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Sample records for sarcocystis sp cyst

  1. Accipiter hawks (Accipitridae) confirmed as definitive hosts of Sarcocystis turdusi, Sarcocystis cornixi and Sarcocystis sp. ex Phalacrocorax carbo.

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    Mayr, Sylvia L; Maier, Kristina; Müller, Jana; Enderlein, Dirk; Gruber, Achim D; Lierz, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Sarcocystis is a large genus of protozoan parasites with complex heteroxenous life cycles. For many species, either the intermediate or the definitive host is still unknown. In this study, 116 Accipiter hawks (Eurasian sparrowhawks and northern goshawks) were investigated for the presence of Sarcocystis spp. in their intestinal tract or their faeces. To gain a wide distribution, samples were collected throughout Germany within 2 years. It was possible to detect Sarcocystis-like oocysts in 65 samples. Sequencing of the ITS region or species-specific PCR identified 33 samples as Sarcocystis turdusi/Sarcocystis sp. ex A. nisus (18), Sarcocystis calchasi (6), Sarcocystis columbae (3), Sarcocystis cornixi (3) and Sarcocystis sp. ex Phalacrocorax carbo (3). Besides the known infestation with S. columbae, S. sp. ex A. nisus and S. calchasi the Accipiter hawks were thereby confirmed as definitive host of S. turdusi, S. cornixi and S. sp. ex Phalacrocorax carbo for the first time.

  2. Morphological and molecular characteristics of four Sarcocystis spp. in Canadian moose (Alces alces), including Sarcocystis taeniata n. sp.

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    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2014-04-01

    Individual sarcocysts were isolated from fresh or alcohol-fixed muscle samples of two moose from Alberta, Canada, and examined by light (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular methods, comprising polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the complete18S rRNA gene and the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1). By LM, four sarcocyst types were recognized, and the sequencing results showed that each type represented a distinct species, i.e. Sarcocystis alces, Sarcocystis alceslatrans, Sarcocystis ovalis and Sarcocystis taeniata n. sp. The finding of S. alceslatrans and S. ovalis has been reported briefly previously, but further details are provided here, including the ultrastructure of sarcoysts of S. alceslatrans as seen by SEM. The species S. alces was found for the first time in Canadian moose, whereas the finding of S. taeniata is the first record of this species in any host. The sarcocysts of S. taeniata were sac-like and about 1,000-1,100 × 60-80 μm in size. By LM, the cysts had a thin and smooth wall with no visible protrusions, whereas SEM revealed that the cyst surface had sparsely but regularly distributed, thin ribbon-like protrusions, about 2 μm long and 0.2 μm wide, lying flat against the surface and leaving most of the cyst surface naked. Similar protrusions have previously been reported from Sarcocystis grueneri in reindeer, which was found by sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses to be the species most closely related to S. taeniata. The phylogenetic analyses further suggested that S. taeniata, like S. alces and S. alceslatrans, use canids as definitive hosts, whereas corvid birds are known definitive hosts for S. ovalis. In contrast to the three other species found, S. taeniata displayed considerable intra-specific and intra-isolate sequence variation (substitutions, insertions/deletions) in certain regions of the 18S rRNA gene.

  3. Study of Zoonotic Tissue Parasites (Hydatid Cyst, Fasciola, Dicrocoelium and Sarcocystis in Hamadan Abattoir

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    M. Fallah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: Zoonotic parasites are large groups of zoonoses among which the most important are hydatid cyst, liver trematodes and sarcocystis.These zoonoses are of considerable importance regarding both human health and economy. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of tissue zoonotic parasites and their epidemiologic status in Hamadan and to estimate the health and medical burden they impose on the society.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study, viscera (including liver, lung, kidney, heart,… and muscles of 2590 sheep, 420 cattle, and 490 goats were macroscopically inspected for hydatid cysts, liver flukes, cysticercus , and microscopically (for Sarcocystis in the Hamadan abattoir. The data were presented by descriptive tables and analyzed by 2 statistical test. Results: The infection rate for hydatid cyst, Fasciola, Dicrocoelium and Sarcocystis were found 12.3%, 4.9%, 6.5%, and 5.5% respectively. The high infection rates for hydatid cyst and Fasciola were found in cattle (16.2% and 9.5% and for Dicrocoelium and Sarcocystis were found in sheep (6.9%. Infection rate of lungs was higher (41.2% than liver (36.6% and liver and lung simultaneously were 22.2% in the infected animals. Infection to Sarcocystis and Cysticercus were not found in the cattle. Conclusion: This study indicated that infection rate of tissue zoonotic parasites are relatively high in the domestic animals of Hamadan , however, the rate is lower in comparison to the previous studies. These parasites had imposed considerable economic burden on the society through reduction in the dairy production and increased the risk of infection in the population as well. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2010;17(3: 5-12

  4. Sarcocystis schneideri n. sp. (Sarcocystidae) infecting the barber skink Eumeces schneideri schneideri (Scincidae) Daudin, 1802. A light and ultrastructural study.

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    Bashtar, Abdel-Rahman; Al Aal, Zain Abd; Maarouf, Wael; Morsy, Kareem; Al Quraishy, Saleh

    2014-06-01

    The current study provides the first record of infection with Sarcocystis species in the barber skink Eumeces schneideri schneideri (Scincidae) captured from the north region of Egypt around the cities of El-Hamam and Al-Dabaa, Mersa Matruh Governorate, Egypt. Morphology of the parasite cysts was described using light and transmission electron microscopy. Five out of 80 (6.25%) of the examined skinks were found to be infected. The infection was recorded firstly by light microscopy as spindle-shaped cysts embedded in the muscle tissue. The cysts were microscopic and measured 250-900 μm in length × 50-100 μm in width (mean, 575 × 75 μm). The validity of this species was confirmed by means of ultrastructural characteristics of the primary cyst wall (0.28 μm thick) which revealed the presence of irregularly shaped crowded and osmiophilic knob-like projections underlined by a thin layer of ground substance measuring 0.15-0.17 μm (mean, 0.16 μm). This layer consisted mainly of fine, dense homogenous granules enclosing the developing metrocytes and merozoites that usually contain nearly all the structures of the apical complex and fill the interior cavity of the cyst. Several septa derived from the ground substance divided the cyst into compartments. The merozoites were banana-shaped and measured 3-5 μm in length and 1.5-2.5 in width with centrally or posteriorly located nuclei. The morphological and morphometric data obtained during study were compared with those recorded previously from organisms within the Scincidae family. It was observed that this parasite possessed some distinguishing characteristics from the comparable species, which should be considered as a new species of the Sarcocystis genus, and the proposed name was Sarcocystis schneideri n. sp. with new host and locality records in Egypt.

  5. Ultrastructure of the cysts of Sarcocystis rangi from skeletal muscle of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus

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    Bjørn Gjerde

    1985-05-01

    Full Text Available Mature muscle cysts of Sarcocystis rangi from Rangifer tarandus were examined by transmission electron microscopy. The long and slender cysts were located within skeletal muscle cells, and were bounded by a unit membrane, the cyst membrane. The cysts were provided with closely spaced flexible, hairlike surface processes, measuring up to 12.6 |im in length and 0.3 to 0.6 \\lm in diameter. The projections had a smooth surface, whereas the cyst membrane formed numerous hexagonally packed vesicular invaginations between the bases of the projections. The cyst membrane was reinforced by an underlying thin layer of electron-dense material, except at the points where it was invaginated. Cyst ground substance formed a thin layer at the periphery of the cysts, filled the core of the projections, and formed thin septa that divided the interior of the cysts into numerous compartments. Most compartments contained a large number of tightly packed cystozoites, whereas a few metrocytes were forund in each of a few compartments at the periphery of the cysts. Some of the cystozoites multiplied by endodyogeny. The metrocytes displayed a vacuolation of their cytoplasm. The cysts of S. rangi were similar in surface morphology to the sarcocysts of certain other Sarcocystis species reported from other intermediate hosts.Ultrastrukturen til cyster av Sarcocystis rangi frå skjelettmuskulaturen hos rein.Abstract in Norwegian / Samandrag: Muskelcyster av S. rangi frå rein vart undersøkt ved transmisjonselektronmikroskopi. Dei lange cystene låg intracellulært i skjelettmuskelceller, og var avgrensa av ein elementærmembran, cystemembranen. Cystene var utstyrt med talrike hårliknande overflateprosessar, som strekte seg langsetter cysteoverflata. Prcsessane var opptil 12.6 Hm lange, og målte 0.3 til 0.6 \\lm i diameter. Prosessane hadde ei glatt overflate, medan cystemembranen danna talrike regelmessige ordna, små invaginasjonar innimellom basis av prosessane

  6. Aborto ovino associado com infecção por Sarcocystis sp Ovine abortion associated with Sarcocystis sp. infection

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    Caroline A. Pescador

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Infecções por protozoários têm distribuição mundial e podem causar aborto, nascimentos prematuros e ou morte fetal em diversas espécies animais. Em julho de 2004, oito ovinos Corriedale apresentaram problemas reprodutivos caracterizados por aborto e natimortalidade no terço final da gestação. Dessas oito perdas, um natimorto macho foi enviado ao Setor de Patologia Veterinária para necropsia. Alterações macroscópicas não foram observadas durante a necropsia. Lesões histológicas foram observadas principalmente no cérebro e coração e se caracterizaram por encefalite não-supurativa multifocal acentuada associada à presença de protozoários no interior de células endoteliais e vasos sanguíneos e miocardite não-supurativa focal leve. Alguns desses organismos apresentaram formato de roseta. O teste de imunoistoquímica anti-Toxoplasma gondii foi negativo, mas houve reação cruzada com anticorpo anti-Neospora caninum. O exame de imunofluorescência direta para Leptospira sp. foi negativo. A bacteriologia aeróbica e micro-aeróbica não revelou crescimento significativo. Esses achados foram compatíveis com o diagnóstico de Sarcocystis sp.Protozoal infection has worldwide distribution and may cause abortion, premature parturition or fetal death in almost all domestic animals. In July 2004, eight Corriedale sheep showed abortion and stillbirth in the third trimester of gestation. Of these reproductive losses, one stillborn male was submitted to the Laboratory of Veterinary Pathology for necropsy investigation. The direct immunofluorescence test for Leptospira sp. was negative. No significant bacteria was isolated from lung and liver by aerobic and microaerobic cultures. Macroscopic lesions were not found in any fetal tissue. The histological lesions were observed mainly in the brain and heart and consisted primarily of severe multifocal nonsupurative encephalitis and nonsuppurative myocarditis. Schizonts of a protozoan

  7. Sarcocystis masoni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae), and redescription of Sarcocystis aucheniae from llama (Lama glama), guanaco (Lama guanicoe) and alpaca (Vicugna pacos).

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    Moré, Gastón; Regensburger, Cristian; Gos, M Laura; Pardini, Lais; Verma, Shiv K; Ctibor, Juliana; Serrano-Martínez, Marcos Enrique; Dubey, Jitender P; Venturini, M Cecilia

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable confusion concerning the species of Sarcocystis in South American camelids (SAC). Several species names have been used; however, proper descriptions are lacking. In the present paper, we redescribe the macroscopic sarcocyst forming Sarcocystis aucheniae and describe and propose a new name, Sarcocystis masoni for the microscopic sarcocyst forming species. Muscles samples were obtained from llamas (Lama glama) and guanacos (Lama guanicoe) from Argentina and from alpacas (Vicugna pacos) and llamas from Peru. Individual sarcocysts were processed by optical and electron microscopy, and molecular studies. Microscopic sarcocysts of S. masoni were up to 800 µm long and 35-95 µm wide, the sarcocyst wall was 2·5-3·5 µm thick, and had conical to cylindrical villar protrusions (vp) with several microtubules. Each vp had 11 or more rows of knob-like projections. Seven 18S rRNA gene sequences obtained from sarcocysts revealed 95-96% identity with other Sarcocystis spp. sequences reported in the GenBank. Sarcocysts of S. aucheniae were macroscopic, up to 1·2 cm long and surrounded by a dense and laminar 50 µm thick secondary cyst wall. The sarcocyst wall was up to 10 µm thick, and had branched vp, appearing like cauliflower. Comparison of the 11 sequences obtained from individual macroscopic cysts evidenced a 98-99% of sequence homology with other S. aucheniae sequences. In conclusion, 2 morphologically and molecularly different Sarcocystis species, S. masoni (microscopic cysts) and S. aucheniae (macroscopic cysts), were identified affecting different SAC from Argentina and Peru.

  8. Sarcocystis canis n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae), the etiologic agent of generalized coccidiosis in dogs.

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    Dubey, J P; Speer, C A

    1991-08-01

    Sarcocystis canis n. sp. is proposed for the protozoon associated with encephalitis, hepatitis, and generalized coccidiosis in dogs. Only asexual stages are known in macrophages, neurons, dermal, and other cells of the body. The parasite is located free in the host cell cytoplasm without a parasitophorous vacuole; schizonts divide by endopolygeny. Schizonts are 5-25 x 4-20 microns and contain 6-40 merozoites. Merozoites are approximately 5-7 microns x 1 micron and do not contain rhoptries. The parasite is PAS-negative and reacts with Sarcocystis cruzi antiserum but not with Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, or Caryospora bigenetica antisera in an immunohistochemical test.

  9. Sarcocystis chloropusae (protozoa: Sarcocystidae) n. sp. from the common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) from Egypt.

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    El-Morsey, A; El-Seify, M; Desouky, A Y; Abdel-Aziz, M M; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2015-07-01

    A new name Sarcocystis chloropusae is proposed for a parasite previously found in two of 25 common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) from Brolos Lake, Egypt. Sarcocysts were microscopic, up to 650 μm long, the cyst wall was up to 4.5 μm thick, and contained villar protrusions that were up to 4 μm long and up to 2 μm wide. The villar protrusions were crowded, contained vesicles but lacked microtubules. The ground substance layer was smooth. The bradyzoites were up to 12 μm long and up to 2 μm wide. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the (ITS-1) supported the conclusion that the Sarcocystis in G. chloropus is a distinct species.

  10. Morphologic identification of a new Sarcocystis sp. in the common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus ) (Aves: Gruiformes: Rallidae) from Brolos Lake, Egypt.

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    El-Morsey, Ahmed; El-Seify, Mahmoud; Desouky, Abdel-Razik Y; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed M; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis species are among the most common and widespread protozoan parasites of mammals and birds. The current study provides the first record of infection with Sarcocystis species in the common moorhens from Brolos Lake, KafrElsheikh province, Egypt. Morphology of the parasite cysts was described using light and transmission electron microscopy. Out of 25 examined birds, sarcocysts were found in neck, thigh, and legs muscles of two birds. The cysts were microscopic and measured 150-650 μm in length×45-185 μm in width. Histologically, the sarcocyst wall appeared striated and characterized by the presence of radial spines. Ultrastructurally, it measured 2-4.5 μm in thickness and had irregularly shaped crowded finger-like villar protrusions that measured 1.5-4 μm in length and up to 0.4-2 μm in width with the presence of dense electron ground substance of 200-750 nm thick. Several septa derived from the ground substance were present and divided the cyst into compartments containing both bradyzoites and metrocytes. The bradyzoites were banana-shaped and measured 6-12 × 1-2 μm with centrally or posteriorly located nuclei. The ultrastructural features of the cyst wall belonged to type 10 cyst wall according the classification of Dubey et al. (1989) and Dubey and Odening (2001).

  11. Ultrastructural and molecular confirmation of the development of Sarcocystis neurona tissue cysts in the central nervous system of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

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    Miller, M A; Barr, B C; Nordhausen, R; James, E R; Magargal, S L; Murray, M; Conrad, P A; Toy-Choutka, S; Jessup, D A; Grigg, M E

    2009-10-01

    In 2004, three wild sea otters were diagnosed with putative Sarcocystis neurona-associated meningoencephalitis by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Schizonts, free merozoites and tissue cysts were observed in the brains of all three infected animals. Tissue cysts walls from sea otter 1 (SO1) stained positively using anti-S. neurona polyclonal antiserum. However, positive staining does not preclude infection by closely related or cross-reactive tissue cyst-forming coccidian parasites. Two immature tissue cysts in the brain of SO1 were examined using transmission electron microscopy. Ultrastructural features included cyst walls with thin villous projections up to 1 microm long with tapered ends and a distinctive, electron-dense outer lining layer composed of linearly-arranged, semi-circular structures with a "hobnailed" surface contour. Small numbers of microtubules extended down through the villi into the underlying granular layer. Metrocytes were short and plump with an anterior apical complex, 22 sub-pellicular microtubules, numerous free ribosomes and no rhoptries. Some metrocytes appeared to be dividing, with two adjacent nuclear profiles. Collectively these ultrastructural features were compatible with developing protozoal cysts and were similar to prior descriptions of S. neurona tissue cysts. Panspecific 18S rDNA primers were utilized to identify protozoa infecting the brains of these otters and DNA amplification and additional sequencing at the ITS1 locus confirmed that all three otters were infected with S. neurona. No other Sarcocystis spp. were detected in the brains or skeletal muscles of these animals by immunohistochemistry or PCR. We believe this is the first ultrastructural and molecular confirmation of the development of S. neurona tissue cysts in the CNS of any animal.

  12. Sarcocystis heydorni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) with cattle (Bos taurus) and human (Homo sapiens) cycle.

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    Dubey, Jitender P; van Wilpe, Erna; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Fayer, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Cattle (Bos taurus) are intermediate hosts for four species of Sarcocystis, namely Sarcocystis cruzi, Sarcocystis hirsuta, Sarcocystis hominis, and Sarcocystis rommeli. Of these four species, mature sarcocysts of S. cruzi are thin-walled (<1 μm), whereas S. hirsuta, S. hominis, and S. rommeli have thick walls (4 μm or more). Here, we describe a new species of Sarcocystis with thin-walled sarcocysts in cattle. Two newborn calves were fed with sporocysts from the feces of a human volunteer who had ingested raw beef. The calves were killed 111 and 222 days later. In addition to thick-walled sarcocysts of S. hominis, both calves were coinfected with a Sarcocystis species that had a thin-walled sarcocysts, distinct from S. cruzi. The sarcocysts were mature, microscopic, up to 80 μm wide, and up to 1060 μm long. By light microscopy, the sarcocyst wall was thin (<1 μm thick) and had minute protrusions. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall had short, conical villar protrusions (vp) that were up to 0.5 μm long and up to 0.5 μm wide, similar to type 29. The vp on the sarcocyst wall lacked microtubules but had six or more disc-shaped plaques. The ground substance layer was smooth, approximately 0.5 μm thick, and without microtubules. The bradyzoites were 8-11 μm long. The structure of the sarcocyst wall was distinct from any species of Sarcocystis reported from livestock. This unique species is named in honor of Dr. Alfred Otto Heydorn who provided the sporocysts.

  13. Cyst wall ultrastructure of two Sarcocystis spp. from European mouflon (Ovis ammon musimon) in Germany compared with domestic sheep.

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    Odening, K; Stolte, M; Walter, G; Bockhardt, I

    1995-10-01

    Muscle samples from six wild and two captive European mouflons (Ovis ammon musimon) in Germany as well as one domestic sheep from a German zoo were infected with sarcocysts (Sarcocystis: Sarcocystidae, Apicomplexa). Sarcocystis tenella and S. arieticanis were identified by light and electron microscopy. Both species are determined for the first time from wild sheep, and this is the first description of S. arieticanis from wild sheep.

  14. A review of Sarcocystis of domestic animals and of other coccidia of cats and dogs.

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    Dubey, J P

    1976-11-15

    The nomenclature, life cycles, and pathogenicity of Sarcocystis of domestic animals are reviewed. Sarcocystis had a 2-host life cycle, with carnivores as definitive hosts and herbivores as intermediate hosts. The following species are found in domestic animals (with the definitive hosts given in parentheses): 3 species in the ox: S cruzi (dog, wolf, coyote, raccoon, fox), S hirsuta (cat), S hominis (man, monkey); 2 species in the sheep: S ovicanis (dog), S tenella (cat); 3 species in the pig: S miescheriana (dog), S porcifelis n sp (cat), S porcihominis n sp (man); and 1 species in the horse: S bertrami (dog). Sarcocystis cruzi, S ovicanis, and S porcifelis are highly pathogenic to the ox, the sheep, and the pig, respectively. Clinical signs of acute bovine sarcocystosis are: anorexia, pyrexia (42 C, or more), anemia, cachexia, enlarged palpable lymph nodes, excessive salivation, and loss of hair at the tip of the tail. Anemia, anorexia, ataxia, and abortions are the chief clinical signs of acute ovine sarcocystosis. These signs are evident at the time of vascular endothelium is parasitized by schizonts. The schizonts disappear in about 1 month, and cysts are formed in the muscles. The cystic phase of sarcocystosis is virtually nonpathogenic. Carnivores shed sporocysts in their feces after ingesting the intramuscular cysts from the herbivores. Sarcocystis is nonpathogenic to the definitive host. Feline and canine coccidia are also reviewed. The following 11 species are found in cats: Toxoplasma gondii, Hammondia hammondi, Isospora felis, Isosporarivolta, Besnoitia besnoiti, Besnoitia sp, and 5 types of Sarcocystis (S hirsuta from the ox, S tenella from the sheep, S muris from the mouse, S porcifelis from the pig, and Sarcocystis sp from Grant's gazelle). The following 10 species are found in canine feces (Isospora canis, Isospora ohioensis, Isospora wallacei n sp; and 7 types of Sarcocystis (S cruzi from the ox, S ovicanis from the sheep, S bertrami and Sarcocystis

  15. Sarcocystis heydorni, n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Protozoa) with cattle (Bos taurus) and human (Homo sapiens) cycle

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    Cattle (Bos taurus) are intermediate hosts for four species of Sarcocystis, S. cruzi, S. hirsuta, S. hominis, and S. rommeli. Of these four species, mature sarcocysts of S. cruzi are thin-walled (< 1µm) whereas S. hirsuta, S. hominis, and S. rommeli have thick walls (4 µm or more). Here we describe ...

  16. A report of intestinal sarcocystosis in the bullsnake (Pituophis melanoleucus sayi) and a re-evaluation of Sarcocystis sp. from snakes of the genus Pituophis.

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    Daszak, P; Cunningham, A

    1995-07-01

    We report a severe enteric infection of Sarcocystis sp. from a wild-caught bullsnake (Pituophis melanoleucus sayi). The animal was collected in October 1988 by a commercial dealer, imported into the United Kingdom during November 1988 and purchased by the London Zoo, in December 1988. The animal was not fed after capture and was anorexic from the time of purchase to the time of death in January 1989. On necropsy, the animal was emaciated and the mucosa of the proximal intestine was markedly thickened. The lamina propria was packed with oocysts, and enterocytes were parasitized by an organism which closely resembled Sarcocystis roudabushi and Sarcocystis idahoensis, two bisporocystid coccidia described previously from Pituophis melanoleucus. We propose that Sarcocystis idahoensis and Sarcocystis roudabushi are synonymous since both occur in the same host species, both invade the intestinal lamina propria and entreocytes, and sporocyst measurement ranges of both species overlap. This is the first report of death believed to be due to sarcocytosis in a naturally-infected definitive host.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of Sarcocystis neurona of horses and opossums to other cyst-forming coccidia deduced from SSU rRNA gene sequences.

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    Elsheikha, Hany M; Lacher, David W; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of the nuclear-encoded small subunit rRNA (ssurRNA) gene were performed to examine the origin, phylogeny, and biogeographic relationships of Sarcocystis neurona isolates from opossums and horses from the State of Michigan, USA, in relation to other cyst-forming coccidia. A total of 31 taxa representing all recognized subfamilies and genera of Sarcocystidae were included in the analyses with clonal isolates of two opossum and two horse S. neurona. Phylogenies obtained by the four tree-building methods were consistent with the classical taxonomy based on morphological criteria. The "isosporid" coccidia Neospora, Toxoplasma, Besnoitia, Isospora lacking stieda bodies, and Hyaloklossia formed a sister group to the Sarcocystis spp. Sarcocystis species were divided into three main lineages; S. neurona isolates were located in the second lineage and clustered with S. mucosa, S. dispersa, S. lacertae, S. rodentifelis, S. muris, and Frenkelia spp. Alignment of S. neurona SSU rRNA gene sequences of Michigan opossum isolates (MIOP5, MIOP20) and a S. neurona Michigan horse isolate (MIH8) showed 100% identity. These Michigan isolates differed in 2/1085 bp (0.2%) from a Kentucky S. neurona horse isolate (SN5). Additionally, S. neurona isolates from horses and opossums were identical based on the ultrastructural features and PCR-RFLP analyses thus forming a phylogenetically indistinct group in these regions. These findings revealed the concordance between the morphological and molecular data and confirmed that S. neurona from opossums and horses originated from the same phylogenetic origin.

  18. Ascoaphaera osmophila sp.nov. An Australian Spore Cyst

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    Skou, Jens-Peder; King, , J.

    1984-01-01

    Ascosphaera osmophila sp. nov. is described. Septa occur often close together and remain intact when the mycelium disintegrates. A fairly good production of mature spore cysts occurs only on media containing 10% sugar or more. A. osmophila lives in association with the mason bee, Chalicodoma...

  19. Experimental inoculation of domestic cats (Felis domesticus) with Sarcocystis neurona or S. neurona-like merozoites.

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    Butcher, M; Lakritz, J; Halaney, A; Branson, K; Gupta, G D; Kreeger, J; Marsh, A E

    2002-07-29

    Sarcocystis neurona is the parasite most commonly associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Recently, cats (Felis domesticus) have been demonstrated to be an experimental intermediate host in the life cycle of S. neurona. This study was performed to determine if cats experimentally inoculated with culture-derived S. neurona merozoites develop tissue sarcocysts infectious to opossums (Didelphis virginiana), the definitive host of S. neurona. Four cats were inoculated with S. neurona or S. neurona-like merozoites and all developed antibodies reacting to S. neurona merozoite antigens, but tissue sarcocysts were detected in only two cats. Muscle tissues from the experimentally inoculated cats with and without detectable sarcocysts were fed to laboratory-reared opossums. Sporocysts were detected in gastrointestinal (GI) scrapings of one opossum fed experimentally infected feline tissues. The study results suggest that cats can develop tissue cysts following inoculation with culture-derived Sarcocystis sp. merozoites in which the particular isolate was originally derived from a naturally infected cat with tissue sarcocysts. This is in contrast to cats which did not develop tissue cysts when inoculated with S. neurona merozoites originally derived from a horse with EPM. These results indicate present biological differences between the culture-derived merozoites of two Sarcocystis isolates, Sn-UCD 1 and Sn-Mucat 2.

  20. Blastocystis sp. in splenic cysts: causative agent or accidental association? A unique case report.

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    Santos, Helena Lúcia Carneiro; Sodré, Fernando Campos; de Macedo, Heloisa Werneck

    2014-04-29

    Blastocystis sp. is one of the most prevalent parasites found in human stool and has been recently considered an opportunistic emerging pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. However, cases of invasive intestinal infections and skin rashes have been attributed to infection by Blastocystis sp in immunocompetent individuals, suggesting that it is an emerging parasite with pathogenic potential. We present a case of a 22 year old female patient who complained of pain in the left hypochondrium. Ultrasonography and abdominal computed tomography scans showed two splenic cysts. The cyst fluid analysis demonstrated numerous Blastocystis sp.; PCR and DNA sequencing analyses confirmed the presence of Blastocystis subtype 3. This is, to our knowledge, the first case report of the presence of Blastocystis subtype 3 in extra-intestinal organs and is strong evidence that Blastocystis sp. is potentially pathogenic and invasive. However, further studies are required to determine the pathogenicity of the parasite.

  1. Cysts

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    ... else in your body, a cyst in the brain is a tumor-like sphere filled with fluid—much like a balloon filled ... areas between layers of the covering of the brain. Colloid Cysts tend to ... tumor-like spheres. Symptoms Symptoms depend on the size and location ...

  2. Morphology and phylogeny of Pentapharsodinium jinhaense sp. nov. (Dinophyceae) producing a calcareous resting cyst

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    Shin, H. H.; LI, Z.; Youn, J. Y.; Kim, E. S.

    2016-02-01

    A new species, Pentapharsodinium jinhaense sp. nov., was established by incubating resting cysts, which were collected from trap samples from Jinhae-Masan Bay, Korea. The resting cysts of P. jinhaense were spherical or ovoidal, with a large reddish pigment body and a thick wall covered by numerous needle-shaped calcareous crystals. The size, shape and plate tabulation of motile cells that germinated from the resting cysts were similar to those of Pentapharsodinium tyrrhenicum and Ensiculifera carinata; however, the motile cells had a spine located in the anterior sulcal plate, and many pores and spines on the thecal surface. Molecular phylogenetic analysis using internal transcribed spacer and 5.8s rDNA showed that P. jinhaense was closely related to P. tyrrhenicum. Large subunit ribosomal DNA sequences also revealed that P. jinhaense was nested within Pentapharsodinium and formed a strongly supported clade with P. dalei and P. tyrrhenicum.

  3. Molecular evidence of Sarcocystis species in captive snakes in Japan.

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    Abe, Niichiro; Matsubara, Katsuki; Tamukai, Kenichi; Miwa, Yasutsugu; Takami, Kazutoshi

    2015-08-01

    Sarcocystis nesbitti, using snakes as the definitive host, is a causative agent of acute human muscular sarcocystosis in Malaysia. Therefore, it is important to explore the distribution and prevalence of S. nesbitti in snakes. Nevertheless, epizootiological information of S. nesbitti in snakes remains insufficient because few surveys have assessed Sarcocystis infection in snakes in endemic countries. In Japan, snakes are popular exotic pet animals that are imported from overseas, but the degree of Sarcocystis infection in them remains unclear. The possibility exists that muscular sarcocystosis by S. nesbitti occurs in contact with captive snakes in non-endemic countries. For a total of 125 snake faecal samples from 67 snake species collected at animal hospitals, pet shops and a zoo, this study investigated the presence of Sarcocystis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the 18S ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA). Four (3.2%) faecal samples were positive by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rDNA sequences obtained from four amplification products revealed one isolate from a beauty snake (Elaphe taeniura), Sarcocystis zuoi, which uses rat snakes as the definitive host. The isolate from a Macklot's python (Liasis mackloti) was closely related with unidentified Sarcocystis sp. from reticulated pythons in Malaysia. The remaining two isolates from tree boas (Corallus spp.) were closely related with Sarcocystis lacertae, Sarcocystis gallotiae and unidentified Sarcocystis sp. from smooth snakes, Tenerife lizards and European shrews, respectively. This report is the first of a study examining the distribution of Sarcocystis species in captive snakes in Japan.

  4. Some observations on the growth and cyst production characteristics of the brine shrimp Artemia sp. (Gujarat strain) in pond culture and its potential for import substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan, P.; Krishna Raju, V.; Thaker, S R

    1989-01-01

    Experimental culture of the brine shrimp Artemia sp. (Gujarat strain) and production of cyst is discussed. The qualitative and quantitative aspects of the cyst and its economic potential for import substitution are highlighted.

  5. Sarcocystis spp. in sheep and goats: frequency of infection and species identification by morphological, ultrastructural, and molecular tests in Bahia, Brazil.

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    Bittencourt, Marta Vasconcelos; Meneses, Iris Daniela S; Ribeiro-Andrade, Müller; de Jesus, Rogério Fernando; de Araújo, Flábio Ribeiro; Gondim, Luís F Pita

    2016-04-01

    Sarcocystis spp. are cyst-forming coccidia that infect numerous animals species, including several livestock species. Despite the importance of sheep and goat production in Brazil, little it is known about the Sarcocystis species that infect small ruminants in the country and their potential impact on meat condemnation due to the presence of macroscopic cysts of the parasite. The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of infection by Sarcocystis spp. in goats and sheep intended for human consumption in Bahia State, Brazil, as well as to identify the parasite species in selected samples. The entire tongue, esophagus, and heart were collected from 120 goats and 120 sheep. Tissues were examined for Sarcocystis spp. by macroscopic evaluation, light microscopy, electron microscopy, and molecular tests. Microscopic cysts of Sarcocystis spp. were detected in 95.8 % of sheep and 91.6 % of goats. Using either transmission electron microscopy or partial sequencing of the 18S region of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) for species identification, Sarcocystis tenella and Sarcocystis arieticanis were observed in sheep and Sarcocystis capracanis in goats. Macroscopic cysts were not detected in the analyzed samples. We concluded that goats and sheep destined for human consumption in Bahia possess high frequencies of Sarcocystis infection. Carcass condemnation due to Sarcocystis macrocysts seems to be rare in the studied region. S. arieticanis and S. capracanis were confirmed for the first time by electron microscopy or by molecular tests in small ruminants from Brazil.

  6. Sarcocystis pantherophis, n. sp. from eastern rat snakes (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) definitive hosts and interferongamma gene knockout mice as experimental intermediate hosts

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    Here we report a new species, Sarcocystis pantherophisi with the Eastern rat snake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) as natural definitive host and the interferon gamma gene knockout (KO) mouse as the experimental intermediate host. Sporocysts (n=15) from intestinal contents of the snake were 17.3 x 10....

  7. Survey on Sarcocystis in bovine carcasses slaughtered at the municipal abattoir of El-Kharga, Egypt

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    Ali Meawad Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The main objectives of this study were to determine the incidence of Sarcocystis sp. infection in cattle and buffalo carcasses slaughtered at El-Kharga abattoir, New Valley Governorate, Egypt. Materials and Methods: The slaughtered animals were daily inspected for Sarcocystis macrocysts through a year (2015. Macroscopic Sarcocystis was detected from a total of 2120 cattle and buffalo carcasses. In addition, 100 meat samples were collected from female cattle and buffalo (50 each and were examined microscopically for sarcocystosis. Results: The overall incidence of Sarcocystis macrocyst among bovine carcasses was 159/2120 (7.5%. Total incidence in cattle was 149/2000 (7.45%, whereas it was 10/120 (8.33% in buffalo carcasses. Concerning gender, the overall prevalence of Sarcocystis infection was 127/1790 (7.09% in male and 32/330 (9.69% in females bovine carcasses. The highest detection rate of Sarcocystis lesions was from the esophagus (76.3% followed by throat muscles (35.3%, tongue (33.8%, and diaphragm muscles (18.71%. Macrocysts from cattle were identified to Sarcocystis hirsuta, whereas Sarcocystis fusiformis was identified from buffalo carcasses. By microscopic examination, 18 (36% of 50 female cattle carcasses harbor Sarcocystis sp., whereas 11 (22% of buffalo carcasses were harbored Sarcocystis microcysts. Conclusion: A high incidence of Sarcocystis infection was detected among slaughtered bovines in El-Kharga abattoir, Egypt. Sarcocystis macrocysts were a higher incidence in female elder animals macrocysts were identified to S. hirsuta in cattle and S. fusiformis in buffaloes. Sarcocystosis constitute a major cause of economic losses at El-Kharga abattoir. Beef meat may carry health risks to consumers.

  8. An outbreak of Sarcocystis calchasi encephalitis in multiple psittacine species within an enclosed zoological aviary.

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    Rimoldi, Guillermo; Speer, Brian; Wellehan, James F X; Bradway, Daniel S; Wright, Lewis; Reavill, Drury; Barr, Bradd C; Childress, April; Shivaprasad, H L; Chin, Richard P

    2013-11-01

    A total of 5 psittacine birds in an enclosed zoological exhibit, including 2 princess parrots and 3 cockatoos of 2 different species, developed severe central nervous system clinical signs over a 2-3-month period and died or were euthanized. Histologically, all birds had a lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic encephalitis with intralesional protozoa consistent with a Sarcocystis species in addition to intramuscular tissue sarcocysts. By immunohistochemical staining, merozoites in brain and tissue cysts in muscle did not react with polyclonal antisera against Sarcocystis falcatula, Sarcocystis neurona, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum, or with a monoclonal antibody to S. neurona. Transmission electron microscopy on sarcocyst tissue cyst walls from 2 birds was morphologically consistent with Sarcocystis calchasi. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of partial 18S ribosomal RNA from muscle tissue cysts and brain schizonts from 3 birds was consistent with a clade containing S. calchasi and Sarcocystis columbae but could not distinguish these closely related Sarcocystis species. However, PCR amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer 1 RNA segment in the brain from 2 birds and muscle from 2 birds specifically identified the isolates as S. calchasi. The current report documents that multiple psittacine species are susceptible intermediate hosts of S. calchasi, and that infection can cause encephalitis resulting in significant morbidity and mortality in psittacine aviaries.

  9. Anticestodal Activity of Endophytic Pestalotiopsis sp. on Protoscoleces of Hydatid Cyst Echinococcus granulosus

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    Vijay C. Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery is still the main treatment in hydatidosis caused by Echinococcus, which is a global health problem in human and animals. So, there is need for some natural protoscolicidal agents for instillation to prevent their reoccurrence at therapeutic doses. In this present investigation, anticestodal activity of one of the endophytic fungi Pestalotiopsis sp. from Neem plant was observed on protoscoleces of hydatid cysts of Echinococcus granulosus. Viability of protoscoleces was confirmed by 0.1% aqueous eosin red stain method, where mortality was observed at different concentrations with respect to time. An average anticestodal activity was observed with different endophytic fungal strains, that is, Nigrospora (479 ± 2.9, Colletotrichum (469 ± 25.8, Fusarium (355 ± 14.5, and Chaetomium (332 ± 28.3 showing 64 to 70% protoscolicidal activity, except Pestalotiopsis sp. (581 ± 15.0, which showed promising scolicidal activity up to 97% mortality just within 30 min of incubation. These species showed significant reduction in viability of protoscoleces. This is the first report on the scolicidal activity of endophytic Pestalotiopsis sp. We conclude that ultrastructural changes in protoscoleces were due to endophytic extract suggesting that there may be some bioactive compounds that have selective action on the tegument layer of protoscoleces. As compared with that of standard drug used, endophytic species of Neem plant shows significant anticestodal activity.

  10. Sarcocystis neurona encephalitis in a dog.

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    Cooley, A J; Barr, B; Rejmanek, D

    2007-11-01

    A 1.5-year-old male Feist dog was presented to a veterinarian for reluctance to stand on the hind legs. Treatment included dexamethasone and resulted in a favorable initial response, but posterior paresis returned and progressed to recumbency, hyperesthesia, and attempts to bite the owner. The dog was euthanized. The brain was negative for rabies by fluorescent antibody analysis. Multiple foci of encephalitis were found in the cerebrum and particularly in the cerebellum. Protozoa morphologically consistent with Sarcocystis sp. were identified at sites of intense inflammation and malacia. Additionally, multiple schizonts were identified in areas without inflammation. Immunohistochemistry using both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for Sarcocystis neurona was strongly positive. No reaction to polyclonal antisera for Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum was found. Polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the protozoa were S. neurona. Additional aberrant hosts for S. neurona other than horses have been identified, but S. neurona encephalitis has not been documented previously in the dog.

  11. PSEUDORHOMBODINIUM CINGULOINDENTATUM GEN. ET SP. N. (DINOFLAGELLATA: A NEW ORGANIC WALLED DINOFLAGELLATE CYST FROM THEUPPER EOCENE OF SICILY, ITALY

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    STEFANO TORRICELLI

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The organic walled dinoflagellate cyst Pseudorhombodinium cinguloindentatum gen. et sp. n. is formally described from the Upper Eocene of Sicily, Italy. It consists of a brown coloured, circumcavate wetzelielloid cyst with marked V-shaped cingular indentations in the pericyst. The proposed generic name refers to similarities existing in the overall morphology with the genus Rhombodinium Gocht. However, substantial differences in archeopyle styling, in the disposition of antapical horns, and in the amount of cingular indentation, advocate the erection of the new genus Pseudorhombodinium. 

  12. Developmental biology of Cystoisospora (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) monozoic tissue cysts

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    Tissue cyst stages are an intriguing aspect of the developmental cycle and transmission of members of the Family Sarcocystidae. Tissue cyst stages of the genera Toxoplasma, Hammondia, Neospora, Besnoitia, and Sarcocystis contain many infectious stages (bradyzoites).The tissue cyst stage of Cystoisos...

  13. Sarcocystis in moose (Alces alces): molecular identification and phylogeny of six Sarcocystis species in moose, and a morphological description of three new species.

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    Dahlgren, Stina S; Gjerde, Bjørn

    2008-06-01

    Muscle tissues from 34 moose from Southeastern Norway and two moose from Canada were examined. Sarcocysts were excised and morphologically classified by light microscopy, and some cysts were further examined by scanning electron microscopy or DNA amplification and sequencing at the small subunit (ssu) rRNA gene. In Norwegian moose, three sarcocyst types were recognized, yet five Sarcocystis species were found by sequence analysis. New names were proposed for three species which could be characterised by both morphological and molecular methods, i.e., Sarcocystis alces, Sarcocystis ovalis, and Sarcocystis scandinavica. S. alces was the most prevalent species, whereas S. scandinavica and the two unnamed species were rare and might either use another principal intermediate host or a rare definitive host. The five species in Norwegian moose were different from Sarcocystis alceslatrans isolated from a Canadian moose. Phylogenetic analyses based on complete ssu rRNA gene sequences revealed a close relationship between the six Sarcocystis species from moose and species from reindeer and Sika deer. We conclude that molecular methods are necessary for unequivocal species identification, as different cervid hosts harbour morphologically indistinguishable sarcocysts.

  14. Molecular differentiation of Sarcocystis buffalonis and Sarcocystis levinei in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) from Sarcocystis hirsuta and Sarcocystis cruzi in cattle (Bos taurus).

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    Gjerde, Bjørn; Hilali, Mosaad; Abbas, Ibrahim E

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to obtain sarcocysts of Sarcocystis buffalonis and Sarcocystis levinei from water buffaloes and characterize the isolates by molecular methods in order to determine whether the two species were genetically different from Sarcocystis hirsuta and Sarcocystis cruzi, respectively, from cattle, which had been characterized before. About 35 macroscopically visible (3-4 × 1-2 mm) and 20 barely visible (1-3 × 0.2 mm) sarcocysts were excised from the esophagus of 18 naturally infected and freshly slaughtered adult water buffaloes at three slaughterhouses in Egypt. Genomic DNA was extracted from the sarcocysts, and all isolates were first characterized at the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1) gene through PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Selected isolates were subsequently further characterized at the 18S and 28S ribosomal (r) RNA genes and the internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of the nuclear rDNA unit by direct sequencing or cloning. Only six of the isolated macroscopic sarcocysts belonged to S. buffalonis, whereas the others belonged to Sarcocystis fusiformis. Twelve of the smaller cysts belonged to S. levinei and seven to Sarcocystis sinensis. The characterization of the sarcocysts of S. sinensis and some of the sarcocysts of S. fusiformis have been reported before. Fifteen additional sarcocyst isolates of S. fusiformis were characterized at cox1 in the present study and found to be identical or closely similar to previous isolates. At cox1, the sequence identity between the six isolates of S. buffalonis was 99.8-100 % (two haplotypes), whereas the identity between the 12 isolates of S. levinei was 99.0-100 % (10 haplotypes). The identity between cox1 sequences of S. buffalonis and S. hirsuta (n = 56) was 92.9-93.6 % (on average 93.4 %), and the identity between cox1 sequences of S. levinei and S. cruzi (n = 22) was 92.9-94.0 % (on average 93.5 %). The phylogenetic

  15. Molecular Analysis of Sarcocystis Spp. Isolated from Sheep (Ovis aries in Babol Area, Mazandaran Province, Northern Iran

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    Narges KALANTARI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: To differentiate Sarcocystis macro-cyst-forming species in slaughtered sheep in Babol area, Mazandaran Province, sequence analysis of 18S rRNA gene was performed.Methods: Overall, 150 slaughtered sheep were examined macroscopically in slaughterhouse, Babol and intra-abdominal and diaphragm muscles tissues infected with macro-cyst of Sarcocystis spp. were collected in 2013. One macro-cyst was isolated from the infected muscles of each sheep. The partial 18S rRNA gene was amplified by PCR and sequenced afterward.Results: The rate of infection with macro-cyst producing Sarcocystis spp. was 33.3% (50 / 150. The partial 18S rRNA gene of Sarcocystis species was amplified at the expected PCR product size (~1100 bp from all 50 macroscopic cysts samples. From 30 sequences DNA samples, 20 samples (66.7%, six (20% and four (13.3% isolates were identified as S. gigantea, S. moulei and Sarcocystis spp., respectively. Eight and thirty-four variations in nucleotide position were seen in partial sequence of the18S rRNA gene of S. gigantea and S. moulei.Conclusion: Sheep can be considered as an alternative intermediate host for S. moulei. Furthermore, multiple alignments showed some variations in the consensus sequences of the isolates obtained in the current study compared with previously published isolates. To understand better the genetic diversity among Sarcocystis species complete sequences of the18S rRNA gene or sequence analysis of other genetic loci would be beneficial.

  16. DNA extraction methods and multiple sampling to improve molecular diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. in cattle hearts.

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    Bräunig, Patrícia; Portella, Luiza Pires; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Libardoni, Felipe; Sangioni, Luis Antonio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias

    2016-10-01

    Molecular detection of Sarcocystis spp. in tissue samples can be useful for experimental and diagnostic purposes. However, the parasite spreads unevenly through tissues, forming tissue cysts, and the cystic wall is an obstacle in DNA extraction protocols. Therefore, adequate sampling and effective disruption of the cysts are essential to improve the accuracy of DNA detection by PCR. The aims of this study were to evaluate the suitability of four protocols for DNA extraction from cysts of Sarcocystis spp. present in bovine myocardium samples or after their harvest in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution as well as determine the effects of single or multiple sampling on the accuracy of molecular diagnosis of sarcocystosis in cattle hearts. Cysts and myocardium samples from nine bovine hearts were randomly distributed to four DNA extraction protocols: kit, kit with modification, DNAzol, and cetyl-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). Samples were submitted to DNA extraction and PCR as replicates of each heart (simplicate, duplicate, and triplicate), and the probability of a true positive diagnostic was calculated. Among the protocols tested, the kit with modification was determined to be the most suitable for DNA extraction from cysts in PBS solution (92.6 % of DNA detection by PCR); DNAzol resulted in higher DNA detection frequency from bovine myocardium samples (48.1 %). Multiple sampling improved the molecular diagnosis of Sarcocystis spp. infection in cattle hearts, increasing at 22.2 % the rate of true positive diagnostic.

  17. A CheR/CheB fusion protein is involved in cyst cell development and chemotaxis in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

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    Wu, Lixian; Cui, Yanhua; Hong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Sanfeng

    2011-12-20

    We here report the sequence and functional analysis of cstB of Azospirillum brasilense Sp7. The predicted cstB contains C-terminal two PAS domains and N-terminal part which has similarity with CheB-CheR fusion protein. cstB mutants had reduced swarming ability compared to that of A. brasilense wild-type strain, implying that cstB was involved in chemotaxis in A. brasilense. A microscopic analysis revealed that cstB mutants developed mature cyst cells more quickly than wild type, indicating that cstB is involved in cyst formation. cstB mutants were affected in colony morphology and the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS) which are essential for A. brasilense cells to differentiate into cyst-like forms. These observations suggested that cstB was a multi-effector involved in cyst development and chemotaxis in A. brasilense.

  18. Sarcocystis spp. in llamas (Lama glama) in Southern Bolivia: a cross sectional study of the prevalence, risk factors and loss in income caused by carcass downgrades.

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    Rooney, A L; Limon, G; Vides, H; Cortez, A; Guitian, J

    2014-10-01

    Llamas (Lama glama) are intermediate hosts of the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis spp. This parasite is described as causing economic losses in the production of llama meat in South America. The aim of this study was to estimate prevalence, identify risk factors and explore spatial patterns of Sarcocystis in llamas in an area of the Bolivian High Plateau including estimating financial losses due to carcass downgrades as a result of the presence of Sarcocystis cysts. Information was collected from a local abattoir between 2006 and 2011 on 1196 llamas. Sarcocystis status was determined at meat inspection where any carcasses with one or more visible cysts were deemed Sarcocystis positive. A high prevalence was found, estimated to vary between 23.4% (95% CI 16.6-30.1) in 2007 and 50.3% (95% CI 44.4-56.3) in 2011. Period prevalence between 2006 and 2011 was estimated at 34.1% (95% CI 31.4-36.8). Age, sex and type (analogous to breed) were identified as risk factors for Sarcocystis using a mixed-effects logistic regression model adjusting for clustering by community and owner. Llamas over 4.5 years of age had an increased odds of being Sarcocystis positive (OR 19.31, 95% CI 9.10-40.98) as well as females (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.13-2.68) and long haired type llamas (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.26-2.87). An interaction between age and sex was detected indicating that the increased odds of disease from the youngest age group to the 2.5-4.5 years group was much more pronounced in females than in males. Spatial patterns of Sarcocystis were explored at district level by means of Standardised Morbidity Ratios and some spatial heterogeneity was revealed. Estimates of financial loss due to the disease were calculated using the difference in price paid for Sarcocystis positive and negative meat. Loss due to Sarcocystis varied per year but could be up to 20% of the annual income generated through the abattoir by sale of meat. Overall this study shows a high prevalence of Sarcocystis in the study

  19. Dinoflagellate cysts in recent marine sediment from Guangxi,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haifeng Gu; Qi Fang; Jun Sun; Dongzhao Lan; Feng Cai; Zhiyong Gao

    2003-01-01

    Total of 33 species of dinoflagellate cysts were discovered from surface sediment in the searegion of Guangxi, among them 12 cyst types (Diplopsalopsis sp. 1, D. sp.2, D. sp.3, Cochlodiniumsp., Protoperidinium sp. 1, P. sp. 2, P.compressum, Scrippsiella sp. 1, S. sp. 2, Alexandriumsp. 1, A. sp. 2, A. sp. 3) were first reported from the South China Sea. And one cyst type(Cochlodinium sp. ) was first reported in the world. Scrippsiella trochoidea is the dominant species inthis area, accounting for 45 % of all the cysts. There are 2 cysts of toxic dinoflagellate (Alexandriumtamarensis and Gymnodinium catenatum ). But there is no relationship between cyst number and grainsize distribution.

  20. High prevalence of Sarcocystis calchasi sporocysts in European Accipiter hawks.

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    Olias, Philipp; Olias, Lena; Krücken, Jürgen; Lierz, Michael; Gruber, Achim D

    2011-02-10

    The emerging Sarcocystis calchasi induces a severe and lethal central nervous disease in its intermediate host, the domestic pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica). Experimental studies have identified the Northern goshawk (Accipiter g. gentilis) as final host. Phylogenetically closely related European sparrowhawks (Accipiter n. nisus) and wood pigeons (Columba palumbus) have been found to harbor genetically closely related Sarcocystis spp. However, data on the prevalence and potential interspecies occurrence of these parasites are lacking. Here, we report that European Accipiter hawks (Accipitrinae) are highly infected with S. calchasi, S. columbae and Sarcocystis sp. ex A. nisus in their small intestine. Thirty-one of 50 (62%) Northern goshawks necropsied during 1997-2008 were positive for S. calchasi in a newly established species-specific semi-nested PCR assay based on the first internal transcribed spacer region. Unexpectedly, 14 of 20 (71.4%) European sparrowhawks tested also positive. In addition, birds of both species were found to be infested with S. columbae and an, as yet, unnamed Sarcocystis sp. recently isolated from European sparrowhawks. These findings raise new questions about the host specificity of S. calchasi and its high virulence in domestic pigeons, since sparrowhawks only rarely prey on pigeons. Notably, isolated sporocysts from both infected Accipiter spp. measured 8 μm × 11.9 μm, precluding a preliminary identification of S. calchasi in feces of Accipiter hawks based on morphology alone. Importantly, three of four Northern goshawks used in falconry tested positive for S. calchasi. In conclusion, the results indicate that both European Accipter spp. in Germany serve as natural final hosts of S. calchasi and suggest that falconry and pigeon sport may serve as risk factors for the spread of this pathogen in domestic pigeons.

  1. Parasitemia due to Sarcocystis neurona-like infection in a clinically ill domestic cat.

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    Zitzer, Nina C; Marsh, Antoinette E; Burkhard, Mary Jo; Radin, M Judith; Wellman, Maxey L; Jugan, Maria; Parker, Valerie

    2017-09-11

    An 8-year-old, 6-kg, male neutered Domestic Shorthair cat was presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (OSU-VMC) for difficulty breathing. Physical examination and thoracic radiographs indicated pneumonia, a soft-tissue mass in the left caudal lung lobe, and diffuse pleural effusion. The effusion was classified as modified transudate. Rare extracellular elongated (~5-7 μm × 1-2 μm) zoites with a central round to oval-shaped purple to deep purple vesicular nucleus with coarsely stippled chromatin and light blue cytoplasm were seen on a peripheral blood smear. Serum IgG and IgM were positive for Sarcocystis sp. antibodies and negative for Toxoplasma gondii antibodies, suggesting that the infection was acute rather than a recrudescence of prior infection. This organism was most consistent with either Sarcocystis neurona or Sarcocystis dasypi based on DNA sequence analysis of PCR products using COC ssRNA, ITS-1, snSAG2, and JNB25/JD396 primer sets. This is the first report to visualize by light microscopy circulating Sarcocystis sp. merozoites in the peripheral blood of a domestic cat. Therefore, Sarcocystis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cats with suspected systemic protozoal infection. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  2. Sarcocystis cruzi (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae no cachorro-do-mato (Cerdocyon thous Sarcocystis cruzi (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae in the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous

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    Janaina S. Rodrigues

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Esporocistos de Sarcocystis foram identificados nas amostras fecais de um cachorro-do-mato. Eles foram dados por via oral para um bezerro em aleitamento, sendo observados cistos com morfologia compatível com os de Sarcocystis cruzi na musculatura cardíaca e esquelética, três meses após a infecção. Musculatura cardíaca deste bezerro foi dada para um segundo cão doméstico livre de coccídios, que eliminou esporocistos compatíveis com os de Sarcocystis em suas fezes, tendo com períodos pré-patente e patente 11 e 12 dias após a infecção respectivamente. Para comparar a morfologia dos esporocistos e cistos, um segundo cão, também livre de coccídios, foi alimentado com musculatura cardíaca de um bovino infectando naturalmente e positivo para cistos de S. cruzi. Esporocistos compatíveis com os eliminados pelo primeiro cão foram encontrados nas fezes. Apesar dos esporocistos eliminados pelo cachorro-do-mato serem significativamente diferentes dos eliminados pelos cães infectados experimentalmente, pode se considerar com base na morfologia dos esporocistos, cistos e na transmissão biológica que a espécie encontrada nas fezes do cachorro-do-mato é Sarcocystis cruzi.Sporocysts of Sarcocystis were identified in feces samples of a crab-eating fox, and were orally given to a suckling calf; after 3 months of infection, sarcocysts morphologically similar to Sarcocystis cruzi were observed in cardiac and skeletal striated muscles. The cardiac muscles of this calf were orally given to a puppy free of coccidia, that shed sporocysts in its feces.with a prepatent and patent period of 11 and 12 days after infection, respectively. To compare the morphology of the sporocysts and cysts, a second puppy was fed on bovine cardiac muscles infected naturally, and sporocysts identical to those shed by the first dog were recovered from its feces. In spite of the significant difference between sporocysts found in the mucosa of the crab-eating fox and

  3. Occurrence and Distribution of Sarcocystis Parasite Isolated from Sheep in Yazd Province, Iran

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    Bahador Hajimohammadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sarcocystis species are one of the most important meat borne parasites. Sarcocystosis causes several symptoms in human as well as numerous diseases with high economic impact in livestock. In current paper at first results of a pilot study for determination of disease agent in lamb of Yazd province central Iran is presented. Then status of parasite in red meat products in study region gets discussed. Materials and Methods: Muscles of 70 slaughtered Sheep from both sexes and different ages were investigated for presence of parasite cysts during September to October 2013. Carcass inspection with naked eye at industrial slaughterhouse of Yazd for macroscopic cysts, and pepsin-digestion method for microscopic cysts was performed on common infected sites of infection. Results: No macroscopic cyst was seen at inspection, however bradyzoites of parasite were observed in 97.14% of animals’ digested muscles. No significant difference between infection and age groups or sex of animals was observed. Conclusion: As humans are considered as final and intermediate host of different species of Sarcocystis, and parasite cysts present at microscopic sizes, transmission of infection from lamb meat should come into consideration. Hence public training of disease health importance, parasite cycle and methods of inactivation probable cysts in meat is recommended.

