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Sample records for sarcolemmal neuronal nos

  1. Neuronal NOS localises to human airway cilia.

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    Jackson, Claire L; Lucas, Jane S; Walker, Woolf T; Owen, Holly; Premadeva, Irnthu; Lackie, Peter M

    2015-01-30

    Airway NO synthase (NOS) isoenzymes are responsible for rapid and localised nitric oxide (NO) production and are expressed in airway epithelium. We sought to determine the localisation of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in airway epithelium due to the paucity of evidence. Sections of healthy human bronchial tissue in glycol methacrylate resin and human nasal polyps in paraffin wax were immunohistochemically labelled and reproducibly demonstrated nNOS immunoreactivity, particularly at the proximal portion of cilia; this immunoreactivity was blocked by a specific nNOS peptide fragment. Healthy human epithelial cells differentiated at an air-liquid interface (ALI) confirmed the presence of all three NOS isoenzymes by immunofluorescence labelling. Only nNOS immunoreactivity was specific to the ciliary axonemeand co-localised with the cilia marker β-tubulin in the proximal part of the ciliary axoneme. We report a novel localisation of nNOS at the proximal portion of cilia in airway epithelium and conclude that its independent and local regulation of NO levels is crucial for normal cilia function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. ChAT and NOS in human myenteric neurons: co-existence and co-absence.

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    Beck, Martin; Schlabrakowski, Anne; Schrödl, Falk; Neuhuber, Winfried; Brehmer, Axel

    2009-10-01

    Most myenteric neurons contain one of the two generating enzymes for major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Two minor groups of myenteric neurons contain either both enzymes or neither. Our study had two aims: (1) to compare the proportions of neurons stained for ChAT and/or NOS in human small and large intestinal whole-mounts by co-staining with an antibody against the human neuronal protein Hu C/D (HU); (2) to characterize these neurons morphologically by co-staining with a neurofilament (NF) antibody. In small intestinal whole-mounts co-stained with HU, we counted more ChAT-positive (ChAT+) than NOS+ neurons (52% vs. 38%), whereas the large intestine exhibited fewer ChAT+ than NOS+ neurons (38% vs. 50%). Neurons co-reactive for both ChAT and NOS accounted for about 3% in both regions, whereas neurons negative for both enzymes accounted for 7% in the small intestine and 8% in the large intestine. Co-staining with NF revealed that, in both small and large intestine, ChAT+/NOS+ neurons were either spiny (type I) neurons or displayed smaller perikarya that were weakly or not NF-stained. Of all spiny neurons, almost one third was co-reactive for ChAT and NOS, whereas nearly two thirds were positive only for NOS. Neurons negative for both ChAT and NOS were heterogeneous in size and NF reactivity. Thus, neither the co-existence nor the co-absence of ChAT and NOS in human myenteric neurons is indicative for particular neuron types, with several qualitative and quantitative parameters showing a wide range of interindividual variability.

  3. Development of nNOS-positive neurons in the rat sensory and sympathetic ganglia.

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    Masliukov, P M; Emanuilov, A I; Madalieva, L V; Moiseev, K Y; Bulibin, A V; Korzina, M B; Porseva, V V; Korobkin, A A; Smirnova, V P

    2014-01-03

    Neurochemical features in sympathetic and afferent neurons are subject to change during development. Nitric oxide (NO) plays a developmental role in the nervous system. To better understand the neuroplasticity of sympathetic and afferent neurons during postnatal ontogenesis, the distribution of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity was studied in the sympathetic para- and prevertebral, nodose ganglion (NG) and Th2 and L4 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from female Wistar rats of different ages (newborn, 10-day-old, 20-day-old, 30-day-old, 2-month-old, 6-month-old, 1-year-old, and 3-year-old). nNOS-positive neurons were revealed in all sensory ganglia but not in sympathetic ones from birth onward. The percentage of nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons increased during first 10 days of life from 41.3 to 57.6 in Th2 DRG, from 40.9 to 59.1 in L4 DRG and from 31.6 to 38.5 in NG. The percentage of nNOS-IR neurons did not change in the NG later during development and senescence. However, in Th2 and L4 DRG the proportion of nNOS-IR neurons was high in animals between 10 and 30days of life and decreased up to the second month of life. In 2-month-old rats, the percentage of nNOS-IR neurons was 52.9 in Th2 DRG and 51.3 in L4 DRG. We did not find statistically significant differences in the percentage of nNOS-IR neurons between Th2 and L4 DRG and between young and aged rats. In NG and DRG of 10-day-old and older rats, a high proportion of nNOS-IR neurons binds isolectin B4. In newborn animals, only 41.3%, 45.3% and 28.4% of nNOS neuron profiles bind to IB4 in Th2, L4 DRG and NG, respectively. In 10-day-old and older rats, the number of sensory nNOS-IR neurons binding IB4 reached more than 90% in DRG and more than 80% in NG. Only a small number of nNOS-positive cells showed immunoreactivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide, neurofilament 200, calretinin. The information provided here will also serve as a basis for future studies investigating mechanisms of the development of

  4. Development of nNOS-positive neurons in the rat sensory ganglia after capsaicin treatment.

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    Masliukov, Petr M; Moiseev, Konstantin Y; Korzina, Marina B; Porseva, Valentina V

    2015-08-27

    To gain a better understanding of the neuroplasticity of afferent neurons during postnatal ontogenesis, the distribution of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity was studied in the nodose ganglion (NG) and Th2 and L4 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) from vehicle-treated and capsaicin-treated female Wistar rats at different ages (10-day-old, 20-day-old, 30-day-old, and two-month-old). The percentage of nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons decreased after capsaicin treatment in all studied ganglia in first 20 days of life, from 55.4% to 36.9% in the Th2 DRG, from 54.6% to 26.1% in the L4 DRG and from 37.1% to 15.0% in the NG. However, in the NG, the proportion of nNOS-IR neurons increased after day 20, from 11.8% to 23.9%. In the sensory ganglia of all studied rats, a high proportion of nNOS-IR neurons bound isolectin B4. Approximately 90% of the sensory nNOS-IR neurons bound to IB4 in the DRG and approximately 80% in the NG in capsaicin-treated and vehicle-treated rats. In 10-day-old rats, a large number of nNOS-IR neurons also expressed TrkA, and the proportion of nNOS(+)/TrkA(+) neurons was larger in the capsaicin-treated rats compared with the vehicle-treated animals. During development, the percentage of nNOS(+)/TrkA(+) cells decreased in the first month of life in both groups. The information provided here will also serve as a basis for future studies investigating mechanisms of sensory neuron development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Homeostatic Sleep Pressure is the Primary Factor for Activation of Cortical nNOS/NK1 Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, Lars; Morairty, Stephen R.; Warrier, Deepti R.; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2014-01-01

    Cortical interneurons, immunoreactive for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the receptor NK1, express the functional activity marker Fos selectively during sleep. NREM sleep ‘pressure' is hypothesized to accumulate during waking and to dissipate during sleep. We reported previously that the proportion of Fos+ cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons is correlated with established electrophysiological markers of sleep pressure. As these markers covary with the amount of NREM sleep, it remained unclea...

  6. Homeostatic sleep pressure is the primary factor for activation of cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons.

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    Dittrich, Lars; Morairty, Stephen R; Warrier, Deepti R; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2015-02-01

    Cortical interneurons, immunoreactive for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the receptor NK1, express the functional activity marker Fos selectively during sleep. NREM sleep 'pressure' is hypothesized to accumulate during waking and to dissipate during sleep. We reported previously that the proportion of Fos(+) cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons is correlated with established electrophysiological markers of sleep pressure. As these markers covary with the amount of NREM sleep, it remained unclear whether cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons are activated to the same degree throughout NREM sleep or whether the extent of their activation is related to the sleep pressure that accrued during the prior waking period. To distinguish between these possibilities, we used hypnotic medications to control the amount of NREM sleep in rats while we varied prior wake duration and the resultant sleep pressure. Drug administration was preceded by 6 h of sleep deprivation (SD) ('high sleep pressure') or undisturbed conditions ('low sleep pressure'). We find that the proportion of Fos(+) cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons was minimal when sleep pressure was low, irrespective of the amount of time spent in NREM sleep. In contrast, a large proportion of cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons was Fos(+) when an equivalent amount of sleep was preceded by SD. We conclude that, although sleep is necessary for cortical nNOS/NK1 neuron activation, the proportion of cells activated is dependent upon prior wake duration.

  7. Involvement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the regulation of migrating motor complex (MMC) in sheep.

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    Castro, M; Muñoz, J M; Arruebo, M P; Murillo, M D; Arnal, C; Bonafonte, J I; Plaza, M A

    2012-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the role of nitric oxide (NO) synthase isoforms (nNOS, eNOS, and iNOS) in the regulation of the migrating motor complex (MMC) in sheep using electromyography and their expression in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry. Intravenous administration of L-NAME or the nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) decreased the MMC interval. Myoelectric activity of intestinal phase II was increased, whereas antral activity was reduced. These effects were blocked by L-arginine. Inhibitors of either iNOS (aminoguanidine and S-methylisothiourea) or eNOS (L-NIO) were ineffective. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside decreased GI myoelectric activity, inhibited the MMC pattern, and prevented the effects induced by L-NAME and 7-NI in the intestine. Intracerebroventricular administration of these agents did not modify GI motility. In the rumen, abomasal antrum, duodenum, and jejunum, WB showed three bands at about 155, 145, and 135kDa corresponding to nNOS, and a 140-kDa band (eNOS); however iNOS was not detected. Positive nNOS immunostaining was observed in neurons of the myenteric and submucous plexus of all GI tissues, while eNOS was found in the endothelial cells, ruminal and intestinal epithelium, as well as in some enteric neurons and in endocrine-like cells of the duodenal Brunner's glands. In contrast, only weak iNOS immunoreactivity was found in ruminal epithelium. Taken together, our results suggest that NO, synthesized at a peripheral level by nNOS, is tonically inhibiting the MMC pattern and intestinal motility in sheep. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The normal distribution and projections of constitutive NADPH-d/NOS neurons in the brainstem vestibular complex of the rat.

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    Saxon, D W; Beitz, A J

    2000-09-11

    The vestibular system is a highly conserved sensory system in vertebrates that is largely responsible for maintenance of one's orientation in space, posture, and balance and for visual fixation of objects during motion. In light of the considerable literature indicating an involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in sensory systems, it is important to determine whether NO is associated with vestibular pathways. To study the relationship of NO to vestibular pathways, we first examined the normal distribution of constitutive NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for nitric oxide synthase (NOS), in the vestibular complex (VC) and then examined its association with selected vestibular projection neurons. Survey of the four major vestibular nuclei revealed that only the medial vestibular nucleus contained significant numbers of perikarya stained for NADPH-d/NOS. By contrast, all the vestibular nuclei contained a network of fine processes that stained positive for NADPH-d, although the density of this network varied among the individual nuclei. To determine whether NADPH-d/NOS neurons project to vestibular efferent targets, injections of the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold were made into known targets of second-order vestibular neurons. Vestibular neurons containing constitutive NADPH-d/NOS were found to project predominantly to the oculomotor nucleus. A small number of neurons also participate in vestibulothalamic and intrinsic vestibular connections. These results indicate that NADPH-d/NOS neurons are prevalent in the MVN and that a subpopulation of these neurons project to the oculomotor complex. Nitric oxide is probably released locally from axons located throughout the vestibular complex but may play a particularly important role in vestibulo-ocular pathways. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Enhanced astrocytic nitric oxide production and neuronal modifications in the neocortex of a NOS2 mutant mouse.

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    Yossi Buskila

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been well accepted that glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS produce nitric oxide (NO through the induction of a nitric oxide synthase isoform (NOS2 only in response to various insults. Recently we described rapid astroglial, NOS2-dependent, NO production in the neocortex of healthy mice on a time scale relevant to neuronal activity. To explore a possible role for astroglial NOS2 in normal brain function we investigated a NOS2 knockout mouse (B6;129P2-Nos2(tm1Lau/J, Jackson Laboratory. Previous studies of this mouse strain revealed mainly altered immune responses, but no compensatory pathways and no CNS abnormalities have been reported. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To our surprise, using NO imaging in brain slices in combination with biochemical methods we uncovered robust NO production by neocortical astrocytes of the NOS2 mutant. These findings indicate the existence of an alternative pathway that increases basal NOS activity. In addition, the astroglial mutation instigated modifications of neuronal attributes, shown by changes in the membrane properties of pyramidal neurons, and revealed in distinct behavioral abnormalities characterized by an increase in stress-related parameters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results strongly indicate the involvement of astrocytic-derived NO in modifying the activity of neuronal networks. In addition, the findings corroborate data linking NO signaling with stress-related behavior, and highlight the potential use of this genetic model for studies of stress-susceptibility. Lastly, our results beg re-examination of previous studies that used this mouse strain to examine the pathophysiology of brain insults, assuming lack of astrocytic nitrosative reaction.

  10. Exercise training increases sarcolemmal and mitochondrial fatty acid transport proteins in human skeletal muscle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Talanian, Jason L; Holloway, Graham P; Snook, Laelie A; Heigenhauser, George J F; Bonen, Arend; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2010-01-01

    ... examined. Therefore, we determined whether high-intensity interval training (HIIT) increased total skeletal muscle, sarcolemmal, and mitochondrial membrane fatty acid transport protein contents...

  11. Genetic absence of nNOS worsens fetal alcohol effects in mice. II: microencephaly and neuronal losses.

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    Karacay, Bahri; Mahoney, Jo; Plume, Jeffrey; Bonthius, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure can kill developing neurons, leading to microencephaly and mental retardation. However, not all fetuses are equally vulnerable to alcohol's neurotoxic effects. While some fetuses are severely affected and are ultimately diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS), others have no evidence of neuropathology and are behaviorally normal. These widely different outcomes among alcohol-exposed fetuses are likely due, in part, to genetic differences. Some fetuses possess genotypes that make them much more vulnerable than others to alcohol's teratogenic effects. However, to date, only 1 gene has been identified whose mutation can worsen alcohol-induced behavioral deficits in an animal model of FAS. That gene is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). The purpose of this study was to determine whether mutation of nNOS can likewise worsen alcohol-induced microencephaly and lead to permanent neuronal deficits. Wild-type and nNOS(-/-) mice received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4 mg/g) daily over postnatal days (PDs) 4 to 9. Beginning on PD 85, the mice underwent a series of behavioral tests; the results of which are reported in the companion paper. The brains were then weighed, and stereological cell counts were performed on the cerebral cortex and hippocampal formation, which are the brain regions that mediate the aforementioned behavioral tasks. Alcohol caused dose-dependent microencephaly, but only in the nNOS(-/-) mice and not in wild-type mice. Alcohol-induced neuronal losses were more severe in the nNOS(-/-) mice than in the wild-type mice in all of the brain regions examined, including the cerebral cortex, hippocampal CA3 subregion, hippocampal CA1 subregion, and dentate gyrus. Targeted mutation of the nNOS gene increases the vulnerability of the developing brain to alcohol-induced growth restriction and neuronal losses. This increased neuropathology is associated with worsened behavioral dysfunction. The results demonstrate the critical importance

  12. nNOS(+ striatal neurons, a subpopulation spared in Huntington Disease, possess functional NMDA receptors but fail to generate mitochondrial ROS in response to an excitotoxic challenge

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    Lorella M.T. Canzoniero

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hungtinton’s disease (HD is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by severe neuronal loss in the cortex and striatum that leads to motor and behavioral deficits. Excitotoxicity is thought to be involved in HD and several studies have indicated that NMDA receptor (NMDAR overactivation can play a role in the selective neuronal loss found in HD. Interestingly, a small subset of striatal neurons (less than 1% of the overall population is found to be spared in post-mortem HD brains. These neurons are medium-sized aspiny interneurons that highly express the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Intriguingly, nNOS(+ neurons show reduced vulnerability to NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity. Mechanisms underlying this reduced vulnerability are still largely unknown. One untested possibility is that nNOS(+ neurons possess fewer or less functioning NMDARs. Employing single cell calcium imaging we challenged this hypothesis and found that cultured striatal nNOS(+ neurons show NMDAR-evoked responses that are identical to the ones observed in the overall population of nNOS(- neurons. NMDAR-dependent dysregulation of intraneuronal Ca2+ is known to generate high levels of reactive oxygen species of mitochondrial origin (mt-ROS, a crucial step in the excitotoxic cascade. With confocal imaging and dihydrorhodamine (DHR; a ROS-sensitive probe we compared mt-ROS levels generated by NMDAR activation in nNOS(+ and (- striatal neurons. DHR experiments revealed that nNOS(+ neurons failed to produce significant amounts of mt-ROS in response to NMDA exposure, thereby providing a mechanism for their reduced vulnerability to excitotoxicity.

  13. Activation of microglial NADPH oxidase is synergistic with glial iNOS expression in inducing neuronal death: a dual-key mechanism of inflammatory neurodegeneration

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    Brown Guy C

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation-activated glia are seen in many CNS pathologies and may kill neurons through the release of cytotoxic mediators, such as nitric oxide from inducible NO synthase (iNOS, and possibly superoxide from NADPH oxidase (NOX. We set out to determine the relative role of these species in inducing neuronal death, and to test the dual-key hypothesis that the production of both species simultaneously is required for significant neuronal death. Methods Primary co-cultures of cerebellar granule neurons and glia from rats were used to investigate the effect of NO (from iNOS, following lipopolysaccharide (LPS and/or cytokine addition or superoxide/hydrogen peroxide (from NOX, following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, ATP analogue (BzATP, interleukin-1β (IL-1β or arachidonic acid (AA addition on neuronal survival. Results Induction of glial iNOS caused little neuronal death. Similarly, activation of NOX alone resulted in little or no neuronal death. However, if NOX was activated (by PMA or BzATP in the presence of iNOS (induced by LPS and interferon-γ then substantial delayed neuronal death occurred over 48 hours, which was prevented by inhibitors of iNOS (1400W, NOX (apocynin or a peroxynitrite decomposer (FeTPPS. Neurons and glia were also found to stain positive for nitrotyrosine (a putative marker of peroxynitrite only when both iNOS and NOX were simultaneously active. If NOX was activated by weak stimulators (IL-1β, AA or the fibrillogenic prion peptide PrP106-126 in the presence of iNOS, it caused microglial proliferation and delayed neurodegeneration over 6 days, which was prevented by iNOS or NOX inhibitors, a peroxynitrite decomposer or a NMDA-receptor antagonist (MK-801. Conclusion These results suggest a dual-key mechanism, whereby glial iNOS or microglial NOX activation alone is relatively benign, but if activated simultaneously are synergistic in killing neurons, through generating peroxynitrite. This

  14. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase is dislocated in type I fibers of myalgic muscle but can recover with physical exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L; Andersen, L L; Schrøder, H D

    2015-01-01

    Trapezius myalgia is the most common type of chronic neck pain. While physical exercise reduces pain and improves muscle function, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Nitric oxide (NO) signaling is important in modulating cellular function, and a dysfunctional neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) may...... assigned to either 10 weeks of specific strength training (SST, n = 18), general fitness training (GFT, n = 15), or health information (REF, n = 8). Distribution of fiber type, cross-sectional area, and sarcolemmal nNOS expression did not differ between MYA and CON. However, MYA showed increased...... contribute to an ineffective muscle function. This study investigated nNOS expression and localization in chronically painful muscle. Forty-one women clinically diagnosed with trapezius myalgia (MYA) and 18 healthy controls (CON) were included in the case-control study. Subsequently, MYA were randomly...

  15. Protein inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor are expressed in the rat and mouse penile nerves and colocalize with penile neuronal NOS.

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    Magee, T R; Ferrini, M G; Davila, H H; Zeller, C B; Vernet, D; Sun, J; Lalani, R; Burnett, A L; Rajfer, J; González-Cadavid, N F

    2003-02-01

    Nitrergic neurotransmission triggering penile erection is mediated by nitric oxide (NO) synthesized in the cavernosal nerves of the penis by penile neuronal NO synthase (PnNOS). In the central nervous system, nNOS is activated by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and, presumably, is inhibited by the protein inhibitor of NOS (PIN). The PnNOS and NMDAR are expressed in the penis, and PnNOS has been localized in penile nerves. Both proteins colocalize with PIN in the hypothalamus and the spinal cord involved in the control of erection. The present study aimed to elucidate the relationship between PnNOS, PIN, and NMDAR in the penis. It was found that in the rat, PIN was expressed in the pelvic ganglion and the cavernosal nerve, and penile PIN cDNA was cloned, sequenced, and expressed. Immunohistochemistry localized PIN to the cavernosal and dorsal nerve of the penis, whereas NMDAR was not detected in the latter. Dual-fluorescence labeling showed that PnNOS colocalized with PIN in both nerves but with NMDAR only in the cavernosal nerve. Aging did not affect the mRNA levels of PnNOS, nNOS, NMDAR, and PIN. Both PIN and NMDAR were detected in penile nerves of the wild-type and nNOS(-/-) mouse. The PIN protein did not inhibit or bind NOS in penile extracts, and in vivo, PIN cDNA reduced the erectile response to electrical field stimulation. In conclusion, PIN and NMDAR colocalize with PnNOS in penile nerves, but the functional significance of these protein interactions for penile erection remains to be elucidated.

  16. Neuronal NOS Activates Spinal NADPH Oxidase 2 Contributing to Central Sigma-1 Receptor-Induced Pain Hypersensitivity in Mice.

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    Choi, Sheu-Ran; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin James; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2016-12-01

    We recently demonstrated that activation of spinal sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1Rs) induces pain hypersensitivity via the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 2 (Nox2). However, the potential direct interaction between nNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO) and Nox2-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) is poorly understood, particularly with respect to the potentiation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the spinal cord associated with the development of central sensitization. Thus, the main purpose of this study was to investigate whether Sig-1R-induced and nNOS-derived NO modulates spinal Nox2 activation leading to an increase in ROS production and ultimately to the potentiation of NMDA receptor activity and pain hypersensitivity. Intrathecal pretreatment with the nNOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole or with the Nox inhibitor, apocynin significantly inhibited the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by intrathecal administration of the Sig-1R agonist, 2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride (PRE084). Conversely, pretreatment with 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(4-sulphonatophenyl)-porphyrinato iron(III) (FeTPPS; a scavenger of peroxynitrite, a toxic reaction product of NO and superoxide) had no effect on the PRE084-induced pain hypersensitivity. Pretreatment with 7-nitroindazole significantly reduced the PRE084-induced increase in Nox2 activity and concomitant ROS production in the lumbar spinal cord dorsal horn, whereas apocynin did not alter the PRE084-induced changes in nNOS phosphorylation. On the other hand pretreatment with apocynin suppressed the PRE084-induced increase in the protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit (pGluN1) at Ser896 site in the dorsal horn. These findings demonstrate that spinal Sig-1R-induced pain hypersensitivity is mediated by nNOS activation, which leads to an increase in Nox2 activity

  17. Importance of genetics in fetal alcohol effects: null mutation of the nNOS gene worsens alcohol-induced cerebellar neuronal losses and behavioral deficits.

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    Bonthius, Daniel J; Winters, Zachary; Karacay, Bahri; Bousquet, Samantha Larimer; Bonthius, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is a major target of alcohol-induced damage in the developing brain. However, the cerebella of some children are much more seriously affected than others by prenatal alcohol exposure. As a consequence of in utero alcohol exposure, some children have substantial reductions in cerebellar volume and corresponding neurodevelopmental problems, including microencephaly, ataxia, and balance deficits, while other children who were exposed to similar alcohol quantities are spared. One factor that likely plays a key role in determining the impact of alcohol on the fetal cerebellum is genetics. However, no specific gene variant has yet been identified that worsens cerebellar function as a consequence of developmental alcohol exposure. Previous studies have revealed that mice carrying a homozygous mutation of the gene for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-/- mice) have more severe acute alcohol-induced neuronal losses from the cerebellum than wild type mice. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine whether alcohol induces more severe cerebellum-based behavioral deficits in nNOS-/- mice than in wild type mice and to determine whether these worsened behavior deficits are associated with worsened cerebellar neuronal losses. nNOS-/- mice and their wild type controls received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4mg/g) daily over postnatal days 4-9. In adulthood, the mice underwent behavioral testing, followed by neuronal quantification. Alcohol caused dose-related deficits in rotarod and balance beam performance in both nNOS-/- and wild type mice. However, the alcohol-induced behavioral deficits were substantially worse in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. Likewise, alcohol exposure led to losses of Purkinje cells and cerebellar granule cells in mice of both genotypes, but the cell losses were more severe in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. Behavioral performances were correlated with neuronal number in the nNOS-/- mice, but not in wild type. Thus, homozygous

  18. Increased ICP promotes CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of neuronal NOS at Ser⁸⁴⁷ in the hippocampus immediately after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

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    Makino, Kazushige; Osuka, Koji; Watanabe, Yasuo; Usuda, Nobuteru; Hara, Masahito; Aoyama, Masahiro; Takayasu, Masakazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2015-08-07

    Early brain injury has recently been identified as an indicator of poor prognosis after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) has been shown to phosphorylate neuronal NOS (nNOS) at Ser(847), resulting in a reduction in nNOS activity. In this study, we revealed chronological changes in the phosphorylation of nNOS at Ser(847) in the hippocampus and cortex immediately after SAH. In a rat single-hemorrhage model of SAH, the hippocampus and adjacent cortex were collected up to 24h after SAH. Samples from rats that were not injected with blood were used as controls. NOS was partially purified from the crude samples using ADP-agarose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis revealed that nNOS phosphorylated (p-nNOS) at Ser(847) was significantly increased in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, at 1h after SAH compared with that resulting from the control treatment. Immunoreactivity of p-nNOS at Ser(847) was observed in interneurons of the hippocampus at 1h after SAH. Injection of saline instead of blood also significantly induced p-nNOS at Ser(847) levels in the hippocampus at 1h after injection. The colocalization of CaMKIIα and nNOS was transiently increased in the hippocampus at 0.5h after SAH. Our data suggest that immediately after SAH, an increase in intracranial pressure might induce transient cerebral ischemia, potentially promoting the phosphorylation of nNOS at Ser(847) by CaMKIIα in the hippocampus. The activation of p-nNOS at Ser(847) in the hippocampus may alleviate ischemic insults immediately after SAH to exert a neuroprotective effect against early brain injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The trafficking protein, EHD2, positively regulates cardiac sarcolemmal KATP channel surface expression: role in cardioprotection.

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    Yang, Hua Qian; Jana, Kundan; Rindler, Michael J; Coetzee, William A

    2017-11-13

    ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels uniquely link cellular energy metabolism to membrane excitability and are expressed in diverse cell types that range from the endocrine pancreas to neurons and smooth, skeletal, and cardiac muscle. A decrease in the surface expression of KATP channels has been linked to various disorders, including dysregulated insulin secretion, abnormal blood pressure, and impaired resistance to cardiac injury. In contrast, up-regulation of KATP channel surface expression may be protective, for example, by mediating the beneficial effect of ischemic preconditioning. Molecular mechanisms that regulate KATP channel trafficking are poorly understood. Here, we used cellular assays with immunofluorescence, surface biotinylation, and patch clamping to demonstrate that Eps15 homology domain-containing protein 2 (EHD2) is a novel positive regulator of KATP channel trafficking to increase surface KATP channel density. EHD2 had no effect on cardiac Na+ channels (Nav1.5). The effect is specific to EHD2 as other members of the EHD family-EHD1, EHD3, and EHD4-had no effect on KATP channel surface expression. EHD2 did not directly affect KATP channel properties as unitary conductance and ATP sensitivity were unchanged. Instead, we observed that the mechanism by which EHD2 increases surface expression is by stabilizing KATP channel-containing caveolar structures, which results in a reduced rate of endocytosis. EHD2 also regulated KATP channel trafficking in isolated cardiomyocytes, which validated the physiologic relevance of these observations. Pathophysiologically, EHD2 may be cardioprotective as a dominant-negative EHD2 mutant sensitized cardiomyocytes to ischemic damage. Our findings highlight EHD2 as a potential pharmacologic target in the treatment of diseases with KATP channel trafficking defects.-Yang, H. Q., Jana, K., Rindler, M. J., Coetzee, W. A. The trafficking protein, EHD2, positively regulates cardiac sarcolemmal KATP channel surface expression

  20. A hypothesis for examining skeletal muscle biopsy derived sarcolemmal nNOSµ as surrogate for enteric nNOSα function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun eChaudhury

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of gastrointestinal motility disorders is controversial and largely unresolved. This provokes empiric approaches to patient management of these so-called functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs. Preliminary evidence demonstrate that defects in nNOS expression and function, the enzyme that synthesizes nitric oxide (NO, the key inhibitory neurotransmitter mediating mechano-electrical smooth muscle relaxation, is the major pathophysiological basis for sluggishness of oro-aboral transit of luminal contents. This opinion is an ansatz of the potential of skeletal muscle biopsy and examining sarcolemmal nNOSµ to provide complementary insights regarding nNOSα expression, localization and function within enteric nerve terminals, the site of stimulated de novo NO synthesis. The main basis of this thesis is two-folds: (a the molecular similarity of the structures of nNOS α and µ, similar mechanisms of localizations to active zones of nitrergic synthesis and same mechanisms of electron transfers during NO synthesis (b pragmatic difficulty to routinely obtain full-thickness biopsies of gastrointestinal tract, even in patients presenting with the most recalcitrant manifestations of stasis and delayed transit of lu

  1. Conditioning increases the gain of contraction-induced sarcolemmal substrate transport in ultra-endurance racing sled dogs.

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    Michael S Davis

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise relies on transsarcolemmal flux of substrates in order to avoid depletion of intramuscular reserves. Previous studies of endurance trained sled dogs have shown a remarkable capacity of these dogs to adapt rapidly to endurance exercise by decreasing the utilization of intramuscular reserves. The current study tested the hypothesis that the dogs' glycogen-sparing phenotype is due to increased sarcolemmal transport of glucose and fatty acids. Basal and exercise-induced transport of glucose and fatty acids into sarcolemmal vesicles was evaluated in racing sled dogs prior to and after 7 months of exercise conditioning. Sarcolemmal substrate transport capacity was measured using sarcolemmal vesicles and radiolabelled substrates, and transporter abundance was measured using Western blot quantification in whole muscle homogenates and the sarcolemmal vesicle preparations. Conditioning resulted in increased basal and exercise-induced transport of both glucose and palmitate. Neither acute exercise nor conditioning resulted in changes in muscle content of GLUT4 or FAT/CD36, but conditioning did result in decreased abundance of both transporters in the sarcolemmal vesicles used for the basal transport assays, and this decrease was further amplified in the vesicles used for the exercise-induced transport assays. These results demonstrate conditioning-induced increases in sarcolemmal transport of oxidizable substrates, as well as increased gain of exercise-induced sarcolemmal transport of these substrates. These results further indicate that increased sarcolemmal transport of oxidizable substrates may be due to either an increased intrinsic capacity of the existing transporters or to a different population of transporters from those investigated.

  2. Supplementation with 0.1% and 2% vitamin e in diabetic rats: analysis of myenteric neurons immunostained for myosin-V and nNOS in the jejunum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleandro Aparecido Tronchini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Diabetes mellitus is a disease characterized by hyperglycemia that, when allowed to progress long-term untreated, develops vascular and neurological complications, which are responsible for the development of alterations in the enteric nervous system in diabetic patients. In the gastrointestinal tract, diabetes mellitus promotes motor and sensory changes, and in the reflex function of this system, causing gastroparesis, diarrhea, constipation, megacolon, slow gastrointestinal transit, gastric stasis and dilation with decreased or increased peristaltic contractions. Several studies have shown that oxidative stress is the main responsible for the vascular and neurological complications affecting the enteric nervous system of diabetics. OBJECTIVE: The effects of 0.1% and 2% vitamin E on myosin-V- and nNOS-immunoreactive neurons in the jejunum of diabetic rats were investigated. METHODS: Thirty rats were divided into the groups: normoglycemic, normoglycemic treated with 0.1% vitamin E, normoglycemic treated with 2% vitamin E, diabetic, diabetic treated with 0.1% vitamin E, and diabetic treated with 2% vitamin E. The neuronal density and areas of neuron cell bodies were determined. RESULTS: Diabetes (diabetic group significantly reduced the number of myosin-V-immunoreactive neurons compared with the normoglycemic group. The diabetic treated with 0.1% vitamin E and diabetic treated with 2% vitamin E groups did not exhibit a greater density than the D group (P>0.05. Nitrergic density did not change with diabetes (P>0.05. The areas of myosin-V- and nNOS-immunoreactive neurons significantly increased in the normoglycemic treated with 2% vitamin E and diabetic groups compared with the normoglycemic group. CONCLUSION: Supplementation with 2% vitamin E had a neurotrophic effect only in the area of myosin-V-immunoreactive neurons compared with the diabetic group.

  3. Sarcolemmal blebs and osmotic fragility as correlates of irreversible ischemic injury in preconditioned isolated rabbit cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, S C; Shivell, L C; Ganote, C E

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis that irreversible ischemic injury is related to sub-sarcolemmal blebbing and an inherent osmotic fragility of the blebs was tested by subjecting isolated control and ischemically preconditioned (IPC) or calyculin A (CalA)-pretreated (protected) rabbit cardiomyocytes to ischemic pelleting followed by resuspension in 340, 170 or 85 mosmol medium containing trypan blue. At time points from 0-240 min, osmotic fragility was assessed by the percentage of trypan blue permeable cells. Membrane blebs were visualized with India ink preparations. Bleb formation, following acute hypo-osmotic swelling, developed by 75 min and increased with longer periods of ischemia. Osmotic fragility developed only after 75 min. Cells resuspended in 340 mosmol media did not form blebs and largely retained the ability to exclude trypan blue, even after 240 min ischemia. Although the latent tendency for osmotic blebbing preceded the development of osmotic fragility, most osmotically fragile cells became permeable without evident sarcolemmal bleb formation. The onset of osmotic fragility was delayed in protected cells, but protection did not reduce the bleb formation. It is concluded that blebbing and osmotic fragility are independent manifestations of ischemic injury. The principal locus of irreversible ischemic injury and the protection provided by IPC may lie within the sarcolemma rather than at sarcolemmal attachments to underlying adherens junctions.

  4. A role for cortical nNOS/NK1 neurons in coupling homeostatic sleep drive to EEG slow wave activity

    OpenAIRE

    Morairty, Stephen R.; Dittrich, Lars; Pasumarthi, Ravi K.; Valladao, Daniel; Heiss, Jaime E.; Gerashchenko, Dmitry; Kilduff, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is a homeostatically regulated process. Slow wave sleep is characterized by slow waves detectable from the cerebral cortex by EEG. When homeostatic sleep “drive” is manipulated by varying durations of sleep deprivation, the intensity of EEG slow waves proportionally increases. The neural circuitry underlying this homeostatic response is little understood. In this study we describe a systematic relationship between homeostatic sleep drive and activation of cortical neurons that express n...

  5. Role of mitochondrial and sarcolemmal K(ATP) channels in ischemic preconditioning of the canine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanada, S; Kitakaze, M; Asanuma, H; Harada, K; Ogita, H; Node, K; Takashima, S; Sakata, Y; Asakura, M; Shinozaki, Y; Mori, H; Kuzuya, T; Hori, M

    2001-01-01

    We tested whether mitochondrial or sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channels play a key role in ischemic preconditioning (IP) in canine hearts. In open-chest beagle dogs, the left anterior descending artery was occluded four times for 5 min each with 5-min intervals of reperfusion (IP), occluded for 90 min, and reperfused for 6 h. IP as well as cromakalim and nicorandil (nonspecific K(ATP) channel openers) markedly limited infarct size (6.3 +/- 1.2, 8.9 +/- 1.9, and 7.2 +/- 1.6%, respectively) compared with the control group (40.9 +/- 4.1%). A selective mitochondrial K(ATP) channel blocker, 5-hydroxydecanoate, partially blunted the limitation of infarct size in the animals subjected to IP and those treated with cromakalim and nicorandil (21.6 +/- 3.8, 25.1 +/- 4.6, and 19.8 +/- 5.2%, respectively). A nonspecific K(ATP) channel blocker, glibenclamide, completely abolished the effect of IP (38.5 +/- 6.2%). Intracoronary or intravenous administration of a mitochondria-selective K(ATP) channel opener, diazoxide, at >100 micromol/l could only partially decrease infarct size (19.5 +/- 4.3 and 20.1 +/- 4.4%, respectively). In conclusion, mitochondrial and sarcolemmal K(ATP) channels independently play an important role in the limitation of infarct size by IP in the canine heart.

  6. Genetic modifiers of muscular dystrophy act on sarcolemmal resealing and recovery from injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Capote, Joanna; Ohiri, Joyce C; Warner, James L; Vo, Andy H; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Demonbreun, Alexis R; Spencer, Melissa J; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2017-10-01

    Genetic disruption of the dystrophin complex produces muscular dystrophy characterized by a fragile muscle plasma membrane leading to excessive muscle degeneration. Two genetic modifiers of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy implicate the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway, osteopontin encoded by the SPP1 gene and latent TGFβ binding protein 4 (LTBP4). We now evaluated the functional effect of these modifiers in the context of muscle injury and repair to elucidate their mechanisms of action. We found that excess osteopontin exacerbated sarcolemmal injury, and correspondingly, that loss of osteopontin reduced injury extent both in isolated myofibers and in muscle in vivo. We found that ablation of osteopontin was associated with reduced expression of TGFβ and TGFβ-associated pathways. We identified that increased TGFβ resulted in reduced expression of Anxa1 and Anxa6, genes encoding key components of the muscle sarcolemma resealing process. Genetic manipulation of Ltbp4 in dystrophic muscle also directly modulated sarcolemmal resealing, and Ltbp4 alleles acted in concert with Anxa6, a distinct modifier of muscular dystrophy. These data provide a model in which a feed forward loop of TGFβ and osteopontin directly impacts the capacity of muscle to recover from injury, and identifies an intersection of genetic modifiers on muscular dystrophy.

  7. The presence of a protein activator of sarcolemmal polyphosphoinositide phospholipase C in cardiac cytosol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quist, E.E.; Kriewaldt, S.D.; Powell, P.B. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth (USA))

    1989-01-01

    To study polyphosphoinositide phospholipase (PL) C, isolated sarcolemmal membranes were preincubated with Mg({sup 32}P)-ATP to label phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate (PIP{sub 2}). After washing, PLC activity was determined by measuring the release of {sup 32}P-labeled inositol diphosphate (IP{sub 2}) and/or inositol trisphospate (IP{sub 3}) from membrane PIP and PIP{sub 2} during incubation at 25{degree}C and pH 7.4. Increasing concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} (0-100 {mu}M) increased IP{sub 2} by 100% over the 0 Ca{sup 2+} control levels. Ca{sup 2+} dependent PLC hydrolyzed both PIP and PIP{sub 2} with apparent D{sub A}'s of approximately 0.5 and 70 {mu}M. Addition of dialyzed cytosol further increased IP{sub 2} release by 250% without affecting the K{sub A}'s for Ca{sup 2+} activation. The cytosolic activator was partially purified by DEAE Sephacel chromatography was heat labile and sensitive to trypsin pretreatment identifying it as a protein. In contrast, 10 mM NaF increased the Ca{sup 2+} affinity for PLC 2-fold. These results show that cardiac sarcolemma possess a membrane bound Ca{sup 2+} dependent PLC activity which is regulated by a cytosolic protein activator and a G protein. The cytosolic activator would potentially amplify the amount of sarcolemmal polyphosphoinositides hydrolyzed by PLC in response to muscarinic receptor activation by acetylcholine. In addition, activation of PLC by NaF or other G protein activators could result from increasing the Ca{sup 2+} affinity of PLC to physiological intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels.

  8. Relative contributions of NOS isoforms during experimental colitis: endothelial-derived NOS maintains mucosal integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallance, Bruce A.; Dijkstra, Gerard; Qiu, Bosheng; van der Waaij, Laurens A.; van Goor, Harry; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Collins, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in inflammatory bowel diseases has traditionally focused on the inducible form of NO synthase (iNOS). However, the constitutive endothelial (eNOS) and neuronal (nNOS) isoforms may also impact on colitis, either by contributing to the inflammation or by regulating

  9. Dietary fats significantly influence the survival of penumbral neurons in a rat model of chronic ischemic by modifying lipid mediators, inflammatory biomarkers, NOS production, and redox-dependent apoptotic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lausada, Natalia; Arnal, Nathalie; Astiz, Mariana; Marín, María Cristina; Lofeudo, Juan Manuel; Stringa, Pablo; Tacconi de Alaniz, María J; Tacconi de Gómez Dumm, Nelva; Hurtado de Catalfo, Graciela; Cristalli de Piñero, Norma; Pallanza de Stringa, María Cristina; Illara de Bozzolo, Eva María; Bozzarello, Enrique Gustavo; Cristalli, Diana Olga; Marra, Carlos Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Brain stroke is the third most important cause of death in developed countries. We studied the effect of different dietary lipids on the outcome of a permanent ischemic stroke rat model. Wistar rats were fed diets containing 7% commercial oils (S, soybean; O, olive; C, coconut; G, grape seed) for 35 d. Stroke was induced by permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. Coronal slices from ischemic brains and sham-operated animals were supravitally stained. Penumbra and core volumes were calculated by image digitalization after 24, 48, and 72 h poststroke. Homogenates and mitochondrial fractions were prepared from different zones and analyzed by redox status, inflammatory markers, ceramide, and arachidonate content, phospholipase A2, NOS, and proteases. Soybean (S) and G diets were mainly prooxidative and proinflammatory by increasing the liberation of arachidonate and its transformation into prostaglandins. O was protective in terms of redox homeostatic balance, minor increases in lipid and protein damage, conservation of reduced glutathione, protective activation of NOS in penumbra, and net ratio of anti-to proinflammatory cytokines. Apoptosis (caspase-3, milli- and microcalpains) was less activated by O than by any other diet. Dietary lipids modulate NOS and PLA2 activities, ceramide production, and glutathione import into the mitochondrial matrix, finally determining the activation of the two main protease systems involved in programmed cell death. Olive oil appears to be a biological source for the isolation of protective agents that block the expansion of brain core at the expense of penumbral neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. MGE-derived nNOS+interneurons promote fear acquisition in nNOS-/-mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Yuan, Hong-Jin; Cao, Bo; Kong, Cheng-Cheng; Yuan, Fang; Li, Jun; Ni, Huan-Yu; Wu, Hai-Yin; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yan; Luo, Chun-Xia

    2017-12-02

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) 1 , mainly responsible for NO release in central nervous system (CNS) 2 , plays a significant role in multiple physiological functions. However, the function of nNOS + interneurons in fear learning has not been much explored. Here we focused on the medial ganglionic eminences (MGE) 3 -derived nNOS + interneurons in fear learning. To determine the origin of nNOS + interneurons, we cultured neurons in vitro from MGE, cortex, lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) 4 , caudal ganglionic eminences (CGE) 5 and preoptic area (POA) 6 . The results showed that MGE contained the most abundant precursors of nNOS + interneurons. Moreover, donor cells from E12.5 embryos demonstrated the highest positive rate of nNOS + interneurons compared with other embryonic periods (E11.5, E12, E13, E13.5 and E14). Additionally, these cells from E12.5 embryos showed long axonal and abundant dendritic arbors after 10 days culture, indicating the capability to disperse and integrate in host neural circuits after transplantation. To investigate the role of MGE-derived nNOS + interneurons in fear learning, donor MGE cells were transplanted into dentate gyrus (DG) 7 of nNOS knock-out (nNOS -/- ) or wild-type mice. Results showed that the transplantation of MGE cells promoted the acquisition of nNOS -/- but not the wild-type mice, suggesting the importance of nNOS + neurons in fear acquisition. Moreover, we transplanted MGE cells from nNOS -/- mice or wild-type mice into DG of the nNOS -/- mice and found that only MGE cells from wild-type mice but not the nNOS -/- mice rescued the deficit in acquisition of the nNOS -/- mice, further confirming the positive role of nNOS + neurons in fear learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Excitation-contraction coupling in zebrafish ventricular myocardium is regulated by trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ influx and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, Moritz; Hannes, Tobias; Trieschmann, Jan; Verhaegh, Rabea; Köster, Annette; Hescheler, Jürgen; Brockmeier, Konrad; Adelmann, Roland; Khalil, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have become a popular model in cardiovascular research mainly due to identification of a large number of mutants with structural defects. In recent years, cardiomyopathies and other diseases influencing contractility of the heart have been studied in zebrafish mutants. However, little is known about the regulation of contractility of the zebrafish heart on a tissue level. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of trans-sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-flux and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-release in zebrafish myocardium. Using isometric force measurements of fresh heart slices, we characterised the effects of changes of the extracellular Ca(2+)-concentration, trans-sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-flux via L-type Ca(2+)-channels and Na(+)-Ca(2+)-exchanger, and Ca(2+)-release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as beating frequency and β-adrenergic stimulation on contractility of adult zebrafish myocardium. We found an overall negative force-frequency relationship (FFR). Inhibition of L-type Ca(2+)-channels by verapamil (1 μM) decreased force of contraction to 22 ± 7% compared to baseline (n=4, pmyocardium (n=5, pmyocardium requires not only trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+-flux, but also intact sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-cycling. In contrast to mammals, FFR is strongly negative in the zebrafish heart. These aspects need to be considered when using zebrafish to model human diseases of myocardial contractility.

  12. Protective Effects of Hericium erinaceus Mycelium and Its Isolated Erinacine A against Ischemia-Injury-Induced Neuronal Cell Death via the Inhibition of iNOS/p38 MAPK and Nitrotyrosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam-Fai Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hericium erinaceus, an edible mushroom, has been demonstrated to potentiate the effects of numerous biological activities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether H. erinaceus mycelium could act as an anti-inflammatory agent to bring about neuroprotection using a model of global ischemic stroke and the mechanisms involved. Rats were treated with H. erinaceus mycelium and its isolated diterpenoid derivative, erinacine A, after ischemia reperfusion brain injuries caused by the occlusion of the two common carotid arteries. The production of inflammatory cytokines in serum and the infracted volume of the brain were measured. The proteins from the stroke animal model (SAM were evaluated to determine the effect of H. erinaceus mycelium. H. erinaceus mycelium reduced the total infarcted volumes by 22% and 44% at a concentration of 50 and 300 mg/kg, respectively, compared to the SAM group. The levels of acute inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor á, were all reduced by erinacine A. Levels of nitrotyrosine-containing proteins, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP and homologous protein (CHOP expression were attenuated by erinacine A. Moreover, the modulation of ischemia injury factors present in the SAM model by erinacine A seemed to result in the suppression of reactive nitrogen species and the downregulation of inducible NO synthase (iNOS, p38 MAPK and CHOP. These findings confirm the nerve-growth properties of Hericium erinaceus mycelium, which include the prevention of ischemic injury to neurons; this protective effect seems to be involved in the in vivo activity of iNOS, p38 MAPK and CHOP.

  13. Protective effects of Hericium erinaceus mycelium and its isolated erinacine A against ischemia-injury-induced neuronal cell death via the inhibition of iNOS/p38 MAPK and nitrotyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kam-Fai; Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Teng, Chih-Chuan; Shen, Chien-Heng; Hsieh, Meng-Chiao; Lu, Chien-Chang; Lee, Ko-Chao; Lee, Li-Ya; Chen, Wan-Ping; Chen, Chin-Chu; Huang, Wen-Shih; Kuo, Hsing-Chun

    2014-08-27

    Hericium erinaceus, an edible mushroom, has been demonstrated to potentiate the effects of numerous biological activities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether H. erinaceus mycelium could act as an anti-inflammatory agent to bring about neuroprotection using a model of global ischemic stroke and the mechanisms involved. Rats were treated with H. erinaceus mycelium and its isolated diterpenoid derivative, erinacine A, after ischemia reperfusion brain injuries caused by the occlusion of the two common carotid arteries. The production of inflammatory cytokines in serum and the infracted volume of the brain were measured. The proteins from the stroke animal model (SAM) were evaluated to determine the effect of H. erinaceus mycelium. H. erinaceus mycelium reduced the total infarcted volumes by 22% and 44% at a concentration of 50 and 300 mg/kg, respectively, compared to the SAM group. The levels of acute inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor á, were all reduced by erinacine A. Levels of nitrotyrosine-containing proteins, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) and homologous protein (CHOP) expression were attenuated by erinacine A. Moreover, the modulation of ischemia injury factors present in the SAM model by erinacine A seemed to result in the suppression of reactive nitrogen species and the downregulation of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), p38 MAPK and CHOP. These findings confirm the nerve-growth properties of Hericium erinaceus mycelium, which include the prevention of ischemic injury to neurons; this protective effect seems to be involved in the in vivo activity of iNOS, p38 MAPK and CHOP.

  14. Supplementation with 0.1% and 2% vitamin e in diabetic rats: analysis of myenteric neurons immunostained for myosin-V and nNOS in the jejunum Suplementação com vitamina E 0,1% e 2% em ratos diabéticos: análise de neurônios mioentéricos imunomarcados para miosina-V e nNOS no jejuno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleandro Aparecido Tronchini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Diabetes mellitus is a disease characterized by hyperglycemia that, when allowed to progress long-term untreated, develops vascular and neurological complications, which are responsible for the development of alterations in the enteric nervous system in diabetic patients. In the gastrointestinal tract, diabetes mellitus promotes motor and sensory changes, and in the reflex function of this system, causing gastroparesis, diarrhea, constipation, megacolon, slow gastrointestinal transit, gastric stasis and dilation with decreased or increased peristaltic contractions. Several studies have shown that oxidative stress is the main responsible for the vascular and neurological complications affecting the enteric nervous system of diabetics. OBJECTIVE: The effects of 0.1% and 2% vitamin E on myosin-V- and nNOS-immunoreactive neurons in the jejunum of diabetic rats were investigated. METHODS: Thirty rats were divided into the groups: normoglycemic, normoglycemic treated with 0.1% vitamin E, normoglycemic treated with 2% vitamin E, diabetic, diabetic treated with 0.1% vitamin E, and diabetic treated with 2% vitamin E. The neuronal density and areas of neuron cell bodies were determined. RESULTS: Diabetes (diabetic group significantly reduced the number of myosin-V-immunoreactive neurons compared with the normoglycemic group. The diabetic treated with 0.1% vitamin E and diabetic treated with 2% vitamin E groups did not exhibit a greater density than the D group (P>0.05. Nitrergic density did not change with diabetes (P>0.05. The areas of myosin-V- and nNOS-immunoreactive neurons significantly increased in the normoglycemic treated with 2% vitamin E and diabetic groups compared with the normoglycemic group. CONCLUSION: Supplementation with 2% vitamin E had a neurotrophic effect only in the area of myosin-V-immunoreactive neurons compared with the diabetic group.CONTEXTO: O diabetes mellitus (DM é uma doença caracterizada pela hiperglicemia que a

  15. Interference of N-(1-[4-(4-fluophenoxy)butyl]-piperidinyl)-N-methyl-2-benzothiazolamin e with Na+/H+exchange and Na+/Ca2+exchange in purified cardiac sarcolemmal membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheufler, E.; Heers, C.; Wilffert, B.; Peters, Thies; Pierce, G.N.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of R 56865 (N-[1-[4-(4-fluorophenoxy) butyl]-piperidinyl]-N-methyl-2-benzothiazolamine, CAS 104606-13-5) on Na+/H+exchange and Na+/Ca2+exchange was studied in isolated cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles. R 56865 inhibited Na+/H+exchange with an ED50of 180 μmol/l at a concentration of 0.05

  16. Cardiomyocyte-specific conditional knockout of the histone chaperone HIRA in mice results in hypertrophy, sarcolemmal damage and focal replacement fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Valenzuela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available HIRA is the histone chaperone responsible for replication-independent incorporation of histone variant H3.3 within gene bodies and regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes, and within the bivalent promoter regions of developmentally regulated genes. The HIRA gene lies within the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome critical region; individuals with this syndrome have multiple congenital heart defects. Because terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have exited the cell cycle, histone variants should be utilized for the bulk of chromatin remodeling. Thus, HIRA is likely to play an important role in epigenetically defining the cardiac gene expression program. In this study, we determined the consequence of HIRA deficiency in cardiomyocytes in vivo by studying the phenotype of cardiomyocyte-specific Hira conditional-knockout mice. Loss of HIRA did not perturb heart development, but instead resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and susceptibility to sarcolemmal damage. Cardiomyocyte degeneration gave way to focal replacement fibrosis and impaired cardiac function. Gene expression was widely altered in Hira conditional-knockout hearts. Significantly affected pathways included responses to cellular stress, DNA repair and transcription. Consistent with heart failure, fetal cardiac genes were re-expressed in the Hira conditional knockout. Our results suggest that transcriptional regulation by HIRA is crucial for cardiomyocyte homeostasis.

  17. High levels of sarcospan are well tolerated and act as a sarcolemmal stabilizer to address skeletal muscle and pulmonary dysfunction in DMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Elizabeth M; Marshall, Jamie L; Ma, Eva; Nguyen, Thien M; Hong, Grace; Lam, Jessica S; Spencer, Melissa J; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H

    2016-12-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder that causes progressive muscle weakness, ultimately leading to early mortality in affected teenagers and young adults. Previous work from our lab has shown that a small transmembrane protein called sarcospan (SSPN) can enhance the recruitment of adhesion complex proteins to the cell surface. When human SSPN is expressed at three-fold levels in mdx mice, this increase in adhesion complex abundance improves muscle membrane stability, preventing many of the histopathological changes associated with DMD. However, expressing higher levels of human SSPN (ten-fold transgenic expression) causes a severe degenerative muscle phenotype in wild-type mice. Since SSPN-mediated stabilization of the sarcolemma represents a promising therapeutic strategy in DMD, it is important to determine whether SSPN can be introduced at high levels without toxicity. Here, we show that mouse SSPN (mSSPN) can be overexpressed at 30-fold levels in wild-type mice with no deleterious effects. In mdx mice, mSSPN overexpression improves dystrophic pathology and sarcolemmal stability. We show that these mice exhibit increased resistance to eccentric contraction-induced damage and reduced fatigue following exercise. mSSPN overexpression improved pulmonary function and reduced dystrophic histopathology in the diaphragm. Together, these results demonstrate that SSPN overexpression is well tolerated in mdx mice and improves sarcolemma defects that underlie skeletal muscle and pulmonary dysfunction in DMD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Low Nitric Oxide Synthases (NOS) in Eyes with Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutto, Imran A.; Baba, Takayuki; Merges, Carol; McLeod, D. Scott; Lutty, Gerard A.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production by vascular endothelium is important in regulation of blood flow. Reduced production of NO can adversely affect blood flow and other vascular functions. We investigated the expression of three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms in retina and choroid of aged human eyes and eyes with AMD. Alkaline phosphatase immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against inducible (iNOS), neuronal (nNOS), and endothelial (eNOS) NOSs on cryopreserved sections from aged control donor eyes (n= 13) and eyes with AMD (n= 22). CD34 antibody was used as an endothelial cell (EC) marker. Three independent masked observers scored the intensity of the immunohistochemical reaction product. Mean scores from the aged control and AMD eyes were statistically compared. In aged control retinas, nNOS was in ganglion cells (RGCs) and neurons of both nuclear layers. In choroid, perivascular nerve fibers and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells were nNOS+. eNOS and iNOS were confined to the retinal and choroidal vascular ECs. Some cells presumably melanocytes or dendritic cells in choroid were also eNOS+. In AMD eyes, nNOS was significantly lower in RGCs, neurons, retinal vessels and RPE (p≤0.05) compared to the aged control eyes. iNOS and eNOS showed no significant differences between aged control and AMD eyes except that there was significantly less eNOS in choroidal arteries (p=0.006) and choroidal cells (p=0.03) of AMD eyes. Although NO was not measured directly, these findings suggest that there is less NO produced in AMD eyes. The decrease in retinal nNOS in AMD eyes is probably related to neuronal degeneration. The decrease in nNOS and eNOS in AMD choroid could be associated with vasoconstriction and hemodynamic changes. PMID:19836390

  19. Ablating the protein TBC1D1 impairs contraction-induced sarcolemmal glucose transporter 4 redistribution but not insulin-mediated responses in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Jamie; Paglialunga, Sabina; Smith, Brennan K; Miotto, Paula M; Simnett, Genevieve; Robson, Holly L; Jain, Swati S; Herbst, Eric A F; Desjardins, Eric M; Dyck, David J; Spriet, Lawrence L; Steinberg, Gregory R; Holloway, Graham P

    2017-10-06

    TBC1 domain family member 1 (TBC1D1), a Rab GTPase-activating protein and paralogue of Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160), has been implicated in both insulin- and 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase-mediated glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) translocation. However, the role of TBC1D1 in contracting muscle remains ambiguous. We therefore explored the metabolic consequence of ablating TBC1D1 in both resting and contracting skeletal muscles, utilizing a rat TBC1D1 KO model. Although insulin administration rapidly increased (p muscles, the TBC1D1 ablation did not alter this response nor did it affect whole-body insulin tolerance, suggesting that TBC1D1 is not required for insulin-induced GLUT4 trafficking events. Consistent with findings in other models of altered TBC1D1 protein levels, whole-animal and ex vivo skeletal muscle fat oxidation was increased in the TBC1D1 KO rats. Although there was no change in mitochondrial content in the KO rats, maximal ADP-stimulated respiration was higher in permeabilized muscle fibers, which may contribute to the increased reliance on fatty acids in resting KO animals. Despite this increase in mitochondrial oxidative capacity, run time to exhaustion at various intensities was impaired in the KO rats. Moreover, contraction-induced increases in sarcolemmal GLUT4 content and glucose uptake were lower in the white gastrocnemius of the KO animals. Altogether, our results highlight a critical role for TBC1D1 in exercise tolerance and contraction-mediated translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane in skeletal muscle. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase is dislocated in type I fibers of myalgic muscle but can recover with physical exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L; Andersen, L L; Schrøder, H D

    2015-01-01

    assigned to either 10 weeks of specific strength training (SST, n = 18), general fitness training (GFT, n = 15), or health information (REF, n = 8). Distribution of fiber type, cross-sectional area, and sarcolemmal nNOS expression did not differ between MYA and CON. However, MYA showed increased...... of strength training normalize these disruptions, which supports previous findings of impaired muscle oxygenation during work tasks and reduced pain following exercise....... contribute to an ineffective muscle function. This study investigated nNOS expression and localization in chronically painful muscle. Forty-one women clinically diagnosed with trapezius myalgia (MYA) and 18 healthy controls (CON) were included in the case-control study. Subsequently, MYA were randomly...

  1. Effect of maternal protein deprivation on morphological and quantitative aspects of the myenteric plexus neurons of proximal colon in rats Efeito da desnutrição protéica materna nos aspectos morfológico e quantitativo dos neurônios do plexo mientérico do colo proximal de ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emeri V.S. Leite-Mello

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the morphological and quantitative aspects of the myenteric plexus neurons of the proximal colon in rats (Rattus norvegicus of Wistar strain submitted to a protein deprivation during prenatal and lactation periods. Twenty pregnant dams were divided in four groups labeled according to the kind of nourishment they were given: Group NN, normal diet; Group DN, low protein diet during prenatal period, and normal diet during lactation period; Group ND, normal diet during prenatal period, and low protein diet during lactation period; Group DD, low protein diet during prenatal and lactation periods. Histological analyses were developed with proximal colon segments using the haematoxylin and eosin staining method. Membrane preparations were stained by Giemsa's method. The statistical analysis has demonstrated no significant difference among the means of neurons found in the four studied groups. It was noticed that the animals under protein deprivation during prenatal and lactation periods presented greater quantity of large and strongly basophilic myenteric neurons. This suggests that neurons have accumulated protein in the cytoplasm.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar os aspectos morfológicos e quantitativos dos neurônios do plexo mientérico do colo proximal de ratos Wistar submetidos a desnutrição protéica, durante a gestação e lactação. Foram utilizados vinte animais, denominados de acordo com o período em que suas mães receberam ração com baixo teor de proteína: grupo NN (normoalimentados, grupo DN (ração hipoprotéica na gestação e normal na lactação, grupo ND (ração normal na gestação e hipoprotéica na lactação e grupo DD (ração hipoprotéica na gestação e lactação. Amostras do colo proximal destinaram-se a cortes histológicos, corados pela hematoxilina-eosina e a preparados de membrana corados pelo método de Giemsa. O tratamento estatístico não demonstrou diferença significativa entre as m

  2. Renal nerves and nNOS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Wolff, Helle; Kuczeriszka, Marta

    2008-01-01

    It was hypothesized that renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) are involved in the acute inhibition of renin secretion and the natriuresis following slow NaCl loading (NaLoad) and that RSNA participates in the regulation of arterial blood pressure (MABP......). This was tested by NaLoad after chronic renal denervation with and without inhibition of nNOS by S-methyl-thiocitrulline (SMTC). In addition, the acute effects of renal denervation on MABP and sodium balance were assessed. Rats were investigated in the conscious, catheterized state, in metabolic cages...... of acutely and chronically denervated rats were less than control (15% and 9%, respectively, P renal denervation (14.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 19.3 +/- 1.3 mIU/l, P

  3. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase: From biochemistry and gene structure to clinical implications of NOS3 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2016-01-10

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important vasodilator with a well-established role in cardiovascular homeostasis. While mediator is synthesized from L-arginine by neuronal, endothelial, and inducible nitric oxide synthases (NOS1,NOS3 and NOS2 respectively), NOS3 is the most important isoform for NO formation in the cardiovascular system. NOS3 is a dimeric enzyme whose expression and activity are regulated at transcriptional, posttranscriptional,and posttranslational levels. The NOS3 gene, which encodes NOS3, exhibits a number of polymorphic sites including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs), microsatellites, and insertions/deletions. Some NOS3 polymorphisms show functional effects on NOS3 expression or activity, thereby affecting NO formation. Interestingly, many studies have evaluated the effects of functional NOS3 polymorphisms on disease susceptibility and drug responses. Moreover, some studies have investigated how NOS3 haplotypes may impact endogenous NO formation and disease susceptibility. In this article,we carried out a comprehensive review to provide a basic understanding of biochemical mechanisms involved in NOS3 regulation and how genetic variations in NOS3 may translate into relevant clinical and pharmacogenetic implications.

