tumor cell type dependent, and hence its application must be considered carefully.

  14. The copy number of Epstein-Barr virus latent genome correlates with the oncogenicity by the activation level of LMP1 and NF-κB

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A tumor model that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent infection facilitated the tumorigenicity was previously established using the Maxi-EBV system. In the present approach, EBV-lost cell clones demonstrated significantly decreased tumorigenesis. On the other hand, the LMP1 gene in Maxi-EBV genome was replaced by that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma origin. The resultant cell line, 293–1/NL showed much lower malignancy than the original 293-EBV. The result was opposite to our expectation. The change...

  15. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA load in leukocytes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects: correlation with the presence of Kaposi's sarcoma and response to anticytomegalovirus therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, G; Gaudreau, A; Toma, E; Lalonde, R; Routy, J P; Murray, G; Handfield, J; Bergeron, M G

    1999-02-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 microgram of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed.

  16. Human Herpesvirus 8 DNA Load in Leukocytes of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects: Correlation with the Presence of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Response to Anticytomegalovirus Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guy; Gaudreau, Annie; Toma, Emil; Lalonde, Richard; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Murray, Gilles; Handfield, Julie; Bergeron, Michel G.

    1999-01-01

    Specific human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) DNA sequences were found in leukocytes of 12 of 29 (41.4%) AIDS subjects with Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS), whereas they were found in 4 of 43 (9.3%) AIDS subjects without KS (P = 0.003), although the peak HHV-8 DNA load in PCR-positive subjects with KS (mean, 425 copies per 0.2 μg of DNA) did not significantly differ from the one found in PCR-positive patients without KS (mean, 218 copies). The use of intravenous ganciclovir or foscarnet therapy to treat cytomegalovirus disease did not affect the HHV-8 DNA load in seven patients for whom serial samples were analyzed. PMID:9925538

  17. V-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (avian)/Trefoil factor 3/high-molecular-weight cytokeratin triple immunostain: a novel tissue-based biomarker in prostate cancer with potential clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca; Mosquera, Juan Miguel

    2013-10-01

    Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) is associated with various cancers and overexpressed in a subset of prostate cancers. Functional studies suggest that v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog (avian) (ERG) down-regulates TFF3 expression in hormone-naïve prostate cancer. To characterize this inverse relationship, we developed a triple immunostain encompassing ERG, TFF3, and high-molecular-weight cytokeratin. Triple stain was performed on 96 tumors and 52 benign cases represented in tissue microarrays. Distinct ERG and TFF3 protein was expressed in 45% (43/96) and 36% (35/96) of prostate cancers, respectively. Coexpression was observed in 5% (5/96) of tumor cases, and 24% (23/96) did not express ERG or TFF3. The inverse expression of ERG and TFF3 was significant (P tumors demonstrating TFF3 expression. Sensitivity and specificity of combined ERG and TFF3 expression in detecting prostate cancer were 76% and 96%, respectively. The feasibility of triple immunostain protocol was validated in a set of 76 needle biopsies. The application of this multiplex in situ biomarker for molecular characterization of prostate cancer and as a supplemental diagnostic and prognostic tool in prostate needle biopsies should be further explored.

  18. Gene mutation and protein expression of v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 in esophageal cancer%食管癌中鼠类肉瘤滤过性毒菌致癌同源体B1基因的突变和蛋白质表达情况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘广杰; 张浩然; 解少男; 李立哲; 刘芳; 刘庆熠

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨食管癌中鼠类肉瘤滤过性毒菌致癌同源体B1 (BRAF)的基因突变和蛋白质表达情况.方法 纳入2014年2月至2015年9月接受手术治疗的75例食管癌患者,取其癌组织、近癌组织和远癌组织,检测BRAF基因的突变和BRAF蛋白质的表达情况,分析BRAF蛋白质阳性表达与食管癌患者临床病理特征的关系.计数资料比较采用卡方检验.结果 在食管癌组织中未检测到BRAF基因第11和15外显子存在突变.75份食管癌组织中,5份Ⅲb期标本在第11外显子上增加了1个碱基C或T.75份食管癌组织中,46份(61.3 %) BRAF蛋白质表达阳性;57份近癌组织中,9份(15.8%)BRAF蛋白质表达阳性;75份远癌组织中,5份(6.7%)BRAF蛋白质表达阳性;3组间比较差异有统计学意义(x2 =61.098,P<0.05).TNM分期Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ期食管癌患者的BRAF蛋白质阳性率分别为21.7%(5/23)、70.8%(17/24)和85.7%(24/28),有和无淋巴结转移患者的BRAF蛋白质阳性率分别为81.6%(31/38)和40.5%(15/37);BRAF蛋白质表达阳性与TNM分期和肿瘤淋巴结转移有关(x2 =23.136、13.313,P均<0.01),与患者性别、年龄和肿瘤分化程度无关(P均>0.05).结论 食管癌组织中BRAF基因第11外显子上有碱基插入情况,但未见突变发生.BRAF蛋白质在食管癌中呈高表达,与TNM分期和淋巴结转移情况有关,可作为判断食管癌恶性程度和患者预后的指标.%Objective To estimate the gene mutation and the protein expression of v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) in esophageal cancer.Methods From February 2014 to September 2015,75 patients with esophageal cancer who received operation were enrolled.Tissues of cancer,adjacent to cancer and far from cancer were taken.The mutation and protein expression of BRAF were detected.The relationship between BRAF protein positive expression and clinical characteristics of patients with esophageal cancer was analyzed.The enumeration data

  19. Immunotherapeutic Intervention against Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Pedrazzoli, Simona Secondino, Vittorio Perfetti, Patrizia Comoli, Daniela Montagna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in systemic therapy for sarcoma have produced, over the last two decades, relatively short-term benefits for the majority of patient. Among the novel biologic therapeutics that will likely increase our ability to cure human cancer in the years to come, immunotherapy is one of the most promising approaches. While past attempts to use immunotherapy have failed to dramatically shift the paradigm of care for the treatment of patients with sarcoma, major advances in basic and translational research have resulted, in more recent years, in clinical trial activity that is now beginning to generate promising results. However, to move from “proof of principle” to large scale clinical applicability, we need well-designed, multi-institutional clinical trials, along with continuous laboratory research to explore further the immunological characteristics of individual sarcoma subtypes and the consequent tailoring of therapy.

  20. [Sarcoma of the breast].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberthür, F; Almendral, A C; Feichter, G; Torhorst, J K

    1992-05-01

    Sarcoma of the breast represents only 0.2-1% of all mammary malignancies. This study reports 5 such cases, including 2 osteosarcomas, 1 fibro-, 1 lipo-, and 1 malignant fibrous sarcoma. The treatment used was mastectomy in 3 cases with excision of axillary lymph nodes. The remaining 2 patients were treated by simple mastectomy whereby 1 of these received a immediate reconstruction with a prosthesis. 1 patient demonstrated local recurrence and died. The remaining 4 patients did not develop neither metastases nor local recurrence and are still alive after an observing period between 12 months up to 17 years. Today, first-line treatment is wide local excision or simple mastectomy. Excision of the axillary lymphatics, adjuvant radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have been disappointing in the treatment of breast sarcoma.

  1. [Moritz Kaposi and his sarcoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Anne; Quint, Koen D

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, Kaposi sarcoma is a multidisciplinary condition, not only observed by dermatologists. Since the HIV epidemic in the 80s and 90s of the last century, more insight into the aetiology of Kaposi sarcoma has been acquired. However, this sarcoma had already been described in 1872 by a Hungarian dermatologist named Moritz Kaposi (1832-1902). Kaposi described the entity as 'idiopathic multiple pigmented sarcoma of the skin'. This entity was an extraordinary diagnosis at that time, mostly observed in Jewish or Mediterranean men. In 1912, 10 years after the death of Moritz Kaposi, the entity name was changed to Kaposi sarcoma.

  2. Uterine sarcoma part III—Targeted therapy: The Taiwan Association of Gynecology (TAG systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shyen Yen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Uterine sarcoma is a very aggressive and highly lethal disease. Even after a comprehensive staging surgery or en block cytoreduction surgery followed by multimodality therapy (often chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy, many patients relapse or present with distant metastases, and finally die of diseases. The worst outcome of uterine sarcomas is partly because of their rarity, unknown etiology, and highly divergent genetic aberration. Uterine sarcomas are often classified into four distinct subtypes, including uterine leiomyosarcoma, low-grade uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma, high-grade uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. Currently, evidence from tumor biology found that these tumors showed alternation and/or mutation of genomes and the intracellular signal pathway. In addition, some preclinical studies showed promising results for targeting receptor tyrosine kinase signaling, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway, various kinds of growth factor pathways, Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway, transforming growth factor β/bone morphogenetic protein signal pathway, aurora kinase A, MDM2 proto-oncogene, histone deacetylases, sex hormone receptors, certain types of oncoproteins, and/or loss of tumor suppressor genes. The current review is attempted to summarize the recurrent advance of targeted therapy for uterine sarcomas.

  3. Lymphangioma-Like Kaposi’s Sarcoma Presenting as Gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan R. Friedman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS is a multicentric vascular neoplasm associated with the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV. KS can occur in immunocompromised patients as well as certain populations in Africa or in the Mediterranean. Less than 5% of KS cases can present with lymphangioma-like kaposi sarcoma (LLKS, which can occur in all KS variants. KS presents with characteristic skin lesions that appear as brown, red, blue, or purple plaques and nodules. The lesions are initially flat and if untreated will become raised. LLKS presents similarly to KS but is associated with severe lymphedema and soft tissue swelling as well as bulla-like vascular lesions. We present the case of an 85-year-old Lebanese, HIV negative, man who presented with a swollen and painful right lower extremity accompanied by necrotic lesions. Wound cultures were positive, and we began the work-up for secondarily infected gangrene. However, skin biopsy results revealed that he in fact had lymphangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma, which allowed us to shift our management. Advanced Kaposi’s sarcoma can present similar to gangrene. It is important to recognize the typical skin lesions of KS and not to overlook Kaposi’s sarcoma or LLKS within the differential.

  4. Relationship between suppression of E6 and E7 virus oncogenes and expression of apoptosis and cell cycle genes in cervical cancer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, E V; Shkoporov, A N; Volodin, N N; Efimov, B A; Pavlov, K A; Kafarskaia, L I

    2010-07-01

    The effects of short interfering RNA suppressing the expression of E6 and E7 human papilloma virus (type 18) on the expression of apoptosis and cell cycle genes were studied in HeLa cells. Changes in the transcription profiles were evaluated using DNA microarray and real-time reverse-transcription PCR. Cell transfection with anti-E6 and anti-E7 short interfering RNA moderately reduced the expression of mRNA for CDC25C, GRB2, GTSE1, and PLK1 genes and induced expression of CDKN1A (p21(CIP)) gene mRNA. In addition, culture proliferation was inhibited and morphological changes characteristic of differentiation and cell aging developed.

  5. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection among the general Uygur population from south and north region of Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi sarcoma (KS is a complex multifocal neoplasm and is the major cause of death for about 50% of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS patients. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic virus with a causal role in the development of all types of KS. KS is prevalent among the Uygur people in Xinjiang, especially in south area. Here we carried out a cross-sectional study among 1534 general Uygur individuals from south and north region of Xinjiang to assess the seroprevalence of KSHV and to identify the potential correlation between KSHV seroprevalence and KS incidence. Results Seroprevalence of KSHV in South and North Xinjiang was 23.1% and 25.9%, respectively. Older age was independently associated with higher KSHV seroprevalence. In subjects from South Xinjiang, lower educational level and reported drinking were each independently associated with higher KSHV seroprevalence. Furthermore, the antibody titer was significantly lower in both south and north KSHV seropositive individuals compared with KS patients, as analyzed by gradient dilution (P Conclusion KSHV is highly prevalent in the general Uygur population in both South and North Xinjiang. Interestingly, the infection rate of KSHV in these two geographical areas did not correlate well with KS incidence. Perhaps unknown factors exist that promote the progression of KSHV infection to KS development in the local minority groups.

  6. SIRT1-mediated downregulation of p27Kip1 is essential for overcoming contact inhibition of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meilan; Yuan, Hongfeng; Tan, Brandon; Bai, Rosemary; Kim, Heon Seok; Bae, Sangsu; Che, Lu; Kim, Jin-Soo; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2016-11-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), a malignancy commonly found in AIDS patients. Despite intensive studies in the last two decades, the mechanism of KSHV-induced cellular transformation and tumorigenesis remains unclear. In this study, we found that the expression of SIRT1, a metabolic sensor, was upregulated in a variety of KSHV-infected cells. In a model of KSHV-induced cellular transformation, SIRT1 knockdown with shRNAs or knockout by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing dramatically suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar of KSHV-transformed cells by inducing cell cycle arrest and contact inhibition. SIRT1 knockdown or knockout induced the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27Kip1). Consequently, p27 knockdown rescued the inhibitory effect of SIRT1 knockdown or knockout on cell proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, treatment of KSHV-transformed cells with a SIRT1 inhibitor, nicotinamide (NAM), had the same effect as SIRT1 knockdown and knockout. NAM significantly inhibited cell proliferation in culture and colony formation in soft agar, and induced cell cycle arrest. Significantly, NAM inhibited the progression of tumors and extended the survival of mice in a KSHV-induced tumor model. Collectively, these results demonstrate that SIRT1 suppression of p27 is required for KSHV-induced tumorigenesis and identify a potential therapeutic target for KS.

  7. Serologic association of human herpesvirus eight with posttransplant Kaposi's sarcoma in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qunibi, W; Al-Furayh, O; Almeshari, K; Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Ross, D; Rigsby, M; Miller, G

    1998-02-27

    In Saudi Arabia, Kaposi's sarcoma occurs in 4.1% of renal transplant recipients and accounts for 70% of malignancies in this group. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV8) has been identified in the DNA of many of these patients. The association between HHV8 and Kaposi's sarcoma was investigated further in post-renal transplant Kaposi's sarcoma patients from a tertiary care hospital (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (n = 14), and non-Kaposi's sarcoma controls with renal transplant (n = 18), chronic renal failure (n = 14), other cancers that did not affect renal function (n = 15), and healthy volunteers (n = 15). The median time from transplant to Kaposi's sarcoma was 13 months. A serum sample was assumed to have antibodies to HHV8 if antibody to either p40 or sVCA was detected. The prevalence of HHV8 seroreactivity was 13/14 (93%) in cases, 5/18 (28%) in renal transplants without Kaposi's sarcoma, and 11/62 (18%) in the aggregate control group. HHV8 seroreactivity was significantly more common (p 0.001) among transplant patients with Kaposi's sarcoma than those without this cancer (odds ratio, 33.80; 95% confidence interval, 2.96-904). These findings suggest an etiologic link between HHV8 and Kaposi's sarcoma presumably due to immunologic or cellular factors that influence host-virus interactions.

  8. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable ext

  9. Sarcoma Foundation of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Google+ Twitter LinkedIn YouTube © 2017 Sarcoma Foundation of America | All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy Website Design & Hosting by 270net Technologies, Inc. X - Enter Your Location - - or - Get your current location Home About Us History People Public Filings News & Media SFA in the ...

  10. Epidemic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and its treatment, see the AIDSinfo website . Nonepidemic Gay-related Kaposi Sarcoma There is a type of ... better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artist, ...

  11. Classic Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and its treatment, see the AIDSinfo website . Nonepidemic Gay-related Kaposi Sarcoma There is a type of ... better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artist, ...

  12. Extremity perfusion for sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald Joan

    2008-01-01

    For more than 50 years, the technique of extremity perfusion has been explored in the limb salvage treatment of local, recurrent, and multifocal sarcomas. The "discovery" of tumor necrosis factor-or. in combination with melphalan was a real breakthrough in the treatment of primarily irresectable

  13. Synovial sarcoma mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2013-01-01

    Human synovial sarcoma is caused by a chromosome translocation, which fuses DNA encoding SSX to that encoding the SS18 protein. Kadoch and Crabtree now show that the resulting cellular transformation stems from disruption of the normal architecture and function of the human SWI/SNF (BAF) complex....

  14. Microenvironmental targets in sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika eEhnman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are rare malignant tumors affecting all age groups. They are typically classified according to their resemblance to corresponding normal tissue. Their heterogeneous features, for example in terms of disease-driving genetic aberrations and body location, complicate both disease classification and development of novel treatment regimens. Many years of failure of improved patient outcome in clinical trials has lead to the conclusion that novel targeted therapies are likely needed in combination with current multimodality regimens. Sarcomas have not, in contrast to the common carcinomas, been the subject for larger systematic studies on how tumor behavior relates to characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. There is consequently an urgent need for identifying suitable molecular targets, not only in tumor cells, but also in the tumor microenvironment. This review discusses preclinical and clinical data about potential molecular targets in sarcomas. Studies on targeted therapies involving the tumor microenvironment are prioritized. A greater understanding of the biological context is expected to facilitate more successful design of future clinical trials in sarcoma.

  15. Leukosis/Sarcoma Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leukosis/sarcoma (L/S) group of diseases designates a variety of transmissible benign and malignant neoplasms of chickens caused by members that belong to the family Retroviridae. Because the expansion of the literature on this disease, it is no longer feasible to cite all relevant publications ...

  16. Management of Bone Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Christina J; Basu-Mallick, Atrayee; Abraham, John A

    2016-10-01

    Treatment of bone sarcoma requires careful planning and involvement of an experienced multidisciplinary team. Significant advancements in systemic therapy, radiation, and surgery in recent years have contributed to improved functional and survival outcomes for patients with these difficult tumors, and emerging technologies hold promise for further advancement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-dose zidovudine plus valganciclovir for Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus-associated multicentric Castleman disease: a pilot study of virus-activated cytotoxic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uldrick, Thomas S.; Polizzotto, Mark N.; Aleman, Karen; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Wyvill, Kathleen M.; Wang, Victoria; Marshall, Vickie; Pittaluga, Stefania; Steinberg, Seth M.; Tosato, Giovanna; Whitby, Denise; Little, Richard F.

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV)–associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a lymphoproliferative disorder most commonly observed in HIV-infected patients. It is characterized by KSHV-infected plasmablasts that frequently express lytic genes. Patients manifest inflammatory symptoms attributed to overproduction of KSHV viral IL-6, human IL-6, and human IL-6. There is no standard therapy and no established response criteria. We investigated an approach targeting 2 KSHV lytic genes, ORF36 and ORF21, the protein of which, respectively, phosphorylate ganciclovir and zidovudine to toxic moieties. In a pilot study, 14 HIV-infected patients with symptomatic KSHV-MCD received high-dose zidovudine (600 mg orally every 6 hours) and the oral prodrug, valganciclovir (900 mg orally every 12 hours). Responses were evaluated using new response criteria. A total of 86% of patients attained major clinical responses and 50% attained major biochemical responses. Median progression-free survival was 6 months. With 43 months of median follow-up, overall survival was 86% at 12 months and beyond. At the time of best response, the patients showed significant improvements in C-reactive protein, albumin, platelets, human IL-6, IL-10, and KSHV viral load. The most common toxicities were hematologic. These observations provide evidence that therapy designed to target cells with lytic KSHV replication has activity in KSHV-MCD. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00099073. PMID:21487108

  18. Genetic structure of avian myeloblastosis virus, released from transformed myeloblasts as a defective virus particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duesberg, Peter H.; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo

    1980-01-01

    Chicken myeloblasts transformed by avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) in the absence of nondefective helper virus (termed nonproducer cells) were found to release a defective virus particle (DVP) that contains avian tumor viral gag proteins but lacks envelope glycoprotein and a DNA polymerase. Nonproducer cells contain a Pr76 gag precursor protein and also a protein that is indistinguishable from the Pr180 gag-pol protein of nondefective viruses. The RNA of the DVP is 7.5 kilobases (kb) long and is 0.7 kb shorter than the 8.2-kb RNAs of the helper viruses of AMV, MAV-1 and MAV-2. Comparisons based on RNA·cDNA hybridization and mapping of RNase T1-resistant oligonucleotides indicated that DVP RNA shares with MAV RNAs nearly isogenic 5′-terminal gag and pol-related sequences of 5.3 kb and a 3′-terminal c-region of 0.7 kb that is different from that found in other avian tumor viruses. Adjacent to the c-region, DVP RNA contains a contiguous specific sequence of 1.5 kb defined by 14 specific oligonucleotides. Except for two of these oligonucleotides that map at its 5′ end, this sequence is unrelated to any sequences of nondefective avian tumor viruses of four different envelope subgroups as well as to the specific sequences of fibroblast-transforming avian acute leukemia and sarcoma viruses of four different RNA subgroups. The specific sequence of the DVP RNA is present in infectious stocks of AMV from this and other laboratories in an AMV-transformed myeloblast line from another laboratory, and it is about 70% related to nucleotide sequences of E26 virus, an independent isolate of an AMV-like virus. Preliminary experiments show DVP to be leukemogenic if fused into susceptible cells in the presence of helper virus. We conclude that DVP RNA is the leukemogenic component of infectious AMV and that its specific sequence, termed AMV, may carry genetic information for oncogenicity. Thus we have found here a transformation-specific RNA sequence, unrelated to helper virus

  19. The Epstein-Barr virus oncogene product, latent membrane protein 1, induces the downregulation of E-cadherin gene expression via activation of DNA methyltransferases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-NeuTsai

    2005-01-01

    The latent membrane protein (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is expressed in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, which isnotoriously metastatic. Although it Is established that LMP1 represses E-cadherin expression and enhances the invasive ability of carcinoma cells, the mechanism underlying this repression remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that LMP1 induces the expression and activity of the DNA methyltransferases 1, 3a, and 3b, using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and enzyme activity assay. This results in hypermethylation of the E-cadherin promoter and down-regulation of E-cadherin gene expression, as revealed by methylation-specific PCR, real-time reverse transcription-PeR and Western blotting data. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5'-Aza-2'dC, restores E-cadherin promoter activity and protein expression in LMPl-expressing cells, which in turn blocks cell migration ability, as demonstrated by the Transwell cell migration assay. Our findings suggest that LMP1 down-regulates E-cadherin gene expression and induces cell migration activity by using cellular DNA methylation machinery.

  20. Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treating Soft Tissue Sarcomas Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Radiation therapy uses ... spread. This is called palliative treatment . Types of radiation therapy External beam radiation therapy: For this treatment, ...

  1. Identification of lymphoproliferative disease virus in wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viral-associated lymphoproliferative neoplasia in domestic poultry is caused by infection with a herpesvirus (Marek’s disease virus) or three species of retroviruses [Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), Avian leukosis/sarcoma virus, lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV)]. Previously, retroviral n...

  2. Primary hepatic sarcomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ri-Sheng; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Biao; Wang, Liu-Hong [Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hangzhou (China); Xu, Xiu-Fang [Zhejiang Medical College, Teaching and Research Group of Radiology, Hangzhou (China)

    2008-10-15

    Primary hepatic sarcomas are rare tumors that are difficult to diagnose clinically. Different primary hepatic sarcomas may have different clinical, morphologic, and radiological features. In this pictorial review, we summarized computed tomography (CT) findings of some relatively common types of hepatic sarcomas, including angiosarcoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE), liposarcoma, undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma (UES), leiomyosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH), and carcinosarcoma (including cystadenocarcinosarcoma). To our knowledge, hepatic cystadenocarcinosarcoma has not been described in the English literature. The CT findings in our case are similar to that of cystadenocarcinoma, a huge, multilocular cystic mass with a large mural nodule and solid portion. The advent of CT has allowed earlier detection of primary hepatic sarcomas as well as more accurate diagnosis and characterization. In addition, we briefly discuss the MRI findings and diagnostic value of primary hepatic sarcomas. (orig.)

  3. Oncogenes in melanoma: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly aggressive tumour with poor prognosis in the metastatic stage. BRAF, NRAS, and KIT are three well-known oncogenes involved in melanoma pathogenesis. Targeting of mutated BRAF kinase has recently been shown to significantly improve overall survival of metastatic melanoma patients, underscoring the particular role of this oncogene in melanoma biology. However, recurrences regularly occur within several months, which supposedly involve further oncogenes. Moreover, oncogenic driver mutations have not been described for up to 30% of all melanomas. In order to obtain a more complete picture of the mutational landscape of melanoma, more recent studies used high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies. A number of new oncogene candidates such as MAPK1/2, ERBB4, GRIN2A, GRM3, RAC1, and PREX2 were identified. Their particular role in melanoma biology is currently under investigation. Evidence for the functional relevance of some of these new oncogene candidates has been provided in in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, these findings await further validation in clinical studies. This review provides an overview on well-known melanoma oncogenes and new oncogene candidates, based on recent high-throughput sequencing studies. The list of genes discussed herein is of course not complete but highlights some of the most significant of recent findings in this area. The new candidates may support more individualized treatment approaches for metastatic melanoma patients in the future.

  4. Molecular biology of sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, M C

    1996-07-01

    There has been a virtual explosion of information relating to the biology of sarcomas with which we as orthopaedists deal. Much more is yet to be learned. These findings will teach us more about the etiology of these tumors. More important, the findings will alter the way in which these tumors are treated. It is unlikely that we will continue to treat osteosarcoma or Ewing's sarcoma patients with currently available drug regimens and surgery or make treatment decisions based on the histologic classification of tumors we know today. If we are to remain active in the management of these patients we must be aware of the findings as they occur. That will ensure both that we remain the primary caretakers of these patients, and that we will continue to be stimulated intellectually by these intriguing scientific investigations.

  5. Pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma: correlation between imaging and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparetto, Taisa Davaus; Marchiori, Edson; Lourenço, Sílvia; Zanetti, Gláucia; Vianna, Alberto Domingues; Santos, Alair A S M D; Nobre, Luiz Felipe

    2009-07-14

    Kaposi sarcoma is a low-grade mesenchymal tumor involving blood and lymphatic vessels. There are four variants of this disease, each presenting a different clinical manifestation: classic or sporadic, African or endemic, organ transplant-related or iatrogenic, and AIDS-related or epidemic. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common tumor among patients with HIV infection, occurring predominantly in homosexual or bisexual men. The pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma occurs commonly in critically immunosupressed patients who commonly have had preceding mucocutaneous or digestive involvement.The etiology of Kaposi sarcoma is not precisely established; genetic, hormonal, and immune factors, as well as infectious agents, have all been implicated. There is evidence from epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular studies that Kaposi sarcoma is associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection. The disease starts as a reactive polyclonal angioproliferative response towards this virus, in which polyclonal cells change to form oligoclonal cell populations that expand and undergo malignant transformation.The diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma usually can be made by a combination of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings, together with the results of bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy. Chest high-resolution computed tomography scans commonly reveal peribronchovascular and interlobular septal thickening, bilateral and symmetric ill-defined nodules in a peribronchovascular distribution, fissural nodularity, mediastinal adenopathies, and pleural effusions. Correlation between the high-resolution computed tomography findings and the pathology revealed by histopathological analysis demonstrate that the areas of central peribronchovascular infiltration represent tumor growth involving the bronchovascular bundles, with nodules corresponding to proliferations of neoplastic cells into the pulmonary parenchyma. The interlobular septal thickening may represent

  6. Pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma: correlation between imaging and pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vianna Alberto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kaposi sarcoma is a low-grade mesenchymal tumor involving blood and lymphatic vessels. There are four variants of this disease, each presenting a different clinical manifestation: classic or sporadic, African or endemic, organ transplant-related or iatrogenic, and AIDS-related or epidemic. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common tumor among patients with HIV infection, occurring predominantly in homosexual or bisexual men. The pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma occurs commonly in critically immunosupressed patients who commonly have had preceding mucocutaneous or digestive involvement. The etiology of Kaposi sarcoma is not precisely established; genetic, hormonal, and immune factors, as well as infectious agents, have all been implicated. There is evidence from epidemiologic, serologic, and molecular studies that Kaposi sarcoma is associated with human herpes virus type 8 infection. The disease starts as a reactive polyclonal angioproliferative response towards this virus, in which polyclonal cells change to form oligoclonal cell populations that expand and undergo malignant transformation. The diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma usually can be made by a combination of clinical, radiographic, and laboratory findings, together with the results of bronchoscopy and transbronchial biopsy. Chest high-resolution computed tomography scans commonly reveal peribronchovascular and interlobular septal thickening, bilateral and symmetric ill-defined nodules in a peribronchovascular distribution, fissural nodularity, mediastinal adenopathies, and pleural effusions. Correlation between the high-resolution computed tomography findings and the pathology revealed by histopathological analysis demonstrate that the areas of central peribronchovascular infiltration represent tumor growth involving the bronchovascular bundles, with nodules corresponding to proliferations of neoplastic cells into the pulmonary parenchyma. The interlobular

  7. Kaposi´s sarcoma, epidemic type. Case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Serrano Ocaña

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Before the AIDS epidemic, Kaposi's sarcoma was found mainly in elderly men of Mediterranean coast, eastern European background and Jewish ancestry (rarely in older women and is a slow growing skin tumor. In AIDS patients, the KS tends to develop more rapidly compromising the skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and other organs. In people with AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma is caused by an interaction between HIV, a weakened immune system and human herpes virus 8. It affects approximately 20% of people with HIV that don’t take antiretroviral drugs. It is more common in homosexual’s patients, but may appear in any HIV positive individual, in Africa where heterosexual HIV transmission route is the most important can also be found in children and women. We are presenting a case of Kaposi sarcoma in a young female admitted at the Internal Medicine Department of Dora Nginza Hospital.

  8. Oncogenic ETS proteins mimic activated RAS/MAPK signaling in prostate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenhorst, Peter C.; Ferris, Mary W.; Hull, Megan A.; Chae, Heejoon; Kim, Sun; Graves, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    The aberrant expression of an oncogenic ETS transcription factor is implicated in the progression of the majority of prostate cancers, 40% of melanomas, and most cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and Ewing's sarcoma. Chromosomal rearrangements in prostate cancer result in overexpression of any one of four ETS transcription factors. How these four oncogenic ETS genes differ from the numerous other ETS genes expressed in normal prostate and contribute to tumor progression is not understood. We report that these oncogenic ETS proteins, but not other ETS factors, enhance prostate cell migration. Genome-wide binding analysis matched this specific biological function to occupancy of a unique set of genomic sites highlighted by the presence of ETS- and AP-1-binding sequences. ETS/AP-1-binding sequences are prototypical RAS-responsive elements, but oncogenic ETS proteins activated a RAS/MAPK transcriptional program in the absence of MAPK activation. Thus, overexpression of oncogenic ETS proteins can replace RAS/MAPK pathway activation in prostate cells. The genomic description of this ETS/AP-1-regulated, RAS-responsive, gene expression program provides a resource for understanding the role of these ETS factors in both an oncogenic setting and the developmental processes where these genes normally function. PMID:22012618

  9. Kaposi′s sarcoma: HIV-negative man with isolated penile localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufiane Mellas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi′s sarcoma is the malignant proliferation of the endothelial cell vessels. Its genesis is still unclear; however, it seems to be related to the herpes virus infection (HHV-8. This neoplasia usually affects the lower limbs and the affected persons are mostly from the Mediterranean region. The exclusive penile localization of the Kaposi′s sarcoma in a patient with a negative HIV serologia is exceptional. Our case is of a 73-year old patient with a negative HIV serology presenting an exclusive penile localization of the Kaposi′s sarcoma treated by radiotherapy.

  10. General Information about Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor that forms from a certain kind of cell in bone or soft tissue . Ewing sarcoma may be found in the bones of the legs, arms, feet, hands, chest , pelvis , spine , or skull . Ewing sarcoma also may be found in the soft tissue of the trunk, arms, legs, head and neck, abdominal cavity , or ...

  11. Treatment Option Overview (Ewing Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumor that forms from a certain kind of cell in bone or soft tissue . Ewing sarcoma may be found in the bones of the legs, arms, feet, hands, chest , pelvis , spine , or skull . Ewing sarcoma also may be found in the soft tissue of the trunk, arms, legs, head and neck, abdominal cavity , or ...

  12. Sarcoma risk after radiation exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrington de Gonzalez Amy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sarcomas were one of the first solid cancers to be linked to ionizing radiation exposure. We reviewed the current evidence on this relationship, focusing particularly on the studies that had individual estimates of radiation doses. There is clear evidence of an increased risk of both bone and soft tissue sarcomas after high-dose fractionated radiation exposure (10 + Gy in childhood, and the risk increases approximately linearly in dose, at least up to 40 Gy. There are few studies available of sarcoma after radiotherapy in adulthood for cancer, but data from cancer registries and studies of treatment for benign conditions confirm that the risk of sarcoma is also increased in this age-group after fractionated high-dose exposure. New findings from the long-term follow-up of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors suggest, for the first time, that sarcomas can be induced by acute lower-doses of radiation (

  13. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcomas (Extremity Sarcoma Closed to Entry as of 5/30/07)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  14. The MicroRNA miR-199a-5p Down-regulation Switches on Wound Angiogenesis by Derepressing the v-ets Erythroblastosis Virus E26 Oncogene Homolog 1-Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yuk Cheung; Roy, Sashwati; Huang, Yue; Khanna, Savita; Sen, Chandan K.

