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Sample records for sapiens mus musculus

  1. Expanding the genetic code of Mus musculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Songmi; Yang, Aerin; Lee, Soonjang; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Chan Bae; Park, Hee-Sung

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the expansion of the genetic code of Mus musculus with various unnatural amino acids including Nɛ-acetyl-lysine. Stable integration of transgenes encoding an engineered Nɛ-acetyl-lysyl-tRNA synthetase (AcKRS)/tRNAPyl pair into the mouse genome enables site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids into a target protein in response to the amber codon. We demonstrate temporal and spatial control of protein acetylation in various organs of the transgenic mouse using a recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) as a model protein. This strategy will provide a powerful tool for systematic in vivo study of cellular proteins in the most commonly used mammalian model organism for human physiology and disease. PMID:28220771

  2. De ontogenese van de darm bij Mus musculus L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pleeging, Johannes Hermanus

    1975-01-01

    Een onderzoek werd verricht naar de ontwikkeling van de darm bij de muis (Mus Musculus L, stam C57 BL/RIJ en stam C57 BL/OSCN), aan embryonen van opeenvolgende leeftijden. Hiertoe werden van de maagdarmtractus van de embryonen 8 tot 16,5 dag p.c. reconstructies vervaardigd. Enige waarnemingen werden

  3. Evolution of major milk proteins in Mus musculus and Mus spretus mouse species: a genoproteomic analysis

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    Panthier Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to their high level of genotypic and phenotypic variability, Mus spretus strains were introduced in laboratories to investigate the genetic determinism of complex phenotypes including quantitative trait loci. Mus spretus diverged from Mus musculus around 2.5 million years ago and exhibits on average a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in every 100 base pairs when compared with any of the classical laboratory strains. A genoproteomic approach was used to assess polymorphism of the major milk proteins between SEG/Pas and C57BL/6J, two inbred strains of mice representative of Mus spretus and Mus musculus species, respectively. Results The milk protein concentration was dramatically reduced in the SEG/Pas strain by comparison with the C57BL/6J strain (34 ± 9 g/L vs. 125 ± 12 g/L, respectively. Nine major proteins were identified in both milks using RP-HPLC, bi-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-Tof mass spectrometry. Two caseins (β and αs1 and the whey acidic protein (WAP, showed distinct chromatographic and electrophoresis behaviours. These differences were partly explained by the occurrence of amino acid substitutions and splicing variants revealed by cDNA sequencing. A total of 34 SNPs were identified in the coding and 3'untranslated regions of the SEG/Pas Csn1s1 (11, Csn2 (7 and Wap (8 genes. In addition, a 3 nucleotide deletion leading to the loss of a serine residue at position 93 was found in the SEG/Pas Wap gene. Conclusion SNP frequencies found in three milk protein-encoding genes between Mus spretus and Mus musculus is twice the values previously reported at the whole genome level. However, the protein structure and post-translational modifications seem not to be affected by SNPs characterized in our study. Splicing mechanisms (cryptic splice site usage, exon skipping, error-prone junction sequence, already identified in casein genes from other species, likely explain the existence of multiple αs1-casein

  4. Soursop Leaves (Annona muricata Folium on Mice (Mus musculus Fetus

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    Yunita Suryani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soursop leaf ethanol extract (Annona muricata (L Folium contains acetogenins which are cytotoxic and have the ability to halt cell growth. This study aimed to understand whether acetogenins have teratogenic effects on mice fetus (Mus musculus. Methods: This study was performed at the Pharmacology and Therapy Laboratory of the Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Padjadjaran, Bandung, between October and November 2012. The study was an experimental laboratory study utilizing 27 pregnant mice which were divided into 3 groups. The first group was the negative control, the second was given soursop leaf ethanol extract at pre-implantation phase (day 1 to 5 and the third had the extract provided in the organogenesis phase (day 6 to 15. Laparotomy was performed on the 19th day of pregnancy. The parameters used were the number of implantation, the number of live and dead or resorbed fetus, the weight and length of the fetus, as well as the macroscopic external morphology abnormalities. The data gained from test subjects were compared to those of the control group. The statistical test used was the normality tes with the Kolmogorov-Smirnov method which was then followed by T-test or Mann-Whitney statistical tests. Results: The experiment exhibited significant differences in the weight and length of the fetus (p-value 0.000, proving that soursop leaf ethanol extract could inhibit intrauterine growth. Aside from that, external morphological abnormalities such as hemorrhage on the head, face, neck, back, forelimbs, hindlimbs, and microcephaly were also found. Conclusion: The soursop leaf ethanol extract (Annona muricata (L Folium has a teratogenic effect on mouse (Mus musculus fetus. [AMJ.2014;1(1:48–53

  5. Superovulation and in vitro oocyte maturation in three species of mice (Mus musculus, Mus spretus and Mus spicilegus).

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    Martín-Coello, J; González, R; Crespo, C; Gomendio, M; Roldan, E R S

    2008-10-01

    Mouse oocytes can be obtained via superovulation or using in vitro maturation although several factors, including genetic background, may affect response. Our previous studies have identified various mouse species as models to understand the role of sexual selection on the evolution of sperm traits and function. In order to do comparative studies of sperm-oocyte interaction, we sought reliable methods for oocyte superovulation and in vitro maturation in mature females of three mouse species (genus Mus). When 5 IU pregnant mare's serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and 5 IU human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) were injected 48 h apart, and oocytes collected 14 h post-hCG, good responses were obtained in Mus musculus (18+/-1.3 oocytes/female; mean+/-S.E.M.) and Mus spretus (12+/-0.8), but no ovulation was seen in Mus spicilegus. Changes in PMSG or hCG doses, or longer post-hCG intervals, did not improve results. Use of PMSG/luteinizing hormone (LH) resulted in good responses in M. musculus (19+/-1.2) and M. spretus (12+/-1.1) but not in M. spicilegus (5+/-0.9) with ovulation not increasing with higher LH doses. Follicular puncture 48 h after PMSG followed by in vitro maturation led to a high oocyte yield in the three species (M. musculus, 23+/-0.9; M. spretus, 17+/-1.1; M. spicilegus, 10+/-0.9) with a consistently high maturation rates. In vitro fertilization of both superovulated and in vitro matured oocytes resulted in a high proportion of fertilization (range: 83-87%) in the three species. Thus, in vitro maturation led to high yields in all three species. These results will allow future studies on gamete interaction in these closely related species and the role of sexual selection in gamete compatibility.

  6. Sequence divergence of Mus spretus and Mus musculus across a skin cancer susceptibility locus

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    Balmain Allan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mus spretus diverged from Mus musculus over one million years ago. These mice are genetically and phenotypically divergent. Despite the value of utilizing M. musculus and M. spretus for quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping, relatively little genomic information on M. spretus exists, and most of the available sequence and polymorphic data is for one strain of M. spretus, Spret/Ei. In previous work, we mapped fifteen loci for skin cancer susceptibility using four different M. spretus by M. musculus F1 backcrosses. One locus, skin tumor susceptibility 5 (Skts5 on chromosome 12, shows strong linkage in one cross. Results To identify potential candidate genes for Skts5, we sequenced 65 named and unnamed genes and coding elements mapping to the peak linkage area in outbred spretus, Spret/EiJ, FVB/NJ, and NIH/Ola. We identified polymorphisms in 62 of 65 genes including 122 amino acid substitutions. To look for polymorphisms consistent with the linkage data, we sequenced exons with amino acid polymorphisms in two additional M. spretus strains and one additional M. musculus strain generating 40.1 kb of sequence data. Eight candidate variants were identified that fit with the linkage data. To determine the degree of variation across M. spretus, we conducted phylogenetic analyses. The relatedness of the M. spretus strains at this locus is consistent with the proximity of region of ascertainment of the ancestral mice. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that, if Skts5 on chromosome 12 is representative of other regions in the genome, then published genomic data for Spret/EiJ are likely to be of high utility for genomic studies in other M. spretus strains.

  7. Phylogeography of Chinese house mice (Mus musculus musculus/castaneus): distribution, routes of colonization and geographic regions of hybridization.

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    Jing, Meidong; Yu, Hon-Tsen; Bi, Xiaoxin; Lai, Yung-Chih; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    House mice (Mus musculus) are human commensals and have served as a primary model in biomedical, ecological and evolutionary research. Although there is detailed knowledge of the biogeography of house mice in Europe, little is known of the history of house mice in China, despite the fact that China encompasses an enormous portion of their range. In the present study, 535 house mice caught from 29 localities in China were studied by sequencing the mitochondrial D-loop and genotyping 10 nuclear microsatellite markers distributed on 10 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed two evolutionary lineages corresponding to Mus musculus castaneus and Mus musculus musculus in the south and north, respectively, with the Yangtze River approximately representing the boundary. More detailed analyses combining published sequence data from mice sampled in neighbouring countries revealed the migration routes of the two subspecies into China: M. m. castaneus appeared to have migrated through a southern route (Yunnan and Guangxi), whereas M. m. musculus entered China from Kazakhstan through the north-west border (Xinjiang). Bayesian analysis of mitochondrial sequences indicated rapid population expansions in both subspecies, approximately 4650-9300 and 7150-14 300 years ago for M. m. castaneus and M. m. musculus, respectively. Interestingly, the migration routes of Chinese house mice coincide with the colonization routes of modern humans into China, and the expansion times of house mice are consistent with the development of agriculture in southern and northern China, respectively. Finally, our study confirmed the existence of a hybrid zone between M. m. castaneus and M. m. musculus in China. Further study of this hybrid zone will provide a useful counterpart to the well-studied hybrid zone between M. m. musculus and Mus musculus domesticus in central Europe.

  8. GAMBARAN HEMATOLOGI MENCIT (Mus musculus MODEL TOKSISITAS SUBKRONIS

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    Ita Nur Eka Pujiastuti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Garlic commonly is consumed as medicine to prevent or heal illness or to maintain someone's health. Many societies prefer garlic (Allium sativum among other herbal remedies for cholesterol treatment. It consists of several types, and one of them is single bulb garlic used to treat hypertension. There has been, however, no published research reporting the toxicological properties of single bulb garlic. The purpose of this study was to determine subchronic toxic effects of single bulb garlic administered to mice using hematological parameters. The experiment parameters were hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, the number of erythrocytes and leukocytes. Male mice (Mus musculus strain Balb-C were treated with single bulb garlic extract for 28 days with dosage levels of 0% (N , 0.25% (P1 , 0.5% (P2 , 1% (P3 , and 2% (P4 . Single bulb garlic showed no effect on hemoglobin and hematocrit levels but increased the number of erythrocyte and leucocyte. We concluded that single bulb garlic did not cause subchronic toxic effects.

  9. Mate choice in Mus musculus is relative and dependent on the estrous state.

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    Zinck, Léa; Lima, Susana Q

    2013-01-01

    Mate choice is a critical behavioral decision process with profound impact on evolution. However, the mechanistic basis of mate choice is poorly understood. In this study we focused on assortative mate choice, which is known to contribute to the reproductive isolation of the two European subspecies of house mouse, Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus. To understand the decision process, we developed both full mating and limited-contact paradigms and tested musculus females' preference for musculus versus domesticus males, mimicking the natural musculus/domesticus contact zone. As hypothesized, when allowed to mate we found that sexually receptive musculus females exhibited a robust preference to mate with musculus males. In contrast, when non-receptive, females did not exhibit a preference and rather alternated between males in response to male mount attempts. Moreover in a no-choice condition, females mated readily with males from both subspecies. Finally, when no physical contact was allowed, and therefore male's behavior could not influence female's behavior, female's preference for its own subspecies was maintained independently of the estrous state. Together, our results suggest that the assortative preference is relative and based on a comparison of the options available rather than on an absolute preference. The results of the limited-contact experiments highlight the interplay between female's internal state and the nature of the interaction with prospective mates in the full mating conditions. With these experiments we believe we established an assortative mate preference assay that is appropriate for the investigation of its underlying substrates.

  10. Twilight and Photoperiod Affect Behavioral Entrainment in the House Mouse (Mus musculus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comas, M.; Hut, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of twilight transitions on entrainment of C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice (Mus musculus) was studied using light-dark cycles of different photoperiods (6, 12, and 18 h) and twilight transitions of different durations (0, 1, and 2 h). Phase angle differences of the onset, center of gravity, and offset

  11. SEM analysis of body hairs and whiskers of heterozygous tortoiseshell (Moto/+) female mice (Mus musculus).

    OpenAIRE

    Sheedlo, H J; Beck, M L

    1982-01-01

    Back hairs of +/+ and Moto/+ female Mus musculus generally exhibited identical form when examined by SEM. However, the hair shafts of Moto/+ female mice were beaded in appearance (monilethrix), twisted (pili torti) or exhibited a rough nodular appearance. Also, some hairs of Moto/+ female mice which were devoid of pigment appeared enlarged and bitubular. The whiskers of +/+ and Moto/+ female mice were identical in form. The hair abnormalities of Moto/+ female mice resulted from a copper defic...

  12. Efficacy of drugs against Giardia muris in mice Mus musculus naturally infected/ Eficácia de drogas contra Giardia muris em camundongos Mus musculus naturalmente infectados

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    Silvia Gonzalez Monteiro

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of metronidazole, fenbendazole and secnidazole against Giardia muris in mice naturally infected. Forty mice of the species Mus musculus were divided in four groups of ten each, being group A non treated, the control group and groups B, C and D treated with 4mg/ml of metronidazole, fenbendazole and secnidazole, respectively. Two feces collection, on day 0 and on day 10 after treatment, were done in order to evaluate the efficacy of the drugs. Samples were analyzed by the centrifugal-flotation method with zinc sulfate. Efficacy of 97,05% for metronidazole, 98,30% for fenbendazole and 100% for secnidazole were observed in the study. According to the results it was concluded that the tested drugs were effective for the treatment of mice parasitized by Giardia muris.Este estudo visou avaliar a eficácia do metronidazol, fenbendazole e secnidazol contra Giardia muris em camundongos naturalmente infectados. Foram utilizados 40 camundongos da espécie Mus musculus divididos em quatro grupos de 10 animais cada, sendo grupo A, grupo controle, não tratados, e grupos B, C e D tratados com 4mg/ml de metronidazol, fenbendazole e secnidazol, respectivamente. Para avaliar a eficácia dos medicamentos foram realizadas duas coletas de fezes uma no dia zero e outra 10 dias após tratamento. As amostras foram processadas e analisadas a partir do método de centrífugo-flutuação com sulfato de zinco. No estudo observou-se eficácia de 97,05% para metronidazol, 98,30% para fenbendazole e 100% para secnidazol no tratamento de giardiase murina. Com base nos resultados concluí-se que as drogas testadas apresentaram eficácia no tratamento de camundongos parasitados por Giardia muris.

  13. Exploratory behavior of two species of murid rodents, Acomys cahirinus and Mus musculus: a comparative study.

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    Birke, L I; D'Udine, B; Albonetti, M E

    1985-03-01

    The exploratory behavior of two species of murid rodents, Acomys cahirinus and Mus musculus, was compared in four experiments: In the first, the responses of the two species to a novel arena were studied. Mus was found to take longer to enter the arena, and to spend more time in the relatively familiar or safer start box, than was Acomys. The results suggest that Acomys may persevere longer in exploring particular areas, whereas Mus appear to explore in the open arena by using frequent shifts of attention. The second experiment investigated species differences in response to the addition of a small novel object. Although the species did respond differently, the major species differences seemed to be related more to the open arena than to the object. The third experiment tested the hypothesis that both species would explore more if there was somewhere to hide (e.g., an artificial burrow) than if there was not. It was found that Acomys treated the available artificial burrow as another novel object, while Mus, as predicted, spent more time hiding inside it than did Acomys. The fourth experiment investigated burrow use when a model "predator" was introduced: Both species increased their use of the burrow but some species differences were found. Mus responded to the model more by freezing, or running immediately into the burrow; Acomys responded more by fleeing.

  14. PEMANFAATAN Spirulina platensis SEBAGAI SUPLEMEN PROTEIN SEL TUNGGAL (PST MENCIT (Mus musculus

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    Haryo Kuntoro Adi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The using of Spirulina platensis as Supplement of Single-Celled Protein (SCP to Mice. High protein in Spirulina platensis can be used as a source of Single-Celled Protein. By using mice (Mus musculus as a animal laboratory, the objective of this research is to know the influence of Biomass S. platensis to the increase of body weight of mice. The name of species is Mus musculus, strain is Swiss derivate. Utilized mice were male, 30-50 weighing gram, and 5-7 weeks of age. Treatment group was given by palette and given by biomass of S. Platensis, while control also fed palette but did not give biomass of S. platensis. Yielded biomass was used as food mixed with palette with composition of dry biomass S. platensis with palette was 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50%. Data analysis was conducted by using t-tes and analysis of variance. The results showed that by giving of dry biomass of S. platensis affected to the increasement of body weight from the first day until twelfth day of observation, and decrease on the thirteenth and fourteenth day. Pursuant to result of statistic, there is a significant difference (p < 0,05 between before giving and after giving of dry biomass S. platensis during 17 day. By giving dry biomass of S. platensis to mice (Mus musculus at first and second week, it was found the difference of average mice body weight among six concentrations of biomass but did not at the third week. It means that not all concentration of biomass have same effect to the increase of mice body weight as a Single-Celled Protein.

  15. Identification of lymphocytic choriomeningitis mammarenavirus in house mouse (Mus musculus, Rodentia) in French Guiana.

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    Lavergne, Anne; de Thoisy, Benoît; Tirera, Sourakhata; Donato, Damien; Bouchier, Christiane; Catzeflis, François; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Thirty-seven house mice (Mus musculus, Rodentia) caught in different localities in French Guiana were screened to investigate the presence of lymphocytic choriomeningitis mammarenavirus (LCMV). Two animals trapped in an urban area were found positive, hosting a new strain of LCMV, that we tentatively named LCMV "Comou". The complete sequence was determined using a metagenomic approach. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that this strain is related to genetic lineage I composed of strains inducing severe disease in humans. These results emphasize the need for active surveillance in humans as well as in house mouse populations, which is a rather common rodent in French Guianese cities and settlements.

  16. Polymorphism in hybrid male sterility in wild-derived Mus musculus musculus strains on proximal chromosome 17.

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    Vyskocilová, Martina; Prazanová, Gabriela; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2009-02-01

    The hybrid sterility-1 (Hst1) locus at Chr 17 causes male sterility in crosses between the house mouse subspecies Mus musculus domesticus (Mmd) and M. m. musculus (Mmm). This locus has been defined by its polymorphic variants in two laboratory strains (Mmd genome) when mated to PWD/Ph mice (Mmm genome): C57BL/10 (carrying the sterile allele) and C3H (fertile allele). The occurrence of sterile and/or fertile (wild Mmm x C57BL)F1 males is evidence that polymorphism for this trait also exists in natural populations of Mmm; however, the nature of this polymorphism remains unclear. Therefore, we derived two wild-origin Mmm strains, STUS and STUF, that produce sterile and fertile males, respectively, in crosses with C57BL mice. To determine the genetic basis underlying male fertility, the (STUS x STUF)F1 females were mated to C57BL/10 J males. About one-third of resulting hybrid males (33.8%) had a significantly smaller epididymis and testes than parental animals and lacked spermatozoa due to meiotic arrest. A further one-fifth of males (20.3%) also had anomalous reproductive traits but produced some spermatozoa. The remaining fertile males (45.9%) displayed no deviation from values found in parental individuals. QTL analysis of the progeny revealed strong associations of male fitness components with the proximal end of Chr 17, and a significant effect of the central section of Chr X on testes mass. The data suggest that genetic incompatibilities associated with male sterility have evolved independently at the proximal end of Chr 17 and are polymorphic within both Mmd and Mmm genomes.

  17. BEHAVIORAL AND MEMORY CHANGES IN Mus musculus COINFECTED BY Toxocara canis AND Toxoplasma gondii

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    Flávia Motta Corrêa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Several researchers have stated that parasites can alter the behavior of their hosts, in order to increase the transmission rate, principally when prey-predator relationships are a reliable way of infection transmission. The aim of this study was to verify the occurrence of changes in anxiety and short-term memory patterns in experimentally infected Mus musculus by Toxocara canis and/or Toxoplasma gondii. Forty male Mus musculus (Balb/c eight-week-old were divided into four groups of 10 mice each. One group was infected with 300 eggs of Toxocara canis; a second group was submitted to infection with 10 cysts of Toxoplasma gondii; a third group was concomitantly infected with both parasites with the same inoculums and the last group was maintained without infection. The anxiety levels were evaluated using an elevated plus maze and an actometer; the short-term memory was determined by a two-way active avoidance equipment. The determination of anxiety levels were conducted 40 and 70 days after infection and the short-term memory was evaluated 140 days after infection. Mice chronically infected by Toxoplasma gondii showed impaired learning and short-term memory, but no significant differences were found in mice infected by Toxocara canis or concomitantly infected by Toxocara canis and Toxoplasma gondii when compared to non infected mice.

  18. EFEK ANTIFERTILITAS EKSTRAK AKAR SOM JAWA (Talinum paniculatum Gaertn. PADA MENCIT (Mus musculus L. JANTAN

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    Tetri Widiyani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Talinum paniculatum Gaertn commonly is used as aphrodisiac herb. Phytosterol, saponin, flavonoid and tannin of the herb have a certain bioactivity and may affect to the body system. The objective of this research was to examine the antifertility effects of sam jawa (Talinum paniculatum Gaertn. root extract (SJRE on male mice (Mus musculus L.. Twenty male mice were divided into 4 groups randomly with 5 replications. SJRE was dissolved in aquadest and given orally everyday for 34 days. The treatment dosages were 0 (control, 100,200, and 300 mg/kg BW. At 35th day mice were sacrificed and sectioned to remove testes and epididymis spermatozoas. Testes were sectioned using paraffin method and stained using Haematoxyllin-Eosin. Spermatogenic cells in each seminiferous tubule were counted to investigated spermatogenesis activity of testes. Epididymis sperm suspension was used to investigate sperm quality i.e: morphology, velocity and motility. Quantitatives data were analized using ANOVA and continued DMRT on 5% significance level. The result showed SJRE had antifertility effects on male mice (Mus musculus L. could inhibit spermatogenesis (decrease the spermatogenic cells count and decrease the sperm quality (increase percentage of abnormal sperm, decrease sperm motility and also decrease sperm velocity.

  19. Cytotoxicity evaluation of the whole protein extract from Bar-transgenic rice on Mus musculus lymphocytes.

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    Lu, X B

    2017-01-23

    With the expanding demand for genetically modified (GM) rice, its safety evaluation is of great significance. Therefore, this study was carried out to assess the acute cytotoxicity of the whole protein extract from GM rice Bar68-1 in Mus musculus lymphocytes in vitro. Cell viability was determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) tests. CCK-8 tests was carried out according to the manufacturer's instructions. Cell dehydrogenase (catalytic redox enzymes) activity was spectrophotometrically determined at 450 nm. The tests result were recorded immediately. NRU tests were completed under yellow light in a dark room according to an improved protocol. Lysosomal uptake of neutral red was spectrophotometrically determined at 540 nm and the results were recorded immediately. The results showed that the survival rate of M. musculus lymphocytes in the positive control group was significantly less than in the blank control group (P tests. There was no significant difference in survival rate between GM rice Bar68-1group and non-GM rice D68 group (P > 0.05). The GM rice Bar68-1 group also did not show a higher survival rate than non-GM rice D68 group (P > 0.05). These results suggested that the whole protein extract from Bar68-1 and D68 were equivalent in their cytotoxicity, and GM rice Bar68-1 had no acute cytotoxic effect on M. musculus lymphocytes in vitro.

  20. Parâmetros morfofisiológicos testiculares de camundongos (Mus musculus suplementados com geleia real Morphophysiological parameters of mice (Mus musculus testicles supplemented with royal jelly

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    A.C.T. Morais

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se os efeitos da geleia real sobre os parâmetros morfofisiológicos testiculares de camundongos (Mus musculus. Utilizaram-se 57 machos Swiss, com quatro meses de idade, distribuídos aleatoriamente em seis tratamentos: T1: solução fisiológica, via intraperitoneal; T2: 0,1mg de geleia real, via intraperitoneal; T3: 0,2mg de geleia real, via intraperitoneal; T4: água destilada, via oral; T5: 0,1mg de geleia real, via oral; e T6: 0,2mg de geleia real, via oral. Após 45 dias de suplementação com geleia real, os animais sacrificados e pesados tiveram seus testículos coletados, incluídos em parafina e corados com hematoxilina/eosina. Não houve diferença entre os tratamentos quanto aos: pesos corporal e testicular, índice gonadossomático, diâmetro tubular, altura do epitélio, comprimento total dos túbulos seminíferos, comprimento tubular por grama de testículo, índices tubulossomático e leydigossomático e valores de proporção volumétrica referentes à túnica própria, epitélio seminífero, vaso sanguíneo e vaso linfático. Foi encontrada diferença entre T1 e T3 em relação aos túbulos seminíferos e ao espaço intertubular.The effects of royal jelly on the morphophysiological parameters of mice (Mus musculus testicles were studied. Fifty-eight male Swiss mice were evaluated. They were four-month old and were randomly distributed in six treatments: T1: physiological solution, intraperitonial route; T2: 0.1mg of royal jelly, intraperitonial route; T3: 0.2mg of royal jelly, intraperitonial route; T4: distilled water, orally; T5: 0.1mg of royal jelly, orally; and T6: 0.2mg of royal jelly, orally. After 45 days of supplementation with royal jelly, the animals were weighted, slaughtered, and the testicles collected, included in paraffin, and stained with haematoxylin-eosin. No differences among treatments were observed for: body and testicular weights, gonadossomatic index, tubular diameter, epithelial height, total

  1. Antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (Houtt.) leaves on Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus.

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    Akinboro, Akeem; Bin Mohamed, Kamaruzaman; Asmawi, Mohd Zaini; Yekeen, Taofeek A

    2014-01-01

    Natural plant extracts offer a promising hope in the prevention/treatment of cancer arising from genetic mutations. This study evaluated in vitro and in vivo mutagenic and antimutagenic effects of aqueous fraction of Myristica fragrans (AFMF) leaves on TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium and Mus musculus (Male Swiss albino mice), respectively. The antioxidant activity of AFMF against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), total phenolic and flavonoid contents were determined, followed by its phytochemical elucidation using the Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography technique (UPLC). The mutagenicity of AFMF at 4, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 µg/well was Rutin was elucidated by the UPLC technique, and thereby suspected to be the phytochemical responsible for the observed antimutagenic activity. Thus far, AFMF seems to contain a promising chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention of genetic damage that is crucial for cancer development.

  2. Sexual selection and the rodent baculum: an intraspecific study in the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus).

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    Ramm, Steven A; Khoo, Lin; Stockley, Paula

    2010-01-01

    The rapid divergence of genitalia is a pervasive trend in animal evolution, thought to be due to the action of sexual selection. To test predictions from the sexual selection hypothesis, we here report data on the allometry, variation, plasticity and condition dependence of baculum morphology in the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus). We find that that baculum size: (a) exhibits no consistent pattern of allometric scaling (baculum size being in most cases unrelated to body size), (b) exhibits low to moderate levels of phenotypic variation, (c) does not exhibit phenotypic plasticity in response to differences in perceived levels of sexual competition and (d) exhibits limited evidence of condition dependence. These patterns provide only limited evidence in support of the sexual selection hypothesis, and no consistent support for any particular sexual selection mechanism; however, more direct measures of how genital morphology influences male fertilization success are required.

  3. Molecular heterogeneity in major urinary proteins of Mus musculus subspecies: potential candidates involved in speciation

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    Hurst, Jane L.; Beynon, Robert J.; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Davidson, Amanda J.; Roberts, Sarah A.; Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Smadja, Carole M.; Ganem, Guila

    2017-01-01

    When hybridisation carries a cost, natural selection is predicted to favour evolution of traits that allow assortative mating (reinforcement). Incipient speciation between the two European house mouse subspecies, Mus musculus domesticus and M.m.musculus, sharing a hybrid zone, provides an opportunity to understand evolution of assortative mating at a molecular level. Mouse urine odours allow subspecific mate discrimination, with assortative preferences evident in the hybrid zone but not in allopatry. Here we assess the potential of MUPs (major urinary proteins) as candidates for signal divergence by comparing MUP expression in urine samples from the Danish hybrid zone border (contact) and from allopatric populations. Mass spectrometric characterisation identified novel MUPs in both subspecies involving mostly new combinations of amino acid changes previously observed in M.m.domesticus. The subspecies expressed distinct MUP signatures, with most MUPs expressed by only one subspecies. Expression of at least eight MUPs showed significant subspecies divergence both in allopatry and contact zone. Another seven MUPs showed divergence in expression between the subspecies only in the contact zone, consistent with divergence by reinforcement. These proteins are candidates for the semiochemical barrier to hybridisation, providing an opportunity to characterise the nature and evolution of a putative species recognition signal. PMID:28337988

  4. Molecular mass spectrometric identification of superoxide dismutase in the liver of mice Mus musculus and Mus spretus using a metallomics analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, M; García-Barrera, T; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2011-11-01

    This paper reports the identification and quantification of superoxide dismutase in the liver of Mus musculus and Mus spretus mice using a metallomics analytical approach. The approach consisted of using orthogonal chromatographic systems coupled to ICP-MS and UV detectors. Size-exclusion fractionation of the cytosolic extracts was followed by anion-exchange chromatographic separation of Cu- and Zn-containing species. After purification then tryptic digestion, Cu- and Zn-containing superoxide dismutase was identified by nESI-QqTOF. The MS-MS spectra of doubly charged peptides, with the Mascot searching engine, were used to obtain the sequence of the protein.

  5. Spermatogenic structure and fertility of Mus musculus after exposure of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L) pericarp extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Alfiah; Agustin, Melia Eka; Rokhimaningrum, Farida Ayu; Adro'i, Hasan; Darmanto, Win

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) pericarp extract on spermatogenics number, seminiferous tubules sized, profile protein of epididymal and testicular sperm, and fertility of mice (Mus musculus). Fourty two male mice strain BALB/C was divided equally into 7 groups. The control group was given 0.05 ml of 0.05% CMC solution. Three group were given mangosteen pericarp extract at various doses (75, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight, respectively) for 7 days, while the other three groups were given the same extract dose for 35 days. Parameters evaluated on histological of spermatogonia, spermatocytes, round spermatids, seminiferous tubule diameter, and thickness of germinal epithelium, analysis of testicular and epidydimal protein profile with SDS-Page, and than fertility test on female mice. The results showed that mangosteen pericarp extract at 75 and 100 mg/kg dose for 7 days had no effect on spermatogenics number and seminiferous tubule sizes, but the treatment dose of 150 mg/kg for 7 days and all treatment (doses of 75, 100, and 150 mg/kg) for 35 days led to significant decrease on the number of spermatogenics and seminiferous tubule sizes; effect on protein profiles testicular and epididymal sperm; and lower fertilization.

  6. The mouse (Mus musculus) T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) variable genes.

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    Bosc, Nathalie; Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2003-01-01

    'The Mouse (Mus musculus) T cell receptor alpha (TRA) and delta (TRD) variable genes' 'IMGT Locus in Focus' report provides the first complete list of the mouse TRAV and TRDV genes which span 1550 kb on chromosome 14 at 19.7 cM. The total number of TRAV genes per haploid genome is 98 belonging to 23 subgroups. This includes 10 TRAV/DV genes which belong to seven subgroups. The functional TRAV genomic repertoire comprises 72-82 TRAV (including 9-10 TRAV/DV) belonging to 19 subgroups. The total number of TRDV genes per haploid genome is 16 (including the 10 TRAV/DV) belonging to 12 subgroups. The functional TRDV genomic repertoire comprises 14-15 genes (5 TRDV and 9-10 TRAV/DV) belonging to 11-12 subgroups. The eight tables and three figures of this report are available at the IMGT Marie-Paule page of IMGT. The international ImMunoGeneTics information system (http://imgt.cines.fr) created by Marie-Paule Lefranc, Université Montpellier II, CNRS, France.

  7. Effect of Physalis peruviana "tomatillo" fruit extract in Mus musculus var. swis with induced hyperlipidemi.

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    Julio Campos Florián

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the hypolipidemic activity of the fruit of Physalis peruviana "tomatillo" in a model of acute hyperlipidemia induced by triton. Mus musculus var. swis males as experimental animals. We worked with four groups of mice, the white group received distilled water orally and saline intraperitoneally, the control group received distilled water orally and intraperitoneally triton, the problem group 1 received orally 0.05g/100g Physalis peruviana extract intraperitoneally and triton and the problem group 2 received orally 0.2g/100g extract of Physalis peruviana and triton intraperitoneally. After 24 hours of administering the treatments were performed measurements of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. Mean levels of cholesterol (mg/dL were: 58.87 ± 11.54 (white, 121.71 ± 15.00 (control, 58.08 ± 9.21 (Problem 1 and 66 78 ± 16.77 (Problem 2. Average levels of triglycerides (g /L were: 0.48 ± 0.07 (white, 1.84 ± 0.18 (control, 0.34 ± 0.10 (Problem 1 and 0.94 ± 0.25 (Problem 2. We found significant reductions (p <0.000 concentrations of both cholesterol and triglycerides in relation to those obtained in the group treated only with Triton.

  8. Penelitian Pendahuluan Pengaruh Daun Manggis sebagai Rodentisida Nabati pada Mencit Mus musculus Strain Balepsi

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    Agus Kardinan

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Research has been conducted at Pest and Disease Laboratory, Research Institute for Spices and Medicinal Crops, Bogor, during 1997-1998. The objective was to evaluate the possibility of Mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana leaves to be used as botanical rodenticide which is tested to reproduction ability of mice Mus musculus. Eight to ten weeks old mice with the average weight of 25 gram were obtained from Research Institute for Livestock, Ciawi. Research was arranged at randomized block design, 8 treatments and 4 replications. Data was analyzed by determining the average value and their standard deviation values. Observations were done to the weight of testis, weight of embryo, number of embryo, volume of extracts drank by mice and mice behavior during experiment. Result revealed that there was no indication that the leaves extract affected the weight of testis, but it affected the number and weight of embryo. There was indication that mangosteen leaves acted as antifertility on mice. Giving leaves extract increased the total volume of extract drink. There was no abnormality at the activity of mice during experiment, included sex activity, poisonous symptoms and others.

  9. Prevalence of Calodium hepaticum (Syn. Capillaria hepatica) in house mice (Mus musculus) in the Azores archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resendes, A R; Amaral, A F S; Rodrigues, A; Almeria, S

    2009-03-23

    Calodium hepaticum (Syn. Capillaria hepatica) is a zoonotic liver nematode of mammals distributed worldwide. Rodents are believed to be the main reservoirs of this nematode. In this paper, prevalence of the parasite was analyzed in liver histological sections from 51 house mice (Mus musculus) caught in human-inhabited houses, from two localities (Furnas and Rabo de Peixe) on São Miguel island from the Azores archipelago (Portugal). Mean prevalence of infection was 19.6%, with 33.3% prevalence in Furnas and 4.1% in Rabo de Peixe (P=0.07). No significant differences were found between the prevalence of infection and the age, body weight and the sex of mice. Hepatic lesions found were either acute and/or chronic stage and consisted of moderate to severe multifocal pyogranulomatous hepatitis with encapsulated eggs with typical bipolar plugs and moderate to severe necrotizing hepatitis consistent with larva tracks. Periportal inflammatory infiltration, hepatocyte regeneration and bile duct hyperplasia were also noted. In most cases, hepatic lesions occupied more than 50% of the liver, but despite severe lesions, in some mice, no signs of hepatic failure were noticed. The high rate of infection found in the present study suggests that house mice are an important reservoir for this parasite in the Azores and could have a role in human transmission.

  10. Foraging decisions in wild versus domestic Mus musculus: What does life in the lab select for?

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    Troxell-Smith, Sandra M; Tutka, Michal J; Albergo, Jessica M; Balu, Deebika; Brown, Joel S; Leonard, John P

    2016-01-01

    What does domestication select for in terms of foraging and anti-predator behaviors? We applied principles of patch use and foraging theory to test foraging strategies and fear responses of three strains of Mus musculus: wild-caught, control laboratory, and genetically modified strains. Foraging choices were quantified using giving-up densities (GUDs) under three foraging scenarios: (1) patches varying in microhabitat (covered versus open), and initial resource density (low versus high); (2) daily variation in auditory cues (aerial predators and control calls); (3) patches with varying seed aggregations. Overall, both domestic strains harvested significantly more food than wild mice. Each strain revealed a significant preference for foraging under cover compared to the open, and predator calls had no detectable effects on foraging. Both domestic strains biased their harvest toward high quality patches; wild mice did not. In terms of exploiting favorable and avoiding unfavorable distributions of seeds within patches, the lab strain performed best, the wild strain worst, and the mutant strain in between. Our study provides support for hypothesis that domestic animals have more energy-efficient foraging strategies than their wild counterparts, but retain residual fear responses. Furthermore, patch-use studies can reveal the aptitudes and priorities of both domestic and wild animals.

  11. HISTOLOGI HATI MENCIT (Mus musculus L. YANG DIBERI EKSTRAK DAUN LAMTORO (Leucaena leucocephala

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    I Wayan Andi Yoga Kurniawan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala has been used as traditional medicine, such asdrugs to decrease the level of blood glucose, so it can be used as drug to indicatediabetes. The aim of this research is to study the histopathological change of mice’s livergiven leucaena leaf extract. This research used 24 male mice that were divided into 4 groupsby completely randomized design. Group P0 (control were given 0,9 % NaCl, and groupsP1, P2, and P3 were given 0,5 g / kg bw, 1 g / kg bw, and 1,5 g / kg bw leucaena’s leafextract by oral administration respectively. The treatment were given daily for 30 days. All ofthe mice were necropsied at day 31, and the liver were taken to examine theirhistopathological change. Histopathological change examination were based on the presenthydropic degeneration, fatty degeneration, and apoptosis surround central vein. Result ofstatistically analised by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis method indicated no significancedifference among the control and treatments. There was no significance toxicity effect ofleucaena leaf extract of all treatment dosage on mice liver.Keywords: Leucaena leucocephala, liver histology, Mus musculus L.

  12. Buah Mengkudu (Morinda citrifolia Meningkatkan Respon Imun Mencit (Mus musculus Terhadap Infeksi Bakteri Staphylococcus aureus

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    Mufidah Zumrotul

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Noni (Morinda citrifolia Increase Immune Response in Mice (Mus musculus Infected Staphylococcus aureus. Infection disease caused by bacteria is one of the illness in several developing countries including in Indonesia, with high mortality rate. Infection of  S. aureus as the cause of problem resistance for antibiotic or multi drug resistance are giving the therapy of drug itself with change to medical herbal. The aim of this study is known the role of M.citrifolia extract to increase immune response of mice with infectioned of S. aureus. Mice were divided into two groups there are Non Infection and infection. Non Infection is without S. aureus and than infection has S. aureus. The each groups are including control, dose 1 (25 mg/kg BW, dose 2 (100 mg/kg BW, and dose 3 (300 mg/kg BW. Relative number of lymphocyte T cell (CD4+ subsets was measured  using the BD FACSCaliburTM Flowcytometer. Data were analyzed using Analysis of Varians (p<0,05 and using SPSS 16 for windows. The result showed that administration of  M. citrifolia crude extract in non infection groups was significantly increase the relative amounts T cell subsets (CD4+. Noni fruit extract can used as prevention therapy on infection disease of S. aureus bacteria because it contains active compounds that are anti-inflammation

  13. Effects of classical music as part of environmental enrichment in captive Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae

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    José Geraldo Pereira da Cruz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the wild, animals are exposed to an ever-changing array of sensory stimuli. The captive environment, by contrast, is generally much more impoverished in terms of the cues it offers the animals housed within. In a bid to remedy this, and promote better welfare, mice (Mus musculus were exposed to two conditions: no auditory stimulation, and stimulation with classical music. In all experiments, a battery of behavior tests was used. The results demonstrated significantly decreased immobility in the forced swim, increased enclosed arm entries in the plus-maze, and decreased immobility in the open-field, in animals that had been pre-exposed to music 24h earlier, suggesting that changes in mouse motor activity were caused by classical music. This study led to the conclusion that environmental enrichment may have profound effects on the behavior of mice in behavioral tests, and that classical music can be a relatively simple method of contributing to the well-being of captive mice, but it can affect the results of experiments such as forced swimming.

  14. Ceftriaxone-vancomycin drug toxicity reduction by VRP 1020 in Mus musculus mice.

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    Soni, Arvind; Chaudhary, Manu; Dwivedi, Vivek Kumar

    2009-05-01

    Drug toxicity is a common cause of liver injury and kidney failure. This study was designed to elucidate whether administration of high doses of Ceftriaxone or Vancomycin induce oxidative stress in liver as well as kidney, and to investigate the protective effects of VRP 1020 with fixed dose combination of ceftriaxone-vancomycin (Immunox-V). Twenty four Mus musculus mice (weighing 30 +/- 5 g) were divided into four groups containing six mice in each group. The activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and the level of malonaldialdehyde, as an marker of lipid per oxidation, were measured to evaluate oxidative stress in homogenates of the liver and renal tissue. Ceftriaxone or vancomycin administration significantly increased malonaldialdehyde levels (p VRP 1020 with FDC of Immunox-V injections caused significantly decreased malonaldialdehyde levels (pVRP 1020 with fixed dose combination of Immunox-V can prevent drug induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress which protects liver injury as well as renal tissue damage by reducing reactive oxygen species which improve the activities of free radical scavenging enzymes.

  15. Helminth fauna of Mus musculus Linnaeus, 1758 from the suburban area of Belgrade, Serbia

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    Kataranovski D.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The helminth fauna of the house mouse (Mus musculus Linnaeus, 1758 was studied on the basis of 429 host individuals from the suburban area of Belgrade. Eleven helminth species were recorded: three cestode species - Catenotaenia pusilla, Rodentolepis fraterna, and Cysticercus (= Strobilocercus fasciolaris [larval stage of Taenia taeniaeformis (Batsch, 1821]; and eight nematode species - Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Syphacia sp., Aspiculuris tetraptera, Syphacia obvelata, Heterakis spumosa, Trichuris muris, Mastophorus muris, and Gongylonema sp. Within the general helminth fauna, H. polygyrus was found to be the most prevalent species (39.2% and caused the highest infection intensity. Prevalences of A. tetraptera, C. pusilla, and S. obvelata ranged from 12.8% to 6.1%, while the remaining species showed prevalences ranging from 4.9% (for Syphacia sp. to 0.2% (for Gongylonema sp.. All the species found in males were also present in females, with the exceptions of M. muris and Gongylonema sp. No significant differences were found between males and females regarding prevalence (P%, mean infection intensity (MI, or mean abundance (MA.

  16. Aktivitas polisakarida krestin dari ekstrak Coriolus versicolor terhadap peningkatan antibodi Mus musculus akibat paparan Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Sri Puji Astuti Wahyuningsih

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to know the bioactivity of polysaccharide krestin (PSK with a different timing on formation of mice antibodyexposed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was used as infection agent that had an abilitiy to be imunogenicand to lead immune system responsses decreased. Polysaccharides krestin was used as immunopotentiator which had a role to activatemacrophage and stimulate B cell in order to produce antibody. This research involved 30 adult female mice of Mus musculus strain Balb/C in the age of 8 €“10 weeks and in the weight between of 30 €“40 g. Mice were divided into six groups, as follows: group K asa control, was added only aquades; group K+ as positive control, was added only PSK; group K- as negative control, was exposedby M. tuberculosis only; group P1 was added PSK before being exposed by M. tuberculosis; group P2 was added PSK after beingexposed by M. tuberculosis; group P3 was added PSK before and after being exposed by M. tuberculosis. Polysaccharides krestin wasadded by gavage with single dose of 500 μg and M. tuberculosis was exposed intraperitoneally with concentration of 5x108 bacteryper ml. The bioactivity of PSK was observed by formation antibody using indirect ELISA test. The results of research were the averageof OD value of K group was 0,590 ± 0,042, K+ group was 0.641 ± 0.025, K- group was 1.044 ± 0.054, P1 group was 1.032 ± 0.125,P2 group was 1.127 ± 0.042, P3 group was 1.230 ± 0.097. The conclusion of this research showed that the adding of PSK increasedmice formation antibody. The time of adding before and after being exposed M. tuberculosis was the most potential to raise antibodyproduction on mice.

  17. Peningkatan Ketebalan Miokardium Mencit (Mus musculus L. Akibat Paparan Medan Listrik Tegangan Tinggi

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    Hendri Busman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of high voltage power transmission line could be expected to harm humans or other living creatures. Research objective was to determine the effect of exposure tohigh-voltage electric field to the thickness of the left ventricular myocardium male mice (Mus musculus L.. The experiment was conducted at the Laboratory of Zoology Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciencesat the University of Lampung and Central Pathology Laboratory Regional Veterinary Investigation III Bandar Lampung, in June−November 2011. Research using completely randomized design with 4 treatments, replicated 6 times and divided into four groups.The control group (K was not given treatment, group 1 (P1 given exposure to 5 kV/m, group 2 (P2 given exposure to 6 kV/m and group 3 (P3 given exposure to 7 kV/m for 8 hours/day, to 37 days. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance. The results obtained thickness of the left ventricular myocardium of male mice at K1,329.83±173.29 μm; P1 at 1,507.50±109.24 μm; P2 at 1,536.70±103.42 μm, and P3 at 1,574.23±123.36 μm. There was an increase in the average thickness of the myocardium with increasing exposure to power an electric field with a statistical test obtained (p=0.019. In conclusion, there is a significant relationship between exposure to high-voltage electric field to change the size of the thickness of the left ventricular myocardium male mice, the higher the electric field exposure thicker left ventricular myocardium male mice.

  18. Stimulus probability effects on temporal bisection performance of mice (Mus musculus).

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    Akdoğan, Başak; Balcı, Fuat

    2016-01-01

    In the temporal bisection task, participants classify experienced stimulus durations as short or long based on their temporal similarity to previously learned reference durations. Temporal decision making in this task should be influenced by the experienced probabilities of the reference durations for adaptiveness. In this study, we tested the temporal bisection performance of mice (Mus musculus) under different short and long reference duration probability conditions implemented across two experimental phases. In Phase 1, the proportion of reference durations (compared to probe durations) was 0.5, whereas in Phase 2 it was increased to 0.8 to further examine the adjustment of choice behavior with more frequent reference duration presentations (under higher reinforcement rate). Our findings suggest that mice developed adaptive biases in their choice behaviors. These adjustments in choice behavior were nearly optimal as the mice maximized their gain to a great extent which required them to monitor stimulus probabilities as well as the level of variability in their temporal judgments. We further found that short but not long categorization response times were sensitive to stimulus probability manipulations, which in turn suggests an asymmetry between short and long categorizations. Finally, we investigated the latent decision processes underlying the bias manifested in subjects' choice behavior within the diffusion model framework. Our results revealed that probabilistic information influenced the starting point and the rate of evidence accumulation process. Overall, the stimulus probability effects on choice behavior were modulated by the reinforcement rate. Our findings illustrate that mice can adapt their temporal behaviors with respect to the probabilistic contingencies in the environment.

  19. Sliver nanoparticles accelerate skin wound healing in mice (Mus musculus through suppression of innate immune system

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    Mohammad Saeed Heydarnejad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: This study aimed to find the effects of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs (40 nm on skin wound healing in mice Mus musculus when innate immune system has been suppressed.   Materials and Methods: A group of 50 BALB/c mice of about 8 weeks (weighting 24.2±3.0 g were randomly divided into two groups: Ag-NPs and control group, each with 25 mice. Once a day at the same time, a volume of 50 microliters from the nanosilver solution (10ppm was applied to the wound bed in the Ag-NPs group while in the untreated (control group no nanosilver solution was used but the wound area was washed by a physiological solution. The experiment lasted for 14. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β, complement component C3, and two other immune system factors involving in inflammation, namely C-reactive protein (CRP and rheumatoid factor (RF in sera of both groups were assessed and then confirmed by complement CH50 level of the blood. Results: The results show that wound healing is a complex process involving coordinated interactions between diverse immunological and biological systems and that Ag-NPs significantly accelerated wound healing and reduce scar appearance through suppression of immune system as indicated by decreasing levels of all inflammatory factors measured in this study. Conclusion: Exposure of mice to Ag-NPs can result in significant changes in innate immune function at the molecular levels. The study improves our understanding of nanoparticle interaction with components of the immune system and suggests that Ag-NPs have strong anti-inflammatory effects on skin wound healing and reduce scarring.

  20. Genotoxic effects in wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) in an open coal mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Grethel; Pérez, Lyda Espitia; Linares, Juan Carlos; Hartmann, Andreas; Quintana, Milton

    2007-06-15

    Coal is a mixture of a variety of compounds containing mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Exposure to coal is considered as an important non-cellular and cellular source of reactive oxygen species that can induce DNA damage. In addition, spontaneous combustion can occur in coal mining areas, further releasing compounds with detrimental effects on the environment. In this study the comet assay was used to investigate potential genotoxic effects of coal mining activities in peripheral blood cells of the wild rodents Rattus rattus and Mus musculus. The study was conducted in a coal mining area of the Municipio de Puerto Libertador, South West of the Departamento de Cordoba, Colombia. Animals from two areas in the coal mining zone and a control area located in the Municipio de Lorica were investigated. The results showed evidence that exposure to coal results in elevated primary DNA lesions in blood cells of rodents. Three different parameters for DNA damage were assessed, namely, DNA damage index, migration length and percentage damaged cells. All parameters showed statistically significantly higher values in mice and rats from the coal mining area in comparison to the animals from the control area. The parameter "DNA Damage Index" was found to be most sensitive and to best indicate a genotoxic hazard. Both species investigated were shown to be sensitive indicators of environmental genotoxicity caused by coal mining activities. In summary, our study constitutes the first investigation of potential genotoxic effects of open coal mining carried out in Puerto Libertador. The investigations provide a guide for measures to evaluate genotoxic hazards, thereby contributing to the development of appropriate measures and regulations for more careful operations during coal mining.

  1. MicroRNA Expression Profiling in CCl4-Induced Liver Fibrosis of Mus musculus

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    Jeongeun Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis is a major pathological feature of chronic liver diseases, including liver cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs, regulate gene expression posttranscriptionally and play important roles in various kinds of diseases; however, miRNA-associated hepatic fibrogenesis and its acting mechanisms are poorly investigated. Therefore, we performed an miRNA microarray in the fibrotic livers of Mus musculus treated with carbon-tetrachloride (CCl4 and analyzed the biological functions engaged by the target genes of differentially-expressed miRNAs through gene ontology (GO and in-depth pathway enrichment analysis. Herein, we found that four miRNAs were upregulated and four miRNAs were downregulated more than two-fold in CCl4-treated livers compared to a control liver. Eight miRNAs were predicted to target a total of 4079 genes. GO analysis revealed that those target genes were located in various cellular compartments, including cytoplasm, nucleolus and cell surface, and they were involved in protein-protein or protein-DNA bindings, which influence the signal transductions and gene transcription. Furthermore, pathway enrichment analysis demonstrated that the 72 subspecialized signaling pathways were associated with CCl4-induced liver fibrosis and were mostly classified into metabolic function-related pathways. These results suggest that CCl4 induces liver fibrosis by disrupting the metabolic pathways. In conclusion, we presented several miRNAs and their biological processes that might be important in the progression of liver fibrosis; these findings help increase the understanding of liver fibrogenesis and provide novel ideas for further studies of the role of miRNAs in liver fibrosis.

  2. [Relationship between characteristics of sexual behavior and male sperm competitive ability in taxa of superspecies complex Mus musculus sensu lato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambaryan, A B; Maltzev, A N; Kotenkova, E V

    2015-01-01

    Some physiological parameters that determine quality of male sperm (its concentration, spermatozoa morphology) and testicle size vary in integrity, i.e. the bigger are testicles the higher is sperm quality. Therefore, the estimate of testicles relative mass is often used as a characteristic of sperm competitive ability when comparing phylogenetically close mammal species. In house mice belonging to the superspecies complex Mus musculus s.l., testicles relative mass is greater in exoanthropic species than in synanthropic ones. It is shown in our study that this pattern is apparent also at the intraspecies level since testicles mass index, sperm concentration, and percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa in subspecies Mus musculus wagneri, which is facultatively synanthropic, are higher compared with synanthropic subspecies M m. musculus. An analysis of sexual behavior of the three forms (namely, exoanthropic species M. spicilegus and two subspecies mentioned above) indicates that in M. spicilegus both sexual behavior efficiency and ejaculation rate during coupling were higher as compared with other two subspecies. Based on the analysis of life pattern, reproduction systems, and group spatial-ethological structure, the hypotheses are formulated that explain the maintenance of selection directed to increase of sperm competitive ability in exoanthropic house mice species.

  3. Fraksi Heksan dan Fraksi Metanol Ekstrak Biji Pepaya Muda Menghambat Spermatogonia Mencit (Mus Musculus Jantan

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    Bagus Komang Satriyasa

    2010-03-01

    spermatogoniaA decreased significantly (p < 0,01. It is concluded that hexan fraction and methanol fraction ofunripe carica papaya seeds extract can decrease spermatogonia A cell of male mice (mus musculus.

