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Sample records for santorini south aegean

  1. Formation of heterogeneous magmatic series beneath North Santorini, South Aegean island arc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, John C; Jensen, E.S.; Hansen, A.

    2008-01-01

    magma formation beneath North Santorini throughout its 500 ka history is attributed to variable transfer of sedimentary components - either terrigenous or pelagic, as bulk sediments or high-temperature partial melts rather than fluids or low-temperature partial melts - from a rupture zone...

  2. Expanding extension, subsidence and lateral segmentation within the Santorini - Amorgos basins during Quaternary: Implications for the 1956 Amorgos events, central - south Aegean Sea, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P.; Hübscher, C.; Papanikolaou, D.; Farangitakis, G. P.; Ruhnau, M.; Lampridou, D.

    2018-01-01

    New bathymetric and seismic reflection data from the Santorini-Amorgos Tectonic Zone in the southern Cyclades have been analysed and a description of the morphology and tectonic structure of the area has been presented. The basins of Anhydros, Amorgos and Santorini-Anafi have been distinguished together with the intermediate Anhydros Horst within the NE-SW oriented Santorini-Amorgos Tectonic Zone which has a length of 60-70 km and a width of 20-25 km. The basins represent tectonic grabens or semi-grabens bordered by the active marginal normal faults of Santorini-Anafi, Amorgos, Ios, Anhydros and Astypalaea. The Santorini-Anafi, Amorgos and Ios marginal faults have their footwall towards the NW where Alpine basement occurs in the submarine scarps and their hangingwall towards the southeast, where the Quaternary sediments have been deposited with maximum thickness of 700 m. Six sedimentary Units 1-6 have been distinguished in the stratigraphic successions of the Santorini-Anafi and the western Anhydros Basin whereas in the rest area only the upper four Units 3-6 have been deposited. This shows the expansion of the basin with subsidence during the Quaternary due to ongoing extension in a northwest-southeast direction. Growth structures are characterized by different periods of maximum deformation as this is indicated by the different sedimentary units with maximum thickness next to each fault. Transverse structures of northwest-southeast direction have been identified along the Santorini-Amorgos Tectonic Zone with distinction of the blocks/segments of Santorini, Anhydros/Kolumbo, Anhydros islet and Amorgos. Recent escarpments with 7-9 m offset observed along the Amorgos Fault indicate that this was activated during the first earthquake of the 7.5 magnitude 1956 events whereas no recent landslide was found in the area that could be related to the 1956 tsunami.

  3. Calc-alkaline lavas from the volcanic complex of Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece : a petrological, geochemical and stratigraphic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijsmans, J.P.P.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of a petrological-geochemical- and stratigraphic study of the calc-alkaline lavas from Santorini, Aegean Sea, Greece. The volcanic complex of Santorini consists of seven eruption centres, of which some have been active contemporaneous. The eruption centres in the

  4. Magnetotelluric Investigation of the South Aegean Volcanic Arc, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisperi, Despina; Romano, Gerardo; Smirnov, Maxim; Kouli, Maria; Perrone, Angela; Makris, John P.; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2014-05-01

    The South Aegean Volcanic Arc (SAVA) is a chain of volcanic islands in the South Aegean resulting from the subduction of the African tectonic plate beneath the Eurasian plate. It extends from Methana, northwest, to the Island of Nisyros southeast (450 km total length). SAVA comprises a series of dormant and historically active volcanoes, with the most prominent to be Aegina, Methana, Milos, Santorini, Kolumbo, Kos and Nisyros. The aim of the ongoing research project "MagnetoTellurics in studying Geodynamics of the hEllenic ARc (MT-GEAR)" is to contribute to the investigation of the geoelectric structure of Southern Aegean, and particularly to attempt to image the Hellenic Subduction Zone. In this context, onshore magnetotelluric (MT) measurements were recently carried out on the central and eastern part of SAVA (Milos, Santorini, Nisyros and Kos Islands). Data were collected using two MT systems running simultaneously plus a remote reference station installed in Omalos plateau (Western Crete). Robust MT data analysis of the broad-band MT soundings and the resulting model of the conductivity structure of the South Aegean Volcanic Arc is presented. The research is co-funded by the European Social Fund (ESF) and National Resources under the Operational Programme 'Education and Lifelong Learning (EdLL) within the context of the Action 'Supporting Postdoctoral Researchers' in the framework of the project title "MagnetoTellurics in studying Geodynamics of the hEllenic ARc (MT-GEAR)".

  5. The South Aegean seismological network - HSNC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hloupis, G.; Papadopoulos, I.; Makris, J. P.; Vallianatos, F.

    2013-04-01

    In the present work, the installation and the technology applied for the operation of the Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC), located in the front of the Hellenic Arc, are presented. The topology, the communication modes (wire and satellite) along with data collection and processing methodologies applied leads to the operation of a new seismological infrastructure in South Aegean, one of the most seismically active regions in Europe.

  6. Setting an ecological baseline prior to the bottom-up establishment of a marine protected area in Santorini island, Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SALOMIDI

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010, a bottom-up initiative has been launched in Santorini Island (Aegean Sea, Eastern Mediterranean for the establishment of the first fully-protected marine protected area in the Cyclades, aiming at improving fisheries and enhancing responsible recreational uses at sea. Following discussions with local small-scale fishers and divers, two sites along the southern and southeastern coasts of the island were suggested as suitable to this end. In 2012, a baseline study was conducted at these areas to assess their state and provide an ecological snapshot that would enable sound designation and monitoring. Several ad hoc indices and metrics were applied, taking into account structural and functional features of the upper infralittoral algae and Posidonia oceanica beds. An integrated assessment of the infralittoral fish assemblages and their associated benthic communities was also performed. Our most important findings were: (i the low total fish biomass and the absence of adult top predators, indicating overfishing; (ii the overgrazing effects of the overabundant alien herbivore spinefoot fishes (Siganus spp., as reflected by the abnormal structure of the algal communities; (iii the scarcity of signs of pollution or other direct anthropogenic pressures, as indicated by the good environmental status of the P. oceanica meadows and the upper infralittoral vegetation; and (iv the presence of a rich diversity of species and habitats, especially along the Akrotiri Peninsula and the wider volcanic Caldera. These findings provide useful insights on strengths and weaknesses of the study area and are discussed together with their implications for protection and management.

  7. Santorini Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  8. Geoarchaeological tsunami deposits at Palaikastro (Crete) and the Late Minoan IA eruption of Santorini

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Hendrik J.; MacGillivray, J. Alexander; Synolakis, Costas E.; Benjamini, Chaim; Keller, Joerg; Kisch, Hanan J.; Kleugel, Andreas; van der Plicht, Johannes; Klügel, Andreas

    The explosive eruption at Santorini in the Aegean Sea during the second millennium BCE was the largest Holocene volcanic upheaval in the Eastern Mediterranean region. The eruption was disastrous for the Minoan settlements at Santorini, but the effect on human society in the neighbouring islands and

  9. Upper Crustal Structure of Santorini Volcano from Seismic Tomography using the PROTEUS dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, B.; Hooft, E. E. E.; Morgan, J. V.; Toomey, D. R.; Nomikou, P.; Papazachos, C. V.; Warner, M.

    2016-12-01

    We present initial travel time tomography results from the PROTEUS experiment (Plumbing Reservoirs Of The Earth Under Santorini), an experiment designed to seismically image magma reservoirs beneath Santorini Volcano (Greece). Few seismic imaging studies have been previously conducted on Santorini and none have investigated the deeper crustal magmatic system. The experiment presents a unique opportunity to seismically probe the plumbing system of a historically active arc volcano because of a relatively thin Aegean crust, permitting easier seismic access to the subvolcanic magmatic system, and because of the ability to use marine air gun sound sources for imaging purposes. The latter provides over 1 million unique station-shot pairs ( 14000 airgun shots, over 100 onshore and offshore seismometers) producing a nearly unparalleled seismic dataset for a continental volcano. Our preliminary travel-time tomography results use tens of thousands of travel-time picks and a 3-D ray tracer to invert for anisotropic velocity structure of the upper 5 km of Santorini Volcano and surrounding tectonic region. Our tomographic images provide new constraints on how differing stages of tectonism and volcanism have shaped the geologic structure of the Aegean Volcanic Arc; specifically, we utilize our seismic dataset as well as the unique bathymetric dataset collected during the PROTEUS experiment to study the relationship between seismic velocity, faulting, and volcanism. These results are the first of a multi-year effort to both seismically image Santorini Volcano and understand how our images compare to other geophysical/geochemical models of Santorini and other analogous volcanoes. This experiment represents an unique opportunity to tomographically investigate the magmatic plumbing of a geochemically and volcanologically well-studied volcano.

  10. Influence of hydrothermal venting on water column properties in the crater of the Kolumbo submarine volcano, Santorini volcanic field (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Maria E.; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steven; Mandalakis, Manolis

    2016-02-01

    The Kolumbo submarine volcano, located 7 km northeast of the island of Santorini, is part of Santorini's volcanic complex in the south Aegean Sea, Greece. Kolumbo's last eruption was in 1650 AD. However, a unique and active hydrothermal vent field has been revealed in the northern part of its crater floor during an oceanographic survey by remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) in 2006. In the present study, conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data collected by ROV Hercules during three oceanographic surveys onboard E/V Nautilus in 2010 and 2011 have served to investigate the distribution of physicochemical properties in the water column, as well as their behavior directly over the hydrothermal field. Additional CTD measurements were carried out in volcanic cone 3 (VC3) along the same volcanic chain but located 3 km northeast of Kolumbo where no hydrothermal activity has been detected to date. CTD profiles exhibit pronounced anomalies directly above the active vents on Kolumbo's crater floor. In contrast, VC3 data revealed no such anomalies, essentially resembling open-sea (background) conditions. Steep increases of temperature (e.g., from 16 to 19 °C) and conductivity near the maximum depth (504 m) inside Kolumbo's cone show marked spatiotemporal correlation. Vertical distributions of CTD signatures suggest a strong connection to Kolumbo's morphology, with four distinct zones identified (open sea, turbid flow, invariable state, hydrothermal vent field). Additionally, overlaying the near-seafloor temperature measurements on an X-Y coordinate grid generates a detailed 2D distribution of the hydrothermal vent field and clarifies the influence of fluid discharges in its formation.

  11. Hydrodynamic features of the South Aegean Sea as derived from Argo T/ S and dissolved oxygen profiles in the area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Dimitris; Krasakopoulou, Evangelia; Korres, Gerasimos; Petihakis, George; Triantafyllou, George S.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the hydrodynamic picture of the South Aegean Sea is examined through an analysis of recent measurements in its sub-basins, the Myrtoan and Cretan Sea. Both sub-basins play an important role in the water circulation, exchange, and formation processes that affect the dynamics of the whole Eastern Mediterranean. For the first time, Bio-Argo floats were deployed in the area under the Greek Argo Research Infrastructure coordination. The acquired profiles cover an almost 2-year period (November 2013-July 2015) and are compared with previous Argo profiles and the re-processed time-series data recorded from the E1-M3A POSEIDON observatory operating in the area since 2007. The spatio-temporal distribution of the physical and chemical properties in each sub-basin is examined. Dense water formation events are revealed in the northern part (Myrtoan), while the wider area can be characterized as pre-conditioned. In the Cretan basin, a strong inter-annual variability of the salinity field at intermediate and deep layers is observed that is associated with water exchange from its open boundaries. Furthermore, comparison of the dissolved oxygen (DO) distribution with physical water properties within both the mixed layer, and at greater depths, indicated that relatively high but still under-saturated DO values are more likely to be associated with convection events. Finally, an updated picture of the physical properties and the DO distribution is presented based on the last 5 years of measurements and the recent introduction of Bio-Argo floats with DO sensors in the area.

  12. SANTORINI BEFORE THE MINOAN ERUPTION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, Walter L.; Sørensen, Annette Højen; Katsipis, Samson

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions Several detailed geological observations in the landscape of Santorini enable us to claim that the two harbour towns were located on the inner side of the caldera wall on the island of Thera prior to the Minoan Eruption. This hypothesis is in agreement with the excavation sites of Balos...... and Raos. The painted landscape in the fresco is highly comparable to what is seen in the two harbour sites discussed above. The water-filled caldera gave the inhabitants additional advantages: several natural harbours, good fishing grounds, and mineral resources. This new interpretation enables us to claim...

  13. Ductile nappe stacking and refolding in the Cycladic Blueschist Unit: insights from Sifnos Island (south Aegean Sea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aravadinou, E.; Xypolias, P.; Chatzaras, V.; Iliopoulos, I.; Gerogiannis, N.

    2016-01-01

    New geological and structural mapping combined with kinematic and amphibole chemistry analyses is used to investigate the deformation history of the Cycladic Blueschist Unit (CBU) on Sifnos Island (Cyclades, Aegean Sea). We concentrate on north Sifnos, an area characterized by exceptionally

  14. Petrological insights on the effusive-explosive transitions of the Nisyros-Yali Volcanic Center, South Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Razvan-Gabriel; Bachmann, Olivier; Ellis, Ben; Degruyter, Wim; Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-04-01

    Volcanoes erupting silicic, volatile-rich magmas can exhibit both effusive and explosive eruptions, even during closely spaced eruptive episodes. Understanding the effusive-explosive transition is fundamental in order to assess the hazards involved. Magma properties strongly influence the processes during magma ascent that determine the eruptive style. Here, we investigate the link between changing conditions in the magma reservoir and the eruptive style. The Quaternary Nisyros-Yali volcanic center, from the South Aegean Sea, provides an excellent natural laboratory to study this process. Over the last 60-100 kyrs, it produced a series of dacitic to rhyolitic eruptions that emplaced alternating effusive and explosive deposits (with explosive eruptions likely shortly following effusive ones). For this study, nine fresh and well-preserved units (five effusive and four explosive) were sampled and analyzed for whole-rock, groundmass glass and mineral compositions, in order to draw insights into the magma chamber processes and thermodynamic conditions that preceded both types of eruptions. Silicic magmas in Nisyros-Yali record a complex, open-system evolution, dominated by fractionation in mushy reservoirs at mid to upper crustal depths, frequently recharged by warmer input from below. Storage temperatures recorded by the amphibole-plagioclase thermometer span a wide range, and they are always cooler than the pre-eruptive temperatures yielded by Fe-Ti oxide thermometry for the same unit, whether it is effusive or explosive. However, magmas feeding effusive eruptions typically reached cooler conditions (expressed by the presence of low-Al, low-Ti amphiboles) than in the explosive cases. The difference between the pre-eruptive and the lowest storing temperatures in the Nisyros series are in the order of 10-30°C for explosive units, while the difference is of about 40-110°C for the effusive units. The Yali series does not perfectly fit this pattern, where explosive units

  15. Geochemical models of melting and magma storage conditions for basalt lava from Santorini Volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baziotis, Ioannis; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Pantazidis, Avgoustinos; Klemme, Stephan; Berndt, Jasper; Asimow, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Santorini volcano sits ˜150 km above the Wadati-Benioff zone of the Aegean arc, where the African plate subducts northward beneath the Eurasian continent (Papazachos et al. 2000). Santorini volcano has a long history: activity started ca. 650 ka (mainly rhyolites and rhyodacites), with active pulses following ca. 550 ka (basalt to rhyodacite) and ca. 360 ka (large explosive eruptions of andesite to rhyodacite and minor basalt), culminating in the caldera-forming Bronze-age Minoan event (Druitt et al. 1999). As in many arc volcanoes, scenarios of fractional crystallization with or without mixing between felsic and mafic magmas have been proposed to explain the compositions, textures, and eruptive styles of Santorini products (e.g., Huijsmans & Barton 1989; Montazavi & Sparks 2004; Andújar et al. 2015). Here we focus on a basalt lava from the southern part of Santorini volcano (Balos cove, 36˚ 21.7'N, 25˚ 23.8'E), one of the few basaltic localities in the Aegean arc. The goals are to infer constraints on the magma chamber conditions which lead to mafic eruption at Santorini Volcano and to evaluate the slab and mantle wedge conditions via geochemical and petrological mass balance modelling. We collected and characterised 20 samples for texture (SEM), mineral chemistry (FE-EPMA) and whole-rock chemistry (XRF). The basalts contain phenocrystic olivine (Ol) and clinopyroxene (Cpx) (magnetite (Mt) with minor glass and rare xenocrystic quartz. Santorini basalts exhibit a pilotaxitic to trachytic texture defined by randomly to flow-oriented tabular Pl, respectively. The predominant minerals are calcic Pl (core An78-85 and rim An60-76; 45-50 vol.%), Cpx (En36-48Wo41-44Fs11-21; 10-15 vol.%) and Ol (Fo74-88; 10-12 vol.%). Idiomorphic to subidiomorphic Mt (<10μm diameter) with variable TiO2 contents (1.9-16.5 wt%) is a minor constituent (˜1-2 vol.%) in the less mafic samples. Observed mineralogy and major element chemistry suggest fractionation in a shallow magma chamber

  16. Ancient pests: the season of the Santorini Minoan volcanic eruption and a date from insect chitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotakopulu, Eva; Higham, Thomas; Sarpaki, Anaya; Buckland, Paul; Doumas, Christos

    2013-07-01

    Attributing a season and a date to the volcanic eruption of Santorini in the Aegean has become possible by using preserved remains of the bean weevil, Bruchus rufipes, pests of pulses, from the storage jars of the West House, in the Bronze Age settlement at Akrotiri. We have applied an improved pre-treatment methodology for dating the charred insects, and this provides a date of 1744-1538 BC. This date is within the range of others obtained from pulses from the same context and confirms the utility of chitin as a dating material. Based on the nature of the insect material and the life cycle of the species involved, we argue for a summer eruption, which took place after harvest, shortly after this material was transported into the West House storeroom.

  17. A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: the South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tiago M; Kokinou, Eleni; Zodiatis, George

    2014-09-15

    This study combines bathymetric, geomorphological, geological data and oil spill predictions to model the impact of oil spills in two accident scenarios from offshore Crete, Eastern Mediterranean. The aim is to present a new three-step method of use by emergency teams and local authorities in the assessment of shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills. The three-step method comprises: (1) real-time analyses of bathymetric, geomorphological, geological and oceanographic data; (2) oil dispersion simulations under known wind and sea current conditions; and (3) the compilation of final hazard maps based on information from (1) and (2) and on shoreline susceptibility data. The results in this paper show that zones of high to very-high susceptibility around the island of Crete are related to: (a) offshore bathymetric features, including the presence of offshore scarps and seamounts; (b) shoreline geology, and (c) the presence near the shore of sedimentary basins filled with unconsolidated deposits of high permeability. Oil spills, under particular weather and oceanographic conditions, may quickly spread and reach the shoreline 5-96 h after the initial accident. As a corollary of this work, we present the South Aegean region around Crete as a valid case-study for confined marine basins, narrow seaways, or interior seas around island groups. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Living the Volcano: A First-Year Study Abroad Experience to Santorini, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, L. A.; Miller, M.; Scarnati, B.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade, enrollment in Northern Arizona University's (NAU) Geologic Disasters (GLG112) class has grown to its current 840 students in 7 sections per semester (4% of NAU enrollment). Given this large audience composed of >50% freshmen, the course curriculum was re-designed in 2012 using standards set by NAU's First Year Learning Initiative (FYLI), which seeks to increase academic success early in college. FYLI pedagogical principles include active-learning, frequent feedback, low-stakes assessments, and increased guidance from professors & peer teaching assistants (PTAs). As a result of the successes measured in FYLI courses, we launched a FYLI study abroad experience in 2014. We posed the question, "How can an early-career study abroad experience further develop the attitudes, skills, & behaviors necessary for success?" The pioneering program was NAU in Greece: The Cataclysmic Eruption of Santorini Volcano. Enrollment was limited to freshman & sophomore students who have taken GLG112 (or equivalent). The 3-week program took 9 students, 1 PTA, & 1 faculty member to Santorini (via Athens, 2 days). A detailed itinerary addressed a set of disciplinary & non-disciplinary learning outcomes. Student learning about Santorini volcano and the tectonic setting & hazards of the Aegean Sea occurred on the go - on ferries & private boat trips and during hiking, snorkeling, and swimming. Classroom time was limited to 1 hr/day and frequent assessments were employed. Student products included a geologic field notebook, travel journal, and 3 blog posts pertaining to geologic hazards & life on Santorini. Geologic disasters are ideal topics for early career study abroad experiences because the curriculum is place-based. Student learning benefits immensely from interacting with the land & local populations, whose lives are affected daily by the dangers of living in such geologically hazardous environments. The needs of early career students are unique, however, and must be

  19. Post-eruptive flooding of Santorini caldera and implications for tsunami generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, Paraskevi; Druitt, Tim; Hübscher, Christian; Mather, Tamsin; Paulatto, Michele; Kalnins, Lara; Kelfoun, Karim; Papanikolaou, Dimitris; Bejelou, Konstantina; Lampridou, Danai; Pyle, David; Carey, Steven; Watts, Anthony; Weiß, Benedikt; Parks, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    Caldera-forming eruptions of island volcanoes generate tsunamis by the interaction of different eruptive phenomena with the sea. Such tsunamis are a major hazard, but forward models of their impacts are limited by poor understanding of source mechanisms. The eruption of Santorini 3600 years ago was one of the largest of eruptions known worldwide from the past 10,000 years - and was at least 3 times larger than the catastrophic eruption of Krakatoa. This huge eruption evacuated large volumes of magma, causing collapse of the large caldera, which is now filled with seawater. Tsunamis from this eruption have been proposed to have played a role in the demise of the Minoan culture across the southern Aegean, through damage to coastal towns, harbors, shipping and maritime trade. Before the eruption, there was an older caldera in the northern part of Santorini, partly filled with a shallow lagoon. In our study, we present bathymetric and seismic evidence showing that the caldera was not open to the sea during the main phase of the eruption, but was flooded once the eruption had finished. Following subsidence of the caldera floor, rapid inflow of seawater and landslides cut a deep 2.0-2.5 km3 submarine channel into the northern flank of the caldera wall. Hydrodynamic modelling indicates that the caldera was flooded through this breach in less than a couple of days. It was previously proposed that collapse of the caldera could have led to the formation of a major tsunami; but this is ruled out by our new evidence. Any tsunami's generated were most likely caused by entry of pyroclastic flows into the sea, combined with slumping of submarine pyroclastic accumulations. This idea is consistent with previous assertions that pyroclastic flows were the main cause of tsunamis at Krakatau.

  20. Santorini Volcano's 20th Century Eruptions: A Combined Petrogenetical, Volcanological, Sociological and Environmental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drymoni, Kyriaki; Magganas, Andreas; Pomonis, Panagiotis

    2014-05-01

    Santorini, the famous stratovolcano in the Aegean Sea, erupted three time periods during the 20th century (1925-1928, 1939-1941, 1950) and since then remains dormant. This study tried to combine and evaluate new and published volcanological, petrological, geochemical, environmental and sociological data of these three phases of Santorini's activity, which practically restricted to the caldera center on the Nea Kameni Islet. After field work on the formed dacite flows, pyroclastics and domes, representative rock samples and enclaves were collected and investigated for their texture, physical parameters, mineralogy and chemical composition by polarizing light microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM-EDS), XRD, Raman spectroscopy and ICP-MS. The petrogenetic evaluation of the data obtained suggests slight but significant changes in the solid and aerial phases produced during the three explosion stages, which can be attributed to minor variations in the magmatic differentiation and magma chamber physicochemical conditions. These variations were also expressed by decrease of duration and intensity of the eruptions, as well as in their volume of ejecta and lava. Probably, the subsequent relatively long dormant period of the volcano is also related to this tension of decrease. The first compared results were collected from scientific literature, old photos as well as local and regional press and state documents from the different periods of volcanism, record the past hazard case scenarios and civil defense planning of the individual eruptions. As part of the disaster management a pilot survey, in which personal interviews with aged local islanders that were eye-witnesses of the events and elderly people or tourists that they indirectly experienced or have heard about them, was also conducted. This event-tracing, along with air pollution software models using volcanological data have shown the social impacts and the environmental consequences of the volcanic

  1. Gis-based assessment of marine oil spill hazard and environmental vulnerability for the coasts of Crete in South Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Nikiforakis, Ioannis K.; Kampanis, Nikolaos A.

    2017-04-01

    Developing effective early warning and coordination systems can save thousands of lives and protect people, property and the environment in the event of natural and man-made disasters. In its document "Towards Better Protection of Citizens against Disaster Risks: Strengthening Early Warning Systems in Europe", the Commission points out that it seeks to follow a multi-hazard approach, to develop near real time alert systems, to ensure a near real time dissemination of alerts to Participating States, and to improve its rapid analytical capacity. In this context, the EU project DECATASTROPHIZE (http://decatastrophize.eu/project/) co-financed by the EU Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection aims to develop a Geospatial Early warning Decision Support System (GE-DSS) to assess, prepare for and respond to multiple and/or simultaneous natural and man-made hazards, disasters, and environmental incidents by using existing models/systems in each partner country (Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy and Spain) in a synergistic way on ONE multi-platform, called DECAT. Specifically, project partners will establish appropriate geo-databases for test areas and use existing hazard models to produce hazard and vulnerability geo-spatial information for earthquakes, landslides, tsunamis, floods, forest fires and marine oil spills. The GE-DSS in will consist of one source code with six geodatabases, i.e., one for each partner and risk data in the respective test area. Each partner organization will be able to manage and monitor its own data/database and their results using Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA). The GE-DSS will be demonstrated at the local, regional and national levels through a set of Command Post and Table Top Disaster Exercises. As part of the DECAT GE-DSS, the gis-based geo-database and assessment of marine oil spill hazard and environmental vulnerability for the coasts of Crete in South Aegean Sea are presented here. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps are

  2. The Response of the Aegean Sea (Eastern Mediterranean) to the Extreme 2016-2017 Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaoras, Dimitris; Papadopoulos, Vassilis P.; Kontoyiannis, Harilaos; Papageorgiou, Dimitra K.; Pavlidou, Alexandra

    2017-09-01

    The exceptionally cold December 2016 over the Aegean Sea—one of the most important dense water formation areas of the eastern Mediterranean Sea—resulted in winter heat loss comparable to the peak Eastern Mediterranean Transient winters (1992-1993). Hydrological data sampled in March/April 2017 showed that newly produced dense waters ventilated the North Aegean deep basins up to density horizons of σθ 29.35 kg/m3. The water column ventilation was unable to reach the bottom as the present upper thermohaline circulation of the eastern Mediterranean does not favor the salinity preconditioning of the Aegean Sea. In the southwest Aegean, the Myrtoan basin was ventilated by dense waters traceable farther south to the West Cretan Straits. Export of these masses from the Aegean Sea can potentially have a broader impact on the thermohaline circulation of the eastern Mediterranean.

  3. Reconstruction of the paleo-coastline of Santorini island (Greece ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 1. Reconstruction of the paleo-coastline of Santorini island (Greece), after the 1613 BC volcanic eruption: A GIS-based quantitative methodology. Dimitrios Oikonomidis Konstantinos Albanakis Spyridon Pavlides Michael Fytikas. Volume 125 Issue 1 ...

  4. Why lithospheric extension separated the Aegean from Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, U.; Gessner, K.; Thomson, S. N.; Markwitz, V.

    2015-12-01

    The Aegean Sea region in the eastern Mediterranean is one of the classic and best-studied extensional provinces. Inspired by recent 3D geodynamic models of laterally heterogeneous accretion during rollback we discuss the nature of the transition from the Aegean Sea basin (Hellenides) into the Anatolian plateau of west Turkey (Anatolides). The Hellenides and Anatolides experienced similar rates of convergence, but display remarkable differences in lithospheric structure. Whereas the Aegean is characterized by sustained high-pressure metamorphism followed by slab retreat since c. 60 Ma, a south verging greenschist-facies thrust-and-fold belt formed in the Anatolides since c. 45 Ma. Fission-track contour maps show that since c. 24 Ma extension in both regions evolved differently. Gravity data, earthquake locations and seismic velocity anomalies highlight a N-S oriented subvertical boundary in the upper mantle between a fast slab below the Aegean and a slow asthenospheric region below west Turkey, the West Anatolia Transfer Zone (WATZ). Our data support the hypothesis that the WATZ developed as a result of laterally inhomogeneous convergence along the boundary of the Adriatic and Anatolian lithospheres. 3D numerical simulations of laterally inhomogeneous convergence predict a similar evolution, where two distinct domains develop along strike: a region of distributed shortening where the systems gets congested by a microcontinent (Anatolides), and a region of extension associated with rollback of the active subduction zone (Hellenides). Strike-slip deformation concentrates perpendicular to the boundary of the two domains (WATZ). The numerical simulations also predict other salient features of regional geology and geodynamics, including the origin of a lithospheric window below west Turkey, local ocean floor topography, and the formation of the North Anatolian Fault zone. We argue that the seemingly complex tectonic evolution of the Aegean-Anatolian portion of the

  5. Forecasting magma-chamber rupture at Santorini volcano, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, John; Drymoni, Kyriaki; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2015-10-28

    How much magma needs to be added to a shallow magma chamber to cause rupture, dyke injection, and a potential eruption? Models that yield reliable answers to this question are needed in order to facilitate eruption forecasting. Development of a long-lived shallow magma chamber requires periodic influx of magmas from a parental body at depth. This redistribution process does not necessarily cause an eruption but produces a net volume change that can be measured geodetically by inversion techniques. Using continuum-mechanics and fracture-mechanics principles, we calculate the amount of magma contained at shallow depth beneath Santorini volcano, Greece. We demonstrate through structural analysis of dykes exposed within the Santorini caldera, previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions, and geodetic measurements of the 2011-2012 unrest period, that the measured 0.02% increase in volume of Santorini's shallow magma chamber was associated with magmatic excess pressure increase of around 1.1 MPa. This excess pressure was high enough to bring the chamber roof close to rupture and dyke injection. For volcanoes with known typical extrusion and intrusion (dyke) volumes, the new methodology presented here makes it possible to forecast the conditions for magma-chamber failure and dyke injection at any geodetically well-monitored volcano.

  6. AegeanMarTech project: General Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarra, S.; Zervakis, V.; Karageorgis, A. P.

    2017-10-01

    This issue of "Continental Shelf Research" is dedicated to the study of processes potentially responsible for the relatively high productivity of the North Aegean Sea in comparison to other regions of the Eastern Mediterranean. This region, one of the most important fishing grounds in the eastern Mediterranean, is characterized by: i) the inflow of mesotrophic waters of Black Sea (BSW) origin into the North Aegean and their interaction with the more saline Levantine waters (LW); and ii) the wind-generated coastal upwelling occurring every summer in the eastern Aegean. The study of these two natural fertilization mechanisms has been the major aim of the AegeanMarTech project ("Technological and oceanographic cooperation Network for the Study of mechanisms fertilizing the North-East Aegean Sea").

  7. Bang! Month-scale eruption triggering at Santorini volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Victoria M; Morgan, Daniel J; Jerram, Dougal A; Caddick, Mark J; Prior, David J; Davidson, Jon P

    2008-08-29

    The time lag between intrusion of fresh, hot magma and an ensuing eruption is of critical importance in both understanding the triggering and mitigating the consequences of volcanic eruptions. This work looks at material erupted during 1925-28 at the Nea Kameni volcanic center in Santorini, Greece, to determine this time scale. By exploiting Fe-Mg diffusion in olivine crystals, we constrained the intrusion-to-eruption time lag to between 3 and 10 weeks. These techniques have potential application at many volcanic centers; previously erupted material can be used to calibrate records of the short-time scale processes common to many volcanic centers.

  8. Geometry of the Aegean Benioff zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Knapmeyer

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of the Aegean Benioff zone was reconstructed using 1366 hypocentres from the PDE catalogue 1973-1997. Two such zones are identified under the Aegean area, a large one (Main Aegean Subduction, MAS spanning the whole Hellenic arc and a smaller and younger one under the Western Peloponnesus. The geometry of the MAS suggests that it blocks its own subduction and, therefore, causes the development of the smaller western zone as a result of a step back process in the Pliocene.

  9. Breathing modes of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Santorini, Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Mertzimekis, Theo J; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2017-04-13

    Submarine volcanoes, such as Kolumbo (Santorini, Greece) are natural laboratories for fostering multidisciplinary studies. Their investigation requires the most innovative marine technology together with advanced data analysis. Conductivity and temperature of seawater were recorded directly above Kolumbo's hydrothermal vent system. The respective time series have been analyzed in terms of non-equilibrium techniques. The energy dissipation of the volcanic activity is monitored by the temperature variations of seawater. The venting dynamics of chemical products is monitored by water conductivity. The analysis of the time series in terms of stochastic processes delivers scaling exponents with turning points between consecutive regimes for both conductivity and temperature. Changes of conductivity are shown to behave as a universal multifractal and their variance is subdiffusive as the scaling exponents indicate. Temperature is constant over volcanic rest periods and a universal multifractal behavior describes its changes in line with a subdiffusive character otherwise. The universal multifractal description illustrates the presence of non-conservative conductivity and temperature fields showing that the system never retains a real equilibrium state. The existence of a repeated pattern of the combined effect of both seawater and volcanic activity is predicted. The findings can shed light on the dynamics of chemical products emitted from the vents and point to the presence of underlying mechanisms that govern potentially hazardous, underwater volcanic environments.

  10. Breathing modes of Kolumbo submarine volcano (Santorini, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Mertzimekis, Theo J.; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Submarine volcanoes, such as Kolumbo (Santorini, Greece) are natural laboratories for fostering multidisciplinary studies. Their investigation requires the most innovative marine technology together with advanced data analysis. Conductivity and temperature of seawater were recorded directly above Kolumbo’s hydrothermal vent system. The respective time series have been analyzed in terms of non-equilibrium techniques. The energy dissipation of the volcanic activity is monitored by the temperature variations of seawater. The venting dynamics of chemical products is monitored by water conductivity. The analysis of the time series in terms of stochastic processes delivers scaling exponents with turning points between consecutive regimes for both conductivity and temperature. Changes of conductivity are shown to behave as a universal multifractal and their variance is subdiffusive as the scaling exponents indicate. Temperature is constant over volcanic rest periods and a universal multifractal behavior describes its changes in line with a subdiffusive character otherwise. The universal multifractal description illustrates the presence of non-conservative conductivity and temperature fields showing that the system never retains a real equilibrium state. The existence of a repeated pattern of the combined effect of both seawater and volcanic activity is predicted. The findings can shed light on the dynamics of chemical products emitted from the vents and point to the presence of underlying mechanisms that govern potentially hazardous, underwater volcanic environments.

  11. The most direct and precise radiocarbon date for the Minoan eruption of Santorini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, Walter L.; Heinemeier, Jan

    for the Minoan eruption. Together with a second olive tree, excavated only 9 meters from the first one, it enables us to repeat the earlier measurements of the first tree 2006 (Friedrich, W.L . Kromer, B Friedrich, M. Heinemeier, J. Pfeiffer, T. Talamo, S. Santorini Eruption Radiocarbon Dated to 1627-1600 BC...

  12. Aquatic animal resources in Prehistoric Aegean, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylona, Dimitra

    2014-12-01

    This paper explores the early stages in the history of fishing in the Aegean Sea in Greece, and highlights its formative phases and its specific characteristics in different points in time. This is testified by various physical remains, such as fish bones, fishing tools, and representations in art, which are gathered in the course of archaeological research. The aquatic resources in the Aegean Sea have been exploited and managed for millennia by communities that lived near the water and often made a living from it. The earliest evidence for a systematic, intensive exploitation of marine resources in the Aegean Sea dates to the Mesolithic, eleven millennia ago. In the Neolithic period, the adoption of a sedentary, agro-pastoral way of life led to a reduction in the intensity of fishing and shellfish gathering. Its importance as an economic resource remained high only in certain regions of rich, eutrophic waters. In the Bronze Age, an era of social complexity and centralized economy, the exploitation of aquatic, mostly marine, resources became a complex, multi-faceted activity which involved subsistence, industry and ideology. The range of preferred fish and invertebrate species, the fishing technology, and the processing of fish and shellfish in order to produce elaborate foods or prestige items are all traceable aspects of the complex relationship between humans and the aquatic resources throughout the prehistory of fishing and shellfish gathering in the Aegean area. The broadening of collaboration between archaeology and physical sciences offers new means to explore these issues in a more thorough and nuanced manner.

  13. Barcode High Resolution Melting (Bar-HRM) analysis for detection and quantification of PDO "Fava Santorinis" (Lathyrus clymenum) adulterants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganopoulos, Ioannis; Madesis, Panagiotis; Darzentas, Nikos; Argiriou, Anagnostis; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2012-07-15

    Legumes considered as one of the most important crops worldwide. Due to high price as a PDO product, commercial products of "Fava Santorinis" are often subjected to adulterations from other legume products coming from other Lathyrus or Vicia and Pisum species. Using plant DNA barcoding regions (trnL and rpoC) coupled with High Resolution Melting (Bar-HRM) we have developed a method allowing us to detect and authenticate PDO "Fava Santorinis". Bar-HRM proved to be a very sensitive tool able to genotype Lathyrus and its closed relative species and to detect admixtures, being sensitive enough to as low as 1:100 of non-"Fava Santorinis" in "Fava Santorinis" commercial products. In conclusion, Bar-HRM analysis can be a faster, with higher resolution and cost effectiveness alternative method to authenticate PDO "Fava Santorinis" and to quantitatively detect adulterations in "Fava Santorinis" with other relative commercial "Fava" food products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Vertical distribution and abundance of juvenile cephalopods in Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alp Salman

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in northern (Saros Bay and southern (Gökova Bay parts of the Aegean Sea. In pelagic samplings, Hamburg Plankton Net (HPN was used. Samplings were done out at four different periods of a 24 hour day; sunrise, noon, sunset and midnight. Horizontal hauls were carried out at depths of 100, 350 and 650 m. As the result of 24 hauls in both parts of the Aegean Sea, one hundred juvenile specimens were sampled and 14 species were determined. Juvenile cephalopods were mostly frequent at 350 m. Among the determined species, Chtenopteryx sicula (Verany, 1851, Brachioteuthis riisei (Steenstrup, 1882, Illex coindetii (Verany, 1839, Thysanoteuthis rhombus Trochel, 1857 and Argonauta argo Linnaeus, 1798 juveniles are being reported for the first time in the Aegean Sea. 28% of the catches were from the northern Aegean and the remaining 72% were from the southern Aegean. Heteroteuthis dispar (Rüppell, 1844 was the most common species.