  4. "NOME" NOS SALMOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Stadelmann

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available "Nome" ocorre 96 vezes nos Salmos de maneira diferente do uso comum que dele se faz na nossa linguagem. O motivo é que "nome" é um termo referencial que designa a Deus cultuado na liturgia da comunidade dos fiéis. Distinguimos duas modalidades no uso de "nome": a primeira consiste na invocação do "nome" em súplicas pela intervenção de Deus, para que venha em auxílio dos homens por meio do seu poder irresistível, de sua autoridade suprema e de sua soberania ilimitada; a segunda se emprega nos encâmios ao "nome" para enaltecer a glória, honra e santidade de Deus.

  5. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Nerves are fibres that conduct electrical signals and hence pass on information from and to the brain. Nerves are made of nerve cells called neurons (Figure 1). Instructions in our body are sent via electrical signals that present themselves as variations in the potential across neuronal membranes. These potential differences ...

  6. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...

  7. P2X4 receptor–eNOS signaling pathway in cardiac myocytes as a novel protective mechanism in heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ronghua; Beqiri, Dardan; Shen, Jian-Bing; Redden, John M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Liang, Bruce T.

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated using immunoprecipitation and immunostaining a novel physical association of the P2X4 receptor (P2X4R), a ligand-gated ion channel, with the cardioprotective, calcium-dependent enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Treatment of murine ventricular myocytes with the P2XR agonist 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP) to induce a current (mainly Na+) increased the formation of nitric oxide (NO), as measured using a fluorescent probe. Possible candidates for downstream effectors mediating eNOS activity include cyclic GMP and PKG or cellular protein nitrosylation. A cardiac-specific P2X4R overexpressing mouse line was protected from heart failure (HF) with improved cardiac function and survival in post-infarct, pressure overload, and calsequestrin (CSQ) overexpression models of HF. Although the role of the P2X4R in other tissues such as the endothelium and monocytes awaits characterization in tissue-specific KO, cardiac-specific activation of eNOS may be more cardioprotective than an increased activity of global systemic eNOS. The intra-myocyte formation of NO may be more advantageous over NO derived externally from a donor. A small molecule drug stimulating this sarcolemmal pathway or gene therapy-mediated overexpression of the P2X4R in cardiac myocytes may represent a new therapy for both ischemic and pressure overloaded HF. PMID:25750695

  8. P2X4 receptor–eNOS signaling pathway in cardiac myocytes as a novel protective mechanism in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghua Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated using immunoprecipitation and immunostaining a novel physical association of the P2X4 receptor (P2X4R, a ligand-gated ion channel, with the cardioprotective, calcium-dependent enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS. Treatment of murine ventricular myocytes with the P2XR agonist 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP to induce a current (mainly Na+ increased the formation of nitric oxide (NO, as measured using a fluorescent probe. Possible candidates for downstream effectors mediating eNOS activity include cyclic GMP and PKG or cellular protein nitrosylation. A cardiac-specific P2X4R overexpressing mouse line was protected from heart failure (HF with improved cardiac function and survival in post-infarct, pressure overload, and calsequestrin (CSQ overexpression models of HF. Although the role of the P2X4R in other tissues such as the endothelium and monocytes awaits characterization in tissue-specific KO, cardiac-specific activation of eNOS may be more cardioprotective than an increased activity of global systemic eNOS. The intra-myocyte formation of NO may be more advantageous over NO derived externally from a donor. A small molecule drug stimulating this sarcolemmal pathway or gene therapy-mediated overexpression of the P2X4R in cardiac myocytes may represent a new therapy for both ischemic and pressure overloaded HF.

  9. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunopositive neurons in cat vestibular complex: a light and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papantchev, V; Paloff, A; Hinova-Palova, D; Hristov, S; Todorova, D; Ovtscharoff, W

    2006-11-01

    Nitric oxide is a unique neurotransmitter, which participates in many physiological and pathological processes in the organism. Nevertheless, there are little data about the neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity (nNOS-ir) in the vestibular complex of a cat. In this respect, the aims of this study were to: (1) demonstrate nNOS-ir in the neurons and fibers, from all major and accessory vestibular nuclei; (2) describe their light microscopic morphology and distribution; (3) investigate and analyze the ultrastructure of the NOS I-immunopositive neurons, fibers, and synaptic boutons. For demonstration of the nNOS-ir, the peroxidase-antiperoxidase-diaminobenzidin method was applied. Immunopositive for nNOS neurons and fibers were present in all major and accessory vestibular nuclei. On the light microscope level, the immunopositive neurons were different in shape and size. According to the latter, they were divided into four groups--small (with diameter less than 15 microm), medium-sized (with diameter from 15 to 30 microm), large type I (with diameter from 30 to 40 microm), and large type II (with diameter greater than 40 microm). On the electron microscope level, the immunoproduct was observed in neurons, dendrites, and terminal boutons. According to the ultrastructural features, the neurons were divided into three groups--small (with diameter less than 15 microm), medium-sized (with diameter from 15 to 30 microm), and large (with diameter greater than 30 microm). At least two types of nNOS-ir synaptic boutons were easily distinguished. As a conclusion, we hope that this study will contribute to a better understanding of the functioning of the vestibular complex in cat and that some of the data presented could be extrapolated to other mammals, including human.

  10. Offre pour nos membres

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Walibi Rhône-Alpes accueille son événement Halloween FreakShow le week-end du 15 et 16 octobre puis tous les jours du 20 octobre au 02 novembre 2016 ! ouverture prolongée jusqu’à 19h et feu d’artifices chaque soir 29, 30 et 31 octobre ! Loup-garou show; 1 labyrinthe; jeu de piste sur le parc (et nombreux lots à gagner); animations (sculpture sur citrouilles et maquillage) et d'autres surpises ! Tarifs pour nos membres : Entrée "Zone terrestre": 23 € au lieu de 29 €. Entrée gratuite pour les enfants de moins de 3 ans, avec accès aux attractions limité. Parking gratuit.

  11. Neurochemical phenotype of cytoglobin‑expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-01-01

    of Cygb neurons remain uncharacterized by the neurochemical content. The aim of the present study was to provide an additional and more detailed neurochemical phenotype of Cygb-expressing neurons in the rat hippocampus. The rat hippocampus was chosen due to the abundance of Cygb, as well as this limbic...... of Cygb neurons co-expressing nNOS. Furthermore, it was shown that the majority of neurons expressing somastostatin and vasoactive intestinal peptide also co-express Cygb and nNOS. Detailed information regarding the neurochemical phenotype of Cygb neurons in the hippocampus can be a valuable tool...

  12. Subtypes of GABAergic neurons project axons in the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyoshi Higo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons in the neocortex have been regarded as interneurons and speculated to modulate the activity of neurons locally. Recently, however, several experiments revealed that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons project cortico-cortically with long axons. In this study, we illustrate Golgi-like images of the nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons using a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d reaction and follow the emanating axon branches in cat brain sections. These axon branches projected cortico-cortically with other non-labeled arcuate fibers, contra-laterally via the corpus callosum and anterior commissure. The labeled fibers were not limited to the neocortex but found also in the fimbria of the hippocampus. In order to have additional information on these GABAergic neuron projections, we investigated green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled GABAergic neurons in GAD67-Cre knock-in / GFP Cre-reporter mice. GFP-labeled axons emanate densely, especially in the fimbria, a small number in the anterior commissure, and very sparsely in the corpus callosum. These two different approaches confirm that not only nNOS-positive GABAergic neurons but also other subtypes of GABAergic neurons project long axons in the cerebral cortex and are in a position to be involved in information processing.

  13. Sprint interval and endurance training are equally effective in increasing muscle microvascular density and eNOS content in sedentary males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Matthew; Shaw, Christopher S; Shepherd, Sam O; Fisher, James P; Ranasinghe, Aaron M; Barker, Thomas A; Tipton, Kevin D; Wagenmakers, Anton J M

    2013-02-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) has been proposed as a time efficient alternative to endurance training (ET) for increasing skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and improving certain cardiovascular functions. In this study we sought to make the first comparisons of the structural and endothelial enzymatic changes in skeletal muscle microvessels in response to ET and SIT. Sixteen young sedentary males (age 21 ± SEM 0.7 years, BMI 23.8 ± SEM 0.7 kg m(-2)) were randomly assigned to 6 weeks of ET (40-60 min cycling at ∼65% , 5 times per week) or SIT (4-6 Wingate tests, 3 times per week). Muscle biopsies were taken from the m. vastus lateralis before and following 60 min cycling at 65% to measure muscle microvascular endothelial eNOS content, eNOS serine(1177) phosphorylation, NOX2 content and capillarisation using quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy. Whole body insulin sensitivity, arterial stiffness and blood pressure were also assessed. ET and SIT increased skeletal muscle microvascular eNOS content (ET 14%; P < 0.05, SIT 36%; P < 0.05), with a significantly greater increase observed following SIT (P < 0.05). Sixty minutes of moderate intensity exercise increased eNOS ser(1177) phosphorylation in all instances (P < 0.05), but basal and post-exercise eNOS ser(1177) phosphorylation was lower following both training modes. All microscopy measures of skeletal muscle capillarisation (P < 0.05) were increased with SIT or ET, while neither endothelial nor sarcolemmal NOX2 was changed. Both training modes reduced aortic stiffness and increased whole body insulin sensitivity (P < 0.05). In conclusion, in sedentary males SIT and ET are effective in improving muscle microvascular density and eNOS protein content.

  14. mRNA expression and localization of bNOS, eNOS and iNOS in human cervix at preterm and term labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byström Birgitta

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preterm birth is the primary cause of the neonatal mortality and morbidity. There will be no preterm birth without a cervical softening. Nitric oxide (NO is shown to be a mediator of term cervical ripening. The aim of this study was to investigate mRNA expression of the three isomers of NO synthases (NOS and to identify them by immunohistochemistry in the human cervix at preterm birth compared to term. Methods The three isomers of NOS- inducible (iNOS, endothelial (eNOS and neuronal (bNOS – were investigated in the human cervix. The expression of mRNA was determined using Real-Time Multiplex RT-PCR. The localisation of synthases in the cervical tissue was analysed using immunohistochemistry. Cervical biopsies were obtained from 4 groups of women without clinical signs of infection: preterm (PTL, term labour (TL, preterm not in labour (PTnotL and term not in labour (TnotL patients. One-Way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, Student t-test or Mann-Whitney test were applied as appropriate to determine statistically significant differences among the groups. Results Patients in preterm labour had significantly (p Conclusion The mRNA levels were higher in the preterm labour group compared to the women at term labour. The significant increase of the eNOS mRNA expression, from the unripe to the favourable cervical state during labour, may indicate a role of eNOS and supports the role of NO in the cervical ripening process. All the three synthases were identified by immunohistochemistry in all the groups of study.

  15. Noisy Neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 1. Noisy Neurons: Hodgkin-Huxley Model and Stochastic Variants. Shurti Paranjape. General Article Volume 20 Issue 1 January 2015 pp 34-43. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Leptin action through hypothalamic nitric oxide synthase-1-expressing neurons controls energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshan, Rebecca L; Greenwald-Yarnell, Megan; Patterson, Christa M; Gonzalez, Ian E; Myers, Martin G

    2012-05-01

    Few effective measures exist to combat the worldwide obesity epidemic(1), and the identification of potential therapeutic targets requires a deeper understanding of the mechanisms that control energy balance. Leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone that signals the long-term status of bodily energy stores, acts through multiple types of leptin receptor long isoform (LepRb)-expressing neurons (called here LepRb neurons) in the brain to control feeding, energy expenditure and endocrine function(2-4). The modest contributions to energy balance that are attributable to leptin action in many LepRb populations(5-9) suggest that other previously unidentified hypothalamic LepRb neurons have key roles in energy balance. Here we examine the role of LepRb in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1)-expressing LebRb (LepRb(NOS1)) neurons that comprise approximately 20% of the total hypothalamic LepRb neurons. Nos1(cre)-mediated genetic ablation of LepRb (Lepr(Nos1KO)) in mice produces hyperphagic obesity, decreased energy expenditure and hyperglycemia approaching that seen in whole-body LepRb-null mice. In contrast, the endocrine functions in Lepr(Nos1KO) mice are only modestly affected by the genetic ablation of LepRb in these neurons. Thus, hypothalamic LepRb(NOS1) neurons are a key site of action of the leptin-mediated control of systemic energy balance.

  17. Stromal cell–derived factor 2 is critical for Hsp90-dependent eNOS activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siragusa, Mauro; Fröhlich, Florian; Park, Eon Joo; Schleicher, Michael; Walther, Tobias C.; Sessa, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) catalyzes the conversion of l-arginine and molecular oxygen into l-citrulline and nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous second messenger that influences cardiovascular physiology and disease. Several mechanisms regulate eNOS activity and function, including phosphorylation at Ser and Thr residues and protein-protein interactions. Combining a tandem affinity purification approach and mass spectrometry, we identified stromal cell–derived factor 2 (SDF2) as a component of the eNOS macromolecular complex in endothelial cells. SDF2 knockdown impaired agonist-stimulated NO synthesis and decreased the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177, a key event required for maximal activation of eNOS. Conversely, SDF2 overexpression dose-dependently increased NO synthesis through a mechanism involving Akt and calcium (induced with ionomycin), which increased the phosphorylation of Ser1177 in eNOS. NO synthesis by iNOS (inducible NOS) and nNOS (neuronal NOS) was also enhanced upon SDF2 overexpression. We found that SDF2 was a client protein of the chaperone protein Hsp90, interacting preferentially with the M domain of Hsp90, which is the same domain that binds to eNOS. In endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), SDF2 was required for the binding of Hsp90 and calmodulin to eNOS, resulting in eNOS phosphorylation and activation. Thus, our data describe a function for SDF2 as a component of the Hsp90-eNOS complex that is critical for signal transduction in endothelial cells. PMID:26286023

  18. Allicin protects rat cortical neurons against mechanical trauma injury by regulating nitric oxide synthase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue-fei; Li, Wen-tao; Han, Hong-cheng; Gao, Da-kuan; He, Xiao-sheng; Li, Liang; Song, Jin-ning; Fei, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Allicin, a small molecule that is responsible for the typical smell and most of the functions of garlic, possesses a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have therapeutic potential in many pathologic conditions. In the present study, we investigated the potential protective effect of allicin in an in vitro model of traumatic brain injury (TBI) using primary cultured rat cortical neurons. We found that allicin treatment significantly reduced mechanical trauma-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and inhibited apoptotic neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner. These protective effects were observed even if allicin treatment was delayed to 2h after injury. Allicin significantly decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and increased the phosphorylation of endothelial NOS (eNOS) but had no effect on neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression. Allicin-induced protection in cortical neurons was augmented by iNOS and nNOS antagonists and was partly reversed by blocking eNOS phosphorylation. In addition, allicin treatment inhibited the TBI-induced activation of ERK and further enhanced the phosphorylation of Akt in TBI-injured neurons. The Akt inhibitor LY294002 attenuated the allicin-induced increase in eNOS expression and phosphorylation, whereas the ERK inhibitor PD98059 had opposite effects on the expression of iNOS and eNOS. Pretreatment with LY294002 or PD98059 partly prevented or further enhanced allicin-induced neuroprotection, respectively. Collectively, these data demonstrate that allicin treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for traumatic neuronal injury and that the potential underlying mechanism involves Akt- and ERK-mediated regulation of NOS pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Currents

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have currents data. *These services are for testing and evaluation use...

  20. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Wind

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have wind data. *These services are for testing and evaluation use only*...

  1. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have salinity data. *These services are for testing and evaluation use...

  2. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Conductivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have conductivity data. *These services are for testing and evaluation use...

  3. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the pancreas of the sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciszewski, M B

    2007-10-01

    In numerous mammals, nitric oxide (NO) influences the activity of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas. In this study, immunocytochemistry was utilized to investigate the expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the pancreas of sheep. In double immunocytochemical staining, the co-localization of nNOS with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY) or substance P (SP) was studied. The presence of nNOS was confined to the intrapancreatic neurones (9.6 +/- 1.3%) as well as to nerve fibres of the endocrine pancreas and intrapancreatic ganglia. nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurones were round and oval in shape and predominantly (83.3 +/- 2.6%) belonged to the middle-size group (25-50 mum). Numerous, fine islets supplying nNOS-IR nerve terminals were devoid of VIP, SP or NPY. Moderately numerous, non-varicose nNOS-IR nerve fibres of intrapancreatic ganglia frequently expressed VIP or NPY, but not SP; 2.2 +/- 0.6% of nNOS-IR intrapancreatic neurones displayed lack of VIP, whereas 7.5 +/- 0.8% were VIP-IR. All nNOS-IR neurones were devoid of SP. The frequencies of nNOS-IR/NPY-IR and nNOS-IR/NPY-negative intrapancreatic neurones were 2.2 +/- 0.4% and 6.1 +/- 1.1%, respectively. Comparison with other mammals indicated that nitrergic innervation of the ovine pancreas is species-determined and may be a reflection of the ruminants' digestion specificity. The possible origin of nNOS-IR nerve fibres and functional significance of NO in the pancreas of sheep were discussed.

  4. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase-Dependent Amelioration of Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Chronic Renocardiac Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongartz, Lennart G.; Soni, Siddarth; Cramer, Maarten-Jan; Steendijk, Paul; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; van Veen, Toon A.; Joles, Jaap A.; Braam, Branko

    We have recently described the chronic renocardiac syndrome (CRCS) in rats with renal failure, cardiac dysfunction and low nitric oxide (NO) availability by combining subtotal nephrectomy and transient low-dose NO synthase (NOS) inhibition. Cardiac gene expression of the neuronal isoform of NOS

  5. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase-Dependent Amelioration of Diastolic Dysfunction in Rats with Chronic Renocardiac Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongartz, Lennart G.; Soni, Siddarth; Cramer, MJ; Steendijk, Paul; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; van Veen, AAB; Joles, Jaap A.; Braam, Branko

    2015-01-01

    We have recently described the chronic renocardiac syndrome (CRCS) in rats with renal failure, cardiac dysfunction and low nitric oxide (NO) availability by combining subtotal nephrectomy and transient low-dose NO synthase (NOS) inhibition. Cardiac gene expression of the neuronal isoform of NOS

  6. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    OpenAIRE

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhib...

  7. Nitric oxide producing neurones in the rat medulla oblongata that project to nucleus tractus solitarii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, F O; McWilliam, P N; Batten, T F

    2000-11-01

    The production of nitric oxide in neurones of the rat medulla oblongata that project to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) was examined by simultaneous immunohistochemical detection of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and of cholera toxin B-subunit (CTb), which was injected into the caudal zone of the NTS. Neurones immunoreactive for CTb and neurones immunoreactive for NOS were widely co-distributed and found in almost all the anatomical divisions of the medulla. Dual-labelled cells, containing both CTb and NOS immunoreactivities were more numerous ipsilaterally to the injection sites. They were concentrated principally in the more rostral zone of the NTS, raphé nuclei, dorsal, intermediate and lateral reticular areas, spinal trigeminal and paratrigeminal nuclei and the external cuneate and medial vestibular nuclei. Isolated dual-labelled neurones were also scattered throughout most of the divisions of the reticular formation. These observations indicate that many areas of the medulla that are known to relay somatosensory and viscerosensory inputs contain NOS immunoreactive neurones that project to the NTS, and may, therefore, contribute to the dense NOS-immunoreactive innervation of the NTS. The release of nitric oxide from the axon terminals of these neurones may modulate autonomic responses generated by NTS neurones in relation to peripheral sensory stimuli, and thus ultimately regulate sympathetic and/or parasympathetic outflow.

  8. AFLATOXICOSE EM SUÍNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Silveira Flôres Schoenau

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO É descrito um surto de aflatoxicose em suínos Duroc de 2 a 6 meses, que consumiam ração contaminada por 519 ppb de aflatoxinas. A morbidade foi de 97%. A mortalidade foi alta, mas não determinada com exatidão. Os sinais clínicos incluíam recusa do alimento, pouco ganho ou perda de peso, diarreia e icterícia. Lesões subagudas e crônicas foram observadas em 4 porcos necropsiados. Nas lesões subagudas o fígado era escuro, com áreas centrolobulares hemorrágicas deprimidas, havia edema da parede da vesícula biliar e bile viscosa. Nos casos crônicos o fígado apresentava-se firme e amarelo-alaranjado. Havia líquido citrino nas cavidades e edema no cólon espiral. Havia avermelhamento da mucosa gástrica da região fúndica. Alterações subagudas eram necrose e hemorragias centrolobulares, hepatomegalocitose, fibrose e hiperplasia ductal. Nos casos crônicos havia fibrose, hiperplasia ductal, megalocitose e degeneração gordurosa hepatocelular. O diagnóstico de aflatoxicose foi feito baseado nos sinais clínicos, nos achados morfológicos e na presença de níveis significativos de aflatoxina na ração dos porcos (B1 = 484,3ppb, B2 = 110,8ppb, G1 = 343,7ppb e G2 = 99,2ppb. Frangos submetidos à mesma alimentação também desenvolveram lesões da toxicose.

  9. Characterisation of type I and type II nNOS-expressing interneurons in the barrel cortex of mouse

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    Quentin ePerrenoud

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the neocortex, neuronal Nitric Oxide-Synthase (nNOS is essentially expressed in two sets of GABAergic neurons: type I neurons displaying a high expression and type II neurons displaying a weaker expression. Using immunocytochemistry on mice expressing GFP under the control of the glutamic acid decarboxylase 67k (GAD67 promoter we studied the distribution of type I and type II neurons in the barrel cortex and their expression of parvalbumin (PV, somatostatin (SOM and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP. We found that type I neurons accumulated in deeper layers and expressed SOM (91.5% while type II neurons concentrated in layer II/III and VI and expressed PV (17.7%, SOM (18.7% and VIP (10.2%. We then characterised 42 nNOS transcribing neurons ex vivo, using whole-cell recordings coupled to singe-cell RT-PCR and biocytin labelling. Unsupervised cluster analysis of this sample disclosed four classes. One cluster (n=7 corresponded to large, deep layer neurons, displaying a high expression of SOM (85.7% and were thus very likely to correspond to type I neurons. The three other clusters were neurogliaform-like interneurons (n=19, deep layer neurons transcribing PV or SOM (n=9 and neurons transcribing VIP (n=7, matching the features of type II cells. Finally, we performed nNOS immunohistochemistry on two mouse lines in which GFP/YFP labelling revealed the expression of two specific developmental genes (Lhx6 and 5-HT3A. We found that type I neurons expressed Lhx6 but never 5-HT3A, indicating that they originate in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE. Type II neurons expressed Lhx6 (63% and 5-HT3A (34.4% supporting that they derive either from the MGE or from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE and the entopeduncular preoptic area (AEP/PO. Together, our results support the view that type I neurons form a particular class of SOM-expressing neurons while type II neurons are heterogeneous and comprise at least three classes.

  10. Effects of oxaliplatin on mouse myenteric neurons and colonic motility

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    Linah eWafai

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxaliplatin, an anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of colorectal cancer, commonly causes gastrointestinal side-effects such as constipation, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting. Damage to enteric neurons may underlie some of these gastrointestinal side-effects, as the enteric nervous system controls the functions of the bowel. In this study, neuronal loss and changes to the structure and immunoreactivity of myenteric neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS neurons were examined in colonic segments from mice following exposure to oxaliplatin ex vivo and following repeated intraperitoneal injections of oxaliplatin over 3 weeks in vivo, using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy. Significant morphological alterations and increases in the proportion of NOS-immunoreactive neurons were associated with both short-term oxaliplatin exposure and long-term oxaliplatin administration, confirming that oxaliplatin causes changes to the myenteric neurons. Long-term oxaliplatin administration induced substantial neuronal loss that was correlated with a reduction in both the frequency and propagation speed of colonic migrating motor complexes in vitro. Similar changes probably produce some symptoms experienced by patients undergoing oxaliplatin treatment.

  11. Spatiotemporal alterations of cortical network activity by selective loss of NOS-expressing interneurons .

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    Dan eShlosberg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering the role of GABAergic neurons in large neuronal networks such as the neocortex forms a particularly complex task as they comprise a highly diverse population. The neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS is expressed in the neocortex by specific subsets of GABAergic neurons. These neurons can be identified in live brain slices by the nitric oxide (NO fluorescent indicator DAF-2DA. However, this indicator was found to be highly toxic to the stained neurons. We used this feature to induce acute phototoxic damage to NO-producing neurons in cortical slices, and measured subsequent alterations in parameters of cellular and network activity.Neocortical slices were briefly incubated in DAF-2DA and then illuminated through the 4X objective. Histochemistry for NADPH diaphorase, a marker for nNOS activity, revealed elimination of staining in the illuminated areas following treatment. Whole cell recordings from several neuronal types before, during and after illumination confirmed the selective damage to non fast-spiking interneurons. Treated slices displayed mild disinhibition. The reversal potential of compound synaptic events on pyramidal neurons became more positive, and their decay time constant was elongated, substantiating the removal of an inhibitory conductance. The horizontal decay of local field potentials (LFPs was significantly reduced at distances of 300-400 m from the stimulation, but not when inhibition was non-selectively weakened with the GABAA blocker picrotoxin. Finally, whereas the depression of LFPs along short trains of 40 Hz stimuli was linearly reduced with distance or initial amplitude in control slices, this ordered relationship was disrupted in DAF-treated slices. These results reveal that NO-producing interneurons in the neocortex convey lateral inhibition to neighboring columns, and shape the spatiotemporal dynamics of the network's activity.

  12. Angiotensin II-mediated posttranslational modification of nNOS in the PVN of rats with CHF: role for PIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neeru M; Llewellyn, Tamra L; Zheng, Hong; Patel, Kaushik P

    2013-09-15

    An increased sympathetic drive is an adverse characteristic in chronic heart failure (CHF). The protein expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)- and hence nitric oxide (NO)-mediated sympathoinhibition is reduced in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rats with CHF. However, the molecular mechanism(s) of nNOS downregulation remain(s) unclear. The aim of the study was to reveal the underlying molecular mechanism for the downregulation of nNOS in the PVN of CHF rats. Sprague-Dawley rats with CHF (6-8 wk after coronary artery ligation) demonstrated decreased nNOS dimer/monomer ratio (42%), with a concomitant increase in the expression of PIN (a protein inhibitor of nNOS known to dissociate nNOS dimers into monomers) by 47% in the PVN. Similarly, PIN expression is increased in a neuronal cell line (NG108) treated with angiotensin II (ANG II). Furthermore, there is an increased accumulation of high-molecular-weight nNOS-ubiquitin (nNOS-Ub) conjugates in the PVN of CHF rats (29%). ANG II treatment in NG108 cells in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin, also leads to a 69% increase in accumulation of nNOS-Ub conjugates immunoprecipitated by an antiubiquitin antibody. There is an ANG II-driven, PIN-mediated decrease in the dimeric catalytically active nNOS in the PVN, due to ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic degradation in CHF. Our results show a novel intermediary mechanism that leads to decreased levels of active nNOS in the PVN, involved in subsequent reduction in sympathoinhibition during CHF, offering a new target for the treatment of CHF and other cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhibitors but not by PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors. Stimulation of cAMP formation by forskolin also activates nNOS phosphorylation. Sustained penile erection elicited by either intracavernous forskolin injection, or augmented by forskolin during cavernous nerve electrical stimulation, is prevented by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME or in nNOS-deleted mice. Thus, nNOS mediates both initiation and maintenance of penile erection, implying unique approaches for treating erectile dysfunction. PMID:23012472

  14. Accumbens nNOS Interneurons Regulate Cocaine Relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alexander C W; Scofield, Michael D; Heinsbroek, Jasper A; Gipson, Cassandra D; Neuhofer, Daniela; Roberts-Wolfe, Doug J; Spencer, Sade; Garcia-Keller, Constanza; Stankeviciute, Neringa M; Smith, Rachel J; Allen, Nicholas P; Lorang, Melissa R; Griffin, William C; Boger, Heather A; Kalivas, Peter W

    2017-01-25

    Relapse to drug use can be initiated by drug-associated cues. The intensity of cue-induced relapse is correlated with the induction of transient synaptic potentiation (t-SP) at glutamatergic synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcore) and requires spillover of glutamate from prefrontal cortical afferents. We used a rodent self-administration/reinstatement model of relapse to show that cue-induced t-SP and reinstated cocaine seeking result from glutamate spillover, initiating a metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-dependent increase in nitric oxide (NO) production. Pharmacological stimulation of mGluR5 in NAcore recapitulated cue-induced reinstatement in the absence of drug-associated cues. Using NO-sensitive electrodes, mGluR5 activation by glutamate was shown to stimulate NO production that depended on activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). nNOS is expressed in ∼1% of NAcore neurons. Using a transgene strategy to express and stimulate designer receptors that mimicked mGluR5 signaling through Gq in nNOS interneurons, we recapitulated cue-induced reinstatement in the absence of cues. Conversely, using a transgenic caspase strategy, the intensity of cue-induced reinstatement was correlated with the extent of selective elimination of nNOS interneurons. The induction of t-SP during cued reinstatement depends on activating matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and selective chemogenetic stimulation of nNOS interneurons recapitulated MMP activation and t-SP induction (increase in AMPA currents in MSNs). These data demonstrate critical involvement of a sparse population of nNOS-expressing interneurons in cue-induced cocaine seeking, revealing a bottleneck in brain processing of drug-associated cues where therapeutic interventions could be effective in treating drug addiction. Relapse to cocaine use in a rat model is associated with transient increases in synaptic strength at prefrontal cortex synapses in the nucleus

  15. Electroacupuncture Delays Hypertension Development through Enhancing NO/NOS Activity in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

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    Hye Suk Hwang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Using spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, this study investigated whether electroacupuncture (EA could reduce early stage hypertension by examining nitric oxide (NO levels in plasma and nitric oxide synthase (NOS levels in the mesenteric resistance artery. EA was applied to the acupuncture point Governor Vessel 20 (GV20 or to a non-acupuncture point in the tail twice weekly for 3 weeks under anesthesia. In conscious SHR and normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, blood pressure was determined the day after EA treatment by the tail-cuff method. We measured plasma NO concentration, and evaluated endothelial NO syntheses (eNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS protein expression in the mesenteric artery. Systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP were lower after 3 weeks of GV20 treatment than EA at non-acupuncture point and no treatment control in SHR. nNOS expression by EA was significantly different between both WKY and no treatment SHR control, and EA at GV20 in SHR. eNOS expression was significantly high in EA at GV 20 compared with no treatment control. In conclusion, EA could attenuate the blood pressure elevation of SHR, along with enhancing NO/NOS activity in the mesenteric artery in SHR.

  16. Alternatively spliced neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Champion, Hunter C.; Crone, Julie K.; Palese, Michael A.; Huang, Paul L.; Sawa, Akira; Luo, Xiaojiang; Musicki, Biljana; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2006-01-01

    A key role for nitric oxide (NO) in penile erection is well established, but the relative roles of the neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) versus endothelial forms of NOS are not clear. nNOS- and endothelial NOS-deficient mice maintain erectile function and reproductive capacity, questioning the importance of NO. Alternatively, residual NO produced by shorter transcripts in the nNOS−/− animals might suffice for normal physiologic function. We show that the β splice variant of nNOS elicits normal erection despite a decrease in stimulus-response characteristics and a 5-fold increased sensitivity to the NOS inhibitor, l-NAME. Residual nNOSβ generates only 10% of the normal NO level in vitro but produces citrulline and diaphorase staining reflecting in vivo NOS activity in pelvic ganglion nerves that is comparable to WT animals. Thus, alternatively spliced forms of nNOS are major mediators of penile erection and so may be targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:16488973

  17. The protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN/DLC1/LC8) binding does not inhibit the NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, a key step in NO synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parhad, Swapnil S. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Jaiswal, Deepa [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); TIFR Centre for Interdisciplinary Sciences, 21 Brundavan Colony, Narsingi, Hyderabad 500075 (India); Ray, Krishanu, E-mail: krishanu@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Mazumdar, Shyamalava, E-mail: shyamal@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India)

    2016-03-25

    The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an essential enzyme involved in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter. Although previous studies have indicated that the dynein light chain 1 (DLC1) binding to nNOS could inhibit the NO synthesis, the claim is challenged by contradicting reports. Thus, the mechanism of nNOS regulation remained unclear. nNOS has a heme-bearing, Cytochrome P450 core, and the functional enzyme is a dimer. The electron flow from NADPH to Flavin, and finally to the heme of the paired nNOS subunit within a dimer, is facilitated upon calmodulin (CaM) binding. Here, we show that DLC1 binding to nNOS-CaM complex does not affect the electron transport from the reductase to the oxygenase domain. Therefore, it cannot inhibit the rate of NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, which results in L-Arginine oxidation. Also, the NO release activity does not decrease with increasing DLC1 concentration in the reaction mix, which further confirmed that DLC1 does not inhibit nNOS activity. These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell. - Highlights: • The effect of interaction of nNOS with DLC1 has been debatable with contradicting reports in literature. • Purified DLC1 has no effect on electron transport between reductase and oxygenase domain of purified nNOS-CaM. • The NO release activity of nNOS was not altered by DLC1, supporting that DLC1 does not inhibit the enzyme. • These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell.

  18. Neurons controlling Aplysia feeding inhibit themselves by continuous NO production.

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    Nimrod Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural activity can be affected by nitric oxide (NO produced by spiking neurons. Can neural activity also be affected by NO produced in neurons in the absence of spiking? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applying an NO scavenger to quiescent Aplysia buccal ganglia initiated fictive feeding, indicating that NO production at rest inhibits feeding. The inhibition is in part via effects on neurons B31/B32, neurons initiating food consumption. Applying NO scavengers or nitric oxide synthase (NOS blockers to B31/B32 neurons cultured in isolation caused inactive neurons to depolarize and fire, indicating that B31/B32 produce NO tonically without action potentials, and tonic NO production contributes to the B31/B32 resting potentials. Guanylyl cyclase blockers also caused depolarization and firing, indicating that the cGMP second messenger cascade, presumably activated by the tonic presence of NO, contributes to the B31/B32 resting potential. Blocking NO while voltage-clamping revealed an inward leak current, indicating that NO prevents this current from depolarizing the neuron. Blocking nitrergic transmission had no effect on a number of other cultured, isolated neurons. However, treatment with NO blockers did excite cerebral ganglion neuron C-PR, a command-like neuron initiating food-finding behavior, both in situ, and when the neuron was cultured in isolation, indicating that this neuron also inhibits itself by producing NO at rest. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Self-inhibitory, tonic NO production is a novel mechanism for the modulation of neural activity. Localization of this mechanism to critical neurons in different ganglia controlling different aspects of a behavior provides a mechanism by which a humeral signal affecting background NO production, such as the NO precursor L-arginine, could control multiple aspects of the behavior.

  19. A epilepsia nos tumores cerebrais

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    Luís Marques-Assis

    1969-03-01

    Full Text Available De 411 casos de tumores cerebrais foram estudados 86 (19,4% que apresentaram manifestações epilépticas. A epilepsia foi estudada quanto à duração, ao tipo de manifestação e à severidade, em relação à natureza e à localização dos tumores cerebrais. A análise dos resultados permitiu aos autores chegarem às seguintes conclusões: 1 a epilepsia incidiu em 19,4% dos casos; 2 o oligodendroglioma, as metástases carcinomatosas e o glioblastoma multiforme foram, pela ordem, os tumores mais epileptogênicos; 3 as áreas frontal, parietal e temporal foram, nessa ordem, as localizações mais epileptogênicas; 4 os carcinomas metastáticos predominaram nos casos com epilepsia com menos de um ano de evolução, enquanto que os astrocitomas predominaram nos casos com mais de três anos; quanto à topografia, predominou a região frontal no primeiro grupo e a temporal, no segundo; 5 nas formas mais severas de epilepsia predominaram os oligodendrogliomas e os meningeomas, quanto à natureza, e a região frontotemporal e a foice, quanto à localização; 6 os craniofaringeomas e os meduloblastomas foram os tumores que mais freqüentemente determinaram o aparecimento de convulsões puras; nesses casos, a sela túrsica e a fossa posterior foram as sedes mais freqüentes; 7 os carcinomas metastáticos e os meningeomas, quanto à natureza, e as regiões frontoparietal e parietal, quanto à localização, foram os mais freqüentemente encontrados nos casos com crises de tipo bravais-jacksoniano.

  20. O luto profissional nos enfermeiros

    OpenAIRE

    Gama, Maria Georgeana Marques da

    2014-01-01

    O crescente contacto do enfermeiro com a morte em contexto profissional tem sido muitas vezes perspectivado num sentido negativo pelas dificuldades emocionais que desencadeia e pelas consequências de sobrecarga nos profissionais de saúde, conducentes a processos de evitamento relacional e de isolamento social e profissional. A exposição diária à morte e ao processo de morrer, para além da sobrecarga de luto, pode constituir-se num desafio ao crescimento pessoal e profissional dos enfermeiros....

  1. Paradoxical regulation of ChAT and nNOS expression in animal models of Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, John H; Li, Qingjie; Sarna, Sushil K

    2013-08-15

    Morphological and functional changes in the enteric nervous system (ENS) have been reported in inflammatory bowel disease. We examined the effects of inflammation on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nNOS in the muscularis externae of two models of colonic inflammation, trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis, which models Crohn's disease-like inflammation, and DSS-induced colitis, which models ulcerative Colitis-like inflammation. In TNBS colitis, we observed significant decline in ChAT, nNOS, and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 protein and mRNA levels. In DSS colitis, ChAT and PGP9.5 were significantly upregulated while nNOS levels did not change. The nNOS dimer-to-monomer ratio decreased significantly in DSS- but not in TNBS-induced colitis. No differences were observed in the percentage of either ChAT (31 vs. 33%)- or nNOS (37 vs. 41%)-immunopositive neurons per ganglia or the mean number of neurons per ganglia (55 ± 5 vs. 59 ± 5, P > 0.05). Incubation of the distal colon muscularis externae in vitro with different types of inflammatory mediators showed that cytokines decreased ChAT and nNOS expression, whereas H₂O₂, a component of oxidative stress, increased their expression. NF-κB inhibitor MG-132 did not prevent the IL-1β-induced decline in either ChAT or nNOS expression. These findings showed that TNBS- and DSS-induced inflammation differentially regulates the expression of two critical proteins expressed in the colonic myenteric neurons. These differences are likely due to the exposure of the myenteric plexus neurons to different combinations of Th1-type inflammatory mediators and H₂O₂ in each model.

  2. Juvenil neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, J R; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases which are characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipopigment in neuronal and extraneuronal cells. The diseases can be differentiated into several subgroups according to age of onset, the clinical picture...

  3. Bowel dysfunction following pullthrough surgery is associated with an overabundance of nitrergic neurons in Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lily S; Schwartz, Dana M; Hotta, Ryo; Graham, Hannah K; Goldstein, Allan M

    2016-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patients with Hirschsprung disease (HD) have abnormal neurotransmitter expression in the ganglionated proximal colon. These alterations may cause persistent bowel dysfunction even after pullthrough surgery. We sought to quantify the proportion of nitrergic neurons in the ganglionic colon of HD patients and relate these findings to functional outcome. The proximal resection margin from 17 patients with colonic HD who underwent a pullthrough procedure and colorectal tissue from 4 age-matched controls were immunohistochemically examined to quantify the proportion of nitrergic neurons. The incidence of constipation, incontinence, and enterocolitis in HD patients was assessed retrospectively and correlated with the proportion of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expressing neurons. Neuronal subtypes in the ganglionic colon of the Edrnb(-/-) mouse model of HD were also studied. Mice with HD had a significantly higher proportion of NOS+ neurons in ganglionic colon than normal littermates (32.0±5.6% vs. 19.8±1.2%, p<0.01). Patients with HD also had significantly more NOS+ neurons than controls (18.4±4.6% vs. 13.1±1.9%, p<0.01). Patients who experienced constipation or enterocolitis postoperatively tended toward a higher proportion of NOS+ neurons (21.4±3.9% vs. 17.1±4.1%, p=0.06). Furthermore, patients with a proportion of NOS+ neurons above the median of all HD patients (18.3%) were significantly more likely to have constipation than those below the median (75% vs. 14%, p<0.05). An overabundance of nitrergic neurons in the proximal resection margin is associated with HD and may predict bowel dysfunction following pullthrough surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Hypergravity-Induced Neuronal Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holstein, Gay R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to identify the neurons and circuits in the vestibular nuclei and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi that utilize nitric oxide (NO) for intercellular signaling during gravity-induced plasticity. This objective was pursued using histochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to localize NO-producing neurons and characterize the fine morphology of the cells in ground-based studies of normal rats, rats adapted to hypergravity, and rats adapted to hypergravity and then re-adapted to the 1G environment. NO-producing neurons were identified and studied using four methodologies: i) immunocytochemistry employing polyclonal antibodies directed against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to provide an indication of the capacity of a cell for NO production; ii) immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, to provide an indirect index of the enzyme's activity; iii) histochemistry based on the NADPH-diaphorase reaction, for fuI1 cytological visualization of neurons; and iv) double immunofluorescence to co-localize nNOS and L-citrulline in individual vestibular nuclei (VN) and neurons.

  5. Effects of long-term inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase on blood pressure and renin release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollerstam, A.; Skøtt, O.; Ek, J.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by neuronal NO-synthase (nNOS) in macula densa cells may be involved in the control of renin release. 7-Nitro indazole (7-NI) inhibits nNOS, and we investigated the effect of short- (4 days) and long-term (4 weeks) 7-NI treatment on blood pressure (BP), plasma renin con...

  6. Neuronal Nitric-Oxide Synthase Deficiency Impairs the Long-Term Memory of Olfactory Fear Learning and Increases Odor Generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Eloisa; Heldt, Scott A.; Fletcher, Max L.

    2013-01-01

    Experience-induced changes associated with odor learning are mediated by a number of signaling molecules, including nitric oxide (NO), which is predominantly synthesized by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brain. In the current study, we investigated the role of nNOS in the acquisition and retention of conditioned olfactory fear. Mice…

  7. Constitutive NOS uncoupling and NADPH oxidase upregulation in the penis of type 2 diabetic men with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicki, B; Burnett, A L

    2017-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) involves dysfunctional nitric oxide (NO) signaling and increased oxidative stress in the penis. However, the mechanisms of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) dysregulation, and the sources of oxidative stress, are not well defined, particularly at the human level. The objective of this study was to define whether uncoupled eNOS and nNOS, and NADPH oxidase upregulation, contribute to the pathogenesis of ED in T2DM men. Penile erectile tissue was obtained from 9 T2DM patients with ED who underwent penile prosthesis surgery for ED, and from six control patients without T2DM or ED who underwent penectomy for penile cancer. The dimer-to-monomer protein expression ratio, an indicator of uncoupling for both eNOS and nNOS, total protein expressions of eNOS and nNOS, as well as protein expressions of NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit gp91phox (an enzymatic source of oxidative stress) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE] and nitrotyrosine (markers of oxidative stress) were measured by western blot in this tissue. In the erectile tissue of T2DM men, eNOS and nNOS uncoupling and protein expressions of NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox, 4-HNE- and nitrotyrosine-modified proteins were significantly (p penis may involve uncoupled eNOS and nNOS and NADPH oxidase upregulation. Our description of molecular factors contributing to the pathogenesis of T2DM-associated ED at the human level is relevant to advancing clinically therapeutic approaches to restore erectile function in T2DM patients. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  8. Mutation screening of NOS1AP gene in a large sample of psychiatric patients and controls

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    Nygren Gudrun

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The gene encoding carboxyl-terminal PDZ ligand of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1AP is located on chromosome 1q23.3, a candidate region for schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD. Previous genetic and functional studies explored the role of NOS1AP in these psychiatric conditions, but only a limited number explored the sequence variability of NOS1AP. Methods We analyzed the coding sequence of NOS1AP in a large population (n = 280, including patients with schizophrenia (n = 72, ASD (n = 81 or OCD (n = 34, and in healthy volunteers controlled for the absence of personal or familial history of psychiatric disorders (n = 93. Results Two non-synonymous variations, V37I and D423N were identified in two families, one with two siblings with OCD and the other with two brothers with ASD. These rare variations apparently segregate with the presence of psychiatric conditions. Conclusions Coding variations of NOS1AP are relatively rare in patients and controls. Nevertheless, we report the first non-synonymous variations within the human NOS1AP gene that warrant further genetic and functional investigations to ascertain their roles in the susceptibility to psychiatric disorders.

  9. The complex contribution of NOS interneurons in the physiology of cerebrovascular regulation

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    Sonia eDuchemin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Following the discovery of the vasorelaxant properties of nitric oxide (NO by Furchgott and Ignarro, the finding by Bredt and coll. of a constitutively expressed NO synthase in neurons (nNOS led to the presumption that neuronal NO may control cerebrovascular functions. Consequently, numerous studies have sought to determine whether neuraly-derived NO is involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow. Anatomically, axons, dendrites or somata of NO neurons have been found to contact the basement membrane of blood vessels or perivascular astrocytes in all segments of the cortical microcirculation. Functionally, various experimental approaches support a role of neuronal NO in the maintenance of resting cerebral blood flow as well as in the vascular response to neuronal activity. Since decades, it has been assumed that neuronal NO simply diffuses to the local blood vessels and produce vasodilation through a cGMP-PKG dependent mechanism. However, NO is not the sole mediator of vasodilation in the cerebral microcirculation and is known to interact with a myriad of signaling pathways also involved in vascular control. In addition, cerebrovascular regulation is the result of a complex orchestration between all components of the neurovascular unit (i.e. neuronal, glial and vascular cells also known to produce NO. In this review article, the role of NO interneuron in the regulation of cortical microcirculation will be discussed in the context of the neurovascular unit.

  10. Neuronal nitric oxide inhibits intestinal smooth muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Anne-Marie; Venkataramana, Shriram; Miller, Kurtis G; Bennett, Brian M; Nair, Dileep G; Lourenssen, Sandra; Blennerhassett, Michael G

    2010-06-01

    Hyperplasia of smooth muscle contributes to the thickening of the intestinal wall that is characteristic of inflammation, but the mechanisms of growth control are unknown. Nitric oxide (NO) from enteric neurons expressing neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) might normally inhibit intestinal smooth muscle cell (ISMC) growth, and this was tested in vitro. In ISMC from the circular smooth muscle of the adult rat colon, chemical NO donors inhibited [(3)H]thymidine uptake in response to FCS, reducing this to baseline without toxicity. This effect was inhibited by the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ and potentiated by the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor zaprinast. Inhibition was mimicked by 8-bromo (8-Br)-cGMP, and ELISA measurements showed increased levels of cGMP but not cAMP in response to sodium nitroprusside. However, 8-Br-cAMP and cilostamide also showed inhibitory actions, suggesting an additional role for cAMP. Via a coculture model of ISMC and myenteric neurons, immunocytochemistry and image analysis showed that innervation reduced bromodeoxyuridine uptake by ISMC. Specific blockers of nNOS (7-NI, NAAN) significantly increased [(3)H]thymidine uptake in response to a standard stimulus, showing that nNOS activity normally inhibits ISMC growth. In vivo, nNOS axon number was reduced threefold by day 1 of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced rat colitis, preceding the hyperplasia of ISMC described earlier in this model. We conclude that NO can inhibit ISMC growth primarily via a cGMP-dependent mechanism. Functional evidence that NO derived from nNOS causes inhibition of ISMC growth in vitro predicts that the loss of nNOS expression in colitis contributes to ISMC hyperplasia in vivo.

  11. Effects of ascorbic acid supplementation in ileum myenteric neurons of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats Efeitos da suplementação do ácido ascórbico nos neurônios mientéricos do íleo de ratos diabéticos induzidos por estreptozootocina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. Silverio

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The exacerbation of the oxidative stress and of the polyol pathway which impair damage myenteric plexus are metabolic characteristics of diabetes. The ascorbic acid (AA is an antioxidant and an aldose reductase inhibitor, which may act as neuroprotector. The effects of AA supplementation on the density and cellular body profile area (CP of myenteric neurons in STZ-induced diabetes in rats were assessed. Four groups with five animals each were formed: normoglycemic (C; diabetic (D; AA-treated diabetic (DS and AA-treated normoglycemic (CS. Dosagen of 50mg of AA were given, three times a week, for each animal (group DS and CS. Ninety days later and after euthanasia, the ileum was collected and processed for the NADPH-diaphorase technique. There were no differences (P>0.05 in the neuronal density among the groups. The CP area was lower (PA exacerbação do estresse oxidativo e da via do poliol que comprometem o plexo mioentérico são alterações metabólicas características do diabetes. O ácido ascórbico (AA é antioxidante e inibidor da aldose redutase, podendo atuar como neuroprotetor. Verificaram-se os efeitos da suplementação com AA sobre o número e a área do perfil do corpo celular (PC de neurônios mioentéricos em ratos diabéticos induzidos por estreptozootocina. Formaram-se quatro grupos com cinco animais cada: normoglicêmico (C; diabético (D; diabético tratado com AA (DS; e normoglicêmico tratado com AA (CS. Três vezes por semana administrou-se 50mg de AA para cada animal (grupos DS e CS. Após 90 dias e eutanásia com tiopental, o íleo foi coletado e processado para a técnica da NADPH-diaforase. Não se observaram diferenças (P>0,05 na densidade neuronal entre os grupos. A área do PC foi menor (P<0,05 para os grupos DS e CS, com incidência maior de neurônios com área do PC superior a 200µm² para os grupos C e D. Concluiu-se que o AA não influenciou a densidade neuronal do íleo, mas foi neuroprotetor prevenindo o

  12. Endogenous angiotensin II modulates nNOS expression in renovascular hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M.C. Pereira

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO influences renal blood flow mainly as a result of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Nevertheless, it is unclear how nNOS expression is modulated by endogenous angiotensin II, an inhibitor of NO function. We tested the hypothesis that the angiotensin II AT1 receptor and oxidative stress mediated by NADPH oxidase contribute to the modulation of renal nNOS expression in two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C hypertensive rats. Experiments were performed on male Wistar rats (150 to 170 g body weight divided into 2K1C (N = 19 and sham-operated (N = 19 groups. nNOS expression in kidneys of 2K1C hypertensive rats (N = 9 was compared by Western blotting to that of 2K1C rats treated with low doses of the AT1 antagonist losartan (10 mg·kg-1·day-1; N = 5 or the superoxide scavenger tempol (0.2 mmol·kg-1·day-1; N = 5, which still remain hypertensive. After 28 days, nNOS expression was significantly increased by 1.7-fold in the clipped kidneys of 2K1C rats and by 3-fold in the non-clipped kidneys of 2K1C rats compared with sham rats, but was normalized by losartan. With tempol treatment, nNOS expression increased 2-fold in the clipped kidneys and 1.4-fold in the non-clipped kidneys compared with sham rats. The changes in nNOS expression were not followed by changes in the enzyme activity, as measured indirectly by the cGMP method. In conclusion, AT1 receptors and oxidative stress seem to be primary stimuli for increased nNOS expression, but this up-regulation does not result in higher enzyme activity.

  13. Light microscopical study of nitric oxide synthase I-positive neurons, including fibres in the vestibular nuclear complex of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papantchev, Vassil; Paloff, Adrian; Christova, Tatiana; Hinova-Palova, Dimka; Ovtscharoff, Wladimir

    2005-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a gaseous neurotransmitter that is synthesized by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase I (NOS I). At present, little is known of NOS I-positive neurons in the vestibular nuclear complex of the cat (VNCc). The aim of the present study was to examine the morphology, distribution patterns and interconnections of NOS I-positive neurons, including fibres in the VNCc. Five adult cats were used as experimental animals. All cats were anaesthetized and perfused transcardially. Brains were removed, postfixed, cut on a freezing microtome and stained in three different ways. Every third section was treated with the Nissl method, other sections were stained either histochemically for NADPH diaphorase or immunohistochemically for NOS I. The atlas of Berman (1928) was used for orientation in the morphometric study. NOS I-positive neurons and fibres were found in all parts of VNCc: medial vestibular nucleus (MVN); lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN); superior vestibular nucleus (SVN); inferior vestibular nucleus (IVN); X, Y, Z groups and Cajal's nucleus. The NOS I-positive neurons were classified according to their size (small, medium-sized, large neurons type I and type II) and their shape (oval, fusiform, triangular, pear-shaped, multipolar and irregular). In every nucleus, a specific neuronal population was observed. In SVN, a large number of interconnections between NOS I-positive neurons were identified. In MVN, chain-like rolls of small neurons were found. Tiny interconnections between MVN and mesencephalic reticular formation were present. Our data provide information on the morphology, distribution patterns and interconnections of NOS I-positive neurons in the VNCc and can be extrapolated to other mammals.

  14. Density and neurochemical profiles of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-expressing interneuron in the mouse basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaona; Liu, Chunhua; Wang, Xiaochen; Gao, Fei; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2017-05-15

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-expressing interneurons reside in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) of rodents. In the present study, we immunohistochemically analyzed nNOS-positive cells in the mouse BLA by focusing on their density, γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergicity, and co-localization with calcium-binding proteins and neuropeptides. The density of nNOS-containing neurons was analyzed with unbiased stereology. Experiments were conducted in both adult wild-type C57BL/6 and glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescence protein (GAD67-GFP) knock-in mice, in which GFP is expressed in GABAergic neurons under the control of the endogenous GAD67 gene promoter. In the BLA, the density of nNOS-positive cells was 3.92×103cells/mm3. Immunofluorescence revealed that nNOS-containing neurons constituted almost 26.93±2.36% of the GAD67-GFP neurons. Almost every nNOS-positive cell expressed glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65). Proportions of nNOS-positive interneurons that expressed calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were approximately 5.20%, 15.63%, 26.50%, 87.50% and 88.00%, respectively; but exhibited no co-localization with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. By contrast, percentages of calbindin, calretinin, parvalbumin, somatostatin and neuropeptide Y-positive cells that expressed nNOS were approximately 1.93%, 7.25%, 25.25%, 80.25% and 87.50%, respectively. Together, these findings suggest that nNOS-expressing cells are a discrete interneuronal subpopulation in the mouse BLA and may play a functional role in the inhibitory circuitry of this brain region. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Inducible and neuronal nitric oxide synthases exert contrasting effects during rat intestinal recovery following fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Junta; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Machida, Naomi; Ohtake, Kazuo; Saito, Yuki; Kobayashi, Jun

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the effects of endogenous inducible (iNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase on recovery from intestinal mucosal atrophy caused by fasting-induced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation during refeeding in rats. Rats were divided into five groups, one of which was fed ad libitum, and four of which underwent 72 h of fasting, followed by refeeding for 0, 6, 24, and 48 h, respectively. iNOS and neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein levels in jejunal tissues were measured, and mucosal height was histologically evaluated. Apoptotic indices, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) transcription levels, nitrite levels (as a measure of nitric oxide [NO] production),8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine formation (indicating reactive oxygen species [ROS] levels), crypt cell proliferation, and the motility indices (MI) were also estimated. Associations between mucosal height and NOS protein levels were determined using Spearman's rank correlation test. Notably, we observed significant increases in mucosal height and in neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein expression as refeeding time increased. Indeed, there was a significant positive correlation between neuronal nitric oxide synthase protein level and mucosal height during the 48-h refeeding period ( r = 0.725, P fasting. Our finding suggests that refeeding likely repairs fasting-induced jejunal atrophy by suppressing iNOS expression and subsequently inhibiting NO, ROS, and IFN-γ as apoptosis mediators, and by promoting neuronal nitric oxide synthase production and inducing crypt cell proliferation via mechanical stimulation. Impact statement Besides providing new data confirming the involvement of iNOS and nNOS in intestinal mucosal atrophy caused by fasting, this study details their expression and function during recovery from this condition following refeeding. We demonstrate a significant negative correlation between iNOS and nNOS levels during refeeding, and associate this with cell proliferation

  16. Depressed nNOS expression during spine transition in the developing hippocampus of FMR1 KO mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, synthesized as needed by NO synthase (NOS, is involved in spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Immature spine morphology is characteristic of fragile X syndrome (FXS. The objective of this research was to investigate and compare changes of postnatal neuronal NOS (nNOS expression in the hippocampus of male fragile X mental retardation 1 gene knockout mice (FMR1 KO mice, the animal model of FXS and male wild-type mice (WT at postnatal day 7 (P7, P14, P21, and P28. nNOS mRNA levels were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (N = 4-7 and nNOS protein was estimated by Western blot (N = 3 and immunohistochemistry (N = 1. In the PCR assessment, primers 5’-GTGGCCATCGTGTCCTACCATAC-3’ and 5’-GTTTCGAGGCAGGTGGAAGCTA-3’ were used for the detection of nNOS and primers 5’-CCGTTTCTCCTGGCTCAGTTTA-3’ and 5’-CCCCAATACCACATCATCCAT-3’ were used for the detection of β-actin. Compared to the WT group, nNOS mRNA expression was significantly decreased in FMR1 KO mice at P21 (KO: 0.2857 ± 0.0150, WT: 0.5646 ± 0.0657; P < 0.05. Consistently, nNOS immunoreactivity also revealed reduced staining intensity at P21 in the FMR1 KO group. Western blot analysis validated the immunostaining results by demonstrating a significant reduction in nNOS protein levels in the FMR1 KO group compared to the WT group at P21 (KO: 0.3015 ± 0.0897, WT: 1.7542 ± 0.5455; P < 0.05. These results suggest that nNOS was involved in the postnatal development of the hippocampus in FXS and impaired NO production may retard spine maturation in FXS.

  17. Depressed nNOS expression during spine transition in the developing hippocampus of FMR1 KO mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qin; Zhu, Zhiwei; Xu, Jialu [Department of Children' s Health Care, Children' s Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang (China); Gu, Weizhong [Department of Pathology, Children' s Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang (China); Zhao, Zhengyan [Department of Children' s Health Care, Children' s Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou Zhejiang (China)

    2012-10-05

    Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized as needed by NO synthase (NOS), is involved in spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Immature spine morphology is characteristic of fragile X syndrome (FXS). The objective of this research was to investigate and compare changes of postnatal neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression in the hippocampus of male fragile X mental retardation 1 gene knockout mice (FMR1 KO mice, the animal model of FXS) and male wild-type mice (WT) at postnatal day 7 (P7), P14, P21, and P28. nNOS mRNA levels were analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR (N = 4-7) and nNOS protein was estimated by Western blot (N = 3) and immunohistochemistry (N = 1). In the PCR assessment, primers 5′-GTGGCCATCGTGTCCTACCATAC-3′ and 5′-GTTTCGAGGCAGGTGGAAGCTA-3′ were used for the detection of nNOS and primers 5′-CCGTTTCTCCTGGCTCAGTTTA-3′ and 5′-CCCCAATACCACATCATCCAT-3′ were used for the detection of β-actin. Compared to the WT group, nNOS mRNA expression was significantly decreased in FMR1 KO mice at P21 (KO: 0.2857 ± 0.0150, WT: 0.5646 ± 0.0657; P < 0.05). Consistently, nNOS immunoreactivity also revealed reduced staining intensity at P21 in the FMR1 KO group. Western blot analysis validated the immunostaining results by demonstrating a significant reduction in nNOS protein levels in the FMR1 KO group compared to the WT group at P21 (KO: 0.3015 ± 0.0897, WT: 1.7542 ± 0.5455; P < 0.05). These results suggest that nNOS was involved in the postnatal development of the hippocampus in FXS and impaired NO production may retard spine maturation in FXS.