  4. The Effect of Epinephrine On The Development of oogenesis Of Mice (Mus Musculus Strain of Japanese

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    Sri Utami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When stress persists continuously and repeatedly, it will automatically increase the epinephrine in the body in which excessive consequently can provide interference on various body systems. In the event of physical stressors can affect the frequency and amplitude of pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH. It is important for the secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH. Additionally stressors can also activate the sympathetic nervous system. If the increase is excessive pulsation can reduce and stop the secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH. Decrease in Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH will inhibit the growth of ovarian follicles and decrease the synthesis of estrogen and progesterone in the ovaries. Decreased synthesis of estrogen and progesterone can cause a decrease in the number of ovarian follicles (Speroff, 1994.The study population was female mice derived from laboratory Biomedic Andalas University in Padang. Mice used were 2-3 months old, weighing an average of 25-35 grams. The Effect of Epinephrine on the Development of Oogenesis of Mice (mus musculus Strain of Japanese, is the growth of primary follicles in which a decline in the number of primary follicles ranging from provision of 0.002 mg / ml, epinephrine administration lowered formation of secondary follicles at a concentration of 0.004 mg / ml and above but no decrease in concentration of 0.002 mg / ml, epinephrine administration lowered formation of tertiary follicles at a concentration of 0.004 mg / ml, 0.006 mg / ml, 0.008 mg / ml and 0.01 mg / ml and no decrease in concentration of 0.002 mg / ml, epinephrine administration did not reduce the formation of follicle de Graaf and administration of epinephrine significantly reduce the formation of the corpus luteum at a concentration of 0.004 mg / ml, 0.006 mg / ml, 0.008 mg / ml and 0.01 mg / ml and no decrease in

  5. Spontaneous and Vaccine-Induced Clearance of Mus Musculus Papillomavirus 1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rosie T; Wang, Joshua W; Peng, Shiwen; Huang, Tsui-Chin; Wang, Chenguang; Cannella, Fabiana; Chang, Yung-Nien; Viscidi, Raphael P; Best, Simon R A; Hung, Chien-Fu; Roden, Richard B S

    2017-08-01

    Mus musculus papillomavirus 1 (MmuPV1/MusPV1) induces persistent papillomas in immunodeficient mice but not in common laboratory strains. To facilitate the study of immune control, we sought an outbred and immunocompetent laboratory mouse strain in which persistent papillomas could be established. We found that challenge of SKH1 mice (Crl:SKH1-Hrhr) with MmuPV1 by scarification on their tail resulted in three clinical outcomes: (i) persistent (>2-month) papillomas (∼20%); (ii) transient papillomas that spontaneously regress, typically within 2 months (∼15%); and (iii) no visible papillomas and viral clearance (∼65%). SKH1 mice with persistent papillomas were treated by using a candidate preventive/therapeutic naked-DNA vaccine that expresses human calreticulin (hCRT) fused in frame to MmuPV1 E6 (mE6) and mE7 early proteins and residues 11 to 200 of the late protein L2 (hCRTmE6/mE7/mL2). Three intramuscular DNA vaccinations were delivered biweekly via in vivo electroporation, and both humoral and CD8 T cell responses were mapped and measured. Previously persistent papillomas disappeared within 2 months after the final vaccination. Coincident virologic clearance was confirmed by in situ hybridization and a failure of disease to recur after CD3 T cell depletion. Vaccination induced strong mE6 and mE7 CD8(+) T cell responses in all mice, although they were significantly weaker in mice that initially presented with persistent warts than in those that spontaneously cleared their infection. A human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)-targeted version of the DNA vaccine also induced L2 antibodies and protected mice from vaginal challenge with an HPV16 pseudovirus. Thus, MmuPV1 challenge of SKH1 mice is a promising model of spontaneous and immunotherapy-directed clearances of HPV-related disease.IMPORTANCE High-risk-type human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs) cause 5% of all cancer cases worldwide, notably cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancers. Since preventative HPV

  6. New data on occurrence of Demodex flagellurus (Acari, Demodecidae) - rarely recorded parasite from the house mouse Mus musculus (Rodentia, Muridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Demodex flagellurus Bukva, 1985 is one of two known demodecid mites of the house mouse Mus musculus Linnaeus, 1758, in which it is observed in genital area. Skin fragments of 30 house mice from various regions of Poland (residential buildings in Gdynia and Gdańsk, rural region in Wielkopolska-Kujawska Lowland) were examined. The mites were noted in 25.0% of the mice, with mean intensity of 48.0 and intensity range of 2-103. D. flagellurus demonstrated the differentiated occurrence in host populations.

  7. Bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and house mice (Mus musculus musculus; M. m. domesticus) in Europe are each parasitized by their own distinct species of Aspiculuris (Nematoda, Oxyurida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnke, J M; Stewart, A; Bajer, A; Grzybek, M; Harris, P D; Lowe, A; Ribas, A; Smales, L; Vandegrift, K J

    2015-10-01

    The molecular phylogeny and morphology of the oxyuroid nematode genus Aspiculuris from voles and house mice has been examined. Worms collected from Myodes glareolus in Poland, Eire and the UK are identified as Aspiculuris tianjinensis, previously known only from China, while worms from Mus musculus from a range of locations in Europe and from laboratory mice, all conformed to the description of Aspiculuris tetraptera. Worms from voles and house mice are not closely related and are not derived from each other, with A. tianjinensis being most closely related to Aspiculuris dinniki from snow voles and to an isolate from Microtus longicaudus in the Nearctic. Both A. tianjinensis and A. tetraptera appear to represent recent radiations within their host groups; in voles, this radiation cannot be more than 2 million years old, while in commensal house mice it is likely to be less than 10,000 years old. The potential of Aspiculuris spp. as markers of host evolution is highlighted.

  8. ORALLY LACTATE CALCIUM AND SWIMMING DECREASE OSTEOCLAST AND INCREASE OSTEOBLAST IN RADIAL PERIMENOPAUSAL MICE (MUS MUSCULUS BONE

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    Muliani **

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Calcium and moderate intensity swimming exercise can increase bone density. The aim of this research is to see the effect of orally calcium consumption and swimming activity to decrease osteoclast and increase osteoblast in radial perimenopausal mice (Mus musculus bone. Pretest and pos#est control group design was used in this research. Research subject used 15-16 aged mice (Mus musculus which divided into 4 groups (each group consisted of 13 mice, that was control, lactate calcium, swimming and lactate calcium and swimming. Treatment was given 90 days. This study showed a significant difference of the mean of the pos#est osteoblast between control and experimental groups (P<0.05. There was no significant difference between lactate calcium and swimming groups (P>0.05. Enhancement of osteoblast mean in combination group was greater than the other experimental groups. There was a significant difference of the mean of the pos#est  osteoclast between control and experimental groups (P<0.05, without significant difference between lactate calcium,   swimming groups and combination of lactate calcium and swimming group (P>0.05.  Conclusion: either lactate calcium or swimming decreases osteoclast and increases osteoblast of the mice but the osteoblast enhancement will be bigger when they are given together at once

  9. PENGARUH DOSIS DAN LAMA PERLAKUAN EKSTRAK DAUN KALIANDRA MERAH (Calliandra calothyrsus Meissn. TERHADAP STRUKTUR HISTOLOGI GINJAL MENCIT (Mus musculus L.

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    Nur Assiam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to determine the effect of red calliandra (Calliandra calothyrsusMeissn. leaf extrac on the histological structure of the kidney of mice (Mus musculus L..Treatment was administered orally with varying doses. This research used a CompletelyRandomized Design in factorial pattern of two factors, doses (0 or control, 2, 4, and 6 mg/kgBW and length of treatment (7, 14, and 21 days, so there are 12 combination groups with 3replications of each. Organ was collected on days 8, 15, and 22 to observe histologicalstructure of the kidney. Renal histological observation of edema, Bowman’s spaceconstriction, and protein deposition, showed no correlation between both factors, but a veryreal correlation occurs in the damage of fatty degeneration, hemorrhage, and nucleuspyknotic. Histological observation of glomerular congestion and infiltration of inflammatorycells did not show any correlation between dose and duration of treatment.Keywords: red calliandra, histopathology of kidney, male mice

  10. Pengaruh VCO terhadap hitung jenis leukosit, kadar glukosa dan kreatinin darah Mus musculus Balb/c hiperglikemi dan tersensitisasi ovalbumin

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    NOOR SOESANTI HANDAJANI

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Handajani NS, Dharmawan R. 2009. Pengaruh VCO terhadap hitung jenis leukosit, kadar glukosa dan kreatinin darah Mus musculus Balb/c hiperglikemi dan tersensitisasi ovalbumin. Bioteknologi 6: 1-10. Obat-obatan kimia dan insulin dapat menurunkan kadar glukosa darah pada pasien dengan efek samping hiperglikemi makro vaskular. Diabetes dan insiden alergi dipengaruhi kualitas dan kuantitas leukosit. Asam laurat dalam VCO dilaporkan menurunkan tingkat glukosa darah pada kejadian diabetes dan beberapa insiden alergi. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui pengaruh VCO pada tingkat glukosa darah, diferensial leukosit dan kadar kreatinin pada mencit hiperglikemi dan normoglicemic tersensitisasi ovalbumin. Empat puluh lima (45 mencit Mus musculus Balb/c jantan dengan berat rata-rata 35 g dibagi menjadi 9 kelompok dengan 5 ulangan, yaitu 4 kelompok non aloksan dan 5 kelompok hiperglikemi yang diinduksi aloksan, Pada hari ke-22 sampai ke-36, mereka disensitisasi dengan ovalbumin sebagai penyebab alergi. Sampel darah diperoleh dari vena orbital menggunakan heparin sebagai anti koagulan, kadar glukosa darah diukur dengan metode GOD sebanyak 6 kali, pada hari ke-1, 4, 18, 22, 32 dan 37, kemudian diuji dengan ANAVA yang diikuti oleh DMRT 0,05 untk mengetahui tingkat perbedaan antar perlakuan. Pada hari ke-37, diferensial leukosit dan tingkat kreatinin darah ditentukan, lalu dibandingkan dengan nilai normal. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa dalam hitungan diferensial leukosit mencit hiperglikemi, persentase neutrofil jauh lebih rendah daripada nilai normal (3.22%, dan persentase limfosit jauh lebih tinggi daripada nilai normal (94.54%. Konsumsi 0.003 mL/35 g VCO lebih dari 18 hari menurunkan kadar glukosa darah pada mencit hiperglikemi, menurunkan persentase basophile pada mencit tersensitisasi ovalbumin, normalisasi persentase neutrophile tidak meningkatkan tingkat kreatinin darah.

  11. Effect of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seed color and hardness genes on the consumption preference of the house mouse (Mus musculus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain is a staple food and provides necessary nutrients for human health and nutrition. Yet, flavor differences among wheat varieties are not well understood. Grain flavor and consumption preference can be examined using the house mouse (Mus musculus L.) as a...

  12. Genome patterns of selection and introgression of haplotypes in natural populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus.

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    Fabian Staubach

    Full Text Available General parameters of selection, such as the frequency and strength of positive selection in natural populations or the role of introgression, are still insufficiently understood. The house mouse (Mus musculus is a particularly well-suited model system to approach such questions, since it has a defined history of splits into subspecies and populations and since extensive genome information is available. We have used high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP typing arrays to assess genomic patterns of positive selection and introgression of alleles in two natural populations of each of the subspecies M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus. Applying different statistical procedures, we find a large number of regions subject to apparent selective sweeps, indicating frequent positive selection on rare alleles or novel mutations. Genes in the regions include well-studied imprinted loci (e.g. Plagl1/Zac1, homologues of human genes involved in adaptations (e.g. alpha-amylase genes or in genetic diseases (e.g. Huntingtin and Parkin. Haplotype matching between the two subspecies reveals a large number of haplotypes that show patterns of introgression from specific populations of the respective other subspecies, with at least 10% of the genome being affected by partial or full introgression. Using neutral simulations for comparison, we find that the size and the fraction of introgressed haplotypes are not compatible with a pure migration or incomplete lineage sorting model. Hence, it appears that introgressed haplotypes can rise in frequency due to positive selection and thus can contribute to the adaptive genomic landscape of natural populations. Our data support the notion that natural genomes are subject to complex adaptive processes, including the introgression of haplotypes from other differentiated populations or species at a larger scale than previously assumed for animals. This implies that some of the admixture found in inbred strains of mice

  13. A survey on helminthic infection in mice (Mus musculus and rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus in Kermanshah, Iran

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    Norollah Pakdel

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic infections of rodents can compromise scientific research as well as the health of the animals and humans. Based on previous studies, infection rate of parasitic helminths is different in various regions of Iran. The current survey was aimed to determine endoparasitic helminths infection in 138 trapped rodents of Kermanshah county, Iran. Mice and rats were trapped using metal snares from January to October 2011 and euthanized. Rodents included 110 Mus musculus (79.00%, 23 Rattus norvegicus (17.00%, and five Rattus rattus (4.00%. The gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts were removed and examined to identify parasitic helminths. The results indicated that 42.02% of examined rodents were infected with eight helminths species, i.e. Trichuris muris (14.49%, Syphacia obvelata (13.76%, Syphacia muris (2.89%, Aspicularis tetrapetra (5.07%, Heterakis spumosa (5.07%, Capillaria hepatica eggs (3.62%, Hyminolepis diminuta (12.30%, and Cystisercus fasciolaris, the larva of Taenia teanieformis (4.34%. Given the results of this study, we concluded that examined rodents were more infected with nematodes than other helminths. As rodents are usually infected with a number of zoonotic parasites, hence control of these animals has an important role in safeguarding public health.

  14. Tissue-Specific Contributions of Paternally Expressed Gene 3 in Lactation and Maternal Care of Mus musculus.

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    Wesley D Frey

    Full Text Available Paternally Expressed Gene 3 (Peg3 is an imprinted gene that controls milk letdown and maternal-caring behaviors. In this study, a conditional knockout allele has been developed in Mus musculus to further characterize these known functions of Peg3 in a tissue-specific manner. The mutant line was first crossed with a germline Cre. The progeny of this cross displayed growth retardation phenotypes. This is consistent with those seen in the previous mutant lines of Peg3, confirming the usefulness of the new mutant allele. The mutant line was subsequently crossed individually with MMTV- and Nkx2.1-Cre lines to test Peg3's roles in the mammary gland and hypothalamus, respectively. According to the results, the milk letdown process was impaired in the nursing females with the Peg3 mutation in the mammary gland, but not in the hypothalamus. This suggests that Peg3's roles in the milk letdown process are more critical in the mammary gland than in the hypothalamus. In contrast, one of the maternal-caring behaviors, nest-building, was interrupted in the females with the mutation in both MMTV- and Nkx2.1-driven lines. Overall, this is the first study to introduce a conditional knockout allele of Peg3 and to further dissect its contribution to mammalian reproduction in a tissue-specific manner.

  15. Discrimination of ultrasonic vocalizations by CBA/CaJ mice (Mus musculus is related to spectrotemporal dissimilarity of vocalizations.

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    Erikson G Neilans

    Full Text Available The function of ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs produced by mice (Mus musculus is a topic of broad interest to many researchers. These USVs differ widely in spectrotemporal characteristics, suggesting different categories of vocalizations, although this has never been behaviorally demonstrated. Although electrophysiological studies indicate that neurons can discriminate among vocalizations at the level of the auditory midbrain, perceptual acuity for vocalizations has yet to be determined. Here, we trained CBA/CaJ mice using operant conditioning to discriminate between different vocalizations and between a spectrotemporally modified vocalization and its original version. Mice were able to discriminate between vocalization types and between manipulated vocalizations, with performance negatively correlating with spectrotemporal similarity. That is, discrimination performance was higher for dissimilar vocalizations and much lower for similar vocalizations. The behavioral data match previous neurophysiological results in the inferior colliculus (IC, using the same stimuli. These findings suggest that the different vocalizations could carry different meanings for the mice. Furthermore, the finding that behavioral discrimination matched neural discrimination in the IC suggests that the IC plays an important role in the perceptual discrimination of vocalizations.

  16. Pengaruh Ekstrak Daun Sambiloto (Andrographis paniculata) terhadap Struktur Mikroanatomi Hepar dan Kadar Glutamat Piruvat Transaminase Serum Mencit (Mus musculus) yang Terpapar Diazinon

    OpenAIRE

    TRI WULANDARI; MARTI HARINI; SHANTI LISTYAWATI

    2007-01-01

    Diazinon is a pesticide which is often using by farmer to kill insect as theenemy of the plant. The over using of pesticide may result in the remaining of diazinon residue in farming product. This residue can cause the damage of body tissue, especially liver. The aim of research were to find out the effect of leaves sambiloto (Andrographis paniculata Ness.) extract on microanatomic structure of liver and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) level of mice (Mus musculus L.) expose...

  17. Aktivitas Penyembuhan Luka Sediaan Topikal Ekstrak Bawang Merah (Allium cepa terhadap Luka Sayat Kulit Mencit (Mus Musculus (THE ACTIVITY OF TOPICAL EXTRACT OF ONIONS (ALLIUM CEPA ON WOUND HEALING PROCESS IN MICE (MUS MUSCULUS

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    Visa Yunanda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a physiological response of the body to restore continuity, structure and function ofthe injured tissue. Onion is one of the plants that are empirically used by the community to heal wounds.The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of topical extract of onions (Allium cepa on woundhealing process in mice (Mus musculus strain BalbC. This study used the posttest-only control groupdesign with completely randomized design (CRD. The samples were 12 male mice with weight ranged of22-32 g divided into four treatments; i.e.: Vaseline, topical extract of onion 5%, topical extract of onion30% and topical extract of onion 55% with 3 replications. Wound healing evaluated macroscopically toobserve hyperemia, wound contraction, granulation, crusting and pus production; and microscopically bycounting the number of fibroblasts on day 10. Hyperemia, granulation, crusting and pus production wereanalyzed descriptively. Wound contraction and the number of fibroblasts were analyzed using ANOVA(p<0.05 and followed with Duncan’s test (p<0,05. Descriptive observations obtained hyperemia lasteduntil day 3, granulation in wounds used topical extract of onion 30% and 55% were faster than the other,crusting lasted until day 6 and the production of pus was not found in any treatment. Statistical testresults showed that topical extract of onion 55% significantly affected wound contraction and topicalextract of onion 30% and 55% significantly affected maturation, which characterized by the decreasednumber of fibroblasts. The results of this study showed that topical extract of onion had significant effect(p<0.05 on wound healing and the effect was in line with the increased concentration of the onion extract.

  18. Devising assisted reproductive technologies for wild-derived strains of mice: 37 strains from five subspecies of Mus musculus.

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    Keiji Mochida

    Full Text Available Wild-derived mice have long offered invaluable experimental models for mouse genetics because of their high evolutionary divergence from laboratory mice. A number of wild-derived strains are available from the RIKEN BioResource Center (BRC, but they have been maintained as living stocks because of the unavailability of assisted reproductive technology (ART. In this study, we sought to devise ART for 37 wild-derived strains from five subspecies of Mus musculus maintained at the BRC. Superovulation of females was effective (more than 15 oocytes per female for 34 out of 37 strains by treatment with either equine chorionic gonadotropin or anti-inhibin serum, depending on their genetic background (subspecies. The collected oocytes could be fertilized in vitro at mean rates of 79.0% and 54.6% by the optimized protocol using fresh or frozen-thawed spermatozoa, respectively. They were cryopreserved at the 2-cell stage by vitrification with an ethylene glycol-based solution. In total, 94.6% of cryopreserved embryos survived the vitrification procedure and restored their normal morphology after warming. A conventional embryo transfer protocol could be applied to 25 out of the 35 strains tested. In the remaining 10 strains, live offspring could be obtained by a modified embryo transfer protocol using cyclosporin A treatment and co-transfer of ICR (laboratory mouse strain embryos. Thus, ART for 37 wild-derived strains was devised successfully and is now routinely used for their preservation and transportation. The information provided here might facilitate broader use and wider distribution of wild-derived mice for biomedical research.

  19. WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF UNGUENTUM DOSAGE FORM OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACTS OF Areca catechu L. NUT IN Mus musculus albinus

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    Azizah Vonna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The activity test of ethanol extract of betel nut ointment (Areca catechu L. in wound healing on mice (Mus musculus albinus has been carried out to determine the ability of the ethanol extract of betel nut ointment in wound healing and determine the concentration which was accelerate the wound healing on mice between 2 concentrations. This experimental research method used completely randomized design (CRD using 20 mices divided into 4 treatment groups ; ointment base, povidone iodine ointment, ethanol extract of betel nut ointment (SEEBP 2% and SEEBP 4%. Each treatment groups was tested in the incision which was made along the 15 mm parallel to the spine (Os. Vetebre with the depth until subcutaneous skin layers. The ointment was applied twice a day for about 21 days and observed changes every day for during the period of observation. The results showed that the average length of time of the scab formation, the scab exfoliation, and the wound healing successively are for the ointment base was 6.6; 10.2 and 18.2 days, povidone iodine ointment was 7; 11.2 and 14.8 days, SEEBP 2% was 5.75; 7.75 and 13.25 days, SEEBP 4% was 4.2; 8.8 and 12.8 days. ANOVA and LSD results of scab formation time showed a significant difference between SEEBP 4% with base ointment and povidone iodine ointment (p <0.05. Results of the exfoliation scab showed a significance difference between SEEBP 2% with base ointment and povidone iodine ointment (p <0.05. The duration of wound healing showed that there was significance difference between SEEBP 2%, SEBP 4% and povidone iodine ointment with ointment base  (p<0.05.Thus, betel nut ointment as an effect on healing process. The concentration which can accelerate wound healing in mice is SEEBP 4%.

  20. Syphacia obvelata (Nematode, Oxyuridae) infecting laboratory mice Mus musculus (Rodentia, Muridae): phylogeny and host-parasite relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gaber, Rewaida

    2016-03-01

    Syphacia obvelata is a pinworm nematode parasite infecting man and laboratory animals in high abundance. This parasitological study was carried out during the period of March 2014-February 2015 to investigate the helminth parasites infecting the laboratory mice Mus musculus in the Animal House at Cairo University, Egypt. The prevalence of S. obvelata in M. musculus was 75.0 %. The extent of infection with S. obvelata is analyzed according to the sex of the host mice. It was shown that the prevalence of male infection was greater than female worms. Morphological characterization revealed that the present Oxyurid species possesses a rounded cephalic end with less developed lips, esophagus divided into cylindrical corpus, and globular bulb supported internally with valvular apparatus; three mamelons are located at the ventral surface with a single chitinized spicule and a gubernaculum provided with an accessory hook in males, and ovijector apparatus opens ventrally by the vulva surrounded by protruded lips in female worms. Body of the male was 0.623-1.130 (0.830 ± 0.11) mm long and 0.092-0.130 (0.110 ± 0.01) mm wide; the esophagus was 0.164-0.280 (0.210 ± 0.01) mm long; the nerve ring and excretory pore are located at 0.035-0.132 (0.073 ± 0.01) and 0.087-0.191 (0.145 ± 0.01) mm from the anterior end, respectively, while the female measured 2.930-4.650 (3.540 ± 0.1) mm long and 0.120-0.232 (0.156 ± 0.001) mm wide; the esophagus was 0.213-0.410 (0.342 ± 0.01) mm long; the nerve ring, excretory pore, and vulval opening are located at 0.026-0.157 (0.121 ± 0.01), 0.134-0.243 (0.195 ± 0.01), and 0.323-0.632 (0.546 ± 0.11) mm from the anterior end, respectively; eggs measured 0.120-0.139 (0.129 ± 0.001) mm long and 0.030-0.052 (0.045 ± 0.001) mm wide. It compared morphometrically with other Syphacia species described previously and showed little differences in

  1. Efecto del extracto del fruto de Physalis peruviana "tomatillo" en Mus musculus var. swis con hiperlipidemia inducida.

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    Julio Campos Florián

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de la presente i nvestigación fue determinar la actividad hipolipidémica del fruto de Physalis peruviana “tomatillo” en un modelo de hiperlipidemia aguda inducida con tritón. Se utilizaron Mus musculus var. swis machos como animales de experimentación. Se trabajó con cuatro grupos de ratones, el grupo blanco recibió agua destilada por vía oral y solución salina fisiológica por vía intraperitoneal, el grupo control recibió agua destilada por vía oral y tritón por vía intraperitoneal, el grupo problema 1 recibió por vía oral 0.05g/100g del extracto de Physalis peruviana y tritón por vía intraperitoneal y el grupo problema 2 recibió por vía oral 0.2g/100g del extracto de Physalis peruviana y tritón por vía intraperitoneal. Luego de 24 horas de administrar los tratamientos se re alizaron las mediciones en suero de las concentraciones de colesterol y triglicéridos. Los niveles promedio de colesterol (mg/dL fueron: 58.87±11.54 (blanco, 121.71±15.00 (control, 58.08±9. 21 (problema 1 y 66.78±16.77 (problema 2. Los niveles promedio de triglicéridos (g/L fueron: 0.48±0.07 (blanco, 1.84±0.18 (control, 0.34±0.10 (problema 1 y 0.94±0.25 (problema 2. Se encontró reducciones significativas (p<0.000, tanto de las concentraciones de colesterol como de triglicéridos en relación a las o btenidas en el grupo tratado sólo con tritón.

  2. Phylogenetic relationships of intraspecific forms of the house mouse Mus musculus: Analysis of variability of the control region (D-loop) of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, A N; Stakheev, V V; Bogdanov, A S; Fomina, E S; Kotenkova, E V

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or D-loop of 96 house mice (Mus musculus) from Russia, Moldova, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan has been used to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships and phylogeographic patterns of intraspecific forms. New data on the phylogenetic structure of the house mouse are presented. Three phylogroups can be reliably distinguished in the eastern part of the M. musculus species range, the first one mainly comprising the haplotypes of mice from Transcaucasia (Armenia); the second one, the haplotypes of mice from Kazakhstan; and the third one, the haplotypes of mice from Siberia and some other regions. The morphological subspecies M. m. wagneri and M. m. gansuensis have proved to be genetically heterogeneous and did not form discrete phylogroups in the phylogenetic tree.

  3. Toxicological Evaluation of Essential Oil From the Leaves of Croton argyrophyllus (Euphorbiaceae) on Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) and Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, R C D; Silva, S L C E; Souza, I A; Gualberto, S A; Carvalho, K S; Santos, F R; Carvalho, M G

    2017-01-27

    Plant-derived essential oils can be used as insecticides for vector control. However, to establish their safety, it is necessary to perform toxicological studies. Herein, we evaluated the chemical composition and insecticidal activity of the essential oil from the leaves of Croton argyrophyllus on the third- and fourth-instar larvae and adult Aedes aegypti (L., 1762). We also evaluated the acute toxicity of the essential oil in adult female Mus musculus The lethal concentration 50 (LC50) and 90 (LC90) of C. argyrophyllus essential oil on larvae of Ae. aegypti were 0.31 and 0.70 mg ml(-1), respectively, and 5.92 and 8.94 mg ml(-1), respectively, on Ae. aegypti adults. The major components of the essential oil were spathulenol (22.80%), (E)-caryophyllene (15.41%), α-pinene (14.07%), and bicyclogermacrene (10.43%). It also displayed acute toxicity in adults of Mus musculus; the intraperitoneal and oral lethal dose 50 (LD50) were 2,000 mg kg(-1) and 2,500 mg kg(-1), respectively. The results showed that the essential oil from C. argyrophyllus leaves has insecticidal activity on Ae. aegypti larvae and adults at an average lethal concentration below the median lethal dose needed to cause acute toxicity in the common mouse.

  4. PENGARUH TRITERPEN TOTAL PEGAGAN (Centella asiatica (L Urban TERHADAP FUNGSI KOGNITIF BELAJAR DAN MENGINGAT PADA MENCIT JANTAN ALBINO (Mus musculus YANG DIHAMBAT DENGAN SKOPOLAMIN

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    Herlina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pegagan (Centella asiatica (L Urban has been described to posses CNS effects such as improving cognitive function, learning and memory. The aim of the research was to evaluate the effects of total triterpen’s pegagan extract on cognitive functions as the learning and memory performance in male albino mice (Mus musculus inhibited by scopolamine. The research design was Complete Randomized Design (RAL – factorial on thirty six mice divided into 4 groups. One control group received only aquabidest (negative control. Three treatment groups received total triterpen 16 mg/kg BW, 32 mg/kg BW orally and piracetam 500 mg/kg BW by intra peritoneally (positive control for 21 days. Data indicating learning and memory process of all subjects were obtained from one-trial passive avoidance test. Data were analyzed by two way ANOVA and BNT (p0,05. In conclusion, total triterpen from pegagan (Centella asiatica (L Urban improved learning ability and memory of male albino mice (Mus musculus even though, it was inhibited by scopolamine.

  5. Anti-cholesterol activity test of tanjung (Mimusops elengi L.) leaf extract in the water using in vivo method in mice (Mus musculus L.) DDY-strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristantini, Dewi; Pradana, Bhayangkara Tegar

    2017-02-01

    High cholesterol level in blood is one of deadly cardiovascular disease's causes which is triggered by accumulation of cholesterol patching in blood vessels through heart and using synthetic medicine has several side effect. However, tanjung (M. elengi) which abundant in Indonesia is believed that it can strengthen and clean plaque in blood vessels wall. In this study, anti-cholesterol activity of tanjung (M. elengi) leaf extract in the water will be tested by in vivo method to 6 group of mice (Mus musculus) DDY-strain. The result showed that tanjung (M. elengi) leaf extract has significant effect to decrease total cholesterol level of mice, more extract given to mice, it will give higher cholesterol decreasing. TE 3 can decrease cholesterol level as much as 36%. In this study, it can be concluded that tanjung (M. elengi) leaf extract can be used as cholesterol decreasing medicine.

  6. Effect of VCO to leucocyte differential count, glucose levels and blood creatinine of hyperglycemic and ovalbumin sensitized Mus musculus Balb/c

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    RUBEN DHARMAWAN

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Handajani NS, Dharmawan R. 2009. Effect of VCO to leucocyte differential count, glucose levels and blood creatinine of hyperglycemic and ovalbumin sensitized Mus musculus Balb/c. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 1-8. Chemical medicines and insulin can decrease glucose blood level on hyperglycemic patients with macro vascular side effect. Diabetes and allergy incidences are influenced by quality and quantity of leucocytes. Lauric acid within VCO reports decreased glucose blood level of diabetes and some allergy incidents. The purpose of the study is to know the effect of VCO on glucose blood level, differential leucocytes count and creatinine blood level on hyperglycemic and normoglicemic ovalbumin sensitized mice. Forty five (45 male (mice of Mus musculus Balb/c with average weight of 35 g are divided into 9 groups with 5 repetitions, those are 4 non alloxan groups and 5 alloxan induced hyperglycemic groups. On 22nd day to 36th day they are sensitize to ovalbumin as allergen. Blood sample was obtained by orbital vena using heparin as anti coagulant in order measuring glucose blood level by GOD method to 6 times, on 1st, 4th, 18th, 22nd, 32nd and 37th days, then are tested by ANOVA followed by DMRT 0.05. On 37th day, differential leucocytes are determined, blood level are counted, and then compared to normal value. The result of this study were that within differential leucocytes count of hyperglycemic mice, neutrophile percentage were much lower than the normal value (3.22%, and lymphocyte percentage were much higher than the normal value (94.54%. Consumed 0.003 mL/35 g VCO more 18 days decreased glucose blood level on hyperglycemic mice, decreased basophile percentage of ovalbumin sensitized mice, normalized neutrophile percentage no increased creatinine blood level.

  7. Two New Species of Demodex (Acari: Demodecidae) with a Redescription of Demodex musculi and Data on Parasitism in Mus musculus (Rodentia: Muridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2015-07-01

    This article describes two new skin mite species found on the house mouse Mus musculus L., 1758. Demodex marculus sp. nov. is a very small demodecid mite (adult stages, on average, 99 µm in length) found in mouse skin in the abdomen, back, limbs, and anal area. It is characterized by relatively large bossing hammer-shaped supracoxal spines, embedded in the trapezoidal gnathosoma. Demodex fusiformis sp. nov., in turn, is a little larger (adult stages on average 111 µm in length), with a small oval gnathosoma equipped with fine, knob-like supracoxal spines. It was found in the skin of abdomen, back, and limbs. Moreover, Demodex musculi (Oudemans, 1897) was redescribed, which is small demodecid mite (adult stages on average 142 µm in length) and characterized by relatively large morphological variation and considerable sexual dimorphism. The characteristic feature of this species is the strongly elongated and rectangular gnathosoma equipped with very large wedge-shaped supracoxal spines. D. musculi was found in the skin of various, haired regions of the mice body (head, neck, abdomen, back, limbs, genital-anal region, and tail). Moreover, one more demodecid mite was found in the skin of the examined mice, it was Demodex flagellurus Bukva, 1985, which was found only in the genital area. Overall infection of Mus musculus L. by all species of Demodex was with the prevalence of 100%, mean intensity of 24.0, and range of intensity of 1-109. Despite high infection levels, no symptoms of parasitosis were observed in the hosts.

  8. Helminth Infections of Meriones persicus (Persian Jird, Mus musculus (House Mice and Cricetulus migratorius (Grey Hamster: A Cross-Sectional Study in Meshkin-Shahr District, Northwest Iran

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    Zabiholah ZAREI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rodents have important role as reservoirs of different parasites. The aim of this study was to determine helminth parasites of abundant rodents in Meshkin-Shahr, Ardabil Province northwest Iran.Methods: From April 2014 to March 2015; 205 rodents including 118 Meriones persicus, 63 Mus musculus and 24 Cricetulus migratorius were collected, using live traps. All rodents were dissected and their different tissues examined for infectivity with helminth parasites.Results: Overall, 74.2% of rodents were infected with helminth parasites. The rate of infectivity in M. persicus, M. musculus and C. migratorius was 82.2%, 61.9%, 66.7%, respectively. In general, among all 205 rodents, the species and infection rates of helminthes were as follows: Nematoda: Trichuris sp. (46.8 %, Capillaria hepatica (18.1%, Syphacia frederici (14.2%, Aspicularis tetraptera (3.4%, Trichuris rhombomidis (2%, Heligmosomom sp. (2%, Streptopharagus kuntzi (0.5%, Spiruridae gen. sp. (0.5%; Cestoda: Hymenolepis nana fraterna (16.6% Hymenolepis diminuta (7.3% tetratiridium of Mesocestoides sp. (1%, Paranoplocephala sp. (0.5%, Cysticercus fasciolaris (0.5%, Taenia endothoracicus larva (0.5%, and Acanthocephala: Moniliformis moniliformis (18.5%.Conclusions: Variable species of helminthes circulate in the rodents of the study area. Presence of several zoonotic species highlights the potential risk of infections for public health.

  9. Helminth Infections of Meriones persicus (Persian Jird), Mus musculus (House Mice) and Cricetulus migratorius (Grey Hamster): A Cross-Sectional Study in Meshkin-Shahr District, Northwest Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZAREI, Zabiholah; MOHEBALI, Mehdi; HEIDARI, Zahra; DAVOODI, Jaber; SHABESTARI, Afshin; MOTEVALLI HAGHI, Afsaneh; KHANALIHA, Khadijeh; KIA, Eshrat Beigom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rodents have important role as reservoirs of different parasites. The aim of this study was to determine helminth parasites of abundant rodents in Meshkin-Shahr, Ardabil Province northwest Iran. Methods: From April 2014 to March 2015; 205 rodents including 118 Meriones persicus, 63 Mus musculus and 24 Cricetulus migratorius were collected, using live traps. All rodents were dissected and their different tissues examined for infectivity with helminth parasites. Results: Overall, 74.2% of rodents were infected with helminth parasites. The rate of infectivity in M. persicus, M. musculus and C. migratorius was 82.2%, 61.9%, 66.7%, respectively. In general, among all 205 rodents, the species and infection rates of helminthes were as follows: Nematoda: Trichuris sp. (46.8%), Capillaria hepatica (18.1%), Syphacia frederici (14.2%), Aspicularis tetraptera (3.4%), Trichuris rhombomidis (2%), Heligmosomom sp. (2%), Streptopharagus kuntzi (0.5%), Spiruridae gen. sp. (0.5%); Cestoda: Hymenolepis nana fraterna (16.6%) Hymenolepis diminuta (7.3%) tetratiridium of Mesocestoides sp. (1%), Paranoplocephala sp. (0.5%), Cysticercus fasciolaris (0.5%), Taenia endothoracicus larva (0.5%), and Acanthocephala: Moniliformis moniliformis (18.5%). Conclusions: Variable species of helminthes circulate in the rodents of the study area. Presence of several zoonotic species highlights the potential risk of infections for public health. PMID:28096855

  10. Classical Mus musculus Igκ enhancers support transcription but not high level somatic hypermutation from a V-lambda promoter in chicken DT40 cells.

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    Naga Rama Kothapalli

    Full Text Available Somatic hypermutation (SHM of immunoglobulin genes is initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID in activated B cells. This process is strictly dependent on transcription. Hence, cis-acting transcriptional control elements have been proposed to target SHM to immunoglobulin loci. The Mus musculus Igκ locus is regulated by the intronic enhancer (iE/MAR and the 3' enhancer (3'E, and multiple studies using transgenic and knock-out approaches in mice and cell lines have reported somewhat contradictory results about the function of these enhancers in AID-mediated sequence diversification. Here we show that the M. musculus iE/MAR and 3'E elements are active solely as transcriptional enhancer when placed in the context of the IGL locus in Gallus gallus DT40 cells, but they are very inefficient in targeting AID-mediated mutation events to this locus. This suggests that either key components of the cis-regulatory targeting elements reside outside the murine Igκ transcriptional enhancer sequences, or that the targeting of AID activity to Ig loci occurs by largely species-specific mechanisms.

  11. Peroral Echinococcus multilocularis egg inoculation in Myodes glareolus, Mesocricetus auratus and Mus musculus (CD-1 IGS and C57BL/6j)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woolsey, Ian David; Jensen, Per Moestrup; Deplazes, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Echinococcus multilocularis transmission predominantly occurs in Europe between the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and various species of rodent intermediate hosts. We infected 3 species of rodent, Myodes glareolus (n = 47), Mesocricetus auratus (n = 11) and outbred Mus musculus (CD-1 IGS) (n = 9...

  12. Whole Genome Sequence of Two Wild-Derived Mus musculus domesticus Inbred Strains, LEWES/EiJ and ZALENDE/EiJ, with Different Diploid Numbers

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    Andrew P. Morgan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild-derived mouse inbred strains are becoming increasingly popular for complex traits analysis, evolutionary studies, and systems genetics. Here, we report the whole-genome sequencing of two wild-derived mouse inbred strains, LEWES/EiJ and ZALENDE/EiJ, of Mus musculus domesticus origin. These two inbred strains were selected based on their geographic origin, karyotype, and use in ongoing research. We generated 14× and 18× coverage sequence, respectively, and discovered over 1.1 million novel variants, most of which are private to one of these strains. This report expands the number of wild-derived inbred genomes in the Mus genus from six to eight. The sequence variation can be accessed via an online query tool; variant calls (VCF format and alignments (BAM format are available for download from a dedicated ftp site. Finally, the sequencing data have also been stored in a lossless, compressed, and indexed format using the multi-string Burrows-Wheeler transform. All data can be used without restriction.

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF POMELO JUICE (CITRUS MAXIMA VAR NAMBANGAN, VITAMIN C AND LYCOPENE TOWARD MDA LEVEL OF MOUSE (MUS MUSCULUS HEPATIC TISSUE WHICH EXPOSURE BY OCHRATOXINA

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    Badriyah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is intended on understanding the potency of Pomelo juice (Citrus var nambangan, vitamin C, lycopene, and the combination of vitamin C and lycopene as the antioxidant toward the hepatic tissue of MDA level on mouse (Mus musculus as consequence of Ochratoxin A (OTA. The 35 male mice (Mus musculus aged between two until three months had strain balb/c, they are randomly divided into seven group of treatments (n=5, which are K0, K1, K2, P1, P2, P3, and P4, each of this controlled groups is only given the adjuvant Olive Oil (K0, adjuvant CMCNa (K1, ochratoxin A (K2, given the Pomelo juice with dosage of 0,5 ml/30 gram of Weight/day (P1, vitamin C with dosage of 5,85 g (P2, lycopene dosage as of 0,1025 g (P3, and the combination of vitamin C dosage as of 5,85 g of mouse weight with the lycopene as of 0,1025 g/30g of weight (P4. In group of K0, K1, K2, the treatment ingredients are given for a week which is in the third week, meanwhile for the group of P1, P2, P3, and P4 the antioxidant compound are given for two weeks starting from the second week, which is in the beginning of the third week is given the ochratoxin A with dosage of 1 mg/kg of Weight/day for a week. At the day of 21 all the experimental animals are scarified for the data collecting. The result of statistic analytical within Kruskal Wallis test that continued with Mann-Whitney test indicate that there is a real different between treatments (p0, 05, lycopene, as well as the combination of vitamin C and lycopene in preventing the free radicals reactivity as the consequence of OTA exposure on mouse’ hepatic.

  14. A new species of the genus Demodex Owen, 1843 (Acari: Demodecidae) from the ear canals of the house mouse Mus musculus L. (Rodentia: Muridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdebska, Joanna N; Rolbiecki, Leszek

    2015-06-01

    A new species Demodex conicus n. sp. is described based on adult and juvenile stages from the ear canals of the house mouse Mus musculus L. in Poland. The new species is most similar to D. auricularis Izdebska, Rolbiecki & Fryderyk, 2014 from the ear canals of the wood mouse Apodemus sylvaticus (L.), but differs in the following features: the gnathosoma is triangular, the supracoxal spines (setae elc.p) are conical, the spines on the terminal segment of palp are four, the striation on opisthosoma is fine but dense, the vulva is located at a distance of c.17 µm from posterior level of legs IV, and the male genital opening is located at the level of legs I. The differences also relate to body size and proportions, female D. conicus n. sp. being, on average slightly larger, and male significantly larger than D. auricularis. Males of the new species also have longer and more massive opisthosoma than males of D. auricularis. Demodex conicus n. sp. was found in 17.5% of the mice studied from different locations in Poland.

  15. Expression of a soluble form of iodotyrosine deiodinase for active site characterization by engineering the native membrane protein from Mus musculus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, Jennifer M.; McTamney, Patrick M.; Rokita, Steven E. (Maryland)

    2012-06-27

    Reductive deiodination is critical for thyroid function and represents an unusual exception to the more common oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms of dehalogenation in mammals. Studies on the reductive processes have been limited by a lack of convenient methods for heterologous expression of the appropriate proteins in large scale. The enzyme responsible for iodide salvage in the thyroid, iodotyrosine deodinase, is now readily generated after engineering its gene from Mus musculus. High expression of a truncated derivative lacking the membrane domain at its N-terminal was observed in Sf9 cells, whereas expression in Pichia pastoris remained low despite codon optimization. Ultimately, the desired expression in Escherichia coli was achieved after replacing the two conserved Cys residues of the deiodinase with Ala and fusing the resulting protein to thioredoxin. This final construct provided abundant enzyme for crystallography and mutagenesis. Utility of the E. coli system was demonstrated by examining a set of active site residues critical for binding to the zwitterionic portion of substrate.

  16. Peroral Echinococcus multilocularis egg inoculation in Myodes glareolus, Mesocricetus auratus and Mus musculus (CD-1 IGS and C57BL/6j

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    Ian David Woolsey

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Echinococcus multilocularis transmission predominantly occurs in Europe between the red fox (Vulpes vulpes and various species of rodent intermediate hosts. We infected 3 species of rodent, Myodes glareolus (n = 47, Mesocricetus auratus (n = 11 and outbred Mus musculus (CD-1 IGS (n = 9 with an E. multilocularis egg suspension that contained 100 eggs with viable oncospheres and performed post mortem examination 6, 8 (M. glareolus and 10 weeks post inoculation (wpi. C57BL/6j mice (n = 4 were used as positive controls as they have been shown to exhibit macroscopic liver lesions 4 wpi. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to experimentally assess susceptibility in the ostensibly competent host M. glareolus. Lesions were only detected in 2 of 47 M. glareolus (4.3% at 8 and 10 wpi and although both contained protoscolices (1675 at 8 wpi and 88 at 12 wpi the low percentage of infected animals brings into question their role as transmitters of the parasite. Significant differences were observed between inbred and outbred mice with E. multilocularis infection in the former demonstrating increased establishment (p ≤ 0.0001 and growth (p ≤ 0.0001. No lesions were found in all 11 M. auratus.

  17. [Histometry of the sublingual gland in male and female mice (Mus musculus) infected with the RAL strain of the Chagas parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi].

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    de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Lopes, Ruberval Armando; Sala, Miguel Angel; Abrahão, Ana Amélia Carraro; Rosa, Domingues Ribeiro

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze histologically and histometrically the sublingual gland of mice infected with the RAL strain of T. cruzi, according to the sex. Swiss mice (Mus musculus) were inoculated with 2 x 10(4) blood trypomastigotes of the RAL strain of T. cruzi. In the peak of the parasitemia (12th day) the mice were sacrificed, and the sublingual glands were fixed in ALFAC. HE-stained histological sections were evaluated histometrically. The parasitemia was higher in females. Histopatologically, acini of the infected animals were smaller, with scanty production of secretion, and smaller striated ducts. The nuclei of the demilunes were smaller and showed amastigote nests in the cytoplasm. Karyometrically, nuclei of the acini, demilunes and striated ducts were smaller in the infected mice. Stereologically, it was observed that relative volumes of acini and ducts were smaller and, inversely, relative volumen were greater for the conjunctive tissue in the infected males. The surface densities of acini and ducts were bigger and the diameter and thickness of the wall were smaller in this group. On the other hand, relative volume of acini was smaller and those of the ducts and conjunctive tissue were bigger in the infected females. The diameter and thickness of the wall of acini were smaller, and those of the striated ducts were bigger in this group. The RAL strain of T. cruzi caused general atrophy in the sublingual gland, with numerous nests of parasites in the glandular parenchyma.

  18. Permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared to reduce blood glucose level and hepatic function in mus musculus with diabetic mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhariningsih; Basuki Notobroto, Hari; Winarni, Dwi; Achmad Hussein, Saikhu; Anggono Prijo, Tri

    2017-05-01

    Blood contains several electrolytes with positive (cation) and negative (anion) ion load. Both electrolytes deliver impulse synergistically adjusting body needs. Those electrolytes give specific effect to external disturbance such as electric, magnetic, even infrared field. A study has been conducted to reduce blood glucose level and liver function, in type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients, using Biophysics concept which uses combination therapy of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared. This study used 48 healthy mice (mus musculus), male, age 3-4 weeks, with approximately 25-30 g in weight. Mice was fed with lard as high fat diet orally, before Streptozotocin (STZ) induction become diabetic mice. Therapy was conducted by putting mice in a chamber that emits the combination of permanent magnetic field, electric field, and infrared, every day for 1 hour for 28 days. There were 4 combinations of therapy/treatment, namely: (1) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared; (2) permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, without infrared; (3) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, and infrared; and (4) permanent magnetic field, alternating electric field, without infrared. The results of therapy show that every combination is able to reduce blood glucose level, AST, and ALT. However, the best result is by using combination of permanent magnetic field, direct electric field, and infrared.

  19. Pengaruh Ekstrak Daun Sambiloto (Andrographis paniculata terhadap Struktur Mikroanatomi Hepar dan Kadar Glutamat Piruvat Transaminase Serum Mencit (Mus musculus yang Terpapar Diazinon

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    TRI WULANDARI

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Diazinon is a pesticide which is often using by farmer to kill insect as theenemy of the plant. The over using of pesticide may result in the remaining of diazinon residue in farming product. This residue can cause the damage of body tissue, especially liver. The aim of research were to find out the effect of leaves sambiloto (Andrographis paniculata Ness. extract on microanatomic structure of liver and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT level of mice (Mus musculus L. exposed to diazinon. The research used Compelete Random Design with five treatments. The treatment of each group were using CMC 1% (placebo control, diazinon solution 40 mg/Kg BW (negative ontrol and the leaves sambiloto extract 12,6; 25,2 and 37,8 mg /kg BW. Diazinon solution was given within 10 days and continued with extract of sambiloto leaves also within 10 days. Parameter observed was the microanatomic structure of liver and serum GPT level. The data was analyzed of Analysis of Varians (Anova and continued with DMRT at significance 5%. The result of the research showed that the giving of the extract of sambiloto leaves in some dose variation degree is significantly influential to repair the microanatomic structure of liver and to decrease the serum GPT level was 37,8 mg/Kg BW.

  20. Anti-hyperglycemic effects of aqueous Lenzites betulina extracts from the Philippines on the blood glucose levels of the ICR mice(Mus musculus)

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    Faizal Rajeeb Mangudadatu Hussin; Rodel Jonathan Santos Vitor Ⅱ; Julie Ann Oraa Joaquin; Melody Mendoza Clerigo; Anamy Ma.Caterial Paano

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the anti-hyperglycemic effects of aqueous Lenzites betulina(L. betulina) extracts on normoglycemic glucose-loaded mice.Methods: Different doses of aqueous extract from L. betulina were administered to 45 ICR mice(Mus musculus) to determine whether there was an effect of L. betulina extracts on the blood glucose level of the ICR mice. Aqueous extracts of L. betulina were orally gavaged to mice using oral glucose tolerance test. A total of five groups were used to determine the effect of the fungi on blood glucose of the mice. Group A(positive control)was given 16.7 mg/kg glimepiride; Group B(negative control) was given distilled water;Group C(low dosage) was given 200 mg/kg aqueous extract; Group D(mid dosage) was given 400 mg/kg aqueous extract and Group E(high dosage) was given 800 mg/kg aqueous extract. Baseline blood glucose value was firstly acquired before induction of hyperglycemia through D-glucose, after which another check on blood glucose was made after 0.5 h. Immediately, after the acquisition of hyperglycemic blood glucose level, the individual administration of treatments were done. After that, three blood collections were done spanning 3 h with 1 h interval.Results: The low dose(200 mg/kg) and the mid dose(400 mg/kg) of L. betulina extracts were significantly different(P 0.05) from its corresponding baseline value, acting faster than the positive control(glimepiride), which only became significantly different(P < 0.05) at the 2nd hour.Conclusions: Aqueous L. betulina extract is able to produce hypoglycemic effects on the mice with all doses, which are able to normalize blood glucose levels at varying times.

  1. The regeneration of thermal wound on mice skin (Mus Musculus) after Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation for cancer therapy candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apsari, R.; Nahdliyatun, E.; Winarni, D.

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate the regeneration of mice skin tissue (Mus Musculus) irradiated by Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser and morphological change due to Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation compared to conventional heating (hairdryer). The 2-3 month of twenty-seven mice were used for experimental animals. Mice were incised in the dorsum by the damage effect of laser energy dose (therapeutic dose) of 29.5 J/cm2 with 10 seconds of exposure time, 10 Hz of repetition rate, and 100 pulses of the given single pulse energy. The mice skin tissue was injuried by hairdryer to get burned effect. Mice were divided into three groups, Group I (control) were not treated by anything, Group II were treated by Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser irradiation and sacrificed on (0, 1, 3, 5) days, and Group III were treated by hairdryer then sacrificed on (0, 1, 3, 5) days. Pathology examination showed that the energy of 29,5 J/cm2 dose produced the hole effect (ablation) through the hypodermic layer caused by optical breakdown and collagen coagulation. Thus, the 60 °C temperature of burn showed coagulation necrosis because piknosis discovered in the injured area. The regeneration process showed that the mice skin tissue's ability to regenerate was irradiated by fast laser because of the focus of Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser. It was showed by the scab releases on third day and completely reepithelialization formation on the fifth day. The collagen fibers distribution was same as normal skin tissue on day 5 and so did angiogenesis. Therefore, Q-Switch Nd: YAG laser can be applied for problems of dermatology medical therapies, especially melasma, nevus of ota and tatto therapy. For skin cancer therapy application, energy dose of unregenerated skin tissue is chosen because the death expected effect is permanent.

  2. Influence of Polysaccharide Krestin from Coriolus versicolor Extract on Nitrite and Malondialdehyde Concencentrations of Mus musculus Serum Exposed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Sri Puji Astuti Wahyuningsih

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major infection agent of tuberculosis that is controlled by the response of cell-mediated immunity. It is macrophages and cytolytic T lymphocytes. Activated macrophages will produce free radicals. Excessive free radicals cause tissue damage. Polysaccharide krestin contains β-glucan. It is a scavenger of free radicals. This research aimed to identify the influence of polysaccharide krestin from C. versicolor on nitrite and malondialdehyde concentrations of mice serum exposed by M. tuberculosis. Nitrite concentration was determined by nitrite assay. Malondialdehyde concentration was determined by TBARS assay. The result showed that adding polysaccharide krestin before exposure (P1 and adding polysaccharide krestin before-after exposure (P3 had the best potential to decrease nitrite concentration. Nitrite concentrations of P1 and P3 were 1.364 ± 0.523 M and 1.456 ± 0.712 M respectively. Meanwhile, P1 group and adding polysaccharide krestin after exposure (P2 had the best potential to decrease malondialdehyde concentration. Malondialdehyde concentrations of P1 and P2 were 1125.86 ± 97.96 µM and 953.86 ± 328.16 µM respectively. Their nitrite and malondialdehyde concentrations decreased, compared to K and K- groups. The research conclusion was that adding polysaccharide krestin before exposure could decrease both nitrite and malondialdehyde concentrations.How to CiteWahyuningsih, S., Pramudya, M., & Sugiharto, S. (2016. Influence of Polysaccharide Krestin from Coriolus versicolor Extract on Nitrite and Malondialdehyde Concencentrations of Mus musculus Serum Exposed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(1, 12-17.

