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Sample records for sarawak malaysia electronic

  1. Odonata of Maludam National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Rory A. Dow

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents records of Odonata collected in July 2012 in Maludam National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia. A total of 48 species from nine families were collected. Three species were new to science, one of which has already been described as Prodasineura yulan Dow & Ngiam, which may be endemic to Maludam. In addition, Maludam is only the second locality recorded in Sarawak for four poorly known species: Pachycypha aurea, Macrogomphus decemlineatus, Brachygonia ophelia and Brachygonia puella. Two of these species, Macrogomphus decemlineatus and Brachygonia ophelia, are recorded for the first time in Sarawak in more than 100 years. 

  2. Publications on Borneo from Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, 2001-2002

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    Sellato, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS) was created at the Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS) in 1998 with Professor Michael Leigh as its inaugural Director. Michael Leigh is a long-time scholar of Sarawak. His earlier publications include: The Chinese Community of Sarawak: a Study of Communal Relations (1964), The Rising Moon: Political Change in Sarawak (1974), and Council Negri Sarawak, Malaysia’s Oldest Legislature (1992). It was after a long career in Australia (University of Sydney...

  3. Students Awareness towards Traditional Cultural Dances in Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Ahmad R. Albattat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia has many ethnic groups, and each ethnic group has own custom and tradition that most Malaysians are not aware, especially traditional dances. Among the Malaysian states, Sabah and Sarawak, situated in the Borneo Island have the most diverse ethnic groups in Sarawak. It has more than 30 ethnic groups. Each of the ethnic groups has its own language, cultures and lifestyle. In this regards, this research focuses on the main ethnic groups of Sarawak which are Orang Ulu, Malays, Melanau, Bidayuh, Chinese and Ibans. The aim of this study is to investigate the level of awareness among the Management and Science University (MSU students regarding their level of awareness and knowledge about traditional dances of Sarawak. The data were gathered by distributing questionnaires among MSU students. The data were then analysed using SPSS system version 18.0. Results concluded that, most of MSU students have limited knowledge about Sarawak traditional dances. Interests, internet, performing arts clubs and family background are the independent variable factors to learn and gain knowledge about Sarawak traditional dances. The level of awareness among MSU students towards Sarawak traditional dances can be enhanced through events and special occasions to increase level of awareness towards Sarawak cultures. The government plays a major role in introducing Sarawak cultures to the whole of Malaysia. Future studies could focus on factors that influence the level of awareness towards Sarawak traditional dances, and the contribution of Sarawak’s traditional dances to Malaysia’s cultural and heritage tourism.

  4. Soil carbon stocks in Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Padmanabhan, E., E-mail: Eswaran_padmanabhan@petronas.com.my [Department of Geosciences, Faculty of Geosciences and Petroleum Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, 31750, Perak (Malaysia); Eswaran, H.; Reich, P.F. [USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, Washington, DC 20250 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between greenhouse gas emission and climate change has led to research to identify and manage the natural sources and sinks of the gases. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and N{sub 2}O have an anthropic source and of these CO{sub 2} is the least effective in trapping long wave radiation. Soil carbon sequestration can best be described as a process of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and relocating into soils in a form that is not readily released back into the atmosphere. The purpose of this study is to estimate carbon stocks available under current conditions in Sarawak, Malaysia. SOC estimates are made for a standard depth of 100 cm unless the soil by definition is less than this depth, as in the case of lithic subgroups. Among the mineral soils, Inceptisols tend to generally have the highest carbon contents (about 25 kg m{sup −2} m{sup −1}), while Oxisols and Ultisols rate second (about 10–15 kg m{sup −2} m{sup −1}). The Oxisols store a good amount of carbon because of an appreciable time-frame to sequester carbon and possibly lower decomposition rates for the organic carbon that is found at 1 m depths. Wet soils such as peatlands tend to store significant amounts of carbon. The highest values estimated for such soils are about 114 kg m{sup −2} m{sup −1}. Such appreciable amounts can also be found in the Aquepts. In conclusion, it is pertinent to recognize that degradation of the carbon pool, just like desertification, is a real process and that this irreversible process must be addressed immediately. Therefore, appropriate soil management practices should be instituted to sequester large masses of soil carbon on an annual basis. This knowledge can be used effectively to formulate strategies to prevent forest fires and clearing: two processes that can quickly release sequestered carbon to the atmosphere in an almost irreversible manner. - Highlights: • Soil carbon stocks in different soils in Sarawak • In depth discussion of

  5. Population and economic development in Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Furuoka, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    This paper chooses a Malaysian state in Borneo Island, Sarawak, as the case study to examine the relationship between population growth and economic development. The findings imply that there is no statistically significant long-run relationship, but a causal relationship between population growth and economic development in Sarawak. In other words, the empirical findings indicate that population can have neither positive nor negative impact on economic development. The findings also indicate...

  6. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Vaessen, T.; Verwer, C.; Demies, M.; Kaliang, H.; Meer, van der P.J.

    2011-01-01

    VAESSEN T, VERWER C, DEMIES M, KALIANG H & VAN DER MEER PJ. 2011. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia. In this study we assessed the species density and relative abundance of termites in peat land in Sarawak, Malaysia. Termites were

  7. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, T.; Verwer, C.; Demies, M.; Kaliang, H.; Meer, van der P.J.

    2011-01-01

    VAESSEN T, VERWER C, DEMIES M, KALIANG H & VAN DER MEER PJ. 2011. Comparison of termite assemblages along a landuse gradient on peat areas in Sarawak, Malaysia. In this study we assessed the species density and relative abundance of termites in peat land in Sarawak, Malaysia. Termites were sampl

  8. Rove Beetles (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae of Lanjak Entimau, Sarawak, East Malaysia

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    Fauziah Abdullah

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A study to determine the abundance of rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae was conducted from 15 to 28 June, 2008 at the dipterocarp forest of Lanjak Entimau, Sarawak, Malaysia. Collections were made at five sites namely Kawi River, Menyaring II, Satap, Begua and Joh River. A total of 175 rove beetles comprising of 17 species were sampled from all 5 sites of Lanjak Entimau. There was a high abundance (Margalef index, 3.097 and moderate diversity (Simpson diversity index, 0.798 of rove beetles at Lanjak Entimau. Four species were identified to species level, Orphnebius bakerianus Motschulscky, 1858, Eleusis kraatzi LeConte, 1863, Belonuchus quadratu Nordman, 1837, Bledius gracilicornis Casey, 1889. Seven species were identified to genus level Orphnebius sp., Coproporus sp., Paederus sp1, Paederus sp2, Hesperus sp., Lispinus sp., Bledius sp. and six species could not be identified even to genus level. Six unidentified species probably new for Science. Moderate diversity and high abundance of rove beetles at Lanjak Entimau are due to diverse habitats. Some differences in species sampled from peninsular Malaysia is explained in terms of isolation between Sarawak in Borneo island with peninsular Malaysia.

  9. Diversity of Cephalopod from Selected Division of Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Zulshafiq Mohd Rubaie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of cephalopod from nine divisions at Sarawak, Malaysia was studied from August 2010 to February 2011. Cephalopod was collected from landing stations and local wet markets of Kuching, Sri Aman, Sibu, Sarikei, Mukah, Miri, Limbang, Lawas and Bintulu. Seven species of cephalopod belongings to three families were identified during the study period. The family Loliginidae was dominated group of cephalopod which consists of three species namely  Uroteuthis (Photololigo edulis, Uroteuthis (Photololigo chinensis and Sepioteuthis lessoniana and recorded from five divisions. The species of cuttlefishes (Family Sepiidae were Sepia recurvirostra, Sepia aculeate and Sepiella inermis and recorded from Sarikei, Kuching and Bintulu. Octopodidae was the only one species named Cistopus indicus and found in Bintulu. The diversity of cephalopod was found highest in Bintulu with seven species while surprisingly no species of cephalopod was recorded from Limbang, Lawas and Mukah. Study suggests that the findings of this study could be useful for future reference and detail study on cephalopod in the coastal water of Sarawak, Malaysia.

  10. PAEDIATRIC OCULAR TRAUMA IN KUCHING, SARAWAK, MALAYSIA

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    INTAN G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the demography, aetiology, type and outcome of paediatric ocular trauma in tertiary centre in Malaysia. Method: We retrospectively studied 118 eyes from 117 patients over a period of 36 months (January 2006 to December 2008. All ocular injuries in patients aged 12 and below seen in the Ophthalmology Department for the first time were included in thisstudy. Results: Mean age of patients was 6.1±3.0 years. 68 cases (58.2% occurred in pre-school children, whereas 49 (41.9% in school-aged children. Boys accounted for 65.8% of cases. There was no predilection for either right or the left eye. 47% of cases (56 patients occurred in Malay. Most of the injuries took place at home when the children were alone (p<0.05. Sharp objects were the commonest cause (45 cases, 38.1%. The majority of cases (103, 87.3% were considered preventable. The frequency of open and closed globe injury was similar. Hyphema was more common in closed globe injury compared to open globe injury (p<0.05. Other associated injuries such as cataract, vitreous hemorrhage and retinal hemorrhage are similar between the two groups. Visual outcome is generally poor with only 34 eyes (28.8% had no visual impairment. Conclusion: Ocular trauma in children is an important cause of visual loss. Most cases occurred at home and were preventable. Prevention through education is the best approach.

  11. Reproductive pattern of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) in Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Onuma, M; Suzuki, M; Ohtaishi, N

    2001-03-01

    Fecal progesterone assays were conducted in 3 captive female sun bears (Helarctos malayanus) segregated from males to characterize the species-specific reproductive pattern in their original distribution area in Sarawak, Malaysia. Peaks of fecal progesterone concentrations were observed once annually, and lactation was observed after increasing progesterone concentrations in all females without mating stimulus. These results suggest that sun bears in Sarawak, Malaysia, may have a seasonal reproductive pattern and ovulation was noted to occur spontaneously, followed by pseudopregnancy.

  12. Leptospirosis in a caver returned from Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Mortimer, Roger B

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a case of leptospirosis in a man who returned from caving in Sarawak, Malaysia, and includes a discussion of epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. The patient presented with symptoms of leptospirosis, which was confirmed by microhemagglutination titers. He became infected despite taking doxycycline daily for malaria prophylaxis. Leptospirosis is an important consideration in any returned traveler with fever. The spirochete spreads from animals to humans via water. Caving in tropical endemic zones may increase exposure risk due to the combination of multiple skin abrasions with immersions. Water in caves may increase infection risk because of increased water pH. Standard prophylaxis may be inadequate in cases of high-risk exposures.

  13. Public Awareness Program and Development of Education Toolkit for Green Sea Turtle Conservation in Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Hassan, Ruhana; Yahya, Nurhartini Kamalia; Ong, Leh Mui; Kheng, Lim Kian; Abidin, Zulkalnain Zainal; Ayob, Anuar; Jainal, Aslina Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Nobody knows exactly what happened during "the lost years" of the turtles in the wild, thus a green turtle headstarting project was carried out at Pantai Pandan, Lundu, Sarawak, Malaysia from June 2014 until December 2015 to shed some lights on the growth of hatchlings during a small part of their "lost years". As a consequent,…

  14. Distribution of the Sunda Colugo (Galeopterus variegatus) in Malaysia (Peninsular, Sabah, Sarawak)

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    Nasir, Muhammad Dzulhelmi Muhammad; Abdullah, Mohd Tajuddin

    2010-01-01

    There is not much information available on the distribution of the Sunda colugo (Galeopterus variegates) in Malaysia, despite it being one of only two known species in the order Dermoptera. Data on the presence of the Sunda colugo and the vernacular names used by various ethnic groups throughout Malaysia were collected and compiled from various primary and secondary sources. There were 27 locations from Peninsular, 11 locations from Sabah and 34 locations from Sarawak that reported the presen...

  15. Rodent Species Distribution and Hantavirus Seroprevalence in Residential and Forested areas of Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Hamdan, Nur Elfieyra Syazana; Ng, Yee Ling; Lee, Wei Bin; Tan, Cheng Siang; Khan, Faisal Ali Anwarali; Chong, Yee Ling

    2017-01-01

    Rodents belong to the order Rodentia, which consists of three families in Borneo (i.e., Muridae, Sciuridae and Hystricidae). These include rats, mice, squirrels, and porcupines. They are widespread throughout the world and considered pests that harm humans and livestock. Some rodent species are natural reservoirs of hantaviruses (Family: Bunyaviridae) that can cause zoonotic diseases in humans. Although hantavirus seropositive human sera were reported in Peninsular Malaysia in the early 1980s, information on their infection in rodent species in Malaysia is still lacking. The rodent populations in residential and forested areas in Sarawak were sampled. A total of 108 individuals from 15 species of rodents were collected in residential (n = 44) and forested ( n = 64) areas. The species diversity of rodents in forested areas was significantly higher (H = 2.2342) compared to rodents in residential areas (H = 0.64715) (p rodent populations in Sarawak, East Malaysia. The results suggested that hantavirus was not circulating in the studied rodent populations in Sarawak, or it was otherwise at a low prevalence that is below the detection threshold. It is important to remain vigilant because of the zoonotic potential of this virus and its severe disease outcome. Further studies, such as molecular detection of viral genetic materials, are needed to fully assess the risk of hantavirus infection in rodents and humans in this region of Malaysia.

  16. Taxonomic Study of Edible Bivalve from Selected Division of Sarawak, Malaysia

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    M.K. Abu Hena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of edible bivalve was conducted from August 2010 to July 2011 covering eight divisions i.e., Kuching, Sarikei, Sibu, Mukah, Bintulu, Miri, Limbang and Lawas of Sarawak, Malaysia. Samples were collected from native market and fishing village during the study period. All edible bivalves inhabit either in brackish or marine environment and comprised 19 species from 10 families namely Meretrix meretrix, M. lyrata, Paphia undulata, Circe scripta, Solen regularies, Solen lamarckii, Pharella acutidens, Amusium pleuronectes, Anadara granosa, Pholas orientalis, Gluconome virens, Placuna placenta, Crassotrea lugubris, Isognomon ephippium, Polymesoda erosa, P. bengalensis, P. expansa, Anadonta woodina and Pilsbryoconcha exilis. The diversity of edible bivalves was found highest in Kuching and Bintulu compared to other divisions studied in Sarawak. The bivalve species at Sarawak could have economic potentiality in terms of protein source, livelihoods of local tribes and economic value. Study suggests that if the high conservation and management of edible bivalve diversity could establish in the coastal and wetland area of Sarawak, a remarkable and vast economic return could achieve.

  17. Seaweed composition from Bintulu coast of Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Zawawi, Mohd Hafizbillah; Idris, Mohd Hanafi; Kamal, Abu Hena Mustafa; King, Wong Sing

    2014-08-01

    Species composition of seaweed and distribution were investigated in the coastal waters of Bintulu, Sarawak. The seaweed samples were collected during low tide between May 2011 and May 2012 from the six different stations. In total 54 species of seaweeds were identified from study areas of Bintulu coastal waters. Among them, 23 species were from Rhodophyta with 11 families, 15 species were from Phaeophyta with 2 families and 16 species were from Chlorophyta with 10 families: Seventeen species of seaweeds were recorded from the Tanjung Batu, while 23 species from Pantai Telekom, 14 species from Golden Beach, 26 species from Kuala Similajau, 12 species from Kuala Nyalau and 21 species from Batu Mandi. Seaweeds abundance was high in rocky substrate and Rhodophyta (11 families and 23 species) was the common and highest group of seaweeds in this coastal areas. Present study recorded high diversified seaweed species at the rocky shore area compare to reef area.

  18. Diversity of Leptospira spp. in Rats and Environment from Urban Areas of Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Chai Fung Pui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various prevalence studies on Leptospira in animals and humans, as well as environmental samples, had been conducted worldwide, including Malaysia. However, limited studies have been documented on the presence of pathogenic, intermediate, and saprophytic Leptospira in selected animals and environments. This study was therefore conducted to detect Leptospira spp. in rats, soil, and water from urban areas of Sarawak using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR method. A total of 107 rats, 292 soil samples, and 324 water samples were collected from April 2014 to February 2015. Pathogenic Leptospira was present in 5.6% (6/107 of rats, 11.6% (34/292 of soil samples, and 1.9% (6/324 of water samples. Intermediate Leptospira was present in 2.7% (8/292 of soil samples and 1.9% (6/324 of water samples. Saprophytic Leptospira was present in 10.3% (11/107 of rats, 1.4% (4/292 of soil samples, and 0.3% (1/324 of water samples. From this study, 76 Leptospira spp. were isolated. Based on DNA sequencing, the dominant Leptospira spp. circulating in urban areas of Sarawak are pathogenic Leptospira noguchii, intermediate Leptospira wolffii serovar Khorat, and saprophytic Leptospira meyeri, respectively. Overall, this study provided important surveillance data on the prevalence of Leptospira spp. from rats and the environment, with dominant local serovars in urban areas of Sarawak.

  19. Diversity of Leptospira spp. in Rats and Environment from Urban Areas of Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Pui, Chai Fung; Bilung, Lesley Maurice; Apun, Kasing; Su'ut, Lela

    2017-01-01

    Various prevalence studies on Leptospira in animals and humans, as well as environmental samples, had been conducted worldwide, including Malaysia. However, limited studies have been documented on the presence of pathogenic, intermediate, and saprophytic Leptospira in selected animals and environments. This study was therefore conducted to detect Leptospira spp. in rats, soil, and water from urban areas of Sarawak using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. A total of 107 rats, 292 soil samples, and 324 water samples were collected from April 2014 to February 2015. Pathogenic Leptospira was present in 5.6% (6/107) of rats, 11.6% (34/292) of soil samples, and 1.9% (6/324) of water samples. Intermediate Leptospira was present in 2.7% (8/292) of soil samples and 1.9% (6/324) of water samples. Saprophytic Leptospira was present in 10.3% (11/107) of rats, 1.4% (4/292) of soil samples, and 0.3% (1/324) of water samples. From this study, 76 Leptospira spp. were isolated. Based on DNA sequencing, the dominant Leptospira spp. circulating in urban areas of Sarawak are pathogenic Leptospira noguchii, intermediate Leptospira wolffii serovar Khorat, and saprophytic Leptospira meyeri, respectively. Overall, this study provided important surveillance data on the prevalence of Leptospira spp. from rats and the environment, with dominant local serovars in urban areas of Sarawak.

  20. Sentinel surveillance for human enterovirus 71 in Sarawak, Malaysia: lessons from the first 7 years

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    Yao Sik-King

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major outbreak of human enterovirus 71-associated hand, foot and mouth disease in Sarawak in 1997 marked the beginning of a series of outbreaks in the Asia Pacific region. Some of these outbreaks had unusually high numbers of fatalities and this generated much fear and anxiety in the region. Methods We established a sentinel surveillance programme for hand, foot and mouth disease in Sarawak, Malaysia, in March 1998, and the observations of the first 7 years are described here. Virus isolation, serotyping and genotyping were performed on throat, rectal, vesicle and other swabs. Results During this period Sarawak had two outbreaks of human enterovirus 71, in 2000 and 2003. The predominant strains circulating in the outbreaks of 1997, 2000 and 2003 were all from genogroup B, but the strains isolated during each outbreak were genetically distinct from each other. Human enterovirus 71 outbreaks occurred in a cyclical pattern every three years and Coxsackievirus A16 co-circulated with human enterovirus 71. Although vesicles were most likely to yield an isolate, this sample was not generally available from most cases and obtaining throat swabs was thus found to be the most efficient way to obtain virological information. Conclusion Knowledge of the epidemiology of human enterovirus 71 transmission will allow public health personnel to predict when outbreaks might occur and to plan interventions in an effective manner in order to reduce the burden of disease.

  1. Forecasting CBM Production of Mukah Balingian Coalfield, Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Sonny Irawan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coal-Bed Methane (CBM or coal-bed gas is a form of natural gas extracted from coal beds. The term refers to methane adsorbed into the solid matrix of the coal. In order to understand the performance of a CBM reservoir, we need to know the Original Gas in Place, Production Rates and also Recovery Factor. This is mainly on creating a Microsoft Excel ® 2007 with the help of Visual Basic for Application (VBA based CBM forecast tool. Field data from Mukah-Balingian Coalfield Sarawak is analyzed and forecasted. Original Gas in Place is calculated by multiplying the mass of the coal with the initial gas content of the coal bed. Following from the generated Relative Permeability data, production rates for both water and gas calculated over a specific time range. During the whole production, an abandonment condition which is mainly the pressure will be set by the engineers. Using this abandonment pressure, we can calculate the recovery factor. Using constant values of Langmuir Volume of 714.29 scf/ton, Langmuir Pressure of 1024.5 psia and reference initial pressure of 2000 psia; flowing pressure of 100 psia which is also the abandonment pressure, various range of skin, permeability, initial gas content as well as porosity tested to predict the field performance. Using the range of initial gas content of 86.286-173.36 scf/ton; range of permeability of 1.01e-6 mD to 1010 mD; porosity, with a range of 0.0001 to 0.5%; Skin ranged from-5 to 4, CBM production is forecasted for the range of 5 years.

  2. Pronominal Differences in Languages of Sabah and Sarawak and the Effect on the Acquisition of Bahasa Malaysia.

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    Lee, Eileen Yen Ee; Boutin, Michael E.

    Bilingual education programs must be based on a sound understanding of the linguistic, social, psychological, and cultural factors affecting students. This paper is concerned with linguistic factors that affect the acquisition of Bahasa Malaysia (BM) pronouns by non-native speakers from Sabah and Sarawak. Properties in the personal pronoun systems…

  3. Annual changes in fecal estradiol-17beta concentrations of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) in Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Onuma, Manabu; Suzuki, Masatsugu; Uchida, Eiji; Niiyama, Masami; Ohtaishi, Noriyuki

    2002-04-01

    Fecal estradiol concentrations were measured in three captive unmated female sun bears (Helarctos malayanus) from August 1998 to July 1999 in Sarawak, Malaysia and vaginal smears from one of the females was observed in August 1998 and March 1999. A single peak in fecal estradiol concentration was obvious for each bear in August or September 1998, and there was a much higher percentage of superficial vaginal anuclear cells in August 1998 than in March 1999. These results suggest that sun bears in Sarawak are likely to be a seasonal breeder associated with a peak of estrogen production in August or September.

  4. The effect of vaccination coverage and climate on Japanese encephalitis in Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Daniel E Impoinvil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Japanese encephalitis (JE is the leading cause of viral encephalitis across Asia with approximately 70,000 cases a year and 10,000 to 15,000 deaths. Because JE incidence varies widely over time, partly due to inter-annual climate variability effects on mosquito vector abundance, it becomes more complex to assess the effects of a vaccination programme since more or less climatically favourable years could also contribute to a change in incidence post-vaccination. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantify vaccination effect on confirmed Japanese encephalitis (JE cases in Sarawak, Malaysia after controlling for climate variability to better understand temporal dynamics of JE virus transmission and control. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monthly data on serologically confirmed JE cases were acquired from Sibu Hospital in Sarawak from 1997 to 2006. JE vaccine coverage (non-vaccine years vs. vaccine years and meteorological predictor variables, including temperature, rainfall and the Southern Oscillation index (SOI were tested for their association with JE cases using Poisson time series analysis and controlling for seasonality and long-term trend. Over the 10-years surveillance period, 133 confirmed JE cases were identified. There was an estimated 61% reduction in JE risk after the introduction of vaccination, when no account is taken of the effects of climate. This reduction is only approximately 45% when the effects of inter-annual variability in climate are controlled for in the model. The Poisson model indicated that rainfall (lag 1-month, minimum temperature (lag 6-months and SOI (lag 6-months were positively associated with JE cases. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides the first improved estimate of JE reduction through vaccination by taking account of climate inter-annual variability. Our analysis confirms that vaccination has substantially reduced JE risk in Sarawak but this benefit may be overestimated if

  5. Biomass and Habitat Characteristics of Epiphytic Macroalgae in the Sibuti Mangroves, Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Isa, Hasmidah Md; Kamal, Abu Hena Mustafa; Idris, Mohd Hanafi; Rosli, Zamri; Ismail, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Mangroves support diverse macroalgal assemblages as epibionts on their roots and tree trunks. These algae provide nutrients to the primary consumers in the aquatic food web and have been reported to be substantial contributors to marine ecosystems. The species diversity, biomass, and habitat characteristics of mangrove macroalgae were investigated at three stations in the Sibuti mangrove estuary, Sarawak, Malaysia, from November 2012 to October 2013. Three groups of macroalgae were recorded and were found to be growing on mangrove prop roots, namely Rhodophyta (Caloglossa ogasawaraensis, Caloglossa adhaerens, Caloglossa stipitata, Bostrychia anomala, and Hypnea sp.), Chlorophyta (Chaetomorpha minima and Chaetomorpha sp.), and Phaeophyta (Dictyota sp.). The biomass of macroalgae was not influenced (p>0.05) by the season in this mangrove forest habitat. The macroalgal species Hypnea sp. contributed the highest biomass at both Station 1 (210.56 mg/cm2) and Station 2 (141.72 mg/cm2), while the highest biomass was contributed by B. anomala (185.89 mg/cm2) at Station 3. This study shows that the species distribution and assemblages of mangrove macroalgae were influenced by environmental parameters such as water nutrients, dissolved solids, and salinity in the estuarine mangrove habitats of Sibuti, Sarawak. PMID:28228913

  6. Cadmium and Lead in Blood Cockle (Anadara granosa) from Asajaya, Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Hossen, Md. Faruk; Hamdan, Sinin; Rahman, Md. Rezaur

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations were ranged from 1.35 ± 0.16 to 2.22 ± 0.34 µg/g (dry weight) and 2.65 ± 0.34 to 4.36 ± 0.53 µg/g (dry weight) for Cd and Pb, respectively, in blood cockle Anadara granosa from four sites of Sabang River, namely, Kampung Sambir, Kampung Tambirat, Beliong Temple, and Kampung Tanjung Apong, which are located at Asajaya, Sarawak, Malaysia. All values exceeded safety limits set by Malaysian Food Regulation (1985). It may be the cause of serious human health problems after long term consumption. Thus, consumer should have consciousness about such type of seafood from mentioned sites and need further investigation. PMID:25538965

  7. Cadmium and Lead in Blood Cockle (Anadara granosa from Asajaya, Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Md. Faruk Hossen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations were ranged from 1.35±0.16 to 2.22±0.34 µg/g (dry weight and 2.65±0.34 to 4.36±0.53 µg/g (dry weight for Cd and Pb, respectively, in blood cockle Anadara granosa from four sites of Sabang River, namely, Kampung Sambir, Kampung Tambirat, Beliong Temple, and Kampung Tanjung Apong, which are located at Asajaya, Sarawak, Malaysia. All values exceeded safety limits set by Malaysian Food Regulation (1985. It may be the cause of serious human health problems after long term consumption. Thus, consumer should have consciousness about such type of seafood from mentioned sites and need further investigation.

  8. Cadmium and lead in blood cockle (Anadara granosa) from Asajaya, Sarawak, Malaysia.

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    Hossen, Md Faruk; Hamdan, Sinin; Rahman, Md Rezaur

    2014-01-01

    The concentrations were ranged from 1.35 ± 0.16 to 2.22 ± 0.34 µg/g (dry weight) and 2.65 ± 0.34 to 4.36 ± 0.53 µg/g (dry weight) for Cd and Pb, respectively, in blood cockle Anadara granosa from four sites of Sabang River, namely, Kampung Sambir, Kampung Tambirat, Beliong Temple, and Kampung Tanjung Apong, which are located at Asajaya, Sarawak, Malaysia. All values exceeded safety limits set by Malaysian Food Regulation (1985). It may be the cause of serious human health problems after long term consumption. Thus, consumer should have consciousness about such type of seafood from mentioned sites and need further investigation.

  9. Applicability of the stages of change and Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire with natives of Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C T

    2007-01-01

    There is an increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Malaysia. Besides prevalence studies, not much is known about either overweight or obese individuals. The objective of this study was to determine the stages of change in losing weight and the self-efficacy in eating control of three indigenous groups of overweight and obese adults in Sarawak, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in one rural region in Sarawak using a purposive sample. A structured questionnaire, which included two scales: (1) Weight: Stages of change (SOC) to assess readiness to change; and (2) Weight Efficacy Lifestyle Questionnaire (WEL) (both adopted from the transtheoretical model of change); and a set of pre-tested questionnaires on socio-demographic data, the presence of health problems and self-assessment of weight appropriateness, was used to interview respondents. The stage distribution for weight loss of these adults respondents (n = 271) showed that 60.5% (n = 164) were in the pre-contemplation stage, 20.7% (n = 56) were in the contemplation stage, 8.5% (n = 23) were in the preparation stage, and 8.9% (n = 24) were in the action stage, while only 1.5% (n = 4) were in the maintenance stage. Except for education, the stage differences were generally stable across age, sex, race, household income, presence or absence of health problem, self-perceived weight and presence of overweight or obesity. Respondents were least able to control their eating under social pressure and food availability, according to their WEL score. A large proportion of the overweight or obese adults was not intending to lose weight. The factor structure of the two WEL original subscales enabled partial differentiation between respondents who were able or unable to resist eating in situations where there were availability of food and experienced physical discomfort. The study results indicate the importance of assessing individuals' SOC score in order to implement stage-matched intervention

  10. Borderlands and Tourism Development in Kalimantan Island: Kalimantan Barat, Indonesia - Sarawak, Malaysia 'Head to Head'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syaiful Muazir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of the regions that share lands and boundaries, Sarawak-Malaysia and Kalimantan Barat-Indonesia have respective characteristics in the borderlands treatment. This paper aims to explore and compare the border areas between two nations, ranging from the borderlands profiles, (tourism development and planning, and their opportunities. Besides, this paper also wants to highlight tourism development as one of the strategies. This paper uses documentary research to seek 'text and context' by narratively describing and compiling the documents. From the discussion, it can be seen that both regions have different characteristics of conditions and problems. For tourism development, different approaches are also 'colored' with timing, momentum, and priorities; as influenced and supported by the national plans. Tourism in the borderlands is the impetus in which each regions has already been aware of this potential because of the traction of informal flow, accessibility, supply, and demand. Furthermore, we argue that if tourism has exist at the first place, in the future, by its backward linkages, it will encourage more physical and economic development and cooperation between nations.

  11. Growth and reproductive performance of sambar deer in Sabal Forest Reserve of Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlan, Ismail; Dawend, Jiwan

    2013-10-01

    We examined the growth, reproduction, rutting behavior, and health status of sambar deer (Cervus unicolor brookei) in secondary Acacia mangium plantation. The data were collected over 11 years from a breeding herd of 21 stags and 33 hinds in Sabal Forest Reserve, Sarawak, Malaysia. Brody's growth model of the pooled data is Y t  = 148.56 (1 - 0.98e(-0.023t)), which estimates that maximum weights of adults are 184 and 115 kg for males and females respectively. Sambar deer are nonseasonal breeders with the breeding peak in February. Although the earliest age at which a female reached sexual maturity was 11 months, the mean age was 23 ± 7 months. Mean age of first fawning was 32 ± 8 months. Mean gestation period was 259 ± 12 days (n = 82). Stags shed antlers mostly between March and July. Velvet hardens at 103 ± 27 days (n = 23), and velvet harvesting is best at 7-9 weeks when antler length is 25-30 cm. Sambar deer are suitable as a farm species in forest plantations and have a vast potential to uplift rural living standards.

  12. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a primary tropical peat swamp forest in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang Che Ing, A.; Stoy, P. C.; Melling, L.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical peat swamp forests are widely recognized as one of the world's most efficient ecosystems for the sequestration and storage of carbon through both their aboveground biomass and underlying thick deposits of peat. As the peat characteristics exhibit high spatial and temporal variability as well as the structural and functional complexity of forests, tropical peat ecosystems can act naturally as both carbon sinks and sources over their life cycles. Nonetheless, few reports of studies on the ecosystem-scale CO2 exchange of tropical peat swamp forests are available to-date and their present roles in the global carbon cycle remain uncertain. To quantify CO2 exchange and unravel the prevailing factors and potential underlying mechanism regulating net CO2 fluxes, an eddy covariance tower was erected in a tropical peat swamp forest in Sarawak, Malaysia. We observed that the diurnal and seasonal patterns of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and its components (gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE)) varied between seasons and years. Rates of NEE declined in the wet season relative to the dry season. Conversely, both the gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE) were found to be higher during the wet season than the dry season, in which GPP was strongly negatively correlated with NEE. The average annual NEE was 385 ± 74 g C m-2 yr-1, indicating the primary peat swamp forest functioned as net source of CO2 to the atmosphere over the observation period.

  13. Leptospiral agglutinins in captive and free ranging non-human primates in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Thayaparan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The proposed study was carried out to determine the extent of exposure to leptospirosis in non-human primates. Materials and Methods: Trapping of non-human primates was carried out opportunistically around the Bako National Park and the Matang Wildlife Center in the vicinity of human settlements and tourism areas of Sarawak. Blood samples were obtained from the saphenous vein to determine the presence of antibodies by the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT to 17 serovars of Leptospira commonly found in Malaysia. Results: This study reports the screening of twelve primates (eight captive and four free ranging for leptospirosis. Eight of the 12 monkeys (66.6%; 95% CI 34.9-90.1 reacted against one or two serovars of Leptospira (Lai and Leptospira Lepto175. The serovar Lai is considered pathogenic for different mammals, including humans. Leptospira Lepto 175 has been identified as an intermediate strain and further studies are being undertaken on this serovar. Conclusion: These results are important as primates may act as reservoirs of Leptospira spp. for humans, which may potentially affect tourism (economic loss, conservation efforts and public health.

  14. Distribution of Major and Trace Elements in a Tropical Hydroelectric Reservoir in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanti, Lee; Ean Lee, Terri Zhuan; Mohd Irwan Lu, Nurul Aida Lu

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the metals content in water, sediment, macroalgae, aquatic plant, and fish of Batang Ai Hydroelectric Reservoir in Sarawak, Malaysia. The samples were acid digested and subjected to atomic absorption spectrometry analysis for Na, K, Mn, Cr, Ni, Zn, Mg, Fe, Sn, Al, Ca, As, Se, and Hg. The total Hg content was analysed on the mercury analyser. Results showed that metals in water, sediment, macroalgae, aquatic plant, and fish are distinguishable, with sediment and biota samples more susceptible to metal accumulation. The distributions of heavy metals in water specifically Se, Sn, and As could have associated with the input of fish feed, boating, and construction activities. The accumulation of heavy metals in sediment, macroalgae, and aquatic plant on the other hand might be largely influenced by the redox conditions in the aquatic environment. According to the contamination factor and the geoaccumulation index, sediment in Batang Ai Reservoir possesses low risk of contamination. The average metal contents in sediment and river water are consistently lower than the literature values reported and well below the limit of various guidelines. For fishes, trace element Hg was detected; however, the concentration was below the permissible level suggested by the Food and Agriculture Organization. PMID:27437493

  15. Serological Prevalence of Leptospirosis Among Rural Communities in the Rejang Basin, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suut, Lela; Mazlan, Mohamad Nur-Azim; Arif, Mohamad Taha; Yusoff, Haironi; Abdul Rahim, Nor-Aliza; Safii, Razitasham; Suhaili, Mohamad Raili

    2016-07-01

    Leptospirosis is an important zoonotic disease globally and is endemic in Malaysia. A study was conducted in the Rejang basin of Sarawak from June 2011 to May 2013 to determine the seroprevalence of leptospirosis among the communities and dominant infecting Leptospira serovars. A total of 508 human sera were analyzed using ELISA and the microscopic agglutination test (MAT). The seroprevalence of leptospirosis in the study area was 37.4%, with the highest prevalence in Kapit division. More women were positive for leptospirosis (59.5%), and the mean age of seropositive individuals was 42.2 (SD = 18.7) years. Antibody titers between 1:50 and 1:1600 were reported, and serovars djasiman (22.1%), shermani (13.2%), and pomona (7.9%) predominated, with varied distribution between geographical locations. This study highlighted the endemicity and diversity of existing Leptospira serovars within the community. This information should be communicated to local health personnel and communities at risk, and rapid diagnostic capability should be made available to local health facilities.

  16. Taxonomic assessment of seaweed community from the coastal areas of Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafizbillah Zawawi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Basic taxonomic information forms the important basis for the documentation, resource management and utilization of marine biodiversity such as seaweeds. A taxonomic assessment of seaweeds in the coastal areas of Bintulu, Sarawak, East Malaysia, was conducted monthly from May 2011 to May 2012. Species composition was recorded following NaGISA protocols, direct observation, and SCUBA and snorkeling techniques. A total of 54 species were identified, classified into Rhodophyta (23 species, Chlorophyta (16 species and Phaeophyta (15 species. The highest abundance was recorded at Kuala Similajau (25 species while the lowest was recorded at Kuala Nyalau (12 species. As the present study was conducted by examining species collected from both rocky shores and the reef area for the first time, a higher number of species was documented compared to previous studies conducted in the same general area but focusing only on particular habitats. Thirty species found in the current survey represent new records for the locality including some with economic potentials.

  17. Evaluation of the Healthy Village program in Kapit district, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyu, Andrew; Steinkuehler, Ashley A; Hashim, Jamilah; Hall, John; Lee, Peter F S; Taylor, Richard

    2006-03-01

    Sarawak, Malaysia has a large population of ethnic minorities who live in longhouses in remote rural areas where poverty, non-communicable diseases, accidents and injuries, environmental hazards and communicable diseases all contribute to a lower quality of life than is possible to achieve in these regions. To address these issues and improve the quality of life for longhouse people, the Kapit Divisional Health Office implemented the World Health Organization's Healthy Village programme in 2000. An evaluation was undertaken in 2003 to determine physical and behavioural changes resulting from the programme. The main changes evaluated were those involving smoking habits, exercise habits, health screening, fire safety, environmental improvements and food preparation and hygiene. A qualitative evaluation was conducted using participant observation and key-informant interviews, focus groups and observation. Results indicate that the programme is inspiring changes in various behavioural and physical characteristics of the study population. It is clear that the Healthy Village programme is a widely accepted way of improving health outcomes in longhouses, and that it is succeeding in making beneficial health changes.

  18. Metal concentrations in sediments from tourist beaches of Miri City, Sarawak, Malaysia (Borneo Island).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, R; Jonathan, M P; Roy, Priyadarsi D; Wai-Hwa, L; Prasanna, M V; Sarkar, S K; Navarrete-López, M

    2013-08-15

    Forty-three sediment samples were collected from the beaches of Miri City, Sarawak, Malaysia to identify the enrichment of partially leached trace metals (PLTMs) from six different tourist beaches. The samples were analyzed for PLTMs Fe, Mn, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn. The concentration pattern suggest that the southern side of the study area is enriched with Fe (1821-6097 μg g(-1)), Mn (11.57-90.22 μg g(-1)), Cr (51.50-311 μg g(-1)), Ni (18-51 μg g(-1)), Pb (8.81-84.05 μg g(-1)), Sr (25.95-140.49 μg g(-1)) and Zn (12.46-35.04 μg g(-1)). Compared to the eco-toxicological values, Cr>Effects range low (ERL), Lowest effect level (LEL), Severe effect level (SEL); Cu>Unpolluted sediments, ERL, LEL; Pb>Unpolluted sediments and Ni>ERL and LEL. Comparative results with other regions indicate that Co, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn are higher, indicating an external input rather than natural process.

  19. Negotiating development narratives within large-scale oil palm projects on village lands in Sarawak, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck; Bruun, Thilde Bech; Egay, Kelvin;

    2016-01-01

    The Malaysian state of Sarawak on the island of Borneo is one of the global hotspots of deforestation and forest degradation. The planting of oil palm has played a key role in the transformation of land use in the state. While much of the expansion in Sarawak so far has taken place in state forests...

  20. Monitoring of Waterborne Parasites in Two Drinking Water Treatment Plants: A Study in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Reena Leeba; Ithoi, Init; Abd Majid, Mohamad Azlan; Wan Sulaiman, Wan Yusoff; Tan, Tian Chye; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of waterborne parasites coupled with water parameters at various processing sites of two drinking water treatment plants (A and B) and seven distribution system (DS) sites in Sarawak, Malaysia were studied. Ten liters of water underwent immunomagnetic separation (IMS) technique to detect the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts. The remaining supernatant was used to detect other parasites whilst 50 mL of water sample was each used in the detection of free-living amoebae and fecal coliforms. Sampled water was positive for Giardia (32.9%; 28/85), Cryptosporidium (18.8%; 16/85) followed by Spirometra ova-like (25.9%; 22/85), Blastocystis-like (25.9%; 22/85), nematode larvae-like (8.2%; 7/85) and Taenia ova-like (1.2%; 1/85). Meanwhile, 90.2% (55/61) samples were positive for Acanthamoeba and Naegleria via cultivation and of these, 11 isolates were confirmed as Acanthamoeba genotype T3 (5/7) and T4 (2/7) followed by Naegleria sp. (4/11), Naegleria italica (2/11), Naegleria australiensis (1/11), Naegleria angularis (1/11) and Vahlkampfia sp. (3/11). Cryptosporidium, Acanthamoeba and Naegleria were also detected in one of the seven tested DS sites. Only Giardia and Cryptosporidium showed significant correlations with fluoride and fecal coliforms. These results describe the occurrence of waterborne parasites that will assist key stakeholders in mitigating contamination at the specific sites. PMID:27367710

  1. Monitoring of Waterborne Parasites in Two Drinking Water Treatment Plants: A Study in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Leeba Richard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of waterborne parasites coupled with water parameters at various processing sites of two drinking water treatment plants (A and B and seven distribution system (DS sites in Sarawak, Malaysia were studied. Ten liters of water underwent immunomagnetic separation (IMS technique to detect the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oocysts. The remaining supernatant was used to detect other parasites whilst 50 mL of water sample was each used in the detection of free-living amoebae and fecal coliforms. Sampled water was positive for Giardia (32.9%; 28/85, Cryptosporidium (18.8%; 16/85 followed by Spirometra ova-like (25.9%; 22/85, Blastocystis-like (25.9%; 22/85, nematode larvae-like (8.2%; 7/85 and Taenia ova-like (1.2%; 1/85. Meanwhile, 90.2% (55/61 samples were positive for Acanthamoeba and Naegleria via cultivation and of these, 11 isolates were confirmed as Acanthamoeba genotype T3 (5/7 and T4 (2/7 followed by Naegleria sp. (4/11, Naegleria italica (2/11, Naegleria australiensis (1/11, Naegleria angularis (1/11 and Vahlkampfia sp. (3/11. Cryptosporidium, Acanthamoeba and Naegleria were also detected in one of the seven tested DS sites. Only Giardia and Cryptosporidium showed significant correlations with fluoride and fecal coliforms. These results describe the occurrence of waterborne parasites that will assist key stakeholders in mitigating contamination at the specific sites.

  2. Monitoring of Waterborne Parasites in Two Drinking Water Treatment Plants: A Study in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Reena Leeba; Ithoi, Init; Abd Majid, Mohamad Azlan; Wan Sulaiman, Wan Yusoff; Tan, Tian Chye; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian

    2016-06-28

    The occurrence of waterborne parasites coupled with water parameters at various processing sites of two drinking water treatment plants (A and B) and seven distribution system (DS) sites in Sarawak, Malaysia were studied. Ten liters of water underwent immunomagnetic separation (IMS) technique to detect the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium (oo)cysts. The remaining supernatant was used to detect other parasites whilst 50 mL of water sample was each used in the detection of free-living amoebae and fecal coliforms. Sampled water was positive for Giardia (32.9%; 28/85), Cryptosporidium (18.8%; 16/85) followed by Spirometra ova-like (25.9%; 22/85), Blastocystis-like (25.9%; 22/85), nematode larvae-like (8.2%; 7/85) and Taenia ova-like (1.2%; 1/85). Meanwhile, 90.2% (55/61) samples were positive for Acanthamoeba and Naegleria via cultivation and of these, 11 isolates were confirmed as Acanthamoeba genotype T3 (5/7) and T4 (2/7) followed by Naegleria sp. (4/11), Naegleria italica (2/11), Naegleria australiensis (1/11), Naegleria angularis (1/11) and Vahlkampfia sp. (3/11). Cryptosporidium, Acanthamoeba and Naegleria were also detected in one of the seven tested DS sites. Only Giardia and Cryptosporidium showed significant correlations with fluoride and fecal coliforms. These results describe the occurrence of waterborne parasites that will assist key stakeholders in mitigating contamination at the specific sites.

  3. Bleeding events and associated factors in a cohort of adult patients taking warfarin in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Frances; Arkell, Paul; Fong; Roberts, Lesley M; Gendy, David; Wong, Christina Siew-Hie; Ngu, Joanna Chee Yien; Tiong, Lee Len; Bibi, Faridha Mohd Salleh; Lai, Lana Yin Hui; Ong, Tiong Kiam; Abouyannis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that rates of adverse events in patients taking warfarin may vary with ethnicity. This study investigated the rates of bleeds and thromboembolic events, the international normalised ratio (INR) status and the relationship between INR and bleeding events in Malaysia. Patients attending INR clinic at the Heart Centre, Sarawak General Hospital were enrolled on an ad hoc basis from May 2010 and followed up for 1 year. At each routine visit, INR was recorded and screening for bleeding or thromboembolism occurred. Variables relating to INR control were used as predictors of bleeds in logistic regression models. 125 patients contributed to 140 person-years of follow-up. The rates of major bleed, thromboembolic event and minor bleed per 100 person-years of follow-up were 1.4, 0.75 and 34.3. The median time at target range calculated using the Rosendaal method was 61.6% (IQR 44.6–74.1%). Of the out-of-range readings, 30.0% were below range and 15.4% were above. INR variability, (standard deviation of individuals’ mean INR), was the best predictor of bleeding events, with an odds ratio of 3.21 (95% CI 1.10–9.38). Low rates of both major bleeds and thromboembolic events were recorded, in addition to a substantial number of INR readings under the recommended target range. This may suggest that the recommended INR ranges may not represent the optimal warfarin intensity for this population and that a lower intensity of therapy, as observed in this cohort, could be beneficial in preventing adverse events.

  4. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-chromosomal STRs in three native Sarawak populations (Iban, Bidayuh and Melanau) in East Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuet Meng; Swaran, Yuvaneswari; Phoon, Yoong Keat; Sothirasan, Kavin; Sim, Hang Thiew; Lim, Kong Boon; Kuehn, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    17 Y-STRs (DYS456, DYS389I, DYS390, DYS389II, DYS458, DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS393, DYS391, DYS439, DYS635 or Y-GATA C4, DYS392, Y-GATA H4, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS448) have been analyzed in 320 male individuals from Sarawak, an eastern state of Malaysia on the Borneo island using the AmpFlSTR Y-filer (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA). These individuals were from three indigenous ethnic groups in Sarawak comprising of 103 Ibans, 113 Bidayuhs and 104 Melanaus. The observed 17-loci haplotypes and the individual allele frequencies for each locus were estimated, whilst the locus diversity, haplotype diversity and discrimination capacity were calculated in the three groups. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that 87.6% of the haplotypic variation was found within population and 12.4% between populations (fixation index F(ST)=0.124, p=0.000). This study has revealed that the indigenous populations in Sarawak are distinctly different to each other, and to the three major ethnic groups in Malaysia (Malays, Chinese and Indians), with the Melanaus having a strikingly high degree of shared haplotypes within. There are rare unusual variants and microvariants that were not present in Malaysian Malay, Chinese or Indian groups. In addition, occurrences of DYS385 duplications which were only noticeably present in Chinese group previously was also observed in the Iban group whilst null alleles were detected at several Y-loci (namely DYS19, DYS392, DYS389II and DYS448) in the Iban and Melanau groups.

  5. On one new genus and three new species of freshwater crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura: Potamidae and Grapsidae) from Lanjak-Entimau, Sarawak, East Malaysia, Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, P.K.L.

    1995-01-01

    The freshwater crabs obtained from the Lanjak-Entimau area in Sarawak, East Malaysia, Borneo, are reported upon. One new genus (Ibanum) and two new species of Potamidae (Ibanum aethes and Isolapotamon stuebingi) and a new species of Grapsidae (Geosesarma katibas) are described. The identity of Potam

  6. Language Use and Sustainability Status of Indigenous Languages in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Su-Hie; Ling, Teck-Yee

    2013-01-01

    The study examines the sustainability status of Sarawak indigenous languages through a survey on adolescents' language use using the Expanded Graded Intergenerational Disruption Scale (EGIDS). The specific aspects examined were: the presence of ethnic languages in relation to other languages in selected domains of language use; the adolescents'…

  7. The undergraduate curriculum of Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak in terms of Harden's 10 questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Alam Sher; Malik, Rukhsana Hussain

    2002-11-01

    The curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences (FMHS) is designed particularly to cater for the health needs of the State of Sarawak, Malaysia. The framework of the curriculum is built on four strands: biological knowledge, clinical skills, behavioural and population aspects. The training is community based and a graduate of FMHS is expected to possess the ability to deal with many ethnic groups with different cultures and beliefs; expertise in tropical infectious diseases; skills to deal with emergencies such as snakebite and near drowning; qualities of an administrator, problem-solver and community leader; and proficiency in information and communication technology. The content of the curriculum strives for commitment to lifelong learning and professional values. The FMHS has adopted a 'mixed economy' of education strategies and a 'mixed menu approach' to test a wide range of curriculum outcomes. The FMHS fosters intellectual and academic pursuits, encourages friendliness and a sense of social responsibility and businesslike efficiency.

  8. Negotiating development narratives within large-scale oil palm projects on village lands in Sarawak, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Astrid Oberborbeck; Bruun, Thilde Bech; Egay, Kelvin

    2016-01-01

    The Malaysian state of Sarawak on the island of Borneo is one of the global hotspots of deforestation and forest degradation. The planting of oil palm has played a key role in the transformation of land use in the state. While much of the expansion in Sarawak so far has taken place in state forests...... resource development projects intersect with and accentuate internal community differences in sites of new plantations. We do so by examining the case of an Iban village where the introduction of a large-scale oil palm scheme has resulted in conflict and division within the community. By analysing...... the narratives that suggest that large-scale land development projects ‘bring development to the people’, utilising ‘idle lands’ and ‘creating employment’ to lift them out of poverty, we argue that political and economic processes related to cultivation of oil palm intersect with local community differences...