  18. NEURON and Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  19. PODE A ARTE NOS SALVAR?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Rizério de Almeida e Pessoa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento do caráter técnico-científico-industrial da civilização moderna trouxe consigo um renovado interesse em se discutir o homem e seu lugar no mundo. Durante o século XX, seja na arte, literatura ou filosofia, não faltaram vozes anunciando para o futuro o fim do homem ou a submissão de seu pensamento a níveis cada vez maiores de alienação. O interesse ou mesmo a necessidade de se questionar um modo de resistência capaz de trazer o homem de volta a si mesmo deu origem a diferentes leituras acerca do lugar do homem no mundo moderno. Entre elas, destacamos a interpretação da essência humana desenvolvida por Martin Heidegger. Segundo o autor alemão, cumpre-nos romper com o tradicional paradigma da subjetividade, que orientou o modo como a modernidade entendeu o ser do homem. Ora, a intenção dessa pesquisa é justamente demarcar as consequências dessa ruptura com a subjetividade para a compreensão do homem e enfim problematizar as suas implicações teóricas ou filosóficas mais gerais. De fato, desde que o homem se arvorou o título de “senhor da terra” parece que ele se encontra em todos oslugares, quando, na verdade, é justamente no domínio da técnica que ele se encontra o mais distante de si mesmo ou de sua essência. Para reencontrar-se consigo mesmo, faz-se necessário a preparação para o advento do novo homem, e está reservada à arte, ao que parece, abrir caminhos na densa floresta que separa o homem de sua autenticidade. Cabe a nós, portanto, questionar se e em que medida a arte pode cumprir essa tarefa, ou se, ao contrário, estamos esperando dela mais do que pode oferecer.

  20. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Water Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have water temperature data. *These services are for testing and evaluation...

  1. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Air Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have air temperature data. *These services are for testing and evaluation...

  2. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL - Water Level

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have water surface height above a reference datum. *These services are for...

  3. Transcriptional coupling of synaptic transmission and energy metabolism: role of nuclear respiratory factor 1 in co-regulating neuronal nitric oxide synthase and cytochrome c oxidase genes in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Shilpa S; Liang, Huan Ling; Wong-Riley, Margaret T T

    2009-10-01

    Neuronal activity is highly dependent on energy metabolism; yet, the two processes have traditionally been regarded as independently regulated at the transcriptional level. Recently, we found that the same transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) co-regulates an important energy-generating enzyme, cytochrome c oxidase, as well as critical subunits of glutamatergic receptors. The present study tests our hypothesis that the co-regulation extends to the next level of glutamatergic synapses, namely, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, which generates nitric oxide as a downstream signaling molecule. Using in silico analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation, promoter mutations, and NRF-1 silencing, we documented that NRF-1 functionally bound to Nos1, but not Nos2 (inducible) and Nos3 (endothelial) gene promoters. Both COX and Nos1 transcripts were up-regulated by depolarizing KCl treatment and down-regulated by TTX-mediated impulse blockade in neurons. However, NRF-1 silencing blocked the up-regulation of both Nos1 and COX induced by KCl depolarization, and over-expression of NRF-1 rescued both Nos1 and COX transcripts down-regulated by TTX. These findings are consistent with our hypothesis that synaptic neuronal transmission and energy metabolism are tightly coupled at the molecular level.

  4. Hydrophilic, Potent, and Selective 7-Substituted 2-Aminoquinolines as Improved Human Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensa, Anthony V; Cinelli, Maris A; Li, Huiying; Chreifi, Georges; Mukherjee, Paramita; Roman, Linda J; Martásek, Pavel; Poulos, Thomas L; Silverman, Richard B

    2017-08-24

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is a target for development of antineurodegenerative agents. Most nNOS inhibitors mimic l-arginine and have poor bioavailability. 2-Aminoquinolines showed promise as bioavailable nNOS inhibitors but suffered from low human nNOS inhibition, low selectivity versus human eNOS, and significant binding to other CNS targets. We aimed to improve human nNOS potency and selectivity and reduce off-target binding by (a) truncating the original scaffold or (b) introducing a hydrophilic group to interrupt the lipophilic, promiscuous pharmacophore and promote interaction with human nNOS-specific His342. We synthesized both truncated and polar 2-aminoquinoline derivatives and assayed them against recombinant NOS enzymes. Although aniline and pyridine derivatives interact with His342, benzonitriles conferred the best rat and human nNOS inhibition. Both introduction of a hydrophobic substituent next to the cyano group and aminoquinoline methylation considerably improved isoform selectivity. Most importantly, these modifications preserved Caco-2 permeability and reduced off-target CNS binding.

  5. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling in mouse NO-synthesizing neurons participates in the hypothalamic control of ovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchate, Naresh Kumar; Parkash, Jyoti; Bellefontaine, Nicole; Mazur, Danièle; Colledge, William H; d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Prevot, Vincent

    2012-01-18

    Reproduction is controlled in the brain by a neural network that drives the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Various permissive homeostatic signals must be integrated to achieve ovulation in mammals. However, the neural events controlling the timely activation of GnRH neurons are not completely understood. Here we show that kisspeptin, a potent activator of GnRH neuronal activity, directly communicates with neurons that synthesize the gaseous transmitter nitric oxide (NO) in the preoptic region to coordinate the progression of the ovarian cycle. Using a transgenic Gpr54-null IRES-LacZ knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate that neurons containing neuronal NO synthase (nNOS), which are morphologically associated with kisspeptin fibers, express the kisspeptin receptor GPR54 in the preoptic region, but not in the tuberal region of the hypothalamus. The activation of kisspeptin signaling in preoptic neurons promotes the activation of nNOS through its phosphorylation on serine 1412 via the AKT pathway and mimics the positive feedback effects of estrogens. Finally, we show that while NO release restrains the reproductive axis at stages of the ovarian cycle during which estrogens exert their inhibitory feedback, it is required for the kisspeptin-dependent preovulatory activation of GnRH neurons. Thus, interactions between kisspeptin and nNOS neurons may play a central role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in vivo.

  6. Neurochemical features of endomorphin-2-containing neurons in the submucosal plexus of the rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Ping; Zhang, Ting; Gao, Chang-Jun; Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Jiao, Xu-Wen; Zhang, Lian-Xiang; Wu, Zhen-Yu; He, Zhong-Yi; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-09-14

    To investigate the distribution and neurochemical phenotype of endomorphin-2 (EM-2)-containing neurons in the submucosal plexus of the rat colon. The mid-colons between the right and left flexures were removed from rats, and transferred into Kreb's solution. For whole-mount preparations, the mucosal, outer longitudinal muscle and inner circular muscle layers of the tissues were separated from the submucosal layer attached to the submucosal plexus. The whole-mount preparations from each rat mid-colon were mounted onto seven gelatin-coated glass slides, and processed for immunofluorescence histochemical double-staining of EM-2 with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). After staining, all the fluorescence-labeled sections were observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope. To estimate the extent of the co-localization of EM-2 with CGRP, ChAT, NOS, NSE, SP and VIP, ganglia, which have a clear boundary and neuronal cell outline, were randomly selected from each specimen for this analysis. In the submucosal plexus of the mid-colon, many EM-2-immunoreactive (IR) and NSE-IR neuronal cell bodies were found in the submucosal plexus of the rat mid-colon. Approximately 6 ± 4.2 EM-2-IR neurons aggregated within each ganglion and a few EM-2-IR neurons were also found outside the ganglia. The EM-2-IR neurons were also immunopositive for ChAT, SP, VIP or NOS. EM-2-IR nerve fibers coursed near ChAT-IR neurons, and some of these fibers were even distributed around ChAT-IR neuronal cell bodies. Some EM-2-IR neuronal cell bodies were surrounded by SP-IR nerve fibers, but many long processes connecting adjacent ganglia were negative for EM-2 immunostaining. Long VIP-IR processes with many branches coursed through the ganglia and surrounded the EM-2-IR neurons. The percentages of the EM-2-IR neurons that were also positive for

  7. DA Negatively Regulates IGF-I Actions Implicated in Cognitive Function via Interaction of PSD95 and nNOS in Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidan Ding

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I has been positively correlated with cognitive ability. Cognitive decline in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE was shown to be induced by elevated intracranial dopamine (DA. The beneficial effect of IGF-I signaling in MHE remains unknown. In this study, we found that IGF-I content was reduced in MHE rats and that IGF-I administration mitigated cognitive decline of MHE rats. A protective effect of IGF-I on the DA-induced interaction between postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS was found in neurons. Ribosomal S6 protein kinase (RSK phosphorylated nNOS in response to IGF-I by recruiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2. In turn, DA inactivated the ERK1/2/RSK pathway and stimulated the PSD95–nNOS interaction by downregulating IGF-I. Inhibition of the interaction between PSD95 and nNOS ameliorated DA-induced memory impairment. As DA induced deficits in the ERK1/2/RSK pathway and the interaction between PSD95 and nNOS in MHE brains, IGF-I administration exerted a protective effect via interruption of the interaction between PSD95 and nNOS. These results suggest that IGF-I antagonizes DA-induced cognitive loss by disrupting PSD95–nNOS interactions in MHE.

  8. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  9. Preferential expression of an AAV-2 construct in NOS-positive interneurons following intrastriatal injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Mihaela; Walker, Paul D; Bouhamdan, Mohamad; Quinn, John P; Bannon, Michael J

    2005-11-18

    Most CNS studies using recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (rAAV-2) vectors have focused on gene delivery for the purpose of gene therapy. In the present study, we examined the feasibility of using rAAV-2 vectors to study the regulation of preprotachykinin-A (PPT-A) promoter activity in striatal medium spiny projection neurons. An rAAV-2 vector incorporating a PPT promoter fragment (shown previously to confer some cell-specificity of expression in vitro) coupled to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene was stereotaxically injected into the rat striatum. Since medium spiny projection neurons represent the predominant neuronal type (90-95%) in the striatum, we predicted that the vast majority of GFP-expressing cells would be of this phenotype. Surprisingly, the transgene was actually expressed in a similar number of medium spiny projection neurons and interneurons, while glial expression of GFP was not observed. A preponderance of GFP-expressing interneurons was immunoreactive for the marker neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Our results suggest that viral vector-related events that occur during transduction are the determining factor in the pattern of transgene expression observed, while the influence of the transgene promoter appears to be secondary, at least under the conditions employed.

  10. Anticonvulsion effect of acupuncture might be related to the decrease of neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R; Huang, Z N; Cheng, J S

    1999-01-01

    To measure the levels of hippocampal nitric oxide synthase isoforms in penicillin induced epilepsy and to test the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on changes of these levels during epilepsy, we injected penicillin into rat hippocampus to make an epilepsy model and performed electroacupuncture treatment on "Feng Fu" (DU 16) and "Jin Suo" (DU 8) points in Wistar rats. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA levels of rat hippocampus were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) mRNA markedly increased (pepilepsy, whereas no significant change in epithelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mRNA was observed. EA inhibited the epilepsy and decreased nNOS (pepilepsy caused an increase in nNOS and iNOS, and the EA anticonvulsant effect might be related to the decrease of these nitric oxide synthases.

  11. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  12. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; Schaik, André van; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems...

  13. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  14. Correlated NOS-Imu and myf5 expression by satellite cells in mdx mouse muscle regeneration during NOS manipulation and deflazacort treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Judy E; Vargas, Cinthya

    2003-06-01

    Satellite cells, muscle precursor cells in skeletal muscle, are normally quiescent and become activated by disease or injury. A lack of dystrophin and changes in the expression or activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS-I) affect the timing of activation in vivo. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition delays muscle repair in normal mice, and worsens muscular dystrophy in the mdx mouse, a genetic homologue of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, the potential role of activation and repair events mediated by nitric oxide in determining the outcome of steroid or other treatments for muscular dystrophy is not clear. We tested the hypothesis that the extent of repair in dystrophic muscles of mdx mice is partly dependent on NOS-Imu expression and activity. Myotube formation in regenerating muscle was promoted by deflazacort treatment of mdx dystrophic mice (PImu mRNA expression and activity were present in satellite cells and very new myotubes of regenerating and dystrophic muscle. Deflazacort treatment resulted in increased NOS-Imu expression in regenerating muscles in a strong and specific correlation with myf5 expression (r=0.95, PImu and myf5 expression in the diaphragm without affecting the diameter of non-regenerating fibres. These in vivo studies suggest that gains in NOS-Imu expression and nitric oxide synthase activity in satellite cells can increase the extent and speed of repair, even in the absence of dystrophin in muscle fibres. NOS-Imu may be a useful therapeutic target to augment the effects of steroidal or other treatments of muscular dystrophy.

  15. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Visser Sid; van Gils Stephan A

    2014-01-01

    We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behaviour intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting Izhikevich neurons. In both cases, the lumped model is compared with the spiking network. There is excellent agreement in terms of duration and number of action potentials within the bursts, but there is ...

  16. Localization of Nitric Oxide Synthase-containing Neurons in the Bat Visual Cortex and Co-localization with Calcium-binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ya-Nan; Kim, Hang-Gu; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2015-08-27

    Microchiroptera (microbats) is a suborder of bats thought to have degenerated vision. However, many recent studies have shown that they have visual ability. In this study, we labeled neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-the synthesizing enzyme of the gaseous non-synaptic neurotransmitter nitric oxide-and co-localized it with calbindin D28K (CB), calretinin (CR), and parvalbumin (PV) in the visual cortex of the greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum, a species of microbats). nNOS-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were found in all layers of the visual cortex. Intensely labeled neurons were most common in layer IV, and weakly labeled neurons were most common in layer VI. Majority of the nNOS-IR neurons were round- or oval-type neurons; no pyramidal-type neurons were found. None of these neurons co-localized with CB, CR, or PV. However, the synthesis of nitric oxide in the bat visual cortex by nNOS does not depend on CB, CR, or PV.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cardiac function and pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin Hua; Jin, Chun Zi; Jang, Ji Hyun; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS or NOS1) is the major endogenous source of myocardial nitric oxide (NO), which facilitates cardiac relaxation and modulates contraction. In the healthy heart it regulates intracellular Ca2+, signalling pathways and oxidative homeostasis and is upregulated from early phases upon pathogenic insult. nNOS plays pivotal roles in protecting the myocardium from increased oxidative stress, systolic/diastolic dysfunction, adverse structural remodelling and arrhythmias in the failing heart. Here, we show that the downstream target proteins of nNOS and underlying post-transcriptional modifications are shifted during disease progression from Ca2+-handling proteins [e.g. PKA-dependent phospholamban phosphorylation (PLN-Ser16)] in the healthy heart to cGMP/PKG-dependent PLN-Ser16 with acute angiotensin II (Ang II) treatment. In early hypertension, nNOS-derived NO is involved in increases of cGMP/PKG-dependent troponin I (TnI-Ser23/24) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMBP-C-Ser273). However, nNOS-derived NO is shown to increase S-nitrosylation of various Ca2+-handling proteins in failing myocardium. The spatial compartmentation of nNOS and its translocation for diverse binding partners in the diseased heart or various nNOS splicing variants and regulation in response to pathological stress may be responsible for varied underlying mechanisms and functions. In this review, we endeavour to outline recent advances in knowledge of the molecular mechanisms mediating the functions of nNOS in the myocardium in both normal and diseased hearts. Insights into nNOS gene regulation in various tissues are discussed. Overall, nNOS is an important cardiac protector in the diseased heart. The dynamic localization and various mediating mechanisms of nNOS ensure that it is able to regulate functions effectively in the heart under stress. PMID:24756636

  18. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  19. nNOS is involved in cardiac remodeling induced by chronic ethanol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Susana M; Silva, Sérgio; Meireles, Manuela; Leal, Sandra

    2015-03-02

    Chronic ethanol consumption has deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system by directly damaging the myocardial structure and/or by neurohormonal activation. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO) derived from neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) seems to be important to balance the harmful effects of ethanol consumption, because it influences several aspects of cardiac physiology and attenuates pathological cardiac remodeling. However, the impact of chronic ethanol consumption on nNOS expression is unknown. We address this subject in the present study by evaluating whether chronic ethanol consumption induces cardiac remodeling and hypertension, and if these changes are associated with alterations in the expression of nNOS. Male Wistar rats were examined after ingesting a 20% alcohol solution for 6 months. Blood alcohol concentration and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels were measured. The cardiac remodeling was assessed by histomorphometric analysis and the nNOS expression was evaluated by immunofluorescence and western blot analysis. Our results show that chronic ethanol consumption induces cardiac remodeling, namely thinning of left ventricular wall, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and increased fibrosis, and elevations of arterial blood pressure. They also show that in rats fed with ethanol for 6 months, the circulating BNP levels had decreased as well as the expression of nNOS in left ventricle cardiomyocytes. These findings suggest that the effects of chronic ethanol consumption on BNP levels and/or on nNOS expression in cardiomyocytes may contribute to aggravate the cardiac remodeling and leads to progression of cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of neuronal populations in the human trigeminal ganglion and their association with latent herpes simplex virus-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Flowerdew

    Full Text Available Following primary infection Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 establishes lifelong latency in the neurons of human sensory ganglia. Upon reactivation HSV-1 can cause neurological diseases such as facial palsy, vestibular neuritis or encephalitis. Certain populations of sensory neurons have been shown to be more susceptible to latent infection in the animal model, but this has not been addressed in human tissue. In the present study, trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons expressing six neuronal marker proteins were characterized, based on staining with antibodies against the GDNF family ligand receptor Ret, the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TrkA, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS, the antibody RT97 against 200 kDa neurofilament, calcitonin gene-related peptide and peripherin. The frequencies of marker-positive neurons and their average neuronal sizes were assessed, with TrkA-positive (61.82% neurons being the most abundant, and Ret-positive (26.93% the least prevalent. Neurons positive with the antibody RT97 (1253 µm(2 were the largest, and those stained against peripherin (884 µm(2 were the smallest. Dual immunofluorescence revealed at least a 4.5% overlap for every tested marker combination, with overlap for the combinations TrkA/Ret, TrkA/RT97 and Ret/nNOS lower, and the overlap between Ret/CGRP being higher than would be expected by chance. With respect to latent HSV-1 infection, latency associated transcripts (LAT were detected using in situ hybridization (ISH in neurons expressing each of the marker proteins. In contrast to the mouse model, co-localization with neuronal markers Ret or CGRP mirrored the magnitude of these neuron populations, whereas for the other four neuronal markers fewer marker-positive cells were also LAT-ISH+. Ret and CGRP are both known to label neurons related to pain signaling.

  1. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice have impaired Renin release but normal blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sällström, Johan; Carlström, Mattias; Jensen, Boye L

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundNitric oxide deficiency is involved in the development of hypertension, but the mechanisms are currently unclear. This study was conducted to further elucidate the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in blood pressure regulation and renin release in relation to different sodiu...

  2. TNF-α antagonism with etanercept enhances penile NOS expression, cavernosal reactivity, and testosterone levels in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtaş Şahin, Tuğçe; Yazir, Yusufhan; Utkan, Tijen; Gacar, Gulcin; Furat Rençber, Selenay; Gocmez, Semil Selcen

    2018-02-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) has been reported to be associated with inflammation. This study investigated the effects of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor etanercept on penile neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expressions, testosterone concentrations, neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxations of corpus cavernosum (CC), and circulating and cavernosal levels of inflammatory markers in aged rats. Animals were separated into control, aged, and etanercept-treated aged groups. Aged rats displayed significantly increased serum and cavernosal TNF-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) levels, and decreased penile nNOS and eNOS expressions and serum testosterone levels compared with controls. In etanercept-treated aged group, NOS expressions were similar to that of the control group. The circulating and cavernosal concentrations of TNF-α, CRP, MCP-1, ICAM-1, and testosterone were also normalized by etanercept. Neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxant responses significantly decreased in aged rats and etanercept treatment markedly improved these relaxation responses. Our findings indicate that aging decreases penile NOS expression, neurogenic and endothelium-dependent relaxations of CC, and also suppresses serum testosterone levels by inducing inflammatory response that may contribute to the development of ED. TNF-α antagonism may be a novel strategy to treat aging-associated ED.

  3. Diabetes-Related Induction of the Heme Oxygenase System and Enhanced Colocalization of Heme Oxygenase 1 and 2 with Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in Myenteric Neurons of Different Intestinal Segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalitha Chandrakumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increase in hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress and decreased effectiveness of endogenous defense mechanisms plays an essential role in the initiation of diabetes-related neuropathy. We demonstrated that nitrergic myenteric neurons display different susceptibilities to diabetic damage in different gut segments. Therefore, we aim to reveal the gut segment-specific differences in the expression of heme oxygenase (HO isoforms and the colocalization of these antioxidants with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS in myenteric neurons. After ten weeks, samples from the duodenum, ileum, and colon of control and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were processed for double-labelling fluorescent immunohistochemistry and ELISA. The number of both HO-immunoreactive and nNOS/HO-immunoreactive myenteric neurons was the lowest in the ileal and the highest in the colonic ganglia of controls; it increased the most extensively in the ileum and was also elevated in the colon of diabetics. Although the total number of nitrergic neurons decreased in all segments, the proportion of nNOS-immunoreactive neurons colocalizing with HOs was enhanced robustly in the ileum and colon of diabetics. We presume that those nitrergic neurons which do not colocalize with HOs are the most seriously affected by diabetic damage. Therefore, the regional induction of the HO system is strongly correlated with diabetes-related region-specific nitrergic neuropathy.

  4. Neuronal avalanches and learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangelis, Lucilla de, E-mail: dearcangelis@na.infn.it [Department of Information Engineering and CNISM, Second University of Naples, 81031 Aversa (Italy)

    2011-05-01

    Networks of living neurons represent one of the most fascinating systems of biology. If the physical and chemical mechanisms at the basis of the functioning of a single neuron are quite well understood, the collective behaviour of a system of many neurons is an extremely intriguing subject. Crucial ingredient of this complex behaviour is the plasticity property of the network, namely the capacity to adapt and evolve depending on the level of activity. This plastic ability is believed, nowadays, to be at the basis of learning and memory in real brains. Spontaneous neuronal activity has recently shown features in common to other complex systems. Experimental data have, in fact, shown that electrical information propagates in a cortex slice via an avalanche mode. These avalanches are characterized by a power law distribution for the size and duration, features found in other problems in the context of the physics of complex systems and successful models have been developed to describe their behaviour. In this contribution we discuss a statistical mechanical model for the complex activity in a neuronal network. The model implements the main physiological properties of living neurons and is able to reproduce recent experimental results. Then, we discuss the learning abilities of this neuronal network. Learning occurs via plastic adaptation of synaptic strengths by a non-uniform negative feedback mechanism. The system is able to learn all the tested rules, in particular the exclusive OR (XOR) and a random rule with three inputs. The learning dynamics exhibits universal features as function of the strength of plastic adaptation. Any rule could be learned provided that the plastic adaptation is sufficiently slow.

  5. NMDA antagonist, but not nNOS inhibitor, requires AMPA receptors in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) to induce antidepressant-like effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, V. S.; Wegener, Gregers; Joca, S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Depressed individuals and stressed animals show enhanced levels of glutamate and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity in limbic structures, including the vmPFC. Systemic administration of glutamatergic NMDA receptor antagonists or inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis induces antide...

  6. Post-translational Regulation of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase: Implications for sympatho-excitatory states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neeru M; Patel, Kaushik P

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized via neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) plays a significant role in regulation/modulation of autonomic control of circulation. Various pathological states are associated with diminished nNOS expression and blunted autonomic effects of NO in the central nervous system (CNS) including heart failure, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure etc. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanism/s involved in dysregulation of nNOS is essential to understand the pathogenesis of increased sympathoexcitation in these diseased states. Areas Covered nNOS is a highly regulated enzyme, being regulated at transcriptional and posttranslational levels via protein-protein interactions and modifications viz. phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and sumoylation. The enzyme activity of nNOS also depends on the optimal concentration of substrate, cofactors and association with regulatory proteins. This review focuses on the posttranslational regulation of nNOS in the context of normal and diseased states within the CNS. Expert Opinion Gaining insight into the mechanism/s involved in the regulation of nNOS would provide novel strategies for manipulating nNOS directed therapeutic modalities in the future, including catalytically active dimer stabilization and protein-protein interactions with intracellular protein effectors. Ultimately, this is expected to provide tools to improve autonomic dysregulation in various diseases such as heart failure, hypertension, and diabetes. PMID:27885874

  7. Phenyl Ether- and Aniline-Containing 2-Aminoquinolines as Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinelli, Maris A; Li, Huiying; Pensa, Anthony V; Kang, Soosung; Roman, Linda J; Martásek, Pavel; Poulos, Thomas L; Silverman, Richard B

    2015-11-12

    Excess nitric oxide (NO) produced by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is implicated in neurodegenerative disorders. As a result, inhibition of nNOS and reduction of NO levels is desirable therapeutically, but many nNOS inhibitors are poorly bioavailable. Promising members of our previously reported 2-aminoquinoline class of nNOS inhibitors, although orally bioavailable and brain-penetrant, suffer from unfavorable off-target binding to other CNS receptors, and they resemble known promiscuous binders. Rearranged phenyl ether- and aniline-linked 2-aminoquinoline derivatives were therefore designed to (a) disrupt the promiscuous binding pharmacophore and diminish off-target interactions and (b) preserve potency, isoform selectivity, and cell permeability. A series of these compounds was synthesized and tested against purified nNOS, endothelial NOS (eNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS) enzymes. One compound, 20, displayed high potency, selectivity, and good human nNOS inhibition, and retained some permeability in a Caco-2 assay. Most promisingly, CNS receptor counterscreening revealed that this rearranged scaffold significantly reduces off-target binding.

  8. Distribution and chemical coding of sensory neurons innervating the skin of the porcine hindlimb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Anna; Mikołajczyk, Anita; Adamiak, Zbigniew; Majewski, Mariusz

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish the origin and chemical phenotyping of neurons involved in skin innervation of the porcine hind leg. The dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) of the lumbar (L4-L6) and sacral (S1-S3) spinal nerves were visualized using the fluorescent tracer Fast Blue (FB). The morphometric analysis of FB-positive (FB+)neurons showed that in the L4, L5, S1 and S2 DRGs, the small-sized perikarya constituted the major population, whereas in the L6 and S3 DRGs the medium-sized cells made up the major population. In all these ganglia, large-sized FB+ perikarya constituted only a small percentage of all FB+ neurons. Immunohistochemistry revealed that small- and medium-sized FB+ perikarya contained sensory markers such as: substance P (SP), calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and galanin (GAL); as well as various other factors such as somatostatin (SOM), calbindin-D28k (CB), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Meanwhile large-sized FB+ perikarya usually expressed SP, CGRP or PACAP. In the lumbar DRGs, some large cells also contained SOM and CB. Double-labeling immunohistochemistry showed that SP-positive neurons co-expressed CGRP, GAL or PACAP; while PACAP-positive cells co-expressed GAL or nNOS. Neurons stained for SOM were also immunoreactive for CB or GAL, while neurons stained for nNOS were also immunoreactive for GAL. In conclusion, the present data has indicated that the distribution and chemical phenotyping of the porcine skin-projecting neurons are different within DRGs of the lumbar (forming a femoral nerve) and sacral (forming a sciatic nerve) spinal nerves. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  10. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Sid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behavior intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting Izhikevich neurons. In both cases, the lumped model is compared with the spiking network. There is excellent agreement in terms of duration and number of action potentials within the bursts, but there is a slight mismatch of the burst frequency. The lumped model accurately accounts for both intrinsic bursting and post inhibitory rebound potentials in the neuron model, features which are absent in prevalent neural mass models.

  11. Stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a large number of open problems in the theory of stochastic neural systems, with the aim of enticing probabilists to work on them. This includes problems arising from stochastic models of individual neurons as well as those arising from stochastic models of the activities of small and large networks of interconnected neurons. The necessary neuroscience background to these problems is outlined within the text, so readers can grasp the context in which they arise. This book will be useful for graduate students and instructors providing material and references for applying probability to stochastic neuron modeling. Methods and results are presented, but the emphasis is on questions where additional stochastic analysis may contribute neuroscience insight. An extensive bibliography is included. Dr. Priscilla E. Greenwood is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lawrence M. Ward is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Brain...

  12. Imaging voltage in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterka, Darcy S.; Takahashi, Hiroto; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, imaging membrane potential has become a fruitful approach to study neural circuits, especially in invertebrate preparations with large, resilient neurons. At the same time, particularly in mammalian preparations, voltage imaging methods suffer from poor signal to noise and secondary side effects, and they fall short of providing single-cell resolution when imaging of the activity of neuronal populations. As an introduction to these techniques, we briefly review different voltage imaging methods (including organic fluorophores, SHG chromophores, genetic indicators, hybrid, nanoparticles and intrinsic approaches), and illustrate some of their applications to neuronal biophysics and mammalian circuit analysis. We discuss their mechanisms of voltage sensitivity, from reorientation, electrochromic or electro-optical phenomena, to interaction among chromophores or membrane scattering, and highlight their advantages and shortcomings, commenting on the outlook for development of novel voltage imaging methods. PMID:21220095

  13. Involvement of the reductase domain of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in superoxide anion production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R T; Martásek, P; Roman, L J; Nishimura, J S; Masters, B S

    1997-12-09

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is a modular enzyme which consists of a flavin-containing reductase domain and a heme-containing oxygenase domain, linked by a stretch of amino acids which contains a calmodulin (CaM) binding site. CaM binding to nNOS facilitates the transfer of NADPH-derived electrons from the reductase domain to the oxygenase domain, resulting in the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline with the concomitant formation of a guanylate cyclase activating factor, putatively nitric oxide. Numerous studies have established that peroxynitrite-derived nitrogen oxides are present following nNOS turnover. Since peroxynitrite is formed by the diffusion-limited reaction between the two radical species, nitric oxide and O2.-, we employed the adrenochrome assay to examine whether nNOS was capable of producing O2.- during catalytic turnover in the presence of L-arginine. To differentiate between the role played by the reductase domain and that of the oxygenase domain in O2.- production, we compared its production by nNOS against that of a nNOS mutant (CYS-331), which was unable to transfer NADPH-derived electrons efficiently to the heme iron under special conditions, and against that of a flavoprotein module construct of nNOS. We report that O2.- production by nNOS and the CYS-331 mutant is CaM-dependent and that O2.- production can be modulated by substrates and inhibitors of nNOS. O2.- was also produced by the reductase domain of nNOS; however, it did not display the same CaM dependency. We conclude that both the reductase and oxygenase domains of nNOS produce O2.-, but that the reductase domain is both necessary and sufficient for O2.- production.

  14. Glutamate gated spiking Neuron Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Krisha M; Roy, Soumik

    2014-01-01

    Biological neuron models mainly analyze the behavior of neural networks. Neurons are described in terms of firing rates viz an analog signal. The Izhikevich neuron model is an efficient, powerful model of spiking neuron. This model is a reduction of Hodgkin-Huxley model to a two variable system and is capable of producing rich firing patterns for many biological neurons. In this paper, the Regular Spiking (RS) neuron firing pattern is used to simulate the spiking of Glutamate gated postsynaptic membrane. Simulation is done in MATLAB environment for excitatory action of synapses. Analogous simulation of spiking of excitatory postsynaptic membrane potential is obtained.

  15. Photosensitive neurons in mollusks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartelija Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to regular photoreceptors, some invertebrates possess simple extra ocular photoreceptors. For ex­ample, the central ganglia of mollusks contain photosensitive neurons. These neurons are located on the dorsal surface of the ganglia and based on their electrophysiological properties it has been postulated that they are internal photoreceptors. Besides the eye, transduction of light also occurs in these extra-ocular photoreceptors. In the present work, we analyze the reactivity of these nerve cells to light and describe the underlying mechanism mediating the light-induced response.

  16. From Neurons to Newtons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bjørn Gilbert

    2001-01-01

    proteins generate forces, to the macroscopic levels where overt arm movements are vol- untarily controlled within an unpredictable environment by legions of neurons¯ring in orderly fashion. An extensive computer simulation system has been developed for this thesis, which at present contains a neural...... network scripting language for specifying arbitrary neural architectures, de¯nition ¯les for detailed spinal networks, various biologically realistic models of neurons, and dynamic synapses. Also included are structurally accurate models of intrafusal and extra-fusal muscle ¯bers and a general body...

  17. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether......Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation...

  18. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfisterer, Ulrich Gottfried; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial...... numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether...... a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation...

  19. Genetic absence of nNOS worsens fetal alcohol effects in mice. I: behavioral deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacay, Bahri; Bonthius, Nancy E; Plume, Jeffrey; Bonthius, Daniel J

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol abuse during pregnancy often induces neuropsychological problems in the offspring, including learning disorders, attention deficits, and behavior problems, all of which are prominent components of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). However, not all children who were exposed to alcohol in utero are equally affected by it. While some children have major deficits, others are spared. This unequal vulnerability is likely due largely to differences in fetal genetics. Some fetuses appear to have certain genotypes that make them much more prone to FASD. However, to date, no gene has been identified that worsens alcohol-induced brain dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous molecule that can protect developing neurons against alcohol-induced death. In the brain, NO is produced by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). In this study, we examined whether homozygous mutation of the nNOS gene in mice worsens the behavioral deficits of developmental alcohol exposure. Wild-type and nNOS(-/-) mice received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4 mg/g) daily over postnatal days (PDs) 4 to 9. Beginning on PD 85, the mice underwent a series of behavioral tests, including open field activity, the Morris water maze, and paired pulse inhibition. For the wild-type mice, alcohol impaired performance only in the water maze. In contrast, for the nNOS(-/-) mice, alcohol impaired performance on all 3 tasks. Furthermore, the nNOS(-/-) mice were substantially more impaired than wild-type mice in their performance on all 3 of the behavioral tests and at both the low (2.2) and high (4.4) doses of alcohol. Targeted disruption of the nNOS gene worsens the behavioral impact of developmental alcohol exposure and allows alcohol-induced learning problems to emerge that are not seen in wild type. This is the first demonstration that a specific genotype can interact with alcohol to worsen functional brain deficits in an animal model of FASD. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  20. Design of selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Richard B

    2009-03-17

    Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced from L-arginine by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) family of enzymes, is an important second-messenger molecule that regulates several physiological functions. In endothelial cells, it relaxes smooth muscle, which decreases blood pressure. Macrophage cells produce NO as an immune defense system to destroy pathogens and microorganisms. In neuronal cells, NO controls the release of neurotransmitters and is involved in synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, memory function, and neuroendocrine secretion. NO is a free radical that is commonly thought to contribute to oxidative damage and molecule and tissue destruction, and thus it is somewhat surprising that it has so many significant beneficial physiological effects. However, the cell is generally protected from NO's toxic effects, except under certain pathological conditions in which excessive NO is produced. In that case, tissue damage and oxidative stress can result, leading to a wide variety of diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease, among others. In this Account, we describe research aimed at identifying small molecules that can selectively inhibit only the neuronal isozyme of NOS, nNOS. By targeting only nNOS, we attained the beneficial effects of lowering excess NO in the brain without the detrimental effects of inhibition of the two isozymes found elsewhere in the body (eNOS and iNOS). Initially, in pursuit of this goal, we sought to identify differences in the second sphere of amino acids in the active site of the isozymes. From this study, the first class of dual nNOS-selective inhibitors was identified. The moieties important for selectivity in the best lead compound were determined by structure modification. Enhancement provided highly potent, nNOS-selective dipeptide amides and peptidomimetics, which were active in a rabbit model for fetal neurodegeneration. Crystal structures of these compounds bound to NOS isozymes showed

  1. Calmodulin controls neuronal nitric-oxide synthase by a dual mechanism. Activation of intra- and interdomain electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Soud, H M; Yoho, L L; Stuehr, D J

    1994-12-23

    In neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (NOS), electron transfer proceeds across domains in a linear sequence from NADPH to flavins to heme, with calmodulin (CaM) triggering the interdomain electron transfer to the heme (Abu-Soud, H. M., and Stuehr, D. J. (1993) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 90, 10769-10772). Here, we utilized a neuronal NOS devoid of its bound heme and tetrahydrobiopterin (apo-NOS) to examine whether interdomain electron transfer is responsible for CaM's activation of NO synthesis, substrate-independent NADPH oxidation, and cytochrome c and ferricyanide reduction. Of the four activities, two (cytochrome c and ferricyanide reduction) were similarly stimulated by CaM in apo-NOS when compared with native NOS, indicating that activation occurs by a mechanism not involving flavin-to-heme electron transfer. Further analysis showed that CaM increased the rate of electron transfer from NADPH into the flavin centers by a factor of 20, revealing a direct activation of the NOS reductase domain by CaM. In contrast, CaM's activation of NO synthesis and substrate-independent NADPH oxidation appeared to involve flavin-to-heme electron transfer because these reactions were not activated in apo-NOS and were blocked in native NOS by agents that prevent heme iron reduction. Thus, CaM activates neuronal NOS at two points in the electron transfer sequence: electron transfer into the flavins and interdomain electron transfer between the flavins and heme. Activation at each point is associated with an up-regulation of domain-specific catalytic functions. The dual regulation by CaM is unique and represents a new means by which electron transfer can be controlled in a metalloflavoprotein.

  2. Lumping Izhikevich neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, S.; van Gils, Stephanus A.

    2014-01-01

    We present the construction of a planar vector field that yields the firing rate of a bursting Izhikevich neuron can be read out, while leaving the sub-threshold behaviour intact. This planar vector field is used to derive lumped formulations of two complex heterogeneous networks of bursting

  3. Effect of Progesterone Therapy on TNF-α and iNOS Gene Expression in Spinal Cord Injury Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Farahabadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI as a destructive crash result in neurons degeneration. The SCI lead to the onset of biochemical and molecular cascades such as inflammation that in turn has a key role in neurodegeneration development. The previous studies demonstrated the role of TNF-α and iNOS genes in intensifying the process after SCI. As a consequence, these genes overexpression intensify the inflammation and neuron degeneration process. In the present study, 32 male Wistar rats were chased and divided into four groups of eight. The SCI were induced in three groups and another group used as a sham. The progesterone hormone used as a therapeutic agent in rats with SCI. The results showed that injection of 10 μg/kg/12h progesterone hormone reduced the TNF-α and iNOS gene expression significantly and confirmed the role of progesterone in the reduction of inflammation. Also, the numbers of intact neurons in progesterone group were higher than other groups that demonstrated the protective effects of progesterone on neuron death. The BBB test was performed and demonstrated that progesterone is an effective factor to the improvement of locomotor response. These results of the study confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of progesterone hormone and suggested that it can be used as a therapeutic factor for SCI.

  4. Spiking neuron network Helmholtz machine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sountsov, Pavel; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    .... This paper aims to unify the two fields of probabilistic inference and synaptic plasticity by using a neuronal network of realistic model spiking neurons to implement a well-studied computational...

  5. Identifying neuronal oscillations using rhythmicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransen, A.M.M.; Ede, F.L. van; Maris, E.G.G.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations are a characteristic feature of neuronal activity and are typically investigated through measures of power and coherence. However, neither of these measures directly reflects the distinctive feature of oscillations: their rhythmicity. Rhythmicity is the extent to which future

  6. Aged neuronal nitric oxide knockout mice show preserved olfactory learning in both social recognition and odor-conditioning tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwen M James

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence for both neurotoxic and neuroprotective roles of nitric oxide (NO in the brain and changes in the expression of the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS gene occur during aging. The current studies have investigated potential support for either a neurotoxic or neuroprotective role of NO derived from nNOS in the context of aging by comparing olfactory learning and locomotor function in young compared to old nNOS knockout (nNOS/- and wildtype control mice. Tasks involving social recognition and olfactory conditioning paradigms showed that old nNOS-/-animals had improved retention of learning compared to similar aged wildtype controls. Young nNOS-/- animals showed superior reversal learning to wildtypes in a conditioned learning task, although their performance was weakened with age. Interestingly, whereas young nNOS-/- animals were impaired in long term memory for social odors compared to wildtype controls, in old animals this pattern was reversed, possibly indicating beneficial compensatory changes influencing olfactory memory may occur during aging in nNOS-/- animals. Possibly such compensatory changes may have involved increased NO from other NOS isoforms since the memory deficit in young nNOS-/-animals could be rescued by the NO-donor, molsidomine. Both nNOS-/- and wildtype animals showed an age-associated decline in locomotor activity although young nNOS-/- animals were significantly more active than wildtypes, possibly due to an increased interest in novelty. Overall our findings suggest that lack of NO release via nNOS may protect animals to some extent against age-associated cognitive decline in memory tasks typically involving olfactory and hippocampal regions, but not against declines in reversal learning or locomotor activity.

  7. Motor neuron disease in blacks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-08-19

    Aug 19, 1989 ... We reported earlier that motor neuron disease occurs more commonly among blacks than Parkinson's disease, which is relatively rare in this race group.! The hypothesis that these conditions, and other neuronal abiotrophies, are the result of previous subclinical neuronal insult and subsequent age-related.

  8. Simple model of spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, E M

    2003-01-01

    A model is presented that reproduces spiking and bursting behavior of known types of cortical neurons. The model combines the biologically plausibility of Hodgkin-Huxley-type dynamics and the computational efficiency of integrate-and-fire neurons. Using this model, one can simulate tens of thousands of spiking cortical neurons in real time (1 ms resolution) using a desktop PC.

  9. Moving Neurons back into place

    OpenAIRE

    Kerjan, Geraldine; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2009-01-01

    Subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) is a neuron migration disorder characterized by an aberrant ‘band-like’ accumulation of neurons within the neocortical white matter, frequently leading to mental retardation and epilepsy. SBH can now be regressed by reactivating neuronal migration.

  10. Neuronal substrate of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeeva, Elena; Calvez, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are devastating and life-threatening psychiatric diseases. Although clinical and experimental investigations have significantly progressed in discovering the neuronal causes of eating disorders, the exact neuronal and molecular mechanisms of the development and maintenance of these pathologies are not fully understood. The complexity of the neuronal substrate of eating disorders hampers progress in revealing the precise mechanisms. The present re...

  11. Understanding Neuronal Mechanisms of Epilepsy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    Control il ti. Human brain. Control epileptic. Mutani et al., 1994 ... of Calcium Transients Evoked in. Response to Spontaneous Epileptic ... Proof : Feed forward inhibition in subiculum. CA1. Subiculum. Stimulation artifact. -60 mV. Excitatory neuron. Inhibitory neuron. Excitatory neuron. Excitatory. Synapse. Inhibitory. Synapse.

  12. Vasculo-Neuronal Coupling: Retrograde Vascular Communication to Brain Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Jung; Ramiro Diaz, Juan; Iddings, Jennifer A; Filosa, Jessica A

    2016-12-14

    Continuous cerebral blood flow is essential for neuronal survival, but whether vascular tone influences resting neuronal function is not known. Using a multidisciplinary approach in both rat and mice brain slices, we determined whether flow/pressure-evoked increases or decreases in parenchymal arteriole vascular tone, which result in arteriole constriction and dilation, respectively, altered resting cortical pyramidal neuron activity. We present evidence for intercellular communication in the brain involving a flow of information from vessel to astrocyte to neuron, a direction opposite to that of classic neurovascular coupling and referred to here as vasculo-neuronal coupling (VNC). Flow/pressure increases within parenchymal arterioles increased vascular tone and simultaneously decreased resting pyramidal neuron firing activity. On the other hand, flow/pressure decreases evoke parenchymal arteriole dilation and increased resting pyramidal neuron firing activity. In GLAST-CreERT2; R26-lsl-GCaMP3 mice, we demonstrate that increased parenchymal arteriole tone significantly increased intracellular calcium in perivascular astrocyte processes, the onset of astrocyte calcium changes preceded the inhibition of cortical pyramidal neuronal firing activity. During increases in parenchymal arteriole tone, the pyramidal neuron response was unaffected by blockers of nitric oxide, GABAA, glutamate, or ecto-ATPase. However, VNC was abrogated by TRPV4 channel, GABAB, as well as an adenosine A1 receptor blocker. Differently to pyramidal neuron responses, increases in flow/pressure within parenchymal arterioles increased the firing activity of a subtype of interneuron. Together, these data suggest that VNC is a complex constitutive active process that enables neurons to efficiently adjust their resting activity according to brain perfusion levels, thus safeguarding cellular homeostasis by preventing mismatches between energy supply and demand. We present evidence for vessel-to-neuron

  13. Editorial - O que nos (pre)ocupa?

    OpenAIRE

    Palmeirim, Madalena Manzoni

    2012-01-01

    Todo o gesto artístico é, em certa medida, um acto político. O contrário torna-se cada vez mais difícil de afirmar. Neste Portugal que se encontra nas mãos de um corpo político sem voz cultural, as decisões que nos são impostas ultrapassam a tão necessária condição de austeridade para fundarem um estado catatónico, onde a cultura é vista como uma exigência caprichosa, supérflua e desnecessária. É precisamente o esvaziamento de criatividade na retórica política que nos impede de...

  14. ¿Las emociones nos distraen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Pilar Pacheco-Unguetti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available ¿Leerás este artículo hasta el final sin interrupciones? Puede que, mientras lo intentas, recibas algún mensaje de whatsapp, se abra una ventana emergente en tu ordenador con una oferta de viajes al Caribe o el cartero llame dos veces a tu puerta. También puede ser que simplemente no tengas un buen día y te resulte especialmente difícil concentrarte. Vivimos expuestos a multitud de estímulos distractores externos, algunos tan inesperados o extraños que entorpecen irremediablemente nuestra concentración en una tarea (distracción por novedad. Pero la distracción también puede tener una causa interna y cómo nos sentimos puede influir en cuánto nos distraemos.

  15. ¿Comer carne nos hizo inteligentes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Marmelada

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La inteligencia abstracta es lo que más nos diferencia de los restantes animales. Su origen continúa siendo un misterio sujeto a debate. Hay quienes afirman que emergió paulatinamente. En este sentido se ha propuesto que incorporar la carne a la dieta de los homínidos pudo haber sido el detonante que la hizo surgir. Pero esta hipótesis tiene sus lagunas.

  16. A mechanism for cognitive dynamics: neuronal communication through neuronal coherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Pascal

    2005-10-01

    At any one moment, many neuronal groups in our brain are active. Microelectrode recordings have characterized the activation of single neurons and fMRI has unveiled brain-wide activation patterns. Now it is time to understand how the many active neuronal groups interact with each other and how their communication is flexibly modulated to bring about our cognitive dynamics. I hypothesize that neuronal communication is mechanistically subserved by neuronal coherence. Activated neuronal groups oscillate and thereby undergo rhythmic excitability fluctuations that produce temporal windows for communication. Only coherently oscillating neuronal groups can interact effectively, because their communication windows for input and for output are open at the same times. Thus, a flexible pattern of coherence defines a flexible communication structure, which subserves our cognitive flexibility.

  17. The Association between NOS3 Gene Polymorphisms and Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Susceptibility and Symptoms in Chinese Han Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial NOS (NOS3 has a potential role in the prevention of neuronal injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Thus, we aimed to explore the association between NOS3 gene polymorphisms and HIE susceptibility and symptoms in a Chinese Han population. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the NOS3 gene, rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744, were detected in 226 children with HIE and 212 healthy children in a Chinese Han population. Apgar scores and magnetic resonance image scans were used to estimate the symptoms and brain damage. The association analyses were conducted by using SNPStats and SPSS 18.0 software. The genotype and allele distributions of rs1800779 and rs1799983 displayed no significant differences between the patients and the controls, while the rs2070744 allele distribution was significantly different (corrected P=0.009. For clinical characteristics, the rs2070744 genotype distribution was significantly different in patients with different Apgar scores (≤5, TT/TC/CC = 6/7/5; 6~7, TT/TC/CC = 17/0/0; 8~9, TT/TC/CC = 6/2/0; 10, TT/TC/CC = 7/1/0; corrected P=0.006 in the 1001 to 1449 g birth weight subgroup. The haplotype test did not show any associations with the risk and clinical characteristics of HIE. The results suggest that NOS3 gene SNP rs2070744 was significantly associated with HIE susceptibility and symptom expression in Chinese Han population.

  18. Multiple embryonic origins of nitric oxide synthase-expressing GABAergic neurons of the neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza eMagno

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cortical GABAergic interneurons in rodents originate in three subcortical regions: the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE, the lateral/caudal ganglionic eminence (LGE/CGE and the preoptic area (POA. Each of these neuroepithelial precursor domains contributes different interneuron subtypes to the cortex. nNOS-expressing neurons represent a heterogenous population of cortical interneurons. We examined the development of these cells in the mouse embryonic cortex and their abundance and distribution in adult animals. Using genetic lineage tracing in transgenic mice we find that nNOS type I cells originate only in the MGE whereas type II cells have a triple origin in the MGE, LGE/CGE and POA. The two populations are born at different times during development, occupy different layers in the adult cortex and have distinct neurochemical profiles. nNOS neurons are more numerous in the adult cortex than previously reported and constitute a significant proportion of the cortical interneuron population. Our data suggest that the heterogeneity of nNOS neurons in the cortex can be attributed to their multiple embryonic origins which likely impose distinct genetic specification programs.

  19. Improvement of Cell Permeability of Human Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors Using Potent and Selective 2-Aminopyridine-Based Scaffolds with a Fluorobenzene Linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Ha T; Wang, Heng-Yen; Li, Huiying; Chreifi, Georges; Poulos, Thomas L; Silverman, Richard B

    2017-11-22

    Inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is a promising therapeutic approach to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, we have achieved considerable progress in improving the potency and isoform selectivity of human nNOS inhibitors bearing a 2-aminopyridine scaffold. However, these inhibitors still suffered from too low cell membrane permeability to enter into CNS drug development. We report herein our studies to improve permeability of nNOS inhibitors as measured by both PAMPA-BBB and Caco-2 assays. The most permeable compound (12) in this study still preserves excellent potency with human nNOS (Ki = 30 nM) and very high selectivity over other NOS isoforms, especially human eNOS (hnNOS/heNOS = 2799, the highest hnNOS/heNOS ratio we have obtained to date). X-ray crystallographic analysis reveals that 12 adopts a similar binding mode in both rat and human nNOS, in which the 2-aminopyridine and the fluorobenzene linker form crucial hydrogen bonds with glutamate and tyrosine residues, respectively.

  20. Phosphoinositide signaling in somatosensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG) are responsible for detecting thermal and tactile stimuli. They are also the primary neurons mediating pain and itch. A large number of cell surface receptors in these neurons couple to phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes leading to the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and the generation of downstream signaling molecules. These neurons also express many different ion channels, several of which are regulated by phosphoinositides. This review will summarize the knowledge on phosphoinositide signaling in these neurons, with special focus on effects on sensory and other ion channels. PMID:26724974

  1. Effect of DDAH/ADMA/NOS regulation pathway on cavernae corporum cavernosorum rat penis of different age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-H; Chen, D; Zhang, K-Q; Zhang, H; Fu, Q

    2016-04-01

    The effect of DDAH/ADMA/NOS pathway in penile tissue of rats of different age was investigated to better understand the mechanism of age-related erectile dysfunction (ED). The Sprague Dawley male rats were assigned as the young group (3 month old, n = 10) and the old group (18 month old, n = 10) respectively. Intracavernous pressure (ICP) was measured before and after papaverine intracavernous injection. Pathology structure of penile tissue was evaluated under transmission electron microscope. The expression amounts of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in penile tissue were detected by ELISA; the expression levels of isoform-specific DDAH and NOS were assessed via Western blot. Compared with the young group, the ICP in the old group rat decreased significantly (33.46 ± 5.37 versus 39.71 ± 3.67 mmHg, P = 0.02) after papaverine injection. Diffused fibrosis and impairment of endothelial cell were observed in corpus cavernosum in the old group rats. Higher level of ADMA (10.83 ± 0.96 versus 7.51 ± 1.39 μmol per gpro, P = 3.14 × 10(-4) ) and lower level of cGMP (29.42 ± 3.84 versus 47.09 ± 6.07 nmol per gpro, P = 1.57 × 10(-6) ) were detected in penile tissue of the old group compared with those of the young group. Expression of DDAH1, DDAH2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS(nNOS) all decreased significantly in penile tissue of the old group rat. The DDAH/ADMA/NOS regulation pathway changes dramatically accompanying with lower ICP in old group rat compared with those of the young group. Such findings in rats are suggestive in understanding the mechanism of age-related ED in humans. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Neuron-specific splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Nor Hakimah Ab; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2017-03-22

    During pre-mRNA splicing events, introns are removed from the pre-mRNA, and the remaining exons are connected together to form a single continuous molecule. Alternative splicing is a common mechanism for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. More than 90% of human genes are known to undergo alternative splicing. The most common type of alternative splicing is exon skipping, which is also known as cassette exon. Other known alternative splicing events include alternative 5' splice sites, alternative 3' splice sites, intron retention, and mutually exclusive exons. Alternative splicing events are controlled by regulatory proteins responsible for both positive and negative regulation. In this review, we focus on neuronal splicing regulators and discuss several notable regulators in depth. In addition, we have also included an example of splicing regulation mediated by the RBFox protein family. Lastly, as previous studies have shown that a number of splicing factors are associated with neuronal diseases such as Alzheime's disease (AD) and Autism spectrum disorder (ASD), here we consider their importance in neuronal diseases wherein the underlying mechanisms have yet to be elucidated.

  3. Antenatal insults modify newborn olfactory function by nitric oxide produced from neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobyshevsky, Alexander; Yu, Lei; Yang, Yirong; Khalid, Syed; Luo, Kehuan; Jiang, Rugang; Ji, Haitao; Derrick, Matthew; Kay, Leslie; Silverman, Richard B; Tan, Sidhartha

    2012-10-01

    Newborn feeding, maternal, bonding, growth and wellbeing depend upon intact odor recognition in the early postnatal period. Antenatal stress may affect postnatal odor recognition. We investigated the exact role of a neurotransmitter, nitric oxide (NO), in newborn olfactory function. We hypothesized that olfactory neuron activity depended on NO generated by neuronal NO synthase (NOS). Utilizing in vivo functional manganese enhanced MRI (MEMRI) in a rabbit model of cerebral palsy we had shown previously that in utero hypoxia-ischemia (H-I) at E22 (70% gestation) resulted in impaired postnatal response to odorants and poor feeding. With the same antenatal insult, we manipulated NO levels in the olfactory neuron in postnatal day 1 (P1) kits by administration of intranasal NO donors or a highly selective nNOS inhibitor. Olfactory function was quantitatively measured by the response to amyl acetate stimulation by MEMRI. The relevance of nNOS to normal olfactory development was confirmed by the increase of nNOS gene expression from fetal ages to P1 in olfactory epithelium and bulbs. In control kits, nNOS inhibition decreased NO production in the olfactory system and increased MEMRI slope enhancement. In H-I kits the MEMRI slope did not increase, implicating modification of endogenous NO-mediated olfactory function by the antenatal insult. NO donors as a source of exogenous NO did not significantly change function in either group. In conclusion, olfactory epithelium nNOS in newborn rabbits probably modulates olfactory signal transduction. Antenatal H-I injury remote from delivery may affect early functional development of the olfactory system by decreasing NO-dependent signal transduction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. DISTINCT MECHANISMS OF INHIBITION OF VSV REPLICATION IN NEURONS MEDIATED BY TYPE I AND TYPE II IFN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Paul M; Yang, Jingjun; Reiss, Carol Shoshkes

    2009-01-01

    Acute viral infection of neurons presents a difficult problem to the host, since neurons are essential and not replaced, therefore cell-autonomous pathway(s) of suppressing viral replication are critical. We have examined the mechanisms by which neurons respond to exogenous interferons (IFNs) and observed that novel pathways inhibit acute vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication. For both type I (IFN-beta) and Type II (IFN-gamma) interferons, post-translational modification of viral proteins contributed to the replication blockade, diminishing the efficiency of viral assembly and budding from the host neuron. IFN-gamma treatment induces the accumulation of NOS-1 in the absence of an increase of mRNA encoding this enzyme; a NOS-1-inhibiting protein, PIN, is rapidly ubiquitinated and eliminated in the presence of IFN-gamma. NOS-1 produces NO which combines with superoxide to form peroxynitrite (ONOO-), this binds tyrosines, cysteines, and serines; antagonism of NOS-1 with either non-specific or selective inhibitors block the antiviral effect of IFN-gamma. VSV proteins are decorated with -NO(2) in IFN-gamma-treated neurons, probably resulting in their diminished ability to interact properly and mature into budding virus. For IFN-beta, protein phosphorylation of the Matrix protein (M) and Phosphoprotein (P) were altered in infected neurons, with hyperphosphorylation of M (but not hypophosphorylated P) found in released virions. Hyperphosphorylated M protein does not immunoprecipitate with the viral ribonucleoprotein complex in IFN-beta-treated neurons. Thus both types of IFN interfere with viral assembly and release of infectious particles, but by distinct pathways.

  5. Disruption of neuronal nitric oxide synthase dimerization contributes to the development of Alzheimer's disease: Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5-mediated phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase at Ser(293).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kyoung Ja; Park, Jung-Hyun; Jo, Inho; Song, Kee-Ho; Han, Jung-Soo; Park, Seung Hwa; Han, Seol-Heui; Cho, Du-Hyong

    2016-10-01

    Although previous studies have suggested that neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-derived NO has neuroprotective effects on the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether and how disruption of nNOS dimerization contributes to the development of AD. No differences in synaptic number or expression of synaptic markers, including synaptophysin and postsynaptic density 95, were found in the cortex of 5 × FAD mice, which possess 5 familial AD mutations, at 6 months of age compared with control littermates. nNOS dimerization was disrupted in the 5 × FAD cortex, accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. The subcellular distribution of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) shifted more diffusely toward a cytosolic compartment, but there was no change in total expression. Furthermore, the levels of p25, a CDK5 activator, increased significantly and it colocalized with nNOS in the 5 × FAD cortex. In silico analysis revealed that a new nNOS-specific GSP (glycine-serine-proline) motif was well-conserved across species at nNOS-Ser(293), which is located ahead of the N-terminal hook. This motif was not present in the closely related isoform, endothelial NOS. Motif scan analysis also predicted that CDK5 can phosphorylate nNOS-Ser(293) with a high likelihood. An in vitro phosphorylation assay clearly showed that CDK5/p25 does indeed phosphorylate nNOS-Ser(293). Finally, nNOS-S293D mutant, a phosphomimetic form of nNOS-Ser(293), and nNOS-S293A mutant, a neutral form of nNOS-Ser(293), significantly decreased nNOS dimerization and NO production. Taken together, our results demonstrate that nNOS dimers are disrupted in the 5 × FAD cortex, and nNOS-Ser(293), a potential site of CDK5 phosphorylation, may be involved in the decrease in nNOS dimerization and NO production, and the development of AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  7. Astroglial networks promote neuronal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chever, Oana; Dossi, Elena; Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Rouach, Nathalie

    2016-01-12

    Astrocytes interact with neurons to regulate network activity. Although the gap junction subunits connexin 30 and connexin 43 mediate the formation of extensive astroglial networks that cover large functional neuronal territories, their role in neuronal synchronization remains unknown. Using connexin 30- and connexin 43-deficient mice, we showed that astroglial networks promoted sustained population bursts in hippocampal slices by setting the basal active state of neurons. Astroglial networks limited excessive neuronal depolarization induced by spontaneous synaptic activity, increased neuronal release probability, and favored the recruitment of neurons during bursting, thus promoting the coordinated activation of neuronal networks. In vivo, this sustained neuronal coordination translated into increased severity of acutely evoked epileptiform events and convulsive behavior. These results revealed that connexin-mediated astroglial networks synchronize bursting of neuronal assemblies, which can exacerbate pathological network activity and associated behavior. Our data thus provide molecular and biophysical evidence predicting selective astroglial gap junction inhibitors as anticonvulsive drugs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Motor neurons and the generation of spinal motor neurons diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas eStifani

    2014-01-01

    Motor neurons (MNs) are neuronal cells located in the central nervous system (CNS) controlling a variety of downstream targets. This function infers the existence of MN subtypes matching the identity of the targets they innervate. To illustrate the mechanism involved in the generation of cellular diversity and the acquisition of specific identity, this review will focus on spinal motor neurons (SpMNs) that have been the core of significant work and discoveries during the last decades. SpMNs a...

  9. Pobreza infantil nos paises ricos 2005

    OpenAIRE

    *UNICEF

    2006-01-01

    Este estudo de 2005 sobre pobreza infantil nos países ricos conclui que a percentagem de crianças pobres no mundo desenvolvido aumentou em 17 dos 24 países da OCDE para os quais existem dados. Independentemente do instrumento aplicado para medir a pobreza, a situação das crianças parece ter-se deteriorado ao longo da última década. A redução da pobreza infantil é uma medida do progresso no sentido da coesão social, da igualdade de oportunidades e do investimento nas crianças de hoje e no mund...

  10. Role of laser fluence in protein synthesis of cultured DRG neurons following low-level laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liqin; Qiu, Caimin; Wang, Yuhua; Zeng, Yixiu; Yang, Hongqin; Zhang, Yanding; Xie, Shusen

    2014-11-01

    Low-level lasers have been used to relieve pain in clinical for many years. But the mechanism is not fully clear. In animal models, nitric oxide (NO) has been reported involving in the transmission and modulation of nociceptive signals. So the objective of this study was to establish whether low-level laser with different fluence could stimulate the production of nitric oxide synthese (NOS), which produces NO in cultured primary dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG neurons). The primary DRG neurons were isolated from healthy Sprague Dawley rats (8-12 weeks of age) and spread on 35 mm culture dishes specially used for confocal microscopy. 24 hours after spreading, cells were irradiated with 658 nm laser for two consecutive days at the energy density of 20, 40, 60 and 80 mJ·cm-2 respectively. Control groups were not exposed to the laser, but were kept under the same conditions as the irradiated ones. The synthesis of NOS after laser irradiation was detected by immunofluorescence assay, and the changes of NOS were evaluated using confocal microscopy and Image J software. The results showed that all the laser fluence could promote the production of NOS in DRG neurons, especially the 60 mJ·cm-2 . These results demonstrated that low-level laser irradiation could modify protein synthesis in a dose- or fluence- dependent manner, and indicated that low-level laser irradiation might achieve the analgesic effect through modulation of NO production.