  3. A Comparison of mucosal surface area and villous histology in small intestines of the Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) and the mouse (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Brun, Antonio; Price, Edwin R; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo P; Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Studies on birds have led to the hypothesis that increased intestinal absorption between enterocytes (paracellular) evolved as a compensation for smaller intestinal size in fliers, which was perhaps selected to minimize the mass of digesta carried. This hypothesis predicts that bats will also exhibit relatively reduced intestinal size and high paracellular absorption, compared with nonflying mammals. Published studies on three bat species indicate relatively high paracellular absorption. One mechanism for increasing paracellular absorption per cm2 small intestine (SI) is increased number of tight junctions (TJs) across which paracellular absorption occurs. To our knowledge, we provide the first comparative analysis of enterocyte size and number in flying and nonflying mammals. Intestines of insectivorous bats Tadarida brasiliensis were compared with Mus musculus using hematoxylin and eosin staining method. Bats had shorter and narrower SIs than mice, and after correction for body size difference by normalizing to mass3/4, the bats had 40% less nominal surface area than the mouse, as predicted. Villous enhancement of surface area was 90% greater in the bat than in the mouse, mainly because of longer villi and a greater density of villi in bat intestines. Bat and mouse were similar in enterocyte diameter. Bats exceeded mice by 54.4% in villous area per cm length SI and by 95% in number of enterocytes per cm2 of the nominal surface area of the SI. Therefore, an increased density of TJs per cm2 SI may be a mechanistic explanation that helps to understand the high paracellular absorption observed in bats compared to nonflying mammals.

  4. Influence of Polysaccharide Krestin from Coriolus versicolor Extract on Nitrite and Malondialdehyde Concencentrations of Mus musculus Serum Exposed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Puji Astuti Wahyuningsih

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major infection agent of tuberculosis that is controlled by the response of cell-mediated immunity. It is macrophages and cytolytic T lymphocytes. Activated macrophages will produce free radicals. Excessive free radicals cause tissue damage. Polysaccharide krestin contains β-glucan. It is a scavenger of free radicals. This research aimed to identify the influence of polysaccharide krestin from C. versicolor on nitrite and malondialdehyde concentrations of mice serum exposed by M. tuberculosis. Nitrite concentration was determined by nitrite assay. Malondialdehyde concentration was determined by TBARS assay. The result showed that adding polysaccharide krestin before exposure (P1 and adding polysaccharide krestin before-after exposure (P3 had the best potential to decrease nitrite concentration. Nitrite concentrations of P1 and P3 were 1.364 ± 0.523 M and 1.456 ± 0.712 M respectively. Meanwhile, P1 group and adding polysaccharide krestin after exposure (P2 had the best potential to decrease malondialdehyde concentration. Malondialdehyde concentrations of P1 and P2 were 1125.86 ± 97.96 µM and 953.86 ± 328.16 µM respectively. Their nitrite and malondialdehyde concentrations decreased, compared to K and K- groups. The research conclusion was that adding polysaccharide krestin before exposure could decrease both nitrite and malondialdehyde concentrations.How to CiteWahyuningsih, S., Pramudya, M., & Sugiharto, S. (2016. Influence of Polysaccharide Krestin from Coriolus versicolor Extract on Nitrite and Malondialdehyde Concencentrations of Mus musculus Serum Exposed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(1, 12-17.

  5. Of mice and the 'Age of Discovery': the complex history of colonization of the Azorean archipelago by the house mouse (Mus musculus) as revealed by mitochondrial DNA variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, S I; Mathias, M L; Searle, J B

    2015-01-01

    Humans have introduced many species onto remote oceanic islands. The house mouse (Mus musculus) is a human commensal and has consequently been transported to oceanic islands around the globe as an accidental stowaway. The history of these introductions can tell us not only about the mice themselves but also about the people that transported them. Following a phylogeographic approach, we used mitochondrial D-loop sequence variation (within an 849- to 864-bp fragment) to study house mouse colonization of the Azores. A total of 239 sequences were obtained from all nine islands, and interpretation was helped by previously published Iberian sequences and 66 newly generated Spanish sequences. A Bayesian analysis revealed presence in the Azores of most of the D-loop clades previously described in the domesticus subspecies of the house mouse, suggesting a complex colonization history of the archipelago as a whole from multiple geographical origins, but much less heterogeneity (often single colonization?) within islands. The expected historical link with mainland Portugal was reflected in the pattern of D-loop variation of some of the islands but not all. A more unexpected association with a distant North European source area was also detected in three islands, possibly reflecting human contact with the Azores prior to the 15th century discovery by Portuguese mariners. Widening the scope to colonization of the Macaronesian islands as a whole, human linkages between the Azores, Madeira, the Canaries, Portugal and Spain were revealed through the sharing of mouse sequences between these areas. From these and other data, we suggest mouse studies may help resolve historical uncertainties relating to the 'Age of Discovery'.

  6. Seasonal effects on the hematology and blood plasma proteins of two species of mice Mus musculus domesticus and M. spretus (Rodentia: Muridae from Portugal

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    António Mira

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Blood samples were taken from Mus musculus domesticus (Rutty, 1772 and M. spretus (Lataste, 1883, live-trapped at one month intervals, from September 88 to July 89, in the district of Lisbon, Portugal. The seasonal hematological variations in the commensal species, M. musculus domesticus, were characterized by an increase in red blood cells, hemoglobin and hematocrit values in winter which reverse during summer. On the contrary, in M. spretus hematocrit values slightly change throughout the year. In both species the albumin/globulin ratio was low in spring and high in autumn. These results were analysed and discussed taking into account environmental factors and physiological conditions of mice. Riassunto Effetti stagionali sull'ematologia e le proteine del plasma di Mus musculus domesticus e M. spretus (Rodentia: Muridae in Portogallo - I campioni di sangue provengono da individui di Mus musculus domesticus (Rutty, 1772 e M. spretus (Lataste, 1883. Gli animali sono stati catturati vivi ogni mese, da settembre 88 a luglio 89, nel distretto di Lisbona, in Portogallo. Le variazioni stagionali ematologiche nella specie commensale, M. m. domesticus, sono caratterizzate da un incremento di cellule rosse del sangue, di emoglobina e dei valori di ematocrito in inverno che assumono un andamento opposto in estate. Al contrario, in M. spretus i valori di ematocrito non cambiano sensibilmente durante tutto l'anno. In entrambe le specie il rapporto albumina/globulina risulta basso in primavera e alto in autunno. Questi risultati sono stati analizzati e discussi tenendo conto dei fattori ambientali e le condizioni fisiologiche dei topi.

  7. Evidencias empíricas de regularidades estadísticas y leyes de potencia en los genomas de Arabidopsis thaliana, Oriza sativa y Mus musculus

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    Martha I Almanza P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available La masiva cantidad de datos biológicos provenientes de las disciplinas "ómicas" y su aprovechamiento en el mejoramiento genético vegetal requiere de nuevos abordajes teóricos y estadísticos que describan de forma satisfactoria principios generales en los genomas. El total de secuencias de los genes de los genomas vegetales de Arabidopsis thaliana y Oriza sativa y del genoma animal Mus musculus fueron extraídas y depuradas de la base de datos pública del Genebank mediante el diseño de algoritmos en lenguaje de programación Python. Se analizaron las distribuciones de las variables frecuencia de uso y tamaño de los genes, exones e intrones por cromosoma y entre genomas. Los resultados señalaron que las variables presentan patrones de comportamiento no lineales en forma de ley de potencia que difieren estadísticamente entre los genomas pero no entre los cromosomas de un mismo genoma. Además, el análisis aportó evidencias respecto al tamaño promedio constante de las secuencias de exones y de los genes simples por cromosoma y entre genomas. Los hallazgos sugieren: primero, que el genoma se auto-organiza de la misma manera en los cromosomas independientemente del tamaño o número de genes que estos contengan, y, segundo, que tanto los cromosomas como sus elementos constituyentes: genes, exones e intrones han evolucionado conjuntamente. El estudio señala que las leyes de potencia cumplen un papel amortiguador en las leyes de variación biológica y proporcionan medidas cuantitativas de la organización de las secuencias de ADN que definen la identidad de un genoma. La regularidad estadística de estas medidas genéticas tiene potenciales aplicaciones en el incremento del valor predictivo de los actuales modelos de mejoramiento genético vegetal.

  8. Evidencias empíricas de regularidades estadísticas y leyes de potencia en los genomas de Arabidopsis thaliana, Oriza sativa y Mus musculus

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    López-López Karina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available La masiva cantidad de datos biológicos provenientes de las disciplinas "ómicas" y su aprovechamiento en el mejoramiento genético vegetal requiere de nuevos abordajes teóricos y estadísticos que describan de forma satisfactoria principios generales en los genomas. El total de secuencias de los genes de los genomas vegetales de Arabidopsis thaliana y Oriza sativa y del genoma animal Mus musculus fueron extraídas y depuradas de la base de datos pública del Genebank mediante el diseño de algoritmos en lenguaje de programación Python. Se analizaron las distribuciones de las variables frecuencia de uso y tamaño de los genes, exones e intrones por cromosoma y entre genomas. Los resultados señalaron que las variables presentan patrones de comportamiento no lineales en forma de ley de potencia que difieren estadísticamente entre los genomas pero no entre los cromosomas de un mismo genoma. Además, el análisis aportó evidencias respecto al tamaño promedio constante de las secuencias de exones y de los genes simples por cromosoma y entre genomas. Los hallazgos sugieren: primero, que el genoma se auto-organiza de la misma manera en los cromosomas independientemente del tamaño o número de genes que estos contengan, y, segundo, que tanto los cromosomas como sus elementos constituyentes: genes, exones e intrones han evolucionado conjuntamente. El estudio señala que las leyes de potencia cumplen un papel amortiguador en las leyes de variación biológica y proporcionan medidas cuantitativas de la organización de las secuencias de ADN que definen la identidad de un genoma. La regularidad estadística de estas medidas genéticas tiene potenciales aplicaciones en el incremento del valor predictivo de los actuales modelos de mejoramiento genético vegetal.

  9. Analysis of the biological response of mouse liver (Mus musculus) exposed to As2O3 based on integrated -omics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sevillano, M A; García-Barrera, T; Navarro, F; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2013-12-01

    Organic and inorganic mass spectrometries were used to investigate the biochemical response of mice (Mus musculus) to inorganic arsenic exposure using liver as the target organ. The toxicological effects of trivalent inorganic arsenic after oral administration (3 mg kg(-1) body weight and per day) were investigated over a period of 7 days using metallomics, metabonomics and redox proteomics approaches. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with ICP-MS detection was combined with anion exchange chromatography (AEC) to characterize the biological response of the exposed mice. On the other hand, direct infusion mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-QTOF-MS) of polar and lipophilic extracts using positive and negative modes of acquisition (ESI+/ESI-) provided information about time-dependent changes in endogenous metabolites identified by Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). Finally, the study has been complemented with the evaluation of up/down-regulation of enzymes related to oxidative stress such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT) and peroxidases in connection with metal toxicity issues. The results show that the inorganic arsenic methylation in the liver may reach the saturation point upon chronic exposure to the element. On the other hand, SEC-ICP-MS coupling provided information about metal containing-proteins and metabolites related to arsenic exposure (metallomics) which has been correlated with the changes in the global metabolism (metabonomics), also considering their consequences on the redox status of protein and protein expression (redox proteomics). Our study shows that arsenic causes biochemical pathway alterations, such as energy metabolism (e.g. glycolysis, Krebs cycle), amino acid metabolism, choline metabolism and degradation of membrane phospholipids (apoptosis). This work illustrates the high reliability of the integrated use of organic mass spectrometry for the metabonomic study of biochemical effects

  10. La zona de polimorfismo cromosómico ‘Barcelona’ de Mus musculus domesticus Schwarz y Schwarz, 1943: dinámica espaciotemporal de su estructura y efecto de las fusiones robertsonianas sobre la espermatogénesis

    OpenAIRE

    Medarde González, Núria Estel

    2013-01-01

    En las inmediaciones de la ciudad de Barcelona existe una zona de polimorfismo robertsoniano (Rb) de ratón doméstico de Europa Occidental (Mus musculus domesticus) que abarca unos 5.000 km2 y se halla rodeada por poblaciones cuyos individuos presentan un cariotipo estándar (St) de 40 cromosomas telocéntricos. En dicha zona se han detectado siete metacéntricos diferentes y animales Rb con números diploides comprendidos entre 27 y 40 cromosomas. El sistema robertsoniano ‘Barcelona' (SRbB) repre...

  11. Comparison of three diagnostic techniques for the detection of leptospires in the kidneys of wild house mice (Mus musculus Comparação de três métodos de diagnóstico para detecção de leptospiras em rins de camundongos selvagens (Mus musculus

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    Carlos A. Rossetti

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Forty-one wild house mice (Mus musculus were trapped in an urban area, near railways, in Santa Fe city, Argentina. Both kidneys from each mouse were removed for bacteriological and histological examination. One kidney was inoculated into Fletcher semi-solid medium and isolates were serologically typed. The other kidney was microscopically examined after hematoxylin-eosin, silver impregnation and immunohistochemical stains. Leptospires, all of them belonging to the Ballum serogroup, were isolated from 16 (39% out of 41 samples. The presence of the agent was recorded in 18 (44% and in 19 (46% out of 41 silver impregnated and immunohistochemically stained samples respectively. Additionally, leptospires were detected in high number on the apical surface of epithelial cells and in the lumen of medullary tubules and they were less frequently seen on the apical surface of epithelial cells or in the lumen of the cortical tubules, which represents an unusual finding in carrier animals. Microscopic lesions consisting of focal mononuclear interstitial nephritis, glomerular shrinkage and desquamation of tubular epithelial cells were observed in 13 of 19 infected and in 10 of 22 non-infected mice; differences in presence of lesions between infected and non-infected animals were not statistically significant (P=0,14. The three techniques, culture, silver impregnation and immunohistochemistry, had a high agreement (k³0.85 and no significant differences between them were detected (P>0.05. In addition, an unusual location of leptospires in kidneys of carrier animals was reported, but a relationship between lesions and presence of leptospires could not be established.Foram capturados 41 camundongos (Mus musculus na região urbana, próximo à ferrovia da cidade de Santa Fé, Argentina. Os rins de cada animal capturado foram removidos para estudos bacteriológicos e histológicos. Um dos rins foi imerso em meio semi-sólido de Fletcher para isolamento de

  12. Model of experimental infection in healthy and immunosuppressed swiss albino mice (Mus musculus using Candida albicans strains with different patterns of enzymatic activity Modelo de infecção experimental em camundongos albino swiss (Mus musculus sadios e imunossuprimidos utilizando cepas de Candida albicans com diferentes padrões de atividade enzimática

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    Guilherme M. Chaves

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to evaluate Candida albicans virulence in vivo, two strains selected were based on their phospholipase and proteinase activity, and used in a model of experimental infection. One strain, isolated from vaginal secretion, was stocked at the URM Culture Collection for 43 years and presented high phospholipase (Pz=0.217 and proteinase (1.386 U.mL-1 activity. The other strain was a fresh strain isolated from oropharyngeal secretion of an AIDS patient, and presented low phospholipase (Pz=0.482 and proteinase (0.780 U.mL-1 activity. The strains were inoculated via intraperitoneum in immunosuppressed and non-immunosuppressed mice (Mus musculus and the infection was evaluated over a period of 21 days. Liver, spleen, lungs and kidneys were aseptically removed and the blood of the animals was collected every 72 h. The number of colony forming units (c.f.u isolated from each organ was counted and a histopathologic examination was performed. The freshly isolated strain was more virulent than the stocked strain, as shown by the number of positive cultures and severity of the lesions observed at the histopathologic examination. A correlation between the in vitro enzymatic activity and the in vivo virulence was not observed.Com o objetivo de avaliar a virulência de Candida albicans in vivo, foram selecionadas duas cepas de acordo com a atividade enzimática de fosfolipase e protease, para utilização em modelo de infecção experimental. Utilizou-se um isolado de secreção vaginal, estocado na Micoteca URM por 43 anos com alta atividade de fosfolipase (Pz=0.217 e de protease (1.386 U.mL-1, e outro recém-isolado de secreção orofaríngea de paciente com AIDS, o qual apresentou baixa atividade de fosfolipase (Pz=0.482 e de protease (0.780 U.mL-1. As amostras foram inoculadas por via intra-peritoneal em camundongos (Mus musculus na presença e ausência de imunossupressão e a infecção foi avaliada durante 21 dias. A cada 72 h foram

  13. Comparative genome mapping of the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus reveals greater similarity to rat (Rattus norvegicus than to the lab mouse (Mus musculus

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    O'Neill Rachel J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus and congeneric species are the most common North American mammals. They represent an emerging system for the genetic analyses of the physiological and behavioral bases of habitat adaptation. Phylogenetic evidence suggests a much more ancient divergence of Peromyscus from laboratory mice (Mus and rats (Rattus than that separating latter two. Nevertheless, early karyotypic analyses of the three groups suggest Peromyscus to be exhibit greater similarities with Rattus than with Mus. Results Comparative linkage mapping of an estimated 35% of the deer mouse genome was done with respect to the Rattus and Mus genomes. We particularly focused on regions that span synteny breakpoint regions between the rat and mouse genomes. The linkage analysis revealed the Peromyscus genome to have a higher degree of synteny and gene order conservation with the Rattus genome. Conclusion These data suggest that: 1. the Rattus and Peromyscus genomes more closely represent ancestral Muroid and rodent genomes than that of Mus. 2. the high level of genome rearrangement observed in Muroid rodents is especially pronounced in Mus. 3. evolution of genome organization can operate independently of more commonly assayed measures of genetic change (e.g. SNP frequency.

  14. Evidencias empíricas de regularidades estadísticas y leyes de potencia en los genomas de Arabidopsis thaliana, Oriza sativa y Mus musculus Empirical evidences of statistical regularities and power laws in the genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana, Oriza sativa and Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha I Almanza P.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available La masiva cantidad de datos biológicos provenientes de las disciplinas "ómicas" y su aprovechamiento en el mejoramiento genético vegetal requiere de nuevos abordajes teóricos y estadísticos que describan de forma satisfactoria principios generales en los genomas. El total de secuencias de los genes de los genomas vegetales de Arabidopsis thaliana y Oriza sativa y del genoma animal Mus musculus fueron extraídas y depuradas de la base de datos pública del Genebank mediante el diseño de algoritmos en lenguaje de programación Python. Se analizaron las distribuciones de las variables frecuencia de uso y tamaño de los genes, exones e intrones por cromosoma y entre genomas. Los resultados señalaron que las variables presentan patrones de comportamiento no lineales en forma de ley de potencia que difieren estadísticamente entre los genomas pero no entre los cromosomas de un mismo genoma. Además, el análisis aportó evidencias respecto al tamaño promedio constante de las secuencias de exones y de los genes simples por cromosoma y entre genomas. Los hallazgos sugieren: primero, que el genoma se auto-organiza de la misma manera en los cromosomas independientemente del tamaño o número de genes que estos contengan, y, segundo, que tanto los cromosomas como sus elementos constituyentes: genes, exones e intrones han evolucionado conjuntamente. El estudio señala que las leyes de potencia cumplen un papel amortiguador en las leyes de variación biológica y proporcionan medidas cuantitativas de la organización de las secuencias de ADN que definen la identidad de un genoma. La regularidad estadística de estas medidas genéticas tiene potenciales aplicaciones en el incremento del valor predictivo de los actuales modelos de mejoramiento genético vegetal.The huge quantity of biological data arising from the omics disciplines and their benefit in plant breeding require of new theoretical and statistical approaches in order to get a satisfactory

  15. Lesiones en Mus musculus inoculados con Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium kansasii y Mycobcterium fortuitum aislados de suelos pampeanos (República Argentina Mus musculus lesions inoculated with Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium fortuitum isolated from soil of La Pampa Province (R. Argentina

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    D.S Oriani

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la capacidad para producir lesiones macro y microscópicas de nueve aislamientos de micobacterias no tuberculosas (MNT cuando eran inoculadas en ratones albinos (Mus musculus. Las micobacterias fueron aisladas de muestras de suelos destinados a la agricultura y ganadería de la provincia de La Pampa, Argentina. Se investigaron tres especies ambientales (M. fortuitum, M. phlei y M. kansasii que eran dominantes en los suelos estudiados. Los animales fueron inoculados por vía endovenosa, con una suspensión de cultivos frescos de MNT, equivalente a 1 mg de bacterias mL¹. Los animales se mantuvieron en un área restringida durante 60 días, en ese momento se les efectuó la eutanasia y la necropsia, recolectando órganos para realizar estudios bacteriológicos e histopatológicos. Las cepas de M. phlei y M. kansasii inoculadas produjeron lesiones en los ratones similares a las producidas por M. tuberculosis y/o bovis, mientras que M. fortuitum no desarrollo patogenicidad en el modelo animal utilizado bajo las condiciones en que se realizó este estudio. Es necesario continuar valorando otras micobacterias ambientales aisladas de suelos y otras vías de inoculación contribuyendo a colaborar en el diagnostico diferencial de la tuberculosis y las enfermedades granulomatosas.The study objective was to determine the capacity of originate macroscopic and microscopic lesions of nine atypical mycobacteria inoculated in albino rats. The mycobacteria were isolated from farms soil samples at different places from La Pampa province (Argentina. It was investigated the three most frequent species (M. fortuitum, M. phlei and M. kansasii. The animals were endovenously inoculated with 1 mg of bacteria/ml-¹ of fresh culture and kept in a restricted area during 60 days. After euthanasia, samples from different organs, for bacteriologic and histopathologic studies, were collected. M. phlei and M. kansasii showed lesions

  16. Histometría de la glándula sublingual de ratones (Mus musculus machos y hembras infectados con la cepa RAL del parásito de Chagas, Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Sérgio de Albuquerque

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Analizamos morfológica e histométricamente la glándula sublingual de ratones infectados con la cepa RAL del Trypanosoma cruzi, en machos y hembras. Usamos ratones albinos (Mus musculus, variedad Swiss, inoculados con 2x104 tripomastigotes sanguíneos de la cepa RAL del T. cruzi.. Sacrificamos los animales en el pico de la parasitemia (12º día y fijamos las glándulas sublinguales en ALFAC. Los cortes histológicos teñidos con HE fueron evaluados histométricamente (cariometría y estereología. La parasitemia fue más elevada en las hembras. Histopatológicamente, los "ácinos" (acini de los animales infectados eran menores, con escasa secreción, y conductos estriados menores. Los núcleos de las "medialunas" eran menores y había nidos de amastigotes en el citoplasma. Cariométricamente, los núcleos de los ácinos, medialunas y conductos estriados eran menores en los ratones infectados. Estereológicamente, los volúmenes relativos ocupados por ácinos y conductos estriados fueron menores e, inversamente, fue mayor el volumen para el tejido conjuntivo de los machos infectados. Las densidades de superficie de ácinos y conductos fueron mayores, y el diámetro y el espesor de la pared menores, en este grupo. Por otro lado, la densidad de ácinos fue menor, y las de los conductos estriados y tejido conjuntivo, fueron mayores en las hembras infectadas. Las densidades de superficie de ácinos y conductos estriados fueron mayores, mientras que el diámetro y espesor de la pared de los ácinos fueron menores (y las de los conductos estriados mayores, en este grupo. La cepa RAL del T. cruzi causó un cuadro general de atrofia general en la glándula sublingual, con numerosos nidos de parásitos.Histometry of the sublingual gland in male and female mice (Mus musculus infected with the RAL strain of the Chagas parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this work was to analyze histologically and histometrically the sublingual gland of mice infected

  17. The house mouse (Mus musculus L.) exerts strong differential grain consumption preferences among hard red and white spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) varieties in a single-elimination tournament design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Craig F; Fuerst, E Patrick; McLean, Derek J; Momont, Kathleen; James, Caleb P

    2014-11-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) plays a central role in the health and nutrition of humans. Yet, little is known about possible flavor differences among different varieties. We have developed a model system using the house mouse (Mus musculus L.) to determine feeding preferences as a prelude to extending results to human sensory analysis. Here, we examine the application of a single-elimination tournament design to the analysis of consumption preferences of a set of hard red and hard white spring wheat varieties. A single-elimination tournament design in this case pairs 2 wheat varieties and only 1 of the 2 is advanced to further tests. Preferred varieties were advanced until an overall "winner" was identified; conversely, less desirable varieties were advanced such that an overall "loser" was identified. Hollis and IDO702 were the winner and loser, respectively, for the hard red varieties, and Clear White 515 and WA8123 were the winner and loser, respectively, for the hard white varieties. When using the more powerful protocol of 14 mice and a 4-d trial, differences in mean daily consumption preferences of 2 varieties were separated at P-values as small as 2 × 10(-8) . The single-elimination tournament design is an efficient means of identifying the most and least desirable varieties among a larger set of samples. One application for identifying the 2 extremes in preference within a group of varieties would be to use them as parents of a population to identify quantitative trait loci for preference.

  18. Structures of PHR Domains from Mus musculus Phr1 (Mycbp2) Explain the Loss-of-Function Mutation (Gly1092 → Glu) of the C. elegans Ortholog RPM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Miller, Stacy A.; Bain, Kevin T.; Rutter, Marc E.; Gheyi, Tarun; Abrams, Benjamin; Wang, Yingchun; Atwell, Shane; Luz, John G.; Thompson, Devon A.; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Park, Eun Chan; Rongo, Christopher; Jin, Yishi; Klemke, Richard L.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K. (Rutgers); (UCSC); (Lilly); (UCSD)

    2010-11-15

    PHR [PAM (protein associated with Myc)-HIW (Highwire)-RPM-1 (regulator of presynaptic morphology 1)] proteins are conserved, large multi-domain E3 ubiquitin ligases with modular architecture. PHR proteins presynaptically control synaptic growth and axon guidance and postsynaptically regulate endocytosis of glutamate receptors. Dysfunction of neuronal ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation is implicated in various neurodegenerative diseases. PHR proteins are characterized by the presence of two PHR domains near the N-terminus, which are essential for proper localization and function. Structures of both the first and second PHR domains of Mus musculus (mouse) Phr1 (MYC binding protein 2, Mycbp2) have been determined, revealing a novel {beta} sandwich fold composed of 11 antiparallel {beta}-strands. Conserved loops decorate the apical side of the first PHR domain (MmPHR1), yielding a distinct conserved surface feature. The surface of the second PHR domain (MmPHR2), in contrast, lacks significant conservation. Importantly, the structure of MmPHR1 provides insights into a loss-of-function mutation, Gly1092 {yields} Glu, observed in the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog RPM-1.

  19. Dramatic changes in 67 miRNAs during initiation of first wave of spermatogenesis in Mus musculus testis: global regulatory insights generated by miRNA-mRNA network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sree, Sreesha; Radhakrishnan, Karthika; Indu, Sivankutty; Kumar, Pradeep G

    2014-09-01

    We mapped global changes in miRNA and mRNA profiles spanning the first wave of spermatogenesis using prepubertal (Postnatal Day 8 [P8]), pubertal (P16), and adolescent (P24) Mus musculus testes and identified the differential expression of 67 miRNAs and 8226 mRNAs. These two data sets were integrated into miRNA-dependent regulatory networks based on miRWalk predictions. In a network representing the P8 to P16 transition, downregulation of four miRNAs and upregulation of 19 miRNAs were linked with 81 upregulated target mRNAs and 228 downregulated target mRNAs, respectively. Furthermore, during the P16 to P24 transition, two miRNAs were downregulated, and eight miRNAs were upregulated, which linked with 64 upregulated mRNAs and 389 downregulated mRNAs, respectively. Only three of the miRNAs present in the network (miR-34b-5p, miR-34c, and miR-449a) showed a progressive increase from P8 through P16 to P24, while the remaining miRNAs in the network showed statistically significant changes in their levels either during the P8 to P16 transition or during the P16 to P24 transition. Analysis of the chromosomal location of these differentially expressed miRNAs showed that 14 out of 25 miRNAs upregulated from P8 to P16, and 18 out of 40 miRNAs upregulated from P8 to P24 were X-linked. This is suggestive of their escape from meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and postmeiotic sex chromatin. This integrated network of miRNA-level and mRNA-level changes in mouse testis during the first wave of spermatogenesis is expected to build a base for evaluating the role of miRNA-mediated gene expression regulation in maturing mammalian testis.

  20. Nova Mus 2008 = QY Mus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2008-10-01

    Nova Mus 2008 = QY Mus was discovered by William Liller, Vina del Mar, Chile, on 2008 September 28.998 UT at magnitude 8.6 (Tech Pan film + orange filter). The position is RA = 13h 16m 36.44s , Dec = -67d 36m 47.8s (from P. Nelson). This object was announced as a nova in IAU Circular 8990 (Daniel W.E. Green, editor). The nova classification was determined using low-resolution spectra by W. Liller indicating the presence of broad H-alpha lines at least 2300 angstroms wide. Several observers confirmed the nova and provided photometry. The position above was provided by Peter Nelson (Ellinbank, Vic., Aus.), and is averaged from four separate exposures (rms error approx. 0.4 arcseconds). The GCVS team have formally designated Nova Mus 2008 as QY MUS. Observations should be reported to the AAVSO International Database as QY MUS.

  1. Topical Treatment of Dermatophytic Lesion on Mice (Mus musculus) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bindu; Kumar, Padma; Joshi, Suresh Chandra

    2011-06-01

    Antidermatophytic potential of three weed plants viz. Tridax procumbens L., Capparis decidua (forsk) Edgew and Lantana camara L. were explored and experimentally induced dermatophytic lesion was topically treated in mice. Microbroth dilution method was carried out for determination of MIC and MFC of different extracts of selected plants. In animal studies, mice were experimentally inoculated with Trichophyton mentagrophytes and infected animals were topically treated with 5 mg/g terbinafine and two concentrations, i.e., 5 and 10 mg/g of test extract ointment. Complete recovery from the infection was observed on 12th day of treatment for reference drug terbinafine (5 mg/g) and 10 mg/g concentration of test extract ointment whereas 5 mg/g concentration of test extract ointment showed complete cure on 16th day of treatment. Fungal burden was also calculated by culturing skin scrapings from infected animals of different groups. Test extract ointment successfully treated induced dermatophytosis in mice without any disease recurrence incidences, thereby indicating efficacy of test extract as an excellent topical antifungal agent for the cure of dermatophytosis.

  2. Competitive ability in male house mice (Mus musculus): genetic influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Christopher B; Ruff, James S; Chase, Kevin; Potts, Wayne K; Carrier, David R

    2013-03-01

    Conspecifics of many animal species physically compete to gain reproductive resources and thus fitness. Despite the importance of competitive ability across the animal kingdom, specific traits that influence or underpin competitive ability are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate whether there are genetic influences on competitive ability within male house mice. Additionally, we examined if litter demographics (litter size and litter sex ratio) influence competitive ability. We phenotyped two generations for a male's ability to possess a reproductive resource--a prime nesting site--using semi-natural enclosures with mixed sex groupings. We used the "Animal Model" coupled with an extensive pedigree to estimate several genetic parameters. Competitive ability was found to be highly heritable, but only displayed a moderate genetic correlation to body mass. Interestingly, litter sex ratio had a weak negative influence on competitive ability. Litter size had no significant influence on competitive ability. Our study also highlights how much remains unknown about the proximal causes of competitive ability.

  3. Embriotoxicidad del bromato de potasio en raton (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grecia Landeo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó in vivo los efectos de bromato de potasio (KBr0 3 sobre el desarrollo de embriones pre- implantacionales de ratón. Ratonas preñadas fueron tratadas con una dosis única de KBr0 3 (68,5 mg/kg de peso corporal; n= 8 y un grupo control (C tratado con agua destilada (n= 7 en el día 1; al cuarto día de preñez, las hembras fueron sacrifi cadas, los embriones fueron extraidos de los oviductos y de los cuernos uterinos para la evaluación. El KBr0 3 produjo un retraso en el desar- rollo embrionario, encontrándose un 76,9±7,8 y 11,2±5,5 en porcentaje de blastocistos y mórulas respectivamente en el C en comparación de un 34,8±11,2 y 49,3±11,9 de la misma relación en el grupo tratado, mostrando diferencias signifi cativas(p<0,05. En cuanto a la calidad embrionaria, se observó un incremento en el porcentaje de embriones de baja calidad (grado III y degenerados en el grupo tratado, pero esta diferencia no es estadísticamente signifi cativa (p>0,05. En conclusión podemos decir que el KBr0 3 produce un efecto dañino sobre el embrión, causando retraso en su desarrollo.

  4. 小鼠体型控制相关microRNA-200b(miR-200b)的表达谱及靶标分析%The Expression Profile and Target Gene Analysis of Mouse (Mus musculus) Body Size Regulation related microRNA-200b(miR-200b)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任红艳; 刘楠; 陶聪; 郑建伟; 李奎

    2013-01-01

    microRNA-200b (miR-200b) has similar functions in regulating body size in mammals, while its exact roles has not been examined in mammals. To study the expression of miR-200b during the embryo development stage, and investigate the important roles of miR-200b and its target gene in regulating the body size of mouse, in this study, precursor miR-200b was amplified from the mouse (Mus musculus) genome DNA, RNA folding sofware was used to construct the secondary structure of miR-200b; potential target genes were predicted with bioinformatic software, and validated through Dual-luciferase reporter assay system; the expression profiles of miR-200b and its target gene Fog2 were detected using Real-time PCR in different tissues of adult mouse and embryos at the stage of 10.5~15.0 days after coitus. The results showed that the miR-200b precursor had the typical stem-loop structure of microRNA, and the Fog2 gene was predicted and tested to be a target gene of miR-200b, which showed negatively related expression to miR-200b in the embryos dpc10. 5~15.0; qRT-PCR results showed that the miR-200b was expressed in almost all the tissues of female mouse, with higher expression in muscle, kidney and uterine, and lower expression in heart, spleen and lung tissues. From the expression profile and target gene testing results, we can conclude that miR-200b may play important roles in regulating mouse embryo development through acting with its target gene Fog2.%microRNA-200b(miR-200b)具有类似的调控哺乳动物体型大小的功能,但尚未在哺乳动物个体上进行验证.为研究microRNA-200b在小鼠发育过程中的表达,探讨microRNA-200b及其靶标基因在小鼠体型发育调控中的关键作用,本研究从小鼠(Mus musculus)基因组中扩增得到miR-200b前体序列,并验证了该miRNA的茎环前体结构;采用生物信息学软件预测miR-200b可能的靶基因,并通过双荧光素酶报告载体系统验证了miR-200b与靶基因3'UTR

  5. The Emergence of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensberger, Boyce

    1980-01-01

    Describes chronologically the evolution of the human race on earth so as to refute Darwin's theory of descent from animals. Skull fragments from sites around the world suggest at least two possible routes toward the emergence of Homo sapiens sapiens. (Author/SK)

  6. A comparison of tooth structure in Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens sapiens: a radiographic study.

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Tooth components of 1st and 2nd erupted permanent molars were measured from standardised radiographs of Homo sapiens sapiens and Homo sapiens neanderthalensis. Enamel height was greater in Homo sapiens sapiens but pulp height and width and the height of the enamel to floor of the pulp chamber were greater in Homo sapiens neanderthalensis. Dentine height, crown width and enamel width showed similar results in the two groups. Unerupted first molars were measured to analyse the influence of func...

  7. Behavior in Mus musculus of Schistosoma mansoni from mollusks treated with hydrocortisone Comportamento em Mus musculus do Schistosoma mansoni oriundo de moluscos tratados com hidrocortisona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Regina Serrano

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Twenty mice were exposed to cercariae from mollusks treated with hydrocortisone and another 20 mice received cercariae from non-treated mollusks. The behavior of the parasites from the two groups of mollusks was compared based on the ability of cercariae to penetrate mice, on the total number of worms recovered after eight weeks of infection, on the relationship between the number of penetrating cercariae and the number of recovered worms and on the number of eggs in the feces. Treating the mollusks with hydrocortisone did not alter the ability of cercariae to penetrate mice nor did it affect the total number of worms recovered. The number of female worms, the number of coupled worms and the number of eggs in the feces were greater in mice infected by cercariae from mollusks treated with hydrocortisone.Vinte camundongos foram expostos a cercárias oriundas de moluscos tratados com hidrocortisona e outros vinte receberam cercárias de moluscos não tratados. O comportamento dos parasitas dos dois grupos foi comparado com base na habilidade das cercárias em penetrar nos camundongos, no número total de vermes recuperados, após oito semanas de infecção, na relação entre o número de cercárias penetrantes e o número de vermes recuperados e o número de ovos nas fezes. O tratamento dos moluscos com hidrocortisona não alterou a habilidade das cercárias em penetrar nos camundongos nem afetou o número total de vermes recuperados. O número de vermes fêmeas, o número de vermes acasalados e o número de ovos nas fezes aumentaram em camundongos infectados por cercárias de moluscos tratados com hidrocortisona.

  8. Preliminary Characterization of Mus musculus–Derived Pathogenic Strains of Leptospira borgpetersenii Serogroup Ballum in a Hamster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Éverton F.; Félix, Samuel R.; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Fagundes, Michel Q.; Neto, Amilton C. P. S.; Grassmann, André A.; Amaral, Marta G.; Gallina, Tiago; Dellagostin, Odir A.

    2010-01-01

    Human and animal leptospirosis caused by Leptospira spp. belonging to serogroup Ballum has increased worldwide in the past decade. We report the isolation and serologic and molecular characterization of four L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum isolates obtained from Mus musculus, and preliminary virulence studies. These isolates are useful for diagnosis of leptospirosis and for epidemiologic studies of its virulence and pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:20682877

  9. Hubungan antara Pemberian Suplementasi Madu dengan Peningkatan Berat Badan Mencit (Mus musculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Limanjaya, Muliadi

    2012-01-01

    Background : Honey is a substance derived from the nectar plants gathered, modified, and stored in the honeycomb by honey bees. Fructose is the monosaccharide with the highest concentrations in honey. Fructose, unlike glucose, does not stimulate insulin secretion from the islet of Langerhans cells in the pancreas. Insulin stimulates the release of leptin in fat cells, and suppress the release of ghrelin by the stomach that causes a tendency to weight gain due to an increased appetite. Objecti...

  10. Genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse (Mus musculus) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor preference and discrimination were examined using a two-choice feeding system and 24-h trials and the Student’s t statistic. To elimi...

  11. Effect of Maytenus macrocarpa“Chuchuhuasi” in the male system reproductive of mouse (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Láyonal G. Acosta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maytenus macrocarpa(chuchuhuasi is native tree of the Peruvian Amazon used as traditional medicine for the treatment of many diseases, but its effect on the male reproductive system has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study is evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of M. macrocarpa in daily doses for 7 days on reproductive parameters of male mice. We used C57BL mature male mice divided into 2 groups (n= 10, Control Group (C: 0.9% NaCl and Treatment group (T: Aqueous extract of Chuchuhuasi, both supplied daily via oral gavages. At the eight day of treatment the mice were euthanized. The weight of the body and reproductive organs: testis, epididymis and vas deferens, were registered. Concentration, motility and sperm morphology were evaluated. The results showed significantly differences (t- Student test P<0.05 in the weight of the head and body epididymis (C: 19.25±1.1 vs T: 21.26±2.0, vas deferens (C: 10.61±0.7 vs T: 11.75±0.5, progressive sperm motility (C: 42.16±5.2 vs T: 25.82±8.4 and immobile sperm (C: 36.05±4.9 vs T: 48.51±7.2. No difference in sperm count was observed. The sperm normal morphology diminished with ingest of M. macrocarpa(tStudent test p <0.05 (C: 39.72±1.3 vs T: 30.78±4.9. We conclude that the aqueous extract of chuchuhuasi, has a negative effect on the male reproductive system of mice.

  12. Characterization of urinary volatiles in Swiss male mice (Mus musculus): bioassay of identified compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Achiraman; G Archunan

    2002-12-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the chemical nature of the urine of male mice and to assess its bioactivity. Urine of mature male mice was extracted with dichloromethane (1 : 1 ratio v/v) and analysed by gas-chromatography linked mass-spectrometry (GC-MS). Ten different compounds such as alkanes, alcohols, etc. were detected in the urine. Among the ten, five compounds are specific to males, namely 3-cyclohexene-1-methanol (I), 3-amino-s-triazole (II), 4-ethyl phenol (III), 3-ethyl-2,7-dimethyl octane (IV) and 1-iodoundecane (V). The compound, 4-ethylphenol, has been previously reported in several strains of male mice. Furthermore, the compounds (II) and (IV) are similar to 2-sec-butylthiazole and dehydro-exo-brevicomin compounds which have already been reported in male mice. Bioassay revealed that compounds (II), (III) and (IV) were responsible for attracting females and in inducing aggression towards males, as compared to the other compounds, i.e. (I) and (V). The results indicate that these three volatiles (II, III and IV) of male mice appear to act as attractants of the opposite sex.

  13. Lack of genotoxic potential of pesticides, spinosad, imidacloprid and neem oil in mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Ankita; Kesari, V P

    2016-03-01

    Pesticides, spinosad, imidacloprid and neem oil are widely used both in residential and agricultural environments because of its broad spectrum insecticidal activity and effectiveness. The present study was undertaken to estimate genotoxicity of formulations of some pesticides in mice. Three pesticides of diverse group studied were spinosad (45% w/v), imidacloprid (17.8%, w/v) and neem oil. Animals were exposed 37, 4.5 and 50 mg kg⁻¹ b.wt. for spinosad, imidacloprid and neem oil, respectively, through oral gavage for 5 consecutive days. A vehicle control group and one positive control (cyclophosphamide; 20 mg kg⁻¹ b. wt.) were also selected. The results showed that cyclophosphamide produced 1.12% micronuclei in mice, as against 0.18 in vehicle control, 0.30 in spinosad, 0.28 in imidacloprid and 0.22% in neem oil, respectively. The gross percentage of chromosomal aberration in mice were 28.5% in cyclophosphamide against 6.5% in vehicle control, 8.0% in spinosad, 9.5% in imidacloprid and 7.0% in neem oil, respectively. The overall findings of the present study revealed that all the three pesticide formulations, imidacloprid, spinosad and neem oil at tested dose did not show any genotoxic effect in mice.

  14. PENGARUH PEMBERIAN “KOMBUCHA” TEH ROSELLA TERHADAP PROFIL DARAH MENCIT (Mus musculus L

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    Mukhani Dwi Hidayanti

    2015-02-01

    dan hemoglobin, serta penurunan jumlah leukosit mencit akibat perlakuan “Kombucha” teh rosella pada ketiga dosis dibanding kontrol. Kata kunci: “Kombucha”, rosella, teh fermentasi, profil darah, mencit

  15. Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 Over-Expression Is Detrimental to Enamel Development: A Mus musculus Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Masashi; Hu, Yuanyuan; Tye, Coralee E.; Guan, Xiaomu; Deagle, Craig C.; Antone, Jerry V.; Smith, Charles E.; Simmer, James P.; Bartlett, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinase-20 (Mmp20) ablated mice have enamel that is thin and soft with an abnormal rod pattern that abrades from the underlying dentin. We asked if introduction of transgenes expressing Mmp20 would revert this Mmp20 null phenotype back to normal. Unexpectedly, for transgenes expressing medium or high levels of Mmp20, we found opposite enamel phenotypes depending on the genetic background (Mmp20−/− or Mmp20+/+) in which the transgenes were expressed. Methodology/Principal Findings Amelx-promoter-Mmp20 transgenic founder mouse lines were assessed for transgene expression and those expressing low, medium or high levels of Mmp20 were selected for breeding into the Mmp20 null background. Regardless of expression level, each transgene brought the null enamel back to full thickness. However, the high and medium expressing Mmp20 transgenes in the Mmp20 null background had significantly harder more mineralized enamel than did the low transgene expresser. Strikingly, when the high and medium expressing Mmp20 transgenes were present in the wild-type background, the enamel was significantly less well mineralized than normal. Protein gel analysis of enamel matrix proteins from the high and medium expressing transgenes present in the wild-type background demonstrated that greater than normal amounts of cleavage products and smaller quantities of higher molecular weight proteins were present within their enamel matrices. Conclusions/Significance Mmp20 expression levels must be within a specific range for normal enamel development to occur. Creation of a normally thick enamel layer may occur over a wider range of Mmp20 expression levels, but acquisition of normal enamel hardness has a narrower range. Since over-expression of Mmp20 results in decreased enamel hardness, this suggests that a balance exists between cleaved and full-length enamel matrix proteins that are essential for formation of a properly hardened enamel layer. It also suggests that few feedback controls are present in the enamel matrix to prevent excessive MMP20 activity. PMID:24466234

  16. The effects of ectopic UCP1 expression on gene expression in skeletal muscle [Mus Musculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.

    2015-01-01

    This SuperSeries is composed of the following subset Series: GSE45991: Amino acid deprivation due to overexpression of UCP1 in skeletal muscle: signalling via FGF-21 GSE45992: Transgenic overexpression of UCP1 in skeletal muscle in mice fed a HFD: signalling via FGF-21 Skeletal muscle FGF21 secretio

  17. Intraperitoneal Injection of Ethanol for the Euthanasia of Laboratory Mice (Mus musculus) and Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal H; Brice, Angela K; Marx, James O; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-11-01

    Compassion, professional ethics, and public sensitivity require that animals are euthanized humanely and appropriately under both planned and emergent situations. According to the 2013 AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals, intraperitoneal injection of ethanol is "acceptable with conditions" for use in mice. Because only limited information regarding this technique is available, we sought to evaluate ethanol by using ECG and high-definition video recording. Mice (n = 85) and rats (n = 16) were treated with intraperitoneal ethanol (70% or 100%), a positive-control agent (pentobarbital-phenytoin combination [Pe/Ph]), or a negative-control agent (saline solution). After injection, animals were assessed for behavioral and physiologic responses. Pain-assessment techniques in mice demonstrated that intraperitoneal injection of ethanol was not more painful than was intraperitoneal Pe/Ph. Median time to loss of consciousness for all mice that received ethanol or Pe/Ph was 45 s. Median time to respiratory arrest was 2.75, 2.25, and 2.63 min, and time (mean ± SE) to cardiac arrest was 6.04 ± 1.3, 2.96 ± 0.6, and 4.03 ± 0.5 min for 70% ethanol, 100% ethanol, and Pe/Ph, respectively. No mouse that received ethanol or Pe/Ph regained consciousness. Although successful in mice, intraperitoneal ethanol at the doses tested (9.2 to 20.1 g/kg) was unsuitable for euthanasia of rats (age, 7 to 8 wk) because of the volume needed and prolonged time to respiratory effects. For mice, intraperitoneal injection of 70% or 100% ethanol induced rapid and irreversible loss of consciousness, followed by death, and should be considered as "acceptable with conditions."

  18. AKTIVITAS ANALGETIK EKSTRAK ETANOL DAUN MELINJO (Gnetum gnemon L. PADA MENCIT PUTIH (Mus musculus L. JANTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safwan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaf melinjo (Gnetum gnemon L. contain flavonoids that has the potential to reduce pain by blocking the action of the enzyme cyclooxygenase. This research was aims to determine the effect of ethanol extract of leaf melinjo of the analgesic effect in mice. Twenty-five mice were divided into 5 groups: negative control (CMC Na 0,5%, positive control group (mefenamic acid 1.3 mg / kg and groups melinjo leaf extract (dose of 6.48 mg / kg, 25.92 mg / kg and 51.84 mg / BB on white male mice. Analgesic test were examined by giving pain stimulation to treated animals, such a 55°C heat stimulation. The observation, then at 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after administered.The results showed melinjo leaf ethanol extract with a dose of 51.84 mg / kg have analgesic effects is no different significantly with mefenamic acid dose of 1.3 mg / kg body weight (P> 0.05.

  19. Pembentukan Pronukleus Jantan dan Betina pada Mencit (Mus musculus setelah Terjadinya Fertilisasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYAHRUDDIN SAID

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Pronuclei are nuclei from male or female before syngami. The information about time of fertilization in vivo in animals was limited, especially in formation of pronuclei. This study have purpose to know the timing of sperm and egg nuclei changes at the time in vivo fertilization until formed male and female pronuclei. The female mouse DDY age 6-8 weeks were super ovulated through injection 5 IU PMSG and hCG (48 h after PMSG per mouse intraperitoneally. The female mouse was mated with male from same species in proportion male: female = 1:1. The eggs were collected on 4, 6, 8, and 10 h after fertilization with 0 h is 12 h after hCG injection with shallow cut of fertilization bladder of female mouse tuba Fallopian. The shallow cut was treated in PBS media supplemented by 3% BSA and 0.1% hyaluronidase; the eggs were washed in same media without hyaluronidase. The eggs were fixed with glutaraldehyde 2.5% in PBS, the eggs were drawn in neutral formalin 10%, dehydration with ethanol 95% and stained with lacmoid 0.25% in acetic acid 45%, the eggs were washed with using acetoglycerol and then observation about development of sperm and egg nuclei morphology. Development of mouse egg nuclei achieve to female pronuclei phase 185 (95%+6 was occur on 8 h after in vivo fertilization, development of mouse sperm nuclei achieve to male pronuclei phase 185 (96%+4 was occur on 8 h after in vivo fertilization. In the present study, we found some of eggs like unfertile eggs, polysperm, and parthenogenesis at the fertilization in vivo.

  20. Characterization of axo-axonic synapses in the piriform cortex of Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinjun; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2012-03-01

    Previous anatomical and physiological studies have established major glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal subtypes within the piriform cortical circuits. However, quantitative information regarding axo-axonic inhibitory synapses mediated by chandelier cells across major cortical subdivisions of piriform cortex is lacking. Therefore, we examined the properties of these synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Our results show the following. 1) γ-Aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1-positive varicosities, whose appearance resembles chandelier cartridges, are found around the initial segments of axons of glutamatergic cells across layers II and III. 2) Both the density of axo-axonic cartridges and the degree of γ-aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1 innervation in each axo-axonic synapse are significantly higher in the piriform cortex than in the neocortex. 3) Glutamate decarboxylase 67, vesicular GABA transporter, and parvalbumin, but not calbindin, are colocalized with the presynaptic varicosities, whereas gephyrin, Na-K-2Cl cotransporter 1, and GABA(A) receptor α1 subunit, but not K-Cl cotransporter 2, are colocalized at the presumed postsynaptic sites. 4) The axo-axonic cartridges innervate the majority of excitatory neurons and are distributed more frequently in putative centrifugal cells and posterior piriform cortex. We further describe the morphology of chandelier cells by using parvalbumin-immunoreactivity and single-cell labeling. In summary, our results demonstrate that a small population of chandelier cells mediates abundant axo-axonic synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Because of the critical location of these inhibitory synapses in relation to action potential regulation, our results highlight a critical role of axo-axonic synapses in regulating information flow and olfactory-related oscillations within the piriform cortex in vivo.

  1. Characterization of Axo-Axonic Synapses in the Piriform Cortex of Mus musculus

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xinjun; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Previous anatomical and physiological studies have established major glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal subtypes within the piriform cortical circuits. However, quantitative information regarding axo-axonic inhibitory synapses mediated by chandelier cells across major cortical subdivisions of piriform cortex is lacking. Therefore, we examined the properties of these synapses across the entire piriform cortex. Our results show the following. 1) γ-Aminobutyric acid membrane transporter 1-posi...

  2. UJI AKTIVITAS ANTIINFLAMASI KUERSETIN KULIT BAWANG MERAH (Allium cepa L. PADA MENCIT PUTIH JANTAN (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulistia Budianti Soemarie

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a local reaction of infection or tissue injury and involves more mediators. Utilization of traditional medicine should be used to minimize the side effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as the use of onion skin (Allium cepa L.. This study aims to determine the activity of quercetin onion skin and the optimal dose of quercetin as a potential anti-inflammatory on male white mice. This study is an experimental research. Red onion skins extracted by maceration method. Preparation of the test is divided into five groups: control positive (Diclofenac Potassium 6,5mg/kg, control negative (Na-CMC, quercetin of onion skin dose I (50mg/kg, dose II (100mg/kg and dose III (200mg/kg. Adduction of test compounds is given by oral, after 30 minute the right paw of mice induced by karagenin 1 %. Paw volume is analyzed with area under curve (AUC. The results showed that quercetin of onions skin have an anti-inflammatory activity. From the analyzed of AUC for each dose of quercetin showed anti-inflammatory power value for dose I amounted 57.13 %, dose II 59.08% , and dose III 73.75 % and ANOVA statistical test with p-value 0.005 ( < 0.05 , which means there is a significant difference between control positive, dose I , and dose II with dose III, the optimal dose is dose III (200 mg / kg.

  3. Pengaruh Hiperglikemia terhadap Gambaran Histopatologis Glomerulus Mencit (Mus musculus Linn yang Diinduksi Aloksan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melati Setia Ningsih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHiperglikemia menjadi ancaman serius karena berdampak buruk terhadap keluaran klinis karena dapat menyebabkan gangguan fungsi imun serta lebih rentan terkena infeksi, perburukan sistem kardiovaskuler, trombosis, peningkatan inflamasi, disfungsi endotel dan kerusakan otak. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh hiperglikemia terhadap gambaran histopatologis glomerulus ginjal pada mencit yang diinduksi aloksan. Ini merupakan penelitian eksperimental dengan rancangan posttest only with control group. Subjek penelitian adalah 12 mencit yang dibagi dalam dua kelompok: kontrol (K dan perlakuan (P. Kelompok perlakuan diinduksi menjadi hiperglikemia melalui pemberian aloksan intraperitoneal dengan dosis 150 mg/Kg BB. Pada hari ke-14 dilakukan terminasi. Diameter, keliling dan luas glomerulus pada kelompok perlakuan (P1 meningkat dibanding kelompok kontrol K (p< 0,05. Kesimpulan hasil penelitian ini adalah induksi hiperglikemia yang dilakukan lewat pemberian aloksan secara intraperitoneal dengan dosis 150 mg/kg BB selama 14 hari menyebabkan perubahan yang signifikan pada gambaran histopatologis glomerulus mencit.Kata kunci: hiperglikemia, glomerulus, gambaran histopatologisAbstractHyperglycemia become a serious health threat because have the bad impact to clinical output because immune functin disruption and more susceptible get infection, decay of cardiovascular systim, thrombosis, increase of inflamation, endotel disfunction dan decay of brain. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hyperglycemia on histopathological features of glomerulus of mice induced by alloxan. Twelve (12 male mice divided into two groups: control group (K and treated group (P. The treated groups received 150 mg/ kg BB doses of alloxan. After 14 days of induction, mice kidney were excised and fixed in Formalin solution. The tissues were processed by paraffin embedding to obtain histopathological sections and stained with haematoxylin-eosine. Morphometric analysis of glomerulus showed that the glomerulus area, circumference and diameter were increased in group P (p<0.05.The result suggest that hyperglycemia induced by alloxan for 14 days caused significant changes in histopathological features of mice glomerulus.Keywords: hyperglycemia, glomerulus, histopathologic features

  4. Pengaruh Hiperglikemia terhadap Gambaran Histopatologis Glomerulus Mencit (Mus musculus Linn) yang Diinduksi Aloksan

    OpenAIRE

    Melati Setia Ningsih; Eryati Darwin; Erlina Rustam

    2015-01-01

    AbstrakHiperglikemia menjadi ancaman serius karena berdampak buruk terhadap keluaran klinis karena dapat menyebabkan gangguan fungsi imun serta lebih rentan terkena infeksi, perburukan sistem kardiovaskuler, trombosis, peningkatan inflamasi, disfungsi endotel dan kerusakan otak. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh hiperglikemia terhadap gambaran histopatologis glomerulus ginjal pada mencit yang diinduksi aloksan. Ini merupakan penelitian eksperimental dengan rancangan postt...