  4. Systems-based analysis of the Sarcocystis neurona genome identifies pathways that contribute to a heteroxenous life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejewski, Tomasz; Nursimulu, Nirvana; Pszenny, Viviana; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Chiasson, Melissa A; Chessman, Kyle; Tonkin, Michelle; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Hung, Stacy S; Bridgers, Joshua; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Boulanger, Martin J; Dubey, Jitender P; Porcella, Stephen F; Kissinger, Jessica C; Howe, Daniel K; Grigg, Michael E; Parkinson, John

    2015-02-10

    Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the coccidia, a clade of single-celled parasites of medical and veterinary importance including Eimeria, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma. Unlike Eimeria, a single-host enteric pathogen, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma are two-host parasites that infect and produce infectious tissue cysts in a wide range of intermediate hosts. As a genus, Sarcocystis is one of the most successful protozoan parasites; all vertebrates, including birds, reptiles, fish, and mammals are hosts to at least one Sarcocystis species. Here we sequenced Sarcocystis neurona, the causal agent of fatal equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. The S. neurona genome is 127 Mbp, more than twice the size of other sequenced coccidian genomes. Comparative analyses identified conservation of the invasion machinery among the coccidia. However, many dense-granule and rhoptry kinase genes, responsible for altering host effector pathways in Toxoplasma and Neospora, are absent from S. neurona. Further, S. neurona has a divergent repertoire of SRS proteins, previously implicated in tissue cyst formation in Toxoplasma. Systems-based analyses identified a series of metabolic innovations, including the ability to exploit alternative sources of energy. Finally, we present an S. neurona model detailing conserved molecular innovations that promote the transition from a purely enteric lifestyle (Eimeria) to a heteroxenous parasite capable of infecting a wide range of intermediate hosts. Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the coccidia, a clade of single-celled apicomplexan parasites responsible for major economic and health care burdens worldwide. A cousin of Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium, Theileria, and Eimeria, Sarcocystis is one of the most successful parasite genera; it is capable of infecting all vertebrates (fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals-including humans). The past decade has witnessed an increasing number of human outbreaks of clinical significance associated with

  5. Developmental biology of Cystoisospora (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) monozoic tissue cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, David S; Houk, Alice E; Mitchell, Sheila M; Dubey, J P

    2014-08-01

    Tissue cyst stages are an intriguing aspect of the developmental cycle and transmission of species of Sarcocystidae. Tissue-cyst stages of Toxoplasma, Hammondia, Neospora, Besnoitia, and Sarcocystis contain many infectious stages (bradyzoites). The tissue cyst stage of Cystoisospora (syn. Isospora) possesses only 1 infectious stage (zoite), and is therefore referred to as a monozoic tissue cyst (MZTC). No tissue cyst stages are presently known for members of Nephroisospora. The present report examines the developmental biology of MZTC stages of Cystoisospora Frenkel, 1977 . These parasites cause intestinal coccidiosis in cats, dogs, pigs, and humans. The MZTC stages of C. belli are believed to be associated with reoccurrence of clinical disease in humans.

  6. Experimental infection of ponies with Sarcocystis fayeri and differentiation from Sarcocystis neurona infections in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saville, W J A; Dubey, J P; Oglesbee, M J; Sofaly, C D; Marsh, A E; Elitsur, E; Vianna, M C; Lindsay, D S; Reed, S M

    2004-12-01

    Sarcocystis neurona and Sarcocystis fayeri infections are common in horses in the Americas. Their antemortem diagnosis is important because the former causes a neurological disorder in horses, whereas the latter is considered nonpathogenic. There is a concern that equine antibodies to S. fayeri might react with S. neurona antigens in diagnostic tests. In this study, 4 ponies without demonstrable serum antibodies to S. neurona by Western immunoblot were used. Three ponies were fed 1 x 10(5) to 1 x 10(7) sporocysts of S. fayeri obtained from dogs that were fed naturally infected horse muscles. All ponies remained asymptomatic until the termination of the experiment, day 79 postinoculation (PI). All serum samples collected were negative for antibodies to S. neurona using the Western blot at the initial screening, just before inoculation with S. fayeri (day 2) and weekly until day 79 PI. Cerebrospinal fluid samples from each pony were negative for S. neurona antibodies. Using the S. neurona agglutination test, antibodies to S. neurona were not detected in 1:25 dilution of sera from any samples, except that from pony no. 4 on day 28; this pony had received 1 X 10(7) sporocysts. Using indirect immunofluorescence antibody tests (IFATs), 7 serum samples were found to be positive for S. neurona antibodies from 1:25 to 1:400 dilutions. Sarcocystis fayeri sarcocysts were found in striated muscles of all inoculated ponies, with heaviest infections in the tongue. All sarcocysts examined histologically appeared to contain only microcytes. Ultrastructurally, S. fayeri sarcocysts could be differentiated from S. neurona sarcocysts by the microtubules (mt) in villar protrusions on sarcocyst walls; in S. fayeri the mt extended from the villar tips to the pellicle of zoites, whereas in S. neurona the mt were restricted to the middle of the cyst wall. Results indicate that horses with S. fayeri infections may be misdiagnosed as being S. neurona infected using IFAT, and further research

  7. Pervasive Environmental Contamination with Human Feces Results in High Prevalence of Zoonotic Sarcocystis Infection in Pigs in the Punjab, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, M; Singh, B B; Sharma, R; Gill, J P S

    2016-04-01

    Three species of Sarcocystis-S. miescheriana, S. suihominis, and S. porcifelis-have been recorded from pigs ( Sus scrofa ). Among these 3 species, the zoonotic species S. suihominis is of paramount importance and an important food safety issue. Previous studies indicate prevalence of porcine Sarcocystis species in India, but molecular evidence, among other evidence, is required for proper species differentiation. Myocardium from 250 stray and farm pigs destined for slaughter for human consumption were collected from slaughter shops located in urban slums in Punjab, northern India. Tissues were examined for Sarcocystis by using an intact cyst isolation method, pepsin acid digestion, Sarcocystis 18S ribosomal RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time quantitative PCR with melting curve analysis (qPCR-MCA). The combination of primers was used for 18S rRNA PCR amplification followed by sequencing. Ten representative samples were sequenced in both the directions from which 7 readable sequences were obtained for phylogenetic analysis. Sarcocystis cysts/zoites were recorded in 146 (58.4%), 169 (67.6%), 182 (72.8%), and 191 (76.4%) of samples by using intact cyst isolation, pepsin HCl digestion, conventional PCR, and qPCR-MCA, respectively. Molecularly, 1 S. miescheriana isolate and 6 isolates of the zoonotic species S. suihominis were recorded. This is the first study providing molecular identification for the presence of zoonotic species S. suihomonis in India. The prevalence of zoonotic S. suihominis in pork in India is worrisome and warrants intervention policies to stop the practice of rearing pigs under unhygienic conditions.

  8. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and the arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) are definitive hosts of Sarcocystis alces and Sarcocystis hjorti from moose (Alces alces).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Stina S; Gjerde, Bjørn

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether foxes might act as definitive hosts of Sarcocystis alces in moose. In 2 experiments, 6 silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 6 blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) were fed muscle tissue from moose containing numerous sarcocysts of S. alces, and euthanazed 7-28 days post-infection (p.i.). Intestinal mucosal scrapings and faecal samples were screened microscopically for Sarcocystis oocysts/sporocysts, which were identified to species by means of species-specific primers and sequence analysis targeting the ssu rRNA gene. All foxes in both experiments became infected with Sarcocystis; the oocysts were fully sporulated by 14 days p.i., containing sporocysts measuring 14-15 x 10 microm. Molecular identification revealed that the oocysts/sporocysts belonged to 2 species, S. alces and Sarcocystis hjorti, although sarcocysts of S. hjorti were only identified in moose subsequent to the infection of foxes. In the first experiment, all 8 foxes also became infected with a Hammondia sp. derived from moose, shedding unsporulated, subspherical oocysts, measuring 10-12 microm in diameter, from 6-7 days p.i. onwards. The study proved that canids (the red fox and arctic fox) are definitive hosts for S. alces and S. hjorti, as had been inferred from the phylogenetic position of these species.

  9. Identification and intraspecific genetic diversity of Sarcocystis rileyi from ducks, Anas spp., in Lithuania and Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakas, P; Oksanen, A; Butkauskas, D; Sruoga, A; Kutkienė, L; Švažas, S; Isomursu, M; Liaugaudaitė, S

    2014-10-01

    Macroscopic Sarcocystis cysts were detected in the muscles of 28 Mallards ( Anas platyrhynchos ), 1 Eurasian Wigeon ( Anas penelope ), and 1 Common Teal ( Anas crecca ) hunted in Lithuania and Finland. According to the sequences of the 18S rRNA gene, 28S rRNA gene, and ITS-1 region, the macrocysts examined from all 30 ducks belonged to Sarcocystis rileyi. This parasite was found in the Eurasian Wigeon and the Common Teal for the first time. All S. rileyi isolates examined were identical to each other and differed from 2 S. rileyi isolates previously reported from 2 Mallards from the United States only by 1 nucleotide substitution within the ITS-1 region.

  10. The resurrection of a species: Sarcocystis bovifelis Heydorn et al., 1975 is distinct from the current Sarcocystis hirsuta in cattle and morphologically indistinguishable from Sarcocystis sinensis in water buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    In the mid-1970s, it was established through transmission experiments and ultrastructural studies of sarcocysts by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that cattle was the intermediate host of three Sarcocystis spp. using dogs, cats and humans, respectively, as definitive hosts. The cat-transmitted species with microscopic sarcocysts was initially named Sarcocystis bovifelis, but it was soon renamed Sarcocystis hirsuta, since it was considered to be identical with a previously named species. In recent years, an apparently new species has been detected in cattle in several countries by molecular methods and TEM and found by both methods to be indistinguishable from Sarcocystis sinensis in water buffaloes. This species was recently named Sarcocystis rommeli. Beginning in August 2014, a thorough review of papers comprising TEM micrographs of thick-walled sarcocysts in cattle was made in order to determine whether S. sinensis-like sarcocysts had been reported previously under other designations. Surprisingly, the review showed that the species S. bovifelis Heydorn et al., 1975 as described from cattle in Germany was S. sinensis-like and that indistinguishable sarcocysts had also been found in cattle in New Zealand and Canada in the 1980s. However, in the New Zealand study, these small sarcocysts were erroneously thought to represent developmental stages of a species with ultrastructurally similar but macroscopic sarcocysts, since the macroscopic cysts were found to be infective for cats. Thus, in the late 1980s, the cat-transmitted S. bovifelis, after having been renamed S. hirsuta, was erroneously synonymised with a second cat-transmitted species in cattle and then slid into obscurity until recently being rediscovered as a S. sinensis-like species in cattle and then named S. rommeli. Following the erroneous synonymisation, the name S. hirsuta has consistently been used for a taxon with macroscopic sarcocysts, and this usage should be continued. The name S. bovifelis

  11. Orthopithonella collaris sp. nov., a new calcareous dinoflagellate cyst from the K/T boundary (Fish Clay, Stevns Klint/Denmark).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, J; Wendler, I; Willems, H

    2001-05-01

    A new calcareous dinoflagellate cyst species, Orthopithonella collaris sp. nov., is described from the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary clay (Fish Clay) of Stevns Klint, Denmark, on the basis of SEM studies and light-microscopic analyses of thin sections of single specimens. The species has been found exclusively in the Fish Clay and as such may be a potential marker for the K/T boundary. Its pulse-like occurrence is thought to be due to the abrupt, relatively short-term ecological catastrophe associated with the K/T boundary event.

  12. Necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by Sarcocystis falcatula in bare-faced ibis (Phimosus infuscatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradt, Guilherme; Bianchi, Matheus Viezzer; Leite-Filho, Ronaldo Viana; da Silva, Bruna Zafalon; Soares, Rodrigo Martins; Pavarini, Saulo Petinatti; Driemeier, David

    2017-02-01

    The infection by S. falcatula is commonly associated with respiratory disease in captive psittacine birds, with a few case reports of this protozoan causing encephalitis in wild birds. We describe the clinical, pathological, and molecular aspects of an infection by S. falcatula in a bare-faced ibis (Phimosus infuscatus). Clinically, wing paralysis and mild motor incoordination were observed. At necropsy, the telencephalic cortex showed multifocal to coalescing yellowish soft areas. Histologically, multifocal to coalescent nonsuppurative necrotizing meningoencephalitis of telencephalic cortex, cerebellum, and brainstem was observed. Necrotic areas showed multiple protozoan organism characteristics of Sarcocystis sp. schizonts in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells or lying free in the neuropil. Partial genetic sequences of the gene encoding cytochrome b (CYTB), the gene encoding the beta subunit of RNA polymerase (RPOB) and the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) from Sarcocystis sp. schizonts revealed that the parasite had ITS-1 sequences that were 100% identical to the homologous alleles from Sarcocystis sp. shed by Didelphis albiventris in Brazil. RPOB and CYTB sequences were 100% identical to homologous of S. falcatula available in Genbank. Thus, this is the first report of necrotizing meningoencephalitis caused by S. falcatula in bare-faced ibis (P. infuscatus).

  13. A Survey on Sarcocystis Infection Rate in Slaughtered Cattle and Sheep by Macroscopic Inspection and Pepsin Digestion Methods in Hamadan Abattoir, Iran, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Parandin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: 130 heteroxenous species of sarcosytis with different life cycle and pathogenesis have been recognized. The pathogenic species for humans are S. hominis from cattle and S. suihominis from pig that humans are definitive and cattle and pig are intermedi-ate hosts. Some species of Sarcocystis can cause important economic loss and disease in livestock, and health issues in humans. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Sarcocystis infection in slaughtered Cattle and sheep in Hamadan, west of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional descriptive study a total of 324 cattle and 334 sheep carcasses were examined using naked eye inspection for macroscopic Sarcocysts, and digestion method, for microscopic types of parasite. Muscles from thigh, heart, tongue, esophagus, diaphragm and costal muscles were examined. All carcasses examined by naked eyes and tissues were minced and poured in digestion medium separately and sediment was examined microscopically. Results: The prevalence of microscopic Sarcocystis in cattle was detected in 100% and there was no macroscopic cyst in examined carcasses. However, the prevalence of microscopic Sarcocystis in the sheep was also 100% and the sarcocysts were found in the 48.34 % of esophagus and 29.49% of diaphragm muscles by naked eyes inspection. Conclusion: The digestion is found the most sensitive method for diagnosis of Sarcocystis. Al-though 100% of muscles were found infected but the majority of the cysts in the sheep and all in the cattle were as microcysts. That means, the meat should be cooked sufficiently irrespec-tive of meat inspection results. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2015; 22 (3: 210-216

  14. A genetically diverse but distinct North American population of Sarcocystis neurona includes an overrepresented clone described by 12 microsatellite alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmundsson, Ingrid M; Dubey, J P; Rosenthal, Benjamin M

    2006-09-01

    The population genetics and systematics of most coccidians remain poorly defined despite their impact on human and veterinary health. Non-recombinant parasite clones characterized by distinct transmission and pathogenesis traits persist in the coccidian Toxoplasma gondii despite opportunities for sexual recombination. In order to determine whether this may be generally true for tissue-cyst forming coccidia, and to address evolutionary and taxonomic problems within the genus Sarcocystis, we characterized polymorphic microsatellite markers in Sarcocystis neurona, the major causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Bayesian statistical modeling, phylogenetic reconstruction based on genotypic chord distances, and analyses of linkage disequilibrium were employed to examine the population structure within S. neurona and closely related Sarcocystis falcatula isolates from North and South America. North American S. neurona were clearly differentiated from those of South America and also from isolates of S. falcatula. Although S. neurona is characterized by substantial allelic and genotypic diversity typical of interbreeding populations, one genotype occurs with significantly excessive frequency; thus, some degree of asexual propagation of S. neurona clones may naturally occur. Finally, S. neurona isolated from disparate North American localities and diverse hosts (opossums, a Southern sea otter, and horses) comprise a single genetic population. Isolates associated with clinical neurological disease bear no obvious distinction as measured by these presumably neutral genetic markers.

  15. Genetic assemblage of Sarcocystis spp. in Malaysian snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Sarcocystis species are protozoan parasites with a wide host range including snakes. Although there were several reports of Sarcocytis species in snakes, their distribution and prevalence are still not fully explored. Methods In this study, fecal specimens of several snake species in Malaysia were examined for the presence of Sarcocystis by PCR of 18S rDNA sequence. Microscopy examination of the fecal specimens for sporocysts was not carried as it was difficult to determine the species of the infecting Sarcocystis. Results Of the 28 snake fecal specimens, 7 were positive by PCR. BLASTn and phylogenetic analyses of the amplified 18S rDNA sequences revealed the snakes were infected with either S. nesbitti, S. singaporensis, S. zuoi or undefined Sarcocystis species. Conclusion This study is the first to report Sarcocystis infection in a cobra, and S. nesbitti in a reticulated python. PMID:24010903

  16. Renal Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as “simple” cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and contain water-like fluid. Renal cysts are fairly common in ... simple kidney cysts, meaning they have a thin wall and only water-like fluid inside. They are fairly common in ...

  17. Vaginal cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cysts URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001509.htm Vaginal cysts To use the sharing ... may need a biopsy to rule out vaginal cancer, especially if the mass appears to be solid. If the cyst is located under the bladder or urethra, x-rays may be needed to see if ...

  18. Baker cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popliteal cyst; Bulge-knee ... A Baker cyst is caused by swelling in the knee. The swelling is due to an increase in the fluid that ... squeezes into the back of the knee. Baker cyst commonly occurs with: A tear in the meniscal ...

  19. Gymnodinium corollarium sp. nov. (Dinophyceae) - a new cold-water dinoflagellate responsible for cyst sedimentation events in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundström, Annica; Kremp, Anke; Daugbjerg, Niels;

    2009-01-01

    unidentified cyst type commonly found in sediment trap samples collected from the northern and central open Baltic Sea. Based on LSU rDNA comparison, these cysts were assigned to G. corollarium. The cysts have been observed in many parts of the Baltic Sea, indicating the ecologic versatility of the species...... revealed a preference of G. corollarium for low salinities and temperatures, confirming it to be a cold-water species well adapted to the brackish water conditions in the Baltic Sea. At nitrogen-deplete conditions, G. corollarium cultures produced small, slightly oval cysts resembling a previously...

  20. Ultrastructural studies of sarcocystis cruzi (Hasselmann,1926 Wenyon, 1926 infection in cattle (Bos Taurus: Philippine cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claveria F.G

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper documents the first report of Sarcocysli s cruzi infection in domesticated cattle (Bos taurus in the Philippines. Fusiformshaped microscopic sarcocysts (183-578 μm long and 20-98 μm wide with distinct septae were found in the skeletal, striated and heart muscle. The sarcocyst wall or parasitophorous vacuolar membrane, 1.37-2.75 μm thick consisted of closely-packed villar protrusions 80-400 nm in dm. Middle and distal segments of VP were bent approximately 90 degrees parallel to the cyst wall surface. The villar core lacked microtubules, and at some points, the distal ends of the VP collectively formed conical tufts. Primary cyst wall had numerous 70-100 nm bubble-like undulations, and the ground substance was 0.25-0.5 μm in thickness. The ultrastructure of S. cruzi cyst wall typifies the Type 7 sarcocyst wall, and bears close similarities with the Philippine and the Vietnam strain of bubaline Sarcocystis levinei.

  1. Occurrence and first molecular characterization of Sarcocystis spp. in wild boars (Sus scrofa) and domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus) in Romania: Public health significance of the isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imre, Kálmán; Sala, Claudia; Morar, Adriana; Imre, Mirela; Ciontu, Cătălin; Chisăliță, Ion; Dudu, Andreea; Matei, Marius; Dărăbuș, Gheorghe

    2017-03-01

    Domestic and wild pigs, as intermediate hosts, can harbor tissue cysts of three Sarcocystis species namely S. miescheriana, S. suihominis and S. porcifelis. Out of them, S. suihominis is zoonotic. Romania is a country with high consumption of raw and/or undercooked traditional pork products. This fact may greatly favor the acquiring of the zoonotic Sarcocystis infections by humans, as definitive host. Based on this consideration and in order to investigate the occurrence and public health significance of Sarcocystis spp. in two western counties (Caraş-Severin and Timiş) of Romania, a total of 165 heart samples from hunted wild boars (Sus scrofa, n=101) and home slaughtered domestic pigs (Sus scrofa domesticus, n=64) were screened using microscopic fresh examination and molecular methods. Microscopic examination revealed the presence of sarcocysts in 60.4% of wild boars, and 23.4% of domestic pigs. Genetic characterization of isolates through the PCR-RFLP procedure, targeting the 18S rRNA gene, was successfully achieved for all microscopically positive samples, indicating the presence of a single species, S. miescheriana, in both hosts. The identity of 13 selected S. miescheriana isolates was also confirmed through sequencing. The tested hosts older than 27 months were found to be significantly higher infected (p<0.05) with Sarcocystis than the 6 to ≤27months age group. Although the human infective S. suihominis has not been registered, for a more reliable epidemiological picture, further molecular studies enrolling a larger number of animals and diagnosis on human intestinal Sarcocystis infections are still necessary.

  2. A review of Sarcocystis spp. shed by opossums (Didelphis spp. in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Yuri Oshiro Branco Valadas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available South American opossums are the definitive hosts of Sarcocystis neurona, Sarcocystis falcatula, Sarcocystis speeri and Sarcocystis lindsayi. The sporocysts of these species of Sarcocystis are morphologically similar and methods like infectivity and pathogenicity for intermediate hosts (immunodeficient mice and psittacine birds and molecular tools are used for identification. Opossums are synanthropic wild animals, and widely distributed in Brazilian territory. Previous studies have shown high environmental contamination with S. neurona sporocysts in several Brazilian regions. This paper reviews information on Sarcocystis spp. shed by various opossum species and its occurrence in Brazil.

  3. Exposure to Sarcocystis spp. in horses from Spain determined by Western blot analysis using Sarcocystis neurona merozoites as heterologous antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, M; Yeargan, M; Francisco, I; Dangoudoubiyam, S; Becerra, P; Francisco, R; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Paz-Silva, A; Howe, D K

    2012-04-30

    Horses serve as an intermediate host for several species of Sarcocystis, all of which utilize canids as the definitive host. Sarcocystis spp. infection and formation of latent sarcocysts in horses often appears to be subclinical, but morbidity can occur, especially when the parasite burden is large. A serological survey was conducted to determine the presence of antibodies against Sarcocystis spp. in seemingly healthy horses from the Galicia region of Spain. Western blot analyses using Sarcocystis neurona merozoites as heterologous antigen suggested greater than 80% seroprevalance of Sarcocystis spp. in a sample set of 138 horses. The serum samples were further tested with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on recombinant S. neurona-specific surface antigens (rSnSAGs). As expected for horses from the Eastern Hemisphere, less than 4% of the serum samples were positive when analyzed with either the rSnSAG2 or the rSnSAG4/3 ELISAs. An additional 246 horses were tested using the rSnSAG2 ELISA, which revealed that less than 3% of the 384 samples were seropositive. Collectively, the results of this serologic study suggested that a large proportion of horses from this region of Spain are exposed to Sarcocystis spp. Furthermore, the anti-Sarcocystis seroreactivity in these European horses could be clearly distinguished from anti-S. neurona antibodies using the rSnSAG2 and rSnSAG4/3 ELISAs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Adrenal cysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Ture cysts of the adrenal gland are lined with endothelium or epithe lium.Most lesions are asympomatic and are discovered incidentally.They may produce s ymptoms because of hemorrhage.CT findings of cysts include(Fig 1): ① Cyst are well-marginated, nonenhancing, homogeneous, fluid-cont aining masses; ② The wall may have thin peripheral calcification if previous hemor rhage has occurred.③ Cyst contents have characteristics of simple fluids(<20 HU)unle ss hemorrhage has occurred.

  5. Ovarian Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the-counter medicine or prescribe stronger medicine for pain relief. Prescribe hormonal birth control if you have cysts often. Hormonal birth ... the-counter medicine or prescribe stronger medicine for pain relief. Prescribe hormonal birth control if you have cysts often. Hormonal birth ...

  6. Ultrastructure of Sarcocystis bertrami sarcocysts from naturally infected donkey (Equus asinus) from Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is considerable confusion concerning Sarcocystis species in equids. Little is known of Sarcocystis infections in donkeys (Equus asinus). Here we describe the structure of Sarcocystis bertrami-like from the donkey by light and transmission electron microscopy (LM, TEM). Nineteen sarcocysts fro...

  7. Baker's Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a cartilage tear is causing the overproduction of synovial fluid, he or she may recommend surgery to remove or repair the torn cartilage. Baker's cysts associated with osteoarthritis usually improve with treatment of the arthritis. Surgical intervention is rarely needed. ...

  8. Arachnoid Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rare Disorders (NORD) See all related organizations Publications Quistes aracnoideos Patient Organizations National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) See all related organizations Publications Quistes aracnoideos Definition Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid-filled ...

  9. Kidney Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluid-filled sac. There are two types of kidney cysts. Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) runs in families. In PKD, the ... place of the normal tissue. They enlarge the kidneys and make them work poorly, leading to kidney ...

  10. Clinical Sarcocystis neurona, Sarcocystis canis, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum infections in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Chapman, Jennifer L; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Mense, M; Schueler, Ronald L

    2006-04-15

    Sarcocystis neurona, Sarcocystis canis, Toxoplasma gondii, and Neospora caninum are related apicomplexans that can cause systemic illness in many species of animals, including dogs. We investigated one breeder's 25 Basset Hounds for these infections. In addition, tissues from dogs and other non-canine hosts previously reported as S. canis infections were studied retrospectively. Schizonts resembling those of S. neurona, and recognized by polyclonal rabbit anti-S. neurona antibodies, were found in six of eight retrospective cases, as well as in two additional dogs (one Basset Hound, one Springer Spaniel) not previously reported. S. neurona schizonts were found in several tissues including the central nervous system, lungs, and kidneys. Fatal toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in an adult dog, and neosporosis was diagnosed in an adult and a pup related to the one diagnosed with S. neurona. No serological reactivity to S. neurona antibodies occurred when S. canis-like liver schizonts were retrospectively assayed from two dogs, a dolphin, a sea lion, a horse, a chinchilla, a black or either of two polar bears. Sequencing conserved (18S) and variable (ITS-1) portions of nuclear ribosomal DNA isolated from the schizont-laden liver of a polar bear distinguished it from all previously characterized species of Sarcocystis. We take this genetic signature as provisionally representative of S. canis, an assumption that should be tested with future sequencing of similar liver infections in other mammalian hosts. These findings further extend the uncharacteristically broad intermediate host range for S. neurona, which also causes a neurologic disease in cats, mink, raccoons, skunks, Pacific harbor seals, ponies, zebras, lynxes, and sea otters. Further work is necessary to delineate the causative agent(s) of other cases of canine sarcocystosis, and in particular to specify the attributes of S. canis, which corresponds morphologically to infections reported from wide range of terrestrial

  11. [Choledochal cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeithaml, J; Třeška, V; Moláček, J; Heidenreich, F

    2015-09-01

    Choledochal cyst is a rare disease with a considerably higher incidence found in the Asian population. Although its etiology is not completely known, the disease is believed to be associated with anomalies in the anatomy of the biliary tract. While being a benign unit, it is considered as a precancerosis with the risk of conversion to the biliary tract carcinoma. Radical surgical removal with biliary tract reconstruction is the only curative solution. The authors present the case report of a patient with choledochal cyst type I according to Todani

  12. First report of predation of Giardia sp. cysts by ciliated protozoa and confirmation of predation of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts by ciliate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Castro, Isabel Cristina Vidal; Greinert-Goulart, Juliane Araújo; Bonatti, Tais Rondello; Yamashiro, Sandra; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno

    2016-06-01

    Ciliated protozoa are important components of the microbial food web in various habitats, especially aquatic environments. These organisms are useful bioindicators for both environmental quality assessment and the wastewater purification process. The pathogenic parasitic protozoan species Giardia and Cryptosporidium represent a significant concern for human health, being responsible for numerous disease outbreaks worldwide. The predation of cysts and oocysts in 15 ciliate species from water and sewage samples collected in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil were verified under laboratory conditions. The ciliated protozoan species were selected based on their mode of nutrition, and only bacterivorous and suspension-feeders were considered for the experiments. The species Blepharisma sinuosum, Euplotes aediculatus, Sterkiella cavicola, Oxytricha granulifera, Vorticella infusionum, Spirostomum minus, and Stentor coeruleus ingested cysts and oocysts, the resistance forms of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp., respectively. This is the first time that the ingestion of Giardia cysts by ciliated protozoa has been reported. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the biological removal of these pathogens from aquatic environments.

  13. Breast Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells may be collected to check for cancer (fine-needle aspiration biopsy). No treatment is necessary for simple breast cysts — those that are fluid-filled and don't cause any symptoms — that are confirmed on breast ultrasound or after a fine-needle aspiration. If the lump persists or feels ...

  14. Nasolabial Cyst Mimicking a Radicular Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kanmani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasolabial cyst is an uncommon nonodontogenic, developmental cyst, originating in maxillofacial soft tissues characterised by its extraosseous location in nasal alar region. This cyst is frequently asymptomatic with most usual sign being alar nose elevation. Its frequency is around 0.7% of cysts of the jaws and 2.5% of the nonodontogenic cyst. A case report of a nasolabial cyst for which a radiographic contrast medium was used in order to localise the lesion is discussed. This article documents the presentation and management of nasolabial cyst in a 50-year-old woman and discusses the considerations related to the diagnosis.

  15. [Control of toxicity of Sarcocystis fayeri in horsemeat by freezing treatment and prevention of food poisoning caused by raw consumption of horsemeat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Seiya; Furukawa, Masato; Tokuoka, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kazutoshi; Yahiro, Shunsuke; Miyasaka, Jiro; Saito, Morihiro; Kamata, Yoichi; Watanabe, Maiko; Irikura, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    More than 27 outbreaks per year of food poisoning caused by consuming horse meat were reported in Kumamoto Prefecture (including Kumamoto City) from January 2009 to September 2011. It was found that the causative agent of the outbreaks was a protein with a molecular weight of 15 kDa that had originated from bradyzoites of Sarcocystis fayeri parasitizing the horse meat. Rabit ileal loop tests showed that pepsin treatment of homogenates of frozen horse meat containing the cysts of S. fayeri induced loss of toxicity, presumably by digestion of the proteinous causative agent(s). Slices of horse meat containing the cysts were frozen at below -20°C for various periods. The cysts were collected after thawing the slices, then treated in an artificial stomach juice containing pepsin. The bradyzoites of the cysts kept at -20°C for 48 hr or more completely disappeared. Simultaneously, the 15 kDa protein also disappeared in the frozen cysts. After notifying the public and recommending freezing treatment of horse meat, no subsequent cases of food poisoning were reported. This indicates that freezing of horse meat is effective to prevent the occurrence of food poisoning caused by consuming raw horse meat containing S. fayeri.

  16. Estudo da ocorrência de enteroparasitas em hortaliças comercializadas na região metropolitana de São Paulo - SP, Brasil: II - Pesquisa de protozoários intestinais Study of the occurrence of intestinal parasites os vegetables comercially traded in the metropolitan area of S.Paulo, SP - Brazil: II - Research into protozoan cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Fernandes de Oliveira

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available Foram analisadas hortaliças "in natura", comercializadas na Região Metropolitana de São Paulo, SP-Brasil, visando à pesquisa e à identificação de cistos de protozoários de interesse médico. As hortaliças, constituídas de 50 amostras de cada variedade, consistiram em: alface (Lactuca sativa, variedades lisa e crespa, escarola (Chichorium sp e agrião (Nasturtium officinale. Os resultados evidenciaram elevados percentuais de contaminação em todas as variedades de hortaliças analisadas, porém as freqüências de protozoários foram maiores no agrião. As amostras de alfaces apresentaram os menores percentuais de contaminação, enquanto que a escarola apresentou valores geralmente situados entre o agrião e as alfaces. Observou-se uma grande variedade de protozoários, cujas freqüências de ocorrência na população residente na Região Metropolitana de São Paulo são igualmente elevadas. Os mais freqüentes foram Entamoeba sp (com 4 e 8 núcleos e Giardia sp. Foram também isolados cistos de Iodamoeba sp, Endolimax sp e Chilomastix sp. Os elevados níveis de contaminação fecal encontrados nas amostras analisadas apontam para a importância dos alimentos na transmissão de protozoários intestinais.Vegetables in natura , commercially traded in the metropolitan area of S.Paulo, Brazil, were analised by means of the appropriate methodology with a view to discovering and identifying protozoan cysts of medical interest. The vegetables under study consisted of 50 samples of each of the variaties listed bel ow: lettuce (Lactuca sativa - oily leaves and crisphead varieties, endive (Chicorium sp and water-cress (Nasturtium officinale. Results showed high rates of contamination in all the varieties of vegetable analysed. However, the water-cress was the one which presented the highest frequencies of enteroparasites. Both the oily leafes and crisphead varieties of lettuce presented the lowest rates of contamination, whereas endive

  17. Intra-uterine exposure of horses to Sarcocystis spp. antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Antonello

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the intra-uterine exposure to Sarcocystis spp. antigens, determining the number of foals with detectable concentrations of antibodies against these agents in the serum, before colostrum ingestion and collect data about exposure of horses to the parasite. Serum samples were collected from 195 thoroughbred mares and their newborns in two farms from southern Brazil. Parasite specific antibody responses to Sarcocystis antigens were detected using the indirect immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT and immunoblot analysis. In 84.1% (159/189 of the pregnant mares and in 7.4% (14/189 of foals we detected antibodies anti-Sarcocystis spp. by IFAT. All samples seropositive from foals were also positive in their respective mares. Serum samples of seropositive foals by IFAT, showed no reactivity on the immunoblot, having as antigens S. neurona merozoites. In conclusion, the intra-uterine exposure to Sarcocystis spp. antigens in horses was demonstrated, with occurrence not only in mares, but also in their foals, before colostrum ingestion these occurrences were reduced.

  18. Sarcocystis spp. Infection in two Red Panda Cubs (Ailurus fulgens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, W M; Needle, D B; French, S J; Lim, A; Bolin, S; Langohr, I; Agnew, D

    2015-01-01

    Two neonatal male red panda (Ailurus fulgens) littermates were submitted for necropsy examination. One animal was found dead with no prior signs of illness; the other had a brief history of laboured breathing. Post-mortem examination revealed disseminated protozoal infection. To further characterize the causative agent, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry (IHC), polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and amplification and nucleic acid sequencing were performed. IHC was negative for Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum, but was positive for a Sarcocystis spp. TEM of cardiac muscle and lung revealed numerous intracellular apicomplexan protozoa within parasitophorous vacuoles. PCR and nucleic acid sequencing of partial 18S rRNA and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS)-1 region confirmed a Sarcocystis spp. that shared 99% sequence homology to Sarcocystis neurona and Sarcocystis dasypi. This represents the first report of sarcocystosis in red pandas. The histopathological, immunohistochemical, molecular and ultrastructural findings are supportive of vertical transmission resulting in fatal disseminated disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora caninum in Brazilian opossums (Didelphis spp.): Molecular investigation and in vitro isolation of Sarcocystis spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Leane S Q; Jesus, Rogério F; Ribeiro-Andrade, Müller; Silva, Jean C R; Siqueira, Daniel B; Marvulo, Maria F V; Aléssio, Felipe M; Mauffrey, Jean-François; Julião, Fred S; Savani, Elisa San Martin Mouriz; Soares, Rodrigo M; Gondim, Luís F P

    2017-08-30

    Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora spp. are protozoan parasites that induce neurological diseases in horses and other animal species. Opossums (Didelphis albiventris and Didelphis virginiana) are definitive hosts of S. neurona, which is the major cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Neospora caninum causes abortion in cattle and infects a wide range of animal species, while N. hughesi is known to induce neurologic disease in equids. The aims of this study were to investigate S. neurona and N. caninum in tissues from opossums in the northeastern Brazil, and to isolate Brazilian strains of Sarcocystis spp. from wild opossums for comparison with previously isolated strains. Carcasses of 39 opossums from Bahia state were available for molecular identification of Sarcocystis spp. and N. caninum in their tissues, and for sporocyst detection by intestinal scraping. In addition, Sarcocystis-like sporocysts from nine additional opossums, obtained in São Paulo state, were tested. Sarcocystis DNA was found in 16 (41%) of the 39 opossums' carcasses; N. caninum DNA was detected in tissues from three opossums. The sporocysts from the nine additional opossums from São Paulo state were tested by bioassay and induced infection in nine budgerigars, but in none of the gamma-interferon knockout mice. In vitro isolation was successful using tissues from all nine budgerigars. The isolated strains were maintained in CV-1 and Vero cells. Three of nine isolates presented contamination in cell culture and were discarded. Analysis of six isolates based on five loci showed that these parasites were genetically different from each other and also distinct from S. neurona, S. falcatula, S. lindsayi, and S. speeri. In conclusion, opossums in the studied regions were infected with N. caninum and Sarcocystis spp. and represent a potential source of infection to other animals. This is the first report of N. caninum infection in tissues from black-eared opossum (D. aurita or D

  20. The identification of a sequence related to apicomplexan enolase from Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A P; Thelen, J J; Lakritz, J; Brown, C R; Marsh, A E

    2004-11-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a neurological disease caused by Sarcocystis neurona, an apicomplexan parasite. S. neurona is also associated with EPM-like diseases in marine and small mammals. The mechanisms of transmission and ability to infect a wide host range remain obscure; therefore, characterization of essential proteins may provide evolutionary information allowing the development of novel chemotherapeutics that target non-mammalian biochemical pathways. In the current study, two-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-ToF) mass spectrometry were combined to characterize and identify an enolase protein from S. neurona based on peptide homology to the Toxoplasma gondii protein. Enolase is thought to be a vestigial, non-photosynthetic protein resulting from an evolutionary endosymbiosis event of an apicomplexan ancestor with green algae. Enolase has also been suggested to play a role in parasite stage conversion for T. gondii. Characterization of this protein in S. neurona and comparison to other protozoans indicate a biochemical similarity of S. neurona enolase to other tissue-cyst forming coccidians that cause encephalitis.

  1. Dual Sarcocystis neurona and Toxoplasma gondii infection in a northern sea otter from Washington state, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, D.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Rosypal, A.C.; Dubey, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    Dual Sarcocystis neurona and Toxoplasma gondii infection was observed in a Northern sea otter from Washington, USA. The animal was found stranded, convulsed, and died shortly thereafter. Encephalitis caused by both S. neurona and T. gondii was demonstrated in histological sections of brain. Immunohistochemical examination of sections with S. neurona specific antisera demonstrated developmental stages that divided by endopolygeny and produced numerous merozoites. PCR of brain tissue from the sea otter using primer pairs JNB33/JNB54 resulted in amplification of a 1100 bp product. This PCR product was cut in to 884 and 216 bp products by Dra I but was not cut by Hinf I indicating that it was S. neurona [J. Parasitol. 85 (1999) 221]. No PCR product was detected in the brain of a sea otter which had no lesions of encephalitis. Examination of brain sections using T. gondii specific antisera demonstrated tachyzoites and tissue cysts of T. gondii. The lesions induced by T. gondii suggested that the sea otter was suffering from reactivated toxoplasmosis. T. gondii was isolated in mice inoculated with brain tissue. A cat that was fed infected mouse brain tissue excreted T. gondii oocysts which were infective for mice. This is apparently the first report of dual S. neurona and T. gondii in a marine mammal.

  2. Molecular characterization of Sarcocystis species from Polish roe deer based on ssu rRNA and cox1 sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenda, Rafał; Ugorski, Maciej; Bednarski, Michał

    2014-08-01

    Sarcocysts from four Polish roe deer were collected and examined by light microscopy, small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssu rRNA), and the subunit I of cytochrome oxidase (cox1) sequence analysis. This resulted in identification of Sarcocystis gracilis, Sarcocystis oviformis, and Sarcocystis silva. However, we were unable to detect Sarcocystis capreolicanis, the fourth Sarcocystis species found previously in Norwegian roe deer. Polish sarcocysts isolated from various tissues differed in terms of their shape and size and were larger than the respective Norwegian isolates. Analysis of ssu rRNA gene revealed the lack of differences between Sarcocystis isolates belonging to one species and a very low degree of genetic diversity between Polish and Norwegian sarcocysts, ranging from 0.1% for Sarcocystis gracilis and Sarcocystis oviformis to 0.44% for Sarcocystis silva. Contrary to the results of the ssu rRNA analysis, small intraspecies differences in cox1 sequences were found among Polish Sarcocystis gracilis and Sarcocystis silva isolates. The comparison of Polish and Norwegian cox1 sequences representing the same Sarcocystis species revealed similar degree of sequence identity, namely 99.72% for Sarcocystis gracilis, 98.76% for Sarcocystis silva, and 99.85% for Sarcocystis oviformis. Phylogenetic reconstruction and genetic population analyses showed an unexpected high degree of identity between Polish and Norwegian isolates. Moreover, cox1 gene sequences turned out to be more accurate than ssu rRNA when used to reveal phylogenetic relationships among closely related species. The results of our study revealed that the same Sarcocystis species isolated from the same hosts living in different geographic regions show a very high level of genetic similarity.

  3. Brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) harbor Sarcocystis neurona and act as intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, L S; Mehler, S; Nelson, K; Elsheikha, H M; Murphy, A J; Knust, B; Tanhauser, S M; Gearhart, P M; Rossano, M G; Bowman, D D; Schott, H C; Patterson, J S

    2008-05-06

    We tested the hypothesis that brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) harbor Sarcocystis neurona, the agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), and act as intermediate hosts for this parasite. In summer 1999, wild caught brown-headed cowbirds were collected and necropsied to determine infection rate with Sarcocystis spp. by macroscopic inspection. Seven of 381 (1.8%) birds had grossly visible sarcocysts in leg muscles with none in breast muscles. Histopathology revealed two classes of sarcocysts in leg muscles, thin-walled and thick-walled suggesting two species. Electron microscopy showed that thick-walled cysts had characteristics of S. falcatula and thin-walled cysts had characteristics of S. neurona. Thereafter, several experiments were conducted to confirm that cowbirds had viable S. neurona that could be transmitted to an intermediate host and cause disease. Specific-pathogen-free opossums fed cowbird leg muscle that was enriched for muscle either with or without visible sarcocysts all shed high numbers of sporocysts by 4 weeks after infection, while the control opossum fed cowbird breast muscle was negative. These sporocysts were apparently of two size classes, 11.4+/-0.7 microm by 7.6+/-0.4 microm (n=25) and 12.6+/-0.6 microm by 8.0+/-0 microm (n=25). When these sporocysts were excysted and introduced into equine dermal cell tissue culture, schizogony occurred, most merozoites survived and replicated long term and merozoites sampled from the cultures with long-term growth were indistinguishable from known S. neurona isolates. A cowbird Sarcocystis isolate, Michigan Cowbird 1 (MICB1), derived from thin-walled sarcocysts from cowbirds that was passaged in SPF opossums and tissue culture went on to produce neurological disease in IFNgamma knockout mice indistinguishable from that of the positive control inoculated with S. neurona. This, together with the knowledge that S. falcatula does not cause lesions in IFNgamma knockout mice, showed that cowbird

  4. Systems based analysis of the Sarcocystis neurona genome identifies pathways that contribute to a heteroxenous life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the Coccidia, a clade of single-celled parasites of medical and veterinary importance including Eimeria, Sarcocystis, Neospora and Toxoplasma. Unlike Eimeria, a single host enteric pathogen, Sarcocystis, Neospora and Toxoplasma are two host parasites that infect an...

  5. Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona, and Sarcocystis canis-like infections in marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Zarnke, R; Thomas, N J; Wong, S K; Van Bonn, W; Briggs, M; Davis, J W; Ewing, R; Mense, M; Kwok, O C H; Romand, S; Thulliez, P

    2003-10-30

    Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona, and S. canis are related protozoans that can cause mortality in many species of domestic and wild animals. Recently, T. gondii and S. neurona were recognized to cause encephalitis in marine mammals. As yet, there is no report of natural exposure of N. caninum in marine mammals. In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii and N. caninum were assayed in sera of several species of marine mammals. For T. gondii, sera were diluted 1:25, 1:50, and 1:500 and assayed in the T. gondii modified agglutination test (MAT). Antibodies (MAT > or =1:25) to T. gondii were found in 89 of 115 (77%) dead, and 18 of 30 (60%) apparently healthy sea otters (Enhydra lutris), 51 of 311 (16%) Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), 19 of 45 (42%) sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) [corrected] 5 of 32 (16%) ringed seals (Phoca hispida), 4 of 8 (50%) bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus), 1 of 9 (11.1%) spotted seals (Phoca largha), 138 of 141 (98%) Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), and 3 of 53 (6%) walruses (Odobenus rosmarus). For N. caninum, sera were diluted 1:40, 1:80, 1:160, and 1:320 and examined with the Neospora agglutination test (NAT) using mouse-derived tachyzoites. NAT antibodies were found in 3 of 53 (6%) walruses, 28 of 145 (19%) sea otters, 11 of 311 (3.5%) harbor seals, 1 of 27 (3.7%) sea lions, 4 of 32 (12.5%) ringed seals, 1 of 8 (12.5%) bearded seals, and 43 of 47 (91%) bottlenose dolphins. To our knowledge, this is the first report of N. caninum antibodies in any marine mammal, and the first report of T. gondii antibodies in walruses and in ringed, bearded, spotted, and ribbon seals. Current information on T. gondii-like and Sarcocystis-like infections in marine mammals is reviewed. New cases of clinical S. canis and T. gondii infections are also reported in sea lions, and T. gondii infection in an Antillean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus).

  6. Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona, and Sarcocystis canis-like infections in marine mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J.P.; Zarnke, R.; Thomas, N.J.; Wong, S.K.; Vanbonn, W.; Briggs, M.; Davis, J.W.; Ewing, R.; Mense, M.; Kwok, O.C.H.; Romand, S.; Thulliez, P.

    2003-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona, and S. canis are related protozoans that can cause mortality in many species of domestic and wild animals. Recently, T. gondii and S. neurona were recognized to cause encephalitis in marine mammals. As yet, there is no report of natural exposure of N. caninum in marine mammals. In the present study, antibodies to T. gondii and N. caninum were assayed in sera of several species of marine mammals. For T. gondii, sera were diluted 1:25, 1:50, and 1:500 and assayed in the T. gondii modified agglutination test (MAT). Antibodies (MAT a?Y1:25) to T. gondii were found in 89 of 115 (77%) dead, and 18 of 30 (60%) apparently healthy sea otters (Enhydra lutris), 51 of 311 (16%) Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), 19 of 45 (42%) sea lions (Zalophus californianus), 5 of 32 (16%) ringed seals (Phoca hispida), 4 of 8 (50%) bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus), 1 of 9 (11.1%) spotted seals (Phoca largha), 138 of 141 (98%) Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus), and 3 of 53 (6%) walruses (Odobenus rosmarus). For N. caninum, sera were diluted 1:40, 1:80, 1:160, and 1:320 and examined with the Neospora agglutination test (NAT) using mouse-derived tachyzoites. NAT antibodies were found in 3 of 53 (6%) walruses, 28 of 145 (19%) sea otters, 11 of 311 (3.5%) harbor seals, 1 of 27 (3.7%) sea lions, 4 of 32 (12.5%) ringed seals, 1 of 8 (12.5%) bearded seals, and 43 of 47 (91%) bottlenose dolphins. To our knowledge, this is the first report of N. caninum antibodies in any marine mammal, and the first report of T. gondii antibodies in walruses and in ringed, bearded, spotted, and ribbon seals. Current information on T. gondii-like and Sarcocystis-like infections in marine mammals is reviewed. New cases of clinical S. canis and T. gondii infections are also reported in sea lions, and T. gondii infection in an Antillean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus).

  7. Serologic responses of cats against experimental Sarcocystis neurona infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Lindsay, D S; Saville, W J A

    2002-08-02

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most important cause of a neurologic disease of horses, equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Cats and other carnivores can act as its intermediate hosts and horses are aberrant hosts. Little is known of the sero-epidemiology of S. neurona infections in cats. In the present study, antibodies to S. neurona were evaluated by the S. neurona agglutination test (SAT). Cats fed sporocysts from the feces of naturally infected opossums or inoculated intramuscularly with S. neurona merozoites developed high levels (> or =1:4000) of SAT antibodies. Antibodies to S. neurona were not found in a cat inoculated with merozoites of the closely related parasite, Sarcocystis falcatula. These results should be useful in studying sero-epidemiology of S. neurona infections in cats.

  8. Detection of Sarcocystis spp. infection in bobcats (Lynx rufus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S. K.; Calero-Bernal, R.; Lovallo, M. J.; Sweeny, A. R.; Grigg, M. E.; Dubey, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of severe clinical disease of horses (called equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, EPM), marine mammals, companion animals, and several species of wildlife animals in the Americas. The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is its definitive host in the USA and other animals act as intermediate or aberrant hosts. Samples of tongue and heart from 35 bobcats hunted for fur and food from Mississippi State, USA in February, 2014 were used for the present study. Muscles were examined for Sarcocystis infection by microscopic examination of either unfixed muscle squash preparations or pepsin digests, by histopathology of fixed samples, and by molecular methods. Sarcocystis-like bradyzoites were found in digests of 14 hearts and 10 tongues of 35 bobcats. In histological sections, sarcocysts were found in 26 of 35 bobcats; all appeared relatively thin-walled similar to S. felis sarcocysts under light microscope at 1000x magnification. S. neurona-like sarcocysts having thickened villar tips were seen in unstained muscle squash of tongue of two bobcats and PCR-DNA sequencing identified them definitively as S. neurona-like parasite. DNA extracted from bradyzoites obtained from tongue and heart muscle digests was analyzed by PCR-DNA sequencing at the ITS1 locus. Results indicated the presence of S. neurona-like parasite in 26 of 35 samples. ITS1 sequences identical to S. dayspi were identified in 3 bobcats, 2 of which were also co-infected with S. neurona-like parasite. The high prevalence of sarcocysts in bobcat tissues suggested an efficient sylvatic cycle of Sarcocystis spp. in the remote regions of Mississippi State with the bobcat as a relevant intermediate host. PMID:26138150

  9. Molecular characterization and development of Sarcocystis speeri sarcocysts in gamma interferon gene knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The North American opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is the definitive host for at least three named species of Sarcocystis: S. falcatula, S. neurona, and S. speeri. It appears that there may be additional undescribed species of Sarcocystis in D. virginiana feces. The South American opossums (D. albive...

  10. Infected cardiac hydatid cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Ceviz, M; Becit, N; Kocak, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 24 year old woman presented with chest pain and palpitation. The presence of a semisolid mass—an echinococcal cyst or tumour—in the left ventricular apex was diagnosed by echocardiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The infected cyst was seen at surgery. The cyst was removed successfully by using cardiopulmonary bypass with cross clamp.


Keywords: cardiac hydatid cyst; infected cardiac hydatid cyst

  11. Investigação de anticorpos contra Sarcocystis neurona e Sarcocystis cruzi em equinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Antonello

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTSarcocystis neurona is the primary agent for Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM, important neurological disease characterized by behavior or muscular changes, that impairs animal performance and husbandry. Sarcocystis cruzi is a pathogen related to myositis in cattle. Although related the life cycles of the parasites are distinct. S. neurona has opossums (Didelphis spp. and S. cruzi, dogs as definitive hosts. However, S. neurona and S. cruzi may undergo cross-reactivity in serological tests, interfering on results of EPM ante-mortem diagnostic tests. In the present study, serology of 189 mares was performed by indirect immunofluorescence antibody test, using antigens of S. neurona and S. cruzi in order to assess the exposure degree of animals to antigens. Analyzing the results, it was observed that most of the animals (84.13% reacted with at least one protozoal species and the number of animals which showed antibodies against S. cruzi was greater than S. neurona (80.42% and 33.86%, respectively and a third of seropositive animals reacted to antigens of both species.

  12. Arachnoid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Ellams, E.T.

    1984-11-01

    The clinical features and neuroradiological and computertomographic findings in 125 patients with cystic intracranial processes, which were neither due to tumour nor of vascular origin, have been analysed. The intrathecal injection of iodinated contrast media is absolutely essential for the differential diagnosis of congenital cysts. CT demonstration using 2 mm. slices and coronal and sagittal reconstruction makes it possible to relate the lesions to surrounding brain structures. Additional anomalies of the brain can be diagnosed and considered when planning treatment. Air studies are no longer necessary, but plain films remain the first diagnostic step. In view of modern micro-surgical techniques, angiography remains of value in order to diagnose vascular anomalies at a pre-operative stage.

  13. Characterization of Sarcocystis from four species of hawks from Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabsley, Michael J; Ellis, Angela E; Stallknecht, David E; Howerth, Elizabeth W

    2009-02-01

    During 2001 to 2004, 4 species of hawks (Buteo and Accipiter spp.) from Georgia were surveyed for Sarcocystis spp. infections by examining intestinal sections. In total, 159 of 238 (66.8%) hawks examined were infected with Sarcocystis spp. Samples from 10 birds were characterized by sequence analysis of a portion of the 18S rRNA gene (783 base pairs). Only 3 of the 10 sequences from the hawks were identical; the remainder differed by at least 1 nucleotide. Phylogenetic analysis failed to resolve the position of the hawk Sarcocystis species, but they were closely related several Sarcocystis species from raptors, rodents, and Sarcocystis neurona. The high genetic diversity of Sarcocystis suggests that more than 1 species infects these 4 hawk species; however, additional molecular or experimental work will be required to determine the speciation and diversity of parasites infecting these avian hosts. In addition to assisting with determining species richness of Sarcocystis in raptors, molecular analysis should be useful in the identification of potential intermediate hosts.

  14. Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai n. spp. (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) Associated with Severe Myositis and Hepatitis in the Domestic Dog (Canis familiaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J. P.; Sykes, J. E.; Shelton, G. D.; Sharp, N.; Verma, S. K.; Calero-Bernal, R.; Viviano, J.; Sundar, N.; Khan, A.; Grigg, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    There are several reports of Sarcocystis sarcocysts in muscles of dogs but these species have not been named. Additionally, there are 2 reports of Sarcocystis neurona in dogs. Here, we propose 2 new names, Sarcocystis caninum, and Sarcocystis svanai for sarcocysts associated with clinical muscular sarcocystosis in 4 domestic dogs (Canis familiaris), 1 each from Montana and Colorado in the USA, and 2 from British Columbia, Canada. Only the sarcocyst stage was identified. Most of the sarcocysts identified were S. caninum. Sarcocysts were studied using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and PCR. Based on collective results 2 new species, Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai were designated. Sarcocystis caninum and Sarcocystis svanai were structurally distinct. Sarcocystis caninum sarcocysts were up to 1.2 mm long and up to 75 μm wide. By light microscopy, the sarcocyst wall was relatively thin and smooth. By transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the sarcocyst wall “type 9”, 1–2 μm thick, and contained villar protrusions that lacked microtubules. Bradyzoites in sections were 7–9 μm long. Sarcocysts of S. svanai were few and were identified by TEM. Sarcocystis svanai sarcocysts were “type 1”, thin walled (< 0.5 μm), and the wall lacked villar protrusions but had tiny blebs that did not invaginate. DNA was extracted either from infected frozen muscle biopsies or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections. Dogs were either singly infected with S. caninum or multiply co-infected with S. caninum and S. svanai (the result of a mixed infection) based on multi-locus DNA sequencing and morphology. BLASTn analysis established that the sarcocysts identified in these dogs were similar to, but not identical to S. canis or S. arctosi, parasites found to infect polar bears (Ursus maritimus) or brown bears (Ursus arctosi), respectively. However, the S. caninum sequence showed 100% identify over the 18S rRNA region sequenced to that of S. arctica

  15. Prevalence, morphology, and molecular characteristics of Sarcocystis spp. in domestic goats (Capra hircus) from Kunming, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun-Jie; Liu, Ting-Ting; Liu, Qiong; Esch, G W; Chen, Jin-Qing; Huang, Si; Wen, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Despite the importance of worldwide goat production, little is known about the prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. in domestic goats (Capra hircus) in China. The aims of the present study were to determine prevalence of Sarcocystis spp. in domestic goats in Kunming, China, as well as to identify parasite species based on morphological characteristics and DNA sequence analysis. Only microscopic sarcocysts of Sarcocystis spp. were detected in 174 of 225 goats (77.3 %). By light and transmission electron microscopy, two species, i.e., Sarcocystis capracanis and Sarcocystis hircicanis, were identified. Two sarcocysts from each of the two species were randomly selected for DNA extraction; the 18S rRNA gene (18S rRNA), the 28S rRNA gene (28S rRNA), and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently sequenced. The results were compared with other previously sequenced Sarcocystis species retrieved from GenBank. There was little sequence variation between two isolates of the same species. S. capracanis was most closely related with Sarcocystis tenella; 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, and mitochondrial cox1 sequences shared identities of 95.7-99.1, 95.3, and 92.3-93.2 % with those of S. tenella, respectively. Thus, mitochondrial cox1 sequences seem to perform better than 18S rRNA sequences or 28S rRNA sequences for identification of the two species. S. hircicanis was most closely related to Sarcocystis arieticanis, i.e., 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA sequences of the former species shared 97.2-97.4 and 95.6-96.1 % identities with those of latter, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from the three genetic markers yielded similar results and indicated the two species were within a group of Sarcocystis species with canines as known, or presumed, definitive hosts.