  11. Nasal neuron PET imaging quantifies neuron generation and degeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Riley, Misha M; Cao, Luxiang; Ehses, Janina; Herrick, Scott P; Ricq, Emily L; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; O'Neill, Michael J; Ahmed, Zeshan; Murray, Tracey K; Smith, Jaclyn E; Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A; Albers, Mark W; Hooker, Jacob M

    2017-01-01

    .... Quantification of the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), which detect odors within the nasal cavity, would provide insight into the etiology of olfactory dysfunction associated with disease and mortality...

  12. Resonate-and-fire neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, E M

    2001-01-01

    We suggest a simple spiking model-resonate-and-fire neuron, which is similar to the integrate-and-fire neuron except that the state variable is complex. The model provides geometric illustrations to many interesting phenomena occurring in biological neurons having subthreshold damped oscillations of membrane potential. For example, such neurons prefer a certain resonant frequency of the input that is nearly equal to their eigenfrequency, they can be excited or inhibited by a doublet (two pulses) depending on its interspike interval, and they can fire in response to an inhibitory input. All these properties could be observed in Hodgkin-Huxley-type models. We use the resonate-and-fire model to illustrate possible sensitivity of biological neurons to the fine temporal structure of the input spike train. Being an analogue of the integrate-and-fire model, the resonate-and-fire model is computationally efficient and suitable for simulations of large networks of spiking neurons.

  13. Nitric oxide pathway genes (NOS1AP and NOS1) are involved in PTSD severity, depression, anxiety, stress and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruenig, Dagmar; Morris, Charles P; Mehta, Divya; Harvey, Wendy; Lawford, Bruce; Young, Ross McD; Voisey, Joanne

    2017-08-20

    The nitric oxide pathway in the hippocampus is involved in the biological stress response with detrimental consequences to cells and HPA axis feedback. Hippocampal atrophy and HPA axis feedback dysfunction are associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study systematically investigates two genes of the nitric oxide pathway NOS1AP and NOS1 for a potential involvement in PTSD, comorbidities and resilience. A cohort of age and gender matched Vietnam veterans including trauma-exposed cases and controls was recruited and comprehensively assessed (n=299). A total of 49 NOS1AP and 16 NOS1 polymorphisms were analysed and genotypes correlated with gold standard clinical measures to assess PTSD severity and related phenotypes (depression, anxiety, stress, resilience) based on diagnostic status. Multiple NOS1AP polymorphisms were associated across all measures, and NOS1 polymorphisms were associated with PTSD severity, stress and resilience. The GG genotype of NOS1 polymorphism rs10744891 was associated with PTSD severity (surviving multiple correction) while the combined TT-TG genotypes were associated with resilience (p=0.005; p=0.033, respectively). This study indicates that NOS1AP and NOS1 from the nitric oxide pathway are likely to play a key role in PTSD, its comorbidities and resilience. Given the essential role of NOS1AP and NOS1 in stress response they may be reliable targets for screening and intervention strategies. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of bNOS and chat immunohistochemistry in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) of the mouse from brain slices prepared for electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veleanu, Maxime; Axen, Tina E; Kristensen, Morten P; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2016-04-01

    Identification of cell phenotype from brain slices upon which in vitro electrophysiological recordings have been performed often relies on conducting post hoc immunohistochemistry on tissue that necessarily has not been ideally prepared for immunohistochemical procedures. In such studies, antibody labeling against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (bNOS) has been used to identify cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) and the pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (PPT), two brainstem nuclei importantly involved in arousal. However, a widespread perception maintains that antibody staining for enzymes involved in synthesis or transport, of acetylcholine would be a more definitive marker and hence, preferable. Colocalization of bNOS and CHAT in the LDT/PPT, and presence of parvalbumin (PV), was examined in non-ideally prepared mouse brain slices using currently available antibodies. Using fluorescent-based immunohistochemistry in LDT/PPT slices prepared for in vitro recordings, a near 100% colocalization of bNOS and CHAT was observed. We confirm in the mouse, findings of near 100% colocalization of bNOS and CHAT in the LDT/PPT, and we expand upon data from rat studies using optimally prepared tissue, that for dendritic visualization, bNOS staining exceeded the quality of CHAT staining for visualization of a higher degree of detail of fine processes. PV is not highly present in the mouse LDT/PPT. CHAT and bNOS are equally useful target proteins for immunofluorescent identification of cholinergic LDT/PPT cells in mouse brain slices prepared for in vitro recordings, however, antibody targeting of bNOS allows for a superior appreciation of structural detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Beatriz Sousa

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1 in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2 in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3 confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation.

  16. STDP in recurrent neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Gilson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent results about spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP in recurrently connected neurons are reviewed, with a focus on the relationship between the weight dynamics and the emergence of network structure. In particular, the evolution of synaptic weights in the two cases of incoming connections for a single neuron and recurrent connections are compared and contrasted. A theoretical framework is used that is based upon Poisson neurons with a temporally inhomogeneous firing rate and the asymptotic distribution of weights generated by the learning dynamics. Different network configurations examined in recent studies are discussed and an overview of the current understanding of STDP in recurrently connected neuronal networks is presented.

  17. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen [Cavendish Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  18. Inhibition of NLRP3 Inflammasome Prevents LPS-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia in Mice: Contribution of NF-κB, Caspase-1/11, ASC, NOX, and NOS Isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolunay, Abdurrahman; Senol, Sefika Pinar; Temiz-Resitoglu, Meryem; Guden, Demet Sinem; Sari, Ayse Nihal; Sahan-Firat, Seyhan; Tunctan, Bahar

    2017-04-01

    The nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat protein 3 (NLRP3), an intracellular signaling molecule that senses many environmental- and pathogen/host-derived factors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases associated with inflammation. It has been suggested that NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of NLRP3-related inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome prevents inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice as well as changes in expression/activity of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), caspase-1/11, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX), and endothelial/neuronal/inducible nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/nNOS/iNOS) that may regulate NLRP3/apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC)/pro-caspase-1 inflammasome formation and activity by using a selective NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitor, MCC950. Male mice received saline (10 ml/kg; i.p.), LPS (10 mg/kg; i.p.), and/or MCC950 (3 mg/kg; i.p.). Reaction time to thermal stimuli within 1 min was evaluated after 6 h. The mice were killed and the brains, hearts, and lungs were collected for measurement of NF-κB, caspase-1, caspase-11, NLRP3, ASC, NOX subunits (gp91 phox ; NOX2), and p47 phox ; NOXO2), nitrotyrosine, eNOS, nNOS, iNOS, and β-actin protein expression, NOS activity, and interleukin (IL)-1β levels. LPS-induced hyperalgesia was associated with a decrease in eNOS, nNOS, and iNOS protein expression and activity as well as an increase in expression of NF-κB p65, caspase-1 p20, caspase-11 p20, NLRP3, ASC, gp91 phox , p47 phox , and nitrotyrosine proteins in addition to elevated IL-1β levels. The LPS-induced changes were prevented by MCC950. The results suggest that inhibition of NLRP3/ASC/pro-caspase-1 inflammasome formation and activity prevents inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by LPS in mice as well as

  19. Priming of hypoxia-inducible factor by neuronal nitric oxide synthase is essential for adaptive responses to severe anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Albert K Y; Marsden, Philip A; Mazer, C David; Adamson, S Lee; Henkelman, R Mark; Ho, J J David; Wilson, David F; Heximer, Scott P; Connelly, Kim A; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Lidington, Darcy; El-Beheiry, Mostafa H; Dattani, Neil D; Chen, Kevin M; Hare, Gregory M T

    2011-10-18

    Cells sense and respond to changes in oxygen concentration through gene regulatory processes that are fundamental to survival. Surprisingly, little is known about how anemia affects hypoxia signaling. Because nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) figure prominently in the cellular responses to acute hypoxia, we defined the effects of NOS deficiency in acute anemia. In contrast to endothelial NOS or inducible NOS deficiency, neuronal NOS (nNOS)(-/-) mice demonstrated increased mortality during anemia. Unlike wild-type (WT) animals, anemia did not increase cardiac output (CO) or reduce systemic vascular resistance (SVR) in nNOS(-/-) mice. At the cellular level, anemia increased expression of HIF-1α protein and HIF-responsive mRNA levels (EPO, VEGF, GLUT1, PDK1) in the brain of WT, but not nNOS(-/-) mice, despite comparable reductions in tissue PO(2). Paradoxically, nNOS(-/-) mice survived longer during hypoxia, retained the ability to regulate CO and SVR, and increased brain HIF-α protein levels and HIF-responsive mRNA transcripts. Real-time imaging of transgenic animals expressing a reporter HIF-α(ODD)-luciferase chimeric protein confirmed that nNOS was essential for anemia-mediated increases in HIF-α protein stability in vivo. S-nitrosylation effects the functional interaction between HIF and pVHL. We found that anemia led to nNOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of pVHL in vivo and, of interest, led to decreased expression of GSNO reductase. These findings identify nNOS effects on the HIF/pVHL signaling pathway as critically important in the physiological responses to anemia in vivo and provide essential mechanistic insight into the differences between anemia and hypoxia.

  20. Nitric oxide synthase in the frog cerebellum: response of Purkinje neurons to unilateral eighth nerve transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisu, Maria Bonaria; Conforti, Elena; Botta, Laura; Valli, Paolo; Bernocchi, Graziella

    2002-09-01

    When vestibular damage occurs, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression in rat cerebellar flocculus is affected. Since compensation for postural symptoms occurs and Purkinje cells play an important role in movement coordination and motor learning, we analyzed in situ the induction of NOS in the Purkinje cell population of the cerebellum (corpus cerebelli) of frog after unilateral transection of the eighth statoacoustic nerve to gain insight into the role of NO in neural plasticity after injury. Three days after neurectomy, the early effects induced NADPH diaphorase reactivity in most of the Purkinje cells on the ipsilateral side, while on the contralateral side the highest labeling was observed at 15 days. This finding can give information on the dynamics of vestibular compensation, in which NOS involvement was investigated. At 30 days, NADPH diaphorase reactivity was present in a large number of Purkinje cells of the whole cerebellum, while at 60 days a down-regulation for NADPH diaphorase reactivity was evident. A similar trend was observed for NOS-immunoreactivity, which was still present at 60 days in a high percentage of Purkinje cells, mainly on the ipsilateral side. On the basis of cell density evaluations, it was proposed that the early induction of NOS after neurectomy was linked to the degeneration of a part of the Purkinje neurons, while the permanence of NOS labeling might be due to a neuroprotective role of NO in the restoration phase of the vestibular compensation process. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase contributes to pentylenetetrazole-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), the major nitric oxide synthase isoform in the mammalian brain, is implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions, including epilepsy. Neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) persists throughout life in the adult brain. Alterations in this process occur in many neurological diseases, including epilepsy. Few studies, however, have addressed the role of nNOS in hippocampal DG neurogenesis in epileptic brain. The present study, therefore, investigated the role of nNOS in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced neurogenesis in hippocampal DG. Our results showed that nNOS expression and enzymatic activity were significantly increased in the hippocampus of PTZ-kindled mice. Meanwhile, these PTZ-kindled mice were characterized by significant enhancement of new born cells proliferation and survival in hippocampal DG, and these survived cells are co-labeled with NeuN and GFAP. Selective inhibition of nNOS by 7-NI, however, suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal DG new born cells proliferation and survival, suggesting that nNOS contributes to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal neurogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase interaction with calmodulin-troponin C chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachhui, R; Abu-Soud, H M; Ghosha, D K; Presta, A; Blazing, M A; Mayer, B; George, S E; Stuehr, D J

    1998-03-06

    Calmodulin (CaM) binding activates neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) catalytic functions and also up-regulates electron transfer into its flavin and heme centers. Here, we utilized seven tight binding CaM-troponin C chimeras, which variably activate nNOS NO synthesis to examine the relationship between CaM domain structure, activation of catalytic functions, and control of internal electron transfer at two points within nNOS. Chimeras that were singly substituted with troponin C domains 4, 3, 2, or 1 were increasingly unable to activate NO synthesis, but all caused some activation of cytochrome c reduction compared with CaM-free nNOS. The magnitude by which each chimera activated NO synthesis was approximately proportional to the rate of heme iron reduction supported by each chimera, which varied from 0% to approximately 80% compared with native CaM and remained coupled to NO synthesis in all cases. In contrast, chimera activation of cytochrome c reduction was not always associated with accelerated reduction of nNOS flavins, and certain chimeras activated cytochrome c reduction without triggering heme iron reduction. We conclude: 1) CaM effects on electron transfer at two points within nNOS can be functionally separated. 2) CaM controls NO synthesis by governing heme iron reduction, but enhances reductase activity by two mechanisms, only one of which is associated with an increased rate of flavin reduction.

  3. COMPOSTAGEM DE DEJETOS DE SUÍNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gonçalves Xavier

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A compostagem, como forma de tratamento para os dejetos de suínos, pode ser uma alternativa viável para gerenciar osefluentes desta importante atividade agropecuária. Deste modo, foi conduzido um estudo em condições de campo em 16 granjas deprodutores de suínos, no sistema de integração com a Perdigão Agroindustrial S/A Regional RS no Sistema Vertical Terminador(SVT, onde os produtores recebem os animais na saída da creche e realizam as fases de crescimento e terminação. Odelineamento experimental utilizado foi o completamente casualizado, com os seguintes tratamentos: Tratamento 1-substratocomposto por serragem, Tratamento 2-substrato composto por maravalha, Tratamento 3-substrato composto por cama de aviário eTratamento 4-Sistema convencional de tratamento de dejetos. Os tratamentos foram distribuídos às unidades experimentais(granjas de maneira aleatória, onde cada tratamento teve quatro repetições. Foram analisadas as variáveis meteorológicas,temperatura do processo de compostagem, volume de dejetos produzidos e análise físico-química do composto e dos dejetoslíquidos. Os dados coletados foram submetidos à análise com o uso de um programa estatístico, sendo que as médias dostratamentos foram comparadas através do uso de contrastes ortogonais. Houve efeito de tratamento para as variáveis volume ematéria seca dos dejetos. Conclui-se que o sistema muda as características físicas dos dejetos, reduz o volume e concentranutrientes.

  4. COMPOSTAGEM DE DEJETOS DE SUÍNOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antonio Daí Pra

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available A compostagem, como forma de tratamento para os dejetos de suínos, pode ser uma alternativa viável para gerenciar os efluentes desta importante atividade agropecuária. Deste modo, foi conduzido um estudo em condições de campo em 16 granjas de produtores de suínos, no sistema de integração com a Perdigão Agroindustrial S/A Regional RS no Sistema Vertical Terminador (SVT, onde os produtores recebem os animais na saída da creche e realizam as fases de crescimento e terminação. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o completamente casualizado, com os seguintes tratamentos: Tratamento 1-substrato composto por serragem, Tratamento 2-substrato composto por maravalha, Tratamento 3-substrato composto por cama de aviário e Tratamento 4-Sistema convencional de tratamento de dejetos. Os tratamentos foram distribuídos às unidades experimentais (granjas de maneira aleatória, onde cada tratamento teve quatro repetições. Foram analisadas as variáveis meteorológicas, temperatura do processo de compostagem, volume de dejetos produzidos e análise físico-química do composto e dos dejetos líquidos. Os dados coletados foram submetidos à análise com o uso de um programa estatístico, sendo que as médias dos tratamentos foram comparadas através do uso de contrastes ortogonais. Houve efeito de tratamento para as variáveis volume e matéria seca dos dejetos. Conclui-se que o sistema muda as características físicas dos dejetos, reduz o volume e concentra nutrientes.

  5. Neuronal avalanches and coherence potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenz, D.

    2012-05-01

    The mammalian cortex consists of a vast network of weakly interacting excitable cells called neurons. Neurons must synchronize their activities in order to trigger activity in neighboring neurons. Moreover, interactions must be carefully regulated to remain weak (but not too weak) such that cascades of active neuronal groups avoid explosive growth yet allow for activity propagation over long-distances. Such a balance is robustly realized for neuronal avalanches, which are defined as cortical activity cascades that follow precise power laws. In experiments, scale-invariant neuronal avalanche dynamics have been observed during spontaneous cortical activity in isolated preparations in vitro as well as in the ongoing cortical activity of awake animals and in humans. Theory, models, and experiments suggest that neuronal avalanches are the signature of brain function near criticality at which the cortex optimally responds to inputs and maximizes its information capacity. Importantly, avalanche dynamics allow for the emergence of a subset of avalanches, the coherence potentials. They emerge when the synchronization of a local neuronal group exceeds a local threshold, at which the system spawns replicas of the local group activity at distant network sites. The functional importance of coherence potentials will be discussed in the context of propagating structures, such as gliders in balanced cellular automata. Gliders constitute local population dynamics that replicate in space after a finite number of generations and are thought to provide cellular automata with universal computation. Avalanches and coherence potentials are proposed to constitute a modern framework of cortical synchronization dynamics that underlies brain function.

  6. Acetyl-L-carnitine protects neuronal function from alcohol-induced oxidative damage in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rump, Travis J; Abdul Muneer, P M; Szlachetka, Adam M; Lamb, Allyson; Haorei, Catherine; Alikunju, Saleena; Xiong, Huangui; Keblesh, James; Liu, Jianuo; Zimmerman, Matthew C; Jones, Jocelyn; Donohue, Terrence M; Persidsky, Yuri; Haorah, James

    2010-11-30

    The studies presented here demonstrate the protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) against alcohol-induced oxidative neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, and impaired neurotransmission. Our findings reveal the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of alcohol-induced oxidative damage in various types of brain cells. Chronic ethanol administration to mice caused an increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine adduct formation in frontal cortical neurons but not in astrocytes from brains of these animals. Interestingly, alcohol administration caused a rather selective activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which, in turn, enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 4-hydroxynonenal, but these were predominantly localized in astrocytes and microglia. Oxidative damage in glial cells was accompanied by their pronounced activation (astrogliosis) and coincident neuronal loss, suggesting that inflammation in glial cells caused neuronal degeneration. Immunohistochemistry studies indicated that alcohol consumption induced different oxidative mediators in different brain cell types. Thus, nitric oxide was mostly detected in iNOS-expressing neurons, whereas ROS were predominantly generated in NOX-expressing glial cells after alcohol ingestion. Assessment of neuronal activity in ex vivo frontal cortical brain tissue slices from ethanol-fed mice showed a reduction in long-term potentiation synaptic transmission compared with slices from controls. Coadministration of ALC with alcohol showed a significant reduction in oxidative damage and neuronal loss and a restoration of synaptic neurotransmission in this brain region, suggesting that ALC protects brain cells from ethanol-induced oxidative injury. These findings suggest the potential clinical utility of ALC as a neuroprotective agent that prevents alcohol-induced brain damage and development of neurological disorders. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Chemical Coding of Sensory Neurons Supplying the Hip Joint Capsule in the Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, A; Sienkiewicz, W; Chrószcz, A; Janeczek, M; Kaleczyc, J

    2017-04-01

    Immunohistochemical properties of nerve fibres supplying the joint capsule were previously described in many mammalian species, but the localization of sensory neurons supplying this structure was studied only in laboratory animals, the rat and rabbit. However, there is no comprehensive data on the chemical coding of sensory neurons projecting to the hip joint capsule (HJC). The aim of this study was to establish immunohistochemical properties of sensory neurons supplying HJC in the sheep. The study was carried out on 10 sheep, weighing about 30-40 kg. The animals were injected with a retrograde neural tracer Fast Blue (FB) into HJC. Sections of the spinal ganglia (SpG) with FB-positive (FB+) neurons were stained using antibodies against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) substance P (SP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP), nitric oxide synthase (n-NOS), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), Leu-5-enkephalin (Leu-Enk), galanin (GAL) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VACHT). The vast majority of FB+ neurons supplying HJC was found in the ganglia from the 5th lumbar to the 2nd sacral. Immunohistochemistry revealed that most of these neurons were immunoreactive to CGRP or SP (80.7 ± 8.0% or 56.4 ± 4.8%, respectively) and many of them stained for PACAP or GAL (52.9 ± 2.9% or 50.6 ± 19.7%, respectively). Other populations of FB+ neurons were those immunoreactive to n-NOS (37.8 ± 9.7%), NPY (34.6 ± 6.7%), VIP (28.7 ± 4.8%), Leu-Enk (27.1 ± 14.6) and VACHT (16.7 ± 9.6). © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Nitric oxide directly inhibits ghrelin-activated neurons of the arcuate nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riediger, Thomas; Giannini, Petra; Erguven, Elif; Lutz, Thomas

    2006-12-13

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) is a target site for signals regulating energy homeostasis. The orexigenic hormone ghrelin directly activates neurons of the medial arcuate nucleus (ArcM) in rats. Nitric oxide (NO) is a neuromodulator implicated in the control of food intake and body weight. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and induces the formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) via a stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Both enzymes NOS and sGC have been identified in the Arc. Using extracellular recordings we characterized the effects of NO signaling on ArcM neurons and their co-sensitivity to ghrelin. The artificial NO donor sodium nitroprusside (10(-4) M) reversibly inhibited 91% of all ArcM neurons by a direct postsynaptic mechanism. 52% of ArcM neurons were excited by ghrelin. In all but one of these neurons SNP caused inhibitory responses. The SNP-induced inhibitions were mediated by cGMP since they were blocked by the specific sGC inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, 10(-4) M). Furthermore, the membrane permeating cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP (10(-4) M) mimicked the inhibitory responses of SNP. In immunohistological in vitro studies SNP induced a cGMP formation, which could also be blocked by ODQ. The current studies demonstrate that NO/cGMP signaling inhibits a large population of ArcM neurons including ghrelin-excited cells. Since an activation of the latter neurons is regarded as a correlate of negative energy balance, NO may represent an anorectic neuromodulator in the Arc and/or restrain the action of signals promoting energy intake. NO signaling in the Arc is also induced following inflammation suggesting a possible role of Arc-intrinsic NO in disease-related anorexia.

  9. [Neurons and values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    This article examines the advances made by neuroscience in the attempt to find an answer to the question regarding the origin and foundation of moral judgements and of human behaviour in compliance with them. The conception of the brain as something dynamic and capable of adapting to the social and cultural surroundings is seen to be an important point for philosophy. At the same time, the complexity of ethical issues that cannot be reduced to observations based strictly on neurons alone also becomes quite apparent. Nevertheless, scientists and philosophers should get together and communicate with one another so as to be able to pose their questions with greater rigour and take advantage of each other's respective knowledge.

  10. Multiplying with Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbiani, F.; Krapp, H.; Koch, C.; Laurent, G.

    1998-03-01

    LGMD and DCMD are a pair of identified neurons in the locust brain thought to be involved in visually triggered escape behavior. LGMD integrates visual inputs in its dendritic arbor, converts them into spikes transmitted in a 1:1 manner to DCMD which relays this information to motor centers. We measured the spike activity of DCMD during simulated object approach and observed that its peak occured prior to the expected collision. The time difference between peak activity and collision depended linearly on the ratio of object size to approach velocity, as expected if LGMD/DCMD were detecting the moment in time when the approaching object reaches a fixed angular threshold θ_thresh on the locust's retina. The response of LGMD/DCMD could be fitted by multiplying the angular velocity at which an approaching object is increasing in size over the retina, dot θ, with an exponential function of the object's angular size, θ: f(t) = g(dot θ(t-δ) e^-α θ(t-δ)) where g is a static non-linearity, α a constant related to the angular threshold detected by LGMD/DCMD (θ_thresh = arctan (2/α)) and δ denotes the lag of the neuronal response with respect to the stimulus. This suggests that LGMD/DCMD derives its angular threshold sensitivity by multiplying dot θ with an exponential of θ. A biophysical implementation would be through linear summation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs proportional to log(dot θ) and -α θ, followed by a conversion to spike rate according to the static non-linearity (g circ exp). We have performed several experiments to test this hypothesis.

  11. Postmitotic specification of Drosophila insulinergic neurons from pioneer neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Miguel-Aliaga

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin and related peptides play important and conserved functions in growth and metabolism. Although Drosophila has proved useful for the genetic analysis of insulin functions, little is known about the transcription factors and cell lineages involved in insulin production. Within the embryonic central nervous system, the MP2 neuroblast divides once to generate a dMP2 neuron that initially functions as a pioneer, guiding the axons of other later-born embryonic neurons. Later during development, dMP2 neurons in anterior segments undergo apoptosis but their posterior counterparts persist. We show here that surviving posterior dMP2 neurons no longer function in axonal scaffolding but differentiate into neuroendocrine cells that express insulin-like peptide 7 (Ilp7 and innervate the hindgut. We find that the postmitotic transition from pioneer to insulin-producing neuron is a multistep process requiring retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signalling and four transcription factors: Abdominal-B, Hb9, Fork Head, and Dimmed. These five inputs contribute in a partially overlapping manner to combinatorial codes for dMP2 apoptosis, survival, and insulinergic differentiation. Ectopic reconstitution of this code is sufficient to activate Ilp7 expression in other postmitotic neurons. These studies reveal striking similarities between the transcription factors regulating insulin expression in insect neurons and mammalian pancreatic beta-cells.

  12. ATRAVESSAMENTO DE SABERES NOS ESTUDOS SOBRE A LINGUAGEM NO/DO BRASIL NOS ANOS 50

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Mallmann Schneiders

    2011-01-01

    A problemática de pesquisa sobre a qual nos debruçamos neste estudo de dissertação volta-se a uma reflexão em torno do discurso sobre a produção do conhecimento linguístico dos anos 50 no/do Brasil. Nosso escopo central está na compreensão da temporalidade e da memória discursiva que constituem o discurso científico sobre a linguagem dessa conjuntura a partir do atravessamento de saberes do campo disciplinar da Linguística. Interessa-nos este atravessamento, pois esse domínio de saber a...

  13. Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Negatively Regulates Zinc-Induced Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Kumar, Vinod; Chauhan, Amit Kumar; Dwivedi, Ashish; Singh, Shweta; Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Deepali; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Ray, Ratan Singh; Jain, Swatantra Kumar; Singh, Chetna

    2017-05-01

    The study aimed to investigate the role of NO and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in Zn-induced neurodegeneration. Animals were treated with zinc sulfate (20 mg/kg), twice a week, for 2-12 weeks along with control. In a few sets, animals were also treated with/without a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), or S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP) for 12 weeks. Moreover, human neuroblastoma (SH-SY-5Y) cells were also employed to investigate the role of nNOS in Zn-induced toxicity in in vitro in the presence/absence of nNOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI). Zn caused time-dependent reduction in nitrite content and total/nNOS activity/expression. SNP/SNAP discernibly alleviated Zn-induced neurobehavioral impairments, dopaminergic neurodegeneration, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, and striatal dopamine depletion. NO donors also salvage from Zn-induced increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO), mitochondrial cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. While Zn elevated LPO content, it attenuated nitrite content, nNOS activity, and glutathione level along with the expression of TH and nNOS in SH-SY-5Y cells. 7-NI further augmented Zn-induced changes in the cell viability, oxidative stress, and expression of TH and nNOS. The results obtained thus demonstrate that Zn inhibits nNOS that partially contributes to an increase in oxidative stress, which subsequently leads to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  14. Erythromycin pretreatment induces tolerance against focal cerebral ischemia through up-regulation of nNOS but not down-regulation of HIF-1α in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei-Cheng; Li, Guang-Yu; Xie, Hui; Qiu, Bo; Yang, Ri-Miao; Guo, Zong-Ze

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the antibiotic erythromycin induces tolerance against focal cerebral ischemia, and the possible underlying mechanism including the involvement of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). In rat focal cerebral ischemia models, we found that erythromycin preconditioning could significantly decrease the cerebral infarct volume and brain edema. Meanwhile, the neurological deficits from day 4 through 7 after surgery were also remarkably decreased after erythromycin preconditioning. Moreover, erythromycin preconditioning induced significantly increased nNOS levels and decreased HIF-1α levels in both mRNA and protein expression. This study for the first time indicated that erythromycin preconditioning could induce focal brain ischemic tolerance and attenuate brain injury of subsequent transient focal cerebral ischemia. The potential mechanism may be due to up-regulation of nNOS, but the HIF-1α system was not involved.

  15. Melatonin influences NO/NOS pathway and reduces oxidative and nitrosative stress in a model of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Santos; Hernández, Raquel; Franchelli, Gustavo; Ramos-Álvarez, Manuel Miguel; Peinado, María Ángeles

    2017-01-30

    In this work, using a rat model combining ischemia and hypobaric hypoxia (IH), we evaluate the relationships between the antioxidant melatonin and the cerebral nitric oxide/nitric oxide synthase (NO/NOS) system seeking to ascertain whether melatonin exerts its antioxidant protective action by balancing this key pathway, which is highly involved in the cerebral oxidative and nitrosative damage underlying these pathologies. The application of the IH model increases the expression of the three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms, as well as nitrogen oxide (NOx) levels and nitrotyrosine (n-Tyr) impacts on the cerebral cortex. However, melatonin administration before IH makes nNOS expression response earlier and stronger, but diminishes iNOS and n-Tyr expression, while both eNOS and NOx remain unchanged. These results were corroborated by nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) staining, as indicative of in situ NOS activity. In addition, the rats previously treated with melatonin exhibited a reduction in the oxidative impact evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Finally, IH also intensified glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, reduced hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α), but did not change nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB); meanwhile, melatonin did not significantly affect any of these patterns after the application of the IH model. The antioxidant melatonin acts on the NO/NOS system after IH injury balancing the release of NO, reducing peroxynitrite formation and protecting from nitrosative/oxidative damage. In addition, this paper raises questions concerning the classical role of some controversial molecules such as NO, which are of great consequence in the final fate of hypoxic neurons. We conclude that melatonin protects the brain from hypoxic/ischemic-derived damage in the first steps of the ischemic cascade, influencing the NO/NOS pathway and reducing oxidative and nitrosative stress. Copyright

  16. Synthesis of a Potent Aminopyridine-Based nNOS-Inhibitor by Two Recent No-Carrier-Added 18F-Labelling Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Drerup

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO, an important multifunctional signaling molecule, is produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase (NOS and has been associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Selective inhibitors of the subtypes iNOS (inducible or nNOS (neuronal are of great interest for decoding neurodestructive key factors, and 18F-labelled analogues would allow investigating the NOS-function by molecular imaging with positron emission tomography. Especially, the highly selective nNOS inhibitor 6-((3-((3-fluorophenethylaminomethylphenoxymethyl-4-methylpyridin-2-amine (10 lends itself as suitable compound to be 18F-labelled in no-carrier-added (n.c.a. form. For preparation of the 18F-labelled nNOS-Inhibitor [18F]10 a “build-up” radiosynthesis was developed based on a corresponding iodonium ylide as labelling precursor. The such activated phenethyl group of the compound was efficiently and regioselectively labelled with n.c.a. [18F]fluoride in 79% radiochemical yield (RCY. After conversion by reductive amination and microwave assisted displacement of the protecting groups, the desired nNOS-inhibitor was obtained in about 15% total RCY. Alternatively, for a simplified “late-stage” 18F-labelling procedure a corresponding boronic ester precursor was synthesized and successfully used in a newer, copper(II mediated n.c.a. 18F-fluoro-deboroniation reaction, achieving the same total RCY. Thus, both methods proved comparatively suited to provide the highly selective NOS-inhibitor [18F]10 as probe for preclinical in vivo studies.

  17. A Neuron Model for FPGA Spiking Neuronal Network Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONTEANU, G.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a neuron model, able to reproduce the basic elements of the neuronal dynamics, optimized for digital implementation of Spiking Neural Networks. Its architecture is structured in two major blocks, a datapath and a control unit. The datapath consists of a membrane potential circuit, which emulates the neuronal dynamics at the soma level, and a synaptic circuit used to update the synaptic weight according to the spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP mechanism. The proposed model is implemented into a Cyclone II-Altera FPGA device. Our results indicate the neuron model can be used to build up 1K Spiking Neural Networks on reconfigurable logic suport, to explore various network topologies.

  18. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review...... the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level....

  19. Evidence of involvement of neurone-glia/neurone-neurone communications via gap junctions in synchronised activity of KNDy neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, K; Minabe, S; Ieda, N; Goto, T; Sugimoto, A; Nakamura, S; Inoue, N; Oishi, S; Maturana, A D; Sanbo, M; Hirabayashi, M; Maeda, K-I; Tsukamura, H; Uenoyama, Y

    2017-06-01

    Pulsatile secretion of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinising hormone is indispensable for the onset of puberty and reproductive activities at adulthood in mammalian species. A cohort of neurones expressing three neuropeptides, namely kisspeptin, encoded by the Kiss1 gene, neurokinin B (NKB) and dynorphin A, localised in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), so-called KNDy neurones, comprises a putative intrinsic source of the GnRH pulse generator. Synchronous activity among KNDy neurones is considered to be required for pulsatile GnRH secretion. It has been reported that gap junctions play a key role in synchronising electrical activity in the central nervous system. Thus, we hypothesised that gap junctions are involved in the synchronised activities of KNDy neurones, which is induced by NKB-NK3R signalling. We determined the role of NKB-NK3R signalling in Ca 2+ oscillation (an indicator of neuronal activities) of KNDy neurones and its synchronisation mechanism among KNDy neurones. Senktide, a selective agonist for NK3R, increased the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations in cultured Kiss1-GFP cells collected from the mediobasal hypothalamus of the foetal Kiss1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice. The senktide-induced Ca 2+ oscillations were synchronised in the Kiss1-GFP and neighbouring glial cells. Confocal microscopy analysis of these cells, which have shown synchronised Ca 2+ oscillations, revealed close contacts between Kiss1-GFP cells, as well as between Kiss1-GFP cells and glial cells. Dye coupling experiments suggest cell-to-cell communication through gap junctions between Kiss1-GFP cells and neighbouring glial cells. Connexin-26 and -37 mRNA were found in isolated ARC Kiss1 cells taken from adult female Kiss1-GFP transgenic mice. Furthermore, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acids and mefloquine, which are gap junction inhibitors, attenuated senktide-induced Ca 2+ oscillations in Kiss1-GFP cells. Taken together, these results suggest that NKB-NK3R signalling

  20. Nonsulfated cholecystokinins in cerebral neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersnap, Mikkel; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Harkany, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a widely expressed neuropeptide system originally discovered in the gut. Both cerebral and peripheral neurons as well as endocrine I-cells in the small intestine process proCCK to tyrosyl-O-sulfated and α-carboxyamidated peptides. Recently, we reported that gut endocrine I...... for nonsulfated CCK-8 with an antibody recognizing both sulfated and nonsulfated CCK. However, nonsulfated CCK immunoreactivity was stronger than that of sulfated CCK in cell bodies and weaker in nerve terminals. We conclude that only a small fraction of neuronal CCK is nonsulfated. The intracellular distribution...... of nonsulfated CCK in neurons suggests that they contribute only modestly to the CCK transmitter activity....

  1. Neurones and neuropeptides in coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Ebbesen, Ditte Graff; McFarlane, I D

    1989-01-01

    The first nervous system probably evolved in coelenterates. Many neurons in coelenterates have morphological characteristics of both sensory and motor neurones, and appear to be multifunctional. Using immunocytochemistry with antisera to the sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide), RFamide-like peptides......) was isolated, which also belongs to the less than Glu...Arg-X-NH2 family. Using specific antisera it was shown that all four peptides were located in neurones. Application of low doses of Antho-RFamide, or Antho-RWamide I or II induced contractions of endodermal muscles of sea anemones. This indicates...

  2. Statistical inference on spontaneous neuronal discharge patterns. I. Single neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lánský, P; Radil, T

    1987-01-01

    A statistical analysis was performed on extracellularly recorded spike trains of spontaneously active mesencephalic reticular neurons of rats. Only stationary records were used for detailed examination. The moments of interspike intervals were computed, hypothesis of renewal process and its specific forms was tested. Implications for statistical methodology are considered on the basis of the results. The main emphasis is laid on the connection between experimental results and stochastic neuronal models.

  3. Subjetividade, alteridade e desamparo nos tempos atuais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Humberto Rodrigues Rocha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho vai ao encontro do que foi realizado ao longo da teoria freudiana: contextualizar o homem em sua ordem social circundante e pensar as relações que se estabelecem na configuração do laço social. O objetivo é refletir sobre as possibilidades de outras articulações metapsicológicas, que permitam compreender a relação dos dispositivos contemporâneos criados para lidar com odesamparo, e as implicações de seu uso recorrente na condição desejante.Para tanto, nos deteremos a propósito das tensões entre as três instâncias do aparelho psíquico: id, ego e superego. Analisando as relações que estruturam o laço social, conseguimos repensar proposições psicanalíticas consagradas, tais como alteridade, desejo, pulsão e seus destinos.

  4. Detection of nitric oxide release from single neurons in the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavik Anil; Arundell, Martin; Parker, Kim H; Yeoman, Mark S; O'Hare, Danny

    2006-11-15

    Multiple film-coated nitric oxide sensors have been fabricated using Nafion and electropolymerized polyeugenol or o-phenylenediamine on 30-microm carbon fiber disk electrodes. This is a rare study that utilizes disk electrodes rather than the widely used protruding tip microelectrodes in order to measure from a biological environment. These electrodes have been used to evaluate the differences in nitric oxide release between two different identified neurons in the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis. These results show the first direct measurements of nitric oxide release from individual neurons. The electrodes are very sensitive to nitric oxide with a detection limit of 2.8 nM and a sensitivity of 9.46 nA microM-1. The sensor was very selective against a variety of neurochemical interferences such as ascorbic acid, uric acid, and catecholamines and secondary oxidation products such as nitrite. Nitric oxide release was measured from the cell bodies of two neurons, the cerebral giant cell (CGC) and the B2 buccal motor neuron, in the intact but isolated CNS. A high-Ca2+/high-K+ stimulus was capable of evoking reproducible release. For a given stimulus, the B2 neuron released more nitric oxide than the CGC neuron; however, both cells were equally suppressed by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME.

  5. Rat vagus nerve stimulation model of seizure suppression: nNOS and ΔFos B changes in the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, K; Majoie, H J M; Aalbers, M W; Philippens, M; Doenni, V M; Vles, J S H; Steinbusch, H M W; Moers-Hornikx, V M P; Hopkins, D A; Hoogland, G

    2012-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a moderately effective treatment for intractable epilepsy. However, the mechanism of action is poorly understood. The effect of left VNS in amygdala kindled rats was investigated by studying changes in nNOS and ΔFos B expression in primary and secondary vagus nerve projection nuclei: the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMV), parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and locus coeruleus (LC). Rats were fully kindled by stimulation of the amygdala. Subsequently, when the fully kindled state was reached and then maintained for ten days, rats received a single 3-min train of VNS starting 1min prior to the kindling stimulus and lasting for 2min afterwards. In control animals the vagus nerve was not stimulated. Animals were sacrificed 48h later. The brainstems were stained for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and ΔFos B. VNS decreased seizure duration with more than 25% in 21% of rats. No VNS associated changes in nNOS immunoreactivity were observed in the NTS and no changes in ΔFos B were observed in the NTS, PBN, or LC. High nNOS immunopositive cell densities of >300cells/mm(2) were significantly more frequent in the left DMV than in the right (χ(2)(1)=26.2, pvagus nerve was stimulated. We conclude that the observed nNOS immunoreactivity in the DMV suggests surgery-induced axonal damage. A 3-min train of VNS in fully kindled rats does not affect ΔFos B expression in primary and secondary projection nuclei of the vagus nerve. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Confocal imaging of autonomic preganglionic neurons in the spinal cord of the caecilian Typhlonectes natans (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Daniele; Lauriano, Eugenia Rita; Capillo, Gioele; Zuwała, Krystyna; Budzik, Karolina Agata; Kuciel, Michał; Zaccone, Giacomo

    2014-10-01

    Little is known about the spinal sympathetic organization in the caecilian amphibians. We examined for the first time the location of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) in the spinal cord using a panel of specific markers expressed in SPNs. The SPNs of anuran amphibians form two cell columns segregated mainly in the lateral and medial marginal areas of the central gray matter. In the caecilian Typhlonectes natans immunoreactivity for galanin and ChAT is found in most laterally arranged neurons lying in spinal segments 2-7. They are encircled by TH- and nNOS-immunoreactive nerve fibers. These neurons might project specifically to a population of adrenergic sympathetic postganglionic neurons in paravertebral ganglia and/or non-adrenergic sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the celiac ganglia. However the segmental restriction and target specificity of the neurons of the species studied are not known. As mucous and granular glands in the dermis may represent one of the peripheral targets of the adrenergic ganglion cells and reflect the prominent preganglionic cell columns, an immunohistochemical study was done also on these glands. Retrograde-tracing studies are, however, needed to study the segmental localization of the preganglionic neurons and their projections to the postganglionic neurons in sympathetic ganglia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Responses of neurons in the inferior colliculus to binaural masking level difference stimuli measured by rate-versus-level functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, D; McAlpine, D; Palmer, A R

    1997-06-01

    The psychophysical detection threshold of a low-frequency tone masked by broadband noise is reduced by binaural masking level difference: BMLD). The contribution of 120 low-frequency neurons (best frequencies 168-2,090 Hz) in the inferior colliculus (ICC) of the guinea pig to binaural unmasking of 500-Hz tones masked by broadband noise was examined. We measured rate-level functions of the responses to identical signals (So) and noise (No) at the two ears (NoSo) and to identical noise but with the signal inverted at one ear (NoS pi): the noise was 7-15 dB suprathreshold. The masked threshold was estimated by the standard separation, "D". The neural BMLD was estimated as the difference between the masked thresholds for NoSo and NoS pi. The presence of So and S pi tones was indicated by discharge rate increases in 55.3% of neurons. In 36.4% of neurons, the presence of So tones was indicated by an increase in discharge rate and S pi tones by a decrease. In 6.8% of neurons, both So and S pi tones caused a decrease in discharge rate. In only 1.5% of neurons was So indicated by a decrease and S pi by an increase in discharge rate. Responses to the binaural configurations were consistent with the neuron's interaural delay sensitivities; 34.4% of neurons showing increases in discharge rate to both So and S pi tones gave positive BMLDs > or = 3 dB (S pi tones were detected at lower levels than So), whereas 37.3% gave negative BMLDs > or = 3 dB. For neurons in which So signals caused an increase in the discharge rate and S pi a decrease, 72.7% gave positive BMLDs > or = 3 dB and only 4.5% gave negative BMLDs > or = 3 dB. The results suggest that the responses of single ICC neurons are consistent with the psychophysical BMLDs for NoSo versus NoS pi at 500 Hz, and with current binaural interaction models based on coincidence detection. The neurons likely to contribute to the psychophysical BMLD are those with BFs near 500 Hz, but detection of So and S pi tones may depend on

  8. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-12-06

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild.

  9. Information processing by neuronal populations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hölscher, Christian; Munk, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    ... simultaneously recorded spike trains 120 Mark Laubach, Nandakumar S. Narayanan, and Eyal Y. Kimchi Part III Neuronal population information coding and plasticity in specific brain areas 149 7 F...

  10. Hydrodynamic Limit for Interacting Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, A.; Galves, A.; Löcherbach, E.; Presutti, E.

    2015-02-01

    This paper studies the hydrodynamic limit of a stochastic process describing the time evolution of a system with N neurons with mean-field interactions produced both by chemical and by electrical synapses. This system can be informally described as follows. Each neuron spikes randomly following a point process with rate depending on its membrane potential. At its spiking time, the membrane potential of the spiking neuron is reset to the value 0 and, simultaneously, the membrane potentials of the other neurons are increased by an amount of potential . This mimics the effect of chemical synapses. Additionally, the effect of electrical synapses is represented by a deterministic drift of all the membrane potentials towards the average value of the system. We show that, as the system size N diverges, the distribution of membrane potentials becomes deterministic and is described by a limit density which obeys a non linear PDE which is a conservation law of hyperbolic type.

  11. Neuronal control of energy homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Qian; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2007-01-01

    Neuronal control of body energy homeostasis is the key mechanism by which animals and humans regulate their long-term energy balance. Various hypothalamic neuronal circuits (which include the hypothalamic melanocortin, midbrain dopamine reward and caudal brainstem autonomic feeding systems) control energy intake and expenditure to maintain body weight within a narrow range for long periods of a life span. Numerous peripheral metabolic hormones and nutrients target these structures providing f...

  12. Novel model of neuronal bioenergetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate)-ind......We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N...... of an ionomycin-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ (i.e. independent of synaptic activity) on neuronal energy metabolism employing 13C-labelled glucose and lactate and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of labelling in glutamate, alanine and lactate. The results demonstrate that glucose utilization...... is positively correlated with intracellular Ca2+ whereas lactate utilization is not. This result lends further support for a significant role of glucose in neuronal bioenergetics and that Ca2+ signalling may control the switch between glucose and lactate utilization during synaptic activity. Based...

  13. Communication among neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Lisbeth

    2012-04-01

    The communication among neurons is the prerequisite for the working brain. To understand the cellular, neurochemical, and structural basis of this communication, and the impacts of aging and disease on brain function, quantitative measures are necessary. This thesis evaluates several quantitative neurobiological methods with respect to possible bias and methodological issues. Stereological methods are suited for the unbiased estimation of number, length, and volumes of components of the nervous system. Stereological estimates of the total length of myelinated nerve fibers were made in white matter of post mortem brains, and the impact of aging and diseases as Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease were evaluated. Although stereological methods are in principle unbiased, shrinkage artifacts are difficult to account for. Positron emission tomography (PET) recordings, in conjunction with kinetic modeling, permit the quantitation of radioligand binding in brain. The novel serotonin 5-HT4 antagonist [11C]SB207145 was used as an example of the validation process for quantitative PET receptor imaging. Methods based on reference tissue as well as methods based on an arterial plasma input function were evaluated with respect to precision and accuracy. It was shown that [11C]SB207145 binding had high sensitivity to occupancy by unlabeled ligand, necessitating high specific activity in the radiosynthesis to avoid bias. The established serotonin 5-HT2A ligand [18F]altanersin was evaluated in a two-year follow-up study in elderly subjects. Application of partial volume correction of the PET data diminished the reliability of the measures, but allowed for the correct distinction between changes due to brain atrophy and receptor availability. Furthermore, a PET study of patients with Alzheimer's disease with the serotonin transporter ligand [11C]DASB showed relatively preserved serotonergic projections, despite a marked decrease in 5-HT2A receptor binding. Possible confounders are

  14. Using a Professional Development Program for Enhancing Chilean Biology Teachers' Understanding of Nature of Science (NOS) and Their Perceptions About Using History of Science to Teach NOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavez, José M.; Vergara, Claudia A.; Santibañez, David; Cofré, Hernán

    2016-05-01

    A number of authors have recognized the importance of understanding the nature of science (NOS) for scientific literacy. Different instructional strategies such as decontextualized, hands-on inquiry, and history of science (HOS) activities have been proposed for teaching NOS. This article seeks to understand the contribution of HOS in enhancing biology teachers' understanding of NOS, and their perceptions about using HOS to teach NOS. These teachers ( N = 8), enrolled in a professional development program in Chile are, according to the national curriculum, expected to teach NOS, but have no specific NOS and HOS training. Teachers' views of NOS were assessed using the VNOS-D+ questionnaire at the beginning and at the end of two modules about science instruction and NOS. Both the pre- and the post-test were accompanied by interviews, and in the second session we collected information about teachers' perceptions of which interventions had been more significant in changing their views on NOS. Finally, the teachers also had to prepare a lesson plan for teaching NOS that included HOS. Some of the most important study results were: significant improvements were observed in teachers' understanding of NOS, although they assigned different levels of importance to HOS in these improvements; and although the teachers improved their understanding of NOS, most had difficulties in planning lessons about NOS and articulating historical episodes that incorporated NOS. The relationship between teachers' improved understanding of NOS and their instructional NOS skills is also discussed.

  15. Pycnogenol Protects Against Rotenone-Induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells Through Regulating NF-κB-iNOS Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo; Chang, Chongwang; Zhou, Jie; Zhao, Tianzhi; Wang, Chao; Li, Chen; Gao, Guodong

    2015-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by dopaminergic neurons degeneration and oxidative damage may underlie this process. However, there are still no efficient drugs to cure the disease. Pycnogenol (PYC) isolated from the procyanidin-rich French maritime pine (Pinus maritime) bark has shown various antioxidant activities in previous studies. In this study, we explored its effect against rotenone (Rot)-induced neurotoxicity and the underlying mechanisms in PC12 cells. Using Rot-induced cell model of PD, we found that PYC treatment significantly increased cell viability and decreased cell apoptosis in Rot-treated PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, data showed that PYC markedly reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-nitric oxide (NO) signaling in Rot-treated PC12 cells. Pretreatment with the iNOS-specific inhibitor significantly attenuated Rot-induced neurotoxicity. Moreover, PYC was found to be capable of reducing Rot-induced NF-κB activation. Blocking NF-κB signaling with its inhibitor mimicked the biological effect of PYC on Rot-induced iNOS and NO expression levels, as well as neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, suggesting that the NF-κB-iNOS signaling pathway was likely to participate in the PYC-mediated protective progress. Our results suggest that PYC protects against Rot-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, and the mechanism may be associated with the downregulation of NF-κB-iNOS signaling pathway.

  16. Changes in the interstitial cells of Cajal and neuronal nitric oxide synthase positive neuronal cells with aging in the esophagus of F344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Yong Sung; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Lee, Sun Min; Park, Ji Hyun; Choi, Daeun; Hwang, Young-Jae; Lee, Jongchan; Lee, Hye Seung; Kim, Min-Seob; Lee, Moon Young; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    The aging-associated cellular and molecular changes in esophagus have not been established, yet. Thus we evaluated histological structure, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive cells, and contractility in the esophagus of Fischer 344 rat at different ages (6-, 31-, 74-weeks, and 2-years). The lamina propria thickness and endomysial area were calculated. The immunoreactivity of c-Kit, nNOS and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 was counted after immunohistochemistry. Expression of c-Kit, stem cell factor (SCF), nNOS and PGP 9.5 mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, and expression of c-Kit and nNOS protein was detected by Western blot. Isovolumetric contractile force measurement and electrical field stimulation (EFS) were conducted. The lamina propria thickness increased (6 week vs 2 year, P = 0.005) and the endomysial area of longitudinal muscle decreased with aging (6 week vs 2 year, Paging (6 week vs 2 year; Pchange of PGP 9.5-immunopositiviy. The expressions of nNOS, c-Kit and SCF mRNA also reduced with aging (6 week vs 2 year; P = 0.006, P = 0.001 and P = 0.006, respectively), while the change of PGP 9.5 mRNA expression was not significant. Western blot showed the significant decreases of nNOS and c-Kit protein expression with aging (6 week vs 2 year; P = 0.008 and P = 0.012, respectively). The EFS-induced esophageal contractions significantly decreased in 2-yr-old rat compared with 6-wk-old rats, however, L-NG-Nitroarginine methylester did not significantly increase the spontaneous and EFS-induced contractions in the 6-wk- and 2-yr-old rat esophagus. In conclusion, an increase of lamina propria thickness, a decrease of endomysial area, c-Kit, SCF and NOS expression with preserved total enteric neurons, and contractility in aged rat esophagus may explain the aging-associated esophageal dysmotility.

  17. Culture of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Qizhi

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons, located in the nasal epithelium, detect and transmit odorant information to the central nervous system. This requires that these neurons form specific neuronal connections within the olfactory bulb and express receptors and signaling molecules specific for these functions. This protocol describes a primary olfactory sensory neuron culture technique that allows in vitro investigation of olfactory sensory neuron differentiation, axon outgrowth, odorant receptor expres...

  18. Allicin protects spinal cord neurons from glutamate-induced oxidative stress through regulating the heat shock protein 70/inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Ren, Peng-Yu; Wang, Guo-Yu; Yao, Shu-Xin; He, Xi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Allicin, the main biologically active compound derived from garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have therapeutic potential in many neurological disorders. Using an in vitro spinal cord injury model induced by glutamate treatment, we sought to investigate the neuroprotective effects of allicin in primary cultured spinal cord neurons. We found that allicin treatment significantly attenuated glutamate-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, loss of cell viability and apoptotic neuronal death. This protection was associated with reduced oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced lipid peroxidation and preservation of antioxidant enzyme activities. The results of western blot analysis showed that allicin decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), but had no effects on the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) following glutamate exposure. Moreover, allicin treatment significantly increased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at both mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of HSP70 by specific targeted small interfere RNA (siRNA) not only mitigated allicin-induced protective activity, but also partially nullified its effects on the regulation of iNOS. Collectively, these data demonstrate that allicin treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury, and that the potential underlying mechanism involves HSP70/iNOS pathway-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress.

  19. Sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons are likely to be absent in the human vestibular and geniculate ganglia: an immunohistochemical study using elderly cadaveric specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masato; Yamamoto, Masahito; Kitamura, Kei; Kasahara, Masaaki; Matsunaga, Satoru; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    The vestibular and geniculate ganglia of the ear in experimental animals carry both of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive sympathetic neurons and the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-positive parasympathetic neurons. With an aid of immunohistochemistry, we examined these ganglia as well as the horizontal part of the facial nerve using specimens from 10 formalin-fixed elderly cadavers. The submandibular ganglion from the same cadavers was used for the positive control for both markers. Although there was a nonspecific reaction in nuclei for the present antibody of nNOS, these ganglia were unlikely to contain either nNOS- or TH-positive neurons. However, we did not deny a possibility that the absence was a result of degeneration with aging. In contrast, the facial nerve horizontal part consistently contained both of TH-positive- and nNOS-positive fibers. These fibers might regulate blood supply to the facial nerve and the dysregulation leads to edema to elevate pressure on the nerve within its osseous canal.

  20. Breast feeding increases vasoconstriction induced by electrical field stimulation in rat mesenteric artery. Role of neuronal nitric oxide and ATP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Blanco-Rivero

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate in rat mesenteric artery whether breast feeding (BF affects the vasomotor response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS, participation by different innervations in the EFS-induced response and the mechanism/s underlying these possible modifications. METHODS: Experiments were performed in female Sprague-Dawley rats (3 months old, divided into three groups: Control (in oestrous phase, mothers after 21 days of BF, and mothers that had recovered their oestral cycle (After BF, in oestrous phase. Vasomotor response to EFS, noradrenaline (NA and nitric oxide (NO donor DEA-NO were studied. Neuronal NO synthase (nNOS and phosphorylated nNOS (P-nNOS protein expression were analysed and NO, superoxide anion (O(2(.-, NA and ATP releases were also determined. RESULTS: EFS-induced contraction was higher in the BF group, and was recovered after BF. 1 µmol/L phentolamine decreased the response to EFS similarly in control and BF rats. NA vasoconstriction and release were similar in both experimental groups. ATP release was higher in segments from BF rats. 0.1 mmol/L L-NAME increased the response to EFS in both control and BF rats, but more so in control animals. BF decreased NO release and did not modify O(2(.- production. Vasodilator response to DEA-NO was similar in both groups, while nNOS and P-nNOS expressions were decreased in segments from BF animals. CONCLUSION: Breast feeding increases EFS-induced contraction in mesenteric arteries, mainly through the decrease of neuronal NO release mediated by decreased nNOS and P-nNOS expression. Sympathetic function is increased through the increased ATP release in BF rats.

  1. Ontogenesis of NADPH-diaphorase positive neurons in guinea pig neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eLiu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian cerebrum there exist two distinct types of interneurons expressing nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Type I neurons are large in size and exhibit heavy nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d histochemical reaction, while type II cells are small with light NADPH-d reactivity. The time of origin of these cortical neurons relative to corticogenesis remains largely unclear among mammals. Here we explored this issue in guinea pigs using cell birth-dating and double-labeling methods. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU pulse-chasing (2 doses at 50 mg/kg, 12 hours apart was given to time-pregnant mothers, followed by quantification of NADPH-d/BrdU colocalization in the parietal and temporal neocortex in offspring at postnatal day 0 (P0, P30 and P60. Type I neurons were partially colabeled with BrdU at P0, P30 and P60 following pulse-chasing at embryonic day 21 (E21, E28 and E35, varied from 2% to 11.3% of total population of these neurons for the three time groups. Type II neurons were partially colabeled for BrdU following pulse-chasing at E21, E28, E35 and E42 at P0 (8.6%-16.5% of total population for individual time groups. At P60, type II neurons were found to co-express BrdU (4.8%-11.3% of total population for individual time groups following pulse-chasing at E21, E28, E35, E42, E49, E56 and E60/61. These results indicate that in guinea pigs type I neurons are generated during early corticogenesis, whereas type II cells are produced over a wide prenatal time window persisting until birth. The data also suggest that type II nitrinergic neurons may undergo a period of development/differentiation, for over one month, before being NADPH-d reactive.

  2. Oct-2 forms a complex with Oct-1 on the iNOS promoter and represses transcription by interfering with recruitment of RNA PolII by Oct-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentrari, Fatima; Chantôme, Aurelie; Knights, Andrew; Jeannin, Jean-François; Pance, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Oct-1 (POU2f1) and Oct-2 (POU2f2) are members of the POU family of transcription factors. They recognize the same DNA sequence but fulfil distinct functions: Oct-1 is ubiquitous and regulates a variety of genes while Oct-2 is restricted to B-cells and neurones. Here we examine the interplay and regulatory mechanisms of these factors to control the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, NOS2). Using two breast cancer cell lines as a comparative model, we found that MCF-7 express iNOS upon cytokine stimulation while MDA-MB-231 do not. Oct-1 is present in both cell lines but MDA-MB-231also express high levels of Oct-2. Manipulation of Oct-2 expression in these cell lines demonstrates that it is directly responsible for the repression of iNOS in MDA-MB-231. In MCF-7 cells Oct-1 binds the iNOS promoter, recruits RNA PolII and triggers initiation of transcription. In MDA-MB-231 cells, both Oct-1 and Oct-2 bind the iNOS promoter, forming a higher-order complex which fails to recruit RNA PolII, and as a consequence iNOS transcription does not proceed. Unravelling the mechanisms of transcription factor activity is paramount to the understanding of gene expression patterns that determine cell behaviour. PMID:26271992

  3. Ephaptic coupling in cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Anastassiou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical processes that underlie neural function manifest themselves in ceaseless spatial and temporal fluctuations in the extracellular electric field. The local field potential (LFP, used to study neural interactions during various brain states, is regarded as an epiphenomenon of coordinated neural activity. Yet the extracellular field activity feeds back onto the electrical potential across the neuronal membrane via ephaptic coupling (Jefferys et al, Physiol Rev, 1995. The extent to which such ephaptic coupling alters the functioning of individual neurons and neural assemblies under physiological conditions has remained largely speculative despite recent advances (Ozen et al, JNeurosci, 2010; Fröhlich & McCormick, Neuron, 2010, Anastassiou et al, JNeurosci, 2010. To address this question we use a 12-pipette setup that allows independent positioning of each pipette under visual control with μm accuracy, with the flexibility of using an arbitrary number of these as patching, extracellularly stimulating or extracellular recording pipettes only a few μm away from the cell body of patched neurons (Anastassiou et al, Nat Neurosci, 2011. We stimulated in rat somatosensory cortical slices a variety of layer 5 neural types and recorded inside and outside their cell bodies while pharmacologically silencing synaptic transmission. Pyramidal cells couple to the extracellular field distinctly different from interneurons. Ephaptic coupling strength depends both on the field strength (as measured at the neuron soma as well as the spike-history of neurons. In particular, we find that ephaptic coupling strength depends both on the field strength (as measured at the cell body as well as the spike-history of neurons. How do such effects manifest themselves in vivo? We address this question through detailed large-scale simulations from thousands of biophysically realistic and interconnected neurons (Reimann, Anastassiou et al, Neuron, 2013 emulating

  4. Long-term administration of ketamine induces erectile dysfunction by decreasing neuronal nitric oxide synthase on cavernous nerve and increasing corporal smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Hung-Sheng; Wu, Yi-No; Liao, Chun-Hou; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chiang, Han-Sun

    2017-09-26

    We investigated and evaluated the mechanisms of erectile dysfunction (ED) in a rat model of long-term ketamine administration. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 32) were divided into four groups: namely the control group receiving intraperitoneal injection of saline, 1-month, 2-month and 3-month groups receiving daily intraperitoneal injection of ketamine (100 mg/kg/day) for 1, 2, and 3 month respectively. After treatment, animals underwent an erectile response protocol to assess intracavernosal pressure (ICP). Smooth muscle content was evaluated. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression were assessed using immunostaining assay. Ketamine-induced apoptosis was analyzed using TUNEL assay. Long-term ketamine administration caused significantly decreased erectile responses as measured by ICP. Smooth muscle content was significantly decreased in the ketamine-treated rats for 3 months. In the erectile tissue, ketamine administration significantly reduced nNOS expression and increased iNOS content compared with controls, whereas eNOS expression was not altered. Ketamine induced apoptosis in corpus cavernosum. The present study demonstrates that long-term ketamine administration led to erectile dysfunction in rat. The molecular mechanisms of ketamine-induced ED involved the increased apoptosis and up-regulated iNOS expression incorporating with loss of corporal smooth muscle content and reduced nNOS expression in cavernous nerve.