  5. UJI TOKSISITAS AKUT EKSTRAK DAUN PSIDIUM GUAVA LINN (DAUN JAMBU BIJI TERHADAP MENCIT (MUS MUSCULUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiyatun Naini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Psidium guava Linn leaf extract as mouthrinse has been suggested to be used against toothache, and also has suggested effect against diarrhea and vomiting, as well as anti spasmodic and rheumatic symptoms, anti inflammation, anti piretic, analgetic, and anti bacterial activity. However, to consider potential side effects, this work aimed to test the acute toxicity of guava leaf extract. For this purpose guava leaf extract was given orally to to groups of ten mice each at a doses of 1.25g, 2.5, 5, 10 and 21 g/kg body weight in a suspension with CMC Na 0,5%. Ten mice were used as control with a dose of 1 ml CMC Na 0,5%. The results suggest no acute toxicity to mice, since even the biggest dose given (show no measurable value of LD 50. It could be concluded that guava leaf extract shows no acute toxicity to mice at tested concentrations.

  6. Working memory and reference memory tests of spatial navigation in mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Tucci, Valter; Sovrano, Valeria Anna; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2015-05-01

    Researchers in spatial cognition have debated for decades the specificity of the mechanisms through which spatial information is processed and stored. Interestingly, although rodents are the preferred animal model for studying spatial navigation, the behavioral methods traditionally used to assess spatial memory do not effectively test the predictions of specificity in their representation. To address such issues, the present study tested the ability of mice to use boundary geometry and features to remember a goal location across 2 types of tasks--a working memory task with a changing goal location, and a reference memory task with 1 rewarded goal location. We show for the first time that mice, like other animals, can successfully encode boundary geometry in a working memory spatial mapping task, just as they do in a reference memory task. Their use of a nongeometric featural cue (striped pattern), in contrast, was more limited in the working memory task, although it quickly improved in the reference memory task. We discuss the implications of these findings for future research on the neural and genetic underpinnings of spatial representations.

  7. Struktur mikroskopis kartilago epifisialis tibia fetus mencit (Mus musculus L. dari induk dengan perlakuan kafein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Budi Santoso

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine affects activity of enzyme of polimerase DNA, induce the mitosis of cells mammal of before replication DNA ended the perfection, and also pursue the activity of enzyme fosfodiesterase is hence anticipated by a potential caffeine generate the developmental defect, for example can pursue the process of ossification endochondralis in growth plate. This present research studied the effect of caffeine gift by oral on pregnant dam during organogenesis to structure of histologi growth plate tibia foetus. Twenty four pregnant mice (6 per group were treated by gavage with 0 (control, 40, 80, 120 mg/kg b.w caffeine from gestation day 6 to 15. On day 18 of pregnancy, fetuses was removed from dams by caecarean section.. Observation of histological structure of the tibial growth plate preparation by paraffin method (Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. The result showed that caffeine cause slightened proliferative zone, maturation zone, and cartilage calcification zone on the mouse tibial growth plate.

  8. PANJANG SIKLUS ESTRUS MENCIT (Mus musculus L. YANG DIBERI PEMANIS BUATAN ASPARTAM SECARA ORAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Sulastri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh pemberian aspartam terhadap panjang siklus estrus mencit betina dewasa. Rancangan yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah Rancangan Acak Lengkap (RAL dengan 4 perlakuan dan 6 ulangan. Perlakuan P0 sebagai kontrol diberi aquades dan perlakuan P1, P2 dan P3 diberi aspartam dosis10 mg/kg bb; 15 mg/kg bb dan20 mg/kg bb. Aspartam diberikan setiap hari secara oral (gavage selama 14 hari sebanyak 0,3 ml. Setelah 14 hari, apusan vagina dibuat setiap 8 jam dalam sehari selama dua kali siklus estrus. Variabel yang diamati adalah panjang waktu tiap fase dalam siklus estrus. Hasil analisis menggunakan Uji One Way Anova dan Uji Kruskal Wallis menunjukkan bahwa aspartam secara nyata (P<0,05 memperpanjang siklus estrus dengan peningkatan dosis yang diberikan.

  9. The effects of ectopic UCP1 expression on gene expression in skeletal muscle [Mus Musculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.

    2015-01-01

    This SuperSeries is composed of the following subset Series: GSE45991: Amino acid deprivation due to overexpression of UCP1 in skeletal muscle: signalling via FGF-21 GSE45992: Transgenic overexpression of UCP1 in skeletal muscle in mice fed a HFD: signalling via FGF-21 Skeletal muscle FGF21

  10. Aggressive and nonaggressive personalities differ in oxidative status in selected lines of mice (Mus musculus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costantini, David; Carere, Claudio; Caramaschi, Doretta; Koolhaas, Jaap M.

    2008-01-01

    Mice selected for aggression and coping (long attack latency (LAL), reactive coping strategy; short attack latency (SAL), pro-active coping strategy) are a useful model for studying the physiological background of animal personalities. These mice also show a differential stress responsiveness, espec

  11. Histopathological effects of Chromium (III Sulfate on Liver and Kidney of Swiss Albino Mice (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iffat Fatima

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium (III sulfate has various industrial applications and is widely used in leather industry due to its high tanning properties. Cr (III is required for efficient metabolism of fats and carbohydrates in traces. Various studies have reported that its constant exposure may lead to severe health problems in both animals and humans. In this study, histopathological effect of dietary Cr (III was evaluated on liver and kidneys of rodents. For this purpose, adult Swiss albino mice (n=25 were divided into different treatment and control groups (n=5/group after sufficient acclimatization. After 3 weeks of treatment, animals were sacrificed and observations regarding histopathology of liver and kidneys were made in all treatment groups and compared to control. Microscopy and photography was performed after processing the tissues according to standard protocol of sectioning and staining. Liver cross sections of treated animals showed signs of fibrosis in portal area, and congestion of sinusoid and central vein. Whereas, more pronounced effects of Cr (III toxicity were observed in kidneys. These include mononuclear cell infiltration, necrosis and contraction of glomerulus within Bowman’s capsule. However, No pathological changes were observed in control group. These results support the hypothesis that enhanced level of Cr (III contamination of food can induce both hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. These basic findings prove that currently increasing levels of trivalent chromium in environment are hazardous to living organisms. Therefore, to avoid health risks to both animals and humans, conversion of toxic chromium waste to less toxic compounds is required. Moreover, exposure level through any route should also be minimized.

  12. STUDI HISTOPATOLOGI HATI MENCIT (Mus musculus L. YANG DIINDUKSI PEMANIS BUATAN

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    Y Utomo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Penggunaan pemanis buatan yang semula hanya ditujukan pada produk-produk khusus bagi penderita diabetes, saat ini penggunaannya semakin meluas pada berbagai produk pangan. Oleh karena itu perlu adanya penelitian tentang pengaruh pemberian pemanis buatan terhadap kerusakan organ tubuh khususnya organ hati. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui gambaran histopatologi hati pada mencit yang diinduksi pemanis buatan. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimental laboratoris dengan rancangan post test randomized control group design. Sebanyak 20 ekor mencit  jantan  galur Balb/c dibagi secara acak menjadi empat kelompok, masing-masing kelompok terdiri dari lima ekor. Kelompok 1 sebagai kelompok kontrol diberi akuades sebagai placebo. Kelompok 2,3, dan 4 berturut-turut diberi  pemanis buatan dengan dosis 5 mg/KgBB, 10 mg/KgBB, dan 15 mg/KgBB. Pemanis buatan diberikan secara oral selama 30 hari. Pada hari ke-31 semua mencit dimatikan untuk diambil organ hatinya. Organ hati selanjutnya dibuat preparat mikroanatomi dan diwarnai dengan HE. Perubahan struktur jaringan hati diamati dan dilakukan penskoran dari 0 sampai 4 berdasarkan derajat perubahannya. Data skor perubahan dianalisis secara deskriptif. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kelompok 1 dan 2 derajat kerusakannya hampir sama yaitu skor 1-2, sedangkan kelompok 4 derajat kerusakannya mencapai skor 2-3. Disimpulkan bahwa semakin tinggi dosis pemanis buatan yang diberikan semakin tinggi derajat kerusakan organ hatinya. The use of artificial sweetener was originally aimed at the specific products for diabetics, but today the use of artificial sweetener is widespread in various food to products. Therefore, it is needed a research on the effects of artificial sweeteners to organs damage especially the liver. The purpose of this study was to determine the histopathological picture of the liver of mice induced by artificial sweeteners. This study was a laboratory experimental design with randomized posttest control group design. Twenty male mice strain Balb/c were randomly divided into four groups, each group consisted of five mice. Group 1 as the control group was given distilled water as placebo. Group 2,3, and 4 was given artificial sweeteners with rising doses. Artificial sweetener was given orally for 30 days. On day 31th all mice’s liver were taken to be examined. Liver then was formed as mikroanatomi smear and stained with HE. Change in the structure of the liver tissue was observed and scored from 0 to 4 based on the degree of change. Score changes data were analyzed descriptively. The results showed that group 1 and 2 has almost same degrees of damage with score of 1-2, while group 4 reached a score of 2-3 of damage degree. It can be concluded that the higher dose of artificial sweeteners given the higher degree of damage to the organs.

  13. Pengaruh Tepung Teripang Pasir (Holothuria Scabra Terhadap Perilaku Seksual dan Kadar Testosteron Darah Mencit (Mus musculus

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    Sarifah Nurjanah

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Sea cucumber is generally believed as a natural material that can be used as a tonic food to increase man vitality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sandfish powder on sexual behavior and blood testosterone level of male mice. Method applied in the study was laboratory experimental method. Mature male mice were treated with administration of sandfish powder with three dosage rate of steroid content (10, 30 and 50 ìg/100 g body weight during 12 days, whereas for control treatment were without hormone administration and with the metil testosterone administration. Parameters that were investigated were kissing vagina and mounting for sexual behavior and the blood testosterone level of male mice. It was found that administration of sandfish powder significantly give effect on the number of kissing vagina and mounting compared to control. Administration of 10 ìg/100 g body weight on male mice showed the highest sexual behavior with 25 kissing vagina for and 6 mounting for 30 minutes. Moreover, administration of sandfish powder increased the testosterone level in the male mice blood. This may due to the steroid contained in sandfish powder and nutrition value that increase mice libido. The study proved that the sandfish powder has a potential as a nature aphrodisiac.

  14. DEFINIENDO HOMO SAPIENS-SAPIENS: APROXIMACIÓN ANTROPOLÓGICA DEFININDO HOMO SAPIENS-SAPIENS: APROXIMAÇÃO ANTROPOLÓGICA DEFINING HOMO SAPIENS-SAPIENS: ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Valdebenito

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo reflexiona sobre los encuentros y desencuentros entre el ser humano y el resto de los animales, en tanto miembros de sistemas en permanente interacción(1. Abordar la definición de Homo, repasar su evolución biológica y cultural y reflexionar sobre los resabios de animalidad que quedan en el comportamiento social del Homo sapiens-sapiens es su objetivo principal. Se busca reflexionar sobre los dilemas morales que acompañan al hombre en tanto ser cultural; para ello se analizan dos dilemas éticos: la violencia y el incestoEste artigo reflete sobre os encontros e desencontros entre o ser humano e os demais animais, enquanto membros de sistemas em permanente interação(1. Seu principal objetivo é abordar a definição de Homo, traçar um panorama de sua evolução biológica e cultural e refletir sobre os resquícios da animalidade que permanecem no comportamento social do Homo sapiens-sapiens. Busca-se refletir sobre os dilemas morais que acompanham o homem enquanto ser cultural, o que para isso são considerados como dilemas éticos: a violência e o incestoThis paper reflects on the similarities and differences between human beings and animals as members of systems in permanent interaction. The main goal is to define Homo, reviewing his/her biological and cultural evolution and reflecting on the animal social behaviors that still remain in Homo sapiens-sapiens. The paper reflect on the moral dilemmas present in humans as cultural beings, taking as example the ethical dilemmas of violence and incest

  15. Spatial Construction Skills of Chimpanzees ("Pan Troglodytes") and Young Human Children ("Homo Sapiens Sapiens")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poti, Patrizia; Hayashi, Misato; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2009-01-01

    Spatial construction tasks are basic tests of visual-spatial processing. Two studies have assessed spatial construction skills in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and young children (Homo sapiens sapiens) with a block modelling task. Study 1a subjects were three young chimpanzees and five adult chimpanzees. Study 1b subjects were 30 human children…

  16. Phylogenetic relationship and time of divergence of Mus terricolor with reference to other Mus species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MAHUA RUDRA; BISHWANATH CHATTERJEE; MIN BAHADUR

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA control region ofMus terricolor , three aboriginal speciesM. spretus ,M. macedonicus ,M. spicilegus ;the Asian lineageM. caroli ,M. cervicolor ,M. cookii ; and the two house mice,M. musculus domesticusandM. m. castaneuswere analysed to estimate the substitution rate, phylogenetic relationship and the probable time of divergence. Results showedthatM. spretus ,M. caroliandM. terricolorare highly diverged from each other (caroli /terricolor =0.146,caroli /spretus =0.147 andterricolor /spretus =0.122), whereasM. spretusshowed less divergence with two house mice species (0.070 and0.071). Sequence divergence betweenM. terricolorand the Palearctic group were found to be ranging from 0.121 to 0.134.Phylogenetic analysis by minimum evolution, neighbour-joining, unweighed pair group method with arithmetic mean andmaximum parsimony showed almost similar topology. Two major clusters were found, one included the Asian lineage,M.caroli ,M. cookiiandM. cervicolorand the other included the house miceM. m. domesticus ,M. m. castaneusand the aboriginalmiceM. macedonicusandM. spicilegusalong withM. spretus , forming the Palearctic clade.M. terricolorwas positionedbetween the Palearctic and Asian clades. Results showed that Palearctic -terricolorand the Asian lineages diverged 5.47million years ago (Mya), whileM. terricolorhad split around 4.63 Mya from their ancestor.M. cervicolor ,M. cookiiandM.carolidiverged between 4.70 and 3.36 Mya, which indicates thatM. terricolorand the Asian lineages evolved simultaneously.M. spretusis expected to have diverged nearly 2.9 Mya from their most recent common ancestor

  17. La Deuotio de Decio Mus

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    En la presente comunicación pretendemos abordar el tema de la pervivencia de la Historia Antigua como fuente iconográfica para el arte europeo de la Edad Moderna (el siglo XVII en nuestro caso). En una primera parte, analizaremos el ritual de la deuotio, contextualizándolo dentro de la religión romana republicana. A partir de las fuentes literarias prestaremos especial atención al estudio de la deuotio de Decio Mus. El siguiente paso será poner lo anterior en relación con Rubens y su ciclo de...

  18. La Deuotio de Decio Mus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Aldea Celada

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available En la presente comunicación pretendemos abordar el tema de la pervivencia de la Historia Antigua como fuente iconográfica para el arte europeo de la Edad Moderna (el siglo XVII en nuestro caso. En una primera parte, analizaremos el ritual de la deuotio, contextualizándolo dentro de la religión romana republicana. A partir de las fuentes literarias prestaremos especial atención al estudio de la deuotio de Decio Mus. El siguiente paso será poner lo anterior en relación con Rubens y su ciclo dedicado a la deuotio de Decio Mus, intentando explicar qué motivo la elección del tema (comitente y destino de la obra, cuál de las fuentes fue la que inspiró a Rubens y qué elementos iconográficos fueron empleados para dar forma al ritual en las diferente escenas que componen el ciclo.

  19. The origin and evolution of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Chris

    2016-07-05

    If we restrict the use of Homo sapiens in the fossil record to specimens which share a significant number of derived features in the skeleton with extant H. sapiens, the origin of our species would be placed in the African late middle Pleistocene, based on fossils such as Omo Kibish 1, Herto 1 and 2, and the Levantine material from Skhul and Qafzeh. However, genetic data suggest that we and our sister species Homo neanderthalensis shared a last common ancestor in the middle Pleistocene approximately 400-700 ka, which is at least 200 000 years earlier than the species origin indicated from the fossils already mentioned. Thus, it is likely that the African fossil record will document early members of the sapiens lineage showing only some of the derived features of late members of the lineage. On that basis, I argue that human fossils such as those from Jebel Irhoud, Florisbad, Eliye Springs and Omo Kibish 2 do represent early members of the species, but variation across the African later middle Pleistocene/early Middle Stone Age fossils shows that there was not a simple linear progression towards later sapiens morphology, and there was chronological overlap between different 'archaic' and 'modern' morphs. Even in the late Pleistocene within and outside Africa, we find H. sapiens specimens which are clearly outside the range of Holocene members of the species, showing the complexity of recent human evolution. The impact on species recognition of late Pleistocene gene flow between the lineages of modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans is also discussed, and finally, I reconsider the nature of the middle Pleistocene ancestor of these lineages, based on recent morphological and genetic data.This article is part of the themed issue 'Major transitions in human evolution'.

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U08278-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hromoso... 37 1.5 BC071576_1( BC071576 |pid:none) Homo sapiens amyotrophic lateral s... 37 1.5 AL844504_111(..._1( AB053307 |pid:none) Mus musculus Als2 mRNA, complete c... 37 1.5 BC046828_1( BC046828 |pid:none) Mus musculus amyotrophic

  1. AcEST: DK959133 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein DJ OS=Mus musculus PE=3 ... 32 2.5 sp|P21941|MATN1_HUMAN Cartilage matrix ...protein OS=Homo sapiens G... 32 2.5 sp|P51942|MATN1_MOUSE Cartilage matrix protein OS=Mus musculus G... 31 4

  2. Stravovacích návyky z hlediska fylogeneze Homo sapiens sapiens.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This Bachelor's thesis on the synthesis of literature, is attempting to create an overview of our human ancestor's dietary habits. The time frame is from the oldest representative of the hominoid family, genus Ardipithecus ramidus, to neolithic Homo sapiens.This will show the connection between the changing food spectrum and the phylogeny of our species.

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U00301-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e) Homo sapiens cDNA FLJ16786 fis, cl... 32 5.7 AY720432_1( AY720432 |pid:none) Homo sapiens crumb...8 BC169202_1( BC169202 |pid:none) Synthetic construct Homo sapiens c... 32 9.8 AF406641_1( AF406641 |pid:none) Mus musculus crumb

  4. Sapiens a brief history of humankind

    CERN Document Server

    Harari, Yuval Noah

    2015-01-01

    From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also comp...

  5. Intraluminar testicular colonization and differentiation of the inner cell mass in mice (Mus Musculus Colonización intraluminar testicular y diferenciación de la masa celular interna en ratones (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Láyonal Acosta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Primordial germ cells (PGC`s are transplanted to testicle of other individual of the same species, they colonize the lumen of the seminiferous tubules, seeking a niche to differentiate into sperm. Our objective was to evaluate the intraluminal colonization of a suspension of cells in the inner cell mass (IMC`s of blastocysts obtained from mice, using a novel technique. It was transplanted a suspension of ICM by mean of inmunosurgery into the rete testis of recipient animals which were previously treated with cyclophosphamide to reduce their own spermatogenesis. We confirmed the presence of intraluminal minitubules in 2 of 100 seminiferous tubules, demonstrating that transplantation of a suspension of cells from the inner cell mass can colonize the seminiferous tubules and also maintain a synchronously xenogenic spermatogenesis with the receiver.Cuando las células germinales primordiales (CGPs son trasplantadas al testículo de otro individuo de la misma especie; colonizan el lumen de los túbulos seminíferos, buscando su nicho para diferenciarse en espermatozoides. Nuestro objetivo fue evaluar la colonización intraluminal de una suspensión de células de la masa celular interna (MCI obtenidas de blastocistos de ratones. Una suspensión de MCI obtenidos mediante una inmunocirugía en la red testicular de animales tratados previamente con ciclofosfamida para disminuir su propia espermatogénesis fueron trasladados a animales receptores. Se comprobó la presencia de minitúbulos intraluminales en 2 de 100 túbulos seminíferos, lo que demuestra que el trasplante de una suspensión de células de la masa celular interna pueden colonizar los túbulos seminíferos y además mantener una espermatogénesis xenogénica de manera sincrónica con el receptor.

  6. Modification of the Mus musculus albino rats parasitological profile induced by low x-ray radiation dose; Modificacao do perfil parasitologico de camundongos albinos Mus musculus causada por raios X em baixa dosagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, P.L.; Veloso, L.F.; Motta, M.A. da [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Biofisica e Radiobiologia

    1994-12-31

    Ionizing radiations can induce alterations on the immunological response. In order to observe the effects of X-Rays in the susceptibility to intestinal worms infestation, feces of 40 Albino Swiss mice (20 males and 20 females) receiving weekly X-Rays doses of 500 mGy, were collected once per week, so as was collected fecal material of an equal group o mice non-irradiated, for comparison. The results of the coprologic examination revealed the presence of Ascaris lumbricoides, eggs mainly in the irradiated females, having the irradiated group a proportional rate of 30:1, as compared with the non-irradiated group. Eggs of Syphacia obveolata was also found, with a rate of 13:1 as compared with the non-irradiated, and also here with a prevalence among the irradiated females. (author). 7 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs.

  7. Heterologous expression of Mus musculus immunoresponsive gene 1 (irg1) in Escherichia coli results in itaconate production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuoristo, K.S.; Mars, A.E.; Loon, S.; Orsi, E.; Eggink, G.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Weusthuis, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Itaconic acid, a C5-dicarboxylic acid, is a potential biobased building block for the polymer industry. It is obtained from the citric acid cycle by decarboxylation of cis-aconitic acid. This reaction is catalyzed by CadA in the native itaconic acid producer Aspergillus terreus. Recently, another en

  8. Estrogenic Effect of 70% Ethanol Turmeric (Curcuma domestica Val. Extract on Ovariectomized Female Mice (Mus musculus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Dewi

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The influence of extract turmeric (Curcuma domestica Val. on endometrium thickness, vaginal epithelium, mammary gland, and protein of estrogen receptor of ovariectomized mice was examined. Twenty five ovariectomized mice which were divided into five groups, were treated by ethynilestradiol (8,4 x 10-3 g, aquades (10 ml, and turmeric extract at doses 230 mg/kg b.w.; 310 mg/kg b.w.; and 390 mg/kg b.w. for eight days. At the end of experiments the mice were killed, then the uterus, vagina, and mammae were removed and the wet weight of uterus was recorded. Uterus, vagina, and mammae were examined histologically. Estrogen receptor protein from uterus were analized by using SDS-PAGE. One way anava test showed that turmeric extract at doses 310 mg/kg b.w. and 390 mg/kg b.w give estrogenic effect on vaginal ephitelium, endometrium thickness, and diametre of mammary glands. SDS-PAGE analysis showed there were differences in protein concentration between control and treatment groups which were seen in the thickness of the bands. Estrogen receptor band could be detected in sampel of treatment groups at molecular weight 45 kDa.

  9. POTENCY ASSAY OF COCOYAM (Xanthosoma sagittifolium (L. Schott. TUBER AS AN ANTIULCER FUNCTIONAL FOOD ON MICE (Mus musculus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyani Yuliastuti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cocoyam (Xanthosoma sagittifolium (L. Schott. tuber is usually consumed as carbohydrates source. Because of highly mineral and fiber contents, it is potential to develop as a functional food source. The mineral contents are potassium, phosphor, magnesium, iron, copper and sodium. Some minerals are well known able to neutralize pH of the gastric fluid. It is necessary to study cocoyam activity on the ulcer gastric. The aims of this study were to determine anti-ulcerogenic activity of cocoyam tuber by observing macroscopic stomach mucous structure on mice and measuring the gastric fluid pH. Twenty male mice aged 2-3 months were used in this study. They were classified in to 4 different treatment groups. Group I was control mice without gastric ulcer, group II, III, and IV were mice with gastric ulcer by using aspirin treatment. Group II,III, and IV were treated with different treatments then for 7 days. Group II was treated by aquadest (negative control group, group III by sucralfat (positive control group, and group IV by cocoyam tuber. In the last treatment day, mice were fasted for 24 hours and then sacrified to pick stomach up. Gastric fluid was collected and the pH was measured then. Stomach mucous structure was observed macroscopically. Data in the gastric fluid pH was analyzed by using one-way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance and continued HSD (Honest Significant Difference-Tukey test in 5% significance degree. Degree of stomach mucous structure damage was analyzed descriptively and then it was scored based on number and diameter size of ulcers. Data on the ulcer score were analyzed by using Kruskal-Wallis test. The results showed that there was a significant difference (p0,05 between cocoyam tuber group and aquadest group. Nevertheless, mice in the cocoyam tuber group had lower ulcer score than mice in the aquadest group. Therefore cocoyam tuber is safe consumed by the gastric ulcer mice. Cocoyam tuber is potential to develop as a functional food on gastric ulcer patient.

  10. Evaluation of diagnostic methods for Myocoptes musculinus according to age and treatment status of mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Kelly A; Albacarys, Lauren K; Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Perkins, Cheryl; Henderson, Kenneth S; Watson, Julie

    2013-11-01

    Detecting and controlling murine fur mites continues to be challenging. Here we compared the efficacy of fur-pluck, cage PCR, and fur PCR testing of mice naturally infested with Myocoptes musculinus and make recommendations regarding the application of these diagnostic strategies in aged or treated mice. We compared all 3 diagnostic methods in groups of infested and noninfested control mice over time. For fur plucks, we used a scoring system to quantitatively compare mite infestations across ages. Mice that were 4 wk old had higher egg and mite scores than did older mice, with average scores at 4 wk corresponding to 40 to 100 individual fur mites and eggs per sample. Furthermore, 15% and 20% of samples from infested mice at 24 and 28 wk of age, respectively, lacked all fur mites and eggs. Cage PCR results varied as mice grew older. Fur PCR testing was the most sensitive and specific assay in untreated infested mice, particularly when mite densities were low. In addition, we compared fur-pluck and fur PCR tests for evaluating the efficacy of selamectin treatment. Two treatments with selamectin eliminated Myocoptes fur-mite infestations. At 8 wk after treatment, all fur-pluck samples were negative, but one-third of treated infested cages remained positive by fur PCR assay; at 16 wk after treatment, all cages were negative by fur PCR assay. Because offspring of infested mice were invariably heavily infested, breeding of suspected infested mice with subsequent testing of offspring was the definitive testing strategy when fur-pluck and PCR results conflicted.

  11. Induction of lipid oxidation gene expression by polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin in small intestine of mice [Mus musculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Keijer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) act as potent natural hypolipidemics and are linked to many health benefits in humans and in animal models. Mice fed long-term a high fat diet, in which medium-chain alpha linoleic acid (ALA) was partially replaced by long-chain docosahexaenoic (DHA) and ei

  12. In vivo toxicity of the culturable marine cyanobacterium Geitlerinema pseudacutissimum CNP 1019 extract on male Swiss albino mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthanayagam, Veerabadhran; Nagarajan, Manivel; Sundararaman, Muthuraman

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vivo toxicity of Geitlerinema pseudacutissimum CNP 1019 organic extract in a murine host. A single intraperitoneal injection of 1 g extract kg⁻¹ body weight (BW) did not exhibit mortality, whereas 3 g extract kg⁻¹ BW (approximate lethal dose) resulted in mortality within 5 days. To perform subchronic exposure toxicity analyses (i.e., daily exposure for a total of 14 days), a maximum concentration of ≤1 g extract kg⁻¹ BW was used. Subchronic toxicity studies in the treated mice, showed fluctuations of feed intake, loss of body weight, increase in specific activity of serum lactate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase and decrease in whole serum protein concentration. LDH isoenzyme expression was found, and levels of the various isoforms were decreased as a result of the treatment. Histopathology studies in liver, kidney, and spleen isolated from the treated mice showed the presence of necrotic debris, hemorrhage, and micronuclei revealing the toxicity of the extract. The dose-dependent alterations in biochemical parameters in conjunction with the histological lesions noted in the animals treated with the prepared extract illustrate the likely potential toxicity to mammals from any encounters with the studied cyanobacterium.

  13. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue [Mus musculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Keijer, J.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Verlinde, E.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that a low versus high glycemic index (GI) diet on a high fat (30% kcal fat) background (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in C57BL/6J male mice. The LGI diet enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and repressed high fat diet-induced bod

  14. UJI AKTIVITAS EKSTRAK REBUNG BAMBU TABAH (Gigantochloa nigrociliata BUSE-KURZ TERHADAP PERILAKU KAWIN MENCIT JANTAN (Mus musculus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Istri Mas Padmiswari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Penelitan ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh ekstrak rebung bambu tabah terhadap perilaku kawin mencit jantan. Rancangan yang digunakan pada penelitian ini adalah rancangan eksperimental sederhana dengan4 kelompok perlakuan dan 6 ulangan, yaitu P0: Kontrol (Perlakuan  dengan pemberian CMC Na 0,5 %, P1: (Perlakuan dengan pemberian ekstrak 200 mg/kg bb, P2: (Perlakuan dengan pemberian ekstrak 300 mg/kg bb dan P3: (Perlakuan dengan pemberian ekstrak 400 mg/kg. Perlakuan ekstrak rebung bambu tabah diberikan pada mencit jantan secara oral setiap hari selama 33 hari dan pengamatan perilaku kawin dilakukan 3 hari sekali. Variabel yang diamati untuk menilai perilaku kawin mencit jantan adalah jumlah mount. Data dianalisa dengan menggunakan uji One Way Annova. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pemberian ekstrak rebung bambu tabah berpengaruh signifikan terhadap peningkatan perilaku kawin mencit jantan (P<0,05.

  15. Circadian response reduction in light and response restoration in darkness : A "Skeleton" light pulse PRC study in mice (Mus musculus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comas, M.; Beersma, D. G. M.; Spoelstra, K.; Daan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Entrainment may involve responses to dawn, to dusk, and to the light in between these transitions. Previous studies showed that the circadian system responds to only 2 light pulses, one at the beginning and one at the end of the day, in a similar way as to a full photoperiod, as long as the photoper

  16. Effects of a 5-HT3 agonist and antagonist on inter-male aggression in Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kerchner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Research has revealed an inverse relationship between serotonin (5-HT levels in the brain and aggressive behavior. However, effects on aggression at the level of the receptor have yet to be elucidated for many 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study examined the effects of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist m-chlorophenylbiguanide (mCPBG and antagonist ondansetron on inter-male aggression in mice. Using a resident-intruder paradigm designed to assess both offensive and defensive aggression, male C57BL/6J mice received 1 mg/kg i.p. injections of either mCPBG, ondansetron, or an inactive vehicle and were subsequently exposed to male AKR/J mice for a period of 10 minutes. Attack latency and the proportion of time engaged in a range of defensive behaviors were recorded. Subject C57BL/6J mice were then immediately run in an open field test for an additional 10 minutes to examine any anxiolytic or sedative effects of the drugs. Results show no significant differences between drug groups in either offensive or defensive behavior. No significant differences were observed between drug groups and open field activity; however, significant differences were seen between the offensive and defensive condition in the open field. In conclusion, this study fails to reveal any significant effects of the 5-HT3 agents on inter-male aggression, which may reflect a functional difference between the 5-HT3 receptor and the remaining G-protein coupled 5-HT receptor. However, this conclusion is limited by the large variance in behavior combined with small sample sizes, or the possibility of a drug dose insufficient for behavioral effects.

  17. Circadian response reduction in light and response restoration in darkness: a "skeleton" light pulse PRC study in mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comas, M; Beersma, D G M; Spoelstra, K; Daan, S

    2007-10-01

    Entrainment may involve responses to dawn, to dusk, and to the light in between these transitions. Previous studies showed that the circadian system responds to only 2 light pulses, one at the beginning and one at the end of the day, in a similar way as to a full photoperiod, as long as the photoperiod is less than approximately 1/2 tau. The authors used a double 1-h light pulse protocol with different intervals of darkness in between (1, 2, 4, 7, 10, and 16 h) to study the phase responses of mice. The phase response curves obtained were compared to full light pulse PRCs of corresponding durations. Up to 6 hours, phase responses induced by double light pulses are virtually the same as by a corresponding full light pulse. The authors made a simple phase-only model to estimate the response reduction due to light exposure and response restoration due to dark exposure of the system. In this model, they assumed a 100% contribution of the first 1-h light pulse and fitted the reduction factor for the second light pulse to yield the best fit to the observations. The results suggest that after 1 h of light followed by less than 4 h of darkness, there is a considerable reduction in response to the second light pulse. Full response restoration requires more than 10 h of darkness. To investigate the influence of the duration of light on the response saturation, the authors performed a second series of experiments where the duration of the 2 light pulses was varied from 4 to 60 min each with a fixed duration of the stimulus (4 h). The response to 2 light pulses saturates when they are between 30 and 60 min long. In conclusion, double pulses replace single full light pulses of a corresponding duration of up to 6 h due to a response reduction during light, combined with response restoration during darkness. By the combined response reduction and response restoration, mice can maintain stable entrainment to the external LD cycle without being continuously exposed to it.

  18. Phase and period responses of the circadian system of mice (Mus musculus) to light stimuli of different duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comas, M.; Beersma, D. G. M.; Spoelstra, K.; Daan, S.

    2006-01-01

    To understand entrainment of circadian systems to different photoperiods in nature, it is important to know the effects of single light pulses of different durations on the free-running system. The authors studied the phase and period responses of laboratory mice (C57BL6J//OlaHsd) to single light

  19. Circadian response reduction in light and response restoration in darkness : A "Skeleton" light pulse PRC study in mice (Mus musculus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comas, M.; Beersma, D. G. M.; Spoelstra, K.; Daan, S.

    2007-01-01

    Entrainment may involve responses to dawn, to dusk, and to the light in between these transitions. Previous studies showed that the circadian system responds to only 2 light pulses, one at the beginning and one at the end of the day, in a similar way as to a full photoperiod, as long as the

  20. Expression of stress hormones AVP and CRH in the hypothalamus of Mus musculus following water and food deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadawa, Arun Kumar; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2016-12-01

    Neurohypophyseal hormone, arginine vasopressin (AVP), in addition to acting as antidiuretic hormone is also considered to be stress hormone like hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Present study was designed to investigate the relative response of these stress hormones during water and food deprivation. In this study, male laboratory mice of Swiss strain were divided in 5 groups, control - provided water and food ad libitum, two experimental groups water deprived for 2 and 4days respectively (WD2 and WD4) and another two groups food deprived for 2 and 4days respectively (FD2 and FD4). Results indicate an increased expression of AVP mRNA as well as peptide in the hypothalamus of WD2 mice and the expression was further upregulated after 4days of water deprivation but the expression of CRH remained unchanged compare to their respective controls. On the other hand no change was observed in the expression of hypothalamic AVP mRNA while AVP peptide increased significantly in FD2 and FD4 mice compare to control. Further, the expression of CRH mRNA although increased in hypothalamus of both FD2 and FD4 mice, the immunofluorescent staining shows decreased expression of CRH in PVN of food deprived mice. Based on these findings it is concluded that since during osmotic stress only AVP expression is upregulated but during metabolic stress i.e. food deprivation transcription and translation of both the stress hormones are differentially regulated. Further, it is suggested that role of AVP and CRH may be stress specific. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Untersuchungen zur künstlichen Beatmung bei der Maus (Mus musculus) mit dem UNO Micro-Ventilator®

    OpenAIRE

    Römer, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    In the present experimental essay the effect of controlled ventilation with the UNO Micro-Ventilator? (UMV) on the mouse is examined. The UMV is a pressure controlled and volume limited ventilation device with a sinus ventilation pattern and lowflow rebreathing of the respiration gas. Not only the impact of a preoxygenation is assessed but also the effect of different respiratory rates on mice of different weight. The assessment is made with blood gas analysis, circulatory parameters and h...

  2. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue [Mus musculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Keijer, J.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Verlinde, E.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that a low versus high glycemic index (GI) diet on a high fat (30% kcal fat) background (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in C57BL/6J male mice. The LGI diet enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and repressed high fat diet-induced bod

  3. Parental origin of chromosomes influences crossover activity within the Kcnq1 transcriptionally imprinted domain of Mus musculus

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    Petkov Petko M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the three functions of DNA, mammalian replication and transcription can be subject to epigenetic imprinting specified by the parental origin of chromosomes, and although there is suggestive indication that this is also true for meiotic recombination, no definitive evidence has yet been reported. Results We have now obtained such evidence on mouse chromosome 7 by assaying meiotic recombination as it occurs in reciprocal F1 mice. A 166 kb region near the Kcnq1 transcriptionally imprinted domain showed significantly higher recombination activity in the CAST×B6 parental direction (p Slc22a18 showed a definitive parent of origin effect on recombination frequency (p Kcnq1 and neighboring H19-Igf2 imprinted domains with their human counterparts, we found that elevated recombination activity in these domains is a consequence of their chromosomal position relative to the telomere and not an intrinsic characteristic of transcriptionally imprinted domains as has been previously suggested. Conclusion Similar to replication and transcription, we demonstrate that meiotic recombination can be subjected to epigenetic imprinting and hotspot activity can be influenced by the parental origin of chromosomes. Furthermore, transcriptionally imprinted regions exhibiting elevated recombination activity are likely a consequence of their chromosomal location rather than their transcriptional characteristic.

  4. A region of euchromatin coincides with an extensive tandem repeat on the mouse (Mus musculus) inactive X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Seberg, Andrew P; Das, Sunny; Figueroa, Debbie M; Sun, Zhuo; Moseley, Shawn C; Chadwick, Brian P

    2014-09-01

    Euchromatic features are largely absent from the human inactive X chromosome (Xi), with the exception of several large tandem repeats that can be detected as euchromatin bands at metaphase. Despite residing megabases apart, these tandem repeats make frequent inactive X-specific interactions. The mouse homologue has been reported for at least one of the tandem repeats, but whether the mouse Xi is also characterized by distinct bands of euchromatin remains unknown. We examined the mouse Xi for the presence of euchromatin bands by examining the pattern of histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 and detected two major signals. The first band resides in the subtelomeric region of band XF5 and may correspond to the pseudoautosomal region. The second band localizes to XE3 and coincides with an extensive complex repeat composed of a large tandem and inverted repeat segment as well as several large short interspersed nuclear element (SINE)-rich tandem repeats. Fluorescence in situ hybridization reveals that sequences with homology to the repeat region are scattered along the length of the Y chromosome. Immunofluorescence analysis of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 on metaphase chromosomes indicates that the repeat region corresponds to a band of constitutive heterochromatin on the male X and female active X chromosomes, whereas the euchromatin signal appears to be female specific. These data suggest that the band of euchromatin observed at XE3 is unique to the mouse Xi, comparable to the chromatin arrangement of several large tandem repeats located on the human X chromosome.

  5. Optimizing the experimental design using the house mouse (Mus musculus L.) as a model for determining grain feeding preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Abstract: BACKGROUND: There is little research evaluating flavor preferences among wheat varieties. We previously demonstrated that mice exert very strong preferences when given binary mixtures of wheat varieties. We plan to utilize mice to identify varieties and genes associated with pref...

  6. Effects of different types of bedding materials on behavioral development in laboratory CD1 mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Toyohito; Ogata, Akio; Inomata, Akiko; Nakae, Dai

    2014-10-01

    Male and female mice were housed in cages, containing different types of bedding materials (wood flakes or pulp chips), from 4 weeks of age in the F0 generation to 11 weeks of age in the F1 generation; selected reproductive and neurobehavioral parameters were measured in the F1 generation. There were no adverse effects of bedding materials on litter size, litter weight, or sex ratios at the time of birth. With regard to behavioral development parameters, bedding materials did not influence any variables (p > 0.05) in both sexes. Regarding exploratory behavior in the F1 generation, number of defecations significantly varied (p = 0.0203) with bedding materials in males at 3 weeks of age. The number of horizontal activities also significantly varied (p = 0.0342) with bedding materials in males at 8 weeks of age. Multiple-T water maze performance data indicated that the time required was significantly shortened across trials in pulp chips group than wood flakes group in males (p = 0.0211). Moreover, all spontaneous behavior variables in males significantly varied with bedding materials, particularly the average time of movement was significantly different (p = 0.0037) in distance between parallel lines of types of bedding materials in the F1 generation. The present study shows that bedding materials influence the neurobehavioral development in mice.

  7. Glycemic index differences of high-fat diets modulate primarily lipid metabolism in murine adipose tissue [Mus musculus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst, van E.M.; Keijer, J.; Bunschoten, J.E.; Verlinde, E.; Schrauwen, P.

    2011-01-01

    We previously reported that a low versus high glycemic index (GI) diet on a high fat (30% kcal fat) background (LGI and HGI, respectively) significantly retarded adverse health effects in C57BL/6J male mice. The LGI diet enhanced whole body insulin sensitivity and repressed high fat diet-induced

  8. The protective effect of bee venom against verapamil embryotoxicity during prenatal liver and kidney development of mice Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin A. Seleem

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Verapamil is a calcium channel blocker that has been widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular abnormalities, hypertension and angina pectoris. The present study investigates the effect of bee venom against verapamil embryotoxicity, bee venom (BV is characterized with anticancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-rheumatoid, pain-relieving and neuroprotective agents. The current study was carried out on 70 pregnant female mice which were divided into two main groups, the first main group divided into three subgroups, control, treated with single and twice dose daily of verapamil (40 mg/kg that was treated from zero day of gestation to scarification of females at E10. The second main group that was treated from the seventh day of gestation was divided into four subgroups, control, treated with single dose daily of verapamil (40 mg/kg, injected with bee venom (150 μg/kg/BW and treated with verapamil combined with bee venom, the females were sacrificed at E14 and E17. The results of this study showed that verapamil treated groups once or twice daily in the first main experiment showed abortion and resorption of uteri embryos. In the second main experiment, developing liver and kidney at E14 and E17 in verapamil treated group showed abnormal architecture of histological picture and alterations of immunohistochemical expression of heat shock protein and BAK that were associated with ultrastructure abnormalities at E17. Bee venom treated group showed the similar structure as control, verapamil combined with bee venom treated group exhibited amelioration against verapamil embryotoxicity. In conclusion, bee venom could be considered as a therapeutic agent and it has a curative effect against the toxicity of verapamil during development of liver and kidney.

  9. Effect of Butanol Extract of Maturated Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria macrocarpa Fruit on Liver Tissue of Mice (Mus musculus

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    ARIF SOEKSMANTO

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Mahkota dewa (Phaleria macrocarpa [Scheff.] Boerl. is a poisonous plant, but almost all parts of the plants can be used as a traditional medicine. Consuming the plant directly can cause swollen, sprue, numb at tongue, fever, even unconscious. Although the plant can conquere various diseases, from diabetes mellitus, hemorrhoid, impotency to cancer, but research on the plant is still limited. A research was conducted to find out effect of subchronic dosage of butanol extract of maturated mahkota dewa fruit. Observation was carried out on liver tissue which is main organ detoxifying poison in the body. Dosage of butanol extract of 0; 42,5; 85 and 170 mg/kg body weight was administered intra peritoneally to mice. The result showed that butanol extract of maturated mahkota dewa fruit did not affect liver tissue, although at dosage 170 mg/kg body weight, a vacuolization on liver's tissue, was occurred.

  10. Passive Immunization of Anti bZP3 (Zone Pellucida3 in Wistar Rat (Rattus novergicus and Mouse (Mus musculus

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    Y. Pantiwati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at comparing the influence of anti bZP3’s passive immunization on anti-anti bZP3’s titer and pregnancy level on Wistar rats and mice. This study employed factorial design experiment with completely randomized design. The first factor was immunogenic type. The treated rats were immunized with 100 L anti bZP3 in 100 L Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA, while the treated mice were injected with 50 L anti bZP3 in 50 L CFA. Control Wistar rats and mice were immunized with CFA and Incomplete Freund’s Adjuvant (IFA without anti bZP3. The second factor was animal type. The third factor was the length of serum incubation, i.e. 38, 49, 63, 86, 100, and 126 d. Dot blot on the treated Wistar rats and mice showed positive response proven by blue gradation; pre-immune mice as well as control Wistar rats and mice showed negative response proven by white gradation. The highest antibody titer in treated mouse serum was shown in 63 d incubation. The pregnancy on treated mice, control mice and Wistar rat occurred 100% until day 126; while the failure percentage on the treated mice was 4.5%. The pregnancy on treated mice occurred in 86 d incubation (1 rat, 100 d incubation (1 rat, and 126 d incubation (3 rats. Effective passive immunization on similar hospes occurred until day 63; while different hospes was ineffective. Antibodi anti-bZP3 was potential as a contraception through passive immunization on similar hospes.

  11. UJI AKTIVITAS EKSTRAK ETANOL DAUN KERSEN (Muntingia calabura L. TERHADAP PENYEMBUHAN LUKA BAKAR PADA KULIT MENCIT PUTIH JANTAN (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Handayani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kersen leaves (Muntingia calabura L. is one kind of plants that have many utilities from bark, fruits to leaves. Kersen leaves contain flavonoids and tannins that have potential as a treatment for skin burn. Kersen leaves is used for a treatment such us for analgesic and anti-inflammatory. This study was an experimental research. The goal of this study was to know the potential of ethanol estracts of Kersen leaves against the healing of burn wounds on the back skin of white male mice. Twenty white male mice and were used in this experiment and were divided into 5 groups: control positive (ointment branded, control negative (vaseline flavum, ethanol extract of kersen leaves in vaseline flavum dose 2.6 mg , 5.2 mg and 10.4 mg . The backs of mice was induced using hot solder modified with stainless steel plate size 1 x 1 cm 2 for 2 seconds and the diameter of the healing skin burns was mensured. The results showed that the percentage of control positive was 100%, control negative (65%, ethanol extract of leaves of kersen dose 2.6 mg (84.3%, dose 5.2 mg (85.3% and dose 10.4 mg (93.3%. The results of data were analyzed using statistical analysis. One - Sample Kolmogorov - Smirnov Test indicated that the data were normally distributed (0.768 > 0.05, the homogenity test (Test homogeneity of Variances indicated that the data were not homogeneous (0.016 < 0.05. Kruskal Wallis test showed that five (5 treatment groups were significantly different and have the effect of healing of burn wound on the skin of male white mice (0.012 < 0.05, the Mann- Whitney test showed that the control positive and 10,4mg was significantly different (0.043 < 0.05.

  12. Identification of anti-inflammatory effects of extract of brown algae Padina sp. in mice (Mus musculus: A pilot study

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    Dwi Fitrah Ariani Bahar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Infection, tissue damage, or interference immune response are factors that cause inflasmmatory reactions of teeth and surrounding tissues. To reduce the side effects of pharmaceutical drugs, it is necessary to research which uses the principle of back to nature as a source of medicines. One of the natural ingredients that have anti-inflammatory activity is brown algae Padina sp. containing polysaccharides, PUFA, and fucoxanthin. The purpose of this research is to determine antiinflammatory effects of extract brown algae Padina sp. in mice. The research design is pretest and post test with control group design. Sample were 15 male mice weighing 14-35g. Mice were divided into three treatment groups (n=5. G1 (negative control NaCMC 1%, G2 (positive control sodium diclofenac 0.35mg/35g B/V, and G3 was extracted with methanol and Padina sp. dose 7mg/35g B/V. After 30 minutes of testing material was injected, peptone 1% (0.05ml is injected at subplantar area of mice left paw. Measurements were taken using plethysmometer. Data was analysis using repeated ANOVA test. The results showed that volume inflammation of the extract brown algae Padina sp. on V0=0.170ml, V1=0.164 ml, V2=0.120ml, V3=0.108ml, V4=0.138ml, respectively. Repeated ANOVA test obtained P value (<.05 in the Padina sp. group. In conclusion, extract brown algae Padina sp. has anti-inflammatory effects in mice.

  13. Heterologous expression of Mus musculus immunoresponsive gene 1 (irg1) in Escherichia coli results in itaconate production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuoristo, K.S.; Mars, A.E.; Loon, S.; Orsi, E.; Eggink, G.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Weusthuis, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Itaconic acid, a C5-dicarboxylic acid, is a potential biobased building block for the polymer industry. It is obtained from the citric acid cycle by decarboxylation of cis-aconitic acid. This reaction is catalyzed by CadA in the native itaconic acid producer Aspergillus terreus. Recently, another

  14. Heterologous expression of Mus musculus immunoresponsive gene 1 (irg1 in Escherichia coli results in itaconate production

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    Kiira S Vuoristo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Itaconic acid, a C5-dicarboxylic acid, is a potential biobased building block for the polymer industry. It is obtained from the citric acid cycle by decarboxylation of cis-aconitic acid. This reaction is catalysed by CadA in the native itaconic acid producer Aspergillus terreus. Recently, another enzyme encoded by the mammalian immunoresponsive gene 1 (irg1, was found to decarboxylate cis-aconitate to itaconate in vitro. We show that heterologous expression of irg1 enabled itaconate production in E. coli with production titres up to 560 mg/L.

  15. What constitutes Homo sapiens? Morphology versus received wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey

    2016-06-20

    Although Linnaeus coined Homo sapiens in 1735, it was Blumenbach forty years later who provided the first morphological definition of the species. Since humans were not then allowed to be ante-Diluvian, his effort applied to the genus, as well. After the Feldhofer Grotto Neanderthal disproved this creationist notion, and human-fossil hunting became legitimate, new specimens were allocated either to sapiens or new species within Homo, or even to new species within new genera. Yet as these taxonomic acts reflected the morphological differences between specimens, they failed to address the question: What constitutes H. sapiens? When in 1950 Mayr collapsed all human fossils into Homo, he not only denied humans a diverse evolutionary past, he also shifted the key to identifying its species from morphology to geological age - a practice most paleoanthropologists still follow. Thus, for example, H. erectus is the species that preceded H. sapiens, and H. sapiens is the species into which H. erectus morphed. In order to deal with a growing morass of morphologically dissimilar specimens, the non-taxonomic terms "archaic" (AS) and "anatomically modern" (AMS) were introduced to distinguish between the earlier and later versions of H. sapiens, thereby making the species impossible to define. In attempting to disentangle fact from scenario, I begin from the beginning, trying to delineate features that may be distinctive of extant humans (ES), and then turning to the fossils that have been included in the species. With the exception of Upper Paleolithic humans - e.g. from Cro-Magnon, Dolni Vestonice, Mladeč - I argue that many specimens regarded as AMS, and all those deemed AS, are not H. sapiens. The features these AMS do share with ES suggest the existence of a sapiens clade. Further, restudy of near-recent fossils, especially from southwestern China (∼11-14.5 ka), reinforces what discoveries such as H. floresiensis indicate: "If it's recent, it's not necessarily H. sapiens".

  16. Yawn contagion and empathy in Homo sapiens.

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    Ivan Norscia

    Full Text Available The ability to share others' emotions, or empathy, is crucial for complex social interactions. Clinical, psychological, and neurobiological clues suggest a link between yawn contagion and empathy in humans (Homo sapiens. However, no behavioral evidence has been provided so far. We tested the effect of different variables (e.g., country of origin, sex, yawn characteristics on yawn contagion by running mixed models applied to observational data collected over 1 year on adult (>16 years old human subjects. Only social bonding predicted the occurrence, frequency, and latency of yawn contagion. As with other measures of empathy, the rate of contagion was greatest in response to kin, then friends, then acquaintances, and lastly strangers. Related individuals (r≥0.25 showed the greatest contagion, in terms of both occurrence of yawning and frequency of yawns. Strangers and acquaintances showed a longer delay in the yawn response (latency compared to friends and kin. This outcome suggests that the neuronal activation magnitude related to yawn contagion can differ as a function of subject familiarity. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that yawn contagion is primarily driven by the emotional closeness between individuals and not by other variables, such as gender and nationality.

  17. Mus cervicolor murine leukemia virus isolate M813 belongs to a unique receptor interference group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, V; Hein, S; Ziegler, M; Ivanov, D; Münk, C; Löhler, J; Stocking, C

    2001-05-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MuLV) M813 was originally isolated from the Southeast Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. As with the ecotropic MuLVs derived from Mus musculus, its host range is limited to rodent cells. Earlier studies have mapped its receptor to chromosome 2, but it has not been established whether M813 shares a common receptor with any other MuLVs. In this study, we have performed interference assays with M813 and viruses from four interference groups of MuLV. The infection efficiency of M813 was not compromised in cells expressing any one of the other MuLVs, demonstrating that M813 must use a distinct receptor for cell entry. The entire M813 env coding region was molecularly cloned. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other MuLVs but with a unique receptor-binding domain. Substitution of M813 env sequences in Moloney MuLV resulted in a replication-competent virus with a host range and interference profile similar to those of the biological clone M813. M813 thus defines a novel receptor interference group of type C MuLVs.