    2012-01-01

    miR-199a-5p plays a critical role in controlling cardiomyocyte survival. However, its significance in endothelial cell biology remains ambiguous. Here, we report the first evidence that miR-199a-5p negatively regulates angiogenic responses by directly targeting v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (Ets-1). Induction of miR-199a-5p in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) blocked angiogenic response in Matrigel® culture, whereas miR-199a-5p-deprived cells exhibited enhanced angiogenesis in vitro. Bioinformatics prediction and miR target reporter assay recognized Ets-1 as a novel direct target of miR-199a-5p. Delivery of miR-199a-5p blocked Ets-1 expression in HMECs, whereas knockdown endogenous miR-199a-5p induced Ets-1 expression. Matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), one of the Ets-1 downstream mediators, was negatively regulated by miR-199a-5p. Overexpression of Ets-1 not only rescued miR-199a-5p-dependent anti-angiogenic effects but also reversed miR-199a-5p-induced loss of MMP-1 expression. Similarly, Ets-1 knockdown blunted angiogenic response and induction of MMP-1 in miR-199a-5p-deprived HMECs. Examination of cutaneous wound dermal tissue revealed a significant down-regulation of miR-199a-5p expression, which was associated with induction of Ets-1 and MMP-1. Mice carrying homozygous deletions in the Ets-1 gene exhibited blunted wound blood flow and reduced abundance of endothelial cells. Impaired wound angiogenesis was associated with compromised wound closure, insufficient granulation tissue formation, and blunted induction of MMP-1. Thus, down-regulation of miR-199a-5p is involved in the induction of wound angiogenesis through derepressing of the Ets-1-MMP1 pathway. PMID:23060436

  15. Collecting and Storing Biological Samples From Patients With Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-21

    Askin Tumor; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  16. Diagnostic Study of Tumor Characteristics in Patients With Ewing's Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-20

    Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  17. [Synovial sarcoma. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deme, Dániel; Abdulfatah, Bishr; Telekes, András

    2016-02-07

    In 2013 there were 94,770 new cancer patients reported in Hungary. Synovial sarcoma accounts for 0.05-0.1% of all cancers and, therefore its incidence is predicted to be 47-94 patients/year in Hungary. The authors report the history of a 18-year-old man who was operated on a right upper abdominal wall tumor with R1 resection. During the next 5 months the tumor grew up to 8 cm in largest diameter. Histology revealed monophasic synovial sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry showed bcl2, focal CD99 and high molecular weight cytokeratin positivity, while smooth muscle actin, S100 and CD34 immunostainings were negative. Becose of this reoperation was not possible, curative six cycles of doxorubicine and ifosfamide with granulocyte colony stimulating factor support and 60 Gy radiotherapy was given to the tumor bed. After these treatments computed tomography scan was negative and the patient attended regular imaging every 3 months. At the age of 20 years the patient developed two neoplastic lesions in the surgical scar measuring 10 mm and 45 × 10 mm in size. R0 resection, partial rib resection and abdominal wall reconstruction were performed. Histology confirmed residual monophasic synovial sarcoma. Radiotherapy was not given because of a risk of intestinal wall perforation. Staging positron emission tomography-computed tomography proved to be negative. At the age of 22 years magnetic resonance imaging scans indicated no tumor recurrence, but after one month a rapidly growing tumorous lesion was found on ultrasound in the surgical scar measuring 20 × 20 × 12 mm in size. Cytology confirmed local recurrence and fluorescence in situ hibridization indicated t(x;18). R0 exstirpation and partial mesh resection were performed and histology showed the same monophasic synovial sarcoma. Because of the presence of vascular invasion and a close resection margin (1 mm) the patient underwent 3 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy (doxorubicine and ifosfamide) with granulocyte colony stimulating

  18. Piracy of PGE2/EP receptor mediated signaling by Kaposi’s sarcoma associated herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8) for latency gene expression: Strategy of a successful pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Arun George; Sharma-Walia, Neelam; Kerur, Nagaraj; White, Carl; Chandran, Bala

    2010-01-01

    KSHV is implicated in the pathogenesis of KS, a chronic inflammation associated malignancy. COX-2 and its metabolite PGE2, two pivotal proinflammatory/oncogeneic molecules, are proposed to play roles in the expression of major KSHV latency associated nuclear antigen-1 (LANA-1). Microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase (mPGES), PGE2 and its receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) were detected in KS lesions with the distinct staining of EP2/EP4 in KS lesions. In latently infected endothelial TIVE-LTC cells, EP receptor antagonists down-regulated LANA-1 expression as well as Ca2+, p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCζ/λ, and p-NF-κB, which are also some of the signal molecules proposed to be important in KS pathogenesis. Exogenous PGE2 and EP receptor agonists induced the LANA-1 promoter in 293 cells, and YY1, Sp1, Oct-1, Oct-6, C/EBP and c-Jun transcription factors appear to be involved in this induction. PGE2/EP receptor induced LANA-1 promoter activity was down-regulated significantly by the inhibition of Ca2+, p-Src, p-PI3K, p-PKCζ/λ, and p-NF-κB. These findings implicate the inflammatory PGE2/EP receptors and the associated signal molecules in herpes virus latency and uncover a novel paradigm that demonstrates the evolution of KSHV genome plasticity to utilize inflammatory response for its survival advantage of maintaining latent gene expression. This data also suggests that potential use of anti-COX-2 and anti-EP receptor therapy may not only ameliorate the chronic inflammation associated with KS but could also lead to elimination of the KSHV latent infection and the associated KS lesions. PMID:20388794

  19. lamivudine inhibits the replication of ALV-J associated acutely transforming virus, its helper virus and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin eWang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the antiviral effects of lamivudine on avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J and its inhibitory effect on the growth of fibrosarcomas caused by acute transforming ALV, a series of experiments were performed in chicken embryo fibroblast cultures and 1-day-old chickens inoculated with an acutely transforming viral stock Fu-J (SDAU1005. This stock was prepared from an acutely fibrosarcoma of field cases in chicken farms and contained both the replication-defective virus Fu-J carrying v-fps oncogene and its helper virus ALV-J strain SDAU1005. The results from 3 different assays in cell cultures demonstrated the significant inhibitory effect of lamivudine on the replication of both SDAU1005 and Fu-J viruses. Furthermore, the effect was dose dependent in the concentration range of 1–4 μg/ml. In chicken experiments, lamivudine could decrease the viral loads of SDAU1005 and Fu-J in the plasma of inoculated chickens, delay the appearance of acute sarcomas, and decrease chicken mortality in the early stage. This model may be used to directly evaluate the inhibitory effects of lamivudine on such tumors and to understand the relationship between the replication-defective virus and its helper virus while also assessing tumor processes.

  20. Study on osteogenic sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eung Chun; Kim, Young Il; Choi, Won Jae; Kim, Young Jin [Dept. of Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-02-15

    The author observed a case of osteogenic sarcoma in a 11-year-old female with complaint of painful swelling on face in right side. The observed results were as follows: 1. Large hematoma was observed, and patient complained painfull swelling on c/c site. 2. Predisposing factor of osteogenic sarcoma was not clear, but patient had history of extraction before patient visiting infirmary of our dental collage. 3. Serologic findings were not specific, and serum aldaline level was normal. 4. Radiographic findings were as follows: a. Diffuse faint radiopacit in the lesion. b. Bony destruction and increased radiopacity in right antrum. c. Displacement of multiple teeth on involved area (i. e no 12, 15, 55, 16, 17, 18) d. Increased periodontal space in single tooth (no 13) e. Destruction of bony crypt on involved teeth (no 13, 14, 15, 17, 18) f. Loss of lamina dura of three teeth in involved area (no 11, 12, 16) 5. Computed tomographic findings were as follows: a. Large calcific and heterogenous component mass in the Rt. maxillary sinus, and this mass extending to Rt. maxilla, alveolar bone, ethmoid sinus. b. Soft tissue bulging in to Rt. side nasal cavity and oral cavity. c. Bone destruction of maxillary sinus wall and Rt. alveolar bone.

  1. Carcinoma de células escamosas oral - contribuição de vírus oncogênicos e alguns marcadores moleculares no desenvolvimento e prognóstico da lesão: uma revisão Oral squamous cell carcinoma - contribution of oncogenic virus and some molecular markers in the development and prognosis of the lesion: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz da Rocha Miranda Venturi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma de células escamosas oral é um evento de muitas etapas, cuja incidência cresce continuamente, particularmente em jovens, numa amplitude que não pode ser completamente explicada pelo aumento da exposição a fatores de risco, como o tabaco e o álcool. Recentes investigações moleculares sugerem que existem múltiplos eventos genéticos, e vírus oncogênicos que são capazes de alterar as funções normais de oncogenes e genes de supressão tumoral. O objetivo deste artigo foi revisar o conhecimento atual sobre o papel do papilomavírus humano (HPV, Epstein-Barr vírus (EBV, P53 e telomerase no desenvolvimento e prognóstico do carcinoma de células escamosas oral.Oral squamous cell carcinoma is a multistep event that continues to increase in incidence, particularly in the young, and to an extent that cannot be fully explained by increased exposure to known risk factors, as tobacco or alcohol. Recent molecular investigations suggest that there are multiple genetic events, and oncogenic virus that are able to alter the normal functions of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The aim of the present article was to review the current knowledge on the role of Human papillomavirus (HPV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, P53 and telomerase in the development and prognosis of the oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  2. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Kaposi Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? Kaposi Sarcoma Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Kaposi Sarcoma? As you cope with Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and ...

  3. Kaposi Sarcoma of the Adrenal Gland Resembling Epithelioid Angiosarcoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Huwait

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection are known to have increased risk of various neoplasms, including Kaposi sarcoma, which classically involves the skin and mucosal locations. The anaplastic variant of Kaposi sarcoma is rare and poorly documented in the literature. It is characterised clinically by a more aggressive behaviour and increased metastatic potential, and histologically by increased cellularity, mitotic rate, and rarely by epithelioid angiosarcoma-like morphology. We report herein a 64-year-old man with a long-standing history of human immunodeficiency virus infection who developed a right adrenal tumor with a high-grade anaplastic angiosarcoma-like morphology. Immunohistochemistry for human herpes virus-8 was strongly positive in the tumor cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an anaplastic Kaposi sarcoma in the adrenal gland.

  4. The role of FLI-1-EWS, a fusion gene reciprocal to EWS-FLI-1, in Ewing sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Elzi, David J.; Song, Meihua; Houghton, Peter J.; Chen, Yidong; Shiio, Yuzuru

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a cancer of bone and soft tissue in children that is characterized by a chromosomal translocation involving EWS and an Ets family transcription factor, most commonly FLI-1. The EWS-FLI-1 fusion oncogene is widely believed to play a central role in Ewing sarcoma. The EWS-FLI-1 gene product regulates the expression of a number of genes important for cancer progression, can transform mouse cells such as NIH3T3 and C3H10T1/2, and is necessary for proliferation and tumorigenicity ...

  5. The Exceptional Oncogenicity of HTLV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Yutaka; Gallo, Robert C

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) is the first pathogenic human retrovirus identified in 1979 by the Gallo group. HTLV-1 causes fatal T-cell leukemia (adult T cell leukemia) and a progressive myelopahy (HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/ tropical spastic paraparesis, HAM/TSP) and other disorders. Since the discovery of HTLV-1, several other microorganisms are demonstrated to cause cancer in humans. In this article, we investigated the oncogenic capacity of HTLV-1, in comparison with those of other oncoviruses and one oncobacterium (Helicobacter pylori, H. Pylori) based on published literature. We conclude here that HTLV-1 is one of the most and may be the most carcinogenic among them and arguably one of the most potent of the known human carcinogens. This fact has not been noted before and is particularly important to justify why we need to study HTLV-1 as an important model of human viral oncogenesis.

  6. Drugs Approved for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Kaposi sarcoma. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  7. High frequency of the HRAS oncogene codon 12 mutation in Macedonian patients with urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasho Panov

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Point mutations at codon 12 of the HRAS (v-Ha-ras Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog oncogene are one of the best defined and widely studied molecular genetic events in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder. The aim of this study was to use the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis of paraffin-embedded tissue-derived DNA to determine the frequency of the HRAS oncogene G ->T codon 12 mutation in TCC patients being treated at the University Urology Clinic in Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded tissue (PET surgically removed TCC specimens of 62 (81.58% out of 76 patients were successfully amplified, the remaining 14 (18.42% showing compromised DNA integrity. The codon 12 mutation of the HRAS oncogene was found in 24 (38.71% out of 62 successfully tested TCC urinary bladder samples. No significant relationship between the mutation frequency and the histopathological grade of tumor differentiation was detected (chi² = 0.044; p = 0.978. The relatively high frequency of mutations found in our study was comparable with some of the previously reported data obtained by this and/or other PCR-based methods. This highly sensitive and specific PCR-RFLP analysis was demonstrated to be a suitable method for the detection of mutations at codon 12 of the HRAS oncogene in PET samples of urinary bladder TCC.

  8. Myeloid Sarcoma in the Orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoxiao; Gigantelli, James W; Abromowitch, Minnie; Morgan, Linda A; Suh, Donny W

    2016-12-08

    The authors describe a case of myeloid sarcoma of the orbit in a pediatric patient. An 8-month-old male infant presented to the ophthalmology clinic with a left orbital mass, which had been increasing in size over the previous 2 months. The mass was initially diagnosed at another clinic as an infantile hemangioma, and had been treated with a topical formulation of timolol. In the ophthalmology clinic, orbital magnetic resonance imaging showed a solid enhancing mass. A biopsy was performed, and histopathology revealed myeloid sarcoma. The disease responded well to a standard chemotherapy regimen. Myeloid sarcoma is a rare, extra-medullary presentation that can occur as an isolated tumor, concurrently with or at relapse of acute myeloid leukemia. Because few cases of myeloid sarcoma in the orbit have been reported, this case report aids in the management of myeloid sarcoma in pediatric patients. The report describes an 8-month-old male infant, the youngest patient to develop myeloid sarcoma without preexisting acute myeloid leukemia. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53:e64-e68.].

  9. Oncogenic cancer/testis antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Andersen, Mads H; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments have set the stage for immunotherapy as a supplement to conventional cancer treatment. Consequently, a significant effort is required to further improve efficacy and specificity, particularly the identification of optimal therapeutic targets for clinical testing. Cancer....../testis antigens are immunogenic, highly cancer-specific, and frequently expressed in various types of cancer, which make them promising candidate targets for cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccination and adoptive T-cell transfer with chimeric T-cell receptors. Our current understanding of tumor...... immunology and immune escape suggests that targeting oncogenic antigens may be beneficial, meaning that identification of cancer/testis antigens with oncogenic properties is of high priority. Recent work from our lab and others provide evidence that many cancer/testis antigens, in fact, have oncogenic...

  10. Concomitant Kaposi sarcoma and multicentric Castleman's disease in a heart transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ami; Bishburg, Eliahu; Zucker, Mark; Tsang, Patricia; Nagarakanti, Sandhya; Sabnani, Indu

    2014-01-01

    Post-transplant human herpes virus -8 (HHV-8)/Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV) infection is associated with neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases. Kaposi sarcoma (KS), multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) are the most common HHV-8-associated neoplastic complications described in solid organ transplant (SOT) patients. Concurrent KS and MCD have been previously described after transplantation only twice - once after liver transplantation and once after renal transplantation. We describe a unique heart transplant patient who also developed concurrent KS and MCD. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of a heart transplant recipient presenting with these two HHV-8-mediated complications at the same time.

  11. Primary Kaposi sarcoma of the subcutaneous tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezube Bruce J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Involvement of the subcutis by Kaposi sarcoma (KS occurs primarily when cutaneous KS lesions evolve into deep penetrating nodular tumors. Primary KS of the subcutaneous tissue is an exceptional manifestation of this low-grade vascular neoplasm. Case presentation We present a unique case of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-associated KS manifesting primarily in the subcutaneous tissue of the anterior thigh in a 43-year-old male, which occurred without overlying visible skin changes or concomitant KS disease elsewhere. Radiological imaging and tissue biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of KS. Conclusion This is the first documented case of primary subcutaneous KS occurring in the setting of AIDS. The differential diagnosis of an isolated subcutaneous lesion in an human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individual is broad, and requires both imaging and a histopathological diagnosis to guide appropriate therapy.

  12. A novel mechanism inducing genome instability in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian R Jackson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with multiple AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV has a biphasic life cycle and both the lytic and latent phases are required for tumorigenesis. Evidence suggests that KSHV lytic replication can cause genome instability in KSHV-infected cells, although no mechanism has thus far been described. A surprising link has recently been suggested between mRNA export, genome instability and cancer development. Notably, aberrations in the cellular transcription and export complex (hTREX proteins have been identified in high-grade tumours and these defects contribute to genome instability. We have previously shown that the lytically expressed KSHV ORF57 protein interacts with the complete hTREX complex; therefore, we investigated the possible intriguing link between ORF57, hTREX and KSHV-induced genome instability. Herein, we show that lytically active KSHV infected cells induce a DNA damage response and, importantly, we demonstrate directly that this is due to DNA strand breaks. Furthermore, we show that sequestration of the hTREX complex by the KSHV ORF57 protein leads to this double strand break response and significant DNA damage. Moreover, we describe a novel mechanism showing that the genetic instability observed is a consequence of R-loop formation. Importantly, the link between hTREX sequestration and DNA damage may be a common feature in herpesvirus infection, as a similar phenotype was observed with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 ICP27 protein. Our data provide a model of R-loop induced DNA damage in KSHV infected cells and describes a novel system for studying genome instability caused by aberrant hTREX.

  13. Screening of the Human Kinome Identifies MSK1/2-CREB1 as an Essential Pathway Mediating Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication during Primary Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Sawant, Tanvee Vinod; Lan, Ke; Lu, Chun; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses often hijack cellular pathways to facilitate infection and replication. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a vascular tumor of endothelial cells. Despite intensive studies, cellular pathways mediating KSHV infection and replication are still not well defined. Using an antibody array approach, we examined cellular proteins phosphorylated during primary KSHV infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Enrichment analysis identified integrin/mitogen-activated protein kinase (integrin/MAPK), insulin/epidermal growth factor receptor (insulin/EGFR), and JAK/STAT as the activated networks during primary KSHV infection. The transcriptional factor CREB1 (cyclic AMP [cAMP]-responsive element-binding protein 1) had the strongest increase in phosphorylation. While knockdown of CREB1 had no effect on KSHV entry and trafficking, it drastically reduced the expression of lytic transcripts and proteins and the production of infectious virions. Chemical activation of CREB1 significantly enhanced viral lytic replication. In contrast, CREB1 neither influenced the expression of the latent gene LANA nor affected KSHV infectivity. Mechanistically, CREB1 was not activated through the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway or via the AKT, MK2, and RSK pathways. Rather, CREB1 was activated by the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2). Consequently, chemical inhibition or knockdown of MSKs significantly inhibited the KSHV lytic replication program; however, it had a minimal effect on LANA expression and KSHV infectivity. Together, these results identify the MSK1/2-CREB1 proteins as novel essential effectors of KSHV lytic replication during primary infection. The differential effect of the MSK1/2-CREB1 pathway on the expression of viral latent and lytic genes might control the robustness of viral lytic replication, and therefore the

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Uterine Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Endometrial Cancer Screening Research Uterine Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Uterine Sarcoma ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  15. How Are Soft Tissue Sarcomas Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of cancer or a benign disease. Several types of biopsies are used to diagnose sarcomas. Doctors experienced with ... But if FNA results suggest a sarcoma, another type of biopsy will usually be done to remove enough tissue ...

  16. General Information about Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forms in soft tissues of the body, including muscle, tendons, fat, blood vessels, lymph vessels, nerves, and tissue around joints. Soft tissue sarcoma occurs in children and adults. Soft ... disorders can increase the risk of childhood soft tissue sarcoma. Anything ...

  17. Stages of Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forms in soft tissues of the body, including muscle, tendons, fat, blood vessels, lymph vessels, nerves, and tissue around joints. Soft tissue sarcoma occurs in children and adults. Soft ... disorders can increase the risk of childhood soft tissue sarcoma. Anything ...

  18. Treatment Options for Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forms in soft tissues of the body, including muscle, tendons, fat, blood vessels, lymph vessels, nerves, and tissue around joints. Soft tissue sarcoma occurs in children and adults. Soft ... disorders can increase the risk of childhood soft tissue sarcoma. Anything ...

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forms in soft tissues of the body, including muscle, tendons, fat, blood vessels, lymph vessels, nerves, and tissue around joints. Soft tissue sarcoma occurs in children and adults. Soft ... disorders can increase the risk of childhood soft tissue sarcoma. Anything ...

  20. Trabectedin in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J. Petek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcomas are a group of rare tumors derived from mesenchymal tissue, accounting for about 1% of adult cancers. There are over 60 different histological subtypes, each with their own unique biological behavior and response to systemic therapy. The outcome for patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma is poor with few available systemic treatment options. For decades, the mainstay of management has consisted of doxorubicin with or without ifosfamide. Trabectedin is a synthetic agent derived from the Caribbean tunicate, Ecteinascidia turbinata. This drug has a number of potential mechanisms of action, including binding the DNA minor groove, interfering with DNA repair pathways and the cell cycle, as well as interacting with transcription factors. Several phase II trials have shown that trabectedin has activity in anthracycline and alkylating agent-resistant soft tissue sarcoma and suggest use in the second- and third-line setting. More recently, trabectedin has shown similar progression-free survival to doxorubicin in the first-line setting and significant activity in liposarcoma and leiomyosarcoma subtypes. Trabectedin has shown a favorable toxicity profile and has been approved in over 70 countries for the treatment of metastatic soft tissue sarcoma. This manuscript will review the development of trabectedin in soft tissue sarcomas.

  1. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus contains G protein-coupled receptor and cyclin D homologs which are expressed in Kaposi's sarcoma and malignant lymphoma.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    A new human herpesvirus was recently identified in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus [KSHV] or human herpesvirus 8), as well as in primary effusion (body cavity-based) lymphomas (PELs). A 12.3-kb-long KSHV clone was obtained from a PEL genomic library. Sequencing of this clone revealed extensive homology and colinearity with the right end of the herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) genome and more limited homology to the left end of the Epstein-Barr virus genome. Fou...

  2. Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus: mechanisms of oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Thomas F; Cesarman, Ethel

    2015-10-01

    Kaposi Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV, HHV8) causes three human malignancies, Kaposi Sarcoma (KS), an endothelial tumor, as well as Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL) and the plasma cell variant of Multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD), two B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. All three cancers occur primarily in the context of immune deficiency and/or HIV infection, but their pathogenesis differs. KS most likely results from the combined effects of an endotheliotropic virus with angiogenic properties and inflammatory stimuli and thus represents an interesting example of a cancer that arises in an inflammatory context. Viral and cellular angiogenic and inflammatory factors also play an important role in the pathogenesis of MCD. In contrast, PEL represents an autonomously growing malignancy that is, however, still dependent on the continuous presence of KSHV and the action of several KSHV proteins.

  3. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankwah EK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ernest K Amankwah,1 Anthony P Conley,2 Damon R Reed2 1Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Sarcoma Department, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subcutaneous tissue, and lymph nodes. Additionally, many sarcoma patients presenting initially with localized disease may relapse at metastatic sites. While localized sarcomas can often be cured through surgery and often radiation, controversies exist over optimal management of patients with metastatic sarcoma. Combinations of chemotherapy are the most effective in many settings, and many promising new agents are under active investigation or are being explored in preclinical models. Metastatic sarcomas are excellent candidates for novel approaches with additional agents as they have demonstrated chemosensitivity and affect a portion of the population that is motivated toward curative therapy. In this paper, we provide an overview on the common sarcomas of childhood (rhabdomyosarcoma, adolescence, and young adults (osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and older adults (leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and undifferentiated high grade sarcoma in terms of the epidemiology, current therapy, promising therapeutic directions and outcome with a focus on metastatic disease. Potential advances in terms of promising therapy and biologic insights may lead to more effective and safer therapies; however, more clinical trials and research are needed for patients with metastatic sarcoma. Keywords: chemotherapy, pediatric sarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, synovial sarcoma

  4. Skin Ultrasound in Kaposi Sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, R; Alfageme, F; Roustán, G; Suarez, M D

    2016-05-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging has recently been increasing in numerous dermatologic diseases. This noninvasive technique provides additional details on the structure and vascularization of skin lesions. Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor that typically arises in the skin and mucosas. It can spread to lymph nodes and internal organs. We performed B-mode and color Doppler ultrasound studies in 3 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Kaposi sarcoma confirmed by histological examination. We found differences in the ultrasound pattern between nodular and plaque lesions, in both B-mode and color Doppler. We believe that skin ultrasound imaging could be a useful technique for studying cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma, providing additional information on the structural and vascular characteristics of the lesion.

  5. Consensus of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases and Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology on the management and treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Arruda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifocal vascular lesion of low-grade potential that is most often present in mucocutaneous sites and usually also affects lymph nodes and visceral organs. The condition may manifest through purplish lesions, flat or raised with an irregular shape, gastrointestinal bleeding due to lesions located in the digestive system, and dyspnea and hemoptysis associated with pulmonary lesions. In the early 1980s, the appearance of several cases of Kaposi's sarcoma in homosexual men was the first alarm about a newly identified epidemic, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In 1994, it was finally demonstrated that the presence of a herpes virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma called HHV-8 or Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus and its genetic sequence was rapidly deciphered. The prevalence of this virus is very high (about 50% in some African populations, but stands between 2% and 8% for the entire world population. Kaposi's sarcoma only develops when the immune system is depressed, as in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which appears to be associated with a specific variant of the Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus. There are no treatment guidelines for Kaposi's sarcoma established in Brazil, and thus the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology and the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases developed the treatment consensus presented here.

  6. Mast cell sarcoma: clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Catherine R; Butterfield, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    Mast cell sarcoma is a disorder that results in abnormal mast cells as identified by morphology, special stains, and in some publications, c-kit mutation analysis. It affects animal species such as canines more commonly than humans. In humans it is a very rare condition, with variable clinical presentation. There is no standard therapy for the disorder. It can affect any age group. It is occasionally associated with systemic mastocytosis and/or urticaria pigmentosa. The prognosis of mast cell sarcoma in published literature is very poor in humans.

  7. Multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma in a cyclosporin treated, HIV-1 negative patient: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Oers MHJ

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD is a rare disease, but is more frequent in AIDS patients. MCD has only been reported twice before in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy after renal transplantation, and never in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy without transplantation. About half of the cases of MCD are human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 – related, in contrast to Kaposi's sarcoma, a more common complication arising after immunosuppression, where the virus is found in virtually all cases. Case presentation We report a HIV-1 negative, non-transplant patient who developed HHV8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma after 17 years of immunosuppressive treatment with cyclosporin A for a minimal change nephropathy. Chemotherapy with liposomal doxorubicin resolved both symptoms of multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma in this patient. A concomitant decline in the HHV8 viral load in serum/plasma, as determined by a quantitative real-time PCR assay, was observed. Conclusions Multicentric Castleman's disease can be a complication of cyclosporin A treatment. Both multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma in this patient were responsive to liposomal doxorubicin, the treatment of choice for Kaposi's sarcoma at the moment, again suggesting a common mechanism linking both disorders, at least for HHV8-positive multicentric Castleman's disease and Kaposi's sarcoma. HHV8 viral load measurements can be used to monitor effectiveness of therapy.

  8. MAPPING OF NATURAL KAPOSI SARCOMA INHIBITOR USING NETWORK BIOLOGY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayadeepa R. M.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of protein-ligand interaction networks on a proteome scale is crucial to address a wide range of biological problems such as correlating molecular functions to physiological processes and designing safe and efficient therapeutics. In this study we have developed a novel computational strategy to identify ligand binding profiles of proteins across gene families and applied it to predicting protein functions, elucidating molecular mechanisms of drug adverse effects, and repositioning safe pharmaceuticals to treat different diseases The resultant network is then extrapolated to proteomics level to sort out the genes only expressed in the specific cancer types. The network is statistically analyzed and represented by the graphical interpretation to encounter the hub nodes. The objective of developing a biological networking is for the evaluation and validation of cancer drugs and their targets. In the field of cancer biology, the drug and their targets holds a role of paramount importance. With the work conducted here it shows the study of relation between drug target networks. Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS is a systemic disease which can present with cutaneous lesions with or without internal involvement. Genes belonging to the group of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors are best targeted for cancer studies. Biological networks like gene regulatory networks, protein interaction network is usually created to simplify the studies. In the present study, 26 proteins as receptor were selected for the study; all the receptors were responsible for the cause of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Also, 121 natural anti-Kaposi Sarcoma compounds were selected from different sources the natural components were the best component for blocking of abnormal activity.

  9. DNA damage, somatic aneuploidy, and malignant sarcoma susceptibility in muscular dystrophies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang M Schmidt

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Albeit genetically highly heterogeneous, muscular dystrophies (MDs share a convergent pathology leading to muscle wasting accompanied by proliferation of fibrous and fatty tissue, suggesting a common MD-pathomechanism. Here we show that mutations in muscular dystrophy genes (Dmd, Dysf, Capn3, Large lead to the spontaneous formation of skeletal muscle-derived malignant tumors in mice, presenting as mixed rhabdomyo-, fibro-, and liposarcomas. Primary MD-gene defects and strain background strongly influence sarcoma incidence, latency, localization, and gender prevalence. Combined loss of dystrophin and dysferlin, as well as dystrophin and calpain-3, leads to accelerated tumor formation. Irrespective of the primary gene defects, all MD sarcomas share non-random genomic alterations including frequent losses of tumor suppressors (Cdkn2a, Nf1, amplification of oncogenes (Met, Jun, recurrent duplications of whole chromosomes 8 and 15, and DNA damage. Remarkably, these sarcoma-specific genetic lesions are already regularly present in skeletal muscles in aged MD mice even prior to sarcoma development. Accordingly, we show also that skeletal muscle from human muscular dystrophy patients is affected by gross genomic instability, represented by DNA double-strand breaks and age-related accumulation of aneusomies. These novel aspects of molecular pathologies common to muscular dystrophies and tumor biology will potentially influence the strategies to combat these diseases.

  10. Soft tissue sarcoma subtypes exhibit distinct patterns of acquired uniparental disomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuna Musaffe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soft tissue sarcomas (STS are heterogeneous mesenchymal tumors with diverse subtypes. STS can be classified into two main categories according to the type of genomic alteration: recurrent translocation driven STS, and non-recurrent translocations. However, little has known about acquired uniparental disomy in STS. Methods In this study, we analyzed SNP microarray data to determine the frequency and distribution patterns of acquired uniparental disomy (aUPD in major soft tissue sarcoma (STS subtypes using CNAG and R softwares. Results We identified recurrent aUPD regions specific to alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma with the most frequent at 11p15.4, gastrointestinal stromal tumor at 1p36.11-p35.3, leiomyosarcoma at 17p13.3-p13.1, myxofibrosarcoma at 1p35.1-p34.2 and 16q23.3-q24.1, and pleomorphic liposarcoma at 13q13.2-q13.3 and 13q14.11-q14.2. In contrast, specific recurrent aUPD regions were not identified in dedifferentiated liposarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, and synovial sarcoma. Strikingly total, centromeric and segmental aUPD regions are more frequent in STS that do not exhibit recurrent translocation events. Conclusions Our study yields a detailed map of aUPD across 9 diverse STS subtypes and suggests the potential location of several novel tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes.

  11. DNA damage, somatic aneuploidy, and malignant sarcoma susceptibility in muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Wolfgang M; Uddin, Mohammed H; Dysek, Sandra; Moser-Thier, Karin; Pirker, Christine; Höger, Harald; Ambros, Inge M; Ambros, Peter F; Berger, Walter; Bittner, Reginald E

    2011-04-01

    Albeit genetically highly heterogeneous, muscular dystrophies (MDs) share a convergent pathology leading to muscle wasting accompanied by proliferation of fibrous and fatty tissue, suggesting a common MD-pathomechanism. Here we show that mutations in muscular dystrophy genes (Dmd, Dysf, Capn3, Large) lead to the spontaneous formation of skeletal muscle-derived malignant tumors in mice, presenting as mixed rhabdomyo-, fibro-, and liposarcomas. Primary MD-gene defects and strain background strongly influence sarcoma incidence, latency, localization, and gender prevalence. Combined loss of dystrophin and dysferlin, as well as dystrophin and calpain-3, leads to accelerated tumor formation. Irrespective of the primary gene defects, all MD sarcomas share non-random genomic alterations including frequent losses of tumor suppressors (Cdkn2a, Nf1), amplification of oncogenes (Met, Jun), recurrent duplications of whole chromosomes 8 and 15, and DNA damage. Remarkably, these sarcoma-specific genetic lesions are already regularly present in skeletal muscles in aged MD mice even prior to sarcoma development. Accordingly, we show also that skeletal muscle from human muscular dystrophy patients is affected by gross genomic instability, represented by DNA double-strand breaks and age-related accumulation of aneusomies. These novel aspects of molecular pathologies common to muscular dystrophies and tumor biology will potentially influence the strategies to combat these diseases.

  12. Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpesvirus Genome Persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceline Juillard

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV has an etiologic role in Kaposi’s sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease. These diseases are most common in immunocompromised individuals, especially those with AIDS. Similar to all herpesviruses, KSHV infection is lifelong. KSHV infection in tumor cells is primarily latent, with only a small subset of cells undergoing lytic infection. During latency, the KSHV genome persists as a multiple copy, extrachromosomal episome in the nucleus. In order to persist in proliferating tumor cells, the viral genome replicates once per cell cycle and then segregates to daughter cell nuclei. KSHV only expresses several genes during latent infection. Prominent among these genes, is the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA. LANA is responsible for KSHV genome persistence and also exerts transcriptional regulatory effects. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and in addition, is responsible for segregation of replicated genomes to daughter nuclei. LANA serves as a molecular tether, bridging the viral genome to mitotic chromosomes to ensure that KSHV DNA reaches progeny nuclei. N-terminal LANA attaches to mitotic chromosomes by binding histones H2A/H2B at the surface of the nucleosome. C-terminal LANA binds specific KSHV DNA sequence and also has a role in chromosome attachment. In addition to the essential roles of N- and C-terminal LANA in genome persistence, internal LANA sequence is also critical for efficient episome maintenance. LANA’s role as an essential mediator of virus persistence makes it an attractive target for inhibition in order to prevent or treat KSHV infection and disease.

  13. Treatment Options for Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and its treatment, see the AIDSinfo website . Nonepidemic Gay-related Kaposi Sarcoma There is a type of ... better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artist, ...

  14. General Information about Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and its treatment, see the AIDSinfo website . Nonepidemic Gay-related Kaposi Sarcoma There is a type of ... better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artist, ...

  15. Kaposi sarcoma associated with lipoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, T R; Ayabakan, O; Sakiz, D; Koslu, A

    2005-05-01

    Lipoedema is a form of lipodistrophy, which consists of abnormal accumulation of fat in subcutaneous tissue of the lower limbs. It does not cause any disease and it has not been reported association with malignity. We describe a 63-year-old woman occurring of Kaposi sarcoma on the lipoedema base.

  16. HITS-CLIP analysis uncovers a link between the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein and host pre-mRNA metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Sei

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic virus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, and some forms of multicentric Castleman's disease. The KSHV ORF57 protein is a conserved posttranscriptional regulator of gene expression that is essential for virus replication. ORF57 is multifunctional, but most of its activities are directly linked to its ability to bind RNA. We globally identified virus and host RNAs bound by ORF57 during lytic reactivation in PEL cells using high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (HITS-CLIP. As expected, ORF57-bound RNA fragments mapped throughout the KSHV genome, including the known ORF57 ligand PAN RNA. In agreement with previously published ChIP results, we observed that ORF57 bound RNAs near the oriLyt regions of the genome. Examination of the host RNA fragments revealed that a subset of the ORF57-bound RNAs was derived from transcript 5' ends. The position of these 5'-bound fragments correlated closely with the 5'-most exon-intron junction of the pre-mRNA. We selected four candidates (BTG1, EGR1, ZFP36, and TNFSF9 and analyzed their pre-mRNA and mRNA levels during lytic phase. Analysis of both steady-state and newly made RNAs revealed that these candidate ORF57-bound pre-mRNAs persisted for longer periods of time throughout infection than control RNAs, consistent with a role for ORF57 in pre-mRNA metabolism. In addition, exogenous expression of ORF57 was sufficient to increase the pre-mRNA levels and, in one case, the mRNA levels of the putative ORF57 targets. These results demonstrate that ORF57 interacts with specific host pre-mRNAs during lytic reactivation and alters their processing, likely by stabilizing pre-mRNAs. These data suggest that ORF57 is involved in modulating host gene expression in addition to KSHV gene expression during lytic reactivation.

  17. Hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    proto-oncogene (or other gene concerned with cell growth, cycling or .... small proportion of the anti-HCV-positive patients with HCC have not had cirrhosis, ..... Abelson murine leukemia virus encoded protein present in transformed fibroblasts ...

  18. Pazopanib in advanced vascular sarcomas: an EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (STBSG) retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kollar, A.; Jones, R.L.; Stacchiotti, S.; Gelderblom, H.; Guida, M.; Grignani, G.; Steeghs, N.; Safwat, A.; Katz, D.; Duffaud, F.; Sleijfer, S.; Graaf, W.T. van der; Touati, N.; Litiere, S.; Marreaud, S.; Gronchi, A.; Kasper, B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pazopanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with selective subtypes of advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) who have previously received standard chemotherapy including anthracyclines. Data on the efficacy in vascular sarcomas are limited.

  19. Treatment of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV-associated cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk P Dittmer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma (KS is the most frequent AIDS-defining cancer worldwide. Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiological agent of KS, and the virus is also associated with two lymphoproliferative diseases. Both KS and KSHV-associated lymphomas, are cancers of unique molecular composition. They represent a challenge for cancer treatment and an opportunity to identify new mechanisms of transformation. Here, we review the current clinical insights into KSHV-associated cancers and discuss scientific insights into the pathobiology of KS, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman’s disease.