  5. Endothelial dysfunction in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice: role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Grazielle C; Silva, Josiane F; Diniz, Thiago F; Lemos, Virginia S; Cortes, Steyner F

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is a common problem associated with hypertension and is considered a precursor to the development of micro- and macro-vascular complications. The present study investigated the involvement of nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase) and H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) in the impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation of the mesenteric arteries of DOCA (deoxycorticosterone acetate)-salt-hypertensive mice. Myograph studies were used to investigate the endothelium-dependent vasodilator effect of ACh (acetylcholine). The expression and phosphorylation of nNOS and eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) were studied by Western blot analysis. Immunofluorescence was used to examine the localization of nNOS and eNOS in the endothelial layer of the mesenteric artery. The vasodilator effect of ACh is strongly impaired in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Non-selective inhibition of NOS sharply reduced the effect of ACh in both DOCA-salt-hypertensive and sham mice. Selective inhibition of nNOS and catalase led to a higher reduction in the effect of ACh in sham than in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. Production of H2O2 induced by ACh was significantly reduced in vessels from DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, and it was blunted after nNOS inhibition. The expression of both eNOS and nNOS was considerably lower in DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice, whereas phosphorylation of their inhibitory sites was increased. The presence of nNOS was confirmed in the endothelial layer of mesenteric arteries from both sham and DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice. These results demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction in the mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt-hypertensive mice is associated with reduced expression and functioning of nNOS and impaired production of nNOS-derived H2O2 Such findings offer a new perspective for the understanding of endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Neuronal factors determining high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicke, Ursula; Roth, Gerhard

    2016-01-05

    Many attempts have been made to correlate degrees of both animal and human intelligence with brain properties. With respect to mammals, a much-discussed trait concerns absolute and relative brain size, either uncorrected or corrected for body size. However, the correlation of both with degrees of intelligence yields large inconsistencies, because although they are regarded as the most intelligent mammals, monkeys and apes, including humans, have neither the absolutely nor the relatively largest brains. The best fit between brain traits and degrees of intelligence among mammals is reached by a combination of the number of cortical neurons, neuron packing density, interneuronal distance and axonal conduction velocity--factors that determine general information processing capacity (IPC), as reflected by general intelligence. The highest IPC is found in humans, followed by the great apes, Old World and New World monkeys. The IPC of cetaceans and elephants is much lower because of a thin cortex, low neuron packing density and low axonal conduction velocity. By contrast, corvid and psittacid birds have very small and densely packed pallial neurons and relatively many neurons, which, despite very small brain volumes, might explain their high intelligence. The evolution of a syntactical and grammatical language in humans most probably has served as an additional intelligence amplifier, which may have happened in songbirds and psittacids in a convergent manner. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  8. Neuronal vulnerability in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Double, Kay L

    2012-01-01

    The classic motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease result from the progressive death of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. To date the relatively selective vulnerability of this brain region is not understood. The unique feature of dopaminergic neurons of the human substantia nigra pars compacta is the presence of the polymer pigment neuromelanin which gives this region its characteristic dark colour. In the healthy brain, neuromelanin appears to play a functional role to protect neurons from oxidative load but we have shown that in the Parkinson's disease brain the pigment undergoes structural changes and is associated with aggregation of α-synuclein protein, even early in the disease process. Further, the role of the pigment as a metal binder has also been suggested to underlie the relative vulnerability of these neurons, as changes in metal levels are suggested to be associated with neurodegenerative cascades in Parkinson's disease. While most research to date has focused on the role of iron in these pathways we have recently shown that changes in copper may contribute to neuronal vulnerability in this disorder. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. METAFICÇÃO NOS ROMANCES DE MACHADO DE ASSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Resende Rocha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nos romances de Machado de Assis, a metaficção é caracterizada de maneira permanente. Este ensaio pretende observar o efeito provocado nessas narrativas pela reflexão do ficcional produzida por elas.

  10. NOAA/NOS and USCGS Seabed Descriptions from Hydrographic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/NOS and USCGS Seabed Descriptions from Hydrographic Surveys database is a compilation of surficial sediment composition from multiple sources for over...

  11. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Verified, Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has verified (quality-controlled), hourly, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)....

  12. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Visibility, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Visibility data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not been...

  13. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Preliminary, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has recent, preliminary (not quality-controlled), 6-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and...

  14. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Preliminary, 1-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has recent, preliminary (not quality-controlled), 1-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and...

  15. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Verified, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has verified (quality-controlled), 6-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)....

  16. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Water Temperature, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Water Temperature data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not...

  17. NOS CO-OPS Active Currents Data, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has surface Active Currents data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These raw data have not...

  18. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Relative Humidity, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Relative Humidity data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not...

  19. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Air Temperature, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Air Temperature data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not...

  20. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Conductivity, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Conductivity data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not been...

  1. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Verified, High Low

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has verified (quality-controlled), daily, high low water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services...

  2. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Wind, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Wind data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not been subjected...

  3. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Barometric Pressure, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Barometric Pressure data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not...

  4. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Rain Fall, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Rain Fall data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not been...

  5. NOAA NOS SOS, EXPERIMENTAL, 1853-present, Barometric Pressure

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NOS SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have barometric pressure data. *These services are for testing and...

  6. The protective effects of propofol against CoCl2-induced HT22 cell hypoxia injury via PP2A/CAMKIIα/nNOS pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Wei; Lin, Chen; Wang, Jiaqiang; Zhu, Minmin; Chen, Jiawei; Miao, Changhong

    2017-02-28

    Perioperative cerebral ischemia/hypoxia could induce hippocampal injury and has been reported to induce cognitive impairment. In this study, we used cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to build a hypoxia model in mouse hippocampal cell lines. Propofol, a widely used intravenous anesthetic agent, has been demonstrated to have neuroprotective effect. Here, we explored whether and how propofol attenuated CoCl2-induced mouse hippocampal HT22 cell injury. Mouse hippocampal HT22 cells were pretreated with propofol, and then stimulated with CoCl2. Cell viability was measured by cell counting kit 8 (CCK8). The effect of propofol on CoCl2-modulated expressions of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), BAX, cleaved caspase 3, phosphatase A2 (PP2A), and the phosphorylation of Ca2+/Calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (pCAMKIIα), neuron nitric oxide synthase at Ser1412 (pnNOS-Ser1412), neuron nitric oxide synthase at Ser847 (pnNOS-Ser847) were detected by Western blot analysis. Compared with control, CoCl2 treatment could significantly decrease cell viability, which could be reversed by propofol. Further, we found CoCl2 treatment could up-regulate the expression of PP2A, BAX, cleaved caspase three and cause the phosphorylation of nNOS-Ser1412, but it down-regulated the expression of Bcl-2 and the phosphorylation of CAMKIIα and nNOS-Ser847. More importantly, these CoCl2-mediated effects were attentuated by propofol. In addition, we demonstrated that propofol could exert similar effect to that of the PP2A inhibitor (okadaic acid). Further, the PP2A activator (FTY720) and the CAMKIIα inhibitor (KN93) could reverse the neuroprotective effect of propofol. Our data indicated that propofol could attenuate CoCl2-induced HT22 cells hypoxia injury via PP2A/CAMKIIα/nNOS pathway.

  7. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanni Brea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron's firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ.

  8. Role of iNOS and eNOS expression in a group of Egyptian diabetic and nondiabetic nephropathy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayssa I. Aly

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion The presence of iNOS is associated with tubular damage resulting in renal failure. The upregulation of NO in diabetes mellitus type 2 may explain the endothelial dysfunction that is associated with almost all diabetic complications.

  9. Copying and evolution of neuronal topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrisantha Fernando

    Full Text Available We propose a mechanism for copying of neuronal networks that is of considerable interest for neuroscience for it suggests a neuronal basis for causal inference, function copying, and natural selection within the human brain. To date, no model of neuronal topology copying exists. We present three increasingly sophisticated mechanisms to demonstrate how topographic map formation coupled with Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP can copy neuronal topology motifs. Fidelity is improved by error correction and activity-reverberation limitation. The high-fidelity topology-copying operator is used to evolve neuronal topologies. Possible roles for neuronal natural selection are discussed.

  10. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal...

  11. Neuronal coherence and its functional role in communication between neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeitler-Geurds, M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations are observed in many brain areas in various frequency bands. Each of the frequency bands is associated with a particular functional role. Gamma oscillations (30-80 Hz) are thought to be related to cognitive tasks like memory and attention and possibly also involved in the

  12. Distribution and chemical coding of neurons in intramural ganglia of the porcine urinary bladder trigone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenon Pidsudko

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the distribution and chemical coding of neurons in the porcine intramural ganglia of the urinary bladder trigone (IG-UBT demonstrated using combined retrograde tracing and double-labelling immunohistochemistry. Retrograde fluorescent tracer Fast Blue (FB was injected into the wall of both the left and right side of the bladder trigone during laparotomy performed under pentobarbital anaesthesia. Ten-microm-thick cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence with antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH, neuropeptide Y (NPY, somatostatin (SOM, galanin (GAL, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, substance P (SP, Leu5-enkephalin (LENK and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT. IG-UBT neurons formed characteristic clusters (from a few to tens neuronal cells found under visceral peritoneum or in the outer muscular layer. Immunohistochemistry revealed four main populations of IG-UBT neurons: SOM- (ca. 35%, SP- (ca. 32%, ChAT- and NPY- immunoreactive (-IR (ca. 23% as well as non-adrenergic non-cholinergic nerve cells (ca. 6%. This study has demonstrated a relatively large population of differently coded IG-UBT neurons, which constitute an important element of the complex neuro-endocrine system involved in the regulation of the porcine urogenital organ function.

  13. Bacopa monnieri Extract (CDRI-08 Modulates the NMDA Receptor Subunits and nNOS-Apoptosis Axis in Cerebellum of Hepatic Encephalopathy Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papia Mondal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, characterized by impaired cerebellar functions during chronic liver failure (CLF, involves N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR overactivation in the brain cells. Bacopa monnieri (BM extract is a known neuroprotectant. The present paper evaluates whether BM extract is able to modulate the two NMDAR subunits (NR2A and NR2B and its downstream mediators in cerebellum of rats with chronic liver failure (CLF, induced by administration of 50 mg/kg bw thioacetamide (TAA i.p. for 14 days, and in the TAA group rats orally treated with 200 mg/kg bw BM extract from days 8 to 14. NR2A is known to impart neuroprotection and that of NR2B induces neuronal death during NMDAR activation. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase- (nNOS- apoptosis pathway is known to mediate NMDAR led excitotoxicity. The level of NR2A was found to be significantly reduced with a concomitant increase of NR2B in cerebellum of the CLF rats. This was consistent with significantly enhanced nNOS expression, nitric oxide level, and reduced Bcl2/Bax ratio. Moreover, treatment with BM extract reversed the NR2A/NR2B ratio and also normalized the levels of nNOS-apoptotic factors in cerebellum of those rats. The findings suggest modulation of NR2A and NR2B expression by BM extract to prevent neurochemical alterations associated with HE.

  14. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Serra, Ines; Husson, Zoé; Bartlett, Jonathan D; Smith, Ewan St John

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Immunohistochemistry analysis using RetroBeads as a retrograde tracer confirmed previous data that cutaneous and articular neurons are a mixture of myelinated and unmyelinated neurons, and the majority of both populations are peptidergic. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, voltage-gated inward currents and action potential parameters were largely similar between articular and cutaneous neurons, although cutaneous neuron action potentials had a longer half-peak duration (HPD). An assessment of chemical sensitivity showed that all neurons responded to a pH 5.0 solution, but that acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) currents, determined by inhibition with the nonselective acid-sensing ion channel antagonist benzamil, were of a greater magnitude in cutaneous compared to articular neurons. Forty to fifty percent of cutaneous and articular neurons responded to capsaicin, cinnamaldehyde, and menthol, indicating similar expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), and transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8), respectively. By contrast, significantly more articular neurons responded to ATP than cutaneous neurons. This work makes a detailed characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons and highlights the importance of making recordings from identified neuronal populations: sensory neurons innervating different tissues have subtly different properties, possibly reflecting different

  15. NOS1 ex1f-VNTR polymorphism influences prefrontal brain oxygenation during a working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopf, Juliane; Schecklmann, Martin; Hahn, Tim; Dresler, Thomas; Dieler, Alica C; Herrmann, Martin J; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Reif, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthase produces NO, which serves as first and second messenger in neurons, where the protein is encoded by the NOS1 gene. A functional variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism in the promoter region of the alternative first exon 1f of NOS1 is associated with various functions of human behavior, for example increased impulsivity, while another, non-functional variant was linked to decreased verbal working memory and a heightened risk for schizophrenia. We therefore investigated the influence of NOS1 ex 1f-VNTR on working memory function as reflected by both behavioral measures and prefrontal oxygenation. We hypothesized that homozygous short allele carriers exhibit altered brain oxygenation in task-related areas, namely the dorsolateral and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and the parietal cortex. To this end, 56 healthy subjects were stratified into a homozygous long allele group and a homozygous short allele group comparable for age, sex and intelligence. All subjects completed a letter n-back task (one-, two-, and three-back), while concentration changes of oxygenated (O(2)Hb) hemoglobin in the prefrontal cortex were measured with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We found load-associated O(2)Hb increases in the prefrontal and parts of the parietal cortex. Significant load-associated oxygenation differences between the two genotype groups could be shown for the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the parietal cortex. Specifically, short allele carriers showed a significantly larger increase in oxygenation in all three n-back tasks. This suggests a potential compensatory mechanism, with task-related brain regions being more active in short allele carriers to compensate for reduced NOS1 expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. What do mirror neurons mirror?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uithol, S.; Rooij, I.J.E.I. van; Bekkering, H.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Single cell recordings in monkeys provide strong evidence for an important role of the motor system in action understanding. This evidence is backed up by data from studies of the (human) mirror neuron system using neuroimaging or TMS techniques, and behavioral experiments. Although the data

  17. The Neuronal Infrastructure of Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menenti, Laura; Segaert, Katrien; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Models of speaking distinguish producing meaning, words and syntax as three different linguistic components of speaking. Nevertheless, little is known about the brain's integrated neuronal infrastructure for speech production. We investigated semantic, lexical and syntactic aspects of speaking using fMRI. In a picture description task, we…

  18. ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES OF THE NEURONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives To study ultrastructural changes in the neuronal component of the detrusor muscle during the spinal shock phase and following early electric neurostimulation in an animal model. Material and Methods 12 dogs were decentralized at the levels from S1 to S3, while three animals were provided as normal controls.

  19. Bursting deep dorsal horn neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Eva Meier; Rasmussen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    In a recent publication, Thaweerattanasinp et al. (J Neurophysiol 116: 1644–1653, 2016) investigated spinal cord injury and firing properties of deep dorsal horn neurons during NMDA or zolmitriptan application by employing electrophysiology in an in vitro spinal cord preparation. Deep dorsal horn...

  20. Computing with Spiking Neuron Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Paugam-Moisy; S.M. Bohte (Sander); G. Rozenberg; T.H.W. Baeck (Thomas); J.N. Kok (Joost)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractAbstract Spiking Neuron Networks (SNNs) are often referred to as the 3rd gener- ation of neural networks. Highly inspired from natural computing in the brain and recent advances in neurosciences, they derive their strength and interest from an ac- curate modeling of synaptic interactions

  1. Nitric oxide synthase, calcitonin gene-related peptide and NK-1 receptor mechanisms are involved in GTN-induced neuronal activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Bhatt, Deepak Kumar; Ploug, Kenneth Beri

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Infusion of glyceryltrinitrate (GTN), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, in awake, freely moving rats closely mimics a universally accepted human model of migraine and responds to sumatriptan treatment. Here we analyse the effect of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and calcitonin gene......-related peptide (CGRP) systems on the GTN-induced neuronal activation in this model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The femoral vein was catheterised in rats and GTN was infused (4 µg/kg/min, for 20 minutes, intravenously). Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyse Fos, nNOS and CGRP and Western blot for measuring n......NOS protein expression. The effect of olcegepant, L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor antagonist L-733060 were analysed on Fos activation. RESULTS: GTN-treated rats showed a significant increase of nNOS and CGRP in dura mater and CGRP in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC...

  2. Uncertainty propagation in neuronal dynamical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Torres Valderrama (Aldemar); J.G. Blom (Joke)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractOne of the most notorious characteristics of neuronal electrical activity is its variability, whose origin is not just instrumentation noise, but mainly the intrinsically stochastic nature of neural computations. Neuronal models based on deterministic differential equations cannot

  3. Shape, connectedness and dynamics in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Cesar Henrique; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2013-11-15

    The morphology of neurons is directly related to several aspects of the nervous system, including its connectedness, health, development, evolution, dynamics and, ultimately, behavior. Such interplays of the neuronal morphology can be understood within the more general shape-function paradigm. The current article reviews, in an introductory way, some key issues regarding the role of neuronal morphology in the nervous system, with emphasis on works developed in the authors' group. The following topics are addressed: (a) characterization of neuronal shape; (b) stochastic synthesis of neurons and neuronal systems; (c) characterization of the connectivity of neuronal networks by using complex networks concepts; and (d) investigations of influences of neuronal shape on network dynamics. The presented concepts and methods are useful also for several other multiple object systems, such as protein-protein interaction, tissues, aggregates and polymers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitric oxide signalling and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the heart under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin Hua

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an imperative regulator of the cardiovascular system and is a critical mechanism in preventing the pathogenesis and progression of the diseased heart. The scenario of bioavailable NO in the myocardium is complex: 1) NO is derived from both endogenous NO synthases (endothelial, neuronal, and/or inducible NOSs [eNOS, nNOS, and/or iNOS]) and exogenous sources (entero-salivary NO pathway) and the amount of NO from exogenous sources varies significantly; 2) NOSs are located at discrete compartments of cardiac myocytes and are regulated by distinctive mechanisms under stress; 3) NO regulates diverse target proteins through different modes of post-transcriptional modification (soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]/cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]/protein kinase G [PKG]-dependent phosphorylation, S-nitrosylation, and transnitrosylation); 4) the downstream effectors of NO are multidimensional and vary from ion channels in the plasma membrane to signalling proteins and enzymes in the mitochondria, cytosol, nucleus, and myofilament; 5) NOS produces several radicals in addition to NO (e.g. superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and different NO-related derivatives) and triggers redox-dependent responses. However, nNOS inhibits cardiac oxidases to reduce the sources of oxidative stress in diseased hearts. Recent consensus indicates the importance of nNOS protein in cardiac protection under pathological stress. In addition, a dietary regime with high nitrate intake from fruit and vegetables together with unsaturated fatty acids is strongly associated with reduced cardiovascular events. Collectively, NO-dependent mechanisms in healthy and diseased hearts are better understood and shed light on the therapeutic prospects for NO and NOSs in clinical applications for fatal human heart diseases. PMID:28649367

  5. Participation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in experimental neuropathic pain induced by sciatic nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chacur

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nerve injury leads to a neuropathic pain state that results from central sensitization. This phenomenom is mediated by NMDA receptors and may involve the production of nitric oxide (NO. In this study, we investigated the expression of the neuronal isoform of NO synthase (nNOS in the spinal cord of 3-month-old male, Wistar rats after sciatic nerve transection (SNT. Our attention was focused on the dorsal part of L3-L5 segments receiving sensory inputs from the sciatic nerve. SNT resulted in the development of neuropathic pain symptoms confirmed by evaluating mechanical hyperalgesia (Randall and Selitto test and allodynia (von Frey hair test. Control animals did not present any alteration (sham-animals. The selective inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (0.2 and 2 µg in 50 µL, blocked hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by SNT. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that nNOS was increased (48% by day 30 in the lumbar spinal cord after SNT. This increase was observed near the central canal (Rexed’s lamina X and also in lamina I-IV of the dorsal horn. Real-time PCR results indicated an increase of nNOS mRNA detected from 1 to 30 days after SNT, with the highest increase observed 1 day after injury (1469%. Immunoblotting confirmed the increase of nNOS in the spinal cord between 1 and 15 days post-lesion (20%, reaching the greatest increase (60% 30 days after surgery. The present findings demonstrate an increase of nNOS after peripheral nerve injury that may contribute to the increase of NO production observed after peripheral neuropathy.

  6. Novel Nuclear Protein Complexes of Dystrophin 71 Isoforms in Rat Cultured Hippocampal GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rodríguez-Muñoz

    Full Text Available The precise functional role of the dystrophin 71 in neurons is still elusive. Previously, we reported that dystrophin 71d and dystrophin 71f are present in nuclei from cultured neurons. In the present work, we performed a detailed analysis of the intranuclear distribution of dystrophin 71 isoforms (Dp71d and Dp71f, during the temporal course of 7-day postnatal rats hippocampal neurons culture for 1h, 2, 4, 10, 15 and 21 days in vitro (DIV. By immunofluorescence assays, we detected the highest level of nuclear expression of both dystrophin Dp71 isoforms at 10 DIV, during the temporal course of primary culture. Dp71d and Dp71f were detected mainly in bipolar GABAergic (≥60% and multipolar Glutamatergic (≤40% neurons, respectively. We also characterized the existence of two nuclear dystrophin-associated protein complexes (DAPC: dystrophin 71d or dystrophin 71f bound to β-dystroglycan, α1-, β-, α2-dystrobrevins, α-syntrophin, and syntrophin-associated protein nNOS (Dp71d-DAPC or Dp71f-DAPC, respectively, in the hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, both complexes were localized in interchromatin granule cluster structures (nuclear speckles of neuronal nucleoskeleton preparations. The present study evinces that each Dp71's complexes differ slightly in dystrobrevins composition. The results demonstrated that Dp71d-DAPC was mainly localized in bipolar GABAergic and Dp71f-DAPC in multipolar Glutamatergic hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our results show that dystrophin 71d, dystrophin 71f and DAP integrate protein complexes, and both complexes were associated to nuclear speckles structures.

  7. Sodium nitrate alleviates functional muscle ischaemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael D; Rosenberry, Ryan; Barresi, Rita; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Rader, Florian; Tang, Xiu; Mason, O'Neil; Schwartz, Avery; Stabler, Thomas; Shidban, Sarah; Mobaligh, Neigena; Hogan, Shomari; Elashoff, Robert; Allen, Jason D; Victor, Ronald G

    2015-12-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. BMD is caused by in-frame mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase mu (nNOSμ), which requires specific spectrin-like repeats (SR16/17) in dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin for sarcolemmal targeting. When healthy skeletal muscle is exercised, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived nitric oxide (NO) attenuates α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, thus optimizing perfusion. In the mdx mouse model of dystrophinopathy, this protective mechanism (functional sympatholysis) is defective, resulting in functional muscle ischaemia. Treatment with a NO-donating non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) alleviates this ischaemia and improves the murine dystrophic phenotype. In the present study, we report that, in 13 men with BMD, sympatholysis is defective mainly in patients whose mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ, with the vasoconstrictor response measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy) to reflex sympathetic activation. Then, in a single-arm, open-label trial in 11 BMD patients and a double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over trial in six patients, we show that acute treatment with oral sodium nitrate, an inorganic NO donor without a NSIAD moiety, restores sympatholysis and improves post-exercise hyperaemia (Doppler ultrasound). By contrast, sodium nitrate improves neither sympatholysis, nor hyperaemia in healthy controls. Thus, a simple NO donor recapitulates the vasoregulatory actions of sarcolemmal nNOS in BMD patients, and constitutes a putative novel therapy for this disease. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  8. Pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance study of domain docking in neuronal nitric oxide synthase: the calmodulin and output state perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astashkin, Andrei V; Chen, Li; Zhou, Xixi; Li, Huiying; Poulos, Thomas L; Liu, Ke Jian; Guillemette, J Guy; Feng, Changjian

    2014-08-28

    The binding of calmodulin (CaM) to neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) enables formation of the output state of nNOS for nitric oxide production. Essential to NOS function is the geometry and dynamics of CaM docking to the NOS oxygenase domain, but little is known about these details. In the present work, the domain docking in a CaM-bound oxygenase/FMN (oxyFMN) construct of nNOS was investigated using the relaxation-induced dipolar modulation enhancement (RIDME) technique, which is a pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance technique sensitive to the magnetic dipole interaction between the electron spins. A cysteine was introduced at position 110 of CaM, after which a nitroxide spin label was attached at the position. The RIDME study of the magnetic dipole interaction between the spin label and the ferric heme centers in the oxygenase domain of nNOS revealed that, with increasing [Ca(2+)], the concentration of nNOS·CaM complexes increases and reaches a maximum at [Ca(2+)]/[CaM] ≥ 4. The RIDME kinetics of CaM-bound nNOS represented monotonous decays without well-defined oscillations. The analysis of these kinetics based on the structural models for the open and docked states has shown that only about 15 ± 3% of the CaM-bound nNOS is in the docked state at any given time, while the remaining 85 ± 3% of the protein is in the open conformations characterized by a wide distribution of distances between the bound CaM and the oxygenase domain. The results of this investigation are consistent with a model that the Ca(2+)-CaM interaction causes CaM docking with the oxygenase domain. The low population of the docked state indicates that the CaM-controlled docking between the FMN and heme domains is highly dynamic.

  9. Spiking Neuron Network Helmholtz Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel eSountsov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of behavioral and neurophysiological data suggests that the brain performs optimal (or near-optimal probabilistic inference and learning during perception and other tasks. Although many machine learning algorithms exist that perform inference and learning in an optimal way, the complete description of how one of those algorithms (or a novel algorithm can be implemented in the brain is currently incomplete. There have been many proposed solutions that address how neurons can perform optimal inference but the question of how synaptic plasticity can implement optimal learning is rarely addressed. This paper aims to unify the two fields of probabilistic inference and synaptic plasticity by using a neuronal network of realistic model spiking neurons to implement a well studied computational model called the Helmholtz Machine. The Helmholtz Machine is amenable to neural implementation as the algorithm it uses to learn its parameters, called the wake-sleep algorithm, uses a local delta learning rule. Our spiking-neuron network implements both the delta rule and a small example of a Helmholtz machine. This neuronal network can learn an internal model of continuous-valued training data sets without supervision. The network can also perform inference on the learned internal models. We show how various biophysical features of the neural implementation constrain the parameters of the wake-sleep algorithm, such as the duration of the wake and sleep phases of learning and the minimal sample duration. We examine the deviations from optimal performance and tie them to the properties of the synaptic plasticity rule.

  10. Ecological constraints on the origin of neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Travis; Paulin, Michael G; Green, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The basic functional characteristics of spiking neurones are remarkably similar throughout the animal kingdom. Their core design and function features were presumably established very early in their evolutionary history. Identifying the selection pressures that drove animals to evolve spiking neurones could help us interpret their design and function today. This paper provides a quantitative argument, based on ecology, that animals evolved neurones after they started eating each other, about 550 million years ago. We consider neurones as devices that aid an animal's foraging performance, but incur an energetic cost. We introduce an idealised stochastic model ecosystem of animals and their food, and obtain an analytic expression for the probability that an animal with a neurone will fix in a neurone-less population. Analysis of the fixation probability reveals two key results. First, a neurone will never fix if an animal forages low-value food at high density, even if that neurone incurs no cost. Second, a neurone will fix with high probability if an animal is foraging high-value food at low density, even if that neurone is expensive. These observations indicate that the transition from neurone-less to neurone-armed animals can be facilitated by a transition from filter-feeding or substrate grazing to episodic feeding strategies such as animal-on-animal predation (macrophagy).

  11. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Grattan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016 report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits.

  12. Effect of Methamidophos on cerebellar neuronal cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Taken together, our study shows that low dose methamidophos may negatively impact. TH-mediated cerebellar neuronal cell development and function, and consequently could interfere with TH-regulated neuronal events. Keywords: Methamidophos, Thyroid hormone, Purkinje cells, Granule cell, Neuronal development.

  13. Neuronal Network Mechanisms of Gamma Oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viriyopase, A.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal oscillations at various frequency bands play an important role in neuronal information processing. In this thesis, we mathematically and computationally investigated the properties of the gamma band (30-80 Hz) with different networks: a simplified network with two neurons, a large network

  14. Pedagogical Reflections by Secondary Science Teachers at Different NOS Implementation Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Benjamin C.; Clough, Michael P.; Olson, Joanne K.

    2017-02-01

    This study investigated what 13 secondary science teachers at various nature of science (NOS) instruction implementation levels talked about when they reflected on their teaching. We then determined if differences exist in the quality of those reflections between high, medium, and low NOS implementers. This study sought to answer the following questions: (1) What do teachers talk about when asked general questions about their pedagogy and NOS pedagogy and (2) what qualitative differences, if any, exist within variables across teachers of varying NOS implementation levels? Evidence derived from these teachers' reflections indicated that self-efficacy and perceptions of general importance for NOS instruction were poor indicators of NOS implementation. However, several factors were associated with the extent that these teachers implemented NOS instruction, including the utility value they hold for NOS teaching, considerations of how people learn, understanding of NOS pedagogy, and their ability to accurately and deeply self-reflect about teaching. Notably, those teachers who effectively implemented the NOS at higher levels value NOS instruction for reasons that transcend immediate instructional objectives. That is, they value teaching NOS for achieving compelling ends realized long after formal schooling (e.g., lifelong socioscientific decision-making for civic reasons), and they deeply reflect about how to teach NOS by drawing from research about how people learn. Low NOS implementers' simplistic notions and reflections about teaching and learning appeared to be impeding factors to accurate and consistent NOS implementation. This study has implications for science teacher education efforts that promote NOS instruction.

  15. Alterations of neurochemical expression of the coeliac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex (CSMG) neurons supplying the prepyloric region of the porcine stomach following partial stomach resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, Katarzyna; Całka, Jarosław

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the response of the porcine coeliac-superior mesenteric ganglion complex (CSMG) neurons projecting to the prepyloric area of the porcine stomach to peripheral neuronal damage following partial stomach resection. To identify the sympathetic neurons innervating the studied area of stomach, the neuronal retrograde tracer Fast Blue (FB) was applied to control and partial stomach resection (RES) groups. On the 22nd day after FB injection, following laparotomy, the partial resection of the previously FB-injected stomach prepyloric area was performed in animals of RES group. On the 28th day, all animals were re-anaesthetized and euthanized. The CSMG complex was then collected and processed for double-labeling immunofluorescence. In control animals, retrograde-labelled perikarya were immunoreactive to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and galanin (GAL). Partial stomach resection decreased the numbers of FB-positive neurons immunopositive for TH and DβH. However, the strong increase of NPY and GAL expression, as well as de novo-synthesis of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and leu5-Enkephalin (LENK) was noted in studied neurons. Furthermore, FB-positive neurons in all pigs were surrounded by a network of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide (CART)-, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-, and substance P (SP)-, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-, LENK- and nNOS- immunoreactive nerve fibers. This may suggest neuroprotective contribution of these neurotransmitters in traumatic responses of sympathetic neurons to peripheral axonal damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Translocation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase to the plasma membrane by ATP is mediated by P2X and P2Y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohnishi Takayuki

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The translocation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS from the cytosol to the membrane is functionally coupled to the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors at synapses. Whereas there is abundant evidence indicating that ATP and nitric oxide are involved in nociceptive transmission, whether nNOS is activated by ATP remains unknown. We recently established a fluorescence imaging system for examining nNOS translocation in PC12 cells expressing a yellow fluorescence protein-tagged nNOS N-terminal mutant, nNOSNT-YFP, and examined the effect of ATP on nNOS translocation using the system. Results The translocation of nNOS was induced by ATP in the presence of NMDA and forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator. The purinergic P2X receptor agonist 2-MeSATP and the P2Y agonist UTP significantly enhanced nNOS translocation; and simultaneous stimulation with 2-MeSATP and UTP exhibited the same concentration-response curve for the translocation as obtained with ATP. ATP, 2-MeSATP, and UTP increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i in PC12 cells. Conversely, whereas the P2X receptor antagonist PPADS and the P2Y antagonist reactive blue-2 partially inhibited increases in the translocation of nNOS and [Ca2+]i by ATP, the non-selective P2 receptor antagonist suramin completely blocked them. In addition, the increase in the nNOS translocation by ATP was blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists and inhibitors of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, and Src kinase. Consistent with the expression of P2X and P2Y receptors in the spinal cord, ATP and UTP increased the [Ca2+]i in primary cultured spinal neurons. ATP potentiated and prolonged the [Ca2+]i increase produced by NMDA in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Furthermore, the selective P2X3/P2X2/3 antagonist A-317491 inhibited nNOS activation assessed by NO formation in spinal slices prepared from neuropathic pain model mice. Conclusion ATP is involved in nNOS

  17. Expression analysis of NOS family and HSP genes during thermal stress in goat ( Capra hircus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay Pratap; Dangi, Satyaveer Singh; Chouhan, Vikrant Singh; Gupta, Mahesh; Dangi, Saroj K.; Singh, Gyanendra; Maurya, Vijay Prakash; Kumar, Puneet; Sarkar, Mihir

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 50 genes other than heat shock protein (HSP) expression changes during thermal stress. These genes like nitric oxide synthase (NOS) need proper attention and investigation to find out their possible role in the adaptation to thermal stress in animals. So, the present study was undertaken to demonstrate the expressions of inducible form type II NOS (iNOS), endothelial type III NOS (eNOS), constitutively expressed enzyme NOS (cNOS), HSP70, and HSP90 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during different seasons in Barbari goats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunocytochemistry were applied to investigate messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, protein expression, and immunolocalization of examined factors. The mRNA and protein expressions of iNOS, eNOS, cNOS, HSP70, and HSP90 were significantly higher ( P homeostasis in goats.

  18. trans-Cinnamaldehyde Inhibits Microglial Activation and Improves Neuronal Survival against Neuroinflammation in BV2 Microglial Cells with Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Fu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Microglial activation contributes to neuroinflammation and neuronal damage in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. It has been suggested that neurodegenerative disorders may be improved if neuroinflammation can be controlled. trans-cinnamaldehyde (TCA isolated from the stem bark of Cinnamomum cassia possesses potent anti-inflammatory capability; we thus tested whether TCA presents neuroprotective effects on improving neuronal survival by inhibiting neuroinflammatory responses in BV2 microglial cells. Results. To determine the molecular mechanism behind TCA-mediated neuroprotective effects, we assessed the effects of TCA on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- induced proinflammatory responses in BV2 microglial cells. While LPS potently induced the production and expression upregulation of proinflammatory mediators, including NO, iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, and TNF-α, TCA pretreatment significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of NO and expression of iNOS, COX-2, and IL-1β and recovered the morphological changes in BV2 cells. TCA markedly attenuated microglial activation and neuroinflammation by blocking nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathway. With the aid of microglia and neuron coculture system, we showed that TCA greatly reduced LPS-elicited neuronal death and exerted neuroprotective effects. Conclusions. Our results suggest that TCA, a natural product, has the potential of being used as a therapeutic agent against neuroinflammation for ameliorating neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Oscillatory integration windows in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Singh, Swikriti Saran; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory synchrony among neurons occurs in many species and brain areas, and has been proposed to help neural circuits process information. One hypothesis states that oscillatory input creates cyclic integration windows: specific times in each oscillatory cycle when postsynaptic neurons become especially responsive to inputs. With paired local field potential (LFP) and intracellular recordings and controlled stimulus manipulations we directly test this idea in the locust olfactory system. We find that inputs arriving in Kenyon cells (KCs) sum most effectively in a preferred window of the oscillation cycle. With a computational model, we show that the non-uniform structure of noise in the membrane potential helps mediate this process. Further experiments performed in vivo demonstrate that integration windows can form in the absence of inhibition and at a broad range of oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal how a fundamental coincidence-detection mechanism in a neural circuit functions to decode temporally organized spiking. PMID:27976720

  20. Neuronal nitric oxide contributes to neuroplasticity-associated protein expression through cGMP, protein kinase G, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Iadecola, Costantino

    2011-05-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) has long been implicated in brain plasticity. However, it is unclear how this short-lived mediator contributes to the long-term molecular changes underlying neuroplasticity, which typically require activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and gene expression. To address this issue, we used a neuroplasticity model based on treatment of neuronal cultures with bicuculline and a model of experience-dependent plasticity in the barrel cortex. In neuronal cultures, NOS inhibition attenuated the bicuculline-induced activation of ERK and the expression of c-Fos, Egr-1, Arc, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins essential for neuroplasticity. Furthermore, inhibition of the NO target soluble guanylyl cyclase or of the cGMP effector kinase protein kinase G (PKG) reduced both ERK activation and plasticity-related protein expression. NOS inhibition did not affect phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a well-established ERK nuclear target, but it attenuated the nuclear accumulation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 and suppressed the activation of Elk-1, another transcription factor target of ERK. Consistent with these in vitro observations, induction of c-Fos, Egr-1, and BDNF was attenuated in the D1 cortical barrel of nNOS(-/-) mice subjected to single whisker experience. These results establish nNOS-derived NO as a key factor in the expression of proteins involved in neuroplasticity, an effect mediated through cGMP, PKG, and ERK signaling. These actions of NO do not depend on CREB phosphorylation but may involve TORC1 and Elk-1. Our data unveil a previously unrecognized link between neuronal NO and the molecular machinery responsible for the sustained synaptic changes underlying neuroplasticity.

  1. l-kynurenine combined with probenecid and the novel synthetic kynurenic acid derivative attenuate nitroglycerin-induced nNOS in the rat caudal trigeminal nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vámos, Eniko; Párdutz, Arpád; Varga, Hedvig; Bohár, Zsuzsanna; Tajti, János; Fülöp, Ferenc; Toldi, József; Vécsei, László

    2009-09-01

    Systemic administration of the nitric oxide (NO) donor nitroglycerin (NTG) triggers a delayed attack without aura in many migraineurs, but not in healthy volunteers. In rats, 4 h after the systemic administration of NTG (10 mg/kg bw, s.c.), the neurons of the caudal trigeminal nucleus (TNC) are activated and the expression of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in the same area is increased suggesting a self-amplifying process in the trigeminal system, which seems to be crucial in migraine pathogenesis. Kynurenic acid (KYNA) and its analogues may exert modulatory effects in many neuropathological conditions, probably via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonism. Since NMDA receptors play a crucial role in trigeminal pain processing, the aim of our experiments was to compare the effects of L-kynurenine (L-KYN) combined with probenecid (PROB) or with 2-(2-N,N-dimethylaminoethylamine-1-carbonyl)-1H-quinolin-4-one hydrochloride alone, a newly synthetized KYNA derivative, on the NTG-induced nNOS expression in the rat TNC. Pretreatment with L-KYN (300 mg/kg bw, i.p.) together with PROB (200 mg/kg bw, i.p.) and KYNA derivative (300 mg/kg bw, i.p.) attenuated the NTG-induced nNOS expression in the rat TNC. Our data suggest that the stimulating effect of NTG, and thus of NO, on the expression of nNOS might be modulated by increasing the KYNA level in the brain, probably through the NMDA receptors. These data could help promote a better understanding of the pathogenesis of headaches and the action of antimigraine drugs.

  2. cAMP-dependent post-translational modification of neuronal nitric oxide synthase neuroprotects penile erection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Serkan; Musicki, Biljana; La Favor, Justin D; Burnett, Arthur L

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation, nNOS uncoupling, and oxidative stress in the penis and major pelvic ganglia (MPG), before and after the administration of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) agonist colforsin in a rat model of bilateral cavernous nerve injury (BCNI),which mimics nerve injury after prostatectomy. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into BCNI and sham-operated groups. Each group included two subgroups: vehicle and colforsin (0.1 mg/kg/day i.p.). After 3 days, erectile function (intracavernosal pressure) was measured and penis and MPG were collected for molecular analyses of phospho (P)-nNOS (Ser-1412 and Ser-847), total nNOS, nNOS uncoupling, binding of protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN) to nNOS, gp91phox subunit of NADPH oxidase, active caspase 3, PKA catalytic subunit α (PKA-Cα; by Western blot) and oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide [H2 O2 ] and superoxide by Western blot and microdialysis method). Erectile function was decreased 3 days after BCNI and normalized by colforsin. nNOS phosphorylation on both positive (Ser-1412) and negative (Ser-847) regulatory sites, and nNOS uncoupling, were increased after BCNI in the penis and MPG, and normalized by colforsin. H2 O2 and total reactive oxygen species production were increased in the penis after BCNI and normalized by colforsin. Protein expression of gp91phox was increased in the MPG after BCNI and was normalized by colforsin treatment. Binding of PIN to nNOS was increased in the penis after BCNI and was normalized by colforsin treatment. Protein expression of active Caspase 3 was increased in the MPG after BCNI and was normalized by colforsin treatment. Protein expression of PKA-Cα was decreased in the penis after BCNI and normalized by colforsin. Collectively, BCNI impairs nNOS function in the penis and MPG by mechanisms involving its phosphorylation and uncoupling in association with increased oxidative stress, resulting in erectile

  3. Selective serotonergic excitation of callosal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eAvesar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT acting as a neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex is critical for cognitive function, yet how 5-HT regulates information processing in cortical circuits is not well understood. We tested the serotonergic responsiveness of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs of the mouse medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, and found 3 distinct response types: long-lasting 5-HT1A (1A receptor-dependent inhibitory responses (84% of L5PNs, 5-HT2A (2A receptor-dependent excitatory responses (9%, and biphasic responses in which 2A-dependent excitation followed brief inhibition (5%. Relative to 5-HT-inhibited neurons, those excited by 5-HT had physiological properties characteristic of callosal/commissural (COM neurons that project to the contralateral cortex. We tested whether serotonergic responses in cortical pyramidal neurons are correlated with their axonal projection pattern using retrograde fluorescent labeling of COM and corticopontine-projecting (CPn neurons. 5-HT generated excitatory or biphasic responses in all 5-HT-responsive layer 5 COM neurons. Conversely, CPn neurons were universally inhibited by 5-HT. Serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was blocked by the 2A antagonist MDL 11939, while serotonergic inhibition of CPn neurons was blocked by the 1A antagonist WAY 100635, confirming a role for these two receptor subtypes in regulating pyramidal neuron activity. Selective serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was not layer-specific, as COM neurons in layer 2/3 were also selectively excited by 5-HT relative to their non-labeled pyramidal neuron neighbors. Because neocortical 2A receptors are implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we propose that COM neurons may represent a novel cellular target for intervention in psychiatric disease.

  4. Los medios de comunicación ¿nos igualan o nos diferencian?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier BALLESTA PAGÁN

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: En este artículo presentamos los resultados obtenidos en una investigación llevada a cabo en los centros educativos de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria de la Región de Murcia donde se ha pretendido valorar el equipamiento, el acceso a la información y el consumo de medios de comunicación en el hogar, por parte del alumnado inmigrante en comparación con el autóctono. Los datos aportados de dicho estudio nos confirman que la mayoría de los recursos más utilizados en el hogar es menor en los hogares del alumnado inmigrante de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria (ESO respecto al resto de la muestra en general de los alumnos. Por otra parte, el acceso a los medios, para estos alumnos inmigrantes, corrobora que son considerados recursos de gran importancia como vehículos en su acercamiento al aprendizaje y al entretenimiento. En cuanto al uso personal de dichos medios de comunicación observamos que mientras el ordenador, el móvil y el DVD son muy utilizados, comprobamos cómo desciende su uso e interés cuando abordamos otros medios de papel impreso, entre los que destacamos el libro y el periódico. Sin embargo, el uso de la televisión es bastante similar en ambos colectivos. Con relación al acceso a Internet, los resultados analizados parecen confirmar que el hogar se convierte en el lugar adecuado para su uso en ambas muestras, por encima de otros espacios públicos o privados. Sin embargo, si comprobamos la disponibilidad de acceso al mismo en el hogar por parte del alumnado inmigrante, destacamos que es menor de la que disponen los hogares autóctonos. En relación con la lectura, el nivel lector de estos jóvenes inmigrantes es también menor, aunque no existe una gran diferencia, respecto de la muestra de alumnos autóctonos. Al valorar el uso que hacen de la biblioteca comprobamos que más de la mitad de los alumnos afirman ir a ella, pero preferentemente a la pública más que la biblioteca del centro o a la de otras

  5. Cyclooxygenase 2 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in the renal cortex are not interdependent in states of salt deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrop, H; Kammerl, M; Mann, Birgitte

    2000-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the kidney are localized to the cortical thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (cTALH), including the macula region, and increase after salt restriction. Because of the similar localization and regulation of n......NOS and COX-2 expression, we have examined whether there is a functional interrelationship between the expression of the two enzymes. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed for 1 week either a low-salt diet (0.02% w/w) which produced moderate increases of nNOS and COX-2 expression, or low salt combined...... with the angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril (10 mg/kg per day), which produced strong increases of renocortical nNOS and COX-2 expressions. To inhibit nNOS or COX-2 activities, animals received in addition N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 50 mg/kg per day) or rofecoxib (10 mg/kg per day...

  6. Gene transfer of neuronal nitric oxide synthase to carotid body reverses enhanced chemoreceptor function in heart failure rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Long; Li, Yi-Fan; Liu, Dongmei; Cornish, Kurtis G; Patel, Kaushik P; Zucker, Irving H; Channon, Keith M; Schultz, Harold D

    2005-08-05

    Our previous studies showed that decreased nitric oxide (NO) production enhanced carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor activity in chronic heart failure (CHF) rabbits. In the present study, we investigated the effects of neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) gene transfer on CB chemoreceptor activity in CHF rabbits. The nNOS protein expression and NO production were suppressed in CBs (Pchemoreceptors in CHF versus sham rabbits. Ad.nNOS decreased the baseline discharge (4.5+/-0.3 versus 7.3+/-0.4 imp/s at 105+/-1.9 mm Hg) and the response to hypoxia (18.3+/-1.2 imp/s versus 35.6+/-1.1 at 40+/-2.1 mm Hg) from CB chemoreceptors in CHF rabbits (Ad.nNOS CB versus contralateral noninfected CB respectively, Pactivity in CHF rabbits. In addition, nNOS gene transfer to the CBs also significantly blunted the baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and the response of RSNA to hypoxia in CHF rabbits (Pactivity in the CB plays an important role in the enhanced activity of the CB chemoreceptors and peripheral chemoreflex function in CHF rabbits.

  7. Results on a Binding Neuron Model and Their Implications for Modified Hourglass Model for Neuronal Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Arunachalam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical models of single neuron like Hodgkin-Huxley point neuron or leaky integrate and fire neuron assume the influence of postsynaptic potentials to last till the neuron fires. Vidybida (2008 in a refreshing departure has proposed models for binding neurons in which the trace of an input is remembered only for a finite fixed period of time after which it is forgotten. The binding neurons conform to the behaviour of real neurons and are applicable in constructing fast recurrent networks for computer modeling. This paper develops explicitly several useful results for a binding neuron like the firing time distribution and other statistical characteristics. We also discuss the applicability of the developed results in constructing a modified hourglass network model in which there are interconnected neurons with excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs. Limited simulation results of the hourglass network are presented.

  8. Single-cell axotomy of cultured hippocampal neurons integrated in neuronal circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomis-Rüth, Susana; Stiess, Michael; Wierenga, Corette J; Meyn, Liane; Bradke, Frank

    2014-05-01

    An understanding of the molecular mechanisms of axon regeneration after injury is key for the development of potential therapies. Single-cell axotomy of dissociated neurons enables the study of the intrinsic regenerative capacities of injured axons. This protocol describes how to perform single-cell axotomy on dissociated hippocampal neurons containing synapses. Furthermore, to axotomize hippocampal neurons integrated in neuronal circuits, we describe how to set up coculture with a few fluorescently labeled neurons. This approach allows axotomy of single cells in a complex neuronal network and the observation of morphological and molecular changes during axon regeneration. Thus, single-cell axotomy of mature neurons is a valuable tool for gaining insights into cell intrinsic axon regeneration and the plasticity of neuronal polarity of mature neurons. Dissociation of the hippocampus and plating of hippocampal neurons takes ∼2 h. Neurons are then left to grow for 2 weeks, during which time they integrate into neuronal circuits. Subsequent axotomy takes 10 min per neuron and further imaging takes 10 min per neuron.

  9. Las Rocas Nos Cuentan (Rocks Tell Their Stories)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerandi-Roman, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    Many Earth science lessons today still focus on memorizing the names of rocks and minerals. This led the author to develop a lesson that reveals the fascinating stories told by rocks through the study of their physical properties. He first designed the lesson for Puerto Rican teachers, hence its Spanish title: "Las Rocas Nos Cuentan Su Historia."…

  10. 77 FR 27719 - Marine Mammals; File Nos. 16109 and 15575

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... marine mammals and sea turtles had been submitted by the above-named applicants. The requested permits... Atlantic right whales and 43 other marine mammal and sea turtle species to conduct photo-identification... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA602 Marine Mammals; File Nos. 16109 and 15575...

  11. 76 FR 51001 - Marine Mammals; File Nos. 16109 and 15575

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... mammals and sea turtles. DATES: Written, telefaxed, or e-mail comments must be received on or before... ] the North Atlantic right whale and 43 other protected marine mammal and sea turtle species in U.S... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA602 Marine Mammals; File Nos. 16109 and 15575...

  12. Motor neurons and the generation of spinal motor neurons diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eStifani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor neurons (MNs are neuronal cells located in the central nervous system (CNS controlling a variety of downstream targets. This function infers the existence of MN subtypes matching the identity of the targets they innervate. To illustrate the mechanism involved in the generation of cellular diversity and the acquisition of specific identity, this review will focus on spinal motor neurons (SpMNs that have been the core of significant work and discoveries during the last decades. SpMNs are responsible for the contraction of effector muscles in the periphery. Humans possess more than 500 different skeletal muscles capable to work in a precise time and space coordination to generate complex movements such as walking or grasping. To ensure such refined coordination, SpMNs must retain the identity of the muscle they innervate.Within the last two decades, scientists around the world have produced considerable efforts to elucidate several critical steps of SpMNs differentiation. During development, SpMNs emerge from dividing progenitor cells located in the medial portion of the ventral neural tube. MN identities are established by patterning cues working in cooperation with intrinsic sets of transcription factors. As the embryo develop, MNs further differentiate in a stepwise manner to form compact anatomical groups termed pools connecting to a unique muscle target. MN pools are not homogeneous and comprise subtypes according to the muscle fibers they innervate.This article aims to provide a global view of MN classification as well as an up-to-date review of the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of SpMN diversity. Remaining conundrums will be discussed since a complete understanding of those mechanisms constitutes the foundation required for the elaboration of prospective MN regeneration therapies.

  13. Aqueous Humor Outflow Physiology in NOS3 Knockout Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yuan; Zhang, Xuejin; Song, Maomao; Wu, Jihong; Sun, Xinghuai

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) on conventional outflow function using NOS3 knockout (KO) mice. Intraocular pressure was measured in both NOS3 KO and wild type (WT) by rebound tonometry. Outflow facility was measured by perfusing enucleated mouse eyes at multiple pressure steps. A subset of eyes was sectioned and stained for histology. Mock aqueous humor ± the nitric oxide (NO) donors nitroprusside dihydrate (SNP) or S-Nitroso-N-Acetyl-D,L-Penicillamine (SNAP) was perfused into enucleated eyes. SNP and SNAP was administered topically at 0, 1, 2, and 3 hours while the contralateral eyes served as vehicle controls. Intraocular pressure was measured in both eyes before and after the last drug treatment. Intraocular pressure was higher in KO mice (18.2 ± 0.7 mm Hg vs. 13.9 ± 0.5 mm Hg, mean ± SEM, n = 30, P animals (n = 12, P < 0.05). In WT mice, SNP and SNAP caused a significant increase in pressure dependent drainage (n = 12, P < 0.05) to a similar degree as in KO mice. Topical application of SNP significantly reduced IOP in WT and KO mice (n = 12, P < 0.05), but SNAP did not change IOP significantly (n = 19). NOS3 KO mice have elevated IOP, which is likely the result of reduced pressure-dependent drainage. These findings are consistent with human data showing polymorphisms in the NOS3 gene associate with ocular hypertension and the development of glaucoma.

  14. Organization of the nitrergic neuronal system in the primitive bony fishes Polypterus senegalus and Erpetoichthys calabaricus (Actinopterygii: Cladistia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Jesús M; Lozano, Daniel; Morona, Ruth; González, Agustín

    2016-06-15

    Cladistians are a group of basal actinopterygian fishes that constitute a good model for studying primitive brain features, most likely present in the ancestral bony fishes. The analysis of the nitrergic neurons (with the enzyme nitric oxide synthase; NOS) has helped in understanding important aspects of brain organization in all vertebrates studied. We investigated the nitrergic system of two cladistian species by means of specific antibodies against NOS and NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) histochemistry, which, with the exception of the primary olfactory and terminal nerve fibers, labeled only for NADPH-d, yielded identical results. Double immunohistochemistry was conducted for simultaneous detection of NOS with tyrosine hydroxylase, choline acetyltransferase, calbindin, calretinin, and serotonin, to establish accurately the localization of the nitrergic neurons and fibers and to assess possible interactions between these neuroactive substances. The pattern of distribution in both species showed only subtle differences in the density of labeled cells. Distinct groups of NOS-immunoreactive cells were observed in pallial and subpallial areas, paraventricular region, tuberal and retromammillary hypothalamic areas, posterior tubercle, prethalamic and thalamic areas, optic tectum, torus semicircularis, mesencephalic tegmentum, interpeduncular nucleus, superior and middle reticular nuclei, magnocellular vestibular nucleus, solitary tract nucleus, nucleus medianus magnocellularis, the spinal cord and amacrine cells in the retina. Large neurons in cranial nerve sensory ganglia were also labeled. The comparison of these results with those from other vertebrates, using a neuromeric analysis, reveals a conserved pattern of organization of the nitrergic system from this primitive fish group to amniotes, including mammals. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nitric oxide: a co-modulator of efferent peptidergic neurosecretory cells including a unique octopaminergic neurone innervating locust heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullerjahn, Alexander; Mentel, Tim; Pflüger, Hans-Joachim; Stevenson, Paul A

    2006-08-01

    Our findings suggest that nitric oxide (NO) acts as peripheral neuromodulator in locusts, in which it is commonly co-localized with RF-like peptide in neurosecretory cells. We also present the first evidence for NO as a cardio-regulator in insects. Putative NO-producing neurones were detected in locust pre-genital free abdominal ganglia by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry and with an antibody against NO synthase (NOS). With both methods, we identified the same 14 somata in each examined ganglion: two dorsal posterior midline somata; six ventral posterior midline somata; and three pairs of lateral somata. A combination of NOS-detection methods with nerve tracing and transmitter immunocytochemistry revealed that at least 12 of these cells were efferent, of which four were identified as peptidergic neurosecretory cells with an antiserum detecting RFamide-like peptides. One of the latter was unequivocally identified as an octopaminergic dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurone, which specifically projected to the heart ("DUM-heart"). Its peripheral projections revealed by axon tracing appeared as a meshwork of varicose endings encapsulating the heart. NOS-like immunoreactive profiles were found in the heart nerve. NO donors caused a dose-dependent increase in heart rate. This cardio-excitatory effect was negatively correlated to resting heart rate and seemed to be dependent on the physiological state of the animal. Hence, NO released from neurones such as the rhythmically active DUM-heart might exert continuous control over the heart. Possible mechanisms for the actions of NO on the heart and interactions with other neuromodulators co-localized in the DUM-heart neurone (octopamine, taurine, RF-amide-like peptide) are discussed.

  16. Somal size of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia: differential effects across neuronal subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierri, Joseph N; Volk, Christine L E; Auh, Sungyoung; Sampson, Allan; Lewis, David A

    2003-07-15

    Cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia may be related to morphologic abnormalities of pyramidal neurons in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC) and the largest pyramidal neurons in deep layer 3 may be most affected. Immunoreactivity (IR) for the nonphosphorylated epitopes of neurofilament protein (NNFP) identifies a subset of large dPFC deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons. We tested the hypotheses that the average size of NNFP-IR neurons is smaller in schizophrenia and that the decrease in size of these neurons is greater than that observed in the general population of deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons. We estimated the mean somal volume of NNFP-IR neurons in deep layer 3 of 9 in 13 matched pairs of control and schizophrenia subjects and compared the differences in somal size of NNFP-IR neurons to the differences in size of all deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons identified in Nissl-stained material. In subjects with schizophrenia, the somal volume of NNFP-IR neurons was nonsignificantly decreased by 6.6%, whereas that of the Nissl-stained pyramidal neurons was significantly decreased by 14.2%. These results suggest that the NNFP-IR subpopulation of dPFC pyramidal neurons are not preferentially affected in schizophrenia. Thus, a subpopulation of dPFC deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons, other than those identified by NNFP-IR, may be selectively vulnerable in schizophrenia.

  17. Glutamatergic Nonpyramidal Neurons From Neocortical Layer VI and Their Comparison With Pyramidal and Spiny Stellate Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelic, Sofija; Gallopin, Thierry; Cauli, Bruno; Hill, Elisa L.; Roux, Lisa; Badr, Sammy; Hu, Emilie; Tamás, Gábor; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    The deeper part of neocortical layer VI is dominated by nonpyramidal neurons, which lack a prominent vertically ascending dendrite and predominantly establish corticocortical connections. These neurons were studied in rat neocortical slices using patch-clamp, single-cell reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and biocytin labeling. The majority of these neurons expressed the vesicular glutamate transporter but not glutamic acid decarboxylase, suggesting that a high proportion of layer VI nonpyramidal neurons are glutamatergic. Indeed, they exhibited numerous dendritic spines and established asymmetrical synapses. Our sample of glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons displayed a wide variety of somatodendritic morphologies and a subset of these cells expressed the Nurr1 mRNA, a marker for ipsilateral, but not commissural corticocortical projection neurons in layer VI. Comparison with spiny stellate and pyramidal neurons from other layers showed that glutamatergic neurons consistently exhibited a low occurrence of GABAergic interneuron markers and regular spiking firing patterns. Analysis of electrophysiological diversity using unsupervised clustering disclosed three groups of cells. Layer V pyramidal neurons were segregated into a first group, whereas a second group consisted of a subpopulation of layer VI neurons exhibiting tonic firing. A third heterogeneous cluster comprised spiny stellate, layer II/III pyramidal, and layer VI neurons exhibiting adaptive firing. The segregation of layer VI neurons in two different clusters did not correlate either with their somatodendritic morphologies or with Nurr1 expression. Our results suggest that electrophysiological similarities between neocortical glutamatergic neurons extend beyond layer positioning, somatodendritic morphology, and projection specificity. PMID:19052106

  18. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L. [School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9709 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  19. L-system modeling of neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Bruce H.; Mulchandani, K.

    1994-09-01

    A formal representation of neuron morphology, adequate for the geometric modeling of manually-traced neurons, is presented. The concept of a stochastic L-system is then introduced and the critical distribution functions governing the stochastic generation of dendritic and axonal trees are defined. Experiments with various stochastic L-system models for pyramidal, motoneuron, and Purkinje cells are reported which generate synthetic neurons with promising proximity to neurons in the neurobiology literature. Work is in progress to improve this degree of proximity, but more importantly to validate the derived stochastic models against available databases of manually-traced neurons. To this end a neuron morphology modeler is described which provides a methodology for iterative refinement of the stochastic L-system model.