  18. Quand le musée soigne

    OpenAIRE

    Marin, Axelle

    2015-01-01

    Après avoir rappelé les fondements historiques de l’art-thérapie, l’auteure relate l’expérience menée au musée d’Art et d’Histoire de Dreux avec la mise en place d’ateliers de psychothérapie à médiation artistique qui s’inscrivent dans le cadre d’une politique volontariste d’ouverture du musée à tous les types de publics et qui s’adressent à des patients de l’hôpital de la ville atteints de maladie névrotiques et psychotiques.

  19. Spatial construction skills of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and young human children (Homo sapiens sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potì, Patrizia; Hayashi, Misato; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2009-07-01

    Spatial construction tasks are basic tests of visual-spatial processing. Two studies have assessed spatial construction skills in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and young children (Homo sapiens sapiens) with a block modelling task. Study 1a subjects were three young chimpanzees and five adult chimpanzees. Study 1b subjects were 30 human children belonging to five age groups (24, 30, 36, 42, 48 months). Subjects were given three model constructions to reproduce: Line, Cross-Stack and Arch, which differed in type and number of spatial relations and dimensions, but required comparable configurational understanding. Subjects' constructions were rated for accuracy. Our results show that: (1) chimpanzees are relatively advanced in constructing in the vertical dimension; (2) Among chimpanzees only adults make accurate copies of constructions; (3) Chimpanzees do not develop in the direction of constructing in two dimensions as human children do starting from age 30 months. The pattern of development of construction skills in chimpanzees partially diverges from that of human children and indicates that spatial analysis and spatial representation are partially different in the two species.

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02514-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Y69H2, com... 38 0.26 AJ748821_1( AJ748821 |pid:none) Homo sapiens mRNA for crumb...8_1( BC031378 |pid:none) Mus musculus crumbs homolog 1 (Dro... 35 1.7 X99571_1( X99571 |pid:none) M.musculus... mRNA for factor XII. 35 1.7 BC053331_1( BC053331 |pid:none) Mus musculus crumbs ...homolog 1 (Dro... 35 1.7 AF406641_1( AF406641 |pid:none) Mus musculus crumbs-like protein 1... 35 1.7 AF3545

  1. Ranking U-Sapiens 2010-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos-Roberto Peña-Barrera

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Los principales objetivos de esta investigación son los siguientes: (1 que la comunidad científica nacional e internacional y la sociedad en general co-nozcan los resultados del Ranking U-Sapiens Colombia 2010_2, el cual clasifica a cada institución de educación superior colombiana según puntaje, posición y cuartil; (2 destacar los movimientos más importantes al comparar los resultados del ranking 2010_1 con los del 2010_2; (3 publicar las respuestas de algunos actores de la academia nacional con respecto a la dinámica de la investigación en el país; (4 reconocer algunas instituciones, medios de comunicación e investigadores que se han interesado a modo de reflexión, referenciación o citación por esta investigación; y (5 dar a conocer el «Sello Ranking U-Sapiens Colombia» para las IES clasificadas. El alcance de este estudio en cuanto a actores abordó todas y cada una de las IES nacionales (aunque solo algunas lograran entrar al ranking y en cuanto a tiempo, un periodo referido al primer semestre de 2010 con respecto a: (1 los resultados 2010-1 de revistas indexadas en Publindex, (2 los programas de maestrías y doctorados activos durante 2010-1 según el Ministerio de Educación Nacional, y (3 los resultados de grupos de investigación clasificados para 2010 según Colciencias. El método empleado para esta investigación es el mismo que para el ranking 2010_1, salvo por una especificación aún más detallada en uno de los pasos del modelo (las variables α, β, γ; es completamente cuantitativo y los datos de las variables que fundamentan sus resultados provienen de Colciencias y el Ministerio de Educación Nacional; y en esta ocasión se darán a conocer los resultados por variable para 2010_1 y 2010_2. Los resultados más relevantes son estos: (1 entraron 8 IES al ranking y salieron 3; (2 las 3 primeras IES son públicas; (3 en total hay 6 instituciones universitarias en el ranking; (4 7 de las 10 primeras IES son

  2. Rethinking the dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groucutt, Huw S; Petraglia, Michael D; Bailey, Geoff; Scerri, Eleanor M L; Parton, Ash; Clark-Balzan, Laine; Jennings, Richard P; Lewis, Laura; Blinkhorn, James; Drake, Nick A; Breeze, Paul S; Inglis, Robyn H; Devès, Maud H; Meredith-Williams, Matthew; Boivin, Nicole; Thomas, Mark G; Scally, Aylwyn

    2015-01-01

    Current fossil, genetic, and archeological data indicate that Homo sapiens originated in Africa in the late Middle Pleistocene. By the end of the Late Pleistocene, our species was distributed across every continent except Antarctica, setting the foundations for the subsequent demographic and cultural changes of the Holocene. The intervening processes remain intensely debated and a key theme in hominin evolutionary studies. We review archeological, fossil, environmental, and genetic data to evaluate the current state of knowledge on the dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa. The emerging picture of the dispersal process suggests dynamic behavioral variability, complex interactions between populations, and an intricate genetic and cultural legacy. This evolutionary and historical complexity challenges simple narratives and suggests that hybrid models and the testing of explicit hypotheses are required to understand the expansion of Homo sapiens into Eurasia. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Gene : CBRC-MMUS-01-0049 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein-coupled receptor 35 [Mus musculus] ref|NP_001097999.1| G protein-coupled receptor 35 [Mus musculus] sp|Q9ES90|GPR35_MOUS...CBRC-MMUS-01-0049 1 A Orphan receptors GPR35_MOUSE 1e-175 100% ref|NP_071715.3| G p...E Probable G-protein coupled receptor 35 gb|AAG18487.1| GPR35 [Mus musculus] gb|AAH27429....1| G protein-coupled receptor 35 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAD83594.1| G-protein coupled... receptor [Homo sapiens] dbj|BAE42168.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|EDL39976.1| G protein-cou

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16214-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -05 EU030004_1( EU030004 |pid:none) Gallus gallus autoimmune regulator... 52 6e-0...e-05 AF128118_1( AF128118 |pid:none) Mus musculus autoimmune regulator ... 52 1e-04 AF128115_1( AF128115 |pid:none) Mus musculus auto...immune regulator ... 52 1e-04 AF128123_1( AF128123 |pid:none) Mus musculus autoimmune... regulator ... 52 1e-04 AF128120_1( AF128120 |pid:none) Mus musculus autoimmune...397_1( BC028397 |pid:none) Homo sapiens ubiquitin-like with P... 52 1e-04 AF128124_1( AF128124 |pid:none) Mus musculus autoimmune

  5. MUS81 promotes common fragile site expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ying, Songmin; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Chan, Kok Lung

    2013-01-01

    Fragile sites are chromosomal loci with a propensity to form gaps or breaks during early mitosis, and their instability is implicated as being causative in certain neurological disorders and cancers. Recent work has demonstrated that the so-called common fragile sites (CFSs) often impair the fait......Fragile sites are chromosomal loci with a propensity to form gaps or breaks during early mitosis, and their instability is implicated as being causative in certain neurological disorders and cancers. Recent work has demonstrated that the so-called common fragile sites (CFSs) often impair...... the faithful disjunction of sister chromatids in mitosis. However, the mechanisms by which CFSs express their fragility, and the cellular factors required to suppress CFS instability, remain largely undefined. Here, we report that the DNA structure-specific nuclease MUS81-EME1 localizes to CFS loci in early...

  6. AcEST: DK953604 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PATE-like protein DJ OS=Mus musculus PE=3 ... 32 2.3 sp|P21941|MATN1_HUMAN Cartilage matrix protein OS=Homo... sapiens G... 32 2.3 sp|P51942|MATN1_MOUSE Cartilage matrix protein OS=Mus muscul

  7. Fossil evidence for the origin of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey H; Tattersall, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Our species Homo sapiens has never received a satisfactory morphological definition. Deriving partly from Linnaeus's exhortation simply to "know thyself," and partly from the insistence by advocates of the Evolutionary Synthesis in the mid-20th Century that species are constantly transforming ephemera that by definition cannot be pinned down by morphology, this unfortunate situation has led to huge uncertainty over which hominid fossils ought to be included in H. sapiens, and even over which of them should be qualified as "archaic" or as "anatomically modern," a debate that is an oddity in the broader context of paleontology. Here, we propose a suite of features that seems to characterize all H. sapiens alive today, and we review the fossil evidence in light of those features, paying particular attention to the bipartite brow and the "chin" as examples of how, given the continuum from developmentally regulated genes to adult morphology, we might consider features preserved in fossil specimens in a comparative analysis that includes extant taxa. We also suggest that this perspective on the origination of novelty, which has gained a substantial foothold in the general field of evolutionary developmental biology, has an intellectual place in paleoanthropology and hominid systematics, including in defining our species, H. sapiens. Beginning solely with the distinctive living species reveals a startling variety in morphologies among late middle and late Pleistocene hominids, none of which can be plausibly attributed to H. sapiens/H. neanderthalensis admixture. Allowing for a slightly greater envelope of variation than exists today, basic "modern" morphology seems to have appeared significantly earlier in time than the first stirrings of the modern symbolic cognitive system.

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12530-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 34403 |pid:none) Mus musculus adult male diencephal... 47 0.001 BC123947_1( BC123947 |pid:none) Xenopus tropicalis amyotrophic...cleotide exchange fact... 42 0.056 BC071576_1( BC071576 |pid:none) Homo sapiens amyotrophic lateral s... 42 ...( BC046828 |pid:none) Mus musculus amyotrophic lateral s... 42 0.073 AC007279_1( AC007279 |pid:none) Homo sa

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12456-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ) Mus musculus wdp103 mRNA for WD-re... 133 1e-29 BC013309_1( BC013309 |pid:none) Homo sapiens PWP2 periodic... |pid:none) Danio rerio PWP2 periodic tryptoph... 121 6e-26 AY065425_1( AY065425 ...|pid:none) Arabidopsis thaliana unknown prote... 119 3e-25 BC031787_1( BC031787 |pid:none) Mus musculus PWP2 (periodic

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05595-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available binding ... 41 0.053 BC048405_1( BC048405 |pid:none) Mus musculus bruno-like 4, ...-3-like factor 3-B; ... 41 0.069 AF515450_1( AF515450 |pid:none) Mus musculus bruno...pid:none) Schmidtea mediterranea bruno-like ... 40 0.15 BC014533_1( BC014533 |pid:none) Homo sapiens myelin

  11. AcEST: DK956100 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available P LC+ S SN SA Sbjct: 101 IKDILCQECSPYAAHLYDAENTQTPLRNLPGLCSDYCSAFHSNCHSA 147 >sp|Q7TSY8|SGOL2_MOUSE Shugosh... sp|Q7TSY8|SGOL2_MOUSE Shugoshin-like 2 OS=Mus musculus GN=Sgol2 ... 39 0.015 sp|...Mus musculus GN=Hhi... 53 1e-06 sp|Q6UWX4|HIPL2_HUMAN HHIP-like protein 2 OS=Homo sapiens GN=HHI... 51 4e-06

  12. Mx1 causes resistance against influenza A viruses in the Mus spretus-derived inbred mouse strain SPRET/Ei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanlaere, Ineke; Vanderrijst, Ananza; Guénet, Jean-Louis; De Filette, Marina; Libert, Claude

    2008-04-01

    Inbred SPRET/Ei mice, derived from Mus spretus, were found to be extremely resistant to infection with a mouse adapted influenza A virus. The resistance was strongly linked to distal chromosome 16, where the interferon-inducible Mx1 gene is located. This gene encodes for the Mx1 protein which stimulates innate immunity to Orthomyxoviruses. The Mx1 gene is defective in most inbred mouse strains, but PCR revealed that SPRET/Ei carries a functional allele. The Mx1 proteins of M. spretus and A2G, the other major resistant strain derived from Mus musculus, share 95.7% identity. We were interested whether the sequence variations between the two Mx1 alleles have functional significance. To address this, we used congenic mouse strains containing the Mx1 gene from M. spretus or A2G in a C57BL/6 background. Using a highly pathogenic influenza virus strain, we found that the B6.spretus-Mx1 congenic mice were better protected against infection than the B6.A2G-Mx1 mice. This effect may be due to different Mx1 induction levels, as was shown by RT-PCR and Western blot. We conclude that SPRET/Ei is a novel Mx1-positive inbred strain useful to study the biology of Mx1.

  13. A candidate subspecies discrimination system involving a vomeronasal receptor gene with different alleles fixed in M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Karn

    Full Text Available Assortative mating, a potentially efficient prezygotic reproductive barrier, may prevent loss of genetic potential by avoiding the production of unfit hybrids (i.e., because of hybrid infertility or hybrid breakdown that occur at regions of secondary contact between incipient species. In the case of the mouse hybrid zone, where two subspecies of Mus musculus (M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus meet and exchange genes to a limited extent, assortative mating requires a means of subspecies recognition. We based the work reported here on the hypothesis that, if there is a pheromone sufficiently diverged between M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus to mediate subspecies recognition, then that process must also require a specific receptor(s, also sufficiently diverged between the subspecies, to receive the signal and elicit an assortative mating response. We studied the mouse V1R genes, which encode a large family of receptors in the vomeronasal organ (VNO, by screening Perlegen SNP data and identified one, Vmn1r67, with 24 fixed SNP differences most of which (15/24 are nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions between M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus. We observed substantial linkage disequilibrium (LD between Vmn1r67 and Abpa27, a mouse salivary androgen-binding protein gene that encodes a proteinaceous pheromone (ABP capable of mediating assortative mating, perhaps in conjunction with its bound small lipophilic ligand. The LD we observed is likely a case of association rather than residual physical linkage from a very recent selective sweep, because an intervening gene, Vmn1r71, shows significant intra(subspecific polymorphism but no inter(subspecific divergence in its nucleotide sequence. We discuss alternative explanations of these observations, for example that Abpa27 and Vmn1r67 are coevolving as signal and receptor to reinforce subspecies hybridization barriers or that the unusually divergent Vmn1r67 allele was not a product of fast positive

  14. Crystal structure of Homo sapiens protein LOC79017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Euiyoung; Bingman, Craig A.; Aceti, David J.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2010-02-08

    LOC79017 (MW 21.0 kDa, residues 1-188) was annotated as a hypothetical protein encoded by Homo sapiens chromosome 7 open reading frame 24. It was selected as a target by the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) because it did not share more than 30% sequence identity with any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known. The biological function of the protein has not been established yet. Parts of LOC79017 were identified as members of uncharacterized Pfam families (residues 1-95 as PB006073 and residues 104-180 as PB031696). BLAST searches revealed homologues of LOC79017 in many eukaryotes, but none of them have been functionally characterized. Here, we report the crystal structure of H. sapiens protein LOC79017 (UniGene code Hs.530024, UniProt code O75223, CESG target number go.35223).

  15. Is Homo sapiens polytypic? Human taxonomic diversity and its implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    The term race is a traditional synonym for subspecies, however it is frequently asserted that Homo sapiens is monotypic and that what are termed races are nothing more than biological illusions. In this manuscript a case is made for the hypothesis that H. sapiens is polytypic, and in this way is no different from other species exhibiting similar levels of genetic and morphological diversity. First it is demonstrated that the four major definitions of race/subspecies can be shown to be synonymous within the context of the framework of race as a correlation structure of traits. Next the issue of taxonomic classification is considered where it is demonstrated that H. sapiens possesses high levels morphological diversity, genetic heterozygosity and differentiation (F(ST)) compared to many species that are acknowledged to be polytypic with respect to subspecies. Racial variation is then evaluated in light of the phylogenetic species concept, where it is suggested that the least inclusive monophyletic units exist below the level of species within H. sapiens indicating the existence of a number of potential human phylogenetic species; and the biological species concept, where it is determined that racial variation is too small to represent differentiation at the level of biological species. Finally the implications of this are discussed in the context of anthropology where an accurate picture of the sequence and timing of events during the evolution of human taxa are required for a complete picture of human evolution, and medicine, where a greater appreciation of the role played by human taxonomic differences in disease susceptibility and treatment responsiveness will save lives in the future.

  16. Helminth Infections of House Mouse (Mus musulus and Wood Mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus from the Suburban Areas of Hamadan City, Western Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yousefi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence and intensity of helminths and their zoonotic importance in small rodents inhabiting in the suburban areas of Hamadan City, Iran.The present survey was conducted on the helminth infections of two species of rodents Apodemus sylvaticus (n=60 and Mus musculus(n=72 in the suburban areas of Hamadan City during 2010-2012. Rodents were collected and examined for helminth in the different organs. The nematodes were collected in 5% formalin solution and cleared in lactophenol, cestodes and trematodes collected from intestine fixed in AFA solution and stained by acetocarmine, cleared in xylol for identification.Helminths found in A. sylvaticus and M. musculus and their prevalence for the first time in suburban areas of Hamadan City were as follows; In A. sylvaticus: Cysticercus fasciolaris(3.33%, Syphacia fredrici(26.67%, S. stroma(8.33%, Anoplocephalidae sp. (1.67%, Skrjabinotaenia lobata(5%, Plagiorchis muris(1.67% and in M. musculus:Hymenolepis nana (16.67%, H.diminuta (5.55%, S. obvelata(30.56%, S. ohtarom (9.72%, Rodentolepis crassa (1.39%, C. fasciolaris (1.39%. Among 11 species in two rodents 4 species including S. obvelata, H. nana, H.diminuta,and P. muris have zoonotic importance. Statistically the relation between gender and their helminth infections was not significant in either M. musculus or A. sylvaticus (P>0.05.This study reports 11 species of helminths and on the other hand 3 species were identified for the first time in Iran and 5 species of them have potential health importance for public health and cat.

  17. Anatomical study of the musculus deltoideus and musculus flexor carpi ulnaris in 3 species of wild birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canova, Marco; Bedoni, Carla; Harper, Valeria; Rambaldi, Anna Maria; Bombardi, Cristiano; Grandis, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Given the limited information regarding the anatomy of the thoracic limb in European avian species, we decided to investigate the related muscles in the grey heron (Ardea cinerea), in the eurasian buzzard (Buteo buteo), and in the common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus). Therefore we performed a stratigraphic dissection of the wing in 3 subjects. The pars major and minor of the musculus deltoideus, despite being roughly in line with those reported by other authors in other species, displayed unique features. Concerning the pars propatagialis of the musculus deltoideus, from what was observed in the grey heron, we believe this structure can contribute to maintain the propatagial tension. In this way vibrations of this structure, which could cause diminished lift, are avoided. Moreover the peculiarity evidenced in the distal insertion of the common kestrel could influence the control of the pronation-supination of the wing during hovering. With respect to the musculus flexor carpi ulnaris, we believe the presence of a sesamoid-like structure at the base tendon, found in the grey heron and in the eurasian buzzard, may help complete the articular surfaces of the elbow. This study shows interesting data on species not previously examined and provides a possible functional correlation between the peculiarity observed and the kind of flight of each species.

  18. Decision support system for individualized nursing procedures: SAPIEN-Tx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, M; Ramos, M P; Chern, M S; Espósito, S R; Carmagnani, M I; Cunha, I C; Piveta, V M; Nespoulos, E; Iwasa, A T; Anção, M S

    1995-01-01

    The present work proposes a Decision Support System for nursing procedures: SAPIEN-Tx. The discussion includes the acquisition, modeling , and implementation of nursing expertise professionals in Renal Transplant. It was developed to obtain better quality healthcare services, as well as an effective contribution to the nursing professional in the global assistance of their clientele. We used the KADS methodology to develop the system knowledge base. This methodology permitted us to perform the knowledge modeling with quality and organization. In opposition to the old method, errors were detected before the implementation, avoiding possible modification on the whole project structure.

  19. Presencia de los géneros invasores Mus y Rattus en áreas naturales de Chile: un riesgo ambiental y epidemiológico Presence of the invasive genera Mus and Rattus in natural areas in Chile: an environmental and epidemiological risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIEL LOBOS

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Realizamos un estudio que incluyó muestreos y prospecciones en un gradiente latitudinal en Chile continental para determinar la presencia y ausencia de roedores murinos introducidos, particularmente Mus musculus, Rattus rattus y R. norvegicus en áreas naturales o silvestres a lo largo de Chile. Además se analizó el riesgo epidemiológico que representan estas especies en el marco de un estudio sobre el virus Hanta. Los resultados mostraron que M. musculus rara vez es recolectado en áreas naturales. Sin embargo, las dos especies de Rattus han invadido ampliamente la región mediterránea chilena. Las regiones desérticas, los ambientes de alturas y las regiones australes, serían biótopos restringidos para estos invasores. Desde una perspectiva epidemiológica, la presencia del virus Hanta (variedades Andes y Seoul en Rattus es un elemento que demuestra que las especies invasoras además de generar impactos ecológicos, pueden ocasionar problemas económicos y de salud pública. La fragilidad de los ecosistemas mediterráneos determina que la presencia de especies exóticas constituya un elemento de alto riesgo para la conservación del patrimonio natural del país. Probablemente, la conservación de áreas naturales constituye la mejor herramienta para enfrentar a estas especies exóticasWe conducted a latitudinal study in natural areas of continental Chile to evaluate the occurrence of the introduced murine rodents Mus musculus, Rattus rattus and R. norvegicus. Furthermore, we evaluated the epidemiological risk of these species as part of an ongoing study on Hantavirus. The results allowed us to conclude that M. musculus occurs rarely in natural environments. However, the two species of Rattus have widely invaded the mediterranean region of Chile. Desert, altitudinal and high latitude regions seem to be restricted areas for these invasive rodents. From an epidemiological perspective, the occurrence of Hantavirus in Rattus (Andes and Seoul

  20. Board of Regents' Montana University System (MUS) Strategic Plan 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana University System, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The Montana University System Strategic Plan is the primary planning document of the Board of Regents. The Plan sets forth an agenda for higher education in Montana by delineating the strategic directions, goals, and objectives that guide the Montana University System (MUS). In July 2006, after several years of study, public dialogue, and internal…

  1. Evaluation of the wound healing effect of some Jordanian traditional medicinal plants formulated in Pluronic F127 using mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Enam A; Afifi, Fatma U; Al-Hussaini, Maysa

    2007-01-03

    The wound healing effect of the aqueous extracts of Inula viscosa, Ajuga chia, Rubia taenifolia and Parieteria diffusa, and the oil of Laurus nobilis, dispersed in water, were examined. The 10% (w/w) Pluronic F127 (PF127) was added to the applied preparations, in order to modify the aqueous extracts viscosity, and to stabilize the oil dispersion. A full thickness wound was made in the dorsal area of the mice. The wounds were treated with the different preparations with 12h intervals for four times in two successive days. For 16 days, the wounds were visually observed, photographically documented and the wound area was measured. After day 16, the animals were sacrificed and the histology of the wound area was examined. The best wound healing activity was observed with the extract of Inula viscosa, followed by Parieteria diffusa, Laurus nobilis, Ajuga chia and the least active extract was that of Rubia taenifolia.

  2. Identification of a QTL in Mus musculus for alcohol preference, withdrawal, and Ap3m2 expression using integrative functional genomics and precision genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubier, Jason A; Jay, Jeremy J; Baker, Christopher L; Bergeson, Susan E; Ohno, Hiroshi; Metten, Pamela; Crabbe, John C; Chesler, Elissa J

    2014-08-01

    Extensive genetic and genomic studies of the relationship between alcohol drinking preference and withdrawal severity have been performed using animal models. Data from multiple such publications and public data resources have been incorporated in the GeneWeaver database with >60,000 gene sets including 285 alcohol withdrawal and preference-related gene sets. Among these are evidence for positional candidates regulating these behaviors in overlapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapped in distinct mouse populations. Combinatorial integration of functional genomics experimental results revealed a single QTL positional candidate gene in one of the loci common to both preference and withdrawal. Functional validation studies in Ap3m2 knockout mice confirmed these relationships. Genetic validation involves confirming the existence of segregating polymorphisms that could account for the phenotypic effect. By exploiting recent advances in mouse genotyping, sequence, epigenetics, and phylogeny resources, we confirmed that Ap3m2 resides in an appropriately segregating genomic region. We have demonstrated genetic and alcohol-induced regulation of Ap3m2 expression. Although sequence analysis revealed no polymorphisms in the Ap3m2-coding region that could account for all phenotypic differences, there are several upstream SNPs that could. We have identified one of these to be an H3K4me3 site that exhibits strain differences in methylation. Thus, by making cross-species functional genomics readily computable we identified a common QTL candidate for two related bio-behavioral processes via functional evidence and demonstrate sufficiency of the genetic locus as a source of variation underlying two traits.

  3. Impact of Dietary Tomato Juice on Changes in Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Structure Induced by Neonatal Hyperoxia in Mice (Mus musculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheena Bouch

    Full Text Available Many preterm infants require hyperoxic gas for survival, although it can contribute to lung injury. Experimentally, neonatal hyperoxia leads to persistent alterations in lung structure and increases leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. These effects of hyperoxia on the lungs are considered to be caused, at least in part, by increased oxidative stress. Our objective was to determine if dietary supplementation with a known source of antioxidants (tomato juice, TJ could protect the developing lung from injury caused by breathing hyperoxic gas. Neonatal mice (C57BL6/J breathed either 65% O2 (hyperoxia or room air from birth until postnatal day 7 (P7d; some underwent necropsy at P7d and others were raised in room air until adulthood (P56d. In subsets of both groups, drinking water was replaced with TJ (diluted 50:50 in water from late gestation to necropsy. At P7d and P56d, we analyzed total antioxidant capacity (TAC, markers of oxidative stress (nitrotyrosine and heme oxygenase-1 expression, inflammation (interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α expression, collagen (COL and smooth muscle in the lungs; we also assessed lung structure. We quantified macrophages in lung tissue (at P7d and leukocytes in BALF (at P56d. At P7d, TJ increased pulmonary TAC and COL1α1 expression and attenuated the hyperoxia-induced increase in nitrotyrosine and macrophage influx; however, changes in lung structure were not affected. At P56d, TJ increased TAC, decreased oxidative stress and reversed the hyperoxia-induced increase in bronchiolar smooth muscle. Additionally, TJ alone decreased IL-1β expression, but following hyperoxia TJ increased TNF-α expression and did not alter the hyperoxia-induced increase in leukocyte number. We conclude that TJ supplementation during and after neonatal exposure to hyperoxia protects the lung from some but not all aspects of hyperoxia-induced injury, but may also have adverse side-effects. The effects of TJ are likely due to elevation of circulating antioxidant concentrations.

  4. Pemanfaatan Hasil Induksi Hormon Estrogen terhadap Kadar Estradiol dan Histologi Uterus Mencit (Mus musculus Sebagai Buku Suplemen Sistem Reproduksi di SMA

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    Erlia Narulita

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic estrogen hormone that has known by the public is an estrogen that is contained in hormonal contraception or birth control pills. The lack of public knowledge about the action mechanism of oral contraception on the reproductive organs makes people ignoring about the impact of it. This study was conducted to analyze the differences in the induction of estrogen towards the levels of estradiol and histology of the uterus and its utilization as a supplement book of Reproductive System topic in high school. Balb-C female mices were used as the tested animals and Microgynon, the contraceptive pill’s trademark was used as a source of estrogen induces. Blood samples were taken at pro-estrus phase, while the uterus was taken at each phase of the estrous cycle. Measurement of estradiol levels was done by ELISA method, whereas the thickness of endometrium is determined on a longitudinal incision of the uterus by the method of preparation of histological paraffin and HE staining. The supplement book was arranged refers to 4-D models. The results showed that there was a difference between the levels of estradiol-induced estrogen treatment with control, but in endometrial thickness among the control treatment with estrogen did not show the differences significantly. The results also showed that the estrogen induction has no significant effect on endometrium thickness at each phases of estrous cycle. The results of research were used as supplement book and it can be used for enriching knowledge of reproductive topic on high school.    

  5. The use of Micronucleus Assay on Swiss-Webster Mice (Mus Musculus Bone Marrow for the Mutagenicity Test of γ-Irradiation

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    R. Sofyan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation is a potentially chromosomal damaging agent. The induction of chromosomal damage as well as the incidence of cell cycle disturbances may depend on the dose of irradiation. One of the indication of chromosomal damage is the formation of micronucleus (MN during the anaphase of mitosis. This study deals with the MN assay on femur bone marrow polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE cells of Swiss-Webster mice, for the mutagenicity test of g-irradiation. The study was conducted on five groups of mice (each group consist of five mice that were irradiated at the doses of 0; 0,2; 0,4; 0,6 and 0,8 Gy respectively. One day after irradiation, the mice were killed by cervical dislocation. Furthermore the femur bone marrow was taken, the cells were then prepared by smear technique onto slides followed by Giemsa staining. The MN in PCE cells or MNPCE were examined microscopically by the magnification of 1000 and counted for every 1000 cells in each mice. The results showed that the MNPCE frequencies on the treatment groups were significantly higher than that of the control (P< 0,05. Further evaluation indicated that the MNPCE frequencies increased with the increase of irradiation dose.

  6. Evaluation of the genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of filling pastes used for pulp therapy on deciduous teeth using the micronucleus test on bone marrow from mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Nilton C N; Ramos, Maria E S P; Ramos, Aline F B; Cerqueira, Adriana B; Cerqueira, Eneida M M

    2016-09-01

    Pulp therapy is the last resort for preserving deciduous teeth. However, the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of many products used in this therapy are not well established. The aim of this study was to use the micronucleus test on bone marrow from mice to evaluate the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of four filling pastes: zinc oxide, calcium hydroxide P.A., mineral trioxide aggregate and an iodoform paste (iodoform + camphorated + paramonochlorophenol + rifamycin + prednisolone). Male Swiss mice were divided into 4 groups of 10 animals, each exposed to one of the pastes, and were subdivided according to the dilutions tested: 1/10, 1/50, 1/500 and 1/1000 administered intraperitoneally (0.1ml/10g of weight). Cyclophosphamide was the positive control. The negative controls were dimethylsulfoxide and buffered saline solution. Five animals were killed 24h and five 48h after the treatment. The material was processed in accordance with Schmid (1976) and micronuclei were counted in 1000 polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE), under an optical microscope in a blinded test. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the PCE/normochromatic erythrocyte (NCE) ratio in 200 erythrocytes. The micronucleus analysis results were evaluated using the conditional test for comparing proportions in situations of rare events. Analysis of variance and Tukey's test were used to evaluate the PCE/NCE ratio. There was significantly greater occurrence of micronuclei in the animals treated with iodoform paste at all the dilutions tested, at both sacrifice times. Greater occurrence of micronuclei was observed among the animals treated with zinc oxide and sacrificed 48h after the treatment, at the dilutions 1:50; 1:500 and 1:1000. Calcium hydroxide P.A. and mineral trioxide aggregate did not present any genotoxic or cytotoxic effects. The genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of zinc oxide and iodoform paste revealed here constitute an initial step towards their contraindication, but additional studies will be necessary in order to securely establish the risks involved in their use.

  7. Nullification of aspirin induced gastrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity by prior administration of wheat germ oil in Mus musculus: histopathological, ultrastructural and molecular studies.

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    Mohamed, H R H; Hamad, S R

    2017-08-30

    Aspirin (salicylic acetyl acid) is used worldwide to treat various inflammatory conditions and prevent cardiovascular disease, along with reducing the risk of cancer. However, administration of aspirin causes toxic effects, especially in the stomach and liver. Thus, our study examined the protective effect of wheat germ oil on aspirin-induced toxicity in the stomach and liver tissues of albino white mice. Administration of wheat germ oil before aspirin has restored normal hepatic and gastric tissue architecture and DNA integrity has become better than that of a negative health control group compared with the aspirin only treated group. The elevated gastric nitric oxide content in the aspirin only treated group was significantly decreased by wheat germ oil prior administration as a result of reducedthe expression of inducible nitric synthase and increased the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase compared to their expression in the aspirin administered group. Wheat germ oil pre-administration significantly reduced the level of malondialdehyde, increased the level of glutathione and decreased catalase and superoxide dismutase activities compared with those in aspirin only treated group. We conclude that wheat germ oil has a potential protective effect against aspirin induced gastro- and hepato-toxicity because of its free radical scavenging ability.

  8. Existence of vimentin and GFAP protein expressions as a result of 2-Methoxyethanol administration in cerebral cortex tissue of Swiss Webster mice (Mus musculus): an immunohistochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irnidayanti, Yulia

    2014-07-01

    Une of the plastic-based materials widely used in the plastics industry in various countries is ester phthalate. This compound will be oxidized in the body into 2-methoxyethanol (2-ME). The effect of 2-ME on human health and environment depends on the number, duration and the frequency of exposure. Recently, the incidence of brain damage tends to increase. In the last decade, it has been widely reported the negative effects of chemical pollutants to the environment. The aim of this study were to know the existence of the expression of Vimentin and GFAP proteins caused by 2-ME on the histological structure of the cerebral cortex of mice fetal during the prenatal period on gestation day 14 (GD 14) and day 18 (GD 18). The 2-ME compound was injected intraperitoneally with a dose of 7.5 mmol kg(-1) of body weight at GD-10. The result showed that there is a change in existence Vimentin protein in the cerebral cortex fetal of treated mice at GD 14, which is very conspicuous. Meanwhile, a change in existence of GFAP protein in cerebral cortex fetal of treated mice at GD 14, have relatively no difference from controls and no impact on histological structure changes of the cerebral corteks at GD 14. The change in existence of Vimentin protein in the cerebral cortex fetal of treated mice at GD 14 have an impact on histological structure of the cerebral cortex of mice treated at GD 18. It is believed that the impact is due to the effects of 2-methoxyethanol.

  9. Perbedaan Efek Pemberian Topikal Gel Lidah Buaya (Aloe vera L. Dengan Solusio Povidone Iodine Terhadap Penyembuhan Luka Sayat Pada Kulit Mencit (Mus musculus

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    Nur Atik

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Normal wound healing is a complex and dynamic process. Wound healing process can accelerate, with chemical treatment or natural. The chemical treatment often used in healing process is povidone iodine. For natural treatment, topical application of Aloe vera gel may accelerate the full-thickness wound healing process. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the differences between topical application of povidone iodine and Aloe vera gel for skin wound healing in mice. This study used 18 mice that were divided into three groups. First group was the wounded (control group, the second group was wounded – Aloe vera group, the third group was wounded - povidone iodine group. Full-thickness skin wound were created on the dorsal area of mice in each group. The control group were not given anything, while the second group were given Aloe vera gel twice a day, and the third group were given povidone iodine solution twice a day. At the fifth day, all mice were sacrificed for histologic evaluation and VEGF A expression. Data was obtained by microscopic observation of the wounded skin, based on quantitative parameter: epithelial thickness, total fibroblast, total blood vessels, and VEGF A expression. Then the data was statistically analyzed by using independent samples T test, ANOVA, and Chi square. The result demonstrated that the sum of epithelial thickness, fibroblast, blood vessels, and VEGF A expression in the Aloe vera group is higher than in povidone iodine group. Statistic evaluation showed that there were significant differences between the two groups (p < 0.05, with 95% confidence interval. Based on this result, it can be concluded that the topical administration of Aloe vera gel twice a day is better than povidone iodine with parameter epithelial thickness, total fibroblass, total blood vessels and VEGF A expression.

  10. Regional thermal specialisation in a mammal: temperature affects power output of core muscle more than that of peripheral muscle in adult mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Rob S; Tallis, Jason; Angilletta, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    In endotherms, such as mammals and birds, internal organs can specialise to function within a narrow thermal range. Consequently, these organs should become more sensitive to changes in body temperature. Yet, organs at the periphery of the body still experience considerable fluctuations in temperature, which could select for lower thermal sensitivity. We hypothesised that the performance of soleus muscle taken from the leg would depend less on temperature than would the performance of diaphragm muscle taken from the body core. Soleus and diaphragm muscles were isolated from mice and subjected to isometric and work-loop studies to analyse mechanical performance at temperatures between 15 and 40 °C. Across this thermal range, soleus muscle took longer to generate isometric force and longer to relax, and tended to produce greater normalised maximal force (stress) than did diaphragm muscle. The time required to produce half of maximal force during isometric tetanus and the time required to relax half of maximal force were both more sensitive to temperature in soleus than they were in diaphragm. However, thermal sensitivities of maximal force during isometric tetani were similar for both muscles. Consistent with our hypothesis, power output (the product of speed and force) was greater in magnitude and more thermally sensitive in diaphragm than it was in soleus. Our findings, when combined with previous observations of muscles from regionally endothermic fish, suggest that endothermy influences the thermal sensitivities of power output in core and peripheral muscles.

  11. Steroid Hormones and Antihormones can Reverse the Castration Induced Stimulation of the Pineal and Adrenal Karyomorphology and Cell Proliferation in Mice (Mus musculus

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    S. Chakraborty

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, influence of castration and castrated animals supplemented with steroid hormones and antihormones on pineal-adrenal karyomorphology and dynamics were studied in post pubertal male mice. A group of thirty five mice were orchidectomized and (N = 7 sham operated, were kept in laboratory condition for 30 days. Such castrated were separately supplemented with estradiol at a dose of 5 g, testosterone at a dose of 100 g and antihormones, tamoxifen at a dose of 500 g and flutamide at 2 g daily (all at doses per 100 g.b.w. for ten consecutive days following thirty days of post castration. Present data reveal that both pineal and adrenal gland nuclear size and cell proliferation were significantly increased in thirty days post orchidectomized mice compared to control animals. The values are control pinealocyte nuclear diameter (dim: 4.750.06; castrated pinealocyte nuclear diameter (m: 5.340.04 (p<0.001. Control pineal M% 1.250.07; castrated pineal M% 2.020.11 (p<0.001. In control adrenal, representative of zones was Z. fasciculata nuclear diameter (m (5.110.04; castrated Z. fasciculata nuclear diameter (m 5.410.03 (p<0.001. Control adrenal M% (1.030.06 castrated adrenal M% (1.630.09 p<0.001. It was further observed that such pineal and adrenal stimulation in orchidectomized mice were significantly decreased when orchidectomized mice were administered with steroid hormones (estradiol and testosterone and antihormones (tamoxifen and flutamide compared to orchidectomized mice. Our study indicates that there exists a mutual stimulatory relationship between pineal and adrenal under conditions of steroid deprivation. However, exogenous administration of steroid hormones and antihormones to those castrated mice caused inhibition of these two peripheral endocrine glands.

  12. Inhibition of toll-like receptor 3-4 with ethanolic extract of propolis on innate immunity in diabetes mellitus mice (Mus musculus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristiwanto, Bambang; Soewondo, A.; Sumitro, Sutiman B.; Rifa'i, Muhaimin

    2017-05-01

    One of the most significant problems today is to treat the effects of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Thus, this study evaluated the ability of an ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) to reduce inflammation in diabetes treatment. The used mice with STZ-induced diabetes mellitus (SID) and the expression of Toll-Like Receptor 3-4 was analyzed in their innate immunity cells. The SID mice had a higher TLR 3-4 expression compared with the healthy control group. Treatment of EEP in SID using three different doses significantly decreased the number of B cells with TLR 3-4 expression. This suggesting that EEP treatment decreases TLR3 & TLR4 expression on innate immunity (especially B cells) from over expression in SID which can affect the acute inflammatory and aggravate the diabetes condition. Even relatively low doses of propolis extract can decrease TLR3 and TLR4 expressed by B cell.

  13. The effect of pomelo citrus (Citrus maxima var. Nambangan), vitamin C and lycopene towards the number reduction of mice (Mus musculus) apoptotic hepatocyte caused of ochratoxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badriyah, Hastuti, Utami Sri

    2017-06-01

    Foods can contaminated by some mycotoxin produced by molds. Ochratoxin A is a sort of mycotoxin that cause structural damage on hepatocytes. Pomelo citrus (Citrus maxima var. Nambangan) contain vitamin C and lycopene that have antioxidant character. This research is done to: 1)examine the effect of pomelo citrus juice, vitamin C, and lycopene treatment towards the number reduction of mice apoptotic hepatocytes caused by ochratoxin A exposure, 2)examine the effect of vitamin C mixed with lycopene treatment towards the number reduction of mice apoptotic hepatocytes caused by ochratoxin A exposure. The experimental group used male mice strain BALB-C in the age of three month and bodyweight 20-30 grams devided in 4 experiment group and control group. The experiment group I were administered pomelo citrus juice 0,5 ml/30 grams BW/day orally during 2 weeks and then administered with ochratoxin in the dose of 1 mg/kg BW during 1 week. The experiment group II were administered with vitamin C in the dose of 5,85 µg/30g BW with the same methods. The experiment group III were administered with lycopene in the dose of 0,1025 µg/30 g BW with the same methods. The experiment group IV were administered with vitamin C mixed with lycopene with the same methods. The control group were administered with ochratoxin A in the dose of 1 mg/kg BW per oral during 1 week. The apoptotic hepatocyte number were count by microscopic observation of hepatocyte slides from experiment group as well as control group with cytochemical staining. The research result shows that: 1) the pomelo citrus juice, vitamin C as well as lycopene administration could reduce the mice apoptotic hepatocyte number caused by ochratoxin A exposure, compared with the mice apoptotic hepatocyte number caused by ochratoxin A exposure only; 2) the vitamin C mixed with lycopene could reduce the mice apoptotic hepatocyte number caused by ochratoxin A exposure compared with the mice apoptotic hepatocyte number caused by ochratoxin exposure only.

  14. A point mutation in the gene for asparagine-linked glycosylation 10B (Alg10b) causes nonsyndromic hearing impairment in mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Frank J; Corrigan, Rebecca R; Del Gaudio, Daniela; Salinger, Andrew P; Lorenzo, Isabel; Gao, Simon S; Chiu, Ilene; Xia, Anping; Oghalai, John S; Justice, Monica J

    2013-01-01

    The study of mouse hearing impairment mutants has led to the identification of a number of human hearing impairment genes and has greatly furthered our understanding of the physiology of hearing. The novel mouse mutant neurological/sensory 5 (nse5) demonstrates a significantly reduced or absent startle response to sound and is therefore a potential murine model of human hearing impairment. Genetic analysis of 500 intercross progeny localized the mutant locus to a 524 kilobase (kb) interval on mouse chromosome 15. A missense mutation in a highly-conserved amino acid was found in the asparagine-linked glycosylation 10B gene (Alg10b), which is within the critical interval for the nse5 mutation. A 20.4 kb transgene containing a wildtype copy of the Alg10b gene rescued the mutant phenotype in nse5/nse5 homozygous animals, confirming that the mutation in Alg10b is responsible for the nse5/nse5 mutant phenotype. Homozygous nse5/nse5 mutants had abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABRs), distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), and cochlear microphonics (CMs). Endocochlear potentials (EPs), on the other hand, were normal. ABRs and DPOAEs also confirmed the rescue of the mutant nse5/nse5 phenotype by the wildtype Alg10b transgene. These results suggested a defect in the outer hair cells of mutant animals, which was confirmed by histologic analysis. This is the first report of mutation in a gene involved in the asparagine (N)-linked glycosylation pathway causing nonsyndromic hearing impairment, and it suggests that the hearing apparatus, and the outer hair cells in particular, are exquisitely sensitive to perturbations of the N-linked glycosylation pathway.

  15. A point mutation in the gene for asparagine-linked glycosylation 10B (Alg10b causes nonsyndromic hearing impairment in mice (Mus musculus.

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    Frank J Probst

    Full Text Available The study of mouse hearing impairment mutants has led to the identification of a number of human hearing impairment genes and has greatly furthered our understanding of the physiology of hearing. The novel mouse mutant neurological/sensory 5 (nse5 demonstrates a significantly reduced or absent startle response to sound and is therefore a potential murine model of human hearing impairment. Genetic analysis of 500 intercross progeny localized the mutant locus to a 524 kilobase (kb interval on mouse chromosome 15. A missense mutation in a highly-conserved amino acid was found in the asparagine-linked glycosylation 10B gene (Alg10b, which is within the critical interval for the nse5 mutation. A 20.4 kb transgene containing a wildtype copy of the Alg10b gene rescued the mutant phenotype in nse5/nse5 homozygous animals, confirming that the mutation in Alg10b is responsible for the nse5/nse5 mutant phenotype. Homozygous nse5/nse5 mutants had abnormal auditory brainstem responses (ABRs, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs, and cochlear microphonics (CMs. Endocochlear potentials (EPs, on the other hand, were normal. ABRs and DPOAEs also confirmed the rescue of the mutant nse5/nse5 phenotype by the wildtype Alg10b transgene. These results suggested a defect in the outer hair cells of mutant animals, which was confirmed by histologic analysis. This is the first report of mutation in a gene involved in the asparagine (N-linked glycosylation pathway causing nonsyndromic hearing impairment, and it suggests that the hearing apparatus, and the outer hair cells in particular, are exquisitely sensitive to perturbations of the N-linked glycosylation pathway.

  16. Neurotropic effects of aspartame, stevia and sucralose on memory retention and on the histology of the hippocampus of the ICR mice(Mus musculus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lejan Miguel Alabastro Villareal; Rachelle Anne Montes Cruz; Michael Bagui Ples; Rodel Jonathan Santos Vitor Ⅱ

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the effects of the consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners on memory retention and on the histology of the hippocampus.Methods: In this study, 20 mice were used to determine if there is an effect of consuming the maximum allowable dose of the non-nutritive sweeteners on the memory retention and on the histology of the hippocampus. The mice were distributed into four groups and the treatments were given via oral gavage: Group 1(water), Group 2(aspartame: 1 000 mg/kg), Group 3(stevia: 1 000 mg/kg) and Group 4(sucralose:16 000 mg/kg). Treatments were administered to the different experimental groups for 32 days, after which memory retention was tested using the two-day water maze protocol.After the tests, the mice were sacrificed and the brain was analyzed histologically for neurotrophic effects.Results: Based on the results of the two-day water maze protocol, there were no differences between the non-nutritive sweeteners and the control group. However, stevia showed high cellular apoptosis followed by aspartame, sucralose and control group.Conclusions: There was no significant effect on the memory of the mice. It showed histologically however, that stevia had a significant neurotropic effect compared to the other sweeteners.

  17. Efecto embriotóxico y teratogénico de Ruta chalepensis L. «ruda», en ratón (Mus musculus

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    José Gonzales

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ruta graveolens L. y R. chalepensis L. son plantas usadas en medicina folclórica como antiespasmódicos, antihelmínticos, antimicrobianos, emenagogos y abortivos. En el presente trabajo se evaluó el efecto del extracto acuoso liofilizado (EAL de las hojas de R. chalepensis en embriones postimplantacionales de ratón. Ratonas albinas preñadas recibieron intraperitonalmente (ip 10 mg de ruda liofilizada/kg de peso corporal (grupo tratado, n=12 durante el periodo post-implantacional (día 9 – día 17 post-cópula, y un grupo control(C, n=18, que recibió sólo agua destilada durante el mismo período. El EAL de ruda no afectó negativamente el peso de la madre pero sí del útero durante el tratamiento (p<0,05. En el grupo tratado la frecuencia de reabsorciones fetales fue mayor (p<0,05 y el peso fetal fue significativamente menor en comparación con el control (p<0,01. Además en el grupo tratado se evidenció la presencia de malformaciones esqueléticas. En conclusión, encontramos que el EAL de R. chalepensis muestra efectos embriotóxicos en ratones expuestos durante el período postimplantacional.

  18. Efecto embriotóxico y teratogénico de Ruta chalepensis L. «ruda», en ratón (Mus musculus)

    OpenAIRE

    José Gonzales; Victor Benavides; Ruth Rojas; José Pino

    2013-01-01

    Ruta graveolens L. y R. chalepensis L. son plantas usadas en medicina folclórica como antiespasmódicos, antihelmínticos, antimicrobianos, emenagogos y abortivos. En el presente trabajo se evaluó el efecto del extracto acuoso liofilizado (EAL) de las hojas de R. chalepensis en embriones postimplantacionales de ratón. Ratonas albinas preñadas recibieron intraperitonalmente (ip) 10 mg de ruda liofilizada/kg de peso corporal (grupo tratado, n=12) durante el periodo post-implantacional (día 9 – dí...

  19. Protective Effect of Parsley Juice (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae against Cadmium Deleterious Changes in the Developed Albino Mice Newborns (Mus musculus Brain

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    Ahmed A. Allam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parsley was used as a probe of the current experiment to prevent the behavioral, morphological and biochemical changes in the newborn brain following the administration of cadmium (Cd to the pregnant mice. The nonanesthetized pregnant mice were given daily parsley juice (Petroselinum crispum at doses of 20 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg. Pregnant mothers were given Cd at a dose of 30 mg/kg divided into 3 equal times. The newborns have been divided into 6 groups: Group A, mothers did not take treatment; Groups B and C, mothers were treated with low and high dose of parsley, respectively; Group D, mothers were treated only with Cd (perinatal intoxication; Groups E and F, mothers were treated with Cd doses and protected by low and high doses of parsley, respectively. Light microscopy showed that Cd-induced neuronal degeneration by chromatolysis and pyknosis in the brain regions. The low dose of parsley 10 g/kg/day exhibited significant effects in neutralizing and reducing the deleterious changes due to Cd exposure during pregnancy on the behavioral activities, neurotransmitters, oxidative stress, and brain neurons morphology of the mice newborns.

  20. Protective Effect of Parsley Juice (Petroselinum crispum, Apiaceae) against Cadmium Deleterious Changes in the Developed Albino Mice Newborns (Mus musculus) Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Ahmed A; Maodaa, Salah N; Abo-Eleneen, Rasha; Ajarem, Jamaan

    2016-01-01

    Parsley was used as a probe of the current experiment to prevent the behavioral, morphological and biochemical changes in the newborn brain following the administration of cadmium (Cd) to the pregnant mice. The nonanesthetized pregnant mice were given daily parsley juice (Petroselinum crispum) at doses of 20 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg. Pregnant mothers were given Cd at a dose of 30 mg/kg divided into 3 equal times. The newborns have been divided into 6 groups: Group A, mothers did not take treatment; Groups B and C, mothers were treated with low and high dose of parsley, respectively; Group D, mothers were treated only with Cd (perinatal intoxication); Groups E and F, mothers were treated with Cd doses and protected by low and high doses of parsley, respectively. Light microscopy showed that Cd-induced neuronal degeneration by chromatolysis and pyknosis in the brain regions. The low dose of parsley 10 g/kg/day exhibited significant effects in neutralizing and reducing the deleterious changes due to Cd exposure during pregnancy on the behavioral activities, neurotransmitters, oxidative stress, and brain neurons morphology of the mice newborns.

  1. Hematological effects of Ipomoea batatas(camote) and Phyllanthus niruri(sampa-sampalukan) from Philippines in the ICR mice(Mus musculus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jessa; Fidel; Montejo; Juan; Arturo; Burgos; Mondonedo; Matthew; Genesis; Aguila; Lee; Michael; Bagui; Ples; Rodel; Jonathan; Santos; Vitor; Ⅱ

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the hematological effects of administering Ipomoea batatas(I.batatas)and Phyllanthus niruri(P.niruri) in the ICR mice.Methods:Powdered leaves of /.batatas and P.nintri were fed to mice for 4 weeks.A total of six groups were used to determine the effect of the plants to the complete blood count of the mouse.Group A(blank control) mice were feed with pellets only;Group B(negative control) mice were fed with pellets coated with honey;Group C(low dosage) mice were fed with honey-coated pellets and powdered leaves of 1.batatas at 10 g/kg body weight of the mouse;Group D(high dosage) mice were fed with honey-coated pellets and powdered leaves of I,batatas at 20 g/kg body weight of the mouse;Group E(low dosage) mice were fed with honey-coated pellets and powdered leaves of P.niruri at 10 g/kg body weight of the mouse:and Group F(high dosage) mice were fed with honey-coated pellets and powdered leaves of P.niruri at 20 g/kg body weight of the mouse.Complete blood count was performed on Days 0.14 and 28.Results:It was shown that I.batatas can increase the values of hematocrit and hemoglobin on both the low dose and high dose at Day 28 and red blood cells(RBC) on both Days 14 and28 of testing.On the other hand.P.niruri can increase RBC.hematocrit and hemoglobin on Day 28 with only the low dose.There were no significant differences with white blood cell,absolute granulocyte,lymphocyte and monocyte,and platelet counts observed for both plant samples.Conclusions:I.batatas and P.niruri have effects on the hematocrit,RBC and hemoglobin levels in mice.

  2. CONGELAMENTO ULTRA-RÁPIDO DE EMBRIÕES Mus musculus COM A UTILIZAÇÃO DE SACAROSE E LACTOSE

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    Mari Lourdes Bernardi

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available Cento e seis mórulas de camundongos da cepa CF1 Suíço Albina, coletadas 76-78h após a administração de HCG, foram congeladas em solução de congelamento contendo glicerol 2,0M + sacarose 0,25M (Grupo S ou Glicerol 2,0M + lactose 0,25M (Grupo L, ambas em PBS modificado. Foi efetuado um pré-tratamento com Glicerol 2,0M durante 4 minutos, sendo as mórulas transferidas, posteriormente, para a solução de congelamento, durante 1 minuto. O envase foi realizado em palhetas de 0,25ml em grupos de 5 a 11 mórulas. As palhetas contendo os embriões foram colocadas em vapor de N2 durante 2 minutos e, após, mergulhados em N2 líquido. O descongelamento foi efetuado em banho-maria a 37°C por 20 segundos e foram recuperadas 103 mórulas após a diluição do crioprotetor, que foi efetuada em solução de sacarose 0,5M (Grupo S e lactose 0,5M (Grupo L , durante 5 minutos , à temperatura ambiente . Após três banhos em PBS, os embriões viáveis foram colocados em cultivo em PBS modificado, a 37°C, por 44-48h. Através da avaliação morfológica, após descongelamento, 45 mórulas (86,5% foram consideradas viáveis no grupo S e 46 (90,2% no grupo L. O percentual de embriões que se desenvolveram após cultivo foi de 67,3% para o grupo S (n =52 e 64,7% para o grupo L (n =51. A análise estatística não revelou diferenças significativas (P >0,01 no número de embriões viáveis após descongelamento e índice de sobrevivência após cultivo, entre os dois açúcares testados.