  9. Checklist of Gastropods from the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morni, Wan Zabidii Wan; Rahim, Siti Akmar Khadijah Ab; Rumpet, Richard; Musel, Jamil; Hassan, Ruhana

    2017-01-01

    This study provides the first marine gastropod checklist from the Sarawak Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). Gastropod samples were collected from selected stations in the Sarawak EEZ using an otter trawl net with a stretched mesh size of 38 mm at the cod end. The trawling operations were conducted more than 12 nautical miles from the coast, and the area was divided into three depth strata: I) 20–50 m, II) 50–100 m and III) 100–200 m. A total of 23 gastropod species were identified during the two-month sampling period from 16 August until 6 October 2015, representing 8 superfamilies, 15 families and 20 genera. Superfamily Tonnoidea was represented by 7 species, followed by Muricoidea (5 species), Cypraeoidea (4 species), and Buccinoidea and Conoidea (both with 2 species). Other superfamilies were represented by a single species. Only 3 species were obtained in 2 depth strata, namely Melo melo, Murex aduncospinosus and Tonna galea. In addition, 9, 13 and 4 species of gastropods were found in strata I, II and III, respectively. The information on gastropod distributions at different depth strata in the Sarawak EEZ could be useful in updating the Malaysian species diversity database.

  10. Influence of risk perception, preventive behavior, movement and environment on malaria infection in Lundu district, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norliza Jusoh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of malaria in Sarawak is among the highest in Malaysia despite its downward trend since 2002. This study was conducted to identify the dominant risk factors related to malaria infection. A case-control study was conducted in Lundu District, Sarawak. Cases were 96 indigenous malaria cases registered from January to September 2005 at Lundu District Health Office. Controls were selected among those who never contracted malaria originating from the same villages as cases. Cases and control were similarly distributed with respect to age, number of household and total household income per month. Cases were more likely than controls to report high risk occupation, opened eaves, ever had movement for those aged 50 years or over and car ownership. Older age, male, lower socioeconomic level and perception of fatality toward malaria increased risk to malaria infection. Male than female had seven-fold risk to be malaria infected [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 7.09; 95% confidence interval (CI = 3.21-15.65]. In term of perception of fatality toward malaria, those who did not have than did have perception of fatality toward malaria had six-fold risk to be malaria infected (ORa = 6.38; 95% CI = 1.32-30.87. On contrary, those who had lower than middle and high per capita income per month had 85% lowered risk to be malaria infected (ORa = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.03-0.72. Male, older age, lower education and socioeconomy level, lower perception towards malaria, or lower environment sanitation had increased risk to be malaria infected. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:267-71Keywords: malaria, gender, sosioeconomics, perception, protective personal measure, environmental

  11. Assessment of the Water and Sediment Quality of Tropical Forest Streams in Upper Reaches of the Baleh River, Sarawak, Malaysia, Subjected to Logging Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teck-Yee Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the impact of logging activities on water and sediment quality of Sarawak forest streams is still scarce despite Sarawak being the largest exporter of timber in Malaysia. This study was aimed at determining the water and sediment quality of forest streams in Sarawak and the potential impact of logging activities. In situ parameters were measured, and water and sediment samples were collected at six stations before rain. Additionally, water quality was investigated at three stations after rain. The results showed that canopy removal resulted in large temperature variation and sedimentation in the forest streams. Lower suspended solids were found at stations with inactive logging (<2 mg/L compared to active logging (10–16 mg/L activities. The highest concentration of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in water and sediment was 4.4 mg/L, 77.6 μg/L, 0.17%, and 0.01%, respectively. Besides, significantly negative correlation of sediment nitrogen and water total ammonia nitrogen indicated the loss of nitrogen from sediment to water. Water quality of the streams deteriorated after rain, in particular, suspended solids which increased from 8.3 mg/L to 104.1 mg/L. This study reveals that logging activities have an impact on the water quality of Sarawak forest streams particularly in rainfall events.

  12. Diversity of Edible Mollusc (Gastropoda and Bivalvia at Selected Divison of Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Hadi Hamli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of edible mollusc was studied at eight divisions of Sarawak from August 2010 to May 2011. At each division, diversity and number of species were collected from road site selling out lets and local wet markets. Total number of mollusc was comprised of 29 species namely  Solen regularies, S. lamarckii,  Pharella acutidens, Anadara granosa, Pholas orientalis, Gluconome virens, Circe scripta, Anodonta woodina, Paphia undulata, Amusium pleuronectes, Meretrix meretrix, M. lyrata, Polymesoda bengalensis, P. erosa and P. expansa  for bivalve and  Cerithidea rizophorarum, C. obtusa, Telescopium telescopium, Clithon retropictus, Nerita articulate, N. chamaeleon, N. albicilla, Ellobium aurisjuda, Trochus radiates, Planaxis sulcatus, Monodonta labio, Turbo crasus, Thais aculate  and Melo melo  for gastropod. The species number of bivalve was recorded highest (15 species in mollusc group from Sarawak. Mollusc diversity was found highest (14 species in Bintulu and lowest (1 species in the division of Sarikei. From this study, there is a wide chance of research to further explore both on the possibility of commercial value and ecosystem conservation.

  13. Soil Properties under Various Stages of Secondary Forests at Sarawak, East Malaysia

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    K Karyati

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Change in the forest community during secondary succession is influencing in various soil properties. However, there is limited information available on the soil properties under different stages of secondary forests in Sarawak. The aims of this study are to clarify the soil morphological and physicochemical properties at secondary forests under different age stands after similar land change (slash and burn. Field surveys were conducted at 3, 5, 10, and 20 years old secondary forests in Sabal, Sarawak. Different fallow time influence changing soil properties in various stage secondary forests. A number of soil properties affected soil development process and land use change. Soil morphological and physicochemical properties differed and varied under different stages of fallow periods. The close relationship can be assumed between soil development process and vegetation succession. The knowledge of forest soil properties is essential to understand the change and development process under various stages secondary forests. The comprehensive understanding about soil properties and development process is important in order to conserve and manage secondary forests.

  14. Factor associated with tobacco use among the adult population in Sarawak, Malaysia: a cross sectional study

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    Mizanur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Consumption of tobacco in any form is one of the leading causes of preventable mortality. The World Health Organization recommends that it should be monitored regularly.  This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of tobacco use among the rural adult population in Sarawak and factors associated with it.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted among the adult population in Sarawak. Data were collected from ten villages in Kota Samarahan and Kuching Division by face to face interview using modified Global Adult Tobacco Survey questionnaire. Non-probability sampling method was adopted to select the villages. All the households of the villages were visited and an adult member was selected randomly from each house irrespective of the sex. After missing value imputation, 1000 data were analysed using statistical software SPSS 19.0 version.Results: Analysis showed that 30.9% of the respondents were current tobacco users and 11% were past tobacco users. The mean age (SD at starting tobacco was 18.1 (6.48 years. The frequency of tobacco use was 14 times per day.  Hierarchical Logistic regression analysis revealed that age with male sex (OR=1. 064, 95% CI: 1.052, 1.076, secondary education (OR=-2.712; 95% CI: 1.122, 6.555, higher secondary and above (OR=3. 571; 95% CI: 1.641,7.774, occupation as business (OR=3. 152; 95% CI: 1.732, 5.735 and environmental exposure such as smoking at working place (OR=2. 754;95% CI: 1.895,4.002, coffee house (OR=2. 274;95% CI: 1.32,3.919 and at home (OR=1. 827;95% CI: 1.242,2.687 appeared to be  important predictors of tobacco use (p<0.05.Conclusion: A large proportion of males use tobacco products. Though tobacco use was negligible among females, but they would be potential users. Environmental exposure to tobacco appeared to be important predictors. Tobacco control campaigns should target banning of tobacco use in closed and open areas and also to intensify the monitoring of all forms

  15. Prevalence, isolation and characterization of Bacillus cereus strains from rice of local cultivators of Sabah, Sarawak, and Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawei, Jelin; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2016-11-01

    Bacillus cereus is a spore-forming, facultative anaerobic, motile microorganism that has been identified as a causative agent of two types of gastrointestinal diseases such as emetic and diarrhea. This foodborne pathogen is found in both vegetative cells and endospores form in foods such as rice either raw or cooked. The aim of this study is to investigate and determine the prevalence, characterize and identify the isolation of vegetative cells and endospores of B. cereus in thirty varieties (n=3) of raw rice from Sabah, Sarawak and Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 90 (n=90) raw rice were examined and 84 (93.33%) samples were positive to vegetative cells of B. cereus. However, only 32 (35.56%) samples were positive for endospore cells that able to germinate after samples were heated at 75°C for 15 mins. The mean log cfu/g for vegetative cells were higher range (0.00 - 4.1533) than visible endospores (0.00 - 3.7533 mean log cfu/g). Sample of raw red rice (UKMRC9) had significantly higher contamination by both vegetative cells and endospores at p<0.05, than the other raw rice samples.

  16. Human behavioural research applied to the leprosy control programme of Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P C

    1986-09-01

    In 1984, in Sarawak, there were a total of 1,099 recorded cases of leprosy for a population of 1.3 million. However, for each case recorded, it is estimated that two others remain undiagnosed as a consequence of the stigmatization associated with leprosy. For the five year period, 1979-1983, an average of 29 new cases were detected each year of which 8.6 (30%) were deformed due to the late stages at which it was being reported. To increase the case-finding rate, human behavioural research was applied to the leprosy control programme so as to develop culture-specific health education packages aimed at self diagnosis and self referral in order to detect the large pool of undiagnosed cases hidden behind the veil of aversion, fear and ignorance. This was achieved through anthropological studies to identify how the various major ethnic groups perceived leprosy and their attitudes towards leprosy. Taking into account these findings, health education packages aimed at adults as well as children were developed for the Chinese as well as the non-Chinese, and consisted of newspaper articles, cartoon tape-slides, cartoon story books and posters.

  17. Municipal Solid Waste Management: Household Waste Segregation in Kuching South City, Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Tunmise A. Otitoju

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia is faced with daunting challenges relating to household waste segregation. Due to an increase in population, economic growth, enforcement, infrastructure, public attitude, awareness and participation among others, source segregation is considered a crucial issue in Malaysia, particularly in urban settings. This paper presents the key findings of the quantitative (questionnaire survey administered among 235 households in Kuching South City and qualitative (interview survey with the Natural Resource & Environmental Board (NREB and Kuching South City Council. This survey attempts to identify the limiting and motivating factors on the part of households to waste segregation. The result shows that age, sex, race and education is insignificant towards waste segregation. The result also shows a significant difference between waste segregators and non-waste separators on their level of perception towards implementation of laws for source segregation. Result also shows that the ease of access to facilities and the methods of collection are the major limiting factors preventing households from waste segregation in Kuching South City.

  18. Knowledge and perception of oral health promotion in schools among dental nurses in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C J; Jallaludin, R L

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, the concept of a Health-Promoting School has received much interest. In Malaysia, dental nurses are ideally placed to play a lead role in promoting Oral Health within the school setting. This study aims to provide information on the knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion in schools, among dental nurses. A postal questionnaire was used to measure dental nurses' knowledge, perception and perceived role of Oral Health Promotion. The majority (60%) of dental nurses had good knowledge of Oral Health Promotion. Generally, they perceived that they play an important role in promoting Oral Health in schools. However, a sizeable proportion (25%) did not think they had a role to play in working together with school authorities to provide children with healthy food choices in school canteens. The majority (60%) of dental nurses did not perceive Oral Health Promotion to be important as a whole. They had a good perception of the concepts: it supports behaviour change, it has appropriate goals, it integrates oral health and general health and relieves anxiety. However, they had a poorer perception of the concepts; diverse educational approaches, participation, focus on prevention, early intervention, "spread of effect" of dental health education and "make healthier choices the easier choices". Years of service was not significantly associated with knowledge and perception of Oral Health Promotion. Dental nurses should be reoriented towards a more holistic practice of Oral Health Promotion. Workshops that invite active participation from dental nurses should be conducted to equip them with the necessary knowledge and skills.

  19. Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    The 1984 Current Population Estimates on 2 Malaysian states, Sabah and Sarawak, has just been published by the Department of Statistics. This report, which describes population trends between 1980-84, is part of a new series aimed at providing information on current population estimates. The population of Sabah grew at an annual rate of 3.7% in 1980-84, while growth rates were 2.4% for Sarawak and 2.5% for Peninsular Malaysia. Of sabah's 1984 population of 1.2 million, 1 million were classified as indigenous persons and .2 million were Chinese. In Sarawak the population was 1.4 million, 1 million of whom were indigenous and .4 million were Chinese. 39% of Sarawak's 1984 population consisted of persons below 15 years of age and 4% were age 65 years or over. In Sabah, these proportions were 44% and 2%, respectively. Also recently published is a population report for the state of Melake based on data from the 1980 Census. According to the Census, Melaka had a population of 464,754 persons, representing 3.4% of Malaysia's total population of 13.7 million. The Census enumerated 81,102 households, with an average of 5.4 persons in each. During the 1970-80 intercensal period, Melaka's annual growth rate was 1%. About 23% of the population lived in urban areas. The median age of the population was 19.4 years in 1980, which is 2.9 years older than in 1970. The total fertility rate was 4/woman in 1980. 65% of those aged 12 years and over had completed a primary education, and 77% of those aged 10 years and over were literate.

  20. Assessment of Near-Bottom Water Quality of Southwestern Coast of Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia: A Multivariate Statistical Approach

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    Chen-Lin Soo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study on Sarawak coastal water quality is scarce, not to mention the application of the multivariate statistical approach to investigate the spatial variation of water quality and to identify the pollution source in Sarawak coastal water. Hence, the present study aimed to evaluate the spatial variation of water quality along the coastline of the southwestern region of Sarawak using multivariate statistical techniques. Seventeen physicochemical parameters were measured at 11 stations along the coastline with approximately 225 km length. The coastal water quality showed spatial heterogeneity where the cluster analysis grouped the 11 stations into four different clusters. Deterioration in coastal water quality has been observed in different regions of Sarawak corresponding to land use patterns in the region. Nevertheless, nitrate-nitrogen exceeded the guideline value at all sampling stations along the coastline. The principal component analysis (PCA has determined a reduced number of five principal components that explained 89.0% of the data set variance. The first PC indicated that the nutrients were the dominant polluting factors, which is attributed to the domestic, agricultural, and aquaculture activities, followed by the suspended solids in the second PC which are related to the logging activities.

  1. Neglected Intestinal Parasites, Malnutrition and Associated Key Factors: A Population Based Cross-Sectional Study among Indigenous Communities in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoo, Yamuna; Ambu, Stephen; Lim, Yvonne Ai Lian; Rajoo, Komalaveni; Tey, Siew Chang; Lu, Chan Woon; Ngui, Romano

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs) have been recognized as one of the most significant causes of illness among disadvantaged communities. Many studies have been conducted on the prevalence of IPIs in Malaysia. However, these studies mostly focused on the indigenous groups in Peninsular Malaysia. The present study was conducted to provide the current baseline data on prevalence of IPIs, anaemia, malnutrition and associated risk factors among the indigenous communities in Sarawak, situation at northwest Borneo island of Malaysia. A cross sectional study was conducted among the longhouses communities. Stool samples were obtained and examined for the presence of IPIs using microscopy technique. Haemoglobin measurement was done using a portable haemoglobin analyzer. Malnutrition (i.e., stunting, underweight and wasting) was assessed using the WHO Anthro software. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS software. A total of 341participants took part in this study. The overall prevalence of IPIs was 57.5%. Multivariate analysis indicated that the absence of toilets (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1-2.7; p = 0.002) and close contact with animals (OR = 1.8; 95% CI = 1.3-2.9; p = 0.027) as significant predictors for IPIs. The incidence of anaemia was 36.4%. The incidence of underweight, wasting and stunting were 22.2%, 5.6% and 35.4%, respectively. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that low level of parental education attainment (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2-3.0; p = 0.006) was identified as significant predictor for anaemia. The incidence of wasting was significantly associated with mild anaemia (OR = 1.2; 95% CI = 0.9-1.7; p = 0.024). Low household income was identified as significant predictor for stunting (OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 9.8-22.2; p = 0.001) and underweight (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 5.6-18.7; p = 0.037), respectively. Essentially, the present study highlighted that intestinal parasitic infections, anaemia and malnutrition are still prevalent among rural indigenous community

  2. Extracting Features of Acacia Plantation and Natural Forest in the Mountainous Region of Sarawak, Malaysia by ALOS/AVNIR2 Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadaei, H.; Ishii, R.; Suzuki, R.; Kendawang, J.

    2013-12-01

    The remote sensing technique has provided useful information to detect spatio-temporal changes in the land cover of tropical forests. Land cover characteristics derived from satellite image can be applied to the estimation of ecosystem services and biodiversity over an extensive area, and such land cover information would provide valuable information to global and local people to understand the significance of the tropical ecosystem. This study was conducted in the Acacia plantations and natural forest situated in the mountainous region which has different ecological characteristic from that in flat and low land area in Sarawak, Malaysia. The main objective of this study is to compare extract the characteristic of them by analyzing the ALOS/AVNIR2 images and ground truthing obtained by the forest survey. We implemented a ground-based forest survey at Aacia plantations and natural forest in the mountainous region in Sarawak, Malaysia in June, 2013 and acquired the forest structure data (tree height, diameter at breast height (DBH), crown diameter, tree spacing) and spectral reflectance data at the three sample plots of Acacia plantation that has 10 x 10m area. As for the spectral reflectance data, we measured the spectral reflectance of the end members of forest such as leaves, stems, road surface, and forest floor by the spectro-radiometer. Such forest structure and spectral data were incorporated into the image analysis by support vector machine (SVM) and object-base/texture analysis. Consequently, land covers on the AVNIR2 image were classified into three forest types (natural forest, oil palm plantation and acacia mangium plantation), then the characteristic of each category was examined. We additionally used the tree age data of acacia plantation for the classification. A unique feature was found in vegetation spectral reflectance of Acacia plantations. The curve of the spectral reflectance shows two peaks around 0.3μm and 0.6 - 0.8μm that can be assumed to

  3. Gender and Racial Differences in the Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Overweight and Obese Rural Adults, Kuching and Samarahan Division, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whye Lian Cheah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to determine whether gender and ethnic differences had an effect on cardiovascular risk factors in overweight and obese rural adults in Sarawak. Design and Setting. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in rural communities in Kuching and Samarahan division, Malaysia. Data was obtained using a set of questionnaire (sociodemographic data and physical activity, measurement of blood pressure, height, weight (body mass index, BMI, body fat percentage, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile from three ethnic groups—Iban, Malay, and Bidayuh. Analysis of data was done using SPSS version 23.0. Results. A total of 155 respondents participated in the study (81.6% response rate. The levels of physical activity, BMI status, body fat, hypercholesterolemia, and hyperglycemia were similar across the three ethnic groups and both females and males. Iban and Bidayuh had significant higher Atherogenic Index of Plasma (AIP when compared to the Malay (Bidayuh OR = 0.30, 95% CI 0.12, 0.78; Iban OR = 0.29, 95% CI 0.12, 0.69. Conclusions. The relationship between cardiovascular risk factors varied according to ethnic groups and gender. A better understanding of these differences would help in the design and implementation of intervention programme for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    In this discussion of Malaysia, attention is directed to the following: geography; the people; history; government; political conditions; the economy; defense; foreign relations; and relations between the US and Malaysia. In 1987 Malaysia's population was estimated to be 16.5 million with an annual growth rate of 2.6%. The infant mortality rate is 25/1000 with a life expectancy of 66 years. Peninsular Malaysia borders Thailand in the north and is separated from Singapore in the south by the narrow Johore Strait. About 50% of the area is covered by tropical jungle. The population distribution is uneven, with some 13.5 of the 16.5 million residents concentrated on the Peninsular Malaysia lowlands. The Malays, the largest population group, make up 49%. Nearly 1/3 of the Malaysians are Chinese, and Malaysians of Indian descent comprise slightly over 9% of the population. The early Buddhist Malay kingdom of Srivijaya, based at what currently is Palembang, Sumatra, dominated much of the Malay Peninsula from the 9th to the 13th centuries A.D. Full European control over the sultanates of the Malay Peninsula, Sabah, and Sarawak was not achieved until the latter half of the 19th century. During British control, a well-ordered system of public administration was created, public services were extended, and large-scale rubber and tin production was developed. Colonial rule was interrupted by the Japanese invasion and occupation from 1942-45. Malaysia achieved independence on August 31, 1957, and is a constitutional monarchy, nominally headed by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, or paramount ruler. The ruler also is the leader of the Islamic faith in Malaysia. Executive power is vested in the Cabinet, led by the prime minister. The Malaysian legal system is based on English common law. The currently ruling Barisan Nasional, formed in 1973, includes 13 parties, among them the chief components of the former Alliance, a coalition of community-based parties. Malaysia's economic record is 1

  5. Case report of a new pathogenic variant of Aspergillus fumigates isolated from Hipposideros cervinus (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S.J. Seelan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available First record of new Aspergillus fumigatus variant (UNIMAS F009 was reported from the ears of bats at Kubah National Park, Borneo, Malaysia. Morphological characterization of this isolate showed some differences in terms of their growth rate, colony color, size of conidia and pigmentation on different media.

  6. Assessment of Heavy Metals in Water, Sediment, and Fishes of a Large Tropical Hydroelectric Dam in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siong Fong Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bakun Hydroelectric Dam in Sarawak is one of the world highest concrete rock filled dams. This paper reports the heavy metals concentrations in water, sediment, and fishes of Bakun Dam. Water and sediment samples were collected from 11 stations and 6 fish species were caught. The samples were digested with open acid digestion and the metals contents were analysed using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer and mercury analyser. The method was validated based on certified reference materials. A higher concentration of Fe and Mn was detected in downstream water with significant longitudinal variation. Cu, Zn, and Hg were present in trace amount. All elements analysed were consistently found in sediment with no risk of contamination. For fish, Hemibagrus planiceps was characterised by higher affinity for Hg accumulation. The concentrations detected in all fish species were within the permissible guideline of 0.5 mg/kg. The health risk assessment suggested that Barbonymus schwanenfeldii, Puntioplites waandersii, Cyclocheilichthys apogon, and Hemibagrus planiceps were characterised by hazard index > 1 implying possible adverse effects. The amount of fish recommended for adults and children was in the range of 500–775 g/week and 33–135 g/week, respectively.

  7. Spatial, environmental and entomological risk factors analysis on a rural dengue outbreak in Lundu District in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Chang, Moh Seng; Wang, Yin Chai

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate the association of various risk factors with dengue cases reported in Lundu district, Sarawak, by analyzing the interaction between environmental, entomological, socio-demographic factors. Besides conventional entomological, serological and house surveys, this study also used GIS technology to generate geographic and environmental data on Aedes albopictus and dengue transmission. Seven villages were chosen based on the high number of dengue cases reported. A total of 551 households were surveyed. An overall description of the socio-demographic background and basic facilities was presented together with entomological and geographical profiles. For serological and ovitrap studies, systematic random sampling was used. Serological tests indicated that 23.7% of the 215 samples had a history of dengue, either recent or previous infections. Two samples (0.9%) were confirmed by IgM ELISA and 49 samples (22.8%) had IgG responses. A total of 32,838 Aedes albopictus eggs were collected in 56 days of trapping. Cluster sampling was also done to determine whether any of the risk factors (entomological or geographical) were influenced by geographical location. These clusters were defined as border villages with East Kalimantan and roadside villages along Lundu/Biawas trunk road. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS version 10.01. Descriptive analysis using frequency, means, and median were used. To determine the association between variables and dengue cases reported, and to describe the differences between the two clusters of villages, two-sample t-test, and Pearson's Chi-Square were used. Accurate maps were produced with overlay and density function, which facilitates the map visualization and report generating phases. This study also highlights the use of differential Global Positioning System in mapping sites of 1m accuracy. Analysis of the data revealed there are significant differences in clusters of villages attributable

  8. Effect of K-N-Humates on Dry Matter Production and Nutrient Use Efficiency of Maize in Sarawak, Malaysia

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    Auldry Chaddy Petrus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural waste, such as sago waste (SW, is one of the sources of pollution to streams and rivers in Sarawak, particularly those situated near sago processing plants. In addition, unbalanced and excessive use of chemical fertilizers can cause soil and water pollution. Humic substances can be used as organic fertilizers, which reduce pollution. The objectives of this study were to produce K- and ammonium-based organic fertilizer from composted SW and to determine the efficiency of the organic-based fertilizer produced. Humic substances were isolated using standard procedures. Liquid fertilizers were formulated except for T2 (NPK fertilizer, which was in solid form. There were six treatments with three replications. Organic fertilizers were applied to soil in pots on the 10th day after sowing (DAS, but on the 28th DAS, only plants of T2 were fertilized. The plant samples were harvested on the 57th DAS during the tassel stage. The dry matter of plant parts (leaves, stems, and roots were determined and analyzed for N, P, and K using standard procedures. Soil of every treatment was also analyzed for exchangeable K, Ca, Mg, and Na, organic matter, organic carbon, available P, pH, total N, P, nitrate and ammonium contents using standard procedures. Treatments with humin (T5 and T6 showed remarkable results on dry matter production; N, P, and K contents; their uptake; as well as their use efficiency by maize. The inclusion of humin might have loosened the soil and increased the soil porosity, hence the better growth of the plants. Humin plus inorganic fertilizer provided additional nutrients for the plants. The addition of inorganic fertilizer into compost is a combination of quick and slow release sources, which supplies N throughout the crop growth period. Common fertilization by surface application of T2 without any additives (acidic and high CEC materials causes N and K to be easily lost. High Ca in the soil may have reacted with phosphate from

  9. Variable impact of Malaysia's national language planning on non-Malay speakers in Sarawak Impacto variável do planejamento linguístico nacional da Malásia sobre não falantes do Malaio em Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Hie Ting

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the impact of the national language policy on the language use of three main ethnic groups in the Malaysian state of Sarawak. The data analyzed was based on a sociolinguistic survey on language use in six domains that involved 937 Malay, Chinese and Iban adolescents from three major towns in Sarawak. The results showed that the use of Bahasa Malaysia exceeded English usage for all three ethnic groups, showing the success of compulsory education in the national language. However, the language planning has greater impact on the Iban than on the Chinese who are shifting away from the ethnic languages of the Chinese sub-groups to Mandarin Chinese. The availability of an alternative standard language with international standing which also functions as a symbol of cultural solidarity compromises the impact of the national language policy.Este estudo examinou o impacto da política de ensino da língua nacional de três principais grupos étnicos no estado malaio de Sarawak. Os dados analisados basearam-se em uma pesquisa sociolinguística sobre o uso da língua em seis domínios e envolveu 937 adolescentes malaios, chineses e Iban de três grandes cidades de Sarawak. Os resultados mostraram que o uso da língua Bahasa da Malásia superou o uso do inglês para todos os três grupos étnicos, comprovando o sucesso da escolaridade obrigatória em língua nacional. No entanto, o planejamento do estudo da língua tem maior impacto sobre o Iban do que sobre os chineses. Estes estão se afastando das línguas étnicas dos subgrupos chineses para o chinês Mandarim. A disponibilidade de uma língua alternativa padrão, com prestígio internacional, que também funciona como um símbolo de solidariedade cultural, compromete o impacto da política de ensino da língua nacional.

  10. Applications of electron accelerator in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairul Zaman Hj. Mohd Dahlan [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

    2003-02-01

    Current status of radiation processing, as one of the core research programs of the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), is presented. Industrial applications of six electron accelerators from 150 kV up to 3 MV in Malaysia now in operation are mainly for curing of surface coatings, crosslinking of tubes, heat shrinkable tubes and packaging films, crosslinking of wire insulation. Their performances are listed. New technology now in R and D stage includes natural rubber, sago starch and chitosan for biomedical applications, and radiation curable materials from oil palm for pressure sensitive adhesive and printing ink. (S. Ohno)

  11. Four Simple Questions: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Half-Day Community Workshops Designed to Increase Awareness of Coastal Cetacean Conservation Issues in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Gianna; Poh, Anna Norliza Zulkifli; Ngeian, Jenny; Peter, Cindy; Tuen, Andrew Alek

    2012-01-01

    Community workshops were held in coastal locations in Sarawak to raise awareness of cetacean conservation. Interviews were conducted up to 2 years later in four "workshop communities" as well as four villages where workshops were not conducted. Comparison of responses between respondents who had attended workshops (n = 127) versus those…

  12. Foreign Direct Investment and Electronics Exports: Exploratory Empirical Evidence from Malaysia's Top Five Electronics Exports

    OpenAIRE

    Tuck Cheong Tang; Koi Nyen Wong

    2007-01-01

    The foreign direct investment (FDI) has contributed significantly to Malaysia's electronics exports as well as the growth and development of the electronics industry as a result of the export-oriented industrialization initiatives undertaken since 1970s. The aim of this study is to explore the causation between FDI and electronics exports by using Malaysia''s top five electronics exports by SITC (Standard International Trade Classification) product groups. The findings show a bi-directional c...

  13. Systematic studies of Bornean Zingiberaceae V. Zingiberoideae of Lambir Hills, Sarawak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakai, S.; Nagamasu, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the subfamily Zingiberoideae (Zingiberaceae) of Lambir Hills National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia. Twelve species representing Boesenbergia, Globba, and Zingiber are recorded. Systematic and ecological notes are provided, and the key to the Bornean species of Boesenbergia is updated.

  14. Tsunami run-up and inundation along the coast of Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia due to a potential Brunei submarine mass failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wai Kiat; Teh, Su Yean; Koh, Hock Lye

    2017-03-25

    Submarine landslides, also known as submarine mass failures (SMFs), are major natural marine disasters that could critically damage coastal facilities such as nuclear power plants and oil and gas platforms. It is therefore essential to investigate submarine landslides for potential tsunami hazard assessment. Three-dimensional seismic data from offshore Brunei have revealed a giant seabed mass deposited by a previous SMF. The submarine mass extends over 120 km from the continental slope of the Baram Canyon at 200 m water depth to the deep basin floor of the Northwest Borneo Trough. A suite of in-house two-dimensional depth-averaged tsunami simulation model TUNA (Tsunami-tracking Utilities and Application) is developed to assess the vulnerability of coastal communities in Sabah and Sarawak subject to potential SMF tsunami. The submarine slide is modeled as a rigid body moving along a planar slope with the center of mass motion parallel to the planar slope and subject to external forces due to added mass, gravity, and dissipation. The nonlinear shallow water equations are utilized to simulate tsunami propagation from deepwater up to the shallow offshore areas. A wetting-drying algorithm is used when a tsunami wave reaches the shoreline to compute run up of tsunami along the shoreline. Run-up wave height and inundation maps are provided for seven densely populated locations in Sabah and Sarawak to highlight potential risks at each location, subject to two scenarios of slide slopes: 2° and 4°. The first wave may arrive at Kudat as early as 0.4 h after the SMF, giving local communities little time to evacuate. Over a small area, maximum inundated depths reaching 20.3 m at Kudat, 26.1 m at Kota Kinabalu, and 15.5 m at Miri are projected, while the maximum inundation distance of 4.86 km is expected at Miri due to its low-lying coast. In view of the vulnerability of some locations to the SMF tsunami, it is important to develop and implement community resilience

  15. Case report of a new pathogenic variant of Aspergillus fumigates isolated from Hipposideros cervinus (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae) in Sarawak, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    S.S.J. Seelan; F.A. Anwarali

    2009-01-01

    First record of new Aspergillus fumigatus variant (UNIMAS F009) was reported from the ears of bats at Kubah National Park, Borneo, Malaysia. Morphological characterization of this isolate showed some differences in terms of their growth rate, colony color, size of conidia and pigmentation on different media.

  16. Disclosure of Traditional and Complementary Medicine Use and Its Associated Factors to Medical Doctor in Primary Care Clinics in Kuching Division, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johny, Anak Kelak; Cheah, Whye Lian; Razitasham, Safii

    2017-01-01

    The decision by the patients to disclose traditional and complementary medicine (TCM) use to their doctor is an important area to be explored. This study aimed to determine the disclosure of TCM use and its associated factors to medical doctor among primary care clinic attendees in Kuching Division, Sarawak. It was a cross-sectional study using questionnaire, interviewer administered questionnaire. A total of 1130 patients were screened with 80.2% reporting using TCM. Logistic regression analysis revealed that being female (AOR = 3.219, 95% CI: 1.385, 7.481), perceived benefits that TCM can prevent complication of illness (AOR = 3.999, 95% CI: 1.850, 8.644) and that TCM is more gentle and safer (AOR = 4.537, 95% CI: 2.332, 8.828), perceived barriers of not having enough knowledge about TCM (AOR = 0.530, 95% CI: 0.309, 0.910), patient dissatisfaction towards healthcare providers being too business-like and impersonal (AOR = 0.365, 95% CI: 0.199, 0.669) and paying more for healthcare than one can afford (AOR = 0.413, 95% CI: 0.250, 0.680), and accessibility of doctors (AOR = 3.971, 95% CI: 2.245, 7.023) are the predictors of disclosure of TCM use. An open communication between patients and doctor is important to ensure safe implementation and integration of both TCM and medical treatment.

  17. Disclosure of Traditional and Complementary Medicine Use and Its Associated Factors to Medical Doctor in Primary Care Clinics in Kuching Division, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anak Kelak Johny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The decision by the patients to disclose traditional and complementary medicine (TCM use to their doctor is an important area to be explored. This study aimed to determine the disclosure of TCM use and its associated factors to medical doctor among primary care clinic attendees in Kuching Division, Sarawak. It was a cross-sectional study using questionnaire, interviewer administered questionnaire. A total of 1130 patients were screened with 80.2% reporting using TCM. Logistic regression analysis revealed that being female (AOR = 3.219, 95% CI: 1.385, 7.481, perceived benefits that TCM can prevent complication of illness (AOR = 3.999, 95% CI: 1.850, 8.644 and that TCM is more gentle and safer (AOR = 4.537, 95% CI: 2.332, 8.828, perceived barriers of not having enough knowledge about TCM (AOR = 0.530, 95% CI: 0.309, 0.910, patient dissatisfaction towards healthcare providers being too business-like and impersonal (AOR = 0.365, 95% CI: 0.199, 0.669 and paying more for healthcare than one can afford (AOR = 0.413, 95% CI: 0.250, 0.680, and accessibility of doctors (AOR = 3.971, 95% CI: 2.245, 7.023 are the predictors of disclosure of TCM use. An open communication between patients and doctor is important to ensure safe implementation and integration of both TCM and medical treatment.

  18. Childhood obesity, self-esteem and health-related quality of life among urban primary schools children in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P Y; Cheah, W l; Chang, C T; Siti Raudzah, G

    2012-08-01

    There is limited data on childhood obesity and its impact on children from diverse cultural backgrounds. This study is aimed at determining the association between obesity, self-esteem and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among Malaysian urban primary school children of different ethnicity. A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 311 children aged 11-13 years from primary schools in Kuching, Sarawak. Self-esteem and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) were measured using the Lawrence Self-esteem Questionnaire (LAWSEQ) questionnaire and the Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), respectively. Body weight and height were taken and body mass index for age calculated. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among the children were 18.2% and 15.2% respectively. Parent-proxy and child self-reported PedsQL scores were higher for normal weight children compared to thin and obese children, but lower than overweight children. At the subscale level, only parent-proxy PedsQL scores in psychosocial health and emotional component were significantly different between overweight and obese children (p=0.019, p=0.02). The Self-esteem score was significantly correlated with parent and child PedsQL scores. Although obesity was associated with lower HRQOL among children, both parent and child PedsQL scores among the overweight group were higher than that for the normal weight group. Overweight and obesity did affect quality of life and self-esteem of children in this study, particularly in the areas of psychosocial and emotional health. Policy makers and programme managers should take into consideration the impact of obesity on children and parents in designing intervention programmes.

  19. An Investigation of Sustainable Power Generation from Oil Palm Biomass: A Case Study in Sarawak

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrin Aghamohammadi; Stacy Simai Reginald; Ahmad Shamiri; Ali Akbar Zinatizadeh; Li Ping Wong; Nik Meriam Binti Nik Sulaiman

    2016-01-01

    Sarawak is the largest state in Malaysia, with 22% of the nation's oil palm plantation area, making it the second largest contributor to palm biomass production. Despite the enormous amount of palm biomass in the state, the use of biomass as fuel for power generation remains low. This study is designed to investigate the sustainability of power generation from palm biomass specifically in Sarawak by conducting a survey among the palm oil mill developers. To conduct this investigation, several...

  20. Geochemical Variations in Hydrocarbon Components Distribution in a Prograding Deltaic Sequence: A Case Study of the Baram Delta, Offshore Sarawak Basin, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ben-Awuah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on hydrocarbon distribution have evolved from basic reservoir characterization to complex studies today involving the interactions between oil components and clay minerals and sequential extraction studies on hydrocarbon extracts in reservoir rocks. Findings from such studies include the discovery of variations in oil fractions in reservoirs such as adsorbed oil and free oil. The theory that first oil charge preferentially interacts with clay minerals occurring in pores and as coatings in reservoirs was also proposed by some researchers. Despite, all these studies some aspects of variations in the composition of hydrocarbons in reservoir rocks still need to be investigated further. This study has been carried out particularly because the qualitative and quantitative composition of aromatic and aliphatic components of hydrocarbons in terms of the presence and quantities of hydrocarbon functional groups and how they relate to hydrocarbon migration have not been exhaustively discussed. This study uses Ultra-Violet visible light (UV-vis and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR to characterize variations in hydrocarbon distribution in reservoir quality sandstones from three fields namely BD01, BD02 and BD03 in the Baram Delta, offshore Sarawak and to deduce how these variations relate to differential migration patterns in hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon extraction was done in the ultra vilolet visible (UV-vis experiment using 0.1M sodium pyrophosphate as solvent whereas in the Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR, the experiment was done on very fine powdered samples of the sandstones. Results from both the UV-vis and FTIR experiments indicate a dominance of aromatic functional groups in the samples. Most of the samples have E4/E6 ratio of more than 1 which indicates a high degree of aromacity. The BD01 field sandstones with a maximum porosity of 32% has the highest average E4/E6 ratio of 1.21, followed by the BD02 field sandstones with a maximum

  1. Malaysia; Malaisie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    This document presents the energy profile of Malaysia: national organizations and energy policy (Economic Planning Unit (EPU), Ministry of Energy, Communication and Multi-media, Energy Commission); electric power companies: Tenaga National Brhd (TNB), Sarawak Electricity Supply Corporation (SESCO) and Sabah Electricity Sdn Bhd (SESB); petroleum companies: Petronas and Petronas Carigali; natural gas companies: Petronas Gas Sdn Bhd (PGSB), Malaysia LNG Ltd, Gas Malaysia Sdn Bhd and Sabah Energy Corporation (SEC) as public utility; supplies (resources, electric power, oil and gas); prices; consumption; stakes and perspectives (combined cycle power plants, Trans Thai Malaysia pipeline, refineries, Asean Grid Power project of interconnected power grids, Trans Asean Gas Pipeline (TAGP) project of interconnected gas networks, Bakun dam). (J.S.)

  2. A study of palm biomass processing strategy in Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. J. Y.; Ng, W. P. Q.; Law, K. H.

    2017-06-01

    In the past decades, palm industry is booming due to its profitable nature. An environmental concern regarding on the palm industry is the enormous amount of waste produced from palm industry. The waste produced or palm biomass is one significant renewable energy source and raw material for value-added products like fiber mats, activated carbon, dried fiber, bio-fertilizer and et cetera in Malaysia. There is a need to establish the palm biomass industry for the recovery of palm biomass for efficient utilization and waste reduction. The development of the industry is strongly depending on the two reasons, the availability and supply consistency of palm biomass as well as the availability of palm biomass processing facilities. In Malaysia, the development of palm biomass industry is lagging due to the lack of mature commercial technology and difficult logistic planning as a result of scattered locality of palm oil mill, where palm biomass is generated. Two main studies have been carried out in this research work: i) industrial study of the feasibility of decentralized and centralized palm biomass processing in Sarawak and ii) development of a systematic and optimized palm biomass processing planning for the development of palm biomass industry in Sarawak, Malaysia. Mathematical optimization technique is used in this work to model the above case scenario for biomass processing to achieve maximum economic potential and resource feasibility. An industrial study of palm biomass processing strategy in Sarawak has been carried out to evaluate the optimality of centralized processing and decentralize processing of the local biomass industry. An optimal biomass processing strategy is achieved.

  3. Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    The official government policy in Malaysia is to reduce the rate of population growth through decreasing fertility levels and a program of economic and social restructuring. Population policy was conceived as encompassing wider dimensions than family planning, with emphasis on spatial distribution policies. The first Population and Housing Census was undertaken by the government in 1970. Regular decennial census taking occurred between 1891 and 1957. Birth and death registrations are considered incomplete. Population issues are integrated by various organizations into their ongoing programs such as those of the Ministries of Health, Education or Agriculture. The National Family Planning Board, an interministerial body in the Prime Minister's Department, has input from development planning units. A population studies group was established within the Economic Planning Unit. The total 1980 population was 13,640,000; the rate of population growth was 2.6 from 1975-80. Life expectancy was 61.3. Morbidity and mortality rates have dropped because of disease control and malnutrition reduction. 7.4% of the population are foreign born. Spatial distribution is to be adjusted through rural land development and resettlement; promotion of industrial development in low-income states; development of new growth centers and towns; and, urban development and renewal.

  4. Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normi Idris Azrul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical models are capable of simulating various groundwater scenarios and relate it towards groundwater management. A mesh based density dependent flow model, FEFLOW is used to simulate groundwater flow and transport for a coastal island aquifer in Kg. Salang, Tioman Island, Malaysia. FEFLOW is designed to simulate 2D and 3D, variable density groundwater flow and multi-species transport. The impacts of pumping and recharge rates represented by three different groundwater scenarios, which were investigated by means of hydraulic heads, TDS concentrations and water balance components. Scenario A showed the standard saturated groundwater flow and the steady state fluid flow. Over pumping and inconsistency in recharge rate are the stresses shown in Scenarios B and C. Scenario B involved in the maximum pumping rate of 96m3 per day and recharge rate of 300mm per year has shown a drawdown of 1.5 m. Scenario C showed the extreme pumping rate of 1000m3 per day and without recharge has shown a decrease in groundwater levels of 6.3 m.and groundwater storage (50%. Scenario B presented the most promising finding compared with Scenario C. Highest hydraulic heads, lowest mass concentration and positive groundwater storage (2578.6m3/day were obtained in Scenario B. Additionally, and further progress is needed in obtaining the water usage data from each part to determine the best pumping rate. A sustainable groundwater management plan is crucial to maintain the natural resources and social benefits as well as to protect the ecological balance.

  5. Four new species of Cephennomicrus Reitter (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Scydmaeninae) from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jałoszyński, Paweł

    2015-01-19

    Four new species of Cephennomicrus are described from Malaysia: C. curvidens sp. n., C. gentingensis sp. n. (both from the Genting Highlands, West Malaysia), C. santubongensis sp. n. and C. muluensis sp. n. (both from Sarawak, East Malaysia). Male genitalia of all new taxa are illustrated and diagnostic characters are discussed. 

  6. STRATEGI PEMBANGUNAN KAWASAN PERBATASAN KALIMANTAN BARAT – SARAWAK DALAM KONTEKS PENGUATAN KETAHANAN NASIONAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Lukman

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The border of Indonesia and neighbouring state region ever peep out very complex strategic issues of economic life, political, social, cultural, law enforcement, defence and security state. It’s free Island of Simpadan and Ligitan to hand of Malaysia and Ambalat conflict are represent the real example of small part of the strategic issue becoming threat factual to sovereignty of Indonesia state. Special particularly in region border of West Kalimantan and Sarawak (East Malaysia which is very loaded with the left behind problem, poorness and various tranasional crime. In consequence needed a correct development strategy to its eliminate so that created a strong national resilience in that area.

  7. Comparing schizophrenia symptoms in the Iban of Sarawak with other populations to elucidate clinical heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Duncan; Loa, Peter; Thara, Rangaswamy; John, Sujit; McGrath, John; Gratten, Jake; Mowry, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The symptom profile of schizophrenia can vary between ethnic groups. We explored selected symptom variables previously reported to be characteristic of schizophrenia in the Iban of Sarawak in transethnic populations from Australia, India and Sarawak, Malaysia. We tested site differences to confirm previous research, and to explore implications of differences across populations for future investigations. Methods We recruited schizophrenia samples in Australia (n=609), India (n=310) and Sarawak (n=205) primarily for the purposes of genetic studies. We analyzed seven identified variables and their relationship to site using logistic regression, including: global delusions, bizarre delusions, thought broadcast/insertion/withdrawal delusions, global hallucinations, auditory hallucinations, disorganized behavior, and prodromal duration. Results We identified a distinct symptom profile in our Sarawak sample. Specifically, the Iban exhibit: low frequency of thought broadcast/insertion/withdrawal delusions, high frequency of auditory hallucinations and disorganized behavior, with a comparatively short prodrome when compared with Australian and Indian populations. Discussion Understanding between-site variation in symptom profile may complement future transethnic genetic studies, and provide important clues as to the nature of differing schizophrenia expression across ethnically distinct groups. A comprehensive approach to subtyping schizophrenia is warranted, utilizing comprehensively ascertained transethnic samples to inform both schizophrenia genetics and nosology. PMID:24038814

  8. Critical factors of implementing Industrialised Building System in Sarawak: A research on SMEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, N. A.; Muhamad, W. M. N. W.; Othman, M. K. F.

    2017-05-01

    Industrialised Building System (IBS) have been adopted in Malaysia for over five decades and is expected to grow consistent with Malaysia's economic development. In promoting the adoption of IBS in construction projects, the government has taken several steps such as levy exemption for contractors and developers. Despite its numerous advantages and efforts pulled by the government, the implementation and adoption of IBS are still below the expected figure. Many researchers investigated readiness, setbacks and issues related to the implementation of IBS in Malaysia's construction projects. However, most of the research mainly for projects located in urban areas of West Malaysia. Therefore, this paper aims to close the gap on factors affecting the implementation of IBS for SMEs in Sarawak, where the level urbanisation is low. A semi-structured interview was conducted with 10 SME's contractors to get better insight view. The study found that logistics and infrastructure problems, a limited number of the manufacturer, lack of incentive, conventional payment methods, lack of financial supports are among critical factors affecting the implementation of IBS. Therefore, it was concluded that government plays major role in providing supports, incentives and facilitating the improvement of infrastructure to successfully implementing IBS in Sarawak.

  9. Case study of the Sarawak River Basin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-20

    Dec 20, 2012 ... (World Weather and Climate Information, 2010–2011) .... Batu Kitang Water Treatment Plant to form the Sarawak River, before flowing into the South China .... current study, and areas shaded in light blue are the flood-prone.

  10. Care demands on mothers caring for a child with Down syndrome: Malaysian (Sarawak) mothers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kim Geok; Lim, Khatijah Abdullah; Ling, How Kee

    2015-10-01

    This paper examines the experiences of mothers caring for a child with Down syndrome in the Malaysian (Sarawak) context. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 26 biological mothers of children with Down syndrome aged 18 years and below. They were accessed through selected child health clinics, community-based rehabilitation centres and schools using purposive sampling within two regions in Sarawak, one of the two Borneo States of Malaysia. Major themes emerging within the context of care demands were children's health, developmental delays, daily needs and behaviour issues. The insights obtained into the care demands experienced by mothers of children with Down syndrome have several implications for practice by care professionals. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Medical Virology in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaw Bing Chua

    2009-01-01

    Virology is a branch of biological science dealing with the study of viruses, and medical virology focuses on the study and control of diseases due to viruses that is of medical importance. The development of medical virology in Malaysia has its beginning in the Institute for Medical Research (IMR), following the establishment of the Division of Medical Zoology and Virus Research in the institute on 23 March 1953. The second institution in the country to establish diagnostic and research work in medical virology was Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University Malaya. This was followed by University Kebangsaan Malaysia, University Sains Malaysia and University of Sarawak Malaysia. The National Public Health Laboratory (NPHL) is the latest institution to establish a laboratory in 2003 for virus isolation and services to support country surveillance and outbreak investigation of infectious diseases due to viruses. In the field of medical virology, Malaysia contributed substantially in the areas of virus diagnostic services, development and research ranging from survey and documentation on the existence and prevalence of viruses causing diseases in Malaysia, clinical presentation and epidemiological features of virus diseases, evaluation of new diagnostic tests to pathogenesis of viral diseases. Malaysia contributed to the discoveries of at least 12 new viruses in the world. ASEAN plus Three (China, Japan, Republic of Korea) Emerging Infectious Programme was established to overcome the challenges and impact of emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases in this region. Malaysia as the co-ordinator of the laboratory component of the programme, contributed to strengthen the regional laboratory capability, capacity, laboratory-based surveillance and networking. The future of medical virology in Malaysia in terms of integration of diagnostic, reference and research to support the country's need will be enhanced and strengthened with the on

  12. An Investigation of Sustainable Power Generation from Oil Palm Biomass: A Case Study in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Aghamohammadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sarawak is the largest state in Malaysia, with 22% of the nation's oil palm plantation area, making it the second largest contributor to palm biomass production. Despite the enormous amount of palm biomass in the state, the use of biomass as fuel for power generation remains low. This study is designed to investigate the sustainability of power generation from palm biomass specifically in Sarawak by conducting a survey among the palm oil mill developers. To conduct this investigation, several key sustainability factors were identified: the security of the biomass supply, the efficiency of conversion technology, the existing network system, challenges and future prospects for power generation from palm biomass. These factors were assessed through a set of questionnaires. The returned questionnaires were then analysed using statistical tools. The results of this study demonstrate that Sarawak has biomass in abundance, and that it is ready to be exploited for large scale power generation. The key challenge to achieving the renewable energy target is the inadequate grid infrastructure that inhibits palm oil developers from benefiting from the Feed-in-Tariff payment scheme. One way forward, a strategic partnership between government and industrial players, offers a promising outcome, depending on an economic feasibility study. The decentralization of electricity generation to support rural electrification is another feasible alternative for renewable energy development in the state.

  13. Enhancing Visitor Experiences Using Thematic Interpretation in Park Guiding Service in Sarawak National Parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Victor Luna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing visitor experiences is arguably the primary and most important goal for interpretation by many protected area managers and tourism business. However, little research has been conducted in Sarawak, Malaysia to directly quantify the effects of thematic interpretation has on tourist experiences. Drawing on the TORE-model of interpretation and through the inception of Park Guiding Training and Licensing System in Sarawak since 2007, this quantitative study examines the effectiveness of thematic interpretive guided tours delivered by park guides at Bako National Park, Sarawak, with the assumption that it will further enhance visitor experiences. A descriptive analysis and Pearson's product-moment correlation analysis of sub-indicators of the global evaluation of interpretation of site, and sub-indicators of elaboration surveyed from visitors of purposively sampled park guides revealed a strong measurement and correlation coefficients of visitors’ overall quality of thematic intepretive guided tours effecting visitor satisfaction and experiences. These findings provide empirical evidence that good thematic interpretive guided tour makes a positive impacts on visitor experiences, thus making training of tourism businesses' employees as park guides as a good investment. The suggestions for further research in influencing visitor attitude and shaping visitor behaviour are offered.