  16. Posttraumatic spinal subarachnoid cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffin, C.M. [Service de Neuroradiologie Charcot, Hopital de la Salpetriere, 47, Boulevard de l`hopital, F-75651, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Weill, A. [Service de Neuroradiologie Charcot, Hopital de la Salpetriere, 47, Boulevard de l`hopital, F-75651, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Miaux, Y. [Service de Neuroradiologie Charcot, Hopital de la Salpetriere, 47, Boulevard de l`hopital, F-75651, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Srour, A. [Service de Neurochirurgie, Hopital de la Salpetriere, 47, Boulevard de l`hopital, F-75651, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Cognard, C. [Service de Neuroradiologie Charcot, Hopital de la Salpetriere, 47, Boulevard de l`hopital, F-75651, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Dubard, T. [Federation de Neurologie, Hopital de la Salpetriere, 47, Boulevard de l`hopital, F-75651, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Savin, D. [Service de Neuroradiologie Charcot, Hopital de la Salpetriere, 47, Boulevard de l`hopital, F-75651, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Chiras, J. [Service de Neuroradiologie Charcot, Hopital de la Salpetriere, 47, Boulevard de l`hopital, F-75651, Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    1996-08-01

    A case of posttraumatic compressive subarachnoid cyst of the thoracic spine studied by MR, myelography, and myelo-CT is reported. This cyst was surgically confirmed and treated by shunting. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  17. Pilonidal cyst resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilonidal abscess; Pilonidal dimple; Pilonidal disease; Pilonidal cyst; Pilonidal sinus ... An infected pilonidal cyst or abscess requires surgical drainage. It will not heal with antibiotic medicines. If you continue to have infections, the ...

  18. Beware the Tarlov cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Jane E; Torode, Hugh; Sears, William; Cousins, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Tarlov cysts are sacral perineural cysts. This case report describes the clinical course after biopsy of a very large Tarlov cyst via laparoscopy, which was thought preoperatively to be an adnexal mass. It serves as a warning against attempting biopsy or resection of these lesions.

  19. Keratinizing dentigerous cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishnavi Sivasankar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratinizing dentigerous cyst is a rare entity. This article reports a case of keratinizing dentigerous cyst associated with an impacted mandibular canine. Clinical and radiological features, cone-beam computed tomography findings and histological features of the case are reported along with a discussion on keratinizing odontogenic cysts and the need for follow-up.

  20. Tail gut cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G Mallikarjuna; Haricharan, P; Ramanujacharyulu, S; Reddy, K Lakshmi

    2002-01-01

    The tail gut is a blind extension of the hindgut into the tail fold just distal to the cloacal membrane. Remnants of this structure may form tail gut cyst. We report a 14-year-old girl with tail gut cyst that presented as acute abdomen. The patient recovered after cyst excision.

  1. Keratinizing dentigerous cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, Vaishnavi; Ranganathan, Kannan; Praveen, B

    2014-01-01

    Keratinizing dentigerous cyst is a rare entity. This article reports a case of keratinizing dentigerous cyst associated with an impacted mandibular canine. Clinical and radiological features, cone-beam computed tomography findings and histological features of the case are reported along with a discussion on keratinizing odontogenic cysts and the need for follow-up. PMID:24808713

  2. Extradural synovial thoracic cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, S D; Fronczak, S; Zindrick, M R; Lorenz, M A; Vrbos, L A

    1994-11-01

    SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Case studies documenting the incidence of thoracic intraspinal, extradural synovial cysts are limited. The occurrence of synovial cysts is associated with varied symptoms that differ among cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions. The clinical appearance may be similar to other spinal diseases. METHODS. This report describes symptoms exhibited by and care provided for a patient with extradural synovial thoracic cyst.

  3. Management of ovarian cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Ulla Breth; Tabor, Ann; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The treatment of an ovarian cyst relies on its nature, and accurate preoperative discrimination of benign and malignant cysts is therefore of crucial importance. This study was undertaken to review the literature concerning the preoperative diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cysts. ME...

  4. Iatrogenic postoperative cerebellar cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Robin; Moscovici, Samuel; Wygoda, Marc; Eliahou, Ruth; Spektor, Sergey

    2016-12-01

    Cerebellar cyst is a known but uncommon entity. It is congenital in most cases, or may develop after brain parenchyma injuries or interventions. To our knowledge, de novo cerebellar cyst after extra-axial tumor excision, has not been described in the literature. We present the first reported case of a de novo cerebellar cyst developing in a 70-year-old woman following retrosigmoid craniotomy for vestibular schwannoma excision, and discuss the possible causes. Following cyst fenestration, there was no clinical or radiological evidence of a residual cyst. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sarcocystis neurona: molecular characterization of enolase domain I region and a comparison to other protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolten, K E; Marsh, A E; Reed, S M; Dubey, J P; Toribio, R E; Saville, W J A

    2008-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona causes protozoal myeloencephalitis and has the ability to infect a wide host range in contrast to other Sarcocystis species. In the current study, five S. neurona isolates from a variety of sources, three Sarcocystis falcatula, one Sarcocystis dasypi/S. neurona-like isolate, and one Besnoitia darlingi isolate were used to compare the enolase 2 gene segment containing the domain I region to previously sequenced enolase genes from Neospora caninum, Neospora hughesi, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium falciparum, and Trypanosoma cruzi; enolase 2 segment containing domain I region is highly conserved amongst these parasites of veterinary and medical importance. Immunohistochemistry results indicates reactivity of T. gondii enolase 1 and 2 antibodies to S. neurona merozoites and metrocytes, but no reactivity of anti-enolase 1 to the S. neurona bradyzoite stage despite reactivity to T. gondii bradyzoites, suggesting expression differences between organisms.

  6. Molecular typing of Sarcocystis neurona: current status and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikha, Hany M; Mansfield, Linda S

    2007-10-21

    Sarcocystis neurona is an important protozoal pathogen because it causes the serious neurological disease equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). The capacity of this organism to cause a wide spectrum of neurological signs in horses and the broad geographic distribution of observed cases in the Americas drive the need for sensitive, reliable and rapid typing methods to characterize strains. Various molecular methods have been developed and used to diagnose EPM due to S. neurona, to identify S. neurona isolates and to determine the heterogeneity and evolutionary relatedness within this species and related Sarcocystis spp. These methods included sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), immuno-fluorescent assay (IFA), slide agglutination test (SAT), SnSAG-specific ELISA, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprinting, and sequence analysis of surface protein genes, ribosomal genes, microsatellite alleles and other molecular markers. Here, the utility of these molecular methods is reviewed and evaluated with respect to the need for molecular approaches that utilize well-characterized polymorphic, simple, independent, and stable genetic markers. These tools have the potential to add to knowledge of the genetic population structure of S. neurona and to provide new insights into the pathogenesis of EPM and S. neurona epidemiology. In particular, these methods provide new tools to address the hypothesis that particular genetic variants are associated with adverse clinical outcomes (severe pathotypes). The ultimate goal is to utilize them in future studies to improve treatment and prevention strategies.

  7. Sarcocystis fayeri in skeletal muscle of horses with neuromuscular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Monica; Shapiro, Karen; Sisó, Silvia; Williams, Diane C; Rejmanek, Daniel; Aguilar, Beatriz; Conrad, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of Sarcocystis fayeri-induced toxicity in people consuming horse meat warrant investigation on the prevalence and molecular characterization of Sarcocystis spp. infection in horses. Sarcocysts in skeletal muscle of horses have been commonly regarded as an incidental finding. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of sarcocysts in skeletal muscle of horses with neuromuscular disease. Our findings indicated that S. fayeri infection was common in young mature horses with neuromuscular disease and could be associated with myopathic and neurogenic processes. The number of infected muscles and number of sarcocysts per muscle were significantly higher in diseased than in control horses. S. fayeri was predominantly found in low oxidative highly glycolytic myofibers. This pathogen had a high glycolytic metabolism. Common clinical signs of disease included muscle atrophy, weakness with or without apparent muscle pain, gait deficits, and dysphagia in horses with involvement of the tongue and esophagus. Horses with myositis were lethargic, apparently painful, stiff, and reluctant to move. Similar to humans, sarcocystosis and cardiomyopathy can occur in horses. This study did not establish causality but supported a possible association (8.9% of cases) with disease. The assumption of Sarcocysts spp. being an incidental finding in every case might be inaccurate.

  8. [Rare location of arachnoid cysts. Extratemporal cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Perez, Rafael; Hinojosa, José; Pascual, Beatriz; Panaderos, Teresa; Welter, Diego; Muñoz, María J

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic management of arachnoid cysts depends largely on its location. Almost 50% of arachnoid cysts are located in the temporal fossa-Sylvian fissure, whereas the other half is distributed in different locations, sometimes exceptional. Under the name of infrequent location arachnoid cysts, a description is presented of those composed of 2 sheets of arachnoid membrane, which are not located in the temporal fossa, and are primary or congenital. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  9. First Molecular Identification of Sarcocystis ovicanis (Protozoa, Apicomplexa in the Brain of Sheep in Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Salehi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to survey the presence of Sarcocystis in sheep's brain in North Khorasan Province.In general, 80 samples of sheep's brain were collected from slaughtered sheep in slaughterhouses of North Khorasan Province. Tissue digestion method was used for observing bradyzoites in tissues. Histopathological processing tracing Sarcocystis and ensuing structural change in the brain tissue were conducted. PCR analysis was conducted on all the brain samples. Sequencing was done for one PCR product. Genotype was identified by Blast search and homology analysis.Sarcocystis spp. was found in one of the brain samples (1.25% using tissue digestion method. The presence of bradyzoite was also confirmed in the prepared histopathological sections. PCR analysis was positive in one of samples. Genotyping of one sample proved that Sarcocystis species was Sarcocystis ovicanis and the nucleotide sequence of this parasite was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number No.KF489431.Sarcocystis ovicanis can involve brain tissue of sheep and consequently causes clinical symptoms.

  10. Baker’s Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frush, Todd J.; Noyes, Frank R.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Popliteal synovial cysts, also known as Baker’s cysts, are commonly found in association with intra-articular knee disorders, such as osteoarthritis and meniscus tears. Histologically, the cyst walls resemble synovial tissue with fibrosis evident, and there may be chronic nonspecific inflammation present. Osteocartilaginous loose bodies may also be found within the cyst, even if they are not seen in the knee joint. Baker’s cysts can be a source of posterior knee pain that persists despite surgical treatment of the intra-articular lesion, and they are routinely discovered on magnetic resonance imaging scans of the symptomatic knee. Symptoms related to a popliteal cyst origin are infrequent and may be related to size. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was conducted with keywords related to the history, diagnosis, and treatment of Baker’s cysts—namely, Baker’s cyst, popliteal cyst, diagnosis, treatment, formation of popliteal cyst, surgical indications, and complications. Bibliographies from these references were also reviewed to identify related and pertinent literature. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Baker’s cysts are commonly found associated with intra-articular knee disorders. Proper diagnosis, examination, and treatment are paramount in alleviating the pain and discomfort associated with Baker’s cysts. Conclusion: A capsular opening to the semimembranosus–medial head gastrocnemius bursa is a commonly found normal anatomic variant. It is thought that this can lead to the formation of a popliteal cyst in the presence of chronic knee effusions as a result of intra-articular pathology. Management of symptomatic popliteal cysts is conservative. The intra-articular pathology should be first addressed by arthroscopy. If surgical excision later becomes necessary, a limited posteromedial approach is often employed. Other treatments, such as arthroscopic debridement and closure of the valvular mechanism

  11. Epidermoid Cyst of Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choubarga Naik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cyst occurring within the tongue is rare. A 5 year old male child was brought to OPD with a tongue mass which was gradually increasing in size. There was associated difficulty in speech and mastication as the swelling increased in size. Intraoral examination revealed moderately tender, fluctuant and enlarged tongue. A diagnosis of dermoid cyst was made and the patient was booked for surgery. Excision of the cyst was done under general anaesthesia. Post-operative histopathology was done. The histopathological findings confirm the diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst, characterized by the presence of: (I a cyst cavity lined by stratified squamous epithelium with keratinization on the surface; and (II connective tissue with a mild inflammation. The proposed treatment was considered successful as the case was solved and there was no recurrence. Keywords: dermoid; epidermoid cyst;tounge. | PubMed

  12. Subcutaneous bronchogenic cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Manchanda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchogenic cysts occur due to the anomalous development of the primitive tracheobronchial tree early in fetal life. They are usually present in middle mediastinum. Rarely, they have been found in other locations. We describe two patients with subcutaneous bronchogenic cysts located over manubrium sterni with special emphasis on the difficulties in pre-operative diagnosis. The two boys were managed by complete excision of the cysts. The children are well on follow-up.

  13. Hydatid cyst of mediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of hydatid cyst of the mediastinum in a 32-year-old female patient who was admitted with chest pain. CT scan reported posterior mediastinal mass towards the right side. Surgical exploration revealed a loculated cyst in posterior mediastinum on the right side, adherent to the overlying lung and underlying bone. Posterolateral thoracotomy was performed for cyst aspiration and excision. The patient was discharged on albendazole.

  14. Parameatal urethral cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal Kamal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyst formation in the parameatal area of the urethra is an uncommon entity. It was first reported in two male cases as recently as 1956 by Thompson and Lantin. Further reports have been rare. Herein, we report a case of a 21 year-old male having a spherical, cystic swelling 1 cm in size at the external urethral meatus. The diagnosis of parameatal urethral cyst was made and the cyst was excised. Histopathological examination revealed a monolocular cyst lined with transitional cells. The postoperative period was uneventful.

  15. Early migration of Sarcocystis neurona in ponies fed sporocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elitsur, E; Marsh, A E; Reed, S M; Dubey, J P; Oglesbee, M J; Murphy, J E; Saville, W J A

    2007-10-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most important cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a neurologic disease of the horse. In the present work, the kinetics of S. neurona invasion is determined in the equine model. Six ponies were orally inoculated with 250 x 10(6) S. neurona sporocysts via nasogastric intubation and killed on days 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 9 postinoculation (PI). At necropsy, tissue samples were examined for S. neurona infection. The parasite was isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes at 1, 2, and 7 days PI; the liver at 2, 5, and 7 days PI; and the lungs at 5, 7, and 9 days PI by bioassays in interferon gamma gene knock out mice (KO) and from cell culture. Microscopic lesions consistent with an EPM infection were observed in brain and spinal cord of ponies killed 7 and 9 days PI. Results suggest that S. neurona disseminates quickly in tissue of naive ponies.

  16. Penetration of equine leukocytes by merozoites of Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, David S; Mitchell, Sheila M; Yang, Jibing; Dubey, J P; Gogal, Robert M; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2006-06-15

    Horses are considered accidental hosts for Sarcocystis neurona and they often develop severe neurological disease when infected with this parasite. Schizont stages develop in the central nervous system (CNS) and cause the neurological lesions associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. The present study was done to examine the ability of S. neurona merozoites to penetrate and develop in equine peripheral blood leukocytes. These infected host cells might serve as a possible transport mechanism into the CNS. S. neurona merozoites penetrated equine leukocytes within 5 min of co-culture. Infected leukocytes were usually monocytes. Infected leukocytes were present up to the final day of examination at 3 days. Up to three merozoites were present in an infected monocyte. No development to schizont stages was observed. All stages observed were in the host cell cytoplasm. We postulate that S. neurona merozoites may cross the blood brain barrier hidden inside leukocytes. Once inside the CNS these merozoites can egress and invade additional cells and cause encephalitis.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships between Sarcocystis species from reindeer and other Sarcocystidae deduced from ssu rRNA gene sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, S.S.; Oliveira, Rodrigo Gouveia; Gjerde, B.

    2008-01-01

    were constructed using Bayesian analysis and maximum likelihood estimations. All six Sarcocystis species from reindeer were placed together with other Sarcocystis species using an even-toed ungulate as their intermediate host. The three canine transmitted species, S. grueneri, S. rangi, S...

  18. Lack of Sarcocystis neurona antibody response in Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) fed Sarcocystis neurona-infected muscle tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, M A; Lindsay, D S; Greiner, E C

    2006-06-01

    Serum was collected from laboratory-reared Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) to determine whether experimentally infected opossums shedding Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts develop serum antibodies to S. neurona merozoite antigens. Three opossums were fed muscles from nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus), and 5 were fed muscles from striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). Serum was also collected from 26 automobile-killed opossums to determine whether antibodies to S. neurona were present in these opossums. Serum was analyzed using the S. neurona direct agglutination test (SAT). The SAT was modified for use with a filter paper collection system. Antibodies to S. neurona were not detected in any of the serum samples from opossums, indicating that infection in the opossum is localized in the small intestine. Antibodies to S. neurona were detected in filter-paper-processed serum samples from 2 armadillos naturally infected with S. neurona.

  19. Epidermoid cyst post dermofasciectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henry, Francis P

    2010-01-01

    We report the finding of an unusual presentation of an epidermoid cyst 3 years following dermofasciectomy for Dupuytren\\'s disease. Epidermoid cysts remain a rare entity in the palmoplanter distribution but also a very unusual finding within the confines of a full thickness skin graft.

  20. Penile Epidermal Inclusion Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El-Shazly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of epidermal inclusion cyst in a 32-year-old male. This was a complication of circumcision that was neglected over years to form stones and urethrocutaneous fistula. Complete excision of the cyst and repair of the fistula were performed successfully. Histopathological examination confirmed our diagnosis.

  1. Multiple cerebral hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banzo, J.; Pina, J.I.; Abos, M.D.; Rios, G.; Garcia, D.; Marin, F.; Diaz, F.J.

    1984-12-01

    A 39-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with headaches, vomiting, psychic impairment and diplopia. Three hydatid cysts of the lung had been previously removed. An avascular mass in the left hemisphere with left-to-right displacement of the anterior cerebral arteries was noted during a brain angioscintigraphy. A cerebralthrombosis (CT) brain scan showed two cystic lesions situated in the left-frontal and occipital regions. A CT abdominal scan showed multiple cysts in the liver, spleen and both kidneys. At operation, two brain cysts were totally extirpated without rupture. The definite pathological diagnosis was secondry hydatid cysts. The headaches, vomiting and diplopia were persistent in the post-operative period. Seven days after the operation, a CT brain scan showed an infratenrorial cyst. The patient rejected any surgical intervention.

  2. Familial thymic cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua, Ben Zion; Raveh, Eyal; Saute, Milton; Schwarz, Michael; Tobar, Ana; Feinmesser, Raphael

    2004-05-01

    Thymic cysts are rare lesions of the anterior mediastinum or neck. The majority are asymptomatic, and the remainder are associated mainly with symptoms of dysphagia or dyspnea. Diagnosis is difficult before surgery. Cervical thymic cysts are relatively rare; age at presentation ranges from the neonatal period to adulthood, and the most frequent presenting sign is a lateral neck mass. Mediastinal thymic cysts are more common and account for 1% of all mediastinal masses. They tend to occur in the older age group and are usually detected incidentally on chest X-ray film or computed tomography scans. Dysphagia and dyspnea are the main symptoms. We describe two brothers, aged 5 and 8 years, with mediastinal thymic cysts that presented as low cervical masses and review the embryology, diagnosis and management of thymic cysts.

  3. Parasitismo por Giardia sp. e Cryptosporidium sp. em Coendou villosus Parasitism by Giardia sp. and Cryptosporidium sp. in Coendou villosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Fabio Soares

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar o possível parasitismo por Giardia sp. e Cryptosporidium sp. em amostras de fezes de ouriço-cacheiro (Coendou villosus. As amostras foram analisadas pelo método de centrífugo-flutuação com sulfato de zinco e apresentaram elevada infecção por cistos de Giardia sp. e por oocistos de Cryptosporidium sp., embora os animais não apresentassem sinal clínico decorrente disso.This research was aimed at verifing the possible parasitism by Giardia sp. and Cryptosporidium sp. in porcupine (Coendou villosus faeces samples. Samples were analyzed by the centrifugal-flotation method with zinc sulphate and showed high infection by cysts of Giardia sp. and by oocysts of Cryptosporidium sp., although the animals did not show any associated clinical sign.

  4. Tarlov cyst and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Azam, Amir; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Tarlov cysts or spinal perineurial cysts are uncommon lesions. These are mostly incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging or myelograms. The objectives of this study were to describe Tarlov cysts of the sacral region as a potential cause for retrograde ejaculations and review available management options. Case report and literature review. A 28-year-old man presented with back pain and retrograde ejaculations resulting in infertility. After microsurgical excision of large perineurial cysts, back pain resolved, but semen quality showed only marginal improvement. Later, the couple successfully conceived by intrauterine insemination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Tarlov cyst associated with retrograde ejaculation and infertility. Despite being mostly asymptomatic and an incidental finding, Tarlov cyst is an important clinical entity because of its tendency to increase in size with time. Tarlov cysts of the sacral and cauda equina region may be a rare underlying cause in otherwise unexplained retrograde ejaculations and infertility. Microsurgical excision may be a good option in a select group of patients.

  5. Sarcocysts of an unidentified species of Sarcocystis in the sea otter (Enhydra lutris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J.P.; Lindsay, D.S.; Rosenthal, B.M.; Thomas, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    The number of Sarcocystis species that infect sea otters (Enhydra lutris) is unknown. Sea otter tissues were recently shown to harbor sarcocysts of S. neurona and of unidentified species of Sarcocystis. Whereas sarcocysts of S. neurona have walls 1a??3 I?m thick with type 9 villar protrusions, ultrastructure of a distinct thin-walled sarcocyst (0.5a??0.7 I?m thick) lacking villar protrusions, but instead exhibiting minute type 1 undulations on the sarcocyst wall, is described in this report. Parasites characterized from a sea otter infection were inferred to be related to, but distinct from, other species belonging to Sarcocystis, based on sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of a portion of the beta subunit of the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase gene.

  6. Sarcocystis nesbitti Infection in Human Skeletal Muscle: Possible Transmission from Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yee Ling; Chang, Phooi Yee; Tan, Chong Tin; Fong, Mun Yik; Mahmud, Rohela; Wong, Kum Thong

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis nesbitti is an intracellular protozoan parasite found as sarcocysts within muscle fibers of intermediate hosts (monkey and baboon). The definitive host is suspected to be the snake. We report two cases from a larger cohort of 89 patients who had fever, headache, and generalized myalgia after a trip to Pangkor Island, Malaysia. Sarcocysts were detected in skeletal muscle biopsy specimens by light and electron microscopy from these two patients. DNA sequencing based on the 18S ribosomal DNA region identified the Sarcocystis species as S. nesbitti. We also identified S. nesbitti sequences in the stools of a snake (Naja naja). Phylogenetic analysis showed that these sequences form a cluster with most of the other known Sarcocystis species for which the snake is a definitive host. We believe these two patients were likely to have symptomatic acute muscular sarcocystosis after S. nesbitti infection that may have originated from snakes. PMID:24420776

  7. Sarcocystis cruzi (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) no cachorro-do-mato (Cerdocyon thous)

    OpenAIRE

    Janaina S. Rodrigues; Gisele S. Meireles; Paulo R. Carvalho Filho; Ribeiro, Carlos T.; Flausino,Walter; Lopes,Carlos Wilson G.

    2008-01-01

    Esporocistos de Sarcocystis foram identificados nas amostras fecais de um cachorro-do-mato. Eles foram dados por via oral para um bezerro em aleitamento, sendo observados cistos com morfologia compatível com os de Sarcocystis cruzi na musculatura cardíaca e esquelética, três meses após a infecção. Musculatura cardíaca deste bezerro foi dada para um segundo cão doméstico livre de coccídios, que eliminou esporocistos compatíveis com os de Sarcocystis em suas fezes, tendo com períodos pré-patent...

  8. Symptomatic Sacral Perineurial (Tarlov) Cysts

    OpenAIRE

    Sajko, Tomislav; Kovač, Damir; Kudelić, Nenad; Kovač, Lana

    2009-01-01

    Sacral perineurial (Tarlov) cysts are rare lesions. Over a seven year period 4000 patients underwent surgery for lumbar disk herniation. In three patients neurological symptoms were caused by large sacral perineurial cysts. Methods of choice for diagnosis of Tarlov cysts are lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography myelography. The majority of Tarlov cysts are asymptomatic. In case of large (ł1.5 cm) and symptomatic perineurial cyst, as in three patients reported in ...

  9. Branchial cleft cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaishali Nahata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branchial cleft cyst, sinuses, and fistulae are among the most commonly encountered congenital anomalies in pediatric otolaryngic practice. They can present difficulty in diagnosis and surgical management. Here, I report a case of 14-year-old boy who presented with asymptomatic, congenital swelling located just below the jawline in the lateral part of the neck. The lesion was excised surgically. Histopathology showed the cyst lined by squamous as well as columnar ciliated epithelium, which was a characteristic finding of branchial cleft cyst. The aim of presenting this case is its rarity.

  10. [Cysts of the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillingso, J.G.; Kirkegaard, P.

    2008-01-01

    Cysts of the liver are discovered in connection with a scope of diseases ranging from simple, infectious, or parasitic to neoplastic cysts. Symptoms, paraclinical, radiological and diagnostic characteristics are described with emphasis on ruling out malignancy. The treatment options from ultrasound...... guided drainage to resections and liver transplantation are discussed. It is concluded that up to 25% of cysts must be treated surgically, because recurrence after percutaneous or laparoscopic treatment is between 5% and 71%, and only resection or liver transplantation are curative Udgivelsesdato: 2008/4/14...

  11. Simple Kidney Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Kidney Disease Simple Kidney Cysts Related Topics Section Navigation Kidney Disease Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease Amyloidosis & ... for a Child with Kidney Disease Ectopic Kidney Medullary Sponge Kidney Kidney Dysplasia Kidney Failure Choosing a ...

  12. Extradural Spinal Arachnoid Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old boy with multiple spinal arachnoid cysts and paraplegia, and 37 similar cases in the literature are reviewed by neurosurgeons and radiologist at Univ of Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  13. [Mediastinal parathyroid cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, K; Sato, Y; Yazawa, M

    1991-07-01

    A 66-year-old woman, having no complaint, admitted our clinic, because of a mass in the right superior mediastinum detected three years ago on chest X-ray. The operation was performed through the right thoracotomy in December of 1989. The thin-walled cyst located adjacent to the trachea between superior vena cava and back bones, occupied from beneath the innominate artery to the right main bronchus. The tumor (7 x 5 x 5 cm) weighing 80 grams had a smooth surface and contained watery fluid. Histological examination showed a cyst lined a monolayer of cuboidal epithelium. The cyst wall consisted of parathyroid tissue. Mediastinal parathyroid cyst is very rare. Since the first report of DeQuervain, 15 cases have been reported. These reports are reviewed.

  14. Gingival Cyst of Newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Aman

    2011-01-01

    Gingival cyst of newborn is an oral mucosal lesion of transient nature. Although it is very common lesion within 3 to 6 weeks of birth, it is very rare to visualize the lesion thereafter. Presented here is a case report of gingival cyst, which was visible just after 15 days of birth. Clinical diagnoses of these conditions are important in order to avoid unnecessary therapeutic procedure and provide suitable information to parents about the nature of the lesion.

  15. Sarcocystis neurona retinochoroiditis in a sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J.P.; Thomas, N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of fatal disease in sea otters in the USA. Encephalitis is the predominant lesion and parasites are confined to the central nervous system and muscles. Here we report retinochoroiditis in a sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) found dead on Copalis Beach, WA, USA. Salient lesions were confined to the brain and eye. Multifocal nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis was present in the cerebrum and cerebellum associated with S. neurona schizonts. The retina of one eye had a focus of inflammation that contained numerous S. neurona schizonts and merozoites. The focus extended from the retinal pigment epithelium inward through all layers of the retina, but inflammation was most concentrated at the inner surface of the tapetum and the outer retina. The inner and outer nuclear layers of the retina were disorganized and irregular at the site of inflammation. There was severe congestion and mild hemorrhage in the choroid, and mild hemorrhage into the vitreous body. Immunohistochemistry with S. neurona-specific polyclonal rabbit antibodies stained schizonts and merozoites. To our knowledge this is the first report of S. neurona-associated retinochoroiditis in any naturally infected animal.

  16. Sarcocystis neurona retinochoroiditis in a sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J.P.; Thomas, N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of fatal disease in sea otters in the USA. Encephalitis is the predominant lesion and parasites are confined to the central nervous system and muscles. Here we report retinochoroiditis in a sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) found dead on Copalis Beach, WA, USA. Salient lesions were confined to the brain and eye. Multifocal nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis was present in the cerebrum and cerebellum associated with S. neurona schizonts. The retina of one eye had a focus of inflammation that contained numerous S. neurona schizonts and merozoites. The focus extended from the retinal pigment epithelium inward through all layers of the retina, but inflammation was most concentrated at the inner surface of the tapetum and the outer retina. The inner and outer nuclear layers of the retina were disorganized and irregular at the site of inflammation. There was severe congestion and mild hemorrhage in the choroid, and mild hemorrhage into the vitreous body. Immunohistochemistry with S. neurona-specific polyclonal rabbit antibodies stained schizonts and merozoites. To our knowledge this is the first report of S. neurona-associated retinochoroiditis in any naturally infected animal. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Efficacy of decoquinate against Sarcocystis neurona in cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, David S; Nazir, M Mudasser; Maqbool, Azhar; Ellison, Siobhan P; Strobl, Jeannine S

    2013-09-01

    Decoquinate is a quinolone anticoccidial approved for use in the prevention of intestinal coccidiosis in farm animals. This compound has good activity against Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in cell cultures. The drug acts on the parasites' mitochondria. The activity of decoquinate against developing merozoites of 2 isolates of Sarcocystis neurona was examined in cell culture. Merozoite production at 10 days was completely inhibited when decoquinate was used at 20 or 240 nM. The IC50 of decoquinate was 0.5 ± 0.09nM for the Sn6 isolate of S. neurona from a horse and 1.1 ± 0.6 nM for the SnOP15 isolate of S. neurona from an opossum. Levamisole was toxic at 5 μg/ml and no synergism was observed when decoquinate was combined with levamisole and tested against the Sn3YFP isolate of S. neurona. Decoquinate was cidal for developing schizonts of S. neurona at 240 nM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular genetic transfection of the coccidian parasite Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Zhang, Deqing; Breathnach, Cormac C; Vaishnava, Shipra; Striepen, Boris; Howe, Daniel K

    2006-11-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that is the major cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). The biology of this pathogen remains poorly understood in part due to unavailability of molecular genetic tools. Hence, with an objective to develop DNA transfection capabilities for S. neurona, the 5' flanking region of the SnSAG1 gene was isolated from a genomic library and used to construct expression plasmids. In transient assays, the reporter molecules beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) could be detected in electroporated S. neurona, thereby confirming the feasibility of transgene expression in this organism. Stable transformation of S. neurona was achieved using a mutant dihydrofolate reductase thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene of Toxoplasma gondii that confers resistance to pyrimethamine. This selection system was used to create transgenic S. neurona that stably express beta-gal and YFP. As shown in this study, these transgenic clones can be useful for analyzing growth rate of parasites in vitro and for assessing drug sensitivities. More importantly, the DNA transfection methods described herein should greatly facilitate studies examining intracellular parasitism by this important coccidian pathogen.

  19. Sarcocystis neurona retinochoroiditis in a sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Thomas, N J

    2011-12-29

    Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of fatal disease in sea otters in the USA. Encephalitis is the predominant lesion and parasites are confined to the central nervous system and muscles. Here we report retinochoroiditis in a sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni) found dead on Copalis Beach, WA, USA. Salient lesions were confined to the brain and eye. Multifocal nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis was present in the cerebrum and cerebellum associated with S. neurona schizonts. The retina of one eye had a focus of inflammation that contained numerous S. neurona schizonts and merozoites. The focus extended from the retinal pigment epithelium inward through all layers of the retina, but inflammation was most concentrated at the inner surface of the tapetum and the outer retina. The inner and outer nuclear layers of the retina were disorganized and irregular at the site of inflammation. There was severe congestion and mild hemorrhage in the choroid, and mild hemorrhage into the vitreous body. Immunohistochemistry with S. neurona-specific polyclonal rabbit antibodies stained schizonts and merozoites. To our knowledge this is the first report of S. neurona-associated retinochoroiditis in any naturally infected animal. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Self-mating in the definitive host potentiates clonal outbreaks of the apicomplexan parasites Sarcocystis neurona and Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jered M Wendte

    Full Text Available Tissue-encysting coccidia, including Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, are heterogamous parasites with sexual and asexual life stages in definitive and intermediate hosts, respectively. During its sexual life stage, T. gondii reproduces either by genetic out-crossing or via clonal amplification of a single strain through self-mating. Out-crossing has been experimentally verified as a potent mechanism capable of producing offspring possessing a range of adaptive and virulence potentials. In contrast, selfing and other life history traits, such as asexual expansion of tissue-cysts by oral transmission among intermediate hosts, have been proposed to explain the genetic basis for the clonal population structure of T. gondii. In this study, we investigated the contributing roles self-mating and sexual recombination play in nature to maintain clonal population structures and produce or expand parasite clones capable of causing disease epidemics for two tissue encysting parasites. We applied high-resolution genotyping against strains isolated from a T. gondii waterborne outbreak that caused symptomatic disease in 155 immune-competent people in Brazil and a S. neurona outbreak that resulted in a mass mortality event in Southern sea otters. In both cases, a single, genetically distinct clone was found infecting outbreak-exposed individuals. Furthermore, the T. gondii outbreak clone was one of several apparently recombinant progeny recovered from the local environment. Since oocysts or sporocysts were the infectious form implicated in each outbreak, the expansion of the epidemic clone can be explained by self-mating. The results also show that out-crossing preceded selfing to produce the virulent T. gondii clone. For the tissue encysting coccidia, self-mating exists as a key adaptation potentiating the epidemic expansion and transmission of newly emerged parasite clones that can profoundly shape parasite population genetic structures or cause

  1. Self-mating in the definitive host potentiates clonal outbreaks of the apicomplexan parasites Sarcocystis neurona and Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendte, Jered M; Miller, Melissa A; Lambourn, Dyanna M; Magargal, Spencer L; Jessup, David A; Grigg, Michael E

    2010-12-23

    Tissue-encysting coccidia, including Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, are heterogamous parasites with sexual and asexual life stages in definitive and intermediate hosts, respectively. During its sexual life stage, T. gondii reproduces either by genetic out-crossing or via clonal amplification of a single strain through self-mating. Out-crossing has been experimentally verified as a potent mechanism capable of producing offspring possessing a range of adaptive and virulence potentials. In contrast, selfing and other life history traits, such as asexual expansion of tissue-cysts by oral transmission among intermediate hosts, have been proposed to explain the genetic basis for the clonal population structure of T. gondii. In this study, we investigated the contributing roles self-mating and sexual recombination play in nature to maintain clonal population structures and produce or expand parasite clones capable of causing disease epidemics for two tissue encysting parasites. We applied high-resolution genotyping against strains isolated from a T. gondii waterborne outbreak that caused symptomatic disease in 155 immune-competent people in Brazil and a S. neurona outbreak that resulted in a mass mortality event in Southern sea otters. In both cases, a single, genetically distinct clone was found infecting outbreak-exposed individuals. Furthermore, the T. gondii outbreak clone was one of several apparently recombinant progeny recovered from the local environment. Since oocysts or sporocysts were the infectious form implicated in each outbreak, the expansion of the epidemic clone can be explained by self-mating. The results also show that out-crossing preceded selfing to produce the virulent T. gondii clone. For the tissue encysting coccidia, self-mating exists as a key adaptation potentiating the epidemic expansion and transmission of newly emerged parasite clones that can profoundly shape parasite population genetic structures or cause devastating disease

  2. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charan Babu HS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple bone cysts (SBC are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two decades of life. Here we report a case of solitary bone cyst mimicking a periapical cyst of a mandibular molar in a 37-year-old patient.

  3. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hs, Charan Babu; Rai, Bhagawan Das; Nair, Manju A; Astekar, Madhusudan S

    2012-05-29

    Simple bone cysts (SBC) are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two decades of life. Here we report a case of solitary bone cyst mimicking a periapical cyst of a mandibular molar in a 37-year-old patient.

  4. Management of Renal Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbant, Ismail; Can Sener, Nevzat; Firat, Hacer; Yeşil, Süleyman; Zengin, Kürşad; Yalcınkaya, Fatih; Imamoglu, Abdurrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Renal cysts have a high prevalence in the general population, and their estimated incidence increases with age. Renal cyst aspiration (usually with sclerotherapy) or open/laparoscopic decortication is a generally effective and safe method in the treatment of symptomatic simple renal cysts. The success rates of laparoscopic decortication and percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy were compared to assist in the decision making for the procedure. Methods: A total of 184 patients with symptomatic simple renal cysts were treated with either laparoscopic decortication in 149 cases or percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy in 35 cases. The follow-up period was approximately 35 months, and the symptomatic and radiologic success rates of the 2 techniques were compared retrospectively. Results: Laparoscopic decortication was found to have high success rates, a low recurrence rate, and minimal morbidity. Percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy is an outpatient procedure with a minimally higher recurrence rate. Conclusion: When a symptomatic cyst is encountered and treatment of the cyst is indicated, laparoscopic decortication is a more efficient method that offers better results than percutaneous aspiration-sclerotherapy. PMID:25848184

  5. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  6. Primary intradural extramedullary hydatid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahilogullari, Gokmen; Tuna, Hakan; Aydin, Zafer; Colpan, Efkan; Egemen, Nihat

    2005-04-01

    Spinal hydatid cysts account for 1% of all cases of hydatid disease; primary intradural hydatid cysts are uncommon. We present a case of pathologically confirmed intradural spinal cyst hydatid in an otherwise healthy patient who showed no other evidence of systemic hydatid cyst disease. The patient presented with back pain, paraparesis, and weakness. An intradural extramedullary cystic lesion was identified with magnetic resonance imaging and was shown to be a hydatid cyst by histopathologic examination after surgical removal. To our knowledge, this is the 25th case of hydatid cyst at an intradural extramedullary location reported in the literature.

  7. Bone cysts: unicameral and aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascard, E; Gomez-Brouchet, A; Lambot, K

    2015-02-01

    Simple and aneurysmal bone cysts are benign lytic bone lesions, usually encountered in children and adolescents. Simple bone cyst is a cystic, fluid-filled lesion, which may be unicameral (UBC) or partially separated. UBC can involve all bones, but usually the long bone metaphysis and otherwise primarily the proximal humerus and proximal femur. The classic aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an expansive and hemorrhagic tumor, usually showing characteristic translocation. About 30% of ABCs are secondary, without translocation; they occur in reaction to another, usually benign, bone lesion. ABCs are metaphyseal, excentric, bulging, fluid-filled and multicameral, and may develop in all bones of the skeleton. On MRI, the fluid level is evocative. It is mandatory to distinguish ABC from UBC, as prognosis and treatment are different. UBCs resolve spontaneously between adolescence and adulthood; the main concern is the risk of pathologic fracture. Treatment in non-threatening forms consists in intracystic injection of methylprednisolone. When there is a risk of fracture, especially of the femoral neck, surgery with curettage, filling with bone substitute or graft and osteosynthesis may be required. ABCs are potentially more aggressive, with a risk of bone destruction. Diagnosis must systematically be confirmed by biopsy, identifying soft-tissue parts, as telangiectatic sarcoma can mimic ABC. Intra-lesional sclerotherapy with alcohol is an effective treatment. In spinal ABC and in aggressive lesions with a risk of fracture, surgical treatment should be preferred, possibly after preoperative embolization. The risk of malignant transformation is very low, except in case of radiation therapy.

  8. Detection of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona, neospora spp., and Toxoplasma gondii in horses from Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum samples from 315 horses from Costa Rica, Central America were examined for the presence of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., and Toxoplasma gondii using the SnSAG2 ELISA, the NhSAG1 ELISA, and the modified agglutination test, respectively. Anti-S. neurona antibodies were f...

  9. Prevalence of antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi in horses from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The risk of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) to horses in Mexico has not been established. Serum samples from 495 horses in Durango State, Mexico were examined for the presence of antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based o...

  10. Bobcat (Lynx rufus) as a new natural intermediate host for Sarcocystis neurona

    Science.gov (United States)

    The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of severe clinical disease of horses (called equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, EPM), marine mammals, companion animals, and several species of wildlife animals in the Americas. The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is its definitive hos...

  11. Detection of zoonotic protozoa Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis suihominis in wild boars from Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food safety regulations require the control of presence of protozoa in meats destined for human consumption. Wild boar (Sus scrofa) meat may constitute a source of zoonoses. A 23.8% (688/2881) seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies, and 72.2% (662/910) Sarcocystis sarcocysts prevalence ...

  12. Sarcocystis arctica (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae): ultrastructural description and its new host record, the Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarcocystis sarcocysts are common in muscles of herbivores but are rare in muscles of carnivores. Here, we report sarcocysts in muscle of an Alaskan wolf (Canis lupus) from Alaska, USA for the first time. Sarcocysts extracted from tongue of the wolf were up to 900 µm long, slender, and appeared to h...

  13. Benign ear cyst or tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteomas; Exostoses; Tumor - ear; Cysts - ear; Ear cysts; Ear tumors; Bony tumor of the ear canal ... bony tumors of the ear canal (exostoses and osteomas) are caused by excess growth of bone. Repeated ...

  14. Acute, fatal Sarcocystis calchasi-associated hepatitis in Roller pigeons (Columbia livia f. dom.) at Philadelphia Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four Roller pigeons (Columba livia f. dom.) at the Philadelphia Zoo died suddenly. Necropsy examination revealed macroscopic hepatitis. Microscopically, the predominant lesions were in liver, characterized with necrosis and mixed cell inflammatory response. Sarcocystis calchasi-like schizonts and fr...

  15. Ovarian chocolate cysts. Staging with relaxation time in MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimura, Kazuro; Ishida, Tetsuya; Takemori, Masayuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Tanaka, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Katsuhito; Shimizu, Tadafumi; Kono, Michio.

    1988-10-01

    Accurate preoperative staging of ovarian chocolate cysts is very important because recent hormonal therapy has been effective in low stage patients. However, it has been difficult to assess the preoperative stage of ovarian chocolate cysts. We evaluated the diagnostic potential of MRI in preoperative staging of 15 overian chocolate cysts. It was well known that the older the ovarian chocolate cyst was the more iron content it had. We examined the iron contents effect on T1 and T2 relaxation times in surgically confirmed chocolate cysts (stage II: 3 cases, stage III: 3 cases and stage IV: 9 cases by AFS classification, 1985) employing the 0.15-T MR system and 200 MHz spectrometer. There was a positive linear relation between T1 of the lesion using the MR system (T1) and T1 of the resected contents using the spectrometer (sp-T1); r = 0.93. The same relation was revealed between T2 and sp-T2; r = 0.87. It was indicated that T1 and T2 using the MR system was accurate. There was a negative linear relation between T1 and the iron contents ( r = -0.81) but no relation between T2 and the iron contents. T1 was 412 +- 91 msec for stage II, 356 +- 126 msec for stage III and 208 +- 30 msec for stage IV. T1 for stage IV was shorter than that for stage II and III, statistically significant differences were noted (p < 0.05). Thus, T1 was useful in differentiating a fresh from an old ovarian chocolate cyst. We concluded that T1 relaxation time using the MR system was useful for the staging of an ovarian chocolate cyst without surgery.

  16. Cervical synovial cyst: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Found, Ernest; Bewyer, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    A 47-year-old female school teacher with a six-week history of left-sided scapular and arm pain is presented. We report her evaluation and treatment Although lumbar degenerative synovial cysts have been reported over 200 times in the literature,6 cervical synovial cysts are much more rare. This case reports a cervicothoracic junction degenerative synovial cyst presenting as radiculopathy.

  17. Pilonidal cyst of the clitoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanis, Margaux J; Momeni, Mazdak; Zakashansky, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    A pilonidal cyst is an epithelialized sinus tract or cyst containing hair follicles with a surrounding inflammatory reaction. It usually develops in the sacrococcygeal region with few reports of its development in the genitalia. We present a case of a periclitoral pilonidal cyst in a young woman and its management.

  18. SEBACEOUS CYSTS MINOR SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Gusti Ayu Agung Laksemi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Minor surgery is small surgery or localized example cut ulcers and boils, cyst excision, and suturing. Somethings that need to be considered in the preparation of the surgery is minor tools, operating rooms and operating tables, lighting, maintenance of tools and equipment, sterilization and desinfection equipment, preparation of patients and anesthesia. In general cysts is walled chamber that consist of fluid, cells and the remaining cells. Cysts are formed not due to inflammation although then be inflamed. Lining of the cysts wall is composed of fibrous tissue and usually coated epithelial cells or endothelial. Cysts formed by dilated glands and closed channels, glands, blood vessels, lymph channels or layers of the epidermis. Contents of the cysts wall consists of the results is serum, lymph, sweat sebum, epithelial cells, the stratum corneum, and hair. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  19. New observations on meniscal cysts

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    Anderson, Jada Jean; Connor, Gregory F.; Helms, Clyde A. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of meniscal cysts, assess the frequency of various magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics, and emphasize radiographic observations not commonly reported. A total of 2,095 consecutive knee MR imaging reports from a 22 month period were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of meniscal cysts. Two musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed the cases where cysts were reported. A meniscal cyst was considered present if abnormally increased signal was identified within an enlarged meniscus (i.e., intrameniscal cyst) or if a loculated fluid-intensity lesion with a clear connection to the adjacent meniscus was identified (i.e., parameniscal cyst). Presence or absence of a meniscal tear, intrameniscal and parameniscal signal intensity, patient age, sex, location of meniscal cyst, presence of discoid meniscus, and size of the parameniscal cyst component were recorded. All knee imaging examinations were performed on a 1.5T MR unit. Imaging findings were correlated with arthroscopic reports when available. A total of 167 cases (8.0%) of meniscal cysts were diagnosed in 161 patients. Of the 167 cysts, 69 (41.3%) were located in the lateral meniscus and 98 (58.7%) in the medial meniscus. In 6 patients (3.7%), meniscal cysts were present in both menisci of the same knee. Twelve (7.2%) meniscal cysts were associated with discoid menisci. Ninety-seven (57.8%) meniscal cysts were associated with meniscal tears. Of the total number of meniscal cysts, 104 (62.3%) had a parameniscal cyst. An isolated intrameniscal cyst was present in 63 (37.7%) cases. One hundred (96%) of the parameniscal cyst components were isointense to fluid on T2-weighted FSE images. All cysts exhibited abnormal intrameniscal signal. Only 14 (8.4%) of the intrameniscal components were isointense to fluid on T2-weighted FSE images. The arthroscopic reports of 88 of the 161 (54.7%) patients were available for review and correlation. A tear extending to

  20. Abdominal neurenteric cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Radoje (C)olovi(c); MarJan Micev; Miodrag Jovanovi(c); Slavko Mati(c); Nikica Grubor; Henry Dushan E Atkinson

    2008-01-01

    Neurenteric cysts are extremely rare congenital anomalies, often presenting in the first 5 years of life, and are caused by an incomplete separation of the notochord from the foregut during the third week of embryogenesis. They are frequently accompanied with spinal or gastrointestinal abnormalities, but the latter may be absent in adults. Although usually located in the thorax, neurenteric cysts may be found along the entire spine. We present a 24-year-old woman admitted for epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting, low grade fever and leucocytosis. She underwent cystgastrostomy for a loculated cyst of the distal pancreas at the age of 4 years, which recurred when she was at the age of 11 years. Ultrasound and computer tomograghy (CT) scan revealed a 16cm×15cm cystic mass in the body and tail of pancreas, with a 6-7 mm thickened wall. Laboratory data and chest X-ray were normal and spinal radiographs did not show any structural abnormalities. The patient underwent a complete cyst excision, and after an uneventful recovery, remained symptom-free without recurrence during the 5-year follow-up. The cyst was found to contain 1200mL of pale viscous fluid. It was covered by a primitive singlelayered cuboidal epithelium, along with specialized antral glandular parenchyma and hypoplastic primitive gastric mucosa. Focal glandular groups resembling those of the body of the stomach were also seen. In addition, ciliary respiratory epithelium, foci of squamous metaplasia and mucinous glands were present. The wall of the cyst contained a muscular layer, neuroglial tissue with plexogenic nerve fascicles, Paccini corpuscle-like structures, hyperplastic neuroganglionar elements and occasional psammomatous bodies, as well as fibroblast-like areas of surrounding stroma. Cartilagenous tissue was not found in any part of the cyst. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of neurogenic elements marked by S-100, GFAP, NF and NSE. The gastric epithelium showed mostly CK7 and EMA

  1. Symptomatic sacral perineurial (Tarlov) cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajko, Tomislav; Kovać, Damir; Kudelić, Nenad; Kovac, Lana

    2009-12-01

    Sacral perineurial (Tarlov) cysts are rare lesions. Over a seven year period 4000 patients underwent surgery for lumbar disk herniation. In three patients neurological symptoms were caused by large sacral perineurial cysts. Methods of choice for diagnosis of Tarlov cysts are lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography myelography. The majority of Tarlov cysts are asymptomatic. In case of large (> or = 1.5 cm) and symptomatic perineurial cyst, as in three patients reported in this article, microsurgical treatment was successful. Although rare, perineurial (Tarlov) cysts must be taken into consideration when approaching to patient with low back and radicular pain. Authors review the medical literature, pathological and pathophysiological features and treatment options of sacral perineurial cysts.

  2. Acquired iris inclusion cysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aruna; Dharmasena; Priya; Bhatt; Jeffrey; Kwartz

    2014-01-01

    Dear Sir/Madam,The development of epithelial implantation cysts of the iris is rare and they pose a major therapeutic challenge due to the poor overall surgical outcome and high risk of recurrence.Several conservative and invasive treatment strategies such as needle aspiration,viscodissection,endolaser photocoagulation,endodiathermy,cryotherapy,

  3. Nasal dermoid sinus cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauchois, R; Laccourreye, O; Bremond, D; Testud, R; Küffer, R; Monteil, J P

    1994-08-01

    Nasal dermoid sinus cyst is one of the diagnoses of midline nasal masses in children. This retrospective study analyzes the various theories regarding the origin of this congenital abnormality, the differential diagnosis, and the value of magnetic resonance imaging, as well as the various surgical options available.

  4. Odonto calcifying cyst

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    Nalini Aswath

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC is reported to be associated with odontoma in 24% of cases. Separation of the cases of calcifying odontogenic cyst associated with odontoma (COCaO may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this lesion. The literature revealed 52 cases of COCaO. The male to female ratio was 1:1.9, with a mean age of 16 years. Most common location was the maxilla (61.5%. The radiographic appearance of most cases (80.5% was a well-defined, mixed radiolucent-radiopaque lesion. Histologically, the lesions consisted of a single large cyst with tooth-like structures as an integral part, giving the impression of a single lesion. In addition to the unique histologic features, differences in gender and distribution were found between the cases of COCaO and those of simple COC. COCaO may be regarded as a separate entity and classified as a benign, mixed odontogenic tumor. The term odontocalcifying odontogenic cyst is suggested.

  5. Evidence to support horses as natural intermediate hosts for Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Thomas; Murphy, Alice J; Kiupel, Matti; Bell, Julia A; Rossano, Mary G; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-10-10

    Opossums (Didelphis spp.) are the definitive host for the protozoan parasite Sarcocystis neurona, the causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Opossums shed sporocysts in feces that can be ingested by true intermediate hosts (cats, raccoons, skunks, armadillos and sea otters). Horses acquire the parasite by ingestion of feed or water contaminated by opossum feces. However, horses have been classified as aberrant intermediate hosts because the terminal asexual sarcocyst stage that is required for transmission to the definitive host has not been found in their tissues despite extensive efforts to search for them [Dubey, J.P., Lindsay, D.S., Saville, W.J., Reed, S.M., Granstrom, D.E., Speer, C.A., 2001b. A review of Sarcocystis neurona and equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Vet. Parasitol. 95, 89-131]. In a 4-month-old filly with neurological disease consistent with EPM, we demonstrate schizonts in the brain and spinal cord and mature sarcocysts in the tongue and skeletal muscle, both with genetic and morphological characteristics of S. neurona. The histological and electron microscopic morphology of the schizonts and sarcocysts were identical to published features of S. neurona [Stanek, J.F., Dubey, J.P., Oglesbee, M.J., Reed, S.M., Lindsay, D.S., Capitini, L.A., Njoku, C.J., Vittitow, K.L., Saville, W.J., 2002. Life cycle of Sarcocystis neurona in its natural intermediate host, the raccoon, Procyon lotor. J. Parasitol. 88, 1151-1158]. DNA from schizonts and sarcocysts from this horse produced Sarcocystis specific 334bp PCR products [Tanhauser, S.M., Yowell, C.A., Cutler, T.J., Greiner, E.C., MacKay, R.J., Dame, J.B., 1999. Multiple DNA markers differentiate Sarcocystis neurona and Sarcocystis falcatula. J. Parasitol. 85, 221-228]. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of these PCR products showed banding patterns characteristic of S. neurona. Sequencing, alignment and comparison of both schizont and sarcocyst DNA

  6. Treatment of spinal synovial cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydon, Mohamad; Papadimitriou, Kyriakos; Witham, Timothy; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Sciubba, Daniel; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Ali

    2013-02-01

    Spinal synovial cysts are a known cause of back pain and radiculopathy. With the advent of high-resolution imaging techniques, synovial cysts are increasingly diagnosed. There are a variety of treatment options for these lesions. A systematic literature review of published articles reporting outcomes after nonsurgical and surgical management of spinal synovial cysts was performed. There were 51 published studies regarding the treatment of synovial cysts identified. Treatment modalities include observation, steroid injections, percutaneous cyst aspiration, hemilaminectomy or bilateral laminectomy with and without instrumented fusion, and minimally invasive cyst excision. Based on review of the treatment modalities and outcomes, recommendations for the management of patients with synovial cysts are proposed. Observation can be considered in cases where there is no intractable pain. High-risk surgical patients with intractable pain may consider corticosteroid injection or percutaneous cyst aspiration; however, the failure rate of such a procedure approaches 50%. Patients with intractable pain are candidates for surgical resection of the symptomatic cyst. In cases of significant neurologic deficit, motor weakness, back pain, multiple synovial cysts, or spondylolisthesis, bilateral laminectomy and instrumented fusion may offer the best long-term outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. JNK signaling regulates E-cadherin junctions in germline cysts and determines primordial follicle formation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Wanbao; Wang, Ye; Wang, Zhengpin; Xin, Qiliang; Wang, Yijing; Feng, Lizhao; Zhao, Lihua; Wen, Jia; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Chao; Xia, Guoliang

    2016-05-15

    Physiologically, the size of the primordial follicle pool determines the reproductive lifespan of female mammals, while its establishment largely depends on a process of germline cyst breakdown during the perinatal period. The mechanisms regulating this process are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling is crucial for germline cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation. JNK was specifically localized in oocytes and its activity increased as germline cyst breakdown progressed. Importantly, disruption of JNK signaling with a specific inhibitor (SP600125) or knockdown technology (Lenti-JNK-shRNAs) resulted in significantly suppressed cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation in cultured mouse ovaries. Our results show that E-cadherin is intensely expressed in germline cysts, and that its decline is necessary for oocyte release from the cyst. However, inhibition of JNK signaling leads to aberrantly enhanced localization of E-cadherin at oocyte-oocyte contact sites. WNT4 expression is upregulated after SP600125 treatment. Additionally, similar to the effect of SP600125 treatment, WNT4 overexpression delays cyst breakdown and is accompanied by abnormal E-cadherin expression patterns. In conclusion, our results suggest that JNK signaling, which is inversely correlated with WNT4, plays an important role in perinatal germline cyst breakdown and primordial follicle formation by regulating E-cadherin junctions between oocytes in mouse ovaries. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Biological characterisation of Sarcocystis neurona isolated from a Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, D.S.; Thomas, N.J.; Dubey, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona was isolated from the brain of a juvenile, male southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) suffering from CNS disease. Schizonts and merozoites in tissue sections of the otter's brain reacted with anti-S. neurona antiserum immunohistochemically. Development in cell culture was by endopolyogeny and mature schizonts were first observed at 3 days postinoculation. PCR of merozoite DNA using primer pairs JNB33/JNB54 and restriction enzyme digestion of the 1100 bp product with Dra I indicated the organism was S. neurona. Four of four interferon-γ gene knockout mice inoculated with merozoites developed S. neurona-associated encephalitis. Antibodies to S. neurona but not Sarcocystis falcatula, Toxoplasma gondii, or Neospora caninum were present in the serum of inoculated mice. This is the first isolation of S. neurona from the brain of a non-equine host.