  3. Perbandingan Pemberian Topikal Aqueous Leaf Extract of Carica Papaya (ALEC dan Madu Khaula Terhadap Percepatan Penyembuhan Luka Sayat pada Kulit Mencit (Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Januarsih Iwan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Topical application of papaya and honey has been hypothesized to accelerate skin wound healing. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the differences between topical application of the ALEC and Khaula Honey in accelerating skin wound healing in mice. The experiment took place in Histology Laboratory, School of Medicine, Padjadjaran University, Bandung, November 2006-April 2007.The prospective experimental method was held in 10 days. Subjects were male ddy mice divided into 3 groups (each consisted of 9 mices, which were control group solcoseryl jelly, 10% ALEC in vaseline and 1.0 g Khaula honey treated group. The comparisons in accelerating skin wound healing were investigated by using full thickness skin wound model produced on the back of the mice. Solcoseryl jelly was applied topically to wound of group 1, group 2 and group 3 mice were treated topically with 10% ALEC in vaseline and Khaula honey, respectively. The mice were sacrificed on 4th, 7th, and 10th day of post wounding for evaluating the histological changes. Data was obtained by microscopically analysis of the skin based on the epidermal regeneration, granulation tissues thickness and angiogenesis and then analyzed by using parametric independent T-test. The level for statistical significant was set p < 0.05. The result of this experiment showed that there were significant difference between control group and ALEC10% in vaseline in three mentioned above. Comparison between control and Khaula honey showed differences only in epidermal regeneration and angiogenesis. Wound treated with ALEC 10% in vaseline and Khaula honey group showed significantly difference in epidermal regeneration (mean 2.19 (0.81 for ALEC 10% and 2.67 (0.67 for honey group, p value < 0.001 and granulation tissues thickness (mean 2.99 (0.94 for ALEC 10% and 3.23 (0.99 for honey group, p value 0.038.These result documented the differences of ALEC and Khaula honey for the acceleration of wound healing process in full thickness skin wound especially in epidermal regeneration and granulation tissues thickness.

  4. Dicty_cDB: SSM640 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AC120874 |AC120874.3 Mus musculus clone RP23-285H4, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 49 unordered pieces. 50 0.022 1... AC011021 |AC011021.3 Homo sapiens chromosome 3 clone RP11-408M18 map 3, WORKING ...DRAFT SEQUENCE, 17 unordered pieces. 36 0.34 5 AC117618 |AC117618.3 Mus musculus clone RP23-111F17, WORKING ...DRAFT SEQUENCE, 3 ordered pieces. 46 0.34 1 AC113100 |AC113100.3 Mus musculus clone RP23-317I17, WORKING DRA...FT SEQUENCE, 7 ordered pieces. 46 0.34 1 AC132878 |AC132878.3 Mus musculus clone RP24-223D21, WORKING DRAFT

  5. LINE-1 repetitive DNA probes for species-specific cloning from Mus spretus and Mus domesticus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rikke, B A; Hardies, S C

    1991-12-01

    Mus domesticus and Mus spretus mice are closely related subspecies. For genetic investigations involving hybrid mice, we have developed a set of species-specific oligonucleotide probes based on the detection of LINE-1 sequence differences. LINE-1 is a repetitive DNA family whose many members are interspersed among the genes. In this study, library screening experiments were used to fully characterize the species specificity of four M. domesticus LINE-1 probes and three M. spretus LINE-1 probes. It was found that the nucleotide differences detected by the probes define large, species-specific subfamilies. We show that collaborative use of such probes can be employed to selectively detect thousands of species-specific library clones. Consequently, these probes could be exploited to monitor and access almost any given species-specific region of interest within hybrid genomes.

  6. Electromagnetic pulse (EMP): Exposure of missile 56 in EMP simulator sapiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikvall, T.

    1985-06-01

    The effects on the electric field caused by the object (missile) in the SAPIENS electromagnetic pulse simulator were studied. A noticeable effect on the field strength is noted close to the object, due to the characteristics of the field. This effect also appears in real electromagnetic pulse environments. During these tests 200 pulses were distributed with good accuracy of reproduction. The SAPIENS is an outdoor device and tests carried out in winter show that weather has very little influence on results.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U14571-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AJ133767 |pid:none) Homo sapiens mRNA for ZASP protein... 51 1e-05 (Q5XI07) RecName: Full=Lipoma-preferre...e) Mus musculus 12 days embryo spinal... 50 2e-05 (Q5F464) RecName: Full=Lipoma-preferred partner homolog; &

  8. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK120540 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK120540 J013129G19 At1g16430.1 surfeit locus protein 5 family protein / SURF5 family protein similar to Sur...feit locus protein 5 (surf5) (SP:Q62276) [Mus musculus]; similar to Surfeit locus protein 5 (SP:Q15528) [Homo sapiens] 2e-40 ...

  9. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK241630 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available / SURF5 family protein similar to Surfeit locus protein 5 (surf5) (SP:Q62276) [Mus musculus]; similar to Surfeit locus protein 5 (SP:Q15528) [Homo sapiens] 5e-40 ... ...AK241630 J065187N12 At1g16430.1 68414.m01965 surfeit locus protein 5 family protein

  10. AcEST: BP918242 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available eolar protein 16 OS=Candida albicans G... 37 0.058 sp|Q8CB62|CNTRB_MOUSE Centrobin OS=Mus musculus GN=Cntrob...N PERQ amino acid-rich with GYF domain-conta... 32 1.4 sp|Q8N137|CNTRB_HUMAN Centrobin OS=Homo sapiens GN=CN

  11. Dicty_cDB: VSK313 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1( BC139012 |pid:none) Mus musculus RALBP1 associated Eps... 72 2e-11 AL672039_2( AL672039 |pid:none) Mouse ... Eps domain-containing p... 72 2e-11 AF511533_1( AF511533 |pid:none) Homo sapiens RALBP1 associated Eps... 7

  12. Genomic organization, transcript variants and comparative analysis of the human nucleoporin 155 (NUP155) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Yu, Jun

    2002-01-01

    complementary to RNAs of the Nup155 orthologs from Fugu and mouse. Comparative analysis of the Nup155 orthologs in many species, including H. sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, F. rubripes, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has revealed two paralogs in S...

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06307-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNA sequence from clone RP11-78L19 on chrom... 44 6.0 1 ( AE014307 ) Homo sapiens chromosome 13q34 schizop...hrenia regio... 44 6.0 1 ( AC100504 ) Mus musculus clone RP23-143L15, LOW-PASS SEQU

  14. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK060182 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK060182 001-001-C03 At4g35140.1 transducin family protein / WD-40 repeat family protein contains 6 (3 signi...ficant) WD-40 repeats; similar to PC326 protein (GI:200241) (PIR2:S37694) [Mus musculus]; Human (H326) mRNA, Homo sapiens, gb:U06631 1e-103 ...

  15. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK073941 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK073941 J033078O14 At4g35140.1 transducin family protein / WD-40 repeat family protein contains 6 (3 signif...icant) WD-40 repeats; similar to PC326 protein (GI:200241) (PIR2:S37694) [Mus musculus]; Human (H326) mRNA, Homo sapiens, gb:U06631 1e-136 ...

  16. Dicty_cDB: VHF744 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 13309 |pid:none) Homo sapiens PWP2 periodic tryptop... 86 1e-21 BC047817_1( BC047817 |pid:none) Danio rerio PWP2 periodic... WD-re... 87 5e-21 BC031787_1( BC031787 |pid:none) Mus musculus PWP2 (periodic tr

  17. Download - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tss (Homo sapiens) (6.5 GB) (reprocessed)pooled_ctss (Mus musculus) (4.5 GB) - 10 Pathway enrichment...rs (160 MB) - 12 Results of de-novo and Motif activity analyses Motifs (6.2 GB) - 13 Sample ontology, GOstat and ontology term enrich...ment Ontology (1.8 MB) - 14 CAGE peaks identified as tru

  18. AcEST: BP917573 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available y protein 16 OS=Homo sapiens GN=FBXO16 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 292 Score = 32.3 bits (72), Expect = 0.76 Identiti...only protein 16 OS=Mus musculus GN=Fbxo16 PE=2 SV=1 Length = 334 Score = 30.0 bits (66), Expect = 3.8 Identi

  19. Arabidopsis CDS blastp result: AK119659 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK119659 002-130-H11 At2g16920.1 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme family protein low si...milarity to ubiquitin-conjugating BIR-domain enzyme APOLLON [Homo sapiens] GI:8489831, ubiquitin-conjugating... enzyme [Mus musculus] GI:3319990; contains Pfam profile PF00179: Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 3e-26 ...

  20. Dicty_cDB: VSA526 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 5e-31 BC053744_1( BC053744 |pid:none) Mus musculus polymerase (RNA) I po... 135... 5e-31 BC017115_1( BC017115 |pid:none) Homo sapiens polymerase (RNA) I po... 135 5e-31 AF000938_1( AF000938 ...clone RP11-548P2 ... 135 5e-31 BC143345_1( BC143345 |pid:none) Homo sapiens polymerase (RNA) I po.

  1. AcEST: DK957635 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available us mus... 55 3e-07 sp|Q9Z268|RASL1_MOUSE RasGAP-activating-like protein 1 OS=Mus mu... 55 4e-07 sp|Q5M7N9|ESYT3_XENTR Extended...acting protein OS=Mus musculus G... 53 1e-06 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synap...totagmin-2 OS=Homo sapiens G... 53 1e-06 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-2 OS=Mus musculus G......tsn2 PE=... 50 8e-06 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Homo sapiens G... 50 1e-05 sp|Q12466|

  2. Confirmation of the occurrence of Mus neavei in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.H. Newbery

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Neave’s mouse, Mus neavei (Thomas, 1910, occurs in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Zambia, Mozambique, Zimbabwe and South Africa (Petter 1981; Musser & Carleton 1993, with the latter record based on material from owl pellets taken at Makapansgat (Pocock 1974. Pocock’s record was disputed by Swanepoel et al. (1980, and in the absence of complete voucher specimens, the occurrence of this species in South Africa was regarded as doubtful. However, it was supported by Meester et al. (1986 and accepted by Musser & Carleton (1993.

  3. Taxonomy Icon Data: house mouse [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available house mouse Mus musculus Chordata/Vertebrata/Mammalia/Theria/Eutheria/etc. Mus_musculus_L.png Mus_musculus..._NL.png Mus_musculus_S.png Mus_musculus_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus...&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=NL http://biosci...encedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus+musculus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Mus...+musculus&t=NS http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/taxonomy_icon_comment_en?species_id=146 ...

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U07176-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 60_1( AF074960 |pid:none) Mus musculus neurogenic extracellu... 35 6.2 BC059267_1( BC059267 |pid:none) Mus m... 6.2 CR954212_161( CR954212 |pid:none) Ostreococcus tauri strain OTTH05... 35 6.2 AF055585_1( AF055585 |pid:none) Homo sapiens neurog...enic extracellu... 35 8.1 (Q9DER5) RecName: Full=Teneuri

  5. Mandibular molar root morphology in Neanderthals and Late Pleistocene and recent Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupczik, Kornelius; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2010-11-01

    Neanderthals have a distinctive suite of dental features, including large anterior crown and root dimensions and molars with enlarged pulp cavities. Yet, there is little known about variation in molar root morphology in Neanderthals and other recent and fossil members of Homo. Here, we provide the first comprehensive metric analysis of permanent mandibular molar root morphology in Middle and Late Pleistocene Homo neanderthalensis, and Late Pleistocene (Aterian) and recent Homo sapiens. We specifically address the question of whether root form can be used to distinguish between these groups and assess whether any variation in root form can be related to differences in tooth function. We apply a microtomographic imaging approach to visualise and quantify the external and internal dental morphologies of both isolated molars and molars embedded in the mandible (n=127). Univariate and multivariate analyses reveal both similarities (root length and pulp volume) and differences (occurrence of pyramidal roots and dental tissue volume proportion) in molar root morphology among penecontemporaneous Neanderthals and Aterian H. sapiens. In contrast, the molars of recent H. sapiens are markedly smaller than both Pleistocene H. sapiens and Neanderthals, but share with the former the dentine volume reduction and a smaller root-to-crown volume compared with Neanderthals. Furthermore, we found the first molar to have the largest average root surface area in recent H. sapiens and Neanderthals, although in the latter the difference between M(1) and M(2) is small. In contrast, Aterian H. sapiens root surface areas peak at M(2). Since root surface area is linked to masticatory function, this suggests a distinct occlusal loading regime in Neanderthals compared with both recent and Pleistocene H. sapiens.

  6. Rad54 and Mus81 cooperation promotes DNA damage repair and restrains chromosome missegregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghamrasni, S El; Cardoso, R; Li, L;

    2016-01-01

    Rad54 and Mus81 mammalian proteins physically interact and are important for the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway; however, their functional interactions in vivo are poorly defined. Here, we show that combinatorial loss of Rad54 and Mus81 results in hypersensitivity to DNA......-damaging agents, defects on both the homologous recombination and non-homologous DNA end joining repair pathways and reduced fertility. We also observed that while Mus81 deficiency diminished the cleavage of common fragile sites, very strikingly, Rad54 loss impaired this cleavage to even a greater extent....... The inefficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) cells was accompanied by elevated levels of chromosome missegregation and cell death. Perhaps as a consequence, tumor incidence in Rad54(-/-)Mus81(-/-) mice remained comparable to that in Mus81(-/-) mice. Our study highlights...

  7. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea;

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We...... have investigated the role of MUS81 in human cells by acutely depleting the protein using shRNAs. We found that MUS81 depletion from human fibroblasts leads to accumulation of ssDNA and a constitutive DNA damage response that ultimately activates cellular senescence. Moreover, we show that MUS81...... is required for efficient replication fork progression during an unperturbed S-phase, and for recovery of productive replication following replication stalling. These results demonstrate essential roles for the MUS81 nuclease in maintenance of replication fork integrity....

  8. MUS81 is associated with cell proliferation and cisplatin sensitivity in serous ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Suhong; Zheng, Hui [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wen, Xuemei [Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Sun, Jiajun; Wang, Yanchun; Gao, Xiang; Guo, Lin [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Lu, Renquan, E-mail: lurenquan@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-08-05

    The dysfunction of DNA damage repair (DDR) pathway contributes to tumorigenesis and drug-resistance in cancer. MUS81 is a member of the conserved xeroderma pigmentosum group F (XPF) family protein of endonucleases, which is important to the DDR pathway. However, the role of MUS81 in the development of ovarian cancer remains uncertain. To explore the expression of MUS81 and its association to serous ovarian cancer (SOC), 43 biopsies of SOC patients were detected by qRT-PCR, and 29 specimens were further performed by immunohistochemistry analysis. Here, we observed that MUS81 was over-expressed in SOC tissues at both transcript and protein levels, and the expression level of MUS81 protein in ovarian cancer cell lines was also higher than that in human normal ovarian surface epithelial cell line (HOSEpiC). We also found that down-regulation of MUS81 expression in ovarian cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation ability, and influenced cell cycle progression. Moreover, inhibition of MUS81 expression induced cellular senescence and enhanced the antitumor effect of cisplatin. Down-regulation of MUS81 expression could suppress the growth and development of SOC. These results indicate that MUS81 might play important roles in the progression of SOC and influence the antitumor effect of cisplatin. - Highlights: • MUS81 was overexpression in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). • Meanwhile down-regulation of inhibited cell proliferation and influenced cell cycle progression. • Inhibition of MUS81 induced cell cellular senescence and enhanced the antitumor effect of cisplatin. • Down-regulation of MUS81 expression could suppress the growth and development of SOC.

  9. Identification and field evaluation of attractants for the cranberry weevil, Anthonomus musculus Say.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szendrei, Zsofia; Averill, Anne; Alborn, Hans; Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar

    2011-04-01

    Studies were conducted to develop an attractant for the cranberry weevil, Anthonomus musculus, a pest of blueberry and cranberry flower buds and flowers in the northeastern United States. In previous studies, we showed that cinnamyl alcohol, the most abundant blueberry floral volatile, and the green leaf volatiles (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate and hexyl acetate, emitted from both flowers and flower buds, elicit strong antennal responses from A. musculus. Here, we found that cinnamyl alcohol did not increase capture of A. musculus adults on yellow sticky traps compared with unbaited controls; however, weevils were highly attracted to traps baited with the Anthonomus eugenii Cano aggregation pheromone, indicating that these congeners share common pheromone components. To identify the A. musculus aggregation pheromone, headspace volatiles were collected from adults feeding on blueberry or cranberry flower buds and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Three male-specific compounds were identified: (Z)-2-(3,3-dimethyl-cyclohexylidene) ethanol (Z grandlure II); (Z)-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexylidene) acetaldehyde (grandlure III); and (E)-(3,3- dimethylcyclohexylidene) acetaldehyde (grandlure IV). A fourth component, (E)-3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-ol (geraniol), was emitted in similar quantities by males and females. The emission rates of these volatiles were about 2.8, 1.8, 1.3, and 0.9 ng/adult/d, respectively. Field experiments in highbush blueberry (New Jersey) and cranberry (Massachusetts) examined the attraction of A. musculus to traps baited with the male-produced compounds and geraniol presented alone and combined with (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate and hexyl acetate, and to traps baited with the pheromones of A. eugenii and A. grandis. In both states and crops, traps baited with the A. musculus male-produced compounds attracted the highest number of adults. Addition of the green leaf volatiles did not affect A. musculus attraction to its pheromone but skewed the sex ratio

  10. EFFECT OF IMPERMEANT CRYOPROTECTANTS ON THE IN VITRO VIABILITY OF FROZEN SPERMATOZOA OF SWISS-ALBINA AND BALB/C MICE (Mus musculus EFEITO DE CRIOPROTETORES IMPERMEÁVEIS SOBRE A VIABILIDADE IN VITRO DE ESPERMATOZOIDES CONGELADOS DE CAMUNDONGOS (Mus musculus DAS LINHAGENS SWISS-ALBINA e BALB/c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sergio Varela Junior

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three disaccharides (sucrose, threalose and lactose used as nonpenetrating cryoprotectants in extender for mice semen. The parameters evaluated were sperm motility (MOT and cleavage rate (CLV after in vitro fertilization in the SWISS-ALBINA and BALB/c lines. The treatments were S1=sucrose; S2=threalose; S3=lactose, for SWISS-ALBINA; and B1=lactose; B2=threalose for BALB/c.  MOT was evaluated after: thawing (THA, centrifugation and re-suspension in P-1 medium (CEN and after 10 minutes of incubation (10M. The MOT for the SWISS-ALBINA line was higher for S2 (P<0.001 in the 3 evaluated steps (47% at DES; 66.5% at CEN and 67.2% at 10M than for S1 (32.5% at DES; 51.5% at CEN and 47.7% at 10M and S3 (30% at DES, 46.5% at CEN and 32.7% at 10M. For the BALB/c line, MOT was superior for B2 than for B1 (P<0.001. Thus, the tested disaccharides, especially threalose, can be recommended for freezing of mice sperm.

    KEY WORDS: Cryopreservation, disaccharides, mice, semen. 

    O trabalho objetivou avaliar os efeitos dos dissacarídeos sacarose, trealose e lactose, como crioprotetores impermeáveis à membrana plasmática em diluentes para criopreservação de sêmen de camundongos. Para avaliação do sêmen utilizaram-se os seguintes parâmetros: motilidade progressiva (MOT das células espermáticas, e a taxa de clivagem embrionária (TXCL obtida por meio de fertilização in vitro, nas linhagens SWISS-ALBINA e BALB/c. Os tratamentos avaliados foram: S1=sacarose; S2=trealose; S3=lactose, para SWISS-ALBINA e B1=lactose; B2=trealose para BALB/c. Avaliou-se a MOT durante as seguintes etapas: descongelação (DES, centrifugação e ressuspensão no meio P-1 (CEN e após dez minutos de incubação (10M. A MOT no S2 para a linhagem SWISS-ALBINA nas três etapas (47% no DES; 66,5% na CEN e 67,2% no 10M foi superior (P<0,001 a S1 (32,5% no DES; 51,5% no CEN e 47,7% na 10M e S3 (30% no DES, 46,5% na CEN e 32,7% no 10M. Na linhagem BALB/c, a MOT no B2 foi superior ao B1 (P<0,001. Em conclusão, pode-se recomendar a utilização dos dissacarídeos testados, com destaque para a trealose, na congelação rápida de sêmen de camundongos. 

    PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Camundongo, criopreservação, dissacarídeos, sêmen.

  11. Localização de Schistosoma mansoni no plexo porta de Mus musculus experimentalmente infectados por um só sexo do trematódeo Localization of Schistosoma mansoni in the portal system of Mus musculus infected experimentally by a single sex of the trematode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Maria Zanotti

    1982-08-01

    Full Text Available Foi estudado o hábito migratório de Schistosoma mansoni em infecções bissexuais e nas produzidas por um só sexo do trematódeo, tendo sido evidenciada a influência do sexo no deslocamento dos esquistossomos. Nas infecções bissexuais parece que o deslocamento dos vermes para os vasos mesentéricos visa o acasalamento e a oviposição.S. mansoni migration in mice infected by unisexual or bisexual modes was studied. The research shows the influence of the adult worms. It seems that in the bisexual infections the schistosome migration to the mesenteric vessels takes place with a view to copulation and oviposition.

  12. Avaliação da patogenicidade decorrente da infecção pelo Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907, agente de infecções unissexuais em Mus musculus Assessment of pathogenic effects of infection with Schistosoma mansoni Sambon, 1907, agent of unisexual infection in Mus musculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Maria Zanotti

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se em camundongos de laboratório, aspectos da patogenicidade decorrentes de infecções unissexuais e bissexuais produzidas por S. mansoni. Verificou-se quantitativamente a deposição de ovos nas fezes, da 1ª a 8ª semana após a infecção. Foram registrados, para análise e correlação, o número de vermes obtidos por necrópsia, o peso corporal dos roedores, o peso do fígado e do baço, o número de granulomas hepáticos, pulmonares, esplênicos e intestinais. Foram observadas reações granulomatosas no pâncreas.The pathogenic action of Schistosoma mansoni in experimental infection produced in mice was studied. The number of eggs per gram of feces from the first to the eighth week was calculed. Liver spleen and total body weight of the mice was also determined; and the hepatic, pulmonary, splenic and intestinal granulomata was studied. The presence of pancreatic granulomata was detected.

  13. Development of the palatal size in Pan troglodytes, Hominids and Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W H; Zoellner, A; Sebastian, T

    2004-12-01

    As the hard palate plays an important role in speech production it was the aim of this study whether similarities or dissimilarities in palatal size may allow conclusions about the ability to produce speech in the extant investigated species. The palatal size of Pan troglodytes, Homo sapiens, Australopithecus afarensis, Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus robustus, Australopithecus boisei, Homo erectus, Homo neanderthalensis and Cro-Magnon has been investigated using euclidian distance matrix analysis (EDMA) and thin-plate-spline analysis. The results show that the palatal size of all australopithecine specimens and H. erectus is very similar to that of P toglodytes, whereas the palatal size of H. neanderthalensis more closely resembles that of H. sapiens. Postnatal development of palatal size in P troglodytes is different from that of H. sapiens. In P troglodytes not only the size of the palate changes but also the form. In H. sapiens there is little change in form, but a continuos uniform growth from infantile to adult specimens. From the results we conclude that in all australopithecine samples which have been investigated, the palatal size is similar to that of P troglodytes. Therefore, it is unlikely that austraopithecine individuals were capable of producing vowels and consonants. The palatal size of H. neandethalensis and Cro-Magnon is similar to that of H. sapiens which may indicate the possibility that they were capable of speech production.

  14. Are Homo sapiens nonsupranuchal fossa and Neanderthal suprainiac fossa convergent traits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowaczewska, Wioletta

    2011-04-01

    The autapomorphic status of the Neanderthal suprainiac fossa was recently confirmed. This was a result of a detailed analysis of the internal bone composition in the area of the suprainiac depression on Neanderthal and Homo sapiens specimens. However, while anatomical differences between Neanderthal suprainiac fossa and the depression in the inion region of the occipital bone of fossil and recent Homo sapiens have been discussed in detail, the etiology of these structures has not been resolved. In this article, the hypothesis that the Homo sapiens non-supranuchal fossa and the Neanderthal suprainiac fossa both formed to maintain the optimal shape of the occipital plane (to minimize strain on the posterior cranial vault) is tested. First, the variation in the expression of the fossa above inion in the crania of recent Homo sapiens from European, African, and Australian samples was examined, and the degree of structural similarity between these depressions and the Neanderthal suprainiac fossa was assessed. Next, the relationship between the shape of the occipital squama in the midsagittal plane and two particular features (the degree of the occipital torus development and the occurrence of a depression in the inion region that is not the supranuchal fossa) were analyzed. Based on the results, it is suggested that the Homo sapiens non-supranuchal fossa and Neanderthal suprainiac fossa are convergent traits.

  15. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Discrete Survival Responses of S. aureus and S. epidermidis to Sapienic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Josephine C; Alorabi, Jamal A; Horsburgh, Malcolm J

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcal colonization of human skin is ubiquitous, with particular species more frequent at different body sites. Whereas Staphylococcus epidermidis can be isolated from the skin of every individual tested, Staphylococcus aureus is isolated from S. aureus is inhibited to a greater extent than S. epidermidis by the sebaceous lipid sapienic acid, supporting a role for this skin antimicrobial in selection of skin staphylococci. We used RNA-Seq and comparative transcriptomics to identify the sapienic acid survival responses of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. Consistent with the membrane depolarization mode of action of sapienic acid, both species shared a common transcriptional response to counteract disruption of metabolism and transport. The species differed in their regulation of SaeRS and VraRS regulons. While S. aureus upregulated urease operon transcription, S. epidermidis upregulated arginine deiminase, the oxygen-responsive NreABC nitrogen regulation system and the nitrate and nitrite reduction pathways. The role of S. aureus ACME and chromosomal arginine deiminase pathways in sapienic acid resistance was determined through mutational studies. We speculate that ammonia production could contribute to sapienic acid resistance in staphylococci.

  16. Genetic, physiologic and ecogeographic factors contributing to variation in Homo sapiens: Homo floresiensis reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gary D

    2006-11-01

    A new species, Homo floresiensis, was recently named for Pleistocene hominid remains on Flores, Indonesia. Significant controversy has arisen regarding this species. To address controversial issues and refocus investigations, I examine the affinities of these remains with Homo sapiens. Clarification of problematic issues is sought through an integration of genetic and physiological data on brain ontogeny and evolution. Clarification of the taxonomic value of various 'primitive' traits is possible given these data. Based on this evidence and using a H. sapiens morphological template, models are developed to account for the combination of features displayed in the Flores fossils. Given this overview, I find substantial support for the hypothesis that the remains represent a variant of H. sapiens possessing a combined growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor I axis modification and mutation of the MCPH gene family. Further work will be required to determine the extent to which this variant characterized the population.

  17. Direction for Artificial Intelligence to Achieve Sapiency Inspired by Homo Sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud Arif Pavel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence technology has developed significantly in the past decades. Although many computational programs are able to approximate many cognitive abilities of Homo sapiens, the intelligence and sapience level of these programs are not even close to Homo sapiens. Rather than developing a computational system with the intelligent or sapient attribute, I propose to develop a system capable of performing functions that could deem as intelligent or sapient by Homo sapiens or others. I advocate converting current computational systems to educable systems that have built-in capabilities to learn and be taught with a universal programming language. The idea is that this attempt would help to attain computational actions in artificial means, which could be viewed as similar to human intelligent and sapient acts. Although this paper is seemingly speculative, some feasible elements are proposed to advance the field of Artificial Intelligence.

  18. Homo sapiens as physician and patient: a view from Darwinian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Franco, Angel A

    2013-09-01

    Medicine's cardinal diagnostic and therapeutic resource is the clinical encounter. Over the last two centuries and particularly over the last five decades the function of the clinical encounter has been eroded to the point of near irrelevance because of the atomized and atomizing influence of technology and microspecialization. Meanwhile, over the past five decades the exceptionalist view of Homo sapiens inherent in the social and religious traditions of the West has similarly undergone radical changes. H. sapiens is now best understood as a microecosystem integrated into a much broader ecosystem: the biosphere. That human microecosystem is composed of constituents derived from the archaeal, bacterial, and eukaryan domains via endosymbiotic, commensalistic and mutualistic interactions. This amalgamation of 100 trillion cells and viral elements is regulated by a composite genome aggregated over the 3.8 billion years of evolutionary history of organic life. No component of H. sapiens or its genome can be identified as irreducibly and exclusively human. H. sapiens' humanity is an emergent property of the microecosystem. Ironically as H. sapiens is viewed by evolutionary science in a highly integrated manner medicine approaches it as a balkanized, deaggregated entity through the eye of 150 different specialties. To effectively address the needs of H sapiens in its role as patient by the same species in its role as physician the disparate views must be harmonized. Here I review some conceptual elements that would assist a physician in addressing the needs of the patient in integrum, as a microecosystem, by the former address the latter as a historical gestalt being. The optimal way to recover the harmony between patient and physician is through a revitalization of the clinical encounter via an ecological and Darwinian epistemology.

  19. Forearm articular proportions and the antebrachial index in Homo sapiens, Australopithecus afarensis and the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frank L'Engle; Cunningham, Deborah L; Amaral, Lia Q

    2015-12-01

    When hominin bipedality evolved, the forearms were free to adopt nonlocomotor tasks which may have resulted in changes to the articular surfaces of the ulna and the relative lengths of the forearm bones. Similarly, sex differences in forearm proportions may be more likely to emerge in bipeds than in the great apes given the locomotor constraints in Gorilla, Pan and Pongo. To test these assumptions, ulnar articular proportions and the antebrachial index (radius length/ulna length) in Homo sapiens (n=51), Gorilla gorilla (n=88), Pan troglodytes (n=49), Pongo pygmaeus (n=36) and Australopithecus afarensis A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 are compared. Intercept-adjusted ratios are used to control for size and minimize the effects of allometry. Canonical scores axes show that the proximally broad and elongated trochlear notch with respect to size in H. sapiens and A. afarensis is largely distinct from G. gorilla, P. troglodytes and P. pygmaeus. A cluster analysis of scaled ulnar articular dimensions groups H. sapiens males with A.L. 438-1 ulna length estimates, while one A.L. 288-1 ulna length estimate groups with Pan and another clusters most closely with H. sapiens, G. gorilla and A.L. 438-1. The relatively low antebrachial index characterizing H. sapiens and non-outlier estimates of A.L. 288-1 and A.L. 438-1 differs from those of the great apes. Unique sex differences in H. sapiens suggest a link between bipedality and forearm functional morphology.

  20. Bone strength and athletic ability in hominids: Ardipithecus ramidus to Homo sapiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    The ability of the femur to resist bending stresses is determined by its midlength cross-sectional geometry, its length and the elastic properties of the mineral part of the bone. The animal's athletic ability, determined by a ``bone strength index,'' is limited by this femoral bending strength in relation to the loads on the femur. This analysis is applied to the fossil record for Homo sapiens, Homo neanderthalensis, Homo erectus, Homo habilis, Australopithecus afarensis and Ardipithecus ramidus. Evidence that the femoral bone strength index of modern Homo sapiens has weakened over the last 50,000 years is found.

  1. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Discrete Survival Responses of S. aureus and S. epidermidis to Sapienic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Josephine C.; Alorabi, Jamal A.; Horsburgh, Malcolm J.

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcal colonization of human skin is ubiquitous, with particular species more frequent at different body sites. Whereas Staphylococcus epidermidis can be isolated from the skin of every individual tested, Staphylococcus aureus is isolated from arginine deiminase, the oxygen-responsive NreABC nitrogen regulation system and the nitrate and nitrite reduction pathways. The role of S. aureus ACME and chromosomal arginine deiminase pathways in sapienic acid resistance was determined through mutational studies. We speculate that ammonia production could contribute to sapienic acid resistance in staphylococci. PMID:28179897

  2. Acute MUS81 depletion leads to replication fork slowing and a constitutive DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Meichun; Wang, Xiaohui; Palmai-Pallag, Timea

    2015-01-01

    The MUS81 protein belongs to a conserved family of DNA structure-specific nucleases that play important roles in DNA replication and repair. Inactivation of the Mus81 gene in mice has no major deleterious consequences for embryonic development, although cancer susceptibility has been reported. We...

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06695-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Mus musculus mammary gland RCB-052... 37 0.92 (Q3UMB5) RecName: Full=Smith-Magenis syndrome chromosomal regi...on... 37 0.92 BC085095_1( BC085095 |pid:none) Mus musculus Smith-Magenis syndrom....399 |pid:none) Sulfolobus islandicus L.S.2.15,... 35 2.7 AF467440_1( AF467440 |pid:none) Homo sapiens Smith-Magenis...5 (Q8TEV9) RecName: Full=Smith-Magenis syndrome chromosomal region... 35 3.5 BC07

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15886-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available pus La protein ho... 83 3e-14 BC081780_1( BC081780 |pid:none) Rattus norvegicus Sjogren syndrome... 79 3e-14...) Mus musculus 17 days pregnant adul... 79 3e-14 EF397636_1( EF397636 |pid:none) Cricetulus griseus Sjogren ...id:none) Rattus norvegicus Sjogren syndrome... 79 4e-13 AK017822_1( AK017822 |pid:none) Mus musculus 8 days ...) Medicago truncatula clone mth1-14... 37 1.7 DQ185046_1( DQ185046 |pid:none) Homo sapiens Sjogren

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U10892-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |pid:none) Sequence 25 from Patent WO20040700... 41 0.092 AF232933_1( AF232933 |pid:none) Bos taurus Goodpa...ype IV alpha-3-binding protein;... 41 0.092 AF232930_1( AF232930 |pid:none) Homo sapiens Goodpasture antigen...K076768_1( AK076768 |pid:none) Mus musculus adult male testis cDN... 41 0.092 AF232934_1( AF232934 |pid:none) Mus musculus Good

  6. AcEST: DK955033 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available musculus G... 53 8e-07 sp|P41823|SY65_APLCA Synaptotagmin-1 OS=Aplysia californica GN=S... 53 8e-07 sp|Q5M7N9|ESYT3_XENTR Extended... synaptotagmin-3 OS=Xenopus tropic... 53 8e-07 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synapto...tagmin-2 OS=Homo sapiens G... 53 8e-07 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended synaptotagm...in-2 OS=Mus musculus GN=Itsn2 PE=... 50 5e-06 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Homo sapiens...tis elegans G... 47 4e-05 sp|Q5DTI8|ESYT3_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Mus musculus G... 47 4e-05 sp|P4

  7. Interval training by normobaric hypoxia accelerates the reinnervation of musculus extensor digitorum longus in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vardya, Irina; (Vard'ya); Mospanova, Svetlana V.

    2000-01-01

    Dokl Biol Sci. 2000 Mar-Apr;371:112-4. Interval training by normobaric hypoxia accelerates the reinnervation of musculus extensor digitorum longus in mice. Vard'ya IV , Mospanova SV , Portnov VV , Balezina OP , Koshelev VB . Department of Human and Animal Physiology, Faculty of Biology, Moscow St...... State University, Russia. PMID: 10833635 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Udgivelsesdato: 2000...

  8. SAPIENS: Spreading Activation Processor for Information Encoded in Network Structures. Technical Report No. 296.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortony, Andrew; Radin, Dean I.

    The product of researchers' efforts to develop a computer processor which distinguishes between relevant and irrelevant information in the database, Spreading Activation Processor for Information Encoded in Network Structures (SAPIENS) exhibits (1) context sensitivity, (2) efficiency, (3) decreasing activation over time, (4) summation of…

  9. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of /ital Homo sapiens/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This volume is the second part of a collection of papers submitted by the participants to the 1986 Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitled Molecular Biology of /ital Homo sapiens/. The 49 papers included in this volume are grouped by subject into receptors, human cancer genes, and gene therapy. (DT)

  10. Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    transduction components between organelle such as the nucleus and mitochondria as the cell strives to maintain homeostasis. Many of these communication... Similar Pathogen Targets in Arabidopsis thaliana and Homo sapiens Protein Networks Paulo Shakarian1*, J. Kenneth Wickiser2 1 Paulo Shakarian...pathogens on host protein networks for humans and Arabidopsis - noting striking similarities . Specifically, we preform k-shell decomposition analysis on

  11. The evolution of the anatomically modern or advanced Homo sapiens: time, place, process, affinities and variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, P; Pathmanathan, G; Talwar, I

    2009-06-01

    This paper surveys the opinions expressed in the recent literature on the origins of the anatomically- modern Homo sapiens, and reviews the evidence from cranial and dental morphology argued by proponents of opposing views to support their case. It also critically analyses problems facing the interpretation of the evidence in arriving at a definitive conclusion to the debate.

  12. The Homo sapiens 'hemibun': its developmental pattern and the problem of homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowaczewska, W; Kuźmiński, L

    2009-01-01

    The occipital bun is widely considered a Neanderthal feature. Its homology to the 'hemibun' observed in some European Upper Palaeolithic anatomically modern humans is a current problem. This study quantitatively evaluates the degree of occipital plane convexity in African and Australian modern human crania to analyse a relationship between this feature and some neurocranial variables. Neanderthal and European Upper Palaeolithic Homo sapiens crania were included in the analysis as well. The results of this study indicated that there is a significant relationship between the degree of occipital plane convexity and the following two features in the examined crania of modern humans: the ratio of the maximum neurocranial height to the maximum width of the vault and the ratio of bregma-lambda chord to bregma-lambda arc. The results also revealed that some H. sapiens crania (modern and fossil) show the Neanderthal shape of the occipital plane and that the neurocranial height and shape of parietal midsagittal profile has an influence on occipital plane convexity in the hominins included in this study. This study suggests that the occurrence of the great convexity of the occipital plane in the Neanderthals and H. sapiens is a "by-product" of the relationship between the same neurocranial features and there is no convincing evidence that the Neanderthal occipital bun and the similar structure in H. sapiens develop during ontogeny in the same way.

  13. A prospective "oversizing'' strategy of the Edwards SAPIEN bioprosthesis : Results and impact on aortic regurgitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samim, Mariam; Stella, Pieter R.; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Kluin, Jolanda; Ramjankhan, Faiz; Sieswerda, Gertjan; Budde, Ricardo; van der Linden, Marijke; Juthier, Francis; Banfi, Carlo; Hurt, Christopher; Samim, Morsal; Hillaert, Marieke; van Herwerden, Lex; Bertrand, Michel E.; Doevendans, Pieter A. M.; Van Belle, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Moderate to severe aortic regurgitation is occurring in 20% to 30% of cases after transcatheter aortic valve implantation. Methods: The purpose of the study was to investigate the impact of a prospective policy of "oversizing'' the Edwards SAPIEN bioprosthesis (Edwards Lifesciences LLC, I

  14. The endogenous Mus81-Eme1 complex resolves Holliday junctions by a nick and counternick mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Pierre-Henri L; Noguchi, Eishi; Shanahan, Paul; Russell, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Functional studies strongly suggest that the Mus81-Eme1 complex resolves Holliday junctions (HJs) in fission yeast, but in vitro it preferentially cleaves flexible three-way branched structures that model replication forks or 3' flaps. Here we report that a nicked HJ is the preferred substrate of endogenous and recombinant Mus81-Eme1. Cleavage occurs specifically on the strand that opposes the nick, resulting in resolution of the structure into linear duplex products. Resolving cuts made by the endogenous Mus81-Eme1 complex on an intact HJ are quasi-simultaneous, indicating that Mus81-Eme1 resolves HJs by a nick and counternick mechanism, with a large rate enhancement of the second cut arising from the flexible nature of the nicked HJ intermediate. Recombinant Mus81-Eme1 is ineffective at making the first cut. We also report that HJs accumulate in a DNA polymerase alpha mutant that lacks Mus81, providing further evidence that the Mus81-Eme1 complex targets HJs in vivo.

  15. MUS81 generates a subset of MLH1-MLH3-independent crossovers in mammalian meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kim Holloway

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Two eukaryotic pathways for processing double-strand breaks (DSBs as crossovers have been described, one dependent on the MutL homologs Mlh1 and Mlh3, and the other on the structure-specific endonuclease Mus81. Mammalian MUS81 has been implicated in maintenance of genomic stability in somatic cells; however, little is known about its role during meiosis. Mus81-deficient mice were originally reported as being viable and fertile, with normal meiotic progression; however, a more detailed examination of meiotic progression in Mus81-null animals and WT controls reveals significant meiotic defects in the mutants. These include smaller testis size, a depletion of mature epididymal sperm, significantly upregulated accumulation of MLH1 on chromosomes from pachytene meiocytes in an interference-independent fashion, and a subset of meiotic DSBs that fail to be repaired. Interestingly, chiasmata numbers in spermatocytes from Mus81-/- animals are normal, suggesting additional integrated mechanisms controlling the two distinct crossover pathways. This study is the first in-depth analysis of meiotic progression in Mus81-nullizygous mice, and our results implicate the MUS81 pathway as a regulator of crossover frequency and placement in mammals.

  16. Similarity analysis between chromosomes of Homo sapiens and monkeys with correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Viswanadha Raju, S

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we consider correlation coefficient, rank correlation coefficient and cosine similarity measures for evaluating similarity between Homo sapiens and monkeys. We used DNA chromosomes of genome wide genes to determine the correlation between the chromosomal content and evolutionary relationship. The similarity among the H. sapiens and monkeys is measured for a total of 210 chromosomes related to 10 species. The similarity measures of these different species show the relationship between the H. sapiens and monkey. This similarity will be helpful at theft identification, maternity identification, disease identification, etc.

  17. Médiation documentaire et culturelle dans le musée

    OpenAIRE

    Fabre, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    International audience; L’article propose de comprendre la place occupée par la médiation documentaire dans le musée où s’exerce une médiation plutôt qualifiée de culturelle. Nous avons choisi de travailler suivant une méthode qualitative, en analysant les discours des documentalistes, qu’ils soient oraux ou écrits, recueillis dans le contexte particulier du musée des Abattoirs, musée d’art contemporain de Toulouse. La médiation documentaire dans le musée, s’oriente aujourd’hui vers la mise e...

  18. Intrafascial hematoma of the musculus rectus abdominis as a complication after laparoscopic operations; Intrafasziale Haematome des Musculus rectus abdominis als Komplikation nach laparoskopischen Operationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennekamp, W. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik am St. Josef-Hospital, Bochum (Germany); Barbera, L. [Chirurgische Universitaetsklinik am St. Josef-Hospital, Bochum (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    We report on two patients with intrafascial hematoma of the musculus rectus abdominis following laparoscopic operations. One patient was operated on a stenosis of the common iliac artery for an aortofemoral bypass. The other patient was operated on an inguinal hernia. Only a CT scan of the abdomen led to the correct diagnosis, because the use of ultrasound was limited by pneumoperitoneum and bandages, and retroperitoneal bleeding could not be recognized. Computed tomography is a valid method for detecting this complication of laparoscopic surgery. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird ueber zwei Patienten berichtet, die nach einer laparoskopischen Operation ein intrafasziales Haematom des Musculus rectus abdominis entwickelten. Bei einem Patienten wurde laparoskopisch ein aortofemoraler Bypass bei hochgradiger A.-iliaca-communis-Stenose, bei dem anderen Patienten ein laparoskopischer Bruchlueckenverschluss bei einer Inguinalhernie durchgefuehrt. Erst die Computertomographie des Abdomens fuehrte in beiden Faellen zur richtigen Diagnose, da Ultraschall aufgrund des Pneumoperitoneous und der Verbandsmaterialien nur bedingt einsetzbar war und retroperitoneale Blutungsansteile nicht erkannt werden konnten. Der Stellenwert der Computertomographie zur Erkennung dieser Komplikation wird hervorgehoben. (orig.)

  19. AcEST: BP913156 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Q6ZPI0|JADE1_MOUSE Protein Jade-1 OS=Mus musculus Align length 50 Score (bit) 32.0 E-value 1.7 Report BLASTX...E Sequences producing significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q6ZPI0|JADE1_MOUSE Protein Jade...-1 OS=Mus musculus GN=Phf17 PE... 32 1.7 sp|Q6IE81|JADE1_HUMAN Protein Jade-1 OS=Homo sapiens GN...=PHF17 PE... 32 2.2 >sp|Q6ZPI0|JADE1_MOUSE Protein Jade-1 OS=Mus musculus GN=Phf17 PE=1 SV=2 Length = 834 Sc...R C +Q + F++ Sbjct: 481 REQDVLFRRLQLFTHLRQDLERVRNLTYMVTRREKIKRSVCKVQEQIFTQ 530 >sp|Q6IE81|JADE1_HUMAN Protein Jade

  20. Dicty_cDB: SSA506 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 23607.2 Mus musculus clone CT7-308D2, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 40 unordered pieces. 44 1.2 1 AC117646 |AC1176...46.3 Mus musculus clone RP23-243B24, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 7 ordered pieces. 44 1.2 1 AC097938 |AC097938.6... Rattus norvegicus clone CH230-142H4, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 1 ordered piece. 42 4.6 1 AC110271 |AC110271.6... Mus musculus clone RP23-326P16, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 10 ordered pieces. 40 18... 1 AC068555 |AC068555.5 Homo sapiens chromosome 8 clone RP11-813M16, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 14 unordered pi

  1. Dicty_cDB: SSL238 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18.4 Mus musculus clone RP23-478L3, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 16 ordered pieces. 50 0.008 1 AC113294 |AC113294....3 Mus musculus clone RP23-419I1, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 22 unordered pieces. 50 0.008 1 AP003161 |AP003161....1 Homo sapiens genomic DNA, chromosome 1p36.2-p36 clone:dJ266I16, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 6 unordered piece...s. 50 0.008 1 AC096104 |AC096104.6 Rattus norvegicus clone CH230-27J15, WORKING D...quence. 50 0.008 1 AC101715 |AC101715.4 Mus musculus clone RP23-283P17, WORKING D

  2. Life as a Cosmic Phenomenon: 2. the Panspermic Trajectory of Homo Sapiens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokoro, Gensuke; Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra

    We discuss the origin and evolution of Homo sapiens in a cosmic context, and in relation to the Hoyle-Wickramasinghe theory of panspermia for which there is now overwhelming evidence. It is argued that the first bacteria (archea) incident on the Earth via the agency of comets 3.8-4 billion years ago continued at later times to be augmented by viral genes (DNA, RNA) from space that eventually led to the evolutionary patterns we see in present-day biology. We argue that the current evolutionary status of Homo sapiens as well as its future trajectory is circumscribed by evolutionary processes that were pre-determined on a cosmic scale -- over vast distances and enormous spans of cosmic time. Based on this teleological hypothesis we postulate that two distinct classes of cosmic viruses (cosmic viral genes) are involved in accounting for the facts relating to the evolution of life.

  3. Earliest evidence for the structure of Homo sapiens populations in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Eleanor M. L.; Drake, Nick A.; Jennings, Richard; Groucutt, Huw S.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the structure and variation of Homo sapiens populations in Africa is critical for interpreting multiproxy evidence of their subsequent dispersals into Eurasia. However, there is no consensus on early H. sapiens demographic structure, or its effects on intra-African dispersals. Here, we show how a patchwork of ecological corridors and bottlenecks triggered a successive budding of populations across the Sahara. Using a temporally and spatially explicit palaeoenvironmental model, we found that the Sahara was not uniformly ameliorated between ∼130 and 75 thousand years ago (ka), as has been stated. Model integration with multivariate analyses of corresponding stone tools then revealed several spatially defined technological clusters which correlated with distinct palaeobiomes. Similarities between technological clusters were such that they decreased with distance except where connected by palaeohydrological networks. These results indicate that populations at the Eurasian gateway were strongly structured, which has implications for refining the demographic parameters of dispersals out of Africa.

  4. Ongoing adaptive evolution of ASPM, a brain size determinant in Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekel-Bobrov, Nitzan; Gilbert, Sandra L; Evans, Patrick D; Vallender, Eric J; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Hudson, Richard R; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Lahn, Bruce T

    2005-09-09

    The gene ASPM (abnormal spindle-like microcephaly associated) is a specific regulator of brain size, and its evolution in the lineage leading to Homo sapiens was driven by strong positive selection. Here, we show that one genetic variant of ASPM in humans arose merely about 5800 years ago and has since swept to high frequency under strong positive selection. These findings, especially the remarkably young age of the positively selected variant, suggest that the human brain is still undergoing rapid adaptive evolution.

  5. Ecospaces occupied by Homo erectus and Homo sapiens in insular Southeast Asia in the Pleistocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertler, Christine; Haupt, Susanne; Volmer, Rebekka; Bruch, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Hominins migrated to the islands of the Sunda Shelf multiple times. At least two immigration events are evident, an early immigration of Homo erectus in the late Early Pleistocene and a second immigration of Homo sapiens during the Late Pleistocene. Regional environments changed considerably in the Pleistocene. Expansion patterns among hominins are at least co-determined by their ecologies and environmental change. We examine these expansion patterns on the basis of habitat reconstructions. Mammalian communities provide a geographically extensive record and permit to assess hominin ecospaces. Although chronological resolution is low, they represent the most complete record of habitat changes associated with hominin expansion patterns. In order to reconstruct and compare hominin ecospaces on a quantitative scale, we set up a reference sample consisting of mammalian communities of 117 national parks in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. The diversity of such communities is assessed by ecological profiling of specialized herbivore taxa. Moreover, datasets on climate and vegetation correlate with the diversity structure of such specialized herbivore communities. Reconstructing the diversity structure of communities at key sites in Pleistocene Southeast Asia permits to infer features of the climatic and vegetation framework associated with different hominin taxa. Our results show that Homo erectus and Homo sapiens did not occupy similar ecospaces. The ecospace of Homo erectus is characterized by comparatively low diversity among frugivorous and folivorous taxa, while obligate grazers are part of the assemblages. Specialized herbivore communities with such a diversity structure occur at present in East Africa, while they are absent in Southeast Asia. In the reference sample, this type of ecospace corresponds to seasonal wetlands. Although Homo sapiens still inhabits this type of environment in Southeast Asia, his ecospace is wider. Homo sapiens is associated with

  6. Two Distinct MUS81-EME1 Complexes from Arabidopsis Process Holliday Junctions1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuting, Verena; Kobbe, Daniela; Hartung, Frank; Dürr, Jasmin; Focke, Manfred; Puchta, Holger

    2009-01-01

    The MUS81 endonuclease complex has been shown to play an important role in the repair of stalled or blocked replication forks and in the processing of meiotic recombination intermediates from yeast to humans. This endonuclease is composed of two subunits, MUS81 and EME1. Surprisingly, unlike other organisms, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has two EME1 homologs encoded in its genome. AtEME1A and AtEME1B show 63% identity on the protein level. We were able to demonstrate that, after expression in Escherichia coli, each EME1 protein can assemble with the unique AtMUS81 to form a functional endonuclease. Both complexes, AtMUS81-AtEME1A and AtMUS81-AtEME1B, are not only able to cleave 3′-flap structures and nicked Holliday junctions (HJs) but also, with reduced efficiency, intact HJs. While the complexes have the same cleavage patterns with both nicked DNA substrates, slight differences in the processing of intact HJs can be detected. Our results are in line with an involvement of both MUS81-EME1 endonuclease complexes in DNA recombination and repair processes in Arabidopsis. PMID:19339504

  7. Mus81 cleavage of Holliday junctions: a failsafe for processing meiotic recombination intermediates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskell, Louise J; Osman, Fekret; Gilbert, Robert J C; Whitby, Matthew C

    2007-04-04

    The Holliday junction (HJ) is a central intermediate of homologous recombination. Its cleavage is critical for the formation of crossover recombinants during meiosis, which in turn helps to establish chiasmata and promote genetic diversity. Enzymes that cleave HJs, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in all domains of life except eukaryotic nuclei. Controversially, the Mus81-Eme1 endonuclease has been proposed to be an example of a eukaryotic nuclear resolvase. However, hitherto little or no HJ cleavage has been detected in recombinant preparations of Mus81-Eme1. Here, we report the purification of active forms of recombinant Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mus81-Eme1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mus81-Mms4, which display robust HJ cleavage in vitro, which, in the case of Mus81-Eme1, is as good as the archetypal HJ resolvase RuvC in single turnover kinetic analysis. We also present genetic evidence that suggests that this activity might be utilised as a back-up to Mus81-Eme1's main activity of cleaving nicked HJs during meiosis in S. pombe.

  8. Two distinct MUS81-EME1 complexes from Arabidopsis process Holliday junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuting, Verena; Kobbe, Daniela; Hartung, Frank; Dürr, Jasmin; Focke, Manfred; Puchta, Holger

    2009-06-01

    The MUS81 endonuclease complex has been shown to play an important role in the repair of stalled or blocked replication forks and in the processing of meiotic recombination intermediates from yeast to humans. This endonuclease is composed of two subunits, MUS81 and EME1. Surprisingly, unlike other organisms, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has two EME1 homologs encoded in its genome. AtEME1A and AtEME1B show 63% identity on the protein level. We were able to demonstrate that, after expression in Escherichia coli, each EME1 protein can assemble with the unique AtMUS81 to form a functional endonuclease. Both complexes, AtMUS81-AtEME1A and AtMUS81-AtEME1B, are not only able to cleave 3'-flap structures and nicked Holliday junctions (HJs) but also, with reduced efficiency, intact HJs. While the complexes have the same cleavage patterns with both nicked DNA substrates, slight differences in the processing of intact HJs can be detected. Our results are in line with an involvement of both MUS81-EME1 endonuclease complexes in DNA recombination and repair processes in Arabidopsis.