  14. IDENTIFYING MOTIVATION FACTOR INVOLVEMENT OF SARAWAK MALAY WOMEN ENTREPRENEUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masyantie Mohamad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sarawak multilayered cake among Sarawak product signature famous among the local as well as international tourist visiting Sarawak. In fact, Sarawak Malay women entrepreneurs have become very necessary players in the entrepreneurial field specifically in this cottage industries from the early introduction of this business, they have facing various problem in this businesses. Thus, this research aims to build an understanding of motivational factor that encourage Sarawak Malay women entrepreneurial experiences especially in multilayered cake businesses. Using qualitative methods, this research aims to identify the entrepreneurial motivations factors; with regards to start-up motivation by Sarawak Malay women. The finding shows that the motivations that influence Malay women within Kuching, Sarawak areas to start and grow their business are involve self-driven and context driven that motivate them involve in multilayered cakes businesses.

  15. Spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Du Hai; Sim, Jillian Ooi Lean; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Moi, Phang Siew

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this article is to represent spatial patterns of seaweed distribution in Malaysia. Seaweeds have been collected since 1984 along coastlines of 4675 km of peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak. However, there is no seaweed database and they cannot be displayed in a geographic view. Therefore, a database with 805 georeferenced observations was setup and GIS is used to analyze seaweed diversity based on this database. The highest number of observations is 94 which occur along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. The highest number of species richness is 82 which are also along east coastline of peninsular Malaysia. Rhodophyta has the highest species richness while Chlorophyta has the least species richness.

  16. The numbering of Sarawak Forest Department collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashton, P.S.

    1966-01-01

    Taxonomists working with material collected by the Sarawak Forest Department have often been hard put to decide how to quote numbers. Is the departmental series number preceeded by a letter S, or an F, or would it be best to quote only the collector and the number? I have tried to unravel the histor

  17. Electron beam accelerator: A new tool for environmental preservation in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Othman, Mohd Nahar [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000, Kajang Selangor (Malaysia)

    2012-09-26

    Electron beam accelerators are widely used for industrial applications such as surface curing, crosslinking of wires and cables and sterilization/ decontamination of pharmaceutical products. The energy of the electron beam determines the type of applications. This is due to the penetration power of the electron that is limited by the energy. In the last decade, more work has been carried out to utilize the energetic electron for remediation of environmental pollution. For this purposes, 1 MeV electron beam accelerator is sufficient to treat wastewater from textile industry and flue gases from fossil fuel combustions. In Nuclear Malaysia, a variable energy Cockroft Walton type accelerator has been utilized to initiate investigations in these two areas. An electron beam flue gas treatment test rig was built to treat emission from diesel combustion, where it was found that using EB parameters of 1MeV and 12mA can successfully remove at least 80% of nitric oxide in the emission. Wastewater from textile industries was treated using combination of biological treatment and EB. The initial findings indicated that the quality of water had improved based on the COD{sub Cr}, BOD{sub 5} indicators.

  18. Electron beam accelerator: A new tool for environmental preservation in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Siti Aiasah; Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Othman, Mohd Nahar

    2012-09-01

    Electron beam accelerators are widely used for industrial applications such as surface curing, crosslinking of wires and cables and sterilization/ decontamination of pharmaceutical products. The energy of the electron beam determines the type of applications. This is due to the penetration power of the electron that is limited by the energy. In the last decade, more work has been carried out to utilize the energetic electron for remediation of environmental pollution. For this purposes, 1 MeV electron beam accelerator is sufficient to treat wastewater from textile industry and flue gases from fossil fuel combustions. In Nuclear Malaysia, a variable energy Cockroft Walton type accelerator has been utilized to initiate investigations in these two areas. An electron beam flue gas treatment test rig was built to treat emission from diesel combustion, where it was found that using EB parameters of 1MeV and 12mA can successfully remove at least 80% of nitric oxide in the emission. Wastewater from textile industries was treated using combination of biological treatment and EB. The initial findings indicated that the quality of water had improved based on the CODCr, BOD5 indicators.

  19. Common efforts in the development of rural Sarawak, Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grijpstra, B.G.

    1976-01-01

    The subject of research was whether it is possible to establish modern cooperative societies in traditionally integrated communities. Views of laymen, politicians and sociologists are presented. The characteristics of tribal societies and loosely structured societies are discussed. An

  20. Common efforts in the development of rural Sarawak, Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grijpstra, B.G.

    1976-01-01

    The subject of research was whether it is possible to establish modern cooperative societies in traditionally integrated communities. Views of laymen, politicians and sociologists are presented. The characteristics of tribal societies and loosely structured societies are discussed. An analysis is ma

  1. A sociological examination of international placement learning by British social work students in children’s services in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Ashencaen Crabtree; Jonathan Parker; Azlinda Azman; Faizah Mas’ud

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses research findings into a study of UK student learning on international social work placements in Malaysia in collaboration with two Malaysian universities: Universiti Sains Malaysia and Universiti Malaysia Sarawak. The discussion focuses on those placements taking place in children’s services: residential care and community-based support programmes. The aim of the study was to explore how social work students adapt to unfamiliar learning situations in new cultural context...

  2. Seasonal Population Dynamics of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L.C. Teck

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Effective control of phytophagous pests requires a thorough understanding of their seasonal population dynamics, dispersion behavior, natural enemy activity and climate. To date, although very little detail information had been published on the ecology of Diaphorina citri. The objective of this investigation was to test through field experiment the hypothesis that the major factors influencing local D. citri populations particularly their seasonal population dynamics in Sarawak are (a flushing cycles, (b climate and (c the impact of the primary parasitoids namely Tamarixia radiata and Diaphorencyrtus aligarhensis. Approach: Seasonal abundance D. citri was studied weekly from March 1998 to December 2000 in the 1-ha citrus honey mandarin (Citrus aurantium L. commercial orchard at Jemukan (1° 33'N, 110° 41'E, Kota Samarahan Division, Southwest Sarawak, in Malaysia. Results: Field studies on citrus trees showed that the D. citri population fluctuates throughout the year on citrus honey mandarin in Sarawak. Generations overlapped but adult and egg population peaks for a short period generally coincided with three annual flushing cycles, in August-September, February-March and June-July between March 1998 and December 2000. Conclusion: Psyllid population levels are positively related to the availability of new shoot flushes. Psyllid populations are adversely affected by weather conditions and parasitoids. Adult psyllid populations increased exponentially during periods of flush growth and migration and dispersal of the adults was also related to flushing cycles. Dispersal and colonization of new trees is greatest in September-October, at the onset of the rainy season.

  3. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  4. Language Learning Strategies and Language Self-Efficacy: Investigating the Relationship in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mary Siew-Lian

    2005-01-01

    This study explored graduate pre-service teachers' language learning strategies and language self-efficacy and the relationship between these two constructs. Seventy-four graduate English-as-a-second-language (ESL) pre-service teachers (13 males, 61 females) from a teachers' college in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, participated in this study. These…

  5. Characterization of the coal derived humic acids from Mukah, Sarawak as soil conditioner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong Sim Siong

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, abundant coal resources were found in Sarawak and Sabah. The utilization of coal resources, to date, is emphasized on the energy productions. The non-energy utilization as soil conditioner is unexplored. Therefore, this study attempted to characterize the coal humic acids extracted from Mukah coal and to evaluate its properties as soil conditioner. The coal humic acids from the regenerated sample were also assessed. The results revealed that different extractants and concentrations influenced the properties of humic acids. The extraction with KOH at 0.5 mol L-1 produced humic acids with low ash content and high acidic functional groups, which are substantial as soil conditioner. However, the yield was low. Regeneration of coal sample with 10% nitric acids improved the yield to an average of 83.45%. The acidic functional groups of nitrohumic acids were improved with the ash content remained at a low level.

  6. Sarawak Bamboo Craft: Symbolism and Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Mohd Zaihidee

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between human beings and their environment has stirred reactions between nature and the development of mind and actions that can be discussed using interdisciplinary approaches such as psychology, sociology, anthropology and history, in understanding human thinking and behavior. A psychological approach is intended to evaluate the individual choices and needs in society. A sociological approach details the various patterns in the social organization. An anthropological approach is tied with culture and belief to fulfil human needs which are based on their habitat, while a historical approach looks at the development which is related to the past. Dimensions of experiences, order and logic, selective elaboration and expressions are used to analyze the bamboo craft of Iban, Melanau and Bidayuh societies in Sarawak long-houses. The existence of constitutive, moral, expressive and cognitive symbols has been interpreted based on a theoretical framework that has been developed by Langer Art Theory, Parsons Social Theory and Kaplan Culture Theory. The values and meaning formed are interpreted to understand matters related to the lives of villagers and the finding suggests that bamboo craft expresses the multi-ethnic mind and character in the socio-culture of long- houses in Sarawak.

  7. Cyber Café Usage in Malaysia: An Exploratory Study

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Shah Alam; Z aini Abdullah; Nilufar Ahsan

    2009-01-01

    Using empirical and new field data, t his exploratory study investigates the pattern of the use of cyber cafes in two cities in Malaysia. The research was based on the convenience sample survey of 284 respondents in total in the two cities, Melaka and Miri in Sarawak. It can be argued that cyb er café seeks to provide its customers with inexpensive Internet access in a comfortable environment. People of all ages and sex come to enjoy the unique, upscale, educational,...

  8. Description of the final stadium larvae of Onychargia atrocyana Selys, 1865 from Sarawak, identified using DNA barcoding (Odonata: Zygoptera: Platycnemididae), with an overview of larval characters in the Platycnemididae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Albert G; Dow, Rory A

    2015-11-11

    The final stadium larva of Onychargia atrocyana Selys, 1865, is described and illustrated based on two female specimens collected at Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, East Malaysia. The larvae were identified by matching the mitochondrial marker COI with that of known adult specimens from Gunung Mulu, Bintulu and Kuching in Sarawak and from Pahang state in West Malaysia. The specimens presented close matches with all adults in this gene. As O. atrocyana is a taxonomically isolated species with no close congeners in Borneo the determination is beyond doubt. O. atrocyana is the only member of the Onychargiinae for which the larva is known. It is compared with the known larvae of other platycnemidid subfamilies, and the possible significance of larval morphology in higher classification of the group is discussed.

  9. A Review of Integrated River Basin Management for Sarawak River

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    Kuok K. Kuok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Sarawak River was a life-sustaining water source for the residents in Kuching City and surrounding areas. Raw water is treated at Batu Kitang Water Treatment Plant (BKWTP that supplies more than 98% of the total water production in Kuching City. The raw water supply to BKWTP is not adequate to meet the ever increasing water demand. In order to overcome this problem, four projects had been implemented along Sarawak River for managing and securing water supply to BKWTP. Approach: These four projects are construction of 1.5m height storage weir across Sungai Sarawak Kiri river channel, Kuching Barrage and Shiplock, Bengoh Dam and Kuching Centralized Wastewater Management System (KCWMS. In 2005, 1.5 m height submersible weir was constructed across Sungai Sarawak Kiri channel for increasing the safe yield that can last until year 2010. Kuching Barrage and Shiplock were commissioned in 2000 as barrier to avoid the saline intrusion reaching upper catchment. 24 telemetry stations were installed along Sarawak River for monitoring and regulating the water level. This will preserve high quality water storage at upper catchment of Sarawak River. In year 2010, Bengoh Dam was constructed to ensure adequate raw water will be supplied to BKWTP for meeting the increasing water demand from 2010-2030. This reservoir will store 144 million m3 of fresh water covering reservoir area of 8.77km2. Beyond 2030, the water supply shall not depend solely on fresh water. Results: Black and grey water in Sarawak Catchment was treated through Kuching Centralized Wastewater Management System (KCWMS and recycled for daily used. Conclusion: The treated water that comply Standard A water quality, can distribute for domestic, industrial and irrigation used in nearest future. This will reduce the water demand solely on raw water and create a sustainable living in Kuching City. Beyond 2030, a few alternatives are also proposed for conserving and

  10. Indo-Pacific Humpback Dolphins in Borneo: A Review of Current Knowledge with Emphasis on Sarawak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Gianna; Zulkifli Poh, Anna Norliza; Peter, Cindy; Porter, Lindsay; Kreb, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins (Sousa chinensis) are documented from various locations along Borneo's coast, including three sites in Sarawak, Malaysia, three sites in Sabah, Malaysia, three locations in Kalimantan, Indonesia and the limited coastal waters of the Sultanate of Brunei. Observations in all these areas indicate a similar external morphology, which seems to fall somewhere between that documented for Chinese populations known as S. chinensis, and that of Sousa sahulensis in Australia and Papua New Guinea. Sightings occur in shallow nearshore waters, often near estuaries and river mouths, and associations with Irrawaddy dolphins (Orcaella brevirostris) are frequently documented. Population estimates exist for only two locations and sightings information throughout Borneo indicates that frequency of occurrence is rare and group size is usually small. Threats from fisheries by-catch and coastal development are present in many locations and there are concerns over the ability of these small and fragmented populations to survive. The conservation and taxonomic status of humpback dolphins in Borneo remain unclear, and there are intriguing questions as to where these populations fit in our evolving understanding of the taxonomy of the genus.

  11. A new record of Fannia pusio (Wiedemann) (Diptera:Fanniidae) from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, B; Kurahashi, H; Jeffery, J; Yasohdha, N; Lau, S Y; John, M C; Marwi, M A; Zuha, R M; Ahmad, M S

    2007-12-01

    Fannia pusio (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Fanniidae) is newly recorded from Malaysia. This record is based on 1male symbol 1female symbol from Sarawak, east Malaysia and 1male symbol 2female symbol from Selangor, peninsular Malaysia. It is included in the pusio group of Fannia wherein are included Fannia femoralis (Stein), Fannia howardi Malloch, Fannia trimaculata (Stein), Fannia leucosticta (Meigen) and Fannia punctiventris Malloch. The male of Fannia pusio is differentiated from other members of the group by the following features: hind femur with a swelling bearing a number of setae that are usually curled at tip; squamae creamy; tergite 1+2 broadly grey dusted at sides.

  12. The impact of A. R. Wallace's Sarawak Law paper reassessed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyhe, John

    2016-12-01

    This article examines six main elements in the modern story of the impact of Alfred Russel Wallace's 1855 Sarawak Law paper, particularly in the many accounts of Charles Darwin's life and work. These elements are: Each of these are very frequently repeated as straightforward facts in the popular and scholarly literature. It is here argued that each of these is erroneous and that the role of the Sarawak Law paper in the historiography of Darwin and Wallace needs to be revised. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. THE UNIFIED LEVELLING NETWORK OF SARAWAK AND ITS ADJUSTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. M. Som

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The height reference network of Sarawak has seen major improvement in over the past two decades. The most significant improvement was the establishment of extended precise leveling network of which is now able to connect all three major datum points at Pulau Lakei, Original and Bintulu. Datum by following the major accessible routes across Sarawak. This means the leveling network in Sarawak has now been inter-connected and unified. By having such a unified network leads to the possibility of having a common single least squares adjustment been performed for the first time. The least squares adjustment of this unified levelling network was attempted in order to compute the height of all Bench Marks established in the entire levelling network. The adjustment was done by using MoreFix levelling adjustment package developed at FGHT UTM. The computational procedure adopted is linear parametric adjustment by minimum constraint. Since Sarawak has three separate datums therefore three separate adjustments were implemented by utilizing datum at Pulau Lakei, Original Miri and Bintulu Datum respectively. Results of the MoreFix unified adjustment agreed very well with adjustment repeated using Starnet. Further the results were compared with solution given by Jupem and they are in good agreement as well. The difference in height analysed were within 10mm for the case of minimum constraint at Pulau Lakei datum and with much better agreement in the case of Original Miri Datum.

  14. The Communicative Ability of Universiti Teknologi MARA Sarawak's Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sharifah Zakiah Wan; Hakim, Simon Faizal; Rahim, Mahdalela; Noyem, John Francis; Ibrahim, Sueb; Ahmad, Johnny; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    This study explores Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Sarawak graduating students' oral proficiency, focusing on grammatical accuracy. Oral proficiency in English has always been the benchmark of language proficiency, and in the context of UiTM's language teaching curriculum, efforts to enhance students' oral proficiency are implemented through…

  15. Beccari’s ascent of ”Mount Poi”, Sarawak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burtt, B.L.

    1964-01-01

    In chapter VII of his book ”Wanderings in the Great Forests of Borneo” Beccari records his ascent of Mount Poi (Poe, Pueh) in south-western Sarawak, and subsequently Poi has been cited as the type locality for a number of species described from his material. The purpose of this note is to put on rec

  16. Devolution of HRM Practices: Perspectives of Two Major Japanese Electrical and Electronics Companies in Malaysia

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    Abang Ekhsan Abang Othman

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines the devolution of HRM functions, the rationale and problemsof such devolution to line management in the context of applications and processes in two major Japanesemultinational companies in Malaysia.Design/methodology/approach– - The research used mixed methodology via case studies and questionnairesurveys. Overall 29 questionnaires from two companies were analyzed, a response rate of 58 percent.In addition, the views of the Executive Director, Head of HR, and line managers were sought regardingtheir role, involvement and problems of devolvement to line managers.Findings -– Analysis of questionnaire responses and interviews shows that devolution of HRM functionsto the line managers was adopted by both organizations, though their approaches varied in terms ofprocess. The study revealed a high degree of devolution of responsibility to line managers for recruitmentand selection and training and development. The devolution of training and development functions specificallyto a separate department resulted in their increased effectiveness. Extensive participation and a closeworking relationship on HR-related issues between HR managers and line managers jointly contributed tothe effectiveness of the companies’ devolution of HRM functions.Practical implications - Devolution of HRM functions to line management is a growing trend internationally.However, despite the positive outcomes of devolution, the process is never unproblematic.Originality/value –- This study thus builds on the existing literature and also contributes to overcomingthe dearth of empirical research on devolution which has been predominantly Western in context.Furthermore, no study examining devolution of the HRM functions in Malaysia.

  17. Pollution Control: How Feasible is Zero Discharge Concepts in Malaysia Palm Oil Mills

    OpenAIRE

    Yahaya S. Madaki

    2013-01-01

    Many palm oil mills in Malaysia still discharged either partially treated or raw palm oil mill effluent (POME) into nearby rivers. Either partially treated or untreated POME depletes a water body of its oxygen and suffocates aquatic life. Vast amounts of biogas are also generated during anaerobic digestion of POME. This paper presented the key findings from the survey mailed to 86 palm oil mills located in Sarawak and Sabah. The survey results provide an overview of the position of the palm o...

  18. An Empirical Study of Critical Soft Factors for Quality Improvement in The Electrical and Electronics Firms in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Madi Abdullah

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Soft factors are important aspect that sustains the organizations in their efforts towards continuous quality improvement (QI and customer satisfaction. The conventional wisdom states that quality improvement in organizations increases profits and productivity. Therefore, the aim of the paper is to examine the influence of critical soft factors (CSF on quality improvement (QI. For that purpose, this study examine: (i the relationship between the CSF and QI and (ii to what extent the six CSF explain QI. The study used survey data from 255 electrical and electronics (E&E firms in Malaysia. The individual managers representing the each firm made the unit of analysis of the study. The finding reveals that QI was significantly influenced by the following soft factors: management commitment, customer focus, employee involvement, training & education, and reward & recognition. Supplier relationship was not a significant predictor of quality improvement. Finally, this study has empirically shown that quality improvement will increase when the organizations emphasize more on soft factors.Keywords: Critical soft factors, quality improvement, Electrical and Electronics firms

  19. Body mass index and factors related to overweight among women workers in electronic factories in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Heng-Leng; Kandiah, Mirnalini; Khalid, Maimunah; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Jamaluddin, Jamilah; Nordin, Nor Anita Megat Mohd; Shuib, Rashidah; Osman, Intan

    2004-01-01

    Factors related to overweight were examined in a cross-sectional survey that included 1612 women workers from 10 large electronics assembly factories in Peninsular Malaysia. Respondents were Malaysian citizens, direct production workers below the supervisory level, and had worked at least a year in the factory where they were presently employed. Heights and weights were taken to calculate the body mass index (BMI). Weights and BMI increased with increasing age. After adjusting for age, odds ratios for overweight were significantly raised for married women in relation to not married women (OR 1.5, 95% CI=1.15-2.02), lower secondary education in relation to higher than upper secondary education (OR 1.8, 95% CI=1.06-3.14), monthly income RM800-999 (OR 1.7, 95% CI=1.21-2.45) and >/=RM1,000 (OR 1.8, 95% CI=1.23-2.72) in relation to income, and working in rotating shifts. The overall prevalence of overweight was 37.4%; the overall mean BMI was 24.2+/-5.4 kg/m(2). Prevalence of overweight and mean BMI for younger age groups were similar to Malay women in the country-wide representative National Health and Morbidity Survey II, but the older age groups in this study had higher overweight prevalence and mean BMI than the national sample. Electronics women workers face a higher risk of overweight, and is an important group for nutrition intervention.

  20. Incorporating Electronic Business Initiatives in Health Services and Health Tourism: A Case Study of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Talh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Telecommunications, information communication technology, miniaturization, computers and Internet went through shorter product life styles and achieved widespread diffusion and reformed the nature of business operation and enhanced competitive business environment instantly. This technological advancement has resulted in evolution and innovation of many products, services and business processes. The Internet has resulted in the emergence of virtual markets with four primary distinctive characteristics, which are real time, shared, open and global. The greatest feature of the Internet is the absence of intermediaries; the manufacturers are able to sell their product relatively easier to buyers via Internet. E-business today is no longer technological issue, but is also a business issue. Incorporating E-business initiatives in health services aims to go beyond the traditional modes of healthcare delivery and instead, provide greater access to better and higher quality healthcare. It is achieved by grabbing opportunities of enhanced multimedia and information technologies and developing new technological solutions. In addition, E-business initiative is incorporated in enhancing health tourism sector through cost cutting strategies and improving quality of patients' care. Thus, this paper attempts to discuss the current states of health services and health tourism and how the emergence of E-business initiative can be capitalized to further boost the industry in Malaysia.

  1. Malaysia (country/area statements).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    According to this statement presented to the Committee on Population of the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, Malaysia by 1984 achieved a crude death rate of 5.3/1000, an infant mortality rate of 17/1000 live births, and a 1983 life expectancy at birth of 67.6 for males and 72.3 for females due primarily to socioeconomic development, better nutrition, and a health system covering 95% of the rural population. Substantial mortality differentials still exist between Peninsular Malaysia, Sabah, and Sarawak, between urban and rural areas, and among ethnic groups. Differences in the coverage and quality of mortality statistics also exist. 83.2% of Malaysia's total population of 15.5 million is in Peninsular Malaysia, 7.3% in Sabah, and 9.5% in Sarawak. In Peninsular Malaysia, 55.1% are Malays, 33.9% Chinese, and 10.3% Indians. About 40% of the population is urban, and 39% is under age 15. The average annual rate of growth declined from 2.6% in the 1960s to 2.3% in the 1970s. The total fertility rate fell from 5.1 children in 1970 to 4.1 in 1980. A rise in age at 1st marriage and reduction in marital fertility have been partly offset by an increase in the proportion of women of childbearing age. The population is projected to grow to about 22 million by the year 2000. Chinese and Indians are expected to approach replacement level fertility by that year, but Malay fertility is expected to remain high for some time. Internal migration, 45% of which is intrarural, increased markedly in the 1970s, probably due to rapid modernization, industrialization, land development, and regional imbalances in economic development. In absolute terms a total of 410,000 persons moved from rural to urban areas during the 1970s. Important progress has been made in regional development programs, but further regional development requires resolution of problems related to internal migration and greater efforts to relocate industries in the less developed areas. The

  2. Beyond hydrology in the sustainability assessment of dams: A planners perspective - The Sarawak experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Edward

    2012-01-01

    SummaryThere is increasing concern about the availability of water supplies in developing countries to provide clean drinking water and sanitation as well as providing for irrigation for food security. This has led to hydrologically led investigation to establish the feasibility and storage capacity of potentially new dam sites. This task has become more difficult for hydrologists and others with the uncertainties created by climate change and the measurement of the hydrological, geographical and ecological footprint of new dams. The questions asked by hydrologists are increasingly likely to be required to be cast in terms of the four pillars of sustainability; environmental, economic, social and institutional. Similarly, regional planners have to be more cognisant of the social outcomes of dam development while understanding the wider hydrological context at a watershed and basin level. The paper defines the concept of sustainability assessment in the context of resettlement and analyses its implications for the Bakun Hydro-electric project in Sarawak, Malaysia. Specifically it attempts to address the question of what social sustainability would really mean in the context of communities affected by dam projects, and their catchments using hermeneutics, tradeoffs and offsets. The findings of this question were presented at a hydrological conference held in Santiago in October 2010, based on the outcome of specific questionnaire responses received from indigenous peoples affected by the Bakun Dam hydroelectric project. The paper also offers some insights pertaining to the social sustainability assessment aspects of dams and their catchments.

  3. Stable isotope stratigraphy and larger benthic foraminiferal extinctions in the Melinau Limestone, Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Laura J.; Pearson, Paul N.; Renema, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Important long-ranging groups of larger benthic foraminifera (LBF) are known to have become extinct during a period of global cooling and climate disruption at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) but the precise timing and mechanisms are uncertain. Recent study showed unexpectedly that the LBF extinction in Tanzania occurs very close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary, as recognised by the extinction of the planktonic foraminiferal Family Hantkeninidae, rather than at the later period of maximum global ice growth and sea-level fall, as previously thought. Here we investigate the same phase of extinction in the Melinau Limestone of Sarawak, on the island of Borneo, Malaysia one of the most complete carbonate successions spanning the Eocene to Lower Miocene. Assemblages of LBF from the Melinau Limestone were studied extensively by Geoffrey Adams during the 1960s-80s, confirming a major extinction during the EOT, but the section lacked independent means of correlation. By analysing rock samples originally studied by Adams and now in the Natural History Museum, London, we provide new bulk stable isotope (δ13C and δ18O) records. This enables us to identify, albeit tentatively, the level of maximum stable isotope excursion and show that the LBF extinction event in the Melinau Limestone occurs below this isotope excursion, supporting the results from Tanzania and indicating that the extinction of LBF close to the Eocene/Oligocene boundary may be a global phenomenon.

  4. New locality record of Isomyia paurogonita Fang & Fan, 1986 (Diptera: Calliphoridae) from Peninsular Malaysia and Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, C C; Aisha, S; Kurahashi, H; Omar, B

    2013-03-01

    Isomyia paurogonita Fang & Fan, 1986 (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a rare species of the subfamily Rhiniinae (tribe Cosminini) was recorded for the first time in Malaysia. We collected one male and two females during a field trip conducted at Genting Highland, Pahang, peninsular Malaysia in May 2011. A 3-day old cow liver was offered as attractant and dipterans collected were transferred to the laboratory for specimens processing and identification. The adults of I. paurogonita were attracted to the odour and then captured by using a sweep net. Isomyia paurogonita was also recorded from two other localities in Peninsular and Malaysian Borneo, namely Gombak Utara, Selangor and Sibu, Sarawak.

  5. Familiarity, perception, and reasons for electronic-cigarette experimentation among the general public in Malaysia: Preliminary insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan Mohamed Elkalmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess the general public views and familiarity toward electronic cigarette (e-cigarette in Kuantan, Malaysia. Methodology: A total of 277 Kuantan people were involved in this study. The questionnaire was distributed at random in shops, businesses, and public places in Kuantan. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS (version 17.0. Results: From 400 participants, a total number of 277 (160, 57.7% men and 117, 42.4% women respondents completed the questionnaire. The mean age was 26.89 ± 9.8 years old. The majority of the study participants were male (57.7%, Malay (83.8%, Muslims (83.8%, singles (69%, and employed (75.8%, with about 83 (29.9% of the respondents were smokers. The prevalence of e-cigarettes smokers was found to be only 1.4% (n = 4. About one-third of the respondents (n = 72, 26% have tried e-cigarette before. Job status was significantly associated with smoking e-cigarette among the population (P = 0.02. Main factors for a person to start e-cigarette smoking were curiosity (37.5% and cheaper price (40.8%. Majority of respondents agreed that e-cigarette would not affect health as normal cigarette, and that variety of flavors contribute to better enjoyment (51.6% and 66.7%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the current study demonstrate that the prevalence of e-cigarettes smoking and its popularity, familiarity, and knowledge are still insufficient among Kuantan population. Further studies should be done to tackle this problem before it getting worse.

  6. Familiarity, perception, and reasons for electronic-cigarette experimentation among the general public in Malaysia: Preliminary insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkalmi, Ramadan Mohamed; Bhagavathul, Akshaya Srikanth; Ya’u, Adamu; Al-Dubai, Sami Abdo Radman; Elsayed, Tarek M.; Ahmad, Akram; Mohamed, Wael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess the general public views and familiarity toward electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) in Kuantan, Malaysia. Methodology: A total of 277 Kuantan people were involved in this study. The questionnaire was distributed at random in shops, businesses, and public places in Kuantan. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS (version 17.0). Results: From 400 participants, a total number of 277 (160, 57.7% men and 117, 42.4% women) respondents completed the questionnaire. The mean age was 26.89 ± 9.8 years old. The majority of the study participants were male (57.7%), Malay (83.8%), Muslims (83.8%), singles (69%), and employed (75.8%), with about 83 (29.9%) of the respondents were smokers. The prevalence of e-cigarettes smokers was found to be only 1.4% (n = 4). About one-third of the respondents (n = 72, 26%) have tried e-cigarette before. Job status was significantly associated with smoking e-cigarette among the population (P = 0.02). Main factors for a person to start e-cigarette smoking were curiosity (37.5%) and cheaper price (40.8%). Majority of respondents agreed that e-cigarette would not affect health as normal cigarette, and that variety of flavors contribute to better enjoyment (51.6% and 66.7%, respectively). Conclusion: The results of the current study demonstrate that the prevalence of e-cigarettes smoking and its popularity, familiarity, and knowledge are still insufficient among Kuantan population. Further studies should be done to tackle this problem before it getting worse. PMID:27413354

  7. Electronic health records approaches and challenges: a comparison between Malaysia and four East Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Ghani, Mohd Khanapi; Bali, Rajeev K; Naguib, Raouf N G; Marshall, Ian M

    2008-01-01

    An integrated Lifetime Health Record (LHR) is fundamental for achieving seamless and continuous access to patient medical information and for the continuum of care. However, the aim has not yet been fully realised. The efforts are actively progressing around the globe. Every stage of the development of the LHR initiatives had presented peculiar challenges. The best lessons in life are those of someone else's experiences. This paper presents an overview of the development approaches undertaken by four East Asian countries in implementing a national Electronic Health Record (EHR) in the public health system. The major challenges elicited from the review including integration efforts, process reengineering, funding, people, and law and regulation will be presented, compared, discussed and used as lessons learned for the further development of the Malaysian integrated LHR.

  8. Characteristic of root decomposition in a tropical rainforest in Sarawak, Malaysi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Mizue; Makita, Naoki; Katayam, Ayumi; Kume, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Kazuho; Khoon Kho, L.

    2016-04-01

    Woody roots play a significant role in forest carbon cycling, as up to 60 percent of tree photosynthetic production can be allocated to belowground. Root decay is one of the main processes of soil C dynamics and potentially relates to soil C sequestration. However, much less attention has been paid for root litter decomposition compared to the studies of leaf litter because roots are hidden from view. Previous studies have revealed that physico-chemical quality of roots, climate, and soil organisms affect root decomposition significantly. However, patterns and mechanisms of root decomposition are still poorly understood because of the high variability of root properties, field environment and potential decomposers. For example, root size would be a factor controlling decomposition rates, but general understanding of the difference between coarse and fine root decompositions is still lacking. Also, it is known that root decomposition is performed by soil animals, fungi and bacteria, but their relative importance is poorly understood. In this study, therefore, we aimed to characterize the root decomposition in a tropical rainforest in Sarawak, Malaysia, and clarify the impact of soil living organisms and root sizes on root litter decomposition. We buried soil cores with fine and coarse root litter bags in soil in Lambir Hills National Park. Three different types of soil cores that are covered by 1.5 cm plastic mesh, root-impermeable sheet (50um) and fungi-impermeable sheet (1um) were prepared. The soil cores were buried in February 2013 and collected 4 times, 134 days, 226 days, 786 days and 1151 days after the installation. We found that nearly 80 percent of the coarse root litter was decomposed after two years, whereas only 60 percent of the fine root litter was decomposed. Our results also showed significantly different ratio of decomposition between different cores, suggesting the different contribution of soil living organisms to decomposition process.

  9. Impacts of Horticultural Mineral Oils and Two Insecticide Practices on Population Fluctuation of Diaphorina citri and Spread of Huanglongbing in a Citrus Orchard in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Chan Teck Leong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of the incidence and spread of the citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB in relation to the vector Diaphorina citri population fluctuation were studied from January 1999 to December 2001 seasons in a 0.8 ha citrus orchard at Jemukan (1° 33′N, 110° 41′E, Southwest Sarawak in Malaysia. In relation to insecticide and horticultural mineral oils (HMOs use, levels of HLB infection rose quite rapidly over the next 3 years in the unsprayed control and less rapidly in the other treatments such as imidacloprid, nC24HMO, and triazophos/cypermethrin/chlorpyrifos. Levels of HLB as determined by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR were 42.2%, 9.4%, 11.4%, and 22.7%, respectively. The effects of nC24HMO and conventional pesticides on the citrus psyllid population and parasitoids in citrus orchard were also determined.

  10. Impacts of horticultural mineral oils and two insecticide practices on population fluctuation of Diaphorina citri and spread of Huanglongbing in a citrus orchard in Sarawak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Stephen Chan Teck; Abang, Fatimah; Beattie, Andrew; Kueh, Roland Jui Heng; Wong, Sing King

    2012-01-01

    Aspects of the incidence and spread of the citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB) in relation to the vector Diaphorina citri population fluctuation were studied from January 1999 to December 2001 seasons in a 0.8 ha citrus orchard at Jemukan (1° 33'N, 110° 41'E), Southwest Sarawak in Malaysia. In relation to insecticide and horticultural mineral oils (HMOs) use, levels of HLB infection rose quite rapidly over the next 3 years in the unsprayed control and less rapidly in the other treatments such as imidacloprid, nC24HMO, and triazophos/cypermethrin/chlorpyrifos. Levels of HLB as determined by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) were 42.2%, 9.4%, 11.4%, and 22.7%, respectively. The effects of nC(24)HMO and conventional pesticides on the citrus psyllid population and parasitoids in citrus orchard were also determined.

  11. KELAS MENENGAH, UMNO DAN INTELIGENSIA: TENTANGAN DOMINASI POLITIK BUMIPUTERA ISLAM DI SARAWAK (MIDDLE CLASS, UMNO AND INTELLIGENTSIA: CONTESTING THE MUSLIM BUMIPUTERA'S POLITICAL DOMINATION IN SARAWAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal S. Hazis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Barisan Nasional mulai mendominasi politik Sarawak setelah pemimpin bumiputera Islam mengambil alih tampuk pemerintahan negeri daripada pemimpin Iban selepas pilihan raya 1970. Di bawah teraju pemimpin bumiputera Islam ini, Barisan Nasional berjaya menguasai setiap pilihan raya negeri dan parlimen yang diadakan sejak tahun 1970 hingga 2008. Walaupun parti pembangkang melancarkan tentangan sengit pada lewat 1970-an dan pertengahan 1980-an, pemimpin bumiputera Islam ini berjaya mengatasinya untuk terus mengekalkan dominasi parti pemerintah di negeri yang mempunyai bilangan kerusi negeri dan parlimen yang terbanyak. Makalah ini menyusuri dominasi politik pemimpin bumiputera Islam Sarawak dan faktor-faktor yang menyumbang kepada kekuatan mereka yang menjangkau lebih empat dekad. Walaupun kuasa politik pemimpin bumiputera Islam masih bertahan sehingga ke hari ini, beberapa sumber baharu mulai muncul untuk memberikan tentangan terhadap kuasa politik golongan minoriti ini. Sumber tentangan baharu yang dimaksudkan ialah golongan kelas menengah, United Malays National Organisation (UMNO dan inteligensia. Makalah ini mengupas tentangan yang diberikan kelompok ini dan impaknya terhadap politik Sarawak khususnya kepimpinan bumiputera Islam.The ruling Barisan Nasional started to dominate Sarawak politics after the Muslim bumiputera took over the state leadership from the Iban after the 1970 elections. Under the stewardship of the Muslim bumiputera, Barisan Nasional had successfully dominated every state and parliamentary elections held since 1970 to 2008. Although the opposition parties launched a strong challenge towards the Muslim bumiputera's dominance in the late 1970s and middle 1980s, the latter was able to fend off this challenge and continued to uphold the ruling party's grip on the state with the largest number of state and parliamentary seats. This article analyses the Muslim bumiputera's dominance in Sarawak politics and the factors that had

  12. Ohcratoxin producing Aspergillus spp. Isolated from tropical soils in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S.S. Seelan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus strains isolated from tropical soils were selected for additional characterization and for ochratoxin analysis, which was determined by ELISA method and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC profiles. Because of its great morphological variability and mycotoxin production availability, 18 isolates of Aspergillus species were selected for this study. Only two isolates of these tropical soils, A. sulphureus and A. carbonarius, showed positive results for ohcratoxin (OA in lower concentration (0.05-0.10 µg/ml. Ochratoxin production by these species was confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography. HPLC analysis for ochratoxin producing A. sulphureus and A. carbonarius showed retention time, Rt value = 4.417 and Rt value = 4.081 respectively.

  13. DO UNIVERSITY STUDENTS HAVE HIGH CARDIOVASCULAR RISK? A PILOT STUDY FROM UNIVERSITI MALAYSIA SARAWAK (UNIMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAMARUDIN K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A health screening was done in UNIMAS in August 2008 for 237 undergraduate students. Body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC and blood pressure (BP were measured for all subjects. Total cholesterol and glucose levels were checked for those who fulfilled the screening criteria. The proportion of participants with cardiovascular (CVD risk factors was high. The strategies for health promotion should not only be targeted to the older community but also to the younger community.

  14. Informal heritage-making at the Sarawak Cultural Village, East Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muzaini, Hamzah

    2017-01-01

    Scholars have always been fascinated with cultural theme parks as tourism attractions or as vehicles for identity formations. With respect to the latter, the focus has been on how these consumption landscapes also portend spaces of representation that mobilize certain attributes of ethnic groups wit

  15. Research for the development of sago palm (Metroxylon sagu Robbt.) cultivation in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, F.S.

    1995-01-01

    General introduction (Chapter 1)This chapter contains an overview of knowledge with respect to the cultivation of the true sago palm (Metroxylon sagu). The palm flowers once and forms suckers or tillers. Seedlings grow into a rosette stage of leaves and trunks are only formed after 4-6 years. The tr

  16. Soil erosion from shifting cultivation and other smallholder land use in Sarawak, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Andreas de; Magid, Jakob; Mertz, Ole

    2008-01-01

    caused by leaching and losses via ashes after clearing and burning. The position on slope had no significant effect on soil texture, carbon or P content, indicating very limited physical movement of soil downslope. A soil carbon inventory to 90 cm depth on the three land uses only showed a higher carbon...... land use of native forest, secondary re-growth, upland rice fields and pepper gardens. Soil samples were collected to 90 cm depth from all three land use types, and analysed for various chemical parameters, including texture, total organic matter and 137Cs content. 137Cs is a radioactive isotope...... comparing to 30 cm depth, soil loss was 30% from both upland rice and pepper fields. Low 137Cs activity in deeper soil layers rendered a total profile inventory impossible. It is concluded that shifting cultivation of upland rice in the current system is not leading to degradation of soil chemical...

  17. Towards Homogeneity in Home Languages: Malay, Chinese Foochow and Indian Tamil Families in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Su-Hie; Mahadhir, Mahanita

    2009-01-01

    This preliminary study examines the languages used by parents with their children in Malay, Chinese Foochow and Indian Tamil families to find out how the similarity or dissimilarity in parents' ethnic language influenced the choice of language transmitted to children and how far standard languages have permeated the family domain in Kuching City…

  18. Research for the development of sago palm (Metroxylon sagu Rottb.) cultivation in Sarawak, Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, F.S.

    1995-01-01

    General introduction (Chapter 1)

    This chapter contains an overview of knowledge with respect to the cultivation of the true sago palm (Metroxylon sagu). The palm flowers once and forms suckers or tillers. Seedlings grow into a rosette stage of leaves

  19. Preliminary findings on lifetime trauma prevalence and PTSD symptoms among adolescents in Sarawak Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Siti Raudzah; Elklit, Ask; Balang, Rekaya Vincent; Sultan, M Ameenudeen; Kana, Kamarudin

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of lifetime exposure to traumatic events and its relation to PTSD symptoms. Participants were randomly selected from several schools located in the city of Kuching. There were 85 adolescents participating in this study, with ages ranging from 13 to 14 years old, of whom 31% (n=26) were males and 69% (n=59) females. The Child Posttraumatic Stress Index-Revised, The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and a lifetime trauma checklist were used in this study. Results showed that 77.6% of participants were exposed to at least one lifetime trauma. The most frequently reported traumas were road accident (20.1%), death of a family member (19.7%), and almost drowning (10%). There was more indirect trauma than direct trauma exposure. Males were more likely to be involved in traumatic events than females. Results showed that 7.1% (6) exhibited PTSD symptoms. There was no significant difference in the mean score of CPTS-RI between genders and among ethnic groups. Total exposure to traumatic events was significantly correlated with PTSD symptoms. Findings suggest that number of lifetime traumatic events was quite high and multiple exposures to traumatic events were significantly related to PTSD symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Malaysia; Malaisie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    This economic analysis provides information on Malaysia energy policy. The energy policy and the associated organizations, the enterprises in the electric power petroleum and gas, the supplying, the prices, the energy consumption, the stakes and forecasts are discussed. Tables and energy data illustrate the analysis. (A.L.B.)

  1. Time series analysis of gold production in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Nora; Hoon, Lee Yuen

    2012-05-01

    Gold is a soft, malleable, bright yellow metallic element and unaffected by air or most reagents. It is highly valued as an asset or investment commodity and is extensively used in jewellery, industrial application, dentistry and medical applications. In Malaysia, gold mining is limited in several areas such as Pahang, Kelantan, Terengganu, Johor and Sarawak. The main purpose of this case study is to obtain a suitable model for the production of gold in Malaysia. The model can also be used to predict the data of Malaysia's gold production in the future. Box-Jenkins time series method was used to perform time series analysis with the following steps: identification, estimation, diagnostic checking and forecasting. In addition, the accuracy of prediction is tested using mean absolute percentage error (MAPE). From the analysis, the ARIMA (3,1,1) model was found to be the best fitted model with MAPE equals to 3.704%, indicating the prediction is very accurate. Hence, this model can be used for forecasting. This study is expected to help the private and public sectors to understand the gold production scenario and later plan the gold mining activities in Malaysia.

  2. Corporate governance in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SINGAM, Kamini

    2003-01-01

    ... governance in Malaysia - the ownership structure, composition and operation of Malaysian companies in Malaysia - the nature of shareholder control and protection made available in the Malaysian corporate...

  3. Hand foot and mouth disease due to enterovirus 71 in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Kaw Bing; Kasri, Abdul Rasid

    2011-08-01

    Hand foot and mouth disease is a febrile sickness complex characterized by cutaneous eruption (exanthem) on the palms and soles with simultaneous occurrence of muco-cutanous vesiculo-ulcerative lesions (enanthem) affecting the mouth. The illness is caused by a number of enteroviruses with coxsackievirus A16 and enterovirus 71 as the main causative agents. Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) belongs to the species Human enterovirus A under the genus Enterovirus within the family Picornaviridae. EV71 has been associated with an array of clinical diseases including hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD), aseptic meningitis, encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like acute flaccid paralysis. A large outbreak of HFMD due to highly neurovirulent EV71 emerged in Malaysia in 1997, and caused 41 deaths amongst young children. In late 2000, a recurrence of an outbreak of HFMD occurred in Malaysia with 8 fatalities in peninsular Malaysia. Outbreak of HFMD due to EV71 recurred in 2003 with an unknown number of cases and mortalities. A similar outbreak of HFMD with 2 recorded deaths in young children occurred in peninsular Malaysia in late 2005 and this was followed by a larger outbreak in Sarawak (Malaysian Borneo) with 6 reported fatalities in the early part of 2006. The current on-going outbreak of HFMD started in peninsular Malaysia in epidemiological week 12 of 2010. As with other HFMD outbreaks in Malaysia, both EV71 and CA16 were the main aetiological viruses isolated. In similarity with the HFMD outbreak in 2005, the isolation of CA16 preceded the appearance of EV71. Based on the VP1 gene nucleotide sequences, 4 sub-genogroups of EV71 (C1, C2, B3 and B4) co-circulated and caused the outbreak of hand, foot and mouth disease in peninsular Malaysia in 1997. Two sub-genogroups (C1 and B4) were noted to cause the outbreak in 2000 in both peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak. EV71 of sub-genogroup B5 with smaller contribution from sub-genogroup C1 caused the outbreak in 2003. In the 2005 outbreak

  4. Hand Foot and Mouth Disease Due to Enterovirus 71 in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaw Bing Chua; Abdul Rasid Kasri

    2011-01-01

    Hand foot and mouth disease is a febrile sickness complex characterized by cutaneous eruption (exanthem) on the palms and soles with simultaneous occurrence of muco-cutanous vesiculo-ulcerative lesions (enanthem) affecting the mouth.The illness is caused by a number of enteroviruses with coxsackievirus A16 and enterovirus 71 as the main causative agents.Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) belongs to the species Human enterovirus A under the genus Enterovirus within the family Picornaviridae.EV71 has been associated with an array of clinical diseases including hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD),aseptic meningitis,encephalitis and poliomyelitis-like acute flaccid paralysis.A large outbreak of HFMD due to highly neurovirulent EV71 emerged in Malaysia in 1997,and caused 41deaths amongst young children.In late 2000,a recurrence of an outbreak of HFMD occurred in Malaysia with S fatalities in peninsular Malaysia.Outbreak of HFMD due to EV71 recurred in 2003 with an unknown number of cases and mortalities.A similar outbreak of HFMD with 2 recorded deaths in young children occurred in peninsular Malaysia in late 2005 and this was followed by a larger outbreak in Sarawak (Malaysian Borneo) with 6 reported fatalities in the early part of 2006.The current on-going outbreak of HFMD started in peninsular Malaysia in epidemiological week 12 of 2010.As with other HFMD outbreaks in Malaysia,both EV71 and CA16 were the main aetiological viruses isolated.In similarity with the HFMD outbreak in 2005,the isolation of CA16 preceded the appearance of EV71.Based on the VP 1 gene nucleotide sequences,4 sub-genogroups of EV71 (C1,C2,B3 and B4) co-circulated and caused the outbreak of hand,foot and mouth disease in peninsular Malaysia in 1997.Two sub-genogroups (C1 and B4) were noted to cause the outbreak in 2000 in both peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak.EV71 of sub-genogroup B5 with smaller contribution from sub-genogroup C1 caused the outbreak in 2003.In the 2005 outbreak,besides the EV71 strains

  5. Fluvial organic carbon losses from oil palm plantations on tropical peat, Sarawak, Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sarah; Page, Susan; Evans, Chris; Whelan, Mick; Gauci, Vincent; Lip Khoon, Kho

    2017-04-01

    Tropical peatlands are valuable stores of carbon. However, tropical peat swamp forests (TPSFs) in Southeast Asia have increasingly been converted to other land-uses. For example, more than 25% of TPSFs are now under oil palm plantations. This conversion - requiring felling and burning of trees and drainage of the peat - can enhance carbon mineralization, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) losses and can contribute significantly to global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, changing these natural carbon sinks into carbon sources. At present, relatively few scientifically sound studies provide dependable estimates of gaseous and fluvial carbon losses from oil palm plantations or from drained tropical peat in general. Here we present an annual (54 week) estimate of the export of dissolved and particulate organic carbon in water draining two oil palm estates and nearby stands of TPSF in Sarawak, Malaysia, subjected to varying degrees of past anthropogenic disturbance. Spectrophotometric techniques including SUVA254 (Specific Ultra-Violet Absorption) were used to gain insight into the aromaticity and subsequent bioavailability of the exported DOC. Water draining plantation and deforested land had a higher proportion of labile carbon compared to water draining forested areas. Preliminary data suggest a total fluvial DOC flux from plantations of ca. 190 g C m-2 year-1; nearly three times estimates from intact TPSFs (63 g C m-2 year-1). DOC accounted for between 86 % - 94 % of the total organic carbon lost (most of which was bioavailable). Wit et al. (2015) estimates that an average of 53 % of peat-derived DOC is decomposed and emitted as CO2, on a monthly basis. Based on these estimates our data suggests an additional 101 g CO2 m-2 may be emitted indirectly from fluvial organic carbon in degraded TPSFs per year. Overall, these findings emphasize the importance of including fluvial organic carbon fluxes when quantifying the impact of anthropogenic disturbance on the

  6. A Survey on the Usage of Biomass Wastes from Palm Oil Mills on Sustainable Development of Oil Palm Plantations in Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, K. Y.; Lau, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    As one of the world’s largest palm oil producers and exporters, Malaysia is committed to sustainable management of this industry to address the emerging environmental challenges. This descriptive study aims to evaluate the oil palm planters’ opinions regarding the usage of biomass wastes from palm oil mills and its impact on sustainable development of oil palm plantations in Sarawak. 253 planters across Sarawak were approached for their opinions about the usage of empty fruit bunch (EFB), palm oil mill effluent (POME), mesocarp fibre (MF), and palm kernel shell (PKS). This study revealed that the planters had generally higher agreement on the beneficial application of EFB and POME in oil palm plantations. This could be seen from the higher means of agreement rating of 3.64 - 4.22 for EFB and POME, compared with the rating of 3.19 - 3.41 for MF and PKS in the 5-point Likert scale (with 5 being the strongest agreement). Besides, 94.7 percent of the planters’ companies were found to comply with the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) requirements where nearly 38 percent carried out the EIA practice twice a year. Therefore high means of agreement were correlated to the compliance of environmental regulations, recording a Likert rating of 3.89 to 4.31. Lastly, the usage of EFB and POME also gained higher Likert scale point of 3.76 to 4.17 against MF and PKS of 3.34 to 3.49 in the evaluation of the impact of sustainability in oil palm plantations. The planters agreed that the usage of EFB and POME has reduced the environmental impact and improved the sustainable development, and its application has been improved and increased by research and development. However the planters were uncertain of the impact of usage of biomass wastes with respect to the contribution to social responsibility and company image in terms of transparency in waste management.