  9. Detection of Zoonotic Protozoa Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis suihominis in Wild Boars from Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Bernal, R; Pérez-Martín, J E; Reina, D; Serrano, F J; Frontera, E; Fuentes, I; Dubey, J P

    2016-08-01

    Food safety regulations require the control of the presence of protozoa in meats destined for human consumption. Wild boar (Sus scrofa) meat may constitute a source of zoonoses. A 23.8% (688/2881) seroprevalence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies and 72.2% (662/910) Sarcocystis sarcocysts prevalence were detected among wild boars hunted in Southwestern areas of Spain. Identity of Sarcocystis spp. was performed by RFLP-PCR and sequencing, detecting S. miescheriana (7/8) and the zoonotic S. suihominis (1/8). Risk assessment studies of these coccidian in meats destined to human consumption are needed. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Eosinophilic myositis resulted from Sarcocystis infection in prime marbled beef of Japanese black cattle

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    Tohru Kimura

    Full Text Available Partial changes of color (greenish to brownish were found in prime marbled beef of Japanese black cattle. The disseminated lesions of the skeletal muscles were histopathologically examined in relation to Sarcocystis infection. The lesions in the muscles showed granulomas with inflammatory cell infiltration. The sarcocysts had a distinct wall, which was radically striated by palisading villar protrusions. The sarcocyst wall was surrounded by degenerative eosinophils and necrotic muscle fibers. In conclusion, eosinophilic myositis in prime marbled beef of Japanese black cattle resulted from Sarcocystis spp. infection. The muscular lesions were characterized by the presence of granulomas and capsulated sarcocysts surrounded by numerous eosinophils. [Vet. World 2011; 4(11.000: 500-502

  11. [Arachnoid cysts: Embriology and pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Conde, Mario; Martín-Viota, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    There is still great controversy surrounding the origin of the arachnoid cyst. The most accepted theory in the case of congenital cysts explains how they are formed from an anomalous development of the arachnoid membrane, which is unfolded allowing the accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid inside and creating a cyst. This theory seems to explain the origin of convexity and sylvian cistern arachnoid cysts, whereas those in other locations might be due to other mechanisms. In the anatomopathological analysis, the arachnoid cyst wall can be seen as having few differences from normal, although thickened due to an increase quantity of collagenous material. A description of the embryological development of the arachnoid layer and cyst formation is presented, describing the main anatomopathological findings. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Two spinal arachnoid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puijlaert, J.B.C.M.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Dulken, H. van

    1985-05-01

    Two cases of spinal arachnoid cysts are reported. One is extradurally located, the other intradurally. The first is only documented with myelography, the second also by subsequent CT scanning. Some clinical and diagnostic aspects of the lesion are discussed. The aim of this report is to add two new cases to the literature and to emphasize the role of high-resolution CT scanning in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  13. A Wayward Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antwan Atia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Pseudocysts are a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. These are usually located within the pancreas but they can occur at other sites as well, including the mediastinum, neck, pelvis and rarely in the liver as in our case. The diagnosis of intrahepatic pancreatic pseudocyst relies on the demonstration of a high amylase level in the sampled cystic fluid in the absence of infection or neoplasm. Case report A 60-year-old man with a history of chronic pancreatitis presents with a clinical and laboratory picture suggestive of acute exacerbation of his pancreatitis. A computed tomogram (CT scan of the abdomen revealed a pancreatic pseudocyst and a cystic lesion involving both lobes of the liver. CT diagnostic aspiration of the intrahepatic cyst revealed high amylase level (greater than 20,000 U/L. The cyst was treated with percutaneous drainage with complete resolution of the cyst. Conclusion In the setting of pancreatitis, intrahepatic pancreatic pseudocyst should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesion of the liver.

  14. Prenatal Diagnosis of Arachnoid Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are a rare central nervous system malformation, representing only 1% of all intracranial masses in newborns. Primary (congenital arachnoid cysts are benign accumulation of clear fluid between the dura and the brain substance throughout the cerebrospinal axis in relation to the arachnoid membrane and do not communicate with the subarachnoid space. Secondary (acquired arachnoid cysts result from hemorrhage, trauma, and infection and usually communicate with the subarachnoid space. The common locations of arachnoid cysts are the surface of the brain at the level of main brain fissures, such as sylvian, rolandic and interhemispheric fissures, sella turcica, the anterior cranial fossa, and the middle cranial fossa. Arachnoid cysts may be associated with ventriculomegaly and dysgenesis of corpus callosum. Prenatal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have led to the increased diagnosis of fetal arachnoid cysts. This article provides a thorough review of fetal arachnoid cysts, including prenatal diagnosis, differential diagnosis and associated chromosomal abnormalities, as well as comprehensive illustrations of perinatal imaging findings of fetal arachnoid cysts. Prenatal diagnosis of intracranial hypoechoic lesions should include a differential diagnosis of arachnoid cysts and prompt genetic investigations.

  15. Fatal hepatic sarcocystosis in a captive black bear (Ursus americanus) associated with Sarcocystis canis-like infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jennifer L; Haldorson, Gary J; Bradway, Dan S; Britton, Ann P

    2011-03-01

    Fatal hepatic sarcocystosis was diagnosed in a 13-year-old captive black bear (Ursus americanus) with a history of acute onset of vomiting, polyuria, polydipsia, and bilirubinuria. Gross lesions included severe icterus, multisystemic hemorrhage, and gall bladder edema. The most significant microscopic lesion was severe necrotizing hepatitis with intralesional protozoa that reproduced by endopolygeny consistent with a Sarcocystis spp. Infrequent microglial nodules were randomly scattered within the white matter of the cerebral cortices, thalamus, and brainstem, but intralesional protozoal schizonts were not observed. In the liver, immunohistochemistry was positive for Sarcocystis spp. and negative for Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora spp. Positive staining was not observed in the brain. Genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of liver and brain; in both tissues, PCR was positive for Sarcocystis spp. Sequence analysis of the PCR amplicons revealed 100% identity to the published sequences of Sarcocystis canis and Sarcocystis arctosi.

  16. Molecular identification of Sarcocystis rileyi sporocysts in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakas, Petras; Liaugaudaitė, Simona; Kutkienė, Liuda; Sruoga, Aniolas; Švažas, Saulius

    2015-05-01

    Despite the fact that Sarcocystis rileyi is one of the earliest described species of the genus Sarcocystis forming macrocysts in ducks, the life cycle of this species is still unknown in Europe. Sarcocystis spp. oocysts/sporocysts were observed in faeces of four of 23 (17.4 %) and in small intestine mucosal scrapings of four of 20 (20.0 %) red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and in small intestine mucosal scrapings of seven of 13 (53.8 %) raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) hunted in Lithuania. A very small number of Sarcocystis sporocysts measuring 11.9 × 8.3 μm (n = 5) was found in faecal samples, whereas considerably more sporulated Sarcocystis oocysts and free sporocysts were detected in the small intestines of red foxes and raccoon dogs. These sporocysts measured 12.9 × 8.1 μm (n = 16) and 12.1 × 8.1 μm (n = 54) in red foxes and raccoon dogs, respectively. Using species-specific PCR and subsequent sequencing, internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS-1) region partial sequences of oocysts/sporocysts from small intestine mucosal scrapings of six raccoon dogs and three red foxes were identified as belonging to S. rileyi. The present study provides strong evidence showing that the red fox and the raccoon dog can serve as final hosts of S. rileyi in Europe; however, transmission experiments are needed for the ultimate approval.

  17. Cyst initiation, cyst expansion and progression in ADPKD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Happé, Hester

    2012-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by large fluid-filled cysts and progressive deterioration of renal function necessitating renal replacement therapy. In this thesis different phases of ADPKD were studied. First, we studied the initiation of cyst formation. We sh

  18. Heterotopic gastrointestinal cyst partially lined with dermoid cyst epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivelini, MM; Soubhia, AMP; Biazolla, ER; Neto, SC

    2001-01-01

    We report a rare heterotopic gastrointestinal cyst located in the right submandibular/submental area with histopathologic features that included portions resembling a dermoid cyst. Some theories of pathogenesis are discussed, and an origin of this lesion in entrapped undifferentiated endodermal cell

  19. Neurenteric cysts of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J J Savage

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurenteric cysts account for 0.7-1.3% of spinal axis tumors. These rare lesions result from the inappropriate partitioning of the embryonic notochordal plate and presumptive endoderm during the third week of human development. Heterotopic rests of epithelium reminiscent of gastrointestinal and respiratory tissue lead to eventual formation of compressive cystic lesions of the pediatric and adult spine. Histopathological analysis of neurenteric tissue reveals a highly characteristic structure of columnar or cuboidal epithelium with or without cilia and mucus globules. Patients with symptomatic neurenteric cysts typically present in the second and third decades of life with size-dependent myelopathic and/or radicular signs. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are essential diagnostic tools for the delineation of cyst form and overlying osseous architecture. A variety of approaches have been employed in the treatment of neurenteric cysts each with a goal of total surgical resection. Although long-term outcome analyses are limited, data available indicate that surgical intervention in the case of neurenteric cysts results in a high frequency of resolution of neurological deficit with minimal morbidity. However, recurrence rates as high as 37% have been reported with incomplete resection secondary to factors such as cyst adhesion to surrounding structure and unclear dissection planes. Here we present a systematic review of English language literature from January 1966 to December 2009 utilizing MEDLINE with the following search terminology: neurenteric cyst, enterogenous cyst, spinal cord tumor, spinal dysraphism, intraspinal cyst, intramedullary cyst, and intradural cyst. In addition, the references of publications returned from the MEDLINE search criteria were surveyed in order to examine other pertinent reports.

  20. Short communication: Genetic variants of Sarcocystis cruzi in infected Malaysian cattle based on 18S rDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yit Han; Fong, Mun Yik; Subramaniam, Vellayan; Shahari, Shahhaziq; Lau, Yee Ling

    2015-12-01

    Sarcocystis species are pathogenic parasites that infect a wide range of animals, including cattle. A high prevalence of cattle sarcocystosis has been reported worldwide, but its status is unknown in Malaysia. This study focused on utilizing 18S rDNA to identify Sarcocystis species in Malaysian cattle and to determine their genetic variants. In this study, only Sarcocystis cruzi was detected in Malaysian cattle. The intra-species S. cruzi phylogenetic tree analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), respectively displayed two minor groups among the parasite isolates. This finding was supported by high Wright FST value (FST=0.647). The definitive hosts (dogs) may play a fundamental role in the development of S. cruzi genetic variants. Additionally, the existence of microheterogeneity within the S. cruzi merozoites and/or distinct genetic variants arisen from independent merozoites in mature sarcocysts, possibly contributed to the existence of intra-species variations within the population.

  1. Enterogenous cyst of the testis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicola Mondaini; Gianluca Giubilei; Simone Agostini; Gabriella Nesi; Alessandro Franchi; Marco Carini

    2006-01-01

    Enterogenous cyst is a rare congenital lesion generally located in the mediastinum or the abdominal cavity. We reported the first case of testicular enterogenous cyst in a 55-year-old white male presented with testicular pain and a gradually enlarging left scrotal mass with a 2-week duration.

  2. Intrathoracic enteric foregut duplication cyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birmole B

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available A one month old male child presented with respiratory distress since day 10 of life. There was intercostal retraction and decreased air entry on the right side. Investigations revealed a well defined cystic mass in the posterior mediastinum with vertebral anomalies, the cyst was excised by posterolateral thoracotomy. Histopathology revealed it to be an enteric foregut duplication cyst.

  3. Fibular hydatid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arti Hamidreza

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid disease is caused by the tapeworm Echinococcus. Genus Echinococcus has different species including Echinococcus vogeli, Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilucularis . Echinococcus granulosus is the most common cause of hydatid disease in humans. This disease occurs either through direct ingestion of parasite eggs from contact with infected dogs or indirectly from the ingestion of contaminated water or food. Infestation of hydatid disease in humans most commonly occurs in the liver (55-70%, followed by the lungs (18-35%. Bone hydatidosis however is very rare (3%. We present herein a case of hydatid cyst of the fibula, which is an uncommon site for the occurrence of this disease.

  4. Simple cyst of urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Yang

    2014-07-01

    Simple cysts are rare in the urinary bladder and can pose a diagnostic dilemma to both the urologist and the histopathologist. No case study was found in the database of Elsevier Science Direct, Spring-Link, or PubMed. We present two cases of subserous cyst in the bladder and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the condition. The cystic lesion at bladder dome was detected by radiologic examination and confirmed by cystoscopy. In case 1, transurethral resection was first performed which was followed by partial cystectomy; In case 2, the cyst was removed with the urachus using laparoscopic surgery. The patients recovered uneventfully and the histopathology showed cysts in subserous layer of urinary bladder. The bladder cyst should be distinguished from urachal tumor, and laparoscopic partial cystectomy is the preferred operative procedure.

  5. Nonfunctional parathyroid cyst: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Molinari Nardi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Parathyroid cysts are rare clinical and pathological entities, with less than 300 cases reported. The inferior parathyroid glands are most commonly involved, with left-side predominance. Parathyroid cysts may be functional or nonfunctional, depending on their association with hypercalcemia. CASE REPORT: A 25-year-old man presented a palpable asymptomatic left-side neck mass. Ultrasound revealed a cystic structure contiguous with the left thyroid lobe. Serum ionic calcium was normal. The patient underwent left thyroid lobectomy plus isthmectomy with excision of the cyst. The histological findings revealed a parathyroid cyst. Parathyroid cysts typically present as asymptomatic neck masses, and surgical excision appears to be the treatment of choice.

  6. Paraurethral cyst. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio Vega Azcúe

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The paraurethral or Skene’s duct cyst, is a rare diagnostic entity in a newborn. It represents less than 0,5 % of congenital malformations of the urinary tract. All over the world it is reported an incidence of 1:2000 to 1:7000 in female births. In the newborn, the paraurethral cyst is caused by retention of secretions in the Skene's gland due to the obstruction of its ducts. Most of these cysts decrease in size during the first four to eight weeks, but they may cause symptoms of infection or urinary obstruction. They can also get formed from persistent embryonic remains of the mesonephric ducts (Wolffian duct, known as Gartner cysts and from the occlusion of unfused paramesonephric ducts (Müllerian. The case of a 25-day-old female, diagnosed with paraurethral cyst that underwent surgery and evolved successfully is presented.

  7. Treatment of intracranial hydatid cysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sailike Duishanbai; WEN Hao; GENG Dangmurenjiafu; LIU Chen; GUO Huai-rong; HAO Yu-jun; LIU Bo; WANG Yong-xin; LUO Kun; ZHOU Kai

    2011-01-01

    Background Echinococcosis is still endemic in many countries, including China, where it is especially prevalent in the northwest. The aim of this study was to enrich the international literature about the treatment of intracranial hydatid cysts.Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical features, radiological manifestations, and surgical outcome of 97 patients with intracranial hydatid cysts, who received surgical treatment at the Neurosurgical Department of First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University from 1985 to 2010 and followed up the patient via sending a questionnaire or telephone contact. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the Karnofsky Performance Scale Index.Results Headache and vomiting were the most common initial symptoms in our patients. Neurological deficits caused by the mass effect of the cysts were seen in 82 cases. On the X-ray, significant bone erosion was seen in only two cases with epidural hydatid cysts. Round-shaped and thin-walled homogeneous low-density cystic lesions without surrounding edema and enhancement were the main findings on computerized tomography (CT) in 95 patients with intraparenchymal hydatid cysts, while two cases with epidural hydatid cysts presented as a heterodensity lesions. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hydatid cyst presented as a round-shaped low signal lesion in T1-weighted images and high signal lesion in T2-weighted images, without enhancement after contrast media injection, while the two cases with epidural cysts presented as mixed signal masses. Surgical removal of cyst was performed in all cases. Total removal was achieved in 93 cases without rupturing the cyst wall. Only two cysts ruptured during the dissection, resulting in two surgery-related mortalities. There was no other additional neurological deficit caused directly by surgery. In 97.2% of the patients, the Karnofsky Performance Scale score was 80 to 90 at the last follow-up.Conclusions Intracranial hydatid cyst is still a

  8. Penile Epidermal Cyst: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaraguru, Veerapandian; Prabhu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal cysts also known as epidermoid cysts, is one of the common benign tumours presenting anywhere in the body. However, epidermal cyst in the penis is very rare. This condition in children is usually congenital due to abnormal embryologic closure of the median raphe; hence, it is termed as median raphe cysts (MRCs). Penile epidermal cysts may occur in adults following trauma or surgery due to epidermal elements being trapped within closed space. During wound healing, trapped squamous epithelium, undergoing keratinisation leads to cyst formation. Here, we report a rare case of patient with a penile epidermoid cyst whose main complaints was discomfort during coitus. PMID:27437298

  9. A giant traumatic iris cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lott Pooi Wah; Tan Boon Hooi; Leow Sue Ngein; Shuaibah Abdul Ghani; Visvaraja AL Subrayan

    2015-01-01

    A 52 year-old construction worker presented with progressive painful blurring of vision in the left eye associated with redness for past 1 month. There was a history of penetrating injury in the same eye 10 years ago and he underwent primary wound toilet and suturing, lens removal with intraocular lens implantation. Slit lamp examination revealed a corneal scar at 9’oclock, a large transilluminant iris cyst superotemporally and adherent to corneal endothelium. It was extended from angle of the pupil and obstructing the visual axis. The patient underwent excision of an iris cyst through superior limbal incision. Viscodissection was done to separate the cyst from the corneal endothelium and underlying iris stroma. Trypan blue ophthalmic solution was injected into the cyst to stain the cyst capsule. Post operatively 7 days, vision improved to 6/7.5 without complication. There was no recurrence up to 1 year postoperation. Histopathological finding revealed a benign cyst mass lined by simple cuboidal to non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium. We had achieved a good surgical outcome with no complication to date for our case study. We advocate this modified surgical method to completely remove iris cyst.

  10. Artemia cyst production in Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, Liudmila I.; Litvinenko, Aleksandr I.; Boiko, Elena G.; Kutsanov, Kirill

    2015-11-01

    In Western Siberia (Russia) there are about 100 Artemia lakes with total area over 1 600 km2. Geographically these lakes are located between 51°-56°N and 61°-82°E. In general these lakes are shallow (depth less than 1.5 m), small or medium size (0.1 to 10 km2); they are chloride; their total salinity is from 40 to 250 g/L. The harvesting of cysts per year is only in 20-40 lakes. In Russia 550 tons of dry Artemia cysts (14%-18% of the world production) were harvested annually. This includes about 350 tons in the Altai region and 200 tons in other regions. During our regular 20-year study period the cyst harvest was: 95 tons in Kurgan; 65 tons in Omsk, 20 tons in Novosibirsk, 20 tons in Tyumen. Ways of increasing cyst harvest in Russia are considered in this article. During the last 30 years the harvest of cysts in Russia has increased from 7-20 to 500-600 tons. A significant influence of dryness of the year was found on productivity in selected lakes, but taken for all the lakes together, the relationship was not significant. The optimal salinity for productivity of cysts in the lakes was determined. Analysis of productivity of the lakes and the harvesting results showed that the stocks of cysts are underutilized by approximately 1.7 times.

  11. Computed tomography of arachnoid cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Min Gi; Bae, Weon Tae; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Chung, Hyun De [College of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-02-15

    The preoperative diagnosis of intracranial arachnoid cysts has been simplified, and made more rapid and accurate with computed tomography (CT). Using CT cisternography, detailed anatomic and physiologic information of arachnoid cysts could be obtained. CT features of pathologically proven 21 arachnoid cysts that were examined at Chonnam National University Hospital from June 1983 to May 1987 were analyzed. The results were as follows: 1.Prevalent age group was the 1st decade (8 cases) and male to female ratio was 17:4. 2.Clinical features were related to the location of arachnoid cyst, common symptoms were headache (53.3%), convulsion, mental change and walking disturbance. 3.Location of the arachnoid cyst were in supratentorial region (15 cases) most in middle cranial fossa (12 cases), and infratentorial region (6 cases), common at the retrocerebellar cisternal space (3 cases). 4.Shapes of arachnoid cyst were biconvex with straight inner margin (8 cases), spherical (7 cases), simple biconvex (3 cases) and others (3 cases). 5.Size of the arachnoid cyst, in the greatest dimension, was ranged from 2cm to 9cm and commonly distributed between 3cm to 5cm (14 cases). 6.Of all 14 cases, who did CT cisternography using metrizamide (11 cases) and iopamidol (3 cases), 2 cases had communication with the subarachnoid space.

  12. MR imaging of pineal cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yong Sik; Yu, Hyeon; Kim, Wan Tae; Bae, Jin Woo; Moon, Hee Jung; Shin, Hyun Ja [Korea Veterans Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the incidence and characteristic findings of pineal cyst incidentally detected on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Brain MR images obtained in 2432 patients were retrospectively reviewed to determine the incidence and MR findings of pineal cysts, which were evaluated according to their size, shape, location, signal intensity, interval change, contrast enhancement and mass effect on adjacent structures. Cysts were encountered in 107(4.4 %) of 2432 patients evaluated. their size ranged from 1 X 1 X 1 to 15 X 8 X 9 (mean, 5.97 X 3.82 X 4.82)mm. All were spherical (n=53) or oval (n=54) in shape. Their margin was smooth and they were homogeneous in nature. On T1-weighted images, the cysts were seen to be hyperintense (n=57) or isointense (n=50) to cerebrospinal fluid, but less so than brain parenchyma. T2-weighted images showed them to be isointense (n=51)or hyperintense (n=56) to cerebrospinal fluid. The cysts were centrally located in 65 cases and eccentrically in 42. Compression of the superior colliculi of the tectum was demonstrated in 17 cases (15.9 %). NO patients presented clinical symptoms or signs related to either pineal or tectal lesions. Peripheral enhancement around the cyst after Gd-DTPA injection was demonstrated in 51 cases(100 %). Follow-up examinations in 19 cases demonstrated no interval change. The incidence of pineal cysts was 4.4 %. The MR characteristics of simple pineal cysts include: (1) an oval or spherical shape, (2) a smooth outer margin and homogeneous nature, (3) isosignal or slightly high signal intensity to cerebrospinal fluid on whole pulse sequences, (4) ring enhancement after contrast injection, (5) an absence of interval change, as seen during follow up MR study. These MR appearances of pineal cysts might be helpful for differentiating them from pineal tumors.

  13. Spinal perineurial and meningeal cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlov, I. M.

    1970-01-01

    Perineurial cysts may be responsible for clinical symptoms and a cure effected by their removal. They do not fill on initial myelography but may fill with Pantopaque some time, days or weeks, after Pantopaque has been instilled into the subarachnoid space. Perineurial cysts arise at the site of the posterior root ganglion. The cyst wall is composed of neural tissue. When initial myelography fails to reveal an adequate cause for the patient's symptoms and signs referable to the caudal nerve roots, then about a millilitre of Pantopaque should be left in the canal for delayed myelography which may later reveal a sacral perineurial cyst or, occasionally, a meningeal cyst. Meningeal diverticula occur proximal to the posterior root ganglia and usually fill on initial myelography. They are in free communication with the subarachnoid space and are rarely in my experience responsible for clinical symptoms. Meningeal diverticula and meningeal cysts appear to represent a continuum. Pantopaque left in the subarachnoid space may convert a meningeal diverticulum into an expanding symptomatic meningeal cyst, as in the case described. Many cases described as perineurial cysts represent abnormally long arachnoidal prolongations over nerve roots or meningeal diverticula. In general, neither of the latter is of pathological significance. Perineurial, like meningeal cysts and diverticula, may be asymptomatic. They should be operated upon only if they produce progressive or disabling symptoms or signs clearly attributable to them. When myelography must be done, and this should be done only as a preliminary to a probable necessary operation, then patient effort should be made to remove the Pantopaque. Images PMID:5531903

  14. Ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Ursula [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Nemec, Stefan F., E-mail: stefan.nemec@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Bettelheim, Dieter [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Division of Prenatal Diagnosis and Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Center of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Integrative Morphology Group, Medical University Vienna, Waehringerstrasse 13, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Horcher, Ernst [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Graham, John M.; Rimoin, David L. [Medical Genetics Institute, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Boulevard, PACT Suite 400, Los Angeles, CA 90048 (United States); Weber, Michael; Prayer, Daniela [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    Objective: Ovarian cysts are the most frequently encountered intra-abdominal masses in females in utero. They may, at times, require perinatal intervention. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to ultrasonography (US) in prenatal diagnosis, we sought to demonstrate the ability to visualize ovarian cysts on prenatal MRI. Materials and methods: This retrospective study included 17 fetal MRI scans from 16 female fetuses (23-37 gestational weeks) with an MRI diagnosis of ovarian cysts after suspicious US findings. A multiplanar MRI protocol was applied to image and to characterize the cysts. The US and MRI findings were compared, and the prenatal findings were compared with postnatal imaging findings or histopathology. Results: Simple ovarian cysts were found in 10/16 cases and complex cysts in 7/16 cases, including one case with both. In 11/16 (69%) cases, US and MRI diagnoses were in agreement, and, in 5/16 (31%) cases, MRI specified or expanded the US diagnosis. In 6/16 cases, postnatal US showed that the cysts spontaneously resolved or decreased in size, and in 1/16 cases, postnatal imaging confirmed a hemorrhagic cyst. In 4/16 cases, the prenatal diagnoses were confirmed by surgery/histopathology, and for the rest, postnatal correlation was not available. Conclusion: Our results illustrate the MRI visualization of ovarian cysts in utero. In most cases, MRI will confirm the US diagnosis. In certain cases, MRI may provide further diagnostic information, additional to US, which is the standard technique for diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment planning.

  15. [Tarlov cyst and symptomatic bladder disfuction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruibal Moldes, M; Sánchez Rodríguez-Losada, J; López García, D; Casas Agudo, V; Janeiro País, J M; González Martín, M

    2008-01-01

    Tarlov cysts or perineural cyst are lesions of the nerve roots located at the sacral level and uncertain aetiology. Most of these cysts remain asymptomatic with no clinical relevance. The symptomatic cysts are uncommon and the usual symptoms are pain or radiculopathy. We report the case of a 53-year-old woman witha symptomatic cyst (with a history of frequency and urgency syndrom), that disappears after surgery.

  16. Eruption cysts: A series of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Dhawan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eruption cysts are benign cysts that appear on the mucosa of a tooth shortly before its eruption. They may disappear by themselves but if they hurt, bleed or are infected they may require surgical treatment to expose the tooth and drain the contents. Here we present 2 case reports of eruption cysts presenting with different chief complaint. The treatment included incising the eruption cyst and draining the contents of the cyst.

  17. Rhinitis and disseminated disease in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo) naturally infected with Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, Ann P; Dubey, J P; Rosenthal, Benjamin M

    2010-04-19

    Naturally occurring Sarcocystis neurona infection in a ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with rhinitis and disseminated disease are described for the first time. The ferret exhibited severe rhinitis with intra-lesional S. neurona merozoites and schizonts. Diagnosis was confirmed immunohistochemically by staining with S. neurona-specific antibodies, and by phylogenetic analyses of conserved and variable portions of nuclear ribosomal DNA. On the basis of intense schizogony in the nasal mucosa, we propose the possibility of an olfactory nerve pathway route of infection for S. neurona meningoencephalitis.

  18. An update on Sarcocystis neurona infections in animals and equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Howe, D K; Furr, M; Saville, W J; Marsh, A E; Reed, S M; Grigg, M E

    2015-04-15

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a serious disease of horses, and its management continues to be a challenge for veterinarians. The protozoan Sarcocystis neurona is most commonly associated with EPM. S. neurona has emerged as a common cause of mortality in marine mammals, especially sea otters (Enhydra lutris). EPM-like illness has also been recorded in several other mammals, including domestic dogs and cats. This paper updates S. neurona and EPM information from the last 15 years on the advances regarding life cycle, molecular biology, epidemiology, clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and control. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Paradental Cyst (Inflammatory Collateral Cyst: A True Clinicopathologic Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raveendranath Rajendran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Paradental cy st is an inflammatory odontogenic cyst arising in association with partially erupted third molars affected with pericoronitis. The common location is on the buccal aspect of the molar teeth. Radiographically, the characteristic presen­ tation is a well defined radiolucency superimposed on the roots. Histologically, cysts were lined with nonkeratinized epithelium. The various concepts underlining the origin/pathogenesis of this rare entity is discussed and critically apprised.

  20. A DUMBBELL URACHAL CYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthilvel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The urachus is an embryological tubular structure extending from the umbilicus to the urinary bladder apex, which usually gets obliterated but may persist uncommonly in adults. Rarely, the urachus may be the primary site of benign and malignant neoplasms. Urachal malignancies are rare and represents less than 1% of all bladder neoplasms. CASE REPORT A 39-year-old female presented with pain and lump in the lower abdomen for 6 months’ duration. No other symptoms. History of caesarean section 8 years back. On examination, a lower midline scar present. A vague swelling of size 6 x 5 cm present in the left lower abdomen adjacent to scar, surface smooth, firm, non-tender and non-reducible. Provisional diagnosed as irreducible, nonobstructing incisional hernia. Routine investigations were normal. Ultrasonogram abdomen was equivocal. CT abdomen plain and oral contrast confirmed a urachal cyst with subcutaneous component, so we planned for diagnostic laparoscopy and exploration. Intra-operatively, a 4x4 cm midline cystic mass infra-umbilical, well away from bladder dome. Abdominal component was mobilized laparoscopically using monopolar hook. A connecting component was identified entering the linea alba close to umbilicus into subcutaneous plane. Further laparoscopic dissection abandoned. A small mid-midline incision was made and both components excised in-toto. The final histopathology report came as fibrocollagenous, fibromyxoid, fibrofatty cyst wall lined by cuboidal to polygonal epithelial cells with focal atypia. Features consistent with urachal cystadenoma with focal atypia. CONCLUSION Rarely described in literature, it should be treated as mucinous cystadenoma of undetermined malignant potential which has the tendency for local recurrence should be completely excised. Followup of these tumours is mandatory, as it presents with focal atypia

  1. Callosal Agenesis and Interhemispheric Cysts

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2001-01-01

    Imaging studies of 25 cases of agenesis of the corpus callosum with interhemispheric cyst were retrospectively reviewed at the University of California, San Francisco, and Harvard Medical School, Boston.

  2. Epidermoid cyst in Anterior, Middle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankane Vivek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are benign slow growing more often extra-axial tumors that insinuate between brain structures, we present the clinical, imaging, and pathological findings in 35 years old female patients with atypical epidermoid cysts which was situated anterior, middle & posterior cranial fossa. NCCT head revealed hypodense lesion over right temporal and perisylvian region with extension in prepontine cistern with mass effect & midline shift and MRI findings revealed a non-enhancing heterogeneous signal intensity cystic lesion in right frontal & temporal region extending into prepontine cistern with restricted diffusion. Patient was detoriated in night of same day of admission, emergency Fronto-temporal craniotomy with anterior peterousectomy and subtotal resection was done. The histological examination confirms the epidermoid cyst. The timing of ectodermal tissue sequestration during fetal development may account for the occurrence of atypical epidermoid cysts.

  3. Migratory intralaryngeal thyroglossal duct cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlatti Pradeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intralaryngeal thyroglossal duct cysts are rare; a migrating one, rarer still. Such a case may be a cause for confusion and it is important to understand this entity and its typical findings.

  4. [Dentigerous cyst: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spini, Roxana G; Bordino, Lucas; Cruz, Daniel; Fitz Maurice, María de Los Ángeles; Martins, Andrea; Michalski, Julian

    2016-10-01

    Maxillary cysts are a diverse group of entities that include benign and malignant odontogenic tumors. Information on the prevalence of this disease is limited. It is more common among males, and usually occurs in the second and third decade of life. The proportion of 6 to 7 year old patients with dentigerous cysts is only 9.1%. Dentigerous cysts encompass the crown of a permanent and unerupted impacted teeth. They are usually slow growing asymptomatic lesions that are not discovered until they affect surrounding organs. The aim of this study is to present an unusual case of dentigerous cyst and to inform the pediatrician about the management of a unilateral maxillary tumor in a healthy child, underlining the importance of a multidisciplinary approach of this disease.

  5. Hydatid cyst of the tibia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiwale C

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available A case of hydatid cyst of the tibia, which manifested as a pathologic fracture is being reported. Pain and swelling of left lower limb with inability to bear the weight were the main features. Tender swelling was also noted at the upper and middle third of tibia. Open biopsy revealed the hydatid cyst wall and scolices of Echinococcus granulosus. Albendazole treatment was followed by curettage and bone grafting.

  6. Hydatid Cyst of Ovary: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Khosravi Maharlooei

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus granulosus is considered the major cause of humanhydatid cysts. Usually the duration of cyst formation is 10-20 years. This period shortens significantly upon rupture of aprimary cyst. The literature describes low incidence of primaryinvolvement of ovary as a site of hydatid cyst formation. Ourcase is the first report on ovarian hydatid cyst in Iran. A 60-year-old woman was presented with abdominal pain in the leftlower quadrant area. Paraclinical data were suggestive of neoplasiaand preoperative diagnosis was ovarian tumor. Duringlaparotomy, multiple cysts resembling hydatid cysts were observedin the left ovary. Pathological examination confirmed thediagnosis of hydatid cyst. Although there is a small possibilityof secondary ovarian echinococcal disease, it is more probablefor this case to be primary infection, as the patient had developedovarian hydatid cysts 15 years after hepatic involvementand recurrence after 30 months is very uncommon.

  7. Prevalence of antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Encephalitozonn cuniculi, Sarcocystis neurona, Besnoitia darlingi, and Neospora caninum in North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana, from Southern Louisian

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the prevalence of antibodies to zoonotic protozoan parasites (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Encephalitozoon cuniculi) and protozoan’s of veterinary importance (Neospora caninum, Sarcocystis neurona and Besnoitia darlingi) in a population of North American opossums (Didelphis...

  8. Clinical study of histologically proven conjunctival cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Shreya; Jain, Jagriti; Kinger, Mallika; Palod, Sapan; Wadhva, Jatin; Vishnoi, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This is a clinco-histopathological study of different varieties of conjunctival cysts where modification of surgical technique was done as per requirement for intact removal of cysts to minimise recurrence rate. Materials and methods Retrospective study of 40 cases of conjunctival cysts. A thorough ocular examination and basic haematological work up was done for all patients. B-scan USG and MRI was done wherever required to see the posterior extent. All patients underwent surgical excision of cyst followed by histo-pathological examination. Results The various types of conjunctival cysts found in our study were primary inclusion cyst 12 (30%), secondary inclusion cyst 6 (15%), pterygium with cysts 15 (37.5%), parasitic cyst 4 (10%), lymphatic cyst 2 (5%), and orbital cyst with rudimentary eye 1 (2.5%). The common symptoms noted were progressive increase in size of cyst (39.45%), cosmetic disfigurement (26.23%), foreign body sensations (27.86%), proptosis (1.6%), ocular motility restrictions (3.2%) and decreased visual acuity (1.6%). The patients were followed till one year after surgical excision for any recurrence and complications and no recurrence was seen. Conclusion Careful and intact removal of conjunctival cyst is important to prevent recurrence. Minor modifications in surgical technique according to the size, site and nature of cyst help in intact removal and prevent recurrence. PMID:25892928

  9. Effects of Experimental Sarcocystis neurona-Induced Infection on Immunity in an Equine Model

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    S. Rochelle Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcocystis neurona is the most common cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM, affecting 0.5–1% horses in the United States during their lifetimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the equine immune responses in an experimentally induced Sarcocystis neurona infection model. Neurologic parameters were recorded prior to and throughout the 70-day study by blinded investigators. Recombinant SnSAG1 ELISA for serum and CSF were used to confirm and track disease progression. All experimentally infected horses displayed neurologic signs after infection. Neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes from infected horses displayed significantly delayed apoptosis at some time points. Cell proliferation was significantly increased in S. neurona-infected horses when stimulated nonspecifically with PMA/I but significantly decreased when stimulated with S. neurona compared to controls. Collectively, our results suggest that horses experimentally infected with S. neurona manifest impaired antigen specific response to S. neurona, which could be a function of altered antigen presentation, lack of antigen recognition, or both.

  10. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays for Detection of Equine Antibodies Specific to Sarcocystis neurona Surface Antigens†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoane, Jessica S.; Morrow, Jennifer K.; Saville, William J.; Dubey, J. P.; Granstrom, David E.; Howe, Daniel K.

    2005-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a common neurologic disease of horses in the Americas. We have developed a set of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on the four major surface antigens of S. neurona (SnSAGs) to analyze the equine antibody response to S. neurona. The SnSAG ELISAs were optimized and standardized with a sample set of 36 equine sera that had been characterized by Western blotting against total S. neurona parasite antigen, the current gold standard for S. neurona serology. The recombinant SnSAG2 (rSnSAG2) ELISA showed the highest sensitivity and specificity at 95.5% and 92.9%, respectively. In contrast, only 68.2% sensitivity and 71.4% specificity were achieved with the rSnSAG1 ELISA, indicating that this antigen may not be a reliable serological marker for analyzing antibodies against S. neurona in horses. Importantly, the ELISA antigens did not show cross-reactivity with antisera to Sarcocystis fayeri or Neospora hughesi, two other equine parasites. The accuracy and reliability exhibited by the SnSAG ELISAs suggest that these assays will be valuable tools for examining the equine immune response against S. neurona infection, which may help in understanding the pathobiology of this accidental parasite-host interaction. Moreover, with modification and further investigation, the SnSAG ELISAs have potential for use as immunodiagnostic tests to aid in the identification of horses affected by EPM. PMID:16148170

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of equine antibodies specific to Sarcocystis neurona surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoane, Jessica S; Morrow, Jennifer K; Saville, William J; Dubey, J P; Granstrom, David E; Howe, Daniel K

    2005-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a common neurologic disease of horses in the Americas. We have developed a set of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on the four major surface antigens of S. neurona (SnSAGs) to analyze the equine antibody response to S. neurona. The SnSAG ELISAs were optimized and standardized with a sample set of 36 equine sera that had been characterized by Western blotting against total S. neurona parasite antigen, the current gold standard for S. neurona serology. The recombinant SnSAG2 (rSnSAG2) ELISA showed the highest sensitivity and specificity at 95.5% and 92.9%, respectively. In contrast, only 68.2% sensitivity and 71.4% specificity were achieved with the rSnSAG1 ELISA, indicating that this antigen may not be a reliable serological marker for analyzing antibodies against S. neurona in horses. Importantly, the ELISA antigens did not show cross-reactivity with antisera to Sarcocystis fayeri or Neospora hughesi, two other equine parasites. The accuracy and reliability exhibited by the SnSAG ELISAs suggest that these assays will be valuable tools for examining the equine immune response against S. neurona infection, which may help in understanding the pathobiology of this accidental parasite-host interaction. Moreover, with modification and further investigation, the SnSAG ELISAs have potential for use as immunodiagnostic tests to aid in the identification of horses affected by EPM.

  12. Effects of Experimental Sarcocystis neurona-Induced Infection on Immunity in an Equine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, S Rochelle; Ellison, Siobhan P; Dascanio, John J; Lindsay, David S; Gogal, Robert M; Werre, Stephen R; Surendran, Naveen; Breen, Meghan E; Heid, Bettina M; Andrews, Frank M; Buechner-Maxwell, Virginia A; Witonsky, Sharon G

    2014-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most common cause of Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM), affecting 0.5-1% horses in the United States during their lifetimes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the equine immune responses in an experimentally induced Sarcocystis neurona infection model. Neurologic parameters were recorded prior to and throughout the 70-day study by blinded investigators. Recombinant SnSAG1 ELISA for serum and CSF were used to confirm and track disease progression. All experimentally infected horses displayed neurologic signs after infection. Neutrophils, monocytes, and lymphocytes from infected horses displayed significantly delayed apoptosis at some time points. Cell proliferation was significantly increased in S. neurona-infected horses when stimulated nonspecifically with PMA/I but significantly decreased when stimulated with S. neurona compared to controls. Collectively, our results suggest that horses experimentally infected with S. neurona manifest impaired antigen specific response to S. neurona, which could be a function of altered antigen presentation, lack of antigen recognition, or both.

  13. Antigenic evaluation of a recombinant baculovirus-expressed Sarcocystis neurona SAG1 antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G D; Lakritz, J; Saville, W J; Livingston, R S; Dubey, J P; Middleton, J R; Marsh, A E

    2004-10-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the primary parasite associated with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). This is a commonly diagnosed neurological disorder in the Americas that infects the central nervous system of horses. Current serologic assays utilize culture-derived parasites as antigen. This method requires large numbers of parasites to be grown in culture, which is labor intensive and time consuming. Also, a culture-derived whole-parasite preparation contains conserved antigens that could cross-react with antibodies against other Sarcocystis species and members of Sarcocystidae such as Neospora spp., Hammondia spp., and Toxoplasma gondii. Therefore, there is a need to develop an improved method for the detection of S. neurona-specific antibodies. The sera of infected horses react strongly to surface antigen 1 (SnSAG1), an approximately 29-kDa protein, in immunoblot analysis, suggesting that it is an immunodominant antigen. The SnSAG1 gene of S. neurona was cloned, and recombinant S. neurona SAG1 protein (rSnSAG1-Bac) was expressed with the use of a baculovirus system. By immunoblot analysis, the rSnSAG1-Bac antigen detected antibodies to S. neurona from naturally infected and experimentally inoculated equids, cats, rabbit, mice, and skunk. This is the first report of a baculovirus-expressed recombinant S. neurona antigen being used to detect anti-S. neurona antibodies in a variety of host species.

  14. Description and SEM Observations of a New Species of Cyst Nematode Heterodera goldeni (Nematoda: Heteroderidae) Attacking Panicum coloratum in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Handoo, Zafar A.; Ibrahim, I. K. A.

    2002-01-01

    A cyst nematode, Heterodera goldeni n. sp., is photographed and described from Qasabagrass roots (Panicum coloratum L.) in Alexandria, Egypt. It is characterized in having second-stage juveniles with body length of 546 µm (450-612), stylet length of 22.6 µm (22-23.5) with anchor-shaped knobs, lateral field with 3 lines, tail 60-75 µm, hyaline tail terminus 38.4 µm (33-43); cysts are lemon-shaped, dark to light brown with an extensive sub-crystalline layer covering the entire cyst, cuticular m...

  15. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas and elevated cyst fluid carcinoembryonic antigen: a diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Nilanjana; Rollins, Katie; Wu, Jessie; Kaye, Phillip; Lobo, Dileep N

    2014-09-28

    Pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts are rare, benign cysts which can present diagnostic difficulties. Non-invasive imaging alone is unreliable in distinguishing between benign and malignant cysts. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and fine needle aspiration (FNA) with analysis of cyst fluid is more reliable, but invasive. In addition, tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can be grossly elevated in cyst fluid of benign cysts. We present the case of a 67 year old man with an incidental finding of a pancreatic cyst. EUS and FNA-guided aspiration of cyst fluid was performed. Fluid CEA was grossly elevated and resectional surgery was performed. On histological examination the diagnosis was confirmed as lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas. Tumor markers such as CEA can be elevated in the cyst fluid of benign pancreatic conditions such as lymphoepithelial cyst. Although the diagnosis is challenging preoperatively, if a systematic algorithm is followed, these conditions can be managed safely and efficiently.

  16. Paraurethral Skene's duct cyst in a newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralioğlu, Serdar; Bosnalı, Oktav; Celayir, Ayşenur Cerrah; Şahin, Ceyhan

    2013-01-01

    Paraurethral or Skene's duct cysts are rare causes of interlabial masses in neonates. The diagnosis of Skene's duct cysts in the neonatal period is based on its location, in relation to the urethra, and the demonstration of transitional epithelium in the cyst wall. The distinguishing features of paraurethral cysts are the displacement of urethral meatus by the mass and a cyst containing milky fluid. Thus, we report a case of a Skene's duct cyst in a newborn which was treated by incision and drainage. PMID:24049387

  17. Spontaneous hygroma in intracranial arachnoid cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnoli, A.L.

    1984-06-01

    Anamnesis and treatment of two cases of arachnoid cysts extending into the subarachnoid space are described. No traumatic incident was discovered in the previous history of these two patients. The causal genesis of neurological signs of deficiency in patients with arachnoid and acquired cysts is discussed. However, the cause of the development of a subdural hygroma in arachnoid cysts remains unclarified. CT findings of arachnoid cysts with a hypodense zone between brain surface and the vault of the cranium always require an investigation into the possibility of a spontaneous emptying of the cyst or of a congenital and not only localised extension of the cyst itself.

  18. Epidemiology of Sarcocystis neurona infections in domestic cats (Felis domesticus) and its association with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) case farms and feral cats from a mobile spay and neuter clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, J F; Stich, R W; Dubey, J P; Reed, S M; Njoku, C J; Lindsay, D S; Schmall, L M; Johnson, G K; LaFave, B M; Saville, W J A

    2003-11-28

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a serious neurologic disease in the horse most commonly caused by Sarcocystis neurona. The domestic cat (Felis domesticus) is an intermediate host for S. neurona. In the present study, nine farms, known to have prior clinically diagnosed cases of EPM and a resident cat population were identified and sampled accordingly. In addition to the farm cats sampled, samples were also collected from a mobile spay and neuter clinic. Overall, serum samples were collected in 2001 from 310 cats, with samples including barn, feral and inside/outside cats. Of these 310 samples, 35 were from nine horse farms. Horse serum samples were also collected and traps were set for opossums at each of the farms. The S. neurona direct agglutination test (SAT) was used for both the horse and cat serum samples (1:25 dilution). Fourteen of 35 (40%) cats sampled from horse farms had circulating S. neurona agglutinating antibodies. Twenty-seven of the 275 (10%) cats from the spay/neuter clinic also had detectable S. neurona antibodies. Overall, 115 of 123 (93%) horses tested positive for anti-S. neurona antibodies, with each farm having greater than a 75% exposure rate among sampled horses. Twenty-one opossums were trapped on seven of the nine farms. Eleven opossums had Sarcocystis sp. sporocysts, six of them were identified as S. neurona sporocysts based on bioassays in gamma-interferon gene knockout mice with each opossum representing a different farm. Demonstration of S. neurona agglutinating antibodies in domestic and feral cats corroborates previous research demonstrating feral cats to be naturally infected, and also suggests that cats can be frequently infected with S. neurona and serve as one of several natural intermediate hosts for S. neurona.

  19. Multiple liver cyst infection caused by Salmonella ajiobo in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himeno, Akihiro; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Suzuki, Yumiko; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Isozaki, Taisuke

    2013-06-01

    Most Salmonella infections are usually self-limited; however, some cases of enteritis result in bacteremia, and there have been reports of extra-intestinal manifestations. Cyst infections are rare, and few cases have been reported. We report a 77-year-old woman with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) complicated with a multiple liver cyst infection caused by Salmonella ajiobo. The patient was hospitalized for fever, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. The blood culture identified Salmonella sp., but the source of infection was not detected by computed tomography or echography. The patient was initially treated with meropenem followed by fluoroquinolones for 3 weeks; however, her C-reactive protein level was high (10-20 mg/dL) even after the antimicrobial therapy. The patient had a fever again on day 51, and Salmonella sp. was detected again from 2 sets of blood cultures. Despite the antimicrobial treatment, her general condition gradually deteriorated, and she died on day 66. The autopsy revealed that most of the liver had been replaced by cysts. Several cysts filled with pus were detected and Salmonella ajiobo was identified in the pus of the infected cysts.

  20. Dermoid cyst with respiratory manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calle-Cabanillas MI, Ibañez-Muñoz C, Pérez-Sáez J, Navazo-Eguía AI, Clemente-García A, Sánchez-Hernández JM.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermoid cysts are congenital tumors caused by entrapment of ectoderm during embryogenesis. The most common localization are the gonads and less than 10% are in the head and neck. They are slow growing and generally observed between the second and third decades of life, being unusual in chilhood. Description: We report a case of a 5 year old male with recurrent respiratory infections, mouth breathing and snoring with apneas and daytime sleepiness. On physical examination tonsillar hypertrophy and a 4 cm sublingual tumor are detected. As complementary tests are performed overnight polysomnography with AHI of 18.3 / h and ultrasonography, reported as cystic mass with multiple rounded echogenic structures inside. Results: The patient was diagnosed with severe OSA and tonsillectomy and intraorally enucleation of tumor (as diagnosis and treatment were performed; with histopathological diagnosis of dermoid cyst. In the postoperative control we check the resolution of respiratory events and snoring. Discussion: Dermoid cysts of the oral cavity (where sublingual localization is the most common represent only 0,01% of all cysts and 1,6% of all dermoid cysts. Usually present as slow-growing asymptomatic mass, even if they reach large size can compromise swallowing, speech or breathing and eventually cause, as in our case, a severe OSA. The surgical treatment allows to confirm the diagnosis an avoid the risk of infectious complications and eventual malignant transformation.

  1. Evaluation and Treatment of Lumbar Facet Cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Barrett S; Savage, Jason W

    2016-12-01

    Lumbar facet cysts are a rare but increasingly common cause of symptomatic nerve root compression and can lead to radiculopathy, neurogenic claudication, and cauda equina syndrome. The cysts arise from the zygapophyseal joints of the lumbar spine and commonly demonstrate synovial herniation with mucinous degeneration of the facet joint capsule. Lumbar facet cysts are most common at the L4-L5 level and often are associated with spondylosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis. Advanced imaging studies have increased diagnosis of the cysts; however, optimal treatment of the cysts remains controversial. First-line treatment is nonsurgical management consisting of oral NSAIDs, physical therapy, bracing, epidural steroid injections, and/or cyst aspiration. Given the high rate of recurrence and the relatively low satisfaction with nonsurgical management, surgical options, including hemilaminectomy or laminotomy to excise the cyst and decompress the neural elements, are typically performed. Recent studies suggest that segmental fusion of the involved levels may decrease the risks of cyst recurrence and radiculopathy.

  2. A huge presacral Tarlov cyst. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazuhiko; Yuzurihara, Masahito; Asamoto, Shunji; Doi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Motoo

    2007-08-01

    Perineural cysts have become a common incidental finding during lumbosacral magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Only some of the symptomatic cysts warrant treatment. The authors describe the successful operative treatment of a patient with, to the best of their knowledge, the largest perineural cyst reported to date. A 29-year-old woman had been suffering from long-standing constipation and low-back pain. During an obstetric investigation for infertility, the clinician discovered a huge presacral cystic mass. Computed tomography myelography showed the lesion to be a huge Tarlov cyst arising from the left S-3 nerve root and compressing the ipsilateral S-2 nerve. The cyst was successfully treated by ligation of the cyst neck together with sectioning of the S-3 nerve root. Postoperative improvement in her symptoms and MR imaging findings were noted. Identification of the nerve root involved by the cyst wall, operative indication, operative procedure, and treatment of multiple cysts are important preoperative considerations.

  3. Respiratory epithelial cysts of the orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Rachel L Z; Hardy, Thomas G; Williams, Richard A; McNab, Alan A

    2016-10-01

    To describe post-traumatic and congenital respiratory epithelial cysts in the orbit, which are rare lesions with only 5 and 13 published cases, respectively. We reviewed all cases of respiratory epithelial cysts diagnosed at three institutions (two tertiary referral hospitals, one private clinic) between 1995 and 2015. We describe 10 cases of post-traumatic respiratory epithelial cyst (age range 23 - 82), presenting a mean of 17.4 years after their original trauma; and 3 congenital cases (age range 17-34). All but one case underwent surgical excision of the cyst and its lining, along with any surgical implant within the cyst. Two were recurrent after incomplete excision. Three presented with acute infection within the cyst. Respiratory epithelial orbital cysts are probably commoner than the paucity of published reports would suggest. Post-traumatic cysts often present many years after trauma, and may become secondarily infected. Complete surgical removal is recommended to prevent future recurrence.

  4. Benign mediastinal cysts: pointed appearance on CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, T C; Budorick, N E; Posniak, H V

    1989-01-01

    A case of bronchogenic cyst and two cases of pericardial cysts are presented. Our report illustrates the diagnostic utility of a pointed contour and the dependence of contour on position on CT in establishing the cystic nature of mediastinal mass.

  5. Epidermoid cyst of clitoris mimicking clitoromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Clitoromegaly in pediatric and adolescent age group is usually indicative of a disorder of sexual differentiation. We report a girl child presenting with clitoral enlargement due to an epidermoid cyst. The cyst was excised with complete cosmetic recovery.

  6. Epidermoid cyst of clitoris mimicking clitoromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Satish Kumar; Manchanda, Vivek; Pant, Nitin

    2010-01-01

    Clitoromegaly in pediatric and adolescent age group is usually indicative of a disorder of sexual differentiation. We report a girl child presenting with clitoral enlargement due to an epidermoid cyst. The cyst was excised with complete cosmetic recovery. PMID:21180500

  7. DIAGNOSIS AND SURGICAL TREATMENT OF BRONCHOGENIC CYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戈烽; 廖泉; 肖蜀梅; 任华; 张志庸; 李泽坚

    1995-01-01

    Between 1974 and 1993, 22 patients with bronchogenic cysts were operated on in our hospital; there were 14 men and 8 women, ranging in age from 11 to 62 years, The cyst locations were mediastinal in 13 (59.1%) and intrapulmonary in 9 (40.9%). There were symptoms (chest pain and recurrent bronehiolits) in 20 patients (91%). The preoperative complications included infection in the lung and in the cyst and dysphagia due to esophageal eornpression. Chest pain was the main symptom in mediastinal cyst and recurrent infection of lung in intrapulmonary cyst. Plain chest radiograms showed that a rousd shadow, occasional air-fluid levels, and peripheral calcification may be found in cysts. An operation is the best treatment for cysts. All cysts were completely excised. No postoperative complieations, late complica-tions, or recurrence developed in our patients.

  8. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Woo Keun; Cho, Keun-Tae; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  9. Symptomatic tarlov cyst following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Woo Keun; Cho, Keun-Tae; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-08-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  10. Characterization of complex renal cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graumann, Ole; Osther, Susanne Sloth; Osther, Palle Jörn Sloth

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Complex renal cysts represent a major clinical problem, since it is often difficult to exclude malignancy. The Bosniak classification system, based on computed tomography (CT), is widely used to categorize cystic renal lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate critically ...... of this "new" classification strategy is, however, still missing. Data on other imaging modalities are too limited for conclusions to be drawn.......Abstract Objective. Complex renal cysts represent a major clinical problem, since it is often difficult to exclude malignancy. The Bosniak classification system, based on computed tomography (CT), is widely used to categorize cystic renal lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate critically...... available data on the Bosniak classification. Material and methods. All publications from an Entrez Pubmed search were reviewed, focusing on clinical applicability and the use of imaging modalities other than CT to categorize complex renal cysts. Results. Fifteen retrospective studies were found. Most...

  11. Asymptomatic vallecular cyst: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuce, Yucel; Uzun, Sennur; Aypar, Ulku

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presented himself for an intracranial glioblastoma multiforme excision. After being routinely monitored, he was preoxygenated. We induced anesthesia and paralysis with 200 mg propofol, 50 μg fentanyl and 9 mg vecuronium. Direct laryngoscopy with a Macintosh 3 blade revealed a 2x2 cm cyst, pedunculated, arising from the right side of the vallecula preventing the endotracheal intubation. While the patient remained anesthetized, we urgently consulted an otolaryngologist and aspirated the cyst with a 22-gauge needle and syringe under direct laryngoscopy. We aspirated 10 cc of liquid content. This was followed by an uneventful tracheal intubation with a 9.0 enforced spiral cuffed tube. An alternative to fiberoptic intubation may be careful cyst aspiration to facilitate the intubation.