  20. Recent advances in the study of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication and pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denis; Avey; Brittany; Brewers; Fanxiu; Zhu

    2015-01-01

    It has now been over twenty years since a novel herpesviral genome was identified in Kaposi’s sarcoma biopsies. Since then, the cumulative research effort by molecular biologists, virologists, clinicians, and epidemiologists alike has led to the extensive characterization of this tumor virus, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus(KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8(HHV-8)), and its associated diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of KSHV biology and pathogenesis, with a particular emphasis on new and exciting advances in the field of epigenetics. We also discuss the development and practicality of various cell culture and animal model systems to study KSHV replication and pathogenesis.

  1. Oncogenic Brain Metazoan Parasite Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela N. Spurgeon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple observations suggest that certain parasitic infections can be oncogenic. Among these, neurocysticercosis is associated with increased risk for gliomas and hematologic malignancies. We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with colocalization of a metazoan parasite, possibly cysticercosis, and a WHO grade IV neuroepithelial tumor with exclusively neuronal differentiation by immunohistochemical stains (immunopositive for synaptophysin, neurofilament protein, and Neu-N and not for GFAP, vimentin, or S100. The colocalization and temporal relationship of these two entities suggest a causal relationship.

  2. Growth-promoting role of the miR-106a~363 cluster in Ewing sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layne Dylla

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs have been identified as potent regulators of both normal development and the hallmarks of cancer. Targeting of microRNAs has been shown to have preclinical promise, and select miR-based therapies are now in clinical trials. Ewing Sarcoma is a biologically aggressive pediatric cancer with little change in clinical outcomes despite improved chemotherapeutic regimens. There is a substantial need for new therapies to improve Ewing Sarcoma outcomes and to prevent chemotherapy-related secondary sequelae. Most Ewing Sarcoma tumors are driven by the EWS/Fli-1 fusion oncoprotein, acting as a gain-of-function transcription factor causing dysregulation of a variety of targets, including microRNAs. Our previous studies, and those of others, have identified upregulation of miRs belonging to the related miR-17~92a, miR-106b~25, and miR-106a~363 clusters in Ewing Sarcoma. However, the functional consequences of this have not been characterized, nor has miR blockade been explored as an anti-cancer strategy in Ewing Sarcoma. To simulate a potential therapeutic approach, we examined the effects of blockade of these clusters, and their component miRs. Using colony formation as a read-out, we find that blockade of selected individual cluster component miRs, using specific inhibitors, has little or no effect. Combinatorial inhibition using miR "sponge" methodology, on the other hand, is inhibitory to colony formation, with blockade of whole clusters generally more effective than blockade of miR families. We show that a miR-blocking sponge directed against the poorly characterized miR-106a~363 cluster is a particularly potent inhibitor of clonogenic growth in a subset of Ewing Sarcoma cell lines. We further identify upregulation of miR-15a as a downstream mechanism contributing to the miR-106a~363 sponge growth-inhibitory effect. Taken together, our studies provide support for a pro-oncogenic role of the miR-106a~363 cluster in Ewing Sarcoma, and

  3. Ribociclib and Doxorubicin in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcomas That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Metastatic Angiosarcoma; Metastatic Epithelioid Sarcoma; Metastatic Fibrosarcoma; Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma; Metastatic Liposarcoma; Metastatic Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma; Metastatic Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Myxofibrosarcoma; Pleomorphic Rhabdomyosarcoma; Stage III Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Undifferentiated (Embryonal) Sarcoma

  4. Long-term treatment with the oncolytic ECHO-7 virus Rigvir of a melanoma stage IV M1c patient, a small cell lung cancer stage IIIA patient, and a histiocytic sarcoma stage IV patient-three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Pēteris; Olmane, Evija; Brokāne, Linda; Krastiņa, Zanda; Romanovska, Māra; Kupčs, Kārlis; Isajevs, Sergejs; Proboka, Guna; Erdmanis, Romualds; Nazarovs, Jurijs; Venskus, Dite

    2016-10-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a recent addition to cancer treatment. Here, we describe positive treatment outcomes in three patients using Rigvir virotherapy. One of the patients is diagnosed with melanoma stage IV M1c, one with small cell lung cancer stage IIIA, and one with histiocytic sarcoma stage IV. The diagnoses of all patients are verified by histology or cytology. All patients started Rigvir treatment within a few months after being diagnosed and are currently continuing Rigvir treatment. The degree of regression of the disease has been determined by computed tomography. Safety assessment of adverse events graded according to NCI CTCAE did not show any value above grade 1 during Rigvir(®) treatment. Using current standard treatments, the survival of patients with the present diagnoses is low. In contrast, the patients described here were diagnosed 3.5, 7.0, and 6.6 years ago, and their condition has improved and been stabile for over 1.5, 6.5, and 4 years, respectively. These observations suggest that virotherapy using Rigvir can successfully be used in long-term treatment of patients with melanoma stage IV M1c, small cell lung cancer stage IIIA, and histiocytic sarcoma stage IV and therefore could be included in prospective clinical studies.

  5. Oncogenic HPV among HIV infected female population in West Bengal, India

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta Sharmila; Bhattacharya Subhasish; Saha Bibhuti; Bal Baishali; Pal Reshmi; Sarkar Kamalesh; Mazumdar Partha; Chakraborti Shekhar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Prevalence of both cervical cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are very high in India. Natural history of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection is known to be altered in HIV positive women and there is an increased possibility of persistence of HPV infections in this population. Therefore, this study was conducted to understand the epidemiology and circulating genotypes of oncogenic HPV among HIV positive and negative female population in West Bengal, ...

  6. Potential Therapeutic Targets in Uterine Sarcomas

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas are rare tumors accounting for 3,4% of all uterine cancers. Even after radical hysterectomy, most patients relapse or present with distant metastases. The very limited clinical benefit of adjuvant cytotoxic treatments is reflected by high mortality rates, emphasizing the need for new treatment strategies. This review summarizes rising potential targets in four distinct subtypes of uterine sarcomas: leiomyosarcoma, low-grade and high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undi...

  7. Head and Neck Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Aljabab, A. S.; Nason, R. W.; Kazi, R; Pathak, K. A.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcomas are malignant neoplasms originating from mesodermal tissues and constitute less than 1% of body’s tumors, including those of the head and neck region. 5–15% of adult sarcomas are in the head and neck region (20% from bones and cartilages and 80% in soft tissues). Commonly encountered sarcomas in the head and neck region are - osteosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, fibrosarcoma and angiosarcoma. This article reviews the available literature on head and neck sa...

  8. Epidemiology and therapies for metastatic sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Amankwah EK; Conley AP; Reed DR

    2013-01-01

    Ernest K Amankwah,1 Anthony P Conley,2 Damon R Reed2 1Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Sarcoma Department, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA Abstract: Sarcomas are cancers arising from the mesenchymal layer that affect children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. Although most sarcomas are localized, many display a remarkable predilection for metastasis to the lungs, liver, bones, subc...

  9. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladra, Matthew M.; Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  10. Primary epithelioid sarcoma of scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma G Gurwale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelioid sarcoma (ES is a rare mesenchymal tumor of unknown histogenesis which displays multidirectional differentiation, predominantly epithelial. They have no normal cellular counterpart and differ from both synovial sarcoma and other carcinomas. It mainly affects young adults. It has two variants, classic type and proximal type. The more common classic type presents as a slowly growing painless nodule or plaque on the distal extremities. It is rare in children and older individuals. There is male predominance. The size varies from few millimeters to several centimeters. Central deeply seated lesions in pelvis and genital tract are termed as proximal ES. It has a multinodular growth pattern and usually occurs in older patients. These are comparatively more aggressive and metastasize early. On histopathological examination, these lesions need to be distinguished from other tumors showing epithelioid morphology. Primary ES of scalp is an exceedingly rare tumor. We present a case of nodular tumor on the scalp with cervical lymph node metastasis.

  11. A Case of Patch Stage of Kaposi’s Sarcoma and Discussion of the Differential Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kak, Ipshita; Salama, Samih; Gohla, Gabriella; Naqvi, Asghar; Alowami, Salem

    2016-01-01

    A 55 year old HIV positive male had a skin lesion biopsy which showed atypical vascular proliferation within the superficial and deep dermis with mild atypia of lining endothelial cells. A sparse lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate surrounding the irregular vascular channels was noted. Immunohistochemistry highlighted the atypical blood vessels with the vascular markers CD31, CD34 and Factor VIII. The differential diagnosis included unusual vascular or lymphatic proliferations, stasis dermatitis, kaposiform hemangioendothelioma, progressive lymphangioma and angiosarcoma with focal Kaposi’s sarcoma features. Characteristic human herpes virus-8 positive staining helped support the diagnosis of patch stage of Kaposi’s sarcoma. Herein, we discuss the case findings, differential diagnosis and characteristic histological findings associated with the patch stage of Kaposi’s sarcoma which can be an elusive diagnosis. PMID:27134709

  12. Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 sequentially shapes the NK cell repertoire during the course of asymptomatic infection and Kaposi sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Dupuy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of innate immunity to immunosurveillance of the oncogenic Human Herpes Virus 8 (HHV8 has not been studied in depth. We investigated NK cell phenotype and function in 70 HHV8-infected subjects, either asymptomatic carriers or having developed Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. Our results revealed substantial alterations of the NK cell receptor repertoire in healthy HHV8 carriers, with reduced expression of NKp30, NKp46 and CD161 receptors. In addition, down-modulation of the activating NKG2D receptor, associated with impaired NK-cell lytic capacity, was observed in patients with active KS. Resolution of KS after treatment was accompanied with restoration of NKG2D levels and NK cell activity. HHV8-latently infected endothelial cells overexpressed ligands of several NK cell receptors, including NKG2D ligands. The strong expression of NKG2D ligands by tumor cells was confirmed in situ by immunohistochemical staining of KS biopsies. However, no tumor-infiltrating NK cells were detected, suggesting a defect in NK cell homing or survival in the KS microenvironment. Among the known KS-derived immunoregulatory factors, we identified prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 as a critical element responsible for the down-modulation of NKG2D expression on resting NK cells. Moreover, PGE2 prevented up-regulation of the NKG2D and NKp30 receptors on IL-15-activated NK cells, and inhibited the IL-15-induced proliferation and survival of NK cells. Altogether, our observations are consistent with distinct immunoevasion mechanisms that allow HHV8 to escape NK cell responses stepwise, first at early stages of infection to facilitate the maintenance of viral latency, and later to promote tumor cell growth through suppression of NKG2D-mediated functions. Importantly, our results provide additional support to the use of PGE2 inhibitors as an attractive approach to treat aggressive KS, as they could restore activation and survival of tumoricidal NK cells.

  13. Myc and Ras oncogenes engage different energy metabolism programs and evoke distinct patterns of oxidative and DNA replication stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Ostrakova, Jitka; Kosar, Martin; Hall, Arnaldur; Duskova, Pavlina; Mistrik, Martin; Merchut-Maya, Joanna Maria; Hodny, Zdenek; Bartkova, Jirina; Christensen, Claus; Bartek, Jiri

    2015-03-01

    Both Myc and Ras oncogenes impact cellular metabolism, deregulate redox homeostasis and trigger DNA replication stress (RS) that compromises genomic integrity. However, how are such oncogene-induced effects evoked and temporally related, to what extent are these kinetic parameters shared by Myc and Ras, and how are these cellular changes linked with oncogene-induced cellular senescence in different cell context(s) remain poorly understood. Here, we addressed the above-mentioned open questions by multifaceted comparative analyses of human cellular models with inducible expression of c-Myc and H-RasV12 (Ras), two commonly deregulated oncoproteins operating in a functionally connected signaling network. Our study of DNA replication parameters using the DNA fiber approach and time-course assessment of perturbations in glycolytic flux, oxygen consumption and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) revealed the following results. First, overabundance of nuclear Myc triggered RS promptly, already after one day of Myc induction, causing slow replication fork progression and fork asymmetry, even before any metabolic changes occurred. In contrast, Ras overexpression initially induced a burst of cell proliferation and increased the speed of replication fork progression. However, after several days of induction Ras caused bioenergetic metabolic changes that correlated with slower DNA replication fork progression and the ensuing cell cycle arrest, gradually leading to senescence. Second, the observed oncogene-induced RS and metabolic alterations were cell-type/context dependent, as shown by comparative analyses of normal human BJ fibroblasts versus U2-OS sarcoma cells. Third, the energy metabolic reprogramming triggered by Ras was more robust compared to impact of Myc. Fourth, the detected oncogene-induced oxidative stress was due to ROS (superoxide) of non-mitochondrial origin and mitochondrial OXPHOS was reduced (Crabtree effect). Overall, our study provides novel

  14. Olaratumab for soft tissue sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssonneau, Diego; Italiano, Antoine

    2017-08-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare malignant tumors. Unfortunately, the first-line doxorubicin-based treatment has not been improved since the 1970s. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor alpha (PDGFR-α) and its ligands are co-expressed in many types of cancer, including sarcomas. They are involved in stimulating growth and regulating stromal-derived fibroblasts and angiogenesis. PDGFR-α and its ligand may play an important role in tumorigenesis and be a potential target in the treatment of sarcomas. Olaratumab is a fully human IgG1-type anti-PDGFR-α monoclonal antibody with a high affinity and a low 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Areas covered: The authors review the role of olaratumab in the treatment of STS by focusing on the recent, randomized Phase II JDGD trial that challenged patients with unresectable or metastatic STS with doxorubicin in the presence or absence of olaratumab. This trial showed a great improvement in overall survival (OS), with an increase in survival from 14.7 months to 26.5 months for patients in the experimental arm and showed acceptable toxicity. Expert opinion: Results seem promising. However, it must be qualified, as the study includes several uncertainties. These uncertainties should be addressed by the ongoing Phase 3 JGDJ confirmatory trial, for which the final efficacy analysis is expected by 2019.

  15. 40 CFR 798.3300 - Oncogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Species of Experimental Animals for Inhalation Carcinogenicity Studies” Paper presented at Conference on...) HEALTH EFFECTS TESTING GUIDELINES Chronic Exposure § 798.3300 Oncogenicity. (a) Purpose. The objective of a long-term oncogenicity study is to observe test animals for a major portion of their life span for...

  16. Bilateral tonsillar and esophageal Kaposi sarcoma in an HIV-negative patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbudak, Irem Hicran; Guney, Kenan; Mutlu, Derya; Gelen, Tekinalp; Ozbilim, Gulay

    2011-07-01

    Tonsillar involvement in Kaposi sarcoma is extremely rare, as only a few such cases have been reported; all but 1 of these previously reported cases occurred in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We describe what to the best of our knowledge is the first reported case of concurrent bilateral tonsillar and esophageal Kaposi sarcoma in an HIV-negative patient. A 68-year-old man presented with sore throat and dysphagia. Clinical examination revealed the presence of bilateral and asymmetrical tonsillar masses, as well as generalized lymphadenopathy in the cervical chain. The masses were resected, and findings on histopathologic analysis were consistent with Kaposi sarcoma. In addition, human herpesvirus 8 was demonstrated on a tonsil specimen by polymerase chain reaction, and microinvasive squamous cell carcinoma was also detected. Later, another Kaposi sarcoma lesion was detected in the lower third of the esophagus. We recommend that clinicians not discount the possibility of oral classic Kaposi sarcoma in the workup of an immunocompetent patient with oral vascular lesions.

  17. Virus como inductores de neoplasias cutáneas Viruses as agents inducing cutaneous neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bravo Puccio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available El rol oncogénico de los virus en las neoplasias cutáneas es conocido por el hombre desde hace más de un siglo, cuando se atribuía el origen de la verruga vulgar al virus papiloma humano (VPH. En la actualidad, las neoplasias inducidas por virus pueden agruparse en tumores sólidos y procesos linfoproliferativos. Destacan entre los primeros el VPH, del cual ahora conocemos numerosos serotipos, cada uno vinculado a una neoplasia específica, el herpesvirus humano tipo 8 que produce el sarcoma de Kaposi y el poliomavirus vinculado al carcinoma de Merkel. Entre los procesos linfoproliferativos debemos mencionar al virus linfotrópico de células T humanas tipo 1 (HTLV-1 responsable de los linfomas de células T, en los cuales el compromiso cutáneo es inespecífico, con un amplio espectro de presentaciones clínicas y, que por consiguiente, plantean un reto para el diagnóstico diferencial. En este grupo también se encuentra el virus Epstein Barr vinculado a los linfomas nasales de Células NK/T y a los linfomas tipo Hidroa, de reciente descripción. En esta era en la que lo genético y lo molecular priman en las investigaciones en cáncer, no podemos dejar de lado el concepto de neoplasia como resultado de la infección por un agente viral, lo que abre una nueva veta de posibilidades de tratamiento anticanceroso basado en medicamentos antiviralesThe oncogenic role of viruses in cutaneous neoplasms has been known by humankind for more than a century, when the origin of the common wart, or verruca vulgaris, was attributed to the human papilloma virus (HPV. Currently, virus-induced cutaneous neoplasms may be grouped into solid tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. HPV, from which various serotypes are now known, each being linked to a specific neoplasm, the human herpes virus type 8 producing Kaposi sarcoma, and the Merkel cell polyomavirus, highlight among the first group. Regarding the lymphoproliferative disorders, we should mention the

  18. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-induced tumor suppressor microRNA MiR-34a is growth promoting in EBV-infected B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Eleonora; Salinas, Raul E; Chang, Christina; Zhou, Ting; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Gottwein, Eva; Jacobs, Cassandra; Jima, Dereje; Li, Qi-Jing; Dave, Sandeep S; Luftig, Micah A

    2012-06-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of primary human B cells drives their indefinite proliferation into lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs). B cell immortalization depends on expression of viral latency genes, as well as the regulation of host genes. Given the important role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulating fundamental cellular processes, in this study, we assayed changes in host miRNA expression during primary B cell infection by EBV. We observed and validated dynamic changes in several miRNAs from early proliferation through immortalization; oncogenic miRNAs were induced, and tumor suppressor miRNAs were largely repressed. However, one miRNA described as a p53-targeted tumor suppressor, miR-34a, was strongly induced by EBV infection and expressed in many EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected lymphoma cell lines. EBV latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) was sufficient to induce miR-34a requiring downstream NF-κB activation but independent of functional p53. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-34a was not toxic in several B lymphoma cell lines, and inhibition of miR-34a impaired the growth of EBV-transformed cells. This study identifies a progrowth role for a tumor-suppressive miRNA in oncogenic-virus-mediated transformation, highlighting the importance of studying miRNA function in different cellular contexts.

  19. The management of clear cell sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, DR; Hoekstra, HJ; Veth, RPH; Wobbes, T

    2003-01-01

    Clear cell sarcoma is a rare soft tissue tumour, constituting approximately 1% of all soft tissue sarcomas. Prognosis is reported to be poor due to the great propensity to metastasise regionally and distantly. In this paper, we report the surgical experience of two university hospitals. Both disease

  20. Extrauterine Low-Grade Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ju Chen

    2005-12-01

    Conclusions: Low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma typically has an indolent clinical course and favorable prognosis. Surgical resection is the primary therapeutic approach, and adjuvant therapy with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or progesterone therapy should be considered for the management of residual or recurrent low-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas.

  1. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection and Kaposi's sarcoma in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramos-da-Silva

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS became a critical health issue with the emergence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS in the 1980s. Four clinical-epidemiological forms of KS have been described: classical KS, endemic KS, iatrogenic KS, and AIDS-associated KS. In 1994, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV or human herpesvirus type 8 was identified by Chang and colleagues, and has been detected worldwide at frequencies ranging from 80 to 100%. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of KSHV infection in KS lesions from HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients in Brazil, as well as to review the current knowledge about KS transmission and detection. For these purposes, DNA from 51 cases of KS was assessed by PCR: 20 (39.2% cases of classical KS, 29 (56.9% of AIDS-associated KS and 2 (3.9% of iatrogenic KS. Most patients were males (7.5:1, M/F, and mean age was 47.9 years (SD = ± 18.7 years. As expected, HIV-positive KS patients were younger than patients with classical KS. On the other hand, patients with AIDS-associated KS have early lesions (patch and plaque compared to classical KS patients (predominantly nodular lesions. This is assumed to be the result of the early diagnose of KS in the HIV-positive setting. KSHV infection was detected by PCR in almost all cases (48/51; 94.1%, irrespectively of the clinical-epidemiological form of KS. These results show that KSHV is associated with all forms of KS in Brazilian patients, a fact that supports the role of this virus in KS pathogenesis.

  2. Delays in the management of retroperitoneal sarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinen, Jojanneke; Almquist, Martin; Styring, Emelie

    2010-01-01

    at the general practitioner, 36 days at local hospitals, and 55 days at the sarcoma centre. Conclusion. Centralization per se is not sufficient for optimized and efficient management. Our findings suggest that delays can be minimized by direct referral of patients from primary health care to sarcoma centers...... sarcoma in the southern Sweden health care region 2003-2009 were eligible for the study. Data on referrals and diagnostic investigations were collected from clinical files from primary health care, local hospitals, and from the sarcoma centre. Lead times were divided into patient delays and health care...... delays caused by primary health care, local hospitals, or procedures at the sarcoma centre. Results. Complete data were available from 33 patients and demonstrated a median patient delay of 23 days (0-17 months) and median health care delay of 94 days (1-40 months) with delays of median 15 days...

  3. Delays in the management of retroperitoneal sarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seinen, Jojanneke; Almquist, Martin; Styring, Emelie

    2010-01-01

    at the general practitioner, 36¿days at local hospitals, and 55¿days at the sarcoma centre. Conclusion. Centralization per se is not sufficient for optimized and efficient management. Our findings suggest that delays can be minimized by direct referral of patients from primary health care to sarcoma centers...... sarcoma in the southern Sweden health care region 2003-2009 were eligible for the study. Data on referrals and diagnostic investigations were collected from clinical files from primary health care, local hospitals, and from the sarcoma centre. Lead times were divided into patient delays and health care...... delays caused by primary health care, local hospitals, or procedures at the sarcoma centre. Results. Complete data were available from 33 patients and demonstrated a median patient delay of 23¿days (0-17¿months) and median health care delay of 94¿days (1-40¿months) with delays of median 15¿days...

  4. Penile epithelioid sarcoma: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirikci, A.; Bayram, M.; Demirci, M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Kolejtepe, Gaziantep (Turkey); Bakir, K. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Kolejtepe, Gaziantep (Turkey); Sarica, K. [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Kolejtepe, Gaziantep (Turkey)

    1999-10-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 38-year-old man with epithelioid sarcoma of the penis is presented. It started as a firm, painless and slowly growing nodule at the base of his penis 6 months previously which caused pain radiating to the testis during coitus. It has been well known that sarcomas may well mimic reactive processes. Initial presentation of epithelioid sarcoma may provoke considerable diagnostic difficulty, and its differentiation from benign lesions, such as Peyronie`s disease and chronic inflammation, may be a clinical problem. In our present report the MR findings are compared with those of the epithelioid sarcomas of various locations reported in the literature and differential diagnosis of the entity is discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report regarding the MR findings of the epithelioid sarcoma of penis. (orig.) With 3 figs., 16 refs.

  5. Oncogene Mutation Survey in MPNST Cell Lines Enhances the Dominant Role of Hyperactive Ras in NF1 Associated Pro-Survival and Malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daochun; Tainsky, Michael A; Haddad, Ramsi

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are a type of soft tissue sarcoma that can be associated with germline mutations in Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) or may occur sporadically. Although the etiology of MPNST is poorly understood, it is clear that a loss of function of the NF1 gene, encoding a Ras-GAP, is an important factor in the tumorigenesis of the inherited form of MPNST. Tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional mutational events are probably required for malignancy. In order to define oncogene mutations associated with 5 MPNST cell lines, we assayed the 238 most frequent mutations in 19 commonly activated oncogenes using mass spectroscopy-based analysis. All 238 mutation sites in the assayed oncogenes were determined to harbor only wild-type sequences. These data suggest that hyperactive Ras resulting from the loss function of neurofibromin may be sufficient to set up the direction of malignant transformation of Schwann cells to MPNST.

  6. Synovial Sarcoma in the Rectovesical Space: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Min Chul; Cho, Bum Sang; Han, Gi Seok; Park, Kil Sun; Kim, Sung Jin; Cha, Sang Hoon; Lee, Seung Young; Kang, MIn Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chunju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ok Jun [Dept. of Pathology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Chunju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Synovial sarcoma is an uncommon soft tissue malignancy usually arising in the extremities of young adults. Synovial sarcomas at unusual anatomic locations have been reported; however, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports on primary synovial sarcoma in the rectovesical space. Here, we describe the radiologic findings of primary synovial sarcoma in the rectovesical space and review relevant literature.

  7. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  8. EWS-FLI1 inhibits TNF{alpha}-induced NF{kappa}B-dependent transcription in Ewing sarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagirand-Cantaloube, Julie, E-mail: julie.cantaloube@crbm.cnrs.fr [UMR8113 CNRS, LBPA, Ecole Normale Superieure, Cachan (France); Laud, Karine, E-mail: karine.laud@curie.fr [U830 INSERM, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Institut Curie, Genetique et biologie des cancers, Paris (France); Lilienbaum, Alain, E-mail: alain.lilienbaum@univ-paris-diderot.fr [EA300 Universite Paris 7, Stress et pathologies du cytosquelette, Paris (France); Tirode, Franck, E-mail: franck.tirode@curie.fr [U830 INSERM, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Institut Curie, Genetique et biologie des cancers, Paris (France); Delattre, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.delattre@curie.fr [U830 INSERM, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Institut Curie, Genetique et biologie des cancers, Paris (France); Auclair, Christian, E-mail: auclair@lbpa.ens-cachan.fr [UMR8113 CNRS, LBPA, Ecole Normale Superieure, Cachan (France); Kryszke, Marie-Helene, E-mail: kryszke@lbpa.ens-cachan.fr [UMR8113 CNRS, LBPA, Ecole Normale Superieure, Cachan (France)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} EWS-FLI1 interferes with TNF-induced activation of NF{kappa}B in Ewing sarcoma cells. {yields} EWS-FLI1 knockdown in Ewing sarcoma cells increases TNF-induced NF{kappa}B binding to DNA. {yields} EWS-FLI1 reduces TNF-stimulated NF{kappa}B-dependent transcriptional activation. {yields} Constitutive NF{kappa}B activity is not affected by EWS-FLI1. {yields} EWS-FLI1 physically interacts with NF{kappa}B p65 in vivo. -- Abstract: Ewing sarcoma is primarily caused by a t(11;22) chromosomal translocation encoding the EWS-FLI1 fusion protein. To exert its oncogenic function, EWS-FLI1 acts as an aberrant transcription factor, broadly altering the gene expression profile of tumor cells. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF{kappa}B) is a tightly regulated transcription factor controlling cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, as well as tumorigenesis. NF{kappa}B activity is very low in unstimulated Ewing sarcoma cells, but can be induced in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF). We wondered whether NF{kappa}B activity could be modulated by EWS-FLI1 in Ewing sarcoma. Using a knockdown approach in Ewing sarcoma cells, we demonstrated that EWS-FLI1 has no influence on NF{kappa}B basal activity, but impairs TNF-induced NF{kappa}B-driven transcription, at least in part through inhibition of NF{kappa}B binding to DNA. We detected an in vivo physical interaction between the fusion protein and NF{kappa}B p65, which could mediate these effects. Our findings suggest that, besides directly controlling the activity of its primary target promoters, EWS-FLI1 can also indirectly influence gene expression in tumor cells by modulating the activity of key transcription factors such as NF{kappa}B.

  9. Ewing's Sarcoma and Second Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D. Schiffman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing's sarcoma (ES is a rare tumor that is most common in children and young adults. Late effects of ES therapy include second cancers, a tragic outcome for survivors of such a young age. This paper will explore the frequencies and types of malignancies that occur after ES. Additionally, it will review how second malignancies have changed with the shift in treatment from high-dose radiation to chemotherapy regimens including alkylators and epipodophyllotoxins. The risk of additional cancers in ES survivors will also be compared to survivors of other childhood cancers. Finally, the possible genetic contribution to ES and second malignancies will be discussed.

  10. Lurbinectedin Inactivates the Ewing Sarcoma Oncoprotein EWS-FLI1 by Redistributing It within the Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Matt L; Maloney, Nichole; Roland, Joseph; Guillen Navarro, Maria Jose; Easton, Matthew K; Kitchen-Goosen, Susan M; Boguslawski, Elissa A; Madaj, Zachary B; Johnson, Ben K; Bowman, Megan J; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Winn, Mary E; Turner, Lisa; Hostetter, Galen; Galmarini, Carlos María; Aviles, Pablo M; Grohar, Patrick J

    2016-11-15

    There is a great need to develop novel approaches to target oncogenic transcription factors with small molecules. Ewing sarcoma is emblematic of this need, as it depends on the continued activity of the EWS-FLI1 transcription factor to maintain the malignant phenotype. We have previously shown that the small molecule trabectedin interferes with EWS-FLI1. Here, we report important mechanistic advances and a second-generation inhibitor to provide insight into the therapeutic targeting of EWS-FLI1. We discovered that trabectedin functionally inactivated EWS-FLI1 by redistributing the protein within the nucleus to the nucleolus. This effect was rooted in the wild-type functions of the EWSR1, compromising the N-terminal half of the chimeric oncoprotein, which is known to be similarly redistributed within the nucleus in the presence of UV light damage. A second-generation trabectedin analogue lurbinectedin (PM01183) caused the same nuclear redistribution of EWS-FLI1, leading to a loss of activity at the promoter, mRNA, and protein levels of expression. Tumor xenograft studies confirmed this effect, and it was increased in combination with irinotecan, leading to tumor regression and replacement of Ewing sarcoma cells with benign fat cells. The net result of combined lurbinectedin and irinotecan treatment was a complete reversal of EWS-FLI1 activity and elimination of established tumors in 30% to 70% of mice after only 11 days of therapy. Our results illustrate the preclinical safety and efficacy of a disease-specific therapy targeting the central oncogenic driver in Ewing sarcoma. Cancer Res; 76(22); 6657-68. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Energy parasites trigger oncogene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Jandová, Anna; Kobilková, Jitka; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Cancer initialization can be explained as a result of parasitic virus energy consumption leading to randomized genome chemical bonding. Analysis of experimental data on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) containing about 12,000 cases of healthy humans, cancer patients and patients with precancerous cervical lesions disclosed that the specific cancer and the non-specific lactate dehydrogenase-elevating (LDH) virus antigen elicit similar responses. The specific antigen is effective only in cancer type of its origin but the non-specific antigen in all examined cancers. CMI results of CIN patients display both healthy and cancer state. The ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the LDH virus parasitizing on energy reduces the ratio of coherent/random oscillations. Decreased effect of coherent cellular electromagnetic field on bonding electrons in biological macromolecules leads to elevating probability of random genome reactions. Overlapping of wave functions in biological macromolecules depends on energy of the cellular electromagnetic field which supplies energy to bonding electrons for selective chemical bonds. CMI responses of cancer and LDH virus antigens in all examined healthy, precancerous and cancer cases point to energy mechanism in cancer initiation. Dependence of the rate of biochemical reactions on biological electromagnetic field explains yet unknown mechanism of genome mutation.

  12. Primary osteogenic sarcoma of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akang Effiong E

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary extra-osseous osteogenic sarcomas have been reported in many tissues of the body but their occurrence in the breast is extremely rare. It can arise as a result of osseous metaplasia in a pre-existing benign or malignant neoplasm of the breast or as non-phylloides sarcoma from the soft tissue of a previously normal breast. Case presentation A 40 year-old Nigerian woman was clinically diagnosed to have carcinoma of the left breast. The histology report of core-needle biopsy of the mass showed a malignant neoplasm comprising islands of chondroblastic and osteoblastic stromal cells. This report changed the diagnosis from carcinoma to osteogenic sarcoma of the breast. She had a left modified radical mastectomy, however there was significant post surgery skin deficit. A latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap was used to cover the anterior chest wall defect. Sections from the mastectomy specimen confirmed the diagnosis of osteogenic sarcoma. She died six months after mastectomy. Conclusion A diagnosis of osteogenic sarcoma of the breast was made based on histology report and after excluding an osteogenic sarcoma arising from underlying ribs and sternum. This is the second documented case of primary osteogenic sarcoma of the breast coming from Nigeria

  13. Amplification of cellular oncogenes in solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Bagci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term gene amplification refers to an increase in copy number of a gene. Upregulation of gene expression through amplification is a general mechanism to increase gene dosage. Oncogene amplifications have been shown in solid human cancers and they are often associated with progression of cancer. Defining oncogene amplification is useful since it is used as a prognostic marker in clinical oncology nowadays, especially v-erb-b2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (HER2 targeted agents are used in breast cancer patients with high level of HER2 overexpression as a therapeutic approach. However, patients without HER2 overexpression do not appear to benefit from these agents. We concluded that determination of oncogene amplification in solid tumors is an important factor in treatment of human cancers with many unknowns. We have referred to PubMed and some databases to prepare this article.

  14. Molecular and immunohistochemical detection of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadburn, Amy; Wilson, Janet; Wang, Y Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus/human herpesvirus-8 (KSHV/HHV-8) is etiologically related to the development of several human diseases, including Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL)/extra-cavitary (EC) PEL, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), and large B-cell lymphoma arising in KSHV/HHV-8-associated multicentric Castleman disease. Although serologic studies can identify persons infected with this virus, molecular genetics, specifically PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and immunohistochemical techniques, are rapid, sensitive, and specific, and are able to more closely link KSHV/HHV-8 to a given disease process. As these KSHV/HHV-8-related diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality in affected individuals, the identification of the virus within lesional tissue will allow for more targeted therapy.

  15. [Synovial sarcoma of the infratemporal fossa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarit Conejeros, José Manuel; Estrems Navas, Paloma; Estellés Ferriol, Enrique; Dalmau Galofre, José

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is the fourth most common type of sarcoma. It is usually found in the knee or ankle joints, and is exceptional in the head and neck. Most cases are diagnosed in men between 20 and 40 years of age. Diagnosis is often casual due to the infrequent nature of this tumour and its non-specific clinical and radiological characteristics. Confirmation is therefore based on immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. We report a case of biphasic sinovial sarcoma located in the infratemporal fossa treated at our hospital and we make a review of the literature. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Sarcoma sinovial anorretal: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Hernán Augusto Centurión Sobral; Enzo Martins Taglietti; Elisângela Plazaz Monteiro; Marília Resende Von Sonnleithner Gama; Sérgio Henrique Couto Horta; Galdino José Sitonio Formiga

    2006-01-01

    Os sarcomas são neoplasias que se originam das células mesenquimais primitivas, sendo raros na região anorretal. O objetivo é relatar um caso de sarcoma sinovial anorretal, neoplasia extremamente rara nesta localização. É descrito o caso de uma paciente de 77 anos que apresentava nodulação anal dolorosa e sangrante às evacuações, associada a puxo, tenesmo e perda ponderal. A lesão foi biopsiada e o estudo imunohistoquímico evidenciou sarcoma sinovial anorretal. A paciente foi submetida a ampu...