  20. Involvement of PKA-dependent upregulation of nNOS-CGRP in adrenomedullin-initiated mechanistic pathway underlying CFA-induced response in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Ruan, Liqin; Hong, Yanguo; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Quirion, Rémi

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that intrathecal administration of the adrenomedullin (AM) receptor antagonist AM(22-52) produces a long-lasting anti-hyperalgesia effect. This study examined the hypothesis that AM recruits other pronociceptive mediators in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation. Injection of CFA in the hindpaw of rat produced an increase in the expression of nNOS in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn. An intrathecal administration of AM(22-52), but not the CGRP antagonist BIBN4096BS, abolished the CFA-induced increase of nNOS. Moreover, AM-induced increase of CGRP was inhibited by the nNOS inhibitors L-NAME and 7-nitroindazole in cultured ganglion explants. Addition of AM to ganglion cultures induced an increase in nNOS protein, which was attenuated by the PKA inhibitor H-89. Treatment with AM also concentration-dependently increased cAMP content and pPKA protein level, but not its non-phosphorylated form, in cultured ganglia. In addition, nNOS was shown to be co-localized with the AM receptor components calcitonin receptor-like receptor and receptor activity-modifying protein 2- and 3 in DRG neurons. The present study suggests that the enhanced activity of nitric oxide (NO) mediates the biological action of AM at the spinal level and that AM recruits NO-CGRP via cAMP/PKA signaling in a mechanistic pathway underlying CFA-induced hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance limitations of relay neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Agarwal

    Full Text Available Relay cells are prevalent throughout sensory systems and receive two types of inputs: driving and modulating. The driving input contains receptive field properties that must be transmitted while the modulating input alters the specifics of transmission. For example, the visual thalamus contains relay neurons that receive driving inputs from the retina that encode a visual image, and modulating inputs from reticular activating system and layer 6 of visual cortex that control what aspects of the image will be relayed back to visual cortex for perception. What gets relayed depends on several factors such as attentional demands and a subject's goals. In this paper, we analyze a biophysical based model of a relay cell and use systems theoretic tools to construct analytic bounds on how well the cell transmits a driving input as a function of the neuron's electrophysiological properties, the modulating input, and the driving signal parameters. We assume that the modulating input belongs to a class of sinusoidal signals and that the driving input is an irregular train of pulses with inter-pulse intervals obeying an exponential distribution. Our analysis applies to any [Formula: see text] order model as long as the neuron does not spike without a driving input pulse and exhibits a refractory period. Our bounds on relay reliability contain performance obtained through simulation of a second and third order model, and suggest, for instance, that if the frequency of the modulating input increases or the DC offset decreases, then relay increases. Our analysis also shows, for the first time, how the biophysical properties of the neuron (e.g. ion channel dynamics define the oscillatory patterns needed in the modulating input for appropriately timed relay of sensory information. In our discussion, we describe how our bounds predict experimentally observed neural activity in the basal ganglia in (i health, (ii in Parkinson's disease (PD, and (iii in PD during

  2. Neuronal communication: firing spikes with spikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, Michael

    2012-08-21

    Spikes of single cortical neurons can exert powerful effects even though most cortical synapses are too weak to fire postsynaptic neurons. A recent study combining single-cell stimulation with population imaging has visualized in vivo postsynaptic firing in genetically identified target cells. The results confirm predictions from in vitro work and might help to understand how the brain reads single-neuron activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Timme

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree or sends out (out-degree. To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to

  4. Sensory Neurons in the Human Geniculate Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tadasu; Yamaguma, Yu; Sasaki, Yu; Kanda, Noriyuki; Sasahara, Nobuyuki; Kokubun, Souichi; Yajima, Takehiro; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The geniculate ganglion (GG) contains visceral and somatic sensory neurons of the facial nerve. In this study, the number and cell size of sensory neurons in the human GG were investigated. The estimated number of GG neurons ranged from 1,580 to 2,561 (mean ± SD = 1,960 ± 364.6). The cell size of GG neurons ranged from 393.0 to 2,485.4 μm2 (mean ± SD = 1,067.4 ± 99.5 μm2). Sensory neurons in the GG were significantly smaller in size than those in the dorsal root (range = 326.6-5343.4 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,683.2 ± 203.8 μm2) or trigeminal ganglia (range = 349.6-4,889.28 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,529.0 ± 198.48 μm2). Sensory neurons had similar cell body sizes in the GG and nodose ganglion (range = 357.2-3,488.33 μm2, mean ± SD = 1,160.4 ± 156.61 μm2). These findings suggest that viscerosensory neurons have smaller cell bodies than somatosensory neurons. In addition, immunohistochemistry for several neurochemical substances was performed on the human GG. In the ganglion, sensory neurons were mostly immunoreactive for secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine-like 1 (94.3%). One third of GG neurons showed vesicular glutamate transporter 2 immunoreactivity (31.3%). Only 7.3% of GG neurons were immunoreactive for transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1. Sensory neurons in the human GG may respond to gustatory, nociceptive, and/or mechanoreceptive stimuli from tongues, soft palates, and external auditory canals. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Functions of class V myosins in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, John A; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-10-04

    This minireview focuses on recent studies implicating class V myosins in organelle and macromolecule transport within neurons. These studies reveal that class V myosins play important roles in a wide range of fundamental processes occurring within neurons, including the transport into dendritic spines of organelles that support synaptic plasticity, the establishment of neuronal shape, the specification of polarized cargo transport, and the subcellular localization of mRNA.

  6. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  7. Role of DAPK in neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yuki; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2014-02-01

    Neuronal cell death happens as a result of the normal physiological process that occurs during development, or as part of the pathological process that occurs during disease. Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is an intracellular protein that mediates cell death by its serine/threonine kinase activity, and transmits apoptotic cell death signals in various cells, including neurons. DAPK is elevated in injured neurons in acute models of injury such as ischemia and seizure. The absence of DAPK has been shown to protect neurons from a wide variety of acute toxic insults. Moreover, DAPK also regulates neuronal cell death during central nervous system development. Neurons are initially overproduced in the developing nervous system, following which approximately one-half of the original cell population dies. This "naturally-occurring" or "programmed" cell death is essential for the construction of the developing nervous system. In this review, we focus on the role of DAPK in neuronal cell death after neuronal injury. The participation of DAPK in developmental neuronal death is also explained.

  8. Tuning curves, neuronal variability, and sensory coding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Butts

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Tuning curves are widely used to characterize the responses of sensory neurons to external stimuli, but there is an ongoing debate as to their role in sensory processing. Commonly, it is assumed that a neuron's role is to encode the stimulus at the tuning curve peak, because high firing rates are the neuron's most distinct responses. In contrast, many theoretical and empirical studies have noted that nearby stimuli are most easily discriminated in high-slope regions of the tuning curve. Here, we demonstrate that both intuitions are correct, but that their relative importance depends on the experimental context and the level of variability in the neuronal response. Using three different information-based measures of encoding applied to experimentally measured sensory neurons, we show how the best-encoded stimulus can transition from high-slope to high-firing-rate regions of the tuning curve with increasing noise level. We further show that our results are consistent with recent experimental findings that correlate neuronal sensitivities with perception and behavior. This study illustrates the importance of the noise level in determining the encoding properties of sensory neurons and provides a unified framework for interpreting how the tuning curve and neuronal variability relate to the overall role of the neuron in sensory encoding.

  9. Cognition and behaviour in motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Patricia; Hodges, John R

    2010-12-01

    Motor neurone disease has traditionally been considered a pure motor syndrome which spares aspects of cognition and behaviour, although in recent years it has been suggested that up to 50% of patients with motor neurone disease may develop frontal dysfunction which, in some cases, is severe enough to reach criteria for frontotemporal dementia. We review the cognitive and behavioural changes in motor neurone disease emphasizing the recent advances. A major advance in pathology has been the recent discovery of TDP-43 and FUS inclusions as the key components in cases of motor neurone disease, frontotemporal dementia-motor neurone disease and some cases with pure frontotemporal dementia. In addition, mutations in TARDBP and FUS genes have been reported in recent years. Longitudinal studies showed that progression of cognitive impairment over the course of motor neurone disease appears to be mild and occurs only in a proportion of motor neurone disease patients. The presence of cognitive impairment seems to be related to a faster disease and a shorter survival. Motor neurone disease is a multi-system disorder which overlaps with frontotemporal dementia. Behavioural and cognitive changes appear to occur in a subset of patients with motor neurone disease, but the cause of this variability remains unclear.

  10. Functional connectivity in in vitro neuronal assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Daniele; Pastore, Vito P.; Massobrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Complex network topologies represent the necessary substrate to support complex brain functions. In this work, we reviewed in vitro neuronal networks coupled to Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) as biological substrate. Networks of dissociated neurons developing in vitro and coupled to MEAs, represent a valid experimental model for studying the mechanisms governing the formation, organization and conservation of neuronal cell assemblies. In this review, we present some examples of the use of statistical Cluster Coefficients and Small World indices to infer topological rules underlying the dynamics exhibited by homogeneous and engineered neuronal networks. PMID:26500505

  11. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  12. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashery, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level. PMID:26372048

  13. Macroscopic Description for Networks of Spiking Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montbrió, Ernest; Pazó, Diego; Roxin, Alex

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of neuroscience, statistical physics, and nonlinear dynamics is to understand how brain function arises from the collective dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. This challenge has been chiefly addressed through large-scale numerical simulations. Alternatively, researchers have formulated mean-field theories to gain insight into macroscopic states of large neuronal networks in terms of the collective firing activity of the neurons, or the firing rate. However, these theories have not succeeded in establishing an exact correspondence between the firing rate of the network and the underlying microscopic state of the spiking neurons. This has largely constrained the range of applicability of such macroscopic descriptions, particularly when trying to describe neuronal synchronization. Here, we provide the derivation of a set of exact macroscopic equations for a network of spiking neurons. Our results reveal that the spike generation mechanism of individual neurons introduces an effective coupling between two biophysically relevant macroscopic quantities, the firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which together govern the evolution of the neuronal network. The resulting equations exactly describe all possible macroscopic dynamical states of the network, including states of synchronous spiking activity. Finally, we show that the firing-rate description is related, via a conformal map, to a low-dimensional description in terms of the Kuramoto order parameter, called Ott-Antonsen theory. We anticipate that our results will be an important tool in investigating how large networks of spiking neurons self-organize in time to process and encode information in the brain.

  14. Effective stimuli for constructing reliable neuron models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaul Druckmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The rich dynamical nature of neurons poses major conceptual and technical challenges for unraveling their nonlinear membrane properties. Traditionally, various current waveforms have been injected at the soma to probe neuron dynamics, but the rationale for selecting specific stimuli has never been rigorously justified. The present experimental and theoretical study proposes a novel framework, inspired by learning theory, for objectively selecting the stimuli that best unravel the neuron's dynamics. The efficacy of stimuli is assessed in terms of their ability to constrain the parameter space of biophysically detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the neuron's dynamics as attested by their ability to generalize well to the neuron's response to novel experimental stimuli. We used this framework to evaluate a variety of stimuli in different types of cortical neurons, ages and animals. Despite their simplicity, a set of stimuli consisting of step and ramp current pulses outperforms synaptic-like noisy stimuli in revealing the dynamics of these neurons. The general framework that we propose paves a new way for defining, evaluating and standardizing effective electrical probing of neurons and will thus lay the foundation for a much deeper understanding of the electrical nature of these highly sophisticated and non-linear devices and of the neuronal networks that they compose.

  15. Odor processing by adult-born neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Yoav; Adam, Yoav; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-03-05

    The adult mammalian brain is continuously supplied with adult-born neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) and hippocampus, where they are thought to be important for circuit coding and plasticity. However, direct evidence for the actual involvement of these neurons in neural processing is still lacking. We recorded the spiking activity of adult-born periglomerular neurons in the mouse OB in vivo using two-photon-targeted patch recordings. We show that odor responsiveness reaches a peak during neuronal development and then recedes at maturity. Sensory enrichment during development enhances the selectivity of adult-born neurons after maturation, without affecting neighboring resident neurons. Thus, in the OB circuit, adult-born neurons functionally integrate into the circuit, where they acquire distinct response profiles in an experience-dependent manner. The constant flow of these sensitive neurons into the circuit provides it with a mechanism of long-term plasticity, wherein new neurons mature to process odor information based on past demands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Contribution of the nos-pdt operon to virulence phenotypes in methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapp, April M; Mogen, Austin B; Almand, Erin A; Rivera, Frances E; Shaw, Lindsey N; Richardson, Anthony R; Rice, Kelly C

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as an important regulator of bacterial stress resistance, biofilm development, and virulence. One potential source of endogenous NO production in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is its NO-synthase (saNOS) enzyme, encoded by the nos gene. Although a role for saNOS in oxidative stress resistance, antibiotic resistance, and virulence has been recently-described, insights into the regulation of nos expression and saNOS enzyme activity remain elusive. To this end, transcriptional analysis of the nos gene in S. aureus strain UAMS-1 was performed, which revealed that nos expression increases during low-oxygen growth and is growth-phase dependent. Furthermore, nos is co-transcribed with a downstream gene, designated pdt, which encodes a prephenate dehydratase (PDT) enzyme involved in phenylalanine biosynthesis. Deletion of pdt significantly impaired the ability of UAMS-1 to grow in chemically-defined media lacking phenylalanine, confirming the function of this enzyme. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the operon organization of nos-pdt appears to be unique to the staphylococci. As described for other S. aureus nos mutants, inactivation of nos in UAMS-1 conferred sensitivity to oxidative stress, while deletion of pdt did not affect this phenotype. The nos mutant also displayed reduced virulence in a murine sepsis infection model, and increased carotenoid pigmentation when cultured on agar plates, both previously-undescribed nos mutant phenotypes. Utilizing the fluorescent stain 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2',7'-Difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM) diacetate, decreased levels of intracellular NO/reactive nitrogen species (RNS) were detected in the nos mutant on agar plates. These results reinforce the important role of saNOS in S. aureus physiology and virulence, and have identified an in vitro growth condition under which saNOS activity appears to be upregulated. However, the significance of the operon organization of nos-pdt and potential

  17. Contribution of the nos-pdt operon to virulence phenotypes in methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April M Sapp

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is emerging as an important regulator of bacterial stress resistance, biofilm development, and virulence. One potential source of endogenous NO production in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is its NO-synthase (saNOS enzyme, encoded by the nos gene. Although a role for saNOS in oxidative stress resistance, antibiotic resistance, and virulence has been recently-described, insights into the regulation of nos expression and saNOS enzyme activity remain elusive. To this end, transcriptional analysis of the nos gene in S. aureus strain UAMS-1 was performed, which revealed that nos expression increases during low-oxygen growth and is growth-phase dependent. Furthermore, nos is co-transcribed with a downstream gene, designated pdt, which encodes a prephenate dehydratase (PDT enzyme involved in phenylalanine biosynthesis. Deletion of pdt significantly impaired the ability of UAMS-1 to grow in chemically-defined media lacking phenylalanine, confirming the function of this enzyme. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the operon organization of nos-pdt appears to be unique to the staphylococci. As described for other S. aureus nos mutants, inactivation of nos in UAMS-1 conferred sensitivity to oxidative stress, while deletion of pdt did not affect this phenotype. The nos mutant also displayed reduced virulence in a murine sepsis infection model, and increased carotenoid pigmentation when cultured on agar plates, both previously-undescribed nos mutant phenotypes. Utilizing the fluorescent stain 4-Amino-5-Methylamino-2',7'-Difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM diacetate, decreased levels of intracellular NO/reactive nitrogen species (RNS were detected in the nos mutant on agar plates. These results reinforce the important role of saNOS in S. aureus physiology and virulence, and have identified an in vitro growth condition under which saNOS activity appears to be upregulated. However, the significance of the operon organization of nos-pdt and

  18. Endothelin-1 Overexpression Improves Renal Function in eNOS Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Tsuprykov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To investigate the renal phenotype under conditions of an activated renal ET-1 system in the status of nitric oxide deficiency, we compared kidney function and morphology in wild-type, ET-1 transgenic (ET+/+, endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout (eNOS-/- and ET+/+eNOS-/- mice. Methods: We assessed blood pressure, parameters of renal morphology, plasma cystatin C, urinary protein excretion, expression of genes associated with glomerular filtration barrier and tissue remodeling, and plasma metabolites using metabolomics. Results: eNOS-/- and ET+/+eNOS-/- mice developed hypertension. Osteopontin, albumin and protein excretion were increased in eNOS-/- and restored in ET+/+eNOS-/- animals. All genetically modified mice developed renal interstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis. Genes involved in tissue remodeling (serpine1, TIMP1, Col1a1, CCL2 were up-regulated in eNOS-/-, but not in ET+/+eNOS-/- mice. Plasma levels of free carnitine and acylcarnitines, amino acids, diacyl phosphatidylcholines, lysophosphatidylcholines and hexoses were descreased in eNOS-/- and were in the normal range in ET+/+eNOS-/- mice. Conclusion: eNOS-/- mice developed renal dysfunction, which was partially rescued by ET-1 overexpression in eNOS-/- mice. The metabolomics results suggest that ET-1 overexpression on top of eNOS knockout is associated with a functional recovery of mitochondria (rescue effect in β-oxidation of fatty acids and an increase in antioxidative properties (normalization of monounsaturated fatty acids levels.

  19. Endothelial (NOS3 E298D) and inducible (NOS2 exon 22) nitric oxide synthase polymorphisms, as well as plasma NOx, influence sepsis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Guadalupe; Asensi, Víctor; Montes, A Hugo; Collazos, Julio; Alvarez, Victoria; Pérez-Is, Laura; Carton, José A; Taboada, Francisco; Valle-Garay, Eulalia

    2014-11-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) influences susceptibility to infection and hemodynamic failure (HF) in sepsis. NOS3 and NOS2 SNPs might modify plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels, sepsis development, hemodynamics and survival. 90 severely septic and 91 non-infected ICU patients were prospectively studied. NOS3 (E298D), NOS3 (-786 T/C), NOS3 (27 bp-VNTR), and NOS2A (exon 22) SNPs and plasma NOx levels were assessed. 21 patients (11.6%) died, 7 with sepsis. TT homozygotes and T allele carriers of NOS3 (E298D) and AG carriers of the NOS2A (exon 22) SNPs were more frequent among septic compared to non-infected ICU patients (p < 0.05). Plasma NOx was higher in septic, especially in septic with hemodynamic failure (HF) or fatal outcome (p < 0.006). Plasma NOx was higher in carriers of the T allele of the NOS3 (E298D) SNP (p = 0.006). Sepsis independently associated with HF, increased NOx, peripheral neutrophils, and fibrinogen levels, decreased prothrombin and the presence of the NOS3 (E298D) and NOS2A (exon 22) SNPs. A low APACHE II score was the only variable associated with sepsis survival. NOx was independently associated with sepsis, HF, decreased neutrophils and higher APACHE. NOS3 (E298D) and NOS2A (exon 22) SNPs, individually and in combination, and plasma NOx, associated with sepsis development. NOx associated with HF and fatal outcome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitro-Oxidative Stress after Neuronal Ischemia Induces Protein Nitrotyrosination and Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Tajes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is an acute vascular event that obstructs blood supply to the brain, producing irreversible damage that affects neurons but also glial and brain vessel cells. Immediately after the stroke, the ischemic tissue produces nitric oxide (NO to recover blood perfusion but also produces superoxide anion. These compounds interact, producing peroxynitrite, which irreversibly nitrates protein tyrosines. The present study measured NO production in a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, a murine glial (BV2, a human endothelial cell line (HUVEC, and in primary cultures of human cerebral myocytes (HC-VSMCs after experimental ischemia in vitro. Neuronal, endothelial, and inducible NO synthase (NOS expression was also studied up to 24 h after ischemia, showing a different time course depending on the NOS type and the cells studied. Finally, we carried out cell viability experiments on SH-SY5Y cells with H2O2, a prooxidant agent, and with a NO donor to mimic ischemic conditions. We found that both compounds were highly toxic when they interacted, producing peroxynitrite. We obtained similar results when all cells were challenged with peroxynitrite. Our data suggest that peroxynitrite induces cell death and is a very harmful agent in brain ischemia.

  1. Nitro-Oxidative Stress after Neuronal Ischemia Induces Protein Nitrotyrosination and Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajes, Marta; ILL-Raga, Gerard; Palomer, Ernest; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Guix, Francesc X.; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Guivernau, Biuse; Jiménez-Conde, Jordi; Ois, Angel; Pérez-Asensio, Fernando; Reyes-Navarro, Mario; Galán, Ana M.; Alameda, Francesc; Escolar, Ginés; Opazo, Carlos; Planas, Anna; Roquer, Jaume; Valverde, Miguel A.; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is an acute vascular event that obstructs blood supply to the brain, producing irreversible damage that affects neurons but also glial and brain vessel cells. Immediately after the stroke, the ischemic tissue produces nitric oxide (NO) to recover blood perfusion but also produces superoxide anion. These compounds interact, producing peroxynitrite, which irreversibly nitrates protein tyrosines. The present study measured NO production in a human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y), a murine glial (BV2), a human endothelial cell line (HUVEC), and in primary cultures of human cerebral myocytes (HC-VSMCs) after experimental ischemia in vitro. Neuronal, endothelial, and inducible NO synthase (NOS) expression was also studied up to 24 h after ischemia, showing a different time course depending on the NOS type and the cells studied. Finally, we carried out cell viability experiments on SH-SY5Y cells with H2O2, a prooxidant agent, and with a NO donor to mimic ischemic conditions. We found that both compounds were highly toxic when they interacted, producing peroxynitrite. We obtained similar results when all cells were challenged with peroxynitrite. Our data suggest that peroxynitrite induces cell death and is a very harmful agent in brain ischemia. PMID:23983901

  2. NETMORPH: a framework for the stochastic generation of large scale neuronal networks with realistic neuron morphologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, R.A.; Tijms, B.; van Hees, P.; Postma, F.; de Ridder, A.; Ramakers, G.J.A.; van Pelt, J.; van Ooyen, A.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simulation framework, called NETMORPH, for the developmental generation of 3D large-scale neuronal networks with realistic neuron morphologies. In NETMORPH, neuronal morphogenesis is simulated from the perspective of the individual growth cone. For each growth cone in a growing axonal

  3. Tratamento de dejetos suínos com biorreator UASB

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    Pablo Costa da Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Esse trabalho tem por objetivo analisar a importância do biodigestor UASB no tratamento de dejetos suínos. A suinocultura possui papel importante quanto ao desenvolvimento econômico do Brasil. No entanto, o aumento de produção vem causando problemas ambientais graves, por conta do grande volume de resíduos sólidos gerados pela atividade. O desenvolvimento de métodos de tratamento de dejetos que agreguem valor à produção e respeitem as leis ambientais é um dos grandes desafios do setor. A biodigestão anaeróbia é um dos métodos mais eficazes para o tratamento de dejetos de suinoculturas. Este método de digestão, denominado UASB, tem como característica principal a produção de biogás e de biofertilizante, produto rico em nutrientes, e livre de patógenos. O método oferece vantagens como a promoção do bem estar animal, o aumento da fertilidade do solo, a diminuição da poluição e da emissão de gases geradores do efeito estufa e a melhoria da qualidade de vida, nos centros produtores de suínos, além de minimizar problemas relacionados ao déficit de energia elétrica. Portanto, a utilização de biodigestores UASB para o tratamento de dejetos de suínos é uma opção interessante, que deve ser avaliada com seriedade.

  4. COLECISTECTOMIA VÍDEO-LAPAROSCÓPICA EM SUÍNOS

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    Marcelo Alves Pinto

    1993-08-01

    Full Text Available Dezoito suínos foram submetidos experimentalmente a colecistectomia vídeo-laparoscópica. Neste experimento procurou-se padronizar e avaliar a técnica cirúrgica e anestésica para sua utilização em centros de treinamento em cirurgia experimental, bem como de terapêutica cirúrgica em medicina veterinária.

  5. Participação nos Lucros ou Resultados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Felipe Ferreira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A participação nos lucros ou resultados é uma forma de remuneração variável, pela qual não há incidência de encargos sociais, além de incentivar o aumento da produtividade, podendo assim ser utilizada pelas empresas como estratégia, para enfrentarem os desafios dinâmicos e competitivos em que atuam. Esta pesquisa caracteriza-se como sendo exploratória, com abordagem qualitativa e tem como objetivo conceituar e explanar as formas pela quais são praticadas a participação nos lucros ou resultados em empresas do setor alimentício em Santa Catarina, que foram escolhidas por meio do critério de acessibilidade e disponibilidade. Dos dados coletados, pode-se verificar que as empresas: COC Alimentos, Moinho Catarinense e Pepsico do Brasil utilizam a participação nos resultados e a Perdigão utiliza a participação mista. A Moinho Catarinense distribui para todos os empregados um salário nominal, como a CDC Alimentos, exceto para os gerentes. A Perdigão beneficia todos os empregados, sendo que 60% da distribuição é pelo lucro líquido e 40% por indicadores de desempenho. A Pepsico do Brasil distribui aos empregados operacionais 50% de um salário nominal e para os empregados da administração central um salário nominal, atrelado ao cumprimento de metas, especificadas no programa de participação nos lucros ou resultados.

  6. Pragmatismo e os pragmáticos nos estudos organizacionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Kanashiro Meneghetti

    Full Text Available O objetivo central deste ensaio teórico é avaliar as contribuições do pragmatismo nos Estudos Organizacionais e, os específicos, avaliar se as contribuições teóricas de Charles Peirce e John Dewey possibilitam afirmar o pragmatismo como senso comum, ciência ou teoria do conhecimento; analisar as contribuições - possibilidadese limites - do pragmatismo como conhecimento científico; compreender os percursos do pragmatismo nos Estudos Organizacionais. Chaga-se a conclusão de que ser pragmático é diferente de conceber estudos articulados no campo epistemológico do pragmatismo. O sujeito pragmático vê na sua utilidade e na necessidade deação, o ponto de tensão que coloca em dúvida a veracidade dos pressupostos do pragmatismo como ciência. O que ocorre nos Estudos Organizacionais éa conversão do pragmatismo como conhecimento científico emsubordinação irracional à utilidade e à ação prática, sobretudo, no campo da economia, da política, da ciência, da cultura, da educação, e assim por diante.

  7. Neoplasmas em suínos: 37 casos

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    Juliana S. Brum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Neoplasmas em suínos são raros. Esse trabalho descreve os neoplasmas encontrados em suínos na rotina diagnóstica de um laboratório de patologia veterinária localizado na Região Central do Rio Grande do Sul. Durante um período de 49 anos, 2.266 casos de várias afecções em suínos foram encontrados, dos quais 37 (1,6% eram neoplasmas. Em ordem decrescente de frequência, os seguintes neoplasmas foram encontrados: Linfoma (11/37, nefroblastoma (11/37, melanoma (8/37 e papiloma (2/37. Adicionalmente, um caso de cada um dos seguintes tumores foi observado: Adenoma hepatocelular, carcinoma hepatocelular, colangiocarcinoma, histiocitoma fibroso maligno e sarcoma granulocítico. O aspecto macroscópico e histológico desses tumores é descrito e a sua epidemiologia é comparada com os dados disponíveis na literatura para neoplasia suína.

  8. Glucose-sensing neurons of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdakov, Denis; Luckman, Simon M; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2005-12-29

    Specialized subgroups of hypothalamic neurons exhibit specific excitatory or inhibitory electrical responses to changes in extracellular levels of glucose. Glucose-excited neurons were traditionally assumed to employ a 'beta-cell' glucose-sensing strategy, where glucose elevates cytosolic ATP, which closes KATP channels containing Kir6.2 subunits, causing depolarization and increased excitability. Recent findings indicate that although elements of this canonical model are functional in some hypothalamic cells, this pathway is not universally essential for excitation of glucose-sensing neurons by glucose. Thus glucose-induced excitation of arcuate nucleus neurons was recently reported in mice lacking Kir6.2, and no significant increases in cytosolic ATP levels could be detected in hypothalamic neurons after changes in extracellular glucose. Possible alternative glucose-sensing strategies include electrogenic glucose entry, glucose-induced release of glial lactate, and extracellular glucose receptors. Glucose-induced electrical inhibition is much less understood than excitation, and has been proposed to involve reduction in the depolarizing activity of the Na+/K+ pump, or activation of a hyperpolarizing Cl- current. Investigations of neurotransmitter identities of glucose-sensing neurons are beginning to provide detailed information about their physiological roles. In the mouse lateral hypothalamus, orexin/hypocretin neurons (which promote wakefulness, locomotor activity and foraging) are glucose-inhibited, whereas melanin-concentrating hormone neurons (which promote sleep and energy conservation) are glucose-excited. In the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, excitatory actions of glucose on anorexigenic POMC neurons in mice have been reported, while the appetite-promoting NPY neurons may be directly inhibited by glucose. These results stress the fundamental importance of hypothalamic glucose-sensing neurons in orchestrating sleep-wake cycles, energy expenditure and

  9. Intoxicação por selênio em suínos no Sul do Brasil

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    Danilo C. Gomes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available São descritos dois surtos de intoxicação por selênio em suínos na região Sul do Brasil. Foram acometidos leitões em fase de creche, entre 27 e 22 dias, com mortalidade variando de 16% a 15,3% (Surto 1 e 2 respectivamente. Os suínos apresentaram poliomielomalacia simétrica focal e lesões de casco, que inicialmente eram caracterizadas por uma linha avermelhada na borda coronária que evoluía nos suínos sobreviventes para desprendimento do casco. Os sinais clínicos iniciaram após seis dias (Surto 1 e 30 horas (Surto 2 da introdução da ração com alto teor de selênio. O surgimento dos sinais foi abrupto, caracterizado por andar cambaleante, com evolução para paralisia dos membros pélvicos e posteriormente tetraparesia. Macroscopicamente observaram-se focos circulares amarelados com áreas deprimidas mais escuras, restritas ao corno ventral da substância cinzenta em intumescências cervical e lombar. Microscopicamente essas áreas corresponderam à malacia da substância cinzenta, caracterizada por microcavitações, perda neuronal, cromatólise, neuronofagia, infiltrado de células Gitter, microgliose, astrócitos de Alzheimer tipo II e proliferação de células endoteliais evidenciadas na imunohistoquímica (IHQ para fator de von Willebrand. Ainda, no segundo surto, dois animais apresentaram vacuolização difusa do citoplasma de neurônios e em um suíno foram observados astrócitos gemistocíticos. Na IHQ para GFAP ficou evidenciada uma astrocitose e astrogliose. Além dessas alterações medulares, em dois suínos observou-se, polioencefalomalácia simétrica no tronco encefálico. Em amostras de ração, detectou-se 3,38ppm (Surto 1 e 154ppm (Surto 2 de Se/kg e em amostras de fígado foram encontradas dosagens superiores a 3,34ppm (variando de 3,34 até 10ppm. No Surto 2, após 44 dias da retirada da ração, foi realizada eutanásia de seis suínos para monitoramento de níveis hepáticos de selênio (dois suínos

  10. Protein kinase A-dependent Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase Activation Mediates the Enhancement of Baroreflex Response by Adrenomedullin in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii of Rats

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    Ho I-Chun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adrenomedullin (ADM exerts its biological functions through the receptor-mediated enzymatic mechanisms that involve protein kinase A (PKA, or neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. We previously demonstrated that the receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA pathway involves in ADM-enhanced baroreceptor reflex (BRR response. It remains unclear whether ADM may enhance BRR response via activation of nNOS-dependent mechanism in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS. Methods Intravenous injection of phenylephrine was administered to evoke the BRR before and at 10, 30, and 60 min after microinjection of the test agents into NTS of Sprague-Dawley rats. Western blotting analysis was used to measure the level and phosphorylation of proteins that involved in BRR-enhancing effects of ADM (0.2 pmol in NTS. The colocalization of PKA and nNOS was examined by immunohistochemical staining and observed with a laser confocal microscope. Results We found that ADM-induced enhancement of BRR response was blunted by microinjection of NPLA or Rp-8-Br-cGMP, a selective inhibitor of nNOS or protein kinase G (PKG respectively, into NTS. Western blot analysis further revealed that ADM induced an increase in the protein level of PKG-I which could be attenuated by co-microinjection with the ADM receptor antagonist ADM22-52 or NPLA. Moreover, we observed an increase in phosphorylation at Ser1416 of nNOS at 10, 30, and 60 min after intra-NTS administration of ADM. As such, nNOS/PKG signaling may also account for the enhancing effect of ADM on BRR response. Interestingly, biochemical evidence further showed that ADM-induced increase of nNOS phosphorylation was prevented by co-microinjection with Rp-8-Br-cAMP, a PKA inhibitor. The possibility of PKA-dependent nNOS activation was substantiated by immunohistochemical demonstration of co-localization of PKA and nNOS in putative NTS neurons. Conclusions The novel finding of this study is that the signal transduction cascade that

  11. The eNOS enhancer AVE 9488: a novel cardioprotectant against ischemia reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, S; Adamek, A; Fraccarollo, D; Tillmanns, J; Widder, J D; Dienesch, C; Schäfer, A; Podolskaya, A; Held, M; Ruetten, H; Ertl, G; Bauersachs, J

    2009-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important regulator of vascular and myocardial function. Cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury is reduced in mice overexpressing endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) suggesting cardioprotection by eNOS. Novel pharmacological substances, so called eNOS enhancers, upregulate eNOS expression and thereby increase NO production. We tested the effects of the eNOS enhancer AVE 9488 on cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury in vivo in mice. After treatment with the eNOS enhancer AVE 9488 (30 mg/kg/day) or placebo for one week mice underwent 30 min of coronary artery ligation and 24 h of reperfusion in vivo. Ischemia-reperfusion damage was significantly reduced in mice treated with the eNOS enhancer when compared to placebo treated mice (infarct/area at risk 65.4 +/- 4.1 vs. 36.9 +/- 4.0%, placebo vs. eNOS enhancer, P = 0.0002). The protective effect was blunted in eNOS knockout mice treated with the eNOS enhancer (infarct/area at risk 64.1 +/- 6.2%, eNOS knockout + eNOS enhancer vs. WT + eNOS enhancer, P = ns). Reactive oxygen species were significantly reduced in mice treated with the eNOS enhancer as indicated by significantly lower malondialdehyde-thiobarbituric acid levels (placebo vs. eNOS enhancer, 3.2 +/- 0.5 vs. 0.8 +/- 0.07 micromol/l, P = 0.0003). Thus pharmacological interventions addressed to increase eNOS-derived NO production constitute a promising therapeutic approach to prevent myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  12. Neuroprotective role of nanoencapsulated quercetin in combating ischemia-reperfusion induced neuronal damage in young and aged rats.

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    Aparajita Ghosh

    Full Text Available Cerebral stroke is the leading cause of death and permanent disability among elderly people. In both humans and animals, cerebral ischemia damages the nerve cells in vulnerable regions of the brain, viz., hippocampus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and hypothalamus. The present study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of nanoencapsulated quercetin (QC in combating ischemia-reperfusion-induced neuronal damage in young and aged Swiss Albino rats. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the common carotid arteries of both young and aged rats followed by reperfusion. Nanoencapsulated quercetin (2.7 mg/kg b wt was administered to both groups of animals via oral gavage two hours prior to ischemic insults as well as post-operation till day 3. Cerebral ischemia and 30 min consecutive reperfusion caused a substantial increase in lipid peroxidation, decreased antioxidant enzyme activities and tissue osmolality in different brain regions of both groups of animals. It also decreased mitochondrial membrane microviscosity and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in different brain regions of young and aged rats. Among the brain regions studied, the hippocampus appeared to be the worst affected region showing increased upregulation of iNOS and caspase-3 activity with decreased neuronal count in the CA1 and CA3 subfields of both young and aged rats. Furthermore, three days of continuous reperfusion after ischemia caused massive damage to neuronal cells. However, it was observed that oral treatment of nanoencapsulated quercetin (2.7 mg/kg b wt resulted in downregulation of iNOS and caspase-3 activities and improved neuronal count in the hippocampal subfields even 3 days after reperfusion. Moreover, the nanoformulation imparted a significant level of protection in the antioxidant status in different brain regions, thus contributing to a better understanding of the given pathophysiological processes causing ischemic neuronal damage.

  13. Heavy metals in locus ceruleus and motor neurons in motor neuron disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The causes of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS) and other types of motor neuron disease (MND) remain largely unknown. Heavy metals have long been implicated in MND, and it has recently been shown that inorganic mercury selectively enters human locus ceruleus (LC) and motor neurons. We therefore used silver nitrate autometallography (AMG) to look for AMG-stainable heavy metals (inorganic mercury and bismuth) in LC and motor neurons of 24 patients with MND (18 with SALS and 6 with familial MND) and in the LC of 24 controls. Results Heavy metals in neurons were found in significantly more MND patients than in controls when comparing: (1) the presence of any versus no heavy metal-containing LC neurons (MND 88%, controls 42%), (2) the median percentage of heavy metal-containing LC neurons (MND 9.5%, control 0.0%), and (3) numbers of individuals with heavy metal-containing LC neurons in the upper half of the percentage range (MND 75%, controls 25%). In MND patients, 67% of remaining spinal motor neurons contained heavy metals; smaller percentages were found in hypoglossal, nucleus ambiguus and oculomotor neurons, but none in cortical motor neurons. The majority of MND patients had heavy metals in both LC and spinal motor neurons. No glia or other neurons, including neuromelanin-containing neurons of the substantia nigra, contained stainable heavy metals. Conclusions Uptake of heavy metals by LC and lower motor neurons appears to be fairly common in humans, though heavy metal staining in the LC, most likely due to inorganic mercury, was seen significantly more often in MND patients than in controls. The LC innervates many cell types that are affected in MND, and it is possible that MND is triggered by toxicant-induced interactions between LC and motor neurons. PMID:24330485

  14. Relationship between soil type and N₂O reductase genotype (nosZ) of indigenous soybean bradyrhizobia: nosZ-minus populations are dominant in Andosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Yoko; Itakura, Manabu; Choi, Hyunseok; Saeki, Yuichi; Hayatsu, Masahito; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains that have the nosZ gene, which encodes N2O reductase, are able to mitigate N2O emissions from soils (15). To examine the distribution of nosZ genotypes among Japanese indigenous soybean bradyrhizobia, we isolated bradyrhizobia from the root nodules of soybean plants inoculated with 32 different soils and analyzed their nosZ and nodC genotypes. The 1556 resultant isolates were classified into the nosZ+/nodC+ genotype (855 isolates) and nosZ-/nodC+ genotype (701 isolates). The 11 soil samples in which nosZ- isolates significantly dominated (P volcanic ash soil prevalent in agricultural fields in Japan), whereas the 17 soil samples in which nosZ+ isolates significantly dominated were mainly alluvial soils (non-volcanic ash soils). This result was supported by a principal component analysis of environmental factors: the dominance of the nosZ- genotype was positively correlated with total N, total C, and the phosphate absorption coefficient in the soils, which are soil properties typical of Andosols. Internal transcribed spacer sequencing of representative isolates showed that the nosZ+ and nosZ- isolates of B. japonicum fell mainly into the USDA110 (BJ1) and USDA6 (BJ2) groups, respectively. These results demonstrated that the group lacking nosZ was dominant in Andosols, which can be a target soil type for an N2O mitigation strategy in soybean fields. We herein discussed how the nosZ genotypes of soybean bradyrhizobia depended on soil types in terms of N2O respiration selection and genomic determinants for soil adaptation.

  15. Relationship Between Soil Type and N2O Reductase Genotype (nosZ) of Indigenous Soybean Bradyrhizobia: nosZ-minus Populations are Dominant in Andosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Yoko; Itakura, Manabu; Choi, Hyunseok; Saeki, Yuichi; Hayatsu, Masahito; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2014-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains that have the nosZ gene, which encodes N2O reductase, are able to mitigate N2O emissions from soils (15). To examine the distribution of nosZ genotypes among Japanese indigenous soybean bradyrhizobia, we isolated bradyrhizobia from the root nodules of soybean plants inoculated with 32 different soils and analyzed their nosZ and nodC genotypes. The 1556 resultant isolates were classified into the nosZ+/nodC+ genotype (855 isolates) and nosZ−/nodC+ genotype (701 isolates). The 11 soil samples in which nosZ− isolates significantly dominated (P volcanic ash soil prevalent in agricultural fields in Japan), whereas the 17 soil samples in which nosZ+ isolates significantly dominated were mainly alluvial soils (non-volcanic ash soils). This result was supported by a principal component analysis of environmental factors: the dominance of the nosZ− genotype was positively correlated with total N, total C, and the phosphate absorption coefficient in the soils, which are soil properties typical of Andosols. Internal transcribed spacer sequencing of representative isolates showed that the nosZ+ and nosZ− isolates of B. japonicum fell mainly into the USDA110 (BJ1) and USDA6 (BJ2) groups, respectively. These results demonstrated that the group lacking nosZ was dominant in Andosols, which can be a target soil type for an N2O mitigation strategy in soybean fields. We herein discussed how the nosZ genotypes of soybean bradyrhizobia depended on soil types in terms of N2O respiration selection and genomic determinants for soil adaptation. PMID:25476067

  16. Neuronal dynamics on FPGA: Izhikevich's model

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, M.; Caruso, E.; Fortuna, L.; Frasca, M.; Occhipinti, L.; Rivoli, F.

    2005-06-01

    The study of spatio-temporal patterns generation and processing in systems with high parallelism like biological neuronal networks gives birth to a new technology able to realize architectures with robust performance even in noisy environments. The behavioural properties of neural assemblies warrant an effective exchange and use of information in presence of high-level neuronal noise. Neuron population processing and self-organization have been reproduced by connecting several neuron through synaptic connections, which can be either electrical or chemical, in artificial information processing architectures based on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). The adopted neuron model is based on Izhikevich"s description of cortical neuron dynamics [1]. The development of biological neuronal network models has been focused on architecture features like changes over time of topologies, uniformity of the connections, node diversity, etc. The hardware reproduction of neuron dynamical behaviour, by giving high computation performance, allows the development of innovative computational methods and models based on self-organizing nonlinear architectures.

  17. Bursting and synaptic plasticity in neuronal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, J.

    2010-01-01

    Networks of neonatal cortical neurons, cultured on multi electrode arrays (MEAs) exhibit spontaneous action potential firings. The electrodes embedded in the glass surface of a MEA can be used to record and stimulate activity at 60 sites in a network of ~50.000 neurons. Such in-vitro networks enable

  18. Sorting out polarized transport mechanisms in neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipka, J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are highly polarized cells with two distinct processes called axons and dendrites. To establish and maintain their specialized morphology and function, neurons use molecular motors: kinesins, myosins and dynein to steer cargo transport along the cytoskeleton into axons and dendrites.

  19. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

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    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  20. Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1990-01-01

    Training time decreases dramatically. In improved mathematical model of neural-network processor, temperature of neurons (in addition to connection strengths, also called weights, of synapses) varied during supervised-learning phase of operation according to mathematical formalism and not heuristic rule. Evidence that biological neural networks also process information at neuronal level.

  1. Power laws from linear neuronal cable theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersen, Klas H; Lindén, Henrik Anders; Tetzlaff, Tom

    2014-01-01

    suggested to be at the root of this phenomenon, we here demonstrate a possible origin of such power laws in the biophysical properties of single neurons described by the standard cable equation. Taking advantage of the analytical tractability of the so called ball and stick neuron model, we derive general...

  2. Locally active Hindmarsh-Rose neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Paolo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy); Fortuna, Luigi [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: lfortuna@diees.unict.it; Frasca, Mattia [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: mfrasca@diees.unict.it; Rosa, Manuela La [SST Group, Corporate R and D, STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: manuela.la-rosa@st.com

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the locally active and the edge of chaos regions of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) model for neuron dynamics are studied. From these regions parameters are chosen to set emergent phenomena both in 2D and 3D grids of HR neurons.

  3. Neurochemical phenotype and function of endomorphin 2-immunopositive neurons in the myenteric plexus of the rat colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Qing eLi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and activity of endomorphins (EMs, which are endogenous m-opioid receptor (MOR ligands in the gastrointestinal tract (GI, have yet to be elucidated. The current study aimed to shed light on this topic. EM2 was expressed in the enteric neurons in the myenteric plexus of the mid-colon. Of the EM2-immunoreactive (EM2-IR neurons, 53 ± 4.6%, 26 ± 4.5%, 26 ± 2.8% and 49 ± 4.2% displayed immunopositive staining for choline acetyl transferase (ChAT, substance P (SP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP and nitric oxide synthetase (NOS, respectively. A bath application of EM2 (2 mM enhanced spontaneous contractile amplitude and tension, which were reversed by β-FNA (an antagonist of MOR but not NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ether (L-NAME, a non-selective inhibitor of NOS or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP6-28 (an antagonist of the VIP receptor in the colonic strips. EM2 significantly suppressed inhibitory junction potentials (IJPs in 14 of the 17 examined circular muscle cells, and this effect was not antagonized by preincubation in L-NAME. EM2 was widely expressed in interneurons and motor neurons in the myenteric plexus and presynaptically inhibited fast IJPs, thereby enhancing spontaneous contraction and tension in the colonic smooth muscle.

  4. Mortalidade de bovinos zebuínos por hipotermia em Mato Grosso do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethania S. Santos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve por objetivo descrever a ocorrência periódica de mortalidade de bovinos por hipotermia após inversão térmica no estado de Mato Grosso do Sul. São relatados 16 surtos encaminhados ao Laboratório de Patologia Animal da FAMEZ/UFMS, ocorridos de agosto de 2000 a julho de 2010, em 13 municípios do Estado. O diagnóstico de hipotermia baseou-se na ocorrência de mortes após queda brusca de temperatura acompanhada de chuvas e ventos, simultaneamente em diversas propriedades, nos sinais clínicos observados e na ausência de lesões macro e microscópicas significativas. Em todos os surtos houve uma queda brusca de temperatura, de até 29ºC, em intervalos de um a quatro dias associada a chuva e vento. Na maioria das vezes a morte dos bovinos ocorreu em locais onde havia escassez de pasto e ausência de abrigos naturais ou artificiais. Os bovinos afetados estavam magros, com baixo escore corporal, e, em grande parte dos casos, eram encontrados mortos nos cantos das invernadas e próximos a cercas no dia seguinte à queda brusca da temperatura. Foram afetados bovinos de diferentes idades. Os sinais clínicos se caracterizavam por cegueira, incoordenação, dismetria, fraqueza, decúbito esternal, movimentos de pedalagem, opistótono, tremores musculares, e dificuldade respiratória e morte. Em 30 bovinos necropsiados os principais achados macroscópicos foram edema subcutâneo, cavitário e pulmonar, e, em alguns casos, histologicamente havia eosinofilia neuronal. A hipotermia é uma importante causa de mortalidade quando bovinos com pobre estado nutricional, pouca disponibilidade e qualidade dos pastos e ausência de abrigos naturais, são submetidos a uma condição de mudança climática com queda brusca de temperatura combinada com ventos fortes e chuvas.

  5. The influence of intravesical administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX) on the chemical coding of sympathetic chain ganglia (SChG) neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepiarczyk, Ewa; Majewski, Mariusz; Bossowska, Agnieszka

    2015-11-01

    Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is used as an experimental drug in therapy of neurogenic urinary bladder disorders. The present study investigated the chemical coding of sympathetic chain ganglia (SChG) neurons supplying porcine urinary bladder after intravesical RTX instillation. The SChG neurons were visualized with retrograde tracing method and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labeling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH; marker of noradrenergic neurons), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), galanin, Leu(5)-enkephalin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). It was found that in both the control (n = 5) and RTX-treated pigs (n = 5), the vast majority (90.4 ± 2.8 and 89.7 ± 2.3%, respectively) of FB-positive (FB+) nerve cells were DβH+. RTX instillation caused a decrease in the number of FB+/DβH+ neurons immunopositive to NPY (71.1 ± 12.1 vs 43.2 ± 6.7%), VIP (21.3 ± 10.7 vs 5.3 ± 4.3%) or SOM (16.5 ± 4.6 vs 2.3 ± 2.6%) and a distinct increase in the number of FB+/DβH+ neurons immunoreactive to nNOS (0.8 ± 1 vs 5.3 ± 1.9 %). The present study for the first time has provided some information that therapeutic effects of RTX on the mammalian urinary bladder can be partly mediated by SChG neurons.

  6. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... higher than 300 mg/m2 the patients lost distal tendon and H-reflexes and displayed reduced vibration sense in the feet and the fingers. The amplitudes of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP) from the fingers innervated by the median nerve and the dorsolateral side of the foot innervated by the sural...... of the foot evoked by a tactile probe showed similar changes to those observed in SNAPs evoked by electrical stimulation. At these doses, somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) from the tibial nerve had increased latencies of peripheral, spinal and central responses suggesting loss of central processes...

  7. Optogenetic stimulation of MCH neurons increases sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konadhode, Roda Rani; Pelluru, Dheeraj; Blanco-Centurion, Carlos; Zayachkivsky, Andrew; Liu, Meng; Uhde, Thomas; Glen, W Bailey; van den Pol, Anthony N; Mulholland, Patrick J; Shiromani, Priyattam J

    2013-06-19

    Melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) is a cyclic neuropeptide present in the hypothalamus of all vertebrates. MCH is implicated in a number of behaviors but direct evidence is lacking. To selectively stimulate the MCH neurons the gene for the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2, was inserted into the MCH neurons of wild-type mice. Three weeks later MCH neurons were stimulated for 1 min every 5 min for 24 h. A 10 Hz stimulation at the start of the night hastened sleep onset, reduced length of wake bouts by 50%, increased total time in non-REM and REM sleep at night, and increased sleep intensity during the day cycle. Sleep induction at a circadian time when all of the arousal neurons are active indicates that MCH stimulation can powerfully counteract the combined wake-promoting signal of the arousal neurons. This could be potentially useful in treatment of insomnia.

  8. Neuronal Migration and AUTS2 Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Kei; Hoshino, Mikio

    2017-05-14

    Neuronal migration is one of the pivotal steps to form a functional brain, and disorganization of this process is believed to underlie the pathology of psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and epilepsy. However, it is not clear how abnormal neuronal migration causes mental dysfunction. Recently, a key gene for various psychiatric diseases, the Autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2), has been shown to regulate neuronal migration, which gives new insight into understanding this question. Interestingly, the AUTS2 protein has dual functions: Cytoplasmic AUTS2 regulates actin cytoskeleton to control neuronal migration and neurite extension, while nuclear AUTS2 controls transcription of various genes as a component of the polycomb complex 1 (PRC1). In this review, we discuss AUTS2 from the viewpoint of human genetics, molecular function, brain development, and behavior in animal models, focusing on its role in neuronal migration.

  9. Neuronal hyperplasia in the anal canal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, C; Schrøder, H D

    1990-01-01

    In a consecutive series of minor surgical specimens from the anal canal, neuronal hyperplasia was found in nine of 56 haemorrhoidectomy specimens and in four of 23 fibrous polyps. In an additional series of 14 resections of the anal canal, neuronal hyperplasia was present in six cases, of which...... five showed haemorrhoids. In all cases, neuronal hyperplasia was located in the submucosa beneath squamous epithelium and extended over an area from 5 to 12 mm. Immunohistochemically, the foci of hyperplasia were found to consist of both neuronal and Schwann cell components. Staining for vasoactive...... intestinal peptide, neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene related peptide, did not demonstrate any increased terminal density. It is suggested that anal neuronal hyperplasia in these cases represents an acquired lesion due to local mechanical influence....

  10. Attractor dynamics in local neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe eThivierge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of synaptic connectivity in various regions of the brain are characterized by the presence of synaptic motifs, defined as unidirectional and bidirectional synaptic contacts that follow a particular configuration and link together small groups of neurons. Recent computational work proposes that a relay network (two populations communicating via a third, relay population of neurons can generate precise patterns of neural synchronization. Here, we employ two distinct models of neuronal dynamics and show that simulated neural circuits designed in this way are caught in a global attractor of activity that prevents neurons from modulating their response on the basis of incoming stimuli. To circumvent the emergence of a fixed global attractor, we propose a mechanism of selective gain inhibition that promotes flexible responses to external stimuli. We suggest that local neuronal circuits may employ this mechanism to generate precise patterns of neural synchronization whose transient nature delimits the occurrence of a brief stimulus.

  11. Multidisciplinary Interventions in Motor Neuron Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. E. Williams

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron disease is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of upper motor neuron in the motor cortex and lower motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord. Death occurs 2–4 years after the onset of the disease. A complex interplay of cellular processes such as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and impaired axonal transport are proposed pathogenetic processes underlying neuronal cell loss. Currently evidence exists for the use of riluzole as a disease modifying drug; multidisciplinary team care approach to patient management; noninvasive ventilation for respiratory management; botulinum toxin B for sialorrhoea treatment; palliative care throughout the course of the disease; and Modafinil use for fatigue treatment. Further research is needed in management of dysphagia, bronchial secretion, pseudobulbar affect, spasticity, cramps, insomnia, cognitive impairment, and communication in motor neuron disease.

  12. Neuron-derived IgG Protects Neurons from Complement-dependent Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Bingjie; McNutt, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunity of the nervous system has traditionally been thought to be predominantly due to the blood-brain barrier. This concept must now be revisited based on the existence of neuron-derived IgG. The conventional concept is that IgG is produced solely by mature B lymphocytes, but it has now been found to be synthesized by murine and human neurons. However, the function of this endogenous IgG is poorly understood. In this study, we confirm IgG production by rat cortical neurons at the protein and mRNA levels, with 69.0 ± 5.8% of cortical neurons IgG-positive. Injury to primary-culture neurons was induced by complement leading to increases in IgG production. Blockage of neuron-derived IgG resulted in more neuronal death and early apoptosis in the presence of complement. In addition, FcγRI was found in microglia and astrocytes. Expression of FcγR I in microglia was increased by exposure to neuron-derived IgG. Release of NO from microglia triggered by complement was attenuated by neuron-derived IgG, and this attenuation could be reversed by IgG neutralization. These data demonstrate that neuron-derived IgG is protective of neurons against injury induced by complement and microglial activation. IgG appears to play an important role in maintaining the stability of the nervous system. PMID:23979841

  13. Coupled activation of primary sensory neurons contributes to chronic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Shin; Anderson, Michael; Park, Kyoungsook; Zheng, Qin; Agarwal, Amit; Gong, Catherine; Saijilafu; Young, LeAnne; He, Shaoqiu; LaVinka, Pamela Colleen; Zhou, Fengquan; Bergles, Dwight; Hanani, Menachem; Guan, Yun; Spray, David C.; Dong, Xinzhong

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Primary sensory neurons in the DRG play an essential role in initiating pain by detecting painful stimuli in the periphery. Tissue injury can sensitize DRG neurons, causing heightened pain sensitivity, often leading to chronic pain. Despite the functional importance, how DRG neurons function at a population level is unclear due to the lack of suitable tools. Here we developed an imaging technique that allowed us to simultaneously monitor the activities of >1,600 neurons/DRG in live mice and discovered a striking neuronal coupling phenomenon that adjacent neurons tend to activate together following tissue injury. This coupled activation occurs among various neurons and is mediated by an injury-induced upregulation of gap junctions in glial cells surrounding DRG neurons. Blocking gap junctions attenuated neuronal coupling and mechanical hyperalgesia. Therefore, neuronal coupling represents a new form of neuronal plasticity in the DRG and contributes to pain hypersensitivity by “hijacking” neighboring neurons through gap junctions. PMID:27568517

  14. Distinct Corticostriatal GABAergic Neurons Modulate Striatal Output Neurons and Motor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Melzer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The motor cortico-basal ganglion loop is critical for motor planning, execution, and learning. Balanced excitation and inhibition in this loop is crucial for proper motor output. Excitatory neurons have been thought to be the only source of motor cortical input to the striatum. Here, we identify long-range projecting GABAergic neurons in the primary (M1 and secondary (M2 motor cortex that target the dorsal striatum. This population of projecting GABAergic neurons comprises both somatostatin-positive (SOM+ and parvalbumin-positive (PV+ neurons that target direct and indirect pathway striatal output neurons as well as cholinergic interneurons differentially. Notably, optogenetic stimulation of M1 PV+ and M2 SOM+ projecting neurons reduced locomotion, whereas stimulation of M1 SOM+ projecting neurons enhanced locomotion. Thus, corticostriatal GABAergic projections modulate striatal output and motor activity.

  15. Physiological functions of glucose-inhibited neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdakov, D; González, J A

    2009-01-01

    Glucose-inhibited neurones are an integral part of neurocircuits regulating cognitive arousal, body weight and vital adaptive behaviours. Their firing is directly suppressed by extracellular glucose through poorly understood signalling cascades culminating in opening of post-synaptic K(+) or possibly Cl(-) channels. In mammalian brains, two groups of glucose-inhibited neurones are best understood at present: neurones of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) that express peptide transmitters NPY and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neurones of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) that express peptide transmitters orexins/hypocretins. The activity of ARC NPY/AgRP neurones promotes food intake and suppresses energy expenditure, and their destruction causes a severe reduction in food intake and body weight. The physiological actions of ARC NPY/AgRP cells are mediated by projections to numerous hypothalamic areas, as well as extrahypothalamic sites such as the thalamus and ventral tegmental area. Orexin/hypocretin neurones of the LH are critical for normal wakefulness, energy expenditure and reward-seeking, and their destruction causes narcolepsy. Orexin actions are mediated by highly widespread central projections to virtually all brain areas except the cerebellum, including monosynaptic innervation of the cerebral cortex and autonomic pre-ganglionic neurones. There, orexins act on two specific G-protein-coupled receptors generally linked to neuronal excitation. In addition to sensing physiological changes in sugar levels, the firing of both NPY/AgRP and orexin neurones is inhibited by the 'satiety' hormone leptin and stimulated by the 'hunger' hormone ghrelin. Glucose-inhibited neurones are thus well placed to coordinate diverse brain states and behaviours based on energy levels.

  16. Nitric oxide signalling and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the heart under stress [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Hua Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is an imperative regulator of the cardiovascular system and is a critical mechanism in preventing the pathogenesis and progression of the diseased heart. The scenario of bioavailable NO in the myocardium is complex: 1 NO is derived from both endogenous NO synthases (endothelial, neuronal, and/or inducible NOSs [eNOS, nNOS, and/or iNOS] and exogenous sources (entero-salivary NO pathway and the amount of NO from exogenous sources varies significantly; 2 NOSs are located at discrete compartments of cardiac myocytes and are regulated by distinctive mechanisms under stress; 3 NO regulates diverse target proteins through different modes of post-transcriptional modification (soluble guanylate cyclase [sGC]/cyclic guanosine monophosphate [cGMP]/protein kinase G [PKG]-dependent phosphorylation, S-nitrosylation, and transnitrosylation; 4 the downstream effectors of NO are multidimensional and vary from ion channels in the plasma membrane to signalling proteins and enzymes in the mitochondria, cytosol, nucleus, and myofilament; 5 NOS produces several radicals in addition to NO (e.g. superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, and different NO-related derivatives and triggers redox-dependent responses. However, nNOS inhibits cardiac oxidases to reduce the sources of oxidative stress in diseased hearts. Recent consensus indicates the importance of nNOS protein in cardiac protection under pathological stress. In addition, a dietary regime with high nitrate intake from fruit and vegetables together with unsaturated fatty acids is strongly associated with reduced cardiovascular events. Collectively, NO-dependent mechanisms in healthy and diseased hearts are better understood and shed light on the therapeutic prospects for NO and NOSs in clinical applications for fatal human heart diseases.

  17. Beneficial effects of exercise training after myocardial infarction require full eNOS expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waard, Monique C; van Haperen, Rien; Soullié, Thomas; Tempel, Dennie; de Crom, Rini; Duncker, Dirk J

    2010-06-01

    Exercise training attenuates left ventricular (LV) dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI). It could be speculated that these effects of exercise are mediated by increased endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that eNOS plays a critical role in the exercise-induced amelioration of LV dysfunction after MI. MI or sham was induced in eNOS(-/-), eNOS(+/-) and eNOS(+/+) mice. After 8 weeks of voluntary wheel running (approximately 7 km/day in all groups) or sedentary housing, global cardiac function was determined in vivo and (immuno)histochemistry was performed to assess cardiomyocyte size, fibrosis, capillary density and apoptosis in remote myocardium. At baseline eNOS(-/-) mice had higher mean aortic pressure compared to eNOS(+/-) and eNOS(+/+) mice, but had normal global cardiac function. MI resulted in marked LV remodeling, including cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and a reduction in capillary density, increased fibrosis and apoptosis, as well as LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction to the same extent in all genotypes. In eNOS(+/+) MI mice exercise abolished fibrosis and apoptosis in the remote myocardium, attenuated LV systolic dysfunction and ameliorated pulmonary congestion. These beneficial effects were lost in eNOS(+/-) and eNOS(-/-) mice, while LV systolic dysfunction and pulmonary congestion in eNOS(+/-) mice were exacerbated by exercise. In conclusion, the beneficial effects of exercise after MI on LV remodeling and dysfunction depend critically on endogenous eNOS. The observation that the lack of one eNOS allele is sufficient to negate all beneficial effects of exercise, strongly suggests that exercise depends on full eNOS expression. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Death of Neurons following Injury Requires Conductive Neuronal Gap Junction Channels but Not a Specific Connexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Joseph D; Ramsey, Jon; Polk, Jeremy M; Koop, Andre; Denisova, Janna V; Belousov, Andrei B

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade or genetic knockout of neuronal connexin 36 (Cx36)-containing gap junctions reduces neuronal death caused by ischemia, traumatic brain injury and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, whether Cx36 gap junctions contribute to neuronal death via channel-dependent or channel-independent mechanism remains an open question. To address this, we manipulated connexin protein expression via lentiviral transduction of mouse neuronal cortical cultures and analyzed neuronal death twenty-four hours following administration of NMDA (a model of NMDAR excitotoxicity) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (a model of ischemic injury). In cultures prepared from wild-type mice, over-expression and knockdown of Cx36-containing gap junctions augmented and prevented, respectively, neuronal death from NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia. In cultures obtained form from Cx36 knockout mice, re-expression of functional gap junction channels, containing either neuronal Cx36 or non-neuronal Cx43 or Cx31, resulted in increased neuronal death following insult. In contrast, the expression of communication-deficient gap junctions (containing mutated connexins) did not have this effect. Finally, the absence of ethidium bromide uptake in non-transduced wild-type neurons two hours following NMDAR excitotoxicity or ischemia suggested the absence of active endogenous hemichannels in those neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a role for neuronal gap junctions in cell death via a connexin type-independent mechanism that likely relies on channel activities of gap junctional complexes among neurons. A possible contribution of gap junction channel-permeable death signals in neuronal death is discussed.