  7. A sociological examination of international placement learning by British social work students in children’s services in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ashencaen Crabtree

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses research findings into a study of UK student learning on international social work placements in Malaysia in collaboration with two Malaysian universities: Universiti Sains Malaysia and Universiti Malaysia Sarawak. The discussion focuses on those placements taking place in children’s services: residential care and community-based support programmes. The aim of the study was to explore how social work students adapt to unfamiliar learning situations in new cultural contexts with the goal of increasing cultural competence. Data were drawn from formal but anonymised student learning exercises as a non-assessed requirement of this particular placement. Findings indicated a wide range of responses towards social work practice with vulnerable children in the Malaysian context in terms of student constructions of care and abuse. Subject to an analytical schema, the collision or adaptation of otherwise normative professional and personal values are examined in detail.

  8. Diversity in Education Using Blended Learning in Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Siew-Eng; Ariffin, Siti Rahayah Bt; Rahman, Saemah Bt; Lai, Kim-Leong

    2010-01-01

    One of the objectives of Malaysia Ministry of Education is to provide educational opportunities for all Malaysians. Are education opportunities given fairly to all Malaysians who come from two big regions and divided by the South China Sea? The web infancy era, where the World Wide Web (WWW) is blooming fast, has changed the new millennium…

  9. Total Quality Management and Performances of SMEs in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ranggai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management is important for gaining competitive advantage. However, just creating good product will not by itself ensure success for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs if the product does not meet customer specifications. As such, this study aims to examine the relationship between total quality management (TQM practices and organisational performance (OP of the SMEs. Based on the theoretical considerations, a theoretical framework was proposed to link TQM and OP. Structured questionnaires were distributed to randomly selected SMEs in Sarawak. A total of 63 usable questionnaires were anlaysed. This research instrument showed encouraging evidence of reliability and validity. The data analysis reveals that TQM had positive and big impact on OP. However, the selected demographic characteristics of the SMEs had no significant influences on TQM practices. Thus, it was recommended that the SMEs should practice quality management facilitating management tool for improving organizational performance in view of the increasingly more dynamic environments that they are and will be facing.

  10. Cyber Café Usage in Malaysia: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shah Alam

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Using empirical and new field data, t his exploratory study investigates the pattern of the use of cyber cafes in two cities in Malaysia. The research was based on the convenience sample survey of 284 respondents in total in the two cities, Melaka and Miri in Sarawak. It can be argued that cyb er café seeks to provide its customers with inexpensive Internet access in a comfortable environment. People of all ages and sex come to enjoy the unique, upscale, educational, and innovative environment at cyber cafe. This study investigates the rate of u sage of cyber café by the respondents. The results of our study and the implication for future research are discussed

  11. Diversity of fusarium species from highland areas in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshor, Nurhazrati; Rosli, Hafizi; Ismail, Nor Azliza; Salleh, Baharuddin; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2012-12-01

    Fusarium is a cosmopolitan and highly diversified genus of saprophytic, phytopathogenic and toxigenic fungi. However, the existence and diversity of a few species of Fusarium are restricted to a certain area or climatic condition. The present study was conducted to determine the occurrence and diversity of Fusarium species in tropical highland areas in Malaysia and to compare with those in temperate and subtropical regions. A series of sampling was carried out in 2005 to 2009 at several tropical highland areas in Malaysia that is: Cameron Highlands, Fraser Hills and Genting Highlands in Pahang; Penang Hill in Penang; Gunung Jerai in Kedah; Kundasang and Kinabalu Park in Sabah; Kubah National Park and Begunan Hill in Sarawak. Sampling was done randomly from various hosts and substrates. Isolation of Fusarium isolates was done by using pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) agar and 1449 isolates of Fusarium were successfully recovered. Based on morphological characteristics, 20 species of Fusarium were identified. The most prevalent species occurring on the highlands areas was F. solani (66.1%) followed by F. graminearum (8.5%), F. oxysporum (7.8%), F. semitectum (5.7%), F. subglutinans (3.5%) and F. proliferatum (3.4%). Other Fusarium species, namely F. avenaceum, F. camptoceras, F. chlamydosporum, F. compactum, F. crookwellense, F. culmorum, F. decemcellulare, F. equiseti, F. nygamai, F. poae, F. proliferatum, F. sacchari, F. sporotrichioides, F. sterilihyphosum and F. verticillioides accounted for 1% recoveries. The present study was the first report on the occurrences of Fusarium species on highland areas in Malaysia.

  12. Status of Water Quality Based on the Physico-Chemical Assessment on River Water at Wildlife Sanctuary Sibuti Mangrove Forest, Miri Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seca Gandaseca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Mangrove forest is a component of wetlands that has been recognized as one of the most productive ecosystem in the tropic. Rapid development and other land uses in the mangrove areas over the years had negatively affected the ecological functions and its ecosystem. Study was carried out on river water quality at Sibuti Wildlife Sanctuary, Miri based on the physicochemical properties. Approach: A total of 72 water samples were collected from 12 stations or sampling points from Sungai Sibuti (SS and its tributary, a man-made canal called Sungai Parit Scheme (SPS at Sibuti Wildlife Sanctuary Miri, Sarawak in the month of June, August and October 2010. In situ data measurement such as temperature, conductivity, Dissolved Oxygen (DO, pH and turbidity were taken and labeled. Analysis for parameter such as ammoniacal nitrogen (NH3-N, Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and total suspended solids (TSS were conducted in the laboratory. Both in situ and ex situ data were measured and analyzed according to the Standards Methods APHA, 2005. Results for each water quality parameters are summarized as follows, temperature range (29.3-32.8°C, pH range (6.02-8.07, DO range (2.76-4.7 mg L-1, conductivity (0.805-96.1 µS cm-1, TSS range (0.00119-0.4361 mg L-1, turbidity (10.2-15.3 NTU, BOD range (5.21-6.66 mg L-1, COD (7.5-25 and ammoniacal nitrogen (0.1-0.31 mg L-1. Results: Based on Water Quality Index (WQI and Interim National Water Quality Standards for Malaysia (INWQS by the Department of Environment Malaysia, river water of SPS and SS fall under Class II. Conclusion: The water quality status of river water at Sibuti Wildlife Sanctuary Mangrove Forest, Miri Sarawak is under category class II or good water quality status. All water quality parameters in this study are found to be in class I and II (good water quality except for the BOD and DO which indicate fairer and moderate river water quality status.

  13. Foliar diagnosis, nutrition and yield stability of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) in Sarawak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, de P.W.F.

    1969-01-01

    Until 1942 cultivation of pepper P. nigrum L. in Sarawak produced relatively small but regular yields. High demands after 1945 and restricted use of "burnt earth" compelled farmers to abandon the application of this traditional fertilizer. Instead, "fool proof" manufactured fertilizers

  14. Extreme differences in forest degradation in Borneo: comparing practices in Sarawak, Sabah, and Brunei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Bryan

    Full Text Available The Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak are global hotspots of forest loss and degradation due to timber and oil palm industries; however, the rates and patterns of change have remained poorly measured by conventional field or satellite approaches. Using 30 m resolution optical imagery acquired since 1990, forest cover and logging roads were mapped throughout Malaysian Borneo and Brunei using the Carnegie Landsat Analysis System. We uncovered ∼364,000 km of roads constructed through the forests of this region. We estimated that in 2009 there were at most 45,400 km(2 of intact forest ecosystems in Malaysian Borneo and Brunei. Critically, we found that nearly 80% of the land surface of Sabah and Sarawak was impacted by previously undocumented, high-impact logging or clearing operations from 1990 to 2009. This contrasted strongly with neighbouring Brunei, where 54% of the land area remained covered by unlogged forest. Overall, only 8% and 3% of land area in Sabah and Sarawak, respectively, was covered by intact forests under designated protected areas. Our assessment shows that very few forest ecosystems remain intact in Sabah or Sarawak, but that Brunei, by largely excluding industrial logging from its borders, has been comparatively successful in protecting its forests.

  15. Extreme differences in forest degradation in Borneo: comparing practices in Sarawak, Sabah, and Brunei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Jane E; Shearman, Philip L; Asner, Gregory P; Knapp, David E; Aoro, Geraldine; Lokes, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak are global hotspots of forest loss and degradation due to timber and oil palm industries; however, the rates and patterns of change have remained poorly measured by conventional field or satellite approaches. Using 30 m resolution optical imagery acquired since 1990, forest cover and logging roads were mapped throughout Malaysian Borneo and Brunei using the Carnegie Landsat Analysis System. We uncovered ∼364,000 km of roads constructed through the forests of this region. We estimated that in 2009 there were at most 45,400 km(2) of intact forest ecosystems in Malaysian Borneo and Brunei. Critically, we found that nearly 80% of the land surface of Sabah and Sarawak was impacted by previously undocumented, high-impact logging or clearing operations from 1990 to 2009. This contrasted strongly with neighbouring Brunei, where 54% of the land area remained covered by unlogged forest. Overall, only 8% and 3% of land area in Sabah and Sarawak, respectively, was covered by intact forests under designated protected areas. Our assessment shows that very few forest ecosystems remain intact in Sabah or Sarawak, but that Brunei, by largely excluding industrial logging from its borders, has been comparatively successful in protecting its forests.

  16. Prevalence and usage of printed and electronic drug references and patient medication records in community pharmacies in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usir, Ezlina; Lua, Pei Lin; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the availability and usage of printed and electronic references and Patient Medication Record in community pharmacy. It was conducted for over 3 months from 15 January to 30 April 2007. Ninety-three pharmacies participated. Structured questionnaires were mailed to community pharmacies. Six weeks later a reminder was sent to all non responders, who were given another six weeks to return the completed questionnaire. Outcomes were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-square test of independence. Almost all the pharmacies (96.8%) have at least Monthly Index of Medical Specialties (MIMS) while 78.5% have at least MIMS ANNUAL in their stores. Only about a third (31.2%) of the pharmacies were equipped with online facilities of which the majority referred to medical websites (88.9%) with only a minority (11.1%) referring to electronic journals. More than half (59.1%) of the pharmacists kept Patient Medication Record profiles with 49.1% storing it in paper, 41.8% electronically and 9.1% in both printed and electronic versions. In general, prevalence and usage of electronic references in community pharmacies were rather low. Efforts should be increased to encourage wider usage of electronic references and Patient Medication Records in community pharmacies to facilitate pharmaceutical care.

  17. Malaysia and forced migration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arzura Idris

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the phenomenon of "forced migration" in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants...

  18. Possible conservation units of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) in Sarawak based on variation of mtDNA control region.

    OpenAIRE

    ONUMA, Manabu; SUZUKI, Masatsugu; Ohtaishi, Noriyuki

    2006-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA control region of the sun bear(Helarctos malayanus) was sequenced using 21DNA samples collected from confiscated sun bears to identify conservation units, such as evolutionarily significant units and management units, in Sarawak, Borneo Island. A total of 10 haplotypes were observed, indicating the presence of at least two lineages in the sun bear population in Sarawak. Presumably, these two lineages could represent evolutionarily significant units. How...

  19. Wild and Valuable? Tourist Values for Orang-utan Conservation in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin K Zander

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluffy, orange and endearing, orang-utans have won the hearts of people all over the world. However, all sub-species are endangered in the wild with the Bornean orang-utan population having declined by more than 50% over the past 60 years. Fewer than 2,000 wild orang-utans remain in Sarawak with nearly all truly wild ones confined to a remote site on the Indonesian border. Yet each year thousands of tourists and local Sarawak people see orang-utans semi-wild in a reserve or captive in a rehabilitation centre. We investigated the attitudes of such tourists towards the conservation of the remaining wild populations by means of questionnaires, including a choice experiment. Sixty percent of the respondents were, in principle, willing to pay to ensure survival of a wild orang-utan population. International tourists tended to regard wild survival as being more important than having a high probability of seeing orang-utans personally-indeed they preferred wild orang-utans to be hard to find. Malaysian tourists were more inclined to favour investment in the small number of captive or semi-wild animals. Using conservative judgements of the difference between stated and real willingness-to-pay, we estimated that about USD 6.6 million per year could be made available to wild orang-utan conservation from voluntary contributions by visitors to the semi-wild animals. We also estimated that the 40% of visitors to these facilities who come to Sarawak primarily because of the apes, bring between USD 13 and USD 23 million into the local economy each year through their expenditure on local businesses, about 0.6% of the income earned by Sarawak from timber products. Our results suggest that far fewer would come if there were no wild orang-utans in Sarawak. Thus the value of wild orang-utans in Sarawak can be delivered through the captive facilities but the economic benefits from orang-utans require both captive and wild orang-utans.

  20. Standardized morbidity ratio for leptospirosis mapping in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, Aznida Che; Samat, Nor Azah

    2017-05-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease that affects human health in many parts of the world including Malaysia. Leptospirosis is a disease caused by the infection of pathogenic Leptospira genus called Spirochaetes. Leptospirosis can be transmitted directly or indirectly from rats to human. The human infection is usually caused by human contact with urine or tissues of infected animal. This disease can be spread through mucus membrane such as mouth, nose and eyes, ingestion of contaminated food and water and also exposed injured skin to contaminated water or soil. There is still no vaccine currently available for the prevention or treatment of leptospirosis disease but this disease can be treated if it is diagnosed early. Therefore, the aim of this study is to estimate the relative risk for leptospirosis disease based initially on the most common statistic used in the study of disease mapping called Standardized Morbidity Ratio (SMR). We then apply SMR to leptospirosis data obtained in Malaysia. The results show that the states of Melaka have very high risk areas. The states of Kedah, Terengganu and Kelantan are identified as high risk areas. The states of Perak, Perlis, Sabah and Sarawak showed medium risk areas. This is followed by low risk by other states except Pahang, Johor and Labuan with very low risk areas. In conclusion, SMR method is the best method for mapping leptospirosis because by referring to the relative risk maps, the states that deserve closer look and disease prevention can be identified.

  1. Impact of landslides induced by 2014 northeast monsoon extreme rain in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Koay, Swee Peng; Sakai, Naoki; Lateh, Habibah

    2016-04-01

    In December 2014, northeast monsoon brought extreme rainfalls to Malaysia, mainly in the eastern coast of Peninsular Malaysia and coastal area in Sabah and Sarawak. In this month, many of the rain gauge records in this area exceeded 1,000 mm, which is about 1/3 of average annual rainfall precipitation (2,850mm/year) in Malaysia. This unexpected heavy rainfall induced landslides and floods which brought about large-scale losses in Malaysia equivalent to several hundred million USD as thousands of residents had evacuated from hometown for months, and factories, schools and business activities were shut down for weeks. Among the major infrastructure of the nation, East-west Highway was subjected to damages by 21 landslides. Two large-scale landslides cut off the highway for a week. Authors had installed landslide monitoring instruments at reactivated landslide sites along the highway at N05° 36.042' E101° 35.546'. Records by in-situ inclinometers showed clear deformation from 17th December to 26th December, associated with certain change in piezometeres record for groundwater level monitoring. Several cracks occurred in the slope.

  2. Malaysia and forced migration

    OpenAIRE

    Arzura Idris

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the phenomenon of “forced migration” in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants. It considers forced migration as an event hosting multifaceted issues related and relevant to forced migrants and suggests that Malaysia has been preoccupied with the issue of forced migration movements. This is largely seen in various responses invoked from Malaysi...

  3. Abundance and distribution of sylvatic dengue virus vectors in three different land cover types in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Katherine I; Mundis, Stephanie; Widen, Steven G; Wood, Thomas G; Tesh, Robert B; Cardosa, Jane; Vasilakis, Nikos; Perera, David; Hanley, Kathryn A

    2017-08-31

    Mosquito-borne dengue virus (DENV) is maintained in a sylvatic, enzootic cycle of transmission between canopy-dwelling non-human primates and Aedes mosquitoes in Borneo. Sylvatic DENV can spill over into humans living in proximity to forest foci of transmission, in some cases resulting in severe dengue disease. The most likely vectors of such spillover (bridge vectors) in Borneo are Ae. albopictus and Ae. niveus. Borneo is currently experiencing extensive forest clearance. To gauge the effect of this change in forest cover on the likelihood of sylvatic DENV spillover, it is first necessary to characterize the distribution of bridge vectors in different land cover types. In the current study, we hypothesized that Ae. niveus and Ae. albopictus would show significantly different distributions in different land cover types; specifically, we predicted that Ae. niveus would be most abundant in forests whereas Ae. albopictus would have a more even distribution in the landscape. Mosquitoes were collected from a total of 15 sites using gravid traps and a backpack aspirator around Kampong Puruh Karu, Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, where sylvatic DENV spillover has been documented. A total of 2447 mosquitoes comprising 10 genera and 4 species of Aedes, were collected over the three years, 2013, 2014 and 2016, in the three major land cover types in the area, homestead, agriculture and forest. Mosquitoes were identified morphologically, pooled by species and gender, homogenized, and subject to DNA barcoding of each Aedes species and to arbovirus screening. As predicted, Ae. niveus was found almost exclusively in forests whereas Ae. albopictus was collected in all land cover types. Aedes albopictus was significantly (P = 0.04) more abundant in agricultural fields than forests. Sylvatic DENV was not detected in any Aedes mosquito pools, however genomes of 14 viruses were detected using next generation sequencing. Land cover type affects the abundance and distribution of the most

  4. Possible conservation units of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) in Sarawak based on variation of mtDNA control region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuma, Manabu; Suzuki, Masatsugu; Ohtaishi, Noriyuki

    2006-11-01

    The mitochondrial DNA control region of the sun bear (Helarctos malayanus) was sequenced using 21 DNA samples collected from confiscated sun bears to identify conservation units, such as evolutionarily significant units and management units, in Sarawak, Borneo Island. A total of 10 haplotypes were observed, indicating the presence of at least two lineages in the sun bear population in Sarawak. Presumably, these two lineages could represent evolutionarily significant units. However, the geographical distributions of the two lineages remained unknown due to the lack of information regarding the exact capture locations of the confiscated sun bears. It is essential to elucidate the geographical distributions of these lineages in order to create a proper conservation plan for the sun bears in Sarawak. Therefore, further studies examining the haplotype distributions using DNA samples from known localities are essential.

  5. Malaysia and forced migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzura Idris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the phenomenon of “forced migration” in Malaysia. It examines the nature of forced migration, the challenges faced by Malaysia, the policy responses and their impact on the country and upon the forced migrants. It considers forced migration as an event hosting multifaceted issues related and relevant to forced migrants and suggests that Malaysia has been preoccupied with the issue of forced migration movements. This is largely seen in various responses invoked from Malaysia due to “south-south forced migration movements.” These responses are, however, inadequate in terms of commitment to the international refugee regime. While Malaysia did respond to economic and migration challenges, the paper asserts that such efforts are futile if she ignores issues critical to forced migrants.

  6. Epidemiological Characteristics of Strongyloidiasis in Inhabitants of Indigenous Communities in Borneo Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngui, Romano; Halim, Noor Amira Abdul; Rajoo, Yamuna; Lim, Yvonne AL; Ambu, Stephen; Rajoo, Komalaveni; Chang, Tey Siew; Woon, Lu Chan; Mahmud, Rohela

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological study on strongyloidiasis in humans is currently lacking in Malaysia. Thus, a cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infection among the inhabitants of longhouse indigenous communities in Sarawak. A single stool and blood sample were collected from each participant and subjected to microscopy, serological and molecular techniques. Five species of intestinal parasites were identified by stool microscopy. None of the stool samples were positive for S. stercoralis. However, 11% of 236 serum samples were seropositive for strongyloidiasis. Further confirmation using molecular technique on stool samples of the seropositive individuals successfully amplified 5 samples, suggesting current active infections. The prevalence was significantly higher in adult males and tended to increase with age. S. stercoralis should no longer be neglected in any intestinal parasitic survey. Combination of more than 1 diagnostic technique is necessary to increase the likelihood of estimating the ‘true’ prevalence of S. stercoralis. PMID:27853126

  7. Albedo and land surface temperature shift in hydrocarbon seepage potential area, case study in Miri Sarawak Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suherman, A.; Rahman, M. Z. A.; Busu, I.

    2014-02-01

    The presence of hydrocarbon seepage is generally associated with rock or mineral alteration product exposures, and changes of soil properties which manifest with bare development and stress vegetation. This alters the surface thermodynamic properties, changes the energy balance related to the surface reflection, absorption and emission, and leads to shift in albedo and LST. Those phenomena may provide a guide for seepage detection which can be recognized inexpensively by remote sensing method. District of Miri is used for study area. Available topographic maps of Miri and LANDSAT ETM+ were used for boundary construction and determination albedo and LST. Three land use classification methods, namely fixed, supervised and NDVI base classifications were employed for this study. By the intensive land use classification and corresponding statistical comparison was found a clearly shift on albedo and land surface temperature between internal and external seepage potential area. The shift shows a regular pattern related to vegetation density or NDVI value. In the low vegetation density or low NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to lower value than external area. Conversely in the high vegetation density or high NDVI value, albedo of internal area turned to higher value than external area. Land surface temperature of internal seepage potential was generally shifted to higher value than external area in all of land use classes. In dense vegetation area tend to shift the temperature more than poor vegetation area.

  8. Assessment of the characteristic of nutrients, total metals, and fecal coliform in Sibu Laut River, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Chen-Lin; Ling, Teck-Yee; Lee, Nyanti; Apun, Kasing

    2016-03-01

    The concentrations of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus), total metals, and fecal coliform (FC) coupling with chlorophyll- a (chl- a), 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) and other general environmental parameters were evaluated at the sub-surface and near-bottom water columns of 13 stations in the Sibu Laut River during low and high slack waters. The results indicated that inorganic nitrogen (mainly nitrate) was the primary form of nitrogen whereas organic phosphorus was the major form of phosphorus. The abundance of total heavy metals in Sibu Laut River and its tributaries was in the order of Pb metals. Nevertheless, the influence was merely noticeable in the intake creek and amended rapidly along Selang Sibu River and brought minimal effects on the Sibu Laut River. Besides, the domestic sewage effluents from villages nearby also contributed a substantial amount of pollutants.

  9. Unveiling topographical changes using LiDAR mapping capability: case study of Belaga in Sarawak, East-Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganendra, T. R.; Khan, N. M.; Razak, W. J.; Kouame, Y.; Mobarakeh, E. T.

    2016-06-01

    The use of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) remote sensing technology to scan and map landscapes has proven to be one of the most popular techniques to accurately map topography. Thus, LiDAR technology is the ultimate method of unveiling the surface feature under dense vegetation, and, this paper intends to emphasize the diverse techniques that can be utilized to elucidate topographical changes over the study area, using multi-temporal airborne full waveform LiDAR datasets collected in 2012 and 2014. Full waveform LiDAR data offers access to an almost unlimited number of returns per shot, which enables the user to explore in detail topographical changes, such as vegetation growth measurement. The study also found out topography changes at the study area due to earthwork activities contributing to soil consolidation, soil erosion and runoff, requiring cautious monitoring. The implications of this study not only concurs with numerous investigations undertaken by prominent researchers to improve decision making, but also corroborates once again that investigations employing multi-temporal LiDAR data to unveil topography changes in vegetated terrains, produce more detailed and accurate results than most other remote sensing data.

  10. The Relationship between Media Use and Body Mass Index among Secondary Students in Kuching South City, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Chang, Ching Thon; Rosalia, Saimon; Charles, Lai Dekun; Yii, Sze Lin; Tiong, Pik Hoong; Yeap, Kim Pey

    2011-01-01

    Background: Overweight and obesity rates among adolescents have increased substantially over the years. This study aimed to determine the body mass index (BMI) of students and parents and the relationship among media use, BMI, socio-demographic profiles, and snacking behaviour during television watching of secondary school students in Kuching South City. Methods: In accordance with the two-stage sampling method, a total of 316 adolescents aged 13–17 years from 7 secondary schools participated. Data were collected using questionnaire and anthropometric measurement. Independent t test, one-way ANOVA, Mann–Whitney U test, and chi-square test were performed. Results: The mean BMI was 20.56 kg/m2 (SD 4.33) for boys and 20.15 kg/m2 (SD 3.91) for girls. No significant difference in terms of z score for BMI-for-age or socio-demographic factors was found. The mean duration of time devoted to media use was 4.69 hours (SD 2.93) on weekdays and 5.69 hours (SD 2.87) on weekends. Boys were found to spend more hours on media use than did the girls (t = 4.293, P consume more cereal compared with soft drinks and junk foods. Respondents whose fathers worked in the private sector devoted the fewest hours to media use, whereas those with self-employed fathers devoted the most time to media use. Respondents with mothers who were employed spent more time on media use than did respondents whose mothers were housewives (F = 4.067, P consume less unhealthy food. PMID:22135599

  11. A First Survey on the Abundance of Plastics Fragments and Particles on Two Sandy Beaches in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noik, V. James; Mohd Tuah, P.

    2015-04-01

    Plastic fragments and particles as an emerging environmental contaminant and pollutant are gaining scientific attention in the recent decades due to the potential threats on biota. This study aims to elucidate the presence, abundance and temporal change of plastic fragments and particles from two selected beaches, namely Santubong and Trombol in Kuching on two sampling times. Morphological and polymer identification assessment on the recovered plastics was also conducted. Overall comparison statistical analysis revealed that the abundance of plastic fragments/debris on both of sampling stations were insignificantly different (p>0.05). Likewise, statistical analysis on the temporal changes on the abundance yielded no significant difference for most of the sampling sites on each respective station, except STB-S2. Morphological studies revealed physical features of plastic fragments and debris were diverse in shapes, sizes, colors and surface fatigues. FTIR fingerprinting analysis shows that polypropylene and polyethylene were the dominant plastic polymers debris on both beaches.

  12. Brief report do university students have high cardiovascular risk? A pilot study from universiti malaysia sarawak (unimas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Py; Ong, Ta; Muna, S; Syed Alwi, Sar; Kamarudin, K

    2010-01-01

    A health screening was done in UNIMAS in August 2008 for 237 undergraduate students. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) were measured for all subjects. Total cholesterol and glucose levels were checked for those who fulfilled the screening criteria. The proportion of participants with cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors was high. The strategies for health promotion should not only be targeted to the older community but also to the younger community.

  13. Brief Report Do University Students Have High Cardiovascular Risk? A Pilot Study from Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (Unimas)

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, PY; Ong, TA; Muna, S; Syed Alwi, SAR; Kamarudin, K

    2010-01-01

    A health screening was done in UNIMAS in August 2008 for 237 undergraduate students. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and blood pressure (BP) were measured for all subjects. Total cholesterol and glucose levels were checked for those who fulfilled the screening criteria. The proportion of participants with cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors was high. The strategies for health promotion should not only be targeted to the older community but also to the younger community.

  14. Assessment of menopausal symptoms using modified Menopause Rating Scale (MRS among middle age women in Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Syed

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Menopausal symptoms can be assessed by several tools, and can be influenced by various socio-demographic factors. Objectives To determine the commonly reported menopausal symptoms among Sarawakian women using a modified Menopause Rating Scale (MRS. Methods By using modified MRS questionnaire, 356 Sarawakian women aged 40-65 years were interview to document of 11 symptoms (divided into somatic, psychological and urogenital domain commonly associated with menopause. Results The mean age of menopause was 51.3 years (range 47 - 56 years. The most prevalent symptoms reported were joint and muscular discomfort (80.1%; physical and mental exhaustion (67.1%; and sleeping problems (52.2%. Followed by symptoms of hot flushes and sweating (41.6%; irritability (37.9%; dryness of vagina (37.9%; anxiety (36.5%; depressive mood (32.6%. Other complaints noted were sexual problem (30.9%; bladder problem (13.8% and heart discomfort (18.3%. Perimenopausal women (n = 141 experienced higher prevalence of somatic and psychological symptoms compared to premenopausal (n = 82 and postmenopausal (n = 133 women. However urogenital symptoms mostly occur in the postmenopausal group of women. Conclusions The prevalence of menopausal symptoms using modified MRS in this study correspond to other studies on Asian women however the prevalence of classical menopausal symptoms of hot flushes, sweating was lower compared to studies on Caucasian women.

  15. The Relationship between Media Use and Body Mass Index among Secondary Students in Kuching South City, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Whye Lian; Chang, Ching Thon; Rosalia, Saimon; Charles, Lai Dekun; Yii, Sze Lin; Tiong, Pik Hoong; Yeap, Kim Pey

    2011-07-01

    Overweight and obesity rates among adolescents have increased substantially over the years. This study aimed to determine the body mass index (BMI) of students and parents and the relationship among media use, BMI, socio-demographic profiles, and snacking behaviour during television watching of secondary school students in Kuching South City. In accordance with the two-stage sampling method, a total of 316 adolescents aged 13-17 years from 7 secondary schools participated. Data were collected using questionnaire and anthropometric measurement. Independent t test, one-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U test, and chi-square test were performed. The mean BMI was 20.56 kg/m(2) (SD 4.33) for boys and 20.15 kg/m(2) (SD 3.91) for girls. No significant difference in terms of z score for BMI-for-age or socio-demographic factors was found. The mean duration of time devoted to media use was 4.69 hours (SD 2.93) on weekdays and 5.69 hours (SD 2.87) on weekends. Boys were found to spend more hours on media use than did the girls (t = 4.293, P media use, whereas those with self-employed fathers devoted the most time to media use. Respondents with mothers who were employed spent more time on media use than did respondents whose mothers were housewives (F = 4.067, P media time or snacking habits. This finding indicated that media time has no effect on body weight, because respondents were found to have normal weight and to consume less unhealthy food.

  16. Human-Oriented Leadership and Organizational Commitment in US Subsidiary Company Based in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ismail

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article was conducted to examine the relationship between human-oriented leadership (HOL and organizational commitment. A survey method was employed to obtain data from the employees of one US subsidiary companybased in Sarawak. Results of the Partial Least Squares (SmartPLS model analysis confirmed that participative leadership, supportive leadership, and empowerment act as important antecedents of organizational commitment.These findings reveal that the capability of managers practicing HOL styles (supportive, participative, and empowerment has enhanced employees’ commitment to the organization.

  17. Malaysia; Background Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    1996-01-01

    This Background Paper on Malaysia examines developments and trends in the labor market since the mid-1980s. The paper describes the changes in the employment structure and the labor force. It reviews wages and productivity trends and their effects on unit labor cost. The paper highlights that Malaysia’s rapid growth, sustained since 1987, has had a major impact on the labor market. The paper outlines the major policy measures to address the labor constraints. It also analyzes Malaysia’s r...

  18. Older Consumers in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sim Ong, Fon; Phillips, David R

    2007-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to understand the concerns and problems faced by older people in an industrializing middle-income country, Malaysia, in their process of acquiring products to meet...

  19. Sustainable management of peat swamp forest of Sarawak with special reference to ramin (Gonystylus bancanus); development of a monitoring system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijdeven, S.M.J.; Meer, van der P.J.; Chai, F.Y.C.; Tan, S.; Mohizah, M.; Liam, D.

    2004-01-01

    Peat swamp forests in Sarawak are valuable in terms of timber and biodiversity, but heavily degraded. In order to assess the current status, potential developments and possible management interventions, an adequate monitoring system is necessary. In this study a new monitoring system is proposed,

  20. Plasmodium knowlesi in humans, macaques and mosquitoes in peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NorParina Ismail

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since a large focus of human infection with Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria parasite naturally found in long-tailed and pig tailed macaques, was reported in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo, it was pertinent to study the situation in peninsular Malaysia. A study was thus initiated to screen human cases of Plasmodium malariae using molecular techniques, to determine the presence of P. knowlesi in non- human primates and to elucidate its vectors. Methods Nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to identify all Plasmodium species present in the human blood samples sent to the Parasitology laboratory of Institute for Medical Research. At the same time, non-human primates were also screened for malaria parasites and nested PCR was carried out to determine the presence of P. knowlesi. Mosquitoes were collected from Pahang by human landing collection and monkey-baited-traps situated on three different levels. All mosquitoes were identified and salivary glands and midguts of anopheline mosquitoes were dissected to determine the presence of malaria parasites and nested PCR was carried out on positive glands. Sequencing of the csp genes were carried on P. knowlesi samples from humans, monkeys and mosquitoes, positive by PCR. Results and Discussion Plasmodium knowlesi was detected in 77 (69.37% of the 111 human samples, 10 (6.90% of the 145 monkey blood and in 2 (1.7% Anopheles cracens. Sequence of the csp gene clustered with other P. knowlesi isolates. Conclusion Human infection with Plasmodium knowlesi is occurring in most states of peninsular Malaysia. An. cracens is the main vector. Economic exploitation of the forest is perhaps bringing monkeys, mosquitoes and humans into increased contact. A single bite from a mosquito infected with P. knowlesi is sufficient to introduce the parasite to humans. Thus, this zoonotic transmission has to be considered in the future planning of malaria control.

  1. Malaysia Promotes Excellence in English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Vinodini

    2003-01-01

    Highlights the role of English in Malaysia, English in the education system, students learning English, English teachers, instruction and the syllabus, inservice support, private English education, English in tertiary education, and opportunities for teachers in Malaysia. (VWL)

  2. Private sector financing of projects - implementation of the BAKUN hydroelectric project in Malaysia; Private Projektfinanzierung - Errichtung der Wasserkraftanlage Bakun in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failer, E. [Lahmeyer International GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The BAKUN Hydroelectric Power Project in Malaysia represents, alongside the Three Gorges Project in China, one of today's most closely observed hydropower projects. The Bakun Project features a generating capacity of 2 520 MW, a 205 m high concrete face rockfill dam and a 1 320 km long power transmission system from Sarawak (Borneo) to West Malaysia. Implementation costs are estimated at around DM 10 000 million. In December 1996 the concession to construct and operate the Bakun Project for a period of 30 years on a BOT (build-operate-transfer) basis was granted to the Bakun Hydro-Electric Corporation, a private project development company. A US-Dollar million contract was awarded one year prior to this concession, to construct the river diversion works in advance. Completion of the three concrete-lined diversion tunnels, each with an inner diameter of 12 m, is scheduled for the end of 1998. After a brief overview of the Bakun Project, the paper describes a typical structure of the parties involved and the legal framework for BOT project finance. The most important features of the concession agreement, the power purchase agreement (PPA) and the engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) contract are explained. Finally, the paper emphasizes that in future the water resources engineer will have to be more involved with topics such as fixed-price contracts, risk management, turnkey solutions and project finance. (orig.) [German] Mit einer geplanten installierten Leistung von 2 520 MW, einem 205 m hohen Steinschuettdamm mit Betonoberflaechendichtung, einem 1 320 km langen Energieuebertragungssystem von Sarawak (Borneo) nach Westmalaysia und mit Projektkosten von ca. 10 Mrd. DM stellt das BAKUN-Wasserprojekt in Malaysia, neben dem Dreischluchtenprojekt in China, eines der meist beachteten Wasserkraftprojekte der Gegenwart dar. Im Dezember 1996 erhielt die private Projektentwicklungsgesellschaft 'Bakun Hydro-Electric Corporation' die Konzession, das

  3. Economic Development via Dam Building: The Role of the State Government in the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy and the Impact on Environment and Local Communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aeria, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Since 1970, as a consequence of Malaysia’s New Economic Policy (NEP) and its integration into the global economy, the development achievements and per capita GDP growth of the resource-rich state of Sarawak have been impressive...

  4. The economic burden of schizophrenia in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teoh SL

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Siew Li Teoh,1 Huey Yi Chong,1 Salina Abdul Aziz,2 Norliza Chemi,2 Abdul Razak Othman,2 Nurzuriana Md Zaki,2 Possatorn Vanichkulpitak,3 Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk1,4–6 1School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, 4Center of Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research (CPOR, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok, Thailand; 5School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA; 6Health and Well-being Cluster, Global Asia in the 21st Century (GA21 Platform, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, MalaysiaIntroduction: Schizophrenia (SCZ is a highly debilitating disease despite its low prevalence. The economic burden associated with SCZ is substantial and mainly attributed to productivity loss. To improve the understanding of economic burden of SCZ in the low- and middle-income country regions, we aimed to determine the economic burden of SCZ in Malaysia.Methods: A retrospective study was conducted using a prevalence-based approach from a societal perspective in Malaysia with a 1 year period from 2013. We used micro-costing technique with bottom-up method and included direct medical cost, direct non-medical cost, and indirect cost. The main data source was medical chart review which was conducted in Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL. The medical charts were identified electronically by matching the unique patient’s identification number registered under the National Mental Health Schizophrenia Registry and the list of patients in HKL in 2013. Other data sources were government documents, literatures, and local websites. To ensure robustness of result, probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted.Results: The total estimated number of treated SCZ cases in Malaysia in 2015 was 15,104 with the total economic burden of USD 100 million

  5. Pattern of suicides in 2009: data from the National Suicide Registry Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nor Hayati; Zainun, Khairul Anuar; Bahar, Norharlina; Haniff, Jamaiyah; Hamid, Abdul Muneer; Bujang, Mohamad Adam Hj; Mahmood, Mohd Shah

    2014-06-01

    The National Suicide Registry Malaysia (NSRM) is a nationwide system that captures data on completed suicides in Malaysia from all forensic departments under the purview of the Ministry of Health Malaysia. This paper examines all suicidal deaths reported to the NSRM from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2009. The relevant variables were recorded in the paper-based Case Report Form (CRF) and then entered into the online reporting system for analysis. The overall suicide rate for 2009 was 1.18 per 100,000 population (n = 328). The age range was 14-94 years, with a median of 37 (IQR 24) years. There were more men than women, the gender ratio being 2.9:1 (males : females), and the majority (89% or 293/328) were Malaysian citizens. Ethnicity-wise, Indians had the highest suicide rate of 3.67 per 100,000. The Malays and Bumiputera of Sabah and Sarawak had lower rates of 0.32 to 0.37 per 100,000. Mental illness was reported in 22% (72/328) of the cases and physical illnesses in 20.4% (67/328). Previous suicide attempts were reported in 15.5% (51/328) of cases. History of substance abuse was present in 28.7% (83/328). Life events were positive in 41.2% (135/328) of cases. Malaysia is able to generate statistics on suicide by enhancing the collaboration between forensic, psychiatry and clinical research agencies. These trends should be monitored to gain a better understanding of suicide trends. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Ergonomics Issues in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Loo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Ergonomics so far has had little impact in Malaysia. For most Malaysian managers, ergonomics is not considered to be associated with performance, but rather with occupational health and safety and legislation. Approach: This study reviews the development of ergonomics in Malaysia and the underlying issues related to national development. Results: Many changes need to be made within the ergonomics research, education and practice community by integrating concepts from the social sciences with technological advances into Malaysian culture to enhance productivity and sustainable improvements in the quality of life, while achieving essential health and safety goals. Conclusion/Recommendation: Ergonomics helps to improve performance besides enhancing workplace OSH. It is essential to promote ergonomics concepts and practice to various industries in Malaysia. More effort and skills are required to compensate for the lack of infrastructure in providing a framework within which ergonomics recommendations can be disseminated and realized.

  7. Dental education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people.

  8. Manufacturing halal in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In Arabic, halal literally means ‘permissible’ or ‘lawful’. Halal is no longer an expression of an esoteric form of production, trade and consumption, but part of a huge and expanding globalized market in which certification, standards and technoscience play important roles. Over the past three decades, Malaysia has become a world leader in the global expansion of halal markets. This has come about in large part because the state and government of Malaysia have taken on the role of halal-cert...

  9. Flemingin-Type Prenylated Chalcones from the Sarawak Rainforest Plant Desmodium congestum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Karlee A; Bermudez, Cindy; Edwards, David J; Elliott, Alysha G; Ripen, Jovita E; Seta, Cynthia; Huang, Johnny X; Cooper, Matthew A; Fraser, James A; Yeo, Tiong Chia; Butler, Mark S

    2015-08-28

    In an ongoing program to identify new anti-infective leads, an extract derived from whole plant material of Desmodium congestum collected in the Sarawak rainforest was found to have anti-MRSA activity. Bioassay-guided isolation led to the isolation of two new prenylated chalcones, 5'-O-methyl-3-hydroxyflemingin A (1) and 5'-O-methylflemingin C (2), which were closely related to the flemingins previously isolated from various Flemingia species. Chalcones 1 and 2, which were determined to be 4:6 enantiomeric mixtures by chiral HPLC, exhibited moderate activity against a panel of Gram-positive bacteria and were also cytotoxic to the HEK293 human embryonic kidney cell line.

  10. e-Waste Management Scenarios in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fatihah Suja; Rakmi Abdul Rahman; Arij Yusof; Mohd Shahbudin Masdar

    2014-01-01

    e-Waste, or electronic waste, disposal that is uncontrolled can be harmful to human health and the environment because e-waste contains toxic substances and heavy metals. However, if the waste is properly managed, it can become a business opportunity that produces high returns because e-waste also contains valuable materials, such as gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. The government of Malaysia wants to ensure the safe, effective, and economically beneficial management of e-waste in Malay...

  11. e-Waste Management Scenarios in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fatihah Suja; Rakmi Abdul Rahman; Arij Yusof; Mohd Shahbudin Masdar

    2014-01-01

    e-Waste, or electronic waste, disposal that is uncontrolled can be harmful to human health and the environment because e-waste contains toxic substances and heavy metals. However, if the waste is properly managed, it can become a business opportunity that produces high returns because e-waste also contains valuable materials, such as gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. The government of Malaysia wants to ensure the safe, effective, and economically beneficial management of e-waste in Malay...

  12. 6th COSTAM/SFRR (ASEAN/Malaysia) International Workshop on Micronutrients, Oxidative Stress, and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Sies, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    The 6(th) COSTAM/SFRR (ASEAN/Malaysia) workshop, "Micronutrients, Oxidative Stress, and the Environment," was held from June 29 to July 2 at Holiday Inn Damai Beach Resort in Kuching, Sarawak. Two hundred twenty participants from 17 countries presented recent advances on natural antioxidants in the area of oxidative stress and molecular aspects of nutrition. Natural products and research are an important program in academic institutions and are experiencing unprecedented interest and growth by the scientific community and public health authorities. Progress is being driven by better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the relation between oxidative stress and micronutrient action. The gathering of scientists from around the world was fruitful, and we hope that future work will be developed by the formal and informal interactions that took place in this beautiful tropical setting.

  13. High proportion of knowlesi malaria in recent malaria cases in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee Ling; Mahmud, Rohela; Fong, Mun Yik; Jelip, Jenarun; Ngian, Hie Ung; Mustakim, Sahlawati; Hussin, Hani Mat; Marzuki, Noradilah; Mohd Ali, Marlindawati

    2014-05-03

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian parasite that has been recognized as the fifth species causing human malaria. Naturally-acquired P. knowlesi infection is widespread among human populations in Southeast Asia. The aim of this epidemiological study was to determine the incidence and distribution of malaria parasites, with a particular focus on human P. knowlesi infection in Malaysia. A total of 457 microscopically confirmed, malaria-positive blood samples were collected from 22 state and main district hospitals in Malaysia between September 2012 and December 2013. Nested PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene was used to determine the infecting Plasmodium species. A total of 453 samples were positive for Plasmodium species by using nested PCR assay. Plasmodium knowlesi was identified in 256 (56.5%) samples, followed by 133 (29.4%) cases of Plasmodium vivax, 49 (10.8%) cases of Plasmodium falciparum, two (0.4%) cases of Plasmodium ovale and one (0.2%) case of Plasmodium malariae. Twelve mixed infections were detected, including P. knowlesi/P. vivax (n = 10), P. knowlesi/P. falciparum (n = 1), and P. falciparum/P. vivax (n = 1). Notably, P. knowlesi (Included mixed infections involving P. knowlesi (P. knowlesi/P. vivax and P. knowlesi /P. falciparum)) showed the highest proportion in Sabah (84/115 cases, prevalence of 73.0%), Sarawak (83/120, 69.2%), Kelantan (42/56, 75.0%), Pahang (24/25, 96.0%), Johor (7/9, 77.8%), and Terengganu (4/5, 80.0%,). In contrast, the rates of P. knowlesi infection in Selangor and Negeri Sembilan were found to be 16.2% (18/111 cases) and 50.0% (5/10 cases), respectively. Sample of P. knowlesi was not obtained from Kuala Lumpur, Melaka, Perak, Pulau Pinang, and Perlis during the study period, while a microscopically-positive sample from Kedah was negative by PCR. In addition to Sabah and Sarawak, which have been known for high prevalence of P. knowlesi infection, the findings from this study highlight the widespread distribution of P

  14. Mineral processing of heavy mineral sands from Malawi and Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    1992-01-01

    Processing of heavy mineral sands involves many techniques including gravity, magnetic and electrostatic separation. As part of a laboratory programme to develop effective mineral processing techniques, two mineral sands from Malawi and Malaysia were processed using the standard techniques, with emphasis placed on the Carpco electrostatic separator. These sands were initially characterised mineralogically by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron microprobe analysis (EPMA...

  15. Angiostrongylus malaysiensis from Tuaran, Sabah, with reference to the distribution of the parasite in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liat, L B; Wah, L T; Cheah, W; Cheah, W; Fong, Y L; Fong, Y L

    1976-09-01

    A survey of Angiostrongylus malaysiensis among wild rodent and molluscan hosts was made in the Tuaran Central Agricultural Research Station and within the vicinity of Tuaran, Sabah. Three of 19 Rattus rattus diardii, one of 2 R. exulans and one R. argentiventer were found naturally infected with the parasite. In this survey 56 of 382 molluscs comprising of Pila scutata, Achatina fulica and two species of land slugs, Laevicaulis alte and Microparmarion malayanus, were found naturally infected with the parasite. Samples of larvae from each of these molluscs were experimentally transferred to laboratory albino rats and adult worms consistent with A. malaysiensis were recovered. Comparison of the rat hosts and the molluscan intermediate hosts of the parasite in Peninsular Malaysia, Sarawak and Sabah was made, and the finding of A. malaysiensis in Tuaran is the first report of the parasite from Sabah. The distribution of the parasite throughout Malaysia is discussed. Observation on the human consumption of the freshwater snail, P. scutata, was made. Although the infection rate of this snail is low compared with other molluscan hosts examined. The importance of this mollusc as a potential source of human infection should not be overlooked. Hospital records for 1974 and 1975 were examined and clinical human angiostrongyliasis was rarely recorded in Sabah.

  16. Neural tube defects in Malaysia: data from the Malaysian National Neonatal Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Nem-Yun; Cheah, Irene G S; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence and early outcome of neural tube defects (NTDs) in Malaysia. This prospective study included all neonates with NTDs (spina bifida, anencephaly, encephalocoele) born in 2009 in 32 Malaysian hospitals in the Malaysian National Neonatal Network. The prevalence of NTDs was 0.42 per 1000 live births, being highest among the indigenous people of Sarawak (1.09 per 1000 live births) and lowest among Malaysians of Chinese descent (0.09 per 1000 live births). The most common type of NTDs was anencephaly (0.19 per 1000 live births), followed by spina bifida (0.11 per 1000 live births) and encephalocoele (0.07 per 1000 live births). Majority of the infants with anencephaly (94.5%, n = 51), 45.8% (n = 11) with encephalocoele and 9.5% (n = 4) with spina bifida died. The median duration of hospital stay was 4 (range: 0-161) days. NTDs were common in Malaysia. Mortality was high. Long-term monitoring of NTD prevalence following folic fortification of food is recommended.

  17. Statistics Education Research in Malaysia and the Philippines: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reston, Enriqueta; Krishnan, Saras; Idris, Noraini

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of statistics education research in Malaysia and the Philippines by modes of dissemination, research areas, and trends. An electronic search for published research papers in the area of statistics education from 2000-2012 yielded 20 for Malaysia and 19 for the Philippines. Analysis of these papers showed…

  18. Statistics Education Research in Malaysia and the Philippines: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reston, Enriqueta; Krishnan, Saras; Idris, Noraini

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of statistics education research in Malaysia and the Philippines by modes of dissemination, research areas, and trends. An electronic search for published research papers in the area of statistics education from 2000-2012 yielded 20 for Malaysia and 19 for the Philippines. Analysis of these papers showed…

  19. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Pahang, Malaysia based on MSP-1 and MSP-2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atroosh, Wahib M; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Mahdy, Mohammed Ak; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Surin, Johari

    2011-12-13

    Malaria is still a public health problem in Malaysia especially in the interior parts of Peninsular Malaysia and the states of Sabah and Sarawak (East Malaysia). This is the first study on the genetic diversity and genotype multiplicity of Plasmodium falciparum in Malaysia. Seventy-five P. falciparum isolates were genotyped by using nested-PCR of MSP-1 (block 2) and MSP-2 (block 3). MSP-1 and MSP-2 allelic families were identified in 65 blood samples. RO33 was the predominant MSP-1 allelic family identified in 80.0% (52/65) of the samples while K1 family had the least frequency. Of the MSP-2 allelic families, 3D7 showed higher frequency (76.0%) compared to FC27 (20.0%). The multiplicity of P. falciparum infection (MOI) was 1.37 and 1.20 for MSP-1 and MSP-2, respectively. A total of seven alleles were detected; of which three MSP-1 allelic families (RO33, MAD20 and K1) were monomorphic in terms of size while MSP-2 alleles were polymorphic (two 3D7 and two FC27). Heterozygosity (HE) was 0.57 and 0.55 for MSP-1 and MSP-2, respectively. The study showed that the MOI of P. falciparum is low, reflected the low intensity of malaria transmission in Pahang, Malaysia; RO33 and 3D7 were the most predominant circulating allelic families. The findings showed that P. falciparum has low allelic diversity with a high frequency of alleles. As a result, antimalarial drug efficacy trials based on MSP genotyping should be carefully interpreted.

  20. Competition Law in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Anand Raj; Cynthia Lian; Wen-Ly Chin

    2015-01-01

    There is still some way for Malaysia to go and the lack of merger control (for the foreseeable future) remains a significant shortcoming in the Malaysian competition law regime at this stage. Anand Raj, Cynthia Lian, & Wen-Ly Chin (Shearn Delamore & Co., Kuala Lumpur)

  1. Manufacturing halal in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    production, trade and consumption. Based on fieldwork in Malaysia, this article explores how manufacturing companies understand and practise halal certification, standards and technoscience. I argue that while existing studies of halal overwhelmingly explore micro-social aspects such as the everyday...

  2. Financial Sector Assessment : Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia, as many of its Asian neighbors, experienced significant macro/financial distress in the late 1990s. The transformed and strengthened financial sector has been able to weather the recent global financial crisis well. Financial market intermediaries reliance on cross-border and interbank funding remains limited. Banking institutions are well capitalized and are expected to be able...