  12. Laparoscopic approach to retrorectal cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Petra Gunkova; Lubomir Martinek; Jan Dostalik; Igor Gunka; Petr Vavra; Miloslav Mazur

    2008-01-01

    Retrorectal cysts are rare benign lesions in the presacral space which are frequently diagnosed in middle-aged females. We report here our experience with two symptomatic female patients who were diagnosed as having a retrorectal cyst and managed using a laparoscopic approach. The two patients were misdiagnosed as having an ovarian cystic lesion after abdominal ultrasonography. Computer tomograghy (CT) scan was mandatory to establish the diagnosis. The trocar port site was the same in both patients. An additional left oophorectomy was done for a coexisting ovarian cystic lesion in one patient in the same setting. There was no postoperative morbidity or mortality and the two patients were discharged on the 5th and 6th post operative days, respectively. Our cases show that laparoscopic management of retrorectal cysts is a safe approach. It reduces surgical trauma and offers an excellent tool for perfect visualization of the deep structures in the presacral space.

  13. Prenatal diagnosis of arachnoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkut Daglar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are rare, usually benign, space-occupying central nervous system lesion. They are the results of an accumulation of cerebrospinal-like fluid between the cerebral meninges and diagnosed prenatally as a unilocular, simple, echolucent area within the fetal head. They may be primary (congenital (maldevelopment of the meninges or secondary (acquired (result of infection trauma, or hemorrhage. The primary ones typically dont communicate with the subarachnoid space whereas acquired forms usually communicate. In recent years, with the development of radiological techniques, the clinical detectability of arachnoid cysts seems to have increased. We report a case of primary arachnoid cyst that were diagnosed prenatally by using ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging . [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 792-795

  14. Unicystic ameloblastoma arising from a residual cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Amit D; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Khurana, Neha M; Shah, Navin

    2014-01-01

    Intraoral swellings involving alveolar ridges in edentulous patients are clinically diagnosed as residual cysts, traumatic bone cysts, Stafne's jaw bone cavity, ameloblastoma and metastatic tumours of the jaw. This case report describes a residual cyst in a 68-year-old edentulous male patient which was enucleated and histopathologically confirmed as a unicystic ameloblastoma. PMID:25199192

  15. THE PATHOGENESIS OF CEREBRAL GLIOMATOUS CYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LOHLE, PNM; VERHAGEN, ITHJ; TEELKEN, AW; BLAAUW, EH; GO, KG

    1992-01-01

    In this study, the authors have examined the mechanism of the formation of tumor cysts. Cyst fluid samples were obtained during surgery and by percutaneous aspiration from 22 patients with cystic cerebral gliomas. The concentration of protein was measured in the cyst fluid and blood plasma. Analysis

  16. [Inflammatory paradental cyst. Report of 6 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichart, P A; Philipsen, H P

    2003-05-01

    The inflammatory paradental cyst has been described as an entity in the WHO classification of odontogenic tumors and cysts (1992). It is mainly located at mandibular molars, in particular third molars of the lower jaw. Radiologically, involved molars show a circumscribed, mostly half-moon shaped translucency distal or distobuccal to the involved tooth. Patients frequently report episodes of infection (pericoronitis). The histological findings are identical to those of inflammatory radicular cysts. The inflammatory paradental cyst has been described infrequently in the international literature. There are no reports available in German. The aim of the present study was to present six of our own cases of inflammatory paradental cysts. Five men and one woman with an average age of 29.5 years were affected. In two cases paradental cysts occurred bilaterally. Three patients reported recurrent previous infections (pericoronitis). Radiologically, the typical translucency with clear demarcation distal to the third molars was observed. All of the third molars were vertically retained. Histologically, the inflammatory paradental cysts showed features identical to those of radicular cysts. The inflammatory paradental cyst is a clear indication for osteotomy of lower wisdom teeth. Postoperative complications or recurrences of the inflammatory paradental cysts have not been described. A correct clinical, radiological, and histopathological diagnosis of paradental cysts is mandatory, and more reports are needed in order to compile more information about relative frequency and pathogenesis of this cyst variant.

  17. A retrospective study of ovarian cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaji Neelgund

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Unilocular simple ovarian cysts are usually functional ovarian cysts and resolve spontaneously. Therapy by 3 to 6 months of Oral Contraceptives, usually resolves them and this also helps to distinguish between physiological and pathological ovarian cysts [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 1969-1973

  18. Suprasellar arachnoid cyst - a case report -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Byun, Woo Mok; Park, Bok Hwan; Choi, Byung Yearn; Cho, Soo Ho [Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Kyungsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1988-10-15

    Arachnoid cysts are relatively common disease entity, but its location at sarsaparilla region it is important to differentiate with ependymal cysts or third ventricle or third ventricular enlargement secondary to either aqueductal stenosis of extraventricular obstructive hydrocephalus. We recently experienced a case of suprasellar arachnoid cyst and reviewed literature.

  19. EVALUATION OF SURGERY IN SIMPLE OVARIAN CYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁晓曼; 冷金花; 郎景和; 李华军

    2003-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the surgery in simple ovarian cysts.Methods. From Jan. 1994 to Dec. 1999, 221 women with simple ovarian cysts were admitted into ourhospital. The diameter of cysts was <5 cm in 76 cases, and was≥5 cm in 145 cases ultrasonically.One hundred and eighty-four patients underwent laparosocopy, and thirty-seven underwent laparotomy.Results. Histological findings showed no malignancy in this series. Simple cysts, paraovarian cystsand corpus luteum were found histologically in 90.8% of cases with cysts <5 cm, and 60% of those withcysts >7 cm respectively, their difference was significant (X2=-37.13, P<0.001). The simple cysts, paraovar-ian cysts and corpus luteum cysts were found in 81.5% of postmenopausal women and 84.0% of pre-menopausal women. Conclusion. Patients with cysts >7 cm are indicated for surgical procedures, while a period of fol-lowup is acceptable for patients with cysts <7 cm, and surgery is advisable if the cyst is persistent dur-ing followup. Postmenopausal women with cysts should have operations.

  20. Imaging features of ciliated hepatic foregut cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song-Hua Fang; Dan-Jun Dong; Shi-Zheng Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Ciliated hepatic foregut cyst (CHFC) is a very rare cystic lesion of the liver that is histologically similar to bronchogenic cyst. We report one case of CHFC that was hard to distinguish from solid-cystic neoplasm in imaging features. Magnetic resonance imaging was helpful in differentiating these cysts from other lesions.

  1. A rare case of bile duct cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Gang Wang; Shu-Tian Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Choledochal cyst is an uncommon disease usually seen in young women and can be divided into five types. We report a 66-year-old woman who was diagnosed with types Ⅱ and Ⅱ bile duct cyst simultaneously after surgery, which is a rare type of bile duct cyst.

  2. [Free-Floating Intraocular Cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens Ulrich; Lang, Gerhard K; Enders, Christian

    2017-05-03

    Background Free-floating intraocular cysts may be found in the anterior chamber (FZV) and the vitreous (FZG). The first description of a cyst was 150 years ago, and they are considered to be ocular rarities. Materials and Methods The actual knowledge about FZV and FZG is shown on the basis of two exemplary patients. Results and Discussion Patient 1 had a FZV as an incidental finding which had a smooth surface, a slight pigmentation and was translucent. The ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed an echo-free interior space. Without the patient's discomfort and missing treatment indication, a watch-and-wait strategy was chosen. Cysts of the iris can be classified as primary and secondary cysts. Primary cysts of the iris can arise from the stroma as the pigment epithelium wherein it is believed that FZV descend from the pigment epithelium. Secondary cysts and FZV can be generated by tumors, inflammation, epithelial ingrowth, the use of eye-drops or intraocular foreign bodies. Patient 2 showed marked myopic fundus changes and an FZG with a yellowish-greenish surface; the transparency was reduced and the surface was not pigmented. The ultrasound examination also revealed an echo-free interior space. Clinical controls were advised. Congenital and acquired causes are discussed for the formation of FZG. FZG could originate from the pigment epithelium of the iris, but there are conflicting study results. Trauma, inflammation and chorioretinal diseases are considered as a reason for acquired causes of FZG. The genesis, especially of FZG, is still unclear. For the treatment of patients with FZV and FZG, it is important to know the potential causes to be able to make a therapeutic decision. High quality photographic and sonographic documentation is needed in the watch-and-wait strategy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Intracranial, intradural aneurysmal bone cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, Jalil; Snuderl, Matija; Small, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs) are benign, expansile, blood-filled, osteolytic lesions with internal septations that may be intraosseous or extraosseous. The cysts may cause local mass effect, and changes in the regional vascular supply necessitating intervention. A case of an intracranial, intradural ABC in a young male patient with progressively severe headaches is presented. This is only the third recorded intradural case, the majority of these rare lesions being extracranial and only a minute fraction intracranial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of antibodies against Neospora spp. and Sarcocystis neurona in donkeys from northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Maria Gennari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi are coccidian protozoa that can cause neurological illness in horses in America. In this study we report seroprevalence of Neospora spp. andS. neurona in sera of 333 donkeys from the northeastern region of Brazil. Antibodies to Neospora spp. were detected in 2% (7 donkeys of 333 sera tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT with a cut-off dilution of 1:40. Antibodies to S. neurona were found in 3% (10 donkeys of the samples tested by IFAT (cut-off ≥50 and 21% (69 donkeys by the direct agglutination test (SAT ≥50. The SAT and IFAT results for S. neurona showed a poor concordance (value of Kappa=0.051. This is the first report ofNeospora spp. antibodies in Brazilian donkeys and the first detection of antibodies against S. neurona in this animal species.

  5. Daily feeding of diclazuril top dress pellets in foals reduces seroconversion to Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Nicola; Packham, Andrea; Mackie, Sarah; Kass, Philip H; Hunyadi, Laszlo; Conrad, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Thirty-three foals from a farm with a high exposure rate to Sarcocystis neurona were assigned to either an untreated or a diclazuril-treated group. Treated foals received daily 0.5 mg/kg of diclazuril pellets from 1 to 12 months of age. Monthly blood was tested for IgG against S. neurona using the indirect fluorescent antibody test. Following ingestion of colostral antibodies to S. neurona, there was a steady and continuous decline in seroprevalence to S. neurona until foals from both groups reached weaning age. Thereafter, the untreated foal group showed a significant increase in monthly seroprevalence compared to the diclazuril-treated foal group. The difference in temporal seroprevalence could be explained by the successful reduction of S. neurona infection in foals receiving a daily low-dose diclazuril. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona in cats from Virginia and Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Vasha; Grant, David C; Dubey, J P; Zajac, Anne M; Lindsay, David S

    2010-08-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is best known as the causative agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis of horses in the Americas. Domestic cats ( Felis domesticus ) were the first animals described as an intermediate host for S. neurona . However, S. neurona -associated encephalitis has also been reported in naturally infected cats in the United States. Thus, cats can be implicated in the life cycle of S. neurona as natural intermediate hosts. The present study examined the seroprevalence of IgG antibodies to merozoites of S. neurona in populations of domestic cats from Virginia and Pennsylvania. Overall, sera or plasma from 441 cats (Virginia = 232, Pennsylvania = 209) were tested by an indirect immunofluorescent assay at a 1ratio50 dilution. Antibodies to S. neurona were found in 32 (7%) of 441 cats. Of these, 22 (9%) of the 232 cats from Virginia and 10 (5%) of the 209 cats from Pennsylvania were seropositive for S. neurona .

  7. Prevalence of antibodies against Neospora spp. and Sarcocystis neurona in donkeys from northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennari, Solange Maria; Pena, Hilda Fátima de Jesus; Lindsay, David Scott; Lopes, Marcos Gomes; Soares, Herbert Sousa; Cabral, Aline Diniz; Vitaliano, Sérgio Netto; Amaku, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi are coccidian protozoa that can cause neurological illness in horses in America. In this study we report seroprevalence of Neospora spp. andS. neurona in sera of 333 donkeys from the northeastern region of Brazil. Antibodies to Neospora spp. were detected in 2% (7 donkeys) of 333 sera tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) with a cut-off dilution of 1:40. Antibodies to S. neurona were found in 3% (10 donkeys) of the samples tested by IFAT (cut-off ≥50) and 21% (69 donkeys) by the direct agglutination test (SAT ≥50). The SAT and IFAT results for S. neurona showed a poor concordance (value of Kappa=0.051). This is the first report of Neospora spp. antibodies in Brazilian donkeys and the first detection of antibodies against S. neurona in this animal species.

  8. Serological investigation of transplacental infection with Neospora hughesi and Sarcocystis neurona in broodmares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Nicola; Mackie, Sarah; Packham, Andrea; Conrad, Patricia A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the likelihood of transplacental transmission of Neospora hughesi and Sarcocystis neurona in foals, born from seropositive mares. Three broodmares with persistent N. hughesi infection gave birth to eight healthy foals over a period of 7 years. These foals were seropositive to N. hughesi prior to colostrum ingestion, with titers ranging between 640 and 20,480, measured by indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT). Of 174 foals born at another farm to mares with a high seroprevalence to S. neurona, only one (with a pre-colostrum antibody titer of 80) tested seropositive. Transplacental transmission of N. hughesi seems to occur from latently infected mares to their foals, while this route of transmission does not seem to occur commonly for S. neurona. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. HYDATID CYST PRESENTING AS OVARIAN CYST : A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcosis is a zoonotic disease which may present as potential health hazard to human. In developing country like India , it is a significant health problem. Surgery is the treatment of choice for hydatid cyst. Recurrence may be avoided by antihelminthic supplements post - surgery

  10. Antibody index and specific antibody quotient in horses after intragastric administration of Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heskett, Katherine A; Mackay, Robert J

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the use of a specific antibody index (AI) that relates Sarcocystis neurona-specific IgG quotient (Q(SN)) to total IgG quotient (Q(IgG)) for the detection of the anti-S neurona antibody fraction of CNS origin in CSF samples obtained from horses after intragastric administration of S neurona sporocysts. 18 adult horses. 14 horses underwent intragastric inoculation (day 0) with S neurona sporocysts, and 4 horses remained unchallenged; blood and CSF samples were collected on days - 1 and 84. For purposes of another study, some challenged horses received intermittent administration of ponazuril (20 mg/kg, PO). Sarcocystis neurona-specific IgG concentrations in CSF (SN(CSF)) and plasma (SN(plasma)) were measured via a direct ELISA involving merozoite lysate antigen and reported as ELISA units (EUs; arbitrary units based on a nominal titer for undiluted immune plasma of 100,000 EUs/mL). Total IgG concentrations in CSF (IgG(CSF)) and plasma (IgG(plasma)) were quantified via a sandwich ELISA and a radial immunodiffusion assay, respectively; Q(SN), Q(IgG), and AI were calculated. Following sporocyst challenge, mean +/- SEM SN(CSF) and SN(plasma) increased significantly (from 8.8 +/- 1.0 EUs/mL to 270.0 +/- 112.7 EUs/mL and from 1,737 +/- 245 EUs/mL to 43,169 +/- 13,770 EUs/mL, respectively). Challenge did not affect total IgG concentration, Q(SN), Q(IgG), or AI. S neurona-specific IgG detected in CSF samples from sporocyst-challenged horses appeared to be extraneural in origin; thus, this experimental challenge may not reliably result in CNS infection. Calculation of a specific AI may have application to the diagnosis of S neurona-associated myeloencephalitis in horses.

  11. Parasitemia in an immunocompetent horse experimentally challenged with Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, M G; Schott, H C; Murphy, A J; Kaneene, J B; Sellon, D C; Hines, M T; Hochstatter, T; Bell, J A; Mansfield, L S

    2005-01-04

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a serious neurological disease of horses in Americans. Most cases are attributed to infection of the central nervous system with Sarcocystis neurona. Parasitemia has not been demonstrated in immunocompetent horses, but has been documented in one immunocompromised foal. The objective of this study was to isolate viable S. neurona from the blood of immunocompetent horses. Horses used in this study received orally administered S. neurona sporocysts (strain SN 37-R) daily for 112 days at the following doses: 100/day for 28 days, followed by 500/day for 28 days, followed by 1000/day for 56 days. On day 98 of the study, six yearling colts were selected for attempted culture of S. neurona from blood, two testing positive, two testing suspect and two testing negative for antibodies against S. neurona on day 84 of the study. Two 10 ml tubes with EDTA were filled from each horse by jugular venipuncture and the plasma fraction rich in mononuclear cells was pipetted onto confluent equine dermal cell cultures. The cultures were monitored weekly for parasite growth for 12 weeks. Merozoites grown from cultures were harvested and tested using S. neurona-specific PCR with RFLP to confirm species identity. PCR products were sequenced and compared to known strains of S. neurona. After 38 days of in vitro incubation, one cell culture from a horse testing positive for antibodies against S. neurona was positive for parasite growth while the five remaining cultures remained negative for parasite growth for all 12 weeks. The Sarcocystis isolate recovered from cell culture was confirmed to be S. neurona by PCR with RFLP. Gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolate was identical to the challenge strain SN-37R and differed from two known strains UCD1 and MIH1. To our knowledge this is the first report of parasitemia with S. neurona in an immunocompetent horse.

  12. Acute onset of encephalomyelitis with atypical lesions associated with dual infection of Sarcocystis neurona and Toxoplasma gondii in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Richard; Newman, Shelley J; Grunenwald, Caroline M; Crews, Amanda; Hodshon, Amy; Su, Chunlei

    2014-10-15

    A two-year-old male, neutered, basset hound-beagle mix with progressive neurological impairment was examined postmortem. Grossly, the dog had multiple raised masses on the spinal cord between nerve roots. Microscopically, the dog had protozoal myeloencephalitis. Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona were detected in the CNS by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sarcocysts in formalin-fixed muscle were negative for Sarcocystis by PCR. Banked serum was negative for T. gondii using the modified agglutination test, suggesting an acute case of T. gondii infection or immunosuppression; however, no predisposing immunosuppressive diseases, including canine distemper, were found. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of dual T. gondii and S. neurona infection in a dog. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Clinical experience of symptomatic sacral perineural cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyun Young; Lim, Kyung Joon

    2012-07-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion and are usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon but sometimes require surgical treatment. A 69-year-old male presented with pain in the buttock. He was diagnosed as having a sacral cyst with magnetic resonance imaging. For the nonoperative diagnosis and treatment, caudal peridurography and block were performed. After the treatment, the patient's symptom was relieved. We suggest a caudal peridural block is effective in relieving pain from a sacral cyst.

  14. Extensive Epidermoid Cyst and Breathing Difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Dantas Soares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts are common cystic lesions in the skin, ovaries, and testicles, but their occurrence in the oral cavity is uncommon. They consist of cysts delimited by a fibrous capsule without cutaneous annexes and are lined by stratified squamous epithelium. The differential diagnosis includes ranula, dermoid cysts, and lingual thyroid. Despite their benign presentation, these cysts can cause functional limitations, requiring special clinical attention for extensive lesions located in regions that preserve vital structures. This paper aims to report a case of epidermoid cyst in patient with swallowing and breathing difficulty, highlighting the clinical and surgical planning.

  15. [Parathyroid cyst presenting as a mediastinal tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishido, M; Nagao, M

    1996-08-01

    Mediastinal parathyroid cysts are very rare. Since the first report by DeQuervain, 19 cases have been reported. We encountered a case of mediastinal parathyroid cyst presenting as displacement of the trachea. The cyst originated in the lower portion of the left lobe of the thyroid gland and extended to the mediastinum, displacing the trachea and the esophagus. The monolocular mass was a thin walled cyst, and mognetic imaging indicated that it contained watery fluid. The left lobe of the thyroid gland was found to be displaced upward by the tumor, on thyroid scintigram done with technetium-99, which suggested that the cyst originated in the parathyroid gland.

  16. Ovarian damage due to cyst removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perlman, Signe; Kjer, Jens J

    2016-01-01

    tissue during surgery by comparing specimens of endometriomas and dermoid cysts removed laparoscopically. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The material included 326 women in a retrospective cohort study at Rigshospitalet, University hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark from 2011 to 2013. Surgery was performed...... laparoscopically for 393 benign cysts with a diagnosis of either endometrioma (n = 294) or dermoid cyst (n = 99). The microscopic existence of ovarian tissue in the cystectomy specimens were compared and correlation between CA 125 and size of cysts was examined. RESULTS: In total, 80.3% endometrioma cystectomies...... disclosed ovarian stroma compared with 17.2% of the resected dermoid cysts (p

  17. Clinical Experience of Symptomatic Sacral Perineural Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ki Tae; Lee, Hyun Young

    2012-01-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion and are usually asymptomatic. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon but sometimes require surgical treatment. A 69-year-old male presented with pain in the buttock. He was diagnosed as having a sacral cyst with magnetic resonance imaging. For the nonoperative diagnosis and treatment, caudal peridurography and block were performed. After the treatment, the patient's symptom was relieved. We suggest a caudal peridural block is effective in relieving pain from a sacral cyst. PMID:22787551

  18. Extensive Epidermoid Cyst and Breathing Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ciro Dantas; Gurgel, Alberto Costa; de Souza Júnior, Francisco de Assis; de Oliveira, Samila Neres; de Carvalho, Maria Goretti Freire; Oliveira, Hanieri Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts are common cystic lesions in the skin, ovaries, and testicles, but their occurrence in the oral cavity is uncommon. They consist of cysts delimited by a fibrous capsule without cutaneous annexes and are lined by stratified squamous epithelium. The differential diagnosis includes ranula, dermoid cysts, and lingual thyroid. Despite their benign presentation, these cysts can cause functional limitations, requiring special clinical attention for extensive lesions located in regions that preserve vital structures. This paper aims to report a case of epidermoid cyst in patient with swallowing and breathing difficulty, highlighting the clinical and surgical planning. PMID:26180645

  19. Use of proteinase K in the excystation of Sarcocystis cruzi sporocysts for in vitro culture and DNA extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiritu, W; Cawthorn, R J; Kibenge, F S

    1994-03-01

    Proteinase K was used for the cleaning of Sarcocystis cruzi (Apicomplexa) sporocysts prior to excystation. Bovine pulmonary endothelial cell cultures inoculated with the excysted sporozoites remained free of bacterial contamination for the duration of the experiment and had high yields of merozoites. The excysted sporozoites also yielded genomic DNA that could be labelled efficiently with 32P dATP by the random priming method.

  20. Ongoing outbreak of an acute muscular Sarcocystis-like illness among travellers returning from Tioman Island, Malaysia, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, D H; Freedman, D O; Neumayr, A; Parola, P

    2012-11-08

    As of 4 November, 2012, 100 patients with an acute muscular Sarcocystis-like illness associated with travel to Tioman Island, Malaysia, have been identified. Thirty-five travelled there mostly during July and August 2011 and 65 mostly during July and August 2012, suggesting an ongoing outbreak. Epidemiological investigations are ongoing. Public health agencies and practicing clinicians should be aware of this rarely-reported disease in humans and consider it as differential diagnosis in travellers returning from Tioman Island.

  1. Morphological and molecular characterization of Sarcocystis arctica-like sarcocysts from the Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) from Alaska, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Cézar, Camila K; Thompson, Peter C; Verma, Shiv Kumar; Mowery, Joseph; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Antunes Murata, Fernando H; Sinnett, David R; Van Hemert, Caroline; Rosenthal, Benjamin M; Dubey, Jitender P

    2017-07-01

    The muscles of herbivores commonly harbor sarcocysts of parasites belonging to species in the genus Sarcocystis, but such muscle parasites are rare in carnivores. Here, we report Sarcocystis arctica-like sarcocysts in muscles of Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) from Alaska, USA, for the first time. The tongues of 56 foxes were examined for Sarcocystis infection using several methods. Sarcocystis bradyzoites were detected in pepsin digests of 13 (23.2%), and sarcocysts were found in histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) of 9 (16.0%). By light microscopy, sarcocysts were up to 4 mm long and up to 245 μm wide. In HE-stained sections, the sarcocyst wall appeared smooth and up to 1.5 μm thick without visible protrusions. By transmission electron microscopy, the sarcocyst wall had a wavy parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (pvm) folded as pleomorphic villar protrusions (vp), sometimes with anastomoses of villar tips. The vp and the ground substance (gs) layer were smooth and without microtubules. The gs was up to 2.0 μm thick. The total width of the wall including vp and the gs was up to 4.0 μm. The vp were up to 3.0 μm long and most closely resembled "type 9c." All sarcocysts were mature and contained numerous 8.1 × 2.1 μm sized bradyzoites. Molecular characterization (at 18S rDNA, 28S rDNA, ITS-1, and cox1) showed the highest affinity for S. arctica of the Arctic fox (V. lagopus) from Norway. In the present investigation, we provide evidence that sarcocysts are common in tongues of Alaskan Arctic foxes suggesting that these carnivores are serving as intermediate hosts, and we also provide ultrastructure of S. arctica from the Arctic fox for the first time.

  2. Symptomatic Tarlov cyst: report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyabud, Pradit; Suwanpratheep, Kitti

    2006-07-01

    Tarlov or perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly at the sacral spine level arising between covering layers of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The cysts are relatively rare and most of them are asymptomatic. Some Tarlov cysts can exert pressure on nerve elements resulting in pain, radiculopathy and even multiple radiculopathy of cauda equina. There is no consensus on the appropriate therapeutic options of Tarlov cysts. The authors present a case of two sacral cysts diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging. The initial symptoms were low back pain and sciatica and progressed to cauda equina syndrome. Surgical treatment was performed by sacral laminectomy and wide cyst fenestration. The neurological deficits were recovered and had not recurred after a follow-up period of nine months. The literature was reviewed and discussed. This is the first reported case in Thailand.

  3. Chylous mesenteric cyst: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreen L.P. Lee

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A mesenteric cyst is defined as a cyst that is located in the mesentery of the gastrointestinal tract and may extend from the base of the mesentery into the retroperitoneum. A case report of a patient with mesenteric cyst is presented. In addition, a systematic review was performed of English language literature on chylous mesenteric cysts in adult humans. Of the 18 articles included in the review, there were 19 cases of chylous mesenteric cysts reported. Male to female ratio was 1.4:1 with a median age of 46 years. A preoperative diagnosis of mesenteric cyst was made in four patients based on computed tomography. All patients underwent surgery and there were no reports of recurrence on follow up. Chylous mesenteric cyst is a rare entity that needs to be recognized whenever a preliminary diagnosis of intra-abdominal cystic mass is made.

  4. Salivary Duct Cyst: Histo-pathologic Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Vinayachandran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-neoplastic cysts of the salivary glands are uncommon and represent 2-5% of all salivary gland lesions. They are mainly mucoceles or salivary duct cysts. Unlike a mucocele, which is surrounded by granulation tissue, the salivary duct cyst is lined by epithelium. Salivary duct cysts are more common in the oral minor salivary glands and rarely occur in the major salivary glands, show a marked predilection for the superficial lobe of the parotid, and represent 10% of all salivary gland cysts. Neoplastic differentiation of the lining of the salivary duct cyst has been reported. We report a case of a salivary duct cyst of the left parotid gland, with a review of radiographic and histopathologic features.

  5. Splenic Hydatid Cysts: 17 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozogul, Bunyami; Kisaoglu, Abdullah; Atamanalp, Sabri Selcuk; Ozturk, Gurkan; Aydinli, Bulent; Yıldırgan, Mehmet İlhan; Kantarcı, A Mecit

    2015-12-01

    Hydatid cyst disease, which is endemically observed and an important health problem in our country, involves the spleen at a frequency ranking third following the liver and the lungs. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy and results of management in splenic hydatid cysts. The demographic data, localization, diagnosis, treatment methods, and the length of postoperative hospital stay of patients with splenic hydatid cysts in a 12-year period were evaluated retrospectively. Seventeen cases were evaluated. Among these, 13 were females and four were males. Seven had solitary splenic involvement, eight had involvement of both the spleen and the liver, and two had multiple organ involvement. Ten had undergone splenectomy, one had undergone distal splenectomy, and the remaining cases had undergone different surgical procedures. The patients had received albendazole treatment in the pre- and postoperative period. One patient had died secondary to hypernatremia on the first postoperative day. The clinical picture in splenic hydatid cysts, which is seen rarely, is usually asymptomatic. The diagnosis is established by ultrasonography and abdominal CT. Although splenectomy is the standard mode of treatment, spleen-preserving methods may be used.

  6. New insights about suprapatellar cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Crnkovic

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available bursa is located between the quadriceps tendon and femur, and it develops before the birth as a separate synovial compartment proximal to the knee joint. By the fifth month of fetal life there is a suprapatellar septum between the knee joint cavity and suprapatellar bursa which later perforates and involutes in a way that a normal communication between the cavity of bursa and knee is established. A small portion of the embrionic septum can later lag as more or less expressed suprapatellar plica. In case when suprapatellar plica has a small communication with valve mechanism or in case of complete septum, bursa becomes a separate compartment and potential location for the suprapatellar cyst development. Magnetic resonance imaging is recognised as the gold standard in diagnosis of knee cysts because of its ability to show cystic nature of the lesion, its relationship with other anatomic structures, as well as to establish whether other knee pathologies are present. Considering treatment possibilities, majority of cysts around the knee resolve spontaneously and should be treated by aspiration and application of corticosteroids. Suprapatellar cyst is a very rare knee pathology and it can in some occasions be treated using open or arthroscopic surgery.

  7. Baker's Cyst: Diagnostic and Surgical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frush, Todd J; Noyes, Frank R

    2015-07-01

    Popliteal synovial cysts, also known as Baker's cysts, are commonly found in association with intra-articular knee disorders, such as osteoarthritis and meniscus tears. Histologically, the cyst walls resemble synovial tissue with fibrosis evident, and there may be chronic nonspecific inflammation present. Osteocartilaginous loose bodies may also be found within the cyst, even if they are not seen in the knee joint. Baker's cysts can be a source of posterior knee pain that persists despite surgical treatment of the intra-articular lesion, and they are routinely discovered on magnetic resonance imaging scans of the symptomatic knee. Symptoms related to a popliteal cyst origin are infrequent and may be related to size. A PubMed search was conducted with keywords related to the history, diagnosis, and treatment of Baker's cysts-namely, Baker's cyst, popliteal cyst, diagnosis, treatment, formation of popliteal cyst, surgical indications, and complications. Bibliographies from these references were also reviewed to identify related and pertinent literature. Clinical review. Level 4. Baker's cysts are commonly found associated with intra-articular knee disorders. Proper diagnosis, examination, and treatment are paramount in alleviating the pain and discomfort associated with Baker's cysts. A capsular opening to the semimembranosus-medial head gastrocnemius bursa is a commonly found normal anatomic variant. It is thought that this can lead to the formation of a popliteal cyst in the presence of chronic knee effusions as a result of intra-articular pathology. Management of symptomatic popliteal cysts is conservative. The intra-articular pathology should be first addressed by arthroscopy. If surgical excision later becomes necessary, a limited posteromedial approach is often employed. Other treatments, such as arthroscopic debridement and closure of the valvular mechanism, are not well studied and cannot yet be recommended.

  8. Primary hydatid cyst of the supraspinatus muscle: complete removal of the germinal layer and cytodiagnosis by fine-needle aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dilip K; El-Sharawy, Maha; Ayyash, Emad H; Al-Enezi, Nadia A; Iqbal, Jamshed R; Madda, John P

    2014-03-01

    Primary hydatid disease of the skeletal muscle without systemic involvement is rare. The purpose of this report is to document the novel clinical presentation and the interesting facets of fine-needle aspiration in a case of hydatid disease. It was a case of primary hydatid cyst of the left supraspinatus muscle in an Indian woman living in Kuwait, which was clinically diagnosed as a lipoma. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) yielded 2 ml of clear fluid with white particulate material. The cytocentrifuged smears prepared from the aspirated fluid showed many scolices, occasional laminated cyst wall fragments and numerous hooklets. The laminated cyst wall and scolices were PAS positive. Trichrome staining imparted a demon-head-like appearance to the scolices. The cytodiagnosis of hydatid cyst was corroborated by histopathological examination of an excised whitish membrane and an irregular cystic fragment, which showed parallel laminations without germinal layer, and skeletal muscle with granulomas and a dense eosinophilic infiltration, respectively. Quantitative serological (indirect hemagglutination) test on blood sample collected 9 days after the excision of the cyst showed insignificant antibody titer to Echinococcus sp. and after 6 weeks the antibodies were completely absent. CT scan of the chest and abdomen performed 7 weeks after removal of cyst showed no evidence of visceral hydatid cyst.

  9. Using Gordiid cysts to discover the hidden diversity, potential distribution, and new species of Gordiids (Phylum Nematomorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Cleo; Shannon, Ryan; Papeş, Monica; Schmidt-Rhaesa, Andreas; Hanelt, Ben; Bolek, Matthew G

    2016-03-11

    In this study, we sampled aquatic snails for the presence of hairworm cysts from 46 streams in Payne County, Oklahoma. Gordiid cysts were found at 70 % (32/46) of sites examined. Based on cyst morphology, we were able to identify three morphological types of gordiid cysts, including Paragordius, Gordius, and Chordodes/Neochordodes. Using our gordiid cyst presence data in conjunction with environmental variables, we developed an ecological niche model using Maxent to identify areas suitable for snail infections with gordiids. The model successfully predicted all presence localities of gordiid cysts in snails over a geographic area of 1,810 km2. We used this information, along with arthropod host infections and crowdsourcing, citizen scientists sampling for adult free-living worms during peak emergent times in areas predicted suitable by the model, to document Paragordius varius, Chordodes morgani, and a new species of gordiid (Gordius n. sp.). To our knowledge, this is the first ecological niche model attempted on such a narrow geographic scale (county level) that recovered known locations successfully. We provide new scanning electron micrographs and molecular data for these species. Our field data and ecological niche model clearly indicate that gordiid cysts are easy to detect in the environment and together these sampling techniques can be useful in discovering new species of gordiids, even in relatively well sampled areas for these cryptic parasites.

  10. In the United States, negligible rates of zoonotic sarcocystosis occur in feral swine that, by contrast, frequently harbour infections with Sarcocystis miescheriana, a related parasite contracted from canids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero-Bernal, R; Verma, S K; Oliveira, S; Yang, Y; Rosenthal, B M; Dubey, J P

    2015-04-01

    Transmission of pathogens between domestic and wild life animals plays an important role in epidemiology. Feral pig populations are increasing and expanding in the USA, and may constitute a risk to non-biosecure domestic pig facilities by serving as reservoirs for pathogens. We surveyed, for Sarcocystis infection, the myocardium of 1006 feral pigs (Sus scrofa) trapped or hunted in 29 states during the Comprehensive Feral Swine Disease Surveillance Program of the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Wildlife Services unit during 2012-2014. Sarcocysts were detected in histological sections of 25% (251/1006) of myocardium with an average parasitic load/intensity of infection of 3.03 sarcocysts/section (1.5×0.7 cm), and higher prevalence of myocarditis in severe infections. Microscopic examination of pepsin digests of 147 hearts revealed a higher prevalence of Sarcocystis bradyzoites (49%, 72/147) than when diagnosed by histology. A fragment of Sarcocystis 18S rRNA was amplified and digested with a restriction endonuclease, revealing a pattern consistent with Sarcocystis miescheriana in all 44 selected samples. Sequencing 31 of these 44 isolates confirmed their correspondence to S. miescheriana. Thus, S. miescheriana infection, but not the zoonotic parasite Sarcocystis suihominis, appears to be prevalent and widespread in feral pigs in the USA.

  11. INSOLENTITHECA EMEND., PROTO INSOLENTITHECA N. GEN., AND CALIGELLIDAE EMEND., PERMANENT CYSTS OF PALAEOZOIC FORAMINIFERA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DANIEL VACHARD

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Insolentitheca was interpreted as a microproblematicum, a foraminiferal test, or a syzygial cyst. Arguments are listed versus syzygial cysts or ordinary foraminiferal agglutinates, and for permanent cysts with probable infaunal life. Protoinsolentitheca fundamenta n. gen. n. sp. is described, which links Insolentitheca and the Caligellidae. Some elements of nomenclature are introduced to describe the particular tests of the Caligellidae. These taxa could be basically represented by an infaunal naked or chitinaceous foraminifer, which secretes during its lifetime a calcified perimeter denominated the chimney, only present in the Caligellidae. To this initial secretion are added two types of "agglutinated" and bioeroded tests: the fundamental in Protoinsolentitheca and Insolentitheca, and the bricks, in Insolentitheca only. 

  12. Congenital cervical bronchogenic cyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiralj Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital anomalies of the embryonic foregut. They are caused by abnormal budding of diverticulum of the embryonic foregut between the 26th and 40th day of gestation. Bronchogenic cysts can appear in the mediastinum and pulmonary parenchyma, or at ectopic sites (neck, subcutaneous tissue or abdomen. So far, 70 cases of cervical localization of bronchogenic cysts have been reported. Majority of bronchogenic cysts have been diagnosed in the pediatric population. Bronchogenic cysts of the cervical area are generally asymptomatic and symptoms may occur if cysts become large or in case of infection of the cyst. The diagnosis is made based on clinical findings, radiological examination, but histopathologic findings are essential for establishing the final diagnosis. Treatment of cervical bronchogenic cyst involves surgical excision. Case Outline. Authors present a case of a 6-year-old female patient sent by a pediatrician to a maxillofacial surgeon due to asymptomatic lump on the left side of the neck. The patient had frequent respiratory infections and respiratory obstructions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the neck was performed and a well-circumscribed cystic formation on the left side of the neck was observed, with paratracheal location. The complete excision of the cyst was made transcervically. Histopathological findings pointed to bronchogenic cyst. Conclusion. Cervical bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital malformations. Considering the location, clinical findings and the radiological features, these cysts resemble other cervical lesions. Surgical treatment is important because it is both therapeutic and diagnostic. Reliable diagnosis of bronchogenic cysts is based on histopathological examination.

  13. Imaging in pulmonary hydatid cysts

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    Mandeep K Garg; Madhurima Sharma; Ajay Gulati; Ujjwal Gorsi; Ashutosh N Aggarwal; Ritesh Agarwal; Niranjan Khandelwal

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a zoonosis that can involve almost any organ in the human body. After the liver, the lungs are the most common site for hydatid disease in adults. Imaging plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis of the disease, as clinical features are often nonspecific. Classical radiological signs of pulmonary hydatid cysts have been described in the literature, aiding in the diagnosis of the disease. However, complicated hydatid cysts can prove to be a diagnostic challenge at times due to their atypical imaging features. Radiography is the initial imaging modality. Computed tomography can provide a specific diagnosis in complicated cases. Ultrasound is particularly useful in peripheral lung lesions. The role of magnetic resonance imaging largely remains unexplored.

  14. Intraosseous ganglion cyst of olecranon

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    Abolghasem Zarezadeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraosseous ganglia are benign cysts that usually can be seen in lower extremity; especially around ankle. These cysts have fewer incidences in upper extremity, mainly around the wrist. They are extremely rare in olecranon. These lesions are often asymptomatic. Patient was a 75-year-old man who had trauma many years ago. When he came to our clinic, he complained of severe pain around his elbow that he could not do ordinary activity. He had local tenderness in elbow and 30 degree limitation in extension. In radiography, lytic, multiloculated lesion existed in region of olecranon. After excisional biopsy was done, cavity was cleaned completely with curette and was filled with autogenous bone. At 10-year follow-up, the patient was completely asymptomatic. Control radiograph showed cavity filled completely by bone; there was no evidence of relapse.

  15. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

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    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  16. Soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst

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    Wang, X.L.; Gielen, J.L.; Delrue, F.; De Schepper, A.M.A. [Department of Radiology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium); Salgado, R. [Department of Pathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen (University of Antwerp), Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium)

    2004-08-01

    A soft tissue aneurysmal bone cyst located in the right gluteus medius of a 21-year-old man is reported. On conventional radiography, the lesion demonstrated a spherically trabeculated mass with a calcific rim. On CT scan, it showed a well-organized peripheral calcification resembling a myositis ossificans. On MRI, it presented as a multilocular, cystic lesion with fluid-fluid levels. The lesion had no solid components except for intralesional septa. Although findings on imaging and histology were identical to those described in classical aneurysmal bone cyst, diagnosis was delayed because of lack of knowledge of this entity and its resemblance to the more familiar post-traumatic heterotopic ossification (myositis ossificans). (orig.)

  17. Unusual Cases of Epidermoid cyst: Case Series

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    Lalita Yadav

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the oro-facial region cystic lesions of different etiologies are encountered owing to the presence of the teeth in the jaw bones. A bewildering variety of developmental, odontogenic and non-odontogenic cysts are seen. Epidermoid cyst is a rare developmental cyst of the oro-facial region which results from entrapped epidermal elements without adnexal appendages. Dermoid and epidermoid cysts occur in oro-facial region with an incidence of 6.9-7% and represents less than 0.01% of all oral cavity cysts. Here we report two cases of epidermoid cysts occurring at unusual locations involving upper left maxillary region lateral to the nose and pinna of the ear.

  18. Management of ovarian cysts in infants

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    Yan Xue-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To discuss the experience of diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cyst in infants. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was conducted on 20 infants who suffered from ovarian cyst. Results: There were no dysplasia ovarian was found in children which were preoperatively diagnosed simplex cyst. Within thirteen children preoperatively detected mixed cystic-solid lesion, six cases ovarian cysts disappeared and two cases underwent poor blood supply in the following time. Conclusion: Adverse effects for ovarian cyst in infants can be prevented by agressive surgical intervention. Harmful effects of ovarian cyst can be prevented by positive surgical intervention despite the diagnostic difficulties in children with clinical symptoms of this condition.

  19. Lymphoepithelial cyst of the submandibular gland

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    A Saneem Ahamed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoepithelial cysts are benign, slowly growing unilocular or multilocular lesions that appear in the head and neck. They are also called Branchial cyst. The head and neck sites are the salivary glands(more commonly parotid and rarely submandibular gland and the oral cavity (usually the floor of the mouth. there are various methods of investigation available today, of which Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC can be used to provide an immediate diagnosis of a lymphoepithelial cyst. The other investigations include, Ultrasonogram,and Computed tomography.It usually occurs due to the process of lymphocyte-induced cystic ductular dilatation and the confirmatory diagnosis is always made postoperatively by histopathological examination. The mainstay in the treatment of a lymphoepithelial cyst remains the surgical approach, which includes complete enucleation of the cyst along with total excision of the involved salivary gland. This is a report of a lymphoepithelial cyst involving the submandibular salivary gland and its management.

  20. A pigmented calcifying odontogenic cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soames, J V

    1982-04-01

    A case of the pigmented variant of the calcifying odontogenic cyst occurring in a 15-year-old West Indian girl is reported. Melanin pigment was widely distributed and appeared in greatest amount in cells exhibiting the appearance of stellate reticulum. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated large numbers of melanosomes in these cells but relatively few in epithelial ghost cells. The latter contained thick bundles of tonofilaments. Melanocytes were identified and two forms were distinguished, depending on their content of premelanosomes and fully melanized melanosomes.

  1. Bronchogenic cyst of the abdomen

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    Čolović Radoje

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A bronchogenic cyst is a rare congenital anomaly that appears in the thorax, usually the lungs or the mediastinum, being much rarer in the retrosternal space, within the pericardium or the diaphragm, as well as in the neck, while localization within the abdomen is extremely rare, with only about 30 reported cases. We present the case of a 68-year-old woman. During an investigation for an epigastric pain, a cystic lesion in the area of the body and tail of the pancreas was found. During open surgery, a cystic lesion, spanning 95x75x70 mm, above the body and tail of the pancreas was excised. The wall of the cyst was 8-12mm thick; it contained viscous fluid, the culture of which stayed sterile. Histology determined that it was a bronchogenic cyst. After an early uneventful recovery, the patient developed a left colonic fistula, which healed spontaneously within 3 weeks, probably because of the unnoticed operative damage to the splenic flexure of the colon during splenectomy, which was adherent to the cystic mass and impossible to save during excision. Six months after surgery, the patient continued to remain symptom free.

  2. Neurenteric Cyst Presenting with Bleeding Per Rectum.

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    Yadav, Taruna; Parmar, Padam; Rattan, Kamal Nain

    2016-01-01

    Neurenteric cyst in the thoracic cavity may produce a myriad of clinical features. We report a 7-month-old girl who presented with significant bleeding per rectum. On imaging, a mediastinal cystic structure with air-fluid levels was evident with cervico-thoracic vertebral anomalies. The cyst was excised and histopathology showed intestinal mucosal lining with heterotopic pancreatic tissue confirming the diagnosis of neurenteric cyst.

  3. Tarlov cysts: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ramesh Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Chakraborty, Soumya

    2012-04-01

    Perineural cysts are common and usually detected incidentally during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. Treatment is indicated only when the cyst is symptomatic. We report one such patients presented with cauda equina syndrome and another with low back pain with claudication. They underwent excision and duraplasty; both motor and sensory fibres were carefully separated from the cyst wall using a nerve root retractor and penfield. There was no nerve root damage or neural deficit. Symptoms were relieved postoperatively.

  4. Laparoscopic treatment for renal hydatid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabii, Redouane; Mezzour, Mohamed Hicham; Essaki, Hicham; Fekak, Hamid; Joual, Abdenbi; Meziane, Fethi

    2006-03-01

    A multivesicular hydatid cyst was removed from the left kidney of a 26-year-old woman by retroperitoneal laparoscopy to avoid contamination of the abdominal cavity. A scolicidal agent (20% hypertonic saline) was injected around the kidney initially and then instilled into the cyst after the contents had been evacuated. There were no complications and no anaphylactic shock. This appears to be the first reported case of treatment of renal hydatid cyst by laparoscopy.

  5. Swollen eyelid reveals multiple intracranial hydatid cysts associated with a palpebral cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzili, N; Ahbeddou, S; Ahmimech, J; Abboud, H; Boutarbouch, M; El Hassan, A; Berraho, A

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a hydatid cyst of the eyelid in a 12-year-old boy associated with cerebral involvement. The patient was initially treated by neurosurgeons for brain cysts. The course after an interval of two months was marked by regression of the palpebral cyst on albendazole.

  6. Intramedullary bronchogenic cyst of the conus medullaris.

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    Yilmaz, Cem; Gulsen, Salih; Sonmez, Erkin; Ozger, Ozkan; Unlukaplan, Muge; Caner, Hakan

    2009-10-01

    Spinal bronchogenic cysts are rare congenital lesions. The authors describe their experience in the treatment of a 17-year-old boy who presented with back pain and paresthesia in both lower extremities. Lumbar MR imaging revealed the presence of an intramedullary cystic lesion at the conus medullaris and histopathological analysis revealed a bronchogenic cyst. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of an intramedullary spinal bronchogenic cyst arising at the conus; all previously reported spinal bronchogenic cysts were either intradural extramedullary or not located at the conus.

  7. Lone, Mobile Left Atrial Hydatid Cyst

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    Ugurlu, Mehmet; Baktir, Ahmet Oguz; Tekin, Ali Ihsan; Tok, Ahmet; Yagmur, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    Echinococcosis is endemic in various regions of Turkey. Cardiac involvement in echinococcosis is rare, and lone cardiac hydatid cysts are even more unusual. Because cardiac hydatid disease can be fatal, even asymptomatic patients are optimally referred for surgical treatment. We present a rare case of a lone, primary, mobile hydatid cyst in the left atrium of a 62-year-old woman. The cyst caused dyspnea from left ventricular inflow obstruction. In addition to reporting the patient's fatal case, we discuss cardiac hydatid cysts in terms of the scant medical literature. PMID:27303247

  8. A radiologic study of dentigerous cysts

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    Kang, Tae Won; You Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-11-15

    A radiologic study of 139 dentigerous cysts (128 patients) indicated the followings: 1. There was higher incidence in males (62.99%) than in females (37.01%). The most common age group was 11-20 years and the average age was 23.6 years. 2. The most common clinical symptoms was swelling of the jaws (49 cases, 33.09%), and no symptoms was presented in 26 cases (18.71%). 3. Dentigerous cysts were found to be slightly more common in the maxilla (53.24%) than in the mandible (46.76%) and there was almost no difference in occurrence between right and left side. The maxillary supernumerary tooth was the most frequent site of the dentigerous cyst and no dentigerous cyst was found to be related to a deciduous tooth. 4. The most common radiographic findings was root resorption of the adjacent teeth (33.09%), and the central dentigerous cysts were 78 cases (56.12%), the lateral dentigerous cysts were 61 cases (43.88%). 5. The increased radiolucency at the crown portion of the tooth in a cystic cavity was seen in 44 cases (31.65%), and a case of dentigerous cyst was found in a edentulous patient, and 16 cases of multiple dentigerous cysts were found in 5 patients. 6. The ameloblastic changes in 8 cases, the keratinization of the cyst wall in 2 cases, and a case of epidermoid carcinoma were confirmed microscopically.

  9. Snapping Knee Caused by Medial Meniscal Cyst

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    Tsuyoshi Ohishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Snapping phenomenon around the medial aspect of the knee is rare. We present this case of snapping knee caused by the sartorius muscle over a large medial meniscal cyst in a 66-year-old female. Magnetic resonance images demonstrated a large medial meniscal cyst with a horizontal tear of the medial meniscus. Arthroscopic cyst decompression with limited meniscectomy resulted in the disappearance of snapping, and no recurrence of the cyst was observed during a 2-year follow-up period.

  10. Diagnosis and management of bilateral nasolabial cysts

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    Rajkumar Parwani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasolabial cysts are painless, submucosal, non-odontogenic jaw cysts presenting as soft tissue swellings in the maxillary anterior mucolabial fold lateral to midline, leading to elevation of nasal ala. Present case documents bilateral nasolabial cysts in a 69-year-old Asian female patient. In the present case, extraoral swelling of maxillary lip and elevation of nasal ala was observed on right side of the face. Intraorally, soft and fluctuant bilateral cysts were observed. Straw-colored fluid was aspirated from the right cyst. Radiographically, erosion of bone in a "cupping" fashion was observed in the region of left cyst. The cysts were enucleated using intraoral approach. Histopathology of the right-sided cyst revealed a cystic cavity lined by stratified squamous cells along with a few mucosal cells. At few places, stratified squamous and pseudostratified columnar epithelia with many cilia and goblet cells were also evident. Capsule was loosely arranged with fibrous tissue and chronic inflammatory infiltrate. Left-sided cystic specimen showed two or more layered stratified squamous lining epithelium with thin capsule. Diagnosis of bilateral nasolabial/nasoalveolar cysts was confirmed.

  11. A Rare Case Report of Conjunctival Cyst

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    Salagar, Kavita Mallikarjun; Pujari, M. R.; Murthy, Chethan N

    2015-01-01

    A conjunctival cyst is a thin-walled sac or vesicle that contains fluid. This vesicle may develop either on or under the conjunctiva. It develops due to variety of causes such as infection, inflammation, retention cyst and rarely drug induced. The authors aimed to report a case of conjuctival cyst in a 34-year-old male following instillation of anti-allergic topical drugs for over period of one year. Conjuctival cyst developing due to chronic use of anti-allergic topical drugs containing pres...

  12. A Case Report of Enterogenous Cyst

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    M. Amini, M.D.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Foregut cysts are various congenital lesions originated from emberyonic foregut. Bronchogenic, enterogenous and neuroenteric cysts are the most frequent forms of foregut cysts. They create different clinical symptoms based on their location. Enterogenous cysts comprise 4-5 percent of posterior mediastinal cysts and include esophageal, gastric and enteric cysts. A 61 year old woman referred to surgical clinic with dysphasia and regurgitation 6 months ago whose illness aggravared over the last 3 months. In physical examination, a lesion was seen in the right site of posterior mediastinum. Surgical excision was done and a ciliated columnar epithelium with two thin muscular layers were reported in pathology. In reality, the distinction between esophageal and bronchogenic cysts is not always clear. Both cysts present in mediastinum and their epithelial tissues are non-specific, however presence or lack of muscle layer in cyst-wall, proximity to gastrointestinal tract or tracheobronchial tree, adaption of clinical symptoms with paraclinic results and observations during surgical procedure can reveal certain diagnosis.

  13. Hip labral cyst caused by psoas impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Marc; Alvarez, Sonia; Ríos, Jose L

    2012-08-01

    Hip labral impingement can cause labral tears and secondary paralabral cyst formation. Femoroacetabular impingement is the main cause of labral impingement, but other conditions such as iliopsoas tendon impingement are described. There is no description of labral cyst resulting from psoas impingement treated arthroscopically in the literature. We present the case of a young sportsman with groin pain caused by psoas impingement with a labral tear and secondary paralabral cyst who was treated arthroscopically by cyst debridement, psoas tenotomy, and labral repair. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Dermoid cyst of the parotid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trandafir, Violeta; Trandafir, Daniela; Ferariu, D; Boişteanu, Otilia; Haba, Danisia

    2011-01-01

    Dermoid cyst of the parotid gland is a rare clinical entity. Definitive clinical diagnosis is often difficult to determine preoperatively because of the lack of pathognomonic features. The most frequent location of a parotid dermoid cyst is a triangular area lying above the pinna. Imaging studies do not definitely diagnose a parotid dermoid cyst. Although parotid dermoid cyst is (generally) well-encapsulated, complete removal of the cyst wall is not sufficient to cure it, so it is mandatory to perform careful excision of the cyst by parotidectomy, in terms of preserving facial nerve integrity. Histopathology of the parotid gland tumor removed by parotidectomy makes a diagnosis of certainty, by revealing a cyst wall with keratinization of the squamous epithelium and the presence of skin annexes (hair follicles, sweat glands, sebaceous glands). We present a rare case of parotid dermoid cyst in a 21-year-old male patient with symptoms and imaging rather suggestive of arch I branchial cyst and a brief review of data in the medical literature of the last 20 years.

  15. Tarlov cyst: Case report and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Prashad Bhagwat; Jain Anil; Dhammi Ish

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of sacral perineural cyst presenting with complaints of low back pain with neurological claudication. The patient was treated by laminectomy and excision of the cyst. Tarlov cysts (sacral perineural cysts) are nerve root cysts found most commonly in the sacral roots, arising between the covering layer of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The incidence of Tarlov cysts is 5% and most of them are asymptomatic, usually detected as inciden...

  16. Two cases of symptomatic perineural cysts (tarlov cysts) in one family: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Kim, Il Sup; Lee, Sang Won; Son, Byung Chul

    2008-09-01

    Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the etiologies of perineural cysts, but the accurate etiologies remain unclear. We experienced two cases of symptomatic sacral perineural cysts (Tarlov cysts) in one family, who presented with perianal paresthesia. Both of them were operated and postoperatively their symptoms were disappeared immediately. We experienced the excellent treatment outcome with the surgical management of symptomatic perineural cysts in the sacral region. We assume that the theory of congenital origin including a familial tendency is the most plausible of the hypotheses that have been proposed.

  17. Prevalence of antibodies to Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi in horses from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeargan, Michelle R; Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Dubey, Jitender P; Howe, Daniel K

    2013-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a debilitating disease of horses caused by Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi. Sera from 495 horses in Durango State, Mexico were tested for anti-protozoal antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on major surface antigens of these two parasites. Antibodies to S. neurona were detected in 240 (48.5%) of the 495 horse sera tested with the rSnSAG2/4/3 trivalent ELISA. Multivariate analysis showed that exposure to S. neurona was associated with age, feeding grains and crops, and small herd size. Antibodies to N. hughesi were found in 15 (3.0%) of the 495 horse sera tested with the rNhSAG1 ELISA and confirmed by Western blot of N. hughesi tachyzoite antigen. This is the first report of S. neurona and N. hughesi exposure in horses in Mexico, and it affirms that EPM should be in the differential diagnosis for horses exhibiting signs of neurologic disease in this country. © M.R. Yeargan et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2013.

  18. Prevalence and risk factors associated with Sarcocystis neurona infections in opossums (Didelphis virginiana) from central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejmanek, Daniel; Vanwormer, Elizabeth; Miller, Melissa A; Mazet, Jonna A K; Nichelason, Amy E; Melli, Ann C; Packham, Andrea E; Jessup, David A; Conrad, Patricia A

    2009-12-03

    Sarcocystis neurona, a protozoal parasite shed by opossums (Didelphis virginiana), has been shown to cause significant morbidity and mortality in horses, sea otters, and other marine mammals. Over the course of 3 years (fall 2005-summer 2008), opossums from central California were tested for infection with S. neurona. Of 288 opossums sampled, 17 (5.9%) were infected with S. neurona based on the molecular characterization of sporocysts from intestinal scrapings or feces. Risk factors evaluated for association with S. neurona infection in opossums included: age, sex, location, season, presence of pouch young in females, concomitant infection, and sampling method (live-trapped or traffic-killed). Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified that opossums in the Central Valley were 9 times more likely to be infected than those near the coast (p=0.009). Similarly, opossum infection was 5 times more likely to be detected during the reproductive season (March-July; p=0.013). This first investigation of S. neurona infection prevalence and associated risk factors in opossums in the western United States can be used to develop management strategies aimed at reducing the incidence of S. neurona infections in susceptible hosts, including horses and threatened California sea otters (Enhydra lutris neries).