  15. Source of Aegean Sea harbour porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockyer, Christina; Rosel, P. E.; Frantzis, A.

    2003-01-01

    Documented sightings of harbour porpoises in the Mediterranean are rare, although the species is common in the neighbouring North Atlantic and Black Sea. However, in the past 2 decades, 4 harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena have been recorded in the northern Aegean Sea in the eastern Mediterranean...... Basin. Samples were taken from 2 of these. Both have a genetic signature indicative of the Black Sea and their age and small size further suggest they originated from the Black Sea rather than the Atlantic population. These results are the first to indicate probable movement of porpoises out...... of the Black Sea and into the Mediterranean Sea....

  16. Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete (HSNC): a new permanent seismological network in the Southern Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianatos, F.

    2009-04-01

    The Aegean region which comprises the Hellenic arc and the adjacent areas of the Greek mainland, the Aegean Sea and western Turkey, is one of the most seismically active zones of the world and the most active in western Eurasia due to the convergence between the African and Eurasian lithospheric plates. The seismic activity especially in the southern Aegean area is very intense and extends up to a depth of about 180 km. The seismicity of South Aegean is extremely high and is characterised by the frequent occurrence of large shallow and intermediate depth earthquakes. Crete marks the forearc high of the modern Hellenic subduction zone in the eastern Mediterranean. In order to in order to provide modern instrumental coverage of seismicity in the South Aegean, as well as some more insight into the stress and deformation fields, tectonics, structure and dynamics of the Hellenic Arc from which will be possible to retrieve information about the rupture process, a seismological network of high dynamic range is installed. It is called HSNC (Hellenic Seismological Network of Crete) and consists of 11 permanent seismological stations equipped with short period and broadband seismographs coupled with 3rd generation 24bit data loggers as well as from 4 accelerographs. HSNC is rapidly expanded and expected to have complete 18 permanent seismological stations and 12 accelerographs by the end of April 2009. Data transmission and telemetry is based on conventional TCP/IP communication using a hybrid network consisting of dedicated wired ADSL links as well as VSAT links by using the private satellite hub located at lab of Geophysics & Seismology (LGS) at Chania, Crete. Data centre is equipped with a high performance computing cluster capable of providing real time estimations as well as to support great number experimental investigations using the on line or offline data streams. Prototype software solutions are developed for monitoring and controlling network elements, to automate

  17. Offshore wind power in the Aegean Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Hahmann, Andrea N.

    winds (SDW). It is planned to combine the Envisat wind fields with Sentinel-1a and Sentinel-1b wind fields to further detail the offshore wind resource within the New European Wind Atlas. The work is in progress. Sentinel-1a images are processed at DTU Wind Energy near-real-time and we are updating our...... wind resource software. A service-based on satellite SAR-derived winds for wind resource estimation is available at DTU Wind Energy. The project was supported by ESA ResGrow and satellite data from ESA Envisat and Copernicus Sentinel-1....... hub heights at around 100 m using a combination of satellite wind fields and the long-term climate of atmospheric stability from the mesoscale model (Badger et al. 2016). The result of the mean wind speed at hub-height for the Aegean Sea is shown in Figure 1. The map shows the stability dependent...

  18. Cephalopods distribution in the southern Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. LEFKADITOU

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns faunal composition and distribution of cephalopods in the southern Aegean Sea (35Ζ 13’ 19’’- 37Ζ 55’ 25’’ N, 23Ζ 00’ 15’’ - 28Ζ 15’ 37’’ E. Samples were collected from 708 hauls, obtained by an experimental bottom trawl net during eight surveys carried out in the summers of the years 1994-2001, as well as by commercial trawl net during four surveys carried out in September 1995, December 1995, May and September 1996. The hauls were performed at depths ranging from 16 to 778 m. A total of 34 species of cephalopod in 12 families were identified, including 11 oegopsid squid, 3 myopsid squid, 7 octopod, 3 cuttlefish and 10 sepiolid. Trawling with the experimental net resulted in the capturing of some uncommon pelagic species, such as Ctenopteryx siculaand Octopoteuthis sicula, which were recorded for the first time in the Aegean Sea. Most of the species showed a wide depth and geographical range. The species: Sepia officinalis, Sepietta neglecta, Sepietta obscuraand Sepiola rondeletiwere caught only on the continental shelf, whereas the Ancistroteuthis lichtensteini, Bathypolypous sponsalis, Brachioteuthis riisei, Chiroteuthis veranyi, Ctenopteryx sicula, Heteroteuthis dispar, Histioteuthis reversa, Neorossia caroli and Pyroteuthis margaritiferawere found only on the slope. The rest of the species extended in both continental shelf and slope. The spatial distribution of different species groups is discussed in relation to the hydrology and topography of the study area and the species ecology.

  19. Analytical chemistry in the Aegean Sea region: current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanidou, Victoria F

    2012-12-01

    The Eighth Aegean Analytical Chemistry Days Conference took place in Urla, İzmir, Turkey, from 16-20 September 2012. This conference is held every 2 years, organized alternately by analytical chemistry departments of Turkish and Greek universities, so that analytical chemists from the region around the Aegean Sea can exchange experience and knowledge based on their research in a large number of fields. This report summarizes the most interesting presentations and posters pertaining to bioanalytical work.

  20. THE MINOAN SANTORINI ERUPTION AND TSUNAMI DEPOSITS IN PALAIKASTRO (CRETE) : DATING BY GEOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGY, C-14, AND EGYPTIAN CHRONOLOGY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, Hendrik J.; van der Plicht, Johannes; MacGillivray, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Deposits from the Minoan Santorini (Thera) eruption in the eastern Mediterranean region Constitute the most important regional stratigraphic marker in the chronological perplexity of the 2nd Millennium BCE. Extensive tsunami deposits were discovered in Crete at the Minoan archaeological site of

  1. Food-web traits of the North Aegean Sea ecosystem (Eastern Mediterranean) and comparison with other Mediterranean ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagarakis, K.; Coll, M.; Giannoulaki, M.; Somarakis, S.; Papaconstantinou, C.; Machias, A.

    2010-06-01

    A mass-balance trophic model was built to describe the food-web traits of the North Aegean Sea (Strymonikos Gulf and Thracian Sea, Greece, Eastern Mediterranean) during the mid-2000s and to explore the impacts of fishing. This is the first food-web model representing the Aegean Sea, and results were presented and discussed in comparison to other previous ecosystems modelled from the western and the central areas of the basin (South Catalan and North-Central Adriatic Seas). Forty functional groups were defined, covering the entire trophic spectrum from lower to higher trophic levels. Emphasis was placed on commercial invertebrates and fish. The potential ecological role of the invasive ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi, and several vulnerable groups (e.g., dolphins) was also explored. Results confirmed the spatial productivity patterns known for the Mediterranean Sea showing, for example, that the total biomass is highest in N.C. Adriatic and lowest in N. Aegean Sea. Accordingly, food-web flows and several ecosystem indicators like the mean transfer efficiency were influenced by these patterns. Nevertheless, all three systems shared some common features evidencing similarities of Mediterranean Sea ecosystems such as dominance of the pelagic fraction in terms of flows and strong benthic-pelagic coupling of zooplankton and benthic invertebrates through detritus. The importance of detritus highlighted the role of the microbial food-web, which was indirectly considered through detritus dynamics. Ciliates, mesozooplankton and several benthic invertebrate groups were shown as important elements of the ecosystem linking primary producers and detritus with higher trophic levels in the N. Aegean Sea. Adult anchovy was shown as the most important fish group in terms of production, consumption and overall effect on the rest of the ecological groups in the model, in line with results from the Western Mediterranean Sea. The five fishing fleets considered (both artisanal and

  2. An updated checklist of poisonous fishes of Turkish Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Bayhan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The current status of marine poisonous fish species ranging in the Aegean Sea coastline in Turkey were introduced. Turkey is a peninsula surrounded by seas with different ecological features on three sides. The total length of shoreline is 8 333 km including the islands. The total number of fish species in Turkish seas is 512, of which 449 live in the Aegean Sea followed by the Mediterranean Sea (441 species, the Marmara Sea (257 species and the Black Sea (154species. On the Aegean Sea coasts, the richest sea regarding fish diversity, the number of poisonous fish species is also high. This mini-review revealed 51 poisonous fish species belonging to 14 families in the Turkish Aegean Sea. On the Aegean Sea coasts poisonous fish species can be categorized into three groups: (i Fish that contain venomous spines on the tail or on the operculum (ii Fish that carry poisonous bite and (iii Fish having poisonous flesh or liver. Poisoning fish that contain venomous spines on the tail or on the operculum mostly are dangerous because of their poisonous thorns whereas the passive poisonous fish species poison when they are eaten. These toxins can cause morbidity and rarely, mortality in humans. Apart from these, swallowing the blood of species such as European eel Anguilla anguilla and European conger Conger conger might also cause poisoning. Besides, as there has been an invasion of puffer fish especially on the Turkish Mediterranean and Aegean coasts in recent years, there is a danger in question. Thus, it is very important to particularly draw attention to these fish on the Turkish coasts.

  3. Wind Atlas of Aegean Sea with SAR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete

    2013-01-01

    in satellite radar technologies made it possible to use Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) for wind speed and direction measurements at offshore locations. In this study, a new technique of making wind atlases is applied to the region of Aegean Sea is presented. The method has been tested and validated...

  4. Suberitidae (Demospongiae, Hadromerida) from the North Aegean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voultsiadou-Koukoura, Eleni; Soest, van Rob W.M.

    1993-01-01

    Sampling in the North Aegean Sea yielded nine species of the family Suberitidae, four of which, Pseudosuberites sulphureus, P. hyalinus, Suberiles ficus and S. syringella, are new for the fauna of the Eastern Mediterranean, and three more, S. carnosus, S. domuncula, and S. massa, are new records for

  5. Ambient noise levels and characterization in Aegean region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Fatih; Zor, Ekrem; Açıkgöz, Cem; Tarancıoğlu, Adil

    2017-12-01

    We assessed the ambient noise level in the Aegean region and analyzed its diurnal variation and its relation to the earthquake detection capability of the Aegean Region Seismic Network (ARSN). We prepared probability density functions (PDFs) for 19 broadband stations in the Aegean region operated by the Earth and Marine Sciences Institute (EMSI) of the Marmara Research Center (MRC) of the Turkish Scientific Research Council (TÜBİTAK). The power spectral densities (PSDs) used to construct PDFs for each station were computed for the periods between 0.02 and 180 s. In addition, we generated noise map of the Aegean region for different periods using the PDFs to assess the origin of the noise. We analyzed earthquake activity in the region and found that there are more local events recorded at night than during the day for each station. This difference is strongly related to diurnal variation of background noise level for the period range mostly covering the frequency range for the local events. We observed daytime noise level 15 to 20 dB higher than that at the nighttime in high frequencies for almost all stations caused by its proximity to settled areas and roads. Additionally, we observed a splitting peak within the Double Frequency (DF) microseism band; it showed a clear noise increase around the short period DF band at all the stations, decreasing inland. This peak may be related to sea waves locally generated in the Aegean Sea. We also identified a prominent increase related to marble saw companies in some stations' noise PDFs.

  6. Crustal tomography of the Aegean-Anatolian domain using noise cross-correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubans, Fabien; Paul, Anne; Campillo, Michel; Karabulut, Hayrullah; Hatzidimitriou, Panagiotis

    2010-05-01

    Data of more than 150 temporary and permanent broadband seismological stations deployed in the Aegean-Anatolian domain between May 2007 and May 2009 are grouped in the SIMBAAD (Seismic Imaging of the Mantle Across the Anatolian Domain) dataset. We compute noise cross-correlations between all station pairs on a 1.5-yr duration. We obtain more than 11.000 correlations for each component of the cross-correlation tensor. We apply a MFA (Multiple Filter Analysis) method to measure group velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves on 4 components of the correlation tensor (ZZ, ZR, RZ, RR) and of Love waves on the TT component, both in positive and negative times. According to the theory, a noise cross-correlation converges to the Green function if noise sources are randomly distributed around the station pair. If this condition is fulfilled, the cross-correlation should be symmetrical in time. We compare group velocity measurements between positive and negative times to evaluate the convergence of each cross-correlation to the Green function. The quality of the symmetry is used to weight the time measurements in the inversion for group velocity maps. In the last step, Rayleigh wave group velocity data are inverted for a 3-D model of S-wave velocity. This processing gives an image of the crustal structure in the area [37-41°N ; 23-33°E] with a horizontal resolution of 60 to 200 km depending on depth and station coverage. The shallowest layers clearly display the present-day thick sedimentary basins (Axios, Thrace, Marmara, Bay of Antalya, ...) and older sedimentary nappes (Lycian nappes, Miocene sediments in the Kirsehir block) as strong low velocity anomalies. At larger depth, Southwestern Anatolia is characterized by a broad low velocity anomaly which contrasts with the higher velocities of the Aegean Sea. We clearly image a West to East increase of Moho depth from 20-25 km in the Aegean Sea to 35 km in the Anatolian plateau. This increase located between 27°E and

  7. Holocene Climatic Optimum centennial-scale paleoceanography in the NE Aegean (Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantaphyllou, Maria V.; Gogou, Alexandra; Dimiza, Margarita D.; Kostopoulou, Sofia; Parinos, Constantine; Roussakis, Grigoris; Geraga, Maria; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Fleitmann, Dominik; Zervakis, Vassilis; Velaoras, Dimitris; Diamantopoulou, Antonia; Sampatakaki, Angeliki; Lykousis, Vassilis

    2016-02-01

    Combined micropaleontological and geochemical analyses of the high-sedimentation gravity core M-4G provided new centennial-scale paleoceanographic data for sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean Sea during the Holocene Climatic Optimum. Sapropel layer S1a (10.2-8.0 ka) was deposited in dysoxic to oxic bottom waters characterized by a high abundance of benthic foraminiferal species tolerating surface sediment and/or pore water oxygen depletion (e.g., Chilostomella mediterranensis, Globobulimina affinis), and the presence of Uvigerina mediterranea, which thrives in oxic mesotrophic-eutrophic environments. Preservation of organic matter (OM) is inferred based on high organic carbon as well as loliolide and isololiolide contents, while the biomarker record and the abundances of eutrophic planktonic foraminifera document enhanced productivity. High inputs of terrigenous OM are attributed to north Aegean borderland riverine inputs. Both alkenone-based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and δO18 G. bulloides records indicate cooling at 8.2 ka (S1a) and ~7.8 ka (S1 interruption). Sapropelic layer S1b (7.7-6.4 ka) is characterized by rather oxic conditions; abundances of foraminiferal species tolerant to oxygen depletion are very low compared with the U. mediterranea rise. Strongly fluctuating SSTs demonstrate repeated cooling and associated dense water formation, with a major event at 7.4 ka followed by cold spells at 7.0, 6.8, and 6.5 ka. The prominent rise of the carbon preference index within the S1b layer indicates the delivery of less degraded terrestrial OM. The increase of algal biomarkers, labile OM-feeding foraminifera and eutrophic planktonic species pinpoints an enhanced in situ marine productivity, promoted by more efficient vertical convection due to repeated cold events. The associated contributions of labile marine OM along with fresher terrestrial OM inputs after ~7.7 ka imply sources alternative/additional to the north Aegean riverine borderland sources for

  8. The Aegean sea marine security decision support system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perivoliotis, L.; Krokos, G.; Nittis, K.; Korres, G.

    2011-10-01

    As part of the integrated ECOOP (European Coastal Sea Operational observing and Forecasting System) project, HCMR upgraded the already existing standalone Oil Spill Forecasting System for the Aegean Sea, initially developed for the Greek Operational Oceanography System (POSEIDON), into an active element of the European Decision Support System (EuroDeSS). The system is accessible through a user friendly web interface where the case scenarios can be fed into the oil spill drift model component, while the synthetic output contains detailed information about the distribution of oil spill particles and the oil spill budget and it is provided both in text based ECOOP common output format and as a series of sequential graphics. The main development steps that were necessary for this transition were the modification of the forcing input data module in order to allow the import of other system products which are usually provided in standard formats such as NetCDF and the transformation of the model's calculation routines to allow use of current, density and diffusivities data in z instead of sigma coordinates. During the implementation of the Aegean DeSS, the system was used in operational mode in order to support the Greek marine authorities in handling a real accident that took place in North Aegean area. Furthermore, the introduction of common input and output files by all the partners of EuroDeSS extended the system's interoperability thus facilitating data exchanges and comparison experiments.

  9. The Aegean sea marine security decision support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perivoliotis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the integrated ECOOP (European Coastal Sea Operational observing and Forecasting System project, HCMR upgraded the already existing standalone Oil Spill Forecasting System for the Aegean Sea, initially developed for the Greek Operational Oceanography System (POSEIDON, into an active element of the European Decision Support System (EuroDeSS. The system is accessible through a user friendly web interface where the case scenarios can be fed into the oil spill drift model component, while the synthetic output contains detailed information about the distribution of oil spill particles and the oil spill budget and it is provided both in text based ECOOP common output format and as a series of sequential graphics. The main development steps that were necessary for this transition were the modification of the forcing input data module in order to allow the import of other system products which are usually provided in standard formats such as NetCDF and the transformation of the model's calculation routines to allow use of current, density and diffusivities data in z instead of sigma coordinates. During the implementation of the Aegean DeSS, the system was used in operational mode in order to support the Greek marine authorities in handling a real accident that took place in North Aegean area. Furthermore, the introduction of common input and output files by all the partners of EuroDeSS extended the system's interoperability thus facilitating data exchanges and comparison experiments.

  10. Modeling of the upwelling hydrodynamics in the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.G. SAVVIDIS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The special features of the hydrodynamic circulation in the Aegean Sea referring to the development of regional upwelling coastal zones are studied by means of a mathematical model. The modeling effort is focused on the tracing of coastal areas, where upwelling events are frequently observed during the summer meteorological conditions. These areas are characterized by the enrichment of surface waters with nutrients and, consequently, increased fish production. The phenomenon is studied by the use of a two-layer mathematical model comprising the surface heated zone and the rest of the water column. The numerical solution of the model is based on the finite differences method. The wind shear applied over the stratified basin, with predefined density stratification and initial water-layers thickness, and the gravity and Coriolis forces taken into account, constitute the basic external factors for the generation of the hydrodynamic circulation in the area of the Aegean Sea. The calibration and the validation of the model are performed by the comparison of the model output to the data and observations reported in valid scientific sources. The aim of the paper is to demonstrate the significant contribution of numerical models to the better understanding of the hydrodynamics governing the Aegean water circulation as well as the tracing of upwelling zones.

  11. Centennial-scale paleoceanography during sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean (Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantaphyllou, Maria; Gogou, Alexandra; Dimiza, Margarita; Kostopoulou, Sofia; Parinos, Constantine; Roussakis, Grigoris; Geraga, Maria; Skampa, Elisavet; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Fleitmann, Dominik; Zervakis, Vassilis; Velaoras, Dimitris; Diamantopoulou, Antonia; Sampatakaki, Angeliki; Lykousis, Vassilis

    2016-04-01

    Combined micropaleontological and geochemical analyses in the high-sedimentation gravity core M-4G, provided new centennial scale paleoceanographic data for the sapropel S1 deposition in the NE Aegean Sea. Sapropel layer S1a (10.2-8.0 ka) is deposited in dysoxic to oxic bottom waters; sediments are characterized by the high abundance of benthic foraminifers Chilostomella mediterranensis and Globobulimina affinis that are able to tolerate surface sediment and/or pore water oxygen depletion and the presence of the oxic mesotrophic-eutrophic U. mediterranea. Adequate preservation of organic matter is proven by the high organic carbon and loliolide and isololiolide contents, whereas the biomarker record and the abundances of eutrophic planktonic foraminifera document enhanced productivity. Both alkenone-based SSTs and δO18 G. bulloides records indicate coolings at 8.2 ka (S1a) and at ~7.8 ka (S1 interruption). Sapropelic layer S1b (7.7-6.4 ka) is characterized by rather oxic conditions marked by the prominent increase of U. mediterranea. The highly fluctuating SSTs demonstrate repeated coolings and associated dense water formation; major event at 7.4 ka, followed by cold spells at 7.0, 6.8, 6.5 ka. Besides, the increase of algal biomarkers, labile organic matter-feeding foraminifera and eutrophic planktonic species pinpoints rise in in situ marine productivity, which is enhanced by more efficient vertical convection due to repeated cold events. The associated contributions of labile marine organic matter (OM) along with fresher terrestrial OM inputs after ~7.7 ka BP imply alternative/ additional than the north Aegean riverine borderland sources for the influx of organic matter at the south Limnos Basin, also related to the inflow of highly productive Marmara/Black Sea waters

  12. Stratospheric Ozone destruction by the Bronze-Age Minoan eruption (Santorini Volcano, Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoux, Anita; Scaillet, Bruno; Bekki, Slimane; Oppenheimer, Clive; Druitt, Timothy H

    2015-07-24

    The role of volcanogenic halogen-bearing (i.e. chlorine and bromine) compounds in stratospheric ozone chemistry and climate forcing is poorly constrained. While the 1991 eruption of Pinatubo resulted in stratospheric ozone loss, it was due to heterogeneous chemistry on volcanic sulfate aerosols involving chlorine of anthropogenic rather than volcanogenic origin, since co-erupted chlorine was scavenged within the plume. Therefore, it is not known what effect volcanism had on ozone in pre-industrial times, nor what will be its role on future atmospheres with reduced anthropogenic halogens present. By combining petrologic constraints on eruption volatile yields with a global atmospheric chemistry-transport model, we show here that the Bronze-Age 'Minoan' eruption of Santorini Volcano released far more halogens than sulfur and that, even if only 2% of these halogens reached the stratosphere, it would have resulted in strong global ozone depletion. The model predicts reductions in ozone columns of 20 to >90% at Northern high latitudes and an ozone recovery taking up to a decade. Our findings emphasise the significance of volcanic halogens for stratosphere chemistry and suggest that modelling of past and future volcanic impacts on Earth's ozone, climate and ecosystems should systematically consider volcanic halogen emissions in addition to sulfur emissions.

  13. Stratospheric Ozone destruction by the Bronze-Age Minoan eruption (Santorini Volcano, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoux, Anita; Scaillet, Bruno; Bekki, Slimane; Oppenheimer, Clive; Druitt, Timothy H.

    2015-01-01

    The role of volcanogenic halogen-bearing (i.e. chlorine and bromine) compounds in stratospheric ozone chemistry and climate forcing is poorly constrained. While the 1991 eruption of Pinatubo resulted in stratospheric ozone loss, it was due to heterogeneous chemistry on volcanic sulfate aerosols involving chlorine of anthropogenic rather than volcanogenic origin, since co-erupted chlorine was scavenged within the plume. Therefore, it is not known what effect volcanism had on ozone in pre-industrial times, nor what will be its role on future atmospheres with reduced anthropogenic halogens present. By combining petrologic constraints on eruption volatile yields with a global atmospheric chemistry-transport model, we show here that the Bronze-Age ‘Minoan’ eruption of Santorini Volcano released far more halogens than sulfur and that, even if only 2% of these halogens reached the stratosphere, it would have resulted in strong global ozone depletion. The model predicts reductions in ozone columns of 20 to >90% at Northern high latitudes and an ozone recovery taking up to a decade. Our findings emphasise the significance of volcanic halogens for stratosphere chemistry and suggest that modelling of past and future volcanic impacts on Earth’s ozone, climate and ecosystems should systematically consider volcanic halogen emissions in addition to sulfur emissions. PMID:26206616

  14. Post-eruptive flooding of Santorini caldera and implications for tsunami generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomikou, P; Druitt, T H; Hübscher, C; Mather, T A; Paulatto, M; Kalnins, L M; Kelfoun, K; Papanikolaou, D; Bejelou, K; Lampridou, D; Pyle, D M; Carey, S; Watts, A B; Weiß, B; Parks, M M

    2016-11-08

    Caldera-forming eruptions of island volcanoes generate tsunamis by the interaction of different eruptive phenomena with the sea. Such tsunamis are a major hazard, but forward models of their impacts are limited by poor understanding of source mechanisms. The caldera-forming eruption of Santorini in the Late Bronze Age is known to have been tsunamigenic, and caldera collapse has been proposed as a mechanism. Here, we present bathymetric and seismic evidence showing that the caldera was not open to the sea during the main phase of the eruption, but was flooded once the eruption had finished. Inflow of water and associated landsliding cut a deep, 2.0-2.5 km(3), submarine channel, thus filling the caldera in less than a couple of days. If, as at most such volcanoes, caldera collapse occurred syn-eruptively, then it cannot have generated tsunamis. Entry of pyroclastic flows into the sea, combined with slumping of submarine pyroclastic accumulations, were the main mechanisms of tsunami production.

  15. Chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles over the Aegean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezantakos, S.; Barmpounis, K.; Giamarelou, M.; Bossioli, E.; Tombrou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Kalogiros, J.; Allan, J.D.; Bacak, A.; Percival, C.J.; Coe, H.; Biskos, G.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition and water uptake characteristics of sub-micrometre atmospheric particles over the region of the Aegean Sea were measured between 25 August and 11 September 2011 within the framework of the Aegean-Game campaign. High temporal-resolution measurements of the chemical

  16. The PROTEUS Experiment: Active Source Seismic Imaging of the Crustal Magma Plumbing Structure of the Santorini Arc Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooft, E. E. E.; Morgan, J. V.; Nomikou, P.; Toomey, D. R.; Papazachos, C. V.; Warner, M.; Heath, B.; Christopoulou, M. E.; Lampridou, D.; Kementzetzidou, D.

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the PROTEUS seismic experiment (Plumbing Reservoirs Of The Earth Under Santorini) is to examine the entire crustal magma plumbing system beneath a continental arc volcano and determine the magma geometry and connections throughout the crust. These physical parameters control magma migration, storage, and eruption and inform the question of how physical and chemical processing of magma at arc volcanoes forms the andesitic rock compositions that dominate the lower continental crust. These physical parameters are also important to understand volcanic-tectonic interactions and geohazards. Santorini is ideal for these goals because the continental crust has been thinned by extension and so the deep magmatic system is more accessible, also it is geologically well studied. Since the volcano is a semi-submerged, it was possible to collect a unique 3D marine-land active source seismic dataset. During the PROTEUS experiment in November-December of 2015, we recorded 14,300 marine sound sources from the US R/V Langseth on 89 OBSIP short period ocean bottom seismometers and 60 German and 5 Greek land seismometers. The experiment was designed for high-density spatial sampling of the seismic wavefield to allow us to apply two state-of-the-art 3D inversion methods: travel time tomography and full waveform inversion. A preliminary travel time tomography model of the upper crustal seismic velocity structure of the volcano and surrounding region is presented in an accompanying poster. We also made marine geophysical maps of the seafloor using multi-beam bathymetry and of the gravity and magnetic fields. The new seafloor map reveals the detailed structure of the major fault system between Santorini and Amorgos, of associated landslides, and of newly discovered volcanic features. The PROTEUS project will provide new insights into the structure of the whole crustal magmatic system of a continental arc volcano and its evolution within the surrounding tectonic setting.

  17. Aseismic blocks and destructive earthquakes in the Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiros, Stathis

    2017-04-01

    Aseismic areas are not identified only in vast, geologically stable regions, but also within regions of active, intense, distributed deformation such as the Aegean. In the latter, "aseismic blocks" about 200m wide were recognized in the 1990's on the basis of the absence of instrumentally-derived earthquake foci, in contrast to surrounding areas. This pattern was supported by the available historical seismicity data, as well as by geologic evidence. Interestingly, GPS evidence indicates that such blocks are among the areas characterized by small deformation rates relatively to surrounding areas of higher deformation. Still, the largest and most destructive earthquake of the 1990's, the 1995 M6.6 earthquake occurred at the center of one of these "aseismic" zones at the northern part of Greece, found unprotected against seismic hazard. This case was indeed a repeat of the case of the tsunami-associated 1956 Amorgos Island M7.4 earthquake, the largest 20th century event in the Aegean back-arc region: the 1956 earthquake occurred at the center of a geologically distinct region (Cyclades Massif in Central Aegean), till then assumed aseismic. Interestingly, after 1956, the overall idea of aseismic regions remained valid, though a "promontory" of earthquake prone-areas intruding into the aseismic central Aegean was assumed. Exploitation of the archaeological excavation evidence and careful, combined analysis of historical and archaeological data and other palaeoseismic, mostly coastal data, indicated that destructive and major earthquakes have left their traces in previously assumed aseismic blocks. In the latter earthquakes typically occur with relatively low recurrence intervals, >200-300 years, much smaller than in adjacent active areas. Interestingly, areas assumed a-seismic in antiquity are among the most active in the last centuries, while areas hit by major earthquakes in the past are usually classified as areas of low seismic risk in official maps. Some reasons

  18. Variations in fault-slip data and cooling history reveal corridor of heterogeneous backarc extension in the eastern Aegean Sea region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Uwe; Gessner, Klaus; Thomson, Stuart

    2017-03-01

    We report fault-slip data across the boundary between the highly extended and largely submerged crust underlying the Aegean Sea from Samos in the north to eastern Crete in the south, and the much less extended and emergent crust of western Anatolia. We identify three brittle deformation increments, a late Miocene (mainly Pliocene) to Recent crustal stretching increment, an intermittent early to late Miocene shortening increment concurrent with extension and magmatism, and a Miocene extensional event. The youngest increment documents late Miocene to Recent NNE extension over large areas, but can locally also be oriented SE (Amorgos and Astipalea Islands), and ESE (eastern Crete) suggesting overall oblate strain geometry. The intermittent Miocene ( 24-5 Ma) fault-slip records suggest overall prolate strain geometry, where NNE stretching is accompanied by E-W shortening. The older extension event is mainly NNE directed but on Samos Island extension is E-W, probably reflecting local extension in a sinistral wrench corridor in the early/mid Miocene. Overall it seems that since the early Miocene NNE-trending extension is the dominant regime in the eastern Aegean with an intermittent component of short-lived E-W shortening. The existence of a corridor of heterogeneous crustal deformation - which is spatially associated with uncharacteristically old fission track ages - and the apparent change in strain geometry in time challenge concepts that propose that the eastern Aegean Sea and western Anatolia have been deformed as a continuous tectonic domain since the Miocene. We propose that the regional variation in extensional strain geometry resulted from a sinistral wrench component that was superimposed on the regional 'background' NNE extension by translation across a diffuse plate boundary. We conclude that the eastern shoreline of the Aegean Sea is controlled by a Miocene to Recent sinistral wrench corridor that accommodated movement between different lithospheric domains.

  19. Severe accidents due to windsurfing in the Aegean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogeromitros, A; Tsangaris, H; Bilalis, D; Karabinis, A

    2002-06-01

    Windsurfing is a popular sport and has recently become an Olympic event. As an open-air water activity that requires the participant to be in perfect physical condition, windsurfers may be prone to accidents when certain basic rules or procedures are violated. The current study monitored severe injuries due to windsurfing over a period of 12 months in the Aegean Sea in Greece. Our study revealed 22 cases of severe accidents due to windsurfing, with a wide range of injuries including head injuries, spinal cord injuries, and severe fractures of the extremities. Prolonged hospitalization, severe disability and two deaths occurred as consequences of these accidents. The study examined the characteristics of these patients and the possible risk factors and conditions associated with the accidents. We also focused on the most common types of injuries and reviewed the mechanisms that may provoke them. Water sports and particularly windsurfing represent a major challenge for the emergency medical system, especially in the Aegean Sea. Hundreds of islands, kilometres of isolated coasts, millions of tourists, an extended summer period and rapidly changing weather create conditions that constantly test the efficacy of the emergency services. The development of an appropriate infrastructure and maximum control of the risk factors causing these accidents could reduce the morbidity and mortality that, unfortunately but rather predictably, accompany this popular summer activity.

  20. Rare earth elements minimal harvest year variation facilitates robust geographical origin discrimination: The case of PDO "Fava Santorinis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivelos, Spiros A; Danezis, Georgios P; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Georgiou, Constantinos A

    2016-12-15

    This study examines the trace and rare earth elemental (REE) fingerprint variations of PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) "Fava Santorinis" over three consecutive harvesting years (2011-2013). Classification of samples in harvesting years was studied by performing discriminant analysis (DA), k nearest neighbours (κ-NN), partial least squares (PLS) analysis and probabilistic neural networks (PNN) using rare earth elements and trace metals determined using ICP-MS. DA performed better than κ-NN, producing 100% discrimination using trace elements and 79% using REEs. PLS was found to be superior to PNN, achieving 99% and 90% classification for trace and REEs, respectively, while PNN achieved 96% and 71% classification for trace and REEs, respectively. The information obtained using REEs did not enhance classification, indicating that REEs vary minimally per harvesting year, providing robust geographical origin discrimination. The results show that seasonal patterns can occur in the elemental composition of "Fava Santorinis", probably reflecting seasonality of climate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Large-scale bioprospecting of cyanobacteria, micro- and macroalgae from the Aegean Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Montalvao, S.; Demirel, Z.; PrabhaDevi; Lombardi, V.; Hongisto, V.; Perala, M.; Hattara, J.; Imamoglu, E.; Tilvi, S.; Turan, G.; Dalay, M.C.; Tammela, P.

    . In this study, we screened the antimicrobial, antifouling, anti-inflammatory and anticancer potential of in total 98 specimens collected from the Aegean Sea. Ethanol extract of diatom Amphora cf capitellata showed the most promising antimicrobial results against...

  2. An integrated approach to teaching Aegean archaeology and archaeological science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcairn, Erica Glenn

    Outlined here is a course that would serve as an introduction to archaeological science, specifically within the context of Aegean Prehistory. The main objective of this course is to expose students early in their archaeological careers to a variety of methods and questions, and to depart from the culture-historical perspective that typifies introductory survey courses. The class structure is equal parts lecture and discussion, moving between learning how the methods work and evaluating case studies. All graded assignments build on one another, guiding the students through designing their own research project. The ultimate goals of the assignments are to build key writing and professional skills, develop a basic understanding of research design, and to instill confidence that the student can contribute to the production of knowledge, whatever field he or she decides to pursue.

  3. TSUNAMI HAZARD ASSESSMENT IN THE NORTHERN AEGEAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Theilen-Willige

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency planning for the assessment of tsunami hazard inundation and of secondary effects of erosion and landslides, requires mapping that can help identify coastal areas that are potentially vulnerable. The present study reviews tsunami susceptibility mapping for coastal areas of Turkey and Greece in the Aegean Sea. Potential tsunami vulnerable locations were identified from LANDSAT ETM imageries, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM, 2000 data and QuickBird imageries and from a GIS integrated spatial database. LANDSAT ETM and Digital Elevation Model (DEM data derived by the SRTM-Mission were investigated to help detect traces of past flooding events. LANDSAT ETM imageries, merged with digitally processed and enhanced SRTM data, clearly indicate the areas that may be prone to flooding if catastrophic tsunami events or storm surges occur.

  4. Early farmers from across Europe directly descended from Neolithic Aegeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmanová, Zuzana; Kreutzer, Susanne; Hellenthal, Garrett; Sell, Christian; Diekmann, Yoan; Díez-Del-Molino, David; van Dorp, Lucy; López, Saioa; Kousathanas, Athanasios; Link, Vivian; Kirsanow, Karola; Cassidy, Lara M; Martiniano, Rui; Strobel, Melanie; Scheu, Amelie; Kotsakis, Kostas; Halstead, Paul; Triantaphyllou, Sevi; Kyparissi-Apostolika, Nina; Urem-Kotsou, Dushka; Ziota, Christina; Adaktylou, Fotini; Gopalan, Shyamalika; Bobo, Dean M; Winkelbach, Laura; Blöcher, Jens; Unterländer, Martina; Leuenberger, Christoph; Çilingiroğlu, Çiler; Horejs, Barbara; Gerritsen, Fokke; Shennan, Stephen J; Bradley, Daniel G; Currat, Mathias; Veeramah, Krishna R; Wegmann, Daniel; Thomas, Mark G; Papageorgopoulou, Christina; Burger, Joachim

    2016-06-21

    Farming and sedentism first appeared in southwestern Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion, and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithization of Europe. Here we present paleogenomic data for five Neolithic individuals from northern Greece and northwestern Turkey spanning the time and region of the earliest spread of farming into Europe. We use a novel approach to recalibrate raw reads and call genotypes from ancient DNA and observe striking genetic similarity both among Aegean early farmers and with those from across Europe. Our study demonstrates a direct genetic link between Mediterranean and Central European early farmers and those of Greece and Anatolia, extending the European Neolithic migratory chain all the way back to southwestern Asia.