  17. EWS-FLI1 perturbs MRTFB/YAP-1/TEAD target gene regulation inhibiting cytoskeletal autoregulatory feedback in Ewing sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katschnig, A M; Kauer, M O; Schwentner, R; Tomazou, E M; Mutz, C N; Linder, M; Sibilia, M; Alonso, J; Aryee, D N T; Kovar, H

    2017-07-03

    Ewing sarcoma (EWS) is a paediatric bone cancer with high metastatic potential. Cellular plasticity resulting from dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization, typically regulated via the Rho pathway, is a prerequisite for metastasis initiation. Here, we interrogated the role of the Ewing sarcoma driver oncogene EWS-FLI1 in cytoskeletal reprogramming. We report that EWS-FLI1 strongly represses the activity of the Rho-F-actin signal pathway transcriptional effector MRTFB, affecting the expression of a large number of EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes including structural and regulatory cytoskeletal genes. Consistent with this finding, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed strong overlaps in myocardin-related transcription factor B (MRTFB) and EWS-FLI1 chromatin occupation, especially for EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes. Binding of the transcriptional co-activator Yes-associated protein (YAP)-1, enrichment of TEAD-binding motifs in these shared genomic binding regions and overlapping transcriptional footprints of MRTFB and TEAD factors led us to propose synergy between MRTFB and the YAP/TEAD complex in the regulation of EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes. We propose that EWS-FLI1 suppresses the Rho-actin pathway by perturbation of a MRTFB/YAP-1/TEAD transcriptional module, which directly affects the actin-autoregulatory feedback loop. As spontaneous fluctuations in EWS-FLI1 levels of Ewing sarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo, associated with a switch between a proliferative, non-migratory EWS-FLI1-high and a non-proliferative highly migratory EWS-FLI1-low state, were recently described, our data provide a mechanistic basis for the underlying EWS-FLI1-dependent reversible cytoskeletal reprogramming of Ewing sarcoma cells.Oncogene advance online publication, 3 July 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.202.

  18. Persistent Morbillivirus Infection Leads to Altered Cortactin Distribution in Histiocytic Sarcoma Cells with Decreased Cellular Migration Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfankuche, Vanessa Maria; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed; Contioso, Vanessa Bono; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Rohn, Karl; Ulrich, Reiner; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Puff, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Histiocytic sarcomas represent rare but fatal neoplasms in humans. Based on the absence of a commercially available human histiocytic sarcoma cell line the frequently affected dog displays a suitable translational model. Canine distemper virus, closely related to measles virus, is a highly promising candidate for oncolytic virotherapy. Therapeutic failures in patients are mostly associated with tumour invasion and metastasis often induced by misdirected cytoskeletal protein activities. Thus, the impact of persistent canine distemper virus infection on the cytoskeletal protein cortactin, which is frequently overexpressed in human cancers with poor prognosis, was investigated in vitro in a canine histiocytic sarcoma cell line (DH82). Though phagocytic activity, proliferation and apoptotic rate were unaltered, a significantly reduced migration activity compared to controls (6 hours and 1 day after seeding) accompanied by a decreased number of cortactin mRNA transcripts (1 day) was detected. Furthermore, persistently canine distemper virus infected DH82 cells showed a predominant diffuse intracytoplasmic cortactin distribution at 6 hours and 1 day compared to controls with a prominent membranous expression pattern (p ≤ 0.05). Summarized, persistent canine distemper virus infection induces reduced tumour cell migration associated with an altered intracellular cortactin distribution, indicating cytoskeletal changes as one of the major pathways of virus-associated inhibition of tumour spread. PMID:27911942

  19. NFκB pathway is down-regulated by 1α,25(OH)(2)-vitamin D(3) in endothelial cells transformed by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus G protein coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pardo, Verónica; D'Elia, Noelia; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Boland, Ricardo; Russo de Boland, Ana

    2012-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that 1α,25 dihydroxy-vitamin D(3) (1α,25(OH)(2)D(3)) has antiproliferative effects on the growth of endothelial cells transformed by the viral G protein-coupled receptor associated to Kaposi sarcoma (vGPCR). In this work, we have investigated whether 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3) exerts its growth inhibitory effects by inhibiting the Nuclear Factor κ B (NFκB) pathway which is highly activated by vGPCR. Cell proliferation studies demonstrated that 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3), similarly to bortezomib, a proteosome inhibitor that suppresses the activation of NFκB, reduced the proliferation of endothelial cells transformed by vGPCR (SVEC-vGPCR). The activity of NFκB in these cells decreased by 70% upon 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3) treatment. Furthermore, time and dose response studies showed that the hormone significantly decreased NFκB and increased IκBα mRNA and protein levels in SVEC-vGPCR cells, whereas in SVEC only IκBα increased significantly. Moreover, NFκB translocation to the nucleus was inhibited and occurred by a mechanism independent of NFκB association with vitamin D(3) receptor (VDR). 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3)-induced increase in IκBα required de novo protein synthesis, and was independent of MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways. Altogether, these results suggest that down-regulation of the NFκB pathway is part of the mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of 1α,25(OH)(2)D(3) on endothelial cells transformed by vGPCR. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92 oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Kayali

    Full Text Available Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  1. Spi-1, Fli-1 and Fli-3 (miR-17-92) oncogenes contribute to a single oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation in friend erythroleukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Samer; Giraud, Guillaume; Morlé, François; Guyot, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Clonal erythroleukemia developing in susceptible mice infected by Friend virus complex are associated with highly recurrent proviral insertions at one of three loci called Spi-1, Fli-1 or Fli-3, leading to deregulated expression of oncogenic Spi-1 or Fli-1 transcription factors or miR-17-92 miRNA cluster, respectively. Deregulated expression of each of these three oncogenes has been independently shown to contribute to cell proliferation of erythroleukemic clones. Previous studies showed a close relationship between Spi-1 and Fli-1, which belong to the same ETS family, Spi-1 activating fli-1 gene, and both Spi-1 and Fli-1 activating multiple common target genes involved in ribosome biogenesis. In this study, we demonstrated that Spi-1 and Fli-1 are also involved in direct miR-17-92 transcriptional activation through their binding to a conserved ETS binding site in its promoter. Moreover, we demonstrated that physiological re-expression of exogenous miR-17 and miR-20a are able to partially rescue the proliferation loss induced by Fli-1 knock-down and identified HBP1 as a target of these miRNA in erythroleukemic cells. These results establish that three of the most recurrently activated oncogenes in Friend erythroleukemia are actually involved in a same oncogenic network controlling cell proliferation. The putative contribution of a similar ETS-miR-17-92 network module in other normal or pathological proliferative contexts is discussed.

  2. Kaposi`s sarcoma; Sarcome de Kaposi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirova, Y.M.; Belembaogo, E.; Frikha, H.; Yu, S.J.; Le Bourgeois, J.P. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, 94 - Creteil (France)

    1997-09-01

    Moriz Kaposi was the first who, in 1872, described five patients presenting with `sarcoma idiopathicum multiple hemorrhagicum`. In 1912 Sternberg termed this disease Kaposi`s sarcoma. Since then various forms of this rare disease have been observed. In 1914 Hallenberg described the first cases of African or endemic Kaposi`s sarcoma. In the 1960`s the first reports discussing Kaposi`s sarcoma following organ transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy were published. After 1981, the epidemic form associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) was described. All these forms, their history, treatment methods and the role of radiation therapy in the management of this rare malignancy are discussed, and the literature is reviewed. (authors)

  3. Pulmonary Artery Intimal Sarcoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Kriz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas are rare and lethal malignant tumors that typically affect larger vessels: the aorta, inferior vena cava, and pulmonary arteries. Since symptoms and imaging of pulmonary arterial intimal sarcomas mimic pulmonary thromboembolism, the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with chest pain, dyspnea, and filling defect within the pulmonary arteries should include intimal sarcoma. Often right ventricular failure is observed due to pulmonary hypertension caused by the obstructive effect of the tumor and concomitant chronic thromboembolism. We report the case of a 72-year-old African-American male with arterial intimal sarcoma of the left and right pulmonary artery with extension through the right artery into the bronchus and right lung.

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft ... dye reacts to the light. Certain factors affect treatment options and prognosis (chance of recovery). The treatment ...

  5. Treatment Options for Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vascular Tumors Treatment Research Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Soft ... dye reacts to the light. Certain factors affect treatment options and prognosis (chance of recovery). The treatment ...

  6. Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Treatment Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin) Lymphoma (Hodgkin) Neuroblastoma Osteosarcoma Retinoblastoma Rhabdomyosarcoma Skin Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Thyroid Cancer Cancer Resources Childhood Cancer Statistics Coping With Cancer CureSearch CancerCare App Late Effects ...

  7. CLINICAL ANALYSIS AND SURGICAL RESULTS IN SARCOMA

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    Basavaraju

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Sarcomas are quite rare with only 15,000 new cases per year in the United States. Sarcomas therefore represent about one percent of the 1.5 million new cancer diagnoses in that country each year. Sarcoma can be defined as cancer whose cells originate from the cells of mesenchymal origin. The bones, cartilages, muscles are a few examples to be mentioned. This is in contrast to a malignant tumour originating from epithelial cells, which are termed carcinoma. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 1. To clinically analyze the sarcomas. 2. To analyze the surgical outcome of this disease. The survival of the patient depends on the extent of metastasis and the primary identification. The study forms a base for further studies. So atleast it could be diagnosed earlier and treated to the full extent.

  8. Chemotherapy in Ewing′s sarcoma

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    Jain Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing′s sarcoma constitutes three per cent of all pediatric malignancies. Ewing′s sarcoma has generally been more responsive to chemotherapy than adult-type sarcomas, and chemotherapy is now recommended for all patients with this disease. It is essential to integrate local control measures in the form of surgery and/or radiotherapy at the appropriate time, along with chemotherapy to eradicate the disease. This approach has improved the survival substantially to the tune of 70% in localized disease, although outcome for metastatic disease remains dismal. Newer therapeutic approaches are required to improve outcome for metastatic and recurrent or refractory Ewing′s sarcoma in organized co-operative group trials.

  9. Neurogenic sarcomas of the neck in neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G; Kleinsasser, O

    1981-01-01

    Based on two observations and a review of the literature, the pathological and clinical findings in sarcomas of the neck in patients with neurofibromatosis are described. Histologically these neurogenic tumours show a manifold picture; in addition to spindle-cell sarcomas pleomorphic structures are to be found, which can be similar to rhabdomyo-, lipo-, chondro-, angio-, or osteogenic sarcomas so that a histological diagnosis of a neurogenic sarcoma cannot always be made without clinical details. Up to the present surgical treatment is preferred; the value of cytostatic therapy and irradiation is controversial. The results of treating these tumours are unsatisfactory. Of 29 cases reported in the literature, only two could be found in which the patient survived without a recurrence for more than five years.

  10. Histology and imaging of soft tissue sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kind, Michele [Departement d' Imagerie Medicale, Institut Bergonie, 229 cours de l' Argonne, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)], E-mail: kind@bergonie.org; Stock, Nathalie; Coindre, Jean Michel [Departement de Pathologie, Institut Bergonie, 229 cours de l' Argonne, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France); Universite Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, 146 rue Leo Saignat, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)

    2009-10-15

    Imaging and histology are two complementary morphological techniques which play a fundamental role in the diagnosis and management of soft tissue sarcomas. Imaging allows to identify some pseudosarcomatous benign lesions such as myositis ossificans, intramuscular hemangioma, angiomyolipoma, intramuscular lipoma, giant cell tumour of tendon sheath, desmoid tumour and elastofibroma. There is no formal criterion for diagnosing a sarcoma on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but malignancy is strongly suspected with the presence of necrosis and vascular, bone or joint invasion. Imaging may also suggest some histological types of sarcoma such as well-differentiated liposarcoma, dedifferentiated liposarcoma, synovial sarcoma or extraskeletal osteosarcoma. Imaging is also extremely helpful in determining the appropriate kind of sampling to carry out and in guiding the performance of a microbiopsy. The appearance observed on imaging should always be taken into consideration for the interpretation of the microbiopsy by the pathologist.

  11. Myeloid sarcoma of submandibular salivary gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Dagna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report a rare case of a myeloid sarcoma of submandibular salivary gland. Methods: A 65-year-old woman with a history of successfully treated myelodysplastic syndrome, presenting with periodic painful swelling of her right submandibular area. Results: Physical evaluation, ultrasound and CT scan revealed the presence of a 3-cm mass contiguous to the submandibular salivary gland. A core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma. Bone marrow biopsy was still showing complete remission and the submandibular gland was the only extramedullary site involved. The patient was submitted to chemotherapy. Conclusion: Myeloid sarcoma is a rare extramedullary neoplasm. It can virtually involve any anatomic site, but it usually involves lymph nodes, paranasal sinuses, skin, soft tissue and periostium. Myeloid sarcomas of salivary glands are very rare and ENTs should be aware of this disease in order to include it in the differential diagnosis of a solitary neck mass.

  12. Procholecystokinin as marker of human Ewing sarcomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reubi, Jean Claude; Koefoed, Pernille; Hansen, Thomas von O

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Ewing sarcoma is a rapidly growing mesenchymal tumor in young adults. Although it was shown previously to express the cholecystokinin (CCK) gene, it is unknown whether CCK gene expression is detectable at protein level in Ewing sarcoma tumor cell lines, in tumor tissue, and in plasma fro...... in human cancer; Ewing sarcomas synthesize and secrete proCCK that can be identified in plasma as circulating tumor marker....... Ewing sarcoma patients, and, if so, whether CCK peptides might play a role as tumor markers. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: CCK gene expression was evaluated with in situ hybridization or reverse transcription-PCR in tumor tissue. CCK precursors and bioactive CCK were measured with specific RIAs in tumor tissue...

  13. Drugs Approved for Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2015 2014 2013 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media ... This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for soft tissue sarcoma. The list includes ...

  14. KSHV ORF K9 (vIRF) is an oncogene which inhibits the interferon signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, S J; Boshoff, C; Jayachandra, S; Weiss, R A; Chang, Y; Moore, P S

    1997-10-16

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a gammaherpesvirus linked to the development of Kaposi's sarcoma and a rare B cell lymphoma, primary effusion lymphoma. The KSHV gene ORF K9 encodes vIRF which is a protein with low but significant homology to members of the interferon (IFN) regulatory factor (IRF) family responsible for regulating intracellular interferon signal transduction (Moore PS, Boshoff C, Weiss RA and Chang Y. (1996). Science, 274, 1739-1744). vIRF inhibits IFN-beta signal transduction as measured using an IFN-responsive ISG54 reporter construct co-transfected with ORF K9 into HeLa and 293 cells. vIRF also suppresses genes under IFN regulatory control as shown by inhibition of the IFN-beta inducibility of p21WAF1/CIP1, however, no direct DNA-binding or protein-protein interactions characteristic for IRF repressor proteins were identified. Stable transfectant NIH3T3 clones expressing vIRF grew in soft agar and at low serum concentrations, lost contact inhibition and formed tumors after injection into nude mice indicating that vIRF has the properties of a viral oncogene. Since vIRF is primarily expressed in KSHV-infected B cells, not KS spindle cells, this study suggests that vIRF is a transforming oncogene active in B cell neoplasias that may provide a unique immune escape mechanism for infected cells. This data is consistent with tumor suppressor pathways serving a dual function as host cell antiviral pathways.

  15. Pathology of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitomi eFukumoto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, human herpesvirus 8, HHV-8 is a human herpesvirus, classified as a gamma-herpesvirus. KSHV is detected in Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL, and some cases of multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD. Similar to other herpes viruses, there are two phases of infection, latent and lytic. In KSHV-associated malignancies such as KS and PEL, KSHV latently infects almost all tumor cells. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that each tumor cell contains one copy of KSHV in KS lesions. The oncogenesis by KSHV has remained unclear. Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA-1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of KSHV-associated malignancies through inhibition of apoptosis and maintenance of latency. Because all KSHV-infected cells express LANA-1, LANA-1 immunohistochemistry is a useful tool for diagnosis of KSHV infection. KSHV encodes some homologs of cellular proteins including cell-cycle regulators, cytokines and chemokines, such as cyclin D, G-protein coupled protein, interleukin-6, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1 and -2. These viral proteins mimic or disrupt host cytokine signals, resulting in microenvironments amenable to tumor growth. Lytic infection is frequently seen in MCD tissues, suggesting a different pathogenesis from KS and lymphoma.

  16. Primary granulocytic sarcoma of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, G; Gangadharan, V P; Elizabath, K A; Preetha, S; Chithrathara, K

    2000-06-01

    Granulocytic sarcomas are rare extramedullary tumors of malignant myeloid precursor cells. Exceedingly rare in childhood, it commonly involves skin, lymph nodes, bone, and the spine. Ovarian involvement is rare. It can arise de novo, precede the development of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, or be the sole manifestation of relapse. We describe a 26-year-old woman with granulocytic sarcoma of the ovary without any hematologic disorder.

  17. Osteosarcoma with apparent Ewing sarcoma gene rearrangement

    OpenAIRE

    Mathias, Melissa; Chou, Alexander J; Meyers, Paul; Shukla, Neerav; Hameed, Meera; Agaram, Narasimhan; Wang, Lulu; Berger, Michael F.; Walsh, Michael; Kentsis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Poorly differentiated round cell sarcomas present diagnostic challenges due to their variable morphology and lack of specific immunophenotypic markers. We present a case of a 15-year-old female with a tibial tumor that exhibited features of Ewing-like sarcoma, including apparent rearrangement of the EWSR1 gene. Hybridization capture-based next-generation DNA sequencing showed evidence of complex genomic rearrangements, absence of known pathogenic Ewing-like chromosome translocations, and dele...

  18. The importance of Src signaling in sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Quanchi; Zhou, Zifei; Shan, Liancheng; Zeng, Hui; Hua, Yingqi; Cai, Zhengdong

    2015-01-01

    Src is a tyrosine kinase that is of significance in tumor biology. The present review focuses on Src, its molecular structure, and role in cancer, in addition to its expression and function in sarcoma. In addition, the feasibility of Src as a potential drug target for the treatment of sarcoma is also discussed. Previous studies have suggested that Src has essential functions in cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, metastasis and the tumor microenvironment. Thus, it may be a potential targ...

  19. Acroangiodermatitis (Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyendra Kumar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acroangiodermatitis or Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma is a rare angioproliferative entity, related to chronic venous insufficiency or certain other vascular anomalies. It is often associated with chronic venous insufficiency, arteriovenous malformation of the legs, chronic renal failure treated with dialysis, paralyzed legs and amputation stumps. We hereby describe a case of 45 year old female presenting with pitting pedal edema, multiple ulcers over bilateral lower limbs with irregular margins with erythema and hyperpigmentation of the surrounding skin. Color Doppler study of bilateral lower limbs was normal. Histopathological examination from one of the lesions showed hyperplastic epidermis, proliferation of capillaries in dermis, hemosiderin deposits and lymphocytic infiltrate. These features thus confirmed the diagnosis of Acroangiodermatitis.

  20. Primary synovial sarcoma of lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devleena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A synovial sarcoma (SS is a rare form of cancer which usually occurs near the joints of the arm, neck, or leg, but has been documented in most human tissues and organs, including the brain, prostate, and heart. Primary pulmonary SS is an extremely rare tumor. We report a case of primary SS of lung who presented with severe chest pain and a large right lung mass with right-sided pleural effusion in computed tomography (CT scan of thorax. The diagnosis was made on the basis of CT-guided core biopsy and immunohistochemistry. On immunohistochemistry, tumor cell expressed epithelial membrane antigen, bcl 2, Vimentin and smooth muscle actin and were immunonegative for S100 and cytokeratin. So, the final diagnosis was primary SS.

  1. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma in Mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul-Hwan; Jang, Jong-Won; Kim, Moon-Young; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Hang-Gul; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2014-11-01

    Undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS), previously known as malignant fibrous histiocytoma, occurs commonly in the soft tissues in adult, but is rare in the maxillofacial region. It consists of undifferentiated mesenchymal tumor cells resembling histiocytes and fibroblasts. The purpose of this article is to report a case of UPS in the mandible. A 44-year-old patient presented with a painful growing mass in the mandible of two months' duration. Computed tomography and positron emission tomography-computed tomography revealed an ill-defined heterogenous, hypermetabolic mass about 4 cm in size in the left mandible invading adjacent soft tissues. A left mandiblulectomy and reconstruction with a fibular free flap were performed. Immunohistochemical study gave a diagnosis of UPS. The patient was referred for adjuvant chemotherapy after surgical removal of the tumor.

  2. Potential Therapeutic Targets in Uterine Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Cuppens

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine sarcomas are rare tumors accounting for 3,4% of all uterine cancers. Even after radical hysterectomy, most patients relapse or present with distant metastases. The very limited clinical benefit of adjuvant cytotoxic treatments is reflected by high mortality rates, emphasizing the need for new treatment strategies. This review summarizes rising potential targets in four distinct subtypes of uterine sarcomas: leiomyosarcoma, low-grade and high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. Based on clinical reports, promising approaches for uterine leiomyosarcoma patients include inhibition of VEGF and mTOR signaling, preferably in combination with other targeted or cytotoxic compounds. Currently, the only targeted therapy approved in leiomyosarcoma patients is pazopanib, a multitargeted inhibitor blocking VEGFR, PDGFR, FGFR, and c-KIT. Additionally, preclinical evidence suggests effect of the inhibition of histone deacetylases, tyrosine kinase receptors, and the mitotic checkpoint protein aurora kinase A. In low-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas, antihormonal therapies including aromatase inhibitors and progestins have proven activity. Other potential targets are PDGFR, VEGFR, and histone deacetylases. In high-grade ESS that carry the YWHAE/FAM22A/B fusion gene, the generated 14-3-3 oncoprotein is a putative target, next to c-KIT and the Wnt pathway. The observation of heterogeneity within uterine sarcoma subtypes warrants a personalized treatment approach.

  3. Sarcoma sinovial anorretal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Augusto Centurión Sobral

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Os sarcomas são neoplasias que se originam das células mesenquimais primitivas, sendo raros na região anorretal. O objetivo é relatar um caso de sarcoma sinovial anorretal, neoplasia extremamente rara nesta localização. É descrito o caso de uma paciente de 77 anos que apresentava nodulação anal dolorosa e sangrante às evacuações, associada a puxo, tenesmo e perda ponderal. A lesão foi biopsiada e o estudo imunohistoquímico evidenciou sarcoma sinovial anorretal. A paciente foi submetida a amputação abdomino-perineal do reto, encontra-se assintomática, sem sinais de recidiva e em seguimento ambulatorial.Originated from mesenchymal cells, the sarcoma is rare in the anorectal area. The authors report a case of anorectal sinovial sarcoma, extremely rare in this location with no previous reports on literature. It's described a case of a 77 years old patient presenting an anal tumor, associated to pain, bleeding, tenesmus and weight loss. A synovial sarcoma was diagnosed after biopsy and imunohistochemical study. The pacient was submitted to a Miles procedure being assymptomatic and without any signs of disease in the last seven months.

  4. Potential Therapeutic Targets in Uterine Sarcomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppens, Tine; Tuyaerts, Sandra; Amant, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Uterine sarcomas are rare tumors accounting for 3,4% of all uterine cancers. Even after radical hysterectomy, most patients relapse or present with distant metastases. The very limited clinical benefit of adjuvant cytotoxic treatments is reflected by high mortality rates, emphasizing the need for new treatment strategies. This review summarizes rising potential targets in four distinct subtypes of uterine sarcomas: leiomyosarcoma, low-grade and high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma, and undifferentiated uterine sarcoma. Based on clinical reports, promising approaches for uterine leiomyosarcoma patients include inhibition of VEGF and mTOR signaling, preferably in combination with other targeted or cytotoxic compounds. Currently, the only targeted therapy approved in leiomyosarcoma patients is pazopanib, a multitargeted inhibitor blocking VEGFR, PDGFR, FGFR, and c-KIT. Additionally, preclinical evidence suggests effect of the inhibition of histone deacetylases, tyrosine kinase receptors, and the mitotic checkpoint protein aurora kinase A. In low-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas, antihormonal therapies including aromatase inhibitors and progestins have proven activity. Other potential targets are PDGFR, VEGFR, and histone deacetylases. In high-grade ESS that carry the YWHAE/FAM22A/B fusion gene, the generated 14-3-3 oncoprotein is a putative target, next to c-KIT and the Wnt pathway. The observation of heterogeneity within uterine sarcoma subtypes warrants a personalized treatment approach. PMID:26576131

  5. A transcriptome map of cellular transformation by the fos oncogene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruan Hong

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The c-fos gene was originally identified as the cellular homolog of the oncogene v-fos carried by the Finkel-Biskis-Jenkins and Finkel-Biskis-Reilly murine osteogenic sarcoma retroviruses. Sustained expression of fos is sufficient to induce cellular transformation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Fos functions as a component of the AP-1 transcription factor complex to regulate gene transcription and several differentially expressed genes have been identified in cells transformed by fos. We have extended these studies by constructing a cellular system for conditional transformation by v-fos. Using Affymetrix-based DNA microarray technology, we analyzed transcriptional changes over the course of transformation and reversion in an inducible v-fos system. Results Microarray analyses of temporal gene expression during the process of v-fos mediated cellular transformation and morphological reversion revealed a remarkably dynamic transcriptome. Of the more than 8000 genes analyzed in this study, 3766 genes were categorized into 18 gene-expression patterns by using self-organizing map analysis. By combining the analysis of gene expression profiles in stably transformed cells with the analysis of sequential expression patterns during conditional transformation, we identified a relatively small cohort of genes implicated in v-fos mediated cellular transformation. Conclusion This approach defines a general conditional cell transformation system that can be used to study the endogenous transcription regulatory mechanisms involved in transformation and tumorigenesis. In addition, this study is the first reported analysis of dynamic changes in gene expression throughout experimentally controlled morphological transformation mediated by v-fos.

  6. Human genome: proto-oncogenes and proretroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisselev, L L; Chumakov, I M; Zabarovsky, E R; Prassolov, V S; Mett, V L; Berditchevsky, F B; Tret'yakov, L D

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of the studies undertaken at the Laboratory for Molecular Bases of Oncogenesis (Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow) till middle of 1984 is presented. The human genome contains multiple dispersed nucleotide sequences related to the proto-oncogene mos and to proretroviral sequences in tight juxtaposition to each other. From sequencing appropriate cloned fragments of human DNA in phage and plasmid vectors it follows that one of these regions, NV-1, is a pseudogene of proto-mos with partial duplications and two Alu elements intervening its coding sequence, and the other, CL-1, seems to be also a mos-related gene with a deletion of the internal part of the structural gene. CL-1 is flanked by a proretroviral-like sequence including tRNAiMet binding site and U5 (part of the long terminal repeat). The proretroviral-like sequences are transcribed in 21-35S poly(A)+RNA abundant in normal and malignant human cells. Two hypotheses are proposed: endogenous retroviruses take part in amplification of at least some proto-oncogenes; proto-oncogenes are inactivated via insertion of movable genetic elements and conversion into pseudogenes. Potential oncogenicity of a normal human genome undergoes two controversial influences: it increases due to proto-oncogene amplification and decreases due to inactivation of some of them.

  7. Host entry by gamma-herpesviruses--lessons from animal viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Laurent; Frederico, Bruno; Stevenson, Philip G

    2015-12-01

    The oncogenicity of gamma-herpesviruses (γHVs) motivates efforts to control them and their persistence makes early events key targets for intervention. Human γHVs are often assumed to enter naive hosts orally and infect B cells directly. However, neither assumption is supported by direct evidence, and vaccination with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) gp350, to block virion binding to B cells, failed to reduce infection rates. Thus, there is a need to re-evaluate assumptions about γHV host entry. Given the difficulty of analysing early human infections, potentially much can be learned from animal models. Genomic comparisons argue that γHVs colonized mammals long before humans speciation, and so that human γHVs are unlikely to differ dramatically in behaviour from those of other mammals. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), which like EBV and the Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) persists in memory B cells, enters new hosts via olfactory neurons and exploits myeloid cells to spread. Integrating these data with existing knowledge of human and veterinary γHVs suggests a new model of host entry, with potentially important implications for infection control.

  8. A zebrafish transgenic model of Ewing’s sarcoma reveals conserved mediators of EWS-FLI1 tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie W. Leacock

    2012-01-01

    Ewing’s sarcoma, a malignant bone tumor of children and young adults, is a member of the small-round-blue-cell tumor family. Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs, which include peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs, are characterized by chromosomal translocations that generate fusions between the EWS gene and ETS-family transcription factors, most commonly FLI1. The EWS-FLI1 fusion oncoprotein represents an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of Ewing’s sarcoma. The cell of origin of ESFT and the molecular mechanisms by which EWS-FLI1 mediates tumorigenesis remain unknown, and few animal models of Ewing’s sarcoma exist. Here, we report the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model of EWS-FLI1 function and tumorigenesis. Mosaic expression of the human EWS-FLI1 fusion protein in zebrafish caused the development of tumors with histology strongly resembling that of human Ewing’s sarcoma. The incidence of tumors increased in a p53 mutant background, suggesting that the p53 pathway suppresses EWS-FLI1-driven tumorigenesis. Gene expression profiling of the zebrafish tumors defined a set of genes that might be regulated by EWS-FLI1, including the zebrafish ortholog of a crucial EWS-FLI1 target gene in humans. Stable zebrafish transgenic lines expressing EWS-FLI1 under the control of the heat-shock promoter exhibit altered embryonic development and defective convergence and extension, suggesting that EWS-FLI1 interacts with conserved developmental pathways. These results indicate that functional targets of EWS-FLI1 that mediate tumorigenesis are conserved from zebrafish to human and provide a novel context in which to study the function of this fusion oncogene.

  9. Expression of anti-HIV gene in Jurkat cell with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus infection%卡波氏肉瘤相关病毒感染激活Jurkat细胞抗-HIV基因表达的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈彬; 谭晓华; 王小波; 尹小菲; 杨磊

    2010-01-01

    目的:观察Jurkat细胞感染卡波氏肉瘤相关病毒(Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus,KSHV)后细胞内几条主要的抗HIV作用的基因(RANTES、APOBEC3G、APOBEC3F、MX1、MX2)表达情况.方法:首先用佛波酯(TPA)(20ng/ml)刺激BCBL-1细胞72小时,提取KSHV病毒滤液.然后把含KSHV滤液的RPMI-1640培养Jurkat细胞.24小时后,分别在感染后第3、5天收集细胞,提取细胞总RNA,通过实时定量PCR检测分析相关基因的表达情况.结果:通过对KSHV感染不同时期的细胞抗-HIV基因表达分析,结果显示:与未感染组相比,KSHV感染组的Jurkat细胞内的多条抗HIV-1基因表达上调.感染第3天,RANTES上调123倍,APOBEC3G上调3.12倍,A POBEC3F上调1.18倍,MIX1上调2.75倍.MIX2上调4.35倍,感染第5天RANTES上调11.91倍,MX1上调2.72倍,MIX2上调2.22倍.结论:KSHV感染在一定程度上激活Jurkat细胞抗HIV相关基因的表达.

  10. What Are the Risk Factors for Soft Tissue Sarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not been proven to cause soft tissue sarcomas. Arsenic has also been linked to a type of ... Tissue Sarcoma Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treatment After Treatment Back To ...

  11. Insights into pathogenic events of HIV-associated Kaposi sarcoma and immune reconstitution syndrome related Kaposi sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemmer Johan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A decrease in the incidence of human immune deficiency virus-associated Kaposi sarcoma (HIV-KS and regression of some established HIV-KS lesions is evident after the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART, and is attributed to generalized immune restoration, to the reconstitution of human herpesvirus (HHV-8 specific cellular immune responses, and to the decrease in HIV Tat protein and HHV-8 loads following HAART. However, a small subset of HIV-seropositive subjects with a low CD4+ T cell count at the time of introduction of HAART, may develop HIV-KS as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS within 8 weeks thereafter.

  12. Chylothorax in a patient with metastatic Kaposi sarcoma: Differential diagnostic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Alexander, DO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi sarcoma (KS is a low-grade mesenchymal tumor involving blood and lymphatic vessels. There are four types, based on clinical presentation: classic, endemic (Africana, iatrogenic (typically, involving renal allograft recipients, and AIDS-associated (epidemic. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus infection has been linked along with other factors to the development of KS. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus interacts and encodes for numerous molecular proteins that play a role in the pathogenesis of KS, including latency-associated nuclear antigen, viral G protein-coupled receptor, viral FLICE inhibitory protein, and viral IL-6. KS primarily affects the skin and causes disseminated disease in a variety of organs. Involvement of visceral organs other than the lining of the alimentary tract is extremely rare. While the chylous pleural effusions of KS may resemble other pulmonary diseases (including lymphangioma, lymphangectasis, and lymphangioleiomyomatosis with chylous effusions at thoracic CT, differentiating features may allow for more prompt diagnosis and treatment. The presumptive diagnosis of AIDS-related pulmonary KS is often clinical. A tissue diagnosis is not required to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary KS. There are a variety of causes of chylothorax. The primary finding is a near-water-attenuating pleural effusion. The secondary findings of chylothorax can help differentiate the etiology.

  13. Endoscopic Appearance of Oropharyngeal and Upper GI Kaposi's Sarcoma in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renno, Anas; Khan, Zubair; Alkully, Turki; Kamal, Sehrish; Nawras, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) usually manifests as a cutaneous disease but GI manifestation is often rare. It is associated with human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) and seen in immunocompromised patients. In the USA, use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has drastically reduced incidence of KS in HIV patients. Case Presentation. A 65-year-old male with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with cardiopulmonary arrest secondary to hyperkalemia of 7.5 meq/L. Following placement of orogastric and endotracheal tube (ETT), a significant amount of blood was noticed in the ETT. Hemoglobin trended down from 9.6 mg/dL to 6.7 mg/dL over five days. Stool guaiac was positive. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed and revealed multiple large hypervascularized violaceous submucosal nodular lesions with stigmata of bleeding seen on the soft palate and pharynx and within the cricopharyngeal area close to the vocal cords. Biopsy of the soft palate lesions showed proliferation of neoplastic spindle shaped cells arranged in bundles with slit-like capillary spaces containing erythrocytes consistent with Kaposi's sarcoma. Biopsy was positive for HHV-8. Colonoscopy was unremarkable. There were no cutaneous manifestations of the disease. Conclusion. GI involvement of Kaposi's sarcoma must be considered in immunocompromised patients and can be confirmed by endoscopic methods.

  14. Vismodegib and Gamma-Secretase/Notch Signalling Pathway Inhibitor RO4929097 in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    Adult Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma; Adult Angiosarcoma; Adult Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Adult Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma; Adult Epithelioid Sarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Myxoid Chondrosarcoma; Adult Extraskeletal Osteosarcoma; Adult Fibrosarcoma; Adult Leiomyosarcoma; Adult Liposarcoma; Adult Malignant Mesenchymoma; Adult Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor; Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Adult Synovial Sarcoma; Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma; Chondrosarcoma; Clear Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney; Conjunctival Kaposi Sarcoma; Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Adult Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Recurrent Kaposi Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Unclassified Pleomorphic Sarcoma of Bone

  15. Epithelioid sarcoma : Still an only surgically curable disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visscher, Sebastiaan A. H. J.; van Ginkel, Robbert J.; Wobbes, Theo; Veth, Rene P. H.; ten Heuvel, Suzanne E.; Suurmeijer, Albert J. H.; Hoekstra, Harad J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Epithelioid sarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma with a known high propensity for locoregional recurrence and distant metastases. The clinical behavior and prognostic factors that influence the survival of patients with epithelioid sarcoma were studied. METHODS. Twenty-three patients,

  16. Immunotherapy for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenori Uehara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy have improved clinical outcomes of patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas, the prognosis of patients has plateaued over these 20 years. Immunotherapies have shown the effectiveness for several types of advanced tumors. Immunotherapies, such as cytokine therapies, vaccinations, and adoptive cell transfers, have also been investigated for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Cytokine therapies with interleukin-2 or interferons have limited efficacy because of their cytotoxicities. Liposomal muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE, an activator of the innate immune system, has been approved as adjuvant therapeutics in combination with conventional chemotherapy in Europe, which has improved the 5-year overall survival of patients. Vaccinations and transfer of T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors have shown some efficacy for sarcomas. Ipilimumab and nivolumab are monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit immune checkpoint mechanisms. These antibodies have recently been shown to be effective for patients with melanoma and also investigated for patients with sarcomas. In this review, we provide an overview of various trials of immunotherapies for bone and soft tissue sarcomas, and discuss their potential as adjuvant therapies in combination with conventional therapies.