  19. In vitro efficacy of nitro- and halogeno-thiazolide/thiadiazolide derivatives against Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargala, G; Le Goff, L; Ballet, J J; Favennec, L; Stachulski, A V; Rossignol, J F

    2009-06-10

    Sarcocystis neurona is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). The aim of this work was to document inhibitory activities of nitazoxanide (NTZ, [2-acetolyloxy-N-(5-nitro 2-thiazolyl) benzamide]) and new thiazolides/thiadiazolides on S. neurona in vitro development, and investigate their structure-activity relationships. S. neurona was grown in bovine turbinate cell cultures. At concentrations varying from 1.0 to 5.0mg/L, nitazoxanide and 21 of 32 second generation thiazolide/thiadiazolide agents exerted a > or =95% maximum inhibition on S. neurona development. Most active agents were either NO(2) or halogen substituted in position 5 of their thiazole moiety. In contrast, other 5-substitutions such as hydrogen, methyl, SO(2)CH(3), and CH(3) negatively impacted activity. Compared with derivatives with an acetylated benzene moiety, deacetylated compounds which most probably represent primary metabolites exhibited similar inhibitory activities. Present data provide the first evidence of in vitro inhibitory activities of nitazoxanide and new thiazolides/thiadiazolides on S. neurona development. Active halogeno-thiazolide/thiadiazolides may provide a valuable nitro-free alternative to nitazoxanide for EPM treatment depending on further evaluation of their in vivo activities.

  20. Seroepidemiology of Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi infections in domestic donkeys (Equus asinus in Durango, Mexico

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    Alvarado-Esquivel Cosme

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently no information regarding Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi infections in donkeys in Mexico. Here, we determined the presence of antibodies against S. neurona and N. hughesi in donkeys in the northern Mexican state of Durango. Serum samples of 239 domestic donkeys (Equus asinus were assayed for S. neurona and N. hughesi antibodies using home-made enzyme-linked immunoassays; six (2.5% of the 239 donkeys tested seropositive for S. neurona. The seroprevalence of S. neurona infection was comparable among donkeys regardless of their origin, health status, or sex. Multivariate analysis showed that seropositivity to S. neurona was associated with increased age (OR = 2.95; 95% CI: 1.11–7.82; p = 0.02. Antibodies to N. hughesi were found in two (0.8% of the 239 donkeys. Both exposed donkeys were healthy, 3- and 6-year-old females. This is the first evidence of S. neurona and N. hughesi infections in donkeys in Mexico.

  1. Molecular characterization of Sarcocystis neurona strains from opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and intermediate hosts from Central California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejmanek, Daniel; Miller, Melissa A; Grigg, Michael E; Crosbie, Paul R; Conrad, Patricia A

    2010-05-28

    Sarcocystis neurona is a significant cause of neurological disease in horses and other animals, including the threatened Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). Opossums (Didelphis virginiana), the only known definitive hosts for S. neurona in North America, are an introduced species in California. S. neurona DNA isolated from sporocysts and/or infected tissues of 10 opossums, 6 horses, 1 cat, 23 Southern sea otters, and 1 harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) with natural infections was analyzed based on 15 genetic markers, including the first internal transcribed spacer (ITS-1) region; the 25/396 marker; S. neurona surface antigen genes (snSAGs) 2, 3, and 4; and 10 different microsatellites. Based on phylogenetic analysis, most of the S. neurona strains segregated into three genetically distinct groups. Additionally, fifteen S. neurona samples from opossums and several intermediate hosts, including sea otters and horses, were found to be genetically identical across all 15 genetic markers, indicating that fatal encephalitis in Southern sea otters and equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) in horses is strongly linked to S. neurona sporocysts shed by opossums. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Has Sarcocystis neurona Dubey et al., 1991 (Sporozoa: Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) cospeciated with its intermediate hosts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikha, Hany M

    2009-08-26

    The question of how Sarcocystis neurona is able to overcome species barrier and adapt to new hosts is central to the understanding of both the evolutionary origin of S. neurona and the prediction of its field host range. Therefore, it is worth reviewing current knowledge on S. neurona host specificity. The available host range data for S. neurona are discussed in relation to a subject of evolutionary importance-specialist or generalist and its implications to understand the strategies of host adaptation. Current evidences demonstrate that a wide range of hosts exists for S. neurona. This parasite tends to be highly specific for its definitive host but much less so for its intermediate host (I.H.). The unique specificity of S. neurona for its definitive host may be mediated by a probable long coevolutionary relationship of the parasite and carnivores in a restricted ecological niche 'New World'. This might be taken as evidence that carnivores are the 'original' host group for S. neurona. Rather, the capacity of S. neurona to exploit an unusually large number of I.H. species probably indicates that S. neurona maintains non-specificity to its I.H. as an adaptive response to insure the survival of the parasite in areas in which the 'preferred' host is not available. This review concludes with the view that adaptation of S. neurona to a new host is a complex interplay that involves a large number of determinants.

  3. Immune response to Sarcocystis neurona infection in naturally infected horses with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jibing; Ellison, Siobhan; Gogal, Robert; Norton, Heather; Lindsay, David S; Andrews, Frank; Ward, Daniel; Witonsky, Sharon

    2006-06-15

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is one of the most common neurologic diseases of horses in the United States. The primary etiologic agent is Sarcocystis neurona. Currently, there is limited knowledge regarding the protective or pathophysiologic immune response to S. neurona infection or the subsequent development of EPM. The objectives of this study were to determine whether S. neurona infected horses with clinical signs of EPM had altered or suppressed immune responses compared to neurologically normal horses and if blood sample storage would influence these findings. Twenty clinically normal horses and 22 horses with EPM, diagnosed by the presence of S. neurona specific antibodies in the serum and/or cerebrospinal (CSF) and clinical signs, were evaluated for differences in the immune cell subsets and function. Our results demonstrated that naturally infected horses had significantly (Pneurona in horses, as well as to determine the mechanism associated with suppressed in vitro proliferation responses. Finally, overnight storage of blood samples appears to alter T lymphocyte phenotypes and viability among leukocytes.

  4. Life cycle of Sarcocystis neurona in its natural intermediate host, the raccoon, Procyon lotor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, J F; Dubey, J P; Oglesbee, M J; Reed, S M; Lindsay, D S; Capitini, L A; Njoku, C J; Vittitow, K L; Saville, W J A

    2002-12-01

    Sarcocystis neurona causes encephalomyelitis in many species of mammals and is the most important cause of neurologic disease in the horse. Its complete life cycle is unknown, particularly its development and localization in the intermediate host. Recently, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) was recognized as a natural intermediate host of S. neurona. In the present study, migration and development of S. neurona was studied in 10 raccoons that were fed S. neurona sporocysts from experimentally infected opossums; 4 raccoons served as controls. Raccoons were examined at necropsy 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 15, 22, 37, and 77 days after feeding on sporocysts (DAFS). Tissue sections of most of the organs were studied histologically and reacted with anti-S. neurona-specific polyclonal rabbit serum in an immunohistochemical test. Parasitemia was demonstrated in peripheral blood of raccoons 3 and 5 DAFS. Individual zoites were seen in histologic sections of intestines of raccoons euthanized 1, 3, and 5 DAFS. Schizonts and merozoites were seen in many tissues 7 to 22 DAFS, particularly in the brain. Sarcocysts were seen in raccoons killed 22 DAFS. Sarcocysts at 22 DAFS were immature and seen only in skeletal muscle. Mature sarcocysts were seen in all skeletal samples, particularly in the tongue of the raccoon 77 DAFS; these sarcocysts were infective to laboratory-raised opossums. This is the first report of the complete development of S. neurona schizonts and sarcocysts in a natural intermediate host.

  5. Risk of transplacental transmission of Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi in California horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Paulo C; Conrad, Patricia A; Barr, Bradd C; Wilson, W David; Ferraro, Gregory L; Packham, Andrea E; Carpenter, Tim E; Gardner, Ian A

    2004-12-01

    The study objective was to assess the risk of transplacental transmission of Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi in foals from 4 California farms during 3 foaling seasons. Serum of presuckle foals and serum and colostrum of periparturient mares were tested using indirect fluorescent antibody tests for S. neurona and N. hughesi. Serum antibody titers were neurona and N. hughesi in mares increased with age. Mares neurona and N. hughesi, respectively, than mares from California. The strength of association between positivity to either parasite and state of birth decreased as age increased. Mares positive for S. neurona and N. hughesi were 2.2 and 1.7 times more likely, respectively, to have a previous abortion than negative mares, adjusted for age and state of birth. The annual mortality rate for mares was 4%. The annual incidence rate of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis was 0.2%. In conclusion, there was no detectable risk of transplacental transmission of S. neurona and N. hughesi. Prevalence of antibodies against both parasites in mares increased with age.

  6. Horses experimentally infected with Sarcocystis neurona develop altered immune responses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witonsky, Sharon G; Ellison, Siobhan; Yang, Jibing; Gogal, Robert M; Lawler, Heather; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Sriranganathan, Namalwar; Andrews, Frank; Ward, Daniel; Lindsay, David S

    2008-10-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) due to Sarcocystis neurona infection is 1 of the most common neurologic diseases in horses in the United States. The mechanisms by which most horses resist disease, as well as the possible mechanisms by which the immune system may be suppressed in horses that develop EPM, are not known. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to determine whether horses experimentally infected with S. neurona developed suppressed immune responses. Thirteen horses that were negative for S. neurona antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were randomly assigned to control (n = 5) or infected (n = 8) treatment groups. Neurologic exams and cerebrospinal fluid analyses were performed prior to, and following, S. neurona infection. Prior to, and at multiple time points following infection, immune parameters were determined. All 8 S. neurona-infected horses developed clinical signs consistent with EPM, and had S. neurona antibodies in the serum and CSF. Both infected and control horses had increased percentages (P < 0.05) of B cells at 28 days postinfection. Infected horses had significantly decreased (P < 0.05) proliferation responses as measured by thymidine incorporation to nonspecific mitogens phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin (I) as soon as 2 days postinfection.

  7. Seroepidemiology of Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi infections in domestic donkeys (Equus asinus) in Durango, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Howe, Daniel K; Yeargan, Michelle R; Alvarado-Esquivel, Domingo; Alfredo Zamarripa-Barboza, José; Dubey, Jitender P

    2017-01-01

    There is currently no information regarding Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi infections in donkeys in Mexico. Here, we determined the presence of antibodies against S. neurona and N. hughesi in donkeys in the northern Mexican state of Durango. Serum samples of 239 domestic donkeys (Equus asinus) were assayed for S. neurona and N. hughesi antibodies using home-made enzyme-linked immunoassays; six (2.5%) of the 239 donkeys tested seropositive for S. neurona. The seroprevalence of S. neurona infection was comparable among donkeys regardless of their origin, health status, or sex. Multivariate analysis showed that seropositivity to S. neurona was associated with increased age (OR = 2.95; 95% CI: 1.11-7.82; p = 0.02). Antibodies to N. hughesi were found in two (0.8%) of the 239 donkeys. Both exposed donkeys were healthy, 3- and 6-year-old females. This is the first evidence of S. neurona and N. hughesi infections in donkeys in Mexico. © C. Alvarado-Esquivel et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  8. California mussels (Mytilus californianus) as sentinels for marine contamination with Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Lauren; Rejmanek, Daniel; Aguilar, Beatriz; Conrad, Patricia; Shapiro, Karen

    2016-05-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is a terrestrial parasite that can cause fatal encephalitis in the endangered Southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). To date, neither risk factors associated with marine contamination nor the route of S. neurona infection to marine mammals has been described. This study evaluated coastal S. neurona contamination using California mussels (Mytilus californianus) as sentinels for pathogen pollution. A field investigation was designed to test the hypotheses that (1) mussels can serve as sentinels for S. neurona contamination, and (2) S. neurona contamination in mussels would be highest during the rainy season and in mussels collected near freshwater. Initial validation of molecular assays through sporocyst spiking experiments revealed the ITS-1500 assay to be most sensitive for detection of S. neurona, consistently yielding parasite amplification at concentrations ⩾5 sporocysts/1 mL mussel haemolymph. Assays were then applied on 959 wild-caught mussels, with detection of S. neurona confirmed using sequence analysis in three mussels. Validated molecular assays for S. neurona detection in mussels provide a novel toolset for investigating marine contamination with this parasite, while confirmation of S. neurona in wild mussels suggests that uptake by invertebrates may serve as a route of transmission to susceptible marine animals.

  9. Detection of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., and Toxoplasma gondii in horses from Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangoudoubiyam, S; Oliveira, J B; Víquez, C; Gómez-García, A; González, O; Romero, J J; Kwok, O C H; Dubey, J P; Howe, D K

    2011-06-01

    Serum samples from 315 horses from Costa Rica, Central America, were examined for the presence of antibodies against Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora spp., and Toxoplasma gondii by using the surface antigen (SAG) SnSAG2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the NhSAG1 ELISA, and the modified agglutination test, respectively. Anti- S. neurona antibodies were found in 42.2% of the horses by using the SnSAG2 ELISA. Anti- Neospora spp. antibodies were found in only 3.5% of the horses by using the NhSAG1 ELISA, and only 1 of these horses was confirmed seropositive by Western blot. Antibodies to T. gondii were found in 34.0% of the horses tested, which is higher than in previous reports from North and South America. The finding of anti- S. neurona antibodies in horses from geographical areas where Didelphis marsupialis has wide distribution suggests that D. marsupialis is a potential definitive host for this parasite and a source of infection for these horses.

  10. Sarcocystis neurona manipulation using culture-derived merozoites for bradyzoite and sporocyst production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Sarah B; Marsh, Antoinette E; Lewis, Stephanie; Carman, Michelle; Howe, Daniel K; Saville, William J; Reed, Stephen M

    2017-04-30

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) remains a significant central nervous system disease of horses in the American continents. Sarcocystis neurona is considered the primary causative agent and its intermediate life stages are carried by a wide host-range including raccoons (Procyon lotor) in North America. S. neurona sarcocysts mature in raccoon skeletal muscle and can produce central nervous system disease in raccoons, mirroring the clinical presentation in horses. The study aimed to develop laboratory tools whereby the life cycle and various life stages of S. neurona could be better studied and manipulated using in vitro and in vivo systems and compare the biology of two independent isolates. This study utilized culture-derived parasites from S. neurona strains derived from a raccoon or from a horse to initiate raccoon infections. Raccoon tissues, including fresh and cryopreserved tissues, were used to establish opossum (Didelphis virginiana) infections, which then shed sporocyts with retained biological activity to cause encephalitis in mice. These results demonstrate that sarcocysts can be generated using in vitro-derived S. neurona merozoites, including an isolate originally derived from a naturally infected horse with clinical EPM. This study indicates the life cycle can be significantly manipulated in the laboratory without affecting subsequent stage development, allowing further purification of strains and artificial maintenance of the life cycle. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Infection of immunodeficient horses with Sarcocystis neurona does not result in neurologic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellon, Debra C; Knowles, Donald P; Greiner, Ellis C; Long, Maureen T; Hines, Melissa T; Hochstatter, Tressa; Tibary, Ahmed; Dame, John B

    2004-11-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is a progressive neurologic disease of horses most commonly caused by infection with the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona. Factors affecting neuroinvasion and neurovirulence have not been determined. We investigated the pathogenesis of infection with S. neurona in horses with severe combined immune deficiency (SCID). Two immunocompetent (IC) Arabian horses and two Arabian horses with SCID were infected orally with 5 x 10(5) sporocysts of S. neurona. Four IC horses and one SCID horse were infected intravenously (i.v.) with 5 x 10(8) merozoites of the WSU-1 isolate of S. neurona. Despite prolonged parasitemia and persistent infection of visceral tissues (skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, lung, liver, and spleen) as demonstrated by PCR and culture, SCID horses did not develop neurologic signs after oral or i.v. infection. S. neurona was undetectable in the neuronal tissues of SCID horses by either PCR, immunohistochemistry, or culture. In contrast, although parasitemia was undetectable in orally infected IC horses and of only short duration in i.v. infected IC horses, four of six IC horses developed neurologic signs. S. neurona was detectable by PCR and/or culture of neural tissue but not visceral tissue of IC horses with neurologic disease. Infected SCID horses are unable to clear S. neurona from visceral tissues, but the infection does not result in neurologic signs; in contrast, IC horses rapidly control parasitemia and infection of visceral tissues but frequently experience neuroinvasion and exhibit clinical signs of neurologic disease.

  12. Effect of intermittent oral administration of ponazuril on experimental Sarcocystis neurona infection of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Robert J; Tanhauser, Susan T; Gillis, Karen D; Mayhew, Ian G; Kennedy, Tom J

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of intermittent oral administration of ponazuril on immunoconversion against Sarcocystis neurona in horses inoculated intragastrically with S neurona sporocysts. 20 healthy horses that were seronegative for S neurona-specific IgG. 5 control horses were neither inoculated with sporocysts nor treated. Other horses (5 horses/group) each received 612,500 S neurona sporocysts via nasogastric tube (day 0) and were not treated or were administered ponazuril (20 mg/kg, PO) every 7 days (beginning on day 5) or every 14 days (beginning on day 12) for 12 weeks. Blood and CSF samples were collected on day - 1 and then every 14 days after challenge for western blot assessment of immunoconversion. Clinical signs of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) were monitored, and tissues were examined histologically after euthanasia. Sera from all challenged horses yielded positive western blot results within 56 days. Immunoconversion in CSF was detected in only 2 of 5 horses that were treated weekly; all other challenged horses immunoconverted within 84 days. Weekly administration of ponazuril significantly reduced the antibody response against the S neurona 17-kd antigen in CSF. Neurologic signs consistent with EPM did not develop in any group; likewise, histologic examination of CNS tissue did not reveal protozoa or consistent degenerative or inflammatory changes. Administration of ponazuril every 7 days, but not every 14 days, significantly decreased intrathecal anti-S neurona antibody responses in horses inoculated with S neurona sporocysts. Protocols involving intermittent administration of ponazuril may have application in prevention of EPM.

  13. Transmission studies with Sarcocystis idahoensis of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and gopher snakes (Pituophis melanoleucus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bledsoe, B

    1980-04-01

    Transmission studies with Sarcocystis idahoensis of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and gopher snakes (pituophis melanoleucus) were conducted to determine host specificity of various stages of the parasite. Sporocysts were not passed by four dogs or four cats fed infected skeletal muscle from deer mice. Seven white mice (Mus musculus) and 34 white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) were negative for sarcocysts and liver meronts following oral inoculation with S. idahoensis sporocysts; however, excystation of sporocysts occurred in two white-footed mice killed four hours post inoculation (PI). A gopher snake orally inoculated with sporocysts remained negative for coccidia for two months PI. Three deer mice orally inoculated and three intraperitoneally (IP) inoculated with tachyzoites from liver meronts developed sarcocysts in their skeletal muscles similar to those seen in deer mice orally inoculated with sporocysts. Liver meronts were not found. Ten deer mice orally inoculated and 10 deer mice inoculated IP with bradyzoites from S. idahoensis sarcocysts remained negative for sarcocysts and liver meronts at necropsy 17 days PI.

  14. The clinical relevance of Tarlov cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdown, Andrew John; Grundy, Julian R B; Birch, Nicholas C

    2005-02-01

    The sacral perineural cyst was first described by Tarlov in 1938 as an incidental finding at autopsy. There are very few data in the literature regarding the role of Tarlov cysts in causing symptoms, however. Most studies report low numbers, and consequently, the recommendations for treatment are vague. Our aim, therefore, is to present further detail regarding the clinical relevance of Tarlov cysts and to identify whether or not they are a cause of lumbosacral spinal canal stenosis symptoms. Over a 5-year period, 3535 patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan for lumbosacral symptoms. Fifty-four patients were identified as having Tarlov cysts, and their clinical picture was correlated with the findings on MRI. The majority of Tarlov cysts (n = 38) cannot be held responsible for patients' symptoms and are clinically unimportant. However, we encountered several patients in whom Tarlov cysts (n = 9) occurred at the same level as another pathology. In these cases, the cyst itself did not require any specific therapy; treatment was directed at the other pathology, and uneventful symptom resolution occurred. A smaller subgroup of cysts (n = 7) are the main cause of patients' symptoms and may require specific treatment to facilitate local decompression. The majority of Tarlov cysts are incidental findings on MRI. Where confusion exists as to the clinical relevance of a Tarlov cyst, treatment of the primary pathology (ie, non-Tarlov lesion) is usually sufficient. Tarlov cysts may, however, be responsible for a patient's symptoms; possible mechanisms by which this may occur and treatment strategies are discussed.

  15. Classification, mechanism and surgical treatments for spinal canal cysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Sun

    2016-01-01

    A variety of cystic lesions may develop in spinal canal. These cysts can be divided into intramedullary, intradural, extradural, cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and sacral cysts according to anatomical presentation, as well as arachnoid, meningeal, perineural, juxtafacet, discal, neurenteric cysts, and cyst-like lesions according to different etiologies. Mechanisms of initiation and growth vary for different cysts, such as congenital, trauma, bleeding, inflammatory, instability, hydrostatic pressure, osmosis of water, secretion of cyst wall, and one-way-valve effect, etc. Up to now, many treatment methods are available for these different spinal canal cysts. One operation method can be applied in cysts with different types. On the other hand, several operation methods may be utilized in one type of cyst according to the difference of location or style. However, same principle should be obeyed in surgical treatment despite of difference among spinal canal cysts, given open surgery is melely for symptomatic cyst. The surgical approach should be tailored to the individual patient.

  16. Arachnoid cyst in cavernous sinus: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyoung Gun; Yoo, Won Jong; Jung, So Lyung; Lee, Hae Giu; Lim, Hyun Wook; Im, Soo Ah [The Catholic University of Kore College of Medicine, Puchun (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Arachnoid cyst of the cavernous sinus is very rare. When present, its anatomic location frequently gives rise to cranial nerve palsy. We report a case of arachnoid cyst of the cavernous sinus in a 38-year-old man with impeder eyeball movement and diplopia.

  17. Fetal goiter and bilateral ovarian cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Pernille; Sundberg, Karin; Juul, Anders

    2008-01-01

    by each injection and followed by a gradual reduction of fetal goiter as well as the left ovarian cyst. The right cyst ruptured spontaneously. At 36 weeks + 4 days, the patient underwent elective caesarean section and gave birth to a female, weighing 2,880 g with 1- and 5-min Apgar scores of 10...

  18. Orbital dermoid and epidermoid cysts: Case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselinović Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dermoid and epidermoid cysts of the orbit belong to choristomas, tumours that originate from the aberrant primordial tissue. Clinically, they manifest as cystic movable formations mostly localized in the upper temporal quadrant of the orbit. They are described as both superficial and deep formations with most frequently slow intermittent growth. Apart from aesthetic effects, during their growth, dermoid and epidermoid cysts can cause disturbances in the eye motility, and in rare cases, also an optical nerve compression syndrome. Case Outline. In this paper, we described a child with a congenital orbital dermoid cyst localized in the upper-nasal quadrant that was showing signs of a gradual enlargement and progression. The computerized tomography revealed a cyst of 1.5-2.0 cm in size. At the Maxillofacial Surgery Hospital in Niš, the dermoid cyst was extirpated in toto after orbitotomy performed by superciliary approach. Postoperative course was uneventful, without inflammation signs, and after two weeks excellent functional and aesthetic effects were achieved. Conclusion. Before the decision to treat the dermoid and epidermoid cysts operatively, a detailed diagnostic procedure was necessary to be done in order to locate the cyst precisely and determine its size and possible propagation into the surrounding periorbital structures. Apart from cosmetic indications, operative procedures are recommended in the case of cysts with constant progressions, which cause the pressure to the eye lobe, lead to motility disturbances and indirectly compress the optical nerve and branches of the cranial nerves III, IV and VI.

  19. Treatment options for intracranial arachnoid cysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Vedel; Danielsen, Patricia L; Juhler, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    reviewed.Cysts were located infratentorially in 20% (n = 14) and supratentorially in 80% (n = 55); of these 73% (n = 40) were in the middle cranial fossa. Mean cyst size was 61 mm (range 15-100 mm). The most common symptoms were headache (51%), dizziness (26%), cranial nerve dysfunction (23%), seizure (22...

  20. Fetal cyst reveling retroperitoneal enteric duplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imene Dahmane Ayadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroperitoneum is a very uncommon site of enteric duplication (ED. We report a new case of retroperitoneal ED cyst suspected in utero. Prenatal ultrasound showed an abdominal cystic mass. Noncommunicating retroperitoneal ED cyst measuring 70 mm × 30 mm was resected. Histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis.

  1. Intrasacral meningeal cyst demonstrated by sacral epidurography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosen, N.; Vyve, M. van; Moor, J. de

    1985-03-01

    A case of intrasacral meningeal cyst is reported in which radiculography and computed tomography were not conclusive in diagnosing the lesion. Sacral epidurography delineated the cyst very clearly and is proposed as a complementary imaging technique in lesions of the sacral canal.

  2. Membrana nictitans gland cyst in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, C A; Wyman, M; Szymanski, C; Werling, K

    1983-11-01

    A cyst involving the gland of the 3rd eyelid was removed from an 8-year-old dog. Clinically the circumscribed mass resembled a pigmented neoplasm. Histologically the cyst was multiloculated, with homogeneous eosinophilic periodic acid-Schiff-positive content. Melanin pigment was present in epithelial cells and cystic lumens. Protective functions of the 3rd eyelid were retained following excisional biopsy.

  3. Gastric Duplication Cyst Causing Gastric Outlet Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Al Shehi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of a newborn baby with gastric duplication cyst presented with non-bilious vomiting and upper abdominal distension. The diagnosis was suspected clinically and established by ultrasonography and computed tomography. The cyst was completely excised with uneventful recovery.

  4. Infarcted mesothelial cyst: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Navarro

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: imaging following an overall unremarkable physical and laboratory workup for this patient’s abdominal pain directed our further workup and management efforts towards surgical excision of an intra-abdominal cystic mass. Histopathologic examination of the cyst was ultimately diagnostic of an infarcted mesothelial cyst.

  5. Sonographic Spectrum of Tunica Albuginea Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Alvarez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tunica albuginea (TA cyst is the most common extratesticular benign mass, which is usually palpable. Ultrasound examination is the imaging modality of choice to characterize palpable testicular lesions. This pictorial essay presents the spectrum of sonographic features of TA cysts in order to assist radiologists in making the correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessary surgeries.

  6. Congenital orbital sudoriferous cyst: radiological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, Ehsaan; Gill, Dan [McGill University, Department of Radiology, Montreal (Canada); Saigal, Gaurav [University of Miami, Department of Radiology, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Brown, Erik [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Daniel, Sam [McGill University, Department of Otolarnygology, Montreal Children' s Hospital, Montreal (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    We report an extremely unusual case of a 4-month-old boy who presented with a sudoriferous gland cyst of the orbit. Congenital sudoriferous cyst is extremely rare in both the adult and pediatric populations. The CT and MRI findings are presented and the pertinent literature reviewed. (orig.)

  7. Parathyroid cysts: the Latin-American experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aristizábal, Natalia; Aguilar, Carolina; Palacios, Karen; Pérez, Juan Camilo; Vélez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Duque, Carlos Simon; Sanabria, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Background Parathyroid cyst is an infrequent and unsuspected disease. There are more than 300 hundred cases reported in the world literature, a few of them are from Latin America. The experience of our centers and a review of the cases are presented. Methods Case report of a series of patients with parathyroid cyst from our institutions according to the CARE guidelines (Case Reports). A search of Medline, Embase, BIREME (Biblioteca Regional de Medicina) LILACS (Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud), Google Scholar and Scielo (Scientific Electronic Library on Line) databases and telephonic or email communications with other experts from Latin-America was performed . Results Six patients with parathyroid cyst were found in our centers in Colombia. Most of them were managed with aspiration of the cyst. Two of them required surgery. Only one case was functional. Twelve reports from Latin America were found for a total of 18 cases in our region adding ours. Conclusions Parathyroid cysts are uncommonly reported in Latin America. Most of them are diagnosed postoperatively. Suspicion for parathyroid cyst should be raised when a crystal clear fluid is aspirated from a cyst. The confirmation of the diagnosis may be easily done if parathyroid hormone (PTH) level is measured in the cyst fluid. PMID:28149800

  8. Penetration of albendazole sulphoxide into hydatid cysts.

    OpenAIRE

    D. L. Morris; Chinnery, J B; Georgiou, G.; Stamatakis, G; Golematis, B.

    1987-01-01

    The penetration of albendazole sulphoxide, the principal metabolite of albendazole into hydatid cysts (E granulosus) was measured by means of in vitro animal and clinical studies. The drug freely diffuses across the parasitic membranes. Cyst/serum concentrations of 22% were achieved in patients, longer pre-operative therapy produced higher concentrations.

  9. Cyst of ectopic (choristomatous lacrimal gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao V

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of cyst of an ectopic lacrimal gland in the bulbar conjunctiva is reported in a 40 year-old-man. The clinical presentation histopathology, differential diagnosis and treatment of this choristomatous lacrimal ductal cyst (Group IV according to Bullock′s classification is described.

  10. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Daneshpour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended.

  11. Thoracoscopic excision of mediastinal cysts in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain Prashant

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Thoracoscopy offers great advantages when compared with open surgery in terms of postoperative pain and pulmonary complications. Considering the benign nature of most of the mediastinal cysts, thoracoscopy is safe and feasible with minimal morbidity. The purpose of this article is to review our experience with four cases of mediastinal cysts resected successfully within a period of one year by thoracoscopy. Materials and Methods:The cases of mediastinal cysts operated by thoracoscopic excision in K.E.M. Hospital, Mumbai from November 2005 to December 2006 were reviewed. The age varied from six months to 10 years. The patients presented with respiratory distress or recurrent lower respiratory tract infection. All patients underwent Chest X-ray and CT scan thorax to delineate the location of the cyst and its relationship with adjacent vital structures. Two patients had anterior and two had posterior mediastinal cyst. The ports were placed depending on the location of the cyst on the CT scan, following the principles of triangularization. The cysts were excised mainly by blunt dissection. Results: All the patients were successfully managed by thoracoscopic surgery. None of them had intraoperative complications. Dissection in patient with history of recurrent respiratory tract infection was difficult because of adhesions. Intercostal drain was removed within 48hrs and the patients were discharged on the fourth postoperative day. Conclusions: Thoracoscopy in mediastinal cysts is a safe and effective procedure with low morbidity and a shorter hospital stay.

  12. Common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpour, Shima; Bahadoran, Mehran; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Eskandarian, Abas Ali; Mahmoudzadeh, Mehdi; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Different research groups reported a negative correlation between cancers and parasitical infections. As an example, the prevalence of a hydatid cyst among patients with cancer was significantly lower than its prevalence among normal population. Tn antigens exist both in cancer and hydatid cyst. This common antigen may be involved in the effect of parasite on cancer growth. So in this work, common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers have been investigated. Materials and Methods: Different hydatid cyst antigens including hydatid fluid, laminated and germinal layer antigens, and excretory secretory antigens of protoscolices were run in SDS PAGE and transferred to NCP paper. In western immunoblotting, those antigens were probed with sera of patients with different cancer and also sera of non-cancer patients. Also, cross reaction among excretory secretory products of cancer cells and antisera raised against different hydatid cyst antigen was investigated. Results: In western immunoblotting, antisera raised against laminated and germinal layers of hydatid cyst reacted with excretory secretory products of cancer cells. Also, a reaction was detected between hydatid cyst antigens and sera of patients with some cancers. Conclusion: Results of this work emphasize existence of common antigens between hydatid cyst and cancers. More investigation about these common antigens is recommended. PMID:26962511

  13. Epidermoid cyst of clitoris mimicking clitoromegaly

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    Aggarwal Satish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Clitoromegaly in pediatric and adolescent age group is usually indicative of a disorder of sexual differentiation. We report a girl child presenting with clitoral enlargement due to an epidermoid cyst. The cyst was excised with complete cosmetic recovery.

  14. A survey of the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa for the presence of cyst nematodes (Nematoda: Heteroderidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoetze, Rinus; Swart, Antoinette

    2014-12-09

    A survey was performed to detect the presence of cyst nematodes in the Cape Floristic Region of South Africa. Soil was collected in the rhizosphere of the dominant plant species within blocks of indigenous vegetation and cysts were extracted from them. A total of 81 blocks of indigenous vegetation were sampled as described. Cysts were detected in 7 of these samples, representing 6 different vegetation types. One set of primers was used to amplify the ITS regions from these cysts, including the 5.8S ribosomal gene, as well as short parts of the 18S and 28S ribosomal genes. ITS-rDNA sequences from the indigenous isolates were aligned with selected sequences of other species from the Heteroderidae. Phylogenetic analyses to resolve the relationships between indigenous isolates and selected representatives of the Heteroderidae were conducted using the Maximum Parsimony method. The consensus tree resulting from alignment of the circumfenestrate cysts revealed that isolates SK18, WK1 and WK26 are included in a clade of Globodera species that parasitise non-solanaceous plants, forming a monophyletic group with G. millefolii, G. artemisiae, and an unidentified Globodera sp. from Portugal. In a tree resulting from the alignment of the Heterodera spp., isolates OK14 and WK2 are included in the Afenestrata group, forming a monophyletic group with H. orientalis.This survey unearthed at least four potentially new species of cyst nematodes, which may prove invaluable for the study of the evolution and biogeography of the group.

  15. Acute, fatal Sarcocystis calchasi-associated hepatitis in Roller pigeons (Columba livia f. dom.) at Philadelphia Zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trupkiewicz, J G; Calero-Bernal, R; Verma, S K; Mowery, J; Davison, S; Habecker, P; Georoff, T A; Ialeggio, D M; Dubey, J P

    2016-01-30

    Four Roller pigeons (Columba livia f. dom.) at the Philadelphia Zoo died suddenly. Necropsy examination revealed macroscopic hepatitis. Microscopically, the predominant lesions were in liver, characterized with necrosis and mixed cell inflammatory response. Sarcocystis calchasi-like schizonts and free merozoites were identified in liver. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that schizonts were in hepatocytes. A few schizonts were in spleen. PCR using S. calchasi-specific primers confirmed the diagnosis. Neither lesions nor protozoa were found in brain and muscles. This is the first report of acute visceral S. calchasi-associated sarcocystosis in naturally infected avian hosts.

  16. Arachnoid cyst in oculomotor cistern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Kyun; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jeun, Sin Soo; Jung, So Lyung; Ahn, Kook Jin; Kim, Bum Soo [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Oculomotor cistern is normal anatomic structure that is like an arachnoid-lined cerebrospinal fluid-filled sleeve, containing oculomotor nerve. We report a case of arachnoid cyst in oculomotor cistern, manifesting as oculomotor nerve palsy. The oblique sagittal MRI, parallel to the oculomotor nerve, showed well-defined and enlarged subarachnoid spaces along the course of oculomotor nerve. Simple fenestration was done with immediate regression of symptom. When a disease develops in oculomotor cistern, precise evaluation with proper MRI sequence should be performed to rule out tumorous condition and prevent injury of the oculomotor nerve.

  17. Discrete prostatic (paraprostatic) cysts in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, A D

    1978-05-20

    A description is given of the history, clinical features, surgery, outcome and pathology of 12 dogs with discrete prostatic cysts over 50 ml in volume. The dogs were middle-aged and presented with either urinary or alimentary signs or both. The cyst was usually palpable in the posterior abdomen as a smooth, non-painful mass, readily demonstrable on contrast radiography (pneumocystogram). Attempts were made to drain and resect the cysts, but resection often proved difficult due to its attachment to the region of bladder neck and ureters. In no case could the origin be shown to be from an enlarged uterus masculinus. The cyst content was invariably sterile, but its nature and the pathology of the cyst wall varied considerably between individuals. Since the long-term outcome was only satisfactory in three cases, the prognosis must be guarded.

  18. Intraprostatic Hydatid Cyst: An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassine Nouira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of intraprostatic cyst is reported. The patient presented with a completely evacuated hydatid cyst of the prostate. The intraprostatic cystic cavity that was communicating with the urethra developed urinary stones. The patient had transurethral resection of the prostate, the stones in the cyst were pushed into the bladder and fragmented using a ballistic lithotripter. Pathological examination concluded to a prostatic hydatid cyst that had evacuated through the urethra and was complicated by stone formation within the residual cavity. Postoperative course was uneventful and follow-up did not show evidence of recurrence. This is the first case of hydatid cyst of the prostate to present as an intraprostatic stone pouch.

  19. Cytogenetics of jaw cysts - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Esther; Brennan, Peter A; Bodner, Lipa

    2012-07-01

    The pathogenesis of cysts that arise in the jaws is still not certain, and the underlying mechanisms of epithelial proliferation are not fully understood. Cysts of the jaw may involve a reactive, inflammatory, or neoplastic process. Cytogenetics, the study of the number and structure of chromosomes, has provided valuable information about the diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment in many cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytogenetics can also provide information about the possible aetiology or neoplastic potential of a lesion, though to our knowledge no studies of this technique have been used for cysts in the jaws. In this pilot study we used cytogenetics in a series of 10 cysts (3 radicular, 4 dentigerous, 2 of the nasopalatine duct, and 1 dermoid). In all cases we found normal karyotypes. Further work and larger numbers are needed for a definitive study, but we can hypothesise from this pilot study that these cysts do not have cytogenetic aberrations and so have no neoplastic potential.

  20. Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts: new ultrastructural findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Lagunes-Guillén, Anel; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Espinosa-Cantellano, Martha; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2013-03-01

    During Acanthamoeba castellanii trophozoite-cysts differentiation, four morphological stages were identified by scanning electron microscopy: trophozoite, precyst, immature cysts, and mature cysts. Fluorescence microscopy reveals the presence of small cumulus of actin in the cytoplasm of precysts after treatment with rhodamine phalloidin. By the contrary, in mature cysts, fluorescence was not observed. However, when excystation was induced, large fluorescent patches were present. By transmission electron microscopy, encysting amebas showed small cytoplasmic vesicles containing fibrillar material, surrounded by a narrow area of thin fibrils. Similar appearance was observed in pseudopods and phagocytic invaginations. In addition, large aggregates of rod-shape elements, similar to the chromatoid bodies, described in other amebas, were present in the cytoplasm. These cysts presented large areas with orange fluorescence after treatment with acridine orange.

  1. Pilonidal cyst on the vault: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORGES GUILHERME

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilonidal cysts and sinuses are described as dermoid cysts which contain follicles of hairs and sebaceous glands. They clinically present as a classic case of inflammation which comes with pain, local infection and redness. The origin of pilonidal disease remains controverse. There are many hypothesis as lack of hygiene on the affected area and a penetration and growth of a hair in the subcutaneus tissue caused by constant friction or direct trauma on the damaged area. The option for clinical treatment is very frequent. However, taking into consideration the incidence and the possibility of recidive, surgical treatment is presently recommended. Complications include cellulitis and abscess formation. Pilonidal cysts are mostly found on the sacral region. In the literature is found description of pilonidal cysts on the penis, interdigital region on the hands as well as on the cervical region. We present a case of pilonidal cyst located on the vault biparietal region, without malignant degeneration.

  2. Recurrent intramedullary epidermoid cyst of conus medullaris.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Spinal intramedullary epidermoid cyst is a rare condition. Recurrent epidermoid cyst in the spine cord is known to occur. The authors describe a case of recurrent conus medullaris epidermoid cyst in a 24-year-old female. She initially presented at 7 years of age with bladder disturbance in the form of diurnal enuresis and recurrent urinary tract infection. MRI lumbar spine revealed a 4 cm conus medullaris epidermoid cyst. Since the initial presentation, the cyst had recurred seven times in the same location and she underwent surgical intervention in the form of exploration and debulking. This benign condition, owing to its anatomical location, has posed a surgical and overall management challenge. This occurrence is better managed in a tertiary-care centre requiring multi-disciplinary treatment approach.

  3. Lateral meniscal cyst causing common peroneal palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jowett, Andrew J.L.; Johnston, Jaquie F.A. [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Level 7, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gaillard, Francesco; Anderson, Suzanne E. [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Department of Radiology, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2008-04-15

    Lateral meniscal cysts are relatively common, but only in rare instances do they cause common peroneal nerve irritation. There are, we believe, no cases reported in which both the sensory and motor functions of the nerve have been compromised. We present a case of a lateral meniscal cyst that became palpable and led to symptoms of numbness and weakness in the distribution of the common peroneal nerve. The MRI findings were of an oblique tear of the lateral meniscus with an associated multiloculated meniscal cyst that coursed behind the biceps tendon before encroaching on the common peroneal nerve. Surgical resection confirmed the tract as located on the MRI and histology confirmed the mass to be a synovial cyst. Resection of the cyst and arthroscopic excision of the meniscal tear led to resolution of the symptoms in 3 months. (orig.)

  4. INTRACORNEAL AND SCLERAL CYST FOLLOWING CATARACT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel van Rij

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. A six-year-old boy presented with a large progressive intracorneal and scleral cyst. Two years before, bilateral cataract surgery through a 6.5-mm corneal incision was performed elsewhere.Methods. The posterior wall of the cyst could be excised, as well as the anterior wall in the sclera. Upon histo-pathology the cyst wall was lined by epithelium. The epithelial cells of the anterior side in the cornea were removed with a curette and a corpus alienum drill. Three and a half years after removal of the cyst, there was no recurrence. Visual acuity was 0.8. Conclusions. An intracorneal and scleral inclusion cyst was successfully removed by surgical excision and the removal of epithelial cells by a curette and a corpus alienum drill.

  5. Cross-sectional survey in pig breeding farms in Hesse, Germany: seroprevalence and risk factors of infections with Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp. and Neospora caninum in sows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damriyasa, I.M.; Bauer, C.; Edelhofer, R.

    2004-01-01

    A cross-sectional survey was performed to estimate the prevalences of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii (ELISA, IFAT), Sarcocystis spp. (ELISA, using S. miescheriana as antigen) and Neospora caninum (ELISA, immunoblotting) in sows from breeding farms in southern Hesse, Germany. A total of 2041 plas...

  6. In the United States, negligible rates of zoonotic sarcocystosis occur in feral swine that, by contrast, frequently harbor infections with Sarcocystis meischeriana, a related parasite contracted from dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transmission of pathogens between domestic and wild life animals plays important role in epidemiology. Feral pig populations are increasing and expanding in the USA, and may constitute a risk to non-biosecure domestic pig facilities by serving as reservoirs for pathogens. We surveyed, for Sarcocysti...

  7. [Two cases of urachal cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, H; Nagamatu, H; Kihara, K; Fukui, I; Oshima, H

    1991-03-01

    Case 1: A lower abdominal large painful mass was recognized by palpation, CT scan and ultrasonography in a 64-year-old house wife. Urine cytology was negative. The mass at the dome of bladder was covered with normal epithelium cystoscopically. Aspiration cytology of the lower abdominal mass demonstrated no malignancy and total excision of urachal remnant with a portion of bladder wall was carried out. Histologically, the mass was an urachal cyst with granulomatous change infected with C group beta-streptococcus. Case 2: A 46 year-old male engineer complained of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopic examination revealed a small bleeding lesion at the dome of bladder. Urine cytology was negative. CT scan and ultrasonography revealed a tiny cystic mass lesion with irregular density. Biopsy or aspiration cytology appeared difficult because of the size and localization of the mass. En bloc segmental resection of urachal remnant was carried out. Since intraoperative rapid histological examination of the specimen confirmed no malignancies, dissection of pelvic lymph node was not performed. Urachal cysts presented above were suspicious of malignant degeneration from findings of imaging examination. Either preoperative or intraoperative histological examination in such cases appears to be indispensable to avoid unnecessary extensive operation as well as to perform radical operation required for malignant lesions.

  8. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe.

  9. The Cutaneous Ciliated Cyst in Young Male: The Possibility of Ciliated Cutaneous Eccrine Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngjoon; Kim, Hyunjung

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous ciliated cyst was described as a painless cyst occurring on the lower limbs of women between the ages of 15 and 30 years. The cysts are typically lined by ciliated cuboidal to columnar epithelium with pseudostratified areas and focal squamous metaplasia is occasionally present. Immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated that the cysts are PR and ER positive, similar to the epithelia of the fallopian tubes. However, outliers of cutaneous ciliated cysts, including those in male patients and in unexpected locations such as the scalp, finger, and scapular area, have been reported. Thus, some hypotheses have been proposed including the Mullerian heterotopias, ciliated metaplasia of eccrine sweat glands, and embryonic remnants of the cloacal membrane. We report a rare case of cutaneous ciliated cyst on the left shoulder of a 7-year-old boy and this is the eighth case of cutaneous ciliated cyst in male patients. Moreover, through reviewing the articles, we try to propose the classification of the cutaneous ciliated cysts into the cutaneous Mullerian cysts and the ciliated cutaneous eccrine cysts. PMID:26491452

  10. The Cutaneous Ciliated Cyst in Young Male: The Possibility of Ciliated Cutaneous Eccrine Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjoon Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous ciliated cyst was described as a painless cyst occurring on the lower limbs of women between the ages of 15 and 30 years. The cysts are typically lined by ciliated cuboidal to columnar epithelium with pseudostratified areas and focal squamous metaplasia is occasionally present. Immunohistochemical studies have demonstrated that the cysts are PR and ER positive, similar to the epithelia of the fallopian tubes. However, outliers of cutaneous ciliated cysts, including those in male patients and in unexpected locations such as the scalp, finger, and scapular area, have been reported. Thus, some hypotheses have been proposed including the Mullerian heterotopias, ciliated metaplasia of eccrine sweat glands, and embryonic remnants of the cloacal membrane. We report a rare case of cutaneous ciliated cyst on the left shoulder of a 7-year-old boy and this is the eighth case of cutaneous ciliated cyst in male patients. Moreover, through reviewing the articles, we try to propose the classification of the cutaneous ciliated cysts into the cutaneous Mullerian cysts and the ciliated cutaneous eccrine cysts.

  11. Occurrence of Sarcocystis spp. in opossums (Didelphis aurita and Didelphis albiventris in regions of the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Assis Casagrande

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi de determinar a ocorrência de Sarcocystis spp. em D. albiventris e D. aurita em três regiões do Estado de São Paulo. Para tal, utilizou-se noventa e oito Didelphis mortos, sendo 66 D. aurita e 32 D. albiventris, e também 28 D. aurita e cinco D. albiventris vivos. O método de centrífugo-flutuação em solução de sacarose foi empregado para isolamento dos oocistos/esporocistos de Sarcocystis spp. do intestino delgado e das fezes. Encontrou-se Sarcocystis spp. no intestino delgado de 9,1% dos D. aurita (6/66, sendo que quatro destes também houve positividade nas fezes. Não houve diferença estatística significativa entre machos e fêmeas positivos (P= 0,522, e entre os positivos de diferentes origens do Estado de São Paulo (P= 0,627, quanto a ocorrência de Sarcocystis spp. Entretanto, houve diferença estatística significativa entre animais de vida livre e de cativeiro (P = 0.009, sendo que somente os de vida livre foram positivos. Entre adultos e filhotes positivos também houve diferença (P= 0,004, sendo os adultos mais parasitados que os filhotes. Das amostras provenientes dos 28 D. aurita vivos, encontrou-se Sarcocystis spp. em 7.1% (2/28 deles. Dos 32 D. albiventris, todos foram negativos para Sarcocystis spp. nas amostras de intestino delgado e fezes. Os cincos D. albiventris vivos também foram negativos. Sendo assim, pode-se observar que a ocorrência de Sarcocystis spp. em D. aurita e D. albiventris nestas três regiões do Estado de São Paulo é baixa para estas condições analisadas.

  12. Subconjunctival epidermoid cysts in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Craene, S; Batteauw, A; Van Lint, M; Claerhout, I; Decock, C

    2014-08-01

    Epidermoid cysts are common benign cysts which occur particularly on the skin of the face, neck and upper trunk. Subconjunctival location of these cysts is very rare and, until today, only seen in patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Histopathological examination of these cysts show similarities with odontogenic keratocysts, a typical clinical manifestation of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  13. ENDOSCOPIC MICODEBRIDER ASSISTED MARSUPALIZATION OF VALLECULA CYST- NEW TREATMENT MODALITY

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    Hitesh Verma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cystic lesion of larynx is common entity. . The origin of the cyst is unclear. Theories are either obstruction of a minor salivary gland or variant of a thyroglossal duct cyst. Lingual surface of the epiglottis is the commonest site for vallecula cyst. We are here by discussing a case report, where marsupalization of vallecula cyst was done with microdebrider.

  14. Genome-Wide Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Sarcocystis neurona Protein Kinases

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    Edwin K. Murungi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona causes equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM, a degenerative neurological disease of horses. Due to its host range expansion, S. neurona is an emerging threat that requires close monitoring. In apicomplexans, protein kinases (PKs have been implicated in a myriad of critical functions, such as host cell invasion, cell cycle progression and host immune response evasion. Here, we used various bioinformatics methods to define the kinome of S. neurona and phylogenetic relatedness of its PKs to other apicomplexans. We identified 97 putative PKs clustering within the various eukaryotic kinase groups. Although containing the universally-conserved PKA (AGC group, S. neurona kinome was devoid of PKB and PKC. Moreover, the kinome contains the six-conserved apicomplexan CDPKs (CAMK group. Several OPK atypical kinases, including ROPKs 19A, 27, 30, 33, 35 and 37 were identified. Notably, S. neurona is devoid of the virulence-associated ROPKs 5, 6, 18 and 38, as well as the Alpha and RIO kinases. Two out of the three S. neurona CK1 enzymes had high sequence similarities to Toxoplasma gondii TgCK1-α and TgCK1-β and the Plasmodium PfCK1. Further experimental studies on the S. neurona putative PKs identified in this study are required to validate the functional roles of the PKs and to understand their involvement in mechanisms that regulate various cellular processes and host-parasite interactions. Given the essentiality of apicomplexan PKs in the survival of apicomplexans, the current study offers a platform for future development of novel therapeutics for EPM, for instance via application of PK inhibitors to block parasite invasion and development in their host.

  15. Investigation of SnSPR1, a novel and abundant surface protein of Sarcocystis neurona merozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deqing; Howe, Daniel K

    2008-04-15

    An expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing project has produced over 15,000 partial cDNA sequences from the equine pathogen Sarcocystis neurona. While many of the sequences are clear homologues of previously characterized genes, a significant number of the S. neurona ESTs do not exhibit similarity to anything in the extensive sequence databases that have been generated. In an effort to characterize parasite proteins that are novel to S. neurona, a seemingly unique gene was selected for further investigation based on its abundant representation in the collection of ESTs and the predicted presence of a signal peptide and glycolipid anchor addition on the encoded protein. The gene was expressed in E. coli, and monospecific polyclonal antiserum against the recombinant protein was produced by immunization of a rabbit. Characterization of the native protein in S. neurona merozoites and schizonts revealed that it is a low molecular weight surface protein that is expressed throughout intracellular development of the parasite. The protein was designated Surface Protein 1 (SPR1) to reflect its display on the outer surface of merozoites and to distinguish it from the ubiquitous SAG/SRS surface antigens of the heteroxenous Coccidia. Interestingly, infection assays in the presence of the polyclonal antiserum suggested that SnSPR1 plays some role in attachment and/or invasion of host cells by S. neurona merozoites. The work described herein represents a general template for selecting and characterizing the various unidentified gene sequences that are plentiful in the EST databases for S. neurona and other apicomplexans. Furthermore, this study illustrates the value of investigating these novel sequences since it can offer new candidates for diagnostic or vaccine development while also providing greater insight into the biology of these parasites.

  16. Genome-Wide Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Sarcocystis neurona Protein Kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murungi, Edwin K; Kariithi, Henry M

    2017-03-21

    The apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona causes equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), a degenerative neurological disease of horses. Due to its host range expansion, S. neurona is an emerging threat that requires close monitoring. In apicomplexans, protein kinases (PKs) have been implicated in a myriad of critical functions, such as host cell invasion, cell cycle progression and host immune response evasion. Here, we used various bioinformatics methods to define the kinome of S. neurona and phylogenetic relatedness of its PKs to other apicomplexans. We identified 97 putative PKs clustering within the various eukaryotic kinase groups. Although containing the universally-conserved PKA (AGC group), S. neurona kinome was devoid of PKB and PKC. Moreover, the kinome contains the six-conserved apicomplexan CDPKs (CAMK group). Several OPK atypical kinases, including ROPKs 19A, 27, 30, 33, 35 and 37 were identified. Notably, S. neurona is devoid of the virulence-associated ROPKs 5, 6, 18 and 38, as well as the Alpha and RIO kinases. Two out of the three S. neurona CK1 enzymes had high sequence similarities to Toxoplasma gondii TgCK1-α and TgCK1-β and the Plasmodium PfCK1. Further experimental studies on the S. neurona putative PKs identified in this study are required to validate the functional roles of the PKs and to understand their involvement in mechanisms that regulate various cellular processes and host-parasite interactions. Given the essentiality of apicomplexan PKs in the survival of apicomplexans, the current study offers a platform for future development of novel therapeutics for EPM, for instance via application of PK inhibitors to block parasite invasion and development in their host.

  17. Identification of a dithiol-dependent nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Deqing; Gaji, Rajshekhar Y; Howe, Daniel K

    2006-09-01

    A putative nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase (NTPase) gene was identified in a database of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the apicomplexan parasite Sarcocystis neurona. Analysis of culture-derived S. neurona merozoites demonstrated a dithiol-dependent NTPase activity, consistent with the presence of a homologue to the TgNTPases of Toxoplasma gondii. A complete cDNA was obtained for the S. neurona gene and the predicted amino acid sequence shared 38% identity with the two TgNTPase isoforms from T. gondii. Based on the obvious homology, the S. neurona protein was designated SnNTP1. The SnNTP1 cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 714 amino acids with a predicted 22-residue signal peptide and an estimated mature molecular mass of 70kDa. Southern blot analysis of the SnNTP1 locus revealed that the gene exists as a single copy in the S. neurona genome, unlike the multiple gene copies that have been observed in T. gondii and Neospora caninum. Analyses of the SnNTP1 protein demonstrated that it is soluble and secreted into the culture medium by extracellular merozoites. Surprisingly, indirect immunofluorescence analysis of intracellular S. neurona revealed apical localisation of SnNTP1 and temporal expression characteristics that are comparable with the microneme protein SnMIC10. The absence of SnNTP1 during much of endopolygeny implies that this protein does not serve a function during intracellular growth and development of S. neurona schizonts. Instead, SnNTP1 may play a role in events that occur during or proximal to merozoite egress from and/or invasion into cells.

  18. Risk of postnatal exposure to Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Paulo C; Conrad, Patricia A; Wilson, W David; Ferraro, Gregory L; Packham, Andrea E; Bowers-Lepore, Jeanne; Carpenter, Tim E; Gardner, Ian A

    2004-08-01

    To estimate risk of exposure and age at first exposure to Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora hughesi and time to maternal antibody decay in foals. 484 Thoroughbred and Warmblood foals from 4 farms in California. Serum was collected before and after colostrum ingestion and at 3-month intervals thereafter. Samples were tested by use of the indirect fluorescent antibody test; cutoff titers were > or = 40 and > or = 160 for S neurona and N hughesi, respectively. Risk of exposure to S neurona and N hughesi during the study were 8.2% and 3.1%, respectively. Annual rate of exposure was 3.1% for S neurona and 1.7% for N hughesi. There was a significant difference in the risk of exposure to S neurona among farms but not in the risk of exposure to N hughesi. Median age at first exposure was 1.2 years for S neurona and 0.8 years for N hughesi. Highest prevalence of antibodies against S neurona and N hughesi was 6% and 2.1 %, respectively, at a mean age of 1.7 and 1.4 years, respectively. Median time to maternal antibody decay was 96 days for S neurona and 91 days for N hughesi. There were no clinical cases of equine protozoal myeloenchaphlitis (EPM). Exposure to S neurona and N hughesi was low in foals between birth and 2.5 years of age. Maternally acquired antibodies may cause false-positive results for 3 or 4 months after birth, and EPM was a rare clinical disease in horses < or = 2.5 years of age.