  5. Diversity of endophytic fungi from various Aegean and Mediterranean orchids (saleps)

    OpenAIRE

    GEZGİN, Yüksel; ELTEM, Rengin

    2014-01-01

    The diversity and host specificity of endophytic and Rhizoctonia-like fungi were investigated in orchids from the Aegean and Mediterranean regions. Endophytic fungi from various Aegean and Mediterranean orchids (Anacamptis pyramidalis (L.) L.C.M.Richard, Orchis sancta L., Ophrys fusca Link., and Serapias vomeracea subsp. orientalis Greuter) were isolated and identified partially. Surface sterilisation of roots and tubers was carried out in laminar airflow under aseptic conditions. Several mod...

  6. Segmentation of Aegean Fishing Fleet and Spatial Distribution of Fishing Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Ilke Kosar Danisman

    2013-01-01

    The data on fishing fleet play an important role in fisheries management. It is an effective method that collection of reliable and regular data on fleet, and these data into information that is needed in terms of fleet management. In this study, it is demonstrated that the segmentation of the Aegean fishing fleet and fishing port based spatial distribution of fishing capacities concerning each fleet segment at the Aegean coast to improve fisheries management.

  7. Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece): An active window into the Aegean subduction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Andrea Luca; Caracausi, Antonio; Chavagnac, Valèrie; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Mandalakis, Manolis; Kotoulas, Georgios; Magoulas, Antonios; Castillo, Alain; Lampridou, Danai

    2016-06-17

    Submarine volcanism represents ~80% of the volcanic activity on Earth and is an important source of mantle-derived gases. These gases are of basic importance for the comprehension of mantle characteristics in areas where subaerial volcanism is missing or strongly modified by the presence of crustal/atmospheric components. Though, the study of submarine volcanism remains a challenge due to their hazardousness and sea-depth. Here, we report (3)He/(4)He measurements in CO2-dominated gases discharged at 500 m below sea level from the high-temperature (~220 °C) hydrothermal system of the Kolumbo submarine volcano (Greece), located 7 km northeast off Santorini Island in the central part of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). We highlight that the mantle below Kolumbo and Santorini has a (3)He/(4)He signature of at least 7.0 Ra (being Ra the (3)He/(4)He ratio of atmospheric He equal to 1.39×10(-6)), 3 Ra units higher than actually known for gases-rocks from Santorini. This ratio is also the highest measured across the HVA and is indicative of the direct degassing of a Mid-Ocean-Ridge-Basalts (MORB)-like mantle through lithospheric faults. We finally highlight that the degassing of high-temperature fluids with a MORB-like (3)He/(4)He ratio corroborates a vigorous outgassing of mantle-derived volatiles with potential hazard at the Kolumbo submarine volcano.

  8. Evidence of non-extensivity in the seismicity observed during the 2011–2012 unrest at the Santorini volcanic complex, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Papadakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the period of October 2011–January 2012, an increase of earthquake activity has been observed in the volcanic complex of Santorini Island, Greece. Herein, the magnitude distribution of earthquakes as well as the temporal distribution of seismicity are studied. The statistics of both parameters exhibit complexity that is evident in the frequency-magnitude distribution and the inter-event time distribution, respectively. Because of this, we have used the analysis framework of non-extensive statistical physics (NESP, which seems suitable for studying complex systems. The observed inter-event time distribution for the swarm-like earthquake events, as well as the energy and the inter-event earthquake energy distributions for the observed seismicity can be successfully described with NESP, indicating the inherent complexity of the Santorini volcanic seismicity along with the applicability of the NESP concept to volcanic earthquake activity, where complex correlations exist.

  9. High oxygen consumption rates in the deep layers of the North Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. SOUVERMEZOGLOU

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Severe winter meteorological conditions promote dense water formation over the shelves of the North Aegean Sea. The newly formed dense water fills the deep basins of the North Aegean Sea, contributing to their ventilation and the downward transport of organic and inorganic material. The great bathymetric variability imposes limitations on the deep circulation and the communication between the various basins and makes the North Aegean Sea an appropriate area for the monitoring of oxygen consumption in the deep layers. Historical hydrographic data suggest that there was extensive production of dense water in the North Aegean Sea on two occasions during the last decade, the winters of 1987 and 1992-1993. Our data series from August 1986 to September 1989 and from March 1997 to February 1999, permitted us to follow, step by step, the oxygen consumption and the nutrient regeneration in the deep basins of the northern Aegean Sea during these periods of isolation. The organic matter reaching the bottom layer just after the deep water formation event is rich in labile and easily oxidizable material and its decomposition leads to a significant oxygen uptake during the first year of stagnation. The further decomposition of the remaining semi-labile and refractory material turns over on greater time scales, by consuming lesser amounts of oxygen. A more significant oxygen decrease is recorded in the eastern basin (Lemnos Basin of the North Aegean Trough, than in the central (Athos Basin and the western (North Sporades Basin ones and is attributed to the irregular contribution of the Black Sea Water (BSW to the water masses formed on the different shelves of the North Aegean Sea. Our results and the existing data on the Turkish straits showed that dissolved organic matter is the major constituent responsible for this high oxygen consumption. The slightly different particulate organic carbon fluxes to these depressions play a secondary role.

  10. Data fusion for food authentication. Combining rare earth elements and trace metals to discriminate "Fava Santorinis" from other yellow split peas using chemometric tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivelos, Spiros A; Higgins, Kevin; Kalivas, John H; Haroutounian, Serkos A; Georgiou, Constantinos A

    2014-12-15

    "Fava Santorinis", is a protected designation of origin (PDO) yellow split pea species growing only in the island of Santorini in Greece. Due to its nutritional quality and taste, it has gained a high monetary value. Thus, it is prone to adulteration with other yellow split peas. In order to discriminate "Fava Santorinis" from other yellow split peas, four classification methods utilising rare earth elements (REEs) measured through inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are studied. The four classification processes are orthogonal projection analysis (OPA), Mahalanobis distance (MD), partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) and k nearest neighbours (KNN). Since it is known that trace elements are often useful to determine geographical origin of food products, we further quantitated for trace elements using ICP-MS. Presented in this paper are results using the four classification processes based on the fusion of the REEs data with the trace element data. Overall, the OPA method was found to perform best with up to 100% accuracy using the fused data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spatial and Temporal Evolution of the Tertiary Magmatism and Extension in the Aegean Region in Response to Collision-Driven Mantle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilek, Y.; Bonev, N.

    2009-04-01

    Tertiary extension has played an important role in shaping the crustal architecture of the Alpine mountain belt in the Aegean region by unroofing the orogenic stack that was created during the late Mesozoic-Cenozoic convergence between Africa and Eurasia. Exhumation of metamorphic core-complexes started as early as the Paleocene-early Eocene in the Rhodope (Bulgaria-Greece) and Kazdag (NW Turkey) massifs in the north, and continued during the Oligocene-Miocene in the south involving the north-central Aegean region (Greek mainland and islands) and northwest-central Anatolia. This extensional deformation was spatially and temporally associated with voluminous magmatism derived from both mantle and crustal melts. We focus on the interplay between lithospheric-scale extensional tectonics and magmatism during the Eocene-Miocene, and evaluate the mode, nature and tempo of tectonic and magmatic events and their relations in time and space during this time period. Following the latest Cretaceous closure of the Vardar-Izmir-Ankara Ocean, the inherited subduction-zone component in the continental mantle lithosphere influenced the Eocene (56-38 Ma) magmatism, which produced I-type, medium to high-K calc-alkaline, and LILE and LREE enriched arc to syn- and post-collisional granitoids and their extrusive counterparts. This magmatism migrated across from the Rhodope-Serbo-Macedonian massifs in the Balkan Peninsula and the Sakarya continent in western Anatolia in the north, to the Aegean islands and the Menderes massif in the south through the Oligo-Miocene (30-14 Ma). The younging of the granitoid magmatism and the increase in its K2O/SiO2 ratio occurred progressively southwards in the Aegean through time. The decreasing influence of subduction component was accompanied by a progressive increase in crustal component, with involvement of assimilation and fractional crystallization processes in the granitoid petrogenesis. The coeval volcanic suites generally have the same

  12. Anthropogenic transformation of the relief of the Aegean Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsermegas Irena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present the role of human impact in the forming and transformation of the relief of the Aegean Islands. The most significant changes (with a displacement of more than 10 bln m3 of rock material are related to the creation of road infrastructure and the construction of agricultural terraces. In order to create stone buildings, 20 mln m3 of rock material was used; for the purposes of air transport a surface area of nearly 2.5 km2 was levelled; many kilometres of artificial shorelines were created and at least 4.5 mln m3 of material was displaced for the purposes of the construction of artificial reservoirs of a total capacity of more than 25 mln m3. A huge amount of material was removed as a result of mining activities. The indirect impact of economic activities on the relief of the discussed area includes mainly slope, fluvial and coastal processes.

  13. Interaction between trench retreat and Anatolian escape as recorded by neogene basins in the northern Aegean Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beniest, A.; Brun, J. P.; Gorini, C.; Crombez, V.; Deschamps, R.; Hamon, Y.; Smit, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the North Aegean Sea is studied through the development of three deep basins: the North Aegean Trough, the North Skyros Basin and the Ikaria Basin. Bathymetric data, a 2D seismic dataset and the well-investigated stratigraphic records of the onshore deep basins of northern Greece

  14. Teleconnections, Midlatitude Cyclones and Aegean Sea Turbulent Heat Flux Variability on Daily Through Decadal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanski, Joy; Romanou, Anastasia; Bauer, Michael; Tselioudis, George

    2013-01-01

    We analyze daily wintertime cyclone variability in the central and eastern Mediterranean during 1958-2001, and identify four distinct cyclone states, corresponding to the presence or absence of cyclones in each basin. Each cyclone state is associated with wind flows that induce characteristic patterns of cooling via turbulent (sensible and latent) heat fluxes in the eastern Mediterranean basin and Aegean Sea. The relative frequency of occurrence of each state determines the heat loss from the Aegean Sea during that winter, with largest heat losses occurring when there is a storm in the eastern but not central Mediterranean (eNOTc), and the smallest occurring when there is a storm in the central but not eastern Mediterranean (cNOTe). Time series of daily cyclone states for each winter allow us to infer Aegean Sea cooling for winters prior to 1985, the earliest year for which we have daily heat flux observations. We show that cyclone states conducive to Aegean Sea convection occurred in 1991/1992 and 1992/1993, the winters during which deep water formation was observed in the Aegean Sea, and also during the mid-1970s and the winters of 1963/1964 and 1968/1969. We find that the eNOTc cyclone state is anticorrelated with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) prior to 1977/1978. After 1977/1978, the cNOTe state is anticorrelated with both the NAO and the North Caspian Pattern (NCP), showing that the area of influence of large scale atmospheric teleconnections on regional cyclone activity shifted from the eastern to the central Mediterranean during the late 1970s. A trend toward more frequent occurrence of the positive phase of the NAO produced less frequent cNOTe states since the late 1970s, increasing the number of days with strong cooling of the Aegean Sea surface waters.

  15. Tsunami Propagation Database for the Mediterranean and Aegean Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoglu, U.; Hoto, O.; Kalligeris, N.; Flouri, E.; Aydin, B.; Moore, C. W.; Synolakis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Pre-computed tsunami scenario databases are common tools to develop long- or short-term forecasting methodologies and hazard assessment approaches for tsunami-prone regions worldwide. The benefits of such databases include the possibility of probabilistic studies (Gonzalez et al., 2009, J. Geophys. Res. 114, Article Number: C11023), inundation mapping (Barberopoulou et al., 2011, Pure Appl. Geophys. 168(11), 2133-2146), or real-time forecasting (Wei et al., 2008, Geophys. Res. Lett. 35(4), Article Number: L04609). As a result, several tsunami propagation databases have been developed including one by NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL), and another by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM). Pre-computed tsunami scenario databases utilize different approaches. PMEL's tsunami propagation database is based on the concept of a pre-computed tsunami scenarios consisting of propagation results from 100km x 50km fault planes with a slip value of 1m referred to as tsunami source functions. PMEL's source functions are placed along the subduction zones in several rows, covering known faults throughout the major ocean basins. Linearity of the tsunami propagation in the open ocean allows scaling and/or combination of the pre-computed tsunami source functions to generate a desired scenario. The BOM database considers five earthquakes with magnitudes changing from 7.0 to 9.0 at each location with 100km intervals along the subduction zone. However, to date, no similar approach has been computed along the subduction zones in the Aegean and Mediterranean Seas, even though, historically, there have been a considerable number of tsunami events which caused damage in the region (Ambraseys and Synolakis, 2010, J. Earthquake Eng. 14 (3), 309-330, Article Number: PII 919600673). A new project was initiated between Greece and Turkey supported by General Secretariat for Research & Technology, The Ministry for Development (GSRT) of Greece and The Scientific and

  16. Amphibious and special operations in the Aegean Sea 1943-1945 : operational effectiveness and strategic implications

    OpenAIRE

    Gartzonikas, Panagiotis

    2003-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Aegean sea during the Second World War drew the attention of both the Allies and the Axis. The Italian occupation of the Dodecanese islands, which are in the southeastern perimeter of the Aegean was sought to be eliminated by the British from the early stages of the war for operational reasons as well as a bait for bringing Turkey into the war in the Allied side. For various reasons those plans were never implemented when in 194...

  17. The economic determinants of Greek return migration to the islands of the East Aegean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robolis, S; Xideas, E

    1996-01-01

    "The purpose of this article is to investigate the economic determinants of Greek return migration to the islands of the East Aegean, a region comprising hundreds of islands of different size in four administrative departments....[It] examines the sensitivity of return migration flows to changes in economic variables which influence decisions to return....The purpose...is to investigate the effect on return migration not only of economic development in the host country (push factors) but also of economic development in the islands of the East Aegean (pull factors), given their isolation from the mainland and their different economic structures." (SUMMARY IN SPA AND FRE) excerpt

  18. Particular ceramic forms in the central Balkan and northern shores of the Aegean sea in the late bronze age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulatović Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the appearance and development of particular ceramic forms that were prevalent on the wider territory from the lower Danube to the northern shores of the Aegean sea during the middle and Late Bronze Age. These forms relate to globular beakers, pear shaped vessels with everted rims with arch shaped handles, cups with handles with plastic applications on their upper surface, etc. Particular attention is devoted to the phenomenon of globular beakers of the LBA in the valleys of Varder, Mesta and Struma rivers. All information collected primarily through analysis of stylistic-typological characteristics of ceramics of the middle and Late Bronze Age - that took into account ritual burials, layout of settlements, trade routes and climactic conditions during that period - points to population movements from the north to the south already by the LBA, i.e. in 15th century BC. These movements contributed to the creation of particular cultural groups in the LBA in the central Balkans, such as the Brnjica cultural group. However, these movements cannot be clearly linked to the so-called Aegean Migration, and for this reason their character and chronology are subject to debate. Ultimately it can be concluded that beakers of the Zimnicea -Cherkovna-Plovdiv type appeared in the late Bronze Age in the Vlasine depression and the Danube valley through the evolution of beaker forms of cultural groups of earlier periods. Almost contemporaneously, during LBA, a variant of this ceramic form, richly ornamented (mostly with spirals and similar in manner to the cultural group Dubovac-Žuto Brdo-Grla Mare- Krna, appeared in the LBA culture in northern Greece. Clearly this stylistic mannerism, with spirals as characteristic elements, spread relatively quickly through successive migrations in the period of 15th-14th century BC, toward the south of the Balkan Peninsula, thus covering the wider territory from the southern tip of the Carpathian mountains

  19. Early Bronze Age Foodways in the Aegean : Social Archaeozoology on the Eastern Side

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Çakirlar, Canan; Pernicka, Ernst; Ünlüsoy, Sinan; Blum, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Foodways are fundamental to cultural identities, making their analysis an essential component of anthropological investi- gations of past and present societies. In this paper I discuss the approaches to foodways research in Aegean archaeology, with particular reference to the contribution of

  20. Lifelong Learning and Vocational Training Programmes in Northern Aegean (Greece): Weaknesses, Possibilities and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavrimis, Panagiotis; Papanis, Efstratios; Mitrellou, Sotiria; Nikolarea, Ekaterini

    2009-01-01

    This study presents, discusses and assesses the findings of a research into lifelong learning through Vocational Training Centres (VTCs) in the region of Northern Aegean, Greece. In the first part, the paper introduces its readers to the theoretical framework of lifelong education, whereas in the second part it makes a brief historical overview of…

  1. Long-term sea surface temperature variability in the Aegean Sea

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    Nikolaos Skliris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The inter-annual/decadal scale variability of the Aegean Sea Surface Temperature (SST is investigated by means of long-term series of satellite-derived and in situ data. Monthly mean declouded SST maps are constructed over the 1985–2008 period, based on a re-analysis of AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder optimally interpolated data over the Aegean Sea. Basin-average SST time series are also constructed using the ICOADS in situ data over 1950–2006. Results indicate a small SST decreasing trend until the early nineties, and then a rapid surface warming consistent with the acceleration of the SST rise observed on the global ocean scale. Decadal-scale SST anomalies were found to be negatively correlated with the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO index over the last 60 years suggesting that along with global warming effects on the regional scale, a part of the long-term SST variability in the Aegean Sea is driven by large scale atmospheric natural variability patterns. In particular, the acceleration of surface warming in the Aegean Sea began nearly simultaneously with the NAO index abrupt shift in the mid-nineties from strongly positive values to weakly positive/negative values.

  2. Modeling the Fate and Distribution of Floating Litter Particles in the Aegean Sea (E. Mediterranean

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    Dimitrios V. Politikos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A circulation model is coupled to a Lagrangian particle-tracking model to simulate the transport floating litter particles in the Aegean Sea, Greece (Eastern Mediterranean. Considering different source regions and release dates, simulations were carried out to explore the fate and distribution of floating litter over 1990–2009, taking into account the seasonal and interannual variability of surface circulation. Model results depicted recurrently high concentrations of floating litter particles in the North Aegean plateau, the Saronikos Gulf, and along Evia and Crete islands. Modeled transport pathways of floating litter demonstrated that source regions are interconnected, with Saronikos Gulf being a main receptor of litter from other sources. Notably higher percent of litter exit (~35% than enter the model domain (~7% signified that Aegean Sea seems to act as a source rather than receptor of floating litter pollution in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Beached litter was found around 10%, mostly located in the western part of the Aegean Sea. This is the first modeling study to explore the transport of floating marine litter in Greek waters.

  3. Psychiatric Morbidity and Social Capital in Rural Communities of the Greek North Aegean Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseloni, Andromachi; Zissi, Anastasia; Skapinakis, Petros

    2010-01-01

    Which facets of social capital affect mental health in rural settings? This study explores the association between different aspects of social capital and psychiatric morbidity in rural communities of the Greek North Aegean islands. A large number of individual and community characteristics that may influence psychiatric morbidity are concurrently…

  4. Cluster analysis of indermediate deep events in the southeastern Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscic, Marija; Becker, Dirk; Brüstle, Andrea; Meier, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The Hellenic subduction zone (HSZ) is the seismically most active region in Europe where the oceanic African litosphere is subducting beneath the continental Aegean plate. Although there are numerous studies of seismicity in the HSZ, very few focus on the eastern HSZ and the Wadati-Benioff-Zone of the subducting slab in that part of the HSZ. In order to gain a better understanding of the geodynamic processes in the region a dense local seismic network is required. From September 2005 to March 2007, the temporary seismic network EGELADOS has been deployed covering the entire HSZ. It consisted of 56 onshore and 23 offshore broadband stations with addition of 19 stations from GEOFON, NOA and MedNet to complete the network. Here, we focus on a cluster of intermediate deep seismicity recorded by the EGELADOS network within the subducting African slab in the region of the Nysiros volcano. The cluster consists of 159 events at 80 to 190 km depth with magnitudes between 0.2 and 4.1 that were located using nonlinear location tool NonLinLoc. A double-difference earthquake relocation using the HypoDD software is performed with both manual readings of onset times and differential traveltimes obtained by separate cross correlation of P- and S-waveforms. Single event locations are compared to relative relocations. The event hypocenters fall into a thin zone close to the top of the slab defining its geometry with an accuracy of a few kilometers. At intermediate depth the slab is dipping towards the NW at an angle of about 30°. That means it is dipping steeper than in the western part of the HSZ. The edge of the slab is clearly defined by an abrupt disappearance of intermediate depths seismicity towards the NE. It is found approximately beneath the Turkish coastline. Furthermore, results of a cluster analysis based on the cross correlation of three-component waveforms are shown as a function of frequency and the spatio-temporal migration of the seismic activity is analysed.

  5. Evaluation of selected fig genotypes from South east Turkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... Department of Horticulture, Faculty of Agriculture, Bingöl University, Bingöl, 12000, Turkey. E-mail: miksimsek2001@yahoo.com. ... species grown in the Mediterranean countries (Condit,. 1947). Anatolia is an important ... South East Anatolia, the Aegean and the Mediterranean regions. On the way of the ...

  6. Accurate relocation of seismicity along the North Aegean Trough and its relation to active tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, K. I.

    2017-10-01

    The tectonics of northern Aegean are affected by the westward push of Anatolia and the gravitational spreading of the Aegean lithosphere that promote transtensional deformation in the area. This regime is also responsible for the creation of a series of pull-apart basins, collectively known as the North Aegean Trough. This work accurately relocates a total of 2300 earthquakes that were recorded along the North Aegean Trough during 2011-2016 by stations of the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN) and strong-motion sensors. Absolute locations for these events were obtained using a nonlinear probabilistic algorithm and utilizing a minimum 1D velocity model with station corrections. The hypocentral depth distribution of these events shows a peak at 8 km diminishing gradually down to 20 km. A systematic overestimation of hypocentral depths is observed in the routine locations provided by the National Observatory of Athens where the majority of events appear to be deeper than 15 km. In order to obtain more accurate relative locations these events were relocated using the double-difference method. A total of 1693 events were finally relocated with horizontal and vertical uncertainties that do not exceed 0.11 km and 0.22 km respectively. Well-defined clusters of seismicity can be observed along the Saros and Sporades basins as well as the Kassandra and Sithonia peninsulas. These clusters either occur along the well-known NE-SW strike-slip faults bounding the basins, or along normal faults whose strike is perpendicular to the regional minimum stress axis. Locking depth along the North Aegean Trough is found to be remarkably stable between 13 and 17 km. This is likely a consequence of simultaneous reduction along the SW direction of heat flow (from 89 to 51 mW/m2) and strain rate (from 600 to 50 nstrain/yr) whose opposite effects are canceled out, precluding any sharp changes in locking depth.

  7. The Contacts of the Hittites with the Aegean Peoples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen Horvat

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available id the Hittites, a landlocked nation from central Anatolia, have any contacts with the Aegean region and its peoples? This has been a hotly contested issue ever since 1924, when E. Forrer claimed to have discovered a reference to Homeric Greeks in Hittite texts mentioning a country called Ahhiyawa. Almost as soon as the theory appeared, it was refuted by many prominent Hittitologists, most notably F. Sommer and A. Goetze, who claimed Ahhiyawa was just one of the Anatolian principalities. But there were also those who concurred with Forrer's claims - F. Schachermeyer and G. L. Huxley. Some scholars later propounded their own theories about the location of Ahhiyawa, placing it in the area of the Troad or Thrace. Recent scholarship mostly agrees with Guterbock that Ahhiyawa must have had some connection with the Mycenaeans, but not all have been persuaded. There are several Hittite documents in which Ahhiyawa appears. The earliest of there is the so-called Indictment of Madduwata. It dates to the beginning of the 14''' century B. C. and recounts Hittite dealings with a certain Madduwata, forced to flee his country by Attarsiya, whom the Hittites called Man of Ahhiya(wa. Madduwata was installed as a Hittite vassal ruler somewhere in southwestern Anatolia; however, he proved to be an ungrateful and overambitious person, who caused serious trouble for his overlord by attacking Hittite possessions in what appears to have been the area of classical Lycia and Caria. Later he even invaded Cyprus in alliance with his former enemy Attarsiya. The next reference to Ahhiyawa comes from the time of the Hittite king Mursilli, who reigned in the last quarter of the 14''' century B. C. He conquered the country of Arzawa, which lay in the area of classical Lydia, with its capital Apasa (classical Ephesus. Relying on the king of Ahhiyawa, it engaged in hostilities against the Hittites and incited the land of Millawanda (classical Miletus to rebellion, but was

  8. The initiation and development of a caldera-forming Plinian eruption (172 ka Lower Pumice 2 eruption, Santorini, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, J. M.; Cas, R. A. F.; Druitt, T. H.; Carey, R. J.

    2017-07-01

    The rhyodacitic 172 ka Lower Pumice 2 (LP2) eruption terminated the first magmatic cycle at Santorini (Greece), producing a proximal short-lived precursory eruption column, depositing a column (LP2-A2, A3). The progressive increase in maximum vesicle number density (NVF) in rhyodacitic pumice, from 3.2 × 109 cm- 3 in the basal fall unit of LP2-A2-1 to 9.2 × 109 cm- 3 in LP2-A3, translates to an increase in magma decompression rate from 18 to 29 MPa s- 1 over the course of the initial Plinian phase. This is interpreted to be a consequence of progressive vent widening and a deepening of the fragmentation surface. Such interpretations are supported by the increase in lithic clast abundance vertically through LP2-A, and the occurrence of basement-derived (deep) lithic components in LP2-A3. The increasing lithic clast content and the inability to effectively entrain air into the eruption column, due to vent widening, resulted in column collapse and the development of pyroclastic density currents (PDCs; LP2-B). A major vent excavation event or the opening of new vents, possibly associated with incipient caldera collapse, facilitated the ingress of water into the magmatic system, the development of widespread PDCs and the deposition of a < 20m thick massive phreatomagmatic tuff (LP2-C). The eruption cumulated in catastrophic caldera collapse, the enlargement of a pre-existing flooded caldera and the discharge of lithic-rich PDCs, depositing proximal < 9 m thick lithic lag breccias (LP2-D).

  9. Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) in the NE Aegean Sea frontal area: Seasonal dynamics under the influence of Black Sea water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinos, C.; Gogou, A.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Lagaria, A.; Giannakourou, A.; Karageorgis, A. P.; Psarra, S.

    2017-10-01

    The abundance of Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP) was determined on a seasonal basis (autumn, spring and summer) along a north-south transect in the NE Aegean Sea and the vicinity of the Dardanelles Straits. Their distribution patterns were studied in respect to hydrographic conditions and water mass characteristics in the area, as well as particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations, changes in standing stocks of chlorophyll-α and bacterial production. TEP concentrations ranged from 15.4 to 188 μg GX eq L-1. Their spatial distribution patterns within the euphotic zone displayed significant seasonal variability, which appears to closely reflect the temporal variation of the water column structure, resulting from the encounter and interplay of the Black Sea and Levantine Water masses, and the associated biogeochemical processes. Minimum TEP concentrations during autumn could be likely attributed to a minor quantity of TEP and/or its dissolved precursors exuded by phytoplankton and their enhanced degradation due to their long residence time in the water column. During spring, high TEP production was mediated by actively growing phytoplankton, while during summer a positive link to the intense stratification of the water column and the enhanced bacterial growth within the Black Sea Water layer was observed. The results reported in this study highlight the fact that TEP carbon represents a significant fraction of the POC pool. Moreover, TEP production is critical in promoting particle coagulation rates, playing an important role in carbon cycling/transportation out of the euphotic zone.

  10. 1881 and 1949 earthquakes at the Chios-Cesme Strait (Aegean Sea and their relation to tsunamis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Altinok

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The most earthquake-prone areas in the eastern central Aegean Sea are the Izmir Bay, the Karaburun peninsula and the island of Chios. The level of seismic activity and tsunami potential are influenced by the presence of normal faults around the region. There have been about 20 moderate-size earthquakes from 496 BC to 1949 AD. Among these earthquakes, the ones on the dates 20 March 1389, 13 November 1856, 19/22 January 1866, 3 April 1881 and 23 July 1949 produced tsunamis. The Chios-Cesme earthquake (1881, Mw 6.5 took place in the South of the Cesme strait while the Chios-Karaburun earthquake (1949, Mw 6.7 occurred in the North. The tsunamis caused by the earthquakes affected the coasts of Chios Island and Cesme. These waves are thought to be associated with the earthquakes and co-seismic underwater failures possibly occurred along the coasts of the Chios Island and Karaburun Peninsula or on the complex subaqueous morphology between these lands. Some sea waves or oscillations observed following the aftershocks are believed to be related to other natural phenomena; e.g. the seiches occurred mainly in open-narrow bays as triggered by the earthquakes.

  11. The role of wind-forced coastal upwelling on the thermohaline functioning of the North Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamoutos, Ioannis; Zervakis, Vassilis; Tragou, Elina; Karydis, Michael; Frangoulis, Constantin; Kolovoyiannis, Vassilis; Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Psarra, Stella

    2017-10-01

    This work examines the impact of coastal upwelling on the exchanges of a semi-enclosed basin with the open sea. Five oceanographic transects were performed with a cross-shore direction relative to the western coast of Lesvos island of the eastern Aegean Sea, a region where coastal upwelling is regularly observed during the summer Etesian northerly winds. Filaments of highly saline water were observed during upwelling incidents, and were attributed to the enhanced transport of Levantine water from the south due to the baroclinic response to upwelling. All our observations, as well as a 9-year hindcast of the phenomenon revealed that the origin of the upwelled isopycnals usually remained above 40 m depth, and never exceeded the depth of 60 m. On the contrary, the isopycnals hosting the nutricline appear to downwell during upwelling incidents. Our hindcast showed that the secondary geostrophic circulation is comprised both by surface and subsurface longshore currents, which affect the meridional exchanges at the surface and intermediate layers and reduce the residence time of the water in the basin. We conclude that coastal upwelling in a region with longshore temperature and salinity gradients can modify the transport of salt and heat along the coast, possibly affecting the thermohaline functioning of a basin.

  12. PREFACE: Donald D Harrington Symposium on the Geology of the Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlos, Elizabeth J.

    2008-03-01

    This volume of the IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Sciences presents a selection of papers given at the Donald D Harrington Symposium on the Geology of the Aegean held on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin on April 28-30, 2008. Donald D Harrington was born in Illinois in 1899 and moved westward after serving in the Army Air Corps during World War I. Mr Harrington took a position as a landman with Marlin Oil Company in Oklahoma. When the Texas Panhandle oil boom hit in 1926, he moved to Amarillo, Texas, where he met Sybil Buckingham—the granddaughter of one of Amarillo's founding families. They married in 1935 and went on to build one of the most successful independent oil and gas operations in Texas history. The couple created the Don and Sybil Harrington Foundation in 1951 to support worthy causes such as museums, medical research, education, and the arts. At the Harrington Symposium on the Geology of the Aegean, researchers presented papers organized under five general themes: (1) the geology of Aegean in general (2) the geologic history of specific domains within the Aegean (Cyclades, Menderes, Kazdag, Rhodope, Crete, southern Balkans, etc) (3) the dynamic tectonic processes that occur within the Aegean (4) its geo-archeological history, natural history and hazards and (5) comparisons of the Aegean to regions elsewhere (e.g., Basin and Ranges; Asian extensional terranes). The Aegean is a locus of dynamic research in a variety of fields, and the symposium provided an opportunity for geologists from a range of disciplines to interact and share new results and information about their research in the area. At the opening reception in the Harry S Ransom Center, Dr Clark Burchfiel (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA) provided a keynote address on the outstanding geologic problems of the Aegean region. His paper in this volume outlines a framework for future studies. We also call attention to a paper in this volume by Dr Y

  13. North Aegean island landscapes as ecomuseums: the case of Lesvos Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Pavlis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The main advantage of the Aegean islands, in generating national, regional, or international competitiveness, compared to the areas on the continental mainland, is their natural and cultural assets, their cultural landscapes. Consequently, the organized utilization of cultural heritage, rich biodiversity, and the unique Aegean landscape, could make the islands attractive as places to live or work and help them fulfill their sustainability goals. Ecomuseums are ‘in situ’ museums, aimed at local communities and managed by them, aiming at the interpretation, protection, utilization, and promotion of natural and cultural assets of a place, and at the economic revival of marginal regions through the combinational development of small-scale tourism, local manufacturing, and primary production sectors. They could function as laboratories of sustainable development. The island of Lesvos has been selected as a case study for such a potential ecomuseum.

  14. Insights into the benthic communities response to the inflow of Black Sea mesotrophic waters in the North Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Sevastou, Katerina; Podaras, Dimitrios; Tselepides, Anastasios

    2017-10-01

    The effects of the Dardanelles inflow of buoyant, modified Black Sea waters (BSW) of low salinity and temperature, on the meio- and macrobenthic communities of the north Aegean ecosystem was investigated during two cruises in October 2013 and March 2014. Sediment samples were collected from two stations subjected to the BSW effect, one shallow and one deep north of the Dardanelles Straits, and from two stations of similar bathymetry, which were considered to be outside the influence of BSW and were located to the south of the Dardanelles Straits. Results suggest that there is an effect of the BSW on benthos, as both meiofaunal and macrofaunal standing stocks were lower at the most distant, and therefore least affected from the inflow, station, and higher at the station of similar bathymetry which was affected the most by the BSW inflow. Univariate and multivariate non-parametric analyses (nMDS, PERMANOVA) provided further support, indicating differences between the two areas (North vs. South) in the case of the deep stations, while differences between depth categories were evident in the area outside the BSW influence zone. Distance-based linear modeling (DISTLM) indicated that meiofauna correlated with proxies of food availability and sediment characteristics. Macrofauna, on the other hand, showed a rather high significant correlation with depth only. Nematode species composition was statistically significant different between depth categories only, yet the nMDS ordination clearly separated the deep southern station from the rest, with non-selective deposit feeders dominating the stations under the influence of the BSW, and epistratum feeders being important at the stations outside the influence of the BSW. It is concluded that both the meiofaunal and macrofaunal communities at the northern stations benefit from a constant input of high amounts of organic matter to the seafloor, while those at the southern area may be occasionally affected by the thermohaline BSW

  15. Three new exotic fish records from the SE Aegean Greek waters

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    Maria Corsini

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Three exotic fish, Iniistius pavo (Labridae and Lagocephalus sceleratus (Tetraodontidae, Lessepsian immigrants, and Seriola fasciata (Carangidae of Atlantic origin, were recorded in the marine area of Rhodes Island (SE Aegean Sea, Greece. The first species is a new record for the Mediterranean Sea, the second is new for Greek waters, while the occurrence of the third is registered for the first time in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

  16. Sensitivity of the N. AEGEAN SEA ecosystem to Black Sea Water inputs

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    G. PETIHAKIS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Black Sea Water (BSW inputs on the North Aegean Sea productivity and food web dynamics was investigated, by means of sensitivity simulations, investigating the effect of the inflowing BSW, in terms of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic matter. The model used has been successfully applied in the area in the past and extensively presented. Considering the importance of the microbial loop in the ecosystem functioning, the role of the dissolved organics and in order to achieve a more realistic representation of the Dissolved Organic Matter pool, the bacteria sub-model was appropriately revised. The importance of the microbial loop is highlighted by the carbon fluxes where almost 50% of carbon is channelled within it. The impact of dissolved organic matter (DOM (in the inflowing to the Aegean Sea, BSW appears to be stronger than the impact of dissolved inorganic nutrients, showing a more extended effect over the N Aegean. Bacterial production and biomass is more strongly affected in the simulations by modified DOM, unlike phytoplankton biomass and production, which are more dependent on the inflowing nutrients and particularly phosphorus (inorganic and dissolved organic. In the phytoplankton composition, the dinoflagellates appear to be mostly affected, being favoured by higher nutrient availability at the expense of all other groups, particularly picoplankton, indicating a shift to a more classical food chain.

  17. A high resolution data assimilation system for the Aegean Sea hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korres, G.; Nittis, K.; Hoteit, I.; Triantafyllou, G.

    2009-05-01

    We present the development and validation of an eddy-resolving sequential data assimilation system for the Aegean Sea hydrodynamics that has been developed as part of the Poseidon operational system. The assimilation scheme is based on the Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter which is an error subspace Extended Kalman filter that operates with low-rank error covariance matrices as a way to reduce the computational burden. The filter was used to correct the forecast state of a 1/20° Princeton Ocean Model (POM) of the Aegean Sea every time new observations were available. The model is forced with hourly fluxes from a 1/10° ETA regional atmospheric model and is one-way nested to a 1/10° POM model of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. The assimilated data set is multivariate including weekly AVISO sea level anomalies, weekly AVHRR sea surface temperature, and daily Ferrybox sea surface salinity (SSS) along the ferry boat route from Piraeus to Heraklion. Data assimilation experiments are performed to validate the system over a 6-month period (January-June, 2004). In one of the assimilation experiments, where the Ferrybox SSS data were not assimilated and used as independent observations, the multivariate assimilation system was able to reduce the error on the SSS prediction. Additional assimilation of the Ferrybox data on a daily basis shows their positive impact on other predicted variables of the system and their significant local effect on the SSS prediction within the southern Aegean Sea.