  3. Education Reforms in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Aida Suraya Muhammad

    Malaysia's agenda in the late 1990s involved making the transition from an industrial economy to a knowledge-based economy. Thus, the more traditional purpose of education, that is, to produce an educated person, needs to be reevaluated. If the nation's Vision 2020 is to become a reality, the educational program needs to make a fundamental shift…

  4. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  5. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  6. Country Profiles, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzuki, Ariffin Bin; Peng, J. Y.

    A profile of Malaysia is sketched in this paper. Emphasis is placed on the nature, scope, and accomplishments of population activities in the country. Topics and sub-topics include: location and description of the country; population (size, growth patterns, age structure, urban/rural distribution, ethnic and religious composition, migration,…

  7. Plasmodium knowlesi: from Malaysia, a novel health care threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatani, Sergio; Fiorino, Sirio; Manfredi, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Epidemic foci of Plasmodium knowlesi malaria have been identified during the past ten years in Malaysia, in particular in the States of Sarawak and Sabah (Malaysia Borneo), and in the Pahang region (peninsular Malaysia). Based on a review of the available recent international literature, the authors underline the importance of molecular biology examinations, polymerase chain reactions (PCR), performed with primers specific for P. knowlesi, since the current microscopic examination (haemoscope) may fail to distinguish P. knowlesi from Plasmodium malariae, due to the very similar appearance of the two parasites. P. knowlesi has been described as the causal agent of life-threatening and lethal forms of malaria: its clinical picture is more severe when compared with that of P. malariae, since the disease is characterized by greater parasitaemia, as opposed to that documented in the course of P. malariae disease. The most effective carrier is Anopheles leucosphyrus: this mosquito is attracted by both humans and monkeys. Among primates, the natural hosts of P. knowlesi are Macaca fascicularis and Macaca nemestina, while Saimiri scirea and Macaca mulatta, which cannot become infected in nature, may be useful in experimental models. When underlining the potentially severe evolution, we note the key role played by prompt disease recognition, which is expected to be more straightforward in patients monitored in endemic countries at high risk, but should be carefully implemented for subjects being admitted to hospital in Western countries suffering from the typical signs and symptoms of malaria, after travelling in South-East Asia where they were engaged in excursions in the tropical forest (trekking, and similar outdoor activities). In these cases, the diagnosis should be prompt, and suitable treatment should follow. According to data in the literature, in non-severe cases chloroquine proves very effective against P. knowlesi, achieving the disappearance of signs and

  8. Malaysia; 2012 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund.

    2013-01-01

    This report discusses Malaysia’s economic accomplishment and other economic reforms. Malaysia has attained a strong growth in 2012, and a robust growth is expected in the next term. The financial position of Malaysia is sound and supported by a strong regulatory framework with high bank capitals, international reserves, and refined monetary and financial policies. Fiscal policies need to be restructured, and public financial management needs to be strengthened to deal with risks. The author...

  9. Corporate Governance Disclosure in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    ONG, Wei Jiin

    2006-01-01

    This research provides evidence on corporate governance disclosure in Malaysia based on a sample of 25 Malaysian public listed companies on the Kuala Lumpur Composite Index (KLCI) in the year 1998 and 2005 that are listed on the Bursa Malaysia. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine whether after the launch of the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance (HLFC, 2000) following the 1997/98 financial crisis, corporate governance in Malaysia has improved in terms of disclosure information ...

  10. Motorcycle fatalities in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Marizwan Abdul Manan; András Várhelyi

    2012-01-01

    Malaysia has the highest road fatality risk (per 100,000 population) among the ASEAN countries and more than 50% of the road accident fatalities involve motorcyclists. This study has collected and analysed data from the police, government authorities, and national and international research institutes. Only fatality data are used due to the severe underreporting of severe injuries (up to 600%) and slight injuries (up to 1400%). The analysis reveals that the highest numbers of motorcycle fatal...

  11. Internetcensur i Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This project examines the background of the implementation of the Internet censorship legislation in Malaysia in 2012 by the Malaysian government. This is illustrated by an empirical analysis of the two largest pro-government Malaysian newspapers New Straits Times and The Stars coverage of the need for Internet censorship between the two parliamentary elections in 2008 and the recent one in 2013. The government suffered its worst-ever election performance in these elections, and this project ...

  12. Older Consumers in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Phillips

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to understand the concerns and problems faced by older people in an industrializing middle-income country, Malaysia, in their process of acquiring products to meet their everyday needs. Respondents aged 55 and over were interviewed in eight states throughout Peninsular Malaysia providing 1356 usable questionnaires; two-thirds from urban and one-third from rural areas. Education, health status, and life satisfaction were recorded. Service patronage behaviour was examined for four main categories of commonly-sought consumer goods: groceries, health supplements, apparel, eating outlets, plus selected services (public transport, vacation packages and financial services. The findings showed that older adults in Malaysia are rather discerning consumers. Many respondents are price conscious and have developed consumer attitudes with regard to attitude of staff and assistance rendered. Many display a good ability to discriminate and to select, especially on the basis of price and durability of products and many appear to be acting as effectively as consumers in any other age group.

  13. An overview of the population dynamics in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshat, H; Tey Nai Peng

    1988-06-01

    Between 1900 and 1985 the population of Malaysia has increased from 2 million to 16 million. Before World War II most of the growth was due to immigration from China and India; after World War II it was due to natural increase. The crude birth rate appears to be leveling off at about 31.3 and the crude death rate at 5.3. At the current rate of growth the total population will be about 32 million by 2015. The proportion of urban population increased from 27% in 1979 to 34% in 1980. In 1980 83% of the population lived in Peninsular Malaysia (39% of the land area), and 17% lived in Sabah and Sarawak (61% of the land area). Population density ranges from 12 persons per square kilometer in Sarawak to 4521 in the Federal Republic of Kuala Lumpur. The median age of the population is 17.4 years; 40% are under 14, and 3.6% are over 65. In most age groups there are more women than men. The annual growth rate for Malays is higher than for Chinese and Indians, and Malays constituted 55% of the population in 1980. 34% are Chinese and 10% are Indian. Total fertility rate declined from 68/1000 in 1957 to 39/1000 in 1985. Malay fertility (4.8 children) is higher than either Indian (2.9) or Chinese (2.7) Malay fertility has been increasing while that of Indians and Chinese is decreasing due to contraception. Also, among all 3 groups age at marriage has increased. Data from the 1984/85 Malaysian Population and Family Survey show that the differential fertility of the 3 groups is due largely to rural/urban distribution, education, and work patterns. Ideal family size, according to the survey, is 4.8. The National Population and Family Development Program would like to achieve a growth rate of 2%/year, and family planning knowledge has become virtually universal. KAP surveys show that by 1984 contraceptive prevalence was 51%; however 42% of all eligible women were using unreliable methods. In terms of efficient methods, contraceptive prevalence rate was 16% for Malays, 47% for Chinese

  14. e-Waste Management Scenarios in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatihah Suja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available e-Waste, or electronic waste, disposal that is uncontrolled can be harmful to human health and the environment because e-waste contains toxic substances and heavy metals. However, if the waste is properly managed, it can become a business opportunity that produces high returns because e-waste also contains valuable materials, such as gold, silver, platinum, and palladium. The government of Malaysia wants to ensure the safe, effective, and economically beneficial management of e-waste in Malaysia. Management approaches have included law enforcement and regulation and the promotion of e-waste recovery activities. e-Waste of no commercial value must be disposed of at sites/premises licensed by the Department of Environment (DOE, Malaysia. To date, 18 full recovery facilities and 128 partial recovery facilities that use various available technologies have been designated for the segregation, dismantling, and treatment of e-waste. However, there are issues faced by the recovery facilities in achieving the goal of converting e-waste into a source material. The issues include the e-waste supply, the importation of e-waste derived products and coding, and finally the need to develop the criteria for e-waste processing technologies to ensure the safety and the sustainability of the facilities.

  15. Climatic Design and Changing Social Needs in the Tropics: A Case Study in Kuching, Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Karol

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available On the periphery of most urban centres in the tropics, many new houses are being constructed in previously rural areas. However, the design of these houses shows little respect for local climate or local lifestyle, as they are now developer-constructed brick-and-concrete houses on smaller lots rather than community-built housing on large lots. This paper proposes a set of design strategies that acknowledges the particular needs related to climate and changing lifestyle in these tropical zones. Using case study methodology, the design strategies are tested on a prototype for an actual site in Tapah Village on the periphery of Kuching, Sarawak. In order to gauge the thermal performance of the prototype it was thermally simulated. The thermal simulation of the prototype showed that temperatures generally remained within an acceptable range without air-conditioning. An informal workshop was held in Tapah to gauge social acceptance of the design strategies. The prototype demonstrated that specific design strategies, some based on traditional designs, are essential in the tropics in order to minimise the need for air conditioning. These design strategies were acknowledged as important by the local community, although there was concern about the potential increase in the capital cost of such housing.

  16. The pattern of femoral diaphyseal fractures in children admitted in Sarawak General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasit, A H; Mohammad, A W; Pan, K L

    2006-02-01

    Trend towards changing the face of management for pediatric femoral fractures tends to advocate operative treatment. This study was undertaken to review our current practice in the wake of recent progress in the management of pediatric femoral fractures. Fifty patients with femoral diaphyseal fracture treated in Sarawak General Hospital were reviewed retrospectively after an average follow-up of 2.6 years. There were 36 boys and 14 girls, with a mean age of 6.2 years (range five months to 14 years). Children under six years of age constituted the majority of the patients. Half of the fractures were caused by road traffic accident. Nine patients had associated injuries. The most common site of fracture was at the middle third (N=31). The treatment regimens were delayed hip spica (DHS) in 16, immediate hip spica (IHS) in 24, plate osteosynthesis (PO) in five, titanium elastic nailing (TEN) in five, and external fixation (EF) in one. The minimum hospital stay was two days, and the maximum 33 days (mean, 9.7 days). Malunion was the commonest complication. Conservative treatment is the preferred option for children under six years of age. It is cost-effective with minimal complication. The other treatment options are reserved for specific indication in older children. Diaphyseal fractures of the femur in children can be adequately managed non-operatively.

  17. Growth curves for school children from Kuching, Sarawak: a methodological development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Yii Bonn; Shariff, Asma Ahmad; Mohamed, Abdul Majid; Merican, Amir Feisal

    2015-03-01

    In this article, the authors propose reference curves for height and weight for school children in the Kuching area, Sarawak. The school children were from primary to secondary schools (aged 6.5 to 17 years old) and comprised both genders. Anthropometric measurements and demographic information for 3081 school-aged children were collected (1440 boys and 1641 girls). Fitted line plots and percentiles for height and weight (3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th percentiles) were obtained. The height of school boys and school girls were almost similar at the start of their school-going age. For school girls, height and weight values stabilized when they reached 16 or 17 years old but kept increasing for school boys. School boys were taller than school girls as they entered adolescence. Height differences between school boys and school girls became significantly wider as they grew older. Chinese school children were taller and heavier than those of other ethnic groups. © 2012 APJPH.

  18. Global update: Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Malaysia produces more condoms than any other country in the world, yet it has one of the lowest per capita condom usage rates. The official number of HIV-infected persons and of persons with AIDS in Malaysia is 5140 and 72, respectively. People working in AIDS prevention efforts believe the actual number of HIV-infected people is closer to 50,000 and climbing. People working in AIDS prevention efforts believe the actual number of HIV-infected people is closer to 50,000 and climbing. Public health officials report that AIDS is spreading rapidly through Malaysia's relatively large population of IV drug users. The Ministry of Health wants to introduce comprehensive and pragmatic efforts to stem the AIDS epidemic. They include sex education in schools, ways to prevent IV drug users from sharing needles, promotion of condoms among high risk groups, and screening to monitor HIV transmission. Islamic and Catholic groups oppose these program and policy measures, however. The new director of the Ministry's AIDS prevention unit announced during a meeting of health officials that a return to the teaching of Islam and adoption of Islamic values are the means to deal with AIDS. He suggested that boys and girls be separated, television be rigorously censored, and that Muslim scholars not be limited to mosques to do their teaching. The government has greatly increased the 1993 AIDS budget with all of the funds dedicated to blood screening, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and health education. The deputy health minister noted that the NGOs are supposed to address the more sensitive issues. The government does not allow any of the funds to directly go to condom promotion or programs for IV drug users, however.

  19. International Proceedings 2013 of Malaysia-Japan Academic Scholar Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Osamu; Bostamam, Anas; Ling, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The selected papers included in this proceedings on Malaysia-Japan Academic Scholar Conference (MJASC) 2013, are related to nano-science engineering, mechanical engineering, electrical and electronic engineering, computer science, information technology etc. This proceedings will be a source of research findings for Malaysia and Japan specifically, and other countries in general, especially among researchers, industry sectors and government policy makers. It will be served as a resourceful reference and platform to reflect the significant of the Look East Policy outcomes and products.

  20. Sustainable WEE management in Malaysia: present scenarios and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaul Hasan Shumon, Md; Ahmed, S.

    2013-12-01

    Technological advances have resulted development of a lot of electronic products for continuously increasing number of customers. As the customer taste and features of these products change rapidly, the life cycles have come down tremendously. Therefore, a large volume of e-wastes are now emanated every year. This scenario is very much predominant in Malaysia. On one hand e-wastes are becoming environmental hazards and affecting the ecological imbalance. On the other, these wastes are remaining still economically valuable. In Malaysia, e-waste management system is still in its nascent state. This paper describes the current status of e-waste generation and recycling and explores issues for future e-waste management system in Malaysia from sustainable point of view. As to draw some factual comparisons, this paper reviews the e-waste management system in European Union, USA, Japan, as a benchmark. Then it focuses on understanding the Malaysian culture, consumer discarding behavior, flow of the materials in recycling, e-waste management system, and presents a comparative view with the Swiss e-waste system. Sustainable issues for e-waste management in Malaysia are also presented. The response adopted so far in collection and recovery activities are covered in later phases. Finally, it investigates the barriers and challenges of e-waste system in Malaysia.

  1. Malaysia-China Friendship Evening 2009”Held

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Our Staff Reporter

    2009-01-01

    <正>The CPAFFC, the Embassy of Malaysia in China, the Malaysia-China Friendship Association and the Malaysia-China Business Council jointly hosted the "Malaysia-China Friendship Evening 2009"at the Conference Hall of the Chi-

  2. Subaerial freshwater phosphatic stromatolites in Deer Cave, Sarawak — A unique geobiological cave formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Joyce; McFarlane, Donald A.

    2011-05-01

    A suite of distinctive freshwater subaerial phosphatic stromatolites is developed close to the northeastern entrance of Deer Cave, Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Borneo, in conditions of very low light but ample supply of nutrients from guano. These stromatolites are not particulate; they are composed of alternating layers of more porous and more dense amorphous hydroxylapatite. This biomineralization occurs as moulds of coccoid (the majority) and filamentous (less abundant) cyanobacteria. Mineralization occurs at a pH of ~ 7.0 in the extracellular sheaths and in micro-domains of varying carbonate content in the surrounding mucus of the biofilm. The most recent surfaces that are not yet strongly mineralized show still-living filamentous, coccoid and rod-shaped forms. Trace element composition shows enrichment in metal ions, especially Mn and Zn. The stromatolites are present as horizontal shelves arranged in series on a steep rock face that is vertically under a guano-laden shelf. The rock face undergoes active dissolution from acidic guano drainage water (e.g., pH of 2.43) and from aggressive rainwater from an overhead discharge. However, the rock surface under the stromatolite is protected while the rest of the cliff face is backcut, creating a hoodoo-like effect. The stromatolites are ~ 15-20 cm deep, ~ 4-7 cm thick, and of variable width, generally ~ 50 cm. Eventually, guano and biological detritus in the descending water film lodge in the lee of the stromatolite lip, causing local acidification and erosion of stromatolite and rock on the underside of the ledge. A dynamic equilibrium is established between upward accretion of the fresh surface and destruction at the base such that the base of the stromatolite does not reflect the date of its inception and the stromatolite climbs up the wall.

  3. Service Quality Evaluation Of Internet Banking In Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    P.Vijayan,; Bala Shanmugam

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluates the service quality of Internet banking in Malaysia. It focuses on the transaction sites of five leading anchor banks, which provide a platform for electronic banking and examines electronic banking performances through a set of 40 questions specifically prepared for this research. The survey was conducted in January 2002.Only two of the five banks surveyed obtained a four star rating out of a maximum possible of five stars. Three other banks have obtained three star rati...

  4. Telecommunication Value Network in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Business network is believed to offer a superior way of managing the challenges related to the uncertainty and complexity of the contemporary business environment in Malaysia telecommunication industry. This study strives to analyze the value business network in Malaysia telecommunication industry with emphasize on the market leader, Maxis Communication Bhd in its mobile content services. The business network represents the form of organization where the focal company focuses on certain key a...

  5. Radioisotope production in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Anuar Wan Awang [Medical Technology Div., Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    Production of Mo-99 by neutron activation of Mo-99 in Malaysia began as early as 1984. Regular supply of the Tc-99m extracted from it to the hospitals began in early 1988 after going through formal registration with the Malaysian Ministry of Health. Initially, the weekly demand was about 1.2 Ci of Mo-99 which catered the needs of 3 nuclear medicine centres. Sensitive to the increasing demand of Tc-99m, we have producing our own Tc-99m generator from imported TeO{sub 2} because irradiation TeO{sub 2} with our reactor give low yield of I-131. We have established the production of radioisotope for industrial use. By next year, Sm-153 EDTMP will be produce after we have license from our competent authority. (author)

  6. Medical education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Victor K E

    2008-01-01

    Malaysia has a long history of medical education, with Singapore becoming the first medical school to serve the region after its foundation in 1905. The first school to be established in Kuala Lumpur after independence from the British was the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Malaya in 1963. Whilst today there are 21 public and private medical schools, all offering a 5 year undergraduate programme, some private schools have diversified by developing international collaboration and conduct twinning or credit-transfer programmes. All medical schools require accreditation by the National Accreditation Board and the Malaysian Medical Council. Although the criteria for accreditation is comprehensive and covers a broad range of areas of assessment, it is debatable whether it always matches the needs of the country. The dramatic increase in medical schools in the last two decades has posed challenges in terms of maintenance of quality, physical infrastructure and suitably qualified faculty.

  7. Dental health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Z A

    1984-12-01

    Three epidemiological surveys have been carried out in Malaysia since 1971. All showed a high level of caries prevalence. Ninety per cent of school children between the ages of 6 and 18 suffered from dental caries, with a DMFT of approximately 3 and a dft of approximately 2. Ninety-five per cent of the adult population had caries experience, with the mean DMFT being 13.2. Approximately 55 per cent of children showed the presence of gingivitis with the mean number of inflamed gingival units per child ranging from 1.9 to 2.8, while 72.4 per cent of adults had some form of periodontal disease with 29 per cent having pockets deeper than 3 mm. The OHI-S score for adults was 2.2 and 81 per cent used toothbrushes to clean their teeth. A further 5.1 per cent used twigs and fingers with powdered charcoal or salt. One-third of the child population needed orthodontic treatment, with 0.3 per cent examined in peninsular Malaysia having cleft lip or palate or both. In the adult population 10.4 per cent of those examined required some form of orthodontic treatment. Twenty per cent of the children in the survey were in need of dentures; 54.7 per cent of the adults were either in need of dentures or were wearing dentures. Of these 25 per cent had complete dentures. The smoking habit was most commonly associated with pre-cancerous/cancerous lesions with alcohol consumption a close competitor; 114 adults, that is 1.3 per cent of those examined, suffer from leukoplakia but only one case of oral cancer was detected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Dialysis provision in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, T O; Lee, D G; Zaki, M

    2000-06-01

    We determined the provision for dialysis treatment in Malaysia. There were 181 dialysis centres as at 1st June 1999 (161 Haemodialysis (HD) and 20 Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) centres), providing treatment for 5614 patients. This is equivalent to an estimated prevalence rate of 253 patients per million population (pmp) and new dialysis acceptance rate of 49 patients pmp. Dialysis facilities were widely distributed throughout the country though rather unevenly among states. Penang, Selangor/KL, Malacca led with number of dialysis patients pmp ranging from 417 to 480. Kelantan and Sabah had the lowest provision with 51 and 64 patients pmp respectively. There were more centres and HD capacity in the private sector while the Non-Government Organisation and public sectors had about the same capacity. However the public sector had more patients on account of availability of CAPD and home HD services, as well as low HD capacity to patient ratio. The number ofcentres, HD capacity and patients have increased rapidly especially since 1991; the estimated growth rates were 16.5 centres/year, 658 capacity/year, and 392 patients/year respectively. There was also a trend toward increasing over-capacity in the private and NGO sectors. In conclusion, the level of dialysis provision is increasing, indicating increasing accessibility of dialysis treatment in Malaysia. Over-capacity is a concern in the private and NGO sectors. Thus funding agencies should be encouraged to source provision from those sectors. The public sector still has the crucial role of providing for under-served areas in the country.

  9. Motorcycle fatalities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Marizwan Abdul Manan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia has the highest road fatality risk (per 100,000 population among the ASEAN countries and more than 50% of the road accident fatalities involve motorcyclists. This study has collected and analysed data from the police, government authorities, and national and international research institutes. Only fatality data are used due to the severe underreporting of severe injuries (up to 600% and slight injuries (up to 1400%. The analysis reveals that the highest numbers of motorcycle fatalities occur in rural locations (61%, on primary roads (62% and on straight road sections (66%. The majority are riders (89%, 16 to 20 years old (22.5%, and 90% of the motorcycles are privately owned. Of those involved in fatal accidents, 75% of the motorcyclists wear helmets, and 35% do not have proper licences. The highest number of fatalities by type of collision is ‘angular or side’ (27.5%. Although fatal motorcyclist crashes mostly involve ‘passenger cars’ (28%, motorcyclists are responsible for 50% of the collisions either by crashing singly (25% or with other motorcyclists (25%. While male motorcyclists predominate (94% of fatalities, female motorcyclists aged 31 to 70, possessing ‘no licence’, not wearing helmets and travelling during the day, account for a higher percentage than male motorcyclists. Malaysia must acquire more motorcycle exposure data and establish an injury recording system and database based on hospital-records. To reduce motorcycle fatalities, it first has to understand why young male motorcyclists are prone to fatal crashes in the evenings and on weekends on rural primary roads, especially on straight road sections.

  10. Pollution Control: How Feasible is Zero Discharge Concepts in Malaysia Palm Oil Mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya S. Madaki

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many palm oil mills in Malaysia still discharged either partially treated or raw palm oil mill effluent (POME into nearby rivers. Either partially treated or untreated POME depletes a water body of its oxygen and suffocates aquatic life. Vast amounts of biogas are also generated during anaerobic digestion of POME. This paper presented the key findings from the survey mailed to 86 palm oil mills located in Sarawak and Sabah. The survey results provide an overview of the position of the palm oil mills operators on current advance POME treatment technology (PTT in relation to achieving zero discharge concepts. The survey attempted to identify the key issues about the PTT in respect to feasibility of zero discharge concepts in palm oil mills. The results shows that, although palm oil mills generate a lot of different types of wastes during processing of Fresh Fruit Bunches, according to the operators and available literature, POME is the most difficult waste to manage. The results also shows that, palm oil mills cannot meet up with the new discharge limits of 20ppm of BOD and zero emission using only conventional open or closed pounding system

  11. Methane and CO2 fluxes from peat soil, palm stems and field drains in two oil palm plantations in Sarawak, Borneo, on different tropical peat soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Frances; Lip Khoon, Kho; Hill, Tim; Arn Teh, Yit

    2017-04-01

    Oil palm plantations have been expanding rapidly on tropical peat soils in the last 20 years, with 50 % of SE Asian peatlands now managed as industrial or small-holder plantations, up from 11% in 1990. Tropical peat soils are an important carbon (C) store, containing an estimated 17 % of total peatland C. There are large uncertainties as to the soil C dynamics in oil palm plantations on peat due to a shortage of available data. It is therefore essential to understand the soil C cycle in order to promote effective management strategies that optimise yields, whilst maintaining the high C storage capacity of the soil. Here we present CO2 and CH4 fluxes from two oil palm plantations in Sarawak, Malaysia on peat soils. Data were collected from different surface microforms within each plantation that experienced different surface management practices. These included the area next to the palm, in bare soil harvest paths, beneath frond piles, underneath cover crops, from the surface of drains, and from palm stems. Data were collected continuously over one year and analysed with different environmental variables, including soil temperature, WTD, O2, soil moisture and weather data in order to best determine the constraints on the dataset. Total soil respiration (Rtot) varied between 0.09 and 1.59 g C m-2 hr-1. The largest fluxes (0.59 - 1.59 g C m-2 hr-1) were measured next to the palms. Larger CO2 fluxes were observed beneath the cover crops than in the bare soil. This trend was attributed to priming effects from the input of fresh plant litter and exudates. Peat soil type was shown to have significantly different fluxes. The different plantations also had different environmental drivers best explaining the variation in Rtot - with soil moisture being the most significant variable on Sabaju series soil and soil temperature being the most significant environmental variable in the plantation with the Teraja series soil. Rtot was shown to reduce significantly with increasing

  12. Women and the media in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, M H

    1987-01-01

    The contributions of and portrayal of women in the Malaysian media are summarized here in detail. Women's access to training in journalism and education is on average better than that of men. There are 3 communications departments in institutions of higher learning in Malaysia, and all enroll more women than men, probably because of women's better language skills and desire to enter a "glamourous" profession. Women's participation in journalism, except for women's magazines, is much more limited, especially at higher levels. Women's abilities are not lacking, as shown by the number of awards Malaysian women journalists have won, but it is felt that women are not assertive, cannot work late or night shifts, cannot be transferred, because of family and domestic obligations. Perhaps journalism curricula should offer women extra courses in effective family management, public speaking or human relations, or assign cadet journalists women mentors. In Malaysia women are generally portrayed in print, electronic and advertising media as either decorative, foolish, consumption driven, or sex objects. Exploitative poses predominate in ads for male markets, such as automobiles and liquor. Sexual roles for women and girls are depicted as those of subservient or silly housewife or in other negative or traditional roles.

  13. Focus on Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forman, L T

    1979-01-01

    Prospects for a stable, prospering economy in Malaysia appear threatened by an uneven distribution of wealth among non-Malay, particularly Chinese, residents. Native Malays, Bumiputra, have benefitted from the government's 20 year New Economic Policy, a system of subsidies to correct economic imbalances among the races. Malay corporate ownership has increased from 2.4% in 1970 to 28% in 1979. However, equity must increase by 26% annually to meet NEP targets. Without the GNP expanding 7-8% yearly, the government will be tempted to acquire assets at low prices. 70% of the total Malay ownership was held by public enterprises holding equity in trust. An elite group of Bumiputra will own a fair number of shares reserved by 1970. 1/5 of the population of Kuala Lumpur are squatters. Among these groups, communal tension is high. The Chinese businessmen are most resistant to native management. Since they control private domestic investment, they have political power. The Industrial Coordination Act (ICA), which gives power to civil servants through a licensing system, protects the system. The Asian Foundation supports management training, business development, and university demonstration projects in legal aid, solar energy, and community psychiatry. Malaysian competence in English enables widespread distribution of the Books for Asia program.

  14. Yaws in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, E K

    1985-01-01

    In 1954, with the assistance of the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund, a campaign against yaws was initiated in Malaysia with the formation of a yaws elimination unit in the Ministry of Health. Between 1954 and 1975, the reported annual incidence of yaws fell from 140.85 to 1.25 per 100,000 population. When rates dropped to less than two per 100,000, the program was merged with the general health services. Currently when cases are reported, contacts are traced, school and village surveys are carried out, and appropriate treatment is given. The major problems facing the control program today are a loss of interest in control activities; a smaller number of health workers experienced in the diagnosis, management, and control of the disease; and a growing reluctance to treat asymptomatic contacts with penicillin for fear of anaphylactoid reactions. Despite these problems, it is not an unreasonable expectation that, with continued stimulation from the individuals responsible for infectious disease control, yaws will eventually be eliminated.

  15. Burden of stroke in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Keat Wei; Gan, Siew Hua

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is one of the top five leading causes of death and one of the top 10 causes for hospitalization in Malaysia. Stroke is also in the top five diseases with the greatest burden of disease, based on disability-adjusted life years. However, prospective studies on stroke in Malaysia are limited. To date, neither the prevalence of stroke nor its incidence nationally has been recorded. Hypertension is the major risk factor for stroke. The mean age of stroke patients in Malaysia is between 54.5 and 62.6 years. Traditional medicine is commonly practiced. With the increasing number of stroke cases annually, more government and nongovernment organizations should be involved in primary and secondary prevention strategies.

  16. Developing a Malaysia flood model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseldine, Lucy; Baxter, Stephen; Wheeler, Phil; Thomson, Tina

    2014-05-01

    Faced with growing exposures in Malaysia, insurers have a need for models to help them assess their exposure to flood losses. The need for an improved management of flood risks has been further highlighted by the 2011 floods in Thailand and recent events in Malaysia. The increasing demand for loss accumulation tools in Malaysia has lead to the development of the first nationwide probabilistic Malaysia flood model, which we present here. The model is multi-peril, including river flooding for thousands of kilometres of river and rainfall-driven surface water flooding in major cities, which may cause losses equivalent to river flood in some high-density urban areas. The underlying hazard maps are based on a 30m digital surface model (DSM) and 1D/2D hydraulic modelling in JFlow and RFlow. Key mitigation schemes such as the SMART tunnel and drainage capacities are also considered in the model. The probabilistic element of the model is driven by a stochastic event set based on rainfall data, hence enabling per-event and annual figures to be calculated for a specific insurance portfolio and a range of return periods. Losses are estimated via depth-damage vulnerability functions which link the insured damage to water depths for different property types in Malaysia. The model provides a unique insight into Malaysian flood risk profiles and provides insurers with return period estimates of flood damage and loss to property portfolios through loss exceedance curve outputs. It has been successfully validated against historic flood events in Malaysia and is now being successfully used by insurance companies in the Malaysian market to obtain reinsurance cover.

  17. Geochemical characterization of Neogene sediments from onshore West Baram Delta Province, Sarawak: paleoenvironment, source input and thermal maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togunwa, Olayinka S.; Abdullah, Wan H.

    2017-08-01

    The Neogene strata of the onshore West Baram Province of NW Borneo contain organic rich rock formations particularly within the Sarawak basin. This basin is a proven prolific oil and gas province, thus has been a subject of great interest to characterise the nature of the organic source input and depositional environment conditions as well as thermal maturation. This study is performed on outcrop samples of Lambir, Miri and Tukau formations, which are of stratigraphic equivalence to the petroleum bearing cycles of the offshore West Baram delta province in Sarawak. The investigated mudstone samples are organic rich with a total organic carbon (TOC) content of more than 1.0 wt.%. The integration of elemental and molecular analyses indicates that there is no significant variation in the source input between these formations. The investigated biomarkers parameters achieved from acyclic isoprenoids, terpanes and steranes biomarkers of a saturated hydrocarbon biomarkers revealed that these sediments contain high contribution of land plants with minor marine organic matter input that was deposited and preserved under relatively oxic to suboxic conditions. This is further supported by low total sulphur (TS), high TOC/TN ratios, source and redox sensitive trace elements (V, Ni, Cr, Co and Mo) concentrations and their ratios, which suggest terrigenous source input deposited under oxic to suboxic conditions. Based on the analysed biomarker thermal maturity indicators, it may be deduced that the studied sediments are yet to enter the maturity stage for hydrocarbon generation, which is also supported by measured vitrinite reflectance values of 0.39-0.48% Ro.

  18. Cultivation Potentials of Wild Vegetables: Their Role as Cash or Subsistence Crops in Farming Systems of Sarawak, Malaysia. Ph.d.-thesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz, Ole

    1997-01-01

    Natural Resource Managment, Non-Timber Forest Products, Shifting Cultivation, Indigenous knowledge......Natural Resource Managment, Non-Timber Forest Products, Shifting Cultivation, Indigenous knowledge...

  19. Two new species of Myliocotyle (Monogenea: Monocotylidae) from the gills of Aetomylaeus maculatus and A. nichofii (Elasmobranchii: Myliobatidae) from Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Leslie A; Whittington, Ian D

    2004-12-01

    Myliocotyle borneoensis sp. n. and M. multicrista sp. n. (Monocotylidae: Heterocotylinae) are described from the gills of the mottled eagle ray, Aetomylaeus maculatus (Gray), and the banded eagle ray A. nichofii (Bloch et Schneider) (Myliobatidae), respectively, collected from the northern coast of Malaysian Borneo. These are the first monogeneans to be described on elasmobranchs from Borneo. The formerly monotypic Myliocotyle (for M. pteromylaei) was distinguished from other monocotylids by the distribution and morphology of the eight sclerotised dorsal haptoral accessory structures and the morphology of the male copulatory organ. However, we have determined that M. pteromylaei has ten structures on the dorsal surface of the haptor. Myliocotyle borneoensis is distinguished from M. pteromylaei by the morphology of the male copulatory organ and its accessory piece. Myliocotyle multicrista has 12 sclerotised dorsal haptoral accessory structures and a male copulatory organ with two accessory pieces. Additional sclerotised ridges across the ventral surfaces of each loculus (except the posterior-most pair) are also present in M. multicrista. The diagnosis for Myliocotyle is revised given our discovery of additional dorsal haptoral accessory structures in the type species and to accommodate other new characters of the two new species. Anterior secretions of Myliocotyle are discussed.

  20. A study of ecological sanitation as an integrated urban water supply system: case study of sustainable strategy for Kuching City, Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Darrien Mah Yau; Putuhena, Frederik Josep; Said, Salim; Ling, Law Puong

    2009-03-01

    A city consumes a large amount of water. Urban planning and development are becoming more compelling due to the fact of growing competition for water, which has lead to an increasing and conflicting demand. As such, investments in water supply, sanitation and water resources management is a strong potential for a solid return. A pilot project of greywater ecological treatment has been established in Kuching city since 2003. Such a treatment facility opens up an opportunity of wastewater reclamation for reuse as secondary sources of water for non-consumptive purposes. This paper aims to explore the potential of the intended purposes in the newly developed ecological treatment project. By utilizing the Wallingford Software model, InfoWorks WS (Water Supply) is employed to carry out a hydraulic modeling of a hypothetical greywater recycling system as an integrated part of the Kuching urban water supply, where the greywater is treated, recycled and reused in the domestic environment. The modeling efforts have shown water savings of about 40% from the investigated system reinstating that the system presents an alternative water source worth exploring in an urban environment.

  1. Effect of Organic Based N Fertilizer on Dry Matter (Zea mays L., Ammonium and Nitrate Recovery in an Acid Soil of Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilawati Kasim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Exchangeable ammonium (NH4+ could be recovered by humic and fulvic acids from humic substances. The ability of these acids in fixing or retaining NH4+ has been demonstrated in many findings and reports. Both acids could affect the plant growth, nutrients uptake by enhancing photosynthesis rate and root growth among others. Thus, in this study, the effect of both acids (in liquid form on soil exchangeable NH4+, dry matter production and available nitrate (NO3- was investigated. Approach: Humic molecules were isolated using standard procedures, followed by liquid organic N fertilizers formulation. Organic based N fertilizers were applied to soil in pots at 10 Days After Planting (DAP and 28 DAP. Treated soils and plant parts were sampled at 54 DAP or at tasselling stage. Soil samples were analyzed for pH, ammonium and nitrate content. The plant samples were weighed to assess dry matter production. Results: Under acid condition, organic based liquid N fertilizers (fulvic acid or both, humic and fulvic acids increased accumulation of NH4+in soil. The presence of carboxylic groups in humic molecules increased NH4+ retention with increasing soil's stock labile carbon. However, low percentage of these acids reduced their full effect on dry matter production. The availability of nitrate was not statistically different for all treatments. Low soil pH could had reduced nitrification processes and simultaneously soil NO3- content. Conclusion: Liquid form of humic and/or fulvic acids could play an important role in enhancing urea efficiency. However, their contribution needs to be studied in detail in relation to humic molecules characteristics. This study had a potential in the development of liquid and foliar organic fertilizers.

  2. Heavy metals in emergent trees and pioneers from tropical forest with special reference to forest fires and local pollution sources in Sarawak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breulman, G; Markert, B; Weckert, V; Herpin, U; Yoneda, R; Ogino, K

    2002-02-21

    Leaf samples of tropical trees, i.e. Dryobalanops lanceolata (Kapur paji), Dipterocarpaceae and Macaranga spp. (Mahang), Euphorbiaceae were analyzed for 21 chemical elements. The pioneer Macaranga spp. exhibited higher concentrations for the majority of elements compared to the emergent species of Dryobalanops lanceolata, which was attributed to the higher physiological activity of the fast growing pioneer species compared to emergent trees. Lead showed rather high concentrations in several samples from the Bakam re-forestation site. This is suggested to be caused by emissions through brick manufacturing and related activities in the vicinity. A comparison of Dryobalanops lanceolata samples collected in 1993, 1995 and 1997 in the Lambir Hills National Park revealed that certain heavy metals, i.e. Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Ti showed higher values in 1997 compared to the previous years, which could indicate an atmospheric input from the haze caused by the extensive forest fires raging in Borneo and other parts of Southeast Asia.

  3. Migrant labor absorption in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayagam, J

    1992-01-01

    The use of migrant workers to ease labor shortages caused by rapid industrialization in Malaysia during the twentieth century is examined. "This paper will focus on: (1) the extent, composition and distribution of migrant workers; (2) the labor shortage and absorption of migrant workers; and (3) the role of migrant workers in the government's economic restructuring process."

  4. Anurans Collected in West Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cedhagen, Tomas

    1997-01-01

    Distributional records and natural history noles are given for anurans collected in West Malaysia 1976. Rano baramica was observed when it was caught by an Ahaetulfa nasula (Serpentes: Colubridae). Rhacophorus leucomystax, Limnonectes limnociulris and Microhyla heymonsi were all found al night on...

  5. Proton - Malaysia's national car project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The rise and development of the Malaysian national car project. How this project has become an esential part of the industrial development in Malaysia and how it has underpinned a growing middle class consumption culture with house and car as it pivotal goods....

  6. Primary Teacher Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, Chin Phoi; Yee, Chin Peng

    2012-01-01

    In Malaysia the training of primary school teachers is solely carried out by teacher training institutes which offer the Bachelor of Teaching with Honors (Primary education) program and was first launched in 2007. This program prepares primary school teachers specializing in various subjects or major and is carried out in 27 teacher training…

  7. Daphniphyllum (Daphniphyllaceae) in Peninsular Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiew, R.; Rafidah, A.R.

    2008-01-01

    Three species of Daphniphyllum occur in Peninsular Malaysia: D. glaucescens Blume var. lancifolium (Hook.f.) T.C.Huang, D. laurinum (Benth.) Baill. and D. scortechinii Hook.f. Daphniphyllum glaucescens var. glaucescens and var. blumeanum (Baill. ex Müll.Arg.) J.J.Sm. do not occur in Peninsular Malay

  8. Die Parlamentswahlen 2008 in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reher, Stefanie; Knirsch, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Nach den Parlamentswahlen vom März 2008 in Malaysia deutet manches auf einen politischen Umbruch hin: Die regierende Barisan Nasional (BN), die sich bislang einer komfortablen Zweidrittelmehrheit von 91,4 Prozent der Sitze im Parlament des Landes erfreut hatte, rutschte auf 63,1 Prozent ab und das...

  9. Malaysia Economic Monitor, December 2015

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    Growth moderated throughout 2015, affected by a slowdown in private consumption and weak export growth. The authorities have generally managed the downturn in commodity prices and the financial market volatility with a reasonable mix of macro policies. Heightened external volatility calls for prudent macro policies and acceleration of structural reforms. The eleventh Malaysia plan stresses...

  10. Malaysia Economic Monitor, December 2015

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    Growth moderated throughout 2015, affected by a slowdown in private consumption and weak export growth. The authorities have generally managed the downturn in commodity prices and the financial market volatility with a reasonable mix of macro policies. Heightened external volatility calls for prudent macro policies and acceleration of structural reforms. The eleventh Malaysia plan stresses...

  11. The Winter Rainfall of Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Tsay, Jenq-Dar; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Matsumoto, Jun

    2013-01-01

    .... The major cause of the rainfall maximum of Peninsular Malaysia is cold surge vortices (CSVs) and heavy rainfall/flood (HRF) events propagating from the Philippine area and Borneo. In contrast, the major cause of the rainfall maximum of Borneo is these rain-producing disturbances trapped in Borneo. Disturbances of the former group are formed by the cold sur...

  12. Bakun/Malaysia: Energy supply assurance on the basis of hydroelectric power generation. Bakun/Malaysia: Energiesicherung durch Wasserkraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The project agreement 'hydro electric scheme Sarawak' made on 1st December 1979 between the Federal German Government and the Malaysian Government expires at the end of the year. The project aim of this collaboration which has existed for more than nine years consisted in the entire planning to exploit the hydroelectric potential in Sarawak. The working results range from the general inspection of the electricity supply via detail studies to the documents concerning the calls for tenders. All planning results necessary for a technically feasible and economically meaningful decision to utilize the hydro-electric potential in Sarawak which is justifiable as far as the effects on the environment are concerned, will be presented to the Malaysian government as a recommendation.

  13. Population trends in Malaysia: 1970-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Saharani Abdul; Ghani, Puzziawati Ab; Daud, Noorizam

    2014-12-01

    The size of population in Malaysia had reached 28.3 million in 2010 and is expected to increase to 38.6 million in the next 30 years. This demographic milestone that is causing renewed attention to the challenges caused by population growth. This paper looks at the last 40 years of changes in Malaysia population structure due to the changes in demographic phenomenon using data obtained from the Department of Statistics Malaysia. The principal finding of this research indicates that population structure in Malaysia had changed dramatically from the year 1970 to 2010. At the same time, Malaysia has completed its demographic transition in less than four decades. The fall in fertility and mortality rates have led to an improvement in the life expectancy of the population which has resulted an ageing population in Malaysia.

  14. Obesity in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M N; Chee, S S; Nawawi, H; Yusoff, K; Lim, T O; James, W P T

    2002-08-01

    significantly higher in Chinese and urban subjects. Men were moderately active with the exception of the Dayaks. Chinese women were considerably less active than Chinese men. Chinese and Dayak women were less active than Malay and Indian women. In both men and women, Indians recorded the highest PALs. Hence, current nutrition and health surveys reveal that Malaysians are already affected by western health problems. The escalation of obesity, once thought to be an urban phenomenon, has now spread to the rural population at an alarming rate. As Malaysia proceeds rapidly towards a developed economy status, the health of its population will probably continue to deteriorate. Therefore, a national strategy needs to be developed to tackle both dietary and activity contributors to the excess weight gain of the Malaysian population.

  15. Made-in-China Brands Favor Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yun

    2004-01-01

    @@ As an important part of celebrating the 30th anniversary of Sino-Malaysia relations, "Chinese Export Commodities Exhibition &Investment Conference (Malaysia)2004" was held in Putra World TradeCenter, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia during December 16-19, 2004. This fair was sponsored by the Ministry of Commerce of the People's Republic of China, organized by China Foreign Trade Center, and supported by the Economic and Commercial Counselor's Offices of the Embassies of China inASEAN and by Malaysia-China Chamber of Commerce.

  16. Drug abuse, relapse, and prevention education in malaysia: perspective of university students through a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chie, Qiu Ting; Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Wong, Chee Piau; Dang, Hoang Minh; Khairuddin, Rozainee

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing accounts of illegal substance abuse among university students and professional groups in Malaysia. This study looks at university students' perceptions about this phenomenon. Students from Malaysian universities were asked for their impressions about drug availability and abuse, as well as factors contributing to drug abuse and relapse. The questionnaire also inquired into their knowledge and views regarding government versus private rehabilitation centers, as well as their exposure to, and views about, school-based drug-prevention education. Participants were 460 university students from five Malaysian states: Penang, Selangor, Kuala Lumpur, Sabah, and Sarawak. Results showed gender differences in perceptions of relapse prevention strategies, as well as factors leading to drug abuse and relapse. Students also believed that drug education would be more effective if initiated between the ages of 11 and 12 years, which is slightly older than the common age of first exposure, and provided suggestions for improving existing programs. Implications of student perceptions for the improvement of current interventions and educational programs are discussed.

  17. Drug abuse, relapse and prevention education in Malaysia: perspective of university students through a mixed methods approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Lian eTam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there have been increasing accounts of illegal substance abuse among university students and professional groups in Malaysia. This study looks at university students’ perceptions about this phenomenon. Students from Malaysian universities were asked for their impressions about drug availability and abuse, as well as factors contributing to drug abuse and relapse. The questionnaire also inquired into their knowledge and views regarding government versus private rehabilitation centres, as well as their exposure to, and views about, school-based drug-prevention education. Participants were 460 university students from five Malaysian states: Penang, Selangor, Kuala Lumpur, Sabah, and Sarawak. Results showed gender differences in perceptions of relapse prevention strategies, as well as factors leading to drug abuse and relapse. Students also believed that drug education would be more effective if initiated between the ages of 11 to 12 years, which is slightly older than the common age of first exposure, and provided suggestions for improving existing programs. Implications of student perceptions for the improvement of current interventions and educational programs are discussed.

  18. Analysis of polymorphisms and selective pressures on ama1 gene in Plasmodium knowlesi isolates from Sabah, Malaysia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHUEN YANG CHUA; PINGCHIN LEE; TIEK YING LAU

    2017-09-01

    The apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) of Plasmodium spp. is a merozoite surface antigen that is essential for the recognition and invasion of erythrocytes. Polymorphisms occurring in this surface antigen will cause major obstacles in developing effective malaria vaccines based on AMA-1. The objective of this study was to characterize ama1 gene in Plasmodium knowlesi isolates from Sabah. DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from Keningau, Kota Kinabalu and Kudat. The Pkama1 gene was amplified using nested PCR and subjected to bidirectional sequencing. Analysis of DNA sequence revealed that most of the nucleotide polymorphisms were synonymous and concentrated in domain I of PkAMA-1. Forteen haplotypes were identified based on amino acid variations and haplotype K5 was the most common haplotype. dN/dS ratios implied that purifying selection was prevalent in Pkama1 gene. Fu and Li’s D and F values further provided evidence of negative selection acting on domain II ofPkama1. Lownucleotide diversitywas also detected for the Pkama1 sequences,which is similar to reports on Pkama1 from Peninsular Malaysia and Sarawak. The presence of purifying selection and low nucleotide diversity indicated that domain II of Pkama1 can be used as a target for vaccine development.

  19. Debris flow study in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrin Jaafar, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The phenomenon of debris flow occurs in Malaysia occasionally. The topography of Peningsular Malysia is characterized by the central mountain ranges running from south to north. Several parts of hilly areas with steep slopes, combined with high saturation of soil strata that deliberately increase the pore water pressure underneath the hill slope. As a tropical country Malaysia has very high intensity rainfall which is triggered the landslide. In the study area where the debris flow are bound to occur, there are a few factors that contribute to this phenomenon such as high rainfall intensity, very steep slope which an inclination more than 35 degree and sandy clay soil type which is easily change to liquidity soil. This paper will discuss the study of rainfall, mechanism, modeling and design of mitigation measure to avoid repeated failure in future in same area.

  20. Electricity energy outlook in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C. S.; Maragatham, K.; Leong, Y. P.

    2013-06-01

    Population and income growth are the key drivers behind the growing demand for energy. Demand for electricity in Malaysia is always growing in tandem with its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) growth. The growth for electricity in Malaysia forecasted by Economic Planning Unit (EPU) has shown an increase of 3.52% in 2012 compared to 3.48% in 2011. This growth has been driven by strong demand growth from commercial and domestic sectors. The share of electricity consumption to total energy consumption has increased from 17.4% in 2007 to 21.7% in 2012. The total electricity production was reported at 122.12TWh in 2012, where gas is still the major fuel source contributing to 52.7% of the total generation fuel mix of electricity followed by Coal, 38.9%, hydro, 7.3%, oil, 1% and others, 0.2%. This paper aims to discuss the energy outlook particularly the electricity production and ways toward greener environment in electricity production in Malaysia

  1. Stream ecosystem integrity is impaired by logging and shifting agriculture in a global megadiversity center (Sarawak, Borneo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinggut, Tajang; Yule, Catherine M; Boyero, Luz

    2012-10-15

    In common with most of Borneo, the Bakun region of Sarawak is currently subject to heavy deforestation mainly due to logging and, to a lesser extent, traditional slash-and-burn farming practices. This has the potential to affect stream ecosystems, which are integrators of environmental change in the surrounding terrestrial landscape. This study evaluated the effects of both types of deforestation by using functional and structural indicators (leaf litter decomposition rates and associated detritivores or 'shredders', respectively) to compare a fundamental ecosystem process, leaf litter decomposition, within logged, farmed and pristine streams. Slash-and-burn agricultural practices increased the overall rate of decomposition despite a decrease in shredder species richness (but not shredder abundance) due to increased microbial decomposition. In contrast, decomposition by microbes and invertebrates was slowed down in the logged streams, where shredders were less abundant and less species rich. This study suggests that shredder communities are less affected by traditional agricultural farming practices, while modern mechanized deforestation has an adverse effect on both shredder communities and leaf breakdown.

  2. Electricity Breakdown Management for Sarawak Energy: Use of Condition-Based Equipment for Detection of Defective Insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. K.; Abas, N.

    2017-07-01

    Managing electricity breakdown is vital since an outage causes economic losses for customers and the utility companies. However, electricity breakdown is unavoidable due to some internal or external factors beyond our control. Electricity breakdown on overhead lines tend occur more frequently because it is prone to external disturbances such as animal, overgrown vegetation and defective pole top accessories. In Sarawak Energy Berhad (SEB), majority of the network are composed of overhead lines and hence, is more prone to failure. Conventional method of equipment inspection and fault finding are not effective to quickly identify the root cause of failure. SEB has engaged the use of corona discharge camera as condition-based monitoring equipment to carry out condition based inspection on the line in order to diagnose the condition of the lines prior to failure. Experimental testing has been carried out to determine the correlation between the corona discharge count and the level of defect on line insulator. The result shall be tabulated and will be used as reference for future scanning and diagnostic on any defect on the lines.