  19. Diversity of Sarcocystis spp shed by opossums in Brazil inferred with phylogenetic analysis of DNA coding ITS1, cytochrome B, and surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadas, Samantha Y O B; da Silva, Juliana I G; Lopes, Estela Gallucci; Keid, Lara B; Zwarg, Ticiana; de Oliveira, Alice S; Sanches, Thaís C; Joppert, Adriana M; Pena, Hilda F J; Oliveira, Tricia M F S; Ferreira, Helena L; Soares, Rodrigo M

    2016-05-01

    Although few species of Sarcocystis are known to use marsupials of the genus Didelphis as definitive host, an extensive diversity of alleles of surface antigen genes (sag2, sag3, and sag4) has been described in samples of didelphid opossums in Brazil. In this work, we studied 25 samples of Sarcocystis derived from gastrointestinal tract of opossums of the genus Didelphis by accessing the variability of sag2, sag3, sag4, gene encoding cytochrome b (cytB) and first internal transcribed spacer (ITS1). Reference samples of Sarcocystis neurona (SN138) and Sarcocystis falcatula (SF1) maintained in cell culture were also analyzed. We found four allele variants of cytB, seven allele variants of ITS1, 10 allele variants of sag2, 13 allele variants of sag3, and 6 allele variants of sag4. None of the sporocyst-derived sequences obtained from Brazilian opossums revealed 100% identity to SN138 at cytB gene, nor to SN138 or SF1 at ITS1 locus. In addition, none of the sag alleles were found identical to either SF1 or SN138 homologous sequences, and a high number of new sag allele types were found other than those previously described in Brazil. Out of ten sag2 alleles, four are novel, while eight out of 13 sag3 alleles are novel and one out of six sag4 alleles is novel. Further studies are needed to clarify if such a vast repertoire of allele variants of Sarcocystis is the consequence of re-assortments driven by sexual exchange, in order to form individuals with highly diverse characteristics, such as pathogenicity, host spectrum, among others or if it only represents allele variants of different species with different biological traits.

  20. Effect of daily administration of pyrantel tartrate in preventing infection in horses experimentally challenged with Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossano, Mary G; Schott, Harold C; Kaneene, John B; Murphy, Alice J; Kruttlin, Elizabeth A; Hines, Melissa T; Sellon, Debra C; Patterson, Jon S; Elsheikha, Hany M; Dubey, J P; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-05-01

    To determine whether daily administration of pyrantel tartrate can prevent infection in horses experimentally challenged with Sarcocystis neurona. 24 mixed-breed specific-pathogen-free weanling horses, 10 adult horses, 1 opossum, and 6 mice. Sarcocystis neurona-naïve weanling horses were randomly allocated to 2 groups. Group A received pyrantel tartrate at the labeled dose, and group B received a nonmedicated pellet. Both groups were orally inoculated with 100 sporocysts/d for 28 days, 500 sporocysts/d for 28 days, and 1000 sporocysts/d for 56 days. Blood samples were collected weekly, and CSF was collected monthly. Ten seronegative adult horses were monitored as untreated, uninfected control animals. All serum and CSF samples were tested by use of western blot tests to detect antibodies against S. neurona. At the end of the study, the number of seropositive and CSF-positive horses in groups A and B were compared by use of the Fisher exact test. Time to seroconversion on the basis of treatment groups and sex of horses was compared in 2 univariable Cox proportional hazards models. After 134 days of sporocyst inoculation, no significant differences were found between groups A and B for results of western blot tests of serum or CSF There were no significant differences in number of days to seroconversion on the basis of treatment groups or sex of horses. The control horses remained seronegative. Daily administration of pyrantel tartrate at the current labeled dose does not prevent S. neurona infection in horses.

  1. The gamma interferon knockout mouse model for sarcocystis neurona: comparison of infectivity of sporocysts and merozoites and routes of inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Lindsay, D S; Kwok, O C; Shen, S K

    2001-10-01

    The dose-related infectivity of Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts and merozoites of 2 recent isolates of S. neurona was compared in gamma interferon knockout (KO) mice. Tenfold dilutions of sporocysts or merozoites were bioassayed in mice, cell culture, or both. All 8 mice, fed 1,000 sporocysts, developed neurological signs with demonstrable S. neurona in their tissues. Of 24 mice fed low numbers of sporocysts (100, 10, 1), 18 became ill by 4 wk postinoculation, and S. neurona was demonstrated in their brains; antibodies (S. neurona agglutination test) to S. neurona and S. neurona parasites were not found in tissues of the 6 mice that were fed sporocysts and survived for >39 days. One thousand culture-derived merozoites of these 2 isolates were pathogenic to all 8 mice inoculated subcutaneously (s.c.). Of the 24 mice inoculated s.c. with merozoites numbering 100, 10, or 1, only 3 mice had demonstrable S. neurona infection; antibodies to S. neurona were not found in the 21 mice that had no demonstrable organisms. As few as 10 merozoites were infective for cell cultures. These results demonstrate that at least 1,000 merozoites are needed to cause disease in KO mice. Sarcocystis neurona sporocysts were infective to mice by the s.c. route.

  2. Limited genetic diversity among Sarcocystis neurona strains infecting southern sea otters precludes distinction between marine and terrestrial isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendte, J M; Miller, M A; Nandra, A K; Peat, S M; Crosbie, P R; Conrad, P A; Grigg, M E

    2010-04-19

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite identified as a cause of fatal neurological disease in the threatened southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis). In an effort to characterize virulent S. neurona strains circulating in the marine ecosystem, this study developed a range of markers relevant for molecular genotyping. Highly conserved sequences within the 18S ribosomal gene array, the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (RPOb) and the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial gene (CO1) were assessed for their ability to distinguish isolates at the genus and species level. For within-species comparisons, five surface antigens (SnSAG1-SnSAG5) and one high resolution microsatellite marker (Sn9) were developed as genotyping markers to evaluate intra-strain diversity. Molecular analysis at multiple loci revealed insufficient genetic diversity to distinguish terrestrial isolates from strains infecting marine mammals. Furthermore, SnSAG specific primers applied against DNA from the closely related species, Sarcocystis falcatula, lead to the discovery of highly similar orthologs to SnSAG2, 3, and 4, calling into question the specificity of diagnostic tests based on these antigens. The results of this study suggest a population genetic structure for S. neurona similar to that reported for the related parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, dominated by a limited number of successful genotypes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Treatment of temporomandibular joint ganglion cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao-I; Liu, Ka-Wai; Hsu, Yung-Chang; Chiang, I-Ping; Chang, Sophia Chia-Ning

    2011-09-01

    Ganglion cysts of the temporomandibular joint are very rare and always misdiagnosed as synovial cyst, parotid gland tumor, or other cystic lesions. They present with pain, swelling, or dysfunction. Image studies could facilitate to identify the tumor mass from the adjacent soft tissue, but a definitive diagnosis could be made from the pathologic report.A 59-year-old woman presented to the clinics with a chief complaint of a painless swelling mass in the right preauricular region of 3-month duration. Computed tomography was performed, which showed a small radiolucent lesion adjacent to the right condyle. Local excision was performed, and the specimen was sent for histologic examination.Microscopic examination showed a cystic space walled by dense fibrous connective tissue without epithelial or endothelial lining. Immunohistochemical staining of these lining cells showed positivity for vimentin and negativity for cytokeratin. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of ganglion cyst.Ganglion cysts present as unilobulate or multilobulate cysts that arise from the collagenous tissue and is filled with highly viscous fluid. It does not communicate with the joint cavity. In contrast, synovial cyst is a true cyst lined by cuboidal or flattened cells from the synoviocytes and is filled with gelatinous fluid. It may or may not communicate with the joint cavity. Excision is the treatment of choice of symptomatic cystic lesions. Incomplete excision of these lesions may cause further recurrence or infection. Thus, injection of hydrocortisone or aspiration may be considered as an alternative management.

  4. Equine articular synovial cysts: 16 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourt, Mathieu; MacDonald, Melinda; Rossier, Yves; Laverty, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    To report the clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of equine patients with articular synovial cysts. Retrospective case series. Horses (n = 16) with articular synovial cysts. Horses diagnosed with articular synovial cysts (1988-2009) at 2 veterinary teaching hospitals were studied. Signalment, history, clinical signs, diagnostic methods and treatment were retrieved and telephone follow-up was obtained. Sixteen horses with articular synovial cysts were identified. Lameness was the reason for referral in most (n = 9) horses. Diagnosis was based on a combination of palpation and imaging studies, including radiography, ultrasonography and/or arthrography. Excision of the cyst was performed in 8 horses. Outcome was available for 4 surgically and 2 conservatively treated horses. Lameness resolved in 3 horses treated surgically and the 4th died for unrelated reasons. The 2 conservatively treated horses performed satisfactorily for the rest of their career. Equine articular synovial cysts are rare and can be associated with lameness. The cysts had a synovial lining in all horses where it was assessed. Surgical excision may be successful in resolving the lameness and allowing selected horses to return to work. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  5. Isolated Retroperitoneal Hydatid Cyst Invading Splenic Hilum

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    Safak Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hydatid disease (HD is an infestation that is caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. The liver is affected in approximately two-thirds of patients, the lungs in 25%, and other organs in a small proportion. Primary retroperitoneal hydatid cyst is extremely rare. The most common complaint is abdominal pain; however, the clinical features of HD may be generally dependent on the location of the cyst. Case Presentation. A 43-year-old female was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain. Her physical examination was normal. Computed tomography (CT revealed a 17 × 11 cm cystic lesion, with a thick and smooth wall that is located among the left liver lobe, diaphragm, spleen, tail of the pancreas, and transverse colon and invading the splenic hilum. Total cystectomy and splenectomy were performed. Pathological examination was reported as cyst hydatid. Discussion. Cysts in the peritoneal cavity are mainly the result of the spontaneous or traumatic rupture of concomitant hepatic cysts or surgical inoculation of a hepatic cyst. Serological tests contribute to diagnosis. In symptomatic and large hydatid peritoneal cysts, surgical resection is the only curative treatment. Total cystectomy is the gold standard. Albendazole or praziquantel is indicated for inoperable and disseminated cases. Percutaneous aspiration, injection, and reaspiration (PAIR technique is another nonsurgical option.

  6. Surgical treatment of congenital biliary duct cyst

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    Wang De-chun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is acknowledged that total cyst excision is a safe and ideal surgical treatment for congenital biliary duct cyst, compared to simple internal drainage. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal operation occasion and the effect of laparoscopy on congenital biliary duct cyst based upon total cyst excision. Methods From January 2002 to January 2011, 217 patients were admitted to Southwest Hospital for congenital biliary duct cyst. To determine the optimal surgery occasion, we divided these subjects into three groups, the infant group (age ≤ 3 years, the immaturity group (3 18 years, and then evaluated the feasibility, risk and long-term outcome after surgery in the three groups. To analyze the effect of laparoscopic technique on congenital biliary duct cyst, we divided the patients into the laparoscopy and the open surgery groups. Results Among the three groups, the morbidity from cholangiolithiasis before surgical treatment had obvious discrepancy (p 0.05. Similarly, no significant discrepancy was observed in the morbidity from postoperative complications or long-term postoperative complications (p > 0.05 between the laparoscopic and the open surgery groups. Conclusions We conclude that total cyst excision should be performed as early as possible. The optimal treatment occasion is the infant period, and laparoscopic resection may be a new safe and feasible minimally invasive surgery for this disease.

  7. Arthroscopic Decompression for a Giant Meniscal Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    The authors report the case of a giant medial meniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee of an 82-year-old woman that was successfully treated with only arthroscopic cyst decompression. The patient noticed a painful mass on the medial side of the right knee that had been gradually growing for 5 years. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an encapsulated large medial cystic mass measuring 80×65×40 mm that was adjacent to the medial meniscus. An accompanying horizontal tear was also detected in the middle and posterior segments of the meniscus. The medial meniscus was resected up to the capsular attachment to create bidirectional flow between the joint and the cyst with arthroscopic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging performed 14 months postoperatively showed that the cyst had completely disappeared, and no recurrence was observed during a 2-year follow-up period. An excellent result could be obtained by performing limited meniscectomy to create a channel leading to the meniscal cyst, even though the cyst was large. Among previously reported cases of meniscal cysts, this case is the largest to be treated arthroscopically without open excision.

  8. CT Imaging Findings of Ruptured Ovarian Endometriotic Cysts: Emphasis on the Differential Diagnosis with Ruptured Ovarian Functional Cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Rae [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of abnormal CT findings in patients with surgically proven ruptured endometriotic cysts, as compared with those abnormal CT findings of ruptured ovarian functional cysts. This study included 13 retrospectively identified patients with surgically confirmed ruptured ovarian endometriotic cysts and who had also undergone preoperative CT scanning during the previous seven years. As a comparative group, 25 cases of surgically confirmed ruptured ovarian functional cysts were included. We assessed the morphologic features of the cysts and the ancillary findings based on CT. For the endometriotic cysts, the mean maximum cyst diameter was significantly larger than that of the functional cysts (70.1 mm versus 36.4 mm, respectively, p < 0.05). The endometriotic cysts frequently had a multilocular shape and a thicker cyst wall, as compared to that of functional cysts, and these differences were statistically significant. Among the ancillary findings, endometriotic cysts showed a significantly higher prevalence of loculated ascites, ascites confined to the pelvic cavity without extension to the upper abdomen, and peritoneal strandings and infiltrations (p < 0.05). Although 11 of the 25 cases of functional cysts showed active extravasation of contrast material at the ovarian bleeding site, only one of 13 cases of endometriotic cysts showed active extravasation. The diagnosis of ruptured endometriotic cyst should be suspected for a woman in whom CT reveals the presence of multilocular or bilateral ovarian cysts with a thick wall and loculated ascites confined to the pelvic cavity with pelvic fat infiltrations

  9. Sublingual epidermoid cyst: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandogan Tolga

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Epidermoid and dermoid cysts represent less than 0.01% of all oral cavity cysts. The cysts can be defined as epidermoid when the lining presents only epithelium, dermoid cysts when skin adnexa are found, and teratoid cysts when other tissue such as muscle, cartilage, and bone are present. In this article, we present the case of an epidermoid cyst, with an oral as well as a submental component, in an 11 year old boy who presented with complaints of a mass in the oral cavity, difficulty chewing and swallowing of solid foods for about 3 years. He was admitted to the otolaryngology department. On examination, a mass displacing the tongue superiorly and posteriorly was noticed. An MRI scan was done and showed a 40 × 35 mm well-circumscribed non-enhancing cystic mass extending from the sublingual area to the level of the thyroid notch. The content of the cyst was homogenous. On examining the neck, a firm swelling was also noticed in the submental area, extending down to the thyroid notch. Under general anesthesia and with nasotracheal intubation, the patient underwent surgical removal of the mass. Extraorally, a midline submental horizontal incision was performed through the mucosa overlying the swelling and the cyst was dissected from the surrounding tissues and removed. On histological examination, acidophilic stratum corneum and basophilic dot like staining of stratum granulosum, which is the hallmark of an epidermoid cyst, were seen. The patient did well postoperatively, and no recurrence was noticed at the 6-months follow-up.

  10. Laparoscopic management of neonatal ovarian cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oak Sanjay

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The first prenatal detection of an ovarian cyst was by Valenti in 1975. Since then antenatal and neonatal ovarian cysts are encountered more frequently due to the improvement of imaging techniques as well as routine antenatal ultrasound scanning. We discuss here the laparoscopic management of three cases of neonatal ovarian cysts. This approach is well tolerated by neonates, and it may overcome the controversy between the ′wait and see′ policy and early surgical intervention, as laparoscopy has both diagnostic and therapeutic value with minimal morbidity, and ovarian salvage whenever possible.

  11. Simple bone cysts of two brothers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Seo Young; An, Chang Hyeon; Choi, Karp Shik [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    17-year-old and 14-year-old brothers were referred for evaluation of the cystic lesions on the mandibular anterior area with no symptoms. Neither their mother nor the brothers could recall any past trauma to those areas. Panoramic and intraoral radiographs revealed moderately defined cystic lesions on their mandibular anterior areas. Biopsies on both lesions revealed simple bone cysts. Hereditary cause or familial history of simple bone cysts could not be found in literature review. This case may have been a coincidence. However, further investigation is needed to find the cause of simple bone cysts occurring in patients those are closely related.

  12. An Unusual Case of Hydatid Cyst

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    SA Mirhoseini

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydatidosis is a parasitic disease in all over the world which is caused by a Cestode (tape worm. Liver, lung, and brain are the most Common involved organs and involvement of muscles and bones is unusual. We report a 32years old man who had low back and radicular leg pain. He had a paravertebral mass with involvement of Spinal column. This patient was operated with differential diagnosis of tumor or hydatid cyst. The final diagnosis was hydatidosis of paravertebral muscles and vertebral column. Keywords: hydatidosis, p aravertebral muscle hydatid cyst, spinal column hydatid cyst

  13. A RARE CASE OF LARGE EPIGLOTTIC CYST

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    Prathipaty James

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Epiglottic cysts are generally benign lesions, which can affect all age groups. Depending on their location and size they can cause airway obstruction and potentially lead to sudden death. I report a case of 45 year old male attended to my clinic with Cyst epiglottis. His complaints were feeling of lump in the throat and occasional attacks of c hocking especially during sleep. The patient was successfully treated surgically with no recurrence in the 2years follow - up. KEYWORDS: Epiglottic cysts - Large sized - symptom range - Complications/sudden death - Treatment

  14. THE DIFFERENTIATIVE DIAGNOSIS OF RENAL CYSTS

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    A. V. Seregin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available  Despite the progress of diagnostic possibilities, the interpretation of renal cysts is still difficult and may have false negative results. So far there is no algorithm of renal cysts patients examination and treatment. Further diagnostic process improvement and an exact knowledge of the possibilities of each method are needed. The main factor for choosing the right tactics of treatment and giving the prognosis of the disease is not only the diagnosis, but also the exact gradation of the renal cysts according to the Bosniak classification. 

  15. Sacral Tarlov cyst: surgical treatment by clipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantore, Giampaolo; Bistazzoni, Simona; Esposito, Vincenzo; Tola, Serena; Lenzi, Jacopo; Passacantilli, Emiliano; Innocenzi, Gualtiero

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the anatomopathological classification of Tarlov cysts and the various treatment techniques described in the literature. The authors present their patient series (19 cases) with a long follow-up (range 9 months to 25 years) treated by cyst remodeling around the root using titanium clips. The technique is effective in both avoiding cerebrospinal fluid leakage and resolving bladder dysfunction when urinary symptoms are incomplete and discontinuous. The clipping technique for Tarlov cysts is easy, valid, safe, rapid, and effective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bilateral Nasoalveolar Cyst Causing Nasal Obstruction

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    Uzeyir Yildizoglu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasoalveolar cysts, which originate from epithelial remnants of nasolacrimal duct, are nonodontogenic soft tissue lesions of the upper jaw. These cysts are thought to be developmental and are presented with fullness in the upper lip and nose, swelling on the palate, and sometimes nasal obstruction. Because of cosmetic problems, they are often diagnosed at an early stage. These lesions are mostly revealed unilaterally but also can be seen on both sides. In this case report, a patient who complained of nasal obstruction and then diagnosed with bilateral nasoalveolar cysts and treated by sublabial excision is presented and clinical features and treatment approaches are discussed with the review of literature.

  17. Bilateral Nasoalveolar Cyst Causing Nasal Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildizoglu, Uzeyir; Polat, Bahtiyar; Durmaz, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Nasoalveolar cysts, which originate from epithelial remnants of nasolacrimal duct, are nonodontogenic soft tissue lesions of the upper jaw. These cysts are thought to be developmental and are presented with fullness in the upper lip and nose, swelling on the palate, and sometimes nasal obstruction. Because of cosmetic problems, they are often diagnosed at an early stage. These lesions are mostly revealed unilaterally but also can be seen on both sides. In this case report, a patient who complained of nasal obstruction and then diagnosed with bilateral nasoalveolar cysts and treated by sublabial excision is presented and clinical features and treatment approaches are discussed with the review of literature. PMID:27980871

  18. Intestinal Duplication Cyst Mimicking as Mesenteric Cyst with Asso- ciated Ileal Atresia Type III A

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    Surekha Arakeri

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal duplication cysts (IDC are uncom-mon congenital malformations that couldpresent diagnostic and therapeutic challenge.They may be often mistaken as mesentericcysts, omental cyst, cystic lymphangioma etc.However, IDC are differentiated from otherintra-abdominal cystic lesions by presence ofgastrointestinal mucosal lining and smoothmuscles in their wall. We report a case of IDCmimicking as mesenteric cyst associated withatresia of ileum in a neonate presented withacute surgical emergency.

  19. Contrast-enhanced MRI of intrasellar arachnoid cysts: relationship between the pituitary gland and cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, M. [National Cardiovascular Center, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery]|[Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Tachibana, O. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Hasegawa, M. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kohda, Y. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Nakada, M. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Yamashima, T. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Yamashita, J. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Suzuki, M. [Kanazawa Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-08-01

    We recently encountered two large intrasellar arachnoid cysts extending to the suprasellar region. The intensity of the cyst contents was identical to that of the cerebrospinal fluid on both T1- and T2-weighted MRI. On contrast-enhanced MRI, the pituitary gland was compressed posteroinferiorly and flattened in the sella turcica. In this report of rare intrasellar arachnoid cysts the discussion is focused on dislocation of the pituitary gland. (orig.)

  20. Multi-vesicular pulmonary hydatid cyst, the potent underestimated factor in the formation of daughter cysts of pulmonary hydatid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokouti, Mohsen; Sokouti, Babak; Shokouhi, Behrooz; Rahimi-Rad, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary multi-vesicular hydatid disease (HD) with Echinococcus granulosus is rare. A 28-year-old woman presented to our center with cough and respiratory distress. Chest x-ray and computerized tomography scan revealed bilateral giant cysts with water-lily sign (ruptured hydatid cysts). The left cyst was in vicinity of heart. With thoracotomy cysts of both lungs were removed. Thousands of translucent, homogenized small daughter cysts were discovered from the left side cyst. Pathologic examinations revealed the ruptured hydatid cysts of both lungs with daughter cysts on the left lung cyst. To best of our knowledge probably this is the first report of multi-vesicular HD in lung. We suppose that the heart pulsation was effective in the formation of daughter cysts.

  1. A Wandering Abdominal Mass in a Neonate: An Enteric Duplication Cyst Mimicking an Ovarian Cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Shigeo

    2017-01-01

    Enteric duplication cysts are rare congenital anomalies that are prenatally diagnosed through antenatal ultrasonography (US). In female patients, however, attention must be paid since these formations might be confused with ovarian cysts. Herein, we present a case of a low birth weight female infant with an enteric duplication cyst. A cystic lesion was detected in the right abdomen of the fetus on antenatal US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Serial US and MRI examinations performed after birth showed a single cyst that wandered from side to side in the abdomen; the initial diagnosis was thought to be an ovarian cyst. During laparotomy, however, it was found to be an enteric duplication cyst with volvulus. To our knowledge, there has been no report of an enteric duplication cyst presenting as a wandering abdominal mass. Our experience indicates that early intervention is necessary for patients who have a wandering abdominal mass to avoid complications and urgent surgery, whether it is an ovarian cyst or an enteric duplication cyst.

  2. Botryoid odontogenic cyst developing from lateral periodontal cyst: A rare case and review on pathogenesis

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    Piyush Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Botryoid odontogenic cyst (BOC is considered to be a polycystic variant of the lateral periodontal cyst (LPC as the specimen resembled a cluster of grapes. It is a non-inflammatory odontogenic cyst. The BOCs can be unicystic or multicystic. These cysts have potential to extend in the bone and become multilocular and they have a high recurrence rate. Till now, only 73 cases of BOC have been reported. The pathogenesis of BOC is still debatable. We review different pathogenesis proposed for BOC and discuss a rare case of BOC developing from lining of an abnormally large LPC which showed aggressive behaviour in terms of growth and size.

  3. Intramedullary cyst formation after removal of multiple intradural spinal arachnoid cysts: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekaj, Edvin; Saleh, Christian; Servello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Background: A rare cause of spinal cord compression is spinal arachnoid cysts. Symptoms are caused by spinal cord compression, however, asymptomatic patients have been also reported. Treatment options depend upon symptom severity and clinical course. Case Description: We report the case of a 47-year-old patient who developed an intramedullary arachnoid cyst after removal of an intradural extramedullary cyst. Conclusion: Surgery should be considered early in a symptomatic disease course. Longstanding medullary compression may reduce the possibility of neurological recovery as well as secondary complications such as intramedullary cyst formation. PMID:27512608

  4. Duplication Cyst of the Sigmoid Colon

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    Bastian Domajnko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 21-year-old male with developmental delay presented with abdominal pain of two days' duration. He was afebrile and his abdomen was soft with mild diffuse tenderness. There were no peritoneal signs. Plain x-ray demonstrated a large air-filled structure in the right upper quadrant. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a 9×8 cm structure adjacent to the hepatic flexure containing an air-fluid level. It did not contain oral contrast and had no apparent communication with the colon. At operation, the cystic lesion was identified as a duplication cyst of the sigmoid colon that was adherent to the right upper quadrant. The cyst was excised with a segment of the sigmoid colon and a stapled colo-colostomy was performed. Recovery was uneventful. Final pathology was consistent with a duplication cyst of the sigmoid colon. The cyst was attached to the colon but did not communicate with the lumen.

  5. Hemorrhagic Colloid Cyst Presenting with Acute Hydrocephaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Reza; Zandi, Behrouz; Pezeshki-Rad, Masoud; Farrokh, Donya

    2017-01-01

    Colloid cysts are benign slow-growing cystic lesions located on the roof of the third ventricle that usually present with symptoms related to gradual rise of intracranial pressure. They mostly remain asymptomatic and sometimes grow progressively and cause diverse symptoms associated with increased intracranial pressure such as headache, diplopia, and sixth cranial nerve palsy. Here we report a 47-year-old female who presented to the emergency department with acute severe headache and nausea/vomiting. On MRI examination acute hydrocephaly due to hemorrhagic colloid cyst was detected. Acute hemorrhage in colloid cysts is extremely rare and may present with symptoms of acute increase in the intracranial pressure. Intracystic hemorrhage is very rarely reported as a complication of colloid cyst presenting with paroxysmal symptoms of acute hydrocephaly. PMID:28210514

  6. Unexplainable development of a hydatid cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio Di Cataldo; Rosalia Latino; Aldo Cocuzza; Giovanni Li Destri

    2009-01-01

    Echinococcosis is a cyclozoonosis characterized by cystic lesions usually situated inside or outside the liver. We discuss the case of a 77-year-old woman with a recurrent hydatidosis with a cyst arising from the liver, growing through the lateral right abdomen wall, and reaching the subcutaneous tissue of the lumbar region. In the literature, rare subcutaneous or muscular localizations of hydatid cysts are described, however, there is no mention of a cyst growing over the abdominal wall muscles, shaped like an hourglass, partially in the liver and partially in the subcutaneous tissue, as in our case.We have not found any pathogenetic explanation for this growth pattern which is not typical of the biological behaviour of a hydatid cyst.

  7. Unexplainable development of a hydatid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cataldo, Antonio; Latino, Rosalia; Cocuzza, Aldo; Li Destri, Giovanni

    2009-07-14

    Echinococcosis is a cyclozoonosis characterized by cystic lesions usually situated inside or outside the liver. We discuss the case of a 77-year-old woman with a recurrent hydatidosis with a cyst arising from the liver, growing through the lateral right abdomen wall, and reaching the subcutaneous tissue of the lumbar region. In the literature, rare subcutaneous or muscular localizations of hydatid cysts are described, however, there is no mention of a cyst growing over the abdominal wall muscles, shaped like an hourglass, partially in the liver and partially in the subcutaneous tissue, as in our case. We have not found any pathogenetic explanation for this growth pattern which is not typical of the biological behaviour of a hydatid cyst.

  8. Epidermoid cysts of the velum interpositum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahuleyan, Biji; Daniel, Roy T; Chacko, Geeta; Chacko, Ari G

    2008-10-01

    The cistern of the velum interpositum is a space located between the corpus callosum dorsally and the roof of the third ventricle ventrally. Lesions located within the velum interpositum are rare and include meningiomas, pilocytic astrocytomas, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors and arachnoid cysts. Epidermoid cysts in this location have not been reported previously. We report the clinical and radiological features of two patients with epidermoid cysts located in the velum interpositum. The patients presented with gait difficulty and features of raised intracranial pressure and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated large tumors in the velum interpositum with intensities suggestive of epidermoid cysts. There was ventral displacement of the internal cerebral veins and dorsal displacement of the corpus callosum in keeping with a mass in the velum interpositum. Tumors of the third ventricle displace the internal cerebral veins dorsally. A transcallosal approach was used in both patients to effectively excise the tumors.

  9. MR myelography of sacral meningeal cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, K.; Katase, S.; Hachiya, J. [Kyorin Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the findings of sacral meningeal cysts (SMCs) on MR myelography and assess its value for the diagnosis of SMCs. Material and Methods: We evaluated the MR images and MR myelograms obtained from 10 patients with SMC. MR myelograms were obtained using a 2D or 3D single-shot fast spin-echo sequence. In 5 patients, X-ray myelograms and postmyelographic CT images were compared with the MR myelograms. Results: A total of 33 SMCs were diagnosed within the spinal canal and/or sacral foramen. MR myelograms clearly revealed each cyst as a well-defined mass showing hyperintensity (10 cysts) or isointensity (23 cysts) compared to cerebrospinal fluid. MR myelograms demonstrated SMCs better than X-ray myelograms and postmyelographic CT images in 3 of the 5 patients. Conclusion: MR myelography can be an adjunct to conventional imaging techniques when surgical treatment is indicated, because it can precisely delineate the extent of SMCs. (orig.)

  10. [Tarlov cysts: report of four cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Márcia Cristina da Paixão Rodrigues Miranda de; Sá, Renato Carlos Ferreira Leite Miranda de

    2004-09-01

    Four perineurial cysts cases (Tarlov's cysts) are reported. The purpose of this study is to describe and to compare them with data from a literature review. The evaluation was performed among 88 adult patients with symptoms of radiculopathy, sacral pain, low back pain. Four patients revealed Tarlov's cysts (4.5%). The diagnosis was made by magnetic resonance imaging. Four cases underwent sacral laminectomy. Following surgery, the claudication pain resolved with no motor or sensory deficits. Tarlov's cysts should be considered as a differential diagnosis of sacral radiculopathy, sacral or lumbar pain syndromes and mainly to the lumbar disc prolapse. The goal of the surgical treatment is to relieve the neural compression and stop bone erosion.

  11. Surgical results of sacral perineural (Tarlov) cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Ito, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Kazuo; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ikuma, Hisanori; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the surgical outcomes and to determine indicators of the necessity of surgical intervention. Twelve consecutive patients harboring symptomatic sacral perineural cysts were treated between 1995 and 2003. All patients were assessed for neurological deficits and pain by neurological examination. Magnetic resonance of imaging, computerized tomography, and myelography were performed to detect signs of delayed filling of the cysts. We performed a release of the valve and imbrication of the sacral cysts with laminectomies in 8 cases or recapping laminectomies in 4 cases. After surgery, symptoms improved in 10 (83%) of 12 patients, with an average follow-up of 27 months. Ten patients had sacral perineural cysts with signs of positive filling defect. Two (17%) of 12 patients experienced no significant improvement. In one of these patients, the filling defect was negative. In conclusion, a positive filling defect may become an indicator of good treatment outcomes.

  12. Surgical results of sacral perineural (Tarlov cysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka,Masato

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the surgical outcomes and to determine indicators of the necessity of surgical intervention. Twelve consecutive patients harboring symptomatic sacral perineural cysts were treated between 1995 and 2003. All patients were assessed for neurological deficits and pain by neurological examination. Magnetic resonance of imaging, computerized tomography, and myelography were performed to detect signs of delayed filling of the cysts. We performed a release of the valve and imbrication of the sacral cysts with laminectomies in 8 cases or recapping laminectomies in 4 cases. After surgery, symptoms improved in 10 (83% of 12 patients, with an average follow-up of 27 months. Ten patients had sacral perineural cysts with signs of positive filling defect. Two (17% of 12 patients experienced no significant improvement. In one of these patients, the filling defect was negative. In conclusion, a positive filling defect may become an indicator of good treatment outcomes.

  13. [Hydatic kidney cyst: 90 case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekak, H; Bennani, S; Rabii, R; Mezzour, M H; Debbagh, A; Joual, A; el Mrini, M

    2003-06-01

    The hydatid cyst of kidney is rare, it ranks third among all visceral localisations. The authors report a series of 90 cases renal hydatid cyst from 1972 to 2000. The middle age is 36 years with female predominance. Renal hydatid cyst often has a suggestive clinical presentation; flank mass in 84%, pain in 74% and sometimes a specific presentation hydaturia in 29%. The hydatid serology is positive in 55% and preferring ultrasonography and computed tomography in diagnosis of renal hydatid cyst. Surgical treatment is now well defined. Conservative treatment occupes a predominant place 84% and resection of the proeminent dome is usually efficient. Total nephrectomy should only be considered in the case of a completely destroyed kidney (16%) of cases. Post-operative course is generally uneventful and reexpansion of renal parenchyma is observed in 93% indicating the benign nature of this disease.

  14. Right ventricular hydatid cyst ruptured to pericardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feridoun Sabzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatidosis is rare presentation of body hydatidosis. Incidence of cardiac involvements range from 5% to 5% of patients with hydatid disease. Most common site of hydatid cyst in heart is interventricular septum and left ventricular free wall. Right ventricular free wall involvement by cyst that ruptured to pericardial cavity is very rare presentation of hydatid cyst. Cardiac involvement may have serious consequences such as rupture to blood steam or pericardial cavity. Both the disease and its surgical treatment carry a high complication rate, including rupture leading to cardiac tamponade, anaphylaxis and also death. In the present report, a 43-year-old man with constrictive pericarditis secondary to a pericardial hydatid cyst is described.

  15. Percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhan, Okan; Oezmen, Mustafa N

    1999-10-01

    Hydatic disease caused by Echinococcus granulosus is an endemic disease and an important public health problem in some countries of the world. The results of surgical treatment are associated with a high rate of mortality, morbidity, postoperative recurrence and a long period of hospital stay and the medical treatment results are still controversial. Although the percutaneous aspiration and treatment of liver hydatid cysts were considered to be contraindicated due to risks of anaphylactic shock and dissemination of clear-crystal fluid into the abdomen, several reports of successful percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts have been published in the literature. Today, percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts is the most effective and reliable treatment procedure in the selected cases. In this review, indications, contraindications, method and techniques, healing criteria, complications, results and importance of the percutaneous treatment of liver hydatid cysts are discussed.

  16. Diagnosis of the nasolabial cyst: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rafaela Motta Moitinho

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The nasolabial cyst is classified in the group of non-odontogenic epithelial developmental cysts. Their occurrence is rare, however, they are located in the nasolabial sulcus, close to the alar insertion in the nose, external to the maxillary bone tissue. It is characterized as a floating tumor, generally asymptomatic, which promotes elevation on the nasal ala. OBJECTIVE: To report a case of nasolabial cyst addressing clinical, histopathological and radiological aspects, in order to alert professionals as regards their responsibility in diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Female patient with a swelling in the region of the upper lip and nasal ala. After clinical examination, radiographic examination, puncture and aspiration, total surgical enucleation of the cyst was performed and the material collected was sent for histopathologic analysis. CONCLUSION: the dentist must be alert in order to make an early diagnosis, because it is not uncommon to overlook the lesion in the early stages.

  17. Chondroblastoma with Secondary Aneurysmal Bone Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    dysplasia, chondroblastoma, chondromyxoid fibroma , osteochondroma, giant cell tumors, or enchondroma. Chondrosarcoma, osteoblastoma–aggressive variant and...mass appears lobulated with scalloped cortical margins. Calcifications and cysts are often described.2,3,5 Chondromyxoid fibromas present in the

  18. Arachnoid Cyst Presenting With Sudden Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Ho Chen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts can occur at different intracranial sites, including the cerebellopontine angle (CPA. They often occur in childhood, in the posterior fossa. They may present with symptoms such as dizziness, tinnitus and hearing loss, or they may be asymptomatic. Presentation with sudden deafness is very rare. We report the unusual presentation of a 67-year-old male with CPA arachnoid cyst and the complaint of sudden-onset deafness. In this case, the cystic lesion at the CPA was found by magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Pathology after retromastoid suboccipital craniotomy confirmed an arachnoid cyst. The treatment of this patient is discussed and the possible causes of CPA arachnoid cyst are briefly reviewed.

  19. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt blockage by hydatid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar A Wani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt is one of the commonest procedures done in neurosurgical practice throughout the world. One of the commonest problems after putting the VP shunt is the shunt obstruction, which can be due to varied causes. Shunt obstruction secondary to the parasitic infections is rarely seen. We are presenting a 15-year-old child, a case of operated cerebral hydatid cyst with hydrocephalus. She presented with shunt malfunction after 1 year of surgical excision of the hydatid cyst. Revision of the VP shunt was done and peroperatively, it was found that the shunt tubing was obstructed due to small hydatid cysts. This is the first reported case of VP shunt obstruction by hydatid cyst.

  20. Extensive epidermoid cyst of the submental region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utumi, Estevam Rubens; Araujo, Juliane Pirágine; Pedron, Irineu Gregnanin; Yonezaki, Frederico; Machado, Gustavo Grothe

    2016-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts are malformations that are rarely observed in the submental region. Imaging has an important role in surgical planning according to the size and location of the cyst in relation to geniohyoid and mylohyoid muscles. This article reports the case of a 15-year-old female patient complaining of submental swelling. The differential diagnosis included infection, tumor, ranula, and abnormalities during embryonic development. The lesion was surgically excised using an extra-oral approach. The histopathological examination revealed a cyst wall lined with stratified squamous epithelium with the presence of several horny scales consistent with the diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. No recurrences were found after 1 year of follow-up. PMID:27547744

  1. Unusual Postrhinoplasty Complication: Nasal Dorsum Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Giorgio Giacomini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among all the possible complications of aesthetic rhinoplasty, a rare one is the development of cystic masses on the nasal dorsum: several theories suggest that cysts develop commonly by entrapment of nasal mucosa in the subcutaneous space, but they can also originate from foreign body reactions. This report deals with two cases of nasal dorsum cysts with different pathogenesis: both patients had undergone aesthetic rhinoplasty in the past (26 years ago and 14 years ago, resp.. Both cystic masses were removed via a direct open approach and nasal reconstruction was performed successfully with autologous vomer bone. The pathologic investigations showed a foreign body inclusion cyst associated with latex rubber in the first case and a sequestration of a mucosal-lined nasal bone was not removed at the time of primary rhinoplasty in the second case. A brief review of the literature focuses on the pathophysiology and treatment options for nasal dorsal cysts following aesthetic rhinoplasty.

  2. Infected paratracheal air cyst; A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jou, Sung Shick; Kim, Young Tong; Han, Jong Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    An air-filled paratracheal cyst is a common radiological finding. It may be a congenital defect or an acquired lesion. 'Acquired paratracheal cyst' is the term given to the acquired abnormalities, which usually arise in adults. They result from a weakness of the tracheal wall, and they may be caused by trauma, infection, high pressure injuries, long lasting tracheostomy, and obstructive tracheal disease. Majority of the paratracheal air cysts are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally on radiological images. Also, the management is primarily conservative treatment. Here, we report a case of an infected paratracheal air cyst on the right posterolateral wall of the trachea, which developed into an abscess and was visualized on follow-up multidetector computed tomography and was surgically removed due to persistent symptoms.

  3. Clinicopathological features and histogenesis of penile cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezcano, Cecilia; Chaux, Alcides; Velazquez, Elsa F; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2015-05-01

    Cysts arising in the penis are uncommon and can be found anywhere from the urethral meatus to the root of the penis involving glans, foreskin, or shaft. Median raphe cysts account for the majority of penile cystic lesions reported in the literature. As their name suggests, they arise on the ventral midline of the penis that extends from the urethral meatus to the scrotum and perineum. Proposed hypotheses for their origin as well as their diverse morphology are discussed.

  4. Epidermal Inclusion Cysts of The Breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir R. Motabar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal inclusion cysts are uncommon in the breast, but the consequences can besevere when these cysts occur in the breast parenchyma. Here,we report two suchcases. The patient in case 1 was an 37-year-old woman with a 3-cm palpable mass inthe right breast. Mammography revealed a round and smoothly outlined mass, whichindicated a benign tumor, and sonography showed an irregularly shaped and heterogeneoushypoechoic mass, fibroadenoma was suspected on the basis of clinical andimage findings, but excisional biopsy revealed an epidermal inclusion cyst. The patientin case 2 was a 50-year-old woman with a 2.5-cm lesion in the left breast. Mammographyrevealed a round, dense, smoothly outlined mass, and sonography showeda well-defined, central hyperechoic mass. . Breast cancer was suspected on the basisof the sonographic findings and the age of the patient, but the resected specimen revealedan epidermal inclusion cyst. Although epidermal inclusion cysts are benign,occasionally they may play a role in the origin of squamous carcinoma of the breast. .Mammographic and sonographic features of an epidermal cyst may mimic a malignantlesion. Malignant change appears to occur more frequently in epidermal inclusioncysts in the mammary gland, compared to common epidermal inclusion cysts,and this may be associated with origination of mammary epidermal inclusion cystsfrom squamous metaplasia of the mammary duct epithelium.Epidermmoid inclusion cyst of the breast is potentially serious, although such cystsare rare, and differentiation from a malignant or benign breast tumor is required. Excisionis probably the most appropriate treatment, and can eliminate the possible riskof malignant transformation.

  5. [Urothelial carcinoma in a pyelocaliceal cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Danilo; Vella, Marco; Alonge, Vincenza; Serretta, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Renal complex cysts are lesions whose nature can be either benign or malignant. Depending on the presence of septa, solid components, enhancement or calcifications, they are distinguished according to the Bosniak classification based on CT findings, as well as MRI and ETG. We report a rare case of urothelial carcinoma, originating over a pyelocalyceal cyst in a 50-year-old man, and classified as Bosniak IIF by CT and MRI investigations.

  6. Aggressive dentigerous cyst with ectopic central incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Mitra, Malay; Bandlapalli, Anila; Jana, Biswanath

    2014-06-09

    Dentigerous cysts form from accumulation of fluid between reduced enamel epithelium and the crown of an unerupted tooth. They cause several difficulties such as swelling, non-eruption of the involved teeth, and displacement of adjacent teeth, and thus require early detection and prompt treatment. Treatment ranges from marsupialisation to enucleation. Enucleation is rarely used in children compared with marsupialisation. This paper discusses successful use of enucleation for treating a dentigerous cyst and explains the need for such a radical procedure.

  7. Vesicoovarian Fistula on an Endometriosis Abscessed Cyst

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed a vesicoovarian fistula on an endometriosis abscessed cyst. The patient presented with an advanced endometriosis stage IV complicated with a right ovarian abscessed cyst of 10 cm. A first coelioscopy with cystectomy was realized. After surgery, a voiding cystography highlighted a fistula between the ovarian abscess and the bladder. A second surgery by median laparotomy was realized with the resection of the right ovarian abscess and the resection ...

  8. Retroperitoneal Cyst: An Uncommon Presentation of Filariasis

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    Senthil Ganesan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary retroperitoneal parasitic cysts are rare. Here we report about a middle aged male patient from rural north India with a recent onset of central abdominal retroperitoneal lump, pain, and fever. After surgical resection due to diagnostic uncertainty, at histopathology, it turned out be a filarial cyst. After receiving a course of diethylcarbamazine, the patient is asymptomatic at 4 months’ follow-up.

  9. Testicular epidermoid cyst; Quiste epidermoide testicular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabaza, M. J.; Medina, A.; Lopez, G.; Pardo, P. [Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves. Granada (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    The testicular epidermoid cyst is an uncommon benign tumor that represents 1% to 2% of resected testicular masses. The observation of the characteristic ultrasonographic features of these lesions facilitates their diagnosis and may make it possible to perform enucleation, obviating the need for orchidectomy. We present two cases in which the testicular epidermoid cysts were diagnosed preoperatively and their presence confirmed after conservative surgery. We review the literature concerning imaging studies and the management of these lesions. (Author) 9 refs.

  10. Case report of lung hydatid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Emami ardestani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hydatid cyst caused by the larval stage of echinococus parasit manifests in a variety of features from asymptomatic to symptoms including chronic cough,pleuritis,chest pain and hemoptysis due to cyst rupture into bronchus.some radiologic paterns has been described for it.the case we present it here is an unusual case regarding its patern of pulmonary involvement radiologically.

  11. Lumbar discal cyst in an elite athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Alex; Agarwal, Vikas; Casagranda, Bethany; Hughes, Marion A; Rothfus, William E

    2013-01-01

    Our patient, a 22-year-old starting wide receiver for an NCAA Division I football team, presented with low back pain and sciatica. A lumbar-spine MRI without contrast demonstrated findings suspicious for discal cyst. The patient was referred for surgery, and the lesion was resected. The rarity of discal cyst makes it difficult to diagnose because most radiologists are not aware of the entity. An organized approach to diagnosis can facilitate appropriate management.

  12. Phaeohyphomycotic Cyst Caused by Colletotrichum crassipes

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    A case of phaeohyphomycosis is reported in a male renal transplant recipient with a nodular lesion in the right leg who was treated with immunosuppressing drugs. The lesion consisted of a purulent cyst with thick walls. The cyst was excised surgically, and the patient did not receive any antifungal therapy. One year later he remains well. Histological study of the lesion showed a granulomatous reaction of epithelioid and multinucleate giant cells, with a central area of necrosis and pus. Font...

  13. Huge Pericardial Cyst Misleading Symptoms of COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göktürk Fındık

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Pericardial cysts are rare benign congenital mediastinal lesions. It accounts 30% of all mediastinal cysts. They are usually asemptomatic. They can produce the compression of the mediastinal structures typically caused the symptoms of dyspnea, thoracic pain, tachicardia and cough due to the unusual large size of the cyst. It can performed symptoms of lung atelectasia. The case was a sixty-five years old woman followed with a diagnosis of COPD for seven years. The patient was admitted to our center with the diagnosis of elevation of the right hemidiaphragm on chest radiography. The computed tomography revealed a cystic lesion adjacent to the right hemidiaphragm and cyst excision was performed via right thoracotomy. Patient%u2019s postoperative clinical findings indicated that the symptoms of COPD regressed completely and the patient did not require any further bronchodilator therapy. The aim of this case report is to demonstrate that the pericardial cysts can be missed in chest radiographs and impression of cysts may cause COPD like symptoms in these patients.

  14. Primary hydatid cyst in gastrocnemius muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswata Bharati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis, which is caused by the larval stages of Echinococcus granulosus, results from the presence of one or more massive cysts or hydatids, and can involve any organ, including the liver, lungs, heart, brain, kidneys, and long bones. Muscle hydatidosis is usually secondary in nature, resulting from spread of larval tissue from a primary site after spontaneous or trauma-induced cyst rupture or after release of viable parasite material during invasive treatment procedures. Primary muscle hydatidosis is extremely uncommon, because implantation at this site would require passage through the filters of the liver and lung. Intramuscular hydatid cyst can cause a variety of diagnostic problems, especially in the absence of typical radiologic findings. We present an unusual case of a primary hydatid cyst found in the popliteal fossa of the right knee of a 52-year-old woman, presenting as an enlarging soft-tissue tumor for 6 months associated with pain. The mass initially was diagnosed to be Backer′s cyst by ultrasonography, but later it was confirmed postoperatively through histopathological studies to be due to hydatid disease. In regions where hydatidosis is endemic, hydatid cyst should be included in the differential diagnosis of any unusual muscular mass.

  15. Tarlov Cyst Causing Sacral Insufficiency Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Gates, Marcus J; Copeland, William; Krauss, William E; Fogelson, Jeremy

    2017-06-01

    Tarlov cysts, also known as perineural cysts, have been described as meningeal dilations of the spinal nerve root sheath between the peri- and endoneurium at the dorsal root ganglion. Most often they are found in the sacrum involving the nerve roots. Normally asymptomatic, they have been reported to present with radiculopathy, paresthesias, and even urinary or bowel dysfunction. Sacral insufficiency has not been a well-documented presentation. The patient is a 38-year-old female who started to develop left low back pain and buttock pain that rapidly progressed into severe pain with some radiation down the posterior aspect of her left leg. There was no recent history of spine or pelvic trauma. These symptoms prompted her initial emergency department evaluation, and imaging demonstrated a large Tarlov cyst with an associated sacral insufficiency fracture. She was noted to have a normal neurological examination notable only for an antalgic gait. She was taken to surgery via a posterior approach and the cyst was identified eccentric to the left. The cyst was fenestrated and the nerve roots identified. Given her large area of bone erosion and insufficiency fractures, fixation of the sacroiliac joints was deemed necessary. Fusion was extended to the L5 vertebral body to buttress the fixation. She tolerated the procedure well and was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 3. Tarlov cysts of the sacrum can lead to significant bone erosion and subsequent insufficiency fractures, requiring fenestration and in some cases, complex sacropelvic fixation.

  16. Abundance and distribution of dinoflagellate cysts in Xiamen Western Harbor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Wenqing; LIN Yuanshao; FANG Luping

    2004-01-01

    In a grid investigation, dinoflagellate cysts were collected from sediments in Xiamen Western Harbor in May of 2000,from which five species of cysts were identified: Alexandrium tamarensis, A. minutum, Lingulodinium polyedra,Gonyaulax scrippsae and Gymnodinium catenatum, account for about 21% in the species composition. The quantitative analysis of the sediments shows that the number of dinoflagellate cysts varies from 51 to 256 cysts/g of sediment, the highest value (>200 cysts/g) being recorded at the stations of the central part of the bay, while the lowest (<100 cysts/g) at the bay mouth. A good linear relationship is found between cyst amount and fine-grained sediments. Complex physiognomies on the seabed, topographty in the bay and weak water exchange are the main factors not only in cyst accumulation but also in their distribution pattern, and have resulted in the difference in cyst densities between the inner bay and the outer bay in the harbor.

  17. Abundance and distribution of dinoflagellate cysts in Xiamen Western Harbor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Wenqing; LIN Yuanshao; FANG Luping

    2004-01-01

    In a grid investigation, dinoflagellate cysts were collected from sediments in Xiamen Western Harbor in May of 2000,from which five species of cysts were identified: Alexandrium tamarensis, A. minutum, Lingulodinium polyedra,Gonyaulax scrippsae and Gymnodinium catenatum, account for about 21% in the species composition. The quantitative analysis of the sediments shows that the number of dinoflagellate cysts varies from 51 to 256 cysts/g of sediment, the highest value (>200 cysts/g) being recorded at the stations of the central part of the bay, while the lowest (<100 cysts/g) at the bay mouth. A good linear relationship is found between cyst amount and fine-grained sediments. Complex physiognomies on the seabed, topographty in the bay and weak water exchange are the main factors not only in cyst accumulation but also in their distribution pattern, and have resulted in the difference in cyst densities between the inner bay and the outer bay in the harbor.

  18. Mixed typeⅠ andⅡ choledochal cyst in an adult

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nitin Agarwal; Sunil Kumar; Abdul Hai; Ritesh Agrawal

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Choledochal cysts are classiifed into ifve types based on the location of the cyst. Mixed types of choledochal cysts are extremely rare. Only ifve cases of mixed typeⅠ andⅡ choledochal cysts have been reported, of which one was an adult case. We report a mixed typeⅠandⅡ choledochal cyst in a 25-year-old man. METHODS: The unusual nature of the choledochal cyst, suspected on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography RCP to be typeⅠ initially, was conifrmed by laparotomy to be a mixed typeⅠ+Ⅱ cyst. Excision of the cyst and hepaticojejunostomy were performed. RESULT: The operation was uneventful, and the patient recovered well. CONCLUSIONS: Mixed type choledochal cysts are rare, and may be missed on imaging, unless careful evaluation is done. The operative method may not need to be modiifed signiifcantly, as in the management of our case.

  19. Selective inhibition of Sarcocystis neurona calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Verma, Shiv K; Scheele, Suzanne; DeRocher, Amy E; Yeargan, Michelle; Choi, Ryan; Smith, Tess R; Rivas, Kasey L; Hulverson, Matthew A; Barrett, Lynn K; Fan, Erkang; Maly, Dustin J; Parsons, Marilyn; Dubey, Jitender P; Howe, Daniel K; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2016-12-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most frequent cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, a debilitating neurological disease of horses that can be difficult to treat. We identified SnCDPK1, the S. neurona homologue of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1), a validated drug target in Toxoplasma gondii. SnCDPK1 shares the glycine "gatekeeper" residue of the well-characterized T. gondii enzyme, which allows the latter to be targeted by bumped kinase inhibitors. This study presents detailed molecular and phenotypic evidence that SnCDPK1 can be targeted for rational drug development. Recombinant SnCDPK1 was tested against four bumped kinase inhibitors shown to potently inhibit both T. gondii (Tg) CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoite growth. SnCDPK1 was inhibited by low nanomolar concentrations of these BKIs and S. neurona growth was inhibited at 40-120nM concentrations. Thermal shift assays confirmed these bumped kinase inhibitors bind CDPK1 in S. neurona cell lysates. Treatment with bumped kinase inhibitors before or after invasion suggests that bumped kinase inhibitors interfere with S. neurona mammalian host cell invasion in the 0.5-2.5μM range but interfere with intracellular division at 2.5μM. In vivo proof-of-concept experiments were performed in a murine model of S. neurona infection. The experimental infected groups treated for 30days with compound BKI-1553 (n=10 mice) had no signs of disease, while the infected control group had severe signs and symptoms of infection. Elevated antibody responses were found in 100% of control infected animals, but only 20% of BKI-1553 treated infected animals. Parasites were found in brain tissues of 100% of the control infected animals, but only in 10% of the BKI-1553 treated animals. The bumped kinase inhibitors used in these assays have been chemically optimized for potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties, and hence are good candidates for treatment of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. Copyright © 2016

  20. The diagnosis and management of synovial cysts: Efficacy of surgery versus cyst aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E; Baisden, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The surgical management of lumbar synovial cysts that have extruded into the spinal canal remains controversial (e.g. decompression with/without fusion). The neurological presentation, anatomy, pathophysiology, and surgical challenges posed by synovial cysts in the lumbar spine are well known. Neurological complaints typically include unilateral or, more rarely, bilateral radicular complaints, and/or cauda equina syndromes. Anatomically, synovial cysts constitute cystic dilatations of synovial sheaths that directly extrude from facet joints into the spinal canal. Pathophysiologically, these cysts reflect disruption of the facet joints often with accompanying instability, and potentially compromise both the cephalad and caudad nerve roots. Aspiration of lumbar synovial cysts, which are typically gelatinous and non-aspirable, and typically performed by "pain specialists" (e.g. pain management, rehabilitation, radiologists, others) utilizing fluoroscopy or CT-guided aspiration, is associated with 50-100% failure rates. Surgical decompression with/without fusion (as the issue regarding fusion remains unsettled) results in the resolution of back and radicular pain in 91.6-92.5% and 91.1-91.9% of cases, respectively. After a thorough review of the literature, it appears that the treatment with the best outcome for patients with synovial cysts is cyst removal utilizing surgical decompression; the need for attendant fusion remains unsettled. The use of an alternative treatment, percutaneous aspiration of cysts, appears to have a much higher recurrence and failure rate, but may be followed by surgery if warranted.

  1. Non-odontogenic hard palate cysts with special reference to globulomaxillary cyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bharat Bhushan Sharma; Shweta Sharma; Arvind Jha; Kamal Deep Sharma; Jai Deep Sharma; Chattur Bhuj Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Palatal cysts are always confusing by deifning their exact nomenclature or conclusive diagnosis. One of these presentations is globulomaxillary cyst which requires to be categorized under appropriate head for the management point of view. Though this entity appears to be of odontogenic in origin but because of its anatomical relation and histo-pathological background this is placed in non odontogenic group. Though the mechanism of its formation remains the same but this cyst cannot be mixed up with nasopalatine cyst as per their location. Globulomaxillary cyst appears as inverted pear shaped radiolucency in all radiological procedures. This remains asymptomatic for a long time and rarely gets infected. We present a 29-year-old male who reported with one year history of asymptomatic right side hard palate swelling. He was subsequently diagnosed as globulomaxillary cyst with the help of radiological modalities like computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. This article will highlight mainly the clinical and radiological features of these cysts with particular reference to globulomaxillary cyst which is our presenting case.