  18. Large-scale bioprospecting of cyanobacteria, micro- and macroalgae from the Aegean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvão, Sofia; Demirel, Zeliha; Devi, Prabha; Lombardi, Valter; Hongisto, Vesa; Perälä, Merja; Hattara, Johannes; Imamoglu, Esra; Tilvi, Supriya Shet; Turan, Gamze; Dalay, Meltem Conk; Tammela, Päivi

    2016-05-25

    Marine organisms constitute approximately one-half of the total global biodiversity, being rich reservoirs of structurally diverse biofunctional components. The potential of cyanobacteria, micro- and macroalgae as sources of antimicrobial, antitumoral, anti-inflammatory, and anticoagulant compounds has been reported extensively. Nonetheless, biological activities of marine fauna and flora of the Aegean Sea have remained poorly studied when in comparison to other areas of the Mediterranean Sea. In this study, we screened the antimicrobial, antifouling, anti-inflammatory and anticancer potential of in total 98 specimens collected from the Aegean Sea. Ethanol extract of diatom Amphora cf capitellata showed the most promising antimicrobial results against Candida albicans while the extract of diatom Nitzschia communis showed effective results against Gram-positive bacterium, S. aureus. Extracts from the red alga Laurencia papillosa and from three Cystoseira species exhibited selective antiproliferative activity against cancer cell lines and an extract from the brown alga Dilophus fasciola showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity as measured in primary microglial and astrocyte cell cultures as well as by the reduction of proinflammatory cytokines. In summary, our study demonstrates that the Aegean Sea is a rich source of species that possess interesting potential for developing industrial applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. INTER-annual/decadal variability of the north Aegean Sea hydrodynamics over 1960-2000

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    V. VERVATIS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Results from a high-resolution hindcast model experiment, supported by available observations, reveal an increasing salinity trend in the north Aegean during the Eastern Mediterranean Transient (EMT, largely controlled by increases in the flow rate and salinity of water masses of Levantine origin entering the domain through the Myconos-Ikaria strait as a response to an acceleration of the Aegean thermohaline cell. Changes in the Dardanelles inflow (increasing salinity and in the surface freshwater flux (increasing Evaporation-Precipitation, although both contribute to a higher salt content of the basin during the EMT, play a minor role in the inter-annual/decadal variability of the freshwater budget. A long-term decreasing temperature trend is observed from the 1960s to the early 1990s. It is superimposed on the salinity-preconditioning phase over the 1980s and early 1990s. Both signals are, concomitantly, favouring conditions for intense Dense Water Formation (DWF in the north Aegean Sea. In addition, the northward displacement of the Black Sea Water front over the EMT, leads to the expansion of convective cells towards the north and to higher formation rates associated with both colder and saltier surface waters.

  20. Simulating Etesians over the Aegean and Implications for Wind Energy Production in Southeastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafka, Stella; Toreti, Andrea; Luterbacher, Juerg; Zanis, Prodromos; Tyrlis, Evangelos; Xoplaki, Elena

    2017-04-01

    Episodes of extremely strong wind can represent a threat for the safe design, construction and operation of wind energy turbines over the Aegean Sea (Greece). During boreal summer and early autumn, strong and persistent northerly winds, known as Etesians, can cause hazardous conditions over the Aegean Archipelago. Here, an assessment of extreme Etesians is performed. Twelve measuring stations over the Aegean Sea and three different hub heights are used and compared with six-hourly wind speed measurements from five EURO-CORDEX, ERA-Interim-driven, Regional Climate Models (RCMs) for the extended summer season (May-September) from 1989 to 2008. Results indicate, that all RCMs tend to underestimate the magnitude of wind speed extremes (50-year return levels), at the different hub heights, by approximately 10-30% when compared to station series. DMI and IPSL models achieve, however, higher skill in this respect. On the other hand, the SMHI produces lower uncertainty compared to other simulations. In addition, all the analysed models are able to reproduce with a good approximation the spatial distribution of the extremes when compared with the observations. Finally, the exposure to north-northeasterly wind directions seems to play a key role in the extreme wind distribution. More intense extremes are found over the central and northern subregions, indicating challenging sites for class 1-turbine construction and cut-out speeds higher than 25m/s.

  1. The Emergence and Development of a Round Building Tradition in the Aegean and Crete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannouli, Evyenia

    This paper examines the emergence of the non-submerged type of round building in the settlements of prehistoric Aegean, including Crete. It complements our earlier discussion of the Minoan evidence that concentrated on the properties of architectural form and the cultural semantics of its perishable structure. This work explores the common characteristics that this particular architectural genre acquires in the prehistoric communities of the Greek mainland, the Aegean islands and Crete, along with the features that seem to demarcate distinct chronological and geographical groupings. More specifically, the systematic co-occurrence of features warrant, in our view, the identification of a hitherto unidentified round building type, detected in the iconography of Minoan Crete. It is the Minoan evidence par excellence that presents the greatest diversity of architectural variants, contexts and apparently function. On a more general level, the tradition of a round building type is inferred on the basis of the persistent adoption of a particular architectural form, along with the local adaptation of certain peculiarities that impinge on its cultural semantics. Our treatment of the material defines a conspectus of topics for further research, posing a frame for the historical understanding of a general building shape that in the Aegean may often, but not always, preserve the form and contents of a typical settlement house.

  2. Factors affecting plant species richness and endemism on land-bridge islands - An example from the East Aegean archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panitsa, Maria; Trigas, Panayiotis; Iatrou, Gregoris; Sfenthourakis, Spyros

    2010-07-01

    The native flora and a number of environmental factors were recorded for twenty islands in the eastern Aegean archipelago (Greece) in order to study the patterns of native and endemic plant species diversity as well as the effects of environmental factors in shaping these patterns at different levels of endemism. Stepwise regressions were used to test the effects of these factors on species richness of native and especially of endemic plants, at local scales. The performance of the Choros model was also compared with the separate effects of area and habitat diversity using simple linear regressions. The residuals from the species-area functions of native and endemic species were used as indices of relative island richness. Out of the 2238 species and subspecies recorded in total, 302 taxa (13.4%) are endemics (either single island endemics or endemic at a broader scale, namely Aegean, Greek-Aegean, or Anatolian-Aegean). All native, all endemic and Aegean endemic species similarities among islands were assessed and the three matrices were compared with the matrices of among-island geographical distances and island similarities based on components of habitat diversity using Mantel test. Among the factors tested, habitat diversity, of which elevation is another dimension, is the main factor affecting floral richness on east Aegean islands. The patterns exhibited by local endemics, though, are of a more idiosyncratic nature since this factor is the major predictor of species richness of most of the endemics levels (including single island endemics) except the Aegean endemics which are better predicted by elevation. The Choros model does not provide a better prediction of richness than habitat diversity alone. There is a positive correlation between native species similarities and geographical distances among islands, but no correlation between environmental and floral similarities.

  3. The Kolumbo submarine volcano of Santorini island is a large pool of bacterial strains with antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbouli, Maria; Katsifas, Efstathios A; Papathanassiou, Evangelos; Karagouni, Amalia D

    2015-05-01

    Microbes in hydrothermal vents with their unique secondary metabolism may represent an untapped potential source of new natural products. In this study, samples were collected from the hydrothermal field of Kolumbo submarine volcano in the Aegean Sea, in order to isolate bacteria with antimicrobial activity. Eight hundred and thirty-two aerobic heterotrophic bacteria were isolated and then differentiated through BOX-PCR analysis at the strain level into 230 genomic fingerprints, which were screened against 13 different type strains (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) of Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. Forty-two out of 176 bioactive-producing genotypes (76 %) exhibited antimicrobial activity against at least four different type strains and were selected for 16S rDNA sequencing and screening for nonribosomal peptide (NRPS) and polyketide (PKS) synthases genes. The isolates were assigned to genus Bacillus and Proteobacteria, and 20 strains harbored either NRPS, PKS type I or both genes. This is the first report on the diversity of culturable mesophilic bacteria associated with antimicrobial activity from Kolumbo area; the extremely high proportion of antimicrobial-producing strains suggested that this unique environment may represent a potential reservoir of novel bioactive compounds.

  4. Geochemistry of mylonitic gneisses from the Cycladic Basement Unit (Paros and Serifos, Aegean Sea): implications for protoliths of the high-grade gneisses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Annette; Stouraiti, Christina; Windley, Brian

    2017-09-01

    The nature of the protolith(s) of high-grade gneisses from the Aegean Cycladic Basement Unit of the islands of Paros and Serifos is investigated using whole-rock geochemistry and Sr-Nd-O isotopes, in order to better understand their origin and to compare with possible equivalents from the southern Aegean region. On Paros, the basement unit consists of heterogeneous, mylonitized upper amphibolite-grade paragneisses and associated migmatitic rocks, whereas on Serifos, it consists of a mylonitized felsic gneiss, intercalated with layers and lenses of S-type leucogranites and minor mafic metavolcanics. New Nd, Sr and O isotope data suggest a predominantly crustal-derived source in the gneiss protolith from both islands: high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (≥7052 to 0.711, calculated at 300 Ma), negative initial ɛNd (-2.8 to -7.7) values for bulk-rock gneiss samples, and high δ18O values of quartz separates (+10 to +12.7 ‰). Major and trace-element variations corroborate that chemical differentiation within the NW Paros gneiss subunit results from progressive migmatitization. Peraluminous gneisses from eastern Paros share clear similarities with metapelitic gneisses from the Naxos gneiss dome, in terms of their trace-element patterns, ɛNd (300) and O isotope characteristics. The mineral assemblage, the fine grain size (due to intense mylonitization), and the metaluminous affinity of the South Serifos grey quartzofeldpathic gneiss do not allow for an unambiguous interpretation for these undated rocks; however, a combination of geochemical parameters and tectonic discrimination diagrams indicates an immature siliciclastic (greywacke) protolith from a continental island arc setting. Sr-Nd isotopic systematics indicates an increasing lower crustal component in gneisses from NW Paros, which is closer to the migmatitic core of the Paros dome. The overall isotopic trend of the gneissic Cycladic Basement Unit on Paros is spatially correlated with that of the Naxos gneiss dome.

  5. Carbonate system parameters and anthropogenic CO2 in the North Aegean Sea during October 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasakopoulou, E.; Souvermezoglou, E.; Giannoudi, L.; Goyet, C.

    2017-10-01

    Data of AT (total alkalinity) and CT (total inorganic carbon) collected during October 2013, on a N-S transect crossing the North of Lemnos basin allowed to identify the peculiarities of the CO2 system in the North Aegean Sea and estimate the anthropogenic CO2 (CANT) concentrations. Extremely high concentrations of AT and CT were recorded in the upper layer of the North Aegean reflecting the high loads of AT and CT by the brackish BSW (Black Sea Water) outflowing through the Dardanelles strait and by the rivers runoff. Both AT and CT exhibit strong negative linear correlation with salinity in the upper layer (0-20 m). Investigation of the AT-S relationship along with the salinity adjustment of AT revealed excess alkalinity throughout the water column in relation to the surface waters implying a possible occurrence of non-carbonate alkalinity inputs as well as of other processes that take place probably over the extended shelves and contribute to the alkalinity surplus. The intermediate layer occupied by the Modified Levantine Intermediate Water (MLIW) mass exhibits the lowest CT and AT concentrations, while rather elevated AT and CT concentrations characterize the North Aegean Deep Water (NAgDW) mass filling the deep layer of the North of Lemnos basin linked to previous dense water formation episodes. High anthropogenic CO2 content was detected at intermediate and deep layers of the North Aegean reflecting the effective transportation of the absorbed atmospheric CO2 from the surface to the deeper waters via the dense water formation episodes. The MLIW layer is more affected by the penetration of CANT than the NAgDW that fills the deep part of the basin. The observed variability of CANT distribution reflects the influence of the intensity of dense water formation events, of the different θ/S properties of the newly formed dense waters as well as of the diverse submarine pathways followed by the cascading dense waters. The invasion of CANT has lead to more acidic

  6. Subduction and slab tearing dynamics constrained by thermal anomalies in the Anatolia-Aegean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Vincent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Loiselet, Christelle; Bouchot, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones with backward migration (rollback), slab tearing or slab breakoff by numerical or laboratory experiments and by integrating seismicity, tomography data and geochemical studies. Here we investigate these processes in the Aegean-Anatolian domain and particularly the western side of Turkey (western Anatolia) by incorporating thermal regime of the crust, and in particular the geothermal fields as anomalies that could reflect the thermal state of Aegean subduction zone at depth. This domain is characterized by 1) extensional crustal deformation which progressively localized during the Aegean slab retreat from late Eocene to Present, enabling the development of a hot backarc domain; this extension accelerated between 15 and 8 Ma coeval with a fast rotation of the Hellenides and 2) since the latest Miocene, extension is coupled with the development of the North Anatolian Fault that accommodates the westward escape of the Anatolian block. Both the acceleration of extension in the Middle Miocene and the recent escape of Anatolia have been proposed to result from several slab tearing events, the first one being located below western Turkey and the Eastern Aegean Sea, a second one below eastern Turkey and a last one below the Corinth Rift (Faccenna et al., 2006; Jolivet et al., 2013). The distribution of magmatism and mineral resources has been suggested to be largely controlled by these retreat and tearing events (Menant et al., submitted). The development of a widespread active geothermal province in western Anatolia is unlikely to simply result from the Quaternary magmatism whose volcanism part has a too limited extent. Conversely, the long wavelength east-west variation of surface heat flow density could reflect deep thermal processes in the lower crust and/or deeper, and we thus look for possible connections with larger-scale mantle dynamics. We use the distribution of thermal anomalies at different scales and the 3

  7. Circulation and hydrological characteristics of the North Aegean Sea: a contribution from real-time buoy measurements

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    K. NITTIS

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the POSEIDON Project, a network of open sea oceanographic buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors has been operational in the Aegean Sea since 1998. The analysis of upper-ocean physical data (currents at 3m, temperature and salinity at 3-40m depths collected during the last 2 years from the stations of the North Aegean basin indicates a strong temporal variability of flow field and hydrological characteristics in both synoptic and seasonal time scales. The northern part of the basin is mainly influenced by the Black Sea Water outflow and the mesoscale variability of the corresponding thermohaline fronts, while the southern stations are influenced by the general circulation of the Aegean Sea with strong modulations caused by the seasonally varying atmospheric forcing.

  8. Nutrient exchange fluxes between the Aegean and Black Seas through the Marmara Sea

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    S. TUGRUL

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term data obtained in the Turkish Strait System (TSS including the Sea of Marmara, the Dardanelles and Bosphorus straits, during 1990-2000, have permitted us to calculate seasonal and annual fluxes of water and nutrients (nitrate, phosphate exchanged between the Aegean and Black Seas through the TSS. Two-layer flow regimes in the TSS introduce the brackish waters of the Black Sea into the Aegean basin of the northeastern Mediterranean throughout the year. A counter flow in the TSS carries the salty Mediterranean water into the Black Sea via the Marmara deep basin. The annual volume influx from the Black Sea to the Marmara upper layer is nearly two-fold the salty water exported from the Marmara to the Black Sea via the Bosphorus underflow. The brackish Black Sea inflow is relatively rich in nitrate and phosphate in winter, decreasing to the lowest levels in late summer and autumn. Biologically labile nutrients of Black Sea origin are utilized in photosynthetic processes in the Marmara Sea and are partly exported to the Marmara lower layer. Eventually, the brackish Black Sea waters reach the Dardanelles Strait, with modified bio-chemical properties. On the other hand, the salty Mediterranean waters with low concentrations of nutrients enter the Marmara deep basin. During threir 6-7 year sojourn in the Marmara basin, the salty waters become enriched in nitrate (DIN and phosphate (DIP, due to oxidation of planktonic particles sinking from the Marmara surface layer. The annual nutrient inputs from the Black Sea to the Marmara basin were estimated as 8.17x108 moles of DIN and 4.25x107 moles of DIP, which are much less than the importation from the Marmara lower layer via the Bosphorus undercurrent. The salty Aegean water introduces nearly 6.13x108 moles of DIN and 2.79x107 moles of DIP into the Marmara lower layer. The estimated DIP outflux from the Aegean Sea is nearly 2 times less than the importation from the Marmara Sea via the Dardanelles

  9. Reproductive biology of Sepietta oweniana (Pfeffer, 1908 (Sepiolidae: Cephalopoda in the Aegean Sea

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    Alp Salman

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available It is stated that S. oweniana, one of the well-known taxa of the family Sepiolidae, has a wide distribution throughout the Aegean Sea. In this study 805 specimens were collected, and the gonad stages of both sexes and the seasonal gonado-somatic index value were examined. It was observed that the spawning period of S. oweniana covers the whole year with two maxima in April-May and October-November. No discernible difference in length frequencies of males and females was observed. The reproductive biology parameters of the specimens were compared with those observed in other seas.

  10. Geochemical characteristics of late Quaternary sediments from the southern Aegean Sea (Eastern Mediterranean

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    A. SIOULAS

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Ten cores from the southern Aegean Sea have been logged for their lithological composition and seventy-three sub-samples were analysed for the determination of major and trace elements concentrations. Four lithological units were identified, namely, mud, volcanic, turbidite and sapropel. On the basis of the “Z-2” Minoan ash layer radiocarbon age sedimentation rates for the southern Aegean Sea were estimated at 3.26 to 4.15 cm kyr -1. Simple correlation analysis revealed three groups of elements associated with: (1 biogenic carbonates; (2 terrigenous alumino-silicates and (3 sapropelic layers. R-mode factor analysis applied on the carbonate-free corrected data-set defined four significant factors: (1 the “detrital alumino-silicate factor” represented by Si, Al, Na, K, Rb, Zr, Pb and inversely related to Ca, Mg, and Sr; (2 a “hydrothermal factor” loaded with Cr, Ni, Co, Cu, Fe; (3 the “volcanic ash factor” with high loadings for Ti, Al, Fe, Na and (4 a “sapropel factor” represented by Ba, Mo, and Zn. High factor scores for the “hydrothermal factor” were observed in sediment samples proximal to Nisyros Isl., suggesting a potential hydrothermal influence. Red-brown oxides and crusts dredged from this area support further this possibility. The use of factor analysis enabled for a better understanding of the chemical elements associations that remained obscured by correlation analysis.

  11. Non-extensive statistical physics analysis of earthquake magnitude sequences in North Aegean Trough, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Giorgos; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2017-06-01

    In a recent study, Papadakis et al. (Physica A 456: 135-144, 2016) investigate seismicity in Greece, using the non-extensive statistical physics formalism. Moreover, these authors examine the spatial distribution of the non-extensive parameter q M and show that for shallow seismicity, increase of q M coincides with strong events. However, their study also reveals low q M values along the North Aegean Trough, despite the presence of strong events during 1976-2009. Consequently, the present study further examines the temporal behaviour of parameters q M and A, to reveal their relation with the evolution of the earthquake sequence. Through temporal examination of these parameters, we aim to show that the seismogenic system of the North Aegean Trough presents high degree of interactions after strong earthquakes during the studied period. Our findings indicate that increase of q M signifies the existence of long-range correlations. If its value does not significantly decrease after a strong earthquake (i.e. M ≥ 5) then the studied area has not reached the state of equilibrium.

  12. Magnetotellurics and Transient Electromagnetics to Investigate the Geoelectric Structure of Southern Aegean, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, J. P.; Kalisperi, D.; Smirnov, M.; Rigakis, H.; Romano, G.; Kokologiannakis, A.; Pentes, G.; Pentaris, F.; Skoulakis, A.; Perrone, A.; Kouli, M.; Vallianatos, F.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2012 a great number of onshore magnetotelluric (MT) and Transient Electromagnetic (TEM) measurements have been conducted in Southern Aegean, Greece. The survey included Crete, almost all the islands of Dodecanese and Southern Cyclades, Southern Peloponnese, and the islands Kithira, Antikithira and Gavdos. Southern Aegean Sea, featuring the Southern Hellenic Arc (HA) of the Hellenic Subduction Zone (HSZ) and the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA), depicts complex geotectonics and the most intense seismicity and geodynamics of Western Eurasia. In this work we summarize the most important results of the MT and TEM combined analysis and modelling. Furthermore, two permanent telemetric MT stations were installed and operated in Western Crete and Rhodes, respectively, to be used as remote reference and to investigate possible transient seismoelectromagnetic signals. The case of the October 12, 2013 strong earthquake (Mb6.4) is discussed. The research was conducted in the framework of the project entitled "MagnetoTellurics in studying Geodynamics of the hEllenic Arc (MT-GEAR)", co-funded by the European Social Fund (ESF) and National Resources within the context of the Action "Supporting Postdoctoral Researchers" of the Operational Programme 'Education and Lifelong Learning'.

  13. Trichoptera biodiversity of the Aegean and Adriatic sea basins in the republic of Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahimi, Halil; Kučinić, Mladen; Gashi, Agim; Grapci-Kotori, Linda

    2014-01-01

    We present the first preliminary inventory of Trichoptera taxa in the Aegean and Adriatic Sea basins in Kosovo that have previously received poor and fragmentary attention. Adult caddisflies were collected using ultraviolet (UV) light traps in 13 stations in areas of the Aegean Sea and Adriatic Sea drainage basins in Kosovo. Nineteen species out of 82, reported in this article, are first records for the Kosovo caddisfly fauna. Five genera are recorded for the first time in Kosovo: Brachycentrus, Ecclisopteryx, Psilopteryx, Thremma, and Oecetis. During this investigation, we found several Southeastern European endemic and rare species whose previous known distribution was limited to particular areas of this region, as well as other species whose distribution is considerably enlarged by this investigation: Polycentropus ierapetra, Polycentropus irroratus, Chaetopteryx stankovici, Drusus schmidi, Drusus tenellus, Potamophylax goulandriourum, Oecetis notata, and Notidobia melanoptera. Even though this article is a result of a limited sampling effort, it increases the number of Trichoptera taxa recorded for the Republic of Kosovo to 131. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  14. Heterotrophic bacterial growth and substrate utilization in the oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean (Aegean Sea

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    U. CHRISTAKI

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Heterotrophic bacterial growth and substrate utilization were studied in March and September of 1997 in the oligotrophic Aegean Sea. Maximum velocities of ectoproteolytic activity (ectoaminopeptidase ctivity, EAP, as well as amino acid assimilation and respiration rates (AA-A, AA-R were measured along with bacterial production (protein synthesis. At the northern stations which are influenced by the input of the Black Sea waters, rates at 5 m depth of EAP, AA-A and bacterial production were 2 to 3 times higher than at southern stations. Influenced by the Black Sea water, mean bacterial numbers in the 0-100 m layer showed typical oceanic concentrations averaging 0.7 x 10 6 cells ml -1 . These values, along with low bacterial production rates (30 ng C l -1 h -1 implied slow growth for bacteria and/or that a large number among them were inactive. Neither bacterial abundance nor production were correlated with primary production. The percentage of amino acids respired was higher in September compared to March, particularly in the northern Aegean (mean 69 %. The enzyme kinetic analysis showed a biphasic model, the transition between the high and low affinity enzymes being obtained at 50 ΜM. Ectoaminopeptidase activity was weakly correlated with bacterial production (p < 0.05, but strongly correlated with respiration rates of amino acids (p < 0.001, suggesting that the substrate used was devoted to maintain energy requirements.

  15. Tomographic image of the crust and uppermost mantle of the Ionian and Aegean regions

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    G. N. Stavrakakis

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a tomographic view of the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the Central Mediterranean area obtained from P-wave arrival times of regional earthquakes selected from the ISC bulletin. The P-wave velocity anomalies are obtained using Thurber's algorithm that jointly relocates earthquakes and computes velocity adjustments with respect to a starting model. A specific algorithm has been applied to achieve a distribution of epicentres as even as possible. A data set of 1009 events and 49072 Pg and Pn phases was selected. We find a low velocity belt in the crust, evident in the map view at 25 km of depth, beneath the Hellenic arc. A low velocity anomaly extends at 40 km of depth under the Aegean back arc basin. High velocities are present at Moho depth beneath the Ionian sea close to the Calabrian and Aegean arcs. The tomographic images suggest a close relationship between P-wave velocity pattern and the subduction systems of the studied area.

  16. Spatial distribution of vector borne disease agents in dogs in Aegean region, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Ural

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Assess the spatial distribution of seroprevalence of infection with or exposure to 4 vector-borne pathogens Ehrlichia canis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi and Dirofilaria immitis, across the coastal states of the Aegean region with special reference to clinical signs and haematological variances related to disease condition. Materials and methods. A convenience sample, targeting blood from at least 10 pet dogs from İzmir, Aydin, Denizli, Mugla and Manisa cities involved was evaluated using a canine point-of-care ELISA kit. Results. Out of 307 dogs tested the overall seroprevalence was highest for E. canis (24.42%, followed by E. canis + A. phagocytophilum co-infection (10.42%, A. phagocytophilum (7.49% and D. immitis (2.28%. Only 2 cases were seropositive to B. burgdorferi albeit 10 dogs were co-infected with more than 2 agents. For both dogs infected with E. canis and co-infected with E. canis and A. phagocytophilum, anemia, thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis, were more commonly detected, whereas thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis were significant finding in dogs infected with A. phagocytophilum or D. immitis, respectively. Variance analysis showed significant differences for mean RBC, Hb, PCV and PLT values (p<0.01 among control group and other groups. Conclusions. Seropositivity for vector-borne pathogens other than B. burgdorferi, is moderately to widely distributed in dogs residing in the Aegean region in Turkey.

  17. Particle characterization and composition in the NE Aegean Sea: Combining optical methods and biogeochemical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgis, A. P.; Drakopoulos, P. G.; Psarra, S.; Pagou, K.; Krasakopoulou, E.; Banks, A. C.; Velaoras, D.; Spyridakis, N.; Papathanassiou, E.

    2017-10-01

    The NE Aegean Sea constitutes a challenging sector of the world ocean in studying optical and biogeochemical properties and processes due to a dynamic frontal regime resulting from the continuous mixing of Black Sea waters (BSW) and waters of Levantine origin (LW), which are characterized by substantially different physical, chemical and biological properties. In the framework of Perseus and AegeanMarTech projects, inherent optical properties (IOPs; beam attenuation, optical backscattering, chlorophyll-α fluorescence), particle size, and discrete bottle data (particulate matter, particulate organic carbon, and chlorophyll-α concentrations) were measured during October 2013, March and July 2014. Black Sea water enters into the Aegean Sea through the Dardanelles and disperses to the west-northwest, as traced by characteristic salinity minima. The core of the BSW to the east of Lemnos Island was occasionally particle-enriched, showing maxima in cp, bbp, D50, PMC, POC, and TChl-α, the latter, however, detected primarily at sub-surface layers. Particle composition was chiefly organic, associated with phytoplanktonic communities (BSW and LW), heterotrophic planktonic organisms and detrital organic matter primarily originating in the BSW and forming aggregates often >100 μm in diameter. A discrepancy between particle and TChl-α abundance was observed, with cp local maxima occurring in surface waters (BSW) and TChl-α maxima in mid-waters (LW). This pattern was attributed to phytoplankton photo- acclimation with depth leading to increased cell- chlorophyll content deeper, not necessarily matched by a similar biomass increase, thus, using TChl-α as an absolute proxy for phytoplankton biomass may not be appropriate, when considering water bodies encompassing the entire euphotic zone. Primarily in surface waters, the in situ optically measured median particle diameter primarily corresponds to large particles/aggregates, contrary to the findings obtained by laboratory

  18. Temporal and spatial variations in provenance of Eastern Mediterranean Sea sediments: Implications for Aegean and Aeolian arc volcanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, M.; Djuly, T.; de Graaf, S.; Sakes, A.; Wijbrans, J.R.; Davies, G.R.; Vroon, P.Z.

    2015-01-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) is the last remnant of the Tethys Ocean that has been subducted to the north since the Jurassic. Subduction has led to the formation of multiple island arcs in the EMS region where the Aeolian and Aegean arcs are currently active. The EMS is surrounded by

  19. Unexpected Covariant Behavior of the Aegean and Ionian Seas in the Period 1987-2008 by Means of a Nondimensional Sea Surface Height Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, M.; Salon, S.; Crise, A.; Farneti, R.; Mosetti, R.; Sannino, G.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we use a set of recent multiyear simulations to develop a simplified sea surface height index (SSH). The index characterizes the dynamics of Ionian upper layer circulation and its links with sea surface height and salinity in the Southern Adriatic and Aegean Seas during the period 1987-2008. The analysis highlights a covariant behavior between Ionian Sea and Aegean Sea associated with a mutual zonal exchange of water masses with different salinity characteristics. Our analysis confirms that the variability observed in the period 1987-2008 in the upper layer circulation of the Ionian was driven by the salinity variability in the Southern Adriatic and Aegean Sea. This study supports and reinforces the hypothesis that two observed BiOS-like reversals reflect the existence of multiple equilibrium states in the Mediterranean Thermohaline circulation in the Eastern Mediterranean and that a complete characterization of observed variability needs to take into account a fully coupled Adriatic-Ionian-Aegean System.

  20. 3D instantaneous dynamics modeling of present-day Aegean subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glerum, Anne; Spakman, Wim; van Hinsbergen, Douwe; Pranger, Casper

    2017-04-01

    To study the sensitivity of surface observables to subduction and mantle flow, i.e. the coupling of crustal tectonics and the underlying mantle dynamics, we have developed 3D numerical models of the instantaneous crust-mantle dynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. These models comprise both a realistic crust-lithosphere system and the underlying mantle. The focus for this presentation lies on the regional crustal flow response to the present-day Aegean subduction system. Our curved model domain measures 40°x40°x2900km with the Aegean subduction system taken as the geographic center. Model set-ups are based on geological and geophysical data of the eastern Mediterranean. We first create a 3D synthetic geometry of the crust-lithosphere system in a stand-alone program, including the present-day configuration of the plates in the region and crust and lithosphere thickness variations abstracted from Moho and LAB maps (Faccenna et al., 2014, Carafa et al., 2015). In addition we construct the geometry of the Aegean slab from a seismic tomography model (UU-P07; Amaru, 2007) and earthquake hypocenters (NCEDC, 2014). Geometries are then imported into the finite element code ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012) using specially designed plugins. The mantle initial temperature conditions can include deviations from an adiabatic profile obtained from conversion of the UU-P07 seismic velocity anomalies to temperature anomalies using a depth-dependent scaling (Karato, 2008). We model compressible mantle flow for which material properties are obtained from thermodynamics P-T lookup-tables (Perple_X, Connolly, 2009) in combination with nonlinear viscoplastic rheology laws. Sublithospheric flow through the lateral model boundaries is left free via open boundary conditions (Chertova et al., 2012), while plate motion is prescribed at the model sides in terms of relative as well as absolute plate motion velocities (e.g. Doubrovine et al., 2012). So far, we used a free-slip surface, but

  1. Technical Characteristics of Some Fishing Gears, Used in Small Scale Fisheries in Bodrum Peninsula (Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan AKYOL

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we determined the technical characteristics and target species of some fishing gears, used in small scale fisheries in Bodrum Peninsula (Aegean Sea. The samplings were carried out in eight fishery cooperatives and fishing ports (Gündoğan, Göltürkbükü, Torba, Güvercinlik, Turgutreis, Akyarlar, Kıyıkışlacık ve Güllük during 2012-2013. Technical plans of the fishing gears were drawn by MS-Visio programme with scale for gillnets, but no scales for longlines and handlines. A total of 9 type set nets of which 6 trammel nets and 3 gillnets, 4 type longlines and 4 type handlines were determined.

  2. Symbiosis of sea anemones and hermit crabs: different resource utilization patterns in the Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafeiadou, Anna-Maria; Antoniadou, Chryssanthi; Chintiroglou, Chariton

    2012-09-01

    The small-scale distribution and resource utilization patterns of hermit crabs living in symbiosis with sea anemones were investigated in the Aegean Sea. Four hermit crab species, occupying shells of nine gastropod species, were found in symbiosis with the sea anemone Calliactis parasitica. Shell resource utilization patterns varied among hermit crabs, with Dardanus species utilizing a wide variety of shells. The size structure of hermit crab populations also affected shell resource utilization, with small-sized individuals inhabiting a larger variety of shells. Sea anemone utilization patterns varied both among hermit crab species and among residence shells, with larger crabs and shells hosting an increased abundance and biomass of C. parasitica. The examined biometric relationships suggested that small-sized crabs carry, proportionally to their weight, heavier shells and increased anemone biomass than larger ones. Exceptions to the above patterns are related either to local resource availability or to other environmental factors.

  3. The Aegean in the Early 7th Millennium BC: Maritime Networks and Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horejs, B; Milić, B; Ostmann, F; Thanheiser, U; Weninger, B; Galik, A

    The process of Near Eastern neolithization and its westward expansion from the core zone in the Levant and upper Mesopotamia has been broadly discussed in recent decades, and many models have been developed to describe the spread of early farming in terms of its timing, structure, geography and sociocultural impact. Until now, based on recent intensive investigations in northwestern and western Anatolia, the discussion has mainly centred on the importance of Anatolian inland routes for the westward spread of neolithization. This contribution focuses on the potential impact of east Mediterranean and Aegean maritime networks on the spread of the Neolithic lifestyle to the western edge of the Anatolian subcontinent in the earliest phases of sedentism. Employing the longue durée model and the concept of 'social memory', we will discuss the arrival of new groups via established maritime routes. The existence of maritime networks prior to the spread of farming is already indicated by the high mobility of Epipalaeolithic/Mesolithic groups exploring the Aegean and east Mediterranean seas, and reaching, for example, the Cyclades and Cyprus. Successful navigation by these early mobile groups across the open sea is attested by the distribution of Melian obsidian. The potential existence of an additional Pre-Pottery Neolithic (PPN) obsidian network that operated between Cappadocia/Cilicia and Cyprus further hints at the importance of maritime coastal trade. Since both the coastal and the high seas networks were apparently already well established in this early period, we may further assume appropriate knowledge of geographic routes, navigational technology and other aspects of successful seafaring. This Mesolithic/PPN maritime know-how package appears to have been used by later groups, in the early 7th millennium calBC, exploring the centre of the Anatolian Aegean coast, and in time establishing some of the first permanent settlements in that region. In the present paper, we

  4. Dynamics of Late Quaternary sapropel periods documented by micropaleontological and sedimentological data from North Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkaniatsa, Georgia; Kontakiotis, George; Antonarakou, Assimina; Drinia, Hara; Anastasakis, George

    2017-04-01

    Located at the interface of the mid/high latitude climate system and affected by the North Atlantic Oscillation and the monsoonal system over Africa, the Mediterranean Sea has a unique potential to record the occurrence and phasing of climatic changes in both systems. In particular, the eastern Mediterranean Sea is more sensitive and faster responding to external forcing than the open ocean due to smaller size and partial isolation. A manifestation of the high sensitivity of the eastern Mediterranean sedimentary environment to climatic forcing is the periodic deposition of dark colored and organic matter rich sediments, termed "sapropels". In particular their formation is closely correlated with the reduction in ventilation, due to low salinity surface water layer, leading to anoxia at the bottom and preservation of organic matter, and/or the increase in primary productivity in the photic zone. To address which factor is more responsible for the sapropel's formation, a high-resolution study of planktonic foraminiferal abundances in two cores from North Aegean was carried out. Their response reflects the essential information about the paleoceanographic evolution in the water column in terms of stratification and productivity during the different sapropel events covering the last 90 kyrs. Cores M 22-67 and M22-68 were recovered from the water depths of 175 and 305 m respectively in the Chios Basin (North Aegean Sea). Both cores approximately span the last 90 ka, exposing the most recent S1 and the older S3 sapropels. They particularly exposed at very high resolution compared to most occurrences throughout the eastern Mediterranean, because of the highest sediment accumulation rates occurred in the study basin. Application of this information to the study hemipelagic sediment cores, through the planktonic foraminiferal analyses, suggests that we further contribute to existing evidence of climatic instability during sapropel deposition in eastern Mediterranean Sea

  5. Progress of KOERI Tsunami Warning System for the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necmioglu, Ocal; Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Ozer Sozdinler, Ceren; Yilmazer, Mehmet; Cokacar, Tulay; Comoglu, Mustafa; Pinar, Ali; Kekovali, Kivanc

    2016-04-01

    This presentation provides a progress report on the activities of the Bogazici University / Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute - Regional Earthquake and Tsunami Monitoring Center (KOERI-RETMC) which provides services as a Candidate Tsunami Service Provider (CTSP) of ICG/NEAMTWS in the Eastern Mediterranean, Aegean and Black Seas since 1 July 2012. KOERI continues to operate 178 BB and 97 strong motion and 6 short period sensors and the regional coverage includes 77 stations from GFZ and additional 16 stations through bilateral agreements. One radar-type tide-gauge has been installed in Fethiye within the framework of "Inexpensive Device for Sea-Level Measurement" (IDSL) initiative offered as donation by the EC/JRC and planning is in progress for the possible installation of three more IDSLs in selected locations in the Aegean Sea coast of Turkey. The capabilities and the limitations of HF Radar technology for the purpose of tsunami detection in the Eastern Mediterranean has been identified and the maturity and the applicability of these systems for the possible use under the Tsunami Warning System has been determined. The development of the TsuComp as a user-friendly interface to be used in the assessment of tsunamigenic potential and as a single-point entry for message dissemination has been finalized. The work towards the creation of Tsunami Inundation Maps at the Tsunami Forecast Points in Turkey is near finalization. This work is partially funded by project ASTARTE - Assessment, Strategy And Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe - FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3, Grant 603839. The authors would like to thank EC/JRC and Mr. Alessandro Annunziato for their continuous support in the operational activities of RETMC and IDSL initiative.