  9. Mus308 Processes Oxygen and Nitrogen Ethylation DNA Damage in Germ Cells of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Díaz-Valdés

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The D. melanogaster mus308 gene, highly conserved among higher eukaryotes, is implicated in the repair of cross-links and of O-ethylpyrimidine DNA damage, working in a DNA damage tolerance mechanism. However, despite its relevance, its possible role on the processing of different DNA ethylation damages is not clear. To obtain data on mutation frequency and on mutation spectra in mus308 deficient (mus308- conditions, the ethylating agent diethyl sulfate (DES was analysed in postmeiotic male germ cells. These data were compared with those corresponding to mus308 efficient conditions. Our results indicate that Mus308 is necessary for the processing of oxygen and N-ethylation damage, for the survival of fertilized eggs depending on the level of induced DNA damage, and for an influence of the DNA damage neighbouring sequence. These results support the role of mus308 in a tolerance mechanism linked to a translesion synthesis pathway and also to the alternative end-joinig system.

  10. RNA editing differently affects protein-coding genes in D. melanogaster and H. sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Leoni, Guido; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-07-14

    When an RNA editing event occurs within a coding sequence it can lead to a different encoded amino acid. The biological significance of these events remains an open question: they can modulate protein functionality, increase the complexity of transcriptomes or arise from a loose specificity of the involved enzymes. We analysed the editing events in coding regions that produce or not a change in the encoded amino acid (nonsynonymous and synonymous events, respectively) in D. melanogaster and in H. sapiens and compared them with the appropriate random models. Interestingly, our results show that the phenomenon has rather different characteristics in the two organisms. For example, we confirm the observation that editing events occur more frequently in non-coding than in coding regions, and report that this effect is much more evident in H. sapiens. Additionally, in this latter organism, editing events tend to affect less conserved residues. The less frequently occurring editing events in Drosophila tend to avoid drastic amino acid changes. Interestingly, we find that, in Drosophila, changes from less frequently used codons to more frequently used ones are favoured, while this is not the case in H. sapiens.

  11. The Emergence of Homo sapiens in South Asia: The Central Narmada Valley as Witness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anek R. Sankhyan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available :The emergence of anatomically modern Homo sapiens in South Asia is hotly debated due to a great gap in fossil record. A solitary partial cranium from Hathnora dated around 250 Kya is debated and conveniently interpreted as "evolved" Homo erectus or "archaic" Homo sapiens or Homo heidelbergensis or even Homo indet. Cranial fossils of Pre-Toba or post- Toba anatomically modern Homo sapiens are unknown barring the very late 30 Kya modern human remains from Sri Lanka. The present paper reviews the scenario of human evolution in South Asia with special reference to the cranial and recent postcranial fossil findings by the author in association with the archaeological evidences from Central Narmada valley. It is concluded that the Narmada fossils and archaeological findings support the presence of three hominins- two 'archaic' and one 'early modern'. The Mode 2 Acheulian hominin represented by the calvarium and the femur was a 'large-bodied' species akin to Homo heidelbergensis. It appeared first in the Central Narmada valley and was followed by a 'small-bodied' Mode 3 archaic type represented by two clavicles and the 9th rib, provisionally named here as Homo narmadensis. It likely continued and attained anatomical and behavioural modernity in South Asia as attested by the humerus and bone artifacts, and diversified to various short-bodied indigenous populations of South Asia supported by the genomic evidences.

  12. The dispersal of Homo sapiens across southern Asia: how early, how often, how complex?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennell, Robin; Petraglia, Michael D.

    2012-07-01

    The timing and the paths of colonization of southern Asia by Homo sapiens are poorly known, though many population geneticists, paleoanthropologists, and archaeologists have contended that this process began with dispersal from East Africa, and occurred between 60,000 and 40,000 years ago. However, the evidence for this scenario is very weak, particularly the lack of human skeletal evidence between the Levant and Borneo before 40 ka, and other explanations are possible. Here we argue that environmental and archaeological information is increasingly indicating the likelihood that H. sapiens exited Africa much earlier than commonly thought, and may have colonized much of southern Asia well before 60,000 years ago. Additionally, we cannot exclude the possibility that several dispersal events occurred, from both North and East Africa, nor the likelihood that early populations of H. sapiens in southern Asia interbred with indigenous populations of Neanderthals, Denisovans and Homo erectus. The population history of southern Asia during the Upper Pleistocene is likely far more complex than currently envisaged.

  13. Taxonomic differences in deciduous upper second molar crown outlines of Homo sapiens, Homo neanderthalensis and Homo erectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Shara E; Benazzi, Stefano; Souday, Caroline; Astorino, Claudia; Paul, Kathleen; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2014-07-01

    A significant number of Middle to Late Pleistocene sites contain primarily (and sometimes only) deciduous teeth (e.g., Grotta del Cavallo, Mezmaiskaya, Blombos). Not surprisingly, there has been a recent renewed interest in deciduous dental variation, especially in the context of distinguishing Homo neanderthalensis and Homo sapiens. Most studies of the deciduous dentition of fossil hominins have focused on standard metrical variation but morphological (non-metric and morphometric) variation also promises to shed light on long standing taxonomic questions. This study examines the taxonomic significance of the crown outline of the deciduous upper second molar through principal components analysis and linear discriminant analysis. We examine whether or not the crown shape of the upper deciduous second molar separates H. neanderthalensis from H. sapiens and explore whether it can be used to correctly assign individuals to taxa. It builds on previous studies by focusing on crown rather than cervical outline and by including a large sample of geographically diverse recent human populations. Our samples include 17 H. neanderthalensis, five early H. sapiens, and 12 Upper Paleolithic H. sapiens. In addition, we include two Homo erectus specimens in order to evaluate the polarity of crown shape differences observed between H. neanderthalensis and H. sapiens. Our results show that crown outline shape discriminates H. sapiens and H. neanderthalensis quite well, but does not do well at distinguishing H. erectus from H. sapiens. We conclude that the crown outline shape observed in H. sapiens is a primitive retention and that the skewed shape observed in H. neanderthalensis is a derived condition. Finally, we explore the phylogenetic implications of the results for the H. erectus molars.

  14. Human MUS81-EME2 can cleave a variety of DNA structures including intact Holliday junction and nicked duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amangyeld, Tamir; Shin, Yong-Keol; Lee, Miju; Kwon, Buki; Seo, Yeon-Soo

    2014-05-01

    MUS81 shares a high-degree homology with the catalytic XPF subunit of the XPF-ERCC1 endonuclease complex. It is catalytically active only when complexed with the regulatory subunits Mms4 or Eme1 in budding and fission yeasts, respectively, and EME1 or EME2 in humans. Although Mus81 complexes are implicated in the resolution of recombination intermediates in vivo, recombinant yeast Mus81-Mms4 and human MUS81-EME1 isolated from Escherichia coli fail to cleave intact Holliday junctions (HJs) in vitro. In this study, we show that human recombinant MUS81-EME2 isolated from E. coli cleaves HJs relatively efficiently, compared to MUS81-EME1. Furthermore, MUS81-EME2 catalyzed cleavage of nicked and gapped duplex deoxyribonucleic acids (DNAs), generating double-strand breaks. The presence of a 5' phosphate terminus at nicks and gaps rendered DNA significantly less susceptible to the cleavage by MUS81-EME2 than its absence, raising the possibility that this activity could play a role in channeling damaged DNA duplexes that are not readily repaired into the recombinational repair pathways. Significant differences in substrate specificity observed with unmodified forms of MUS81-EME1 and MUS81-EME2 suggest that they play related but non-overlapping roles in DNA transactions. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. AcEST: DK950294 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -activating protein 4 OS=Mus mus... 69 2e-11 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-2 OS=Mus musculus ...G... 67 6e-11 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-2 OS=Homo sapiens G...... 1 OS=Mus mu... 65 4e-10 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Homo sapiens G... 65 4e-10 sp|Q0J...e-09 sp|Q5RAG2|ESYT1_PONAB Extended synaptotagmin-1 OS=Pongo abelii G... 63 2e-09... sp|O95294|RASL1_HUMAN RasGAP-activating-like protein 1 OS=Homo s... 62 2e-09 sp|Q9Z1X1|ESYT1_RAT Extended s

  16. Joint molecule resolution requires the redundant activities of MUS-81 and XPF-1 during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel J O'Neil

    Full Text Available The generation and resolution of joint molecule recombination intermediates is required to ensure bipolar chromosome segregation during meiosis. During wild type meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans, SPO-11-generated double stranded breaks are resolved to generate a single crossover per bivalent and the remaining recombination intermediates are resolved as noncrossovers. We discovered that early recombination intermediates are limited by the C. elegans BLM ortholog, HIM-6, and in the absence of HIM-6 by the structure specific endonuclease MUS-81. In the absence of both MUS-81 and HIM-6, recombination intermediates persist, leading to chromosome breakage at diakinesis and inviable embryos. MUS-81 has an additional role in resolving late recombination intermediates in C. elegans. mus-81 mutants exhibited reduced crossover recombination frequencies suggesting that MUS-81 is required to generate a subset of meiotic crossovers. Similarly, the Mus81-related endonuclease XPF-1 is also required for a subset of meiotic crossovers. Although C. elegans gen-1 mutants have no detectable meiotic defect either alone or in combination with him-6, mus-81 or xpf-1 mutations, mus-81;xpf-1 double mutants are synthetic lethal. While mus-81;xpf-1 double mutants are proficient for the processing of early recombination intermediates, they exhibit defects in the post-pachytene chromosome reorganization and the asymmetric disassembly of the synaptonemal complex, presumably triggered by crossovers or crossover precursors. Consistent with a defect in resolving late recombination intermediates, mus-81; xpf-1 diakinetic bivalents are aberrant with fine DNA bridges visible between two distinct DAPI staining bodies. We were able to suppress the aberrant bivalent phenotype by microinjection of activated human GEN1 protein, which can cleave Holliday junctions, suggesting that the DNA bridges in mus-81; xpf-1 diakinetic oocytes are unresolved Holliday junctions. We propose that the

  17. Homo Sapiens to Robo Sapiens

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, M

    1997-01-01

    Is it possible for engineers to build robots that will be more intelligent than humans?Could such robots become conscious?Could Artificial Life be engineered?If so,how long will it be before this is achieved?

  18. Evaluating the transitional mosaic: frameworks of change from Neanderthals to Homo sapiens in eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, William; White, Dustin; Lewis, Mark; Stringer, Chris

    2015-06-01

    Defining varying spatial and temporal analytical scales is essential before evaluating the responses of late Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens to Abrupt Environmental Transitions (AETs) and environmental disasters for the period 130-25 ka. Recent advances in addressing the population histories and interactions (using both genetic and archaeological evidence) of Neanderthals and H. sapiens have encouraged consideration of more subtle dynamics of archaeological change. Descriptions of change based on methodologies pioneered some 160 years ago are no longer adequate to explain the patterning we now see in the record. New chronological results, using multiple dating methods, allow us to begin to unpick the spatial and temporal scales of change. Isochronic markers (such as specific volcanic eruptions) can be used to create temporal frameworks (lattices), and results from other dating techniques compared against them. A combination of chronological lattices and direct dating of diagnostic artefacts and human fossils permits us, for the first time, to have greater confidence in connecting human (recent hominin) species and their behavioural responses to environmental conditions, and in quantifying scales of change over time and space (time-transgression). The timing of innovations, particularly those in bone, antler and ivory, can be directly quantified and tested, and used to re-evaluate longstanding models of cultural change. This paper also uses these new chronologies to explore the ecologies of late Neanderthals and early H. sapiens: their population densities, mobilities, resources exploited and possible interactions. Environmental productivity estimates are used to generate new questions of potential population densities and mobilities, and thus the sensitivity of these groups to environmental perturbations. Scales and intensities of effect on environments from natural disasters and AETs (notably Heinrich Events and the Campanian Ignimbrite eruption) are defined

  19. LB1 and LB6 Homo floresiensis are not modern human (Homo sapiens) cretins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Excavations in the late Pleistocene deposits at Liang Bua cave, Flores, have uncovered the skeletal remains of several small-bodied and small-brained hominins in association with stone artefacts and the bones of Stegodon. Due to their combination of plesiomorphic, unique and derived traits, they were ascribed to a new species, Homo floresiensis, which, along with Stegodon, appears to have become extinct ∼17 ka (thousand years ago). However, recently it has been argued that several characteristics of H. floresiensis were consistent with dwarfism and evidence of delayed development in modern human (Homo sapiens) myxoedematous endemic (ME) cretins. This research compares the skeletal and dental morphology in H. floresiensis with the clinical and osteological indicators of cretinism, and the traits that have been argued to be associated with ME cretinism in LB1 and LB6. Contrary to published claims, morphological and statistical comparisons did not identify the distinctive skeletal and dental indicators of cretinism in LB1 or LB6 H. floresiensis. Brain mass, skeletal proportions, epiphyseal union, orofacial morphology, dental development, size of the pituitary fossa and development of the paranasal sinuses, vault bone thickness and dimensions of the hands and feet all distinguish H. floresiensis from modern humans with ME cretinism. The research team responsible for the diagnosis of ME cretinism had not examined the original H. floresiensis skeletal materials, and perhaps, as a result, their research confused taphonomic damage with evidence of disease, and thus contained critical errors of fact and interpretation. Behavioural scenarios attempting to explain the presence of cretinous H. sapiens in the Liang Bua Pleistocene deposits, but not unaffected H. sapiens, are both unnecessary and not supported by the available archaeological and geochronological evidence from Flores. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Musées d’entreprise : un genre composite

    OpenAIRE

    Cousserand, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    Que recouvrent les musées d’entreprise ? Quelles sont leurs spécificités ? Comment peut-on les caractériser ? Souvent associés aux circuits de visites d’une organisation ou d’une entreprise, ces espaces muséaux ne sont spécifiés par aucune nomenclature, prennent des formes multiples et répondent à des objectifs variés. À travers un corpus de musées créés par des organisations de différents secteurs, il s’agit de mieux les cerner et de montrer en quoi ces dispositifs participent de la communic...

  1. High-spin {\\mu}s isomeric states in 96Ag

    CERN Document Server

    Becerril, A D; Amthor, A M; Baumann, T; Bazin, D; Berryman, J S; Brown, B A; Crawford, H L; Estrade, A; Gade, A; Ginter, T; Guess, C J; Hausmann, M; Hitt, G W; Mantica, P F; Matos, M; Meharchand, R; Minamisono, K; Montes, F; Perdikakis, G; Pereira, J; Portillo, M; Schatz, H; Smith, K; Stoker, J; Stolz, A; Zegers, R G T

    2011-01-01

    The isomeric and {\\beta} decays of the N = Z +2 nucleus 96Ag were investigated at NSCL. A cascade of {\\gamma}-ray transitions originating from the de-excitation of a {\\mu}s isomer was observed for the first time and was found in coincidence with two previously-known transitions with energies of 470 and 667 keV. The isomeric half-life was determined as 1.45(7) {\\mu}s, more precise than previously reported. The existence of a second, longer-lived {\\mu}s isomer, associated with a 743-keV transition, is also proposed here. Shell model results within the (p_{3/2}p_{1/2}f_{5/2}g_{9/2}) model space, using the jj44b interaction, reproduced level energies and isomeric decay half-lives reasonably well.

  2. X-ray Detection of the Cluster Containing the Cepheid S Mus

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Nancy Remage; Wolk, Scott J; Guinan, Edward; Engle, Scott; Bond, Howard E; Schaefer, Gail H; Karovska, Margarita; DePasquale, Joseph; Tingle, Evan

    2014-01-01

    The galactic Cepheid S Muscae has recently been added to the important list of Cepheids linked to open clusters, in this case the sparse young cluster ASCC 69. Low-mass members of a young cluster are expected to have rapid rotation and X-ray activity, making X-ray emission an excellent way to discriminate them from old field stars. We have made an XMM-Newton observation centered on S Mus and identified (Table 1) a population of X-ray sources whose near-IR 2MASS counterparts lie at locations in the J, (J-K) color-magnitude diagram consistent with cluster membership at the distance of S Mus. Their median energy and X-ray luminosity are consistent with young cluster members as distinct from field stars. These strengthen the association of S Mus with the young cluster, making it a potential Leavitt Law (Period-Luminosity relation) calibrator.

  3. POSSuMUS: a position sensitive scintillating muon SiPM detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ruschke, Alexander

    The development of a modular designed large scale scintillation detector with a two-dimensional position sensitivity is presented in this thesis. This novel POsition Sensitive Scintillating MUon SiPM Detector is named POSSuMUS. The POSSuMUS detector is capable to determine the particle’s position in two space dimensions with a fast trigger capability. Each module is constructed from two trapezoidal shaped plastic scintillators to form one rectangular shaped detector module. Both trapezoids are optically insulated against each other. In both trapezoids the scintillation light is collected by plastic fibers and guided towards silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). SiPMs are light sensors which are capable to detect even smallest amounts of light. By combining several detector modules, position sensitive areas from 100 cm2 to few m2 are achievable with few readout channels. Therefore, POSSuMUS provides a cost effective detector concept. The position sensitivity along the trapezoidal geometry of one detector module ...

  4. Comparison of SAPIEN 3 and SAPIEN XT transcatheter heart valve stent-frame expansion: evaluation using multi-slice computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuno, Yoshio; Maeno, Yoshio; Kawamori, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Abramowitz, Yigal; Babak, Hariri; Kashif, Mohammad; Chakravarty, Tarun; Nakamura, Mamoo; Cheng, Wen; Friedman, John; Berman, Daniel; Makkar, Raj R.; Jilaihawi, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Aims Stent-frame morphology of the newer-generation, balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve (THV), the SAPIEN 3 (S3), after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is unknown. We evaluated the THV stent-frame morphology post TAVI of the S3 using multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) compared with the prior-generation THV, SAPIEN XT (S-XT). Methods and results A total of 94 consecutive participants of RESOLVE registry (NCT02318342) had MSCT after balloon-expandable TAVI (S3 = 39 and S-XT = 55). The morphology of the THV stent-frame was evaluated for expansion area and eccentricity at the THV-inflow, native annulus, mid-THV and THV-outflow levels. Mean %-expansion area for the S3 and the S-XT was 100.9 ± 5.7 and 96.1 ± 5.5%, respectively (P < 0.001). In the S3 group, the THV-inflow level had the largest value of %-expansion area, which decreased from THV-inflow to mid-THV level (105.2 ± 6.4 to 96.5 ± 5.9%, P < 0.001). However, in the S-XT group, %-expansion area increased from THV-inflow level to mid-THV level (93.2 ± 6.2 to 95.1 ± 6.1%, P = 0.0058). On nominal delivery balloon volume, the S3 in 88.5% of cases had overexpansion at the THV-inflow level. The observed degree of THV oversizing of the S3 was significantly lower than the S-XT (6.3 ± 8.6 vs. 11.8 ± 8.5%, P = 0.0027). Nonetheless, the incidence of post-procedural paravalvular aortic regurgitation (PVR) ≥ mild following the S3 TAVI was also significantly lower than the S-XT TAVI (17.9 vs. 43.6%, P = 0.014). Conclusion The newer-generation, balloon-expandable device, the S3, has a flared inflow morphology, whereas the prior-generation device, the S-XT, has relatively constrained inflow morphology post TAVI. This may contribute to a lesser degree of PVR with the S3. PMID:27002141

  5. Did the loss of endogenous ascorbate propel the evolution of Anthropoidea and Homo sapiens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challem, J J

    1997-05-01

    It has been previously theorized that free-radical reactions led to the first life on Earth, and their ability to randomly cause mutations may have subsequently led to the evolution of life. One of the most efficient free-radical quenchers is ascorbate, which most animals manufacture endogenously. It is generally believed that, approximately 25 million years ago, an ancestor of the Anthropoidea primate suborder, which includes Homo sapiens, lost the ability to produce its own ascorbate, and all descending species inherited this genetic defect. The first of three hypotheses presented here proposes that a genetic defect, caused by either free radicals or a virus, deleted the gene needed by Anthropoidea to manufacture endogenous ascorbate. The second hypothesis proposes that this evolutionary accident permitted large numbers of free radicals to remain metabolically unquenched. The third hypothesis proposes that the presence of these excessive free radicals increased the likelihood of free-radical-induced genetic mutations, and these mutations propelled the evolution of Anthropoidea, leading to Homo sapiens.

  6. Relationship between cusp size and occlusal wear pattern in Neanderthal and Homo sapiens first maxillary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Luca; Benazzi, Stefano; Viola, Bence; Kullmer, Ottmar; Schrenk, Friedemann

    2011-03-01

    Tooth wear studies in mammals have highlighted the relationship between wear facets (attritional areas produced during occlusion by the contact between opposing teeth) and physical properties of the ingested food. However, little is known about the influence of tooth morphology on the formation of occlusal wear facets. We analyzed the occlusal wear patterns of first maxillary molars (M(1) s) in Neanderthals, early Homo sapiens, and contemporary modern humans. We applied a virtual method to analyze wear facets on the crown surface of three-dimensional digital models. Absolute and relative wear facet areas are compared with cusp area and cusp height. Although the development of wear facets partially follows the cusp pattern, the results obtained from the between-group comparisons do not reflect the cusp size differences characterizing these groups. In particular, the wear facets developed along the slopes of the most discriminate cusp between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens (hypocone) do not display any significant difference. Moreover, no correlations have been found between cusp size and wear facet areas (with the exception of the modern sample) and between cusp height and wear facet areas. Our results suggest that cusp size is only weakly related to the formation of the occlusal wear facets. Other factors, such as, diet, food processing, environmental abrasiveness, and nondietary habits are probably more important for the development and enlargement of wear facets, corroborating the hypotheses suggested from previous dental wear studies.

  7. Evolutionary genetic analyses of MEF2C gene: implications for learning and memory in Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmady, Sunil V; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Arasappa, Rashmi; Rao, Naren P

    2013-02-01

    MEF2C facilitates context-dependent fear conditioning (CFC) which is a salient aspect of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. CFC might have played a crucial role in human evolution because of its advantageous influence on survival of species. In this study, we analyzed 23 orthologous mammalian gene sequences of MEF2C gene to examine the evidence for positive selection on this gene in Homo sapiens using Phylogenetic Analysis by Maximum Likelihood (PAML) and HyPhy software. Both PAML Bayes Empirical Bayes (BEB) and HyPhy Fixed Effects Likelihood (FEL) analyses supported significant positive selection on 4 codon sites in H. sapiens. Also, haplotter analysis revealed significant ongoing positive selection on this gene in Central European population. The study findings suggest that adaptive selective pressure on this gene might have influenced human evolution. Further research on this gene might unravel the potential role of this gene in learning and memory as well as its pathogenetic effect in certain hippocampal disorders with evolutionary basis like schizophrenia.

  8. AcEST: DK955542 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available =Arabidopsis thali... 72 3e-12 sp|Q9BSJ8|ESYT1_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-1 OS=Homo sapiens G... 52 3e-06 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Ext...ended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Homo sapiens G... 50 6e-06 sp|Q5DTI8|ESYT3_MOUSE Extende...d synaptotagmin-3 OS=Mus musculus G... 50 8e-06 sp|Q5RAG2|ESYT1_PONAB Extended syna...ptotagmin-1 OS=Pongo abelii G... 50 8e-06 sp|Q9Z1X1|ESYT1_RAT Extended synaptotagmin-1 OS=Rattus norvegicu...... 48 4e-05 sp|Q3U7R1|ESYT1_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-1 OS=Mus musculus G... 48

  9. AcEST: DK960373 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available sis tha... 62 2e-09 sp|Q9BSJ8|ESYT1_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-1 OS=Homo sapiens G... 52 4e-06 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended... synaptotagmin-3 OS=Homo sapiens G... 50 8e-06 sp|Q5DTI8|ESYT3_MOUSE Extended synaptotagm...in-3 OS=Mus musculus G... 50 1e-05 sp|Q5RAG2|ESYT1_PONAB Extended synaptotagmin-1... OS=Pongo abelii G... 50 1e-05 sp|Q9Z1X1|ESYT1_RAT Extended synaptotagmin-1 OS=Rattus norvegicu... 48 5e-05 sp|Q3U7R1|ESYT1_MOUSE Ext...ended synaptotagmin-1 OS=Mus musculus G... 48 5e-05 sp|P27715|UNC13_CAEEL Phorbol e

  10. Dicty_cDB: CHK630 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nificant alignments: (bits) Value EU937530_1( EU937530 |pid:none) Mus musculus sucrase-isomaltase mR... 87 1...e-15 L25926_1( L25926 |pid:none) Rat sucrase-isomaltase (SI) mRNA, comp... 83 1e-...14 ( P23739 ) RecName: Full=Sucrase-isomaltase, intestinal; Contains:... 83 1e-14 AF118226_1( AF118226 |pid:...:none) Mus musculus glucosidase, alpha, a... 75 3e-12 BC115034_1( BC115034 |pid:none) Homo sapiens sucrase-isomalt...ase (a... 75 3e-12 BC116452_1( BC116452 |pid:none) Homo sapiens sucrase-isomaltase (a... 75 3e-12 prot

  11. AcEST: BP913425 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |Q9HCL0|PCD18_HUMAN Protocadherin-18 OS=Homo sapiens GN=PCDH18... 31 3.4 sp|A7MB46|PCD18_BOVIN Protocadherin-18 OS=Bos taurus GN=PCDH... sp|Q8VHR0|PCD18_MOUSE Protocadherin 18 OS=Mus musculus GN=Pcdh18... 30 7.7 >sp|Q9HCL0|PCD18_HUMAN Protocadh...erin-18 OS=Homo sapiens GN=PCDH18 PE=2 SV=3 Length = 1135 Score = 31.2 bits (69), Expect = 3.4 Identities = ...101 NLNCSIEFDVITLPTEHLQLFHIEVEVLDINDNSPQFSRSLIPIEISESAAVGTRIPL 158 >sp|A7MB46|PCD18_BOVIN Protocadherin-18 OS=Bos taurus GN=PCDH1...tocadherin 18 OS=Mus musculus GN=Pcdh18 PE=1 SV=2 Length = 1134 Score = 30.0 bits

  12. AcEST: BP913833 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available OS=Shigella fl... 31 3.7 sp|Q5TB80|QN1_HUMAN Protein QN1 homolog OS=Homo sapiens GN=KIAA1... 30 4.9 sp|Q8VI24|SATB2..._MOUSE DNA-binding protein SATB2 OS=Mus musculus ... 30 6.4 sp|Q9UPW6|SATB2..._HUMAN DNA-binding protein SATB2 OS=Homo sapiens ... 30 6.4 sp|Q5PQJ5|RHG29_RAT Rho GTPase-activating prot...jct: 1060 DVKKND 1065 >sp|Q8VI24|SATB2_MOUSE DNA-binding protein SATB2 OS=Mus musculus GN=Satb2 PE=2 SV=1 Le...P 615 Query: 306 NTKTIENLEDIDEYTQYAHDV 244 ++T +LE + + HDV Sbjct: 616 RSRTKISLEALGILQSFIHDV 636 >sp|Q9UPW6|SATB2

  13. AcEST: DK950447 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2_DANRE N-acetyltransferase ESCO2 OS=Danio rerio GN=esco2 PE=2 SV=1 Length...ss-Prot sp_hit_id Q8CIB9 Definition sp|Q8CIB9|ESCO2_MOUSE N-acetyltransferase ESCO2 OS=Mus musculus Align le...g significant alignments: (bits) Value sp|Q8CIB9|ESCO2_MOUSE N-acetyltransferase ESCO2 OS=Mus musculus ... 100 1e-20 sp|Q56NI9|ESCO...2_HUMAN N-acetyltransferase ESCO2 OS=Homo sapiens ... 92 2e-18 sp|Q5FWF5|ESCO...1_HUMAN N-acetyltransferase ESCO1 OS=Homo sapiens ... 92 2e-18 sp|Q5SPR8|ESCO2_DANRE N-acetyltransferase ESCO

  14. Dicty_cDB: SSC385 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ry G from Tetraodon nigroviridis. 46 0.29 1 AC132603 |AC132603.2 Mus musculus chromosome UNK clone RP24-66C10, WORK...osome UNK clone RP23-445B17, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 5 unordered pieces. 44 1.2 1 AC094951 |AC094951.5 Rattu...04.2 Homo sapiens clone RP11-637N16, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 7 unordered pieces. 42 4.6 1 AC102662 |AC102662....2 Mus musculus clone RP23-144N11, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 6 unordered pieces. 42... 4.6 1 AC020694 |AC020694.4 Homo sapiens chromosome 17 clone RP11-637N15 map 17, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 21

  15. Dicty_cDB: SLI777 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 881 |AX345881.1 Sequence 952 from Patent WO0200928. 40 0.23 2 AC079806 |AC079806.3 Homo sapiens chromosome 7 clone RP11-760E16, WORK...9 |AC079619.3 Homo sapiens chromosome 7 clone RP11-654I12, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 55 unordered pieces. 46 0....36 2 AC125477 |AC125477.6 Medicago truncatula clone mth2-12j8, WORKING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 18 unordered pieces.... 34 0.63 5 AC142167 |AC142167.2 Mus musculus chromosome UNK clone RP24-117F4, WORK...ING DRAFT SEQUENCE, 11 unordered pieces. 44 0.94 1 AC140399 |AC140399.1 Mus musculus chromosome UNK clone RP24-89F16, WORK

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11332-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 265_1( AK129265 |pid:none) Mus musculus premature mRNA for mK... 45 0.015 ( P59438 ) RecName: Full=Hermansky....28 (Q297N8) RecName: Full=Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 protein homol... 41 0.28 A... Synthetic construct DNA, clone: pF... 41 0.37 (Q9UPZ3) RecName: Full=Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 protein; A...40 |pid:none) Homo sapiens Hermansky-Pudlak synd... 41 0.37 AK292436_1( AK292436 |pid:none) Homo sapiens cDN...m 3D7 chromo... 38 3.1 BC082542_1( BC082542 |pid:none) Mus musculus Hermansky-Pudlak synd... 37 4.1 AL844509

  17. AcEST: DK960216 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protei... 33 1.9 sp|Q9JLC8|SACS_MOUSE Sacsin OS=Mus musculus GN=Sacs... PE=1 SV=2 32 4.3 sp|Q9NZJ4|SACS_HUMAN Sacsin OS=Homo sapiens GN=SACS PE=1 SV=2 32 4...++ L + YG G VD + Sbjct: 124 HK-KYESMWKILKQMKDLSLDISGETLCFIIEQYGKNGHVDQAV 166 >sp|Q9JLC8|SACS_MOUSE Sacs...in OS=Mus musculus GN=Sacs PE=1 SV=2 Length = 4582 Score = 31.6 bits (70), Expect = 4....AN 510 N Sbjct: 2966 PVN 2968 >sp|Q9NZJ4|SACS_HUMAN Sacsin OS=Homo sapiens GN=SACS PE=1 SV=2 Length = 4579 S

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-03-0049 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-03-0049 gb|AAC72792.1| ORF1 [Mus musculus domesticus] gb|AAC72794.1| ORF1 [Mus musculus domestic...us] gb|AAC72801.1| ORF1 [Mus musculus domesticus] gb|AAC72804.1| ORF1 [Mus musculus domestic

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-09-0014 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-09-0014 gb|AAC72792.1| ORF1 [Mus musculus domesticus] gb|AAC72794.1| ORF1 [Mus musculus domestic...us] gb|AAC72801.1| ORF1 [Mus musculus domesticus] gb|AAC72804.1| ORF1 [Mus musculus domestic

  20. Gene : CBRC-GGOR-01-0291 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ICTED: hypothetical protein [Mus musculus] 7e-23 43% MHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCG...VLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVMHCGVLCGVIXILXHHTKP ...

  1. Gene : CBRC-SARA-01-1792 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available otein product [Mus musculus] 1e-17 62% MTKILRGHVGLCNQHQEGLSSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPFSLSLSLSFFLSFFLSF...FSFFLSLSFFISLSAFVSVVTKVLQKSNLLSFLSSLLPSLTPPSSLPSFLPSSLPPSPSLLPSFLPSLPLFLPSLLPSFLPPFLPSFLPSLSSFLPSFLPSFPLFLPSLLPS

  2. Gene : CBRC-SARA-01-1600 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available otein product [Mus musculus] 7e-15 54% MICSFLITVYSTLYIYKCSIHSPIIGISRGVYLFCLFSLCPSIDSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLLPSFLPSFLPSFLPSFLPS...FLPSFLLSFLTSMAPSLPPSSXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXLPSSLQPSFFPCLLLAFFLPSYRPCFLPS

  3. Gene : CBRC-CJAC-01-1308 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein product [Mus musculus] 2e-51 55% MCISIYLTCLSIYLSIYLSIYLSIIYLSVCLSIYLSIYIYLSSIYLSVCLSIYLYLSIIYLSVCLSVCLSI...YLSISIYHLSIYLSIIYLSIYLSNLSIYLSIYLIYLSIYLSSIYLSVCLSIYLSIYHLSIYLSLSIIYLSVCLSVCLSVYLSIYLSIIYLSIYLSISIYHLSIYLSIIYHLSICLSI...YLSIYLSSIYLSIYHLSIYLSIYHLSIYLSIYHLSIYLSIYLSSIYLSIYHLSIYLSIIYLSICLSVCLSI

  4. Gene : CBRC-ETEL-01-1017 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein product [Mus musculus] 5e-37 54% MSEPRVAVMVSPSGQRSSSFCCPSTLPSMVYISTSTYLPLSIIYLSIIYLSSLSLSLSLIYLLSLSIY...LSIYLSIYLSIYLSISISIYHLSISLSLSLSIYLSSIIHLSSIYLSLSLSIYLSSIIHLSSIYLSIIYLSIYLSIYLSIIYHLSVISLSLIYHPSIIYLSLYLLSIYLSIYLSIYHLSICHLSLSLSSII...HLSSISLSLYLSIIYLSIYLSSIIYLSSLSLSHLSSIYHISIYLSIIYLSIYLAIIYHPSVIYLSIIYLSIIYHLSIYLSFIYLSIIYLSIYLSIYHLSTIYLSIIYLSSVSIIYLSIYLSI ...

  5. Gene : CBRC-FCAT-01-1196 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein product [Mus musculus] 4e-21 48% MSVSIIYLSSIYLSSIIYYVPTYYLSIYQSIIHLSSIIYLSIIIYHLSSIYYLPTYYLSIIHLSSIYLSIYHLLCTYLSSIYQSIYYPSII...YYLSMIYLSLSIIYHPSIYYLSTYYVSIYLSIIIYHLSSIIYLPIIYYPSIIYLPIYQSIICLLSTYLLSMYLSINHLSSVYYLSIIIYHLSSIYHLPTYYLSSIYLLSFYLSSSSSSSLSIIYLSLLLLFIIYLSSNIYVPCQERLA ...

  6. Gene : CBRC-PVAM-01-1219 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein product [Mus musculus] 9e-35 55% MIIYHLSSIYLSIYLSIYLSIYLSIYLSIIYVSVITIIIIITIIYHLSIYLSIIYLSIYLSIYLSIYLSFIIYLSIYLSSIYHLSSIYLSII...YLSIYLSIYHLCIYHHHHHHHLSSIYLSVCLSIYLSSVCLSVYLSIYHLSIIYVSIITIIIIIIIICHLSIYLSIYLSIYHLSIIYLSIYLSIYLSIYLYLIIYHFYKSNT ...

  7. Gene : CBRC-CJAC-01-0556 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein product [Mus musculus] 1e-18 42% MPLHPLCARIYPLSASIYLSSSYHLPIIYHLSIIYLYLSSIYLSSIYHLPIIYLSSIIYLSSIYIYHLSSIYIYHLSIYHLSII...YLSSIYLSSIYIYHVSIIYLSSIYHLSSTYHLSISIIYLSIIYLLSTYHLSIIYHVSVIYLYLSSITYHLSISIIYLSSTYHLSSNYHLSIIYHVSIIYLSIIYPSIIYHLSIIASIICHLSSIYLSIVYXXXXHFLPIVKPQPVFHLKSLVEKKSQVPTAP ...

  8. Gene : CBRC-ETEL-01-1032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein product [Mus musculus] 1e-40 60% MVTLQPMVEAIVSGYLSSIYLSIIYLSIYLSIYLSIIYLSIYLSIYLSILYLSIYLSIYLSSIYLSIY...LSIYHLSVYHLSIYLSVCLSVYRSIGPSVHRSIDPSIHLSIIYLSIYLSIYHLSVYLSIYLSIGPSVHRSIDPSIYLSIIYLTSIIYLSIYLSIYLSIYLSIIYLSIYLSIIYLSIYLSIYHLSIHHLSNIYYLLSIIYLSIYLSIIYLSIYLSIIYPSIYLSSIYPSSM ...

  9. Gene : CBRC-TTRU-01-0062 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein product [Mus musculus] 2e-20 52% MPAFLLIYSINIYIYLSIIDLLSIFHLSICYLSSIYYLSIYIYHLSIIYQSFIYLSSIYYLSSVYLLS...IYHISTYLSSIYLSVSIYHLDIISVYHLSIYYLSIYLSIIYLSSVYLISIYISSISHLSIIYHLSIYYLSSIYLSSIIYLYVSSVFHLSIYLSSINLLSIICLSSIYPSIYLSYDA ...

  10. Gene : CBRC-PTRO-13-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein product [Mus musculus] 7e-15 27% MNPHFSWEFSKMELLDHKVCTIVILIHITNHFYMYLCISTCVILQIISICISAYRLLSYYKSFLSVSLHIDFCHITNHFYLYLCIS...TFVILQIISICIFVYRLLSYYKSFLSVSLYRLLSYYKSFLSVSLYIDFCHITNHFYMYLCISTFVILQIISICISVYRLVILQIISICIS...VYQLLSYYKSFLAVSLYIDFCHITNHYYMYLCISTFVVLQIISICISAYRLLSYYKSFLSVSLHIDFCHITNHFYLYLCISTCHITNHFYLYLCISTFVILQIISICIFVYRLLSYYKSFLSVSLYINFCDSSLLVLCPFCY ...

  11. iTRAQ analysis of hepatic proteins in free-living Mus spretus mice to assess the contamination status of areas surrounding Doñana National Park (SW Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abril, Nieves; Chicano-Gálvez, Eduardo; Michán, Carmen; Pueyo, Carmen; López-Barea, Juan, E-mail: bb1lobaj@uco.es

    2015-08-01

    This work aims to develop and integrate new -omics tools that would be applicable to different ecosystem types for a technological updating of environmental evaluations. We used a 2nd-generation (iTRAQ-8plex) proteomic approach to identify/quantify proteins differentially expressed in the liver of free-living Mus spretus mice from Doñana National Park or its proximities. Mass spectrometry was performed in an LTQ Orbitrap system for iTRAQ reporter ion quantitation and protein identification using a Mus musculus database as reference. A prior IEF step improved the separation of the complex peptide mixture. Over 2000 identified proteins were altered, of which 118 changed by ≥ 2.5-fold in mice from at least two problem sites. Part of the results obtained with the iTRAQ analysis was confirmed by Western blot. Over 75% of the 118 proteins were upregulated in animals captured at polluted sites and only 16 proteins were downregulated. Upregulated proteins were involved in stress response; cell proliferation and apoptosis; signal transduction; metastasis or tumour suppression; xenobiotic export or vesicular trafficking; and metabolism. The downregulated proteins, all potentially harmful, were classified as oncoproteins and proteins favouring genome instability. The iTRAQ results presented here demonstrated that the survival of hepatic cells is compromised in animals living at polluted sites, which showed deep alterations in metabolism and the signalling pathways. The identified proteins may be useful as biomarkers of environmental pollution and provide insight about the metabolic pathways and/or physiological processes affected by pollutants in DNP and its surrounding areas. - Highlights: • iTRAQ quantitation was used for the first time to monitor a wildlife reserve • Over 2,000 proteins with altered expression were identified in problem Doñana sites • Of them, 118 changed over 2.5-fold in, at least, two problem sites • Upregulation of protective proteins

  12. Dbf4-dependent kinase and the Rtt107 scaffold promote Mus81-Mms4 resolvase activation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princz, Lissa N; Wild, Philipp; Bittmann, Julia; Aguado, F Javier; Blanco, Miguel G; Matos, Joao; Pfander, Boris

    2017-03-01

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is under stringent cell cycle control. This includes the last step of the reaction, disentanglement of DNA joint molecules (JMs). Previous work has established that JM resolving nucleases are activated specifically at the onset of mitosis. In case of budding yeast Mus81-Mms4, this cell cycle stage-specific activation is known to depend on phosphorylation by CDK and Cdc5 kinases. Here, we show that a third cell cycle kinase, Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK), targets Mus81-Mms4 in conjunction with Cdc5-both kinases bind to as well as phosphorylate Mus81-Mms4 in an interdependent manner. Moreover, DDK-mediated phosphorylation of Mms4 is strictly required for Mus81 activation in mitosis, establishing DDK as a novel regulator of homologous recombination. The scaffold protein Rtt107, which binds the Mus81-Mms4 complex, interacts with Cdc7 and thereby targets DDK and Cdc5 to the complex enabling full Mus81 activation. Therefore, Mus81 activation in mitosis involves at least three cell cycle kinases, CDK, Cdc5 and DDK Furthermore, tethering of the kinases in a stable complex with Mus81 is critical for efficient JM resolution. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  13. The role of AtMUS81 in interference-insensitive crossovers in A. thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke E Berchowitz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available MUS81 is conserved among plants, animals, and fungi and is known to be involved in mitotic DNA damage repair and meiotic recombination. Here we present a functional characterization of the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog AtMUS81, which has a role in both mitotic and meiotic cells. The AtMUS81 transcript is produced in all tissues, but is elevated greater than 9-fold in the anthers and its levels are increased in response to gamma radiation and methyl methanesulfonate treatment. An Atmus81 transfer-DNA insertion mutant shows increased sensitivity to a wide range of DNA-damaging agents, confirming its role in mitotically proliferating cells. To examine its role in meiosis, we employed a pollen tetrad-based visual assay. Data from genetic intervals on Chromosomes 1 and 3 show that Atmus81 mutants have a moderate decrease in meiotic recombination. Importantly, measurements of recombination in a pair of adjacent intervals on Chromosome 5 demonstrate that the remaining crossovers in Atmus81 are interference sensitive, and that interference levels in the Atmus81 mutant are significantly greater than those in wild type. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMUS81 is involved in a secondary subset of meiotic crossovers that are interference insensitive.

  14. Il musée du quai Branly, dialogo interculturale o monologo autoreferenziale?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Colombini Mantovani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Musée du Quai Branly features ethnological findings from four continents: Africa, Asia, Oceania and the Americas. Today scholars and experts are still debating whether in this particular museum/institution the aesthetic concern should prevail - allowing visitors to relate to the works without additional knowledge - or whether more complete and updated anthropological references should be provided.

  15. A Comparative Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles during Skin Regeneration in Mus and Acomys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Orr Brant

    Full Text Available The African spiny mouse (Acomys spp. can heal full thickness excisional skin wounds in a scar-free manner with regeneration of all dermal components including hair and associated structures. Comparing Acomys scar-free healing from Mus scarring identifies gene expression differences that discriminate these processes. We have performed an extensive comparison of gene expression profiles in response to 8mm full-thickness excisional wounds at days 3, 5, 7 and 14 post-wounding between Acomys and Mus to characterize differences in wound healing, and identify mechanisms involved in scar-free healing. We also identify similarities with scar-free healing observed in fetal wounds. While wounding in Mus elicits a strong inflammatory response, wounding in Acomys produces a moderated immune response and little to no increase in expression for most cytokines and chemokines assayed. We also identified differences in the ECM profiles of the Acomys wounds, which appear to have a collagen profile more similar to fetal wounds, with larger increases in expression of collagen types III and V. In contrast, Mus wounds have very high levels of collagen XII. This data suggests that an overall lack of induction of cytokines and chemokines, coupled with an ECM profile more similar to fetal wounds, may underlie scar-free wound healing in Acomys skin. These data identify candidate genes for further testing in order to elucidate the causal mechanisms of scar-free healing.

  16. A Comparative Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles during Skin Regeneration in Mus and Acomys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Jason Orr; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Baker, Henry V; Barbazuk, W Brad; Maden, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The African spiny mouse (Acomys spp.) can heal full thickness excisional skin wounds in a scar-free manner with regeneration of all dermal components including hair and associated structures. Comparing Acomys scar-free healing from Mus scarring identifies gene expression differences that discriminate these processes. We have performed an extensive comparison of gene expression profiles in response to 8mm full-thickness excisional wounds at days 3, 5, 7 and 14 post-wounding between Acomys and Mus to characterize differences in wound healing, and identify mechanisms involved in scar-free healing. We also identify similarities with scar-free healing observed in fetal wounds. While wounding in Mus elicits a strong inflammatory response, wounding in Acomys produces a moderated immune response and little to no increase in expression for most cytokines and chemokines assayed. We also identified differences in the ECM profiles of the Acomys wounds, which appear to have a collagen profile more similar to fetal wounds, with larger increases in expression of collagen types III and V. In contrast, Mus wounds have very high levels of collagen XII. This data suggests that an overall lack of induction of cytokines and chemokines, coupled with an ECM profile more similar to fetal wounds, may underlie scar-free wound healing in Acomys skin. These data identify candidate genes for further testing in order to elucidate the causal mechanisms of scar-free healing.

  17. Musée ideale : unistused täiuslikust muuseumist / Mariann Raisma

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raisma, Mariann, 1974-

    2008-01-01

    18.-19. sajandi unistusi täiuslikust muuseumist kolmel tasandil: vormi ehk arhitektuuri, muuseumikogu terviklikkuse ning pärandi kättesaadavuse kaudu. Pikemalt Napoleon Bonaparte'ile pühendatud Musée Napoleoni kogudest, kontseptsioonist ja koopiamuuseumidest Lääne-Euroopas ning Tartus

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13150-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BC037971 |pid:none) Homo sapiens MYC binding protein 2... 184 2e-45 AY325887_1( AY325887 |pid:none) Mus musculus highwire...3376 |pid:none) Drosophila melanogaster LP10764 fu... 174 2e-42 (Q9NB71) RecName: Full=E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase highwire...; ... 174 2e-42 AF262977_1( AF262977 |pid:none) Drosophila melanogaster highwire (... 174 2e-

  19. AcEST: DK953000 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AY97|CCD91_RAT Coiled-coil domain-containing protein 91 OS=... 39 0.024 sp|P23565|AINX_RAT Alpha-internexin ...OS=Rattus norvegicus GN=Ina ... 39 0.024 sp|P46660|AINX_MOUSE Alpha-internexin OS=Mus musculus GN=Ina PE=...... 39 0.024 sp|Q16352|AINX_HUMAN Alpha-internexin OS=Homo sapiens GN=INA PE=... 39

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15273-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chromosome 3 clone RP11-551L4 map 3,... 38 8.5 4 ( CV013224 ) Dl_sw_23C10_TEXF1 Diplosoma listerianum mixed ...... 44 6.9 1 ( BB126996 ) Mus musculus 16 days neonate cerebellum cDNA, RIK... 44 6.9 1 ( CV012939 ) Dl_sw_17B01_TEXF1 Diplosoma list...erianum mixed adu... 40 7.0 2 ( AC068074 ) Homo sapiens

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12643-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1e-07 DQ177283_1( DQ177283 |pid:none) Mus musculus ENH1 (Pdlim5) mRNA, c... 60 1e-07 (Q5F464) RecName: Full=Lipoma-preferred...6 2e-06 AC012360_1( AC012360 |pid:none) Homo sapiens BAC clone RP11-332H14... 56 2e-06 (Q5XI07) RecName: Full=Lipoma-preferred

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13837-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available |pid:none) D.melanogaster crumbs protein mRNA, co... 41 0.074 ( P10040 ) RecName: Full=Protein crumb...|pid:none) Homo sapiens crumbs-like protein 2... 40 0.21 AK035019_1( AK035019 |pid:none) Mus musculus 12 day...e: Full=Fibrillin-3; Flags: Precursor; &AY165863... 40 0.21 AY720432_1( AY720432

  3. DNAtraffic—a new database for systems biology of DNA dynamics during the cell life

    OpenAIRE

    Kuchta, Krzysztof; Barszcz, Daniela; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Pomorski, Pawel; Krwawicz, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    DNAtraffic (http://dnatraffic.ibb.waw.pl/) is dedicated to be a unique comprehensive and richly annotated database of genome dynamics during the cell life. It contains extensive data on the nomenclature, ontology, structure and function of proteins related to the DNA integrity mechanisms such as chromatin remodeling, histone modifications, DNA repair and damage response from eight organisms: Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae,...

  4. Dicty_cDB: SLE504 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e (Q553W9) RecName: Full=Ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal protein 5 ... 467 e-130 AC116305_28( AC116305 |pid:n...olfactory ... 103 8e-21 BC025487_1( BC025487 |pid:none) Mus musculus ceroid-lipofuscinosis... sapiens cDNA FLJ90628 fis, cl... 100 5e-20 (Q1ZYR0) RecName: Full=Ceroid-lipofuscinosis neuronal protein 5;

  5. The structure-specific endonuclease Mus81 contributes to replication restart by generating double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Katsuhiro; Budzowska, Magda; Davies, Sally L; van Drunen, Ellen; Onizawa, Hideo; Beverloo, H Berna; Maas, Alex; Essers, Jeroen; Hickson, Ian D; Kanaar, Roland

    2007-11-01

    Faithful duplication of the genome requires structure-specific endonucleases such as the RuvABC complex in Escherichia coli. These enzymes help to resolve problems at replication forks that have been disrupted by DNA damage in the template. Much less is known about the identities of these enzymes in mammalian cells. Mus81 is the catalytic component of a eukaryotic structure-specific endonuclease that preferentially cleaves branched DNA substrates reminiscent of replication and recombination intermediates. Here we explore the mechanisms by which Mus81 maintains chromosomal stability. We found that Mus81 is involved in the formation of double-strand DNA breaks in response to the inhibition of replication. Moreover, in the absence of chromosome processing by Mus81, recovery of stalled DNA replication forks is attenuated and chromosomal aberrations arise. We suggest that Mus81 suppresses chromosomal instability by converting potentially detrimental replication-associated DNA structures into intermediates that are more amenable to DNA repair.

  6. Comparison of the Edwards SAPIEN S3 Versus Medtronic Evolut-R Devices for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shoshan, Jeremy; Konigstein, Maayan; Zahler, David; Margolis, Gilad; Chorin, Ehud; Steinvil, Arie; Arbel, Yaron; Aviram, Galit; Granot, Yoav; Barkagan, Michael; Keren, Gad; Halkin, Amir; Banai, Shmuel; Finkelstein, Ariel

    2017-01-15

    New generation of the most widely used devices for transcatheter aortic valve implantation have been recently introduced into practice. We compare the short-term outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation with the Edwards SAPIEN S3 and the Medtronic Evolut-R. We performed a retrospective analysis from a single high-volume tertiary center. Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria were used to define composite end points of device success and safety at 30 days. Study population included 232 patients implanted with the SAPIEN S3 (n = 124) and Evolut-R (n = 108). Device success reached 91.9% and 95.4% in the SAPIEN S3 and Evolut-R groups, respectively (p = 0.289). Postprocedural echocardiography showed greater aortic valve gradients (22.8 ± 7 vs 16 ± 9 mm Hg, p <0.001) among SAPIEN S3 group. Paravalvular leak of ≥ moderate severity was observed in 2.4% and 0% in the SAPIEN S3 and Evolut-R groups, respectively (p = 0.251). Similar rates of in-hospital complications, including major bleedings, vascular complications, and pacemaker implantations were recorded in both groups. At 30-day follow-up, the combined safety end point was reached in 5.6% and in 6.5% of patients in the SAPIEN S3 and Evolut-R groups, respectively (p = 0.790). During follow-up of 237 ± 138 days, all-cause mortality was higher in patients implanted with Evolut-R compared with SAPIEN S3 (7 vs 1 cases, respectively, p = 0.006), however, cardiovascular mortality was not significantly different between groups. In conclusions, in a single-center comparative analysis, comparable rate of device success as well as safety profile and long-term cardiovascular mortality were observed with the SAPIEN S3 and Evolut-R valves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Histopatologia da esquistossomose mansoni em fígado de Mus musculus infectado por amostras humanas de fase aguda e crônica da periferia de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia Dulce Vilela de Carvalho

    1986-06-01

    Full Text Available Exemplares de Biomphalaria glabrataforam infectados com miracídios obtidos de ovos de Schistosoma mansoni, encontrados em fezes de indivíduos de 7 a 18 anos, da região de Lagoa da Pampulha, Belo Horizonte, MG. Os pacientes de fase aguda se infectaram em uma primeira visita ao foco. Os da fase crônica eram moradores próximos aos focos. Para cada caso clínico, isolou-se a respectiva amostra do parasita. Foram infectados pela cauda 55 camundongos fêmeas com 70 ± 10 cercárias. Cortes histológicos de fígados, corados por HE, tricrômico de Gomori, impregnação metálica pela prata, e PAS foram observados à microscopia óptica. Não houve diferenças estatísticas em relação às médias das mensurações dos diâmetros dos granulomas referentes às amostras e datas de sacrifícios. Os granulomas apresentaram fase exsudativa do tipo Ha (reação de inflamação mista e IIIa (granuloma com células epitelióides. Com amostras de pacientes em fase aguda o padrão predominante foi a Ha na 7ª semana. Na 10.ª semana predominaram granulomas do tipo IIIa. Nas amostras de pacientes em fase crônica, verificou-se uma mescla de granulomas do tipo Ha e IIIa na 7ª semana. Na 10ª semana predominou o tipo IIIa. Alguns aspectos histopatológicos de fígados foram descritos e comparados com aqueles existentes na literatura.