  17. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

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    Giuseppe Balistreri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  18. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Giuseppe; Viiliäinen, Johanna; Turunen, Mikko; Diaz, Raquel; Lyly, Lauri; Pekkonen, Pirita; Rantala, Juha; Ojala, Krista; Sarek, Grzegorz; Teesalu, Mari; Denisova, Oxana; Peltonen, Karita; Julkunen, Ilkka; Varjosalo, Markku; Kainov, Denis; Kallioniemi, Olli; Laiho, Marikki; Taipale, Jussi; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Ojala, Päivi M

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  19. Uterine sarcoma Part II—Uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma: The TAG systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huann-Cheng Horng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial stromal tumors are rare uterine tumors (<1%. Four main categories include endometrial stromal nodule, low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LG-ESS, high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (HG-ESS, and uterine undifferentiated sarcoma (UUS. This review is a series of articles discussing the uterine sarcomas. LG-ESS, a hormone-dependent tumor harboring chromosomal rearrangement, is an indolent tumor with a favorable prognosis, but characterized by late recurrences even in patients with Stage I disease, suggesting the requirement of a long-term follow-up. Patients with HG-ESS, based on the identification of YWHAE-NUTM2A/B (YWHAE-FAM22A/B gene fusion, typically present with advanced stage diseases and frequently have recurrences, usually within a few years after initial surgery. UUS is, a high-grade sarcoma, extremely rare, lacking a specific line of differentiation, which is a diagnosis of exclusion (the wastebasket category, which fails to fulfill the morphological and immunohistochemical criteria of translocation-positive ESS. Surgery is the main strategy in the management of uterine sarcoma. Due to rarity, complex biological characteristics, and unknown etiology and risk factors of uterine sarcomas, the role of adjuvant therapy is not clear. Only LG-ESS might respond to progestins or aromatase inhibitors.

  20. Kaposi sarcoma following postmastectomy lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Pérez, Iria; Rodríguez-Pazos, Laura; Álvarez-Pérez, Adriana; Ferreirós, M Mercedes Pereiro; Aliste, Carlos; Suarez-Peñaranda, Jose Manuel; Toribio, Jaime

    2015-11-01

    Classical Kaposi sarcoma (KS) usually appears on lower extremities accompanied or preceded by local lymphedema. However, the development in areas of chronic lymphedema of the arms following mastectomy, mimicking a Stewart-Treves syndrome, has rarely been described. We report an 81-year-old woman who developed multiple, erythematous to purple tumors, located on areas of post mastectomy lymphedema. Histopathological examination evidenced several dermal nodules formed by spindle-shaped cells that delimitated slit-like vascular spaces with some red cell extravasation. Immunohistochemically, the human herpesvirus type 8 (HHV-8) latent nuclear antigen-1 was detected in the nuclei of most tumoral cells confirming the diagnosis of KS. Lymphedema could promote the development of certain tumors by altering immunocompetence. Although angiosarcoma (AS) is the most frequent neoplasia arising in the setting of chronic lymphedema, other tumors such as benign lymphangiomatous papules (BLAP) or KS can also develop in lymphedematous limbs. It is important to establish the difference between AS and KS because their prognosis and treatment are very different. Identification by immunohistochemistry of HHV-8 is useful for the distinction between KS and AS or BLAP.

  1. Sarcomas cutâneos primários Primary cutaneous sarcomas

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    Luiz Fernando Fróes Fleury Jr

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Os sarcomas com apresentação cutânea primária são tumores raros e de grande heterogeneidade histológica. Com a evolução da oncologia cutânea e da cirurgia dermatológica, os dermatologistas têm sido cada vez mais requisitados para o diagnóstico e orientação terapêutica de tumores menos freqüentes. Este artigo de revisão analisa os sarcomas cutâneos primários observando suas características clínicas, etiopatogênicas e histológicas, bem como aspectos do tratamento e evolução. Enfatiza os sarcomas de maior relevância para o dermatologista, como angiossarcoma, dermatofibrossarcoma protuberans, fibroxantoma atípico, leiomiossarcoma, lipossarcoma, tumor maligno de bainha de nervo periférico e sarcoma epitelióide. O sarcoma de Kaposi não é abordado devido a suas características individuais específicas.Soft tissue tumors represent a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal and neural lesions. The cutaneous presentation of these tumours is rare. With the evolution of dermatologic surgery and cutaneous oncology, dermatologists have emerged as specialists for skin cancer management. This article reviews primary cutaneous sarcomas with particular emphasis on the epidemiologic, clinical, and histological features of diagnosis, as well as treatment modalities and prognosis. The most frequent cutaneous sarcomas were reviewed, including angiosarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, atypical fibroxanthoma, leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, malignant nerve sheath tumor, and epithelioid sarcoma. Kaposi's sarcoma, due to specific characteristics, was omitted from this review.

  2. Chimeric EWSR1-FLI1 regulates the Ewing sarcoma susceptibility gene EGR2 via a GGAA microsatellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Thomas G. P.; Bernard, Virginie; Gilardi-Hebenstreit, Pascale; Raynal, Virginie; Surdez, Didier; Aynaud, Marie-Ming; Mirabeau, Olivier; Cidre-Aranaz, Florencia; Tirode, Franck; Zaidi, Sakina; Perot, Gaëlle; Jonker, Anneliene H.; Lucchesi, Carlo; Le Deley, Marie-Cécile; Oberlin, Odile; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Véron, Amélie S.; Reynaud, Stephanie; Lapouble, Eve; Boeva, Valentina; Frio, Thomas Rio; Alonso, Javier; Bhatia, Smita; Pierron, Gaëlle; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Cussenot, Olivier; Cox, David G.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Charnay, Patrick; Delattre, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the ways in which somatic mutations and germline susceptibility variants cooperate to promote cancer is challenging. Ewing sarcoma is characterized by fusions between EWSR1 and members of the ETS gene family, usually EWSR1-FLI1, leading to the generation of oncogenic transcription factors that bind DNA at GGAA motifs1–3. A recent genome-wide association study4 identified susceptibility variants near EGR2. Here we found that EGR2 knockdown inhibited proliferation, clonogenicity and spheroidal growth in vitro and induced regression of Ewing sarcoma xenografts. Targeted germline deep sequencing of the EGR2 locus in affected subjects and controls revealed 291 Ewing-associated SNPs. At rs79965208, the A risk allele connected adjacent GGAA repeats by converting an interspaced GGAT motif into a GGAA motif, thereby increasing the number of consecutive GGAA motifs and thus the EWSR1-FLI1–dependent enhancer activity of this sequence, with epigenetic characteristics of an active regulatory element. EWSR1-FLI1 preferentially bound to the A risk allele, which increased global and allele-specific EGR2 expression. Collectively, our findings establish cooperation between a dominant oncogene and a susceptibility variant that regulates a major driver of Ewing sarcomagenesis. PMID:26214589

  3. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Related Solid Lymphoma Involving the Heart and Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R. Andrews

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in 1994, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV has been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders, particularly in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The disorders most strongly linked to KSHV are multicentric Castleman's Disease (MCD, primary effusion lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. We report an unusual case of KSHV-associated lymphoma in an HIV-infected patient manifesting with myocardial and central nervous system involvement. We discuss this case in the context of increasing array of KSHV-associated lymphomas. In the HIV-infected patient with a mass lesion, a history of cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma and prolonged immunosuppression should alert clinicians as to the possibility of KSHV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders, in order to establish a timely diagnosis.

  4. Serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF for treatment of sarcoma in rodents and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramante, Simona; Koski, Anniina; Kipar, Anja; Diaconu, Iulia; Liikanen, Ilkka; Hemminki, Otto; Vassilev, Lotta; Parviainen, Suvi; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Pesonen, Saila K; Oksanen, Minna; Heiskanen, Raita; Rouvinen-Lagerström, Noora; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Hakonen, Tiina; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Pesonen, Sari; Hemminki, Akseli

    2014-08-01

    Sarcomas are a relatively rare cancer, but often incurable at the late metastatic stage. Oncolytic immunotherapy has gained attention over the past years, and a wide range of oncolytic viruses have been delivered via intratumoral injection with positive safety and promising efficacy data. Here, we report preclinical and clinical results from treatment of sarcoma with oncolytic adenovirus Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF (CGTG-102). Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF is a serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The efficacy of Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF was evaluated on a panel of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) cell lines and in two animal models. Sarcoma specific human data were also collected from the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), in preparation for further clinical development. Efficacy was seen in both in vitro and in vivo STS models. Fifteen patients with treatment-refractory STS (13/15) or primary bone sarcoma (2/15) were treated in ATAP, and treatments appeared safe and well-tolerated. A total of 12 radiological RECIST response evaluations were performed, and two cases of minor response, six cases of stable disease and four cases of progressive disease were detected in patients progressing prior to virus treatment. Overall, the median survival time post treatment was 170 days. One patient is still alive at 1,459 days post virus treatment. In summary, Ad5/3-D24-GMCSF appears promising for the treatment of advanced STS; a clinical trial for treatment of refractory injectable solid tumors including STS is ongoing.

  5. Oncogene mutational profile in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Chen Zhang,1,* Sha Fu,1,* Fang Wang,1 Hai-Yun Wang,1 Yi-Xin Zeng,2 Jian-Yong Shao11Department of Molecular Diagnostics, 2Department of Experimental Research, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common tumor in Southern China, but the oncogene mutational status of NPC patients has not been clarified. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined in 123 NPC patients. The relationships between mutational status and clinical data were assessed with a χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. In 123 patients, 21 (17.1% NPC tumors were positive for mutations in eight oncogenes: six patients had PIK3CA mutations (4.9%, five NRAS mutations (4.1%, four KIT mutations (3.3%, two PDGFRA mutations (1.6%, two ABL mutations (1.6%, and one with simultaneous mutations in HRAS, EGFR, and BRAF (1%. Patients with mutations were more likely to relapse or develop metastasis than those with wild-type alleles (P=0.019. No differences or correlations were found in other clinical characteristics or in patient survival. No mutations were detected in oncogenes AKT1, AKT2, CDK, ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, JAK2, KRAS, MET, and RET. These results demonstrate an association between NPC and mutations in NRAS, KIT, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, and ABL, which are associated with patient relapse and metastasis. Keywords: NPC, oncogene, mutation

  6. Pregnancy and genital sarcoma: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koji; Eno, Michele L; Im, Dwight D; Rosenshein, Neil B

    2009-08-01

    We conducted a literature review to determine the clinical characteristics of genital sarcoma during pregnancy. The systematic literature search was conducted using the search engines PubMed and MEDLINE with keywords "sarcoma" and "pregnancy" and was limited to female genital organs such as ovary, uterus, cervix, vagina, vulva, and retroperitoneal sarcoma. Kaposi's sarcoma, metastatic sarcoma, history of sarcoma, bone sarcoma located in pelvis, and fetal sarcoma were excluded in this study. There were 40 cases of genital sarcoma during pregnancy between 1955 and 2007. The majority of the cases were uterine sarcoma (37.5%), followed by retroperitoneal sarcoma (27.5%), vulvar sarcoma (22.5%), and vaginal sarcoma (12.5%). Mean age of the patient was 27.8 +/- 7.0. The distribution in the onset of symptoms had two peaks: first trimester (27.5%) and third trimester (50.0%). Growing mass (42.5%), abdominal pain (30.0%), and vaginal bleeding (22.5%) were the three most common symptoms. Incidental diagnosis was made in 22.5% and included during cesarean section (12.5%) and routine pelvic exam (7.5%). The cases initially not suspicious for malignancy were 42.5%. Thirty-three (82.5%) cases had live-born infants with term delivery in 55.2%. Mean birth weight was 2843 +/- 791 g, and male infants were more common (66.7%). Intrauterine growth retardation was seen in 12.5% of cases. Preterm labor was a common complication. Median survival period was 2.5 years (95% confidence, 1.9 to 3.1). The 2-, 3-, and 5-year cumulative survival rates were 60%, 38%, and 17%, respectively. Genital sarcomas in pregnancy are rare. There is a delay in diagnosis due to low index of suspicion. A majority had live births, and the 5-year survival is similar to that of advanced-stage sarcoma in nonpregnant women.

  7. Generalized intramuscular granulocytic sarcoma mimicking polymyositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Jan; Claussen, Claus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Horger, Marius S. [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Vogel, Wichard [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Internal Medicine-Oncology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wehrmann, Martin [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Pathology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    We report a case of granulocytic sarcoma exclusively manifesting as diffuse intramuscular infiltration of the proximal upper and lower limb girdle and the torso muscles in a patient with previous history of acute myelogenous leukemia 5a. Whole-body CT showed widespread distribution of ill-defined intramuscular, homogeneously enhancing lesions. On whole-body MRI, lesions were homogeneously hyperintense on fat saturated T2-weighted images, isointense on T1-weighted images and strongly enhancing after intravenous gadolinium contrast administration. Histopathology revealed muscular infiltration of blast cells with identical immunochemistry to the initial manifestation of leukemia, diagnostic for an extramedullary relapse manifesting as granulocytic sarcoma. CT and MRI characteristics of this previously undocumented manifestation of granulocytic sarcoma should assist in the identification of such cases. (orig.)

  8. Clinical Pathological Analysis of Synovial Sarcoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the clinical diagnosis and differential diagnosis of synovial sarcoma (SS).METHODS A total of 41 paraffin-embedded synovial sarcoma samples were examined by H&E staining, immunohistochemistry staining and the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), in order to provide a scientific bases for diagnosis and differential diagnosis.RESULTS Twelve cases were a biphasic type, 22 cases were a monophasic fibrous type, and 7 cases were a poorly differentiated type. Thirty-six cases were both CK (and/or EMA) and Vim positive. Five cases were only Vim positive. A SYT-SSX fusion gene was detected in 18 cases by RT-PCR.CONCLUSION By observation of the histomorphology, immunohistochemistry markers and detection of a SYT-SSX fusion gene, we can make a clinical pathological diagnosis of synovial sarcoma.

  9. Primary Breast Sarcoma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Torres Ajá

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary breast sarcoma is the least frequent non-epithelial malignant tumour, representing less than 1 % of all breast cancers. It has a dismal prognosis with the presence of early metastases, mainly in the lungs and bones. Survival is very poor at 5 years. A case of a 79 year-old female patient with a large ulcerated sarcoma in the left breast is presented. The patient was examined in an interdisciplinary consultation, and the presence of a stromal sarcoma of the breast without apparent visceral or bone metastases was confirmed by an aspiration biopsy with thick needle, excisional biopsy by paraffin and by immunohistochemical studies. The publication of this report has clinical interest for health professionals due to the rarity of the disease.

  10. Sarcoma derived from cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; Nauta, Alma J; Osborn, Mark J; Panoskaltsis Mortari, Angela; McElmurry, Ron T; Bell, Scott; Xia, Lily; Zhou, Ning; Riddle, Megan; Schroeder, Tania M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; McIvor, R Scott; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Szuhai, Karoly; Oseth, Leann; Hirsch, Betsy; Yant, Stephen R; Kay, Mark A; Peister, Alexandra; Prockop, Darwin J; Fibbe, Willem E; Blazar, Bruce R

    2007-02-01

    To study the biodistribution of MSCs, we labeled adult murine C57BL/6 MSCs with firefly luciferase and DsRed2 fluorescent protein using nonviral Sleeping Beauty transposons and coinfused labeled MSCs with bone marrow into irradiated allogeneic recipients. Using in vivo whole-body imaging, luciferase signals were shown to be increased between weeks 3 and 12. Unexpectedly, some mice with the highest luciferase signals died and all surviving mice developed foci of sarcoma in their lungs. Two mice also developed sarcomas in their extremities. Common cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in tumor cells isolated from different animals. Original MSC cultures not labeled with transposons, as well as independently isolated cultured MSCs, were found to be cytogenetically abnormal. Moreover, primary MSCs derived from the bone marrow of both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice showed cytogenetic aberrations after several passages in vitro, showing that transformation was not a strain-specific nor rare event. Clonal evolution was observed in vivo, suggesting that the critical transformation event(s) occurred before infusion. Mapping of the transposition insertion sites did not identify an obvious transposon-related genetic abnormality, and p53 was not overexpressed. Infusion of MSC-derived sarcoma cells resulted in malignant lesions in secondary recipients. This new sarcoma cell line, S1, is unique in having a cytogenetic profile similar to human sarcoma and contains bioluminescent and fluorescent genes, making it useful for investigations of cellular biodistribution and tumor response to therapy in vivo. More importantly, our study indicates that sarcoma can evolve from MSC cultures.

  11. Descriptive epidemiology of Kaposi sarcoma in Europe. Report from the RARECARE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, C A; Trama, A; Brewster, D H; Verne, J; Bouchardy, C; Navarro, C; Chirlaque, M D; Marcos-Gragera, R; Visser, O; Serraino, D; Weiderpass, E; Dei Tos, A P; Ascoli, V

    2014-12-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a virus-related malignancy which most frequently arises in skin, though visceral sites can also be involved. Infection with Kaposi sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV or HHV-8) is required for development of KS. Nowadays, most cases worldwide occur in persons who are immunosuppressed, usually because of HIV infection or as a result of therapy to combat rejection of a transplanted organ, but classic Kaposi sarcoma is predominantly a disease of the elderly without apparent immunosuppression. We analyzed 2667 KS incident cases diagnosed during 1995-2002 and registered by 75 population-based European cancer registries contributing to the RARECARE project. Total crude and age-standardized incidence rate was 0.3 per 100,000 per year with an estimated 1642 new cases per year in the EU27 countries. Age-standardized incidence rate was 0.8 per 100,000 in Southern Europe but below 0.3 per 100,000 in all other regions. The elevated rate in southern Europe was attributable to a combination of classic Kaposi sarcoma in some Mediterranean countries and the relatively high incidence of AIDS in several countries. Five-year relative survival for 2000-2002 by the period method was 75%. More than 10,000 persons were estimated to be alive in Europe at the beginning of 2008 with a past diagnosis of KS. The aetiological link with suppressed immunity means that many people alive following diagnosis of KS suffer comorbidity from a pre-existing condition. While KS is a rare cancer, it has a relatively good prognosis and so the number of people affected by it is quite large. Thus it provides a notable example of the importance of networking in diagnosis, therapy and research for rare cancers.

  12. FDG PET/CT findings in rare sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergül, N; Aydın, M

    2013-01-01

    The role of FDG PET/CT in management of soft tissue and bone sarcomas has been described in many studies up-to-date. However, contribution of PET/CT to diagnosis and treatment in some types of sarcomas that are seen with low incidence has not been identified properly yet. Clear cell sarcoma, synovial sarcoma of chest and myxoid lyposarcoma are rare types of sarcomas. We aimed to describe the FDG uptake patterns of these rare tumors and find out the role of FDG PET/CT in management of disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary mediastinal giant synovial sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Rea

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Synovial sarcoma has been defined by the World Health Organization (WHO in 2002 as a type of mesenchymal tissue cell tumor that exhibits epithelial differentiation and represents the third most common soft-tissue sarcoma in adults, accounting for approximately 10% of soft-tissue sarcomas. To date, only few reports have focused on mediastinal synovial sarcoma imaging findings. Herein, we report a case of a 13 cm primary mediastinal giant synovial sarcoma, diagnosed in a 56-year-old patient admitted in our Department of Radiology with a six-month history of dyspnea and back pain.

  14. Serodiagnosis for Tumor Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Brian J.; Labo, Nazzarena; Miley, Wendell J.; Whitby, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The known human tumor viruses include the DNA viruses Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, human papillomavirus, and hepatitis B virus. RNA tumor viruses include Human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type-1 and hepatitis C virus. The serological identification of antigens/antibodies in plasma serum is a rapidly progressing field with utility for both scientists and clinicians. Serology is useful for conducting seroepidemiology studies and to inform on the pathogenesis and host immune response to a particular viral agent. Clinically, serology is useful for diagnosing current or past infection and for aiding in clinical management decisions. Serology is useful for screening blood donations for infectious agents and for monitoring the outcome of vaccination against these viruses. Serodiagnosis of human tumor viruses has improved in recent years with increased specificity and sensitivity of the assays, as well as reductions in cost and the ability to assess multiple antibody/antigens in single assays. Serodiagnosis of tumor viruses plays an important role in our understanding of the prevalence and transmission of these viruses and ultimately in the ability to develop treatments/preventions for these globally important diseases. PMID:25843726

  15. The HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir inhibits Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Ikoma, Minako; Gachelet, Eliora; Gray, Matthew; Geballe, Adam P; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael; Vieira, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common HIV-associated cancer worldwide and is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality in some regions. Antiretroviral (ARV) combination regimens have had mixed results for KS progression and resolution. Anecdotal case reports suggest that protease inhibitors (PIs) may have effects against KS that are independent of their effect on HIV infection. As such, we evaluated whether PIs or other ARVs directly inhibit replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the gammaherpesvirus that causes KS. Among a broad panel of ARVs tested, only the PI nelfinavir consistently displayed potent inhibitory activity against KSHV in vitro as demonstrated by an efficient quantitative assay for infectious KSHV using a recombinant virus, rKSHV.294, which expresses the secreted alkaline phosphatase. This inhibitory activity of nelfinavir against KSHV replication was confirmed using virus derived from a second primary effusion lymphoma cell line. Nelfinavir was similarly found to inhibit in vitro replication of an alphaherpesvirus (herpes simplex virus) and a betaherpesvirus (human cytomegalovirus). No activity was observed with nelfinavir against vaccinia virus or adenovirus. Nelfinavir may provide unique benefits for the prevention or treatment of HIV-associated KS and potentially other human herpesviruses by direct inhibition of replication.

  16. Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Köhne, Wiebke [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea [Institute of Pathology, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas [Department of Human Genetics, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Tilkorn, Daniel [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany); Steinstraesser, Lars, E-mail: lars.steinstraesser@rub.de [Department of Plastic Surgery, BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Ruhr-University Bochum (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies “initial” and “final” passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: • Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). • Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. • Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

  17. Biomarkers of Osteosarcoma, Chondrosarcoma, and Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evola, Francesco R.; Costarella, Luciano; Pavone, Vito; Caff, Giuseppe; Cannavò, Luca; Sessa, Andrea; Avondo, Sergio; Sessa, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent malignant bone neoplasm, followed by chondrosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. The diagnosis of bone neoplasms is generally made through histological evaluation of a biopsy. Clinical and radiological features are also important in aiding diagnosis and to complete the staging of bone cancer. In addition to these, there are several non-specific serological or specific molecular markers for bone neoplasms. In bone tumors, molecular markers increase the accuracy of the diagnosis and assist in subtyping bone tumors. Here, we review these markers and discuss their role in the diagnosis and prognosis of the three most frequent malignant bone neoplasms, namely osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma. PMID:28439237

  18. Amputation for histiocytic sarcoma in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Takahiro; Hata, Takashi; Nezu, Yoko; Michishita, Masaki; Matsumoto, Hirotaka; Mizutani, Hisashi; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Koyama, Hidekazu

    2012-02-01

    A 9-year-old spayed female domestic shorthair cat presented with a skin lesion of the left tarsus. The lesion was biopsied and, based on the microscopic appearance and immunohistochemical characteristics, histiocytic sarcoma was diagnosed. Amputation was performed with improved demeanor seen postoperatively. However, between 44 and 60 days following the surgery, relapse of skin lesions appeared in multiple locations, including at the previous amputation site, and euthanasia was elected. This is the first report of a histiocytic sarcoma treated with amputation in a cat.

  19. Primary Renal Synovial Sarcoma: An Oncologic Surprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Krishna Moorthy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal synovial sarcoma is a rare tumor having a specific chromosomal translocation t(X; 18 (p11.2; q11.2. The clinical features of this tumor and radiologic appearances are quite similar to those of renal cell carcinoma. Confirmatory diagnosis requires fluorescent in situ hybridization or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction validation for differentiating the tumors from sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma. We present a case of primary renal synovial sarcoma that was diagnosed in a middle-aged man.

  20. Soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooper, T M

    2012-02-03

    A retrospective review of 33 cases of soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity presenting over a 10 year period was undertaken. The history, patterns of referral, diagnostic investigations, procedures undertaken and outcomes were studied. We found there was a frequent delay in diagnosis and sometimes misinterpretation of biopsy specimens. Patients were seen by a variety of specialists from disciplines such as general surgery, plastic surgery, orthopaedic surgery and rheumatology. Considerable progress has been made in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas, often allowing local control of the tumour without amputation. We believe there should be early referral of patients having these tumours to a centre where a combined multidisciplinary approach can be undertaken.

  1. Structure-Function Based Molecular Relationships in Ewing’s Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roumiana Todorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing’s Sarcoma Oncogene (ews on chromosome 22q12 is encoding a ubiquitously expressed RNA-binding protein (EWS with unknown function that is target of tumor-specific chromosomal translocations in Ewing’s sarcoma family of tumors. A model of transcription complex was proposed in which the heterodimer Rpb4/7 binds to EAD, connecting it to Core RNA Pol II. The DNA-binding domain, provided by EFP, is bound to the promoter. Rpb4/7 binds RNA, stabilizing the transcription complex. The complex Rpb4/7 can stabilize the preinitiation complexes by converting the conformation of RNA Pol II. EWS may change its conformation, so that NTD becomes accessible. Two different mechanisms of interaction between EWS and RNA Pol II are proposed: (I an intermolecular EWS-EWS interaction between two molecules, pushing conformation from “closed” to “open” state, or (II an intramolecular interaction inside the molecule of EWS, pushing conformation of the molecule from “closed” to “open” state. The modified forms of EWS may interact with Pol II subunits hsRpb5 and hsRpb7. The EWS and EFPs binding partners are described schematically in a model, an attempt to link the transcription with the splicing. The proposed model helps to understand the functional molecular interactions in cancer, to find new partners and ways to treat cancer.

  2. The genomic landscape of the Ewing Sarcoma family of tumors reveals recurrent STAG2 mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Brohl

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (EFT is a group of highly malignant small round blue cell tumors occurring in children and young adults. We report here the largest genomic survey to date of 101 EFT (65 tumors and 36 cell lines. Using a combination of whole genome sequencing and targeted sequencing approaches, we discover that EFT has a very low mutational burden (0.15 mutations/Mb but frequent deleterious mutations in the cohesin complex subunit STAG2 (21.5% tumors, 44.4% cell lines, homozygous deletion of CDKN2A (13.8% and 50% and mutations of TP53 (6.2% and 71.9%. We additionally note an increased prevalence of the BRCA2 K3326X polymorphism in EFT patient samples (7.3% compared to population data (OR 7.1, p = 0.006. Using whole transcriptome sequencing, we find that 11% of tumors pathologically diagnosed as EFT lack a typical EWSR1 fusion oncogene and that these tumors do not have a characteristic Ewing sarcoma gene expression signature. We identify samples harboring novel fusion genes including FUS-NCATc2 and CIC-FOXO4 that may represent distinct small round blue cell tumor variants. In an independent EFT tissue microarray cohort, we show that STAG2 loss as detected by immunohistochemistry may be associated with more advanced disease (p = 0.15 and a modest decrease in overall survival (p = 0.10. These results significantly advance our understanding of the genomic and molecular underpinnings of Ewing sarcoma and provide a foundation towards further efforts to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and precision therapeutics testing.

  3. Conservation of a Triple-Helix-Forming RNA Stability Element in Noncoding and Genomic RNAs of Diverse Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz T. Tycowski

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abundant expression of the long noncoding (lnc PAN (polyadenylated nuclear RNA by the human oncogenic gammaherpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV depends on a cis-element called the expression and nuclear retention element (ENE. The ENE upregulates PAN RNA by inhibiting its rapid nuclear decay through triple-helix formation with the poly(A tail. Using structure-based bioinformatics, we identified six ENE-like elements in evolutionarily diverse viral genomes. Five are in double-stranded DNA viruses, including mammalian herpesviruses, insect polydnaviruses, and a protist mimivirus. One is in an insect picorna-like positive-strand RNA virus, suggesting that the ENE can counteract cytoplasmic as well as nuclear RNA decay pathways. Functionality of four of the ENEs was demonstrated by increased accumulation of an intronless polyadenylated reporter transcript in human cells. Identification of these ENEs enabled the discovery of PAN RNA homologs in two additional gammaherpesviruses, RRV and EHV2. Our findings demonstrate that searching for structural elements can lead to rapid identification of lncRNAs.

  4. Kaposi Sarcoma Risk in HIV-Infected Children and Adolescents on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy From Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and Asia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Niels; Kirk, Ole

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  The burden of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and adolescents on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has not been compared globally. METHODS:  We analyzed cohort data from the International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS...

  5. DJ-1, an oncogene and causative gene for familial Parkinson's disease, is essential for SV40 transformation in mouse fibroblasts through up-regulation of c-Myc

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yun Chul; Kitaura, Hirotake; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) is a tumor virus and its early gene product large T-antigen (LT) is responsible for the transforming activity of SV40. Parkinson's disease causative gene DJ-1 is also a ras-dependent oncogene, but the mechanism of its oncogene function is still not known. In this study, we found that there were no transformed foci when fibroblasts from DJ-1-knockout mice were transfected with LT. We also found that DJ-1 directly bound to LT and that the expression level of c-Myc in tran...

  6. Kaposi sarcoma in association with molluscum contagiosum: an uncommon diagnosis in a single biopsy and potential diagnostic pitfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad Busarla, Satya Vara; Sayed, Shahin; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Gimbel, Devon C; Moloo, Zahir; Sohani, Aliyah R

    2012-02-01

    Molluscum contagiosum is a cutaneous poxviral infection that is rarely associated with other skin diseases, such as cutaneous neoplasms. Such associations are likely to be coincidental, except in immunocompromised patients. Kaposi sarcoma, an angioproliferative neoplasm derived from lymphatic endothelium, is mediated by human herpes virus-8 infection and occurs with increased frequency in immunocompromised individuals. We report an unusual case of molluscum contagiosum with underlying cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed in a single skin biopsy of a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient. Our case highlights the importance of adequate sampling to avoid missing secondary diagnoses in histopathologic sections and alerts pathologists and dermatologists to the possibility of coinfection in high-risk patients by 2 virally-mediated skin conditions.

  7. Adjuvant immunotherapy of feline injection-site sarcomas with the recombinant canarypox virus expressing feline interleukine-2 evaluated in a controlled monocentric clinical trial when used in association with surgery and brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this randomised, controlled, parallel-group monocentric clinical trial was to assess the efficacy (at low and high dose and the safety (at high dose of a recombinant canarypox virus (ALVAC® expressing feline interleukin 2 (IL-2. ALVAC IL-2 was administered to cats as an adjunct treatment of feline fibrosarcoma in complement to surgery and brachytherapy (reference treatment. Seventy-one cats with a first occurrence of feline fibrosarcoma were referred to the Veterinary Oncology Centre for post-surgical radiotherapy. They were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: reference treatment group (23 cats, ALVAC IL-2 low dose group (25 cats and ALVAC IL-2 high dose group (23 cats. Two dosages of ALVAC IL-2 were used to assess both safety (high dose and efficacy (high and low doses. The treatment consisted of six consecutive doses of ALVAC IL-2 administered subcutaneously at the tumour site on Day 0 (one day before brachytherapy treatment, Day 7, Day 14, Day 21, Day 35 and Day 49. All cats were evaluated for relapse (i.e. local tumour recurrence and/or metastasis every three months for at least one year (ALVAC IL-2 high dose group or two years (reference treatment and ALVAC IL-2 low dose groups by complete physical examination and regular CT scans. ALVAC IL-2 treatment was well tolerated and adverse effects were limited to mild local reactions. ALVAC IL-2 treatment resulted in a significant longer median time to relapse (>730 days in the ALVAC IL-2 low dose group than in the reference treatment group (287 days, and a significant reduction of the risk of relapse by 56% at one year (ALVAC IL-2 treatment groups versus reference treatment group and 65% at two years (ALVAC IL-2 low dose treatment group versus reference treatment group.

  8. Treatment of classical Kaposi's sarcoma with gemcitabine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brambilla, L; Labianca, R; Ferrucci, SM; Taglioni, M; Boneschi, [No Value

    2001-01-01

    Background: Several drugs are active in aggressive classical Kaposi's sarcoma (CKS); chemotherapeutic agents with fewer side-effects, more rapid response and able to overcome resistance to previous treatment are advisable when treating patients in a second line. Gemcitabine, an analogue of deoxycyti

  9. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  10. Extraosseus Ewing sarcoma: An uncommon periclavicular location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Albarello, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapidly enlarging right sternoclavicular mass in a young male was labeled as a nonspecific mass. MRI played a crucial role in characterizing the lesion, helping to define the possible mesenchymal origin and the relative involvement of the surrounding structures. We also discuss the differential diagnosis of an extraosseus Ewing sarcoma (ES, with its imaging findings.

  11. Therapeutic strategies for epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aldenhoven, M.; Barlo, N. P.; Sanders, C. J. G.

    2006-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) remains the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in HIV-infected patients, and is one of the AIDS-defining diagnoses. Several different therapeutic options are available, but the optimal therapy is still unclear. The incidence of KS has sharply declined since highly active antire

  12. Osteogenic sarcoma with skeletal muscle metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, W.C.G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong); Shek, T.W.H. [Department of Pathology, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong); Wang Shihchang [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, National University of Singapore, National University Hospital (Singapore); Wong, J.W.K.; Chien, E.P. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong)

    1999-05-01

    Two cases of osteogenic sarcoma with skeletal muscle metastases are described. A 40-year-old woman presented with progressive swelling of both calves and a soft tissue back lump. She had been diagnosed with mandibular chondroblastic osteogenic sarcoma 6 years earlier. Radiographs showed calcified masses. MRI scans and bone scintigraphy revealed multiple soft tissue masses in both calves. Bone scintigraphy also showed uptake in the back lump, right thigh and left lung base. Biopsy confirmed metastatic chondroblastic osteogenic sarcoma, which initially responded well to chemotherapy. However, the metastatic disease subsequently progressed rapidly and she died 21 months after presentation. The second case concerns a 20-year-old man who presented with a pathologic fracture of the humerus, which was found to be due to osteoblastic osteogenic sarcoma. He developed cerebral metastases 17 months later, followed by metastases at other sites. Calcified masses were subsequently seen on radiographs of the abdomen and chest. CT scans confirmed the presence of densely calcified muscle metastases in the abdominal wall, erector spinae and gluteal muscles. The patient`s disease progressed rapidly and he died 30 months after presentation. (orig.) With 6 figs., 29 refs.

  13. Immunosuppressive Therapy-Related Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and its treatment, see the AIDSinfo website . Nonepidemic Gay-related Kaposi Sarcoma There is a type of ... better than another. Trials are based on past studies and what has been learned ... by their creator. In such cases, it is necessary to contact the writer, artist, ...