  6. Exploration of the Black, Aegean, and Mediterranean Seas Aboard E/V Nautilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K. L.; Ballard, R. D.; Brennan, M. L.; Raineault, N. A.; Shank, T. M.; Mayer, L. A.; Roman, C.; Mitchell, G. A.; Coleman, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, the Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus undertook a two-month expedition to the Black, Aegean, and Mediterranean Seas. The primary goal of the Nautilus is to create a focus of international leadership for the development and integration of leading-edge technologies, educational programs, field operations, and public outreach programs for ocean exploration, in partnership with the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration, National Geographic Society, Office of Naval Research, and corporate partners. To do so, the program uses a complement of deep submergence vehicle systems and telepresence technologies to engage scientists, educators and the public, both at sea and ashore, allowing them to become integral members of the on-board exploration team. When discoveries are made, experts ashore are notified and brought aboard virtually within a short period of time to help guide shipboard response before the ship moves on. The 2012 expedition is comprised of four areas of interest. Extensive sidescan mapping took place off the Turkish coasts of the southern Black Sea and eastern Aegean Sea, and was followed by remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives on targets of archaeological, geological, and biological interest. In the Black Sea, additional work was done on the porewater chemistry of the sediments in the oxic, suboxic, and anoxic zones. Nautilus returned to the Anaximander Seamounts, including Kazan, Amserdam, Thessaloniki, and Athina, to further explore active and formerly active seep sites located in 2010. Finally, based on biological and geological discoveries made on Eratosthenes Seamount in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, we returned to further study chemosynthetic vent communities and tectonic processes.;

  7. Chemical composition and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles over the Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezantakos, S.; Barmpounis, K.; Giamarelou, M.; Bossioli, E.; Tombrou, M.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Kalogiros, J.; Allan, J. D.; Bacak, A.; Percival, C. J.; Coe, H.; Biskos, G.

    2013-11-01

    The chemical composition and water uptake characteristics of sub-micrometre atmospheric particles over the region of the Aegean Sea were measured between 25 August and 11 September 2011 within the framework of the Aegean-Game campaign. High temporal-resolution measurements of the chemical composition of the particles were conducted using an airborne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (cToF-AMS). These measurements were performed during two flights from the island of Crete to the island of Lemnos and back. A hygroscopic tandem differential mobility analyser (HTDMA) located on the island of Lemnos was used to measure the ability of the particles to take up water. The HTDMA measurements showed that the particles in the dominant mode were internally mixed, having hygroscopic growth factors that ranged from 1.00 to 1.59 when exposed to 85% relative humidity. When the aircraft flew near the ground station on Lemnos, the cToF-AMS measurements showed that the organic volume fraction of the particles ranged from 43 to 56%. These measurements corroborate the range of hygroscopic growth factors measured by the HTDMA during that time. Good closure between HTDMA and cToF-AMS measurements was achieved when assuming that the organic species were less hygroscopic and had an average density that corresponds to aged organic species. Using the results from the closure study, the cToF-AMS measurements were employed to determine vertical profiles of a representative aerosol hygroscopic parameter κmix. Calculated κmix values ranged from 0.19 to 0.84 during the first flight and from 0.22 to 0.80 during the second flight. Air masses of different origin as determined by back trajectory calculations can explain the spatial variation in chemical composition and κmix values of the particles observed in the region.

  8. Climate variability and socio-environmental changes in the northern Aegean (NE Mediterranean) during the last 1500 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogou, Alexandra; Triantaphyllou, Maria; Xoplaki, Elena; Izdebski, Adam; Parinos, Constantine; Dimiza, Margarita; Bouloubassi, Ioanna; Luterbacher, Juerg; Kouli, Katerina; Martrat, Belen; Toreti, Andrea; Fleitmann, Dominik; Rousakis, Gregory; Kaberi, Helen; Athanasiou, Maria; Lykousis, Vasilios

    2016-04-01

    We provide new evidence on sea surface temperature (SST) variations and paleoceanographic/paleoenvironmental changes over the past 1500 years for the north Aegean Sea (NE Mediterranean). The reconstructions are based on multiproxy analyses, obtained from the high resolution (decadal to multi-decadal) marine record M2 retrieved from the Athos basin. Reconstructed SSTs show an increase from ca. 850 to 950 AD and from ca. 1100 to 1300 AD. A cooling phase of almost 1.5 °C is observed from ca. 1600 AD to 1700 AD. This seems to have been the starting point of a continuous SST warming trend until the end of the reconstructed period, interrupted by two prominent cooling events at 1832 ± 15 AD and 1995 ± 2 AD. Application of an adaptive Kernel smoothing suggests that the current warming in the reconstructed SSTs of the north Aegean might be unprecedented in the context of the past 1500 years. Internal variability in atmospheric/oceanic circulations systems as well as external forcing as solar radiation and volcanic activity could have affected temperature variations in the north Aegean Sea over the past 1500 years. The marked temperature drop of approximately ~2°C at 1832 ± 15 yr AD could be related to the 1809 ΑD 'unknown' and the 1815 AD Tambora volcanic eruptions. Paleoenvironmental proxy-indices of the M2 record show enhanced riverine/continental inputs in the northern Aegean after ca. 1450 AD. The palaeoclimatic evidence derived from M2 record is combined with a socio-environmental study of the history of the north Aegean region. We show that the cultivation of temperature-sensitive crops, i.e. walnut, vine and olive, co-occurred with stable and warmer temperatures, while its end coincided with a significant episode of cooler temperatures. Periods of agricultural growth in Macedonia coincide with periods of warmer and more stable SSTs, but further exploration is required in order to identify the causal links behind the observed phenomena. The Black Death likely

  9. SeaWiFs satellite data analysis of Black Sea water discharge pattern into the Aegean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, L

    2002-01-01

    Satellite data from the SeaWiFS sensor has been used to determine chlorophyll-a contents in the North Aegean Sea using SEADAS 3.3 software. The data is used to extract knowledge on water movements/flow phenomena using chlorophyll as a "tracer" but will also indicate water quality. More than 100 SeaWiFS scenes from 1998 up to 2001 have been analyzed in terms of hydrodynamic phenomena, mainly the transport and spreading pattern of Black Sea Water in the North Aegean Sea but also concerning the water quality and its seasonal and yearly variation at the mouth region of the Dardanelles. Some comparison with earlier studies using NOAA AVHRR thermal data and historical CZCS scenes is also made.

  10. Description of the first Lessepsian squid migrant, Sepioteuthis lessoniana (CEPHALOPODA: Loliginidae, in the Aegean Sea (Eastern Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. LEFKADITOU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Loliginid squids of the Sepioteuthis lessoniana complex are widely spread in the Indo-Pacific Ocean, where they constitute a commercially important resource for neritic fisheries. Sepioteuthis lessoniana is the only Lessepsian squid migrant till now, recorded for the first time in the Mediterranean in 2002 along the Turkish Levantine coasts. Two maturing males, with mantle lengths 193 mm and 244 mm, have been recently caught near the coasts of Rhodes Island (SE Aegean, extending the species distribution northward, into Hellenic waters. Their identity was confirmed by comparison of the main body, beak characteristics and morphometric measurements with those available in the literature for this species. Suspected expansion of the Lessepsian loliginid into the Aegean Sea, due to the gradual warming of the sea, is discussed.

  11. Ectoparasitic sea lice, Caligus minimus (Otto 1821, Copepoda: Caligidae) on Brawn wrasse, Labrus merula L. in Izmir Bay, Aegean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    TANRIKUL, Tansel T.; Fatih Percin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the species of Caligus minimus of the genus Caligus (Siphonosto - matoida: Caligidae), parasitic on marine fish, brawn wrasse (Labrus merula), genus Labridae, of Izmir Bay, Aegean Sea. The sea lice, C. minimus, is identified from the gill and external surfaces of the brawn wrasse (total length, 30 cm; weight, 210 gr.), particularly on its head. The entire collection of sea lice consists of 11-12 specimens, all of which are female. Ectoparasitic copepods especially belong...

  12. First record of the red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus (Risso, 1816 (Decapoda: Aristeidae from the Aegean Sea coast of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. OZCAN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A female specimen of the deep-water red shrimp, Aristeus antennatus(Risso, 1816 was caught at depths of between 550 m and 670 m during 2005 by trawling off the Marmaris coast. A. antennatus is a species known to inhabit only the Levantine Sea coast of Turkey. This paper is on the first record of the species along the southern Aegean Sea coast of Turkey

  13. AN UPDATED CHECKLIST OF MARINE FLORA ON THE CONTINENTAL SHELF OF GÖKÇEADA ISLAND (NORTHERN AEGEAN SEA, TURKEY)

    OpenAIRE

    Güreşen, Aysu; OKUDAN, Emine Şükran; Aktan, Yelda; Erduğan, Hüseyin; Dural, Berrin; Aysel, Veysel

    2017-01-01

    The present paper aims to describe the marine floraoccurring on the continental shelf of Gökçeada Island (North Aegean) based onthe review of the long-term researches (1973-2016) which provided qualitativeinformation on many taxa including Cyanobacteria, Chlorophyta, Ochrophyta,Rhodophyta and Tracheophyta.Eight species (Polysiphonia brevearticulata, Ceramium codii, Gymnothamnion elegans, Spermothamnion repens, Lophosiphoniacristata, Hydrolithon cruciatum, Leathesia marina, Caulerpa racemosa)a...

  14. Ectoparasitic sea lice, Caligus minimus (Otto 1821, Copepoda: Caligidae on Brawn wrasse, Labrus merula L. in Izmir Bay, Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansel T. Tanrikul

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the species of Caligus minimus of the genus Caligus (Siphonosto - matoida: Caligidae, parasitic on marine fish, brawn wrasse (Labrus merula, genus Labridae, of Izmir Bay, Aegean Sea. The sea lice, C. minimus, is identified from the gill and external surfaces of the brawn wrasse (total length, 30 cm; weight, 210 gr., particularly on its head. The entire collection of sea lice consists of 11-12 specimens, all of which are female. Ectoparasitic copepods especially belong to the Caligidae family, the most common crustacean parasites on fish. C. minimus can be found in Atlantic coasts, British waters, the North Sea, and the Mediterranean Sea. C. minimus ectoparasite is a host and mainly recorded on Perciformes, such as Dicentrarchus labrax, Pagellus bogaraveo, Umbrina cirrosa, and Mugil cephalus. Recently, in both sides of the Aegean Sea, C. minimus has been identified from cultured marine fish, mainly D. labrax. The intensity of the infection is apparent on adult fish, especially during the winter and early spring. C. minimus is the first record on brawn wrasse caught by gill nets from the Urla coasts in Izmir Bay, Aegean Sea in March 2010.

  15. The Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Aftershocks of The North Aegean Sea Earthquake on 24 May 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didem Tamtaş, Burçin

    2017-04-01

    An earthquake occured in the North Aegean Sea on 24 May 2014 12:25 local time (UTC+3) with Ml=6.5. It was a shallow earthquake with 21 km focal depth and felt in Aegean and Marmara regions of Turkey. 321 people were temporarily hospitalised as reported by Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD). And also the earthquake caused damage to about 300 buildings. In this study, the spatial and temporal changes of the seismicity parameters of North Aegean Sea Earthquake were analyzed by using the aftershock data. Calculations are based on Gutenberg-Richter and Omori laws. It has been determined that the b value which is one of the seismicity parameters is changing in between 0.85 ≤ b ≤ 0.92 and increases by time. Based on the increasing value of b by time, it is reasonable to assume that the effective tension in the area is decreasing by time. It has been calculated that the p value which defines the declination of aftershocks by time changes in between 1.18 ≥ p ≥ 1.07 and decreases by time. The distributions of the main shock and the aftershocks locations and the focal mecanisms show that the region is the continution of the North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ).

  16. On Entrepreneurs and Entrepreneurship of the Olive-oil Economy in the Aegean: The Case of Lesvos Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evridiki Sifneos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the conclusions of a study on entrepreneurial activities related to the cycle of the olive-oil economy in Lesvos, an island in the North-Eastern Aegean, from the eighteenth century until the middle of the twentieth century. It is based on research and observations drawn from a multiform primary material, such as companies' records, communal and family archives, consular and administrative reports, as well as secondary sources which allow comparisons with other oleiferous regions and connect the economy of Lesvos to the broader Aegean and Mediterranean environment. It points out that the single cultivation phenomenon, though associated to the economy of risk, obeyed to the market's command and was prepared by the abolition of the governor's monopoly on the oil trading and the consequent opening of the market. This enabled the Christian ottoman subjects to develop the administration of intensive olive growing, mechanized oil extraction and trade expansion. Olive oil and soap were the two basic commodities of the island's export revenues that were commercialised, despite their low quality, into a wide range of port and island markets of the Asia Minor coast, the Aegean islands and the Black Sea. Moreover, the article explores the type of commercial and industrial enterprises and the characteristics of the olive-cycle entrepreneurs. It concludes with the commercial crisis suffered from the major political and economic changes of the twentieth century and the consequent reorientation of Lesvos' businessmen towards Crete and Piraeus, the olive manufacturing centres of the Neohellenic state.

  17. Assessment of the sardine (Sardina pilchardus Walbaum, 1792 fishery in the eastern Mediterranean basin (North Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. ANTONAKAKIS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe the biometric characteristics of the European sardine (Sardina pilchardus catches and assess the current status of sardine stock in North Aegean Sea based on population characteristics and abundance trends. The stock was dominated by age groups 1 and 2, not exceeding age group 4. The sardine stock in this area was assessed through an Integrated Catch-at-Age model which implements a separable Virtual Population Analysis on catch at age data with weighted tuning indices. Sardine landings data derived from the commercial purse seine fishery over the period 2000-2008 were combined with the age structure of the stock as resulted from fisheries independent acoustic surveys. Sensitivity analysis of the impact of natural mortality values on stock assessment results was applied. Additionally forecast of the sardine population parameters and catches under different exploitation scenarios was implemented in a medium term basis. Results indicated that the North Aegean Sea sardine stock is considered fully exploited with the fishery operating close but over the empirical exploitation level for sustainability. Finally, the status of the sardine stock in N. Aegean Sea is discussed in relation to the sardine stocks from the western and the central Mediterranean basin.

  18. Changing paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic parameters during sapropel formation in the Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isler, E. B.; Aksu, A. E.; Hiscott, R. N.

    2009-04-01

    A high-resolution record of paleoenvironmental changes during the last 80,000 years, monitored using a mean temporal sampling interval of ~900 years, has been determined for two 8-meter long piston cores collected from North Skiros and North Ikaria basins in the northern Aegean Sea. Paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic trends are revealed by geochemical, stable-isotope and trace-element analyses and by micropaleontological studies. Trace-element concentrations were obtained from the carbonate tests of the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber using laser-ablation ICP-MS. The data are intended to evaluate the role of two theoretical factors, organic-matter preservation and biological productivity, in the formation of sapropels. On the basis of total organic carbon (TOC) content, visual examination and color, four distinct sapropel units (S1, S2, S3, and S4) were identified throughout the cores. The chronostratigraphy of the cored successions is based on the ages of identified tephra layers and correlation of oxygen-isotope curves for the benthic foraminifer Uvigerina mediterranea with the global oxygen-isotope curve. Mg incorporation into foraminiferal calcite is predominantly regulated by temperature. Mg/Ca ratios are used to calculate sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) variations. The latter variable is obtained from the oxygen-isotopic composition of sea water (^18Ow):salinity relationship where ^18Ow can be extracted from the paleotemperature equation based on the independent calculation of temperature. SST, SSS and ^18Ow plots show that the surface waters were predominantly cool and less saline prior to the onset of sapropel deposition, but became progressively warmer and more saline during and after sapropel deposition. The observed fluctuations in salinity (and possibly temperature) demonstrate that there was an increased influx of fresh and/or brackish waters to the Aegean Sea, probably originating from the Black Sea

  19. Investigation of Turbulence Parametrization Schemes with Reference to the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over the Aegean Sea During Etesian Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandou, A.; Tombrou, M.; Kalogiros, J.; Bossioli, E.; Biskos, G.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Coe, H.

    2017-08-01

    The spatial structure of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) over the Aegean Sea is investigated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. Two `first-order' non-local and five `1.5-order' local planetary boundary-layer (PBL) parametrization schemes are used. The predictions from the WRF model are evaluated against airborne observations obtained by the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements BAe-14 research aircraft during the Aegean-GAME field campaign. Statistical analysis shows good agreement between measurements and simulations especially at low altitude. Despite the differences between the predicted and measured wind speeds, they reach an agreement index of 0.76. The simulated wind-speed fields close to the surface differ substantially among the schemes (maximum values range from 13 to 18 m s^{-1} at 150-m height), but the differences become marginal at higher levels. In contrast, all schemes show similar spatial variation patterns in potential temperature fields. A warmer (1-2 K) and drier (2-3 g kg^{-1}) layer than is observed, is predicted by almost all schemes under stable conditions (eastern Aegean Sea), whereas a cooler (up to 2 K) and moister (1-2 g kg^{-1}) layer is simulated under near-neutral to nearly unstable conditions (western Aegean Sea). Almost all schemes reproduce the vertical structure of the PBL and the shallow MABL (up to 300 m) well, including the low-level jet in the eastern Aegean Sea, with non-local schemes being closer to observations. The simulated PBL depths diverge (up to 500 m) due to the different criteria applied by the schemes for their calculation. Under stable conditions, the observed MABL depth corresponds to the height above the sea surface where the simulated eddy viscosity reaches a minimum; under neutral to slightly unstable conditions this is close to the top of the simulated entrainment layer. The observed sensible heat fluxes vary from -40 to 25 W m^{-2}, while the simulated

  20. Gill net and trammel net selectivity in the northern Aegean Sea, Turkey

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    F. Saadet Karakulak

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Fishing trials were carried out with gill nets and trammel nets in the northern Aegean Sea from March 2004 to February 2005. Four different mesh sizes for the gill nets and the inner panel of trammel nets (16, 18, 20 and 22 mm bar length were used. Selectivity parameters for the five most economically important species, bogue (Boops boops, annular sea bream (Diplodus annularis, striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus, axillary sea bream (Pagellus acarne and blotched picarel (Spicara maena, caught by the two gears were estimated. The SELECT method was used to estimate the selectivity parameters of a variety of models. Catch composition and catch proportion of several species were different in gill and trammel nets. The length frequency distributions of the species caught by the two gears were significantly different. The bi-modal model selectivity curve gave the best fit for gill net and trammel net data, and there was little difference between the modal lengths of these nets. However, a clear difference was found in catching efficiency. The highest catch rates were obtained with the trammel net. Given that many discard species and small fish are caught by gill nets and trammel nets with a mesh size of 16 mm, it is clear that these nets are not appropriate for fisheries. Consequently, the best mesh size for multispecies fisheries is 18 mm. This mesh size will considerably reduce the numbers of small sized individuals and discard species in the catch.

  1. Zooplankton community dynamics in the N. Aegean front (E. Mediterranean in the winter spring period

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    I. SIOKOU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Zooplankton community composition was studied in the North Aegean frontal area in the winter-spring period along a trophic gradient going from the less saline and cold modified Black Sea water to the high salinity and temperature waters of Levantine origin. Samples were collected at the upper 100 m of three stations positioned along this gradient by using three nets with different mesh sizes (45 μm, 200 μm and 500 μm. Τhe community composition (all sizes was differentiated along the gradient with smoother seasonal succession and higher diversity with increasing oligotrophy and salinity. The temporal variability of the community composition revealed significant changes in the January-April period as well as gradual decrease of diversity index values at the station positioned within the front.  The major characteristic at this station was the abrupt increment and dominance of Centropages typicus in April, especially within the layer occupied by the modified Black Sea water. Significant difference in the community composition between March and April was a common feature in the whole study area and for all zooplankton fractions, though not of the same strength. The inflow of the Black Sea water and the trophic gradient were found to be important factors for the observed temporal variability and its spatial differentiation, while changes in the phytoplankton and protozoa abundance and community composition could account for the seasonal succession in species dominance.

  2. Description of a new sepioline species, Sepiola boletzkyi sp. nov. (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae, from the Aegean Sea

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    Giambattista Bello

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A new sepioline species, Sepiola boletzkyi sp. nov. (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae, is described based on two specimens from the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean. The type specimens are lodged in the Ege University Faculty of Fisheries Museum of Izmir (Turkey. The new species belongs to the Sepiola atlantica group sensu Naef, hence it is compared with the species in this group, namely Sepiola affinis, Sepiola atlantica, Sepiola bursadhaesa, Sepiola intermedia, Sepiola robusta, Sepiola rondeletii, Sepiola steenstrupiana and Sepiola tridens. The male of S. boletzkyi sp. nov. differs from all the others in having the combination of homomorphous ventral arm tips, eight enlarged suckers, subdivided into two groups, in the dorsal row of the distal part of the hectocotylus and a dorsal lobe complementing the copulatory apparatus. In females of S. boletzkyi sp. nov. the bursa copulatrix is large and, unlike all other species in the genus, has a large fungiform process towards the mantle wall. The discovery of S. boletzkyi sp. nov. increases to 12 the number of NE Atlantic-Mediterranean species of Sepiola.

  3. Viability and Management Targets of Mediterranean Demersal Fisheries: The Case of the Aegean Sea.

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    George Tserpes

    Full Text Available Management of the Mediterranean demersal stocks has proven challenging mainly due to the multi-species character of the fisheries. In the present work, we focus on the multi-species demersal fisheries of the Aegean Sea (eastern Mediterranean aiming to study the effects of different management measures on the main commercial stocks, as well as to explore the economic viability of the fisheries depending upon these resources, by means of simulated projections. Utilizing the limited available data, our results demonstrated that, under the current exploitation pattern, the economic viability of the fleets is threatened, particularly if fuel prices increase. Additionally, the biological targets set for the most exploited species, such as hake, will not be met under the current management regime. The projections also showed that the only management scenario under which both resource sustainability and economic viability of the fisheries are ensured is the decrease of fleet capacity in terms of vessel numbers. In this case, however, measures to support the fisheries-dependent communities need to be implemented to prevent the collapse of local economies due to employment decrease. Scenarios assuming selectivity improvements would be also beneficial for the stocks but they showed low economic performance and their application would threaten the viability of the fleets, particularly that of the trawlers.

  4. Spectroscopic studies of humic acids from subsurface sediment samples collected across the Aegean Sea

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    F. SAKELLARIADOU

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural humic acids are biogenic, structurally complex and heterogeneous, refractory, acidic, yellow-to black-coloured organic polyelectrolytes of relatively high molecular weight. They occur in all soils, sediments, fresh waters, and seawaters. Humic acids represent the largest portion of nonliving soil organic matter. In the present paper, humic substances were isolated from marine subsurface sediment samples collected across the Aegean sea (in Greece and especially from a marine area extending northwards of the Samothraki plateau towards the north-eastern part of the island of Crete. In a following step, humic preparations were studied using infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy (emission, excitation and synchronous-scan excitation spectra were obtained. The infrared spectra suggested functional chemical groups such as as OH-, C-H aliphatic, C=C, C=O/COO-, salts of carboxylic acids, and also, in some cases, silicate anions or C-O from alcohols, esters and ethers. Fluorescence emission, excitation and synchronous scan excitation provided some valuable information concerning a probable origin (marine and/or terrestrial for the isolated humics.

  5. Biosynthetic potential of actinomycetes in brown forest soil on the eastern coast of the aegean sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokikh, I. G.; Shirokikh, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    The taxonomic and functional structures of the actinomycetal complex in the litter and upper horizon of the brown forest soil was studied in a Pinus brutia var. pendulifolia forest on the eastern coast of the Aegean Sea. The complex of actinomycetes included representatives of the Streptomyces and Micromonospora genera and oligosporus forms. Streptomycetes predominated (73.8%) in the soil, and micromonospores (66.7%) were dominants in the litter. Thirty isolates of ten Streptomyces species from five series and three sections prevailed. In the upper soil horizon, species of the Helvolo-Flavus Helvolus section predominated (48%); the S. felleus species occurred most frequently. Among the isolated cultures, the S. globisporus and S. sindenensis species capable to produce antitumor antibiotics were found. The testing of the antimicrobial activity of the natural isolates showed that five strains inhibit the growth of pathogenic Fusarium sp., Alternaria sp., Acremonium sp., and Bipolaris sorokiniana fungi. When testing the effect of streptomycetes on the production of cellulases, a high-efficient strain belonging to the S. noboritoensis species was revealed. All the streptomycetes isolated from the brown forest soil produced auxins at the rate of 7.8 to 19.7 μg of indole acetic acid/mL of the liquid medium in the presence of 200 mg/L of tryptophan. Twelve isolates of streptomycetes were transferred to the collection of biotechnologically promising cultures for studying their properties.

  6. Creating the electric energy mix of a non-connected Aegean island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamou, Paraskevi; Karali, Sophia; Chalakatevaki, Maria; Daniil, Vasiliki; Tzouka, Katerina; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Iliopoulou, Theano; Papanicolaou, Panos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Mamasis, Nikos

    2017-04-01

    As the electric energy in the non-connected islands is mainly produced by oil-fueled power plants, the unit cost is extremely high. Here the various energy sources are examined in order to create the appropriate electric energy mix for a non-connected Aegean island. All energy sources (renewable and fossil fuels) are examined and each one is evaluated using technical, environmental and economic criteria. Finally the most appropriate energy sources are simulated considering the corresponding energy works. Special emphasis is given to the use of biomass and the possibility of replacing (even partially) the existing oil-fueled power plant. Finally, a synthesis of various energy sources is presented that satisfies the electric energy demand taking into account the base and peak electric loads of the island. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  7. Extension in the Aegean nappe-stacks: Numerical Model and their Geological Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, E.; Huet, B.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Labrousse, L.; Jolivet, L.

    2010-12-01

    After mountain building, the crust exhibits complex structure. Especially, thickening achieved by nappe-stacking induces rheological heterogenities at all scales: from the fault scale up to the crustal scale. This process is likely to influence post-orogenic evolution. However, it is generally not considered in numerical models. In this study, we consider the impact of pre-existing thrusts and nappes structures on the mode of post-orogenic extension. We focus on thermomechanical modeling of reactivation of convergent structures inherited from compression. The Aegean domain that experienced extension after the formation of the Hellenides is considered as a natural laboratory. Natural data are used to constrain a priori the geometry and rheology of the models and to validate them a posteriori. Three problems at different scales are considered. Firstly, we model the reactivation of a thrust as a low angle normal fault. Recent studies show that Aegean detachments were active in the brittle field with very shallow dips. These observations are in contradiction with the classical fault mechanics theory. In order to reconcile both point of view, we propose a new model by introducing an elasto-plastic frictional fault gouge that is able to compact. Our models show that plastic strain on badly oriented faults is favored by compaction of the fault gouge. Secondly, we model the formation of the Corinth rift. The Phyllite-Quartizte nappe is introduced in the upper crust as a weak shallow-dipping layer between the Pindos and Tripolitza massive carbonate nappes. The competence contrast between this nappe and its surrounding controls the dynamics of rifting. High competence contrast leads to the formation of crustal-scale planar faults rooting on the brittle ductile transition of the crust and thin-skinned listric faults rooting on the nappe itself. This model is consistent with the observed microseismicity patterns, the asymmetry of the Corinth Gulf, and the kinematics of fault

  8. Imaging the Ionian Sea subducting slab panels and faults to control present day motion in the Hellenic-Aegean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachpazi, Maria

    2017-04-01

    The Hellenic-Mediterranean subduction system characterized by its fast overriding upper plate, fast trench retreat and its most rapidly extending Corinth Rift has been the target of several conceptual models on slab dynamics and lithosphere extension. Using teleseismic waves conversions on a dense 2-D seismic array -installed in the frame of Thales Was Right project- from Crete to the North Aegean coast through central Greece, a high-resolution imaging of the Hellenic slab and the overlying Aegean plate lithospheric mantle has been acquired. The subducting slab top appears segmented into panels 30- 50km wide by SW-NE along dip faults to at least 100km depth. Intermediate-depth Mw>6 earthquakes are located on those faults which implies that they are seismically active at 70 km depth. Smaller magnitude earthquakes of the upper Benioff zone commonly related to dehydration processes of the descending slab, are also resolved to be clustered along these faults. These faults are likely inherited structures of the oceanic lithosphere and sites of preferred hydration. Their revealed relation with this specific seismicity provides high-resolution insight validating dehydration embrittlement. RF imaging on 4 OBS sites has allowed to resolve the depth and geometry of the updip offshore part of the slab, the thrust interplate boundary. The observations support a trenchward continuation of the slab faults and correlation with the similarly segmented thrusting contact of the Mediterranean Ridge accretionary wedge over the upper plate. The slab faults may control the location and size of major historical megathrust earthquakes a hypothesis that has been strengthened by the study of the Mw 6.8 14.02.2008 earthquake, the first large instrumental interplate earthquake offshore SW Peloponnesus. New high-resolution imaging resolves the Aegean plate lithospheric mantle and shows the presence of a significant heterogeneity on top of the presently subducting slab, never imaged before. It

  9. Climate change effects on the marine characteristics of the Aegean and Ionian Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Christos; Galiatsatou, Panagiota; Tolika, Konstantia; Anagnostopoulou, Christina; Kombiadou, Katerina; Prinos, Panayotis; Velikou, Kondylia; Kapelonis, Zacharias; Tragou, Elina; Androulidakis, Yannis; Athanassoulis, Gerasimos; Vagenas, Christos; Tegoulias, Ioannis; Baltikas, Vassilis; Krestenitis, Yannis; Gerostathis, Theodoros; Belibassakis, Kostantinos; Rusu, Eugen

    2016-12-01

    This paper addresses the effects of estimated climate change on the sea-surface dynamics of the Aegean and Ionian Seas (AIS). The main aim is the identification of climate change impacts on the severity and frequency of extreme storm surges and waves in areas of the AIS prone to flooding. An attempt is made to define design levels for future research on coastal protection in Greece. Extreme value analysis is implemented through a nonstationary generalized extreme value distribution function, incorporating time harmonics in its parameters, by means of statistically defined criteria. A 50-year time span analysis is adopted and changes of means and extremes are determined. A Regional Climate Model (RegCM3) is implemented with dynamical downscaling, forced by ECHAM5 fields under 20C3M historical data for the twentieth century and the SRES-A1B scenario for the twenty-first century. Storm surge and wave models (GreCSSM and SWAN, respectively) are used for marine climate simulations. Comparisons of model results with reanalysis and field data of atmospheric and hydrodynamic characteristics, respectively, are in good agreement. Our findings indicate that the dynamically downscaled RegCM3 simulation adequately reproduces the present general circulation patterns over the Mediterranean and Greece. Future changes in sea level pressure and mean wind fields are estimated to be small, yet significant for marine extremes. In general, we estimate a projected intensification of severe wave and storm surge events during the first half of the twenty-first century and a subsequent storminess attenuation leading to the resettlement of milder extreme marine events with increased prediction uncertainty in the second half of the twenty-first century.

  10. Traditionally used wild edible greens in the Aegean Region of Turkey

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    Yunus Dogan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Turkey has the largest coastal area in the Mediterranean, possesses an extraordinarily rich flora, and a great traditional knowledge. This diversity of plants naturally affects the traditional use of plants and is reflected in the rich Turkish cuisine. Consequently, the Mediterranean Diet (whose typical components are wild greens constitutes one of the important elements of Turkish cuisine. For this reason, the aim of this study was to determine the consumption of wild edible green plants for the Aegean Region of Turkey and to establish the similarities to or differences from consumption in other regions and other cuisine in the Mediterranean Basin. This study compiles and evaluates the ethnobotanical data currently available. There were 111 taxa that were identified as wild edible greens in the study area belonging to 26 different families. Asteraceae (21 taxa were the most commonly consumed as food. It was followed by Boraginaceae with 19 taxa, Apiaceae with 15 taxa and Lamiaceae with 7 taxa, respectively. Rumex and Erodium were the most represented genera with 4 species. Tamus communis and Asparagus acutifolius, Mediterranean elements and distributed in all of the Mediterranean Basin, are among the most widely consumed wild plants in the area. Wild edible plants are consumed in a variety of ways. The most common type of consumption (79 taxa was in salads. The fact that the majority of the plants used in the area are consumed in salads shows the close relationship between the local diet and the concept of the Mediterranean Diet. As a result, very promisingly, there is a renewed or increasing interest in consuming wild food plants as part of this diet.

  11. Recovery of the commercial sponges in the central and southeastern Aegean Sea (NE Mediterranean after an outbreak of sponge disease

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    J. CASTRITSI-CATHARIOS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and biometry of commercial sponges (Porifera in coastal areas of the central and southeastern Aegean Sea was investigated to estimate the recovery progress of the populations eight years after the first appearance of sponge disease. Signs of the disease were detected only in 1.6% of the harvested sponges. Multivariate analysis on the percentage abundance of sponges showed two distinct groups among the sixteen fishing grounds studied: the eight deep (50-110 m and the eight shallow ones (<40 m. The group from the deep depths consisted of Spongia officinalis adriatica, S. agaricina and S. zimocca. The infralittoral zone was characterized by the presence of Hippospongia communis, S. officinalis adriatica and S. officinalis mollissima. These bath sponges showed an enhanced abundance in the eastern Cretan Sea (S. Aegean Sea. In addition, their dimensions, particularly height, increased with increasing depth. It is indicated that the hydrographic conditions prevailing in the eastern Cretan Sea affected the repopulating processes of sponge banks. In each species, the biometric characteristics of the experimental specimens were similar to those of the sponges found in the market and harvested at respective depths prior to the appearance of sponge disease.

  12. Modelling the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. Part I: wind stresses, thermal and haline fluxes

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    I. A. Valioulis

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a computer model capable of simulating the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. There is historical, phenomenological and recent experimental evidence of important hydrographical features whose causes have been variably identified as the highly complex bathymetry, the extreme seasonal variations in temperature, the considerable fresh water fluxes, and the large gradients in salinity or temperature across neighbouring water masses (Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. In the approach taken here, physical processes are introduced into the model one by one. This method reveals the parameters responsible for permanent and seasonal features of the Aegean Sea circulation. In the first part of the work reported herein, wind-induced circulation appears to be seasonally invariant. This yearly pattern is overcome by the inclusion of baroclinicity in the model in the form of surface thermohaline fluxes. The model shows an intricate pattern of sub-basin gyres and locally strong currents, permanent or seasonal, in accord with the experimental evidence.

  13. Modelling the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. Part I: wind stresses, thermal and haline fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Valioulis

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a computer model capable of simulating the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. There is historical, phenomenological and recent experimental evidence of important hydrographical features whose causes have been variably identified as the highly complex bathymetry, the extreme seasonal variations in temperature, the considerable fresh water fluxes, and the large gradients in salinity or temperature across neighbouring water masses (Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. In the approach taken here, physical processes are introduced into the model one by one. This method reveals the parameters responsible for permanent and seasonal features of the Aegean Sea circulation. In the first part of the work reported herein, wind-induced circulation appears to be seasonally invariant. This yearly pattern is overcome by the inclusion of baroclinicity in the model in the form of surface thermohaline fluxes. The model shows an intricate pattern of sub-basin gyres and locally strong currents, permanent or seasonal, in accord with the experimental evidence.

  14. Seismic properties and mineral crystallographic preferred orientations from EBSD data: Results from a crustal-scale detachment system, Aegean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Élise; Schneider, David; Audet, Pascal; Grasemann, Bernhard; Habler, Gerlinde

    2015-05-01

    The crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) were measured on a suite of samples representative of different structural depths along the West Cycladic Detachment System, Greece. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses were conducted on calcitic and mica schists, impure quartzites, and a blueschist, and the average seismic properties of the rocks were calculated with the Voigt-Reuss-Hill average of the single minerals' elastic stiffness tensor. The calcitic and quartzitic rocks have P- and S-wave velocity anisotropies (AVp, AVs) averaging 8.1% and 7.1%, respectively. The anisotropy increases with depth represented by the blueschist, with AVp averaging 20.3% and AVs averaging 14.5%, due to the content of aligned glaucophane and mica, which strongly control the seismic properties of the rocks. Localised anisotropies of very high magnitudes are caused by the presence of mica schists as they possess the strongest anisotropies, with values of ~ 25% for AVp and AVs. The direction of the fast and slow P-wave velocities occurs parallel and perpendicular to the foliation, respectively, for most samples. The fast propagation has the same NE-SW orientation as the lithospheric stretching direction experienced in the Cyclades since the Late Oligocene. The maximum shear wave anisotropy is subhorizontal, similarly concordant with mineral alignment that developed during extension in the Aegean. Radial anisotropy in the Aegean mid-crust is strongly favoured to azimuthal anisotropy by our results.

  15. New gastropod records for the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and one new alien (Emarginula decorata Deshayes, 1863) for the Mediterranean Sea from NW Aegean Sea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manousis, Thanasis; Galinou-Mitsoudi, Sofia

    2014-12-01

    The NW Aegean Sea has a complex topography, high quality waters, oligotrophic to eutrophic conditions, is connected with estuaries and wetlands, is of high ecological interest, harbours all the types of human activities and yet few researchers work on its marine biodiversity. With this study, the contribution to the knowledge of the Hellenic and Eastern Mediterranean gastropod biodiversity of the studied families is continued, and an expansion of the search in other substrates and deeper waters of the NW Aegean Sea with emphasis on the minor in size species during the period from October 2008 to January 2014. Thirty seven species belonging to seven families (Cerithiopsidae, Fissurellidae, Phasianellidae, Scissurellidae, Siliquariidae, Skeneidae, and Triphoridae) were identified and their biodiversity was compared with the current checklists of marine gastropod molluscs for the Hellenic Seas based on previous surveys. In this collection of gastropods, one species (Emarginula decorata Deshayes, 1863) is a new alien for the Mediterranean Sea, 14 species are new for the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and 16 species are new for the Hellenic fauna (with the one above mentioned alien species included). The main identification characteristics and ecological information such as habitat, distribution, alien expansion paths to the NW Aegean Sea and origin of the species are given and discussed. The Hellenic gastropod biodiversity of the studied families was enriched with 37 new records for the N Aegean Sea, out of which 16 are new for Greece, 14 are new for the Eastern Mediterranean Sea while one (Emarginula decorata) is a new alien for the Mediterranean Sea.