  3. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  4. Engaging with Lyell: Alfred Russel Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers as reactions to Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, J T

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) and Charles Darwin (1809-1882) are honored as the founders of modern evolutionary biology. Accordingly, much attention has focused on their relationship, from their independent development of the principle of natural selection to the receipt by Darwin of Wallace's essay from Ternate in the spring of 1858, and the subsequent reading of the Wallace and Darwin papers at the Linnean Society on 1 July 1858. In the events of 1858 Wallace and Darwin are typically seen as central players, with Darwin's friends Charles Lyell (1797-1875) and Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) playing supporting roles. This narrative has resulted in an under-appreciation of a more central role for Charles Lyell as both Wallace's inspiration and foil. The extensive anti-transmutation arguments in Lyell's landmark Principles of Geology were taken as the definitive statement on the subject. Wallace, in his quest to solve the mystery of species origins, engaged with Lyell's arguments in his private field notebooks in a way that is concordant with his engagement with Lyell in the 1855 and 1858 papers. I show that Lyell was the object of Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers through a consideration of the circumstances that led Wallace to send his Ternate paper to Darwin, together with an analysis of the material that Wallace drew upon from the Principles. In this view Darwin was, ironically, intended for a supporting role in mediating Wallace's attempted dialog with Lyell.

  5. Economic Education in Malaysia: A Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    This report provides a brief description of economic education in Malaysia and indicates interest, on the part of various Asian countries, i.e., Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines, in the establishment of economic education programs. (Editor/RK)

  6. The Evolution of Special Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lay Wah; Low, Hui Min

    2014-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of special education in Malaysia across four chronological stages: before and during the early colonial period (before 1900), pre-independence (1900-1957), post-independence (1957-1990) and modern Malaysia (1990 to the present), through document analysis. By placing current issues and trends within a historical…

  7. Homeschool in Malaysia: A Foresight Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Soon, Ng; Rahman Bin Ahmad, Abd; Bin Sulaiman, Muhammad Ibrahim; Sirisa, Ng Mei Xin

    2015-01-01

    Homeschooling in Malaysia is a form of alternative education that emphasizes quality education based on moral values and beliefs while strengthening family bonds. This alternative form of education is being practiced by a growing number of families in Malaysia. As such, the Ministry of Education has given the green light for intending parents who…

  8. Notes on the Lecythidaceae of Peninsular Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prance, G.T.

    2010-01-01

    In preparation for the account of Lecythidaceae for the Flora of Peninsular Malaysia some changes involving new names are needed. The genus Abdulmajidia is reduced to synonymy with Barringtonia and the necessary new combinations are made. Three new species of Barringtonia from Malaysia are described

  9. The Evolution of Special Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lay Wah; Low, Hui Min

    2014-01-01

    This article traces the evolution of special education in Malaysia across four chronological stages: before and during the early colonial period (before 1900), pre-independence (1900-1957), post-independence (1957-1990) and modern Malaysia (1990 to the present), through document analysis. By placing current issues and trends within a historical…

  10. An Exploration of African Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Irene Tan Ai

    2011-01-01

    The exploratory study is an attempt to understand the reasons that prompted African students to study in Malaysia, the challenges encountered and the coping strategies used. The research on such topics among international students is well documented, but studies on international students in Malaysia are scarce. The sample included 155 African…

  11. Information Policies in Saudi Arabia and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Abdus Sattar

    1993-01-01

    Discussion of national information policy focuses on Saudi Arabia and Malaysia. Documents from the two countries that were reviewed to examine policy provisions related to library and information services are listed, and Malaysia's national policy on library and information services is presented as a model for other developing countries. (Contains…

  12. Economic Education in Malaysia: A Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    This report provides a brief description of economic education in Malaysia and indicates interest, on the part of various Asian countries, i.e., Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Thailand, and the Philippines, in the establishment of economic education programs. (Editor/RK)

  13. TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE TOURISM MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siti Nabiha AK; N Abdul Wahid; A Amran; H Che Haat; I Abustan

    2008-01-01

    .... Protection of the environment is vital in ensuring the sustainability of the industry. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the issues pertaining to sustainable tourism development in Malaysia. In so doing, policies, regulations and strategies to achieve sustainable tourism will be examined. The paper concludes with the arguments for having local agenda for sustainable tourism in Malaysia.

  14. Distinct genetic difference between the Duffy binding protein (PkDBPαII) of Plasmodium knowlesi clinical isolates from North Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Mun-Yik; Rashdi, Sarah A A; Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee-Ling

    2015-02-21

    Plasmodium knowlesi is one of the monkey malaria parasites that can cause human malaria. The Duffy binding protein of P. knowlesi (PkDBPαII) is essential for the parasite's invasion into human and monkey erythrocytes. A previous study on P. knowlesi clinical isolates from Peninsular Malaysia reported high level of genetic diversity in the PkDBPαII. Furthermore, 36 amino acid haplotypes were identified and these haplotypes could be separated into allele group I and allele group II. In the present study, the PkDBPαII of clinical isolates from the Malaysian states of Sarawak and Sabah in North Borneo was investigated, and compared with the PkDBPαII of Peninsular Malaysia isolates. Blood samples from 28 knowlesi malaria patients were used. These samples were collected between 2011 and 2013 from hospitals in North Borneo. The PkDBPαII region of the isolates was amplified by PCR, cloned into Escherichia coli, and sequenced. The genetic diversity, natural selection and phylogenetics of PkDBPαII haplotypes were analysed using MEGA5 and DnaSP ver. 5.10.00 programmes. Forty-nine PkDBPαII sequences were obtained. Comparison at the nucleotide level against P. knowlesi strain H as reference sequence revealed 58 synonymous and 102 non-synonymous mutations. Analysis on these mutations showed that PkDBPαII was under purifying (negative) selection. At the amino acid level, 38 different PkDBPαII haplotypes were identified. Twelve of the 28 blood samples had mixed haplotype infections. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all the haplotypes were in allele group I, but they formed a sub-group that was distinct from those of Peninsular Malaysia. Wright's FST fixation index indicated high genetic differentiation between the North Borneo and Peninsular Malaysia haplotypes. This study is the first to report the genetic diversity and natural selection of PkDBPαII of P. knowlesi from Borneo Island. The PkDBPαII haplotypes found in this study were distinct from those from

  15. Malaysia mental health country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameshvara Deva, M

    2004-01-01

    Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be

  16. Sustained growth but non-sustainable urbanisation in Penang, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wangel, Arne; Fold, Niels

    1998-01-01

    of trade unions, which lack the strength to substantially improve wages or influence the institutions of the labour market. So a frenzied labour market tries to balance the upgrading of skills and the control of wages. The paper concludes that a focus on sustainable urbanisation will renew the debate......Foreign capital, particularly from the transnational electronics industries, has spurred urban growth in Penang, Malaysia. But the demand for labour-quantitative and qualitative-exceeds its supply from the northern states. Local and national labour policies are decided without the involvement...

  17. SOURCES OF GROWTH IN THE MANUSFACTURING SECTOR IN MALAYSIA: EVIDENCE FROM ARDL AND STRUCTURAL DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohana Kamaruddin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry has been an important sector in the Malaysian economy for the past three decades. The important role of this industry to the Malaysian economy today is not only because Malaysia depends substantially on manufacturing for its foreign exchange earnings, but also because Malaysia is the main exporter of electrical and electronic products. This study examines the structural changes in the Malaysian economy by utilising two economics tools, namely, the econometric approach using the Autoregressive Distributed Lag (ARDL model and the input-output approach using Structural Decomposition Analysis (SDA. These two approaches are used to analyse the sources of growth in the manufacturing sector in Malaysia. From both economic approaches, ARDL and IO, the results agreed on the importance of the domestic consumption effect as a source of growth in the economy. The empirical results from this study are very useful guide to the manufacturing industry for the need to generate more domestically oriented products.

  18. Medical Tourism in Malaysia: Prospect and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Abdullah

    2013-08-01

    Tourism, combined with the phrase medical, seems to be a new form of tourism which has gained huge popularity in recent decades. Though, a number of literatures available with regard to the tourism industry and the competitiveness of the destination, however, the major aspects which determine the satisfaction of medical tourists are hardly focused specifically on Malaysia. There is a lack of empirical evidence in this area of study which needs to be bridged. Hence, this study aimed at investigating the various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia. As the purpose of the research was to find out various factors contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia, so this study used Structural Equation modeling (SEM) for data analysis. The target population for this study consisted of the medical tourists coming to Malaysia with the primary intension of seeking medical procedures other than sightseeing. A total sample size of 266 was collected through non-probability judgment sampling during the period between December 2012 and February 2013. The result confirms that destination competitiveness and service quality play an important role in the medical tourist's mind towards medical tourism aspect in Malaysia. Thus, Malaysia need to promote various medical success stories together with the services they offer to attract more foreign patients. This study contributes to the theoretical development in the tourism industry by offering the structured relationship among various aspects contributing towards the development of medical tourism in Malaysia.

  19. Green commercial building insurance in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu Xin Ou; Chew, Boon Cheong; Loo, Heoy Shin; Tan, Lay Hong

    2017-03-01

    Green building construction is growing tremendously globally even in Malaysia. Currently, there are approximate 636 buildings have registered and to be certified with Green Building Index. Among these buildings, 45 buildings have already fulfilled the requirements and fully certified. The other buildings still under provisional certification stage. Malaysia had adopted Green Building Index in 2009 to support a move to promote green building concept. Malaysia starts to move towards green building because Malaysian construction and building industry realizes that both energy consumed and waste produced are reduced without irreversible impacts to ecosystems. Consequently, insurance companies such as Fireman's Fund from America has started the green building insurance policies for their green building in the year of 2006, while Malaysia still remain the coverage for green buildings using conventional property insurance. There are lacks of efforts to be seen from insurance companies to propose green building insurance for these green buildings. There are a few factors which can take into consideration for insurance companies to start the very first green building insurance in Malaysia. Although there are challenges, some efficient strategies have been identified to overcome the problems. The methods used in this research topic is qualitative research. The results obtained shows that green commercial building insurance has a huge business opportunity in Malaysia because the number of green commercial buildings are increasing tremendously in Malaysia. It is a favor to implement green building insurance in Malaysia. Furthermore, insurance companies can consider to add in extra coverage in standard building policy to provide extra protection for non-certified green buildings which have the intention to rebuilt in green when damage happens. Generally, it is very important to introduce green commercial buildings insurance into Malaysia so that all of the green commercial

  20. Situation Report--Austria, Cameroon, Canada, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Egypt, France, German Federal Republic, Greece, Hungary, Irish Republic, Jamaica, Malta, Norway, Sabah, Sarawak, Spain, Tahiti (French Polynesia), Tonga, Turkey, and United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in 21 foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Austria, Cameroon, Canada, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Egypt, France, German Federal Republic, Greece, Hungary, Irish Republic, Jamaica, Malta, Norway, Sabah, Sarawak, Spain, Tahiti, Tonga, Turkey, and United…

  1. Distribution network connection pricing framework and methodology: identification of areas of improvement for Sarawak Energy Berhad Connection Charges Guidelines through modified delphi method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. K.; Abas, N.

    2017-07-01

    Complaints on issues and matters related to connection charges have been very common for electricity supply utility companies around the world including Sarawak Energy Berhad. In order to identify the areas that can be improved, a mixed method of exploratory research involving qualitative and quantitative methods have been designed and undertaken rather than a single method of survey. This will ensure a more comprehensive and detailed understanding of the issues from various target groups. The method is designed under three phases, employing Modified Delphi Technique for phase 1 through a series of stake holder engagements, online and offline survey questionnaires to be filled by internal wiring contractors for phase 2 whilst under phase 3, case studies shall be carried out on the issues identified from phase 1 and phase 2 of the study. This paper presented the findings from the Modified Delphi Technique. The findings revealed that there are areas of improvement for Sarawak Energy Berhad connection guidelines in term of differentiation of dedicated and shared assets which leads to unfairness to the connecting customers, inconsistency and non-transparent in charging. The findings of Modified Delphi Technique shall be used for implementation of phase 2 and phase 3 of the study.

  2. Sustainable development and construction industry in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman L. Kh. M.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable construction is a way for the building and infrastructure industry to move towards achieving sustainable development, taking into account environmental, socioeconomic and cultural issues. Differing approaches and differing economic markets lead to different priorities. This paper presents the construction scenario of Malaysia and the developments in sustainable construction taking place in this country. Barriers to the implementation of sustainable construction are discussed. A list of recommendation was proposed to drive sustainable construction in this country. In conclusion, the status of sustainable construction in Malaysia is still in its infancy. The lack of awareness, training and education, ineffective procurement systems, existing public policies and regulatory frameworks are among the major barriers for sustainable construction in Malaysia. Besides the needs for capacities, technologies and tools, total and ardent commitment by all players in the construction sectors including the governments and the public atlarge are required in order to achieve sustainable construction in Malaysia.

  3. Middle-class projects in modern Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    .... This is also the case with the Malay Muslim middle class in Malaysia, but how this class is developing over time is not well understood even if the Malays constitute the largest and fastest growing...

  4. Feed-in tariff outlook in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chua, Shing Chyi; Oh, Tick Hui [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Goh, Wei Wei [Foundation Studies and Extension Education, Multimedia University, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2011-01-15

    This paper aims to present the feed-in tariff (FiT) outlook in Malaysia, which is in the process of being enacted through a Renewable Energy (RE) Policy by the Government of Malaysia (GoM). A brief in policies leading towards the RE policy and the potential of each RE sources under FiT mechanism have been discussed. The successful utilisation of RE source in electricity generation and the FiT implementation globally are positive indicators to implement FiT in Malaysia. Potentials of FiT on biomass, biogas and solid waste energy are currently very promising in Malaysia, but it is solar energy which is predicted to be the main RE of the future, surpassing all other REs. (author)

  5. Factor Affecting Mobile Adoption Companies in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murat Mahad; Shahimi Mohtar; Rushami Zein Yusoff; Abdul Aziz Othman

    2015-01-01

    .... The low penetration of mobile banking in Malaysia, especially in terms of adoption patterns is becoming the research interest, especially when compared to the total number of cellular telephone...

  6. Chinese Youth Dance Delegation in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the China-Malaysia Friendship Association, a 96-member Chi- nese youth dance delegation organized by the CPAFFC and the Chinese Dancers Association, went to Pinang, a famous tourist

  7. Foreign Students’ Motivation for Studying In Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Muh. Amin; Sugiyanto; Keppi Sukesi; Ismadi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – With the recognition of the importance of education in economy different countries are responding with changes within their education systems. Education is recognized as a foundation to the continued growth of a country but with the globalization of business, is education becoming a commodity?Objective - This paper examines international students’ motivation for studying in Malaysia. The second objective is to analyze educational policies and their implementation within Malaysia.Des...

  8. The economic burden of schizophrenia in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Teoh SL; Chong HY; Abdul Aziz S; Chemi N; Othman AR; Md Zaki N; Vanichkulpitak P; Chaiyakunapruk N

    2017-01-01

    Siew Li Teoh,1 Huey Yi Chong,1 Salina Abdul Aziz,2 Norliza Chemi,2 Abdul Razak Othman,2 Nurzuriana Md Zaki,2 Possatorn Vanichkulpitak,3 Nathorn Chaiyakunapruk1,4–6 1School of Pharmacy, Monash University Malaysia, Selangor, 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom, 4Center of Pharmaceutical Outcomes Research (CPOR), Department of Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sc...

  9. Efficiency of Commercial Banks in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd. Azmi Omar; Abdul Rahim Abdul Rahman; Rosylin Mohd. Yusof; M Shabri Abd Majid; Mohd. Eskandar Shah Mohd. Rasid

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the change in the productivity of banking industry during the period of 2000 to 2004. The data consists of a panel of 11 commercial banks in Malaysia namely Malayan Banking, Bumiputra-Commerce, Public Bank, RHB Bank, Hong Leong Berhad, EON Bank, Affin Bank, Southern Bank Berhad, Bank Islam Malaysia Berhad (BIMB), Ambank and Bank Muamalat. Productivity is measured by the Malmquist index, using a Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) technique. The Malmquist productivity measu...

  10. Brand Awareness and Consumer Loyalty in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Firend, A.R; Alvandi, S.

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study is to evaluate consumer's awareness of brand by studying the relationship between brand awareness and variables such as customer loyalty, customer satisfaction, customer trust and quality of services. The study examines the relationship through a quantitative research methodology conducted in main peninsula Malaysia. The examined brand Air Asia airline's services in Malaysia. This study finds the existence of crucial association between customer loyalty, trust, sa...

  11. Management of Waqf Assets in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Zunaidah Ab Hasan; Azhana Othman; Khalilah Ibrahim; Mohd Ab Malek Md Shah; Abd Halim Mohd Noor

    2015-01-01

    Waqf is one of the main mechanism in providing support for the development to all levels of the ummah more so for the underprivileged. Waqf institutions in Malaysia are under the jurisdiction of the 14 states rather than the Federal government. This paper reviews the development of waqf in Melaka, one of the states in Malaysia. It discusses a brief historical background, function and legal aspects of waqf matters. A brief information on the structure and administration of waqf in Melaka, Bait...

  12. MARITIME VIOLENCE : IMPLICATIONS TO MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurulizwan Ahmad Zubir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maritime Piracy has been a serious threat to the international community especially in the SoutheastAsia region. This threat has caused tremendous implications towards the world economy, environment,political stability of the nations involved because 45% of the shipping company passes through theSoutheast Asia. The worrying fact is that these attacks were committed by terrorists as well as traditionalmaritime pirates. This paper examines on the implications of maritime crime in Malaysia and discusseswhether the definition of piracy under the International Law could be applied to these attacks. Thispaper concludes that cooperation between the region’s states and the enhancement of a good securitysystem of one state are needed to combat maritime violence. Thus it is imperative that the internationallaw need to be changed in order to enhance the meaning of piracy and also to include sea terrorism. Key words: piracy, maritime, terrorist

  13. Epidemiology of cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, E K

    1985-12-01

    Some information on cancer in Malaysia are available, and its epidemiology is described. There is a need for systematic and coordinated collection of cancer statistics which are essential to patient management, cancer control programme formulation, implementation and evaluation. The decision of the Ministry of Health to introduce National Cancer Registry and to encourage epidemiological studies, which will ultimately lead to the utilization of data and introduction of control and preventive activities for cancers are positive steps in the right direction. Meanwhile, curative and palliative treatment is available from the existing hospital facilities, and preventive activities such as actions on smoking and health will be continued until such time when a comprehensive prevention and control programme for cancers in the country is evolved.

  14. Federation of Malaysia. Country profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, L

    1985-01-01

    The 1984 population of Malaysia has been estimated at 14.7 million and the population growth rate averaged 2.3% in 1970-80. Population growth is officially encouraged to form a substantial home market for economic development. Toward this end, the 1985 budget has increased tax deductions for families with 5 children. The capital city of Kuala Lumpur is the largest metropolitan area (1 million population) and the Federal Territory is the most densely populated region. Immigration is strictly controlled by the government, and the percentage of foreign-born citizens was 5% in 1980. China, India, and Pakistan are decreasing in importance as countries of origin. Internal mobility, however, is increasing. Rural-rural migration accounted for 45% of internal migration in 1970-80 and was largely motivated by family reasons. Only 7% of Malaysians are estimated to move in search of work. Racial tensions led the government to grant special economic privileges to native-born Islamic Malays. The greatest proportion of the population is centered in the lowest age groups. The percentage of females 15-29 years of age rose from 26% in 1970 to 30% in 1980 and is expected to continue to rise. Fertility is on the decline. The majority of households in the country involve nuclear families. There has been an increase in the number of men and women who delay marriage or remain single. Education is widely available for children aged 6-15 years and those who meet certain academic standards receive free education up to age 19 years. The current labor force is estimated at 5.4 million, with an annual growth rate of 3.1%. Malaysia's per capita income (US $1860 in 1982) is among the highest in Southeast Asia and the gross national product increased by an average annual rate of 8% in 1970-81. The government plans to move toward the development of heavier industries and more manufacturing concerns.

  15. A Comparative Study on Different Baits Used to Attract House Fly in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Hamid

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available House flies are commonly found at homes and businesses in Malaysia. Many kinds of baits are used to attract and trap these flies either by mechanical or chemical means. But all these baits are not capable of attracting flies equally. The main goal of this study is to find out the best bait that can attract house fly effectively. Two baits made in abroad and four baits made in Malaysia were selected for conducting this study because these baits are commonly used in Malaysia. Experiments were carried out by using six selected baits in food industry, fish market and poultry farm in the east coast of Malaysia. Data were collected from the field experiments continuously for six days and analysed to determine the best bait that trap the house flies very effectively. Data analysis results show that the Chinese Electronic Fly Catcher bait is the best one for trapping house flies effectively compared to other baits. Further investigation is still underway to find the volatile compound used for this Chinese Electronic Fly Catcher bait, which will help to generate new bait with the same effect.

  16. Computer Crimes: A Case Study of What Malaysia Can Learn from Others?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaletchumi Appudurai

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of information technology (IT has brought with it many new applications such as e-commerce and global business. The past few years have seen activities in the legislative arena covering issues such as digital signatures, the international recognition of electronic documents and privacy and data protection. Both the developed and developing countries have exhibited keenness to embrace the IT environment. Securing this electronic environment from intrusion, however, continues to be problematic. A particular favorite form of computer crime would be hacking. As more computer systems move on to on-line processing and improved telecommunications, computer hackers are now a real threat. Legislation criminalizing intrusion and destruction activities directed at computers are needed. Malaysia joined the list of countries with computer-specific legislation with the enactment of its Computer Crime Act 1997 (CCA. This paper focuses on hacking as a criminal act, and compares the Malaysian CCA with legislation from other countries. The current computer crime situation in Malaysia is looked at and exposes the difficulties and obstacles Malaysia faces in enforcing the Act. The paper concludes with recommendations for Malaysia in terms of policy, practices and penalties.

  17. Prevalence of a koinobiont endoparasitoid Misotermes mindeni (Diptera: Phoridae) in colonies of the fungus-growing termite Macrotermes gilvus (Blattodea: Termitidae) in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Foong-Kuan; Singham, G Veera; Othman, Ahmad Sofiman; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2011-10-01

    A survey of the infestation rate of colonies of Macrotermes gilvus (Hagen) (Termitidae: Macrotermitinae) with the koinobiont endoparasitoid Misotermes mindeni Disney & Neoh (Diptera: Phoridae) was conducted in Malaysia from September 2009 to January 2011 in the states of Kedah, Penang, Perak, Selangor, Kuala Lumpur, Johor, Terengganu, and Sarawak. Of the 1,125 M. gilvus mounds surveyed, 12.4% contained termites parasitized by M. mindeni and these mounds occurred only in the states of Penang and Perak. High frequencies of mounds containing parasitized termites were found at sites in Penang: Bayan Lepas (21.1%), Minden Campus of Universiti Sains Malaysia ([USM]; 24.5%), Teluk Bahang (28.0%), and Bukit Mertajam (35.0%); the lowest frequency (4.0%) was recorded from Gelugor. The parasitized colonies at all sites were classified as healthy, with exception of several from the Minden Campus of USM (96.4% healthy) and Ayer Itam (87.5% healthy). Most parasitized colonies (71.2%) had a low level of M. mindeni infestation. Only 16.7 and 12.1% of the infested colonies had moderate or high parasite infestation levels, respectively. The height of infected mounds was significantly higher than that of the healthy mounds, but there was no difference between the mound diameters of infested and uninfested mounds. Parasite infestation level was not significantly correlated with mound height or mound diameter. The ambient light intensity at sites with infested mounds was significantly lower than that of uninfested mounds. There was also a significant negative relationship between light intensity and degree of parasitism.

  18. Health profiles of foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ab Rahman, Norazida; Sivasampu, Sheamini; Mohamad Noh, Kamaliah; Khoo, Ee Ming

    2016-01-01

    .... Little is known about the health profiles of foreign population in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to provide a detailed description of the health problems presented by foreigners attending primary care clinics in Malaysia...

  19. Malaysia. Valget handler om vækst og ulighed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Corruption, growth and increasing inequality are some of main theme at the election in Malaysia today.......Corruption, growth and increasing inequality are some of main theme at the election in Malaysia today....

  20. Pulmonary function studies in young healthy Malaysians of Kelantan, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-01-01

    ... (64 males, 64 females) non-smoking healthy young subjects were randomly sampled for the study from the Kelantanese students' population of the University Sains Malaysia, Kota Bharu Campus, Kelantan, Malaysia...

  1. Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program: Malaysia 1995. Participants' Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaysian-American Commission on Educational Exchange, Kuala Lumpur.

    These reports and lesson plans were developed by teachers and coordinators who traveled to Malaysia during the summer of 1995 as part of the U.S. Department of Education's Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program. Sections of the report include: (1) "Gender and Economics: Malaysia" (Mary C. Furlong); (2) "Malaysia: An Integrated,…

  2. Regional air pollution over Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysztofiak, G.; Catoire, V.; Dorf, M.; Grossmann, K.; Hamer, P. D.; Marécal, V.; Reiter, A.; Schlager, H.; Eckhardt, S.; Jurkat, T.; Oram, D.; Quack, B.; Atlas, E.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2012-12-01

    During the SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) campaign in Nov. and Dec. 2011 a number of polluted air masses were observed in the marine and terrestrial boundary layer (0 - 2 km) and in the free troposphere (2 - 12 km) over Borneo/Malaysia. The measurements include isoprene, CO, CO2, CH4, N2O, NO2, SO2 as primary pollutants, O3 and HCHO as secondary pollutants, and meteorological parameters. This set of trace gases can be used to fingerprint different sources of local and regional air pollution (e.g., biomass burning and fossil fuel burning, gas flaring on oil rigs, emission of ships and from urban areas, volcanic emissions, and biogenic emissions). Individual sources and location can be identified when the measurements are combined with a nested-grid regional scale chemical and meteorological model and lagrangian particle dispersion model (e.g., CCATT-BRAMS and FLEXPART). In the case of the former, emission inventories of the primary pollutants provide the basis for the trace gas simulations. In this region, the anthropogenic influence on air pollution seems to dominate over natural causes. For example, CO2 and CH4 often show strong correlations with CO, suggesting biomass burning or urban fossil fuel combustion dominates the combustion sources. The study of the CO/CO2 and CH4/CO ratios can help separate anthropogenic combustion from biomass burning pollution sources. In addition, these ratios can be used as a measure of combustion efficiency to help place the type of biomass burning particular to this region within the wider context of fire types found globally. On several occasions, CH4 enhancements are observed near the ocean surface, which are not directly correlated with CO enhancements thus indicating a non-combustion-related CH4 source. Positive correlations between SO2 and CO show the anthropogenic influence of oil rigs located in the South China Sea. Furthermore, SO2 enhancements are observed without any increase in CO

  3. Inter-Religious Dialogue Models in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Sabri Wan Yusof

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, many organizations have involved in the implementation of inter-religious dialogue in Malaysia. However, there are stillthose who doubt the role and purpose of interreligious dialogue. This might be due to lack of information and understanding regardingthe methodology of dialogue and also about different types that it may take. The present study is aimed at exploring a few models ofinter-religious dialogue that have been practised by some organizations that actively involved in dialogue. The study focuses on a review of selected organizational or institutional dialoguemodels such as Center for Civilizational Dialogue (CCD, Students Representative Council of Malaysia Science University (HealthCampus and Inter-faith Spiritual Fellowship (INSaF. This study provides information concerning the various designs of inter-religiousdialogue model in Malaysia and proposes that different designs of inter-religious dialogue rely on its different types and goals. It is found that, the commonly practiced type of dialogue in Malaysia is educational type which focuses on exploring inter-religious commonalities as well as differences which consequently willincrease understanding and foster meaningful engagement between people of different ethnic and religious background in Malaysia. Thistype of dialogue is distinguished from conflict resolution types of dialogue which aims at identifying issues and generating action plansto conflicts or disputes.

  4. Pollen morphology of Rhizophora L. in Peninsular Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd-Arrabe' , A. B.; Noraini, Talip Noraini [School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    Rhizophora L. are common mangrove genus in Peninsular Malaysia, it contains 3 species and 1 hybrid (R. apiculata Blume, R. mucronata Lam., R. stylosa Griff., R. x lamarckii Montrouz). This genus has some unique adaptation towards extreme environment. Rhizophora has looping aerial stilt-root and uniformly viviparous. The aim of this study is to investigate the variation in the pollen morphology of Rhizophora that can be related to their habitat. Methods include in this study is pollen observation under light and acetolysis method under scanning electron microscope. Pollen type of Rhizophora species studied except hybrid species is classified tricolporate, shape spheroidal based on ratio of length polar axis/ length of equatorial axis (1.03 - 1.09). The exine ornamentation is perforate-reticulate for R. apiculata and R. mucronata, while R. stylosa is perforate. For the only hybrid in Peninsular Malaysia, R. x lamarckii (R. apiculata x R. stylosa) differs from others, tricolpate with the absence of porate, shape is subprolate and exine ornamentation is reticulate and striate in equatorial region. Pollenkitt is present due to the salty and extreme environment. This may enhance the volume of pollenkitt present surrounding the pollen grains in Rhizophora for protection and adaptation purposes. Based on these findings, it is evident that pollen morphology is somehow related to its natural habitat.

  5. Antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdy, Zaleha Abdullah; Basri, Hashimah; Md Isa, Zaleha; Ahmad, Shuhaila; Shamsuddin, Khadijah; Mohd Amin, Rahmah

    2014-04-01

    To determine the adequacy of antenatal calcium intake in Malaysia, and the influencing factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted among postnatal women who delivered in two tertiary hospitals. Data were collected from antenatal cards, hospital documents and diet recall on daily milk and calcium intake during pregnancy. SPSS version 19.0 was used for statistical analyses. A total of 150 women were studied. The total daily calcium intake was 834 ± 43 mg (mean ± standard error of the mean), but the calcium intake distribution curve was skewed to the right with a median intake of 725 mg daily. When calcium intake from milk and calcium supplements was excluded, the daily dietary calcium intake was only 478 ± 25 mg. Even with inclusion of milk and calcium supplements, more than a third (n=55 or 36.7%) of the women consumed less than 600 mg calcium in their daily diet. The adequacy of daily calcium intake was not influenced by maternal age, ethnicity, income or maternal job or educational status as well as parity. The daily dietary calcium intake of the Malaysian antenatal population is far from adequate without the addition of calcium supplements and milk. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2013 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Overview of cancer in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Gerard Chin Chye

    2002-03-01

    The problem of cancer in Malaysia is a growing one. It is now the fourth leading cause of death among medically certified deaths. Cancer of the lung is the most common killer among malignancies. It is estimated that the annual incidence of cancer is 30 000. The majority of patients are found at a late stage of the disease. The National Cancer Control Program aims to reduce the incidence and mortality of cancer and to improve the quality of life of cancer patients. Policies encompass prevention, early diagnosis, treatment, palliative care and rehabilitation. The program for prevention includes an anti-smoking campaign and immunization of babies against hepatitis B. Papanicolaou's smear and breast self-examination are among efforts for the early detection of cancer. Public education and the promotion of healthy lifestyles have been actively carried out. Facilities for treatment and palliative care are being developed further. Networks between the public and private sectors and non-governmental organizations have been on-going. Apart from the establishment and upgrading of treatment facilities, the need for training of skilled staff in the treatment of cancer is highlighted.

  7. Exploring factors influencing smoking behaviour in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Yong Kang; Naidu, Balkish Mahadir

    2012-01-01

    The objective of present study is to investigate the determinants of smoking behaviour among adults in Malaysia. Findings of the Third National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS-3) by the Ministry of Health, Malaysia, were used. The sample consisted of 34,539 observations. A logistic regression model was thus applied to estimate the probability to participate in smoking. Age, income, gender, marital status, ethnicity, employment status, residential area, education, lifestyle and health status were statistically significant in affecting the likelihood of smoking. Specifically, youngsters, low income earners, males, unmarried individuals, Malays, employed individuals, rural residents and primary educated individuals were more likely to smoke. In conclusion, socio-demographic, lifestyle and health factors have significant impacts on smoking participation in Malaysia. Based on these empirical findings, several policy implications are suggested.

  8. Modeling of gold production in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Nora; Ainuddeen, Nasihah Rasyiqah; Ismail, Hamizun; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to identify the main factors that contribute to the gold production and hence determine the factors that affect to the development of the mining industry in Malaysia. An econometric approach was used by performing the cointegration analysis among the factors to determine the existence of long term relationship between the gold prices, the number of gold mines, the number of workers in gold mines and the gold production. The study continued with the Granger analysis to determine the relationship between factors and gold production. Results have found that there are long term relationship between price, gold production and number of employees. Granger causality analysis shows that there is only one way relationship between the number of employees with gold production in Malaysia and the number of gold mines in Malaysia.

  9. Middle-class projects in modern Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    Within the last two decades or so there has been increased scholarly focus on the emergence, consolidation and future of the middle class in developing Asia. This is also the case with the Malay Muslim middle class in Malaysia, but how this class is developing over time is not well understood even...... if the Malays constitute the largest and fastest growing section of the middle class in Malaysia. Based on research projects I have carried out from the mid-1990s to the present, this article argues that an unpacking of the Malay Muslim middle class over time is important in order to understand the broader...... picture surrounding this class and its relationship to Malaysian national repertoires such as Islamic revivalism, politics, consumer culture, social mobility and the state-market nexus. I understand middle-class projects to be the making of local class culture in Malaysia and explore these in four...

  10. Radiation exposure during travelling in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, M; Hassan, A; Sulaiman, I

    2006-01-01

    Absorbed dose rates in vehicles during travelling by different modes of transport in Malaysia were measured. Radiation levels measured on roads in Peninsular Malaysia were within a broad range, i.e. between 36 and 1560 nGy h(-1). The highest reading, recorded while travelling near monazite and zircon mineral dumps, was 13 times the mean environmental radiation level of Malaysia. It is evident that radioactive material dumps on the roadsides can influence the radiation level on the road. The absorbed dose rates measured while travelling on an ordinary train were between 60 and 350 nGy h(-1). The highest reading was measured when the train passed a tunnel built through a granite rock hill. The measurement during sea travelling by ferries gave the lowest radiation level owing to merely cosmic radiation at the sea level.

  11. TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE TOURISM MANAGEMENT IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nabiha AK

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Tourism industry is a key foreign exchange earner for Malaysia, contributing to over 40% of the country’s balance of payment in 2005 (EPU, 2006. The industry provides an important source of income, employment and wealth to the country. Thus, there is a need to ensure that the tourism industry remains both environmentally and economically sustainable. However massive influx of tourists can also cause a detrimental environmental impact. Industry players and improper strategies in attracting more tourists could also add further destruction to the environment. Protection of the environment is vital in ensuring the sustainability of the industry. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to discuss the issues pertaining to sustainable tourism development in Malaysia. In so doing, policies, regulations and strategies to achieve sustainable tourism will be examined. The paper concludes with the arguments for having local agenda for sustainable tourism in Malaysia.

  12. TRAFFIC LIGHT VIOLATION AMONG MOTORISTS IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    S. KULANTHAYAN

    2007-01-01

    Road crashes in Malaysia in 2006 stood at 341,232. This resulted in 6,287 deaths among road users giving an index of 23.5 road fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants. One of the possible reasons for the high number of crashes and injuries is due to beating traffic lights. Thus there is a need to investigate this alarming problem. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Selangor, Malaysia to identify road traffic-light violations. Traffic light violations are believed to be rising and resulted in...

  13. Contributions to Industrial Development of Science and Technology Institutions in Malaysia and Opportunities for Bilateral Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    Lumpur vicinity) which operate on a commercial basis. The Chemistry Department and the Geological Survey provide forensic V chemistry services for the...research in Malaysia that would be of lower priority to Malaysian institutions might be of considerable interest to U.S. scientists (i.e., botany ...rank Lecturer or above Biological Sciences Biochemistry 9 Botany 9 Genetics 12 Microbiology 9 Zoology 14 53 Physical Sciences Electronics 6 Physics 14

  14. International medical travel and the politics of therapeutic place-making in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ormond, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic version excludes material for which permission has not been granted by the rights holder This thesis examines the shifting relationship between the state and its subjects with regard to responsibility for and entitlement to care. Using Malaysia as a case study the research engages with international medical travel (IMT) as an outcome of the neoliberal retrenchment of the welfare state. I offer a critical reading of postcolonial development strategies that negotiate the benefit...

  15. Infant feeding practices in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S T

    1978-12-01

    Retrospective nutritional data on 100 children, aged 6 months to 2 1/2 years, who were admitted to the University Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, was obtained by interviewing the mothers of the children. Analysis of the data revealed that 1) only 49% of the children were breast-fed as infants; 2) 50% of the mothers who did breast-feed discontinued breast-feeding before the children were 3 months old; and 3) the weaning diet of at least 1/3 of the children was inadequate. 18% of the children were Malays, 49% were Chinese, and 33% were Indian. The proportion of breast-fed children was highest among the Malays and lowest among the Chinese. Mothers with higher incomes tended to stop breast-feeding earlier than mothers with lower incomes. 67% of the women said they stopped breast-feeding due to inadequate lactation. Most of the children received supplementary foods at relatively early ages. 50% of the infants received starchy foods by the time they were 3 1/2 months old, and 50% received fruit or fruit juice by the time they were 3 1/2 months old. Vegetable products, meat, fish, and eggs were not added to the diet until the children were considerably older. Recommendations, based on the study findings, were 1) hospitals should discontinue the practice of deferring breast-feeding initiation for 24 hours after delivery; 2) mothers should be encouraged to breast-feed fully; and 3) health personnel should discourage the widespread use of costly precooked cereals for supplementary feeding. Tables depicted 1) the frequency distribution of the 100 children by income and by milk feeding patterns according to ethnic affiliation and 2) the cost of serving precooked cereals as compared to the cost of serving home cooked meals.

  16. Problems of Boarding Students at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Imtiaz Ahmed Chandio; Mir Aftab Hussain Talpur; Shabir Hussain Khahro

    2012-01-01

    This study is carried out to determine the problems of transportation service and canteen facility available to the students of kolej-15-16 (hostels) at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia. A set of questionnaire was designed and distributed randomly to the selected respondents of the study area. The collected data was analyzed in the “Statistical Programme for Social Sciences (SPSS)”. Simple frequency distribution analysis and chi-square t-test analysis are applied to study the lev...

  17. Sustained growth but non-sustainable urbanisation in Penang, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fold, N; Wangel, A

    1998-05-01

    Penang, Malaysia, has been a city characterized by urban growth and rapid industrialization for the past 25 years. Foreign capital, especially from the transnational electronics industry, has spurred the process of urban growth in the city. While the state government is clearly trying to copy and adapt some form of a Singapore model of development and growth in Penang, the quantitative and qualitative demands for labor exceed the available supply from the country's northern states. Local and national labor policies are decided without the involvement of trade unions, which lack the strength to substantially improve wages or influence the institutions of the labor market. Therefore, an energized labor market attempts to balance the upgrading of skills and the control of wages. Focus upon sustainable urbanization will renew the debate on urban, export-oriented industrialization in southeast Asia.

  18. Mass Communication in Malaysia: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Lim Huck, Comp; Sarachandran, V.V., Comp.

    This bibliography lists published and unpublished material relating to mass communications in Malaysia, 1945 to 1973. Most of the items listed are written in English and Malay, and a limited number are in Chinese. The bibliography is divided into 21 sections: bibliography and reference material; communication theory, research methods;…

  19. Ethnicity, Communal Relations, and Education in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C. L.

    Communal life in Malaysia is characterized by discords, tensions, and strife, especially between the Malays and Chinese. By and large, Malays are educationally and economically backward in comparison to non-Malays. Malays seek to redress what they consider racial imbalances through use of their political power. Constitutionally, certain privileges…

  20. The Law of Student Discipline in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Tie Fatt

    2008-01-01

    Judicial review of decisions on student discipline is limited in Malaysia. This arises because of the general presumption that in the enforcement of school discipline, educators are able to act in the best interest of the student to maintain a safe learning environment. This article examines the range of disciplinary measures in Malaysian schools…

  1. Islam and Economic Growth in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    other beneficial expenses, to enable Muslims, through the use of their savings, to partake in capital investments actively, which are halal ...by the year 2020. Currently, this vision was reflected in the efforts to make Malaysia a center for tourism , education, IT, and knowledge-based

  2. Father Involvement among Malay Muslims in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhari, Rumaya; Yaacob, Siti Nor; Talib, Mansor Abu

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a study of 989 fathers of school-going children aged 10 through 16 from intact families in rural and urban areas in Selangor, Malaysia. The study aims to explore the factors that affect father involvement among Malay Muslims. Results indicate that fathers' education, marital quality, and number of…

  3. Inclusive Education in Malaysia: Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelas, Zalizan M.; Ali, Manisah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia's move towards inclusion was given impetus by its participation in workshops and conferences set up under the auspices of the United Nations (UNESCO 1990; UN 1993; UNESCO 1994). Inclusive education was introduced in the Education Act 1996 as part of the continuum of services available for children with special needs. The purpose of this…

  4. Privatization of Higher Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, G.

    2007-01-01

    The study will trace the external factors influencing the liberalization, deregulation and privatization of higher education in Malaysia from 1970 to the present and to analyze the effects of liberalization, deregulation and privatization on the modes of privatization and the internal restructuring of institutions of higher learning to increase…

  5. Teacher Preparation in Malaysia: Needed Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Blake, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The article attempts to present personal views of some changes that are needed to be made within teacher education in Malaysia. It uses one teacher education university as a point of reference to forward concerns. The university remains anonymous as it is not the intent of the article to critique the university but rather to highlight the more…

  6. Inclusive Education in Malaysia: Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelas, Zalizan M.; Ali, Manisah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia's move towards inclusion was given impetus by its participation in workshops and conferences set up under the auspices of the United Nations (UNESCO 1990; UN 1993; UNESCO 1994). Inclusive education was introduced in the Education Act 1996 as part of the continuum of services available for children with special needs. The purpose of this…

  7. Teacher Preparation in Malaysia: Needed Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Pauline Swee Choo; Blake, Damian

    2015-01-01

    The article attempts to present personal views of some changes that are needed to be made within teacher education in Malaysia. It uses one teacher education university as a point of reference to forward concerns. The university remains anonymous as it is not the intent of the article to critique the university but rather to highlight the more…

  8. LEPTOSPIROSIS INCIDENCE AND MORTALITY IN MALAYSIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wei Leong; Soelar, Shahrul Aiman; Mohd Suan, Mohd Azri; Hussin, Narwani; Cheah, Wee Kooi; Verasahib, Khebir; Goh, Pik Pin

    2016-05-01

    Leptospirosis is endemic in Southeast Asia, Central and South America, the Caribbean, and Oceania. Malaysia was categorized as a probable endemic country without any available data. Thus, this study was conducted to determine incidence, case fatality rate and mortality rate of leptospirosis. Leptospirosis is a notifiable disease in Malaysia since 2010 whereby probable or confirmed cases must be notified to relevant health district office. There were 3,665 and 4,457 probable and laboratory confirmed leptospirosis cases notified in 2012 and 2013, respectively. In the 2-year period, the most common age group of patients was 19 years old or less (23.3%) with male:female ratio of 2.61:1. Students consisted about 16.9% of patients, followed by agriculture-based or plantation workers (14.7%). Overall age-standardized incidence rate of leptospirosis in Malaysia for 2012 and 2013 was 29.02 per 100,000. Overall case fatality rate was 1.47% for 2-year period and overall age-standardized mortality rate was 0.45 per 100,000. Leptospirosis is an emerging public health concern in Malaysia and may pose a significant health impact and burden to the nation in the coming years if not well controlled.

  9. OUTLINE OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING IN MALAYSIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Dept. of Labour and National Service, Perth.

    THE FEDERATION OF MALAYSIA HAD A 1964 POPULATION OF 9,000,000. SPECIALIZATION IN A FEW EXPORT PRODUCTS, NOTABLY RUBBER AND TIN, HAS BEEN THE BASIS OF THE ECONOMY. EDUCATION IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION AND EFFORT IS BEING MADE TO ESTABLISH MALAY AS THE NATIONAL LANGUAGE. ELEMENTARY EDUCATION EXTENDS FOR 6 YEARS TO THE LOWER…

  10. Middle-class projects in modern Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fischer, Johan

    2017-01-01

    ... section of the middle class in Malaysia. Based on research projects I have carried out from the mid-1990s to the present, this article argues that an unpacking of the Malay Muslim middle class over time is important in order to understand...

  11. Knowledge Management in University Administration in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad, Roshayu; Manning, Karen; Tatnall, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Part 2: What Issues Do Those Developing New Educational Management Information System Face?; International audience; Knowledge management is important to both business and government organisations as a means of improving their operations. This research project investigated cultural factors affecting knowledge management in higher education administrative departments in Malaysia. It considered strategic decisions made by university administrations and adoption decisions made by individual staf...

  12. The biotechnology and bioeconomy landscape in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arujanan, Mahaletchumy; Singaram, Muthu

    2017-06-28

    Since 1990s Malaysia aspired to make biotechnology and bioeconomy as her engines of economic growth to utlise the abundance of natural resources and biodiversity. The public sector plays an integral role in developing the sector and various incentives are in place for the private sector to be actively involved and to forge collaboration with the public sector. The country launched its National Biotechnology Policy in 2005 and later launched its National Bioeconomy Programme in 2010 to become the first country in South East Asia and second in Asia after China to have such an initiative. Malaysia is also very proactive in its biosafety law and regulations and has most of the related legal instrument in place. A lot of success has been recorded since the inception of the National Biotechnology Policy in terms of job creation, contribution to GDP through biobusinesses and investment from foreign companies, but the sector is not spared from challenges too. Due to the nature of the discipline that is multidisciplinary and that requires huge amount of investment, expertise and political will, there are a lot of barriers before the country emerges as a bioeconomy player. This paper discusses the public policies, initiatives and funding mechanisms in place in Malaysia that drive its research, development and commercialisation in the area of biotechnology and bioeconomy. The authors also discuss the challenges faced in Malaysia in implementing the policies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. FORECASTING TOURIST ARRIVALS TO LANGKAWI ISLAND MALAYSIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamarul Ariffin MANSOR; Wan Irham ISHAK

    2015-01-01

    ..., food and services industries and their best shape. This study focuses on tourist arrivals in Langkawi Island as one of the major tourist attractions situated in the northerly region of Peninsular Malaysia. Importantly, this paper attempts to measure and compare the performance of forecasting with Exponential Smoothing, ARIMA and ARFIMA models using the R software package.

  14. Burnout among Female Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Ahour, Touran

    2011-01-01

    This study is an attempt to survey the burnout level of female teachers in Malaysia and determine the likely factors that are associated with this phenomenon. The subjects of the study were 437 female teachers from primary, secondary, and tertiary levels. A demographic questionnaire was used to collect the data regarding the individual…

  15. Burnout among English Language Teachers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukundan, Jayakaran; Khandehroo, Koroush

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of burnout has always been under scrutiny, especially with reference to the teachers and their demographics. This study has deliberately focused on the English teachers' burnout and its relation with their demographics of age and workload in Malaysia. The findings showed that burnout is evident at high levels in all dimensions. In…

  16. MALAYSIA Hidden Paradise of Southeast Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Remaining as one of the most pleasant and hassle-free countries in Southeast Asia, Malaysia attracts a huge number of tourists from around the world every year due to its splendid tropical beach resorts,golden sandy beaches, magnificent rainforests pluralist culture and brilliant shopping bargains.

  17. Malaysia - Productivity and Investment Climate Assessment Update

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2009-01-01

    In the decades prior to the Asian financial crisis, the Malaysian economy experienced rapid growth and a significant structural transformation. It went from an economy that relied on agriculture and commodities to one dominated by manufacturing and services. Since then, however, Malaysia's growth has slowed to a level well below its key competitors in Asia, including the large labor-surplu...

  18. Malaysia and the Frontiers of Growth Trilogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    I wrote this trilogy about the growth challenges facing Malaysia while I was setting up a School of Economics for University of Nottingham on their beautiful campus on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur. Even driving can inspire economists as they move between countries and I find this the most...

  19. Sphagnum bogs of Kelantan, Peninsular Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, T.L.; Kamarudin, S.; Chew, M.Y.; Kiew, R.

    2009-01-01

    Sphagnum bog, a unique plant community for Peninsular Malaysia was encountered on Padang Ragut, Kelantan. Its topographical features and flora are described, and compared with padang and upper montane floras. It is postulated that the community is derived from upper montane forest and is the result

  20. Leptospirosis in Northeastern Malaysia: Misdiagnosed or Coinfection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Noor Rafizah

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the past decade leptospirosis has been re-emerging as an important disease and can be a serious public health issue in a humid tropical and subtropical country such as Malaysia. Leptospirosis also known as “the Great Mimicker” and may be overlooked and under diagnosed due to its varied clinical presentations. Objective: Since leptospirosis is a significant cause of undifferentiated fever and frequently not recognized, this study was conducted to determine the prevalence of this disease among febrile patients in northeastern Malaysia hospitals. Design: A hospital-based cross sectional study was conducted among 999 of febrile patients admitted in 10 hospitals in northeastern Malaysia. Materials and methods: An interviewer-guided proforma sheet on sociodemographic and final hospital diagnosis data was distributed to all adult patients with fever on admission. Serum sample for leptospirosis was screened by IgM Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay test (IgM ELISA and confirmed by Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT. The cut-off point for positive MAT was ≥1:400 titre in single acute specimen. Results: The seroprevalence of leptospirosis was 8.4% (95% CI: 6.8, 10.3 (n=84 by MAT. In our study, only 31.0% of the confirmed leptospirosis cases by MAT in northeastern Malaysia hospitals were diagnosed as leptospirosis for the final diagnosis on discharge. About 38.1%, 14.3% and 7.1% of the confirmed leptospirosis cases by MAT were diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever, pneumonia and typhoid fever respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that the prevalence of leptospirosis is probably high among febrile patients in northeastern Malaysia hospitals. Awareness and knowledge regarding this disease should be strengthened, especially among public and health care personnel due to the clinical symptoms of leptospirosis mimicking other tropical diseases.

  1. The genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhalifah, Hanim Kamis; Syaza, Fatnin Hisham; Chambers, Geoffrey Keith; Edinur, Hisham Atan

    2016-07-15

    This article explores the genetic history of the various sub-populations currently living in Peninsular Malaysia. This region has received multiple waves of migrants like the Orang Asli in prehistoric times and the Chinese, Indians, Europeans and Arabs during historic times. There are three highly distinct lineages that make up the Orang Asli; Semang, Senoi and Proto-Malays. The Semang, who have 'Negrito' characteristics, represent the first human settlers in Peninsular Malaysia arriving from about 50,000ya. The Senoi later migrated from Indochina and are a mix between an Asian Neolithic population and the Semang. These Asian genomes probably came in before Austroasiatic languages arrived between 5000 and 4000years ago. Semang and Senoi both now speak Austro-Asiatic languages indicative of cultural diffusion from Senoi to Semang. In contrast, the Proto-Malays who came last to the southern part of this region speak Austronesian language and are Austronesians with some Negrito admixture. It is from this group that the contemporary Malays emerged. Here we provide an overview of the best available genetic evidences (single nucleotide polymorphisms, mitochondrial DNA, Y-chromosome, blood groups, human platelet antigen, human leukocyte antigen, human neutrophil antigen and killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor) supporting the complex genetic history of Peninsular Malaysia. Large scale sampling and high throughput genetic screening programmes such as those using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism analyses have provided insights into various ancestral and admixture genetic fractions in this region. Given the now extensive admixture present in the contemporary descendants of ancient sub-populations in Peninsular Malaysia, improved reconstruction of human migration history in this region will require new evidence from ancient DNA in well-preserved skeletons. All other aspects of the highly diverse and complex genetic makeup in Peninsular Malaysia should be

  2. Observation of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances over Peninsular Malaysia based on IPP trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husin, Asnawi; Abdullah, M.; Momani, M. A.