  19. Contribution of synchronized GABAergic neurons to dopaminergic neuron firing and bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Zakharov, Denis; di Volo, Matteo; Gutkin, Boris; Lapish, Christopher C.; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    In the ventral tegmental area (VTA), interactions between dopamine (DA) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons are critical for regulating DA neuron activity and thus DA efflux. To provide a mechanistic explanation of how GABA neurons influence DA neuron firing, we developed a circuit model of the VTA. The model is based on feed-forward inhibition and recreates canonical features of the VTA neurons. Simulations revealed that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor (GABAR) stimulation can differentially influence the firing pattern of the DA neuron, depending on the level of synchronization among GABA neurons. Asynchronous activity of GABA neurons provides a constant level of inhibition to the DA neuron and, when removed, produces a classical disinhibition burst. In contrast, when GABA neurons are synchronized by common synaptic input, their influence evokes additional spikes in the DA neuron, resulting in increased measures of firing and bursting. Distinct from previous mechanisms, the increases were not based on lowered firing rate of the GABA neurons or weaker hyperpolarization by the GABAR synaptic current. This phenomenon was induced by GABA-mediated hyperpolarization of the DA neuron that leads to decreases in intracellular calcium (Ca2+) concentration, thus reducing the Ca2+-dependent potassium (K+) current. In this way, the GABA-mediated hyperpolarization replaces Ca2+-dependent K+ current; however, this inhibition is pulsatile, which allows the DA neuron to fire during the rhythmic pauses in inhibition. Our results emphasize the importance of inhibition in the VTA, which has been discussed in many studies, and suggest a novel mechanism whereby computations can occur locally. PMID:27440240

  20. Generation of sensory neurons is stimulated by leukemia inhibitory factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, M; Reid, K; Hilton, D J; Bartlett, P F

    1991-01-01

    The processes that regulate the development of peripheral neurons from their precursors in the embryonic neural crest are essentially unknown. In this report, we show that leukemia inhibitory factor stimulates the generation of neurons in cultures of mouse neural crest. These neurons have the morphology of sensory neurons and contain neuropeptides found in mammalian sensory neurons. Consistent with these neurons being of the sensory lineage is the finding that they arise from nondividing prec...

  1. Natriuretic peptides stimulate the cardiac sodium pump via NPR-C-coupled NOS activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    William, M.; Hamilton, E.J.; Garcia, A.

    2008-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) and their receptors (NPRs) are expressed in the heart, but their effects on myocyte function are poorly understood. Because NPRs are coupled to synthesis of cGMP, an activator of the sarcolemmal Na(+)-K(+) pump, we examined whether atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP......) regulates the pump. We voltage clamped rabbit ventricular myocytes and identified electrogenic Na(+)-K(+) pump current (arising from the 3:2 Na(+):K(+) exchange and normalized for membrane capacitance) as the shift in membrane current induced by 100 micromol/l ouabain. Ten nanomoles per liter ANP stimulated...... with KT-5823, nitric oxide (NO)-activated guanylyl cyclase with 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), or NO synthase with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Since synthesis of cGMP by NPR-A and NPR-B is not NO dependent or ODQ sensitive, we exposed myocytes to AP-811, a highly...

  2. Forced neuronal interactions cause poor communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzisch, Marine; Toni, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Post-natal hippocampal neurogenesis plays a role in hippocampal function, and neurons born post-natally participate to spatial memory and mood control. However, a great proportion of granule neurons generated in the post-natal hippocampus are eliminated during the first 3 weeks of their maturation, a mechanism that depends on their synaptic integration. In a recent study, we examined the possibility of enhancing the synaptic integration of neurons born post-natally, by specifically overexpressing synaptic cell adhesion molecules in these cells. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are transmembrane proteins mediating the physical connection between pre- and post-synaptic neurons at the synapse, and their overexpression enhances synapse formation. Accordingly, we found that overexpressing synaptic adhesion molecules increased the synaptic integration and survival of newborn neurons. Surprisingly, the synaptic adhesion molecule with the strongest effect on new neurons' survival, Neuroligin-2A, decreased memory performances in a water maze task. We present here hypotheses explaining these surprising results, in the light of the current knowledge of the mechanisms of synaptic integration of new neurons in the post-natal hippocampus.

  3. Staufen2 Regulates Neuronal Target RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacki E. Heraud-Farlow

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in directing RNA translation to neuronal synapses. Staufen2 (Stau2 has been implicated in both dendritic RNA localization and synaptic plasticity in mammalian neurons. Here, we report the identification of functionally relevant Stau2 target mRNAs in neurons. The majority of Stau2-copurifying mRNAs expressed in the hippocampus are present in neuronal processes, further implicating Stau2 in dendritic mRNA regulation. Stau2 targets are enriched for secondary structures similar to those identified in the 3′ UTRs of Drosophila Staufen targets. Next, we show that Stau2 regulates steady-state levels of many neuronal RNAs and that its targets are predominantly downregulated in Stau2-deficient neurons. Detailed analysis confirms that Stau2 stabilizes the expression of one synaptic signaling component, the regulator of G protein signaling 4 (Rgs4 mRNA, via its 3′ UTR. This study defines the global impact of Stau2 on mRNAs in neurons, revealing a role in stabilization of the levels of synaptic targets.

  4. Responses of MST neurons to plaid stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Farhan A; Liu, Liu D; Pack, Christopher C

    2013-07-01

    The estimation of motion information from retinal input is a fundamental function of the primate dorsal visual pathway. Previous work has shown that this function involves multiple cortical areas, with each area integrating information from its predecessors. Compared with neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1), neurons in the middle temporal (MT) area more faithfully represent the velocity of plaid stimuli, and the observation of this pattern selectivity has led to two-stage models in which MT neurons integrate the outputs of component-selective V1 neurons. Motion integration in these models is generally complemented by motion opponency, which refines velocity selectivity. Area MT projects to a third stage of motion processing, the medial superior temporal (MST) area, but surprisingly little is known about MST responses to plaid stimuli. Here we show that increased pattern selectivity in MST is associated with greater prevalence of the mechanisms implemented by two-stage MT models: Compared with MT neurons, MST neurons integrate motion components to a greater degree and exhibit evidence of stronger motion opponency. Moreover, when tested with more challenging unikinetic plaid stimuli, an appreciable percentage of MST neurons are pattern selective, while such selectivity is rare in MT. Surprisingly, increased motion integration is found in MST even for transparent plaid stimuli, which are not typically integrated perceptually. Thus the relationship between MST and MT is qualitatively similar to that between MT and V1, as repeated application of basic motion mechanisms leads to novel selectivities at each stage along the pathway.

  5. AgRP Neurons Regulate Bone Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Geun Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus has been implicated in skeletal metabolism. Whether hunger-promoting neurons of the arcuate nucleus impact the bone is not known. We generated multiple lines of mice to affect AgRP neuronal circuit integrity. We found that mice with Ucp2 gene deletion, in which AgRP neuronal function was impaired, were osteopenic. This phenotype was rescued by cell-selective reactivation of Ucp2 in AgRP neurons. When the AgRP circuitry was impaired by early postnatal deletion of AgRP neurons or by cell autonomous deletion of Sirt1 (AgRP-Sirt1−/−, mice also developed reduced bone mass. No impact of leptin receptor deletion in AgRP neurons was found on bone homeostasis. Suppression of sympathetic tone in AgRP-Sirt1−/− mice reversed osteopenia in transgenic animals. Taken together, these observations establish a significant regulatory role for AgRP neurons in skeletal bone metabolism independent of leptin action.

  6. Sildenafil Attenuates Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Pelvic Ganglia Neurons after Bilateral Cavernosal Nerve Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah A. Garcia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction is a common complication for patients undergoing surgeries for prostate, bladder, and colorectal cancers, due to damage of the nerves associated with the major pelvic ganglia (MPG. Functional re-innervation of target organs depends on the capacity of the neurons to survive and switch towards a regenerative phenotype. PDE5 inhibitors (PDE5i have been successfully used in promoting the recovery of erectile function after cavernosal nerve damage (BCNR by up-regulating the expression of neurotrophic factors in MPG. However, little is known about the effects of PDE5i on markers of neuronal damage and oxidative stress after BCNR. This study aimed to investigate the changes in gene and protein expression profiles of inflammatory, anti-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress related-pathways in MPG neurons after BCNR and subsequent treatment with sildenafil. Our results showed that BCNR in Fisher-344 rats promoted up-regulation of cytokines (interleukin- 1 (IL-1 β, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1, and oxidative stress factors (Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase, Myeloperoxidase (MPO, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, TNF receptor superfamily member 5 (CD40 that were normalized by sildenafil treatment given in the drinking water. In summary, PDE5i can attenuate the production of damaging factors and can up-regulate the expression of beneficial factors in the MPG that may ameliorate neuropathic pain, promote neuroprotection, and favor nerve regeneration.

  7. Beer elicits vasculoprotective effects through Akt/eNOS activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilahur, Gemma; Casani, Laura; Mendieta, Guiomar; Lamuela-Raventos, Rosa M; Estruch, Ramon; Badimon, Lina

    2014-12-01

    There is controversy regarding the effect of alcohol beverage intake in vascular vasodilatory function in peripheral arteries. The effects of beer intake in coronary vasodilation remain unknown. We investigated whether regular beer intake (alcohol and alcohol-free) protects against hypercholesterolaemia-induced coronary endothelial dysfunction and the mechanisms behind this effect. Pigs were fed 10 days: (i) a Western-type hypercholesterolaemic diet (WD); (ii) WD+low-dose beer (12·5 g alcohol/day); (iii) WD+moderate-dose beer (25 g alcohol/day); or (iv) WD+moderate-dose alcohol-free-beer (0·0 g alcohol/day). Coronary responses to endothelium-dependent vasoactive drugs (acetylcholine: receptor mediated; calcium ionophore-A23189: nonreceptor mediated), endothelium-independent vasoactive drug (SNP) and L-NMMA (NOS-antagonist) were evaluated in the LAD coronary artery by flow Doppler. Coronary Akt/eNOS activation, MCP-1 expression, oxidative DNA damage and superoxide production were assessed. Lipid profile, lipoproteins resistance to oxidation and urinary isoxanthohumol concentration were evaluated. Alcoholic and nonalcoholic beer intake prevented WD-induced impairment of receptor- and non-receptor-operated endothelial-dependent coronary vasodilation. All animals displayed a similar vasodilatory response to SNP and L-NMMA blunted all endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation responses. Haemodynamic parameters remained unchanged. Coronary arteries showed lower DNA damage and increased Akt/eNOS axis activation in beer-fed animals. Animals taking beer showed HDL with higher antioxidant capacity, higher LDL resistance to oxidation and increased isoxanthohumol levels. Weight, lipids levels, liver enzymes and MCP-1 expression were not affected by beer intake. Non-alcoholic-related beer components protect against hyperlipemia-induced coronary endothelial dysfunction by counteracting vascular oxidative damage and preserving the Akt/eNOS pathway. Light-to-moderate beer

  8. Uruguay: cómo nos cambia la vida

    OpenAIRE

    Schmal, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01

    La evolución política latinoamericana, particularmente en el cono sur –Uruguay, Chile y Argentina- en los últimos 50 años ha experimentado cambios significativos, desde los tiempos en que los formalismos democráticos eran puestos a prueba por crisis económicas y sociales que desembocaban en crisis políticas, las que por lo general terminaban “resolviéndose” por la vía militar. Agotada esta instancia, los países han tendido a retomar los cauces democráticos. Hoy nos encontramos inmersos en la ...

  9. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardy, Cedric; van den Hurk, Mark; Eames, Tameji; Marchand, Cynthia; Hernandez, Ruben V.; Kellogg, Mariko; Gorris, Mark; Galet, Ben; Palomares, Vanessa; Brown, Joshua; Bang, Anne G.; Mertens, Jerome; Böhnke, Lena; Boyer, Leah; Simon, Suzanne; Gage, Fred H.

    2015-01-01

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely used to culture neurons. We found that classic basal media, as well as serum, impair action potential generation and synaptic communication. To overcome this problem, we designed a new neuronal medium (BrainPhys basal + serum-free supplements) in which we adjusted the concentrations of inorganic salts, neuroactive amino acids, and energetic substrates. We then tested that this medium adequately supports neuronal activity and survival of human neurons in culture. Long-term exposure to this physiological medium also improved the proportion of neurons that were synaptically active. The medium was designed to culture human neurons but also proved adequate for rodent neurons. The improvement in BrainPhys basal medium to support neurophysiological activity is an important step toward reducing the gap between brain physiological conditions in vivo and neuronal models in vitro. PMID:25870293

  10. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  11. Context-aware modeling of neuronal morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torben-Nielsen, Benjamin; De Schutter, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal morphologies are pivotal for brain functioning: physical overlap between dendrites and axons constrain the circuit topology, and the precise shape and composition of dendrites determine the integration of inputs to produce an output signal. At the same time, morphologies are highly diverse and variant. The variance, presumably, originates from neurons developing in a densely packed brain substrate where they interact (e.g., repulsion or attraction) with other actors in this substrate. However, when studying neurons their context is never part of the analysis and they are treated as if they existed in isolation. Here we argue that to fully understand neuronal morphology and its variance it is important to consider neurons in relation to each other and to other actors in the surrounding brain substrate, i.e., their context. We propose a context-aware computational framework, NeuroMaC, in which large numbers of neurons can be grown simultaneously according to growth rules expressed in terms of interactions between the developing neuron and the surrounding brain substrate. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that by using NeuroMaC we can generate accurate virtual morphologies of distinct classes both in isolation and as part of neuronal forests. Accuracy is validated against population statistics of experimentally reconstructed morphologies. We show that context-aware generation of neurons can explain characteristics of variation. Indeed, plausible variation is an inherent property of the morphologies generated by context-aware rules. We speculate about the applicability of this framework to investigate morphologies and circuits, to classify healthy and pathological morphologies, and to generate large quantities of morphologies for large-scale modeling. PMID:25249944

  12. Context-aware modeling of neuronal morphologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eTorben-Nielsen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal morphologies are pivotal for brain functioning: physical overlap between dendrites and axons constrain the circuit topology, and the precise shape and composition of dendrites determine the integration of inputs to produce an output signal. At the same time, morphologies are highly diverse and variant. The variance, presumably, originates from neurons developing in a densely packed brain substrate where they interact (e.g., repulsion or attraction with other actors in this substrate. However, when studying neurons their context is never part of the analysis and they are treated as if they existed in isolation.Here we argue that to fully understand neuronal morphology and its variance it is important to consider neurons in relation to each other and to other actors in the surrounding brain substrate, i.e., their context. We propose a context-aware computational framework, NeuroMaC, in which large numbers of neurons can be grown simultaneously according to growth rules expressed in terms of interactions between the developing neuron and the surrounding brain substrate.As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that by using NeuroMaC we can generate accurate virtual morphologies of distinct classes both in isolation and as part of neuronal forests. Accuracy is validated against population statistics of experimentally reconstructed morphologies. We show that context-aware generation of neurons can explain characteristics of variation. Indeed, plausible variation is an inherent property of the morphologies generated by context-aware rules. We speculate about the applicability of this framework to investigate morphologies and circuits, to classify healthy and pathological morphologies, and to generate large quantities of morphologies for large-scale modeling.

  13. Reaction-Diffusion in the NEURON Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. McDougal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to support research on the role of cell biological principles (genomics, proteomics, signaling cascades and reaction dynamics on the dynamics of neuronal response in health and disease, NEURON has developed a Reaction-Diffusion (rxd module in Python which provides specification and simulation for these dynamics, coupled with the electrophysiological dynamics of the cell membrane. Arithmetic operations on species and parameters are overloaded, allowing arbitrary reaction formulas to be specified using Python syntax. These expressions are then transparently compiled into bytecode that uses NumPy for fast vectorized calculations. At each time step, rxd combines NEURON's integrators with SciPy’s sparse linear algebra library.

  14. Managing Brain Extracellular K(+) during Neuronal Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; Stoica, Anca; MacAulay, Nanna

    2016-01-01

    isoform compositions of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase remain unresolved. The various cell types in the brain serve a certain temporal contribution in the face of network activity; astrocytes respond directly to the immediate release of K(+) from neurons, whereas the neurons themselves become the primary K...... characteristics required to fulfill their distinct physiological roles in clearance of K(+) from the extracellular space in the face of neuronal activity. Understanding the nature, impact and effects of the various Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isoform combinations in K(+) management in the central nervous system might...

  15. Evoking prescribed spike times in stochastic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Jens; Lindner, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Single cell stimulation in vivo is a powerful tool to investigate the properties of single neurons and their functionality in neural networks. We present a method to determine a cell-specific stimulus that reliably evokes a prescribed spike train with high temporal precision of action potentials. We test the performance of this stimulus in simulations for two different stochastic neuron models. For a broad range of parameters and a neuron firing with intermediate firing rates (20-40 Hz) the reliability in evoking the prescribed spike train is close to its theoretical maximum that is mainly determined by the level of intrinsic noise.

  16. Tracing lineages to uncover neuronal identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlmann Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many previous studies have focused on understanding how midbrain dopamine neurons, which are implicated in many neurological conditions, are generated during embryogenesis. One of the remaining questions concerns how different dopamine neuron subtypes are specified. A recent paper in Neural Development has revealed features of a spatial and temporal lineage map that, together with other studies, begins to elucidate the developmental origin of distinct neuronal subtypes within the developing midbrain. See research article http://www.neuraldevelopment.com/content/6/1/29

  17. Statistical Mechanics Characterization of Neuronal Mosaics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; de Lima, Silene Maria Araujo

    2005-01-01

    The spatial distribution of neuronal cells is an important requirement for achieving proper neuronal function in several parts of the nervous system of most animals. For instance, specific distribution of photoreceptors and related neuronal cells, particularly the ganglion cells, in mammal's retina is required in order to properly sample the projected scene. This work presents how two concepts from the areas of statistical mechanics and complex systems, namely the \\emph{lacunarity} and the \\emph{multiscale entropy} (i.e. the entropy calculated over progressively diffused representations of the cell mosaic), have allowed effective characterization of the spatial distribution of retinal cells.

  18. Neuron-glia interactions in glutamatergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Sickmann, H M; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    theses processes also has not been fully elucidated. Cultured astrocytes and neurons were utilized to monitor these processes related to glutamatergic neurotransmission. Inhibitors of glycolysis and TCA cycle in combination with pathway-selective substrates were used to study glutamate uptake and release...... in providing energy for glutamate uptake both in astrocytes and in neurons. The neuronal vesicular glutamate release was less dependent on glycolytic ATP. Dependence of glutamate uptake on glycolytic ATP may be at least partially explained by a close association in the membrane of GAPDH and PGK...

  19. Neuronal damage by secretory phospholipase A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Rodriguez de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils H

    2003-01-01

    signal transduction has previously been suggested (J Biol Chem 271:32722; 1996). Here we show, using neuronal cell cultures, an up-regulation of cPLA(2) expression and an inhibition by the selective cPLA(2) inhibitor AACOCF3 after exposure to neurotoxic concentrations of sPLA(2)-OS2. Pretreatment...... of neuronal cultures with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) or the presynaptic PAF receptor antagonist, BN52021, partially blocked neuronal cell death induced by sPLA(2)-OS2. Furthermore, selective COX-2 inhibitors ameliorated sPLA(2)-OS2-induced neurotoxicity. We conclude that sPLA(2)-OS2 activates...

  20. Inflammatory responses are not sufficient to cause delayed neuronal death in ATP-induced acute brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey-Kyeong Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain inflammation is accompanied by brain injury. However, it is controversial whether inflammatory responses are harmful or beneficial to neurons. Because many studies have been performed using cultured microglia and neurons, it has not been possible to assess the influence of multiple cell types and diverse factors that dynamically and continuously change in vivo. Furthermore, behavior of microglia and other inflammatory cells could have been overlooked since most studies have focused on neuronal death. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the precise roles of microglia and brain inflammation in the injured brain, and determine their contribution to neuronal damage in vivo from the onset of injury. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acute neuronal damage was induced by stereotaxic injection of ATP into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and the cortex of the rat brain. Inflammatory responses and their effects on neuronal damage were investigated by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and stereological counting, etc. ATP acutely caused death of microglia as well as neurons in a similar area within 3 h. We defined as the core region the area where both TH(+ and Iba-1(+ cells acutely died, and as the penumbra the area surrounding the core where Iba-1(+ cells showed activated morphology. In the penumbra region, morphologically activated microglia arranged around the injury sites. Monocytes filled the damaged core after neurons and microglia died. Interestingly, neither activated microglia nor monocytes expressed iNOS, a major neurotoxic inflammatory mediator. Monocytes rather expressed CD68, a marker of phagocytic activity. Importantly, the total number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 3 h (∼80% of that in the contralateral side did not decrease further at 7 d. Similarly, in the cortex, ATP-induced neuron-damage area detected at 3 h did not increase for up to 7 d. CONCLUSIONS: Different cellular

  1. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS/NOS II) in the vestibule of guinea pigs after the application of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Hess, A; Bloch, W; Michel, O

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that the anti-cancer drug cisplatin has an ototoxic property; however, the details are not yet evident. In this study, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS/NOS II) in the vestibule of guinea pigs after i.p. injections of cisplatin was examined immunohistochemically. Three days after the injection of cisplatin (10 mg/kg) or placebo, animals were sacrificed. Then the temporal bones were removed and subjected to Immunohistochemical studies for iNOS. In the cisplatin group, INOS was detectable, whereas the tissue in the control group was negative for iNOS. The vestibule, the wall of blood vessels and the vestibular ganglion cells showed immunoreactivity for iNOS. It is known that INOS catalyzes an inadequate quantity of NO under pathological conditions. Increased NO levels lead to inner ear dysfunction. Therefore, our results indicate that iNOS could also mediate the vestibulo-toxicity of cisplatin.

  2. A novel enteric neuron-glia coculture system reveals the role of glia in neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre-Scoul, Catherine; Chevalier, Julien; Oleynikova, Elena; Cossais, François; Talon, Sophie; Neunlist, Michel; Boudin, Hélène

    2017-01-15

    Unlike astrocytes in the brain, the potential role of enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the formation of the enteric neuronal circuit is currently unknown. To examine the role of EGCs in the formation of the neuronal network, we developed a novel neuron-enriched culture model from embryonic rat intestine grown in indirect coculture with EGCs. We found that EGCs shape axonal complexity and synapse density in enteric neurons, through purinergic- and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent pathways. Using a novel and valuable culture model to study enteric neuron-glia interactions, our study identified EGCs as a key cellular actor regulating neuronal network maturation. In the nervous system, the formation of neuronal circuitry results from a complex and coordinated action of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. In the CNS, extrinsic mediators derived from astrocytes have been shown to play a key role in neuronal maturation, including dendritic shaping, axon guidance and synaptogenesis. In the enteric nervous system (ENS), the potential role of enteric glial cells (EGCs) in the maturation of developing enteric neuronal circuit is currently unknown. A major obstacle in addressing this question is the difficulty in obtaining a valuable experimental model in which enteric neurons could be isolated and maintained without EGCs. We adapted a cell culture method previously developed for CNS neurons to establish a neuron-enriched primary culture from embryonic rat intestine which was cultured in indirect coculture with EGCs. We demonstrated that enteric neurons grown in such conditions showed several structural, phenotypic and functional hallmarks of proper development and maturation. However, when neurons were grown without EGCs, the complexity of the axonal arbour and the density of synapses were markedly reduced, suggesting that glial-derived factors contribute strongly to the formation of the neuronal circuitry. We found that these effects played by EGCs were

  3. Cellular and molecular neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Grace S; Hovda, David A

    2015-01-01

    The brain has the capability to adapt to function when tissue is compromised. This capability of adaptation paves the road to recovery and allows for rehabilitation after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). This chapter addresses neuroplasticity within the context of TBI. Here neuroplasticity is defined as changes in neuronal structure and function, including synaptic changes as well as modifications in neural pathways. First, the influence of TBI pathology on neuroplasticity is addressed. Here, proteins that are important in neuroplasticity are introduced and a description given of how these are affected in a temporal and severity-dependent manner. Secondly, given that we are becoming increasingly aware that the brain's response to injury is highly influenced by the environmental milieu, the manner in which behavioral manipulations have an effect on TBI-associated neuroplasticity is addressed. A description is given of how specific environmental qualities may facilitate or hinder neuroplasticity. Finally, the long-term effects of neuroplasticity and the relevance it has to rehabilitation are described. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. PSD-95 uncoupling from NMDA receptors by Tat-N-dimer ameliorates neuronal depolarisation in cortical spreading depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucharz, Krzysztof; Søndergaard Rasmussen, Ida; Bach, Anders

    2017-01-01

    , UCCB01-144 (Tat-N-dimer) ameliorates the persistent effects of cortical spreading depression on cortical function. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy in somatosensory cortex in mice, we show that fluorescently labelled Tat-N-dimer readily crosses blood-brain barrier and accumulates in nerve cells...... depression on cortical blood flow and CMRO2 We suggest that uncoupling of PSD-95 from NMDA receptors reduces overall neuronal excitability and the amplitude of the spreading depolarisation wave. These findings may be of interest for understanding the neuroprotective effects of the nNOS/PSD-95 uncoupling...

  5. Paraphilia NOS, nonconsent: not ready for the courtroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, Allen; First, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    Sexually violent predators (SVP) constitute a serious potential risk to public safety, especially when they are released after too short a prison sentence. Twenty states and the federal government have developed a seemingly convenient way to reduce this risk. They have passed statutes that allow for the involuntary (often lifetime) psychiatric commitment of mentally disordered sexual offenders after prison time is up. In three separate cases, the Supreme Court has accepted the constitutionality of this procedure, but only if the offender's dangerousness is caused by a mental disorder and is not a manifestation of simple criminality. The idea that paraphilic rape should be an official category in the psychiatric diagnostic manual has been explicitly rejected by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-III, DSM-III-R, DSM-IV, and, recently, DSM-5. Despite this, paraphilia NOS, nonconsent, is still frequently used by mental health evaluators in SVP cases to provide a mental disorder diagnosis that legitimizes psychiatric commitment and makes it appear constitutional. This commentary will show how the diagnosis paraphilia NOS, nonconsent, is based on a fundamental misreading of the original intent of the DSM-IV Paraphilia Workgroup and represents a misuse of psychiatry, all in the admittedly good cause of protecting public safety.

  6. Galilean-invariant Nosé-Hoover-type thermostats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieprzyk, S; Heyes, D M; Maćkowiak, Sz; Brańka, A C

    2015-03-01

    A new pairwise Nosé-Hoover type thermostat for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations which is similar in construction to the pair-velocity thermostat of Allen and Schmid, [Mol. Simul. 33, 21 (2007)] (AS) but is based on the configurational thermostat is proposed and tested. Both thermostats generate the canonical velocity distribution, are Galilean invariant, and conserve linear and angular momentum. The unique feature of the pairwise thermostats is an unconditional conservation of the total angular momentum, which is important for thermalizing isolated systems and those nonequilibrium bulk systems manifesting local rotating currents. These thermostats were benchmarked against the corresponding Nosé-Hoover (NH) and Braga-Travis prescriptions, being based on the kinetic and configurational definitions of temperature, respectively. Some differences between the shear-rate-dependent shear viscosity from Sllod nonequilibrium MD are observed at high shear rates using the different thermostats. The thermostats based on the configurational temperature produced very similar monotically decaying shear viscosity (shear thinning) with increasing shear rate, while the NH method showed discontinuous shear thinning into a string phase, and the AS method produced a continuous increase of viscosity (shear thickening), after a shear thinning region at lower shear rates. Both pairwise additive thermostats are neither purely kinetic nor configurational in definition, and possible directions for further improvement in certain aspects are discussed.

  7. A sociologia funcionalista nos estudos organizacionais: foco em Durkheim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Cabral

    Full Text Available O tema que estrutura este ensaio é o da sociologia funcionalista, particularmente em termos de sua influência nos estudos organizacionais. O seu foco de análise é duplo. Em um primeiro momento, as obras de Durkheim. Em um segundo momento, o impacto e a supremacia dos enfoques funcionalistas nos estudos organizacionais. Embora seus segmentos estejam inter-relacionados, ele é composto de quatro partes. Na primeira, é feita uma análise histórica da emergência e sistematização das ciências sociais, de modo a traçar sua evolução até o surgimento dos trabalhos de Durkheim. Na segunda, tomando como referencial a obra de Burrell e Morgan (1979, é estudado o paradigma funcionalista em termos de sua origem e expoentes, com destaque para Comte e Spencer, visando chegar a uma compreensão inicial do pensamento de Durkheim e de sua sociologia. Na terceira, a vida e as principais obras de Durkheim são sumariadas e discutidas. Por fim, o status atual dos estudos organizacionais -vistos como um conjunto impreciso, elástico e eclético de teorias e pesquisas sociais voltados para os problemas das organizações -é analisado em termos de seus pressupostos epistemológicos e ontológicos subjacentes, como meio de explicitar a supremacia dos enfoques positivistas-funcionalistas.

  8. Endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity and NOS-associated NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry in the domestic cat (Felis catus) testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liman, N; Alan, E; Beyaz, F; Gürbulak, K

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the cellular localization of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) and the endothelial (eNOS) and inducible (iNOS) forms of nitric oxide (NO) synthase in the cat testis were studied using enzyme histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Stage-dependent nuclear and cytoplasmic eNOS/iNOS immunoreactivity and cytoplasmic NADPH-d reactivity were found in all germ cells, including spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes (preleptotene, zygotene, and pachytene spermatocytes), and round (Sa, Sb1) and elongating spermatids (Sb2, Sc) of the seminiferous epithelium. The pachytene spermatocytes exhibited strong positive reactions at all spermatogenic stage. Interestingly, in elongated spermatids (Sd1) at stages VI to VII, eNOS and iNOS immunostainings was observed only in the cytoplasm but not in the nuclei. eNOS and iNOS immunolabeling was observed in the acrosomal vesicle of some round spermatids (Sb1) at stages I, VII, and VIII, and in the acrosomal cap of elongating spermatids (Sb2) at stage II. Furthermore, eNOS, iNOS, and NADPH-d reactions in elongated spermatids (Sd2) just before spermiation at stage VIII were restricted only to the middle and principal pieces of the tail. Positive reactions were also observed in the Sertoli and Leydig cells as well as in other tissues including vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells and peritubular myoid cells. These results suggest that NO may play an important role in chromatin condensation, spermatid shaping, and the final release of sperm from the spermatogenic epithelium. Furthermore, NO may also be involved in spermiogenesis, steroidogenesis, and apoptotic cell death. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ghrelin protects against palmitic acid or lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatocyte apoptosis through inhibition of MAPKs/iNOS and restoration of Akt/eNOS pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yuqing; Wang, Jianbo; Yu, Fujun; Li, Zhengyang; Li, Huanqing; Guo, Chuanyong; Fan, Xiaoming

    2016-12-01

    Ghrelin has been shown to exert various biological functions. However, the effect and mechanism of ghrelin on PA- or LPS-induced liver injury remains unknown. Normal human hepatocyte lines (LO2 and 7701) were pretreated with ghrelin (10 -8 M) for 30min before stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or palmitic acid (PA). The proliferation and apoptosis of cells were detected with CCK8, Hoechst staining and flow cytometric analysis. Levels of NO of cell supernatants were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The protein levels and mRNA of target genes of endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) were measured by western blotting, immunofluorescence and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The expression of Bax, Bcl2, caspase 3, p-Akt, p-P38 and p-JNK were detected by western blotting. Results of CCK8, Hoechst staining and flow cytometric analysis showed that ghrelin-pretreatment attenuated LPS- or PA- induced cellular proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction. ELISA results revealed that ghrelin pretreatment reduced levels of NO of cell supernatants (Pghrelin- pretreated group were significantly reduced compared with LPS- or PA- treated group, while protein levels of eNOS were restored by ghrelin pretreatment. Results of qRT-PCR showed that mRNA levels of Bax, iNOS were reduced by ghrelin pretreatment, while levels of mRNA of Bcl2 and eNOS were increased (Pghrelin pretreatment, while the protein levels of p-JNK, p-P38 and caspase 3 were reduced. The restoration of eNOS could be reversed by an Akt inhibitor. Ghrelin pretreatment attenuated LPS- or PA-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, which may least partly via inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)/iNOS and restoration of Akt/eNOS pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Sensory neuron-derived eph regulates glomerular arbors and modulatory function of a central serotonergic neuron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeet Pratap Singh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons connect to the antennal lobe of the fly to create the primary units for processing odor cues, the glomeruli. Unique amongst antennal-lobe neurons is an identified wide-field serotonergic neuron, the contralaterally-projecting, serotonin-immunoreactive deutocerebral neuron (CSDn. The CSDn spreads its termini all over the contralateral antennal lobe, suggesting a diffuse neuromodulatory role. A closer examination, however, reveals a restricted pattern of the CSDn arborization in some glomeruli. We show that sensory neuron-derived Eph interacts with Ephrin in the CSDn, to regulate these arborizations. Behavioural analysis of animals with altered Eph-ephrin signaling and with consequent arborization defects suggests that neuromodulation requires local glomerular-specific patterning of the CSDn termini. Our results show the importance of developmental regulation of terminal arborization of even the diffuse modulatory neurons to allow them to route sensory-inputs according to the behavioural contexts.

  11. Acute toxication of deltamethrin results in activation of iNOS, 8-OHdG and up-regulation of caspase 3, iNOS gene expression in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Harun; Altun, Serdar; Özdemir, Selçuk

    2017-06-01

    Deltamethrin is a widely used synthetic pyrethroid pesticide that protects agricultural yields, including crops, fruits, and vegetables from insect-pests. It is known that deltamethrin toxication leads to metabolic disorders and has detrimental effects on the brain and liver in different organisms. However, the harmful effects of deltamethrin toxication on aquatic animals remain unclear. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the adverse effects of deltamethrin toxication by performing a histopathological examination, an immunofluorescence assay, and a qRT-PCR on common carp. We observed that a low-dose (0.04μM) and a high-dose (0.08μM) of deltamethrin exposure caused lamellar cells hyperplasia and inflammatory cells infiltration in the gills, hyperemia, diffuse hydropic degenerations and focal necrosis in the hepatocytes, necrotic changes in the neurons, and also induced activation of inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) in the gills, liver, and brain depending on the exposure time (24h, 48h, 72h and 96h). In addition, deltamethrin toxication caused the up-regulation of caspase-3 and the inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) of the gene expression depending on the dose (0.04μM and 0.08μM) and the exposure time in the brain (p<0.05, p<0.01, p<0.001). Our results indicated that long-term deltamethrin exposure could lead to inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA damage, and apoptosis on the different organs in common carp. Thus, deltamethrin toxication is dangerous for common carp populations, and the usage of deltamethrin should be controlled and restricted in agricultural areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Anatomical characterization of PDF-Tri neurons and peptidergic neurons associated with eclosion behavior in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcho, Mareike; Mühlbauer, Barbara; Hensgen, Ronja; Shiga, Sakiko; Wegener, Christian; Yasuyama, Kouji

    2018-02-10

    The peptidergic PDF-Tri neurons are a group of non-clock neurons that appear transiently around the time of adult ecdysis (=eclosion) in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This specific developmental pattern points to a function of these neurons in eclosion or other processes that are active around pupal-adult transition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Frizzled-5 receptor is involved in neuronal polarity and morphogenesis of hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula G Slater

    Full Text Available The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5 on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK.

  14. Transient Synchronization in Complex Neuronal Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura

    2008-01-01

    Transient synchronization in complex neuronal networks as a consequence of activation-conserved dynamics induced by having sources placed at specific neurons is investigated. The basic integrate-and-fire neuron is adopted, and the dynamics is estimated computationally so as to obtain the activation at each node along each instant of time. The dynamics is implemented so as to conserve the total activation entering the system, which is a distinctive feature of the current work. The synchronization of the activation of the network is then quantified along time in terms of its normalized instantaneous entropy. The potential of such concepts and measurements is explored with respect to 6 theoretical models, as well as for the neuronal network of \\emph{C. elegans}. A series of interesting results are obtained and discussed, including the fact that all models led to a transient period of synchronization, whose specific features depend heavily on the topological features of the networks.

  15. Growth control mechanisms in neuronal regeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Doron-Mandel, Ella; Fainzilber, Mike; Terenzio, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Neurons grow during development and extend long axons to make contact with their targets with the help of an intrinsic program of axonal growth as well as a range of extrinsic cues and a permissive milieu...

  16. The Age of Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, R D; Curtis, M A; Spalding, K L; Buchholz, B A; Fink, D; Bjork-Eriksson, T; Nordborg, C; Gage, F H; Druid, H; Eriksson, P S; Frisen, J

    2006-04-06

    The traditional static view of the adult mammalian brain has been challenged by the realization of continuous generation of neurons from stem cells. Based mainly on studies in experimental animals, adult neurogenesis may contribute to recovery after brain insults and decreased neurogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric diseases in man. The extent of neurogenesis in the adult human brain has, however, been difficult to establish. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, in DNA to establish the age of neurons in the major areas of the human cerebral cortex. Together with the analysis of the cortex from patients who received BrdU, which integrates in the DNA of dividing cells, our results demonstrate that whereas non-neuronal cells turn over, neurons in the human cerebral cortex are not generated postnatally at detectable levels, but are as old as the individual.

  17. Review Paper: Polyphenolic Antioxidants and Neuronal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ataie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages, modulate intracellular signaling and ultimately leads to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. To review antioxidants preventive effects on oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases we accumulated data from international medical journals and academic informations' sites. According to many studies, antioxidants could reduce toxic neuronal damages and many studies confirmed the efficacy of polyphenol antioxidants in fruits and vegetables to reduce neuronal death and to diminish oxidative stress. This systematic review showed the antioxidant activities of phytochemicals which play as natural neuroprotectives with low adverse effects against some neurodegenerative diseases as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases.

  18. The Neuronal Network Orchestration behind Motor Behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter Christian

    In biological networks, millions of neurons organize themselves from microscopic noisy individuals to robust macroscopic entities. These entities are capable of producing higher functions like sensory processing, decision-making, and elaborate behavioral responses. Every aspect of these behaviors...... is the outcome of an advanced orchestration of the activity of populations of neurons. Through spiking activity, neurons are able to interact; yet we know little about how this interaction occurs in spinal networks. How is the activity distributed across the population? What is the composition of synaptic input...... that is received by the individual neurons and how is the synaptic input processed? This thesis focuses on aspects of these questions for spinal networks involved in the generation of stereotypical motor behaviors. The thesis consists of two studies. In the first study, I investigated the synaptic input...

  19. Sigma-1 Receptor and Neuronal Excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourrich, Saïd

    2017-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), via interaction with various proteins, including voltage-gated and ligand-gated ion channels (VGICs and LGICs), is involved in a plethora of neuronal functions. This capability to regulate a variety of ion channel targets endows the Sig-1R with a powerful capability to fine tune neuronal excitability, and thereby the transmission of information within brain circuits. This versatility may also explain why the Sig-1R is associated to numerous diseases at both peripheral and central levels. To date, how the Sig-1R chooses its targets and how the combinations of target modulations alter overall neuronal excitability is one of the challenges in the field of Sig-1R-dependent regulation of neuronal activity. Here, we will describe and discuss the latest findings on Sig-1R-dependent modulation of VGICs and LGICs, and provide hypotheses that may explain the diverse excitability outcomes that have been reported so far.

  20. Transition to Chaos in Random Neuronal Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jonathan Kadmon; Haim Sompolinsky

    2015-01-01

    .... Indeed, simplified rate-based neuronal networks with synaptic connections drawn from Gaussian distribution and sigmoidal nonlinearity are known to exhibit chaotic dynamics when the synaptic gain (i.e...

  1. How Might New Neurons Buffer Against Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other possible mechanisms involving stress-related thinking and emotion circuitry. VIDEO Maturation and function of new neurons ... A college student’s stint in a Porter neuroscience lab Heather Frank, then a senior majoring in neuroscience ...

  2. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Kulakov, Larissa; Opländer, Christian; Kolb-Bachofen, Victoria; Kröncke, Klaus-D; Suschek, Christoph V

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO) by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein) and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation.

  3. Zinc regulates iNOS-derived nitric oxide formation in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam M. Cortese-Krott

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant production of nitric oxide (NO by inducible NO synthase (iNOS has been implicated in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease. Mechanisms responsible for the fine-tuning of iNOS activity in inflammation are still not fully understood. Zinc is an important structural element of NOS enzymes and is known to inhibit its catalytical activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the effects of zinc on iNOS activity and expression in endothelial cells. We found that zinc down-regulated the expression of iNOS (mRNA+protein and decreased cytokine-mediated activation of the iNOS promoter. Zinc-mediated regulation of iNOS expression was due to inhibition of NF-κB transactivation activity, as determined by a decrease in both NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter activity and expression of NF-κB target genes, including cyclooxygenase 2 and IL-1β. However, zinc did not affect NF-κB translocation into the nucleus, as assessed by Western blot analysis of nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Taken together our results demonstrate that zinc limits iNOS-derived high output NO production in endothelial cells by inhibiting NF-κB-dependent iNOS expression, pointing to a role of zinc as a regulator of iNOS activity in inflammation.

  4. Integrated microfluidic platforms for investigating neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Joon

    This dissertation describes the development and application of integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms to study neuronal activities in the nervous system in-vitro. The assay platforms were fabricated using soft lithography and micro/nano fabrication including microfluidics, surface patterning, and nanomaterial synthesis. The use of integrated microfluidics-based assay platform allows culturing and manipulating many types of neuronal tissues in precisely controlled microenvironment. Furthermore, they provide organized multi-cellular in-vitro model, long-term monitoring with live cell imaging, and compatibility with molecular biology techniques and electrophysiology experiment. In this dissertation, the integrated microfluidics-based assay platforms are developed for investigation of neuronal activities such as local protein synthesis, impairment of axonal transport by chemical/physical variants, growth cone path finding under chemical/physical cues, and synaptic transmission in neuronal circuit. Chapter 1 describes the motivation, objectives, and scope for developing in-vitro platform to study various neuronal activities. Chapter 2 introduces microfluidic culture platform for biochemical assay with large-scale neuronal tissues that are utilized as model system in neuroscience research. Chapter 3 focuses on the investigation of impaired axonal transport by beta-Amyloid and oxidative stress. The platform allows to control neuronal processes and to quantify mitochondrial movement in various regions of axons away from applied drugs. Chapter 4 demonstrates the development of microfluidics-based growth cone turning assay to elucidate the mechanism underlying axon guidance under soluble factors and shear flow. Using this platform, the behaviors of growth cone of mammalian neurons are verified under the gradient of inhibitory molecules and also shear flow in well-controlled manner. In Chapter 5, I combine in-vitro multicellular model with microfabricated MEA

  5. Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) in Microglia of the Developing Quail Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Ana; Navascués, Julio; Cuadros, Miguel A.; Calvente, Ruth; Martín-Oliva, David; Ferrer-Martín, Rosa M.; Martín-Estebané, María; Carrasco, María-Carmen; Marín-Teva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which produce large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), is induced in macrophages and microglia in response to inflammatory mediators such as LPS and cytokines. Although iNOS is mainly expressed by microglia that become activated in different pathological and experimental situations, it was recently reported that undifferentiated amoeboid microglia can also express iNOS during normal development. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development and after their activation with LPS by using the quail retina as model. iNOS expression was analyzed by iNOS immunolabeling, western-blot, and RT-PCR. NO production was determined by using DAR-4M AM, a reliable fluorescent indicator of subcellular NO production by iNOS. Embryonic, postnatal, and adult in situ quail retinas were used to analyze the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development. iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-treated microglial cells were investigated by an in vitro approach based on organotypic cultures of E8 retinas, in which microglial cell behavior is similar to that of the in situ retina, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory. We show here that amoeboid microglia in the quail retina express iNOS during normal development. This expression is stronger in microglial cells migrating tangentially in the vitreal part of the retina and is downregulated, albeit maintained, when microglia differentiate and become ramified. LPS treatment of retina explants also induces changes in the morphology of amoeboid microglia compatible with their activation, increasing their lysosomal compartment and upregulating iNOS expression with a concomitant production of NO. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that immature microglial cells express iNOS during normal development, suggesting a certain degree of activation. Furthermore, LPS treatment induces overactivation of amoeboid

  6. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Shin; Homma, Ryota; Imamura, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit. PMID:25232305

  7. Progranulin regulates neuronal outgrowth independent of Sortilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gass Jennifer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin (PGRN, a widely secreted growth factor, is involved in multiple biological functions, and mutations located within the PGRN gene (GRN are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FLTD-TDP. In light of recent reports suggesting PGRN functions as a protective neurotrophic factor and that sortilin (SORT1 is a neuronal receptor for PGRN, we used a Sort1-deficient (Sort1−/− murine primary hippocampal neuron model to investigate whether PGRN’s neurotrophic effects are dependent on SORT1. We sought to elucidate this relationship to determine what role SORT1, as a regulator of PGRN levels, plays in modulating PGRN’s neurotrophic effects. Results As the first group to evaluate the effect of PGRN loss in Grn knockout primary neuronal cultures, we show neurite outgrowth and branching are significantly decreased in Grn−/− neurons compared to wild-type (WT neurons. More importantly, we also demonstrate that PGRN overexpression can rescue this phenotype. However, the recovery in outgrowth is not observed following treatment with recombinant PGRN harboring missense mutations p.C139R, p.P248L or p.R432C, indicating that these mutations adversely affect the neurotrophic properties of PGRN. In addition, we also present evidence that cleavage of full-length PGRN into granulin peptides is required for increased neuronal outgrowth, suggesting that the neurotrophic functions of PGRN are contained within certain granulins. To further characterize the mechanism by which PGRN impacts neuronal morphology, we assessed the involvement of SORT1. We demonstrate that PGRN induced-outgrowth occurs in the absence of SORT1 in Sort1−/− cultures. Conclusion We demonstrate that loss of PGRN impairs proper neurite outgrowth and branching, and that exogenous PGRN alleviates this impairment. Furthermore, we determined that exogenous PGRN induces outgrowth independent of SORT1, suggesting another

  8. Efavirenz Induces Neuronal Autophagy and Mitochondrial Alterations

    OpenAIRE

    Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is a non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor in wide use for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Although EFV is generally well tolerated, neuropsychiatric toxicity has been well documented. The toxic effects of EFV in hepatocytes and keratinocytes have been linked to mitochondrial perturbations and changes in autophagy. Here, we studied the effect of EFV on mitochondria and autophagy in neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. In SH-SY5Y cells, EFV...

  9. On the dynamics of random neuronal networks

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Philippe; Touboul, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    We study the mean-field limit and stationary distributions of a pulse-coupled network modeling the dynamics of a large neuronal assemblies. Our model takes into account explicitly the intrinsic randomness of firing times, contrasting with the classical integrate-and-fire model. The ergodicity properties of the Markov process associated to finite networks are investigated. We derive the limit in distribution of the sample path of the state of a neuron of the network when its size gets large. T...

  10. Spatio-Temporal Modeling of Neuron Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Adam

    The starting point and focal point for this thesis was stochastic dynamical modelling of neuronal imaging data with the declared objective of drawing inference, within this model framework, in a large-scale (high-dimensional) data setting. Implicitly this objective entails carrying out three......-temporal array data. This framework was developed with neuron field models in mind but may in turn be applied to other settings conforming to the spatio-temporal array data setup....

  11. Inducible gene manipulations in serotonergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tillmann Weber

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available An impairment of the serotonergic (5-HT system has been implicated in the etiology of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite the considerable genetic evidence, the exact molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this dysfunction remain largely unknown. To address the lack of instruments for the molecular dissection of gene function in serotonergic neurons we have developed a new mouse transgenic tool that allows inducible Cre-mediated recombination of genes selectively in 5-HT neurons of all raphe nuclei. In this transgenic mouse line, the tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase is expressed under the regulatory control of the mouse tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2 gene locus (177kb. Tamoxifen treatment efficiently induced recombination selectively in serotonergic neurons with minimal background activity in vehicle-treated mice. These genetic manipulations can be initiated at any desired time during embryonic development, neonatal stage or adulthood. To illustrate the versatility of this new tool, we show that Brainbow-1.0LTPH2-CreERT2 mice display highly efficient recombination in serotonergic neurons with individual 5-HT neurons labelling with multiple distinct fluorescent colors. This labelling is well suited for visualization and tracing of serotonergic neurons and their network architecture. Finally, the applicability of TPH2-CreERT2 for loxP-flanked candidate gene manipulation is evidenced by our successful knockout induction of the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid-receptor (GR exclusively in 5-HT neurons of adult mice. The TPH2-CreERT2 line will allow detailed analysis of gene function in both developing and adult serotonergic neurons

  12. Action observation: Inferring intentions without mirror neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher; Kilner, James M

    2008-01-01

    A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand.......A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand....

  13. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin eNagayama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit.

  14. Inducible Gene Manipulations in Serotonergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tillmann; Böhm, Gerald; Hermann, Elke; Schütz, Günther; Schönig, Kai; Bartsch, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    An impairment of the serotonergic (5-HT) system has been implicated in the etiology of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Despite the considerable genetic evidence, the exact molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this dysfunction remain largely unknown. To address the lack of instruments for the molecular dissection of gene function in serotonergic neurons we have developed a new mouse transgenic tool that allows inducible Cre-mediated recombination of genes selectively in 5-HT neurons of all raphe nuclei. In this transgenic mouse line, the tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase is expressed under the regulatory control of the mouse tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2) gene locus (177 kb). Tamoxifen treatment efficiently induced recombination selectively in serotonergic neurons with minimal background activity in vehicle-treated mice. These genetic manipulations can be initiated at any desired time during embryonic development, neonatal stage or adulthood. To illustrate the versatility of this new tool, we show that Brainbow-1.0LTPH2-CreERT2 mice display highly efficient recombination in serotonergic neurons with individual 5-HT neurons labeling with multiple distinct fluorescent colors. This labeling is well suited for visualization and tracing of serotonergic neurons and their network architecture. Finally, the applicability of TPH2-CreERT2 for loxP-flanked candidate gene manipulation is evidenced by our successful knockout induction of the ubiquitously expressed glucocorticoid-receptor exclusively in 5-HT neurons of adult mice. The TPH2-CreERT2 line will allow detailed analysis of gene function in both developing and adult serotonergic neurons. PMID:19936315

  15. Unidirectional synchronization of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo-Perez, Octavio [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: octavio@ipicyt.edu.mx; Femat, Ricardo [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: rfemat@ipicyt.edu.mx

    2005-07-01

    Synchronization dynamics of two noiseless Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons under the action of feedback control is studied. The spiking patterns of the action potentials evoked by periodic external modulations attain synchronization states under the feedback action. Numerical simulations for the synchronization dynamics of regular-irregular desynchronized spiking sequences are displayed. The results are discussed in context of generalized synchronization. It is also shown that the HH neurons can be synchronized in face of unmeasured states.

  16. Analysis of Neuronal Sequences Using Pairwise Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    Traversal of a series of place fields results in the generation of a neuronal sequence called a place-field sequence , such as pictured in Figure 1.1. It...16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Sequences of neuronal activation have long been implicated in a variety of brain func- tions. In particular, these... sequences have been tied to memory formation and spatial navigation in the hippocampus, a region of mammalian brains. Traditionally, neu- ronal

  17. Non-linear dendrites can tune neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Daniel Cazé

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A signature of visual, auditory, and motor cortices is the presence of neurons tuned to distinct features of the environment. While neuronal tuning can be observed in most brain areas, its origin remains enigmatic, and new calcium imaging data complicate this problem. Dendritic calcium signals, in a L2/3 neuron from the mouse visual cortex, display a wide range of tunings that could be different from the neuronal tuning (Jia et al 2010. To elucidate this observation we use multi-compartmental models of increasing complexity, from a binary to a realistic biophysical model of L2/3 neuron. These models possess non-linear dendritic subunits inside which the result of multiple excitatory inputs is smaller than their arithmetic sum. While dendritic non-linear subunits are ad-hoc in the binary model, non-linearities in the realistic model come from the passive saturation of synaptic currents. Because of these non-linearities our neuron models are scatter sensitive: the somatic membrane voltage is higher when presynaptic inputs target different dendrites than when they target a single dendrite. This spatial bias in synaptic integration is, in our models, the origin of neuronal tuning. Indeed, assemblies of presynaptic inputs encode the stimulus property through an increase in correlation or activity, and only the assembly that encodes the preferred stimulus targets different dendrites. Assemblies coding for the non-preferred stimuli target single dendrites, explaining the wide range of observed tunings and the possible difference between dendritic and somatic tuning. We thus propose, in accordance with the latest experimental observations, that non-linear integration in dendrites can generate neuronal tuning independently of the coding regime.

  18. Intrinsically active and pacemaker neurons in pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-03-11

    Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks.

  19. Neuronal somatic ATP release triggers neuron-satellite glial cell communication in dorsal root ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Chen, Y; Wang, C; Huang, L-Y M

    2007-06-05

    It has been generally assumed that the cell body (soma) of a neuron, which contains the nucleus, is mainly responsible for synthesis of macromolecules and has a limited role in cell-to-cell communication. Using sniffer patch recordings, we show here that electrical stimulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons elicits robust vesicular ATP release from their somata. The rate of release events increases with the frequency of nerve stimulation; external Ca(2+) entry is required for the release. FM1-43 photoconversion analysis further reveals that small clear vesicles participate in exocytosis. In addition, the released ATP activates P2X7 receptors in satellite cells that enwrap each DRG neuron and triggers the communication between neuronal somata and glial cells. Blocking L-type Ca(2+) channels completely eliminates the neuron-glia communication. We further show that activation of P2X7 receptors can lead to the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) from satellite cells. TNFalpha in turn potentiates the P2X3 receptor-mediated responses and increases the excitability of DRG neurons. This study provides strong evidence that somata of DRG neurons actively release transmitters and play a crucial role in bidirectional communication between neurons and surrounding satellite glial cells. These results also suggest that, contrary to the conventional view, neuronal somata have a significant role in cell-cell signaling.

  20. A neuron-astrocyte transistor-like model for neuromorphic dressed neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, G; Pioggia, G; Armato, A; Ferro, M; Scilingo, E P; De Rossi, D

    2011-09-01

    Experimental evidences on the role of the synaptic glia as an active partner together with the bold synapse in neuronal signaling and dynamics of neural tissue strongly suggest to investigate on a more realistic neuron-glia model for better understanding human brain processing. Among the glial cells, the astrocytes play a crucial role in the tripartite synapsis, i.e. the dressed neuron. A well-known two-way astrocyte-neuron interaction can be found in the literature, completely revising the purely supportive role for the glia. The aim of this study is to provide a computationally efficient model for neuron-glia interaction. The neuron-glia interactions were simulated by implementing the Li-Rinzel model for an astrocyte and the Izhikevich model for a neuron. Assuming the dressed neuron dynamics similar to the nonlinear input-output characteristics of a bipolar junction transistor, we derived our computationally efficient model. This model may represent the fundamental computational unit for the development of real-time artificial neuron-glia networks opening new perspectives in pattern recognition systems and in brain neurophysiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Computational Modeling of Neuronal Current MRI Signals with Rat Somatosensory Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BagheriMofidi, Seyed Mehdi; Pouladian, Majid; Jameie, Seyed Behnammodin; Abbaspour Tehrani-Fard, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic field generated by active neurons has recently been considered to determine location of neuronal activity directly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but controversial results have been reported about detection of such small magnetic fields. In this study, multiple neuronal morphologies of rat tissue were modeled to investigate better estimation of MRI signal change produced by neuronal magnetic field (NMF). Ten pyramidal neurons from layer II to VI of rat somatosensory area with realistic morphology, biophysics, and neuronal density were modeled to simulate NMF of neuronal tissue, from which effects of NMF on MRI signals were obtained. Neuronal current MRI signals, which consist of relative magnitude signal change (RMSC) and phase signal change (PSC), were at least three and one orders of magnitude less than a tissue with single neuron type, respectively. Also, a reduction in voxel size could increase signal alterations. Furthermore, with selection of zenith angle of external main magnetic field related to tissue surface near to 90°, RMSC could be maximized. This value for PSC would be 90° for small voxel size and zero degree for large ones.

  2. Statistics of Visual Responses to Image Object Stimuli from Primate AIT Neurons to DNN Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qiulei; Wang, Hong; Hu, Zhanyi

    2018-02-01

    Under the goal-driven paradigm, Yamins et al. ( 2014 ; Yamins & DiCarlo, 2016 ) have shown that by optimizing only the final eight-way categorization performance of a four-layer hierarchical network, not only can its top output layer quantitatively predict IT neuron responses but its penultimate layer can also automatically predict V4 neuron responses. Currently, deep neural networks (DNNs) in the field of computer vision have reached image object categorization performance comparable to that of human beings on ImageNet, a data set that contains 1.3 million training images of 1000 categories. We explore whether the DNN neurons (units in DNNs) possess image object representational statistics similar to monkey IT neurons, particularly when the network becomes deeper and the number of image categories becomes larger, using VGG19, a typical and widely used deep network of 19 layers in the computer vision field. Following Lehky, Kiani, Esteky, and Tanaka ( 2011 , 2014 ), where the response statistics of 674 IT neurons to 806 image stimuli are analyzed using three measures (kurtosis, Pareto tail index, and intrinsic dimensionality), we investigate the three issues in this letter using the same three measures: (1) the similarities and differences of the neural response statistics between VGG19 and primate IT cortex, (2) the variation trends of the response statistics of VGG19 neurons at different layers from low to high, and (3) the variation trends of the response statistics of VGG19 neurons when the numbers of stimuli and neurons increase. We find that the response statistics on both single-neuron selectivity and population sparseness of VGG19 neurons are fundamentally different from those of IT neurons in most cases; by increasing the number of neurons in different layers and the number of stimuli, the response statistics of neurons at different layers from low to high do not substantially change; and the estimated intrinsic dimensionality values at the low

  3. Effect of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of scale-free neuronal networks. For this purpose, we introduce the heterogeneity to the specified neuron with the highest degree. It is shown that in the absence of delay, an intermediate noise level can optimally assist spike firings of collective neurons so as to achieve stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks for small and intermediate α(h), which plays a heterogeneous role. Maxima of stochastic resonance measure are enhanced as α(h) increases, which implies that the heterogeneity can improve stochastic resonance. However, as α(h) is beyond a certain large value, no obvious stochastic resonance can be observed. If the information transmission delay is introduced to neuronal networks, stochastic resonance is dramatically affected. In particular, the tuned information transmission delay can induce multiple stochastic resonance, which can be manifested as well-expressed maximum in the measure for stochastic resonance, appearing every multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. Furthermore, we can observe that stochastic resonance at odd multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period is subharmonic, as opposed to the case of even multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. More interestingly, multiple stochastic resonance can also be improved by the suitable heterogeneous neuron. Presented results can provide good insights into the understanding of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  4. Intrinsically Active and Pacemaker Neurons in Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illes, Sebastian; Jakab, Martin; Beyer, Felix; Gelfert, Renate; Couillard-Despres, Sébastien; Schnitzler, Alfons; Ritter, Markus; Aigner, Ludwig

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neurons generated from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) self-organize into functional neuronal assemblies in vitro, generating synchronous network activities. Intriguingly, PSC-derived neuronal assemblies develop spontaneous activities that are independent of external stimulation, suggesting the presence of thus far undetected intrinsically active neurons (IANs). Here, by using mouse embryonic stem cells, we provide evidence for the existence of IANs in PSC-neuronal networks based on extracellular multielectrode array and intracellular patch-clamp recordings. IANs remain active after pharmacological inhibition of fast synaptic communication and possess intrinsic mechanisms required for autonomous neuronal activity. PSC-derived IANs are functionally integrated in PSC-neuronal populations, contribute to synchronous network bursting, and exhibit pacemaker properties. The intrinsic activity and pacemaker properties of the neuronal subpopulation identified herein may be particularly relevant for interventions involving transplantation of neural tissues. IANs may be a key element in the regulation of the functional activity of grafted as well as preexisting host neuronal networks. PMID:24672755

  5. The Influence of Tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the Distribution and Chemical Coding of Caudal Mesenteric Ganglion (CaMG) Neurons Supplying the Porcine Urinary Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepiarczyk, Ewa; Bossowska, Agnieszka; Kaleczyc, Jerzy; Majewska, Marta; Gonkowski, Sławomir; Majewski, Mariusz

    2017-03-30

    The treatment of micturition disorders creates a serious problem for urologists. Recently, new therapeutic agents, such as neurotoxins, are being considered for the therapy of urological patients. The present study investigated the chemical coding of caudal mesenteric ganglion (CaMG) neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder after intravesical instillation of tetrodotoxin (TTX). The CaMG neurons were visualized with retrograde tracer Fast blue (FB) and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labeling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), calbindin (CB), galanin (GAL) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). It was found that in both the control (n = 6) and TTX-treated pigs (n = 6), the vast majority (92.6% ± 3.4% and 88.8% ± 2%, respectively) of FB-positive (FB+) nerve cells were TH+. TTX instillation caused a decrease in the number of FB+/TH+ neurons immunopositive to NPY (88.9% ± 5.3% in the control animals vs. 10.6% ± 5.3% in TTX-treated pigs) or VIP (1.7% ± 0.6% vs. 0%), and an increase in the number of FB+/TH+ neurons immunoreactive to SOM (8.8% ± 1.6% vs. 39% ± 12.8%), CB (1.8% ± 0.7% vs. 12.6% ± 2.7%), GAL (1.7% ± 0.8% vs. 10.9% ± 2.6%) or nNOS (0% vs. 1.1% ± 0.3%). The present study is the first to suggest that TTX modifies the chemical coding of CaMG neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

  6. The Influence of Tetrodotoxin (TTX on the Distribution and Chemical Coding of Caudal Mesenteric Ganglion (CaMG Neurons Supplying the Porcine Urinary Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Lepiarczyk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of micturition disorders creates a serious problem for urologists. Recently, new therapeutic agents, such as neurotoxins, are being considered for the therapy of urological patients. The present study investigated the chemical coding of caudal mesenteric ganglion (CaMG neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder after intravesical instillation of tetrodotoxin (TTX. The CaMG neurons were visualized with retrograde tracer Fast blue (FB and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labeling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, neuropeptide Y (NPY, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, somatostatin (SOM, calbindin (CB, galanin (GAL and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. It was found that in both the control (n = 6 and TTX-treated pigs (n = 6, the vast majority (92.6% ± 3.4% and 88.8% ± 2%, respectively of FB-positive (FB+ nerve cells were TH+. TTX instillation caused a decrease in the number of FB+/TH+ neurons immunopositive to NPY (88.9% ± 5.3% in the control animals vs. 10.6% ± 5.3% in TTX-treated pigs or VIP (1.7% ± 0.6% vs. 0%, and an increase in the number of FB+/TH+ neurons immunoreactive to SOM (8.8% ± 1.6% vs. 39% ± 12.8%, CB (1.8% ± 0.7% vs. 12.6% ± 2.7%, GAL (1.7% ± 0.8% vs. 10.9% ± 2.6% or nNOS (0% vs. 1.1% ± 0.3%. The present study is the first to suggest that TTX modifies the chemical coding of CaMG neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

  7. Arsenic Trioxide Modulates the Central Snail Neuron Action Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-Ling Lu

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: As2O3 at 10 mM elicits BoPs in central snail neurons and this effect may relate to the PLC activity of the neuron, rather than protein kinase A activity, or calcium influxes of the neuron. As2O3 at higher concentration irreversibly abolishes the spontaneous action potentials of the neuron.