  2. Atlantoaxial joint synovial cyst: diagnosis and percutaneous treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velán, Osvaldo; Rabadán, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  3. Isolated Hydatid Cyst of Ankle: A Case Report

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    Tuna Demirdal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst is a zoonotic infection usually caused by Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatid cysts are most often localized in the liver and lungs. Isolated cases of hydatid cyst in soft tissue is very rare. The incidance of isolated soft tissue hydatid cyst is 2.3% in endemic areas. Medical treatment is successful in 30-40% of cases. The first choice of treatment is surgery, especially in atypical localization of hydatid cyst. We aimed to present our patient with ankle hydatid cyst, a rare case in the literature.

  4. Foregut duplication cysts of the stomach with respiratory epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Theodosios Theodosopoulos; Athanasios Marinis; Konstantinos Karapanos; Georgios Vassilikostas; Nikolaos Dafnios; Lazaros Samanides; Eleni Carvounis

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication is a congenital rare disease entity. Gastric duplication cysts seem to appear even more rarely. Herein, two duplications cysts of the stomach in a 46 year-old female patient are presented.Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion attached to the posterior aspect of the gastric fundus, while upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a non-communicating cyst and a smaller similar cyst embedded in the gastrosplenic ligament. Excision of both cysts along with the spleen was performed and pathology reported two smooth muscle coated cysts with a pseudostratified ciliated epithelial lining (respiratory type).

  5. Paraurethral Skene′s duct cyst in a newborn

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    Serdar Moralioglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraurethral or Skene′s duct cysts are rare causes of interlabial masses in neonates. The diagnosis of Skene′s duct cysts in the neonatal period is based on its location, in relation to the urethra, and the demonstration of transitional epithelium in the cyst wall. The distinguishing features of paraurethral cysts are the displacement of urethral meatus by the mass and a cyst containing milky fluid. Thus, we report a case of a Skene′s duct cyst in a newborn which was treated by incision and drainage.

  6. Dentigerous Cyst Associated with a Mesiodens: A Case Report

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    Sepideh Vosough Hosseini

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dentigerous cysts are the second most common odontogenic cysts after radicular cysts and are most commonly seen in association with third molars and maxillary canines. Only 5% of dentigerous cysts involve supernumerary teeth, of which mesiodens is the most frequent type. This paper presents a case of dentigerous cyst associated with a mesiodens that caused a painless swelling in the upper lip of an 18-year-old female. The patient was treated surgically by enucleation of total cyst and surgical extraction of mesiodens under local anesthesia.

  7. Dentigerous cyst associated with a mesiodens: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosough Hosseini, Sepideh; Moradzadeh, Monir; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Ala Aghbali, Amir; Fattahi, Shirin

    2011-01-01

    Dentigerous cysts are the second most common odontogenic cysts after radicular cysts and are most commonly seen in association with third molars and maxillary canines. Only 5% of dentigerous cysts involve supernumerary teeth, of which mesiodens is the most frequent type. This paper presents a case of dentigerous cyst associated with a mesiodens that caused a painless swelling in the upper lip of an 18-year-old female. The patient was treated surgically by enucleation of total cyst and surgical extraction of mesiodens under local anesthesia.

  8. Antigenic conservation and variation in Giardia cysts from various vertebrate hosts.

    OpenAIRE

    Riley, E T; Stibbs, H H

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies produced against Giardia muris cysts reacted in indirect immunofluorescence with homologous cysts and cysts from a Giardia-infected wild Norway rat but did not cross-react with Giardia lamblia cysts of human, dog, or beaver sources. Another monoclonal antibody raised against Giardia simoni cysts from the Norway rat reacted with homologous cysts (rat) and cross-reacted with cysts from a cow. The demonstration of antigenic differences at the cyst surfaces of Giardia organi...

  9. Exposure of free-living jaguars to Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis neurona in the Brazilian Pantanal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Samiko Miyazaki Onuma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis neurona are related apicomplexan parasites that cause reproductive and neurological disorders in a wide range of domestic and wild animals. In the present study, the immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT was used to investigate the presence of antibodies against T. gondii, N. caninum and S. neurona in the sera of 11 free-living jaguars (Panthera onca in two protected areas in the Pantanal region of Mato Grosso state, Brazil. Ten jaguars (90.9% showed seropositivity for T. gondii, eight (72.7% for S. neurona, and seven (63.6% for N. caninum antigens. Our findings reveal exposure of jaguars to these related coccidian parasites and circulation of these pathogens in this wild ecosystem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first serological detection of N. caninum and S. neurona in free-living jaguars.

  10. Modest genetic differentiation among North American populations of Sarcocystis neurona may reflect expansion in its geographic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, N; Asmundsson, I M; Thomas, N J; Samuel, M D; Dubey, J P; Rosenthal, B M

    2008-03-25

    Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of neurological disease in horses (equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, EPM) and sea otters in the United States. In addition, EPM-like disease has been diagnosed in several other land and marine mammals. Opossums are its only definitive hosts. Little genetic diversity among isolates of S. neurona from different hosts has been reported. Here, we used 11 microsatellites to characterize S. neurona DNA isolated from natural infections in 22 sea otters (Enhydra lutris) from California and Washington and in 11 raccoons (Procyon lotor) and 1 striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) from Wisconsin. By jointly analyzing these 34 isolates with 26 isolates previously reported, we determined that geographic barriers may limit S. neurona dispersal and that only a limited subset of possible parasite genotypes may have been introduced to recently established opossum populations. Moreover, our study confirms that diverse intermediate hosts share a common infection source, the opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

  11. Exposure of free-living jaguars to Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis neurona in the Brazilian Pantanal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Selma Samiko Miyazaki; Melo, Andréia Lima Tomé; Kantek, Daniel Luis Zanella; Crawshaw-Junior, Peter Gransden; Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves; May-Júnior, Joares Adenílson; Pacheco, Thábata dos Anjos; Aguiar, Daniel Moura de

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum and Sarcocystis neurona are related apicomplexan parasites that cause reproductive and neurological disorders in a wide range of domestic and wild animals. In the present study, the immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was used to investigate the presence of antibodies against T. gondii, N. caninum and S. neurona in the sera of 11 free-living jaguars (Panthera onca) in two protected areas in the Pantanal region of Mato Grosso state, Brazil. Ten jaguars (90.9%) showed seropositivity for T. gondii, eight (72.7%) for S. neurona, and seven (63.6%) for N. caninum antigens. Our findings reveal exposure of jaguars to these related coccidian parasites and circulation of these pathogens in this wild ecosystem. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first serological detection of N. caninum and S. neurona in free-living jaguars.

  12. Comparison of prevalence factors in horses with and without seropositivity to Neospora hughesi and/or Sarcocystis neurona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, Nicola; Tamez-Trevino, Eva; White, Alexandria; Vangeem, Joshua; Packham, Andrea; Conrad, Patricia A; Kass, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis is a commonly diagnosed neurological disease of horses in North America and is caused by infection with Sarcocystis neurona or Neospora hughesi. The aim of this study was to compare prevalence factors among horses seropositive or seronegative to N. hughesi and/or S. neurona. A total of 3123 submissions were included in the study, with horses originating from 49 States. Thirty-eight animals from 21 States tested seropositive for N. hughesi only, 840 horses from 40 States were seropositive for S. neurona only, 25 horses from 14 States were seropositive for both protozoa, and 2220 horses from 49 States tested seronegative for both parasites. Significant associations were found between geographical location (State), month of submission, breed and serological status. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The interaction of Acanthamoeba castellanii cysts with macrophages and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Michael; Proy, Vincent; Niederkorn, Jerry Y; Alizadeh, Hassan

    2003-06-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii, a free-living amoeba, causes a sight-threatening form of keratitis. Even after extensive therapies, corneal damage can be severe, often requiring corneal transplantation to restore vision. However, A. castellanii cysts are not eliminated from the conjunctiva and stroma of humans and can excyst, resulting in infection of the corneal transplant. The aim of this study was to determine whether elements of the innate immune apparatus, neutrophils and macrophages, were capable of detecting and eliminating A. castellanii cysts and to examine the mechanism by which they kill the cysts. Results show that neither innate immune cell is attracted chemotactically to intact cysts, yet both were attracted to lysed cysts. Both macrophages and neutrophils were capable of killing significant numbers of cysts, yet neutrophils were 3-fold more efficient than macrophages. Activation of macrophages with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-gamma did not increase their cytolytic ability. Conditioned medium isolated from macrophages did not lyse the cysts; however, prevention of phagocytosis by cytochalasin D inhibited 100% of macrophage-mediated killing of the cysts. Conditioned medium from neutrophils did kill significant numbers of the cysts, and this killing was blocked by quercetin, a potent inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO). These results indicate that neither macrophages nor neutrophils are chemoattracted to intact cysts, yet both are capable of killing the cysts. Macrophages killed the cysts by phagocytosis, whereas neutrophils killed cysts through the secretion of MPO.

  14. Genetic variation among isolates of Sarcocystis neurona, the agent of protozoal myeloencephalitis, as revealed by amplified fragment length polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikha, H M; Schott, H C; Mansfield, L S

    2006-06-01

    Sarcocystis neurona causes serious neurological disease in horses and other vertebrates in the Americas. Based on epidemiological data, this parasite has recently emerged. Here, the genetic diversity of Sarcocystis neurona was evaluated using the amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method. Fifteen S. neurona taxa from different regions collected over the last 10 years were used; six isolates were from clinically diseased horses, eight isolates were from wild-caught opossums (Didelphis virginiana), and one isolate was from a cowbird (Molothrus ater). Additionally, four outgroup taxa were also fingerprinted. Nine primer pairs were used to generate AFLP patterns, with a total number of amplified fragments ranging from 30 to 60, depending on the isolate and primers tested. Based on the presence/absence of amplified AFLP fragments and pairwise similarity values, all the S. neurona isolates tested were clustered in one monophyletic group. No significant correlation could be found between genomic similarity and host origin of the S. neurona isolates. AFLP revealed significant intraspecific genetic variations, and S. neurona appeared as a highly variable species. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium analysis suggested that S. neurona populations within Michigan have an intermediate type of population structure that includes characteristics of both clonal and panamictic population structures. AFLP is a reliable molecular technique that has provided one of the most informative approaches to ascertain phylogenetic relationships in S. neurona and its closest relatives, allowing them to be clustered by relative similarity using band matching and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean analysis, which may be applicable to other related protozoal species.

  15. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Roman; Szymaś, Janusz; Nowak, Stanisław; Zukiel, Ryszard; Sokół, Bartosz; Paprzycki, Włodzmierz

    2012-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the spine occur most frequently in the lumbosacral region. Methods of treatment vary, but in cases of chronic pain or neurological deficits surgical intervention is undertaken. The aim of this paper is to present indications, surgical technique and efficacy of surgical treatment in patients with synovial cyst of the spinal canal. The retrospective analysis included 11 patients, aged from 47 to 72 years, treated at the Department of Neurosurgery and Neurotraumatology, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, between 2004 and 2009. The length of medical history ranged from 2 months to 6 years. Conservative treatment applied before surgery was not effective. Neurological examination revealed unilateral or bilateral sciatica, superficial sensory disturbance or lower limb paresis. Synovial cysts were located mainly at the L4-L5 level (9 cases). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine was performed in all patients and showed the cystic lesion attached to the intervertebral joint. Surgical treatment consisted of a unilateral fenestration using microsurgical techniques in most cases. Back pain relief was observed in 9 cases. In 10 patients, symptoms of sciatica disappeared. Neurological deficits disappeared in 5 patients. Surgical treatment of spinal synovial cysts is safe, effective and ensures a long-lasting effect. Surgical treatment is indicated in patients in whom the clinical symptoms correlate with the presence of synovial cyst in imaging studies and do not resolve after conservative treatment.

  16. Cerebellar ependymal cyst in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss-Fluehmann, G; Konar, M; Jaggy, A; Vandevelde, M; Oevermann, A

    2008-11-01

    An 11-week-old, male, Staffordshire Bull Terrier had a history of generalized ataxia and falling since birth. The neurologic findings suggested a localization in the cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed. In all sequences the area of the cerebellum was almost replaced by fluid isointense to cerebrospinal fluid. A complete necropsy was performed after euthanasia. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by extensive loss of cerebellar tissue in both hemispheres and vermis. Toward the surface of the cerebellar defect, the cavity was confined by ruptured and folded membranes consisting of a layer of glial fibrillary acidic (GFAP)-positive glial cells covered multifocally by epithelial cells. Some of these cells bore apical cilia and were cytokeratin and GFAP negative, supporting their ependymal origin. The histopathologic features of our case are consistent with the diagnosis of an ependymal cyst. Its glial and ependymal nature as demonstrated by histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination differs from arachnoid cysts, which have also been reported in dogs. The origin of these cysts remains controversial, but it has been suggested that they develop during embryogenesis subsequent to sequestration of developing neuroectoderm. We speculate that the cyst could have been the result of a pre- or perinatal, possibly traumatic, insult because hemorrhage, and tissue destruction had occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ependymal cyst in the veterinary literature.

  17. Dermoid cyst in a domestic shorthair cat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akhtardanesh B; Kheirandish R; Azari O

    2012-01-01

    A 5-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat was presented for examination of a subcutaneous mass in his tail. The mass was firm, non-painful, oval, and approximately 2.5 × 3.5 cm. Surgical exploration revealed a well-circumscribed, encapsulated mass. The mass was removed and sectioned for histopathological examination. In gross section, it was filled with numerous dark hairs. Histologically the mass was consisted of haired skin with dermal cystic structures lined by stratified squamous epithelium. The cyst lumen contained squamous debris and filled with keratinous material. Numerous hair shafts were extended from the wall of the cyst. The sebaceous and apocrine gland adnexal structures were also observed which confirmed the diagnosis of dermoid cyst. No tumor recurrence was observed after surgery in fallowing checkups. Cutaneous or subcutaneous cysts of all types are considered rare in cats and to our knowledge this is the third reported case of cutaneous dermoid cyst of cats in veterinary literature which is different from the other cases because it occurred in dorsal midline in tail area whereas others occurred in flank area.

  18. Endoscopic treatment of the suprasellar arachnoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical options for suprasellar arachnoid cyst are cystoperitoneal shunt, craniotomy fenestration and endoscopic fenestration. Endoscopic management has been found to be safe and effective. We report our experience with endoscopic management in 12 (male five, female seven; age range 8 months to 42 years patients with suprasellar arachnoid cyst. The endoscopic procedure included lateral ventricle puncture by precoronal burr hole and superior and inferior wall of the cyst was communicated with the lateral ventricle and the interpeduncular cistern respectively. All patients had hydrocephalus. Four pediatric patients had macrocephaly. All adult patients had visual disturbances. One adult patient presented with psychomotor disturbance along with features of raised intracranial pressure. All cases improved following endoscopic treatment. There were no complications or death. One patient required VP shunt. Postoperative MRI showed significant reduction in cyst volume in 11 patients. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 6 and a half years. Our study suggests that endoscopic technique is a safe and effective alternative treatment for suprasellar arachnoid cyst. It prevents complications such as subdural effusion and intracranial hematoma, which are not uncommon with craniotomy fenestration.

  19. Spontaneously resolving macular cyst in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe transient macular cysts in an infant and correlate their occurrence with normal development events. A newborn Caucasian girl presented with a protruding corneal mass in her left eye at birth. She underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. A keratinized staphylomatous malformation involving the entire cornea and precluding further visualization of the anterior and posterior segment was observed in the left eye. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT of the right eye performed when the child was approximately 6-week-old had revealed an unexpected finding of macular cysts involving the inner nuclear and outer retinal layers. Corneal transplant in the left eye was performed a month later. Ocular examination under anesthesia just prior to surgery revealed normal intraocular pressure, anterior segment and retina in the right eye. SD-OCT was normal in both eyes and showed complete resolution of the cysts in the right eye. The patient had not been on any medications at that time. Although clinical retinal examination might be unremarkable, SD-OCT may reveal cystic spaces in the macula. In the absence of conditions known to be associated with macular edema, transient macular cysts may arise due to a developmental incompetence of the blood-retinal barrier or may represent transient spaces created during normal migration of retinal cells. Further study is warranted to delineate the entity of transient macular cysts in infancy.

  20. Tarlov cyst: Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashad, Bhagwat; Jain, Anil K; Dhammi, Ish K

    2007-10-01

    We describe a case of sacral perineural cyst presenting with complaints of low back pain with neurological claudication. The patient was treated by laminectomy and excision of the cyst. Tarlov cysts (sacral perineural cysts) are nerve root cysts found most commonly in the sacral roots, arising between the covering layer of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The incidence of Tarlov cysts is 5% and most of them are asymptomatic, usually detected as incidental findings on MRI. Symptomatic Tarlov cysts are extremely rare, commonly presenting as sacral or lumbar pain syndromes, sciatica or rarely as cauda equina syndrome. Tarlov cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these complaints.

  1. Tarlov cyst: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashad Bhagwat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of sacral perineural cyst presenting with complaints of low back pain with neurological claudication. The patient was treated by laminectomy and excision of the cyst. Tarlov cysts (sacral perineural cysts are nerve root cysts found most commonly in the sacral roots, arising between the covering layer of the perineurium and the endoneurium near the dorsal root ganglion. The incidence of Tarlov cysts is 5% and most of them are asymptomatic, usually detected as incidental findings on MRI. Symptomatic Tarlov cysts are extremely rare, commonly presenting as sacral or lumbar pain syndromes, sciatica or rarely as cauda equina syndrome. Tarlov cysts should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these complaints.

  2. Giant epidermoid inclusion cyst of the clitoris mimicking clitoromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ojaimi, Eftekhar Hassan; Abdulla, Maryam Mohd

    2013-01-01

    We describe a rare case of clitoromegaly due to a large clitoral cyst that occurred spontaneously without any declared previous female genital mutilation. The cyst was excised successfully with good cosmetic results.

  3. [Complex odontoma with dentigerous cyst: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qizhang, Xu; Hongliang, Zhang; Xiaoyu, Wang; Zhanji, Wang; Qianqian, Xu; Qiong, Ma

    2014-12-01

    Complex odontoma is a relatively rare dental dysplasia. In particular, a complex odontoma with dentigerous cyst is seldom observed. A case of complex odontoma with dentigerous cyst is reported in this paper.

  4. Duplication cysts: Diagnosis, management, and the role of endoscopic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Roy; Adler, Douglas G

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal tract duplication cysts are rare congenital gastrointestinal malformation in young patients and adults. They consist of foregut duplication cysts, small bowel duplication cysts, and large bowel duplication cysts. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used as a modality for the evaluation and diagnosis of duplication cysts. EUS is the diagnostic tool of choice to investigate duplication cysts since it can distinguish between solid and cystic lesions. The question of whether or not to perform EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) on a lesion suspected of being a duplication cyst is controversial as these lesions can become infected with significant consequences, although EUS-FNA is often required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and to rule out more ominous lesions. This manuscript will review the literature on duplication cysts throughout the body and will also focus on the role of EUS and FNA with regards to these lesions.

  5. An arachnoid cyst presenting as an intramedullary tumour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, P W; van den Bergh, W M; Vandertop, W P

    2000-01-01

    A case of thoracic intradural extramedullary arachnoid cyst is presented in which an intramedullary low grade glioma was suspected preoperatively. The cyst was widely fenestrated and postoperatively, the patient experienced considerable improvement in her symptoms. As postoperative MRI studies also

  6. Spontaneous regression of a cyst of the cavum septi pellucidi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocer, N.; Kantarci, F.; Mihmalli, I.; Islak, C.; Cokyueksel, O. [Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2000-05-01

    A 20-year-old woman with secondary amenorrhoea and an empty sella turcica was found to have a cyst of the cavum septi pellucidi (CSP) on MRI. The cyst had regressed spontaneously on follow-up MRI. (orig.)

  7. Asymptomatic spontaneous rupture of suprasellar dermoid cyst : a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh S

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Suprasellar dermoid cysts are uncommon intracranial lesions. CT and MRI findings in a rare case of asymptomatic rupture of suprasellar dermoid cyst with subarachnoid dissemination is described.

  8. SP. Pescado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Gendre

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Nell'occhiello di un articolo dal titolo Il Peru dei de[Jini rosa e de/la grande pioggia si legge: "da una partenza  in aereo al «pescado»  che ti  sfamera."1 Questa parola spagnola, giustamente chiusa tra caporali, a noi pare molto interes­ sante, perche, nonostante l'apparenza, non ha nulla da spartire sotto i1 profilo se­ mantico con l'it. pescato. lnfatti, tutti i piu importanti dizionari della lingua italiana, di ieri e di oggi, etimologici e non 2, registrano  accanto a pescata,  ii lemma pescato, 3 ma lo spiegano come "quantita di pesce catturato nel corso di una battuta o di una stagione di pesca",4 mentre lo sp. pescado  indica i1 "pesce (solo nel senso di: pesGe pescato da mangiare [...]".s

  9. Sarcocystis neurona schizonts-associated encephalitis, chorioretinitis, and myositis in a two-month-old dog simulating toxoplasmosis, and presence of mature sarcocysts in muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Black, S S; Verma, S K; Calero-Bernal, R; Morris, E; Hanson, M A; Cooley, A J

    2014-05-28

    Sarcocystis neurona is an unusual species of the genus Sarcocystis. Opossums (Didelphis virginianus, D. albiventris) are the definitive hosts and several other species, including dogs, cats, marine mammals, and horses are intermediate or aberrant hosts. Sarcocysts are not known to form in aberrant hosts. Sarcocystis neurona causes fatal disease in horses (Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis, EPM). There are numerous reports of fatal EPM-like infections in other species, usually with central nervous system signs and associated with the schizont stage of S. neurona. Here, we report fatal disseminated S. neurona infection in a nine-week-old golden retriever dog from Mississippi, USA. Protozoal merozoites were identified in smears of the cerebrospinal fluid. Microscopically, lesions and protozoa were identified in eyes, tongue, heart, liver, intestines, nasal turbinates, skeletal muscle and brain, which reacted intensely with S. neurona polyclonal antibodies. Mature sarcocysts were seen in sections of muscles. These sarcocysts were ultrastructurally similar to those of S. neurona from experimentally infected animals. These data suggest that the dog is another intermediate host for S. neurona. Data suggest that the dog was transplacentally infected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Phylogenetic congruence of Sarcocystis neurona Dubey et al., 1991 (Apicomplexa: Sarcocystidae) in the United States based on sequence analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikha, Hany M; Murphy, Alice J; Mansfield, Linda S

    2005-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were to assess the genetic diversity, phylogeny and phylogeographical relationships of available Sarcocystis neurona isolates from different localities in the United States. All 13 Sarcocystis isolates from different hosts were subjected to polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analyses using two published DNA markers (25/396 and 33/54). The 334 bp sequence of the 25/396 marker of these isolates and Besnoitia darlingi, B. bennetti, Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum were sequenced and compared. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using neighbour-joining (NJ), maximum parsimony (MP) and minimum evolution (ME) methods based on the sequences of the 25/396 marker of the 13 Sarcocystis isolates obtained in this study and sequences of 10 related isolates from GenBank. Phylogenetic trees revealed a close relatedness among S. neurona isolates in the US (nucleotide sequence diversity neurona into two separate groups: a northern US group and a Southern US group. These findings suggest a correlation between grouping of the isolates and geographical segregation and were consistent with a genetic bottleneck hypothesis during opossum colonisation of North America. These data do not support either the view of S. neurona as a single super-species or its division into multiple subspecies.

  11. Cyst rupture as a pathogenic mechanism of toxoplasmic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, J K; Escajadillo, A

    1987-05-01

    Seemingly intact cysts and sequential stages of disintegrating cysts of Toxoplasma were identified immunohistologically within developing microglial nodules in a Panamanian night monkey (Aotus lemurinus). This monkey had been successfully immunized and challenged 5 months earlier. This supports the hypothesis that glial nodules unassociated with Toxoplasma tachyzoites may represent the tombstone of a Toxoplasma cyst. Disintegration of cysts may give rise to clinical encephalitis in the presence of apparently adequate immunity.

  12. Knee synovial cyst presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M L; Marshall, T; Donell, S T; Phillips, H

    2004-06-01

    We present the case of a 28-year-old competitive runner with iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome associated with a synovial cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not demonstrate a fluid collection. However, open exploration revealed a large cyst beneath the ITB arising from the capsule of the knee proximal to the lateral meniscus. The cyst disappeared on extension. The pre-operative MRI scan may have revealed the cyst, if it had been taken with the knee flexed.

  13. Hydatid cyst-colonic fistula: an exceptional complication

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a worldwide zoonosis and is localized in the liver in most cases. Its complications are numerous and include those related to the compression of adjacent viscera, infection of the cysts contents or perforation of the cyst. Spontaneous rupture of the hepatic hydatid cyst into colon is an extremely rare complication. The communication is, typically, not discovered until surgery. We present a case of a liver hydatid cyst communicating with the hepatic flexure of colon. The sur...

  14. Trichilemmal Cyst of the Penis in a Paediatric Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Madan; Rashi Joshi

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric penile cysts are uncommon. We report a five-year-old child with an asymptomatic progressively growing cyst on the ventral aspect of the penis after a hypospadias repair. The patient presented to the Cooper Health Clinic, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in March 2012. A complete excision of the cyst was performed. Histology results delineated a capsulated benign trichilemmal cyst. No recurrence or complications were reported in the 26 months following the excision. We recommend an earl...

  15. An Unusual Odontogenic Cyst with Diverse Histologic Features

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Jung Hoon; Ahn, Sang Gun; Kim, Su Gwan; Kim, Jin

    2006-01-01

    An unusual odontogenic cyst, which was originally believed to be a clinical dentigerous cyst associated with an impacted mandibular third molar, was found histologically to demonstrate the characteristics of a glandular odontogenic cyst with para- and orthokeratinization. These histologic diversities were interpreted as a reflection of the pluripotentiality of the epithelial remnants of the mandibular third molars or dentigerous cyst epithelium. It is possible that it has the capacity to indu...

  16. A case of peribiliary cysts accompanying bile duct carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fumihiko Miura; Tadahiro Takada; Hodaka Amano; Masahiro Yoshida; Takahiro Isaka; Naoyuki Toyota; Keita Wada; Kenji Takagi; Kenichiro Karo

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of peribiliary cysts accompaying bile duct carcinoma is presented. A 54-year-old man was diagnosed as having lower bile duct carcinoma and peribiliary cysts by diagnostic imaging. He underwent pylorus preserving pancreatoduodenectomy. As for the peribiliary cysts, a course of observation was taken.Over surgery due to misdiagnosis of patients with biliary malignancy accompanied by peribiliary cysts should be avoided.

  17. Bilateral impacted inverted mesiodens associated with dentigerous cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byatnal, Aditi Amit; Byatnal, Amit; Singh, Ankur; Narayanaswamy, Venkadasalapathi; Radhakrishnan, Raghu

    2013-10-01

    Mesiodens, the most common type of supernumerary tooth, usually results in malocclusion, poor esthetics and cyst formation. The occurrence of a dentigerous cyst around the crown of an unerupted supernumerary tooth is infrequent. We present a case of a dentigerous cyst associated with a nonsyndromic bilateral impacted inverted supernumerary tooth in a 13-year-old boy. A thorough clinical workup, including 3-D reconstruction image and histological examination confirming the features of a dentigerous cyst is presented in this report.

  18. Partial laparoscopic decapsulation of splenic cysts: long-term results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, Susana; Rosado, Rafael; Gallardo, Andrés; Huertas, Francisco; Medina, Pedro; Ramírez, Diego

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of laparoscopic decapsulation in the management of splenic cysts. Cystic disease of spleen is an infrequent entity. Laparoscopic surgery should be considered as the method of choice for the greater of patients diagnosed with a splenic cyst. We provide 2 new cases of splenic cysts treated with partial laparoscopic decapsulation using harmonic scalpel. The patients were examined 5 years later and no cysts recurrence was found.

  19. The glandular odontogenic jaw cyst: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, N W; Joseph, B K; Monsour, P A; Young, W G

    1996-11-01

    A case of a rare odontogenic cyst arising in the lateral periodontal membrane in the mandible in a 14 year old girl is reported. This lesion appeared to be a new entity and has been named glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) or sialo-odontogenic cyst. Histologically the lesion was lined by mucous producing cuboidal epithelium containing several areas of thickening and numerous duct-like structures. The cyst recurred with the same histology two years postoperatively.

  20. Transsphenoidal cyst cisternostomy with a keyhole dural opening for sellar arachnoid cysts: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Kenichi; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Taguchi, Manabu; Takeshita, Akira; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Shozo

    2014-04-01

    A less invasive transsphenoidal approach with a keyhole dural opening for intrasellar arachnoid cysts is described. This approach was used to address seven sellar cystic lesions with suprasellar extension; they were six intrasellar arachnoid cysts (IACs) and one Rathke's cleft cyst (RCC). In all cases, preoperative MRI revealed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images. On preoperative contrast-enhanced MRI, five of the six IACs manifested posterior displacement of the flattened pituitary gland toward the dorsum sellae; one of the six IACs and the RCC exhibited a flattened pituitary gland on the anterior surface of the cyst. Wide cyst cisternostomy through a keyhole dural opening was carried out safely using a microscope with the support of a thin angled endoscope (30° and/or 70°, diameter 2.7 mm). As we aimed to avoid iatrogenic injury of the pituitary function, we found it difficult to obtain a sufficiently wide and precise opening of the cyst wall when the pituitary gland was located on the anterior surface of the cyst wall. Our approach facilitates safe cyst cisternostomy as wide as that obtainable by transcranial manipulation. In addition, CSF leakage is prevented by dural plasty using the fascia lata and stitching with 6-0 monofilament sutures. This technique can be adapted to address various sellar cystic lesions. However, as the posterior or anterior displacement of the normal pituitary gland in the presence of IACs or RCCs, respectively, affects the width of the cyst opening, our technique is more suitable for IACs than RCCs.

  1. Medial meniscal cyst: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Mauro; Sabbioni, Giacomo; Tigani, Domenico

    2008-12-01

    Meniscal cysts are a rare disease constantly combined with a horizontal meniscal lesion. Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance (MRI) is the main diagnostic tool, because of its high sensitivity and specificity, and decompression arthroscopy combined with selective meniscectomy is the treatment of choice. The Authors report a case of a voluminous medial meniscal cyst where instrumental examination, MRI, was fundamental for the preoperative diagnosis of the horizontal meniscal lesion causing the cystic degeneration of the meniscus. The treatment performed was selective meniscectomy of the body and posterior horn of the medial meniscus and decompression of the voluminous cyst by arthroscopy. Physical examination after six months showed the complete resolution of swelling at the medial hemirima, no walking pain and normal range of motion.

  2. Postoperative Maxillary Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiye Şafak Bulut

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative maxillary cyst is a quite rare delayed complication of surgical intervention associated with maxillary sinuses. It occurs many years after surgery. This paper describes a 54-year-old woman presenting with swelling of left cheek for seven-years duration. The orthopantomograph revealed a unilocular cystic radiolucency with well-defined margins in left maxillary sinus. In the computerized tomography, the cyst had a sclerotic wall with bony condensations. Aspiration cytology revealed many neutrophil leukocytes. Cyst was drained and enucleated. Histopathologically, it had a fibrous wall with inflammation and focal reactive bone formation and lined by a respiratory-type epithelium. In the clinical history, it is learned that she had a maxillary sinus surgery 8 years ago and the diagnosis was made considering the clinical and histopathological findings.

  3. Laparoscopic Management of a Complex Adrenal Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Kodama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal cysts are rare, and their clinical management remains controversial. We report a case involving an adrenal cyst with a complicated appearance on radiological studies. Unenhanced computed tomography revealed a unilocular, noncalcified, hypoattenuating mass with a thin wall in the left adrenal gland. The lesion gradually increased in size from 10 to 50 mm at two-year follow-up. On contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, a mural nodule with contrast enhancement was observed. The entire adrenal gland was excised en bloc via a lateral transperitoneal laparoscopic approach without violating the principles of surgical oncology. The pathological diagnosis was an adrenal pseudocyst. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is a safe option for the treatment of complex adrenal cysts, while maintaining the benefits of minimal invasiveness.

  4. Mesenteric dermoid cyst in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Punguyire

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available If a pediatric abdominal mass is not organomegaly or colonic stool, narrowing the diagnostic possibilities may be difficult, especially in resource-poor areas where ancillary tests and treatment options may be limited. A 2-year-old girl was brought to the rural Kintampo Municipal Hospital in Ghana with a freely moveable, non-tender abdominal mass. A huge mesenteric dermoid cyst was surgically removed. Mesenteric cysts are rare intra-abdominal lesions, most commonly occurring in children < 10 years old. Making a preoperative diagnosis is difficult. Dermoid cysts (mature cystic teratoma rarely occur in the mesentery. Poverty, family circumstances and the rural location led to general physicians doing surgery. As in this case, due to economic, social and transportation issues common throughout Africa, children with abdominal masses may need at least initial surgery in hospitals without dedicated pediatric surgery or even a trained surgeon.

  5. Platelet Parameters in Hepatic Hydatid Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Sit

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatic hydatid cyst infection is caused by microorganisms named Echinococcus which belong to family Taeniidae. Platelets are considered as a mediator in inflammation and infectious diseases because of the various proinflammatory substances that they contain. Design and Methods. Thirty-three patients who were admitted to Doğubayazıt State Hospital’s General Surgery Clinic with a diagnosis of hepatic cyst hydatid were enrolled in this retrospective study. Laboratory data of the patients in pre- and postoperative periods were obtained from computerized medical records database of the hospital. Results. Preoperative mean platelet volume (MPV of the patients was significantly increased compared to postoperative MPV values. Conclusion. We claim that MPV is a useful follow-up marker after surgery in patients with hydatid cyst.

  6. HYDATID CYST IN LUNG AND LIVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst is especially prevalent in parts of Eurasia, north and east Africa, Australia, South America. Hydatid disease is a zoonotic infection caused by adult or larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus and affects both humans and mammals. The infection is transmitted to dogs when they are fed on infected viscera of sheep or other ruminant during the home slaughter of animals. In the present case series four cases of hydatid cyst occurring at the lung and liver sites are discussed. The symptoms and signs may be caused by a toxic reaction to the parasite or by local and mechanical effects, depending on the location and nature of the cysts and the presence of complications. Early diagnosis and proper treatment will help to reduce the complication rate and prevent recurrence.

  7. Lymphoepithelial cyst in the palatoglossus arch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evanice Maria Marçal Vieira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe a case of a lymphoepithelial cyst in the palatoglossus arch. A 16-years-old black man said that he was observed a lesion in his mouth. On the physical exam, a pedicled, consistent, smooth surface 1.5 x 1 cm lesion, similar in color to the adjacent mucosa, was found. The lesion was surgically removed and the microscopic exam showed mucosal fragments with pedicled lesion; the cystic cavity sometimes lined with pseudostratified cylindrical epithelium and others with stratified squamous flat interface of the epithelium. Around the cyst, a well-delimited mass of lymphoid tissue, presenting lymphoid follicles, was also seen. Lymphoepithelial cyst has clinical characteristics similar to those of others lesions that occur in the oral cavity. The diagnosis should be based on conservative biopsy, with total removal of lesion.

  8. Pseudotumoral Hydatid Cyst: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis E. Petrakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydatidosis due to Echinococcus granulosus is an endemic parasitic zoonosis characterized by worldwide distribution particularly in Mediterranean countries. The most commonly involved anatomical locations are the liver and lung. Occasionally the cyst may progressively increase in size, mimicking gross ascites or intrabdominal tumor. Herein, are reported a case of a 40-year-old patient with a giant exophytically expanded hepatic echinococcus cyst, misdiagnosed as an abdominal malignancy during formal investigation. The patient was admitted to the hospital complaining for mild diffuse abdominal tenderness, moderate abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhoea, and vomiting. A CT scan revealed the presence of a giant abdominal mass 25×21×14 cm, resembling a tumor, adherent to the liver edges and parietal peritoneum, displacing intestinal loops. During the ensuing days the patient’s clinical condition worsened, and he became febrile. Exploratory laparotomy was performed, and an exophytically grown giant liver hydatid cyst was removed, despite the radiological findings and the preoperative clinical suspicion.

  9. Phaeohyphomycotic Cyst Caused by Colletotrichum crassipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins Castro, Luiz Guilherme; da Silva Lacaz, Carlos; Guarro, Josep; Gené, Josepa; Heins-Vaccari, Elisabeth Maria; de Freitas Leite, Roseli Santos; Hernández Arriagada, Giovana Letícia; Ozaki Reguera, Márcia Maria; Ito, Eunice Miki; Valente, Neusa Yuriko Sakai; Spina Nunes, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    A case of phaeohyphomycosis is reported in a male renal transplant recipient with a nodular lesion in the right leg who was treated with immunosuppressing drugs. The lesion consisted of a purulent cyst with thick walls. The cyst was excised surgically, and the patient did not receive any antifungal therapy. One year later he remains well. Histological study of the lesion showed a granulomatous reaction of epithelioid and multinucleate giant cells, with a central area of necrosis and pus. Fontana-Masson staining demonstrated the presence of pigmented hyphal elements. The fungus Colletotrichum crassipes was grown in different cultures from the cyst. The in vitro inhibitory activities of eight antifungal drugs against the isolate were tested. Clotrimazole and UR-9825 were the most active drugs. This case represents the first known reported infection caused by this rare species. PMID:11376082

  10. Hyperdense Renal Cyst. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Jamil Torres Aranda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased radiological tests have facilitated the discovery of kidney cysts, which sometimes do not meet clear criteria for benignity or malignancy. Among these lesions, the hyperdense cysts pose a challenge to all those responsible for their diagnosis and treatment. For such reasons we decided to present the case of a 23-year-old female patient with a history of sickle cell anemia, who attended the emergency department of the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital due to colic-like pain in the left lumbar region unresponsive to analgesics. She was diagnosed with category II renal cyst according to Bosniak classification using computed tomography with and without intravenous contrast.

  11. Intrathyroidal Parathyroid Cyst: An Unusual Neck Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maswood M Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid cyst (PC is a very rare condition. A case of intrathyroidal PC is being reported here in a 53-year-old woman who presented to the endocrine clinic with slowly progressive painless left anterior neck swelling for 1 year with no symptoms of thyroid or parathyroid dysfunction and no compressive symptoms. Ultrasound of the thyroid showed a well-defined cystic lesion measuring 4.7 × 3.6 cm in maximum diameter with internal echoes within the cyst located in the left lobe of the thyroid gland. Fine needle aspiration revealed colorless clear fluid with a high concentration of parathyroid hormone. The patient underwent left hemithyroidectomy at her request. Histopathology revealed parathyroid tissue with unilocular cyst and thyroid tissue with goitrous changes. She was in remission, and there was no evidence of thyroid or parathyroid dysfunction after surgery.

  12. Lumbar disc cyst with contralateral radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Tourani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Disc cysts are uncommon intraspinal cystic lesions located in the ventrolateral epidural space. They communicate with the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc and cause symptoms by radicular compression. We report a unique case of lumbar disc cyst that was associated with disc herniation and contralateral radiculopathy. A 22 year old male presented with one month history of back-ache radiating to the left leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI showed L3-L4 disc herniation with annular tear and cystic lesion in the extradural space anterior to the thecal sac on right side, which increased in size over a period of 3 weeks. L3 laminectomy and bilateral discectomy and cyst excision was done with partial improvement of patients symptoms.

  13. [True double dermoid cyst of the tongue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Callejo, F J; Roselló Millat, P; Alpera Lacruz, R; Platero Zamarreño, A; Jubert, A

    2001-10-01

    Dermoid cysts into ENT zone are specially infrequent--just the 7% of the organism--, and extremely rare if are located in the tongue. They are usually detected as midline acute swelling, and produce swallowing, speech and sleep disorders at neonatal period because of their congenital character. We present an eleven-year-old boy admitted at our Hospital bearing a submandibular and oral swelling, and dysphagia with odynophagia, finally diagnosed as an intralingual double dermoid cyst of the anterior two thirds. The history of frenulectomy due to a presumed ankyloglossia, the previous presence of a dorsal tumour in tongue with a difficult phonetic articulation, and the midline location of lesions made us to suspect on dermoid cysts of the tongue. Complete surgical excision were diagnostic and therapeutic, and the child recovered totally their mastication, swallowing and speech abilities. Pathophysiological aspects, treatment and the atypical course of the case are discussed.

  14. Giant hepatic hydatid cyst: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Ezer; Tank Zafer Nursal; Turgut Noyan; G(o)khan Moray

    2007-01-01

    Large type 1 cysts are prone to perforation. Furthermore, insufficient drainage with subsequent abscess is a frequent problem of large cysts. We report here a case of a 19-year old man who was admitted to the hospital with pain in the right upper quadrant and epigastric region. An asymmetrical right upper quadrant enlargement was detected on physical examination. Ultrasonography and computerized tomography revealed a type 1 giant hydatid cyst in the right hepatic lobe, measuring 16 cm in diameter. During operation, partial cystectomy and drainage were done. The large dead space was obliterated by the 'sandwich' method. Omentum and gelatin sponges were used to fill the cavity. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day.

  15. Intracranial neurenteric cyst traversing the brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmit Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurenteric cysts (NECs, also called enterogenous cysts, are rare benign endodermal lesions of the central nervous system that probably result from separation failure of the notochord and upper gastrointestinal tract. Most frequently they are found in the lower cervical spine or the upper thoracic spine. Intracranial occurrence is rare and mostly confined to infratentorial compartment, in prepontine region [51%]. Other common locations are fourth ventricle and cerebellopontine angle. There are few reports of NEC in medulla or the cerebellum. Because of the rarity of the disease and common radiological findings, they are misinterpreted as arachnoid or simple cysts until the histopathological confirmation, unless suspected preoperatively. We herein report a rare yet interesting case of intracranial NEC traversing across the brainstem.

  16. Phaeohyphomycotic cyst caused by Colletotrichum crassipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, L G; da Silva Lacaz, C; Guarro, J; Gené, J; Heins-Vaccari, E M; de Freitas Leite, R S; Arriagada, G L; Reguera, M M; Ito, E M; Valente, N Y; Nunes, R

    2001-06-01

    A case of phaeohyphomycosis is reported in a male renal transplant recipient with a nodular lesion in the right leg who was treated with immunosuppressing drugs. The lesion consisted of a purulent cyst with thick walls. The cyst was excised surgically, and the patient did not receive any antifungal therapy. One year later he remains well. Histological study of the lesion showed a granulomatous reaction of epithelioid and multinucleate giant cells, with a central area of necrosis and pus. Fontana-Masson staining demonstrated the presence of pigmented hyphal elements. The fungus Colletotrichum crassipes was grown in different cultures from the cyst. The in vitro inhibitory activities of eight antifungal drugs against the isolate were tested. Clotrimazole and UR-9825 were the most active drugs. This case represents the first known reported infection caused by this rare species.

  17. MRI of degenerative cysts of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalatbari, K. [Department of MRI, Iran Gamma Knife Centre, Iran University of Medial Sciences-Kamrani Charity Foundation, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: khalatbarik@yahoo.com; Ansari, H. [Department of Orthopaedics, Rassoul Akram University Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    Degenerative cysts of the lumbar spine encompass a heterogeneous group of cystic lesions that are presumed to share a common aetiology. Some of these cysts may be incidental findings, whereas others may produce acute or chronic symptoms. These cysts have been categorized using various combinations of topographic and pathological characteristics and by their attachment to or communication with a specific spinal structure.

  18. Cervical perineural cyst masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

  19. PRIMARY OMENTAL HYDATID CYST – A RARE ENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydatid cyst is caused by the parasite Echinococcus granulosus ( L arval form in humans with lesions most frequently encountered in the liver and lungs. It can rarely involve extra - hepatic organs. Primary omental hydatid cyst is rare entity. This report presents the interesting case of a very large primary omental hydatid cyst.

  20. Case report: Antenatal MRI diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangasami, Rajeswaran; Chandrasekharan, Anupama; Archana, Lal; Santhosh, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Esophageal duplication cysts are classified as a subgroup of foregut duplication cysts. They are very rare and are predominantly detected in children. Antenatal detection is very rare. We report a case of an esophageal duplication cyst that was accurately identified antenatally by USG and MRI.

  1. Giant pericardial cyst mimicking dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Hamad M; Galrinho, Ana; Abreu, João; Valente, Bruno; Bakero, Luis; Ferreira, Rui C

    2013-01-01

    Pericardial cysts are rare benign congenital malformations, usually small, asymptomatic and detected incidentally on chest X-ray as a mass located in the right costophrenic angle. Giant pericardial cysts are very uncommon and produce symptoms by compressing adjacent structures. In this report, the authors present a case of a symptomatic giant pericardial cyst incorrectly diagnosed as dextrocardia on chest X-ray.

  2. Deposition of intraosseous fat in a degenerating simple bone cyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, R.; Lambert, R.G.W. [University of Alberta, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    A simple bone cyst in the proximal humerus of an 18-year-old man was treated by percutaneous ablation with alcohol irrigation. Subsequent involution of the cyst was associated with fatty replacement within the intraosseous defect. A possible relationship between involuting bone cyst and apparent intraosseous lipoma is discussed. (orig.)

  3. LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVIOLET STUDIES FOR INACTIVATION OF GIARDIA MURIS CYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysts of Giardia muris were inactivated using a low pressure ultravolet (UV) light source. Cyst viability was detemined by both in vitro excystation and animal infectivity. Cyst doeses were counted using a flow cytometer for the animal infectivity experiments. Using in vitro excy...

  4. LOW PRESSURE ULTRAVEIOLET STUDIES FOR INACTIVATION OF GIARDIA MURIS CYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysts of Giardia muris were inactivated using a low pressure ultravolet (UV) light source. Cyst viability was detemined by both in vitro excystation and animal infectivity. Cyst doeses were counted using a flow cytometer for the animal infectivity experiments. Using in vitro excy...

  5. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Halilbasic; Fahrija Skokic; Nesad Hotic; Edin Husaric; Gordana Radoja; Selma Muratovic; Nermina Dedic; Meliha Halilbasic

    2013-01-01

    Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst.

  6. Unilateral Pulmonary Agenesis and Gastric Duplication Cyst: A Rare Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Halilbasic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung agenesis and gastric duplication cysts are both rare congenital anomalies. Gastric duplication cysts can present with nausea, vomiting, hematemesis, or vague abdominal pain. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis can present with respiratory distress which usually occurs due to retention of bronchial secretions and inflammations. We report the unique case of right pulmonary agenesis associated with gastric duplication cyst.

  7. A Huge Ovarian Dermoid Cyst: Successful Laparoscopic Total Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanikoglu, Hacer; Dusak, Abdurrahim

    2017-08-01

    Giant ovarian cysts, ≥15 cm in diameter, are quite rare in women of reproductive age. Here, we present a case of ovarian cyst with unusual presentation treated by laparoscopic surgery. On histology, mass was found to be mature cystic teratoma. The diagnostic and management challenges posed by this huge ovarian cyst were discussed in the light of the literature.

  8. On the chemical characterization of colloid cyst contents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, ECI; Go, KG; Molenaar, WM; Amerongen, AVN; Vissink, A

    1998-01-01

    Colloid cysts of the third ventricle have been investigated by chemical characterization of the cyst contents using ELISA with monoclonal antibodies for certain carbohydrate epitopes as well as a polyclonal antiserum against peptide domains, and immunohistochemistry on the cyst wall using the same a

  9. Pelvic occupation: the challenges of treating a symptomatic tarlov cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amad; Wilson, Holly Y; Boeris, Davide; Nelson, Richard

    2017-05-04

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts are meningeal dilations of the posterior spinal nerve root sheath located in between the peri- and endoneurium. We present a patient with a symptomatic sacral Tarlov cyst and the technical challenges faced by surgically treating the lesion by disconnection of the cyst from the subarachnoid space.

  10. Cervical Perineural Cyst Masquerading as a Cervical Spinal Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  11. Mapping genetic factors controlling potato/cyst nematode interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouppe van der Voort, J.N.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The thesis describes strategies for genetic mapping of the genomes of the potato cyst nematode and potato. Mapping in cyst nematodes was achieved by AFLP genotyping of single cysts and subsequent segregation analysis in a family of sibling populations. The genetic map of Globodera rostochiensis comp

  12. Diagnostic criteria in renal and hepatic cyst infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantinga, M.A.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Gevers, T.J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyst infection is a severe complication of renal and hepatic cystic disease that frequently leads to hospitalization. In most cases the diagnosis of cyst infection is made empirically as a cyst aspirate is frequently unavailable. This study aims to evaluate diagnostic criteria, microbiological findi

  13. A different approach for sterilization of liver hydatid cysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmet Tekin; Tevfik Kücükkartallar; Adil Kartal

    2007-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR Many different methods have been used in surgical treatment of liver hydatid cysts[1].However, two methods have been frequently used reccently:one is used to radically remove the cyst and the other is used to shrink the cyst cavity after treated with scolocidal agents.

  14. Choledochal cyst as a diagnostic pitfall: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waidner Uta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Choledochal cysts are rare congenital anomalies. Their diagnosis is difficult, particulary in adults. Case presentation This case report demonstrates the diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls. Conclusion To prevent cost-intensive and potentially life-threating complications, a choledochal cyst must be considered in the differential diagnosis whenever the rather common diagnosis of a hepatic cyst is considered.

  15. Immunocytochemical expression of growth factors by odontogenic jaw cysts.

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    Li, T.; Browne, R. M.; Matthews, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine the immunocytochemical pattern of expression of transforming growth factor (TGF) alpha, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and TGF beta in the three most common types of odontogenic jaw cyst. METHODS: Growth factor expression was detected in paraffin wax sections of odontogenic cysts (27 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, and 10 radicular cysts) using a streptavidin-biotin peroxidase technique with monoclonal antibodies directed against TGF alpha (clone 213-4.4) and TGF beta (clone TB21) and a polyclonal antibody directed against EGF (Z-12). RESULTS: The epithelial linings of all cysts showed reactivity for TGF alpha which was mainly localised to basal and suprabasal layers. Odontogenic keratocyst linings expressed higher levels of TGF alpha than those of dentigerous and radicular cysts, with 89% (24/27) of odontogenic keratocysts exhibiting a strong positive reaction compared with 50% (five of 10) of dentigerous and radicular cysts, respectively. EGF reactivity was similar in all cyst groups, weaker than that for TGF alpha and predominantly suprabasal. TGF alpha and EGF were also detected in endothelial cells, fibroblasts and inflammatory cells within the cyst walls. The most intense TGF beta staining in odontogenic cysts was extracellular within the fibrous tissue capsules, irrespective of cyst type. CONCLUSIONS: These results, together with previous studies of EGF receptor, indicate differential expression of TGF alpha, EGF and their common receptor between the different types of odontogenic cyst, suggesting that these growth factors (via autocrine or paracrine, or both, pathways) may be involved in their pathogenesis. Images PMID:9208810

  16. Choledochal cysts in infants and children.

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    Poddar, U; Thapa, B R; Chhabra, M; Rao, K L; Mitra, S K; Dilawari, J B; Singh, K

    1998-07-01

    To study the clinical spectrum and management of choledochal cyst in children below 12 years of age. Descriptive study. Tertiary care hospital. Twenty three children with choledochal cysts were managed between January 1991 to September 1997 and their clinical details, investigations and management were recorded. Choledochal cyst was diagnosed by ultrasonography and confirmed by ERCP or peroperative cholangioram (POC) Children were treated with antibiotics and/or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage if there was cholangitis and subsequently subjected to surgery (excision of the cyst and jejunal loop interposition hepaticoduodenostomy). The median age of these children was 3 years with an almost equal sex ratio. Predominant presentation was jaundice in 18, pain abdomen in 15, fever in 12, and lump abdomen in 9 cases. The classical triad of jaundice, pain and lump was present in only 4 cases. ERCP conducted in 7 and POC in 14 cases yielded positive findings in all. Clinically there were two distinct forms of presentation: (i) infantile form (childhood form (> 1 year) presented with pain abdomen in 12 and jaundice and cholangitis in 9 subjects each. Type I cyst was seen in 20 and type IVa in 3. Two children refused surgery, and the rest underwent surgery. Three infants died after surgery, the remaining 18 were alive and well on follow-up (median 25 months). Secondary biliary cirrhosis was seen in 6, extra hepatic biliary artresia in 2 and congenital hepatic fibrosis in 1 on histology. Choledochal cysts present in two clinically distinct forms. Infantile form is an important cause of cholestasis of infancy. Early diagnosis and referral is essential to prevent complications and death, and prognosis after surgery is good.

  17. Intracranial arachnoid cyst (review of 20 cases

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    Alireza Birjandi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the distribution, clinical features, and treatment modalities of arachnoid cyst in our department. The study was carried out between April 1, 1996 and October 1, 2006 at the neurosurgery department, Ghaem hospital, Mashhad university of medical sciences. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with arachnoid cyst underwent surgery between April 1, 1996 until October 1, 2006, consisting of 12 males and 8 females ranging in age 5 to 68 years (mean age 32.4 years. Twelve patients underwent surgery and one patient underwent endoscopic fenestration, and cystoperitoneal shunting (medium pressure was performed in 7 patients. All patients were followed for minimum of 6 months after surgery. Results: During the study period, 20 patients were investigated. The cysts had strong predilection for the middle cranial fossa in 12 patients (60%, suprasellar region in 1 patient (5%, the cerebral convexity in 1 patient (5%, posterior cranial fossa in 2 patients (10%, cerebellopontine angle in 3 patients (15%, quadrigeminal cisterns in 1 patient (5%. All of 20 cysts had clearly unilateral distribution, 12 (60% were located on the left side and 8 (40% on the right side. The most common symptoms on presentation were epileptic seizures (46%, increased intracranial pressure (34%, visual impairment (5%, headache (10%, cerebellar sign (5%. Conclusion: Arachnoid cysts have a strong predilection for the middle cranial fossa that may be explained by a meningeal maldevelopment theory. We also conclude that the major indication for surgery in patients with arachnoid cyst is the presence of intractable seizures, increased intracranial pressure, and compression of neuronal tissues. Headache only is not a surgical indication.    

  18. Tarlov Cyst: A diagnostic of exclusion.

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    Andrieux, Cyril; Poglia, Pietro; Laudato, Pietro

    2017-07-25

    Tarlov cysts were first described in 1938 as an incidental finding at autopsy. The cysts are usually diagnosed on MRI, which reveals the lesion arising from the sacral nerve root near the dorsal root ganglion. Symptomatic sacral perineural cysts are uncommon and it is recommended to consider Tarlov cyst as a diagnostic of exclusion. We report a case of a patient with voluminous bilateral L5 and S1 Tarlov cyst, and right hip osteonecrosis to increase the awareness in the orthopaedic community. A 57-year-old female, in good health, with chronic low back pain since 20 years, presented suddenly right buttock pain, right inguinal fold pain and low back pain for two months, with inability to walk and to sit down. X-ray of the lumbo-sacral spine revealed asymmetric discopathy L5-S1 and L3-L4. X-ray of the right hip did not reveal anything. We asked for an MRI of the spine and it revealed a voluminous fluid-filled cystic lesion, arising from the first sacral nerve root on both side and measuring 3,3cm in diameter. The MRI also show a part of the hip and incidentally we discovered an osteonecrosis Ficat 3 of the right femoral head. The patient was taken for a total hip arthroplasty, by anterior approach. Patient appreciated relief of pain immediately after the surgery. The current case show that even if we find a voluminous cyst we always have to eliminate other diagnosis (especially the frequent like osteonecrosis of the femoral head) and mostly in the case of unclear neurological perturbation. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. An unusual congenital hepatic cyst in an adolescent and review of differential diagnoses of complex liver cysts

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    Liliane Gibbs

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of a simple hepatic cyst is not difficult, but diagnostic confusion occurs when atypical features such as intracystic debris or extremely large size are present. In children, simple liver cysts are described as small, asymptomatic, and rarely hemorrhagic. We report an adolescent male presenting with an unusually large hepatic cyst that did not have typical imaging characteristics. The imaging findings and histology are displayed along with the differential diagnoses of complex liver cysts.

  20. An unusual congenital hepatic cyst in an adolescent and review of differential diagnoses of complex liver cysts

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    Bryce, Yolanda; Wood, Beverly; Baron, Peter; Gibbs, Liliane

    2008-01-01

    The diagnosis of a simple hepatic cyst is not difficult, but diagnostic confusion occurs when atypical features such as intracystic debris or extremely large size are present. In children, simple liver cysts are described as small, asymptomatic, and rarely hemorrhagic. We report an adolescent male presenting with an unusually large hepatic cyst that did not have typical imaging characteristics. The imaging findings and histology are displayed along with the differential diagnoses of complex liver cysts. PMID:22470600