  14. Primary pleomorphic sarcoma of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, S.; Naik, L.; Shet, S.; Vora, I.M.; Rananavare, R. [BYL Nail Hospital, Bombay (India). Departments of Radiology and Pathology

    1998-02-01

    A 35-year-old woman presented with abdominal distension and a palpable liver mass. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed a large well-delineated liver mass with bilobar involvement. Based on autopsy and immunohistochemical findings, a final diagnosis of primary pleomorphic liver sarcoma with myogenic differentiation W established. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 8 refs., 5 figs.

  15. 3 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiba, K.; Fukuma, H.; Beppu, Y.; Hirota, T. (National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital); Shinohara, N.

    1982-03-01

    Criteria for the diagnosis of radiation-induced sarcoma have been previously described. All cases must have a history of irradiation and the second neoplasm must have arisen in the area of the radiation field. A latent period of several years must have elapsed after irradiation before clinical evidence of a second malignant neoplasm. Most important thing is that, all suspected cases must have been proved histologically. We have experienced 3 cases of radiation-induced sarcoma, they were 42-years-old man who developed an osteosarcoma of the lumbar spine at the field of postoperative irradiation for seminoma 7 years previously, 69-years-old woman who developed a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the buttock at the field of radical radiation for uterine carcinoma 7 years previously and 59-years-old woman who developed an extraskeletal osteosarcoma of the abdominal wall at the field of postoperative irradiation for uterine sarcoma 7 years previously. The last case is very rare and only 8 cases of radiation-induced extraskeletal osteosarcoma have been reported. Since there has been a definite trend in the treatment of cancer toward employing radiation for more favorable cases, in addition to technical improvements in the administration of radiotherapy and more modern equipment, survival data may have been altered considerably in many malignant tumors. Accordingly, more radiation-induced tumors may be encountered in the future. The clinical presentation and histopathology of these radiation-induced sarcomas are presented with a review of the literature.

  16. Feline postvaccinal sarcoma: 20 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, Brian; Wilcock, Anne; Bottoms, Katherine

    2012-04-01

    Comparison of the annual prevalence of feline postvaccinal sarcomas among 11 609 feline skin mass submissions from 1992 to 2010 revealed no decrease in disease prevalence or increase in the age of affected cats in response to changes in vaccine formulation or recommended changes in feline vaccination protocols.

  17. Feline postvaccinal sarcoma: 20 years later

    OpenAIRE

    Wilcock, Brian; Wilcock, Anne; Bottoms, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Comparison of the annual prevalence of feline postvaccinal sarcomas among 11 609 feline skin mass submissions from 1992 to 2010 revealed no decrease in disease prevalence or increase in the age of affected cats in response to changes in vaccine formulation or recommended changes in feline vaccination protocols.

  18. The Value of Surgery for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Sepideh; Jacobs, Charlotte D.; Kapp, Daniel S.; Parast, Layla M.; Norton, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction. Retroperitoneal sarcomas are uncommon large malignant tumors. Methods. Forty-one consecutive patients with localized retroperitoneal sarcoma were retrospectively studied. Results. Median age was 58 years (range 20–91 years). Median tumor size was 17.5 cm (range 4–41 cm). Only 2 tumors were <5 cm. Most were liposarcoma (44%) and high-grade (59%). 59% were stage 3 and the rest was stage 1. Median followup was 10 months (range 1–106 months). Thirty-eight patients had an initial complete resection; 15 (37%) developed recurrent sarcoma and 12 (80%) had a second complete resection. Patients with an initial complete resection had a 5-year survival of 46%. For all patients, tumor grade affected overall survival (P = .006). Complete surgical resection improved overall survival for high-grade tumors (P = .03). Conclusions. Tumor grade/stage and complete surgical resection for high-grade tumors are important prognostic variables. Radiation therapy or chemotherapy had no significant impact on overall or recurrence-free survival. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice for patients with initial and locally recurrent retroperitoneal sarcoma. PMID:19826633

  19. Resistance and perspectives in soft tissue sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, Rudy

    2003-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare malignancies originating from mesenchymal origin. They may occur at any age, but the incidence increases with age: about 50% of the patients are over 60 years of age. A distinct peak incidence is made up by embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas that mostly afflict children at age

  20. The Value of Surgery for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Gholami

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Retroperitoneal sarcomas are uncommon large malignant tumors. Methods. Forty-one consecutive patients with localized retroperitoneal sarcoma were retrospectively studied. Results. Median age was 58 years (range 20–91 years. Median tumor size was 17.5 cm (range 4–41 cm. Only 2 tumors were <5 cm. Most were liposarcoma (44% and high-grade (59%. 59% were stage 3 and the rest was stage 1. Median followup was 10 months (range 1–106 months. Thirty-eight patients had an initial complete resection; 15 (37% developed recurrent sarcoma and 12 (80% had a second complete resection. Patients with an initial complete resection had a 5-year survival of 46%. For all patients, tumor grade affected overall survival (=.006. Complete surgical resection improved overall survival for high-grade tumors (=.03. Conclusions. Tumor grade/stage and complete surgical resection for high-grade tumors are important prognostic variables. Radiation therapy or chemotherapy had no significant impact on overall or recurrence-free survival. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice for patients with initial and locally recurrent retroperitoneal sarcoma.

  1. Soft tissue sarcoma : why not treated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farshadpour, F; Schaapveld, M; Suurmeijer, AJH; Wymenga, ANM; Otter, R; Hoekstra, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Background : Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are uncommon malignancies and elderly STS patients have been reported to receive less definitive treatment compared to young STS patients. The present study was performed to investigate whether withholding treatment was based on disease specific aspects, patie

  2. Radiosensitivity of tumor cells. Oncogenes and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltenburg, L. T. C. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Clinical Oncology

    2000-12-01

    The success of treatment of cancer patients by radiotherapy largely depends on tumor radiosensitivity. Several molecular factors that determine the sensitivity of tumor cells to ionizing radiation have been identified during the last couple of years. Some of these factors are known as oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. This review focuses on the influence of some of these molecular factors on a major determinant of radiosensitivity: i. e. programmed cell death or apoptosis. The crucial molecular step in ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into the cell's cytosol. The ways the tumor suppressor protein p53, as well as the oncogenes ras and raf, c-myc and Bcl-2 can influence this process at different stages are presented. As will be discussed, the result of activation of an oncoprotein on tumor radiosensitivity depends on its mechanism of action and on the presence of other (oncogenic) factors, since complex interactions among many molecular factors determine the delicate balance between cell proliferation and cell death. The ongoing identification and characterization of factors influencing apoptosis will eventually make it possible to predict tumor radiosensitivity and thereby improve cancer treatment.

  3. Differential Regulation of the Overlapping Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus vGCR (orf74) and LANA (orf73) Promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Jeong, Joseph; Papin, James; Dittmer, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    Similar to that of other herpesviruses, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV/HHV-8) lytic replication destroys the host cell, while the virus can persist in a latent state in synchrony with the host. During latency only a few genes are transcribed, and the question becomes one of what determines latent versus lytic gene expression. Here we undertake a detailed analysis of the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA [orf73]) promoter (LANAp). We characterized a minimal region that is...

  4. Oncogenic HPV among HIV infected female population in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Sharmila

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of both cervical cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection are very high in India. Natural history of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection is known to be altered in HIV positive women and there is an increased possibility of persistence of HPV infections in this population. Therefore, this study was conducted to understand the epidemiology and circulating genotypes of oncogenic HPV among HIV positive and negative female population in West Bengal, India. Methods In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, 93 known HIV positive females attending a pre-ART registration clinic and 1106 HIV negative females attending a Reproductive and Child Health Care Clinic were subjected to study. Cervical cell samples collected from the study population were tested for the presence of HPV 16, 18 using specific primers. Roche PCR assay was used to detect other specific HPV genotypes in the cervical cells specimens of HIV positive cases only. Results Prevalence of HPV 16, 18 among HIV positive females (32.2%; n = 30 was higher than HIV negative females (9.1%; n = 101. About 53% (23/43 of cases with oncogenic HPV were infected with genotypes other than 16, 18 either as single/multiple infections. HPV 18 and HPV 16 were the predominant genotypes among HIV positive and HIV negative subjects respectively. Oncogenic HPV was not found to be associated with age and duration of sexual exposure. But the presence of HIV was found to a statistically significant predictor oncogenic HPV. Conclusion The currently available HPV vaccines offer protection only against HPV 16 and 18 and some cross- protection to few associated genotypes. These vaccines are therefore less likely to offer protection against cervical cancer in HIV positive women a high percentage of who were infected with non-16 and non-18 oncogenic HPV genotypes. Additionally, there is a lack of sufficient evidence of immunogenicity in HIV infected individuals. Therefore

  5. GLUT1 Expression in Synovial Sarcomas

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    Gülşah KAYGUSUZ

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, the role of GLUT1 expression in synovial sarcomas and its association with disease pathogenesis were examined.Materials and Methods: Twenty two cases of synovial sarcoma were included in this study. The clinicopathological features of the cases, such as age, sex, localization of tumor, information of primary or metastatic tumor, histopathological type were recorded. The tissue microarray paraffin block containing tumor tissues was built by using tissue microarrayer. GLUT1 expression was analyzed on tissue sections by immunohistochemistry.Results: A total of 22 cases (mean age 36 years; range 14-54 years were analyzed. All cases except one were primary tumors. The tumors showed monophasic histological type in 13 cases and biphasic type in 9 cases. GLUT1 expression was found in 3 cases with biphasic type (14%. The cytoplasmic and incomplete membranous GLUT1 expression was seen in the tumor cells showing epithelial-glandular differentiation, whereas spindled cells were negative.Conclusion: Although GLUT1 expression is a diagnostic marker for juvenile capillary hemangioma and perineural tumors, both of which included in the group of mesenchymal tumors, it can be seen in a subset of synovial sarcomas. In our series, the observation of GLUT1 expression especially in the epithelial component of biphasic synovial sarcomas suggests that; i GLUT1 may be relatively used by tumoral cells composing epithelial component of the tumor, and ii the spindle cell component of the tumor would have been positive for other glucose transporters. The finding of uncommon GLUT1 expression in synovial sarcomas is indirectly consistent with the reported results of decreased standardized uptake value by Positron emission tomography with 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose method in the literature.

  6. The Challenges of Detecting Circulating Tumor Cells in Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Brown, Hannah K.; Young, Robin; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin, many of which have a propensity to develop distant metastases. Cancer cells that have escaped from the primary tumor are able to invade into surrounding tissues, to intravasate into the bloodstream to become circulating tumor cells (CTCs), and are responsible for the generation of distant metastases. Due to the rarity of these tumors and the absence of specific markers expressed by sarcoma tumor cells, the characterization of sarcoma CTCs has to date been relatively limited. Current techniques for isolating sarcoma CTCs are based on size criteria, the identification of circulating cells that express either common mesenchymal markers, sarcoma-specific markers, such as CD99, CD81, or PAX3, and chromosomal translocations found in certain sarcoma subtypes, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, detection of osteoblast-related genes, or measurement of the activity of specific metabolic enzymes. Further studies are needed to improve the isolation and characterization of sarcoma CTCs, to demonstrate their clinical significance as predictive and/or prognostic biomarkers, and to utilize CTCs as a tool for investigating the metastatic process in sarcoma and to identify novel therapeutic targets. The present review provides a short overview of the most recent literature on CTCs in sarcoma. PMID:27656422

  7. Attempts on producing lymphoid cell line from Penaeus monodon by induction with SV40-T and 12S EIA oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Prabhakaran, Priyaja; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt of in vitro transformation, transfection mediated expression of Simian virus-40 (T) antigen (SV40-T) and transduction mediated expression of Adenovirus type 12 early region 1A (12S E1A) oncogene were performed in Penaeus monodon lymphoid cells. pSV3-neo vector encoding SV40-T oncogene and a recombinant baculovirus BacP2-12S E1A-GFP encoding 12S E1A oncogene under the control of hybrid promoters were used. Electroporation and lipofection mediated transformation of SV40-T in lymphoid cells confirmed the transgene expression by phenotypic variation and the expression of GFP in co-transfection experiment. The cells transfected by lipofection (≥ 5%) survived for 14 days with lower toxicity (30%), whilst on electroporation, most of the cells succumbed to death (60%) and survived cells lived up to 7 days. Transduction efficiency in primary lymphoid cells was more than 80% within 14 days of post-transduction, however, an incubation period of 7 days post-transduction was observed without detectable expression of 12S E1A. High level of oncogenic 12S E1A expression were observed after 14 day post-transduction and the proliferating cells survived for more than 90 days with GFP expression, however, without in vitro transformation and immortalization. The study put forth the requirement of transduction mediated 'specific' oncogene expression along with telomerase activation and epigenetic induction for the immortalization and establishment of shrimp cell line.

  8. Two oncogenes, v-fos and v-ras, cooperate to convert normal keratinocytes to squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, D.A.; Welty, D.J.; Player, A.; Yuspa, S.H. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have been implicated the ras{sup Ha} oncogene in the initiation of skin carcinogenesis and the fos oncogene in malignant progression of premalignant skin cell lines. To determine if these two oncogenes are sufficient to convert normal keratinocytes to cancer cells, freshly isolated mouse keratinocytes were coinfected with replication-defective ({psi}-2) v-ras{sup Ha} and v-fos viruses in culture. When tested in nude mice within several days of infection, v-fos/v-ras{sup Ha}-coinfected keratinocytes produced squamous cell carcinomas. Introduction of v-fos alone resulted in normal or hyperplastic skin, whereas v-ras{sup Ha} alone produced squamous papillomas. These results indicate that two oncogenes are sufficient to produce the malignant phenotype in epidermal cells. Furthermore, they clearly link the fos oncogene with malignant conversion. Since fos acts as a transcriptional regulator of other genes, malignant conversion may be an indirect consequence of the overexpression of the fos-encoded protein leading to a change in the expression of fos-controlled cellular genes.

  9. Collecting and Storing Tissue, Blood, and Bone Marrow Samples From Patients With Rhabdomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-26

    Adult Rhabdomyosarcoma; Childhood Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Chordoma; Desmoid Tumor; Metastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Nonmetastatic Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Untreated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  10. Cabozantinib-s-malate in Treating Patients With Relapsed Osteosarcoma or Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-04

    Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma; Metastatic Osteosarcoma; Recurrent Ewing Sarcoma; Recurrent Osteosarcoma; Stage III Osteosarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Osteosarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IVA Osteosarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Osteosarcoma AJCC v7; Unresectable Ewing Sarcoma; Unresectable Osteosarcoma

  11. Identification, expression, and immunogenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded small viral capsid antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, S F; Sun, R; Heston, L; Gradoville, L; Shedd, D; Haglund, K; Rigsby, M; Miller, G.

    1997-01-01

    We describe a recombinant antigen for use in serologic tests for antibodies to Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). The cDNA for a small viral capsid antigen (sVCA) was identified by immunoscreening of a library prepared from the BC-1 body cavity lymphoma cell line induced into KSHV lytic gene expression by sodium butyrate. The cDNA specified a 170-amino-acid peptide with homology to small viral capsid proteins encoded by the BFRF3 gene of Epstein-Barr virus and the ORF65 gene...

  12. Kaposi sarcoma in a fingolimod-treated patient with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susan; Brew, Bruce

    2016-09-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a vascular tumour of endothelial cell origin, associated with human herpes virus 8. It develops in one of four clinical settings, one of which is iatrogenic immunosuppression. We present the case of a 46year-old man with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who developed KS in the context of fingolimod use. To our knowledge, this is the second reported case of KS in a fingolimod-treated individual. This case highlights potential risks associated with immunosuppression with this medicine and ongoing need for vigilance in assessing for such complications.

  13. A rare coexistence - Chronic lymphocytic leukemia and Kaposi sarcoma: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Bekir Hacioglu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common leukemia worldwide. Skin lesions associated with CLL mostly develop on the bases of infectious or a hemorrhagic origin with an estimated incidence of 25% of all the cases. Kaposi sarcoma (KS-associated with human herpes virus-8 infection is a spindle-cell, malignant, low-grade tumor originating from vascular and lymphatic endothelium. KS mostly presents with skin lesions as the initial presentation. The relation between these two pathologies has not yet been clarified up to date. Herein, we report a case of KS along with CLL to illustrate the possible relation between these two pathologies.

  14. The Prognostic Value of Serum Biomarkers in Localized Bone Sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm-Pedersen, Ninna; Maretty-Kongstad, Katja; Keller, Johnny

    2016-01-01

    sarcoma were included. Of these patients, 63 were diagnosed with chondrosarcoma and 109 patients with Ewing/osteosarcoma. The median age was 55 years for chondrosarcoma and 19 years for Ewing/osteosarcoma patients. The overall 5-year mortality was 31% [95% confidence interval (CI): 21-44] and 41% (95% CI......OBJECTIVE: Certain biomarkers such as the C-reactive protein, serum albumin, and the neutrophils to lymphocyte ratio are of prognostic significance regarding survival in different types of cancers. Data from sarcoma patients are sparse and mainly derived from soft tissue sarcoma and/or metastatic...... with localized bone sarcomas and to adjust for potential confounders. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All patients diagnosed with localized intermediate and high-grade bone sarcoma during 1994 to 2008 were extracted from the Aarhus Sarcoma Registry. The serum levels of albumin, C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, neutrophils...

  15. Classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma and human herpesvirus 8 infection in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilnur, P; Katano, H; Wang, Z H; Osakabe, Y; Kudo, M; Sata, T; Ebihara, Y

    2001-11-01

    We report 17 cases of the classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma in Xinjiang, which is located in the north-western area of China surrounded by Mongolia in the east, Russia in the north and Kazakhstan in the west. Fifteen of the patients were of the Uygur people. All patients were male and did not have acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Most of the lesions were found in the lower and/or upper extremities, with 16 patients showing multiple lesions. Immunohistochemical examination of the lesions revealed that human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen was expressed in the nuclei of spindle-shaped tumor cells. HHV-8 DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction in all seven cases examined. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that DNA sequences of the HHV-8-encoded K1 gene in the seven Kaposi's sarcoma cases were classified as subtype C that was common in the Mediterranean, the Middle East and East Asian countries. In addition, using immunofluorescence we investigated the seroprevalence of HHV-8 in 73 Uygur patients with diseases other than Kaposi's sarcoma. Surprisingly, the serological study revealed that 34 of the patients (46.6%) were positive for antibodies against HHV-8, suggesting that HHV-8 infection is widespread in Xinjiang area. The occurrence of the classic type of Kaposi's sarcoma with a high seropositivity rate implies that Xinjiang is the most endemic area for HHV-8 infection in the world known to date. Considering that Xinjiang is located at the middle point of the Silk Road that used to extend from Rome to China, these data imply that the virus may have been in circulation in this area due to the migration of the people via the Silk Road.

  16. Activation of proto-oncogenes by disruption of chromosome neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnisz, Denes; Weintraub, Abraham S; Day, Daniel S; Valton, Anne-Laure; Bak, Rasmus O; Li, Charles H; Goldmann, Johanna; Lajoie, Bryan R; Fan, Zi Peng; Sigova, Alla A; Reddy, Jessica; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Lee, Tong Ihn; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Porteus, Matthew H; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A

    2016-03-25

    Oncogenes are activated through well-known chromosomal alterations such as gene fusion, translocation, and focal amplification. In light of recent evidence that the control of key genes depends on chromosome structures called insulated neighborhoods, we investigated whether proto-oncogenes occur within these structures and whether oncogene activation can occur via disruption of insulated neighborhood boundaries in cancer cells. We mapped insulated neighborhoods in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and found that tumor cell genomes contain recurrent microdeletions that eliminate the boundary sites of insulated neighborhoods containing prominent T-ALL proto-oncogenes. Perturbation of such boundaries in nonmalignant cells was sufficient to activate proto-oncogenes. Mutations affecting chromosome neighborhood boundaries were found in many types of cancer. Thus, oncogene activation can occur via genetic alterations that disrupt insulated neighborhoods in malignant cells.

  17. Radiation-induced prostatic sarcoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scully, J.M.; Uno, J.M.; McIntyre, M.; Mosely, S. (Bay Area Hospital, Coos Bay, OR (USA))

    1990-09-01

    A 64-year-old man had a prostatic sarcoma 8 years after transurethral prostatectomy and radical bilateral pelvic lymph node dissection with insertion of 125-iodine implants for stage B1N carcinoma of the prostate. Therapy for the sarcoma consisted of isolated pelvic perfusion and then pelvic exenteration with creation of an ileal conduit and colostomy. The pathology report showed well encapsulated grade 2 spindle cell sarcoma of the prostate. Multiple small metallic particles were embedded in the tumor specimen.

  18. Osseous Kaposi sarcoma in an HIV-positive patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, Loukas; Mylona, Sofia; Kalioras, Vasilios; Pomoni, Maria; Batakis, Nikolaos [Radiology Department, ' ' Korgialeneio-Benakeio' ' , Red Cross Hospital of Athens, 1 Athanasaki Street, 11526, Athens (Greece)

    2004-04-01

    A case of osseous Kaposi sarcoma in a 35-year-old man is described. The patient (HIV-positive for 8 years) suffered from cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma and presented with right-sided chest pain. He underwent a chest CT scan that revealed three osteolytic lesions involving rib and vertebra with large soft tissue masses, without cutaneous lesions at these sites. CT-guided core needle biopsy led to a histological diagnosis of Kaposi sarcoma. (orig.)

  19. Adjuvant chemotherapy for primary cardiac sarcomas: the IGR experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Llombart-Cussac, A.; Pivot, X; Contesso, G; Rhor-Alvarado, A.; Delord, J P; Spielmann, M.; Türsz, T.; Le Cesne, A.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of additional treatments after surgery in patients with primary cardiac sarcoma (PCS) remains unknown. The present study aims to evaluate the benefit of chemotherapy in patients with non-metastatic cardiac sarcomas after optimal resection. Between October 1979 and December 1995, 15 patients with a median age of 45 (range 16-66) and a resected primary cardiac sarcoma [angiosarcoma (six), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (three), leiomyosarcoma (two), rhabdomyosarcoma (two), liposarcom...

  20. Subcentimeter Pulmonary Nodules Detected in Patients with Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle S. Ginsberg

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Subcentimeter pulmonary nodules are being detected with increasing frequency in patients with sarcoma due to the greater use of chest CT, the advent of helical (spiral CT scanning and multidetector scanners, and the attendant decrease in image section thickness.Assessing the clinical significance of these pulmonary nodules is of particular importance in sarcoma patients, due to the frequent occurrence of pulmonary metastasis from sarcomas.

  1. Functional Analysis of the Proto-oncogenes Septin9 and Nras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Louise Berkhoudt

    by the murine leukemia virus SL3-3 in heterozygous Sept9 knock out mice did not change the latency time compared to wild type; however, the distribution of T-cell subsets in the thymic tumors was altered. Moreover, Sept9 expression was increased in tumors compared to thymus and spleen non-tumorigenic tissues...... regardless of genotype indicating an oncogenic role of SEPT9. Nras is a potent proto-oncogene involved in signaling through a number of proliferative pathways. Earlier detected retroviral integration sites resulting in B-cell lymphomas were used to create Nras knock in models harboring the LTR from...... the murine leukemia virus Akv 1-99 in either sense or antisense direction. In addition a floxed PGK/Tn5 neomycin cassette was inserted. Expression analysis of Nras within knock in was used to study the effect of the LTR. If inserted before the endogenous promoter, the LTR in the antisense direction was found...

  2. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  3. Melanoma: oncogenic drivers and the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Pilotto, Sara; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; González-Cao, María; Riso, Aldo; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina, Miguel Angel; Chaib, Imane; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Richardet, Eduardo; Bria, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Advances and in-depth understanding of the biology of melanoma over the past 30 years have contributed to a change in the consideration of melanoma as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies. The finding that oncogenic BRAF mutations drive tumor growth in up to 50% of melanomas led to a molecular therapy revolution for unresectable and metastatic disease. Moving beyond BRAF, inactivation of immune regulatory checkpoints that limit T cell responses to melanoma has provided targets for cancer immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the molecular biology of melanoma and we focus on the recent advances of molecularly targeted and immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26605311

  4. Dermoscopy of Kaposi's sarcoma: areas exhibiting the multicoloured 'rainbow pattern'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S C-S; Ke, C-L K; Lee, C-H; Wu, C-S; Chen, G-S; Cheng, S-T

    2009-10-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a vascular tumour characterized by a proliferation of spindle cells and endothelial cells to form closely arranged slit-like vascular spaces. Currently, the definitive diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma relies on histology. The dermoscopic features of Kaposi's sarcoma are not clearly defined in the scientific literature. We seek to evaluate the dermoscopic features of Kaposi's sarcoma and compare them with other vascular tumours. One hundred forty-one lesions from seven patients with histologically proven Kaposi's sarcoma were evaluated using polarized light dermoscopy for the presence of various dermoscopic features. Twenty patients with other vascular tumours were also examined. Dermoscopic examination revealed bluish-reddish coloration (84% of lesions), multicoloured areas showing various colours of the rainbow spectrum (36%), scaly surface (29%), and small brown globules (15%). The 'rainbow pattern' was found in six out of seven patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and was not observed in other vascular tumours. In addition, there was an absence of dermoscopic features specific for other vascular and non-vascular skin tumours, such as well-defined lacunae or structured vascular pattern, in most of the Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. The most frequent dermoscopic patterns in Kaposi's sarcoma were found to be bluish-reddish coloration, the 'rainbow pattern', and scaly surface. The rainbow pattern is a dermoscopic feature which has not been previously described. We propose that dermoscopy, as an adjunct to clinical examination, may enhance accuracy in the preoperative diagnosis of Kaposi's sarcoma.

  5. Endometrial stromal sarcoma: a rare tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrit Pal Kaur

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS are rare endometrial tumours arising from stroma of endometrium i.e. connective tissue of endometrium rather than glands. Usually a pre-operative diagnosis is difficult. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is main line of treatment. Adjuvant hormone therapy in the form of progesterones, GnRH analogues, aromatase inhibitors are effective for prevention of recurrences as these tumours are invariably positive for oestrogen & progesterone receptors. Surgical excision, radiotherapy, hormone therapy are recommended for recurrences. We report a 52 yrs widow with undifferentiated endometrial stromal sarcoma weighing 3.75 kg with a short history of 3 months diagnosed only after histopathology. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(1.000: 276-278

  6. The prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 genotypes in Kaposi\\\\\\'s sarcoma in Iran by using molecular technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shah Siah

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the Mediterranean region , Kaposi's sarcoma (KS has a high prevalence especially in patients with AIDS. Iran is located close to the Mediterranean region and the HIV prevalence is increasing in our country . In some stages, Kaposi's sarcoma is morphologically similar to other vascular tumors. Owing to the presence of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 in all cases of Kaposi's sarcoma , detection of virus DNA by PCR method can help in the identification of non-diagnostic cases. Moreover, the prevalence of HHV-8 genotypes is different in various regions of the world and in different races. There are limited studies performed on the HHV-8 genotypes in Iranian population. Methods: Patients with Kaposi's sarcoma from 2001 to 2011 who refer to Tehran Razi Hospital were enrolled in this study. HHV-8 DNA was extracted from paraffin blocks and amplification of the virus genome was performed by PCR method . Finally, the target DNA fragment was used for sequencing and genotype determination. Results: PCR was performed on 53 cases. In 8 cases with suspicious morphology, PCR was negative and they were excluded from study. Of remaining 45 cases, 35 had positive PCR results, 7 had negative results and 3 had low PCR product. Samples from 28 cases that had positive PCR results, which were acceptable for genotyping, were chosen for sequencing. Twenty cases had genotype C, 7 cases had genotype A and one case was negative. The results are consistent with other studies in our geographical area. No correlation was found between the different microscopic stages and HHV-8 Genotypes. Conclusion: Since the HHV-8 is obtained in almost 100% of KS lesions and PCR s ensitivity in detection of the virus is close to 100 %, KS diagnosis can be confirmed in suspicious cases by detection of HHV-8 DNA on paraffin blocks. Moreover the prevalence of HHV-8 genotype was determined in Iran.

  7. BRAF inhibitor resistance mediated by the AKT pathway in an oncogenic BRAF mouse melanoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Daniele; Karreth, Florian A; Rust, Alistair G; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Rashid, Mamunur; Iorio, Francesco; Alifrangis, Constantine; Arends, Mark J; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Bollag, Gideon; Tuveson, David A; Adams, David J

    2015-02-10

    BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B) inhibitors elicit a transient anti-tumor response in ∼ 80% of BRAF(V600)-mutant melanoma patients that almost uniformly precedes the emergence of resistance. Here we used a mouse model of melanoma in which melanocyte-specific expression of Braf(V618E) (analogous to the human BRAF(V600E) mutation) led to the development of skin hyperpigmentation and nevi, as well as melanoma formation with incomplete penetrance. Sleeping Beauty insertional mutagenesis in this model led to accelerated and fully penetrant melanomagenesis and synchronous tumor formation. Treatment of Braf(V618E) transposon mice with the BRAF inhibitor PLX4720 resulted in tumor regression followed by relapse. Analysis of transposon insertions identified eight genes including Braf, Mitf, and ERas (ES-cell expressed Ras) as candidate resistance genes. Expression of ERAS in human melanoma cell lines conferred resistance to PLX4720 and induced hyperphosphorylation of AKT (v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1), a phenotype reverted by combinatorial treatment with PLX4720 and the AKT inhibitor MK2206. We show that ERAS expression elicits a prosurvival signal associated with phosphorylation/inactivation of BAD, and that the resistance of hepatocyte growth factor-treated human melanoma cells to PLX4720 can be reverted by treatment with the BAD-like BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Thus, we define a role for the AKT/BAD pathway in resistance to BRAF inhibition and illustrate an in vivo approach for finding drug resistance genes.

  8. Two novel genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, related to the potentially oncogenic HPV39.

    OpenAIRE

    Longuet, M; Beaudenon, S; Orth, G

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of two novel human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, were cloned from a low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and a vulvar papilloma, respectively, and partially sequenced. Both types are related to HPV39, a potentially oncogenic virus. HPV68 and HPV70 were also detected in genital intraepithelial neoplasia from three patients and one patient, respectively. Comparison with sequence data in the literature indicates that the subgenomic ME180-HPV DNA fragment, clone...

  9. Primary Thyroid Sarcoma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surov, Alexey; Gottschling, Sebastian; Wienke, Andreas; Meyer, Hans Jonas; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Dralle, Henning

    2015-10-01

    Different types of malignant tumors can occur within the thyroid. Primary cancer is the most common type of thyroid malignancy. Non-epithelial malignancies can also arise within the thyroid. The aim of the present study was to analyze clinical and radiological characteristics of reported primary thyroid sarcomas (PTS), based on a large sample of cases. The PubMed database was screened for articles from between 1990 and 2014. Overall, 86 articles with 142 patients were identified. Ultrasound evaluation was reported for 36 patients. Data regarding computed tomography of the neck were available for 29 cases. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed for eight patients. The following data were retrieved for the identified sarcomas: localization, size, homogeneity, internal texture, and margin characteristics. In most cases, PTS occurred in patients over 40 years of age, with a peak incidence for the group aged 60-79 years. Angiosarcoma was diagnosed in 29 cases (20.4%), followed by malignant hemangioendothelioma (n=23, 16.3%), malignant fibrous histiocytoma (n=20, 14.1%), leiomyosarcoma (n=16, 11.3%), and fibrosarcoma (n=13, 9.2%). In most patients (n=113, 79.6%), PTS manifested clinically as a painless goiter. On ultrasound, PTS were predominantly mixed hypo-to-hyperechoic in comparison to the normal thyroid tissue. On non-contrast computed tomography, most sarcomas were inhomogeneous hypo-to-hyperdense. On post-contrast magnetic resonance images, most sarcomas showed marked non-homogenous enhancement. In 26.8%, infiltration of the adjacent organs was seen. The trachea or esophagus was affected more frequently in patients with malignant histiocytoma and liposarcoma. Different strategies were used in the treatment of PTS. Our analysis provides clinical and radiological characteristics of PTS. The described features should be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of thyroid tumors.

  10. MRI of perineural extramedullary granulocytic sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, A. [Rehabilitation Medicine, Hunters Moor Neurological Rehabilitation Centre, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom); Hodgson, T. [Neuroradiology Dept., Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Jacubowski, J. [Neurosurgical Dept., Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Norfolk, D. [Haematology Department, Leeds General Infirmary, Leeds LS1 3EX (United Kingdom); Smith, C. [Pathology Dept., Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2001-06-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is an extramedullary solid tumour consisting of myelogenous leukaemic blast cells, usually seen in acute myeloid leukaemia and less commonly in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia or myeloproliferative disorders. Blast cells have a predilection for periosteal and perineural regions and rarely precede evidence of systemic disease. We present two patients, aleukaemic on peripheral blood counts, both at presentation and during subsequent treatment. We present the MRI features of this rare but important condition. (orig.)

  11. Sonographic Findings of Uterine Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong-Ah; Lee, Myung Sook; Choi, Jong-Sun

    2006-01-01

    Objective The study was performed to present the sonographic findings of uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS). Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective review of sonographic findings of 10 cases that were diagnosed as uterine ESS. The patients' ages ranged from 25 to 51 years (mean age: 36.1 years). The reviews focused on the location, margin, size, number and echotexture of the lesions. Hysterectomy (n = 9) and myomectomy (n = 1) were performed and a pathologic diagnosis was o...

  12. Biomarkers of Osteosarcoma, Chondrosarcoma, and Ewing Sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Evola, Francesco R.; Costarella, Luciano; Pavone, Vito; Caff, Giuseppe; Cannavò, Luca; Sessa, Andrea; Avondo, Sergio; Sessa, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent malignant bone neoplasm, followed by chondrosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. The diagnosis of bone neoplasms is generally made through histological evaluation of a biopsy. Clinical and radiological features are also important in aiding diagnosis and to complete the staging of bone cancer. In addition to these, there are several non-specific serological or specific molecular markers for bone neoplasms. In bone tumors, molecular markers increase the accuracy of the d...