  16. Lifestyle and health determinants of cardiovascular disease among Greek older adults living in Eastern Aegean Islands: An adventure within the MEDIS study

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    Alexandra Foscolou

    2016-11-01

    Conclusions: Overall, CVD risk seems to be low among Eastern Aegean Islanders; certain differences in CVD risk factors exist between Greek islanders and their counterparts living in Gökçeada, and those differences may be attributed to various environmental, cultural and lifestyle factors.

  17. Comparing demersal megafaunal species diversity along the depth gradient within the South Aegean and Cretan Seas (Eastern Mediterranean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peristeraki, Panagiota; Tserpes, George; Lampadariou, Nikolaos; Stergiou, Kostantinos I

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge on biodiversity patterns of demersal megafaunal species in the Mediterranean and particularly in its eastern basin is still very scarce. In the present study, fine-scale diversity patterns in relation to depth were analyzed for three major megafaunal groups (fish, cephalopods and crustaceans) in three subareas of the eastern Mediterranean (Crete, Cyclades and Dodecanese islands). The analysis was based on data from the Mediterranean International Trawl Survey conducted during 2005-2014 and the relationship between depth and two different diversity measures (species richness and Shannon-Weaver) was examined using Generalized Additive Modeling (GAM) techniques. Species richness of fish decreased with depth in two of the three subareas (Cyclades, Dodecanese), while the opposite was true for crustaceans in all subareas. Cephalopods had higher species richness at intermediate depths, near the shelf break. Significant differences among subareas were found, with Crete showing a distinct species richness-depth pattern, which was more obvious for fish and cephalopods. The differences among subareas were also highlighted based on the occurrence of alien species of Indo-Pacific origin, which were more frequent in Crete. Our results suggested that the importance of depth-related factors in structuring communities was higher for cephalopods and less important for fish, and that Crete showed a distinct diversity-depth relationship, a fact that can be attributed to its specific geographical and oceanographic characteristics. These results support the current GFCM/FAO's characterization of Crete as a unique geographic subarea. The findings of the study contribute to understanding the causes of underlying diversity patterns and would assist various environmental management actions, particularly those related to the establishment of marine-protected areas.

  18. Physical and underway data collected aboard the OCEANUS during cruise OC454-02 in the Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea - Eastern Basin from 2009-07-28 to 2009-08-05 (NODC Accession 0104319)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC accession 0104319 includes physical and underway data collected aboard the OCEANUS during cruise OC454-02 in the Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea - Eastern...

  19. Monitoring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Northeast Aegean Sea using Posidonia oceanica seagrass and synthetic passive samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulou, Maria-Venetia; Monteyne, Els; Krikonis, Konstantinos; Pavlopoulos, Kosmas; Roose, Patrick; Dehairs, Frank

    2014-10-15

    The concentrations of 22 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in Posidonia oceanica seagrass, sediments, and seawater from the Alexandroupolis Gulf in the Aegean Sea, were investigated from 2007 to 2011. Temporal trends of total PAH contents in P. oceanica and sediments were similar. PAH levels in seawater, sediments, and seagrasses generally decreased with increasing distance from Alexandroupolis Port. Leaves and sheaths of P. oceanica had higher PAH levels than roots and rhizomes. P. oceanica accumulates PAHs and has good potential as a bioindicator of spatiotemporal pollution trends. PAH concentrations were also examined using in situ passive seawater sampling and were compared to results of passive sampling in the laboratory using local sediments and seawater. Levels of high molecular weight PAHs assessed using passive samplers confirmed the decreasing gradient of pollution away from Alexandroupolis Port. Passive sampling also proved useful for investigating sources of PAHs in P. oceanica meadows. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Observations on a population of the sea anemone Anemonia viridis (Forskal, 1775) in the North Aegean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chariton Chintiroglou, C. [Thessaloniki, Aristotle Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Zoology

    1996-12-31

    The present paper is concerned with the structural aspects of Anemonia viridis populations found in the North Aegean Sea. It was found that mean wet weight and density of anemone populations increases with depth and distance from shore. Differences in the structure of the Anemonia viridis populations were attributed both to the specific hydrodynamic characteristics of the biotopes and to a number biotic interactions. From our results and t previous investigations the adoption of three different lifestyles by the anemones was assumed.: (1) a colonial form, with population densities around 650 individuals per m{sup 2}, found in substrates exposed to increased hydrodynamism; (2) a colonial form, with lower densities (90 indiv. per m{sup 2}), found in less exposed sites; (3) finally, large individuals in deeper waters chose a solitary lifestyle, as mechanical stresses were much lower.

  1. Preliminary results constraining the kinematics of subduction and exhumation processes on Skopelos island, Northern Sporades (Aegean Domain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porkolab, Kristof; Willingshofer, Ernst; Sokoutis, Dimitrios; Creton, Iverna

    2017-04-01

    Extension in the Aegean region is a process driven by slab rollback since 45 Ma (e.g. Brun and Sokoutis, 2007; Brun et al. 2016). These and other studies dominantly focused on the northern Aegean/Rhodope or the Cycladic tectonic systems, yielding abundant kinematic, structural, petrologic and geochronological data to constrain their geodynamic evolution. This contrasts with the region of the Northern Sporades, which have not yet been thoroughly studied in the light of subduction-exhumation processes. In particular, a detailed kinematic analysis, the focus of this study, is missing that allows for establishing the relation between the deformation structures on the island, and the large-scale tectonic events in the Aegean domain. The Northern Sporades consist of three major (area ≥ 50km2) islands (Skiathos, Skopelos, and Alonnisos) and a number of smaller islands. As the first phase of exploring the structural evolution of the Northern Sporades, this work reports the results of field work performed on the island of Skopelos, and aims to provide a preliminary model for the deformation history of the island. Skopelos consists from bottom to top of three structural units, which are separated by thrust contacts (Jacobshagen and Wallbrecher, 1984; Matarangas, 1992; Jacobshagen and Matarangas, 2004): the Pelagonian, the Eohellenic, and the Palouki unit. The age of the formations constituting these units ranges from Paleozoic to Paleogene, and all formations have been metamorphosed under lower greenschist or possibly also blueschist facies conditions (Mposkos and Liati, 1991) and experienced polyphase deformation. Based on our field kinematic and structural analysis we suggest the following deformation sequence on Skopelos island: D1 is characterized by tight to isoclinal folding (F1) and the formation of a penetrative foliation (S1), which is the axial plane cleavage to the F1 folds. S1 planes carry a NE-SW trending stretching lineation, along which top-SW shear has been

  2. Development of a behavioural framework for analyzing employment mobility decisions in island areas: the case of the Aegean Islands, Greece

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    Eleni Kitrinou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a theoretical framework to model employment mobility in island areas. It aims at identifying the critical factors affecting the decision of the employees to relocate their workplace to an island area, given a possible residential relocation. Emphasis is given to the role of transport and telecommunications systems on the region’s connectivity and accessibility. Discrete choice models are developed, using both observed and latent variables for the workplace relocation decision to the Aegean island area in Greece. Data was collected in the year 2012 from 518 Greek employees. Findings indicate the importance of the role of transport and telecommunications systems for employment mobility in island areas. The estimated choice models identified profiles of the employees who are prone to: a keep their current workplace; b relocate their workplace to the island area; c change occupation after residential relocation. Finally, the sample enumeration method integrates the models’ results across all Greek employees.

  3. Two experimental fish aggregating systems (fads in the Aegean sea: their design and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aytaç Özgül

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Two steel spar buoys were constructed and moored in 50 and 100 m deep of water in the Aegean Sea to support recreational fisheries. The first FAD was deployed at coordinates 38°01´48´´N 26°58´02´´E and at a distance of 3 nautical miles from the shoreline. The other FAD was moored at 1.1 nautical miles from the shoreline at coordinates 38°03´11´´N; 26°59´01´´E. An anchor (1.2x1.2x0.8 m3 weighing approximate 2.76 metric ton, made of reinforced concrete, was used to hold a FAD weighing approximate 1.5 metric ton. Hardware and connections of FADs, ropes, mooring calculation and anchor design were made. The interaction between the forces of wave and current and FADs in those waters was investigated. In the experiment, all forces (drag force, buoyancy force etc. acting on FADs were calculated. It is proposed that the construction of the FADs should take the following design criteria into consideration: wave and current, forces related to the FADs, deployment depth, mooring hardware and ropes. This knowledge provides an important reference for stakeholders performing projects aiming to increase the performance and service life FADs.Duas bóias de aço spar foram construídas e ancoradas em 50 e 100 m de profundidade nas águas do Mar Egeu para dar apoio à pesca recreativa. O primeiro FAD foi implantado nas coordenadas 38°01'48''N 26°58'02''E, a uma distância de 3 milhas náuticas da costa. O outro ficou ancorado a 1,1 milha náutica da costa nas coordenadas 38°03'11''N; 26°59'01''E. Uma âncora (1.2x1.2x0.8 m3, pesando aproximadamente 2,76 toneladas, feita de concreto armado, foi usada para prender um FAD de peso aproximado de 1,5 toneladas. Foram realizados cálculos para determinação das conexões dos FADs, dos cabos e da ancoragem. A interação entre as forças de ondas e correntes com os FADs foi também investigada. No experimento, todas as forças (força de arrasto, força de empuxo, etc atuantes sobre os FADs foram

  4. Inferences on the Mesozoic evolution of the North Aegean from the isotopic record of the Chalkidiki block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kydonakis, Konstantinos; Brun, Jean-Pierre; Poujol, Marc; Monié, Patrick; Chatzitheodoridis, Elias

    2016-07-01

    The Chalkidiki block is a major domain in the North Aegean that, contrary to other domains in the region, largely escaped thermal perturbations during Tertiary extension. As a result, the Chalkidiki block is an ideal candidate to glean information related to the timing of Mesozoic thermal events using appropriate geochronological techniques. We have undertaken a laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) study (U-Th-Pb on monazites and U-Pb on zircons) coupled with 40Ar/39Ar dating on nine samples from various structural levels within the thrust system of the Chalkidiki block. The eastern, and structurally lower part of the system revealed a complete isotopic reset of Carboniferous - Early Triassic monazites coeval with partial monazite destruction, REE-mobilisation and formation of apatite-allanite-epidote coronas at 132 Ma, a reaction that is commonly observed in amphibolite-facies rocks. These coronas formed after crystallisation of garnet (i.e., at T > 580 °C) and, in all probability, either close to the peak-temperature conditions ( 620 °C) on a prograde path or during retrogression between the peak-temperature and the low-temperature boundary of the amphibolite facies. Cooling of these rocks and arrival at mid-crustal levels occurred at 95-100 Ma. By contrast, the western, and structurally uppermost part of the system went through the same event by 120-125 Ma. Further structural considerations with respect to medium-temperature geochronology data imply that syn-metamorphic thrusting must have ceased by early Late Cretaceous. We emphasize that, with the sole exception of the Chalkidiki block, no pre-45 Ma medium-temperature geochronology data are preserved in other North Aegean domains, a feature that is clearly related to the extension-induced thermal perturbation of the region during the Tertiary.

  5. Assessment of offshore wind power potential in the Aegean and Ionian Seas based on high-resolution hindcast model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takvor Soukissian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study long-term wind data obtained from high-resolution hindcast simulations is used to analytically assess offshore wind power potential in the Aegean and Ionian Seas and provide wind climate and wind power potential characteristics at selected locations, where offshore wind farms are at the concept/planning phase. After ensuring the good model performance through detailed validation against buoy measurements, offshore wind speed and wind direction at 10 m above sea level are statistically analyzed on the annual and seasonal time scale. The spatial distribution of the mean wind speed and wind direction are provided in the appropriate time scales, along with the mean annual and the inter-annual variability; these statistical quantities are useful in the offshore wind energy sector as regards the preliminary identification of favorable sites for exploitation of offshore wind energy. Moreover, the offshore wind power potential and its variability are also estimated at 80 m height above sea level. The obtained results reveal that there are specific areas in the central and the eastern Aegean Sea that combine intense annual winds with low variability; the annual offshore wind power potential in these areas reach values close to 900 W/m2, suggesting that a detailed assessment of offshore wind energy would be worth noticing and could lead in attractive investments. Furthermore, as a rough estimate of the availability factor, the equiprobable contours of the event [4 m/s ≤ wind speed ≤ 25 m/s] are also estimated and presented. The selected lower and upper bounds of wind speed correspond to typical cut-in and cut-out wind speed thresholds, respectively, for commercial offshore wind turbines. Finally, for seven offshore wind farms that are at the concept/planning phase the main wind climate and wind power density characteristics are also provided.

  6. New gastropod records for the Eastern Mediterranean Sea and one new alien (Emarginula decorata Deshayes, 1863) for the Mediterranean Sea from NW Aegean Sea, Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Manousis, Thanasis; Galinou-Mitsoudi, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Background The NW Aegean Sea has a complex topography, high quality waters, oligotrophic to eutrophic conditions, is connected with estuaries and wetlands, is of high ecological interest, harbours all the types of human activities and yet few researchers work on its marine biodiversity. With this study, the contribution to the knowledge of the Hellenic and Eastern Mediterranean gastropod biodiversity of the studied families is continued, and an expansion of the search in other substrates and ...

  7. Unlocking of the North Anatolian Fault prior to the 2014 M 6.9 North Aegean Earthquake: Evidence from seismological and geodetic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Fatih; Ozener, Haluk; Dogru, Asli; Aktug, Bahadir

    2017-04-01

    We integrated long-term microseismicity and near-fault GPS measurements to elaborate on generation process of the 2014 M 6.9 Aegean Earthquake. The mainshock ruptured part of the westernmost segments of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF), Turkey. We observed that the 2014 M 6.9 Aegean earthquakes were preceded by almost a decade-long period of enhanced microearthquake activity representing a front-edge fracturing process preparing the failure. Microseismicity-derived pre-seismic low-slip patches are interpreted to represent locked fault sections rather than a pure a-seismic creep. The nucleation of the mainshock occurred at low-slip patches where the lowest pre-slip has been accommodated along the ruptured fault section. For the time period of 2006-2014, acceleration in microseismicity delays for one year with respect to the increase in GPS-derived tectonic motion. This verifies that the tectonic loading drives the acceleration in microseismicity. The direction of GPS-derived velocity field rotates systematically from 234° to 244° clockwise, which tends smoothly to be sub-parallel to the local fault strike. This rotation corresponds to upward migration of locking depth from 13.0 km to 8.0 km within a time period of eight years suggesting unlocking of the NAF prior to the 2014 M 6.9 North Aegean Earthquake.

  8. Climatological Factors Affecting Electromagnetic Surface Ducting in the Aegean Sea Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    19  x Figure 11.  The Azores or Bermuda High and southwest and south-central Asia thermal low tend to produce a...of Frequency (green lines with triangle markers), moisture mixing ratio at the surface level (blue lines with rhombus markers) and moisture mixing...of Frequency (green lines with triangle markers), moisture mixing ratio at the surface level (blue lines with rhombus markers) and moisture mixing

  9. Review of variations in Mw < 7 earthquake motions on position and TEC (Mw = 6.5 Aegean Sea earthquake sample)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Omer; Inyurt, Samed; Mekik, Cetin

    2016-02-01

    Turkey is a country located in the middle latitude zone, where tectonic activity is intensive. Recently, an earthquake of magnitude 6.5 Mw occurred offshore in the Aegean Sea on 24 May 2014 at 09:25 UTC, which lasted about 40 s. The earthquake was also felt in Greece, Romania, and Bulgaria in addition to Turkey. In recent years, ionospheric anomaly detection studies have been carried out because of seismicity with total electron content (TEC) computed from the global navigation satellite system's (GNSS) signal delays and several interesting findings have been published. In this study, both TEC and positional variations have been examined separately following a moderate size earthquake in the Aegean Sea. The correlation of the aforementioned ionospheric variation with the positional variation has also been investigated. For this purpose, a total of 15 stations was used, including four continuously operating reference stations in Turkey (CORS-TR) and stations in the seismic zone (AYVL, CANA, IPSA, and YENC), as well as international GNSS service (IGS) and European reference frame permanent network (EPN) stations. The ionospheric and positional variations of the AYVL, CANA, IPSA, and YENC stations were examined using Bernese v5.0 software. When the precise point positioning TEC (PPP-TEC) values were examined, it was observed that the TEC values were approximately 4 TECU (total electron content unit) above the upper-limit TEC value at four stations located in Turkey, 3 days before the earthquake at 08:00 and 10:00 UTC. At the same stations, on the day before the earthquake at 06:00, 08:00, and 10:00 UTC, the TEC values were approximately 5 TECU below the lower-limit TEC value. The global ionosphere model TEC (GIM-TEC) values published by the Centre for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) were also examined. Three days before the earthquake, at all stations, it was observed that the TEC values in the time period between 08:00 and 10:00 UTC were approximately 2 TECU

  10. Focal mechanisms in the southern Aegean from temporary seismic networks – implications for the regional stress field and ongoing deformation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Friederich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lateral variation of the stress field in the southern Aegean plate and the subducting Hellenic slab is determined from recordings of seismicity obtained with the CYCNET and EGELADOS networks in the years from 2002 to 2007. First motions from 7000 well-located microearthquakes were analysed to produce 540 well-constrained focal mechanisms. They were complemented by another 140 derived by waveform matching of records from larger events. Most of these earthquakes fall into 16 distinct spatial clusters distributed over the southern Aegean region. For each cluster, a stress inversion could be carried out yielding consistent estimates of the stress field and its spatial variation. At crustal levels, the stress field is generally dominated by a steeply dipping compressional principal stress direction except in places where coupling of the subducting slab and overlying plate come into play. Tensional principal stresses are generally subhorizontal. Just behind the forearc, the crust is under arc-parallel tension whereas in the volcanic areas around Kos, Columbo and Astypalea tensional and intermediate stresses are nearly degenerate. Further west and north, in the Santorini–Amorgos graben and in the area of the islands of Mykonos, Andros and Tinos, tensional stresses are significant and point around the NW–SE direction. Very similar stress fields are observed in western Turkey with the tensional axis rotated to NNE–SSW. Intermediate-depth earthquakes below 100 km in the Nisyros region indicate that the Hellenic slab experiences slab-parallel tension at these depths. The direction of tension is close to east–west and thus deviates from the local NW-oriented slab dip presumably owing to the segmentation of the slab. Beneath the Cretan sea, at shallower levels, the slab is under NW–SE compression. Tensional principal stresses in the crust exhibit very good alignment with extensional strain rate principal axes derived from GPS velocities except

  11. Fish community structure on littoral rocky shores in the Eastern Aegean Sea: Effects of exposure and substratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Raedemaecker, Fien; Miliou, Anastasia; Perkins, Rupert

    2010-11-01

    Littoral rocky shores are important habitats for many coastal fish species providing food, shelter and nursery grounds. Nearshore fish community structure results have been mainly derived from macro-scale habitat characteristics including depth and wave exposure but the influence of, and interaction with, micro-scale habitat substratum features is not well known. This study investigated the structure and functioning of the ichthyofauna composition on rocky substrata around the island of Arki in the Eastern Aegean Sea. Quantitative surveys of fish assemblage composition were carried out by Underwater Visual Census (UVC) at 14 sites assigned to three levels of exposure. The physical substratum of every transect area was described by 14 microhabitat characteristics. Multidimensional scaling (MDS) showed that exposure to wave activity was a significant factor in structuring fish assemblages differing in feeding guilds, species richness and diversity. Substratum heterogeneity, depth, boulder complexity and verticality were the main substratum descriptors that were related with wave exposure and hence were the determining factors defining fish community structure, as revealed by Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA). The similarity of percentages (SIMPER) determined the species that typified the different exposure groups. This study has shown that rocky littoral shores are of high ecological importance and their conservation is of great significance to maintain coastal fish diversity.

  12. Testing the species--genetic diversity correlation in the Aegean archipelago: toward a haplotype-based macroecology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Anna; Anastasiou, Ioannis; Spagopoulou, Foteini; Stalimerou, Malda; Terzopoulou, Sofia; Legakis, Anastasios; Vogler, Alfried P

    2011-08-01

    A positive correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity has been proposed, consistent with neutral predictions in macroecology. We assessed the species--genetic diversity correlation in tenebrionid beetle communities of the Aegean archipelago on 15 islands of different sizes, distances to mainland, and ages of isolation. Alpha and beta diversity of species and haplotypes were assessed using sequences of > 1,000 individuals (mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 and nuclear muscular protein 20). We show that (i) there is a strong species-area and haplotype-area relationship; (ii) species richness in island communities is correlated with intraspecific genetic diversity in the constituent species except when island size or distance to mainland is factored out in partial correlations; (iii) community similarity declines exponentially at an increasing rate when calculated on the basis of species, nuclear, and mtDNA haplotypes; and (iv) distance decay of community similarity is slower in dispersive sand-dwelling lineages compared with less dispersive lineages that are not sand obligate. Taken together, these correlated patterns at the species and haplotype level are consistent with individual-based stochastic dispersal proposed by neutral theories of biodiversity. The results also demonstrate the utility of haplotype data for exploring macroecological patterns in poorly known biota and predicting large-scale biodiversity patterns based on genetic inventories of local samples.

  13. Phytoplankton variability and community structure in relation to hydrographic features in the NE Aegean frontal area (NE Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagaria, A.; Mandalakis, M.; Mara, P.; Frangoulis, C.; Karatsolis, B.-Th.; Pitta, P.; Triantaphyllou, M.; Tsiola, A.; Psarra, S.

    2017-10-01

    The structure of phytoplankton community in the salinity-stratified Northeastern Aegean frontal area adjacent to the Dardanelles Straits was investigated on a seasonal basis (autumn, spring and summer) and in relation to circulating water masses: the modified Black Sea Water (BSW) and the Levantine Water (LW). By employing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) for the analysis of phytoplankton pigments in conjunction with conventional cell counting methodologies (i.e. inverted light microscopy, flow cytometry) and primary production measurements, a comprehensive qualitative and quantitative characterization of phytoplankton community composition and its activity was conducted. Chlorophyll-a normalized production and estimated growth rates presented the highest values within the 'fresh' BSW mass during summer, though generally growth rates were low (<0.4 d-1) at all seasons. The spatiotemporal variation of BSW outflow was found to greatly affect the relative contribution of pico-, nano- and micro-phytoplankton to total phytoplankton biomass and production. Large cell organisms, and in particular diatoms, were closely associated with the surface BSW masses outflowing from the Straits. Our results showed that all phytoplankton size components were significant over time and space suggesting a rather multivorous food web functioning of the system.

  14. HF Radar observations of the Dardanelles outflow current in North Eastern Aegean using validated WERA HF radar data

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    Z. KOKKINI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-site WERA HF radar station was installed in November 2009 at the eastern coast of Lemnos Island in North Aegean Sea, aiming to monitor the surface inflow of Black Sea waters exiting from the Dardanelles Strait, as well as to constitute a coastal management tool for incidents of oil-pollution or save-and-rescue operations. Strong interference by foreign transmissions is a source of noise deteriorating the quality of the backscattered signal, thus significantly reducing the HF radar’s effective data return rate. In order to ameliorate this problem, further quality-control and data gap interpolating procedures have been developed and applied, to be used in addition to the procedures incorporated and used by the manufacturer’s signal processing software. The second-level processing involves traditional despiking in the temporal domain, preceding Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis. The latter is used not only to filter high-frequency noise but also to fill data gaps in time and space. The data reconstruction procedure has been assessed via comparison of (a HF radial with CODE-type drifter radial velocities as well as (b HF-derived virtual drifter tracks with actual drifter tracks. The main circulation features and their variability, as revealed by the reconstructed fields, are presented.

  15. Delimitation of the warm and cold period of the year based on the variation of the Aegean sea surface temperature

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    A. MAVRAKIS

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the warm and cold season onset is important for the living conditions and the occupational activities of the inhabitants of a given area, and especially for agriculture and tourism. This paper presents a way to estimate the onset/end of the cold and warm period of the year, based on the sinusoidal annual variation of the Sea Surface Temperature. The method was applied on data from 8 stations of the Hellenic Navy Hydrographic Service, covering the period from 1965-1995. The results showed that the warm period starts sometime between April 28th and May 21st while it ends between October 27th and November 19th in accordance with the findings of other studies. Characteristic of the nature of the parameter used is the very low variance per station – 15 days at maximum. The average date of warm period onset is statistically the same for the largest part of the Aegean, with only one differentiation, that between Kavala and the southern stations ( Thira and Heraklion.

  16. LC-ICP-MS analysis of arsenic compounds in dominant seaweeds from the Thermaikos Gulf (Northern Aegean Sea, Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Albert; Kokkinis, Giannis; Malea, Paraskevi; Pergantis, Spiros A; Rubio, Roser; López-Sánchez, José Fermín

    2013-11-01

    The content of total arsenic and arsenic compounds in the dominant seaweed species in the Thermaikos Gulf, Northern Aegean Sea was determined in samples collected in different seasons. Total arsenic was determined by acid digestion followed by ICP-MS. Arsenic speciation was analyzed by water extraction followed by LC-ICP-MS. Total arsenic concentrations in the seaweeds ranged from 1.39 to 55.0 mg kg(-1). Cystoseira species and Codium fragile showed the highest total As contents, while Ulva species (U. intestinalis, U. rigida,U. fasciata) had the lowest Arsenosugars, the most common arsenic species in seaweeds, were found in all samples, and glycerol-arsenosugar was the most common form; however, phosphate-arsenosugar and sulfate-arsenosugar were also present. Inorganic arsenic was measured in seven algae species and detected in another. Arsenate was the most abundant species in Cystoseira barbata (27.0 mg kg(-1)). Arsenobetaine was measured in only one sample. Methylated arsenic species were measured at very low concentrations. The information should contribute to further understanding the presence of arsenic compounds in dominant seaweeds from the Thermaikos Gulf. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. U-Pb zircon geochronology of the Paleogene - Neogene volcanism in the NW Anatolia: Its implications for the Late Mesozoic-Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the Aegean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, E. Yalçın; Akal, Cüneyt; Genç, Ş. Can; Candan, Osman; Palmer, Martin R.; Prelević, Dejan; Uysal, İbrahim; Mertz-Kraus, Regina

    2017-10-01

    The northern Aegean region was shaped by subduction, obduction, collision, and post-collisional extension processes. Two areas in this region, the Rhodope-Thrace-Biga Peninsula to the west and Armutlu-Almacık-Nallıhan (the Central Sakarya) to the east, are characterized by extensive Eocene to Miocene post-collisional magmatic associations. We suggest that comparison of the Cenozoic magmatic events of these two regions may provide insights into the Late Mesozoic to Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Aegean. With this aim, we present an improved Cenozoic stratigraphy of the Biga Peninsula derived from a new comprehensive set of U-Pb zircon age data obtained from the Eocene to Miocene volcanic units in the region. The compiled radiometric age data show that calc-alkaline volcanic activity occurred at 43-15 Ma in the Biga Peninsula, 43-17 Ma in the Rhodope and Thrace regions, and 53-38 Ma in the Armutlu-Almacık-Nallıhan region, which are slightly overlapping. We discuss the possible cause for the distinct Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the eastern and western parts of the region, and propose that the Rhodope, Thrace and Biga regions in the north Aegean share the same Late Mesozoic to Cenozoic geodynamic evolution, which is consistent with continuous subduction, crustal accretion, southwestward trench migration and accompanying extension; all preceded by the Late Cretaceous - Paleocene collision along the Vardar suture zone. In contrast, the Armutlu-Almacık-Nallıhan region was shaped by slab break-off and related processes following the Late Cretaceous - Paleocene collision along the İzmir-Ankara suture zone. The eastern and western parts of the region are presently separated by a northeast-southwest trending transfer zone that was likely originally present as a transform fault in the subducted Tethys oceanic crust, and demonstrates that the regional geodynamic evolution can be strongly influenced by the geographical distribution of geologic features on the

  18. Lifestyle and health determinants of cardiovascular disease among Greek older adults living in Eastern Aegean Islands: An adventure within the MEDIS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foscolou, Alexandra; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Paka, Efstratia; Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Zeimbekis, Akis; Tyrovola, Dimitra; Ural, Dilek; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate lifestyle and health determinants of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Greek elderly residents living in Eastern Aegean islands, in both Greece and Turkey. Under the context of the MEDIS study, 724 older adults (aged 65 to 100 years) from 8 Eastern Aegean Sea Greek islands (n=100 living in Samothrace, 142 in Lesvos, 150 in Limnos, 76 in Ikaria, 52 in Kassos, 149 in Rhodes and Karpathos) and from Turkey (n=55older adults of Greek origin living on Gökçeada Island) were voluntarily recruited. Overall cardiometabolic risk was measured as the sum (range 0-4) of four common CVD risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and obesity). Greek islanders had higher CVD scores compared to Greeks of Gökçeada (1.9±1.1 vs 1.4±1.0 risk factors / participant, pGreek islanders was similar to the traditional Mediterranean diet; however, these individuals demonstrated 2-times higher odds (95% CI, 1.04-3.87) for having hypertension, 1.53-times higher odds (95% CI, 0.66-3.54) for having diabetes, 3.29-times higher odds (95% CI, 1.58-6.81) for having hypercholesterolemia; whereas they had 0.78-times lower odds (95% CI, 0.40-1.52) for being obese, compared to elderly Greek adults living on Gökçeada. Overall, CVD risk seems to be low among Eastern Aegean Islanders; certain differences in CVD risk factors exist between Greek islanders and their counterparts living in Gökçeada, and those differences may be attributed to various environmental, cultural and lifestyle factors. Copyright © 2016 Hellenic Cardiological Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessing enigmatic boulder deposits in NE Aegean Sea: importance of historical sources as tool to support hydrodynamic equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vacchi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to their importance in the assessment of coastal hazards, several studies have focused on geomorphological and sedimentological field evidence of catastrophic wave impacts related to historical tsunami events. Among them, many authors used boulder fields as important indicators of past tsunamis, especially in the Mediterranean Sea. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanism of deposition of clusters of large boulders, consisting of beachrock slabs, which were found on the southern coasts of Lesvos Island (NE Aegean Sea. Methods to infer the origin of boulder deposits (tsunami vs. storm wave are often based on hydrodynamic models even if different environmental complexities are difficult to be incorporated into numerical models. In this study, hydrodynamic equations did not provide unequivocal indication of the mechanism responsible for boulder deposition in the study area. Further analyses, ranging from geomorphologic to seismotectonic data, indicated a tsunami as the most likely cause of displacement of the boulders but still do not allow to totally exclude the extreme storm origin. Additional historical investigations (based on tsunami catalogues, historical photos and aged inhabitants interviews indicated that the boulders are likely to have been deposited by the tsunami triggered by the 6.7 Ms Chios-Karaburum earthquake of 1949 or, alternatively, by minor effects of the destructive tsunami produced by 1956's Amorgos Island earthquake. Results of this study point out that, at Mediterranean scale, to flank numerical models with the huge amount of the available historical data become a crucial tool in terms of prevention policies related to catastrophic coastal events.

  20. Tracing organic and inorganic pollution sources of soils and water resources in Güzelhisar Basin of Aegean Region, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Colak Esetlili, Bihter; Esetlili, Tolga; Tepecik, Mahmut; Kurucu, Yusuf; Anac, Dilek; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2017-04-01

    This study was carried out to determine the residue level of major concern organic and inorganic pollutants in Güzelhisar Basin of Aegean Region in Turkey which represents a rather industrialized area having five large iron and steel mills, but also areas of agriculture. Soil samples were collected from GPS determined points at 0-30 and 30-60 cm depth of a grid system of 2.5 km to the east and 2.5 km to the west of the Güzelhisar stream. The area was grouped into three main areas as West, Middle, and East region. Water and sediment samples were collected from the Güzelhisar stream and from Güzelhisar dam every 30 kilometers which is already contaminated due to industrial facilities in Aliaga, is used to irrigate the agricultural land. Soil pH of the research area was determined within the range from 5.87 to 6.61. Topsoil contamination was examined for all investigated elements with the exception of Cd. An increase in pseudo total metal contents of Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn was observed with increasing distance from the coast with a simultaneous decrease in pH. Due to the analysis of the organic pollutants, a continuous load with the herbicide trifluralin was determined with a few clearly raised points to a possible load of the stream water. Although HCH-Isomers were not found, DDT (DDT and transformation products) residues were ascertained in the soil samples. With regard to the analysis of the water samples of the Güzelhisar stream and dam, a background load with trifluralin was found which is to be explained with transport processes with regard to utilization of trifluralin in the agricultural areas.

  1. Diet and trophic level of the longnose spurdog Squalus blainville (Risso, 1826) in the deep waters of the Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousteni, Vasiliki; Karachle, Paraskevi K.; Megalofonou, Persefoni

    2017-06-01

    Knowledge of the diet and trophic level of marine predators is essential to develop an understanding of their ecological role in ecosystems. Research conducted on the trophic ecology of the deep-sea sharks is rather limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the diet of the longnose spurdog Squalus blainville, a deep-sea shark categorized as "data deficient" within its distribution range, with respect to sex, maturity, age, season and sampling location. The stomach contents of 211 specimens, captured in the Aegean (off Skyros and the Cyclades Islands) and Cretan Seas, using commercial bottom-trawlers from 2005 to 2012, were analysed. The cumulative prey curve showed that the sample size was adequate to describe the species' diet. The identified prey items belonged to five major groups: Teleostei, Crustacea, Cephalopoda, Annelida and Phanerogams. Higher diet diversity was observed in females compared to males, in immature individuals compared to mature ones, regardless of sex, and in spring and winter compared to other seasons. Age and sampling location seemed to influence both the diet diversity and trophic spectrum of the species. Feeding intensity based on the vacuity index was not significantly influenced by any of the factors examined, while the stomach filling degree was significantly influenced by all factors, except sex, showing significantly higher values in mature females compared to immature ones, in older individuals, in autumn compared to winter, and a significantly lower value in the Cyclades Islands compared to other locations. Females showed a significant larger mouth length compared to males of the same length, while no between-sex differences were found in gut morphometrics. The estimated fractional trophic level (TROPH=4.41) classified the species as carnivore with a preference for Teleostei and Cephalopoda, confirming its high trophic position.

  2. Investigation of the stochastic nature of wave processes for renewable resources management: a pilot application in a remote island in the Aegean sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, Evangelos; Manou, Georgia; Georganta, Xristina; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Iliopoulou, Theano; Tyralis, Hristos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Tsoukala, Vicky

    2017-04-01

    The large energy potential of ocean dynamics is not yet being efficiently harvested mostly due to several technological and financial drawbacks. Nevertheless, modern renewable energy systems include wave and tidal energy in cases of nearshore locations. Although the variability of tidal waves can be adequately predictable, wind-generated waves entail a much larger uncertainty due to their dependence to the wind process. Recent research has shown, through estimation of the wave energy potential in coastal areas of the Aegean Sea, that installation of wave energy converters in nearshore locations could be an applicable scenario, assisting the electrical network of Greek islands. In this context, we analyze numerous of observations and we investigate the long-term behaviour of wave height and wave period processes. Additionally, we examine the case of a remote island in the Aegean sea, by estimating the local wave climate through past analysis data and numerical methods, and subsequently applying a parsimonious stochastic model to a theoretical scenario of wave energy production. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  3. Impact of the Aegean Sea oil spill on the subtidal fine sand macrobenthic community of the Ares-Betanzos Ria (Northwest Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez Gesteira, J.L. [Vigo Univ. (Spain). Grupo de Fisica Oceanographic y de Costas; Dauvin, J.C. [Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Wimereux (France). Station Marine

    2005-09-01

    Two sites located in the sublittoral fine-sand macrobenthic community of the Ares-Betanzos Ria were sampled over four years (December 1992-November 1996) in the wake of the Aegean Sea oil spill. This sampling revealed that the petroleum had affected the structure and abundance of this community, as well as the number of taxa present. In this context, the results of the biotic index and the biotic coefficient were insufficient; however, study of the synthetic parameters, particularly through multivariate analysis, showed that the community went through three successive and distinct phases over time. A short period of high mortality in some species, especially amphipods, was followed by a period of low abundance that lasted until the spring of 1995. A period of recovery began in the second half of 1995 and continued through to the end of 1996, when the survey ended. The community showed a gradual evolution back towards the conditions observed immediately after the spill, when abundance of the more resistant species was still high. Despite this similarity, the last period exhibits a new structure, clearly separate from the two previous periods. This study provides information about the short-term effects of the Aegean Sea oil spill on the fine sand bottoms of the sites surveyed in the Ares-Betanzos Ria. This information could also serve as a baseline for identifying the effects of a more recent accident, the Prestige oil spill, in which similar communities in other Galician rias were polluted in 2002-2003. (author)

  4. Grain size distribution, clay mineralogy and chemistry of bottom sediments from the outer Thermaikos Gulf, Aegean Sea, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.G. PEHLIVANOGLOU

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The Thermaikos Gulf constitutes the NW part of the North Aegean Sea and is limited eastward from the Chalkidiki Peninsula and westward from the Pieria Prefecture. Its plateau covers an area of 3,500 km2. The mechanisms responsible for the grain size distribution into the Gulf, the clay mineralogy and the chemistry of some bottom sediments from the outer Thermaikos Gulf, are examined. Source mixing during transportation, flocculation, differential settling processes and organic matter appear to be the main mechanisms for the distribution of clay minerals in shallow waters. All grain size fractions studied present a wide range of values confirming the extreme variations of the discharged load and the variability in marine processes. Plagioclases predominate over K-feldspars, while quartz is the most abundant mineral present. In addition, micas, chlorites, amphiboles and pyroxenes exist as primary and/or accessory minerals in all samples. Among clay minerals, illite predominates over smectite and smectite over chlorite (+ kaolinite. The ordered interstratified phase of I/S, with 30-35% S layers, is present in the 2-0.25µm fraction. The randomly interstratified phase of I/S, with 50% S layers, is present in the <0.25& micro; m fraction. On average the clay mineral content of the studied samples is: 48% I, 23% S, 17% Ch (+K and 12% others for the 2-0.25µm fraction and 50% I, 30% S and 20% Ch (+K for the <0.25 µm fraction. All these minerals are the weathering products of the rocks from the drainage basins of the rivers flowing into the Gulf, as well as of the Neogene and Quaternary unconsolidated sediments of the surrounding coasts. The terrigenous input, the water mass circulation and, to a lesser extent, the quality of the discharged material and the differential settling of grains, control the grain size distribution within the outer Thermaikos Gulf. The chemical composition of the analysed samples is generally in agreement with their mineral

  5. Comparison of fish community structure on artificial reefs deployed at different depths on turkish Aegean sea coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benal Gül

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deployment depth of artificial reefs is one of the most important issue in planning stage and future success. Most of the studies aimed at determination of fish community around artificial reefs were conducted mainly 10-25m depths in Mediterranean and Aegean Sea. The goals of this study are determine and compare of fish community structure around artificial reefs which deployed 20, 30 and 40 m depths. Underwater visual census technique was used to determine fish species, number of individual and size estimation. There was no statistical difference (p>0.05 in mean fish biomass and number of individual between the depths. But mean species number was significantly greater on 20 m in comparison to 30 m and 40 m depths (pA profundidade da implantação de recifes artificiais é uma das questões mais importantes no planejamento de etapas e do futuro êxito. A maior parte dos estudos visando determinar a comunidade de peixes em volta de recifes artificiais foi realizada, principalmente , a profundidades de 10-25m no Mediterrâneo e Mar Egeu. Os objetivos deste estudo são determinar e comparar a estrutura da comunidade de peixes em volta de recifes artificiais que foram implantados a profundidades de 20, 30 e 40 m. A técnica de censo visual foi usada para determinar as espécies e obter uma estimativa do número e tamanho dos peixes. Não houve nenhuma diferença estatística (p> 0.05 entre as profundidades, na média da biomassa de peixes e no número de indivíduos. Entretanto, a média do número de espécies foi significativamente maior nos 20 m em comparação com as profundidades de 30 m e de 40 m (p <0.05. Além disso, os valores calculados dos índices de Zurro-Curtis e Jaccard revelaram pequena semelhança (minuto 3% - máximo %37 entre as profundidades.