  8. Functional maps within a single neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The presence and plasticity of dendritic ion channels are well established. However, the literature is divided on what specific roles these dendritic ion channels play in neuronal information processing, and there is no consensus on why neuronal dendrites should express diverse ion channels with different expression profiles. In this review, we present a case for viewing dendritic information processing through the lens of the sensory map literature, where functional gradients within neurons are considered as maps on the neuronal topograph. Under such a framework, drawing analogies from the sensory map literature, we postulate that the formation of intraneuronal functional maps is driven by the twin objectives of efficiently encoding inputs that impinge along different dendritic locations and of retaining homeostasis in the face of changes that are required in the coding process. In arriving at this postulate, we relate intraneuronal map physiology to the vast literature on sensory maps and argue that such a metaphorical association provides a fresh conceptual framework for analyzing and understanding single-neuron information encoding. We also describe instances where the metaphor presents specific directions for research on intraneuronal maps, derived from analogous pursuits in the sensory map literature. We suggest that this perspective offers a thesis for why neurons should express and alter ion channels in their dendrites and provides a framework under which active dendrites could be related to neural coding, learning theory, and homeostasis. PMID:22933729

  9. Spike-timing dynamics of neuronal groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izhikevich, Eugene M; Gally, Joseph A; Edelman, Gerald M

    2004-08-01

    A neuronal network inspired by the anatomy of the cerebral cortex was simulated to study the self-organization of spiking neurons into neuronal groups. The network consisted of 100 000 reentrantly interconnected neurons exhibiting known types of cortical firing patterns, receptor kinetics, short-term plasticity and long-term spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), as well as a distribution of axonal conduction delays. The dynamics of the network allowed us to study the fine temporal structure of emerging firing patterns with millisecond resolution. We found that the interplay between STDP and conduction delays gave rise to the spontaneous formation of neuronal groups--sets of strongly connected neurons capable of firing time-locked, although not necessarily synchronous, spikes. Despite the noise present in the model, such groups repeatedly generated patterns of activity with millisecond spike-timing precision. Exploration of the model allowed us to characterize various group properties, including spatial distribution, size, growth, rate of birth, lifespan, and persistence in the presence of synaptic turnover. Localized coherent input resulted in shifts of receptive and projective fields in the model similar to those observed in vivo.

  10. Rewiring of neuronal networks during synaptic silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrosch, Jana Katharina; Einem, Vicky von; Breininger, Katharina; Dahlmanns, Marc; Maier, Andreas; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja Wolfgang

    2017-09-15

    Analyzing the connectivity of neuronal networks, based on functional brain imaging data, has yielded new insight into brain circuitry, bringing functional and effective networks into the focus of interest for understanding complex neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the analysis of network changes, based on the activity of individual neurons, is hindered by the lack of suitable meaningful and reproducible methodologies. Here, we used calcium imaging, statistical spike time analysis and a powerful classification model to reconstruct effective networks of primary rat hippocampal neurons in vitro. This method enables the calculation of network parameters, such as propagation probability, path length, and clustering behavior through the measurement of synaptic activity at the single-cell level, thus providing a fuller understanding of how changes at single synapses translate to an entire population of neurons. We demonstrate that our methodology can detect the known effects of drug-induced neuronal inactivity and can be used to investigate the extensive rewiring processes affecting population-wide connectivity patterns after periods of induced neuronal inactivity.

  11. Simulation of developing human neuronal cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kerstin; Priwitzer, Barbara; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tietz, Lukas H B; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2016-08-30

    Microelectrode array (MEA) is a widely used technique to study for example the functional properties of neuronal networks derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-NN). With hESC-NN, we can investigate the earliest developmental stages of neuronal network formation in the human brain. In this paper, we propose an in silico model of maturating hESC-NNs based on a phenomenological model called INEX. We focus on simulations of the development of bursts in hESC-NNs, which are the main feature of neuronal activation patterns. The model was developed with data from developing hESC-NN recordings on MEAs which showed increase in the neuronal activity during the investigated six measurement time points in the experimental and simulated data. Our simulations suggest that the maturation process of hESC-NN, resulting in the formation of bursts, can be explained by the development of synapses. Moreover, spike and burst rate both decreased at the last measurement time point suggesting a pruning of synapses as the weak ones are removed. To conclude, our model reflects the assumption that the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory neurons during the maturation of a neuronal network and the spontaneous emergence of bursts are due to increased connectivity caused by the forming of new synapses.

  12. The neuronal insulin receptor in its environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gralle, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Insulin is known mainly for its effects in peripheral tissues, such as the liver, skeletal muscles and adipose tissue, where the activation of the insulin receptor (IR) has both short-term and long-term effects. Insulin and the IR are also present in the brain, and since there is evidence that neuronal insulin signaling regulates synaptic plasticity and that it is impaired in disease, this pathway might be the key to protection or reversal of symptoms, especially in Alzheimer's disease. However, there are controversies about the importance of the neuronal IR, partly because biophysical data on its activation and signaling are much less complete than for the peripheral IR. This review briefly summarizes the neuronal IR signaling in health and disease, and then focuses on known differences between the neuronal and peripheral IR with regard to alternative splicing and glycosylation, and lack of data with respect to phosphorylation and membrane subdomain localization. Particularities in the neuronal IR itself and its environment may have consequences for downstream signaling and impact synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, establishing the relative importance of insulin signaling through IR or through hybrids with its homolog, the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, is crucial for evaluating the consequences of brain IR activation. An improved biophysical understanding of the neuronal IR may help predict the consequences of insulin-targeted interventions. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Optimal stimulus shapes for neuronal excitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B Forger

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An important problem in neuronal computation is to discern how features of stimuli control the timing of action potentials. One aspect of this problem is to determine how an action potential, or spike, can be elicited with the least energy cost, e.g., a minimal amount of applied current. Here we show in the Hodgkin & Huxley model of the action potential and in experiments on squid giant axons that: 1 spike generation in a neuron can be highly discriminatory for stimulus shape and 2 the optimal stimulus shape is dependent upon inputs to the neuron. We show how polarity and time course of post-synaptic currents determine which of these optimal stimulus shapes best excites the neuron. These results are obtained mathematically using the calculus of variations and experimentally using a stochastic search methodology. Our findings reveal a surprising complexity of computation at the single cell level that may be relevant for understanding optimization of signaling in neurons and neuronal networks.

  14. Purification of dopamine neurons by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, C W; Lee, L J; Romero, A A; Stull, N D; Iacovitti, L

    1994-12-05

    The heterogeneity and preponderence of other cell types present in cultures has greatly impeded our ability to study dopamine neurons. In this report, we describe methods for isolating nearly pure dopamine neurons for study in culture. To do so, the lipid-soluble dye, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3'3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (diI) was injected into the embryonic rat striata where it was taken up by nerve terminals and transported overnight back to the innervating perikarya in the ventral midbrain. Midbrain cells were then dissected, dissociated and separated on the basis of their (rhodamine) fluorescence by flow cytometry. Nearly all cells recovered as fluorescent positive (> 98%) were also immunoreactive for the dopamine specific enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (80%-96%). Little contamination by other cells types was observed after labeling for specific neuronal and glial markers. Purified dopamine neurons continued to thrive and elaborate neuronal processes for at least 3 days in culture. Using this new model, it may now be possible to directly study the cellular and molecular processes regulating the survival and functioning of developing, injured and transplanted dopamine neurons.

  15. Peripheral but crucial: a hydrophobic pocket (Tyr(706), Leu(337), and Met(336)) for potent and selective inhibition of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fengtian; Li, Huiying; Fang, Jianguo; Roman, Linda J; Martásek, Pavel; Poulos, Thomas L; Silverman, Richard B

    2010-11-01

    Selective inhibition of the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) over endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) has become a promising strategy for the discovery of new therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases. However, because of the high sequence homology of different isozymes in the substrate binding pocket, developing inhibitors with both potency and excellent isoform selectivity remains a challenging problem. Herein, we report the evaluation of a recently discovered peripheral hydrophobic pocket (Tyr(706), Leu(337), and Met(336)) that opens up upon inhibitor binding and its potential in designing potent and selective nNOS inhibitors using three compounds, 2a, 2b, and 3. Crystal structure results show that inhibitors 2a and 3 adopted the same binding mode as lead compound 1. We also found that hydrophobic interactions between the 4-methyl group of the aminopyridine ring of these compounds with the side chain of Met(336), as well as the π-π stacking interaction between the pyridinyl motif and the side chain of Tyr(706) are important for the high potency and selectivity of these nNOS inhibitors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential effects of serotonin reuptake inhibitors on erectile responses, NO-production, and neuronal NO synthase expression in rat corpus cavernosum tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Javier; Peiró, Concepción; Sanchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Gabancho, Sonia; Cuevas, Pedro; Gupta, Sandeep; Tejada, Iñigo Sáenz de

    2001-01-01

    Increased incidence of impotence is associated with some selective serotonin-reuptake-inhibitors (SSRIs), but the pathophysiological mechanism is unknown. Paroxetine and citalopram are extensively used SSRIs, but only paroxetine has been shown to inhibit nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. NO is a key mediator of penile erection. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effects of paroxetine and citalopram on erectile function and NO production, in a rat model. Application of cavernosal nerve electrical stimulation produced frequency-related intracavernosal pressure (ICP) increases, which were inhibited by the NOS inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (0.3 mg kg−1). Acute or chronic (2 weeks) paroxetine-treatment (10 mg kg−1) reduced ICP-responses, while citalopram did not. Paroxetine, but not citalopram, significantly reduced nitrite+nitrate plasma levels by 61.4% and inhibited penile neuronal NOS (nNOS) protein expression by 31.2% after chronic treatment. The results show that paroxetine inhibits erectile responses in rats. We propose that this effect is due to reduced NO production and nNOS expression. PMID:11704638

  17. Integrated analysis of the involvement of nitric oxide synthesis in mitochondrial proliferation, mitochondrial deficiency and apoptosis in skeletal muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gabriela Silva; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira; Kiyomoto, Beatriz Hitomi; Gamba, Juliana; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Schmidt, Beny; Tengan, Célia Harumi

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling messenger involved in different mitochondrial processes but only few studies explored the participation of NO in mitochondrial abnormalities found in patients with genetic mitochondrial deficiencies. In this study we verified whether NO synthase (NOS) activity was altered in different types of mitochondrial abnormalities and whether changes in mitochondrial function and NOS activity could be associated with the induction of apoptosis. We performed a quantitative and integrated analysis of NOS activity in individual muscle fibres of patients with mitochondrial diseases, considering mitochondrial function (cytochrome-c-oxidase activity), mitochondrial content, mitochondrial DNA mutation and presence of apoptotic nuclei. Our results indicated that sarcolemmal NOS activity was increased in muscle fibres with mitochondrial proliferation, supporting the relevance of neuronal NOS in the mitochondrial biogenesis process. Sarcoplasmic NOS activity was reduced in cytochrome-c-oxidase deficient fibres, probably as a consequence of the involvement of NO in the regulation of the respiratory chain. Alterations in NOS activity or mitochondrial abnormalities were not predisposing factors to apoptotic nuclei. Taken together, our results show that NO can be considered a potential molecular target for strategies to increase mitochondrial content and indicate that this approach may not be associated with increased apoptotic events. PMID:26856437

  18. Arginine induces GH gene expression by activating NOS/NO signaling in rat isolated hemi-pituitaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinto, S.C.F. [Faculdade de Ciências Integradas do Pontal, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Ituiutaba, MG (Brazil); Adrião, M.G. [Departamento de Morfologia e Fisiologia, Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Castro-Barbosa, T.; Goulart-Silva, F.; Nunes, M.T. [Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-01

    The amino acid arginine (Arg) is a recognized secretagogue of growth hormone (GH), and has been shown to induce GH gene expression. Arg is the natural precursor of nitric oxide (NO), which is known to mediate many of the effects of Arg, such as GH secretion. Arg was also shown to increase calcium influx in pituitary cells, which might contribute to its effects on GH secretion. Although the mechanisms involved in the effects of Arg on GH secretion are well established, little is known about them regarding the control of GH gene expression. We investigated whether the NO pathway and/or calcium are involved in the effects of Arg on GH gene expression in rat isolated pituitaries. To this end, pituitaries from approximately 170 male Wistar rats (∼250 g) were removed, divided into two halves, pooled (three hemi-pituitaries) and incubated or not with Arg, as well as with different pharmacological agents. Arg (71 mM), the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 1 and 0.1 mM) and a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) analogue (8-Br-cGMP, 1 mM) increased GH mRNA expression 60 min later. The NO acceptor hemoglobin (0.3 µM) blunted the effect of SNP, and the combined treatment with Arg and L-NAME (an NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 55 mM) abolished the stimulatory effect of Arg on GH gene expression. The calcium channel inhibitor nifedipine (3 µM) also abolished Arg-induced GH gene expression. The present study shows that Arg directly induces GH gene expression in hemi-pituitaries isolated from rats, excluding interference from somatostatinergic neurons, which are supposed to be inhibited by Arg. Moreover, the data demonstrate that the NOS/NO signaling pathway and calcium mediate the Arg effects on GH gene expression.

  19. Normal and high eNOS levels are detrimental in both mild and severe cardiac pressure-overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Deel, Elza D; Octavia, Yanti; de Boer, Martine; Juni, Rio P; Tempel, Dennie; van Haperen, Rien; de Crom, Rini; Moens, An L; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2015-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) exerts beneficial effects in a variety of cardiovascular disease states. Studies on the benefit of eNOS activity in pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction produced by aortic stenosis are equivocal, which may be due to different expression levels of eNOS or different severities of pressure-overload. Consequently, we investigated the effects of eNOS-expression level on cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction produced by mild or severe pressure-overload. To unravel the impact of eNOS on pressure-overload cardiac dysfunction we subjected eNOS deficient, wildtype and eNOS overexpressing transgenic (eNOS-Tg) mice to 8weeks of mild or severe transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and studied cardiac geometry and function at the whole organ and tissue level. In both mild and severe TAC, lack of eNOS ameliorated, whereas eNOS overexpression aggravated, TAC-induced cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. Moreover, the detrimental effects of eNOS in severe TAC were associated with aggravation of TAC-induced NOS-dependent oxidative stress and by further elevation of eNOS monomer levels, consistent with enhanced eNOS uncoupling. In the presence of TAC, scavenging of reactive oxygen species with N-acetylcysteine reduced eNOS S-glutathionylation, eNOS monomer and NOS-dependent superoxide levels in eNOS-Tg mice to wildtype levels. Accordingly, N-acetylcysteine improved cardiac function in eNOS-Tg but not in wildtype mice with TAC. In conclusion, independent of the severity of TAC, eNOS aggravates cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, which appears due to TAC-induced eNOS uncoupling and superoxide production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. VSV replication in neurons is inhibited by type I IFN at multiple stages of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trottier, Mark D; Palian, Beth M; Reiss, Carol Shoshkes

    2005-03-15

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a rhabdovirus which causes acute encephalitis in mice after intranasal infection. Because type I interferon (IFN) has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of VSV, we investigated the role of type I IFN in viral replication in neurons in culture. Pre-treatment of NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells or primary neuron cultures with IFN-beta or IFN-alpha strongly inhibits virus replication, with 1000-fold inhibition of infectious virus release occurring at 7 h post-infection, and maximum inhibition of 14,000-fold occurring at 14 h. Type I IFN inhibited both viral protein and RNA synthesis, but not enough to account for the inhibition of infectious virus yield. The influenza virus protein NS1 binds dsRNA and antagonizes induction of PKR activity, an IFN-inducible antiviral protein which phosphorylates and inactivates the elongation factor eIF-2alpha, resulting in cessation of translation. In NS1-expressing neuroblastoma cells, VSV replication was inhibited by IFN-beta as well as in control NB41A3 cells, and eIF-2alpha phosphorylation was blocked, suggesting that PKR activity was not involved in inhibition of viral protein synthesis. Similarly, inhibition of VSV by IFN-beta was not affected by addition of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, indicating that IFN-beta activity is not mediated by nitric oxide or superoxide. This contrasts with the essential role of NOS-1 in inhibition of VSV replication when neurons are treated with IFN-gamma. Analysis of cell culture supernatants revealed suppression of release of VSV particles from both NB41A3 cells and primary neurons treated with IFN. The inhibition of virion release closely matched the overall suppression of infectious VSV particle release, suggesting that type I IFN plays a role in inhibition of VSV assembly.

  1. Primary cilia modulate TLR4-mediated inflammatory responses in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hyunjung; Shin, Hyo Jung; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Shin, Nara; Kim, Sena; Yi, Min-Hee; Zhang, Enji; Hong, Jinpyo; Kang, Joon Won; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Kim, Dong Woon

    2017-09-19

    The primary cilium is an organelle that can act as a master regulator of cellular signaling. Despite the presence of primary cilia in hippocampal neurons, their function is not fully understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that the primary cilium influences interleukin (IL)-1β-induced NF-κB signaling, ultimately mediating the inflammatory response. We, therefore, investigated ciliary function and NF-κB signaling in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation in conjunction with ciliary length analysis. Since TLR4/NF-κB signaling is a well-known inflammatory pathway, we measured ciliary length and inflammatory mediators in wild type (WT) and TLR4-/- mice injected with LPS. Next, to exclude the effects of microglial TLR4, we examined the ciliary length, ciliary components, inflammatory cytokine, and mediators in HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells. Primary ciliary length decreased in hippocampal pyramidal neurons after intracerebroventricular injection of LPS in WT mice, whereas it increased in TLR4-/- mice. LPS treatment decreased primary ciliary length, activated NF-κB signaling, and increased Cox2 and iNOS levels in HT22 hippocampal neurons. In contrast, silencing Kif3a, a key protein component of cilia, increased ARL13B ciliary protein levels and suppressed NF-κB signaling and expression of inflammatory mediators. These data suggest that LPS-induced NF-κB signaling and inflammatory mediator expression are modulated by cilia and that the blockade of primary cilium formation by Kif3a siRNA regulates TLR4-induced NF-κB signaling. We propose that primary cilia are critical for regulating NF-κB signaling events in neuroinflammation and in the innate immune response.

  2. Correlation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibition with TNF-α, caspase-1, FasL and TLR-3 in pathogenesis of rabies in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, B P; Singh, K P; Saminathan, M; Singh, R; Tiwari, A K; Manjunatha, V; Harish, C; Manjunathareddy, G B

    2016-02-01

    The role of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1α/β (IL-1α/β), IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferons, nitric oxide (NO) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in pathogenesis of rabies is being actively pursued. Presently, levels of certain immune molecules in pathogenesis of rabies in mice have been investigated. CVS strain of rabies infection resulted in early increase in iNOS, TNF-α, caspase-1, Fas ligand (FasL) and toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3) mRNA levels in brain, and nitric oxide levels in serum. The severity of clinical signs and microscopic lesions largely correlated with NO levels. Aminoguanidine (AG; iNOS inhibitor) decreased NO production with delay in development of clinical signs and increase in survival time. Prolonged survival time correlated with reduced viral load evident by real-time PCR, reduced fluorescent signals of rabies antigen in brain and reduced immunohistochemistry signals in neuronal cytoplasm. These parameters suggested that nitric oxide did influence the rabies virus replication. Inhibition of iNOS by AG administration led to decreased expression of TNF-α, caspase-1, FasL and TLR-3 mRNA levels suggesting that increase in NO levels in rabies virus infection possibly contributed to development of disease through inflammation, apoptosis and immune-evasive mechanisms.

  3. Differences in NOS protein expression and activity in the rat vestibular nucleus following unilateral labyrinthectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Horii, A; Smith, P F; Darlington, C L

    2001-03-31

    We used Western blotting to analyse the expression of different isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the rat vestibular nucleus complex (VNC) at various times following unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD), together with a radioenzymatic assay to compare NOS activity at the same time points. nNOS expression did not change significantly in the ipsilateral or contralateral VNC at any time following UVD. However, eNOS expression decreased significantly (P<0.05) in the contralateral VNC at 6 h post-UVD, recovering to normal levels by 50 h. iNOS was not expressed at any time following UVD. NOS activity demonstrated a significant increase in the contralateral VNC at 6 h post-UVD (P<0.05), recovering toward normal levels by 50 h.

  4. NeuronMetrics: software for semi-automated processing of cultured neuron images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narro, Martha L; Yang, Fan; Kraft, Robert; Wenk, Carola; Efrat, Alon; Restifo, Linda L

    2007-03-23

    Using primary cell culture to screen for changes in neuronal morphology requires specialized analysis software. We developed NeuronMetrics for semi-automated, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional (2D) images of fluorescently labeled cultured neurons. It skeletonizes the neuron image using two complementary image-processing techniques, capturing fine terminal neurites with high fidelity. An algorithm was devised to span wide gaps in the skeleton. NeuronMetrics uses a novel strategy based on geometric features called faces to extract a branch number estimate from complex arbors with numerous neurite-to-neurite contacts, without creating a precise, contact-free representation of the neurite arbor. It estimates total neurite length, branch number, primary neurite number, territory (the area of the convex polygon bounding the skeleton and cell body), and Polarity Index (a measure of neuronal polarity). These parameters provide fundamental information about the size and shape of neurite arbors, which are critical factors for neuronal function. NeuronMetrics streamlines optional manual tasks such as removing noise, isolating the largest primary neurite, and correcting length for self-fasciculating neurites. Numeric data are output in a single text file, readily imported into other applications for further analysis. Written as modules for ImageJ, NeuronMetrics provides practical analysis tools that are easy to use and support batch processing. Depending on the need for manual intervention, processing time for a batch of approximately 60 2D images is 1.0-2.5 h, from a folder of images to a table of numeric data. NeuronMetrics' output accelerates the quantitative detection of mutations and chemical compounds that alter neurite morphology in vitro, and will contribute to the use of cultured neurons for drug discovery.

  5. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puerto, Ana; Wandosell, Francisco; Garrido, Juan José

    2013-10-28

    Brain development requires the interaction of complex signaling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of central nervous system development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic program that establishes the brain's morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron-glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the nervous

  6. Small molecules enable highly efficient neuronal conversion of human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladewig, Julia; Mertens, Jerome; Kesavan, Jaideep; Doerr, Jonas; Poppe, Daniel; Glaue, Finnja; Herms, Stefan; Wernet, Peter; Kögler, Gesine; Müller, Franz-Josef; Koch, Philipp; Brüstle, Oliver

    2012-06-01

    Forced expression of proneural transcription factors has been shown to direct neuronal conversion of fibroblasts. Because neurons are postmitotic, conversion efficiencies are an important parameter for this process. We present a minimalist approach combining two-factor neuronal programming with small molecule-based inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and SMAD signaling, which converts postnatal human fibroblasts into functional neuron-like cells with yields up to >200% and neuronal purities up to >80%.

  7. Comportamento do fósforo nos agro-ecossistemas

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, M.C.H.

    2012-01-01

    Nesta conferência contextualizou-se a importância do fósforo a nível agronómico, ambiental e económico, fez-se referência ao ciclo do fósforo e à situação actual das suas reservas mundiais. Tendo como base trabalhos realizados em solos Portugueses apresentaram-se resultados sobre a gestão do fósforo nos solos Portugueses focando os aspectos da dinâmica do fósforo no solo, da avaliação do risco de transferência de fósforo do solo para as águas superficiais, águas de escoamento superficial o...

  8. Lévi-Strauss nos 90 voltas ao passado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévi-Strauss Claude

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo responde às críticas formuladas por Christian Delacampagne e Bernard Traimond em "A Polêmica Sartre/Lévi-Strauss Revisitada. Nas Raízes das Ciências Sociais de Hoje", publicado em Les Temps Modernes 596 (novembro-dezembro de 1997. Para fazê-lo, recorda inicialmente o caráter relativo da oposição entre "sociedades frias" e "sociedades quentes". Em seguida, refuta a tese de que Maurice Merleau-Ponty, sob a capa de um elogio, teria dirigido críticas veladas ao autor. Finalmente, reconhecendo o afastamento da antropologia de hoje em face das posições do autor, admite, sem se pronunciar sobre o valor desse movimento, que temas de ar sartriano ressurgem nos antropólogos contemporâneos.

  9. Lima Barreto e Oswald de Andrade nos descaminhos da modernidade

    OpenAIRE

    Fattori, Danusa da Matta Duarte

    2006-01-01

    Este estudo estabelece uma comparação entre as obras de dois importantes escritores e intelectuais brasileiros do início do século XX, Lima Barreto e Oswald de Andrade, com o objetivo de verificar a forma como ambos enfrentaram as forças modernizadoras que se impuseram no nosso país no início do século XX. Com base, principalmente, nos textos Recordações do Escrivão Isaías Caminha, O Diário íntimo, Triste fim de Policarpo Quaresma, Impressões de Leitura e Os Bruzundangas do primeiro aut...

  10. O direito dos acionistas de participar nos lucros sociais

    OpenAIRE

    Cometti, Marcelo Tadeu

    2007-01-01

    O presente trabalho tem por objetivo o estudo do direito dos acionistas de participar nos lucros sociais como um instrumento de estabilização nas relações de poder internas na companhia, sendo, para tanto, dividido em três capítulos.No primeiro capítulo são analisadas as regras estabelecidas na Lei 6.404/76 e posteriores alterações que irão determinar os critérios para a apuração e destinação dos lucros sociais. Busca-se assim determinar o conceito de lucro social, o período de...

  11. Tecnologia dos sonhos em Artemidoro, Freud, Jung e nos Warlpiri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrahão de Oliveira Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Apresentaremos distintas tecnologias dos sonhos: em Artemidoro, Freud, Jung e nos Warlpiri. Artemidoro revela a mensagem onírica imprescindível à condução do cidadão, com os elementos das instituições, da cidade, do cosmo. Com Freud, no moderno mundo europeu, o sonho recebe o sentido da interioridade. Outra leitura é de Carl Jung. O uso dos sonhos tem seu sentido histórico, se relacionando com as práticas de governo, os modos de condução da vida e da cidade. Para além das tradições eurodescendentes e mentalistas vigentes, apresentaremos a tecnologia coletiva dos sonhos dos Warlpiri e uma nova possibilidade de lidarmos com a experiência onírica.

  12. Circulating Blood eNOS Contributes to the Regulation of Systemic Blood Pressure and Nitrite Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Katherine C.; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M.; Kovacic, Jason C.; Noguchi, Audrey; Liu, Virginia B.; Wang, Xunde; Raghavachari, Nalini; Boehm, Manfred; Kato, Gregory J.; Kelm, Malte; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mice genetically deficient in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS−/−) are hypertensive with lower circulating nitrite levels, indicating the importance of constitutively produced nitric oxide (NO•) to blood pressure regulation and vascular homeostasis. While the current paradigm holds that this bioactivity derives specifically from expression of eNOS in endothelium, circulating blood cells also express eNOS protein. A functional red cell eNOS that modulates vascular NO• signaling has been proposed. Approach and Results To test the hypothesis that blood cells contribute to mammalian blood pressure regulation via eNOS-dependent NO• generation, we cross-transplanted WT and eNOS−/− mice, producing chimeras competent or deficient for eNOS expression in circulating blood cells. Surprisingly, we observed a significant contribution of both endothelial and circulating blood cell eNOS to blood pressure and systemic nitrite levels, the latter being a major component of the circulating NO• reservoir. These effects were abolished by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME and repristinated by the NOS substrate L-Arginine, and were independent of platelet or leukocyte depletion. Mouse erythrocytes were also found to carry an eNOS protein and convert 14C-Arginine into 14C-Citrulline in a NOS-dependent fashion. Conclusions These are the first studies to definitively establish a role for a blood borne eNOS, using cross transplant chimera models, that contributes to the regulation of blood pressure and nitrite homeostasis. This work provides evidence suggesting that erythrocyte eNOS may mediate this effect. PMID:23702660

  13. Channel properties of Nax expressed in neurons.

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    Masahito Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Nax is a sodium-concentration ([Na+]-sensitive Na channel with a gating threshold of ~150 mM for extracellular [Na+] ([Na+]o in vitro. We previously reported that Nax was preferentially expressed in the glial cells of sensory circumventricular organs including the subfornical organ, and was involved in [Na+] sensing for the control of salt-intake behavior. Although Nax was also suggested to be expressed in the neurons of some brain regions including the amygdala and cerebral cortex, the channel properties of Nax have not yet been adequately characterized in neurons. We herein verified that Nax was expressed in neurons in the lateral amygdala of mice using an antibody that was newly generated against mouse Nax. To investigate the channel properties of Nax expressed in neurons, we established an inducible cell line of Nax using the mouse neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro-2a, which is endogenously devoid of the expression of Nax. Functional analyses of this cell line revealed that the [Na+]-sensitivity of Nax in neuronal cells was similar to that expressed in glial cells. The cation selectivity sequence of the Nax channel in cations was revealed to be Na+ ≈ Li+ > Rb+ > Cs+ for the first time. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Nax bound to postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95 through its PSD95/Disc-large/ZO-1 (PDZ-binding motif at the C-terminus in neurons. The interaction between Nax and PSD95 may be involved in promoting the surface expression of Nax channels because the depletion of endogenous PSD95 resulted in a decrease in Nax at the plasma membrane. These results indicated, for the first time, that Nax functions as a [Na+]-sensitive Na channel in neurons as well as in glial cells.

  14. Ancient origin of somatic and visceral neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A key to understanding the evolution of the nervous system on a large phylogenetic scale is the identification of homologous neuronal types. Here, we focus this search on the sensory and motor neurons of bilaterians, exploiting their well-defined molecular signatures in vertebrates. Sensorimotor circuits in vertebrates are of two types: somatic (that sense the environment and respond by shaping bodily motions) and visceral (that sense the interior milieu and respond by regulating vital functions). These circuits differ by a small set of largely dedicated transcriptional determinants: Brn3 is expressed in many somatic sensory neurons, first and second order (among which mechanoreceptors are uniquely marked by the Brn3+/Islet1+/Drgx+ signature), somatic motoneurons uniquely co-express Lhx3/4 and Mnx1, while the vast majority of neurons, sensory and motor, involved in respiration, blood circulation or digestion are molecularly defined by their expression and dependence on the pan-visceral determinant Phox2b. Results We explore the status of the sensorimotor transcriptional code of vertebrates in mollusks, a lophotrochozoa clade that provides a rich repertoire of physiologically identified neurons. In the gastropods Lymnaea stagnalis and Aplysia californica, we show that homologues of Brn3, Drgx, Islet1, Mnx1, Lhx3/4 and Phox2b differentially mark neurons with mechanoreceptive, locomotory and cardiorespiratory functions. Moreover, in the cephalopod Sepia officinalis, we show that Phox2 marks the stellate ganglion (in line with the respiratory — that is, visceral— ancestral role of the mantle, its target organ), while the anterior pedal ganglion, which controls the prehensile and locomotory arms, expresses Mnx. Conclusions Despite considerable divergence in overall neural architecture, a molecular underpinning for the functional allocation of neurons to interactions with the environment or to homeostasis was inherited from the urbilaterian ancestor by

  15. Expression of NOS and VEGF in feline mammary tumours and their correlation with angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, M S; Matsumoto, M; Hidaka, R; Miyoshi, N; Yasuda, N

    2012-06-01

    In order to define the role of nitric oxide (NO) in feline mammary tumours, the expression of endothelial or inducible nitric oxide synthase (e/iNOS) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and their relationship with angiogenesis, was investigated in 23 feline mammary tumours (two hyperplastic, 19 adenocarcinoma, one osteosarcoma and one squamous cell carcinoma) by immunohistochemistry. Tumour angiogenesis was assessed by CD31 immunostaining and was expressed as microvessel density (MVD). In general, iNOS immunoreactivity was localised in tumour cells and occasionally in stromal myofibroblasts, whereas eNOS and VEGF were localised in the cytoplasm of tumour epithelial cells and endothelium. In malignancy, expression of iNOS increased from well- to less-differentiated phenotypes (Grades 1-3) and was significantly higher in G3 and G2 when compared with G1 cases. However, increasing eNOS expression was limited only in hyperplastic lesions and showed no significant changes among the grades. In addition, expression of iNOS was positively correlated with VEGF and MVD in feline mammary tumours and both measures were significantly greater in less differentiated phenotypes (Pfeline mammary tumours depended on tumour grade, and the positive correlations between iNOS and angiogenic markers suggests that iNOS synthesised by tumour cells promotes tumour growth. Thus, iNOS can be used as an important immunohistochemical marker to determine the degree of malignancy and prognosis of feline mammary carcinoma. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Expression and Correlation of iNOS and p53 in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

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    Lan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is the most prevalent form of oral cancer. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and p53 are associated with a variety of human cancers, but their expression and interaction in OSCC have not been fully explored. In this study, we investigated the expression of iNOS and p53 in OSCC and their correlation with tumor development and prognosis. In addition, we explored the interaction of iNOS and p53 in OSCC. The expression of iNOS and p53 in OSCC was investigated using immunohistochemical method and their interaction was studied using RNAi technique. Our results showed that the expression of both iNOS and p53 was significantly correlated with tumor stages and pathological grade of OSCC (P<0.05. In contrast, there was no correlation between iNOS and p53 expression and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05. The OSCC survival rate was negatively associated with iNOS expression, but not with p53. A significant increase in the expression of the p53 was observed when iNOS expression was knocked down. The immunoexpression of iNOS is correlated with tumorigenesis and prognosis of OSCC and may serve as a prognostic marker.

  17. Glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) inhibits cytokine induced iNOS expression in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Brian T; Feng, Xuesheng; Jeyabalan, Geetha; Zhang, Baochun; Shao, Lifang; Guo, Zhong; Geller, David A

    2007-03-01

    Although the accumulation of hydrophobic bile acid (e.g., glycine conjugated chenodeoxycholic acid, GCDC) is considered to be an important factor contributing to cholestatic liver dysfunction, its pathogenesis is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the bile salt GCDC on the regulation of iNOS expression, a key immune modulator during liver inflammation. GCDC significantly decreased cytokine-stimulated iNOS promoter activity, and both iNOS mRNA and protein expression. GCDC decreased iNOS promoter activity by preventing IkappaB degradation and inhibiting NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity. To explore the role of iNOS in bile salt induced apoptosis, we also examined the effect of NO on caspase-3 activity. GCDC strongly induced caspase-3 activity, and this increase was abrogated by both exogenous NO exposure and endogenous NO synthesis. Furthermore, adenoviral iNOS (AdiNOS) pre-treatment decreased acute cholestatic-induced liver injury in a rat bile duct ligation model. These findings indicate a novel signaling pathway where potentially toxic bile salts down-regulate hepatic iNOS expression. This blockade of the iNOS mediated antiapoptotic phenotype may have important implications in certain liver disorders.

  18. EL NOS-OTROS-ORIGINARIO: Sobre la posibilidad de respetar los derechos de el-otro

    OpenAIRE

    Fager Sáenz, Nayid Abú

    2016-01-01

    Este texto plantea la posibilidad de recuperar el nos-otros-originario como clave para la superación del «sufrimiento inútil» del sujeto; de este modo, muestra al nos-otros-originario como una zona de protección de los derechos de el-otro, hace una crítica en contra del nos-otros-caído como vulnerador de derechos fundamentales, y aborda la posibilidad de recuperar el nos-otros-originario a través de una consumación definitiva de la "justicia". This article shows the possibility of recoveri...

  19. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

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    Jana Schwieger

    Full Text Available The functionality of cochlear implants (CI depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN. The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth.Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml, alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours.The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture.The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  20. Neuronal medium that supports basic synaptic functions and activity of human neurons in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardy, C.; Hurk, M. van den; Eames, T.; Marchand, C.; Hernandez, R.V.; Kellogg, M.; Gorris, M.A.J.; Galet, B.; Palomares, V.; Brown, J.; Bang, A.G.; Mertens, J.; Bohnke, L.; Boyer, L.; Simon, S.; Gage, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Human cell reprogramming technologies offer access to live human neurons from patients and provide a new alternative for modeling neurological disorders in vitro. Neural electrical activity is the essence of nervous system function in vivo. Therefore, we examined neuronal activity in media widely

  1. Closing the Phenotypic Gap between Transformed Neuronal Cell Lines in Culture and Untransformed Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tereance A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Ott, C. Mark; HonerzuBentrup, Kerstin; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Nelman-Gonzales, Mayra; Pierson, Duane L.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) are frequently limited by the failure of primary neurons to propagate in vitro. Neuronal cell lines can be substituted for primary cells but they often misrepresent normal conditions. We hypothesized that a dimensional (3-D) cell culture system would drive the phenotype of transformed neurons closer to that of untransformed cells. In our studies comparing 3-D versus 2-dimensional (2-D) culture, neuronal SH-SY5Y (SY) cells underwent distinct morphological changes combined with a significant drop in their rate of cell division. Expression of the proto-oncogene N-myc and the RNA binding protein HuD was decreased in 3-D culture as compared to standard 2-D conditions. We observed a decline in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in 3-D culture, coupled with increased expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Moreover, thapsigargin (TG)-induced apoptosis was enhanced in the 3-D cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly differing mRNA levels for over 700 genes in the cells of each culture type. These results indicate that a 3-D culture approach narrows the phenotypic gap between neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. The resulting cells may readily be used for in vitro research of neuronal pathogenesis.

  2. Neuronal migration illuminated: a look under the hood of the living neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Niraj; Solecki, David J

    2011-01-01

    During vertebrate brain development, migration of neurons from the germinal zones to their final laminar positions is essential to establish functional neural circuits. Whereas key insights into neuronal migration initially came from landmark studies identifying the genes mutated in human cortical malformations, cell biology has recently greatly advanced our understanding of how cytoskeletal proteins and molecular motors drive the morphogenic cell movements that build the developing brain. This Commentary & View reviews recent studies examining the role of the molecular motors during neuronal migration and critically examines current models of acto-myosin function in the two-step neuronal migration cycle. Given the apparent emerging diversity of neuronal sub-type cytoskeletal organizations, we propose that two approaches must be taken to resolve differences between the current migration models: the mechanisms of radial and tangential migration must be compared and the loci of tension generation, migration substrates, and sites of adhesion dynamics must be precisely examined in an integrated manner.

  3. Reliable neuronal systems: the importance of heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengler, Johannes; Jug, Florian; Steger, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    For every engineer it goes without saying: in order to build a reliable system we need components that consistently behave precisely as they should. It is also well known that neurons, the building blocks of brains, do not satisfy this constraint. Even neurons of the same type come with huge variances in their properties and these properties also vary over time. Synapses, the connections between neurons, are highly unreliable in forwarding signals. In this paper we argue that both these fact add variance to neuronal processes, and that this variance is not a handicap of neural systems, but that instead predictable and reliable functional behavior of neural systems depends crucially on this variability. In particular, we show that higher variance allows a recurrently connected neural population to react more sensitively to incoming signals, and processes them faster and more energy efficient. This, for example, challenges the general assumption that the intrinsic variability of neurons in the brain is a defect that has to be overcome by synaptic plasticity in the process of learning.

  4. Reliable neuronal systems: the importance of heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Lengler

    Full Text Available For every engineer it goes without saying: in order to build a reliable system we need components that consistently behave precisely as they should. It is also well known that neurons, the building blocks of brains, do not satisfy this constraint. Even neurons of the same type come with huge variances in their properties and these properties also vary over time. Synapses, the connections between neurons, are highly unreliable in forwarding signals. In this paper we argue that both these fact add variance to neuronal processes, and that this variance is not a handicap of neural systems, but that instead predictable and reliable functional behavior of neural systems depends crucially on this variability. In particular, we show that higher variance allows a recurrently connected neural population to react more sensitively to incoming signals, and processes them faster and more energy efficient. This, for example, challenges the general assumption that the intrinsic variability of neurons in the brain is a defect that has to be overcome by synaptic plasticity in the process of learning.

  5. Spin orbit torque based electronic neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Abhronil, E-mail: asengup@purdue.edu; Choday, Sri Harsha; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    A device based on current-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) that functions as an electronic neuron is proposed in this work. The SOT device implements an artificial neuron's thresholding (transfer) function. In the first step of a two-step switching scheme, a charge current places the magnetization of a nano-magnet along the hard-axis, i.e., an unstable point for the magnet. In the second step, the SOT device (neuron) receives a current (from the synapses) which moves the magnetization from the unstable point to one of the two stable states. The polarity of the synaptic current encodes the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the neuron input and determines the final orientation of the magnetization. A resistive crossbar array, functioning as synapses, generates a bipolar current that is a weighted sum of the inputs. The simulation of a two layer feed-forward artificial neural network based on the SOT electronic neuron shows that it consumes ∼3× lower power than a 45 nm digital CMOS implementation, while reaching ∼80% accuracy in the classification of 100 images of handwritten digits from the MNIST dataset.

  6. Doubly stochastic coherence in complex neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Jianjun

    2012-11-01

    A system composed of coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons with various topological structures is investigated under the co-presence of two independently additive and multiplicative Gaussian white noises, in which particular attention is paid to the neuronal networks spiking regularity. As the additive noise intensity and the multiplicative noise intensity are simultaneously adjusted to optimal values, the temporal periodicity of the output of the system reaches the maximum, indicating the occurrence of doubly stochastic coherence. The network topology randomness exerts different influences on the temporal coherence of the spiking oscillation for dissimilar coupling strength regimes. At a small coupling strength, the spiking regularity shows nearly no difference in the regular, small-world, and completely random networks. At an intermediate coupling strength, the temporal periodicity in a small-world neuronal network can be improved slightly by adding a small fraction of long-range connections. At a large coupling strength, the dynamical behavior of the neurons completely loses the resonance property with regard to the additive noise intensity or the multiplicative noise intensity, and the spiking regularity decreases considerably with the increase of the network topology randomness. The network topology randomness plays more of a depressed role than a favorable role in improving the temporal coherence of the spiking oscillation in the neuronal network research study.

  7. Memristors Empower Spiking Neurons With Stochasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-06-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that probabilistic spiking can be interpreted as learning and inference in cortical microcircuits. This interpretation creates new opportunities for building neuromorphic systems driven by probabilistic learning algorithms. However, such systems must have two crucial features: 1) the neurons should follow a specific behavioral model, and 2) stochastic spiking should be implemented efficiently for it to be scalable. This paper proposes a memristor-based stochastically spiking neuron that fulfills these requirements. First, the analytical model of the memristor is enhanced so it can capture the behavioral stochasticity consistent with experimentally observed phenomena. The switching behavior of the memristor model is demonstrated to be akin to the firing of the stochastic spike response neuron model, the primary building block for probabilistic algorithms in spiking neural networks. Furthermore, the paper proposes a neural soma circuit that utilizes the intrinsic nondeterminism of memristive switching for efficient spike generation. The simulations and analysis of the behavior of a single stochastic neuron and a winner-take-all network built of such neurons and trained on handwritten digits confirm that the circuit can be used for building probabilistic sampling and pattern adaptation machinery in spiking networks. The findings constitute an important step towards scalable and efficient probabilistic neuromorphic platforms. © 2011 IEEE.

  8. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

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    Hill Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity.

  9. Magnetic skyrmion-based artificial neuron device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sai; Kang, Wang; Huang, Yangqi; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-08-01

    Neuromorphic computing, inspired by the biological nervous system, has attracted considerable attention. Intensive research has been conducted in this field for developing artificial synapses and neurons, attempting to mimic the behaviors of biological synapses and neurons, which are two basic elements of a human brain. Recently, magnetic skyrmions have been investigated as promising candidates in neuromorphic computing design owing to their topologically protected particle-like behaviors, nanoscale size and low driving current density. In one of our previous studies, a skyrmion-based artificial synapse was proposed, with which both short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation functions have been demonstrated. In this work, we further report on a skyrmion-based artificial neuron by exploiting the tunable current-driven skyrmion motion dynamics, mimicking the leaky-integrate-fire function of a biological neuron. With a simple single-device implementation, this proposed artificial neuron may enable us to build a dense and energy-efficient spiking neuromorphic computing system.

  10. Motor neuron disease after electric injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, H; Couratier, P; Camu, W

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of motor neuron disease after electrical injury in six patients is reported and compared with patients from the literature. The patients were five men with spinal onset and one woman with bulbar motor neuron disease after electric shock. Two patients were struck by lightning and four by industrial electric shock. For all six of them, the disease started at the site of the electrical trauma. The mean delay for onset of motor neuron disease was 44 months. In four of the spinal patients the disease progressed slowly with mild handicap after several years. For the fifth patient, improvement was noted progressively. The patient with bulbar disease died 26 months after onset. A link between electric shock and motor neuron disease is likely, given the homogenous profile of the patients both in the five spinal cases presented here and in the literature. Bulbar onset has not been reported to date. However, in this patient the long delay between the electrical injury and motor neuron disease, together with the rapid evolution may suggest a chance association.

 PMID:11459909

  11. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  12. Magnetic skyrmion-based artificial neuron device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sai; Kang, Wang; Huang, Yangqi; Zhang, Xichao; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-08-04

    Neuromorphic computing, inspired by the biological nervous system, has attracted considerable attention. Intensive research has been conducted in this field for developing artificial synapses and neurons, attempting to mimic the behaviors of biological synapses and neurons, which are two basic elements of a human brain. Recently, magnetic skyrmions have been investigated as promising candidates in neuromorphic computing design owing to their topologically protected particle-like behaviors, nanoscale size and low driving current density. In one of our previous studies, a skyrmion-based artificial synapse was proposed, with which both short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation functions have been demonstrated. In this work, we further report on a skyrmion-based artificial neuron by exploiting the tunable current-driven skyrmion motion dynamics, mimicking the leaky-integrate-fire function of a biological neuron. With a simple single-device implementation, this proposed artificial neuron may enable us to build a dense and energy-efficient spiking neuromorphic computing system.

  13. WNT signaling in neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Silvana B.; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in the development of the central nervous system and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulates the structure and function of the adult nervous system. Wnt components are key regulators of a variety of developmental processes, including embryonic patterning, cell specification, and cell polarity. In the nervous system, Wnt signaling also regulates the formation and function of neuronal circuits by controlling neuronal differentiation, axon outgrowth and guidance, dendrite development, synaptic function, and neuronal plasticity. Wnt factors can signal through three very well characterized cascades: canonical or β-catenin pathway, planar cell polarity pathway and calcium pathway that control different processes. However, divergent downstream cascades have been identified to control neuronal morphogenesis. In the nervous system, the expression of Wnt proteins is a highly controlled process. In addition, deregulation of Wnt signaling has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we will review different aspects of neuronal and dendrite maturation, including spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Finally, the role of Wnt pathway components on Alzheimer’s disease will be revised. PMID:23847469

  14. Binding by asynchrony: the neuronal phase code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Nadasdy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons display continuous subthreshold oscillations and discrete action potentials. When action potentials are phase-locked to the subthreshold oscillation, we hypothesize they represent two types of information: the presence/absence of a sensory feature and the phase of subthreshold oscillation. If subthreshold oscillation phases are neuron-specific, then the sources of action potentials can be recovered based on the action potential times. If the spatial information about the stimulus is converted to action potential phases, then action potentials from multiple neurons can be combined into a single axon and the spatial configuration reconstructed elsewhere. For the reconstruction to be successful, we introduce two assumptions: that a subthreshold oscillation field has a constant phase gradient and that coincidences between action potentials and intracellular subthreshold oscillations are neuron-specific as defined by the "interference principle." Under these assumptions, a phase coding model enables information transfer between structures and reproduces experimental phenomenons such as phase precession, grid cell architecture, and phase modulation of cortical spikes. This article reviews a recently proposed neuronal algorithm for information encoding and decoding from the phase of action potentials (Nadasdy 2009. The focus is given to the principles common across different systems instead of emphasizing system specific differences.

  15. Exploring neuronal bistability at the depolarization block.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Dovzhenok

    Full Text Available Many neurons display bistability--coexistence of two firing modes such as bursting and tonic spiking or tonic spiking and silence. Bistability has been proposed to endow neurons with richer forms of information processing in general and to be involved in short-term memory in particular by allowing a brief signal to elicit long-lasting changes in firing. In this paper, we focus on bistability that allows for a choice between tonic spiking and depolarization block in a wide range of the depolarization levels. We consider the spike-producing currents in two neurons, models of which differ by the parameter values. Our dopaminergic neuron model displays bistability in a wide range of applied currents at the depolarization block. The Hodgkin-Huxley model of the squid giant axon shows no bistability. We varied parameter values for the model to analyze transitions between the two parameter sets. We show that bistability primarily characterizes the inactivation of the Na(+ current. Our study suggests a connection between the amount of the Na(+ window current and the length of the bistability range. For the dopaminergic neuron we hypothesize that bistability can be linked to a prolonged action of antipsychotic drugs.

  16. WNT signalling in neuronal maturation and synaptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Beatriz Rosso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in the development of the central nervous system (CNS and growing evidence indicates that Wnts also regulates the structure and function of the adult nervous system. Wnt components are key regulators of a variety of developmental processes, including embryonic patterning, cell specification, and cell polarity. In the nervous system, Wnt signaling also regulates the formation and function of neuronal circuits by controlling neuronal differentiation, axon outgrowth and guidance, dendrite development, synaptic function and neuronal plasticity. Wnt factors can signal through three very well characterized cascades: canonical or β-catenin pathway, planar cell polarity pathway and calcium pathway that control different processes. However, divergent downstream cascades have been identified to control neuronal morphogenesis. In the nervous system, the expression of Wnt proteins is a highly controlled process. In addition, deregulation of Wnt signaling has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we will review different aspects of neuronal and dendrite maturation, including spinogenesis and synaptogenesis. Finally, the role of Wnt pathway components on Alzheimer’s disease will be revised.

  17. Energy-efficient neural information processing in individual neurons and neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lianchun; Yu, Yuguo

    2017-11-01

    Brains are composed of networks of an enormous number of neurons interconnected with synapses. Neural information is carried by the electrical signals within neurons and the chemical signals among neurons. Generating these electrical and chemical signals is metabolically expensive. The fundamental issue raised here is whether brains have evolved efficient ways of developing an energy-efficient neural code from the molecular level to the circuit level. Here, we summarize the factors and biophysical mechanisms that could contribute to the energy-efficient neural code for processing input signals. The factors range from ion channel kinetics, body temperature, axonal propagation of action potentials, low-probability release of synaptic neurotransmitters, optimal input and noise, the size of neurons and neuronal clusters, excitation/inhibition balance, coding strategy, cortical wiring, and the organization of functional connectivity. Both experimental and computational evidence suggests that neural systems may use these factors to maximize the efficiency of energy consumption in processing neural signals. Studies indicate that efficient energy utilization may be universal in neuronal systems as an evolutionary consequence of the pressure of limited energy. As a result, neuronal connections may be wired in a highly economical manner to lower energy costs and space. Individual neurons within a network may encode independent stimulus components to allow a minimal number of neurons to represent whole stimulus characteristics efficiently. This basic principle may fundamentally change our view of how billions of neurons organize themselves into complex circuits to operate and generate the most powerful intelligent cognition in nature. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Optogenetic identification of hypothalamic orexin neuron projections to paraventricular spinally projecting neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Schwartz, Alan R; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Mendelowitz, David

    2017-04-01

    Orexin neurons, and activation of orexin receptors, are generally thought to be sympathoexcitatory; however, the functional connectivity between orexin neurons and a likely sympathetic target, the hypothalamic spinally projecting neurons (SPNs) in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) has not been established. To test the hypothesis that orexin neurons project directly to SPNs in the PVN, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was selectively expressed in orexin neurons to enable photoactivation of ChR2-expressing fibers while examining evoked postsynaptic currents in SPNs in rat hypothalamic slices. Selective photoactivation of orexin fibers elicited short-latency postsynaptic currents in all SPNs tested (n = 34). These light-triggered responses were heterogeneous, with a majority being excitatory glutamatergic responses (59%) and a minority of inhibitory GABAergic (35%) and mixed glutamatergic and GABAergic currents (6%). Both glutamatergic and GABAergic responses were present in the presence of tetrodotoxin and 4-aminopyridine, suggesting a monosynaptic connection between orexin neurons and SPNs. In addition to generating postsynaptic responses, photostimulation facilitated action potential firing in SPNs (current clamp configuration). Glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, postsynaptic currents were diminished by application of the orexin receptor antagonist almorexant, indicating orexin release facilitates glutamatergic neurotransmission in this pathway. This work identifies a neuronal circuit by which orexin neurons likely exert sympathoexcitatory control of cardiovascular function.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This is the first study to establish, using innovative optogenetic approaches in a transgenic rat model, that there are robust heterogeneous projections from orexin neurons to paraventricular spinally projecting neurons, including excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory GABAergic neurotransmission. Endogenous orexin release modulates glutamatergic, but not GABAergic

  19. Crosstalks between kisspeptin neurons and somatostatin neurons are not photoperiod dependent in the ewe hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufourny, Laurence; Lomet, Didier

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal reproduction is under the control of gonadal steroid feedback, itself synchronized by day-length or photoperiod. As steroid action on GnRH neurons is mostly indirect and therefore exerted through interneurons, we looked for neuroanatomical interactions between kisspeptin (KP) neurons and somatostatin (SOM) neurons, two populations targeted by sex steroids, in three diencephalic areas involved in the central control of ovulation and/or sexual behavior: the arcuate nucleus (ARC), the preoptic area (POA) and the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMHvl). KP is the most potent secretagogue of GnRH secretion while SOM has been shown to centrally inhibit LH pulsatile release. Notably, hypothalamic contents of these two neuropeptides vary with photoperiod in specific seasonal species. Our hypothesis is that SOM inhibits KP neuron activity and therefore indirectly modulate GnRH release and that this effect may be seasonally regulated. We used sections from ovariectomized estradiol-replaced ewes killed after photoperiodic treatment mimicking breeding or anestrus season. We performed triple immunofluorescent labeling to simultaneously detect KP, SOM and synapsin, a marker for synaptic vesicles. Sections from the POA and from the mediobasal hypothalamus were examined using a confocal microscope. Randomly selected KP or SOM neurons were observed in the POA and ARC. SOM neurons were also observed in the VMHvl. In both the ARC and POA, nearly all KP neurons presented numerous SOM contacts. SOM neurons presented KP terminals more frequently in the ARC than in the POA and VMHvl. Quantitative analysis failed to demonstrate major seasonal variations of KP and SOM interactions. Our data suggest a possible inhibitory action of SOM on all KP neurons in both photoperiodic statuses. On the other hand, the physiological significance of KP modulation of SOM neuron activity and vice versa remain to be determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of the effect of diode laser therapy on incisional wound healing and expression of iNOS and eNOS on rat oral tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parichehr Ghalayani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Histological findings showed that diode laser needs several repeated irradiations for the acceleration of wound healing. The iNOS amount showed that increases are associated with better healing.

  1. Expression of beta-catenin, COX-2 and iNOS in colorectal cancer: relevance of COX-2 adn iNOS inhibitors for treatment in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seok Kwan; Gul, Yunus A; Ithnin, Hairuszah; Talib, Arni; Seow, Heng Fong

    2004-01-01

    Promising new pharmacological agents and gene therapy targeting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) could modulate treatment of colorectal cancer in the future. The aim of this study was to elucidate the expression fo beta-catenin and teh presence of COX-2 and iNOS in colorectal cancer specimens in Malaysia. This is a useful prelude to future studies investigating interventions directed towards COX-2 adn iNOS. A cross-section study using retrospective data over a 2-year period (1999-2000) involved 101 archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of colorectal cancers that were surgically resected in a tertiary referral. COX-2 production was detected in adjacent normal tissue in 34 sample (33.7%) and in tumour tissue in 60 samples (59.4%). More tumours expressed iNOS (82/101, 81.2%) than COX-2. No iNOS expression was detected in adjacent normal tissue. Intense beta-catenin immunoreactivity at the cell-to-cell border. Poorly differentiated tumours had significantly lower total beta-catenin (p = 0.009) and COX-2 scores (p = 0.031). No significant relationships were established between pathological stage and beta-catenin, COX-2 and iNOS scores. the accumulation of beta-catenin does not seem to be sufficient to activate pathways that lead to increased COX-2 and iNOS expression. A high proportion of colorectal cancers were found to express COX-2 and a significant number produced iNOS, suggesting that their inhibitors may be potentially useful as chemotherapeutic agents in the management of colorectal cancer.

  2. Nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein is expressed by scattered neurons in the vestibular and precerebellar brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baizer, Joan S

    2009-11-17

    Vestibular information is essential for the control of posture, balance, and eye movements. The vestibular nerve projects to the four nuclei of the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC), as well as to several additional brainstem nuclei and the cerebellum. We have found that expression of the calcium-binding proteins calretinin (CR) and calbindin (CB), and the synthetic enzyme for nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) define subdivisions of the medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) and the nucleus prepositus (PrH), in cat, monkey, and human. We have asked if the pattern of expression of nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (NPNFP) might define additional subdivisions of these or other nuclei that participate in vestibular function. We studied the distribution of cells immunoreactive to NPNFP in the brainstems of 5 cats and one squirrel monkey. Labeled cells were scattered throughout the four nuclei of the VNC, as well as in PrH, the reticular formation (RF) and the external cuneate nucleus. We used double-label immunofluorescence to visualize the distribution of these cells relative to other neurochemically defined subdivisions. NPNFP cells were excluded from the CR and CB regions of the MVe. In PrH, NPNFP and nNOS were not colocalized. Cells in the lateral vestibular nucleus and RF colocalized NPNFP and a marker for glutamatergic neurons. We also found that the cholinergic cells and axons of cranial nerve nuclei 3, 4, 6, 7,10 and 12 colocalize NPNFP. The data suggest that NPNFP is expressed by a subset of glutamatergic projection neurons of the vestibular brainstem. NPNFP may be a marker for those cells that are especially vulnerable to the effects of normal aging, neurological disease or disruption of sensory input.

  3. Neuronal over-expression of ACE2 protects brain from ischemia-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji; Zhao, Yuhui; Chen, Shuzhen; Wang, Jinju; Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiaotang; Penchikala, Madhuri; Xia, Huijing; Lazartigues, Eric; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Yanfang

    2014-04-01

    Angiotensin (Ang) II exaggerates cerebral injury in ischemic damage. Angiotensin-converting enzyme type 2 (ACE2) converts Ang II into Ang (1-7) and thus, may protect against the effects of Ang II. We hypothesized that neuronal ACE2 over-expression decreases ischemic stroke in mice with Ang II overproduction. Human renin and angiotensinogen double transgenic (RA) mice and RA mice with neuronal over-expression of ACE2 (SARA) were used for the study. The mean arterial pressure (MAP) was calculated from telemetry-recorded blood pressure (BP). SARA mice were infused peripherally with Norepinephrine to "clamp" the BP, or intracerebroventricularly-infused with a Mas receptor antagonist (A-779). Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) surgery was performed to induce permanent focal ischemic stroke. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and neurological function were determined. Two days after surgery, brain samples were collected for various analyses. Results showed: 1) When compared to chronically hypertensive RA mice, SARA mice had lower basal MAP, less MCAO-induced infarct volume, and increased CBF, neurological function and cerebral microvascular density in the peri-infarct area; 2) These changes in SARA mice were not altered after MAP "clamping", but partially reversed by brain infusion of A-779; 3) Ang (1-7)/Ang II ratio, angiogenic factors, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and nitric oxide production were increased, whereas, NADPH oxidase subunits and reactive oxygen species were decreased in the brain of SARA mice. ACE2 protects brain from ischemic injury via the regulation of NADPH oxidase/eNOS pathways by changing Ang (1-7)/Ang II ratio, independently of MAP changes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neuronal replacement therapy: previous achievements and challenges ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grade, Sofia; Götz, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    Lifelong neurogenesis and incorporation of newborn neurons into mature neuronal circuits operates in specialized niches of the mammalian brain and serves as role model for neuronal replacement strategies. However, to which extent can the remaining brain parenchyma, which never incorporates new neurons during the adulthood, be