  13. Multimodality Local Therapy for Retroperitoneal Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paryani, Nitesh N.; Zlotecki, Robert A.; Swanson, Erika L.; Morris, Christopher G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Hochwald, Steven N. [Department of General Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); Marcus, Robert B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States); Indelicato, Daniel J., E-mail: dindelicato@floridaproton.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States); University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Soft-tissue sarcomas of the retroperitoneum are rare tumors comprising less than 1% of all malignancies. Although surgery continues as the mainstay of treatment, the large size of these tumors coupled with their proximity to critical structures make resection with wide margins difficult to achieve. The role and timing of radiotherapy are controversial. This study updates our institutional experience using multimodality local therapy for resectable retroperitoneal sarcoma and identifies prognostic factors impacting disease control and survival. Methods and Materials: Between 1974 and 2007, 58 patients with nonmetastatic retroperitoneal sarcoma were treated with surgery and radiation at University of Florida. The median age at radiotherapy was 57 years old (range, 18-80 years). Forty-two patients received preoperative radiotherapy and 16 received postoperative radiotherapy. Nineteen patients received 1.8 Gy once daily and 39 patients received 1.2 Gy twice daily. Variables analyzed for prognostic value included age, grade, kidney involvement, histology, de novo versus recurrent presentation, tumor diameter, margin status, radiotherapy sequencing (preoperative vs. postoperative), total radiation dose, fractionation scheme, and treatment era. Results: The 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rates were 49%, 58%, and 62%, respectively. Nearly two-thirds of disease failures involved a component of local progression. On multivariate analysis, only margin status was significantly associated with improved 5-year local control (85%, negative margins; 63%, microscopic positive margins; 0%, gross positive margins; p < 0.0001) and 5-year overall survival (64%, negative margins; 56%, microscopic positive margins; 13%, gross positive margins; p = 0.0012). Thirty-one Grade 3 or greater toxicities were observed in 22 patients, including two treatment-related deaths (3%). Conclusion: For retroperitoneal sarcoma, local control remains a

  14. Lymphangiectatic Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient with AIDS Sarcoma de Kaposi linfangiectásico em paciente com Aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Santos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is a malignant disease that originates in the lymphatic endothelium. It has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations. Its four distinct clinical forms are: classic, endemic, iatrogenic and epidemic Kaposi's sarcoma. In non-HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma, the disease is typically limited to the lower extremities, but in immunodeficient patients, it is a multifocal systemic disease. The clinical course of the disease differs among patients, ranging from a single or a few indolent lesions to an aggressive diffuse disease. Advanced Kaposi's sarcoma lesions, typically those on the lower extremities, are often associated with lymphedema. In this paper, we report a case of a patient with a rare form of AIDS-associated Kaposi sarcoma called lymphangiectatic Kaposis's sarcoma.O sarcoma de Kaposi é uma neoplasia originária do endotélio linfatico, que apresenta um amplo espectro de manifestações, com quatro formas clínicas: sarcoma de Kaposi clássico, endêmico, iatrogêncio e epidêmico ou associado ao HIV. Em pacientes imunocompetentes, a doença é tipicamente limitada às extremidades. Porém em pacientes imunideprimidos, o sarcoma de Kaposi é uma doença sistêmica multifocal. Apresenta cursos clínicos diferentes, desde simples lesões cutâneas isoladas até lesões agressivas e difusas, com ou sem envolvimento sistêmico. Lesões avançadas de sarcoma de Kaposi, principalmente as localizadas nas extremidades, podem apresentar linfedema. Neste trabalho, reportamos caso de paciente com forma rara de Sarcoma de Kaposi associado a Aids, chamada de sarcoma de Kaposi linfangiectásico.

  15. Lymphangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posada García, Celia; García-Cruz, Aranzazu; García-Doval, Ignacio; De La Torre, Carlos; Cruces, Manuel José

    2009-09-15

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a multifocal vascular disease with uncertain histogenesis. It is characterized by clinical and histologic polymorphism. The "lymphangioma-like" variant is very uncommon, accounting for less than 5% of all cases. We report the case of a 76-year-old woman, HIV negative, with a 4-year history of classic Kaposi sarcoma treated with cryotherapy who developed new bullous lesions on her lower extremities. Biopsy revealed histologic findings of lymphangioma-like KS (LLKS), together with areas of classic KS; HHV-8 staining was positive. Diagnosis of LLKS was made and the patient was proposed for radiotherapy. The lymphangioma-like Kaposi sarcoma is a rare morphologic expression of KS characterized by dilated and bizarrely shaped vascular channels lined by flattened endothelium permeating the dermis. "Bulla-like" lesions have been considered as a clinical hallmark of this variant. Its histologic appearance suggests a lymphatic origin of KS and it may resemble other vascular tumors. Findings of areas of typical KS and positive staining for HHV-8 may help to make a definitive diagnosis.

  16. Sarcoma Immunotherapy: Past Approaches and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. D'Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are heterogeneous malignant tumors of mesenchymal origin characterized by more than 100 distinct subtypes. Unfortunately, 25–50% of patients treated with initial curative intent will develop metastatic disease. In the metastatic setting, chemotherapy rarely leads to complete and durable responses; therefore, there is a dire need for more effective therapies. Exploring immunotherapeutic strategies may be warranted. In the past, agents that stimulate the immune system such as interferon and interleukin-2 have been explored and there has been evidence of some clinical activity in selected patients. In addition, many cancer vaccines have been explored with suggestion of benefit in some patients. Building on the advancements made in other solid tumors as well as a better understanding of cancer immunology provides hope for the development of new and exciting therapies in the treatment of sarcoma. There remains promise with immunologic checkpoint blockade antibodies. Further, building on the success of autologous cell transfer in hematologic malignancies, designing chimeric antigen receptors that target antigens that are over-expressed in sarcoma provides a great deal of optimism. Exploring these avenues has the potential to make immunotherapy a real therapeutic option in this orphan disease.

  17. Gene expression array analyses predict increased proto-oncogene expression in MMTV induced mammary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popken-Harris, Pamela; Kirchhof, Nicole; Harrison, Ben; Harris, Lester F

    2006-08-01

    Exogenous infection by milk-borne mouse mammary tumor viruses (MMTV) typically induce mouse mammary tumors in genetically susceptible mice at a rate of 90-95% by 1 year of age. In contrast to other transforming retroviruses, MMTV acts as an insertional mutagen and under the influence of steroid hormones induces oncogenic transformation after insertion into the host genome. As these events correspond with increases in adjacent proto-oncogene transcription, we used expression array profiling to determine which commonly associated MMTV insertion site proto-oncogenes were transcriptionally active in MMTV induced mouse mammary tumors. To verify our gene expression array results we developed real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for the common MMTV insertion site genes found in RIII/Sa mice (int-1/wnt-1, int-2/fgf-3, int-3/Notch 4, and fgf8/AIGF) as well as two genes that were consistently up regulated (CCND1, and MAT-8) and two genes that were consistently down regulated (FN1 and MAT-8) in the MMTV induced tumors as compared to normal mammary gland. Finally, each tumor was also examined histopathologically. Our expression array findings support a model whereby just one or a few common MMTV insertions into the host genome sets up a dominant cascade of events that leave a characteristic molecular signature.

  18. Intracortical osteoblastic osteosarcoma with oncogenic rickets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, T.; Hirohashi, Setsuo [Pathology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan); Shimoda, Tadakazu [Clinical Laboratory Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Ryohei; Beppu, Yasuo [Orthopedic Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Maeda, Shotaro [Department of Pathology, Nippon Medical School Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    Intracortical osteosarcoma is the rarest variant of osteosarcoma, occurring within, and usually confined to, the cortical bone. Oncogenic osteomalacia, or rickets, is an unusual clinicopathologic entity in which vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia, or rickets, occurs in association with some tumors of soft tissue or bone. We present a case of oncogenic rickets associated with intracortical osteosarcoma of the tibia in a 9-year-old boy, whose roentgenographic abnormalities of rickets disappeared and pertinent laboratory data except for serum alkaline phosphatase became normal after surgical resection of the tumor. Histologically, the tumor was an osteosarcoma with a prominent osteoblastic pattern. An unusual microscopic feature was the presence of matrix mineralization showing rounded calcified structures (calcified spherules). Benign osteoblastic tumors, such as osteoid osteoma and osteoblastoma, must be considered in the differential diagnosis because of the relatively low cellular atypia and mitotic activity of this tumor. The infiltrating pattern with destruction or engulfment of normal bone is a major clue to the correct diagnosis of intracortical osteosarcoma. The co-existing radiographic changes of rickets were due to the intracortical osteosarcoma. (orig.) With 8 figs., 25 refs.

  19. Oncogenic activation of NF-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudt, Louis M

    2010-06-01

    Recent genetic evidence has established a pathogenetic role for NF-kappaB signaling in cancer. NF-kappaB signaling is engaged transiently when normal B lymphocytes respond to antigens, but lymphomas derived from these cells accumulate genetic lesions that constitutively activate NF-kappaB signaling. Many genetic aberrations in lymphomas alter CARD11, MALT1, or BCL10, which constitute a signaling complex that is intermediate between the B-cell receptor and IkappaB kinase. The activated B-cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma activates NF-kappaB by a variety of mechanisms including oncogenic mutations in CARD11 and a chronic active form of B-cell receptor signaling. Normal plasma cells activate NF-kappaB in response to ligands in the bone marrow microenvironment, but their malignant counterpart, multiple myeloma, sustains a variety of genetic hits that stabilize the kinase NIK, leading to constitutive activation of the classical and alternative NF-kappaB pathways. Various oncogenic abnormalities in epithelial cancers, including mutant K-ras, engage unconventional IkappaB kinases to activate NF-kappaB. Inhibition of constitutive NF-kappaB signaling in each of these cancer types induces apoptosis, providing a rationale for the development of NF-kappaB pathway inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

  20. Implantação intracerebral experimental de sarcomas Experimental intracerebral implantation of sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Alencar

    1972-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudo histopatológico da implantação intracerebral de sarcomas, realizado em ratos (fibrosarcoma e em camundongos (sarcoma 180. A implantação intracerebral de fibrosarcoma desenvolveu, em cerca de 45 dias, neoplasia relativamente bem delimitada, com pequena infiltração do parênquima nervoso adjacente, nunca se propagando a maiores distãncias devido a forte coesão entre as suas células, com grande diferenciação de fibrilas reticulares e de colágeno. Ao contrário, a inoculação do sarcoma 180, principalmente sob a forma ascítica, levou rapidamente a um quadro de forte hipertensão intracraniana, com disseminação das células neoplásticas pelos espaços subaracnoideanos e intraventriculares. Ambas as neoplasias propagavam-se pelos espaços subaracnoideanos e intraventriculares. Ambas as neoplasias propagavam-se pelos espaços perivasculares, porém o faziam de maneira diversa; o sarcoma 180 tinha uma disseminação muito intensa e rápida, que se fazia a longas distâncias, enquanto que o fibrossarcoma somente se disseminava nos vasos próximos à neoplasia em desenvolvimento. Tomando por base observações próprias e outras colhidas na bibliografia especializada, conclui-se que os agentes etiológicos destes tumores exercem sua ação sobre tipos celulares diferentes.Histopathological study of intracerebral implantation of sarcomas, performed in rats (fibrosarcomas and mice (sarcoma 180. The intracerebral implantation of fibrosarcoma has developed in about 45 days a well limited tumor, with little infiltration of the adjacent nervous parenchyma, never streading to longer distances because the strong cohesion between its cells, with great differentiation of reticular fibers and collagen. On the contrary, the innoculation of sarcoma 180, chiefly of the ascitical form, has rapidly lead to a strong intracranial hipertension, with dissemination of neoplastic cells through the subarachnoid and intraventricular spaces. Both

  1. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hwa Jang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30% had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70% had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  2. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy.

  3. Sarcoma de kaposi endemico en un paciente VIH negativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Revilla-López

    Full Text Available El sarcoma de Kaposi (SK es un cáncer angioproliferativo inflamatorio multifocal asociado a herpes virus 8 (VHH-8. Se han descrito cuatro variantes clínico-epidemiológicas: clásico, endémico, iatrogénico y epidémico o asociado a VIH. Clínicamente puede ser indolente o agresivo, afecta principalmente áreas mucocutáneas con eventual compromiso visceral y de ganglios linfáticos. Se presenta frecuentemente y de forma más agresiva en la población VIH positiva. Presentamos un caso de un paciente varón de 27 años VIH negativo con lesión tumoral sangrante en el anillo de Waldeyer, múltiples adenopatías y lesiones exofíticas en pie que remiten con quimioterapia de emergencia basada en antraciclinas. El SK VIH negativo es una condición poco frecuente. Es importante tener en cuenta al Perú como región endémica para el VHH-8. La afectación oral del SK es una manifestación rara y de mal pronóstico, sin embargo, el factor VIH negativo podría conferirle un buen pronóstico

  4. Radiation-enhanced murine sarcoma virus genome rescue activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, K.S.S.

    1975-01-01

    Although the doses of x ray (312-2,500 R) used for irradiation of cells caused impairment of DNA synthesis and cell replication, co-cultivation of x-irradiated MuLV-carrier cells with un-irradiated nonproducer cells of MSV-induced tumour resulted in as much as a 20-fold increase in MSV retrieval compared with the un-irradiated control. The enhancement was apparent also as a 3-fold increase in the number of cells producing MSV (infectious centers) in the co-cultivation plate. This suggested that the MSV genome rescue efficiency in terms of MSV per cell, as well as the number of cells producing MSV, increased markedly. By uridine-/sup 3/H-labeling and focus assay experiments, evidence was presented which suggested that an increase in MSV/MuLV ratio in the culture fluid of co-cultivation plates was obtained when the MuLV-carrier cells were pre-irradiated. By contrast, x irradiation of the nonproducer cells prior to co-cultivation caused only reductions in MSV genome rescue efficiency. However, use of x irradiated MuLV-carrier cells for co-cultivation with x-irradiated nonproducer cells restored this efficiency to some extent. The dose-survival curve of the nonproducer cells was not much different from those of the MuLV-carrier cells after x irradiation. It was suggested that the viability of non-producer cells was required for replication of MuLV transferred from the carrier cells and for subsequent MSV genome rescue.

  5. Cannabidiol inhibits growth and induces programmed cell death in kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-infected endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Yehoshua; Yu, Jinlong; Kuzontkoski, Paula M; Dezube, Bruce J; Zhang, Xuefeng; Groopman, Jerome E

    2012-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is the most common neoplasm caused by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). It is prevalent among the elderly in the Mediterranean, inhabitants of sub-Saharan Africa, and immunocompromised individuals such as organ transplant recipients and AIDS patients. Current treatments for Kaposi sarcoma can inhibit tumor growth but are not able to eliminate KSHV from the host. When the host's immune system weakens, KSHV begins to replicate again, and active tumor growth ensues. New therapeutic approaches are needed. Cannabidiol (CBD), a plant-derived cannabinoid, exhibits promising antitumor effects without inducing psychoactive side effects. CBD is emerging as a novel therapeutic for various disorders, including cancer. In this study, we investigated the effects of CBD both on the infection of endothelial cells (ECs) by KSHV and on the growth and apoptosis of KSHV-infected ECs, an in vitro model for the transformation of normal endothelium to Kaposi sarcoma. While CBD did not affect the efficiency with which KSHV infected ECs, it reduced proliferation and induced apoptosis in those infected by the virus. CBD inhibited the expression of KSHV viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR), its agonist, the chemokine growth-regulated protein α (GRO-α), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3), and the VEGFR-3 ligand, vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C). This suggests a potential mechanism by which CBD exerts its effects on KSHV-infected endothelium and supports the further examination of CBD as a novel targeted agent for the treatment of Kaposi sarcoma.

  6. BCOR-CCNB3 (Ewing-like) sarcoma: a clinicopathologic analysis of 10 cases, in comparison with conventional Ewing sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, Florian; Niblett, Angela; Marland, Gillian; Gaston, Czar Louie L; Douis, Hassan; Mangham, D Chas; Sumathi, Vaiyapuri P; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar

    2014-10-01

    BCOR-CCNB3 fusion transcripts resulting from an X-chromosomal paracentric inversion were recently identified in a series of unclassifiable soft tissue and bone sarcomas with Ewing sarcoma-like morphology. The morphologic and clinical features of these sarcomas are, as yet, not well characterized. Here we describe the clinicopathologic features of 10 cases of BCOR-CCNB3 sarcoma and compare their clinical course with typical Ewing sarcoma. Nine of 10 patients were male, and all were 11 to 18 years of age. Seven tumors were located in the bone and 3 in the deep soft tissues. The histomorphologic spectrum was quite wide, with 7 tumors predominately showing small primitive cell morphology with angulated nuclei simulating so-called atypical Ewing sarcoma and 3 predominately showing spindle cell morphology. Recurrent and metastatic lesions showed increased cellularity and marked pleomorphism. Immunohistochemistry showed expression of CCNB3 (100%), bcl2 (90%), CD99 (60%), and CD117 (60%). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for BCOR-CCNB3 fusion transcripts was positive in all 9 cases, which yielded sufficient extracted RNA. Five- and 10-year survival rates were 75% and 56%, respectively. BCOR-CCNB3 sarcomas located in axial skeleton and soft tissues showed a significantly shorter survival. The Ewing sarcoma overall survival was not statistically different, although there was a trend for longer survival of patients with BCOR-CCNB3 sarcomas in the extremities. In conclusion, this study provides a detailed description of the histologic spectrum, immunohistochemical features, and clinical characteristic of BCOR-CCNB3 sarcoma justifying distinction from Ewing sarcoma with its typical EWS/FUS-ETS translocations. Ideally immunohistochemistry is used in combination with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for definitive diagnosis.

  7. Mislocalized activation of oncogenic RTKs switches downstream signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Olsen, Jesper V; Brandts, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of oncogenic kinases at intracellular locations is frequently observed in human cancers, but its effects on global signaling are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the oncogenic mutant of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD), when localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aberrant...

  8. Oncogenic Transformation of Human-Derived Gastric Organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertaux-Skeirik, Nina; Centeno, Jomaris; Gao, Jian; Gabre, Joel; Zavros, Yana

    2016-08-19

    The culture of organoids has represented a significant advancement in the gastrointestinal research field. Previous research studies have described the oncogenic transformation of human intestinal and mouse gastric organoids. Here we detail the protocol for the oncogenic transformation and orthotopic transplantation of human-derived gastric organoids.

  9. Oncogenic pathways implicated in ovarian epithelial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicosia, Santo V; Bai, Wenlong; Cheng, Jin Q; Coppola, Domenico; Kruk, Patricia A

    2003-08-01

    Characterization of intracellular signaling pathways should lead to a better understanding of ovarian epithelial carcinogenesis and provide an opportunity to interfere with signal transduction targets involved in ovarian tumor cell growth, survival, and progression. Challenges toward such an effort are significant because many of these signals are part of cascades within an intricate and likely redundant intracellular signaling network (Fig.1). For instance, a given signal may activate a dual intracellular pathway (ie, MEK1-MAPK and PI3K/Akt required for fibronectin-dependent activation of matrix metalloproteinase 9). A single pathway also may transduce more than one biologic or oncogenic signal (ie, PI3K signaling in epithelial and endothelial cell growth and sprouting of neovessels). Despite these challenges, evidence for therapeutic targeting of signal transduction pathways is accumulating in human cancer. For instance, the EGF-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitor ZD 1839 (Iressa) may have a beneficial therapeutic effect on ovarian epithelial cancer. Therapy of this cancer may include inhibitors of PI kinase (quercetin), ezrin and PIP kinase (genistein). The G protein-coupled family of receptors, including LPA, also is an attractive target to drugs, although their frequent pleiotropic functions may be at times toxic and lack specificity. Because of the lack of notable toxicity, PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitors such as FTIs are a promising targeted therapy of ovarian epithelial cancer. Increasing insight into the oncogenic pathways involved in ovarian epithelial cancer also is helping clinicians to understand better the phenomenon of chemoresistance in this malignancy. Oncogenic activation of gamma-synuclein promotes cell survival and provides resistance to paclitaxel, but such a resistance is partially overcome by an MEK inhibitor that suppresses ERK activity. Ovarian epithelial cancer is a complex group of neoplasms with an overall poor prognosis. Comprehension of

  10. Synovial sarcoma presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesiha, Mena; Bauer, Thomas; Andrish, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Iliotibial band friction syndrome is a common entity that is often quickly diagnosed in orthopedic clinics. However, synovial sarcoma is an elusive clinical entity that appears around many joints with variable presentations. This case report is an example of a patient with a classic presentation of iliotibial band friction syndrome that was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma on further investigation.

  11. Is There a Predisposition Gene for Ewing's Sarcoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Randall

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing's sarcoma is a highly malignant tumor of children and young adults. The molecular mechanisms that underlie Ewing's Sarcoma development are beginning to be understood. For example, most cases of this disease harbor somatic chromosomal translocations that fuse the EWSR1 gene on chromosome 22 with members of the ETS family. While some cooperative genetic events have been identified, such as mutations in TP53 or deletions of the CDKN2A locus, these appear to be absent in the vast majority of cases. It is therefore uncertain whether EWS/ETS translocations are the only consistently present alteration in this tumor, or whether there are other recurrent abnormalities yet to be discovered. One method to discover such mutations is to identify familial cases of Ewing's sarcoma and to then map the susceptibility locus using traditional genetic mapping techniques. Although cases of sibling pairs with Ewing's sarcoma exist, familial cases of Ewing's sarcoma have not been reported. While Ewing's sarcoma has been reported as a 2nd malignancy after retinoblastoma, significant associations of Ewing's sarcoma with classic tumor susceptibility syndromes have not been identified. We will review the current evidence, or lack thereof, regarding the potential of a heritable condition predisposing to Ewing's sarcoma.

  12. Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery--diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Wakako; Morohashi, Satoko; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2011-08-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma is a rare tumour and the diagnosis is often delayed. We report the case of a woman with a primary pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma who presented with massive pulmonary embolism. The definitive diagnosis was elucidated after the patient's death by autopsy specimen. We discuss the diagnosis and lessons learned from this case.

  13. Postradiation sarcoma of bone: review of 78 Mayo Clinic cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weatherby, R.P.; Dahlin, D.C.; Ivins, J.C.

    1981-05-01

    Postradiation sarcoma of bone is an uncommon but serious sequela of radiation therapy. Seventy-eight Mayo Clinic patients have been treated for sarcomas arising in irradiated bones. They received their initial radiotherapy for a wide variety of nonneoplastic and neoplastic conditions, both benign and malignant. Thirty-five sarcomas arose in bone that was normal at the time of radiotherapy, and 43 arose in irradiated preexisting osseous lesions. The latent period between radiotherapy and diagnosis of sarcoma averaged 14.3 years. Ninety percent of the postradiation sarcomas were either osteosarcomas or fibrosarcomas; chondrosarcoma, malignant (fibrous) histiocytoma, malignant lymphoma, Ewing's tumor, and metastasizing chondroblastoma also occurred. Prompt radical surgery, when feasible, is usually the treatment of choice for the sarcoma. About 30% of patients with sarcomas of the extremities or craniofacial bones survived 5 years without recurrence; there were no disease-free survivors among patients with tumors of the vertebral column, pelvis, or shoulder girdle. The low risk of sarcoma following radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer should not be a contraindication to its use in these patients; however, radiation therapy for benign bone tumors should be reserved for lesions that are not amenable to surgical treatment. An unusual case is also reported herein in which a fibrosarcoma was discovered in the humerus of a patient who had received radiotherapy 55 years previously for a verified osteosarcoma in the same site.

  14. Amaurosis fugax due to pleomorphic sarcoma in the left atrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Pabon

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions and importance: The authors postulate emboli from the left atrial sarcoma entered systemic circulation and subsequently caused brief episodes of transient occlusion to retinal, ophthalmic and/or ciliary arteries leading to momentary retinal hypoxia. We believe this is a novel finding, previously unreported in the literature, of transient embolic occlusion without permanent visual sequelae due to a malignant primary cardiac pleomorphic sarcoma.

  15. Kaposi sarcoma as initial presentation of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Malhari Warpe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Kaposi′s sarcoma (KS, a vascular tumor that manifests as nodular lesions on the skin and to a lesser extent, the visceral organs, is the most common neoplasm encountered in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected patients. It consists of an angiosarcomatous change of not only the epithelial and mucous membrane-associated connective tissue in various sites, for example, skin, gastrointestinal system, lungs, and so on, but may also involve non-epithelial organs, such as lymph nodes. Surgical excision is the line of management for the tumor. Case Report: We present one case of a 65-year-old heterosexual Indian male, clinically unsuspected for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS who presented with multiple non-blanching, bluish-red nodules on all extremities, chest, back and bilateral submandibular and cervical lymphadenopathy. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC was performed from subcutaneous nodule and lymph node. Smears showed hypercellular plump spindle cell groups in a hemorrhagic background. Diagnosis was given as low-grade spindle cell neoplasm consistent with KS, which was later confirmed on histopathology. Conclusion: The first line diagnostic aid of FNAC has several advantages over the traditional biopsy in testing such vascular tumors. The latter is generally needed for confirmation of KS. However, FNAC of such vascular tumors has advantages of better patient compliance, ease of procedure, no recurrences, and safety in immuno-compromised patients. Ancillary studies can be done on aspirates along with polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification techniques in confirming the detection of associated human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8 infection with KS.

  16. Purification of autocrine growth factor from conditioned medium of rat sarcoma (XC) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checiówna, D; Klein, A

    1996-01-01

    Transformation of rat cells by Rous sarcoma virus(es) induced the release of growth factors into serum-free conditioned media. An PR-RSV-transformed rat cell line, XC, produced and released polypeptide factors which promote anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent growth of XC cells. One of the autocrine factors of XC cells was purified to homogeneity by four-step procedure: ultrafiltration, ion-exchange chromatography on MonoS, reverse-phase chromatography on Spherisorb ODS2 and gel filtration on Superose 12. The factor gave a single band on SDS-electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gel and was assumed to have a molecular weight of 16 kDa. The factor is a potent mitogen for XC cells; half-maximal stimulation of DNA synthesis was achieved at a concentration of 0.8 ng/ml. The peptide is probably one of the family of EGF-like heparin-binding growth factors.

  17. Enhancer hijacking activates GFI1 family oncogenes in medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcott, Paul A; Lee, Catherine; Zichner, Thomas; Stütz, Adrian M; Erkek, Serap; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Shih, David J H; Hovestadt, Volker; Zapatka, Marc; Sturm, Dominik; Jones, David T W; Kool, Marcel; Remke, Marc; Cavalli, Florence M G; Zuyderduyn, Scott; Bader, Gary D; VandenBerg, Scott; Esparza, Lourdes Adriana; Ryzhova, Marina; Wang, Wei; Wittmann, Andrea; Stark, Sebastian; Sieber, Laura; Seker-Cin, Huriye; Linke, Linda; Kratochwil, Fabian; Jäger, Natalie; Buchhalter, Ivo; Imbusch, Charles D; Zipprich, Gideon; Raeder, Benjamin; Schmidt, Sabine; Diessl, Nicolle; Wolf, Stephan; Wiemann, Stefan; Brors, Benedikt; Lawerenz, Chris; Eils, Jürgen; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Risch, Thomas; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Weber, Ursula D; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Turányi, Eszter; Hauser, Peter; Sanden, Emma; Darabi, Anna; Siesjö, Peter; Sterba, Jaroslav; Zitterbart, Karel; Sumerauer, David; van Sluis, Peter; Versteeg, Rogier; Volckmann, Richard; Koster, Jan; Schuhmann, Martin U; Ebinger, Martin; Grimes, H Leighton; Robinson, Giles W; Gajjar, Amar; Mynarek, Martin; von Hoff, Katja; Rutkowski, Stefan; Pietsch, Torsten; Scheurlen, Wolfram; Felsberg, Jörg; Reifenberger, Guido; Kulozik, Andreas E; von Deimling, Andreas; Witt, Olaf; Eils, Roland; Gilbertson, Richard J; Korshunov, Andrey; Taylor, Michael D; Lichter, Peter; Korbel, Jan O; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Pfister, Stefan M

    2014-07-24

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant paediatric brain tumour currently treated with a combination of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, posing a considerable burden of toxicity to the developing child. Genomics has illuminated the extensive intertumoral heterogeneity of medulloblastoma, identifying four distinct molecular subgroups. Group 3 and group 4 subgroup medulloblastomas account for most paediatric cases; yet, oncogenic drivers for these subtypes remain largely unidentified. Here we describe a series of prevalent, highly disparate genomic structural variants, restricted to groups 3 and 4, resulting in specific and mutually exclusive activation of the growth factor independent 1 family proto-oncogenes, GFI1 and GFI1B. Somatic structural variants juxtapose GFI1 or GFI1B coding sequences proximal to active enhancer elements, including super-enhancers, instigating oncogenic activity. Our results, supported by evidence from mouse models, identify GFI1 and GFI1B as prominent medulloblastoma oncogenes and implicate 'enhancer hijacking' as an efficient mechanism driving oncogene activation in a childhood cancer.

  18. Two Cases of Ectopic Hamartomatous Thymoma Masquerading as Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukiko; Tanaka, Hiroko; Sasaki, Toru; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Mitani, Hiroki; Yonekawa, Hiroyuki; Fukushima, Hirofumi; Shimbashi, Wataru

    2017-01-01

    Ectopic hamartomatous thymoma (EHT) is an extremely rare benign tumor. EHTs are difficult to differentiate from sarcomas, especially synovial sarcomas. We encountered two cases of EHT that were referred from other hospitals because sarcoma was suspected. In these cases, fusion gene detection via polymerase chain reaction or fluorescence in situ hybridization was useful for differentiating EHT from synovial sarcoma. EHT requires accurate diagnosis before surgery to avoid excessive treatment. Both tumor location and the presence of fat inside the tumor are important imaging findings for EHT, and confirmation of spindle cells, epithelial cells, and mature adipose cells in the tumor is an important pathological finding. It is important to exclude synovial sarcoma from the differential diagnosis via fusion gene analysis. PMID:28168073

  19. Granulocytic Sarcoma of the Stomach Presenting as Dysphagia during Pregnancy

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    Anuradha Sekaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulocytic sarcoma also known as extramedullary myeloid sarcoma or chloroma is an uncommon manifestation of leukemia and presents as a deposit of leukemic cells outside the bone marrow. We report a case of a twenty-five-year-old pregnant woman who presented with progressive dysphagia and recurrent postprandial vomiting. Upper GI endoscopy had shown large flat laterally spread nodular lesions in the cardia and proximal body of stomach. Biopsies from the gastric lesion showed granulocytic sarcoma of the stomach. Concurrent peripheral and bone marrow picture was suggestive of acute myeloid leukemia (AML–M4. There is limited reported literature on granulocytic sarcoma of the stomach. Concurrent gastric granulocytic sarcoma involving cardia and AML in pregnancy has not been reported till date.

  20. The roles and implications of exosomes in sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Shen, Jacson; Tu, Chongqi; Hornicek, Francis; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-09-01

    Better diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic options are still necessary for patients with sarcomas due to the current limitations of diagnosis and treatment. Exosomes are small extracellular membrane vesicles that are released by various cells and are found in most body fluids. Tumor-derived exosomes have been proven to mediate tumorigenesis, intercellular communication, microenvironment modulation, and metastasis in different cancers, including in sarcomas. Recently, exosomes have been considered as potential biomarkers for sarcoma diagnosis and prognosis, and as possible targets for sarcoma therapy. Moreover, due to their specific cell tropism and bioavailability, exosomes can also be engineered as vehicles for drug delivery. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the roles of tumor-derived exosomes in sarcoma and their potential clinical applications.

  1. Visceral Kaposi's Sarcoma Related to Human Herpesvirus-8 in Liver Transplant Recipient: Case Report and Literature Review

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    H. Benhammane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS in transplant recipients is about 400 to 500 times rate in the general population. It is strongly associated to Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8 infection which has been found in 95% of KS lesions. The optimal approach to managing posttransplantation KS is to reduce or discontinue immunosuppressive therapy but this strategy carries a risk of the acute rejection of the graft. Recently, the use of an mTOR inhibitor has added new opportunities for KS treatment and prevention. Case Report. We report a case of 24 years-old Turkish woman with visceral HHV-8-associated Kaposi's sarcoma after orthotopic liver transplantation. Conclusion. Posttransplantation KS is considered an experimental model of virus induced tumor suggesting the usefulness of HHV-8 screening in transplant recipient and donor. Therapeutic approaches are complex and require a multidisciplinary team.

  2. Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus Induces LYN Overexpression in Kaposis Sarcoma%Kaposi肉瘤相关疱疹病毒感染诱导LYN表达在其发病中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张芳; 陈颖; 郭峰; 徐益明; 谭晓华; 杨磊; 李锋; 姬玉; 李冬妹

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze the function of Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection in the expression of v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral related oncogene homolog (lyn) and reveal the mechanism in Kaposis Sarcoma (KS).Methods Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultivated by enzyme infusion method and immunocytochemistry (ICC) was used to detect CD31 and CD34 to verify HUVECs.KSHV were extracted from BCBL-1 cells, then used to infect HUVECs.We observed the cell morphology variation using microscope and recorded imagines.PCR was used to amplificate KS330233 fragment to verify the infection.Western blot was used to detect the level of LYN, p-PI3K and p-AKT.Results HUVECs were cytomembrane staining for CD31 and cytoplasmic staining for CD34, which verified that the primary cultivated cells were HUVECs.After KSHV infected HUVECs, the cells showed long spindle morphology.The expression of LYN was increase and the expression of p-PI3K and p-AKT was also increased.Conclusion KSHV promoted overexpression of LYN in KSHV de novo infected HUVECs and increased the level of p-PI3K as well as p-AKT in PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.%目的 探讨Kaposi肉瘤相关疱疹病毒(kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus,KSHV)感染对v-yes-1 Yamaguchi肉瘤病毒相关同源癌基因(v-yes-1 Yamaguchi sarcoma viral related oncogene homolog,LYN)表达的影响,及其在卡波氏肉瘤(kaposi's sarcoma,KS)发病机制中的作用.方法 采用酶灌注法原代培养脐静脉内皮细胞(human umbilical vein endothelial cells,HUVECs),运用免疫细胞化学检测CD34和CD31以验证HUVECs.从BCBL-1中提取KSHV病毒感染HUVECs,显微镜下观察细胞形态并拍照,PCR扩增KS330233证实感染成功.采用Western blot检测LYN表达及p-PI3K和p-AKT水平.结果 HUVECs中CD 31胞膜阳性和CD 34胞浆阳性,说明酶灌注法取得的细胞为HUVECs.KSHV感染HUVECs后细胞变为长梭形,LYN表达增高,同时p-PI3K

  3. Glycerophospholipid profile in oncogene-induced senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Cristina; Vosbeck, Sonja; Hein, Eva-Maria; Hellwig, Birte; Langer, Alice; Hayen, Heiko; Franckenstein, Dennis; Büttner, Bettina; Hammad, Seddik; Marchan, Rosemarie; Hermes, Matthias; Selinski, Silvia; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Peksel, Begüm; Török, Zsolt; Vígh, László; Hengstler, Jan G

    2012-09-01

    Alterations in lipid metabolism and in the lipid composition of cellular membranes are linked to the pathology of numerous diseases including cancer. However, the influence of oncogene expression on cellular lipid profile is currently unknown. In this work we analyzed changes in lipid profiles that are induced in the course of ERBB2-expression mediated premature senescence. As a model system we used MCF-7 breast cancer cells with doxycycline-inducible expression of NeuT, an oncogenic ERBB2 variant. Affymetrix gene array data showed NeuT-induced alterations in the transcription of many enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, several of which (ACSL3, CHPT1, PLD1, LIPG, MGLL, LDL and NPC1) could be confirmed by quantitative realtime PCR. A study of the glycerophospholipid and lyso-glycerophospholipid profiles, obtained by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometry revealed senescence-associated changes in numerous lipid species, including mitochondrial lipids. The most prominent changes were found in PG(34:1), PG(36:1) (increased) and LPE(18:1), PG(40:7) and PI(36:1) (decreased). Statistical analysis revealed a general trend towards shortened phospholipid acyl chains in senescence and a significant trend to more saturated acyl chains in the class of phosphatidylglycerol. Additionally, the cellular cholesterol content was elevated and accumulated in vacuoles in senescent cells. These changes were accompanied by increased membrane fluidity. In mitochondria, loss of membrane potential along with altered intracellular distribution was observed. In conclusion, we present a comprehensive overview of altered cholesterol and glycerophospholipid patterns in senescence, showing that predominantly mitochondrial lipids are affected and lipid species less susceptible to peroxidation are increased.

  4. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Non-Metastatic Extracranial Ewing Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-08

    Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone; Extraosseous Ewing Sarcoma; Extraosseous Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Kidney; Untreated Childhood Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  5. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bosch, Walter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Haas, Rick L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Translational Research Consortium, 21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Dian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed.