  8. 转Bar基因稻谷全蛋白对体外培养小鼠淋巴细胞的毒性%In Vitro Cytotoxicity of Whole Protein from Bar-transgenic Rice to Mus musculus Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金; 黄毅; 孙艳波; 颜亨梅

    2014-01-01

    为了评价转基因大米Bar68-1全蛋白的急性细胞毒性,分别以25、50、100和200 μg·mL-1转基因大米Bar68-1全蛋白孵育昆明小鼠淋巴细胞,并各孵育2h、6h、24 h,然后通过体外试验用CCK-8及中性红摄取试验检测细胞毒性大小.在经过不同的孵育时间段后,阳性对照组淋巴细胞的细胞存活率与空白对照组相比,存在显著差异(p<0.05).其中,CCK-8试验、中性红试验测得细胞存活率存在着明显的损伤作用-时间效应关系.转基因大米Bar68-1全蛋白组孵育的淋巴细胞存活率与非转基因大米D68全蛋白组孵育的淋巴细胞相比无明显差异(p>0.05),且与空白对照组细胞存活率差异不显著(p>0.05).结果显示,转基因大米Bar68-1全蛋白与非转基因大米D68全蛋白急性细胞毒性效应相似,对小鼠淋巴细胞无明显急性毒性.

  9. Comparison of Gavage, Water Bottle, and a High-Moisture Diet Bolus as Dosing Methods for Quantitative D-xylose Administration to B6D2F1 (Mus musculus) Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, J. Paul; Lewis, Sherry M.; Moyer, Jerry L.

    1993-01-01

    Gavage, water bottle, and diet incorporation are 3 dosing methods used orally to administer test compounds to rodents. These 3 methods were compared in mice to determine which represented the most quantitative delivery system. For dietary incorporation, a high-moisture bolus form of NIH-31 rodent meal was developed using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose as an autoclave-stable binding agent. A high-moisture bolus were selected to increase the acceptability of the dosed diet and to promote quantitative consumption through reduced wastage. The test compound used was D-xylose, a pentose sugar that may be quantitatively detected, colorimetrically, in urine following oral dosing. Six male and 6 female B6D2FI mice were placed in metabolism cages and dosed with a known quantity of D-xylose by each of the 3 methods. Urine was collected before and after each method of administration and analysed for total D-xylose; the per cent recovery was based upon the amount of D-xylose consumed. Quantitative consumption was apparently greatest for water bottle dosing with an average recovery of 56.0% of the original D-xylose dose. High-moisture bolus incorporation ranked second with 50.0% D-xylose recovery, and gavage was third with 41.0% D-xylose recovery.

  10. Primera evidencia de infección por el virus de la coriomeningitis linfocítica (arenavirus en roedores Mus musculus capturados en la zona urbana del municipio de Sincelejo, Sucre, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anais Castellar

    2017-04-01

    Conclusión. Los resultados indicaron que la infección por el virus de la coriomeningitis linfocítica en humanos podría ocurrir en el área urbana de Sincelejo, aunque hasta la fecha no se hayan reportado casos.

  11. The mystery of the seven spheres how homo sapiens will conquer space

    CERN Document Server

    Bignami, Giovanni F

    2015-01-01

    In this book, Giovanni Bignami, the outstanding Italian scientist and astronomer, takes the reader on a journey through the “seven spheres”, from our own planet to neighboring stars. The author offers a gripping account of the evolution of Homo Sapiens to the stage where our species is developing capabilities, in the form of new energy propulsion systems, that will enable us to conquer space. The reader will learn how we first expanded our activities to reach beyond our planet, to the Moon, and how nuclear energy, nuclear fusion, and matter–antimatter annihilation will enable us to extend our exploration. After Mars and Jupiter we shall finally reach the nearest stars, which we now know are surrounded by numerous planets, some of which are bound to be habitable. The book includes enticing descriptions of such newly discovered planets and also brings alive key historical characters in our story, such as Jules Verne and Werner von Braun.

  12. Protamines and spermatogenesis in Drosophila and Homo sapiens : A comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanippayoor, Rachelle L; Alpern, Joshua H M; Moehring, Amanda J

    2013-04-01

    The production of mature and motile sperm is a detailed process that utilizes many molecular players to ensure the faithful execution of spermatogenesis. In most species that have been examined, spermatogenesis begins with a single cell that undergoes dramatic transformation, culminating with the hypercompaction of DNA into the sperm head by replacing histones with protamines. Precise execution of the stages of spermatogenesis results in the production of motile sperm. While comparative analyses have been used to identify similarities and differences in spermatogenesis between species, the focus has primarily been on vertebrate spermatogenesis, particularly mammals. To understand the evolutionary basis of spermatogenetic variation, however, a more comprehensive comparison is needed. In this review, we examine spermatogenesis and the final packaging of DNA into the sperm head in the insect Drosophila melanogaster and compare it to spermatogenesis in Homo sapiens.

  13. Body composition in Pan paniscus compared with Homo sapiens has implications for changes during human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihlman, Adrienne L; Bolter, Debra R

    2015-06-16

    The human body has been shaped by natural selection during the past 4-5 million years. Fossils preserve bones and teeth but lack muscle, skin, fat, and organs. To understand the evolution of the human form, information about both soft and hard tissues of our ancestors is needed. Our closest living relatives of the genus Pan provide the best comparative model to those ancestors. Here, we present data on the body composition of 13 bonobos (Pan paniscus) measured during anatomical dissections and compare the data with Homo sapiens. These comparative data suggest that both females and males (i) increased body fat, (ii) decreased relative muscle mass, (iii) redistributed muscle mass to lower limbs, and (iv) decreased relative mass of skin during human evolution. Comparison of soft tissues between Pan and Homo provides new insights into the function and evolution of body composition.

  14. Unravelling the (arte)fact of increased pacemaker rate with the Edwards SAPIEN 3 valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantini, Giuseppe; Mojoli, Marco; Purita, Paola; Napodano, Massimo; D'Onofrio, Augusto; Frigo, Annachiara; Covolo, Elisa; Facchin, Michela; Isabella, Giambattista; Gerosa, Gino; Iliceto, Sabino

    2015-07-01

    Early data on the Edwards SAPIEN 3 valve (S3-THV) have shown low rates of paravalvular leaks and vascular complications but relatively high 30-day permanent pacemaker implantation (PPMI) rates. No direct comparisons on clinical outcomes including PPMI rates are available for the S3-THV and the Edwards SAPIEN XT (XT-THV). We aimed to compare the 30-day PPMI rates in patients treated with the two prostheses and to assess the interplay among valve type, depth of implantation and PPMI rate. Two hundred and nine patients treated by TAVI were considered. The S3-THV was associated with higher PPMI rates compared to the XT-THV, both overall and in subgroups matched for several predictors of PPMI. However, in the S3-THV group, 30-day PPMI was strictly associated with deep valve implantation, and PPMI risk of high-implanted S3-THVs was similar to that of the overall XT-THV matched group. No cases of significant paravalvular leak were observed in the S3-THV group. The S3-THV was associated with a higher incidence of PPMI compared to the XT-THV. In the S3-THV group, pacemaker implantation was strictly associated with deep valve implantation. An implantation technique involving higher initial placement of the central marker (from 0 to 3 mm above the base of the aortic cusps) and, as a consequence, higher final valve depth might help in preventing post-TAVI PPMI with the S3-THV, without affecting the risk of paravalvular leak.

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0359 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0359 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 2e-84 49% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0361 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0361 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 2e-77 51% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-07-0309 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-07-0309 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 1e-74 48% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0363 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0363 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 1e-124 68% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-07-0307 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-07-0307 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 8e-83 51% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-07-0317 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-07-0317 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 3e-91 56% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0357 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0357 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 2e-92 53% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0362 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0362 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 1e-134 78% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-02-0031 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-02-0031 dbj|BAC28219.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC34893.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC35734.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC39215.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAC39226.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] BAC28219.1 3e-96 74% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PTRO-27-0250 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PTRO-27-0250 ref|NP_666507.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61363.1| olfactory... receptor MOR245-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71670.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1276 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27563.1| olfactory... receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27803.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] NP_666507.1 1e-116 69% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-4115 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-4115 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 1e-130 73% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-18-0207 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-18-0207 ref|NP_667192.1| olfactory receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60770.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71654.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1260 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27664.1| olfactory... receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27466.1| olfactory receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] NP_667192.1 1e-148 84% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0312 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0312 ref|NP_666646.1| olfactory receptor 993 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61326.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71451.1| olfactory receptor Olfr993 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24030.1| olfactory... receptor 993 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27327.1| olfactory receptor 993 [Mus musculus] NP_666646.1 1e-137 77% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-0445 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-0445 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-118 69% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0762 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0762 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 1e-126 67% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-4023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-4023 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-137 75% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-03-0025 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-03-0025 ref|NP_667161.1| olfactory receptor 341 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60801.1| olfactory... receptor MOR136-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70875.1| olfactory receptor Olfr341 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM20475.1| olfactory... receptor 341 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08679.1| olfactory receptor 341 [Mus musculus] NP_667161.1 1e-150 84% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-02-0123 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-02-0123 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 1e-154 87% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0213 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0213 ref|NP_667058.1| olfactory receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60909.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71517.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1090 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24652.1| olfactory... receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27371.1| olfactory receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] NP_667058.1 1e-140 77% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-03-0217 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-03-0217 ref|NP_667047.1| olfactory receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60920.1| olfactory... receptor MOR177-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71551.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1132 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25126.1| olfactory... receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27401.1| olfactory receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] NP_667047.1 1e-153 88% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-0090 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-0090 ref|NP_666644.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61328.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71452.1| olfactory receptor Olfr994 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24031.1| olfactory... receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27328.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] NP_666644.1 2e-30 65% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1410 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1410 ref|NP_667151.1| olfactory receptor 352 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60811.1| olfactory... receptor MOR136-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70886.1| olfactory receptor Olfr352 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16518.1| olfactory... receptor 352 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08690.1| olfactory receptor 352 [Mus musculus] NP_667151.1 1e-134 78% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-1536 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-1536 ref|NP_667122.1| olfactory receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60840.1| olfactory... receptor MOR129-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71759.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1377 [Mus musculus] emb|CAI35307.1| olfactory... receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33683.1| olfactory receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] NP_667122.1 4e-78 76% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-0332 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-0332 ref|NP_666507.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61363.1| olfactory... receptor MOR245-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71670.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1276 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27563.1| olfactory... receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27803.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] NP_666507.1 1e-98 77% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0108 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0108 ref|NP_667047.1| olfactory receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60920.1| olfactory... receptor MOR177-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71551.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1132 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25126.1| olfactory... receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27401.1| olfactory receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] NP_667047.1 4e-59 77% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1203 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1203 ref|NP_667192.1| olfactory receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60770.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71654.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1260 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27664.1| olfactory... receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27466.1| olfactory receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] NP_667192.1 1e-130 74% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-0145 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-0145 ref|NP_666644.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61328.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71452.1| olfactory receptor Olfr994 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24031.1| olfactory... receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27328.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] NP_666644.1 1e-103 77% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-0525 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-0525 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-125 69% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-3176 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-3176 ref|NP_667192.1| olfactory receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60770.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71654.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1260 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27664.1| olfactory... receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27466.1| olfactory receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] NP_667192.1 1e-136 76% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0675 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0675 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-136 76% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-0259 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-0259 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 2e-67 69% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-0625 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-0625 ref|NP_667047.1| olfactory receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60920.1| olfactory... receptor MOR177-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71551.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1132 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25126.1| olfactory... receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27401.1| olfactory receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] NP_667047.1 1e-135 75% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-02-0041 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-02-0041 ref|NP_666480.1| olfactory receptor 361 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61388.1| olfactory... receptor MOR159-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70894.1| olfactory receptor Olfr361 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM20133.1| olfactory... receptor 361 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08698.1| olfactory receptor 361 [Mus musculus] NP_666480.1 1e-142 84% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-2747 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-2747 ref|NP_666646.1| olfactory receptor 993 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61326.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71451.1| olfactory receptor Olfr993 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24030.1| olfactory... receptor 993 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27327.1| olfactory receptor 993 [Mus musculus] NP_666646.1 1e-133 76% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-0079 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-0079 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-137 75% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-03-0146 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-03-0146 ref|NP_667058.1| olfactory receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60909.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71517.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1090 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24652.1| olfactory... receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27371.1| olfactory receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] NP_667058.1 1e-145 80% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-0928 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-0928 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-123 71% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-10-0083 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-10-0083 ref|NP_667122.1| olfactory receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60840.1| olfactory... receptor MOR129-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71759.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1377 [Mus musculus] emb|CAI35307.1| olfactory... receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33683.1| olfactory receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] NP_667122.1 2e-98 73% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-02-0023 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-02-0023 ref|NP_667161.1| olfactory receptor 341 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60801.1| olfactory... receptor MOR136-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70875.1| olfactory receptor Olfr341 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM20475.1| olfactory... receptor 341 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08679.1| olfactory receptor 341 [Mus musculus] NP_667161.1 1e-177 100% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-12-0068 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-12-0068 ref|NP_667189.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60773.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71652.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1258 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27661.1| olfactory... receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27464.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] NP_667189.1 1e-139 81% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0016 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0016 ref|NP_667088.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60876.1| olfactory... receptor MOR277-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71777.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1395 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM46261.1| olfactory... receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33774.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] NP_667088.1 1e-127 87% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2646 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2646 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 1e-117 73% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1224 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1224 ref|NP_667151.1| olfactory receptor 352 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60811.1| olfactory... receptor MOR136-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70886.1| olfactory receptor Olfr352 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16518.1| olfactory... receptor 352 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08690.1| olfactory receptor 352 [Mus musculus] NP_667151.1 1e-130 81% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0959 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0959 ref|NP_666854.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61117.1| olfactory... receptor MOR174-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71568.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1155 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18637.1| olfactory... receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27414.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] NP_666854.1 2e-79 56% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-1434 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-1434 ref|NP_666507.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61363.1| olfactory... receptor MOR245-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71670.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1276 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27563.1| olfactory... receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27803.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] NP_666507.1 4e-49 82% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1124 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1124 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-136 75% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-0915 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-0915 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-147 82% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-0986 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-0986 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 2e-84 65% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-0091 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-0091 ref|NP_667151.1| olfactory receptor 352 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60811.1| olfactory... receptor MOR136-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70886.1| olfactory receptor Olfr352 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16518.1| olfactory... receptor 352 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08690.1| olfactory receptor 352 [Mus musculus] NP_667151.1 2e-70 75% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OCUN-01-0578 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OCUN-01-0578 ref|NP_667189.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60773.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71652.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1258 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27661.1| olfactory... receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27464.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] NP_667189.1 1e-154 90% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1437 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1437 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-123 71% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-4104 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-4104 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 1e-135 76% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0651 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0651 ref|NP_666854.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61117.1| olfactory... receptor MOR174-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71568.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1155 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18637.1| olfactory... receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27414.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] NP_666854.1 1e-123 72% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-4099 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-4099 ref|NP_666854.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61117.1| olfactory... receptor MOR174-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71568.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1155 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18637.1| olfactory... receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27414.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] NP_666854.1 1e-112 66% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-3900 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-3900 ref|NP_667047.1| olfactory receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60920.1| olfactory... receptor MOR177-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71551.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1132 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM25126.1| olfactory... receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27401.1| olfactory receptor 1132 [Mus musculus] NP_667047.1 1e-135 78% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-0347 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-0347 ref|NP_667189.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60773.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71652.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1258 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27661.1| olfactory... receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27464.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] NP_667189.1 2e-69 81% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-1606 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-1606 ref|NP_666644.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61328.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71452.1| olfactory receptor Olfr994 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24031.1| olfactory... receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27328.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] NP_666644.1 1e-140 79% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-0227 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-0227 ref|NP_667189.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60773.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71652.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1258 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27661.1| olfactory... receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27464.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] NP_667189.1 1e-146 85% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1510 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1510 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-117 69% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-10-0087 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-10-0087 ref|NP_667122.1| olfactory receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60840.1| olfactory... receptor MOR129-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71759.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1377 [Mus musculus] emb|CAI35307.1| olfactory... receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33683.1| olfactory receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] NP_667122.1 1e-155 86% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-18-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-18-0035 ref|NP_667161.1| olfactory receptor 341 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60801.1| olfactory... receptor MOR136-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70875.1| olfactory receptor Olfr341 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM20475.1| olfactory... receptor 341 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08679.1| olfactory receptor 341 [Mus musculus] NP_667161.1 4e-04 24% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-03-0168 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-03-0168 ref|NP_667058.1| olfactory receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60909.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71517.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1090 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24652.1| olfactory... receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27371.1| olfactory receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] NP_667058.1 1e-166 93% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-1441 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-1441 ref|NP_667189.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60773.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71652.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1258 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27661.1| olfactory... receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27464.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] NP_667189.1 1e-110 78% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-1009 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-1009 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-149 83% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-10-0097 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-10-0097 ref|NP_667088.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60876.1| olfactory... receptor MOR277-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71777.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1395 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM46261.1| olfactory... receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33774.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] NP_667088.1 1e-102 61% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-0312 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-0312 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-137 76% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-2874 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-2874 ref|NP_667230.1| olfactory receptor 1054 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60732.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71498.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1054 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM17888.1| olfactory... receptor 1054 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27363.1| olfactory receptor 1054 [Mus musculus] NP_667230.1 3e-83 60% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-0810 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-0810 ref|NP_667230.1| olfactory receptor 1054 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60732.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71498.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1054 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM17888.1| olfactory... receptor 1054 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27363.1| olfactory receptor 1054 [Mus musculus] NP_667230.1 1e-101 62% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-0483 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-0483 ref|NP_666854.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61117.1| olfactory... receptor MOR174-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71568.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1155 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18637.1| olfactory... receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27414.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] NP_666854.1 1e-125 77% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ETEL-01-0939 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ETEL-01-0939 ref|NP_667192.1| olfactory receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60770.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71654.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1260 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27664.1| olfactory... receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27466.1| olfactory receptor 1260 [Mus musculus] NP_667192.1 1e-139 76% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-2011 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-2011 ref|NP_667088.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60876.1| olfactory... receptor MOR277-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71777.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1395 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM46261.1| olfactory... receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33774.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] NP_667088.1 1e-164 91% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-2611 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-2611 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-140 77% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-02-0028 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-02-0028 ref|NP_667161.1| olfactory receptor 341 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60801.1| olfactory... receptor MOR136-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70875.1| olfactory receptor Olfr341 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM20475.1| olfactory... receptor 341 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08679.1| olfactory receptor 341 [Mus musculus] NP_667161.1 1e-148 84% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-4024 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-4024 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 1e-133 75% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1238 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-SARA-01-1238 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-116 72% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-0402 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-0402 ref|NP_667088.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60876.1| olfactory... receptor MOR277-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71777.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1395 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM46261.1| olfactory... receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33774.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] NP_667088.1 5e-32 80% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0483 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0483 ref|NP_667122.1| olfactory receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60840.1| olfactory... receptor MOR129-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71759.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1377 [Mus musculus] emb|CAI35307.1| olfactory... receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33683.1| olfactory receptor 1377 [Mus musculus] NP_667122.1 1e-140 79% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-BTAU-01-0513 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-BTAU-01-0513 ref|NP_666854.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61117.1| olfactory... receptor MOR174-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71568.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1155 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18637.1| olfactory... receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27414.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] NP_666854.1 1e-125 77% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-0795 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-0795 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 4e-74 52% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-1194 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-1194 ref|NP_666646.1| olfactory receptor 993 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61326.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71451.1| olfactory receptor Olfr993 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24030.1| olfactory... receptor 993 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27327.1| olfactory receptor 993 [Mus musculus] NP_666646.1 1e-110 67% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-02-0150 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-02-0150 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-133 74% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-0039 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-0039 ref|NP_667019.1| olfactory receptor 1240 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60949.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-8 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71635.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1240 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27922.1| olfactory... receptor 1240 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27460.1| olfactory receptor 1240 [Mus musculus] NP_667019.1 1e-136 76% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-2829 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-2829 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-137 78% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-3501 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-3501 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-117 67% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-3226 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-3226 ref|NP_666854.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61117.1| olfactory... receptor MOR174-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71568.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1155 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18637.1| olfactory... receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27414.1| olfactory receptor 1155 [Mus musculus] NP_666854.1 1e-110 77% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-1815 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-1815 ref|NP_666644.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61328.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71452.1| olfactory receptor Olfr994 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24031.1| olfactory... receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27328.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] NP_666644.1 1e-139 79% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-1221 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-1221 ref|NP_666646.1| olfactory receptor 993 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61326.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-2 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71451.1| olfactory receptor Olfr993 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24030.1| olfactory... receptor 993 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27327.1| olfactory receptor 993 [Mus musculus] NP_666646.1 1e-139 77% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-2296 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-2296 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-130 74% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-EEUR-01-1209 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-EEUR-01-1209 ref|NP_667088.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60876.1| olfactory... receptor MOR277-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71777.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1395 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM46261.1| olfactory... receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33774.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] NP_667088.1 1e-101 58% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0121 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0121 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-111 81% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUR-01-0611 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUR-01-0611 ref|NP_667088.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60876.1| olfactory... receptor MOR277-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71777.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1395 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM46261.1| olfactory... receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL33774.1| olfactory receptor 1395 [Mus musculus] NP_667088.1 1e-101 59% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-05-0203 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-05-0203 ref|NP_667189.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60773.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71652.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1258 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27661.1| olfactory... receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27464.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] NP_667189.1 1e-148 83% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CFAM-18-0201 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CFAM-18-0201 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-146 81% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1398 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1398 ref|NP_667151.1| olfactory receptor 352 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60811.1| olfactory... receptor MOR136-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70886.1| olfactory receptor Olfr352 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16518.1| olfactory... receptor 352 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08690.1| olfactory receptor 352 [Mus musculus] NP_667151.1 1e-133 78% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CPOR-01-1270 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CPOR-01-1270 ref|NP_667058.1| olfactory receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60909.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71517.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1090 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24652.1| olfactory... receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27371.1| olfactory receptor 1090 [Mus musculus] NP_667058.1 1e-106 62% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-3876 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-3876 ref|NP_667077.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60887.1| olfactory... receptor MOR187-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71460.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1008 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM16171.1| olfactory... receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27333.1| olfactory receptor 1008 [Mus musculus] NP_667077.1 5e-60 58% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-03-0043 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-03-0043 ref|NP_666480.1| olfactory receptor 361 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61388.1| olfactory... receptor MOR159-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP70894.1| olfactory receptor Olfr361 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM20133.1| olfactory... receptor 361 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL08698.1| olfactory receptor 361 [Mus musculus] NP_666480.1 1e-153 85% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0139 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0139 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-140 81% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FCAT-01-0901 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FCAT-01-0901 ref|NP_666507.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61363.1| olfactory... receptor MOR245-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71670.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1276 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27563.1| olfactory... receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27803.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] NP_666507.1 1e-140 79% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-02-0339 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-02-0339 ref|NP_666507.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61363.1| olfactory... receptor MOR245-10 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71670.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1276 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27563.1| olfactory... receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27803.1| olfactory receptor 1276 [Mus musculus] NP_666507.1 1e-135 76% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-03-0360 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-03-0360 ref|NP_667189.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60773.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71652.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1258 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27661.1| olfactory... receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27464.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] NP_667189.1 1e-148 84% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-02-0138 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-02-0138 ref|NP_667223.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60739.1| olfactory... receptor MOR188-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71493.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1047 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM18161.1| olfactory... receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27358.1| olfactory receptor 1047 [Mus musculus] NP_667223.1 1e-136 76% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-0835 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-0835 ref|NP_666644.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL61328.1| olfactory... receptor MOR203-4 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71452.1| olfactory receptor Olfr994 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM24031.1| olfactory... receptor 994 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27328.1| olfactory receptor 994 [Mus musculus] NP_666644.1 1e-137 78% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-1645 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-1645 ref|NP_667189.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60773.1| olfactory... receptor MOR232-3 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71652.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1258 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM27661.1| olfactory... receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27464.1| olfactory receptor 1258 [Mus musculus] NP_667189.1 1e-117 66% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-2547 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-2547 ref|NP_667194.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|AAL60768.1| olfactory... receptor MOR231-1 [Mus musculus] gb|AAP71649.1| olfactory receptor Olfr1256 [Mus musculus] emb|CAM19163.1| olfactory... receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] gb|EDL27463.1| olfactory receptor 1256 [Mus musculus] NP_667194.1 1e-138 77% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-07-0306 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-07-0306 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 6e-64 47% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-07-0314 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-07-0314 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 1e-102 59% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MMUS-07-0315 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-07-0315 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 7e-66 49% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0360 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0360 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 4e-77 51% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0355 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0355 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 1e-124 69% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0358 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0358 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 3e-82 51% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-RNOR-01-0366 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-RNOR-01-0366 ref|NP_991379.3| MAS-related GPR, member B1 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28310.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28348.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28352.1| unname...d protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE28451.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] NP_991379.3 1e-89 57% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PHAM-01-0810 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PHAM-01-0810 ref|NP_663758.2| melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04326.1| Melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04325.1| Melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|EDL25036.1| melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] dbj|BAH03531.1| melatonin receptor 1b [Mus musculus] NP_663758.2 1e-163 80% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-0764 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-0764 ref|NP_663758.2| melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04326.1| Melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04325.1| Melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|EDL25036.1| melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] dbj|BAH03531.1| melatonin receptor 1b [Mus musculus] NP_663758.2 1e-130 68% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-1192 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-1192 ref|NP_663758.2| melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04326.1| Melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04325.1| Melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|EDL25036.1| melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] dbj|BAH03531.1| melatonin receptor 1b [Mus musculus] NP_663758.2 1e-158 77% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1631 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1631 ref|NP_663758.2| melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04326.1| Melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04325.1| Melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|EDL25036.1| melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] dbj|BAH03531.1| melatonin receptor 1b [Mus musculus] NP_663758.2 1e-157 80% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MLUC-01-0792 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MLUC-01-0792 ref|NP_663758.2| melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04326.1| Melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04325.1| Melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|EDL25036.1| melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] dbj|BAH03531.1| melatonin receptor 1b [Mus musculus] NP_663758.2 1e-156 75% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGOR-01-1001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGOR-01-1001 ref|NP_663758.2| melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04326.1| Melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04325.1| Melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|EDL25036.1| melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] dbj|BAH03531.1| melatonin receptor 1b [Mus musculus] NP_663758.2 1e-130 80% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-VPAC-01-1590 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-VPAC-01-1590 ref|NP_663758.2| melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04326.1| Melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04325.1| Melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|EDL25036.1| melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] dbj|BAH03531.1| melatonin receptor 1b [Mus musculus] NP_663758.2 1e-113 69% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-STRI-01-2918 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-STRI-01-2918 ref|NP_663758.2| melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04326.1| Melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|AAI04325.1| Melatonin receptor 1B [Mus musculus] gb|EDL25036.1| melaton...in receptor 1B [Mus musculus] dbj|BAH03531.1| melatonin receptor 1b [Mus musculus] NP_663758.2 1e-150 74% ...

  15. Reidentification of Ebola Virus E718 and ME as Ebola Virus/H.sapiens-tc/COD/1976/Yambuku-Ecran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jens H; Lofts, Loreen L; Kugelman, Jeffrey R; Smither, Sophie J; Lever, Mark S; van der Groen, Guido; Johnson, Karl M; Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Bavari, Sina; Jahrling, Peter B; Towner, Jonathan S; Nichol, Stuart T; Palacios, Gustavo

    2014-11-20

    Ebola virus (EBOV) was discovered in 1976 around Yambuku, Zaire. A lack of nomenclature standards resulted in a variety of designations for each isolate, leading to confusion in the literature and databases. We sequenced the genome of isolate E718/ME/Ecran and unified the various designations under Ebola virus/H.sapiens-tc/COD/1976/Yambuku-Ecran.

  16. The Homo sapiens Cave hominin site of Mulan Mountain,Jiangzhou District,Chongzuo,Guangxi with emphasis on its age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN ChangZhu; PAN WenShi; ZHANG YingQi; CAI YanJun; XU QinQi; TANG ZhiLu; WANG Wei; WANG Yuan; LIU JinYi; QIN DaGong; R.Lawrence Edwards; CHENG Hai

    2009-01-01

    One of the most hotly debated and frontal issues in paleoanthropology focuses on the origins of modern humans.Recently,an incomplete hominin mandible with a distinctly weaker mental protuberance than modern human and a great variety of coexisting fossil mammals were unearthed from the Homo sapiens Cave of Mulan Mountain,Chongzuo,Guangxi.The mammalian fauna from the Homo sapiens Cave characterized by the combination of Elephas kiangnanensis,first occurring Elephas maixmus,and Megatapirus augustus,and strikingly different from the Early Pleistocene Gigantopithecus fauna and the Middle Pleistocene Ailuropoda-Stogodon fauna of South China could be regarded as an early representive of the typical Asian elephant fauna.Faunal analysis,biostratigraphic correlation,and,most importantly,U-series dating all consistently support an estimate of ca.110 ka for the age of the fossil Homo sapiens and coexisting mammalian fauna,that is,the early Late Pleistocene.The fauna is mainly made up of tropical-subtropical elements,but grassland elements have a much greater variety than forest elements,which probably indicates a drier climate at that time.This discovery of early Homo sapiens at the Mulan Mountain will play a significant role in the study of the origin and its environmental background of modern humans.

  17. Molecular biology of Homo sapiens: Abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, J.D.; Siniscalco, M.

    1986-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts of papers presented at the 51st Cold Springs Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology. The topic for this meeting was the ''Molecular Biology of Homo sapiens.'' Sessions were entitled Human Gene Map, Human Cancer Genes, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, Drugs Made Off Human Genes, Receptors, and Gene Therapy. (DT)

  18. Coordinated actions of SLX1-SLX4 and MUS81-EME1 for Holliday junction resolution in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Haley D M; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Matos, Joao; West, Stephen C

    2013-10-24

    Holliday junctions (HJs) are four-way DNA intermediates that form during homologous recombination, and their efficient resolution is essential for chromosome segregation. Here, we show that three structure-selective endonucleases, namely SLX1-SLX4, MUS81-EME1, and GEN1, define two pathways of HJ resolution in human cells. One pathway is mediated by GEN1, whereas SLX1-SLX4 and MUS81-EME1 provide a second and genetically distinct pathway (SLX-MUS). Cells depleted for SLX-MUS or GEN1 pathway proteins exhibit severe defects in chromosome segregation and reduced survival. In response to CDK-mediated phosphorylation, SLX1-SLX4 and MUS81-EME1 associate at the G2/M transition to form a stable SLX-MUS holoenzyme, which can be reconstituted in vitro. Biochemical studies show that SLX-MUS is a HJ resolvase that coordinates the active sites of two distinct endonucleases during HJ resolution. This cleavage reaction is more efficient and orchestrated than that mediated by SLX1-SLX4 alone, which exhibits a potent nickase activity that acts promiscuously upon DNA secondary structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. AcEST: DK955142 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n-conta... 62 3e-09 sp|Q6DN12|MCTP2_HUMAN Multiple C2 and transmembrane domain-conta... 60 8e-09 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended... synaptotagmin-2 OS=Mus musculus G... 60 8e-09 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended synaptotagm... Tricalbin-2 OS=Saccharomyces cerevisiae GN=... 56 1e-07 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=H...omo sapiens G... 56 1e-07 sp|Q5DTI8|ESYT3_MOUSE Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Mus m...usculus G... 55 2e-07 sp|P46935|NEDD4_MOUSE E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase NEDD4 OS=Mus m... 54 4e-07 sp|Q7ZWU7|EST2B_XENLA Extended

  20. AcEST: DK955023 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available S=Mus mu... 55 4e-07 sp|Q5M7N9|ESYT3_XENTR Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Xenopus tropic... 54 5e-07 sp|O95294|... sp|Q9QZ06|TOLIP_MOUSE Toll-interacting protein OS=Mus musculus G... 53 1e-06 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended... synaptotagmin-2 OS=Homo sapiens G... 53 1e-06 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended syn...ntersectin-2 OS=Mus musculus GN=Itsn2 PE=... 50 7e-06 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Homo

  1. AcEST: DK954995 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available vating-like protein 1 OS=Mus mu... 55 4e-07 sp|Q5M7N9|ESYT3_XENTR Extended synaptotagmin-3 OS=Xenopus tropic...s norvegicu... 53 1e-06 sp|Q9QZ06|TOLIP_MOUSE Toll-interacting protein OS=Mus musculus G... 53 1e-06 sp|A0FGR8|ESYT2_HUMAN Extended... synaptotagmin-2 OS=Homo sapiens G... 53 1e-06 sp|Q3TZZ7|ESYT2_MOUSE Extended...sp|Q9Z0R6|ITSN2_MOUSE Intersectin-2 OS=Mus musculus GN=Itsn2 PE=... 50 7e-06 sp|A0FGR9|ESYT3_HUMAN Extended

  2. Midterm clinical outcome following Edwards SAPIEN or Medtronic Corevalve transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI): Results of the Belgian TAVI registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collas, Valérie M; Dubois, Christophe; Legrand, Victor; Kefer, Joëlle; De Bruyne, Bernard; Dens, Jo; Rodrigus, Inez E; Herijgers, Paul; Bosmans, Johan M

    2015-09-01

    To assess midterm (3 years) clinical outcomes of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in Belgium using the Edwards SAPIEN valve or the Medtronic CoreValve transcatheter heart valve (THV). Medium and long term follow-up data of both THVs are still relatively scarce, although of great clinical relevance for a relatively new but rapidly expanding treatment modality. Therefore, reporting mid- and long term clinical outcome data, coming from large "real world" national registries, remains contributive. Between December 2007 and March 2012, 861 "real world" patients who were not candidates for surgical aortic valve replacement as decided by the local heart teams, underwent TAVI at 23 sites. Eleven sites exclusively used SAPIEN THV (n = 460), while 12 exclusively used CoreValve THV (n = 401). Differences in clinical outcomes by valve system were assessed, according to access route and baseline EuroSCORE risk profile (20%: high risk). Overall cumulative survival at 3 years was 51% for SAPIEN vs. 60% for CoreValve (P = 0.021). In transfemorally treated patients, SAPIEN and CoreValve had similar survival at 3 years for each of the baseline EuroSCORE cohorts (low risk: 72% vs. 76%, P = 0.45; intermediate risk: 62% vs. 59%, P = 0.94; high risk: 48% vs. 53%, P = 0.65). Cumulative midterm 3 year survival after transfemoral TAVI in "real world" patients refused for surgery with similar baseline EuroSCORE risk profile is not different between SAPIEN or CoreValve. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-SARA-01-1746 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|EAW65549.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 1, ...isoform CRA_a [Homo sapiens] gb|EAW65551.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 1, isoform CRA_a... [Homo sapiens] gb|ABM82178.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 1 ...[synthetic construct] gb|ABM85364.1| non imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome 1 [synthetic construct] CAD97953.1 1e-113 81% ...

  4. AcEST: DK948680 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available n ligase Arkadia OS=Hom... 35 0.50 sp|O35177|CASL_MOUSE Enhancer of filamentation 1 OS=Mus musculus... 35 0....50 sp|Q14511|CASL_HUMAN Enhancer of filamentation 1 OS=Homo sapiens... 35 0.50 sp|O94402|YQF9_SCHPO Uncharac... P G PPQ +PP Sbjct: 643 RHYMPPPYASLTRPLHHQASACPHSHGNPPPQTQPP 678 >sp|O35177|CASL_MOUSE Enhancer of filamentation...bjct: 527 LDRFVMVAKTVPDDAKQLTTTI 548 >sp|Q14511|CASL_HUMAN Enhancer of filamentation 1 OS=Homo sapiens GN=NE

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15647-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9 0.55 BC064601_1( BC064601 |pid:none) Homo sapiens pleckstrin homology d... 39 0.55 AF232934_1( AF232934 |pid:none) Mus musculus Goo..._1( AF232933 |pid:none) Bos taurus Goodpasture antigen-bin... 39 0.72 AF123047_1( AF123047 |pid:none) Rattus.... 39 0.72 AF232930_1( AF232930 |pid:none) Homo sapiens Goodpasture antigen-b... 39 0.72 CQ855864_1( CQ855864

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09813-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ( O55176 ) RecName: Full=E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Praja1; ... 46 0.001 AL83175... sapiens cDNA FLJ11830 fis, cl... 46 0.001 BT026528_1( BT026528 |pid:none) Bos taurus praja 1 (PJA1), mRNA, ...c... 46 0.001 AF335251_1( AF335251 |pid:none) Mus musculus Praja1 isoform c (Pja... 46 0.001 DQ415920_18( DQ...45 0.002 BC048323_1( BC048323 |pid:none) Homo sapiens praja ring finger 1, ... 45...0U04) RecName: Full=E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Praja2; ... 43 0.011 AK122282_1( AK122282 |pid:none) Mus mus

  7. INTEGRAL/JEM-X detection of fading emission from GT Mus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiocchi, M.; Chenevez, J.; Sguera, V.;

    2015-01-01

    On November 15th 2015 the MAXI/GSC detected a big flare from the RS CVn star GT Mus with a flux of ~100 mCrab in the 2-20 keV energy band. (ATel #8285). During recent INTEGRAL observations of the Musca region performed between 17 Nov 16:08 and 18 Nov 00:05 (UTC) the source GT Mus was within...... a 3 sigma upper limit of about 25 mCrab in the 18-40 keV energy range. In addition, INTEGRAL observed the Musca region on Nov 12 2015 between 11:14 and 17:11 (UTC) and the source was not significantly detected by JEM-X. We derive a 5-sigma upper limit of 4 mCrab (3-10 keV) for a net exposure time...

  8. Novel insights into maintaining genomic integrity: Wee1 regulating Mus81/Eme1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Yusé

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Maintenance of genomic integrity is essential for cell survival. Specifically, during DNA replication cells use a complex network of mechanisms that prevents genomic instability. Recently, we and others identified Wee1, a serine/threonine and tyrosine kinase, as a new modulator of the genomic stability during S phase. Loss of its activity causes a general DNA damage response activation and a decrease in replication fork speed. These effects are counteracted by the downregulation of the endonuclease complex Mus81-Eme1, showing a new link between this endonuclease and Wee1 during DNA replication. Here we discuss the function of Wee1 in genomic stability and its relationship with the Mus81-Eme1 complex.

  9. A Comparative Analysis of Gene Expression Profiles during Skin Regeneration in Mus and Acomys

    OpenAIRE

    Brant, Jason Orr; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Barbazuk, W. Brad; Maden, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    The African spiny mouse (Acomys spp.) can heal full thickness excisional skin wounds in a scar-free manner with regeneration of all dermal components including hair and associated structures. Comparing Acomys scar-free healing from Mus scarring identifies gene expression differences that discriminate these processes. We have performed an extensive comparison of gene expression profiles in response to 8mm full-thickness excisional wounds at days 3, 5, 7 and 14 post-wounding between Acomys and ...

  10. Dental size reduction in Indonesian Homo erectus: Implications for the PU-198 premolar and the appearance of Homo sapiens on Java.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanski, Joshua M; Marsh, Hannah E; Maddux, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    The recent recovery of a hominin maxillary third premolar, PU-198, within the faunal collections from Punung Cave (East Java) has led to assertions that Homo sapiens appeared on Java between 143,000 and 115,000 years ago. The taxonomic assignment of PU-198 to H. sapiens was based predominantly on the small size of the specimen, following an analysis which found little to no overlap in premolar size between Homo erectus and terminal Pleistocene/Holocene H. sapiens. Here, we re-evaluate the use of size in the taxonomic assignment of PU-198 in light of 1) new buccolingual and mesiodistal measurements taken on the fossil, 2) comparisons to a larger sample of H. erectus and H. sapiens maxillary third premolars, and 3) evidence of a diachronic trend in post-canine dental size reduction among Javan H. erectus. Our results demonstrate PU-198 to be slightly larger than previously suggested, reveal substantial overlap in premolar size between H. erectus and H. sapiens, and indicate a statistically significant reduction in premolar size between early and late Javan H. erectus. Our findings cast doubt on the assignment of PU-198 to H. sapiens, and accordingly, question the appearance of H. sapiens on Java between 143,000 and 115,000 years ago.

  11. Stringent homology-based prediction of H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hufeng; Gao, Shangzhi; Nguyen, Nam Ninh; Fan, Mengyuan; Jin, Jingjing; Liu, Bing; Zhao, Liang; Xiong, Geng; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Wong, Limsoon

    2014-04-08

    H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv protein-protein interaction (PPI) data are essential for understanding the infection mechanism of the formidable pathogen M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Computational prediction is an important strategy to fill the gap in experimental H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI data. Homology-based prediction is frequently used in predicting both intra-species and inter-species PPIs. However, some limitations are not properly resolved in several published works that predict eukaryote-prokaryote inter-species PPIs using intra-species template PPIs. We develop a stringent homology-based prediction approach by taking into account (i) differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins and (ii) differences between inter-species and intra-species PPI interfaces. We compare our stringent homology-based approach to a conventional homology-based approach for predicting host-pathogen PPIs, based on cellular compartment distribution analysis, disease gene list enrichment analysis, pathway enrichment analysis and functional category enrichment analysis. These analyses support the validity of our prediction result, and clearly show that our approach has better performance in predicting H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs. Using our stringent homology-based approach, we have predicted a set of highly plausible H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPIs which might be useful for many of related studies. Based on our analysis of the H. sapiens-M. tuberculosis H37Rv PPI network predicted by our stringent homology-based approach, we have discovered several interesting properties which are reported here for the first time. We find that both host proteins and pathogen proteins involved in the host-pathogen PPIs tend to be hubs in their own intra-species PPI network. Also, both host and pathogen proteins involved in host-pathogen PPIs tend to have longer primary sequence, tend to have more domains, tend to be more hydrophilic, etc. And the protein domains from both

  12. Roles of SLX1-SLX4, MUS81-EME1, and GEN1 in avoiding genome instability and mitotic catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbajna, Shriparna; Davies, Derek; West, Stephen C

    2014-05-15

    The resolution of recombination intermediates containing Holliday junctions (HJs) is critical for genome maintenance and proper chromosome segregation. Three pathways for HJ processing exist in human cells and involve the following enzymes/complexes: BLM-TopoIIIα-RMI1-RMI2 (BTR complex), SLX1-SLX4-MUS81-EME1 (SLX-MUS complex), and GEN1. Cycling cells preferentially use the BTR complex for the removal of double HJs in S phase, with SLX-MUS and GEN1 acting at temporally distinct phases of the cell cycle. Cells lacking SLX-MUS and GEN1 exhibit chromosome missegregation, micronucleus formation, and elevated levels of 53BP1-positive G1 nuclear bodies, suggesting that defects in chromosome segregation lead to the transmission of extensive DNA damage to daughter cells. In addition, however, we found that the effects of SLX4, MUS81, and GEN1 depletion extend beyond mitosis, since genome instability is observed throughout all phases of the cell cycle. This is exemplified in the form of impaired replication fork movement and S-phase progression, endogenous checkpoint activation, chromosome segmentation, and multinucleation. In contrast to SLX4, SLX1, the nuclease subunit of the SLX1-SLX4 structure-selective nuclease, plays no role in the replication-related phenotypes associated with SLX4/MUS81 and GEN1 depletion. These observations demonstrate that the SLX1-SLX4 nuclease and the SLX4 scaffold play divergent roles in the maintenance of genome integrity in human cells.

  13. Normalization of Complete Genome Characteristics: Application to Evolution from Primitive Organisms to Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorimachi, Kenji; Okayasu, Teiji; Ohhira, Shuji

    2015-04-01

    Normalized nucleotide and amino acid contents of complete genome sequences can be visualized as radar charts. The shapes of these charts depict the characteristics of an organism's genome. The normalized values calculated from the genome sequence theoretically exclude experimental errors. Further, because normalization is independent of both target size and kind, this procedure is applicable not only to single genes but also to whole genomes, which consist of a huge number of different genes. In this review, we discuss the applications of the normalization of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid contents of complete genomes to the investigation of genome structure and to evolutionary research from primitive organisms to Homo sapiens. Some of the results could never have been obtained from the analysis of individual nucleotide or amino acid sequences but were revealed only after the normalization of nucleotide and amino acid contents was applied to genome research. The discovery that genome structure was homogeneous was obtained only after normalization methods were applied to the nucleotide or predicted amino acid contents of genome sequences. Normalization procedures are also applicable to evolutionary research. Thus, normalization of the contents of whole genomes is a useful procedure that can help to characterize organisms.

  14. Apoptotic lymphocytes of H. sapiens lose nucleosomes in GC-rich promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosid, Sergey; Ioshikhes, Ilya

    2014-07-01

    We analyzed two sets of human CD4+ nucleosomal DNA directly sequenced by Illumina (Solexa) high throughput sequencing method. The first set has ∼40 M sequences and was produced from the normal CD4+ T lymphocytes by micrococcal nuclease. The second set has ∼44 M sequences and was obtained from peripheral blood lymphocytes by apoptotic nucleases. The different nucleosome sets showed similar dinucleotide positioning AA/TT, GG/CC, and RR/YY (R is purine, Y--pyrimidine) patterns with periods of 10-10.4 bp. Peaks of GG/CC and AA/TT patterns were shifted by 5 bp from each other. Two types of promoters in H. sapiens: AT and GC-rich were identified. AT-rich promoters in apoptotic cell had +1 nucleosome shifts 50-60 bp downstream from those in normal lymphocytes. GC-rich promoters in apoptotic cells lost 80% of nucleosomes around transcription start sites as well as in total DNA. Nucleosome positioning was predicted by combination of {AA, TT}, {GG, CC}, {WW, SS} and {RR, YY} patterns. In our study we found that the combinations of {AA, TT} and {GG, CC} provide the best results and successfully mapped 33% of nucleosomes 147 bp long with precision ±15 bp (only 31/147 or 21% is expected).

  15. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of Homo sapiens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen years marked the time between the discovery of the double helix in 1953 and the elucidation of the genetic code in 1966. A similar interval has now passed since the development by Cohen and Boyer of a simple procedure for the cloning of selective DNA fragments. The scientific advances made possible by the subsequent modification and elaboration of these original cloning procedures now amaze, stimulate, and increasingly often overwhelm us. Facts that until recently were virtually unobtainable now flow forth almost effortlessly. Most excitingly, the frenetic pace of these new discoveries, instead of marking the impending end of a glorious moment of learning, give every indication of opening up scientific frontiers that will take hundreds if not thousands of years to explore thoroughly. This new era of enlightenment is nowhere more apparent than in our newfound ability to study ourselves at the molecular level. This volume is the first of two collections of papers submitted by the contributors to the Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology for 1986 - molecular biology of Homo sapiens. Contained in this collection are 80 papers grouped into sessions entitled Human Gene Map, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, and Drugs Made Off Human Genes.

  16. Reconstruction of Protein-Protein Interaction Network of Insulin Signaling in Homo Sapiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saliha Durmuş Tekir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is one of the most prevalent diseases in the world. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the failure of synthesizing and secreting of insulin because of destroyed pancreatic β-cells. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is described by the decreased synthesis and secretion of insulin because of the defect in pancreatic β-cells as well as by the failure of responding to insulin because of malfunctioning of insulin signaling. In order to understand the signaling mechanisms of responding to insulin, it is necessary to identify all components in the insulin signaling network. Here, an interaction network consisting of proteins that have statistically high probability of being biologically related to insulin signaling in Homo sapiens was reconstructed by integrating Gene Ontology (GO annotations and interactome data. Furthermore, within this reconstructed network, interacting proteins which mediate the signal from insulin hormone to glucose transportation were identified using linear paths. The identification of key components functioning in insulin action on glucose metabolism is crucial for the efforts of preventing and treating type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Pair-bonding, romantic love, and evolution: the curious case of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Garth J O; Simpson, Jeffry A; Campbell, Lorne; Overall, Nickola C

    2015-01-01

    This article evaluates a thesis containing three interconnected propositions. First, romantic love is a "commitment device" for motivating pair-bonding in humans. Second, pair-bonding facilitated the idiosyncratic life history of hominins, helping to provide the massive investment required to rear children. Third, managing long-term pair bonds (along with family relationships) facilitated the evolution of social intelligence and cooperative skills. We evaluate this thesis by integrating evidence from a broad range of scientific disciplines. First, consistent with the claim that romantic love is an evolved commitment device, our review suggests that it is universal; suppresses mate-search mechanisms; has specific behavioral, hormonal, and neuropsychological signatures; and is linked to better health and survival. Second, we consider challenges to this thesis posed by the existence of arranged marriage, polygyny, divorce, and infidelity. Third, we show how the intimate relationship mind seems to be built to regulate and monitor relationships. Fourth, we review comparative evidence concerning links among mating systems, reproductive biology, and brain size. Finally, we discuss evidence regarding the evolutionary timing of shifts to pair-bonding in hominins. We conclude there is interdisciplinary support for the claim that romantic love and pair-bonding, along with alloparenting, played critical roles in the evolution of Homo sapiens.

  18. Greater Emphasis on Female Attractiveness in Homo Sapiens: A Revised Solution to an Old Evolutionary Riddle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Gottschall

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Substantial evidence from psychology and cross-cultural anthropology supports a general rule of greater emphasis on female physical attractiveness in Homo sapiens. As sensed by Darwin (1871 and clarified by Trivers (1972, generally higher female parental investment is a key determinant of a common pattern of sexual selection in which male animals are more competitive, more eager sexually and more conspicuous in courtship display, ornamentation, and coloration. Therefore, given the larger minimal and average parental investment of human females, keener physical attractiveness pressure among women has long been considered an evolutionary riddle. This paper briefly surveys previous thinking on the question, before offering a revised explanation for why we should expect humans to sharply depart from general zoological pattern of greater emphasis on male attractiveness. This contribution hinges on the argument that humans have been seen as anomalies mainly because we have been held up to the wrong zoological comparison groups. I argue that humans are a partially sex-role reversed species, and more emphasis on female physical attractiveness is relatively common in such species. This solution to the riddle, like those of other evolutionists, is based on peculiarities in human mating behavior, so this paper is also presented as a refinement of current thinking about the evolution of human mating preferences.

  19. Similar Efficacies of Selection Shape Mitochondrial and Nuclear Genes in Both Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Brandon S; Burrus, Chad R; Ji, Chao; Hahn, Matthew W; Montooth, Kristi L

    2015-08-21

    Deleterious mutations contribute to polymorphism even when selection effectively prevents their fixation. The efficacy of selection in removing deleterious mitochondrial mutations from populations depends on the effective population size (Ne) of the mitochondrial DNA and the degree to which a lack of recombination magnifies the effects of linked selection. Using complete mitochondrial genomes from Drosophila melanogaster and nuclear data available from the same samples, we reexamine the hypothesis that nonrecombining animal mitochondrial DNA harbor an excess of deleterious polymorphisms relative to the nuclear genome. We find no evidence of recombination in the mitochondrial genome, and the much-reduced level of mitochondrial synonymous polymorphism relative to nuclear genes is consistent with a reduction in Ne. Nevertheless, we find that the neutrality index, a measure of the excess of nonsynonymous polymorphism relative to the neutral expectation, is only weakly significantly different between mitochondrial and nuclear loci. This difference is likely the result of the larger proportion of beneficial mutations in X-linked relative to autosomal loci, and we find little to no difference between mitochondrial and autosomal neutrality indices. Reanalysis of published data from Homo sapiens reveals a similar lack of a difference between the two genomes, although previous studies have suggested a strong difference in both species. Thus, despite a smaller Ne, mitochondrial loci of both flies and humans appear to experience similar efficacies of purifying selection as do loci in the recombining nuclear genome.

  20. Temporal coherence for pure tones in budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilans, Erikson G; Dent, Micheal L

    2015-02-01

    Auditory scene analysis has been suggested as a universal process that exists across all animals. Relative to humans, however, little work has been devoted to how animals perceptually isolate different sound sources. Frequency separation of sounds is arguably the most common parameter studied in auditory streaming, but it is not the only factor contributing to how the auditory scene is perceived. Researchers have found that in humans, even at large frequency separations, synchronous tones are heard as a single auditory stream, whereas asynchronous tones with the same frequency separations are perceived as 2 distinct sounds. These findings demonstrate how both the timing and frequency separation of sounds are important for auditory scene analysis. It is unclear how animals, such as budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), perceive synchronous and asynchronous sounds. In this study, budgerigars and humans (Homo sapiens) were tested on their perception of synchronous, asynchronous, and partially overlapping pure tones using the same psychophysical procedures. Species differences were found between budgerigars and humans in how partially overlapping sounds were perceived, with budgerigars more likely to segregate overlapping sounds and humans more apt to fuse the 2 sounds together. The results also illustrated that temporal cues are particularly important for stream segregation of overlapping sounds. Lastly, budgerigars were found to segregate partially overlapping sounds in a manner predicted by computational models of streaming, whereas humans were not.