    2011-04-01

    Using vertical total electron content (VTEC) data that were derived from the Malaysia Real Time Kinematic GPS network (MyRTKnet), we analyzed the time variation of the VTEC with the occurrence of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) based on ionospheric pierce point (IPP) trajectories. MSTIDs are known as ionospheric disturbance phenomena that generally induce perturbations in important ionospheric parameters such as the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). A method was developed to detect the existence of MSTIDs by identifying rapid fluctuations in the TEC by subjecting the TEC data time series to high-pass filtering. Data were evaluated using the GPS MyRTKnet network over Peninsular Malaysia in the month of September 2007 (a time period with relatively low geomagnetic activity). Two-dimensional maps over Peninsular Malaysia were constructed based on the IPP trajectories. Analysis of the cross correlation of detrended VTEC data from six MyRTKnet stations (PASP, KRAI, GMUS, CAME, TLKI and SBKB) yielded MSTID velocities of around 100 ± 50 m s-1 in the daytime and 60 ± 30 m s-1 in the nighttime, with occurrences of 17.6% and 13.7%, respectively. The results show that although the MSTID wave structure propagates southwestward, some waves also move northward. These waves were connected to the effect of the meridional neutral wind in the upper regions of the ionosphere (400 km).

  3. Existing Noise Level at Railway Stations in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahidan Shahiron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Railway transportation known as one of the most environmental friendly transportation mode. However, the significance problems of railway transportation are noise pollution and negatively impact the wellbeing of the whole community. Unfortunately, there has been lack of public awareness about the noise level produce by the railway transportation in Malaysia. This study investigates the noise level produced by railway transportation in Malaysia specifically by Keretapi Tanah Melayu Berhad (KTMB. Methods of collecting existing noise level at railway stations in Malaysia are briefly discussed in this study. The finding indicates that the noise level produced by the railway transportation in Malaysia which is by KTMB is considered as dangerous to human being and also exceed the noise limit that has been assigned by Department of Environment Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of Malaysia. A better noise barrier and improved material should be developed to mitigate the existing noise level produced by railway transportations in Malaysia.

  4. Epidemiology of dengue disease in Malaysia (2000-2012: a systematic literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hamid Mohd-Zaki

    Full Text Available A literature survey and analysis was conducted to describe the epidemiology of dengue disease in Malaysia between 2000 and 2012. Published literature was searched for epidemiological studies of dengue disease, using specific search strategies for each electronic database; 237 relevant data sources were identified, 28 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The epidemiology of dengue disease in Malaysia was characterized by a non-linear increase in the number of reported cases from 7,103 in 2000 to 46,171 in 2010, and a shift in the age range predominance from children toward adults. The overall increase in dengue disease was accompanied by a rise in the number, but not the proportion, of severe cases. The dominant circulating dengue virus serotypes changed continually over the decade and differed between states. Several gaps in epidemiological knowledge were identified; in particular, studies of regional differences, age-stratified seroprevalence, and hospital admissions.PROSPERO #CRD42012002293.

  5. Internet use and addiction among medical students of Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haque, Mainul; A. Rahman, Nor; Azim Majumder, Md. Anwarul; Haque, Seraj Zohurul; Kamal, Zubair M; Islam, Zakirul; Haque, ATM Emdadul; Rahman, Nor Azlina A; Alattraqchi, Ahmed Ghazi

    2016-01-01

    ... of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine and Defense Health, National Defense University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, 2Department of Biomedical Science, Kulliyyah of Allied Health Sciences, Kuantan, Malaysia...

  6. Critical Success Factors for Limited Service Hotels in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Chee Keng

    2015-01-01

    Critical success factors were used originally in Information technology areas when it was first introduced but has since been applied generically in other industries. This study explores the critical success factors for limited service hotels in Malaysia from both customer and hotel operator/ business owners’ perspective. The literature presents information from tourism in general and in Malaysia, definition of limited service hotels and its relevance to the hospitality industry in Malaysia, ...

  7. Establishing in Malaysia : The Impact of Cultural Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Dohlnér, Lisa; Grom, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Malaysia is one of the developing countries in the world that is on the verge to become de-veloped (Internationella Programkontoret, 2003). In 2004, Malaysia had a growth rate around 7% (United Nation Statistic Division, 2005) and it is implied that the Malaysian market is continuously growing. One factor that can increase the growth rate in Malaysia is foreign direct investments (FDI), which is, according to Chino (2004), one factor of sus-tainable growth. It has been noticed that the world ...

  8. Geographical distribution of Musa gracilis Holttum in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfazlina, B.; Wickneswari, R.; Choong, C. Y.

    2016-11-01

    Musa gracilis (Musaceae) is placed under section Callimusa and was considered endemic to Peninsular Malaysia. The objective of this study was to evaluate the current occurrence of Musa gracilis in Peninsular Malaysia. The coordinates of each population was recorded using the Global Positioning System (GPS) and mapped to show the geographical distribution of Musa gracilis. This study revealed that Musa gracilis exhibits specific pattern of distribution, which exists only in a lowland areas on the eastern and southern part of Peninsular Malaysia.

  9. LEGAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE SHARIAH ADVISORY COUNCIL IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Norhashimah Mohd Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia has always aspired to be the hub for Islamic banking and finance. Various measures have been, and are being, carried out to promote Malaysia as an international Islamic banking and financial centre. As the backbone for this, the national Shariah Advisory Council (SAC) has been established under the auspices of the Central Bank of Malaysia Act 1958 (CBMA). Under the CBMA, the SAC has been conferred a statutory function as the authority for the ascertainment of Islamic law for the purp...

  10. LEGAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE SHARIAH ADVISORY COUNCIL IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Norhashimah Mohd Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia has always aspired to be the hub for Islamic banking and finance. Various measures have been, and are being, carried out to promote Malaysia as an international Islamic banking and financial centre. As the backbone for this, the national Shariah Advisory Council (SAC) has been established under the auspices of the Central Bank of Malaysia Act 1958 (CBMA). Under the CBMA, the SAC has been conferred a statutory function as the authority for the ascertainment of Islamic law for the purp...

  11. How to Avoid Middle Income Traps : Evidence from Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Flaaen, Aaron; Ghani, Ejaz; Mishra, Saurabh

    2013-01-01

    Malaysia's structural transformation from low to middle income is a success story, making it one of the most prominent manufacturing exporters'in the world. However, like many other middle income economies, it is squeezed by the competition from low-wage economies on the one hand, and more innovative advanced economies on the other. What can Malaysia do? Does Malaysia need a new growth strategy? This paper emphasizes the need for broad structural transformation; that is, moving to higher prod...

  12. Sprouting Buds of Zebrafish Research in Malaysia: First Malaysia Zebrafish Disease Model Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2016-04-01

    Zebrafish is gaining prominence as an important vertebrate model for investigating various human diseases. Zebrafish provides unique advantages such as optical clarity of embryos, high fecundity rate, and low cost of maintenance, making it a perfect complement to the murine model equivalent in biomedical research. Due to these advantages, researchers in Malaysia are starting to take notice and incorporate the zebrafish model into their research activities. However, zebrafish research in Malaysia is still in its infancy stage and many researchers still remain unaware of the full potential of the zebrafish model or have limited access to related tools and techniques that are widely utilized in many zebrafish laboratories worldwide. To overcome this, we organized the First Malaysia Zebrafish Disease Model Workshop in Malaysia that took place on 11th and 12th of November 2015. In this workshop, we showcased how the zebrafish model is being utilized in the biomedical field in international settings as well as in Malaysia. For this, notable international speakers and those from local universities known to be carrying out impactful research using zebrafish were invited to share some of the cutting edge techniques that are used in their laboratories that may one day be incorporated in the Malaysian scientific community.

  13. Sustainability of Three Recreational Forest Landscape Management in Selangor, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohd Kher Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Different stakeholders managed recreational forests in Selangor, Malaysia. These stakeholders' involvements have risen a question whether their development have fulfilled the sustainable landscape requirement...

  14. Supply of Rubber Wood Log in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Noraida

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Issue on shortage of raw material for wood processing solved by discovery of rubber wood log as one of the substitutes the natural log. This paper examines the supply of rubber wood log in Malaysia. We employ ARDL Bound Approach Test and time series data from 1980 to 2010 which represented the whole Malaysia are used to achieve the established objectives. The result shown, in the long run harvested area and wages have 1% and 10% significant level respectively. While in the short run, there was only harvested area having an impact with 1% significant level. This result indicates that, the harvested area become the most impact towards supply of rubber wood log either in short run or in the long run. While wages as input cost gave less impact in another word it become unburden to the producers.

  15. Cofiring biomass with coal: Opportunities for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A. A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Malaysia generated 108,175 GWh of electricity in 2010 where 39.51 % was sourced from coal. Coal power generation is also planned to overtake natural gas as the main fuel for electricity generation within the next two decades. Malaysia also has a vast biomass resource that is currently under-utilised for electricity generation. This paper studies the option of cofiring biomass in existing Malaysian coal power plants to increase the nation's renewable energy mix as well as to reduce its power sector carbon dioxide emission. Benefits of cofiring to the nation were discussed and agricultural residues from palm oil and paddy was identified as a potential source of biomass for cofiring. It was also found that there is a willingness for cofiring by stakeholders but barriers existed in the form of technical issues and lack of clear direction and mechanism.

  16. Gambling participation and policies in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine M. Y. Loo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Regulatory policies for responsible gambling practices in Asia are constantly evolving as the gambling industry and technological landscape change over time. Malaysia makes an interesting case study for a commentary on gambling participation and policies, as this country has a unique dual justice system with religious and ethnic diversity that may impact on the way in which gambling activities are regulated. This regulatory ecosystem has important consequences on behaviour change, treatment approaches and recovery processes involved in gambling disorder. This commentary will discuss evidence for Malaysian gambling antecedents, public policy and socioeconomic impacts of gambling, possible costs and benefits of gambling legalization, and issues pertinent to regulating gambling activities in Malaysia.

  17. Public Perception of Forestry Practices in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegatheswaran RATNASINGAM

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article endeavours to assess public perceptions about the importance of forests for young people in the age group of 21-35 years in Malaysia based on 1,503 reliably answered interviews. Overall patterns show that timber production and environment protection are very important attributes among this age group. The interviews indicated high awareness of negative environmental impacts of deforestation, with high levels of concern over higher temperatures, air pollution and loss of clean water sources. Large-scale deforestation (e.g., for industrial oil palm plantations and political interference appeared to be more context-dependent, with most respondents considering it to have on overall negative impact on sustainable forestry in Malaysia. Increasing information accessibility, awareness and experience in the forest of the young people could ultimately result in positive processes.

  18. PRESS FREEDOM IN SINGAPORE AND MALAYSIA: DEFAMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Kate Chapman

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the arguments around restriction on freedom of the press in the Strong States of Singapore and Malaysia. It assesses the presence of constraints on press freedoms in democratic western countries imposed by corporation rather than state and the similar effects that these constraints may have on bias present in publicly accessible news reporting. It argues that independence of the press does not just require protection from legal and executive regulation, but also protection from large media corporations and their political alignments. This report will assess the bias of reporting and news media publication that exists in Malaysia and Singapore due to legislative and regulatory constraints as opposed to bias that exist in the western liberal democratic nations of the United Kingdom (UK and the United States of America (USA due to Media Organisation control.

  19. Holistic BIM Adoption and Diffusion in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamter Shahela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Building Information Modeling is modeling technology and associated set of processes to produce, communicate and analyze digital information models for construction life cycle. Although many benefits can gain by the implementation of BIM, the pace adoption of BIM in Malaysia is still slow. There is an abundance of theories and models purporting to describe the drivers and mechanisms of how new technologies are adopted or diffused into a particular section of society or by individuals or stake players. In addition, many acceptance theories, which imply the adoption of new technologies and can be applied in every sector. This paper aims to present a review of the existing literature of BIM adoption and diffusion theory/model/framework in Malaysia. Researcher revealed the list of driven factors of Holistic BIM Adoption. In addition, it will deal with how to work effectively with groups that initially are relatively

  20. Islamist Civil Society Activism Malaysia Abdullah: Angkatan Belia Islam Malaysia (ABIM Darul Arqam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fauzi Abdul Hamid

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Without discounting the relevance of such a framework, this article seeks to look at the phenomenon of Islamism in Malaysia from the angle of Islamist civil society movements that are not directly involved in the domain of electoral politics, but that have nonetheless significantly in fenced political behavior of especially the majority Malay-Muslim population of Malaysia. The provisional impact of these new groupings form the main thread in our discussion, which narrows down to an investigation into the metamorphoses that have a?ected and transpired in two of the most influential civil society movements in contemporary Islamism in Malaysia, viz. ABIM and Darul Arqam.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v16i3.475

  1. Mercury Concentration in Environmental Samples of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    SAKAMOTO, Hayao; Ichikawa, Toshihiro; TOMIYASU, Takashi; SATO, Masanori

    2004-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of mercury in environmental samples (sea water, rock, sea sand, sediment, soil, fish and etc.) taken from various coastal sea areas and its ambient area in Malaysia were investigated. Mercury in environmental samples was subjected to the reduction-vaporization using of tin (II) chloride and heating-vaporization method. The mercury vapor was concentrated with a porous gold collector. Afterwards, mercury vapor evolved from the heated collector was determined b...

  2. Tourism, Health and Income in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Chan-Fatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study employed the ARDL bounds test and Granger causality test to investigate long- and the short-run relationships among economic development, tourism sector development, and health care sector development in Malaysia. Annual time series data from 1981–2011 also were employed in this study. Based on our tests, there is a long-run relationship from economic development to health care sector development and from tourism development to health care sector development.

  3. State of the Coral Triangle: Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia has made a firm commitment to sustainable management and conservation of its coastal and marine resources, helping formulate and implement the Sulu–Sulawesi Marine Ecoregion Initiative and the Coral Triangle Initiative. Rapid economic growth, uncontrolled tourism development, unregulated fishing, and unsustainable use of marine resources have depleted the country’s fish stocks, lost nearly 36% of its mangrove forests, and increased the number of endangered species. Despite impressive...

  4. PERBANDINGAN PENDIDIKAN ISLAM DI INDONESIA DAN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Haryanto, Budi

    2016-01-01

    Islamic education as a subsystem which cannot be separated from national education, because it not only serves as a complement but also as the foundation stone for the formulation of national education goals. This is true in Indonesia and Malaysia. Islamic education in both countries, also affected the national struggle journey, to the efforts to maintain and develop its existence after the independence so as to have a clear role in mental strengthen human resources in their respective countr...

  5. Strategies of Indian University Students in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Christian Franklin

    2014-01-01

    Through an analysis of the connection between the social backgrounds of the students and societal inclusion and exclusion, Svensson demonstrates how globalization has produced major changes in relations between the economy and class structures, stressing that the emergence of cosmopolitan elites...... can challenge existing conceptions of the role of the nation-state, cultural mechanisms and hierarchies. He further contributes to the debate by demonstrating how social imagination evolves from the Indian students’ contested social position as a minority group in Malaysia....

  6. The current biotechnology outlook in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Khairiah Salwa MOKHTAR; Mahalingam, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Blessed with extremely rich biodiversity, Malaysia is all geared up to explore new high technology to utilize the advantage it possesses whilst to protect its environment. Biotechnology has been identified as an appropriate driver that can deliver economic gains through research and development, improvement of food security, creation of entrepreneurial opportunities for industrial growth, health and environmental sustainability. This paper attempts to address the evolution of biotechnology in...

  7. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysias energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining) through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors). The integration to the economic sectors is done exogene...

  8. Infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razali, Salmi; Kirkman, Maggie; Ahmad, S Hassan; Fisher, Jane

    2014-10-01

    Infant abandonment and infanticide are poorly understood in Malaysia. The information available in the public arena comes predominantly from anecdotal sources. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and characteristics of infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia and to estimate annual rates for the most recent decade. Summaries of data about infanticide and illegal infant abandonment were gathered from police records; the annual number of live births was ascertained from the national registry. The estimated inferred infanticide rates for Malaysia were compared with the infanticide rates among countries of very high, high, medium, and low rankings on the Human Development, Gender Inequality, and Gini indices. From 1999 to 2011, 1,069 cases of illegal infant abandonment were recorded and 1,147 people were arrested as suspected perpetrators. The estimated inferred infanticide rate fluctuated between 4.82 and 9.11 per 100,000 live births, a moderate rate relative to the infanticide rates of other countries. There are substantial missing data, with details undocumented for about 78-87% of cases and suspected perpetrators. Of the documented cases, it appeared that more boys than girls were victims and that suspected perpetrators were predominantly Malays who were women, usually mothers of the victim; the possibility of arrest bias must be acknowledged. Economic and social inequality, particularly gender inequality, might contribute to the phenomena of infanticide and abandonment. Strategies to reduce rates of infanticide and illegal infant abandonment in Malaysia will require strengthening of the surveillance system and attention to the gender-based inequalities that underpin human development.

  9. Atopic eczema in a multiracial country (Malaysia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, R B; Pettit, J H

    1993-11-01

    A total of 14,342 patients with skin diseases who had attended either the National University of Malaysia skin clinic or a private dermatological office were analysed. Five hundred and thirty-four cases (3.7%) had atopic eczema, the prevalence being highest among the Malays (4.3%). The prevalence of atopic eczema among clinic attenders is lower in all three major Malaysian races when compared with studies from England.

  10. Integration in an international university in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Sengupta, Enakshi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of the current study is to investigate the relationship between experiences with diversity offered in an international university in Malaysia and the ways students and staff view integration. The problem that promoted this study arose from the researcher’s own experience of being an international student with difficulties in integrating in a multi-cultural environment in the university. Two outcomes are investigated in this study, the meaning of the term ‘integration’ ...

  11. Demand analyses of rice in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tey, (John) Yeong-Sheng; Shamsudin, Mad Nasir; Mohamed, Zainalabidin; Abdullah, Amin Mahir; Radam, Alias

    2008-01-01

    As a typical developing Asian county, the growth in per capita income generally brings to diversification in Malaysians food basket. The most significant observation is the falling in per capita consumption of rice with continuous growth of demand for wheat based products. The objective of this study is to estimate the demand elasticities of rice in Malaysia, focusing whether rice is an inferior good. By using data from Household Expenditure Survey 2004/2005, this study obtains demand elastic...

  12. Occupational rehabilitation in Singapore and Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kay-Fei; Tan, Charlie W C; Yeo, Doreen S C; Tan, Heidi S K; Tan, F L; Tan, E W; Szeto, Grace P Y; Cheng, Andy S K

    2011-03-01

    Asia is the new and favored magnet of economic attention and foreign investments after it made an almost uneventful rebound from the depths of financial crisis of 2008/2009. Not many Western observers fully understand the diversity that is Asia other than perhaps its 2 growing economic giants of China and India. Indeed many smaller countries like Singapore and Malaysia in South East Asia along with Australia and Hong Kong (a Special Administrative Region within China) look to symbiotic relationships with these two economic giants. The purpose of this discussion paper is to examine the current issues related to the development and provision of occupational rehabilitation services in Singapore and Malaysia with a forward-looking view of how Asia's different developing societies could potentially benefit from better alignment of occupational rehabilitation practices and sharing of expertise through international collaboration and dialogue platforms. Seven therapists and one physician who are frequently involved in occupational rehabilitation services in their home countries critically reviewed the current issues in Singapore and Malaysia which included analysis of the prevalence and cost of occupational injury; overview of workers' compensation system; current practices, obstacles, and challenges in providing occupational rehabilitation and return to work practices. They also offered opinions about how to improve the occupational rehabilitation programs of their two home countries. Even though Malaysia and Singapore are two different countries, in many ways their current provision of occupational rehabilitation services and the problems they face with are very similar. There is a lot of room for systemic improvements that require government support and action. Most prominently, the training of more healthcare professionals in the assessment and rehabilitation of the injured worker should be encouraged. There could be better liaison between the many stakeholders and

  13. Assimilation of Baba and Nyonya in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Razaleigh Muhamat Kawangit

    2015-01-01

    This research set outs to explore the exact level of the social aspect of assimilation between Baba and Nyonya and their Malay counterparts in Malaysia. It was sure that assimilation in social aspect is a dilemma which Baba and Nyonya face when they interact with Malays as a dominant ethnic group. It suggests that when the process of interaction, their behavior changes in line with the identity of the Malays. This is because the majority influenced the minority in the Malaysian context. Whils...

  14. Sustainable development and construction industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable construction is a way for the building and infrastructure industry to move towards achieving sustainable development, taking into account environmental, socioeconomic and cultural issues. Differing approaches and differing economic markets lead to different priorities. This paper presents the construction scenario of Malaysia and the developments in sustainable construction taking place in this country. Barriers to the implementation of sustainable construction are discussed. A li...

  15. The 1995 Parliamentary Elections in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rashid Moten

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The parliamentary elections in Malaysia have brought about a significant change in the distribution of partisanship in the electorate. It redefined the relationships between social groups and party support and have enhanced the political stability of the country. The Barisan Nasional's victory, attributable to a booming economy, full employment, and superior organization and finance, signalled a vote of confidence in the politics of accommodation characterised by tolerance, mutual cooperation, and compromise.

  16. Public Perception of Forestry Practices in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Florin IORAS; Ratnasingam, Jega; Vacalie, Claudia Christina; Sestras, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    This article endeavours to assess public perceptions about the importance of forests for young people in the age group of 21-35 years in Malaysia based on 1,503 reliably answered interviews. Overall patterns show that timber production and environment protection are very important attributes among this age group. The interviews indicated high awareness of negative environmental impacts of deforestation, with high levels of concern over higher temperatures, air pollution and loss of clean wate...

  17. Empirical Evaluation On External Debt Of Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Nor’Aznin Abu Bakar; Sallahuddin Hassan

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the effects of external debts on economic growth in Malaysia. The analysis is conducted both at aggregate and disaggregate levels. The empirical results are based on VAR estimates using GDP, external debts, capital accumulation, labor force and human capital. Estimation results at the aggregate level indicate that total external debts affect economic growth positively. In particular, one percentage point increase in total external debts generates 1.29 percentage point of e...

  18. PRESS FREEDOM IN SINGAPORE AND MALAYSIA: DEFAMATION

    OpenAIRE

    Georgia Kate Chapman

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the arguments around restriction on freedom of the press in the Strong States of Singapore and Malaysia. It assesses the presence of constraints on press freedoms in democratic western countries imposed by corporation rather than state and the similar effects that these constraints may have on bias present in publicly accessible news reporting. It argues that independence of the press does not just require protection from legal and executive regulation, but also protecti...

  19. Labor markets and economic development in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P

    1991-01-01

    A researcher analyzed data on male workers from 1262 households from Peninsular Malaysia (1976-1977 Malaysian Family Life Survey) to identify the leading effects of economic development for earnings and employment patterns within labor markets. All 3 major ethnic groups in Malaysia profited from the increasing levels of real income over time. The relative income of ethnic Malays, the poorest socioeconomic class, increased more so than the Chinese and Indians. Yet the income of Chinese was 108% higher than Malays and that of Indians was 60%. The difference between Malays and Chinese grew considerably as men aged. Further economic growth resulted in higher earnings for young men than for older men. In addition, the more educated men were the higher their earnings. In fact, education was the most significant determinant of time related growth in incomes. Further, income of men who participated in job training programs grew 2 times as fast than that of men who did not participate in job training programs. Lastly, economic growth increased earnings of men in urban areas more so than those in rural areas. Malaysia had put a lot of time and resources in research and development in rubber and rice production which has resulted in continual introduction of new varieties of rubber trees and rice. These new varieties have increased production considerably. In conclusion, Malaysia was able to experience economic growth because it invested in education and job training for male workers and in research and development to advance production of its 2 most important commodities--rubber and rice.

  20. The Politics of Meritocracy in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-01

    Historical Background The History of Malaysia can be traced back to the 15th century when the Malacca ( Melaka ) Sultanate became a great inter-port city...known as the Federated Malay States while Kelantan, Trengganu, Perlis, Kedah and Johor were known as Unfederated Malay States. Penang, Melaka and...86 A. J. Williams Myers, Biological Differences, Social Inequality and Distributive Goods- An Exploratory Argument, Journal of Black

  1. Human infection with Dirofilaria repens in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, K C; Pathmanathan, R; Krishnan, R

    1996-09-01

    Human dirofilariasis is a rare infection in Malaysia. Thus far, only two human cases have been reported viz. Dirofilaria immitis and D. (Nochtiella) repens and in both instances, adult worms were recovered from infected patients. The two cases reported in the present study, one from Melaka and the other from Penang, were diagnosed histologically. Based on the diagnostic criteria for identifying Dirofilaria in tissue sections, the parasites were identified as D. (Nochtiella) repens.

  2. Maritime Security: Malaysia’s Persistent Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Malaysian Maritime Zone is safe and peaceful to maritime communities. To minimize loss of lives and properties at sea based on a set standard. To...navies, and air forces of the littoral states.”20 In his keynote address at the 2011 Shangri-La Dialogue, Prime Minister Dato ’ Sri Najib Tun Razak...Monitor, Vol. 4 No. 3, 2006. Razak, Dato ’ Sri Najib Tun, Prime Minister Malaysia. Keynote Address. Shangri-La Dialogue. Singapore, June 3, 2011

  3. Aging in Multi-ethnic Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Nai Peng; Siraj, Saedah Binti; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah Binti; Chin, Ai Vyrn; Tan, Maw Pin; Sinnappan, Glaret Shirley; Müller, Andre Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Multiethnic Malaysia provides a unique case study of divergence in population aging of different sociocultural subgroups within a country. Malaysia represents 3 major ethnicities in Asia-the Malay, Chinese, and Indian. The 3 ethnic groups are at different stages of population aging, as they have undergone demographic transition at different pace amidst rapid social and economic changes. Between 1991 and 2010, the Malaysian population aged 60 and over has more than doubled from about 1 million to 2.2 million, and this is projected to rise to about 7 million or 17.6% of the projected population of 40 million by 2040. In 2010, the aging index ranged from 22.8% among the Bumiputera (Malays and other indigenous groups), to 31.4% among the Indians and 55.0% among the Chinese. Population aging provides great challenges for Malaysia's social and economic development. The increasing prevalence of noncommunicable diseases in older adults, coupled with the erosion of the traditional family support system has increased demands on health care services with an overwhelming need for multidisciplinary and specialized geriatric care. Following the adoption of the National Policy for the Elderly in 1995, issues of population aging have gained increasing attention, especially among researchers. There is an urgent need to increase public awareness, develop infrastructure, as well as support action oriented research that will directly translate to comprehensive and cohesive social strategies, policies, and legislation to protect not just the current older Malaysians but the future of all Malaysians.

  4. Corporate Governance & Auditor Choice in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nasrudin Wan Asma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the determinants of firm’s auditor choice in Malaysia in respect of their corporate governance mechanisms. A logit regression model was developed to test the impact of firms’ internal corporate governance mechanism on auditor choice decisions made by public listed companies listed on main board of Bursa Malaysia from year 2006 to 2015. Five variables are used to proxy for firm’s internal corporate mechanism which are the ownership concentration, the duality of CEO and chairman of BOD, the size of audit committee, the size of BOD and the number of independent directors on the board. All auditors in Malaysia were classified into Big Four and non-Big Four, assuming Big Four auditors can provide higher quality audit services. The final result show that firms with less concentrated ownership, with larger size of audit committee, larger size of the BOD, with lower proportion of independent directors on the board, or in which CEO and BOD’s chairman are not the same person are more likely to hire a high-quality auditor. Hence, it suggests that when benefits from lowering capital raising costs are trivial, firms with good corporate governance mechanism are prone to choose a high-quality auditor.

  5. Zakat Institution in Malaysia: Problems and Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Ab Rahman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Zakat administration in Malaysia is a State matter in particular relating to the passing of regulations and statutes. The respective Heads of States (the rulers are heads of Islam as enshrined in the Federal Constitution. This paper gives a chronicle of the transformation and phases of development of zakat institution in Malaysia. Zakat institution can play an important role in complementing the Government’s poverty eradication effort although its scope is for the poor and needy Muslims only. Besides the poorand needy, there are other beneficiaries allowed by the Syariah. Its success would also help to buffer the effects of recession of the economy on the poor through capacity building and mindsettransformation. The effectiveness of the zakat institution in carrying out its duties would depend on a number of factors viz. expansionof new resources for zakat, the collection of zakat from tangible and intangible properties, systematic zakat management, efficientzakat distribution and the thoroughness of implementation of Islamic rules. The article would discuss on matters that should be dealtwith in order to improve zakat institutions in Malaysia in terms of the inefficiency issue, prospective payers, and capacity building.

  6. Micronutrient status and intervention programs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Geok Lin

    2005-06-01

    Approximately 70% of the world's malnourished children live in Asia, giving that region the highest concentration of childhood malnutrition worldwide. Prevalence of stunting and underweight are high especially in south Asia where one in every two preschool children is stunted. Iron-deficiency anemia affects 40%-50% of preschool and primary schoolchildren. Nearly half of all vitamin A deficiency and xerophthalmia in the world occurs in south and southeast Asia. Iodine deficiency disorders have resulted in high goiter rates in India, Pakistan, and parts of Indonesia. Compared with other developing countries in Asia, the nutrition situation in Malaysia is considerably better, owing to rapid economic and socioeconomic development that has occurred since Malaysia gained its independence in 1957. Prevalence of undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency is markedly lower in Malaysian children. Nonetheless, undernutrition in the form of underweight, stunting, and anemia can be found in poor communities throughout the country. A prevalence of 25% underweight and 35% stunting is reported among young children from poor rural households. Anemia and subclinical forms of vitamin A deficiency were reported in children under 5 years old. Typical of a country in nutrition transition, Malaysia faces the dual burden of malnutrition in children, with the persistence of under-nutrition problems especially among the poor and the emerging overweight problem especially in urban areas. Since 1996, nutrition programs of the government sector are coordinated under the National Plan of Action for Nutrition. These activities and other nutrition intervention efforts by other agencies are discussed in this paper.

  7. Rethinking health care commercialization: evidence from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwagbara, Vitalis Chukwudi; Rasiah, Rajah

    2015-11-19

    Against the backdrop of systemic inefficiency in the public health care system and the theoretical claims that markets result in performance and efficiency improvement, developing countries' governments have been rapidly commercializing health care delivery. This paper seeks to determine whether commercialization through an expansion in private hospitals has led to performance improvements in public hospitals. Inpatient utilization records of all public hospitals in Peninsular Malaysia over the period 2006-2010 were used in this study. These records were obtained from the Ministry of Health. The study relied on utilization ratios, bed occupancy rates (BOR), bed turnover rates (BTR) and average length of stay (ALOS). The data were analyzed using SPSS 22 Statistical Software and the Pabon Lasso technique. Over 60 % of public hospitals in Malaysia are inefficient and perform sub-optimally. Average BOR among the public hospitals was 56 % in 2006 and 61 % in 2010. There was excessive BTR of 65 and 73 times within the period. Overall, the ALOS was low, falling from 3.4 days in 2006 to 3.1 days in 2010. This study demonstrates that commercialization has not led to performance improvements in the public health care sector in Malaysia. The evidence suggests that efforts to improve performance will require a focus directly on public hospitals.

  8. Improving cancer pain management in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Within Malaysia's otherwise highly accessible public healthcare system, palliative medicine is still an underdeveloped discipline. Government surveys have shown that opioid consumption in Malaysia is dramatically lower than the global average, indicating a failure to meet the need for adequate pain control in terminally ill patients. Indeed, based on daily defined doses, only 24% of patients suffering from cancer pain receive regular opioid analgesia. The main barriers to effective pain control in Malaysia relate to physicians' and patients' attitudes towards the use of opioids. In one survey of physicians, 46% felt they lacked knowledge to manage patients with severe cancer pain, and 64% feared effects such as respiratory depression. Fear of addiction is common amongst patients, as is confusion regarding the legality of opioids. Additional barriers include the fact that no training in palliative care is given to medical students, and that smaller clinics often lack facilities to prepare and stock cheap oral morphine. A number of initiatives aim to improve the situation, including the establishment of palliative care departments in hospitals and implementation of post-graduate training programmes. Campaigns to raise public awareness are expected to increase patient demand for adequate cancer pain relief as part of good care.

  9. Demand analysis of tobacco consumption in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Hana; Al-Sadat, Nabilla A M

    2007-11-01

    We estimated the price and income elasticity of cigarette demand and the impact of cigarette taxes on cigarette demand and cigarette tax revenue in Malaysia. The data on cigarette consumption, cigarette prices, and public policies between 1990 and 2004 were subjected to a time-series regression analysis applying the error-correction model. The preferred cigarette demand model specification resulted in long-run and short-run price elasticities estimates of -0.57 and -0.08, respectively. Income was positively related to cigarette consumption: A 1% increase in real income increased cigarette consumption by 1.46%. The model predicted that an increase in cigarette excise tax from Malaysian ringgit (RM) 1.60 to RM2.00 per pack would reduce cigarette consumption in Malaysia by 3.37%, or by 806,468,873 cigarettes. This reduction would translate to almost 165 fewer tobacco-related lung cancer deaths per year and a 20.8% increase in the government excise tax revenue. We conclude that taxation is an effective method of reducing cigarette consumption and tobacco-related deaths while increasing revenue for the government of Malaysia.

  10. Has Malaysia's antidrug effort been effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorzelli, J F

    1992-01-01

    It is a common belief that a massive effort in law enforcement, preventive education and rehabilitation will result in the elimination of a country's drug problem. Based on this premise. Malaysia in 1983 implemented such a multifaceted anti-drug strategy, and the results of a 1987 study by the author suggested that Malaysia's effort had begun to contribute to a steady decrease in the number of identified drug abusers. Although the number of drug-addicted individuals declined, the country's recidivism rates were still high. Because of this high relapse rate, Malaysia expanded their rehabilitation effort and developed a community transition program. In order to determine the impact of these changes on the country's battle against drug abuse, a follow-up study was conducted in 1990. The results of this study did not clearly demonstrate that the Malaysian effort had been successful in eliminating the problem of drug abuse, and raised some questions concerning the effectiveness of the country's drug treatment programs.

  11. DESKRIPSI TIPOLOGI, KLASIFIKASI DAN ANALISIS PERANCANGAN MASJID DI MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Tajuddin Mohamad Rasdi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available As one of the countries with the largest muslim communities in Southeast Asia, the study of Islamic architecture, especially the architecture of  modern mosques in Malaysia, has not yet been done intensively. Most of the  studies and documentation carried out were more focused in the study of old  mosques which were considered as more valuable historically with a more unique  traditional architecture. This paper will attempt to describe the typology of form  and visual style of the mosques (as the main building of Islamic architecture  developed in Malaysia, ranging from traditional mosques in the area of  remote villages to modern mosques in urban areas. This study is very  important in  recognizing aspects of morphology, the influence, and the development of mosque  design in Malaysia which will become a reference in designing the mosque,  especially in this country in the future. The discussion itself will consists of the Traditional Vernacular Mosque Architecture of Malaysia, a Sino Eclectic Mosques in Malaysia, the European Classical Mosque in Malaysia, the  North Indian Mosque in Malaysia, the Malaysia’s Vernacular Mo  dern Mosque, the Modern Expressionism Revivalism Mosque in Malaysia and the Post-Modern Mosque in Malaysia. It is expected that this  study would give an idea of the various approaches and the development  of mosque design in Malaysia in order to recognize the ideas and thoughts of Islamic architecture in Malaysia.

  12. Pusat Tenaga Malaysia's Zero Energy Office (ZEO) Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, C.K.; Reimann, Gregers Peter; Kristensen, Poul Erik

    Technical Review of the Zero Energy Office building in Malaysia. The building, which has an energy index of 50 kWh/m2/year, reaches a net annual energy of zero through the use of building integrated photovoltaic panels. For reference, ordinary offices in Malaysia consume 200 - 300 kWh/m2/year...

  13. Innovation Management and Performance Framework for Research University in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowang, Tan Owee; Long, Choi Sang; Rasli, Amran

    2015-01-01

    Institutions of Higher Learning (IHL) in Malaysia are recognized as the core of new innovation development. This paper empirically studies one of IHLs in Malaysia with the objectives to gauge the perceived important level of success factors for innovation management, and to examine the relationship between innovation management success factors…

  14. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of…

  15. Malaysia - Insurance Core Principles : Detailed Assessment of Observance

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    This assessment provides an understanding of the significant regulatory and supervisory framework for the insurance sector of Malaysia. The assessment was conducted by Mark Causevic (external expert from OSFI Canada) during April 2012. Malaysia is undertaking the Financial Sector Assessment Program (FSAP) for the first time, and it includes a formal assessment of its observance with the In...

  16. Trade in Higher Education Services in Malaysia: Key Policy Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Siew Yean

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Malaysia has emerged as an unexpected contender in the world market for international students in higher education. Recognizing this sector as a potential new source of growth and export revenue, Malaysia aims to become a regional hub for higher education. In view of this, the objectives of this paper are to profile the pattern of…

  17. Beginning Teachers as Policy Workers in Malaysia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vivienne Ruth; Young, Sharon; Blanch, Keely; Smith, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Malaysia government initiated twinned primary teacher education arrangements with five Southern Hemisphere higher education institutions (HEIs). Participating students completed their teacher education in both Malaysia and a partner HEI. In this paper, we consider the preliminary findings of a comparative study tracking the beginning…

  18. Thinking Skill Education and Transformational Progress in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Nooraini; Mohamad, Khairul Azmi

    2014-01-01

    This paper intends to highlight the issues in thinking skills development and efforts made in addressing these issues in Malaysia. The education system in Malaysia has undergone a huge transformational progress particularly in the field related to the development of thinking skill. Traditionally, thinking skill was not specifically cultivated in…

  19. A Model of Homeschooling Based on Technology in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Norlidah; Rahman, Mohd. Nazri Abdul; Siraj, Saedah; Ibrahim, Ruslina

    2013-01-01

    Homeschooling in Malaysia is a form of alternative education that emphasizes quality education based on moral values and belief in strengthening family ties. The purpose of this study is to produce a model of homeschooling technology-based learning activities in Malaysia as a guideline to improve the quality of education, curriculum and organize…

  20. 78 FR 57620 - Trade Mission to Philippines and Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... International Trade Administration Trade Mission to Philippines and Malaysia AGENCY: International Trade... FR 22237, April 15, 2013, regarding the education industry trade mission to Manila, Philippines and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia scheduled for October 23-October 30, 2013, to revise the mission description from...

  1. Beginning Teachers as Policy Workers in Malaysia and New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vivienne Ruth; Young, Sharon; Blanch, Keely; Smith, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Malaysia government initiated twinned primary teacher education arrangements with five Southern Hemisphere higher education institutions (HEIs). Participating students completed their teacher education in both Malaysia and a partner HEI. In this paper, we consider the preliminary findings of a comparative study tracking the beginning…

  2. A Visual Analysis of Festive Television Commercials in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lean Mei

    2011-01-01

    Malaysia is a multiracial country with a diverse range of religions, leading to a broad range of religious festivals throughout the year. In recent years, corporate giants such as Petronas, Telekom Malaysia (TM), Tenaga and Astro have taken to airing television commercials (TVCs) that contain a local touch when greeting their customers. Perhaps…

  3. Satisfaction from Academic Activities among Medical Students in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan A.; Bobryshev, Yuri V.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of data about the levels of satisfaction among medical students in regards to their academic activities in Malaysia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to fill the gap in the existing knowledge. A cross sectional study was carried out at the International medical school, the Management and Science University of Malaysia,…

  4. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of education,…

  5. Counseling in Malaysia: History, Current Status, and Future Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Ching Mey; Ng, Kok-Mun

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the history of counseling in Malaysia, provides an update of its current status, and discusses some anticipated future trends for the profession in light of recent developments in the country. Counseling in Malaysia began with school guidance in the 1960s and has now achieved recognition as a profession in…

  6. War Against Terrorism: Malaysia’s Experience in Defeating Terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-19

    Internal security in Malaysia has been based in the Legislative Acts , that is, the Internal Security Act and the Sedition Act . The Internal Security Act ...11 SEDITION ACT ...............................................................................................................................11...manner prejudicial to the security of Malaysia ”. • The Act also allows for restrictions on freedom of assembly, association, and expression, freedom

  7. Ecology and distribution of Lycopodiaceae Mirbel in Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusea, G.; Claysius, K.; Runi, S.; Joanes, U.; Haja Maideen, K.M.; Latiff, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the first account to discuss the distribution, ecology and habitats of the Lycopodiaceae in Malaysia. Lycopodiaceae are widely distributed throughout Malaysia with respect to altitudes and environmental conditions but most abundantly found in hill forest and lower montane forest,

  8. Household Expenditures on Private Tutoring: Emerging Evidence from Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenayathulla, Husaina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Private tutoring has been a burgeoning phenomenon in Malaysia for decades. This study examines the determinants of private tutoring expenditures in Malaysia using the 2004/2005 Household Expenditures Survey and applies hurdle regression models to the data. The results indicate that total household expenditures, household head's level of education,…

  9. Italian in the Linguistic Landscape of Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    This article looks at the presence of Italian in the linguistic landscape (LL) of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Rather surprisingly, Italian is quite visible, and it might even be the most used European language after English. After a general introduction on the Italian language and Malaysia, including the latter's LL, the article goes on to outline the…

  10. Combining Education and Work; Experiences in Asia and Oceania: Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugasu, V.

    Work oriented education has been tied to national development in Malaysia since the 1960's. Increasing population, unemployment, and shortages of skilled manpower led the government to relate education more closely to work and develop technical and vocational education. Malaysia extended basic education to lower secondary manpower needs; and…

  11. Malaysia's Multimedia Super Corridor and Roles of Information Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Edna

    In Malaysia, the government is supporting the diffusion of the Internet and is spearheading a project to bring Malaysia into the information age, by helping to design a smart city called the Multimedia Super Corridor (MSC). The MSC is being planned as a high-technology center where world-class multimedia companies can develop state-of-the-art…

  12. A Visual Analysis of Festive Television Commercials in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lean Mei

    2011-01-01

    Malaysia is a multiracial country with a diverse range of religions, leading to a broad range of religious festivals throughout the year. In recent years, corporate giants such as Petronas, Telekom Malaysia (TM), Tenaga and Astro have taken to airing television commercials (TVCs) that contain a local touch when greeting their customers. Perhaps…

  13. Trade in Higher Education Services in Malaysia: Key Policy Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Siew Yean

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, Malaysia has emerged as an unexpected contender in the world market for international students in higher education. Recognizing this sector as a potential new source of growth and export revenue, Malaysia aims to become a regional hub for higher education. In view of this, the objectives of this paper are to profile the pattern of…

  14. Students' Biotechnology Literacy: The Pillars of STEM Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Nurnadiah Mohamed; Suryawati, Evi; Osman, Kamisah

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology has been widely applied in various products throughout the 21st century. Malaysia selected the biotechnology sector as one of the key strategic technologies that would enable Malaysia to transform into a fully developed nation by the year 2020. However, to date, there has been very little research on the level of biotechnology…

  15. Students' Biotechnology Literacy: The Pillars of STEM Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Nurnadiah Mohamed; Suryawati, Evi; Osman, Kamisah

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology has been widely applied in various products throughout the 21st century. Malaysia selected the biotechnology sector as one of the key strategic technologies that would enable Malaysia to transform into a fully developed nation by the year 2020. However, to date, there has been very little research on the level of biotechnology…

  16. Treatment of wastewater from rubber industry in Malaysia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment of wastewater from rubber industry in Malaysia. ... Discharge of untreated rubber effluent to waterways resulted in water pollution that affected the human health. ... waste minimization, utilization of waste, resource recovery and recycling of ... Key words: Rubber industry, effluent, waste management, Malaysia.

  17. An Analysis of Globalization and Higher Education in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiasamy, Anantha Raj A.

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine the impact of globalization on private higher education in Malaysia. The impact of globalization and the development of knowledge-based economy have caused much dramatic change to the character and functions of higher education in Malaysia. The major trend is the reforming and restructuring of private higher education in…

  18. Multicultural Early Childhood Education: Practices and Challenges in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoon, Hooi San; Abdullah, Melissa Ng Lee Yen; Abdullah, Anna Christina

    2013-01-01

    Multicultural early childhood education is necessary in a culturally diverse country like Malaysia. Preschool teachers play an important role in implementing multicultural education in the classroom. This paper reports the findings of a self-report questionnaire involving 854 preschool teachers in Malaysia. The preschool teachers disclosed their…

  19. Contemporary Challenges and Changes: Principals' Leadership Practices in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Michelle; Adams, Donnie; Joo, Mabel Tan Hwee; Muniandy, Vasu; Perera, Corinne Jaqueline; Harris, Alma

    2015-01-01

    This article outlines the findings from a contemporary study of principals' leadership practices in Malaysia as part of the 7 System Leadership Study. Recent policy developments within Malaysia have increased principals' accountability and have underlined the importance of the role of the principals in transforming school performance and student…

  20. The Flora Malesiana Project and its relevance to Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saw, L.G.; Soepadmo, E.

    2002-01-01

    In a developing country like Malaysia, it is becoming difficult to attract funds to do basic taxonomic work. Taxonomic research must be made relevant to national needs. Among the increasing needs for indigenous plants and their environment in Malaysia are their conservation and determining the

  1. HIZBUT TAHRIR MALAYSIA: the Emergence of a New Transnational Islamist Movement in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Nawab Mohamed Osman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at the Hizbut Tahrir of Malaysia and places it in the context of the wider and deeper development of Muslim politics and mass mobilisation across Asia and the world at large. While much has been written about the Hizbut Tahrir of Indonesia (HTI, little is known about the HTM. This paper traces the initial arrival of the HT to Malaysia, via the network of Malaysian students and activists who were educated abroad and who have managed to build their own inter-personal networks and relationships outside the parameters of mainstream political Islam and the state apparatus in the country. Furthermore it is interesting to note that HTM in Malaysia takes its own unique stand on Islamic issues with relation to the mainstream Islamic party PAS and the Malay-Muslim UMNO party. The paper therefore attempts to locate the ideological positioning of the HTM in the wider context of Islamist politics in contemporary Malaysia and to analyse its relationship to the wider currents of ethno-communal as well as religious politics in the country as a whole. 

  2. 2006 China Machinery and Electronical Products Trade Fair:Ample Fruits Shown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ 2006 Malaysia China Machinery and Electronical Products Trade Fair, organized by China Council for the Promotion of International Trade(CCPIT), was held in August in Prince World Trade Center(PWTC), Kuala Lumpur.

  3. Zoonotic parasites from exotic meat in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazly, Z A; Nurulaini, R; Shafarin, M S; Fariza, N J; Zawida, Z; Muhamad, H Y; Adnan, M; Premaalatha, B; Erwanas, A I; Zaini, C M; Ong, C C; Chandrawathani, P

    2013-09-01

    Four zoonotic parasites, Sarcocystis spp., Toxoplasma gondii, Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp were screened in exotic meats. A total of forty-six (n=46) meat samples from various species of exotic animals were received from all the 14 states in Malaysia from January 2012 to April 2012. All exotic meat samples were examined macroscopically and histologically for the four zoonotic parasites. Results by histological examination of exotic meats showed the presence of Sarcocystis and Toxoplasma cysts at 8.7% (n=4) and 4.3% (n=2) respectively. No Trichinella spp. and Taenia spp. were found.

  4. Nationalizing Rituals? The Ritual Economy in Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Starting in the 1970s, the wave of Islamic revivalism in Malaysia has revitalized ritual life among many Malay Muslims. In the same period, the country has witnessed steady economic growth, an emerging Malay middle class and the formation of an Islamic state bureaucracy that attempts to transform...... the understanding and practice of Islamic ritual. Building on fieldwork in a suburb outside Malaysia’s capital city, Kuala Lumpur, this article explores this ritual economy i.e. ways in which economic processes are driven by and integrated with religious ritual. I shall show how the question of Islamic rituals...

  5. An Examination of Customer Misbehaviour in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, Wai Yip

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the research is to identify the common traits of customer misbehaviour and the motives behind such deviant acts in Malaysia. It is also aims to find out which service industries are prone to customer misbehaviour. Services have become part of everyone’s life, be it going to the cinema, taking a train, or dining in the restaurant. Customers that are physically present in the service area for consumption of goods and services are given the opportunity to misbehave, be it in the form ...

  6. The burden of terrorism in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abul Aziz, Azhar

    2003-01-01

    In the peace-loving, moderate and progressive country of Muslim-dominated Malaysia, violence generally is alien to the culture. Terrorism initially took shape during the post-independence, communist era by jungle recalcitrant actions. In recent years, this has been superceded by a more internationally related trend of violence. Only very few incidents were based locally, while the majority were linked to international groups or organizations abroad, including the Kumpulan Mujahidin Malaysia (KMM), Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), and the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG). Kidnapping with ransom seemed to have been the most commone modus operandi, while killing and robbery accounted for very few of these incidents. The number of victims in each event so far has been small, and smaller for those physically harmed or killed. This pattern of terrorist attacks suggests that the current level of provision of emergency medical services is sufficient to handle such incidents. Recent advances in local emergency medicine also have witnessed the establishment of various teaching and training modules, a pivotal role played by university hospitals and supported by the Ministry of Health. However, the spate of ongoing events of mass destruction such as the conflict in Israel/Palestine, wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the World Trade Center and Pentagon tragedies of 11 September 2001, and the Bali bombing in Indonesia, remain as great concerns to Malaysians. Both the government and the people of Malaysia abhor such unjustified uses of terror, and take every measure to curtail them. The National Security Council policies of Arahan No. 18 and Arahan No. 20 detail specific roles and responsibilities of various agencies in managing terrorism and disasters respectively, while the use of the stern Internal Security Act that allows indefinite detention without trial, evidently has been an efficient intelligence and security apparatus. With more recent developments of terrorist events regionally and globally

  7. Nuclear energy in Malaysia - closing the gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    >Malaysian Nuclear Society (Mns,

    2013-06-01

    This article is prepared by the Malaysian Nuclear Society (MNS) to present the views of the Malaysian scientific community on the need for Malaysia to urgently upgrade its technical know-how and expertise to support the nuclear energy industry for future sustainable economic development of the country. It also present scientific views that nuclear energy will bring economic growth as well as technically sound industry, capable of supporting nuclear energy industry needs in the country, and recommend action items for timely technical upgrading of Malaysian expertise related to nuclear energy industry.