  6. The Absolute Dating Potential of Proximal-Distal Tephra Correlations in an Aegean Marine Stratigraphy (Core LC21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satow, Christopher; Lowe, John; Rohling, Eelco; Blockley, Simon; Menzies, Martin; Grant, Katharine; Smith, Vicki; Tomlinson, Emma

    2010-05-01

    Quaternary marine stratigraphies frequently suffer from poor absolute age control. Radiocarbon dating is intuitively the most appropriate technique for most marine stratigraphies, but its application is limited to the last 50ka or so by the decay rate of carbon. There are also uncertainties related to reservoir effects and the calibration of radiocarbon time to real time. However, precise dating and correlation of marine cores is essential to understand the timing and spatial relationships of the valuable environmental records they preserve. Here we demonstrate the potential of both visible and "invisible" micro-tephra layers to precisely date an important marine environmental record (Core LC21 from the Southern Aegean Sea). This is done by geochemically correlating the distal marine tephra layers to proximal volcanic deposits from Italy, Greece and Turkey. We use both Major Element (EPMA- Oxford Archaeology) and Trace Element (LA-ICP-MS, Royal Holloway Earth Sciences) analyses on individual tephra shards to determine the source of the tephra, and to make the correlations to explosive eruptive events. The most precise date (14C, 39Ar:40Ar or U-Th) from the event's proximal deposit is then imported into the equivalent distal tephra found in the marine core. Many of these distal "micro-tephras" were previously undetected by standard core logging techniques such as visual stratigraphy or scanning XRF. The extent and potential application of these tephras is now being realised. This study will provide the first direct (same core) and independent, absolute chronological markers for sapropels S3, S4 and S5, three major anoxic events found in the Eastern Mediterranean. In addition, the major and trace element geochemistry will be used to robustly correlate three marine cores spanning the Mediterranean. This work forms the Marine Tephrostratigraphy component (Work Package 5) of the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) consortium project "RESET" (Response of

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from METEOR in the Aegean Sea, Mediterranean Sea and others from 2001-10-18 to 2001-11-11 (NODC Accession 0084620)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0084620 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from METEOR in the Aegean Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Mediterranean Sea - Eastern Basin,...

  8. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from Marcus G. Langseth in the Aegean Sea, Alboran Sea and others from 2015-04-13 to 2015-11-12 (NCEI Accession 0144534)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144534 includes Surface underway data collected from Marcus G. Langseth in the Aegean Sea, Alboran Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Mediterranean Sea -...

  9. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from POLARSTERN in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea and others from 2014-03-09 to 2015-01-31 (NCEI Accession 0160489)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160489 includes Surface underway, chemical and meteorological data collected from POLARSTERN in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Alboran Sea, Arabian...

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer, Shower head chamber equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement and other instruments from AEGAEO in the Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea from 2006-02-08 to 2006-02-13 (NODC Accession 0084543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0084543 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from AEGAEO in the Aegean Sea and Mediterranean Sea from...

  11. Dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from METEOR in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea and others from 2011-04-05 to 2011-04-28 (NODC Accession 0108079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0108079 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from METEOR in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Alboran Sea, Ionian Sea, Mediterranean Sea,...

  12. PH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from PROFESSOR SIEDLECKI in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea and others from 1988-11-17 to 1988-11-26 (NCEI Accession 0144306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144306 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from PROFESSOR SIEDLECKI in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Mediterranean...

  13. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and OXYGEN - APPARENT UTILIZATION (AOU) collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from UNKNOWN PLATFORMS in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea and others from 1874-10-11 to 2000-04-26 (NODC Accession 0117350)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117350 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from UNKNOWN PLATFORMS in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Alboran Sea,...

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from Surface underway observations using Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from unknown platforms in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea and others from 2012-01-01 to 2012-12-31 (NODC Accession 0059946)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0059946 includes Surface underway, chemical, meteorological and physical data collected from unknown platforms in the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea,...

  15. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in core sediment samples in Gulf of Izmir, Aegean Sea, Turkey (by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES))

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal Yumun, Zeki; Kam, Erol; Kurt, Dilek

    2017-04-01

    Heavy metal and radionuclide analysis studies are crucial in explaining biotic and abiotic interactions in ecosystems. This type of analysis is highly needed in environments such as coastal areas, gulfs or lakes where human activities are generally concentrated. Sediments are one of the best biological indicators for the environment since the pollution accumulates in the sediments by descent to the sea floor. In this study, sediments were collected from the Gulf of Izmir (Eastern Aegean Sea, Turkey) considering the accumulated points of domestic and industrial wastes to make an anthropogenic pollution analysis. The core sediments had different depths of 0.00-30.00 m at four different locations where Karsiyaka, Bayrakli, Incialti and Cesmealti in the Gulf of Izmir. The purpose of the study was determining Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in the drilling samples to assess their levels and spatial distribution in crucial areas of the Aegean Sea by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with microwave digestion techniques. The heavy metal concentrations found in sediments varied for Cd:

  16. A new artificial reef design for octopus (Octopus vulgaris cuvier, 1797 in the Aegean sea and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ula

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in the Gulf of 0zmir in the Aegean Sea between June 2006 and November 2008. The purpose was the creation of a new concept of the artificial reef for Octopus vulgaris, with a view to establishing new artificial reef sites to be used in the fisheries management of this species (MPA, NTZ or fishing areas. First, the main characteristics of natural octopus nests were recorded (entrance width, length, etc. by divers. These characteristics were used in the construction of new octahedral artificial reef blocks. The blocks were made of reinforced concrete, in a shape like that of an inverted pyramid, with an upper surface of 100x100x25 cm³ and a lower one of 60x60 cm². Four cylindrical holes each with two ellipsoidal openings were placed in one face and in the lateral edge of the octo-block, to serve as the entrances to the artificial nest. Each nest has a volume of 5000 cm³. Eighty octo-blocks were deployed as artificial reefs at 10 m from each other at 15 different depths at two sites by divers with the help of the winch of the R/V EGESUF. These artificial octo-reefs were censused by direct observation. Twenty-eight octopuses were sampled at the end of 25 dives. Minimum mantle length of the octopuses was 75 mm and the maximum 249 mm, with an average of 152.71 mm. The average total length was calculated to be 918.57 mm. The weight of the specimens was between 244 g and 7140 g with an average of 2335.43 g. The results showed that both sites were inhabited by octopuses coming from the artificial reefs, which used them as nests. These nests seem to have constituted special places for fisheries management and will permit the assessment of reserve areas or marine protection areas (MPA, thus opening up a new perspective for Turkish fisheries.Este estudo foi realizado no golfo de 0zmir, no Mar Egeu, entre junho de 2006 e novembro de 2008. O objetivo foi uma nova concepção de recife artificial para Octopus vulgaris, visando o

  17. Old stories and lost pieces of the Eastern Mediterranean puzzle: a new approach to the tectonic evolution of the Western Anatolia and the Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaltırak, Cenk; Engin Aksu, Ali; Hall, Jeremy; Elitez, İrem

    2015-04-01

    During the last 20 or so years, the tectonic evolution of Aegean Sea and Western Anatolia has been dominantly explained by back-arc extension and escape tectonics along the North Anatolian Fault. Various datasets have been considered in the construction of general tectonic models, including the geometry of fault patterns, paleomagnetic data, extensional directions of the core complexes, characteristic changes in magmatism and volcanism, the different sense of Miocene rotation between the opposite sides of the Aegean Sea, and the stratigraphy and position of the Miocene and Pliocene-Quaternary basins. In these models, the roles of the Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone, the Trakya-Eskişehir Fault Zone, the Anaximander Mountains and Isparta Angle have almost never been taken into consideration. The holistic evaluation of numerous land and marine researches in the Aegean Sea and western Anatolia suggest the following evolutionary stages: 1. during the early Miocene, Greece and western Anatolia were deformed under the NE-SW extensional tectonics associated with the back-arc extension, when core complexes and supra-detachment basins developed, 2. following the collision of the Anaximander Mountains and western Anatolia in early Miocene , the Isparta Angle locked this side of the western arc by generating a triangle-shaped compressional structure, 3. while the Isparta Angle penetrated into the Anatolia, the NE-striking Burdur-Fethiye Shear Zone in the west and NW-striking Trakya-Eskişehir Fault Zone in the north developed along the paleo-tectonic zones , 4. the formation of these two tectonic structures allowed the counterclockwise rotation of the western Anatolia in the middle Miocene and this rotation removed the effect of the back-arc extension on the western Anatolian Block, 5. the counterclockwise rotation developed with the early westward escape of the Western Anatolian reached up to 35-40o and Trakya-Eskişehir Fault Zone created a total dextral displacement of about 200

  18. Heulandite and mordenite-rich tuffs from Greece: a potential source for pozzolanic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsopoulos, K. P.; Dunham, A. C.

    1996-09-01

    The microcystalline mass of the Pliocene tuffs of Santorini and Polyegos islands, in the South Aegean Volcanic Arc, Greece, is very rich in zeolite minerals, more specifically heulandite type 3, i.e. clinoptilolite, and mordenite. In Santorini, clinoptilolite is the dominant authigenic phase and it was formed in a semi-closed system, by the activity of interstitial water within the volcaniclastic sequence. In Polyegos, mordenite dominates and it was formed by hydrothermal alteration of pyroclastics. Experiments described in this work show that the presence of the zeolite minerals has created materials with excellent pozzolanic properties. Tuffs from the two areas were calcined at 760 °C and for 12 h and then mixed with lime in a constant ratio of 1 part lime to 3 parts calcined tuff. As a result, the free lime content of the lime-calcined tuff mixtures was reduced from 25% to 2.05% (Santorini) and 1.31% (Polyegos). Compressive strength tests were carried out on concrete cubes made with 100% Portland cement as the cementitious agent, to be used as reference cubes, and concrete cubes in which the Portland cement has been replaced in 4% and 7% proportions by the calcined tuff as pozzolans. The free lime estimation and the compressive strength tests were all carried out in accordance with the British Standards Institution (BS 4550 and BS 1881) guidelines. Early stage measurements of the compressive strength showed that pozzolan-bearing concrete cubes reached values as high as 140% of the reference cubes. The pozzolan-bearing concrete cubes maintained this superior strength throughout the entire one year period of the experiments. After 360 days, they finally maintained 107% of the compressive strength of the reference cubes.

  19. Climatic significance of D/H and 13 C/12 C ratios in Irish oak cellulose

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Even though one of the trees did not exhibit climatic correlations, both trees show a significant positive correlation of 13C and a negative correlation of D with ring width variations. Furthermore, two tree samples that grew during the 1620s B.C., when a volcano is thought to have erupted on the Aegean island of Santorini, ...

  20. Molecular analysis of abnormal hemoglobins in beta chain in Aegean region of Turkey and first reports of hemoglobin Andrew-Minneapolis and Hb Hinsdale from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Ayça; Onay, Hüseyin; Durmaz, Asude; Karaca, Emin; Vergin, Canan; Aydınok, Yeşim; Özkınay, Ferda

    2015-07-01

    The Agean is one of the regions in Turkey where thalassemias and abnormal hemoglobins (Hbs) are prevalent. Combined heterozygosity of thalassemia mutations with a variety of structural Hb variants lead to an extremely wide spectrum of clinical and hematological phenotypes which is of importance for prenatal diagnosis. One hundred and seventeen patients and carriers diagnosed by hemoglobin electrophoresis (HPLC), at risk for abnormal hemoglobinopathies were screened for mutational analysis of the beta-globin gene. The full coding the 5' UTR, and the 3' UTR sequences of beta-globin gene (GenBank accession no. U01317) were amplified and sequenced. In this study, a total of 118 (12.24%) structural Hb variant alleles were identified in 1341 mutated beta-chain alleles in Medical Genetics Department of Ege University between January 2006 and November 2013. Here, we report the mutation spectrum of abnormal Hbs associated with the beta-globin gene in Aegean region of Turkey. In the present study, the Hb Hinsdale and Hb Andrew-Minneapolis variants are demonstrated for the first time in the Turkish population.

  1. Selectivity of commercial, larger mesh and square mesh trawl codends for deep water rose shrimp Parapenaeus longirostris (Lucas, 1846 in the Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Kaykaç

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the differences between size selectivity of a commercial codend (40 mm diamond mesh – 40D, a larger mesh codend (48 mm diamond mesh – 48D, and a square mesh codend (40 mm square mesh – 40S for Parapenaeus longirostris in international waters of the Aegean Sea. Selectivity data were collected by using a covered codend method and analysed taking between-haul variation into account. The results indicate significant increases in L50 values in relation to an increase in mesh size and when the square mesh is used in the commercial trawl codend. The results demonstrate that the commercially used codend (40D is not selective enough for P. longirostris in terms of length at first maturity. Changing from a 40D to a 48D codend significantly improves selection, with an increase of about 15% in the L50 values (carapace length 14.5 mm for 40D and 16.6 mm for 48D. Similarly, 40 mm square mesh, which has recently been legislated for EU Mediterranean waters, showed a 12.4% higher mean L50 value (16.3 mm than 40 mm diamond mesh for this species. However, despite these improvements, the 48D and 40S codends still need further improvements to obtain higher selectivity closer to the length at first maturity (20 mm carapace length.

  2. Using guarding net to reduce regularly discarded invertebrates in trammel net fisheries operating on seagrass meadows (Posidonia oceanica in Izmir Bay (Eastern Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. AYDIN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prohibition of both beach and boat seines and trawl fishery along the İzmir Bay coasts in the Aegean Sea signifies intensive usage of gillnets and trammel nets, for catching red mullet (Mullus spp. species in particular. Trials were realized between March 2009 and February 2010 with trammel nets in the areas on the boundaries of the sea grass (Posidonia oceanica meadows in the Bay. Guarding net (selvedge was attached to the lead line of experimental nets (Exp1-Exp2 - 36 and 40 mm inner panel. Differences for discard amounts between control group nets (C1-C2 (having the same inner panel as the experimental nets, used by commercial fishermen, and experimental nets are 54.7% for C1-Exp1 and 62.8% for C2-Exp2 (p<0.05. Use of nets with selvedge not only reduced regularly discarded invertebrates (Hexaplex trunculus, Bolinus brandaris, Maja spp. in the region, but also avoided net damage caused by these species.

  3. Cumulative impacts from multiple human activities on seagrass meadows in eastern Mediterranean waters: the case of Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea, Greece).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Maren Myrto; Pantazi, Maria; Kokkali, Athina; Panayotidis, Panayotis; Gerakaris, Vasilis; Maina, Irida; Kavadas, Stefanos; Kaberi, Helen; Vassilopoulou, Vassiliki

    2017-12-05

    Ecosystem-based management (EBM) addresses the fundamental need to account for cumulative impacts of human activities with the aim of sustainably delivering ecosystem services. The Saronikos Gulf, a large embayment of the Aegean Sea, provides a wide range of ecosystem services that are impacted by multiple human activities, deriving from the metropolitan area of Athens (situated at the northeast part of the Gulf). The anthropogenic impacts affect the status of several marine ecosystem components, e.g., seagrass meadows. Cymodocea nodosa meadows are only present at the most confined western part of the Gulf, whereas Posidonia oceanica meadows are mainly distributed in the inner and outer part of the Gulf. The aim of this study is to assess the cumulative impacts from multiple human activities on the seagrass meadows in the Gulf. The main results indicated that most impacted meadows are P. oceanica in the inner part of the Gulf, adjacent to the most urbanized coastal areas, and near port infrastructures. Land-based pollution, as well as physical damage and loss seem to be the main pressures exerted on the meadows. Understanding cumulative impacts is crucial for informing policy decisions under an EBM approach.

  4. Seasonal variations in dissolved organic matter composition using absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy in the Dardanelles Straits - North Aegean Sea mixing zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitta, Elli; Zeri, Christina; Tzortziou, Maria; Mousdis, George; Scoullos, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The Dardanelles Straits - North Aegean Sea mixing zone is the area where the less saline waters of Black Sea origin supply organic material to the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea. The objective of this work was to assess the seasonal dynamics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in this region based on the optical properties (absorbance and fluorescence). By combining excitation-emission fluorescence with parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC), four fluorescent components were identified corresponding to three humic - like components and one amino acid - like. The latter was dominant during all seasons. Chromophoric DOM (CDOM) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were found to be strongly coupled only in early spring when conservative conditions prevailed and the two water masses present (Black Sea Waters - BSW and Levantine Waters - LW) could be identified by their absorption coefficients (a300) and spectral slopes S275-295. In summer and autumn the relationships collapsed. During summer two features appear to dominate the dynamics of CDOM: i) photodegradation that acts as an important sink for both the absorbing DOM and the terrestrially derived fluorescent humic substances and ii) the release of marine humic like fluorescent substances from bacterial transformation of DOM. Autumn results revealed a source of fluorescent CDOM of high molecular weight, which was independent of water mass sources and related to particle and sedimentary processes. The removal of the amino acid-like fluorescence during autumn provided evidence that although DOC was found to accumulate under low inorganic nutrient conditions, dissolved organic nitrogenous compounds could serve as bacterial substrate.

  5. Modelling the water mass exchange through navigational channels connecting adjacent coastal basins - application to the Channel of Potidea (North Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. G. Savvidis

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is the detection of the mechanism of the water mass exchange through a navigational channel connecting two adjacent coastal basins. The research involves the application of a mathematical model in parallel to in-situ measurements. The hydrodynamic circulation in the greater area of the NW Aegean Sea is modeled by means of a barotropic circulation model. Wind, Coriolis and Tide are the main forcings taken into account. The flow through the channel is resolved at a subgrid scale by means of a local open channel flow model. The comparison between field measurements, recorded during a limited period, and the model results supports the model verification. The study is integrated by an operational application of the model under various realistic forcings. The results help to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating the water mass exchange and the consequent interaction between two adjacent connected coastal basins. From the case study of the Potidea channel it is revealed that the water mass exchange under mean wind forcing is of the same order as the one induced by the tidal forcing.

  6. South Africa

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cathy Egan

    SOUTH AFRICA. Ruled for decades by the systematic, violent injustice of apartheid, South Africa by the mid-1980s was subjected to international sanctions and near-universal condemnation. It was in this period — long before transition seemed likely — that IDRC opened its own new assessment of its approach to South ...

  7. South-South, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovutor Owhoeli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 213 faecal samples were collected from four abattoirs and households to determine the prevalence of helminthes infections in exotic and indigenous goats in Port Harcourt, South-South, Nigeria. The study revealed that out of 153 exotic goats (Red Sokoto Capra hircus, 112 were infected with various species of gastrointestinal helminths; out of 60 indigenous goats (West African dwarf Capra hircus, 49 were also infected with various types of gastrointestinal helminths. The formol-ether concentration method was used to analyse the specimens. The study revealed that an overall prevalence of (75.5% was recorded, out of which 57 (76.0%, 55 (70.5%, and 49 (81.6% were recorded for exotic goat in the months of May–September, 2010, exotic goat in the months October 2010–February, 2011 and for indigenous goats, respectively. The overall prevalence amongst the infected animals was not statistically significant (P>0.05. Species of helminthes revealed from the study were, Haemonchus, Strongyloides, Chabertia, Trichuris, Ostertagia, Bunostomum, Trichostrongyloida, Ascaris, Tenia, Avitelina, Fasciola, Eurytrema, Gastrothylax, Schistosoma, and Dicrocoelium.

  8. Tracing organic and inorganic pollution sources of agricultural crops and water resources in Güzelhisar Basin of the Aegean Region - Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Sezin; Colak Esetlili, Bihter; Esetlili, Tolga; Tepecik, Mahmut; Anac, Dilek; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The study area Güzelhisar Basin is 6 km far from the city Aliaga, Aegean Region in Turkey which represents a rather industrialized area having five large iron and steel factories, but also areas of agriculture. Steel industry in Aliaga is causing metal pollution. Around Güzelhisar Basin and nearby, the dominant crop fields are cotton, maize, vegetables, olive trees and vineyards. Güzelhisar stream and dam water is used for irrigation of the agricultural land. Due to contamination from metal industry in Aliaga, organic farming is not allowed in this region. Industrial activities in the region present a threat on sustainable agriculture. The region is a multi-impacted area in terms of several pollutant sources affecting soil and water quality. The overall objective of the project is to trace back plant nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, and B), hazardous substances (i. e. persistent organic pollutants), radionuclides (40K, 232Th, 226Ra/238U), and metal contents (As, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) by examining the soils, agricultural crops and natural plants from Güzelhisar Basin and water and sediments from Güzelhisar stream and dam. Spatial distribution of pollution will be evaluated by regionalization methods. For this, an advanced analytical methodology will be applied which provides an understanding of sources and occurrence of the respective substances of concern. An innovative multi-tracer approach comprising organic and inorganic marker substances, will identify and quantitatively assess sources and their impact on water pollution and the pollutant pathways in this agricultural crop production system.

  9. Effect of terroir on the phenolic compounds of Muscat of Bornova Wines from 3 different sub-regions of Aegean, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaoğlan Selin N. Yabaci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the phenolic compounds of wines from Muscat of Bornova, a native aromatic white grape variety (Vitis vinifera grown in the Aegean region of Turkey and the influence of terroir (Menderes, Halilbeyli and Kemaliye sub- regions on these compounds were investigated. From Muscat of Bornova growing sub regions, Menderes/İzmir has a typical Mediterranean climate at around 90 m altitude which is located Eagean cost area with a fertile sandy-loamy soil; Halilbeyli/İzmir sub-region is located in inner İzmir, close to Manisa with 115 m altitude with same soil structure of Menderes. Kemaliye/Manisa has a transition climate between Mediterranean and continental climate at about 245 m altitude. Its soil is pale with a distinct amount of lime (∼30% and sandy-loamy, as well. High performance liquid chromatography-diode array dedector (HPLC-DAD and mass spectrometry (MS were used for the phenolic compounds analysis. Four flavanols, eight phenolic acids and a flavonol were identified and quantified. It was observed that the total phenolic content in the Halilbeyli sub-region was the highest, fol- lowed by the Menderes and Kemaliye sub-regions. Procyanidin B4 was the most abundant flavanol and quercetin-3-O-glucoside was the only flavonol identified in all regions’ wines. Sensory analysis was also used to investigate the influences of terroir. Statistically significant (0.05 regional differences were observed. Based upon sensory analysis, the wine obtained from Halilbeyli was darker in color, and had more astringency and bitterness than the others, and was the least popular wine. Kemaliye and Menderes were both preferred due to their better coloring, flavour, less astringency and bitterness attributes.

  10. Wild fire effects on floristic diversity in three thermo-Mediterranean vegetation types in a small islet of eastern Aegean sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Eleni; Kyriazopoulos, Apostolos; Korakis, George; Parissi, Zoi; Chouvardas, Dimitrios

    2014-05-01

    Sclerophyllus scrub formations, the main vegetation type in many islands of the Aegean area, are characterized by their high biodiversity. Dominant shrub species of sclerophyllus formations are well adapted to dry season conditions by various anatomical and physiological mechanisms. As a result, their biomass acts as very flammable fine fuel, and consequently wild fires are very common in these ecosystems. Wildfire effects on vegetation and biodiversity in the Mediterranean basin have been studied and the results are diverse depending mainly on vegetation type and frequency of fire. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of wildfire on floristic diversity and species composition in three thermo-Mediterranean vegetation types 1) Sacropoterium spinosum phrygana, 2) low formations of Cistus creticus and 3) low formations of Cistus creticus in abandoned terraces. The research was conducted in Enoussa islet, which is located northeastern of Chios Island, in May 2013 (one year after the fire). Vegetation sampling was performed along five transects placed in recently burned and in adjacent unburned sites of each vegetation type. The plant cover and the floristic composition were measured, while diversity, evenness and dominance indices were determined for the vegetation data. Vegetation cover and the floristic diversity were significant lower and higher respectively in burned areas in comparison to the unburned. The woody species followed by the annual grasses and the annual forbs dominated in both burned and unburned areas. However, the woody species were significantly decreased in the burned areas in all vegetation types, while the annual grasses only in the burned areas of Sacropoterium spinosum phrygana and Cistus creticus in abandoned terraces. Inversely, the annual forbs significantly increased in the burned sites of Cistus creticus formations. The highest value of Morisita-Horn Index of similarity between burned and unburned sites (beta diversity) was

  11. Climatic variability of the sub-surface sea temperatures in the Aegean-Black Sea system and relation to meteorological forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kontoyiannis, H.; Papadopoulos, V.; Georgopoulos, D. [Hellenic Center for Marine Research, Attica (Greece); Kazmin, A.; Zatsepin, A. [P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanography, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    Non-smoothed yearly temperature records with minimal statistical uncertainties are constructed for winter and summer of the period 1950-2000 in two areas in the Aegean Sea, for the sub-surface layer of 80-120 m, and two areas in the Black Sea, for the sub-surface layer of sigma-theta isopycnals between 14.5 and 15.4. The specific areas are selected mostly because of the dense hydrographic-data coverage they have during the period 1950-2000. Two trend regimes appear in both Seas: a period of decreasing sea temperatures from the early/mid 1960s to the early/mid 1990s and an apparent warming afterwards. Trends in sea temperatures correlate with trends in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and partly the East Atlantic West Russian (EAWR) indexes, but the signs of NAO and/or EAWR cannot sufficiently justify the winter-to-winter temperature changes in the entire study area. In examining the wind flows in the sea-level-pressure maps for characteristic winters in which local peaks in the sea-temperature records occur, we identify particular sea-level-pressure structures that are not accounted for by the typical North-Atlantic or East Atlantic-West Russia positive or negative dipoles. In addition, there are winters when the Siberian High induces local maxima in sea-temperatures in the study area. A spectral-coherence analysis of the unfiltered winter sea-temperature and the corresponding teleconnection NAO/EAWR records, shows that common spectral and coherence peaks exist at {proportional_to}5-6, {proportional_to}9-10 and {proportional_to}15-17 years. (orig.)

  12. Tales of some ancient harbors in the Aegean back-arc region: Earthquakes, coastal changes, historical impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiros, Stathis; Saltogianni, Vasso

    2017-04-01

    this ancient town since approximately AD200 as a result of loss of the only significant harbor along the southern coast of the Gulf of Corinth. Farther west, in the south part of the Greek mainland, rising of the level of the dock shortly after its construction may imply response to seismic land subsidence, while at the nearby harbor of Palairos, remains of a submerged breakwater, offset by several meters, testify to strike slip faulting with seismic offset amplified by liquefaction.

  13. Monitoring heavy metal pollution in foraminifera from the Gulf of Edremit (northeastern Aegean Sea) between Izmir, Balıkesir and Çanakkale (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yümün, Zeki Ünal; Önce, Melike

    2017-06-01

    In this study, the populations and abnormal shell structures of Quaternary foraminifers in the sediments of the North-eastern Aegean Sea were examined. For this purpose, offshore drilling was carried out at three locations, and core samples were collected from 13 locations at Küçükkuyu (Çanakkale), Güre (Edremit-Balıkesir) and Dikili (İzmir). At these points, drilling reached depths ranging from 3.00 to 22.00 m beneath the seafloor; recent sediments were observed, but the bedrock was not reached. Examination of the faunal and sedimentological properties of the samples showed that the Gulf of Edremit is completely influenced by the sea and has rich foraminifers and ostracod populations. The abnormalities observed in the foraminifer shells, as well as the yellow- and/or black-coloured shells seen in both the foraminifer and ostracod populations, are due to natural and anthropogenic ecological pollution. The vertical (chronological) and horizontal (spatial) distributions of heavy metal concentrations in both the core and drill core samples were investigated to determine the causes of the morphological abnormalities observed in the foraminifers. In the present study, pollution index (PI) values were calculated to assess the degree of heavy metal pollution (Yümün 2017). The current land use status of the coastal areas corresponding to the measured PI values was investigated to identify the sources of the pollution. Especially in the Güre region, a large number of genera and species of benthic foraminifers showed overgrowth in the shell sizes of individuals, and the coloration of the shells is noteworthy. These changes in the shells are a result of thermal sources and agricultural activities in the region. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to perform an elemental analysis of the surfaces of dark yellow-orange foraminifers (Ammonia compacta and Elphidium crispum). The S, Fe and Mn concentrations in the shells were found to be high, based on the SEM

  14. Systems medicine, personalized health and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siest, Gérard; Auffray, Charles; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Murray, Helena; Visvikis-Siest, Sophie; Ansari, Marc; Marc, Janja; Jacobs, Peter; Meyer, Urs; Van Schaik, Ron H N; Müller, Mathias M; Wevers, Ron A; Simmaco, Maurizio; Kussmann, Martin; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Beastall, Graham; Németh, György

    2015-01-01

    The 7th Santorini Conference was held in Santorini, Greece, and brought together 200 participants from 40 countries in several continents, including Europe, USA but also Japan, Korea, Brazil and South Africa. The attendees had the opportunity to: listen to 60 oral presentations; participate in two

  15. South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Peter; Tarp, Finn

    1996-01-01

    This paper explores the macroeconomic situation and medium-term perspectives of the South African economy. Three fully quantified and internally consistent scenarios are presented. The projections demonstrate that there is room for increased public spending in real terms to help address South...... Africa's pressing social needs. Moreover, such expansion is possible without falling into a much feared debt trap, provided moderately optimistic assumptions about the future materialize. Yet, if growth and real resource inflows falter, not even considerable moderation will be sufficient to maintain...... macro-economic balance and avoid unsustainable public sector deficits....

  16. South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abiy Chelkeba

    legal state succession scenarios of South Sudan to the 1929 and 1959 Nile water ... Section 2 surveys the legal regime and the institutional framework that govern the utilization of the Nile river with particular emphasis to the 1929 and 1959 ..... On the other hand, some Egyptian writers are of the opinion that the Nile.

  17. South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    The 1983 population of South Africa was estimated at 31.1 million, with an annual growth rate of 2.5% (0.8% for whites, 1.8% for blacks and "coloreds," 1.8% for Asians, and 2.8% for Africans). The infant mortality rate was 14.9/1000 live births among whites, 80.6/1000 among blacks and coloreds, and 25.3/1000 among Asians. Life expectancy was 70 years for whites, 59 years for blacks and coloreds, 66 years for Asians, and 55 years for Africans. Racial discrimination has become increasingly institutionalized in South Africa since the ruling National Party came to power in 1948. The policy of apartheid calls for separate political institutions for the 4 major racial groups in the population. Africans are considered citizens of the homelands to which their tribal group is assigned, not permanent citizens of the country. Coloreds and Asians are considered citizens and given some political expression. The new political system envisions broad consensus among whites, coloreds, and Indians, and a parliamentary committee is considering possible abolition of laws against multiracial political activity. The work force totals 11 million, 30% of whom are engaged in agriculture, 29% are employed in industry and commerce, 34% work in the services sector, and 7% work in mining. The GNP in 1983 totalled US$75.5 billion and the GDP stood at US$73.2 billion. Per capita GNP was US$5239.

  18. Greek Islands, Western Asia Minor as seen from STS-58

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This north-looking view shows the western margin of Turkey (right) and the Dodecanese Islands of Greece between the Aegean Sea (left) and the Sea of Crete (foreground). The largest island is Crete (foreground) with the semicircular island of Thira beyond. Thira is dominated by the volcanoe Santorini. Two airplane contrails appear between the Turkish mainland and the large island of Rhodes immediately offshore. The narrow straits of the Dardanelles, joining the Black Sea to the Mediterranean, can be detected top left.

  19. Agglomeration Effects in South-South FDI

    OpenAIRE

    Alessia Amighini; Chiara Franco

    2012-01-01

    The progressive rise in the amount of South-South FDI flows has inspired a number of studies to account for possible determinants. Using firm-level data on FDI flows from 2003 until 2011, we examine what determines green field FDI among the group of low and middle income countries (South-South FDI), with special regard to the role played by agglomeration economies. We separately consider manufacturing and services sectors. Our main findings confirm the hypotheses according to which both count...

  20. [South] Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Yemen has an area of 112,000 square miles, the terrain is mountainous in the interior, and has a flat and sandy coast. The climate is extremely hot with little rainfall. 2.2 million is the population level with an annual growth rate of 2.6%. The ethnic background is Arab, the religion is Islam and the language is Arabic. 50 years is the average life expectancy and the infant mortality rate is 142/1000. The labor force is 42% agriculture, fisheries, industry and commerce 31%, and services 27%. A republic formed in 1967, the government has a constitution approved in 1978. They have 1 party, the Yemeni Socialist Party with a executive presidium, a supreme people's council and a federal high court. Natural resources include oil and fish, and agricultural products are cotton, hides, skins, and coffee. In 1962 the Federation of South Arabia was formed and a treaty was signed in 1959 for independence by 1968. There was much turmoil from 1967 until 1986 when Haydar Bakr Al-Attus gained power, and there are still strong internal rivalries. The economy has been concentrated in the city of Aden, and with the loss of tourist trade in 1967, and closing of the British base, it has declined by more than 20% by 1968. Attempts are being made to build roads, fisheries, villages, a power plant, and agriculture and irrigation projects.

  1. Reconstruction of the paleo-coastline of Santorini island (Greece ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A GIS-based quantitative methodology. Dimitrios Oikonomidis∗ ... gered the scientists' interest and many efforts have been made in order to .... action is very strong. 2. Data-methodology. 2.1 Data. The following data were used: • Topographical map of 1/50,000 scale. Sheet: Nisos Thira (Hellenic Army Geographical Ser-.

  2. New constraints on the rapid crustal motion of the Aegean region: recent results inferred from GPS measurements (1993-1998) across the West Hellenic Arc, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocard, M.; Kahle, H.-G.; Peter, Y.; Geiger, A.; Veis, G.; Felekis, S.; Paradissis, D.; Billiris, H.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper we present the most recent observations of crustal motion across the entire West Hellenic Arc (WHA). These are based on repeated GPS measurements carried out in the period from 1993 to 1998. The results are presented in terms of trajectories and rates, relative to Eurasia. Within these five years southwestern Greece has moved to the southwest by an average rate of 30 mm/a, increasing from 10 mm/a at the island of Lefkada, in the center of the Ionian islands, to nearly 40 mm/a along the southwest part of the Peloponnesus and to 35 mm/a on the islands of Crete and Gavdhos. The data provide strong evidence that distributed shear strain starts at the Kephalonia Fault Zone (KFZ), were an anomalously high earthquake activity is also observed. A striking interruption of the motion is seen at the island of Strofades, at the southwest leading edge of the WHA, where a south-oriented displacement of 12 cm was detected, coincident with the M = 6.4 Strofades earthquake of Nov. 18, 1997.

  3. South Atlantic Shrimp System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SEFSC, in cooperation with the South Atlantic states, collects South Atlantic shrimp data from dealers and fishermen. These data are collected to provide catch,...