  6. Pazopanib in advanced vascular sarcomas: an EORTC Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (STBSG) retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollár, A; Jones, R L; Stacchiotti, S; Gelderblom, H; Guida, M; Grignani, G; Steeghs, N; Safwat, A; Katz, D; Duffaud, F; Sleijfer, S; van der Graaf, W T; Touati, N; Litière, S; Marreaud, S; Gronchi, A; Kasper, B

    2017-01-01

    Pazopanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for the treatment of patients with selective subtypes of advanced soft tissue sarcoma (STS) who have previously received standard chemotherapy including anthracyclines. Data on the efficacy in vascular sarcomas are limited. The main objective of this study was to investigate the activity of pazopanib in vascular sarcomas. A retrospective study of patients with advanced vascular sarcomas, including angiosarcoma (AS), epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HE) and intimal sarcoma (IS) treated with pazopanib in real life practice at EORTC centers as well as patients treated within the EORTC phase II and III clinical trials (62043/62072) was performed. Patient and tumor characteristics were collected. Response was assessed according to RECIST 1.1. and survival analysis was performed. Fifty-two patients were identified, 40 (76.9%), 10 (19.2%) and two (3.8%) with AS, HE and IS, respectively. The response rate was eight (20%), two (20%) and two (100%) in the AS, HE and IS subtypes, respectively. There was no significant difference in response rate between cutaneous and non-cutaneous AS and similarly between radiation-associated and non-radiation-associated AS. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and median overall survival (OS; from commencing pazopanib) were three months (95% CI 2.1-4.4) and 9.9 months (95% CI 6.5-11.3) in AS, respectively. The activity of pazopanib in AS is comparable to its reported activity in other STS subtypes. In this study, the activity of pazopanib was similar in cutaneous/non-cutaneous and in radiation/non-radiation-associated AS. In addition, pazopanib showed promising activity in HE and IS, worthy of further evaluation.

  7. E6/E7 oncogenes increase and tumor suppressors decrease the proportion of self-renewing neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, K; Kerosuo, L; Hakanen, J; Eriksson, M; Angers-Loustau, A; Leppä, S; Salminen, M; Sariola, H; Wartiovaara, K

    2006-08-10

    Many if not most tissues need a controlled number of stem cells to maintain normal function. Cancer can be seen as a process of disturbed tissue homeostasis, in which too many cells have or acquire too primitive identity. Here we measured how oncogenes and tumour suppressors affect the differentiation capacity, proportion and characteristics of progenitor cells in a model tissue. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) were exposed to human papilloma virus E6, E7 or E6/E7 oncogenes, which degrade tumour suppressors p53 and pRb family members, respectively. E6/E7-expressing or p53-/- NPCs were able to differentiate, but simultaneously retained high capacity for self-renewal, proliferation, ability to remain multipotent in conditions promoting differentiation and showed delayed cell cycle exit. These functions were mediated through p53 and pRb family, and involved MEK-ERK signalling. Decreased amount of p53 increased self-renewal and proliferation, whereas pRb affected only proliferation. Our results suggest that the oncogenes increase whereas p53 and pRb family tumour suppressors decrease the number and proportion of progenitor cells. These findings provide one explanation how oncogenes and tumour suppressors control tissue homeostasis and highlight their importance in stem cell self- renewal, linked both to cancer and life-long tissue turnover.

  8. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus microRNAs induce metabolic transformation of infected cells.

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    Ohad Yogev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered cell metabolism is inherently connected with pathological conditions including cancer and viral infections. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS. KS tumour cells display features of lymphatic endothelial differentiation and in their vast majority are latently infected with KSHV, while a small number are lytically infected, producing virions. Latently infected cells express only a subset of viral genes, mainly located within the latency-associated region, among them 12 microRNAs. Notably, the metabolic properties of KSHV-infected cells closely resemble the metabolic hallmarks of cancer cells. However, how and why KSHV alters host cell metabolism remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effect of KSHV infection on the metabolic profile of primary dermal microvascular lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC and the functional relevance of this effect. We found that the KSHV microRNAs within the oncogenic cluster collaborate to decrease mitochondria biogenesis and to induce aerobic glycolysis in infected cells. KSHV microRNAs expression decreases oxygen consumption, increase lactate secretion and glucose uptake, stabilize HIF1α and decreases mitochondria copy number. Importantly this metabolic shift is important for latency maintenance and provides a growth advantage. Mechanistically we show that KSHV alters host cell energy metabolism through microRNA-mediated down regulation of EGLN2 and HSPA9. Our data suggest that the KSHV microRNAs induce a metabolic transformation by concurrent regulation of two independent pathways; transcriptional reprograming via HIF1 activation and reduction of mitochondria biogenesis through down regulation of the mitochondrial import machinery. These findings implicate viral microRNAs in the regulation of the cellular metabolism and highlight new potential avenues to inhibit viral latency.

  9. c-myc in Kaposi's sarcoma: analyses by fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, K; Yang, S; Tung, N; Lee, J; Mahalingam, M

    2014-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene plays a central role in the regulation of cellular transcription, differentiation, and apoptosis, and has been shown to be deregulated in many types of human cancer. Recent findings have demonstrated its amplification in select vascular neoplasms, such as secondary angiosarcomas, suggesting a role in angiogenesis as well. In vitro studies have shown that the c-Myc protein is an important regulatory molecule of spindle cell proliferation and migration in Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). In light of these findings, our primary aim was to ascertain whether c-myc, by promoting proliferation and angiogenesis, is an essential co-factor in the aetiopathogenesis of KS. We also attempted to determine a correlation between immunohistochemical expression of the c-Myc protein and c-myc gene copy amplification using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Samples analyzed included archival tissue of KS (n = 24). PCR for detection of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus DNA was performed on all samples of KS. For FISH analyses, a dual-labelled technique was employed and probes for the c-myc gene and chromosome 8 were used. The monoclonal anti-c-myc antibody, 9E10, was used for immunohistochemical analyses. While FISH analyses revealed no amplification of c-myc in any of the cases of KS, immunohistochemical analyses revealed positive staining for c-Myc in 13/24 cases (54%). Amplification of the c-myc gene was not witnessed in this preliminary study of 24 cases and thus cannot be correlated with the expression of the c-Myc protein. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2012 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  10. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro

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    Friedman Herman

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Methods Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68, and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Results Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. Conclusions THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC

  11. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock

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    Sneha Nandy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles, Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi′s sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis.

  12. Histological variants of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma

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    Pantanowitz Liron

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review provides a comprehensive overview of the broad clinicopathologic spectrum of cutaneous Kaposi sarcoma (KS lesions. Variants discussed include: usual KS lesions associated with disease progression (i.e. patch, plaque and nodular stage; morphologic subtypes alluded to in the older literature such as anaplastic and telangiectatic KS, as well as several lymphedematous variants; and numerous recently described variants including hyperkeratotic, keloidal, micronodular, pyogenic granuloma-like, ecchymotic, and intravascular KS. Involuting lesions as a result of treatment related regression are also presented.

  13. Sarcoma de Kaposi asociado al VIH

    OpenAIRE

    Malagón Gutiérrez, Sandra Ximena; Chimenos Küstner, Eduardo

    1995-01-01

    La neoplasia más común asociada al VIH es el sarcoma de Kaposi (SK). Esta puede ser superficialmente mucocutánea o internamente visceral, apareciendo frecuentemente en la cavidad oral. Este tumor se ha relacionado con una proliferación atípica de estructuras vasculares, la cual haya sido inducida por un agente angiogénico estimulado a su vez por la infección retroviral. Este artículo es una revisión bibliográfica sobre esta lesión, la cual representa una patología importante para la profesión...

  14. Acroangiodermatite (pseudo-sarcoma de Kaposi

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    Azulay Rubem David

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Acroangiodermatite é enfermidade rara, caracterizada por lesões eritêmato-violáceas bem delimitadas que acometem pernas e pés com aspecto semelhante ao do sarcoma de Kaposi. É relatado o caso de paciente do sexo feminino, de 57 anos, com início súbito de lesões eritêmato-violáceas nas pernas sem outras alterações. O caso acrescenta aprendizado por sua dificuldade diagnóstica e reafirma a importância da imuno-histoquímica. Trata-se da publicação do primeiro caso brasileiro.

  15. Neoplastic transformation of a human prostate epithelial cell line by the v-Ki-ras oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parda, D S; Thraves, P J; Kuettel, M R; Lee, M S; Arnstein, P; Kaighn, M E; Rhim, J S; Dritschilo, A

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of mechanisms of human prostate carcinogenesis are limited by the unavailability of a suitable in vitro model system. We have demonstrated that an immortal, but nontumorigenic, human epithelial cell line (267B1) established from fetal prostate tissue can be malignantly transformed by a biological carcinogen, and can serve as a useful model for investigations of the progression steps of carcinogenesis. Activated Ki-ras was introduced into 267B1 cells by infection with the Kirsten murine sarcoma virus. Morphological alterations and anchorage-independent growth were observed; when cells were injected into nude mice, poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas developed. These findings represent the first evidence of malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in culture, and support a role for Ki-ras activation in a multistep process for prostate neoplastic transformation.

  16. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8 and the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma Herpesvírus humano tipo 8 (HHV-8 e a etiopatogênese do sarcoma de Kaposi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Carneiro Leão

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the current literature on human herpesvirus 8 with particular attention to the aspects related to the etiopathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The authors searched original research and review articles on specific aspects of human herpesvirus 8 infection, including virology, epidemiology, transmission, diagnosis, natural history, therapy, and Kaposi's sarcoma etiopathogenesis. The relevant material was evaluated and reviewed. RESULTS: Human herpesvirus 8 is a recently discovered DNA virus that is present throughout the world but with major geographic variation. In the Western world, the virus, transmitted mainly by means of sexual contact, is strongly associated with Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity-based lymphoma and more controversially with multiple myeloma and other non-proliferative disorders. There is no specific effective treatment, but HIV protease inhibitors may play an indirect role in the clearance of human herpesvirus 8 DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected patients. Human herpesvirus 8 DNA is present in saliva, but there are as yet no documented cases of nosocomial transmission to health care workers. The prevalence of human herpesvirus 8 among health care workers is probably similar to that in the general population. CONCLUSION: Human herpesvirus 8 appears to be, at least in Western Europe and United States, restricted to a population at risk of developing Kaposi's sarcoma. Human herpesvirus 8 certainly has the means to overcome cellular control and immune responses and thus predispose carriers to malignancy, particularly Kaposi's sarcoma. The wide diffusion of Human herpesvirus 8 in classic Kaposi's sarcoma areas appears to represent an important factor in the high incidence of the disease. However, additional co-factors are likely to play a role in the development of Kaposi's sarcoma.OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente artigo foi revisar a literatura recente em rela

  17. The association between let-7, RAS and HIF-1α in Ewing Sarcoma tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Isaac; Ash, Shifra; Cohen, Ian J.; Kodman, Yona; Haklai, Ronit; Elad-Sfadia, Galit; Kloog, Yoel; Chepurko, Elena; Feinmesser, Meora; Issakov, Josephine; Sher, Osnat; Luria, Drorit; Kollender, Yehuda; Weizman, Avraham; Avigad, Smadar

    2015-01-01

    Ewing Sarcoma (ES) is the second most common primary malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in cancer as tumor suppressors or oncogenes. We studied the involvement of miRNAs located on chromosomes 11q and 22q that participate in the most common translocation in ES. Of these, we focused on 3 that belong to the let-7 family. We studied the expression levels of let-7a, and let-7b and detected a significant correlation between low expression of let-7b and increased risk of relapse. let-7 is known to be a negative regulator of the RAS oncogene. Indeed, we detected an inverse association between the expression of let-7 and RAS protein levels and its downstream target p-ERK, following transfection of let-7 mimics and inhibitors. Furthermore, we identified let-7 as a negative regulator of HIF-1α and EWS-FLI-1. Moreover, we were able to show that HIF-1α directly binds to the EWS-FLI-1 promoter. Salirasib treatment in-vitro resulted in the reduction of cell viability, migration ability, and in the decrease of cells in S-phase. A significant reduction in tumor burden and in the expression levels of both HIF-1α and EWS-FLI-1 proteins were observed in mice after treatment. Our results support the hypothesis that let-7 is a tumor suppressor that negatively regulates RAS, also in ES, and that HIF-1α may contribute to the aggressive metastatic behavior of ES. Moreover, the reduction in the tumor burden in a mouse model of ES following Salirasib treatment, suggests therapeutic potential for this RAS inhibitor in ES. PMID:26393682

  18. Suppression of feline immunodeficiency virus infection in vivo by 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Egberink, H.F.; Borst, M.; Niphuis, H.; Balzarini, J.; Neu, H.; Schellekens, H.; Clercq, H. de; Koolen, M.J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The acyclic purine nucleoside analogue 9-(2-phosphonomethoxyethyl)adenine [PMEA; formerly referred to as 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine] is a potent and selective inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus replication in vitro and of Moloney murine sarcoma virus-induced tumor formation in mice.

  19. The oncogenic action of ionizing radiation on rat skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    Progress has occurred in several areas corresponding to the specific aims of the proposal: (1) Progression and multiple events in radiation carcinogenesis of rat skin as a function of LET; (2) cell cycle kinetics of irradiated rat epidermis as determined by double labeling and double emulsion autoradiography; (3) oncogene activation detected by in situ hybridization in radiation-induced rat skin tumors; (4) amplification of the c-myc oncogene in radiation-induced rat skin tumors as a function of LET; and (5) transformation of rat skin keratinocytes by ionizing radiation in combination with c-Ki-ras and c-myc oncogenes. 111 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma in six children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, Salomine [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Andronikou, Savvas; Plessis, Jaco du; George, Reena; Mapukata, Ayanda; Grobbelaar, Marie; Hayes, Murray [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Child Health, Tygerberg Academic Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Wieselthaler, Nicky [University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Davidson, Alan [University of Cape Town, Department of Oncology, Red Cross Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2007-12-15

    Pulmonary involvement in Kaposi sarcoma is rare in children and can be difficult to distinguish from other pathology. To describe the radiological findings in paediatric pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma. Sequential chest radiographs of six children and CT scans of four of these children were evaluated retrospectively. Their ages ranged from 18 months to 10 years; four were male and two were female. All six children were HIV-positive. The observers were two radiologists. Chest radiographs revealed air-space (100%) and reticular (83%) opacification in the mid- and lower lung zones; pleural effusions were present in 83% of the children. All the children showed progressive air-space opacification on follow-up radiography. CT demonstrated bilateral air-space opacification in a perihilar distribution in all the children; reticular opacification was seen in 75%. All the children had mediastinal and axillary lymphadenopathy; 75% had bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy. In both adults and children, chest radiography demonstrates perihilar and lower zone involvement. Pleural effusions are more common on radiographs in children. Air-space disease and lymphadenopathy are much more common on CT in children than adults. (orig.)

  1. Histiocytic sarcoma that mimics benign histiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisseau-Garsaud, A M; Vergier, B; Beylot-Barry, M; Nastasel-Menini, F; Dubus, P; de Mascarel, A; Eghbali, H; Beylot, C

    1996-06-01

    A 28-year-old man presented with a histiocytic sarcoma of a very uncommon origin, as it had developed for several years like a benign cutaneous histiocytosis resembling generalized eruptive histiocytoma before becoming acute, with nodal and massive pulmonary involvement. Despite various chemotherapies, the patient died within 8 months. Skin biopsies showed histiocytic proliferation in the dermis and node biopsies showed histiocytic proliferation with a sinusoidal pattern. Immunohistochemical analysis, performed on paraffin-embedded sections, demonstrated strong labeling of tumoral cells for CD68 and moderate labeling for CD3 and CD4. CD30 labeling was negative. S-100 protein was positive on a Langerhans' cell reactive subpopulation. Electron microscopy confirmed the histiocytic nature of malignant cells and showed cytoplasmic inclusions such as regularly laminated bodies, dense bodies and pleomorphic inclusions. No Birbeck granules were seen. A gene rearrangement study of T-cell receptor gamma and immunoglobulin heavy chain genes showed a germline configuration. Histiocytic sarcoma is an extremely rare true histiocytic malignancy, the existence of which has been recently debated since it has often been mistaken in the past for large cell lymphomas. Such a deceptive onset as benign cutaneous histiocytosis has not been described in the literature to our knowledge.

  2. Metastatic endometrial stromal sarcoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha S. Pillai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma (ESS is a rare slow growing tumour of mesodermal origin arising from the stroma of the endometrium and accounting for less than 1% of all uterine cancers. It is characterized by late recurrences and distant metastases. This report presents a case of ESS in a 40 year old nulliparous woman who had a myomectomy for a clinically suspected Leiomyoma uterus in a local hospital. The histopathological examination of the specimen revealed ESS and the patient was referred to our tertiary institute. Here after investigations including a CT scan which also revealed pulmonary metastases, patient underwent Modified Radical Hysterectomy with Bilateral Salpingo-oophorectomy with pelvic lymph node sampling. Histopathological Examination of the uterine specimen confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was given the option of referral to a thoracic surgeon for resection of the isolated lung metastasis, but she refused this and opted instead for hormone therapy which she is presently undergoing. ESS is a very rare tumour often presenting with clinical and examination findings suggestive of leiomyoma of the uterus and hence misdiagnosed. In cases of rapidly growing tumours and suspicious radiological features, suspect sarcoma and initiate timely diagnosis and proper treatment. Recommended long-term follow up in view of late recurrences. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(3.000: 812-815

  3. Limb salvage treatment vs. amputation in sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motamedi M

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available Many years ago the treatment of sarcoma was radiotherapy up to 2000-4000 rad. This treatment was very complicated, due to producing neoplasm after radiotherapy. By this method of treatment of osteosarcoma, the rate of survival became about 20% (two years. The second method of treatment was chemotherapy for a period of 2-5 weeks that amputation was performed afterwards. By chemotherapy, the rate of being alive reached up to 25-27% (five years. Right now, the best treatment for sarcoma is limb salvage. In our report, the chance of being alive in chondrosarcoma was about four years. This was nearly the same as that of the other institutes in the world especially in America, Europe, and Japan. The rate of recurrence was also more than that from different parts of the world. The survival rate in osteosarcomatic patients was about two years less for males the females, and it was more in tall people than short ones. The survival rate of the patients with giant cell tumor was more than osteosarcoma up to five years, and it has no recurrence or metastasis

  4. Sonographic Findings of Uterine Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Myung Sook; Choi, Jong Sun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The study was performed to present the sonographic findings of uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS). We conducted a retrospective review of sonographic findings of 10 cases that were diagnosed as uterine ESS. The patients ages ranged from 25 to 51 years (mean age: 36.1 years). The reviews focused on the location, margin, size, number and echotexture of the lesions. Hysterectomy (n = 9) and myomectomy (n = 1) were performed and a pathologic diagnosis was obtained in all cases. The masses were located in the uterine wall (n = 6), or they presented as a polypoid mass protruding into the endometrial cavity from the myometrium (n = 3) or as a central cavity mass (n = 1). The lesion margins were smooth (n = 5), ill defined (n = 2), or smooth with partially nodular extensions (n = 3). The maximal mass length was 38 mm to 160 mm with a mean mass length of 83.5 mm. There were single lesions in eight cases and multiple lesions in two cases. The lesion echotextures were hypoechoic solid (n = 3), heterogeneously intermediate echoic (n = 5), diffuse myometrial thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity (n = 1) and septated cystic (n = 1). Endometrial stromal sarcoma presents with four patterns of its sonographic appearance; a polypoid mass with nodular myometrial extension, an intramural mass with an ill defined margin and heterogeneous echogenicity, an ill defined large central cavity mass or, diffuse myometrial thickening.

  5. Primary intravascular synovial sarcoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Osman Nuri; Erbasan, Ozan; Golbasi, Ilhan

    2012-10-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS), a mesenchymal spindle cell tumor, displays variable epithelial differentiation, including glandular formation, and features a specific chromosomal translocation, t(X;18)(p11;q11). SS accounts for 5% to 10% of soft-tissue sarcomas. These tumors occur mostly in the joints, especially near the knee, but they also occur in other locations. Primary intravascular SS (IVSS) are extremely rare; only 6 well-documented cases have been reported in the English literature. We describe a new case of primary IVSS of the superior vena cava (SVC) in a 16-year-old boy. A transthoracic echocardiogram confirmed a large (4.8 × 4.6 cm) circumscribed mass filling the right atrium, as well as a moderate pericardial effusion. The mass extended from the SVC to the tricuspid valve but did not prevent valve coaptation. Surgery via a transatrial approach revealed a huge mass (8 to 12 cm) attached to the SVC via a 5-mm pedicle. The tumor was excised, and the patient experienced an uneventful postoperative course. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed the presence of the SS-specific translocation.

  6. Multidisciplinary Management of Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas M. Nystrom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcoma is a rare malignancy, with approximately 11,000 cases per year encountered in the United States. It is primarily encountered in adults but can affect patients of any age. There are many histologic subtypes and the malignancy can be low or high grade. Appropriate staging work up includes a physical exam, advanced imaging, and a carefully planned biopsy. This information is then used to guide the discussion of definitive treatment of the tumor which typically involves surgical resection with a negative margin in addition to neoadjuvant or adjuvant external beam radiation. Advances in imaging and radiation therapy have made limb salvage surgery the standard of care, with local control rates greater than 90% in most modern series. Currently, the role of chemotherapy is not well defined and this treatment is typically reserved for patients with metastatic or recurrent disease and for certain histologic subtypes. The goal of this paper is to review the current state of the art in multidisciplinary management of soft tissue sarcoma.

  7. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of the Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kawahara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The case was a 40-year-old female. She visited a local doctor with a chief complaint of right side abdominal pain. A right kidney tumor measuring 10 cm in diameter was observed in an abdominal Computed Tomography (CT scan. Based on the CT image, the possibility of angiomiolipoma (AML could not be ruled out, but a high maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax of 7.8 was observed in a Positron Emission Tomography CT (PET-CT scan and there was a possibility of malignancy. We therefore performed a transperitoneal right radial nephrectomy. Although adhesion of the tumor to the duodenum and the inferior vena cava was observed, it was possible to perform an excision. The tumor accounted for a large proportion of the excised kidney; the surrounding areas had taken on a cyst-like structure, and the interior comprised grayish brittle tissue exhibiting solid growth. Histologically, gland-like and cyst-like structures composed of cylindrical cuboidal cells and mainly characterized by the solid growth of short fusiform-shaped and oval-shaped basophilic cells were observed, and we believed it was a synovial sarcoma. There were no malignant findings in the adrenal gland. There have been approximately 30 reported cases around the world of synovial sarcoma that developed in the kidney, and we herein report this case with bibliographic considerations.

  8. Primary fibro sarcoma of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabashi, Serbeze; Hoxha, Naim; Gashi, Shkelzen; Ahmegjekaj, Ilir; Bejta, Ilir; Sadiku, Muharrem; Ymeri, Halit; Kabashi, Antigona; Bicaj, Xhavit; Mucaj, Sefedin

    2013-01-01

    Primary malignant heart tumors represent rare entities where fibro sarcoma represents about 3% of all. Introducing the patient: A 15 years old patient with cardiac insufficiency (heart failure) symptoms, such as weakness, cyanosis, palpitations and breathing difficulties; enlargement of upper mediastinum and pleural effusion. Through echocardiography a pericardial effusion and intracavitary thrombus in atrium was diagnosed. With computed tomography is diagnosed a tumoral mass in right atrium which is also spread in the right ventricle of the heart. Tumor is completely removed; pat histology result showed primary fibro sarcoma of the heart. At that time no metastasis was found. Conclusion. Primary malignant heart tumors may manifest like cardiac insufficiency or like systemic diseases. Fibrosarcomas are rare and have bad prognosis. On average patients can live around six months after initial symptoms appeared and diagnosis of the tumor was done. In the case of cardiac insufficiency with differential diagnosis we should also think of heart tumors, which could certainly be proved for or eliminated by echocardiography.

  9. Ewing sarcoma versus osteomyelitis: differential diagnosis with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henninger, B.; Glodny, B.; Rudisch, A.; Trieb, T.; Loizides, A.; Judmaier, W.; Schocke, M.F. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Putzer, D. [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-08-15

    To find and evaluate characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns for the differentiation between Ewing sarcoma and osteomyelitis. We identified 28 consecutive patients referred to our department for MRI (1.5 T) of an unclear bone lesion with clinical symptoms suggestive of Ewing sarcoma or osteomyelitis. MRI scans were re-evaluated by two experienced radiologists, typical MR imaging features were documented and a diagnostic decision between Ewing sarcoma and osteomyelitis was made. Statistical significance of the association between MRI features and the biopsy-based diagnosis was assessed using Fisher's exact test. The most clear-cut pattern for determining the correct diagnosis was the presence of a sharp and defined margin of the bone lesion, which was found in all patients with Ewing sarcoma, but in none of the patients with osteomyelitis (P < 0.0001). Contrast enhancing soft tissue was present in all cases with Ewing sarcoma and absent in 4 patients with osteomyelitis (P = 0.0103). Cortical destruction was found in all patients with Ewing sarcoma, 4 patients with osteomyelitis did not present any cortical reaction (P = 0.0103). Cystic or necrotic areas were identified in 13 patients with Ewing sarcoma and in 1 patient with osteomyelitis (P = 0.004). Interobserver reliability was very good (kappa = 1) in Ewing sarcoma and moderate (kappa = 0.6) in patients with osteomyelitis. A sharp and defined margin, optimally visualized on T1-weighted images in comparison to short tau inversion recovery (STIR) images, is the most significant feature of Ewing sarcoma in differentiating from osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  10. EBV finds a polycomb-mediated, epigenetic solution to the problem of oncogenic stress responses triggered by infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin John Allday

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses that establish a persistent infection, involving intracellular latency, commonly stimulate cellular DNA synthesis and sometimes cell division early after infection. However, most cells of metazoans have evolved ‘fail-safe’ responses that normally monitor unscheduled DNA synthesis and prevent cell proliferation when, for instance, cell proto-oncogenes are ‘activated’ by mutation, amplification or chromosomal rearrangements. These cell intrinsic defense mechanisms that reduce the risk of neoplasia and cancer are collectively called oncogenic stress responses (OSR. Mechanisms include the activation of tumor suppressor genes and the so-called DNA damage response (DDR that together trigger pathways leading to cell cycle arrest (eg cell senescence or complete elimination of cells (eg apoptosis. It is not surprising that viruses that can induce cellular DNA synthesis and cell division have the capacity to trigger OSR, nor is it surprising that these viruses have evolved countermeasures for inactivating or bypassing OSR. The main focus of this review is how the human tumour-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV manipulates the host polycomb group (PcG protein system to control – by epigenetic repression of transcription – key components of the OSR during the transformation of normal human B cells into permanent cell lines.

  11. AIDS-related primary Kaposi sarcoma of the nasopharynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelenk, Fatih; Yilmaz, Metin; Asal, Korhan; Ekinci, Özgür; Tokgöz, Nil

    2011-06-01

    Primary nasopharyngeal Kaposi sarcoma is extremely rare, as only 1 case has been previously reported in the literature. We report a new case, which occurred in a 37-year-old man with a known history of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). The patient presented with complaints of recurrent epistaxis and postnasal hemorrhage. Endoscopic examination detected a bluish, smooth, firm, nonpulsatile mass in the nasopharyngeal wall. Histopathologic findings on biopsy were consistent with Kaposi sarcoma. The tumor was successfully treated with radiotherapy. Kaposi sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of any AIDS patient who presents with recurrent unilateral nasal bleeding.

  12. Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma (acroangiodermatitis): occurring after bullous erysipelas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Yardimci, Gürkan; Engin, Burhan; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Aydin, Övgü; Khatib, Rashid; Tuzun, Yalçın

    2015-05-18

    Pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma is a benign reactive vascular proliferative disorder, which can be seen at any age. It occurs when the chronic venous pressure changes result in vascular proliferation in the upper and mid dermis. This disease is divided into two subtypes: the most frequent subtype is the Mali type and seen in early ages. The Mali type is seen in chronic venous insufficiency and in those patients with arteriovenous shunts. The rare subtype is the Stewart-Bluefarb type. This disease must be distinguished from Kaposi sarcoma because of their clinical resemblance. Herein, we present a patient with pseudo-Kaposi sarcoma, which developed after bullous erysipelas.

  13. Ewing Sarcoma of the Posterior Fossa in an Adolescent Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas M. Stark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma, astrocytoma, and ependymoma represent the most common infratentorial tumors in childhood, while Ewing sarcomas in that localization are extremely rare. A large left infratentorial space-occupying lesion was diagnosed in a 12-year-old girl with signs of increased intracranial pressure. Following total tumor resection, histological and molecular examination revealed Ewing sarcoma with rearranged EWSR-1 gene. The patient achieved complete remission following adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy according to Euro-EWING 2008 treatment protocol. Intracranial Ewing sarcoma, although rare, should be an important differential diagnosis of intracranial tumors in childhood which requires aggressive multimodal treatment.

  14. Sarcoma sinovial intraoral primario monofásico

    OpenAIRE

    GAC E,PATRICIO; CABANÉ T,PATRICIO; Gallegos M,Iván; ABUSLEME P,EUGENIA; ORTÚZAR E,WALDO; Amat V,José; MARAMBIO R,ANDRÉS; MARTÍNEZ G,FELIPE; MIRANDA V,CAROLINA

    2008-01-01

    El sarcoma sinovial es un tumor maligno de partes blandas, bien diferenciado y que representa entre 5.6% a 10% de todos los sarcomas. Su localización en cabeza y cuello no es común, y representa cerca de un 9%, con menos de 100 casos reportados en la literatura. La localización intraoral es muy peculiar, existiendo 32 casos previamente descritos en el mundo, de los cuales 3 corresponden al tipo monofásico. Se presenta un caso de un paciente varón de 16 años con un caso de sarcoma sinovial int...

  15. Myeloid Sarcoma Presenting as Multiple Lymphadenopathy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sun Hwa; Suh, Sang Il; Seol, Hae Young; Cho, Jea Gu; Shin, Bong Kyung [Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Myeloid sarcoma manifesting as multiple lymphadenopathy is quite rare. We present here a case of myeloid sarcoma that first presented with palpable bilateral neck masses. A 53-year-old woman complained about repetitive swelling in the right infraauricular and submental areas for 3 years. The results of computed tomography showed multiple lymphadenopathy in both areas of the neck as well as other parts of the body. So, the presumptive diagnosis was lymphoma, but the result of the excisional biopsy of the neck mass confirmed it to be a myeloid sarcoma.

  16. Extremely underwound chromosomal DNA in nucleoids of mouse sarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, M; Matthes, E; Arnold, W

    1981-07-01

    The superhelical properties of chromosomal DNA from cells of a mouse sarcoma were investigated in neutral sucrose gradients containing ethidium bromide. Removal of negative supercoiling from the DNA of the sarcoma cells required a substantially higher dye concentration than was necessary in the case of DNA from cultured mouse fibroblasts. The calculated value of the mean superhelical density in malignant cells (sigma = -0.14) appears abnormally high compared with the value (sigma = -0.09) obtained for DNA of mouse fibroblasts. Chromosomal DNA from mouse sarcoma cells is therefore concluded to be highly deficient in helical turns.

  17. Upregulation of NKX2.2, a target of EWSR1/FLI1 fusion transcript, in primary renal Ewing sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinari Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal Ewing sarcoma (ES is a rare malignant tumor characterized by fusion of the EWSR1 gene with a member of the ETS family of oncogenes, arising at a specific chromosomal translocation. Diagnosis of ES can be problematic, especially from cytological or small bioptical specimens because the differential diagnoses comprising a diverse group of small round blue cell tumors (SRBCTs. We report a case of primary renal ES in a young male, which had a t(11;22 (q24;q12 chromosome translocation encoding a type2 EWSR1/FLI1 fusion transcript. The tumor cells showed diffuse cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for CD99 and diffuse nuclear immunoreactivity for NKX2.2, an important oncogenic transcriptional target of EWSR1/FLI1, not only in the histological, but also in the cytological specimens. From the results of this case, we speculate that NKX2.2, in combination with CD99, may be a useful immunocytochemical marker to distinguish renal ES from other SRBCTs of kidney.

  18. v-erbA oncogene activation entails the loss of hormone-dependent regulator activity of c-erbA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zenke, M; Muñoz, A; Sap, J;

    1990-01-01

    and erythrocyte-specific gene expression in a T3-dependent fashion, when introduced into erythroid cells via a retrovirus. In contrast, the endogenous thyroid hormone receptor does not detectably affect erythroid differentiation. The analysis of a series of chimeric v-/c-erbA proteins suggests that the v......The v-erbA oncogene, one of the two oncogenes of the avian erythroblastosis virus, efficiently blocks erythroid differentiation and suppresses erythrocyte-specific gene transcription. Here we show that the overexpressed thyroid hormone receptor c-erbA effectively modulates erythroid differentiation......-erbA oncoprotein has lost one type of thyroid hormone receptor function (regulating erythrocyte gene transcription in response to T3), but constitutively displays another function: it represses transcription in the absence of T3. The region responsible for the loss of hormone-dependent regulator activity of v...

  19. Allelic complementation between MHC haplotypes B(Q) and B17 increases regression of Rous sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senseney, H L; Briles, W E; Abplanalp, H; Taylor, R L

    2000-12-01

    Major histocompatibility (B) complex haplotypes B(Q) and B17 were examined for their effect on Rous sarcoma outcome. Pedigree matings of B(Q)B17 chickens from the second backcross generation (BC2) of Line UCD 001 (B(Q)B(Q)) mated to Line UCD 003 (B17B17) produced progeny with genotypes B(Q)B(Q), B(Q)B17, and B17B17. Six-week-old chickens were injected with subgroup A Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). The tumors were scored for size at 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks postinoculation. A tumor profile index (TPI) was assigned to each bird based on the six tumor scores. Two experiments with two trials each were conducted. In Experiment 1, chickens (n = 84) were inoculated with 30 pock-forming units (pfu) RSV. There was no significant B genotype effect on tumor growth over time or TPI among the 70 chickens that developed tumors. Chickens (n = 141) were injected with 15 PFU RSV in Experiment 2. The B genotype significantly affected tumor growth pattern over time in the 79 chickens with sarcomas. The B(Q)B17 chickens had the lowest TPI, which was significantly different from B17B17 but not B(Q)B(Q). The data indicate complementation because more tumor regression occurs in the B(Q)B17 heterozygote than in either B(Q)B(Q) or B17B17 genotypes at a 15 pfu RSV dose and significantly so compared to B17B17. By contrast, the 30 pfu RSV dose utilized in the first experiment overwhelmed all genotypic combinations of the B(Q) and B17 haplotypes, suggesting that certain MHC genotypes affect the immune response under modest levels of viral challenge.

  20. Granulocytic sarcoma masquerading as Ewing′s sarcoma: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haresh Kunhi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An eleven-year-old boy presented with a swelling in his left elbow. Radiologically the features were that of an Ewing′s sarcoma involving the ulna. Histopathology showed small round cell tumor strongly positive for Monoclonal Imperial Cancer research fund 2 (MIC2 antigen. Similar cells in the bone marrow were involved with MIC2 positivity. The patient developed skin lesions, which on biopsy were found to be chloromas. The initial biopsies were reevaluated with special stains revealing granulocytic sarcomas in acute myeloid leukemia masquerading as Ewing′s due to its MIC2 positivity. The possibility of myeloid neoplasms should be considered routinely with known MIC2 positive round cell tumors.