  8. Codonoboea (Gesneriaceae Sections in Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Lu Lim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Codonoboea is the largest genus of Gesneriaceae in Peninsular Malaysia with 92 species. Nine sections,   Boeopsis, Codonoboea, Didymanthus, Glossadenia, Heteroboea, Pectinati, Reptantes, Salicini and Venusti, have been erected based on morphological characters, such as habit, leaf arrangement and shape, type of inflorescence, number of flowers, corolla type and nectary type. Recent molecular phylogenetic study using ITS and trnL-F sequences show that only section Heteroboea is monophyletic. While the sections of Codonoboea can no longer be maintained as   formal taxonomic taxa, as informal groupings they are useful in identification and in constructing keys.

  9. Islamic Mobility : Car Culture in Modern Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Johan

    2016-01-01

    In a modern and respectable middle-class suburb outside Kuala Lumpur, the overtness of cars evokes intense speculation about the nature of the make-up of covert middle-class homes and the formation of Malay Muslim identities more generally. I argue that the more ‘Islamic’ cultures of consumption assert themselves in modern Malaysia, the more the growing Malay Muslim middle class is split between desiring cars as positional commodities, on the one hand, and claims for piety through consumption...

  10. Ethnicity and infant mortality in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, G

    1993-06-01

    Malaysian infant mortality differentials are a worthwhile subject for study, because socioeconomic development has very clearly had a differential impact by ethnic group. The Chinese rates of infant mortality are significantly lower than the Malay or Indian rates. Instead of examining the obvious access to care issues, this study considered factors related to the culture of infant care. Practices include the Chinese confinement of the mother in the first month after childbirth ("pe'i yue") and Pillsbury's 12 normative rules for Malaysian Chinese care. Malay practices vary widely by region and history. Indian mothers are restricted by diet. Data-recording flaws do not permit analysis of Sarawak or Sabah. The general assumption that Western medicine favors better health for mothers and infants is substantiated among peninsular communities, however, there are also negative impacts which affect infant mortality. The complex interaction of factors impacting on infant mortality reported in seven previous studies is discussed. A review of these studies reveals that immediate causes are infections, injuries, and dehydration. Indirect causes are birth weight or social and behavioral factors such as household income or maternal education. Indirect factors, which are amenable to planned change and influence the biological proximate determinants of infant mortality, are identified as birth weight, maternal age at birth, short pregnancy intervals or prior reproductive loss, sex of the child, birth order, duration of breast feeding and conditions of supplementation, types of household water and sanitation, year of child's birth, maternal education, household income and composition, institution of birth, ethnicity, and rural residence. Nine factors are identified empirically as not significant: maternal hours of work in the child's first year, maternal occupation, distance from home to workplace, presence of other children or servants, incidence of epidemics in the child's first

  11. Tectonic Motion of Malaysia: Analysis from Years 2001 TO 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J.; Shariff, N. S.; Omar, K.; Amin, Z. M.

    2015-10-01

    This paper seeks to investigate the tectonic motion of Malaysia using the Malaysian Active GPS Station (MASS) and Malaysia Realtime Kinematic GNSS Network (MyRTKnet) data from years 2001 to 2013. GNSS data were processed using Bernese 5.0, and plotted as a time series; whereby the period before and after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman mega earthquake are plotted separately. From the time series, episodic events and stable inter-seismic deformation period are analysed. The results indicate that the 2001- 2004 and 2008-2011 periods were free from episodic events; hence, chosen to depict the tectonic motion of Malaysia before and after 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, respectively. The motion had a major change in direction and rate, especially for East Malaysia and South Peninsular Malaysia. This indicates there exist a long-term post-seismic deformation due to the 2004 mega earthquake. Nonetheless, the 2008-2011 inter-seismic period is stable, and suitable to represent the current long-term tectonic motion of Malaysia: Peninsular and East Malaysia moves south-east, at an average velocity of 0.89 ±0.01 cm/yr south and 1.70 ±0.02 cm/yr east, and 1.06 ±0.01 cm/yr south and 2.50 ±0.02 cm/yr east, respectively. In addition, the co-seismic motion for the 2005 Nias, 2007 Bengkulu and 2012 Northern Sumatra earthquakes after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake are relatively small, indicating these three earthquakes have no significant contribution to the long-term tectonic motion of Malaysia. Overall, this paper aims to provide a general insight into the tectonic motion of Malaysia which, expectedly, may benefit other scientific fields.

  12. Management of Waqf Assets in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunaidah Ab Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Waqf is one of the main mechanism in providing support for the development to all levels of the ummah more so for the underprivileged. Waqf institutions in Malaysia are under the jurisdiction of the 14 states rather than the Federal government. This paper reviews the development of waqf in Melaka, one of the states in Malaysia. It discusses a brief historical background, function and legal aspects of waqf matters. A brief information on the structure and administration of waqf in Melaka, Baitulmal is responsible for the sake of administering and managing such waqf assets in Melaka is also presented. This study is also concerned with examining of the current situation of development waqf asset; which is known as waqf saham in Melaka through the record by Majlis Agama Islam Melaka (MAIM. Yet, it is undeniably true that some challenges and impediments pertaining to the issues of developing waqf assets; inter alia, lack of fund and expertise, poor documentation and the record value of waqf property and others.

  13. A review of schizophrenia research in malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, K Y; Salina, A A

    2014-08-01

    Research in schizophrenia has advanced tremendously. One hundred and seventy five articles related to Schizophrenia were found from a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. This project aims to examine published research articles, in local and international journals in order to provide a glimpse of the research interest in Malaysia with regards to schizophrenia. Single case study, case series report, reviews and registry reports were not included in this review. Medication trial, unless it concerned a wider scope of psychopharmacology was also excluded from this review. A total of 105 articles were included in this review. Despite numerous genetics studies conducted and published, a definitive conclusion on the aetiology or mechanism underlying schizophrenia remains elusive. The National Mental Health - Schizophrenia Registry (NMHR) proved to be an important platform for many studies and publications. Studies stemmed from NMHR have provided significant insight into the baseline characteristic of patients with schizophrenia, pathway to care, and outcomes of the illness. International and regional collaborations have also encouraged important work involving stigma and discrimination in schizophrenia. Ministry of Health's hospitals (MOH) are the main research sites in the country with regards to schizophrenia research. Numbers of schizophrenia research are still low in relation to the number of universities and hospitals in the country. Some of the weaknesses include duplication of studies, over-emphasising clinical trials and ignoring basic clinical research, and the lack of publications in international and regional journals.

  14. Tsunami risk mapping simulation for Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, S.Y.; Koh, H. L.; Moh, Y.T.; De Angelis, D. L.; Jiang, J.

    2011-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Andaman mega tsunami killed about a quarter of a million people worldwide. Since then several significant tsunamis have recurred in this region, including the most recent 25 October 2010 Mentawai tsunami. These tsunamis grimly remind us of the devastating destruction that a tsunami might inflict on the affected coastal communities. There is evidence that tsunamis of similar or higher magnitudes might occur again in the near future in this region. Of particular concern to Malaysia are tsunamigenic earthquakes occurring along the northern part of the Sunda Trench. Further, the Manila Trench in the South China Sea has been identified as another source of potential tsunamigenic earthquakes that might trigger large tsunamis. To protect coastal communities that might be affected by future tsunamis, an effective early warning system must be properly installed and maintained to provide adequate time for residents to be evacuated from risk zones. Affected communities must be prepared and educated in advance regarding tsunami risk zones, evacuation routes as well as an effective evacuation procedure that must be taken during a tsunami occurrence. For these purposes, tsunami risk zones must be identified and classified according to the levels of risk simulated. This paper presents an analysis of tsunami simulations for the South China Sea and the Andaman Sea for the purpose of developing a tsunami risk zone classification map for Malaysia based upon simulated maximum wave heights. ?? 2011 WIT Press.

  15. TRAFFIC LIGHT VIOLATION AMONG MOTORISTS IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KULANTHAYAN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Road crashes in Malaysia in 2006 stood at 341,232. This resulted in 6,287 deaths among road users giving an index of 23.5 road fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants. One of the possible reasons for the high number of crashes and injuries is due to beating traffic lights. Thus there is a need to investigate this alarming problem. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Selangor, Malaysia to identify road traffic-light violations. Traffic light violations are believed to be rising and resulted in 136 motorist fatalities and 155 injuries in 2002. Near-miss incidents could be higher as they go unreported. This study was conducted through observations from 14 December 2005 until 22 January 2006. Four locations were chosen to represent Selangor: Kajang, Kelang, Utara Subang Jaya (USJ and Bangi. During this 5-week period a total of 3,471 vehicles were observed. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13.0. A bivariate analysis (logistic regression was applied to determine any relationship between traffic light violation and five identified variables. The results showed traffic light violation has a relationship with all five factors: day (weekday or weekend, camera enforcement, type of vehicle (two-wheel vehicles or four-wheel vehicles, traffic light cycle time (long or short and type of traffic lights (timer or normal.

  16. Prehospital emergency medical services in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamuddin, N A R Nik; Hamzah, M Shah; Holliman, C James

    2007-05-01

    Once a very slowly developing country in a Southeast Asia region, Malaysia has undergone considerable change over the last 20 years after the government changed its focus from agriculture to developing more industry and technology. The well-known "Vision 2020," introduced by the late Prime Minister, set a target for the nation to be a developed country in the Asia region by the year 2020. As the economy and standard of living have improved, the demand from the public for a better health care system, in particular, emergency medical services (EMS), has increased. Despite the effort by the government to improve the health care system in Malaysia, EMS within the country are currently limited, best described as being in the "developing" phase. The Ministry of Health, Ministry of Education, Civil Defense, and non-governmental organizations such as Red Crescent and St. John's Ambulance, provide the current ambulance services. At the present time, there are no uniform medical control or treatment protocols, communication systems, system management, training or education, or quality assurance policies. However, the recent development of and interest in an Emergency Medicine training program has gradually led to improved EMS and prehospital care.

  17. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysia’s energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors. The integration to the economic sectors is done exogeneously by specifying the annual sectoral energy demand levels. The model in turn optimizes the energy variables for a specified objective function to meet those demands. Results: By minimizing the inter temporal petroleum product imports for the crude oil system the annual extraction level of Tapis blend is projected at 579600 barrels per day. The aggregate demand for petroleum products is projected to grow at 2.1% year-1 while motor gasoline and diesel constitute 42 and 38% of the petroleum products demands mix respectively over the 5 year planning period. Petroleum products import is expected to grow at 6.0% year-1. Conclusion: The preliminary results indicate that the model performs as expected. Thus other types of energy carriers such as natural gas, coal and biomass will be added to the energy system for the overall development of Malaysia energy model.

  18. Child-to-Child programme in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, M S; Abraham, S

    1982-09-01

    Even though Malaysia is a relatively prosperous country amongst the developing nations, it is still be set by problems of a rapidly increasing population. The economic cake is also unevenly distributed and there are pockets of poverty in the slums surrounding the towns as well as in the rural areas. Added to that is the problem of ignorance and superstition especially amongst its adult population. It is due to these problems that the Child-to-Child programme has found special application in Malaysia. The Child-to-Child has been introduced through either the government agencies or the voluntary organizations. Through the Ministry of Education, the concept has found its ways through the schools and the state department of education. The Ministry of Information and Broadcasting has also introduced the concept of Child-to-Child in the media. The voluntary organizations have also introduced the concept of Child-to-Child in their projects. The Sang Kancil project has to some extent used the idea in the running of its activities. The Health and Nutrition Education House have found that by applying the concept and using older children to help in running its activities, its over all objective which is the improvement of the health of the children in the slums could be reached more easily.

  19. Pedestrian Crossing Speed: The Case of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Hoe Goh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrians are vulnerable road users, and they are always at risk when making their daily trips. Hence, roadway design and traffic’ control devices need to consider pedestrians’ safety. Pedestrian walking speed is fundamental to any roadway and traffic’ control design. Unfortunately, no specific guidelines exist for pedestrian crossing speed in Malaysia. The ultimate goals of this research are to establish the local pedestrian crossing speed and to identify the contributing factors. A total of 1579 samples on pedestrian crossing speed were collected at signalized and non-signalized crosswalks. The Bi-variate analysis (chi-square test was carried out to study statistically the association of the contributing factors. The Bi-variate analysis shows that crosswalk type, age and gender significantly contribute to pedestrian speed in Malaysia. However, lighting (daytime and night-time and race are not contributing to the pedestrians’ speed. Besides, pedestrians at non-signalized crosswalk have significantly faster crossing speed than at signalized crosswalk. Chi-square test also showed that children pedestrians are the fastest group, and elderly pedestrians are the slowest group in terms of pedestrian crossing speed. Moreover, male pedestrians have significantly faster crossing speed than female pedestrians do.

  20. Thorium: Issues and prospects in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Areqi, Wadeeah M.; Majid, Amran Ab.; Sarmani, Sukiman; Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul

    2015-04-01

    In Malaysia, thorium exists in minerals and rare earth elements production residue. The average range of thorium content in Malaysian monazite and xenotime minerals was found about 70,000 and 15,000 ppm respectively. About 2,636 tonnes of Malaysian monazite was produced for a period of 5 years (2006-2010) and based on the above data, it can be estimated that Malaysian monazite contains about 184.5 tonnes of thorium. Although thorium can become a major radiological problem to our environment, but with the significant deposit of thorium in Malaysian monazite, it has a prospect as a future alternative fuel in nuclear technology. This paper will discuss the thorium issues in Malaysia especially its long term radiological risks to public health and environment at storage and disposal stages, the prospect of exploring and producing high purity thorium from our rare earth elements minerals for future thorium based reactor. This paper also highlights the holistic approach in thorium recovery from Malaysian rare earth element production residue to reduce its radioactivity and extraction of thorium and rare earth elements from the minerals with minimum radiological impact to health and environment.

  1. Proximate determinants of fertility in peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, Nai Peng; Ng, Sor Tho; Yew, Siew Yong

    2012-05-01

    The continuing decline in fertility despite a contraction in contraceptive use in Peninsular Malaysia since the mid-1980s has triggered considerable interest in the reasons behind this phenomenon, such as increase in abortion, sterility, and out-of-wedlock pregnancy. Fertility decline has been attributed to rapid socioeconomic development, which can only influence fertility through the intermediate variables. Application of vital statistics, population census, and survey data of Peninsular Malaysia on Bongaarts's model vindicates that marriage postponement and contraceptive use are the 2 most important proximate determinants of fertility, but the effects are not uniform across the ethnic groups. For instance, the predicted total fertility rate for Chinese and Malays are 2.9 and 1.6, respectively, compared with the observed level of 3.0 and 1.9. Postpartum infecundability and abortion also play a part in explaining ethnic fertility differentials. The fertility inhibiting effects of these proximate determinants have significant implications on reproductive health and future population growth.

  2. Macroeconomic Determinants of Skilled Labour Migration: The Case of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuie Hong; Solucis Santhapparaj, A.

    In this study, macroeconomic determinants of immigration are analysed with pooled cross-country and time series data on skilled immigration into Malaysia from 39 countries during 1998-2004. Results demonstrate clearly that both high frequency (such as differences in cyclical economic conditions) and low frequency determinants (such as differences in levels of economic development) have been important for determinants of immigration into Malaysia. Immigration is determined by the income growth of Malaysia, change in Malaysian unemployment rate and population of the source countries. Year-to-year changes in skilled immigration flows are dominated by economic fluctuation.

  3. Sustainable River Water Quality Management in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mamun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Ecological status of Malaysia is not as bad as many other developing nations in the world. However, despite the enforcement of the Environmental Quality Act (EQA in 1974, the water quality of Malaysian inland water (especially rivers is following deteriorating trend. The rivers are mainly polluted due to the point and non-point pollution sources. Point sources are monitored and controlled by the Department of Environment (DOE, whereas a significant amount of pollutants is contributed by untreated sullage and storm runoff. Nevertheless, it is not too late to take some bold steps for the effective control of non-point source pollution and untreated sullage discharge, which play significant roles on the status of the rivers. This paper reviews the existing procedures and guidelines related to protection of the river water quality in Malaysia.  There is a good possibility that the sewage and effluent discharge limits in the Environmental Quality Act (EQA may pose hindrance against achieving good quality water in the rivers as required by the National Water Quality Standards (NWQS. For instance, Ammoniacal Nitrogen (NH3-N is identified as one of the main pollutants to render many of the rivers polluted but it was not considered in the EQA as a monitoring parameter until the new regulations published in 2009.  Surprisingly, the new regulation for sewage and industrial effluent limits set allowable NH3-N concentration quite high (5 mg/L, which may result in low Water Quality Index (WQI values for the river water. The water environment is a dynamic system. Periodical review of the monitoring requirements, detecting emerging pollutants in sewage, effluent and runoff, and proper revision of water quality standards are necessary for the management of sustainable water resources in the country. ABSTRAK: Satus ekologi Malaysia tidak seburuk kebanyakan negara membangun lain di dunia. Walaupun Akta Kualiti Alam Sekitar (EQA dikuatkuasakan pada tahun 1974

  4. Assistive Courseware for Hearing Impaired Learners in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Nadwan Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a research on Hearing Impaired (HI learners in Malaysia which focuses on beginner level. This research has been carried out with intention to solve problem faced by parents of HI children in teaching their children to know the six basic sounds which is known as Ling-6 Sound. The HI learners were assisted by speciallydeveloped electronic-learning application or known as Assistive Courseware (AC in their teaching and learning process. The AC utilizes their mother tongue language.  The objectives of the study include 1 To identify the characteristic of AC for HI learners, 2 To design the storyboard of AC for HI learners, and 3 To design the interface of AC for HI learners. This study adapts the Iterative Triangulation Methodology, and is integrated with the IntView Methodology. The storyboard of the prototype is outlined next. The findings of this paper highlight the prototype of the AC labelled with certain characteristics that has been identified and the result is based on interview with parents. The final part concludes this paper.

  5. Malaysia -U.S. Relations: Influencing Factors and its Impact on Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    For example, the occasion of the non- import of palm oil by the U.S. from Malaysia had strained the economic relations of both the countries. (At...began lobbying against palm cooking oils on the basis that they were unhealthy, these were not a welcome actions or Malaysian growers and producers...the territorial integrity of Indonesia . Fourth, Malaysia’s Prime Minister Najib as a statesman and Muslim leader lends a credible voice of reason

  6. Study on Seroprevalence and Leptospiral Antibody Distribution among High-risk Planters in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridzuan, J Mohd; Aziah, B D; Zahiruddin, W M

    2016-06-01

    To determine the leptospirosis seroprevalence and to identify the predominant infecting serovars among oil palm plantation workers. The cross-sectional study involved 350 asymptomatic oil palm plantation workers in Melaka and Johor. A serological test using the microscopic agglutination test was conducted in the Institute of Medical Research with a cut-off titre for seropositivity of ≥1:100. The overall seroprevalence of leptospiral antibodies was 28.6%. The job category with the highest seroprevalence was the fruit collector with 59.2%. The predominant serovar identified was serovar Sarawak (Lepto 175) (62%). A high seroprevalence of leptospiral antibodies was detected among oil palm plantation workers and specifically among fruit collectors. The predominant infecting serovar among the workers was serovar Sarawak (Lepto 175). The findings suggest that more studies are needed to determine the reasons for the high seroprevalence and the transmission and pathogenicity of the local serovar Sarawak (Lepto 175).

  7. MALAYSIA'S GENERAL ELECTIONS AMIDST THE SHADOW OF RE-MAHATHIRISATION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmad Fauzi Abdul Hamid; Muhamad Takiyuddin Ismail

    2014-01-01

    ...) coalition and its main component party, the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO). Re-Mahathirisation refers to the increase in attachment towards the legacy of Malaysia's fourth Prime Minister, Dr. Mahathir Mohamad (1981-2003...

  8. Challenges in Implementing Engineering Technology Education in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmah Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.As Malaysia races against time to achieve Vision 2020 to be a developed nation, there is an urgent need for highly-skilled human resources to fulfill the requirements of the industry. This calls for an expansion of the engineering technology program to increase the number of technical graduates.  However, various challenges are faced by the institutions in the implementation of the Engineering Technology programs, which have significant negative impact on the nation in general and in particular the graduates from the programs. Data was collected from a brainstorming session between six organizations involved in providing engineering technology education in Malaysia and the UniversitiTeknologi Malaysia (UTM and a convention on Engineering Technology Future in Malaysia. These challenges are categorized into four and discussed in this paper.Keywords: Accreditation, Challenges, Engineering technology; Human resources, Technical graduates.

  9. Greenspace planning and management in Klang Valley, Peninsular Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul Aziz, Nor Akmar Binti; Konijnendijk, Cecil Cornelis; Sreetheran, M.

    2011-01-01

    In rapidly developing countries such as Malaysia, the importance of urban greenspaces is recognized, but due to rapid industrialization and urbanization, maintaining and developing greenspace is a major challenge. This paper analyzes the status of urban greenspace policy, planning, and management...... in Malaysia. For this purpose, information was collected about urban greenspaces and their governance, planning, and management, both at the national level and in six representative case cities in the most urbanized part of Malaysia, the Klang Valley. Data was compiled by means of a literature review......, document analysis, and expert interviews with municipal officers in the selected cities. Results show the greenspace discourse in Malaysia has shifted its focus from one dominated by beautification to one concentrated on regarding greenspace as an essential part of the urban infrastructure. In spite...

  10. Minority Language Education in Malaysia: Four Ethnic Communities' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karla J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses minority language education in Malaysia, a multilingual and multicultural country. Looks at four language minority groups and what they have done to to provide beginning education programs for their children that use the children's native languages. (Author/VWL)

  11. Sexuality education in Malaysia: perceived issues and barriers by professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Zahra Fazli; Low, Wah Yun; Merghati-Khoei, Effat; Ghorbani, Behzad

    2014-07-01

    This research explored the perspectives of Malaysian professionals on the issues and barriers affecting the implementation of sexuality education in Malaysia. This qualitative study involved in-depth interviews with 15 key professionals working in the field of sexuality and reproductive health in Malaysia. Thematic analysis was selected to analyze data. Barriers to sexuality education were perceived from 5 aspects: feasibility, acceptability, accountability, strategies, and community unawareness. Respondents believed that implementing national sexuality education is a time-consuming project. They regarded Malaysian multicultural society as a barrier to national sexuality education, and they believed that school-based sexuality education is not easily accomplished in Malaysia; also abstinence-only policy restricts the access of young people to accurate information. Lack of community involvement was perceived as a key concern to sexuality education. Campaigning to promote awareness of families, teachers, community leaders, and policy makers are recommended to help establishing national sexuality education in Malaysia. © 2014 APJPH.

  12. PAST WINDSTORM OCCURRENCE TREND, DAMAGE, AND LOSSES IN PENANG, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID, T. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Windstorm occurrence in several parts of Malaysia, particularly in the northern region, has severely affected humans, causing damage to property as well as fatality. This study aims to investigate the past windstorm occurrence trend, including damage and losses, in Penang districts from 2010 to 2013. Data on windstorm occurrence and on damages and losses from districts were collected from the Land and District office and Social Welfare Department of Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia. The monthly windstorm occurrences in the districts were compared. Windstorm likely occurs in during March, May, and November annually. This windstorm occurrence indirectly contributes to the damage and losses in that particular area. Therefore, this phenomenon must not be neglected in Malaysia. The negative effects of this phenomenon become more severe with increasing incidence. Therefore, disaster mitigation efforts should be exerted to reduce the disastrous consequences of windstorm.

  13. Intersite epibiosis characterization on dominant mangrove crustacean species from Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Leborans, G.; Hanamura, Y.; Siow, R.; Chee, P.-E.

    2009-01-01

    Epibiosis was studied in dominant mangrove crustacean species in several areas in Malaysia. The observed basibionts were the crustaceans Mesopodopsis orientalis, Acetes japonicus, Acetes sibogae, Acetes indicus and Fenneropenaeus merguiensis and the epibionts found were the protozoan ciliates Acinet

  14. Governance and Risk Management: Empirical Evidence from Malaysia and Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rashidah Abdul Rahman; Siti Balqis Noor; Tariq Ismail

    2013-01-01

    ... management practices of Islamic banks in Malaysia and Egypt. The findings of this study identified that the Islamic banks in the selected countries are somewhat efficient in their risk management process...

  15. Web Document Analysis for Companies Listed in Bursa Malaysia

    CERN Document Server

    Othman, Mohd Shahizan; Salim, Juhana

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses a research on web document analysis for companies listed on Bursa Malaysia which is the forerunner of financial and investment center in Malaysia. Data set used in this research are from the company web documents listed in the Main Board and Second Board on Bursa Malaysia. This research has used the Web Resources Extraction System which was developed by the research group mainly to extract information for the web documents involved. Our research findings have shown that the level of website usage among the companies on Bursa Malaysia is still minimal. Furthermore, research has also found that 60.02 percent of the image files are utilized making it the most used type of file in creating websites.

  16. Options for Greenhouse Horticulture in Malaysia : trip report March 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elings, A.; Hemming, S.

    2008-01-01

    Protected greenhouse horticulture is a growing activity in Malaysia that has been prioritized by the Malaysian government as an area of cooperation with The Netherlands. Also, the private sector sees business opportunities and initiates modernization. Traditional horticultural production takes place

  17. THE PROCESS AND EFFECTS OF DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION IN PENANG, MALAYSIA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Usman Haji Yaakob; Nik Norliati Fitri Md Nor

    2013-01-01

      This article describes the demographic transition in Penang, Malaysia based on the demographic transition theory, which explains the decline of birth and death rates in European countries during the 18th century...

  18. Codonoboea personatiflora (Gesneriaceae), a new species from Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiew, Ruth; Sam, Yen-Yen

    2012-01-01

    Codonoboea personatiflora Kiew & Y.Y.Sam, sp. nov., is described from lowland forest in the foothills in Terengganu, Peninsular Malaysia. It is unique in the genus in its personate flower. Its conservation status falls within the IUCN Endangered category.

  19. Malaysia as the Archetypal Garden in the British Creative Imagination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siti Nuraishah Ahmad

    2014-01-01

      [...]this paper reads images of Malaysia in British fiction through the framework of archetypal literary criticism and theories of colonial representations of space to reveal the production of a specific...

  20. Supporting Effective Feed-in Tariff Development in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-04-01

    Since 2011, Malaysia's overarching policy framework for clean energy development, the New Energy Policy, has led to significant deployment of renewable energy and energy efficiency. Building on the New Energy Policy, Malaysia mandated adoption of a renewable energy feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism under the 2011 Renewable Energy Act. In 2013, Malaysia's Sustainable Energy Development Authority partnered with the Clean Energy Solutions Center and the Clean Energy Regulators Initiative (CERI), via the Ask an Expert service, to implement FiT policies and expand renewable energy development. Through collaboration between the government of Malaysia and the Clean Energy Solutions Center, concrete policy action was supported and implemented, building a strong framework to expand and catalyze clean energy development.

  1. Factors Affecting Fertility – New Evidence from Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atif Awad; Ishak Yussof

    2017-01-01

    This research paper investigates long and short term determinants of fertility rates in Malaysia based on basic macroeconomic variables for the period 1980-2014 using Auto Regressive Distributed Lag (ARDL) method...

  2. Intersite epibiosis characterization on dominant mangrove crustacean species from Malaysia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Leborans, G.; Hanamura, Y.; Siow, R.; Chee, P.-E.

    2009-01-01

    Epibiosis was studied in dominant mangrove crustacean species in several areas in Malaysia. The observed basibionts were the crustaceans Mesopodopsis orientalis, Acetes japonicus, Acetes sibogae, Acetes indicus and Fenneropenaeus merguiensis and the epibionts found were the protozoan ciliates

  3. China's Investments in Malaysia: Choosing the "Right" Partners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guanie Lim

    2015-01-01

      This paper examines China's outward foreign direct investment into Malaysia by analysing the major coalition partners of mainland Chinese firms that have invested into the country, a relatively underexplored topic...

  4. Factors Determining Mergers of Banks in Malaysia's Banking Sector Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rubi Ahmad; Mohamed Ariff; Michael Skully

    2007-01-01

    What was termed government-guided merger was a unique banking sector reform implemented in 2002 by the central bank of Malaysia guiding a larger number of depository institutions to form 10 large banks...

  5. ISLAM AND MINORITIES: Managing Identity in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Suaedy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Malaysian general election in March 2008 raised an interesting and new phenomenon. For the first time since independence in 1957, the ruling alliance known as the National Front (Barisan Nasional, BN failed to secure two thirds of seats in parliament and lost control of five of Malaysia’s 13 states. This was due to the challenge presented by the new opposition alliance known as the Alternative Front (Barisan Alternatif, BA or the People’s Alliance (Pakatan Rakyat, PK which won more than 36% of seats in parliament and gained control of the five states. In the 2004 election, BN secured the largest ever percentage of seats in parliament with 91%. What is interesting is that it seems that this significant increase in support for the opposition is  due to their offer to change the way minorities and ethnicity is managed. They  propose a move from “Bumiputera Supremacy”, or affirmative action for the approximately 65% of “Bumiputera” Malaysians (the rest being largely of Chinese or Indian ethnicity, to “The People’s Supremacy”, which involves eradicating affirmative action based on ethnicity, basing it instead on need, for  instance need due to poverty. This would potentially increase the likelihood  of justice and equality for all ethnic or racial groups. This paper connects the phenomenon of change, as seen in the about turn in the results between the  2004 and 2008 elections, to the more global trend in which minorities are standing up to demand their rights in this era of globalization, and to the challenge multiculturalism presents to parts of the Muslim world such as Malaysia. Malaysia, a Muslim majority nation that has formally declared Islam the official state religion with Yang di-Pertuan Agong (the King as  Head of the State and symbol of Islam, is one example, though not necessarily  representative, of how Islam and Muslims manage minorities and identity or  multiculturalism within the process of globalization

  6. A Comparison on the Implementation Approaches for the e-Bario and e-Bedian Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    spurred Universiti Malaysia Sarawak ( Unimas ) to conduct similar research projects to introduce ICT to remote communities in Sarawak, Malaysia. The... Unimas ’ research project, as they are both extremely remote, particularly from mainstream development. Both the villages do not have government...Picking on this cue, the researchers from Unimas decided to embark on ICT and Internet connection beginning with the school. The physical

  7. DETERMINANTS OF LEISURE-TIME PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: EVIDENCE FROM MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    YONG KANG CHEAH; Andrew K.G. Tan

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how socio-demographic and health-lifestyle factors determine participation and duration of leisure-time physical activity in Malaysia. Based on the Malaysia Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance-1 data, Heckman's sample selection model is employed to estimate the probability to participate and duration on physical activity. Results indicate that gender, age, years of education and family illness history are significant in explaining participation probability in leisure-tim...

  8. Trends in sustainable landfilling in Malaysia, a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauziah, S H; Agamuthu, P

    2012-07-01

    In Malaysia, landfills are being filled up rapidly due to the current daily generation of approximately 30,000 tonnes of municipal solid waste. This situation creates the crucial need for improved landfilling practices, as sustainable landfilling technology is yet to be achieved here. The objective of this paper is to identify and evaluate the development and trends in landfilling practices in Malaysia. In 1970, the disposal sites in Malaysia were small and prevailing waste disposal practices was mere open-dumping. This network of relatively small dumps, typically located close to population centres, was considered acceptable for a relatively low population of 10 million in Malaysia. In the 1980s, a national programme was developed to manage municipal and industrial wastes more systematically and to reduce adverse environmental impacts. The early 1990s saw the privatization of waste management in many parts of Malaysia, and the establishment of the first sanitary landfills for MSW and an engineered landfill (called 'secure landfill' in Malaysia) for hazardous waste. A public uproar in 2007 due to contamination of a drinking water source from improper landfilling practices led to some significant changes in the government's policy regarding the country's waste management strategy. Parliament passed the Solid Waste and Public Cleansing Management (SWPCM) Act 2007 in August 2007. Even though the Act is yet to be implemented, the government has taken big steps to improve waste management system further. The future of the waste management in Malaysia seems somewhat brighter with a clear waste management policy in place. There is now a foundation upon which to build a sound and sustainble waste management and disposal system in Malaysia.

  9. Malaysia; Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund.

    2013-01-01

    This report is an assessment of the state of compliance with the Basel Core Principles (BCPs) in Malaysia. Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) employs a well-developed risk-focused regulatory and supervisory system, consisting of a hands-on and comprehensive program of onsite supervision and extensive offsite macroeconomic and microeconomic surveillance supervision. The assessment has revealed several opportunities for improvement of the regulatory and supervisory framework. The Executive Board recomm...

  10. The Evolution of Malaysias Immigration Policy Since 1970

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    administration. D. PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF IMMIGRANTS Why would immigrants flock to Malaysia? Malaysia was the premier exporter of rubber, palm oil , tin, and...itself in a quandary. Its irmnigra.tion policy was promoting economic grov.rth, but also generating opposition from society. Public opinion about...both effects of immigration policy --economic grov.rth and public opposition~ould determine political outcomes. In response to public pressure, the

  11. Sustainability of Three Recreational Forest Landscape Management in Selangor, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Kher Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Different stakeholders managed recreational forests in Selangor, Malaysia. These stakeholders' involvements have risen a question whether their development have fulfilled the sustainable landscape requirement. The aim of this study was to understand and generate more comprehensive knowledge on the recreational forest landscape management towards forest sustainability. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the management of recreational forest in Selangor, Malaysia that affect landscap...

  12. CAPITAL ACCOUNT LIBERALIZATION AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    SIONG HOOK LAW; Azman-Saini, W.N.W.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impact of capital account liberalization on economic growth in Malaysia from 1970 to 2004. It uses two measures of capital account openness, namely de jure (an index of liberalization) and de facto (the volume of capital flows). The empirical results based on the modified growth model demonstrate that the de jure measure of capital account liberalization shows an adverse effect on growth in Malaysia. However, the de facto measure shows a robust positive effect on econo...

  13. Malaysia as the Archetypal Garden in the British Creative Imagination

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Nuraishah Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    European travel writing (1512–1984) represented Malaysia as a tropical Garden of Eden, an image that has also percolated into literary texts concerning the region. This article examines spatial images in British fiction through the framework of archetypal literary criticism and theories of colonial representations of space to reveal the worlding (Spivak 1999) of Malaysia as a garden. In order to ascertain the ways in which the garden archetype has been deployed by the British creative imagina...

  14. Trade and Investment Linkages in Higher Education Services in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tham Siew Yean; Andrew Kam Jia Yi

    2007-01-01

    In the Third Industrial Master Plan, several service sub-sectors were identified as new sources of growth for the country, including education services. Apart from this sector’s contribution towards growth, private higher education institutions (PHEIs) can also contribute towards increasing access to education and equity. Malaysia aims to be a global education hub by 2010. In view of the above, this study aims to explore the trade and investment links in private higher education in Malaysia. ...

  15. Entrepreneurial Attitude Orientation and Market Orientation in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Meisam Karami; Tayebeh Khademi; Dauda Muhammad Atiyaye; Nur Naha Abu Mansor

    2014-01-01

    In Malaysia Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) are a significant part of the nation wealth creation and economic. In Malaysia, majority of established businesses are small and medium enterprises with high employment share. The Malaysian government is definite that the framework of the economic transformation plan can raise the small and medium enterprises in developing countries. Therefore, the objective of this study is to thoroughly exploring the predictor which encourages the market orien...

  16. Forms of Corporate Social Responsibility Practices of Companies in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Neoh, Sher Lyn

    2015-01-01

    This management project seeks to explore the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices of companies in Malaysia. To do this, the first part of the study looks into the general views of CSR along with its drivers and enablers before going into the collaboration patterns and drivers of companies and non-governmental organisation. In addition, some findings of multi-national corporations and CSR in Malaysia is also brought forward in this study. The companies selected for this study will t...

  17. Cultural Heritage Tourism in Malaysia: Issues and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail Norhasimah; Masron Tarmiji; Ahmad Azizul

    2014-01-01

    Malaysia is experiencing an incredible pace of tourism development and heritage tourism is one of the tourism branches that have long contributed to appeal the tourist destination and acts as important marketing tool to attract tourist especially with special interests in heritage and arts. Cultural heritage tourism has emerged as a potential form of alternative tourism among both international tourists as well as Malaysian domestic travelers. The difference of ethnics present in Malaysia bro...

  18. Economic implications of ASEAN integration for Malaysia's labour market

    OpenAIRE

    Rasiah, Rajah

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the implications of the formation of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Economic Community (AEC) in 2015 on Malaysia’s labour market. The discussion centres on the nature of the structural change that Malaysia has experienced, especially since the 1980s, and how that has impacted on its labour market. Integration into ASEAN markets has obviously helped Malaysia enjoy the synergies of regional coordination. Although Malaysia’s economic growth has been steady...

  19. TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA. A REVIEW ON FEDERAL GOVERNMENT POLICIES

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki, Azizan

    2010-01-01

    Tourism development in Malaysia began since 1960s. Embarking on the strategy to develop rural areas and provide diversity in national economy, tourism industry drastically become as the second most important sector after petroleum. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the progress of tourism development in Malaysia from the period of the First Malaysian Plan (1966-1970) until the Ninth Malaysian Plan (2006-2010). This paper is also discussed several approaches related to tourism ad...

  20. Family Support and Loneliness among Older Persons in Multiethnic Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Jane Kimm Lii Teh; Nai Peng Tey; Sor Tho Ng

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates factors affecting older persons’ state of loneliness in multiethnic Malaysia using data from the 2004 Malaysian Population and Family Survey, the first nationally representative sample in Malaysia. The study sample was extracted to include Malays, Chinese, Indians and other Indigenous groups aged 60 and above, and who had children (n = 1791). Cross tabulations and ordinal logistic regression methods were used in the analysis. Among the ethnic groups, older Malays were ...

  1. Motorcycle safety programmes in Malaysia: how effective are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin Umar, R S

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the Malaysian Government to contain motorcycle casualties in Malaysia. It involves the exposure control, crash prevention, behaviour modification and injury control related to humans, vehicles and the environment based on pre-crash, crash and post-crash scenarios of motorcycle accidents. These initiatives emanated mainly from the research and development carried out by the Road Safety Research Centre at Universiti Putra Malaysia. Recent outcomes from these initiatives are presented and their impact is highlighted.

  2. Myanmar's Rohingya Refugees in Malaysia: Education and the Way Forward

    OpenAIRE

    Hema Letchamanan

    2013-01-01

    The Rohingya, a persecuted minority, has faced decades of harsh treatment and made stateless by the military government in Myanmar. To escape from this severe repression, most Rohingya flee to Bangladesh, Thailand or Malaysia. In Malaysia, this community has been living invisibly for more than three decades. Just like other refugees, the Rohingya are not allowed to work legally and do not have access to free healthcare and education in this country. Many of these refugee children learn in the...

  3. TOURISM DEVELOPMENT IN MALAYSIA. A REVIEW ON FEDERAL GOVERNMENT POLICIES

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki, Azizan

    2010-01-01

    Tourism development in Malaysia began since 1960s. Embarking on the strategy to develop rural areas and provide diversity in national economy, tourism industry drastically become as the second most important sector after petroleum. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the progress of tourism development in Malaysia from the period of the First Malaysian Plan (1966-1970) until the Ninth Malaysian Plan (2006-2010). This paper is also discussed several approaches related to tourism ad...

  4. Human rights and internal security in Malaysia rhetoric and reality

    OpenAIRE

    Rahim, Noor Hishmuddian

    2006-01-01

    Since 1957, Malaysia has faced external and internal security threats. Over time, Malaysia has succeeded in solving the external threats but internal threats remained. The internal threats have come in many forms, including ethnic conflict, religious extremism and deviationism, and terrorism. Since the safety of the public lies in the hands of the government, measures have been taken to ensure the nation's stability and security, including restriction on civil and political liberties. This th...

  5. Analysis of Fade Dynamic at Ku-Band in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates fade dynamics of satellite communication systems in equatorial heavy rain region based on a one year of Ku-band propagation measurement campaign carried out in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor, Malaysia. First order statistics of rain attenuation are deduced and the results are found to be in good agreement with those obtained from other beacon measurements gathered within the same area (Kuala Lumpur). Moreover, the fade duration and slope statistics of the sa...

  6. The Microeconomics of Changing Income Distribution in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Gary S. Fields; Sergei Soares

    2002-01-01

    This study uses data from Malaysia's Household Income and Expenditure Surveys to quantify the importance of different factors in accounting for the changes in Malaysia's income distribution between 1984 and 1989 ("Period 1") and between 1989 and 1997 ("Period 2"). The analysis is therefore divided into these two periods, in order to be able to assess the factors responsible for the falling inequality in the first period and the rising inequality in the second. The authors also look at the fac...

  7. Corporate Governance and Firm Value: Empirical Evidence in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Mabel Yunn Ru

    2009-01-01

    Well governed firms have been noted to have higher firm performance. However, this is still an empirical question in the context of Malaysia. This paper aims to examine the effect of corporate governance practices on firm value among 151 public listed companies on Bursa Malaysia Main Board between 2006 and 2008. We use the overall governance practice scores (CGS) to measure the level of compliance carried out by the sample firms. The results find that better corporate governance is highly cor...

  8. Foreign Direct Investment in Manufacturing Sector in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Karim, Noor Al-Huda; Winters, Paul C.; Coelli, Tim J.; Fleming, Euan M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyses the determinants of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the manufacturing sector in Malaysia from eleven countries during the period 1988 to 2000. The empirical results indicate that gross domestic product, lending interest rate, labour productivity, exports to home country and imports from home country significantly influenced the level of FDI inflows into Malaysia. However, exchange rate, exchange rate variation, wage and openness index were not important in influencing FDI.

  9. Alternative, complementary and traditional medicine in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, N

    2006-09-01

    This paper sets out the practice of traditional, alternative and/or complementary medicine in Malaysia. It gives an overview of the types of alternative medicine available, and the legal regulation, or lack of it within the current setting. The relevant policies and governmental action in this area are highlighted. Relevant case law decisions in this area are also included. The practice of spiritual healing as one form of traditional medicine, and its role within the spectrum of alternative medicine is dealt with briefly. The significant question of integration of alternative medicine within the existing allopathic system is addressed. The paper concludes that as interest in, and usage of alternative medicine is not likely to decrease, certain measures must be taken by the relevant authorities to ensure among others, the safety and efficacy of these medicines.

  10. Perception towards Public Amenities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozmi Ismail

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The environment where a person lives has a significant impact on his or her development. The objective of the study is to determine the person's perception and satisfaction towards safety and public amenity nearby. Purposive sampling method was utilized to collect data in Selangor and Kelang Vally, Malaysia. Data were collected through interview using a set of questionnaire and analyzed using the SPSS program. The results of the study showed that in terms of public amenities and physical surroundings, the most persons used own car to attend personal and family matters such as clinic and programme. On the other hand, the most safety elements which persons employed to protect their house and family were installing door and window grilles, lights on and informing neighbor when going out for the whole night or longer.

  11. International Women's Day observed in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    On the eve of International Women's Day, 80 women representing five women's groups in Malaysia, including Persatuan Sahabat Wanita, CAW's network member, marched from Petaling Jaya to Penang to attend the Women's Day celebration. The group had organized the visitation in order to strengthen its networking. During their meeting with some reporters before their departure to Penang, they demanded that the women's groups be consulted before any guideline on the prevention and handling of sexual harassment at the workplace is drawn up. They said that they have been handling several complaints and their input would help the Human Resource Ministry formulate a comprehensive set of guidelines. This demand by the women's group was in response to the announcement by the Human Resource Minister Datuk Lim Ah Lek that in a month time a code would be ready on guidelines about the establishment and implementation of in-house preventive and redress mechanisms for dealing with sexual harassment. full text

  12. The current biotechnology outlook in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairiah Salwa MOKHTAR

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Blessed with extremely rich biodiversity, Malaysia is all geared up to explore new high technology to utilize the advantage it possesses whilst to protect its environment. Biotechnology has been identified as an appropriate driver that can deliver economic gains through research and development, improvement of food security, creation of entrepreneurial opportunities for industrial growth, health and environmental sustainability. This paper attempts to address the evolution of biotechnology institutions and the stumbling blocks in developing the Malaysian biotechnology industry. This paper identifies three main impediments in the current Malaysian biotechnology, namely lack of skilled human capital; weak industrial base; and lack of commercialization effort. Besides, a set of strategies are discussed with aim to further improve and strengthen the Malaysian biotechnology industry. In general, the arguments are presented by mapping out the symbiotic relationship between data from elite interviews, archival data and observations.

  13. Zakat di Malaysia dalam Perspektif Ekonomi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhasanah Nurhasanah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Zakah is the implications of the high level of practice Muslims toward the teachings of Islam in Malaysia. It has been carried out since the pre-colonial, colonial times, post-independence, 1957, 80s, and 90s to the present. Regulatory changes are not necessarily  set zakat source in accordance with the economic development and professional management. In zakah management, government noted that the potential fellowship zakah increased in accordance with the economic progress of the Muslim community. To foster public confidence in the management of zakat, government through the Majelis Islam Wilayah Persekutuan (MAIWIP established the Center Levy Zakat (PPZ in 1991 in order to create a profesional zakah management by implementing corporate systems.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v4i1.2084

  14. ZAKAT DI MALAYSIA DALAM PERSPEKTIF EKONOMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhasanah Nurhasanah

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Zakâh is the implications of the high level of practice Muslims toward the teachings of Islam in Malaysia. It has been carried out since the pre-colonial, colonial times, post-independence, 1957, 80s, and 90s to the present. Regulatory changes are not necessarily set zakat source in accordance with the economic development and professional management. In zakâh  management, government noted that the potential fellowship zakâh increased in accordance with the economic progress of the Muslim community. To foster public confidence in the management of zakâh, government through the Majelis Islam Wilayah  Persekutuan (MAIWIP established the Center levy zakâh (PPZ in 1991 in order to create a professional zakâh management by implementing corporate systems.DOI: 10.15408/aiq.v4i1.2540

  15. FORECASTING TOURIST ARRIVALS TO LANGKAWI ISLAND MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarul Ariffin MANSOR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is the act of travelling for a person or group of people from their own locality to a specific destination in a short term or long term period either for leisure or business purposes. Tourism is an important sector in the Malaysian economy where tourism development will lead to the positive economic development of the country and in general improve the quality of life for all citizens. Therefore, forecasting tourist arrivals with high accuracy becomes important since it may ensure the development and the readiness of all tourism related industries such as hotels, transportation, food and services industries and their best shape. This study focuses on tourist arrivals in Langkawi Island as one of the major tourist attractions situated in the northerly region of Peninsular Malaysia. Importantly, this paper attempts to measure and compare the performance of forecasting with Exponential Smoothing, ARIMA and ARFIMA models using the R software package.

  16. Accident characteristics of injured motorcyclists in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, T Y; Umar, R S; Azhar, A A; Ahmad, M M; Nasir, M T; Harwant, S

    2000-03-01

    This study examines the accident characteristics of injured motorcyclists in Malaysia. The aim of this study is to identify the characteristics of motorcyclists who are at higher fatality risk and subsequently be the targeted group for the fatality-reduction countermeasures. A total of 412 motorcycle crash victims with serious or fatal injuries were analysed. The results showed that the injured motorcyclists were predominant young, novice riders of less than 3 years licensure and male. A fatal outcome was more likely to be associated with a larger engine capacity motorcycle, collision with a heavy vehicle, head on collision, and collision at a non-junction road. In contrast, a non-fatal outcome was more likely to be associated with a small engine capacity motorcycle, collision with another motorcycle or passenger car, junction accidents, and side or rear collisions.

  17. Surveying Ethnical Policies in Iran and Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Wendt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available On the bases of culture and ethnic nowadays the world is a plural world, in way that it’s reasonable to say nowhere could be exempted fro this classification. Researches conducted in this field have classified all countries whether developed or developing into lingual, religion, racial and cultural classes.As result of religious, cultural and ethnical overlapping between the countries and cases of unsatisfied needs and request by such group, local, national and even disputes between theses group and their governments is a common case through the ages.this study was conducted while having a historical look on the issue of ethnics in two countries including Iran and Malaysia and also surveying current situation and place of this challenge in the two countries, and also determining courses of ethnical and tradition reconstruction.

  18. Bedload transport of small rivers in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra ZANGENEH SIRDARI; Aminuddin AB GHANI; Zorkeflee Abu HASSAN

    2014-01-01

    Numerous time-consuming equations, based on the relationship between the reliability and representativeness of the data utilized in defining variables and constants, require complex parameters to estimate bedload transport. In this study the easily accessible data including flow discharge, water depth, water surface slope, and surface grain diameter (d50) from small rivers in Malaysia were used to estimate bedload transport. Genetic programming (GP) and artificial neural network (ANN) models are applied as complementary tools to estimate bed load transport based on a balance between simplicity and accuracy in small rivers. The developed models demonstrate higher performance with an overall accuracy of 97% and 93% for ANN and GP, respectively compared with other traditional methods and empirical equations.

  19. Reptiles of Lata Bukit Hijau, Kedah, Malaysia

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    Shahriza Shahrudin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Lata Bukit Hijau is located within the Banjaran Bintang Ranges on the west coast of northern Peninsular Malaysia. The reptile fauna in this pristine area was intensively investigated from 2008 to 2011 on 10 consecutive visits. A total 37 species of reptiles from 31 genera and 10 families were recorded to inhabit this area. Out of this number, 17 species were lizards (13 genera and four families, 17 species were snakes (15 genera and four families and three species were freshwater turtles (three genera and two families. These preliminary data increased the number of lizards, snakes and freshwater turtles reported from Banjaran Bintang from 31 to 41, 30 to 44 and three to five species, respectively

  20. Engineering Geology of Limestone in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the engineering geology of limestone. Limestone is of rather wide occurrence in Malaysia. It is interesting in view of the unique landforms and karstic features that are encountered in limestone terrains, e.g. steep, subvertical limestone cliffs rising abruptly and majestically above the ground surface and highly variable and pinnacled subterranean limestone bedrock. The karstic features and associated engineering geological problems of both the limestone hills and the bedrock are discussed in the paper. Rockfalls, sinkholes, cavities, etc. are some of the common engineering geological problems associated with limestone terrains. Some local case studies are provided as illustrations. Finally the rock mechanical properties of limestone is discussed at the end of the paper.``