  4. South Central Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville, I.D.; Waters, CN.; Collinson, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    The South Central Ireland region extends from the South Munster Basin north to the southern margin of the Dublin Basin and from Wexford in the southeast to the Burren in the northwest (Fig. 22.1). The region is dominated by strata of Mississippian age, with Pennsylvanian strata preserved in boreholes in south Co. Wexford and in the upper part of the Leinster and Kanturk Coalfields. Throughout the South Central region, the Tournaisian strata present below the Waulsortian mud-ban...

  5. Apparel in South Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez-Acevedo, Gladys; Robertson, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Apparel is the largest labor-intensive manufacturing industry in South Asia, and is a major employer of women. Although South Asia’s apparel sector benefits from many of the same favorable conditions as East Asia’s, performance in South Asian apparel remains well below that of East Asia. The objective of this study is to identify the policy changes necessary for South Asia to capitalize on...

  6. Ancient DNA Analysis of 8000 B.C. Near Eastern Farmers Supports an Early Neolithic Pioneer Maritime Colonization of Mainland Europe through Cyprus and the Aegean Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Eva; Pérez-Pérez, Alejandro; Gamba, Cristina; Prats, Eva; Cuesta, Pedro; Anfruns, Josep; Molist, Miquel; Arroyo-Pardo, Eduardo; Turbón, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The genetic impact associated to the Neolithic spread in Europe has been widely debated over the last 20 years. Within this context, ancient DNA studies have provided a more reliable picture by directly analyzing the protagonist populations at different regions in Europe. However, the lack of available data from the original Near Eastern farmers has limited the achieved conclusions, preventing the formulation of continental models of Neolithic expansion. Here we address this issue by presenting mitochondrial DNA data of the original Near-Eastern Neolithic communities with the aim of providing the adequate background for the interpretation of Neolithic genetic data from European samples. Sixty-three skeletons from the Pre Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) sites of Tell Halula, Tell Ramad and Dja'de El Mughara dating between 8,700–6,600 cal. B.C. were analyzed, and 15 validated mitochondrial DNA profiles were recovered. In order to estimate the demographic contribution of the first farmers to both Central European and Western Mediterranean Neolithic cultures, haplotype and haplogroup diversities in the PPNB sample were compared using phylogeographic and population genetic analyses to available ancient DNA data from human remains belonging to the Linearbandkeramik-Alföldi Vonaldiszes Kerámia and Cardial/Epicardial cultures. We also searched for possible signatures of the original Neolithic expansion over the modern Near Eastern and South European genetic pools, and tried to infer possible routes of expansion by comparing the obtained results to a database of 60 modern populations from both regions. Comparisons performed among the 3 ancient datasets allowed us to identify K and N-derived mitochondrial DNA haplogroups as potential markers of the Neolithic expansion, whose genetic signature would have reached both the Iberian coasts and the Central European plain. Moreover, the observed genetic affinities between the PPNB samples and the modern populations of Cyprus and

  7. South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Medical Journal is published by the South African Medical Association, which represents most medical professionals in South Africa. Other websites related to this journal: http://www.samj.org.za/index.php/samj. Back issues of the journal from years 1886 - 2002 can be found on the journal's website under ...

  8. South African Music Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAMUS: South African Music Studies is the official organ for the South African Society for Research in Music (SASRIM). It gives priority to the publication of research on South African music, but continues to represent the wider field of research interests in the country and in the rest of Africa. The journal invites work from any ...

  9. An integrated multi-parameter monitoring approach for the quantification and mitigation of the climate change impact on the coasts of Eastern Crete, S. Aegean Sea (Project AKTAIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghionis, George; Alexandrakis, George; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Sifnioti, Dafni; Vousdoukas, Michalis; Andreadis, Olympos; Petrakis, Stelios; Poulos, Serafim; Velegrakis, Adonis; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Lipakis, Michalis

    2014-05-01

    The AKTAIA project aims at the production of new knowledge regarding the forms of manifestation of the climate change and its influence on the stability and evolution of the coastal landforms along the shoreline of eastern Crete (approximate length: 757 km), taking into account the various aspects of human intervention. Aerial photographs, satellite images and orthophotomaps have been used to produce a detailed coastline map and to study the morphological characteristics of the coastal zone of Eastern Crete. More than 100 beach zones have been visited during three field campaigns, which included geomorphological and human intervention mapping, topographic, meteorological and oceanographic measurements and sedimentological sampling and observations. In addition, two pilot sites (one in the north and one in the south part of Crete) are being monitored, via the installation of coastal video monitoring systems, shore-based meteorological stations and wave-tide recorders installed in the nearshore zone. Detailed seafloor mapping with the use of side scan sonar and scuba diving and bathymetric surveys were conducted in the two pilot sites. Meteorological and oceanographic data from all existing land-based meteorological stations, oceanographic buoys and the ERA-interim dataset are used to determine the wind and wave climate of each beach. The collected climatic, sedimentological and coastal environmental data are being integrated in a GIS database that will be used to forecast the climatic trends in the area of Crete for the next decades and to model the impact of the climatic change on the future evolution of the coastal zone. New methodologies for the continuous monitoring of land-sea interaction and for the quantification of the loss of sensitive coastal zones due to sea-level rise and a modified Coastal Vulnerability Index for a comparative evaluation of the vulnerability of the coasts are being developed. Numerical modelling of the nearshore hydrodynamics and the

  10. Terrorism in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Soon Joo; Choi, Jin Tae; Arnold, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    South Korea has experienced > 30 suspected terrorism-related events since 1958, including attacks against South Korean citizens in foreign countries. The most common types of terrorism used have included bombings, shootings, hijackings, and kidnappings. Prior to 1990, North Korea was responsible for almost all terrorism-related events inside of South Korea, including multiple assassination attempts on its presidents, regular kidnappings of South Korean fisherman, and several high-profile bombings. Since 1990, most of the terrorist attacks against South Korean citizens have occurred abroad and have been related to the emerging worldwide pattern of terrorism by international terrorist organizations or deranged individuals. The 1988 Seoul Olympic Games provided a major stimulus for South Korea to develop a national emergency response system for terrorism-related events based on the participation of multiple ministries. The 11 September 2001 World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks and the 2001 United States of America (US) anthrax letter attacks prompted South Korea to organize a new national system of emergency response for terrorism-related events. The system is based on five divisions for the response to specific types of terrorist events, involving conventional terrorism, bioterrorism, chemical terrorism, radiological terrorism, and cyber-terrorism. No terrorism-related events occurred during the 2002 World Cup and Asian Games held in South Korea. The emergency management of terrorism-related events in South Korea is adapting to the changing risk of terrorism in the new century.

  11. South African Gastroenterology Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Gastroenterology Reviewis written by specialists in the field. Its aim is to publish articles pertinent to the practising Gastroenterologist in South Africa. It is distributed to a broad spectrum of clinicians who have an interest in clinical gastroenterology and hepatology. Other websites related to this ...

  12. APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conventions that are shared by a group of people, and that influence (but do not determine) ..... Africa and Africans as indigenous to South Africa is erroneous .… The history books show us that the original inhabitants of South Africa are the Khoi and San people, ..... IOL News 2007 White Teen Joins Friend for Xhosa Ritual.

  13. a South African perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-05-30

    May 30, 2013 ... Although it is accepted that the estimate of GHG emissions from animal agriculture has been ..... crude fibre content of the diets. It should also be born in mind that intensive ... Animal agriculture in South Africa. The South African red meat industry was deregulated in 1992 and import control was abolished in.

  14. South Sudan Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The SSMJ is the a multi-professional journal in the South Sudan which caters for the needs of Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Clinical Officers, Pharmacists and all other cadres in the health profession. Its vision is to see a well-trained, skilled professionals delivering high quality healthcare to the population of the South Sudan.

  15. South African Crime Quarterly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Crime Quarterly is an inter-disciplinary peer-reviewed journal that promotes professional discourse and the publication of research on the subjects of crime, criminal justice, crime prevention, and related matters including state and non-state responses to crime and violence. South Africa is the primary focus for ...

  16. South African Actuarial Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Actuarial Journalis published by the Actuarial Society of South Africa (ASSA). It is issued free to members of ASSA and will also be made available to them on the Society's website for access via the Internet. The focus of SAAJ is on actuarial research–particularly, but not exclusively, on research of relevance to ...

  17. Nigeria-China Economic Relations Under the South-South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regrettably, these dreams still remain unfulfilled. The experience gained by the developing countries after several years of bilateral interaction with the North underscores the idea that South-South trade should be symmetrical. However the most discernible pattern in the South-South relationship is still asymmetrical. A case ...

  18. Sea Surface Variability in the Aegean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeniz Uçkaç

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ege Denizi’nde yüzey suyu değişimleri. Ege Denizi’nde fiziksel parametreler iklimsel değişimler, tatlısu girdileri ve su döngüsü gibi faktörlere bağlı olarak yer ve zamana göre değişim göstermektedir. Farklı su kütleleri, özellikle Çanakkale boğazından gelen soğuk Karadeniz suyu ve güney kısımdan girmekte olan Levanten suyu Ege Denizi su özelliklerinin karmaşık yapısına katkıda bulunmaktadır. Bu çalışmada Ege Denizi yüzey suyu sirkülasyonu ve fiziksel özelliklerinin değişimi yerinde ölçümler kullanılarak 1986-1994 periyodunda incelenmiştir. Yüzey verisi analizleri yüksek tuzluluk ve yoğunluk değerlerinin ilk olarak Kuzey Ege’de oluştuğunu göstermektedir

  19. South Africa PIMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — PIMS (SOL-674-12-000037) collects and provides information on activities, results, partners, and staff supported through PEPFAR funding in each sub-district of South...

  20. South and Southwest HSRC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hazardous Substance Research Center/South and Southwest is a competitively awarded, peer-reviewed research consortium led by Louisiana State University with the...

  1. The South Asian genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Chambers

    Full Text Available The genetic sequence variation of people from the Indian subcontinent who comprise one-quarter of the world's population, is not well described. We carried out whole genome sequencing of 168 South Asians, along with whole-exome sequencing of 147 South Asians to provide deeper characterisation of coding regions. We identify 12,962,155 autosomal sequence variants, including 2,946,861 new SNPs and 312,738 novel indels. This catalogue of SNPs and indels amongst South Asians provides the first comprehensive map of genetic variation in this major human population, and reveals evidence for selective pressures on genes involved in skin biology, metabolism, infection and immunity. Our results will accelerate the search for the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to disorders such as type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease which are highly prevalent amongst South Asians.

  2. South African Defense Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    identified as mainly a terrorist 33 or guerrilla threat. The evolution of policy can be seen in the actions of the South African government in the years...Simonstown naval base was transferred from Britain in 1957. In November 1969, the SAAF transferred Langebaan air base to the SAN, and it became SAS Flamingo ... Evolution of a White South African Nation as Reflected in the Controversty Over the Assignment of Armed Forces Abroad, 1912-1976 (Athens: Ohio University

  3. South-South cross-border patient travel to South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikanda, Abel; Crush, Jonathan

    2017-12-13

    This paper explores intra-regional South-South cross-border patient travel within the context of Southern Africa. South Africa, in particular, has been widely touted as one of the emerging destinations of high-end patients from the Global North alongside other destinations such as Brazil, India, Costa Rica and Thailand. Using South Africa as a case study, the paper demonstrates that South-South cross-border patient travel is far more significant than North-South patient travel both in numerical and financial terms. Every year, thousands of patients from neighbouring countries travel to South Africa in search of medical treatment for procedures that are not offered in their own countries. Despite its size and importance, the South-South flow of patients in Southern Africa is not fully understood and requires further scholarly research.

  4. South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, B; Blackmore, G

    2001-12-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshop and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km2 and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377 m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economies on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global total of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken on the

  5. South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, Brian [Hong Kong Univ., Swire Inst. of Marine Science, Hong Kong (China); Hong Kong Univ., Dept. of Ecology and Biodiversity, Hong Kong (China); Blackmore, Graham [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Biology, Hong Kong (China)

    2001-07-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshops and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km{sup 2} and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economics on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global total of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken

  6. South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian; Blackmore, Graham

    2001-01-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshop and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km2 and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377 m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economies on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of the three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken on the South

  7. Biotechnology in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloete, Thomas E; Nel, Louis H; Theron, Jacques

    2006-12-01

    Since adopting the National Biotechnology Strategy in 2001, the South African government has established several regional innovation centres and has put in place initiatives to encourage international partnerships that can spur internal development of life science ventures. This strategy seeks to capitalize on the high quality of research carried out in public research institutions and universities but is hampered, somewhat, by the lack of entrepreneurial culture among South African researchers due to, among other reasons, the expenses involved in registering foreign patents. Although private sector development is still relatively embryonic, start-ups are spinning out of universities and pre-existing companies. These represent a vital source of innovations for commercialization in the future, provided that the challenges facing the emerging South African biotechnology industry can be overcome.

  8. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles at the m......A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles...

  9. South American perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moxon, S.

    1999-03-01

    South America still has enormous potential for the further development of hydroelectric power. The reasons why much of the potential remains untapped are discussed and here environmental considerations are prominent: to a lesser extent, war, military coups, corruption, bad management and hyperinflation have all contributed. Some examples of disastrous South American hydro projects are given. Argentina sees a possible solution in using international contractors. However, privatisation has produced some success stories, notably the Canon del Plato hydro plant in Peru and the Duqueco project in Chile. (UK)

  10. South African mining experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, J.D. (British Coal Corporation (UK). North Selby Mine)

    1992-09-01

    The article details the author's visit to South Africa on the 1990 Institution of Mining Electrical and Mining Mechanical Engineers Travelling Scholarship. The author undertook to visit to six coal mines (including two opencast mines and one rail loading terminal), four local engineering manufacturers, three power stations, three gold mines, two diamond mines (both in Botswana), a steel and vanadium works, the 1990 Mining Electra exhibition and the head offices of the Anglo American Corporation of South Africa. 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Paradigm shifts, South African Defence Policy and the South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African paradigm that guided the pre-1994 Total Strategy defence outlook was later opposed and ousted by one that was more explanatory and embracing of the democratic features permeating and envisaged for South African society. This democratic imperative drove the dominant shift in the South African ...

  12. 15Th South African Psychology Congress, Cape Town, South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    The 15th South African Psychology Congress of the Psychological Society of South. Africa (PsySSA) was hosted at the International Convention Centre in Cape Town (CTICC),. South Africa. The congress, under the theme Psychology: Past, Present and Future, took place from 11 to 14 August 2009. The first day was taken ...

  13. "South Park" vormistab roppused muusikalivormi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Animafilm "South Park : suurem, pikem ja lõikamata" ("South Park . Bigger, Longer & Uncut") : Stsenaristid Trey Parker, Matt Stone ja Pam Brady : režissöör Trey Parker : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1999

  14. South African Crime Quarterly 56

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edited by Chandré Gould and Andrew Faull

    SACQ). We believe that the UCT. Centre of Criminology's commitment to advancing policy-relevant research and analysis on public safety, criminal justice and evolving forms of crime in South Africa, and the global South more broadly, ...

  15. SOUTH AfRICA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African concert parties have given shows in canteens and palaces, in magnificent opera houses and in assembly workshops; on open-air stages, on lorries and in fields and hangars. Tarpaulins have been spread on the desert sands, and tap dancers have gone into action on table tops or any available flat sur- face.

  16. The South Africa Case

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    pwust

    54,100. Source: African Renaissance Fund Annual Report: 2004-2005. The ARF 2005-2006 report noted the following beneficiaries and amounts: African Renaissance Fund Grants – 2005-2006. Grant. Value (R'000). Africa Institute of South Africa, Terrorism Commission. 1,700. Liberian disarmament and elections. 25,750.

  17. Phenylketonuria in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    demographic conditions and more pressing health priorities in South Africa. This particular screening programme was discontinued in 1986. The results and conclusions are presented here.for the record. S Atr Med J 1995; 85: 33-36. Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a well-known, inherited metabolic disease. It has attained a high ...

  18. South American sedimentary basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urien, C.M.

    1984-04-01

    More than 64 sedimentary basins have been identified on the South American continent. According to their regional structural character and tectonic setting, they are classified in 4 super groups. About 20 interior or intracratonic basins occur on South American cratons (Guayanas, Brazilian, and Patagonian). In most cases, their sedimentary fill is Paleozoic or early Mesozoic. Rift or transverse grabens resulting from incipient sea floor spreading extend towards the continental margin. Seventeen basins are located along the Atlantic stable margin, and consist primarily of half grabens with downfaulted seaward blocks. These rifts (or pull-apart basins) were separated as results of the migration of the African and American continental blocks. Therefore the sedimentation is chiefly Cretaceous and Tertiary. On the western edge of South American cratons, almost 20 basins of downwarped blocks extend from Orinoco down to the Malvinas plateau in a relatively uninterrupted chain of retroarc basins, bordered by the Andean orogen. They lie on a flexured Precambrian and Paleozoic basement, and are highly deformed in the west (Subandean belt) due to the action of compressional forces caused by the tectonic influence of the Mesozoic Andean batholith. Westward, the Pacific margin is bordered by 27 foreland and forearc basins, which alternate from north to south on an unstable or quasistable margin, fringed by a trench and slope complex where the ocean crust is subducted beneath the continental plate.

  19. South/South, South/North conversations: South Africa, India, the west

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The essay explores a model of literary-historical analysis and evaluation that avoids 'anxiogenic' (anxiety-ridden) or competitive comparisons of centres and peripheries: the north versus the south, the First World versus the Third World or, in antagonistic reaction, the Empire writing back to the centre. Instead, a multilingual ...

  20. South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice(SAFP) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal, which strives to provide primary care physicians and researchers with a broad range of scholarly work in the disciplines of Family Medicine, Primary Health Care, Rural Medicine, District Health and other related fields. SAFP publishes original ...

  1. South Asia and Lithuania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talat-Kelpša Laimonas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest in South Asia among Lithuanian scholars is rather low. For a long time the region has remained off the radar screen of Lithuanian foreign policy makers, who were largely focused on Lithuania’s Euro-Atlantic integration and international consolidation issues. But the situation is changing and South Asia is emerging as an increasingly important political and economic partner for Lithuania. This article attempts to outline the general characteristics of the South Asia region, its geographical and geopolitical limits, and its current key issues, in the backdrop of which Lithuania’s relations with the nations of the region are assessed. Arguably, at present Lithuania has little to offer in addressing the fundamental problems of the region, but its role in individual niches can be quite useful. Lithuanian exports of lasers and laser-related technologies to India, along with the growing number of South Asian students in Lithuanian higher education institutions, are brought in as two small but illustrative examples.

  2. North-South Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Melville

    1975-01-01

    Multinational corporations operating mostly in northern Canada export natural resources thus creating jobs and money for foreign shareholders. Similarly, businesses based in southern Canada reap benefits from northern resources. Environmentalists and churches can ally north-south interests to protect northern resources and people from corporate…

  3. South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nectedness with mother (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.194.98) and friend (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.705.72) predicted current substance use. Conclusion: The study documented the important role of positive relationships between street children and their friends/mothers in preventing psychoactive substance use. South African Family Practice ...

  4. Neptune's 'Hot' South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    These thermal images show a 'hot' south pole on the planet Neptune. These warmer temperatures provide an avenue for methane to escape out of the deep atmosphere. The images were obtained with the Very Large Telescope in Chile, using an imager/spectrometer for mid-infrared wavelengths on Sept. 1 and 2, 2006. The telescope is operated by the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (known as ESO). Scientists say Neptune's south pole is 'hotter' than anywhere else on the planet by about 10 degrees Celsius (50 degrees Fahrenheit). The average temperature on Neptune is about minus 200 degrees Celsius (minus 392 degrees Fahrenheit). The upper left image samples temperatures near the top of Neptune's troposphere (near 100 millibar pressure, which is one-tenth the Earth atmospheric pressure at sea level). The hottest temperatures are indicated at the lower part of the image, at Neptune's south pole (see the graphic at the upper right). The lower two images, taken 6.3 hours apart, sample temperatures at higher altitudes in Neptune's stratosphere. They do show generally warmer temperatures near, but not at, the south pole. They also show a distinct warm area which can be seen in the lower left image and rotated completely around the back of the planet and returned to the earth-facing hemisphere in the lower right image.

  5. South Africa and Poland

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kirstam

    The typology of countries, namely those with innovation-driven, efficiency-driven and factor-/resource-driven ... Switzerland, Norway, Australia, Japan, Singapore, Taiwan, Qatar, Puerto Rico,. Tobago and Trinidad ... of the cultures and values of two countries, namely South Africa and Poland, on entrepreneurial intentions ...

  6. Photonics in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bollig, C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available -power systems in the ultrashort-pulse (mode-locked) and mid-infrared domains. One potential application is the use of such systems in lunar and satellite laser ranging, where South Africa hopes to combine an existing space geodesy programme with short...

  7. Epilepsy in South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    consequent increased perinatal brain injury, high levels of head injury in children ... brain (10). There is no published work on the prevalence of neurocysticercosis in South Sudan (where cattle ownership predominates) but this disease is probably common where pigs are ... show a spike and wave pattern. A comprehensive ...

  8. South African School Geography:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lorraine Innes

    now poised to prepare geospatially competent school leavers for a GIS-enabled future in South. Africa is discussed ... Studies in the first three years of primary school and that Geography was included with History, ... 1967, Social Studies incorporating Geography, History and Civics became a compulsory subject for learners ...

  9. Nursing in the South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flitter, Hessel H.

    National needs for 1975 have been projected at 450 nurses per 100,000 population. For the South to reach a goal of 300 would require that graduations be increased by 1975 to nearly four times the number graduated in 1966. Practical nurse programs have nearly doubled since 1960; in the last six years, the number of associate degree programs has…

  10. Geography: The South Australian Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Malcolm; Shepherd, Rita

    2006-01-01

    Geography as a discipline has a long and healthy history in South Australia. Due to the passion of individual educators and the activities of the Geography Teachers Association of South Australia (GTASA) since its foundation in 1936, South Australia has experienced ongoing curriculum development and indeed innovation in the geographical studies in…

  11. South African Journal of Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Education is the official journal of the Education Association of South Africa (EASA) and publishes original contributions from any of the disciplines in Education, in any of the official languages of South Africa. SAJE is ISI accredited (in the Social Sciences Citation index), with an impact Factor is 0.560 ...

  12. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  13. Selatan—Sur—South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Campbell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Kumpulan puisi dalam Bahasa Indonesia oleh IAN CAMPBELL/Poetry compilation in Indonesian by the Australian poet Ian Campbell. This collection of poems explores the notion of the 'south' from locations in Indonesia, Australia, Chile and Argentina, locations in which the poems were written. Explaining his topographical approach in these poems, Campbell says: "One of the poems, titled in the Indonesian original 'Lejano sur' (Ke Kejauhan Selatan, appears alongside an English version, called 'Further South.' This short poem takes Borges's short story 'Sur' and a reference to Avenida Rivadavia that he includes in 'Sur' as its starting point for crossing into 'the South' from the centre of Buenos Aires. I then explore ideas of southness - as paradoxically moving 'south' away from North into a region where 'the natural elements are supreme'. Recent Chilean poetry eg 'Despedidas Antárticas' by Julio Carrasco (2006 picks up this idea of 'towards the essence' better than recent Australian poetry. Only Tom Griffiths, the historian, has recently explored this in prose. There are Borgesian images of dust/lack of clarity, then we head into a region where eg Torre del Paine, admittedly on the Chilean side of the Andes, come to mind. The stress on the elements - stone, wind, fire - is an allusion to the way Indonesian poet, Acep Zamzam Noor, portrays these elements in a poem 'Batu dan Angin' (Stone and Wind which has strong sufi/meditative elements. We head into the polar area, which because of climate change, is now melting. But there is also an allusion to Douglas Stewart's play 'Fire on the Snow' about the 1911 Scott expedition and the value of 'human failure'. Even the 'essence' is melting and is no longer stable."

  14. South Oregon Coast Reinforcement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a transmission line to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of Oregon. This FYI outlines the proposal, tells how one can learn more, and how one can share ideas and opinions. The project will reinforce Oregon`s south coast area and provide the necessary transmission for Nucor Corporation to build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. The proposed plant, which would use mostly recycled scrap metal, would produce rolled steel products. The plant would require a large amount of electrical power to run the furnace used in its steel-making process. In addition to the potential steel mill, electrical loads in the south Oregon coast area are expected to continue to grow.

  15. South Asian Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Ionel Sergiu Pirju

    2014-01-01

    This article aims at presenting the South Asian cluster composed of India, Indonesia, Iran and Malaysia, the intercultural values that characterizes it, the supported leadership style and tracing the main macroeconomic considerations which characterizes them. The research is synchronic, analysing the contemporary situation of these countries without reference to their evolution in time, by using the positivist paradigm that explains the reality at one point. It will be analysed th...

  16. AIDS in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijsselmuiden, C; Evian, C; Matjilla, J; Steinberg, M; Schneider, H

    1993-01-01

    The National AIDS Convention in South Africa (NACOSA) in October 1992 was the first real attempt to address HIV/AIDS. In Soweto, government, the African National Congress, nongovernmental organizations, and organized industry and labor representatives worked for 2 days to develop a national plan of action, but it did not result in a united effort to fight AIDS. The highest HIV infection rates in South Africa are among the KwaZulu in Natal, yet the Inkatha Freedom Party did not attend NACOSA. This episode exemplifies the key obstacles for South Africa to prevent and control AIDS. Inequality of access to health care may explain why health workers did not diagnose the first AIDS case in blacks until 1985. Migrant labor, Bantu education, and uprooted communities affect the epidemiology of HIV infection. Further, political and social polarization between blacks and whites contributes to a mindset that AIDS is limited to the other race which only diminishes the personal and collective sense of susceptibility and the volition and aptitude to act. The Department of National Health and Population Development's voluntary register of anonymously reported cases of AIDS specifies 1517 cumulative AIDS cases (October 1992), but this number is low. Seroprevalence studies show between 400,000-450,000 HIV positive cases. Public hospitals cannot give AIDS patients AZT and DDI. Few communities provided community-based care. Not all hospitals honor confidentiality and patients' need for autonomy. Even though HIV testing is not mandatory, it is required sometimes, e.g., HIV testing of immigrants. AIDS Training, Information and Counselling Centers are in urban areas, but not in poor areas where the need is most acute. The government just recently developed in AIDS education package for schools, but too many people consider it improper, so it is not being used. The poor quality education provided blacks would make it useless anyhow. Lifting of the academic boycott will allow South African

  17. North-South Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-15

    included. The Second World consists of the Comunist bloc of nations, includ- ing the Soviet Union, Poland, East Germany, Hungary, Romania, and...Japan Second World 3. industrial rich autarchic USSR 4. nonindustrial rich/poor autarchic China Third World 5. nonindustrial rich trading Saudi Arabia...political values issuing from the Third World itself rather than from Comunist states. They are the result of seeing North-South relations in the context

  18. Beyond rhetoric: South-South collaboration for REDD+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nhantumbo, Isilda; MacQueen, Duncan

    2011-11-15

    Global debates about reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and promoting conservation, sustainable forest management and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (REDD+) emphasise the need for strategies to build on existing knowledge. In one example of South-South collaboration to do just this, IIED has helped facilitate a Mozambique-Brazil partnership to share expertise and create a unique REDD+ working group. The initiative provides key lessons for other countries contemplating South-South collaboration on REDD+, including the need for charismatic champions, continuity in government representation, and integration across sectors.

  19. Education crisis in south Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Brown

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Education flourished in refugee camps but young people repatriating to south Sudan are frustrated by a serious shortage of educational opportunities, particularly in secondary education.

  20. Combatting poverty in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    M.Com. (Economics) Combating poverty is at the frontier of analyses in South Africa today. The study to combat poverty in South Africa is six-fold. After setting the nature of the study to be pursued in Chapter 1, the dissertation analyses the theories of poverty in Chapter 2. The record of poverty in South Africa is analysed in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 focuses on the methods to combat poverty in South Africa. Chapter 5 is a summary of the main findings of the study. A proposed structure plan ...

  1. Global South: Anthropological Reflections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steur, Luisa Johanna; Kalb, Don

    2015-01-01

    The global south is a complex and dynamic concept that straddles multiple social science and humanist disciplines. Emerging around 2000, it reflects the agenda of two ascending forces in those years: the antiglobalist (alterglobalist/global justice) movement and the World Social Forum, on the one...... hand, and an alliance of Southern states within the World Trade Organization on the other. Generally seen as an inheritor of the emancipatory thought behind the notion of the ‘third world,’ in the social sciences the idea of the ‘global south’ is also entangled with more classical academic themes...

  2. South Asian Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionel Sergiu Pirju

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at presenting the South Asian cluster composed of India, Indonesia, Iran and Malaysia, the intercultural values that characterizes it, the supported leadership style and tracing the main macroeconomic considerations which characterizes them. The research is synchronic, analysing the contemporary situation of these countries without reference to their evolution in time, by using the positivist paradigm that explains the reality at one point. It will be analysed the overall cluster with the existing interactions between the countries that composes it, while the article being one of information will avoid building recommendation, or new theories.

  3. An analysis of tourism SMEs in South Africa | Saayman | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a comparative study of 37 participating countries on an analysis of Small Medium Enterprises (GEM, 2002) it was found that South Africa ranked the lowest of all developing countries, with only 3.3% of the adult population being involved in pursuing exploitable opportunities in various industries. Since 1994 South Africa ...

  4. Malaria in South Sudan 3: laboratory diagnosis | Cornelio | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Malaria in South Sudan 3: laboratory diagnosis. Charles Ochero Cornelio ...

  5. Paediatric triage in South Africa | Cheema | South African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reducing child mortality is a high priority in sub-Saharan Africa, and swift, appropriate triage can make an important contribution to this goal. There has been a lot of interest and work in the field of triage of sick children in South Africa over the past few years. Despite this, in many parts of South Africa no formal system for ...

  6. Reflections on educational research in South Africa | Kamper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is evident that educational research in South Africa has a noteworthy record of national and regional impact. Present threats to its academic stature and praxiological impact can only be overcome by taking appropriate and timely research management action. South African Journal of Education Vol.24(3) 2004: 233-238 ...

  7. South-to-South Collaboration on Genomics Innovation | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... collaborate. Researchers will identify lessons from and devise models for programs that stimulate innovation. Based on the research findings, and in consultation with research users, they will devise policy measures to encourage South-to-South collaboration. The project is funded in partnership with Genome Canada.

  8. Depression in the South African workplace | Stander | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Depression is a common psychiatric disorder and can be costly, having a significant impact on the individual and employers. The South African Depression and Anxiety Group (SADAG) in partnership with HEXOR, with the support of Lundbeck, undertook research into depression in the workplace, because South African ...

  9. Epilepsy in South Sudan | Newman | South Sudan Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 4, No 4 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Epilepsy in South Sudan. Peter K. Newman. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text:.

  10. Cannabis use trends in South Africa | Peltzer | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this review is to synthesise cannabis use data from surveys, specialised alcohol and drug treatment centres, cannabis-related trauma unit admissions and arrestee studies over the past 12 years in South Africa. Results indicate that cannabis is the most common illicit substance used in South Africa, with ...

  11. South Africa's D-day veterans | Bisset | Scientia Militaria: South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although some 657 members of the South African Union Defence Forces served in North West Europe between D-Day on 6 June 1944 and VE-Day on 8 May 1945, it would seem that relatively few of them were present on D-Day. South Africa's main contributions to the war effort were made in Ethiopia, Madagascar, the ...

  12. Eating disorders in black South African females | Szabo | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of cases is presented documenting the existence of eating disorders in young black South African women. This has implications in terms of both conceptualising these conditions as culture-bound with respect to 'westernisation' and planning health service delivery in an increasingly westernised future South Africa.

  13. Smoking in urban pregnant women in South Africa | Steyn | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. To estimate the exposure to active and passive smoking of pregnant women in South Africa and to determine their knowledge and behaviour with regard to smoking during pregnancy. Methods. A questionnaire was completed by pregnant women attending antenatal services in four South African cities. Questions were ...

  14. Malaria prophylaxis - the South African viewpoint | Baker | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A consensus meeting was held under the auspices of the Department of National Health and Population Development in September 1991 in order to establish local, current consensus on malaria prophylaxis for the South African traveller within South Africa and neighbouring African countries. The meeting was attended by ...

  15. The microbiology of South African dried sausage | Holzapfel | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (1976) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. The microbiology of South African dried sausage.

  16. Short communication: Parentage verification of South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short communication: Parentage verification of South African Angora goats, using microsatellite markers. ... South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home ... Eighteen markers were tested in 192 South African Angora goats representing different family structures with known and unknown parent information.

  17. South America Geologic Map (geo6ag)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — South America is part of Region 6 (Central and South America) for the World Energy Assessment. The geologic map of South America was digitized so that we could use...

  18. African Journals Online: South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan Medical Journal. The SSMJ is the a multi-professional journal in the South Sudan which caters for the needs of Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Clinical Officers, Pharmacists and all other cadres in the health profession. Its vision is to see a well-trained, skilled professionals delivering high quality healthcare to the ...

  19. violence in South African society

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    My Smile: An exploration into the causes of youth violence in South Africa,4 and Youth Violence: Sources and Solutions in South Africa.5 It is also reflected in popular concerns about ..... experts, widely substantiated by global research and supported by international best practice, simply had no traction against popular ...

  20. Art Renaissance in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jim

    1990-01-01

    South Carolina's requirement that school districts identify and serve artistically gifted/talented students in grades 3-12 has led the State Department of Education to develop support activities, as establishing curriculum guidelines, showcasing successful programs, and creating leadership roles for the South Carolina Arts Commission and the…

  1. South African Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Surgery is published by the South African Medical Association and publishes papers related to surgery. Other websites related to this journal: http://www.sajs.org.za/index.php/sajs. Vol 55, No 4 (2017). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  2. Archives: South African Music Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 13 of 13 ... Archives: South African Music Studies. Journal Home > Archives: South African Music Studies. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 13 of 13 Items ...

  3. Archives: South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 341 ... Archives: South African Medical Journal. Journal Home > Archives: South African Medical Journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 341 ...

  4. Responsible investing in South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viviers, S.; Bosch, J.K.; Smit, vd M E.; Buijs, A.

    2009-01-01

    Given growing interest in the phenomenon of Responsible Investing (RI), both locally and internationally, the purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the RI sector in South Africa. It focuses on the definition and characteristics of RI within the South African context; the size and nature

  5. in South Africa in 2000

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    through a regular supply of crude wine as part of their wages. Alcohol has also been used to exert control over labour ... an integral part of the South African economy, and the wine and brewing industries have made South Africa an ..... marketing and increased alcohol counter~advertising. August 2007, Vol. 97, No. 8 SAM].

  6. Fiji in the South Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Rosalind; Semaan, Leslie

    This text introduces Fiji and other island nations located in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean. Cut off from the world by vast expanses of water, these people developed a unique culture. Contents include: Teacher Overview, Geography of the South Pacific Islands, History of the South Pacific, Fiji, Traditional Village Life, Yaquna Ceremony,…

  7. South African Journal of Botany

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Botany, the official journal of the South African Association of Botanists publishes papers which make an original contribution to any field of Botany. Papers are accepted on the understanding that their contents have not been published, or submitted for publication, elsewhere. All submitted ...

  8. South African Gastroenterology Review: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Gastroenterology Review: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > South African Gastroenterology Review: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Clinical neuropsychology in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Sun; Chey, Jeanyung

    2016-11-01

    Clinical neuropsychology in South Korea, albeit its relatively short history, has advanced dramatically. We review a brief history and current status of clinical neuropsychology in South Korea. The history, the educational pathway, the training pathway, the certification process, and careers in clinical neuropsychology in South Korea are reviewed. We have reviewed the neuropsychological services, including assessment and treatment, research on neurological and psychiatric populations, and neuropsychology education and the requirements related to education, training, and board examinations of those providing neuropsychological services in South Korea. We also describe how the Korean Society for Neuropsychology Research, the first and only meeting for neuropsychologists in the country established in 1999, has played a major role in how clinical neuropsychology is practiced and developed as a professional field in South Korea. Clinical neuropsychology in South Korea has achieved major progress over just a quarter of a century, and its future is promising in light of the increasing demand for neuropsychological services and advances in neuroscience in the country. Challenges that the community of clinical neuropsychologists are currently facing in South Korea, including formalizing neuropsychological curriculum and training programs and developing advanced credentialing procedures, are discussed.

  10. Developing healthcare in South Sudan | Bregazzi | South Sudan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 2 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. Research in South Africa - Quo Vadis? | Stutterheim | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 1 (1971) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  12. South African Actuarial Journal: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Editorial Advisory Panel: Anthony Asher (Australia) Gary Blumsohn (USA) Howard Bolnick (USA) David Bowie (UK) Barry Childs (South Africa) Rob Dorrington (South Africa) Peter Doyle (South Africa) Angus Macdonald (UK) Heather McLeod (New Zealand) Peter Withey, President of the Actuarial Society of South Africa.

  13. Special Education in South Korea: Daegu University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Ha; Rhee, Kun Yong; Burns, Carol; Lerner, Janet W.

    2009-01-01

    Daegu University has enjoyed a long and remarkable history of special education. Daegu University is large University located in Daegu, South Korea, a large city in South Korea that is south of Seoul. Since the 1970's, South Korea has achieved unusual and comprehensive growth in its economy, and the field of special education continued to thrive…

  14. Pioneers in South African Anaesthesia:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Figure 1). He matriculated in South. Africa from Pretoria Boys High School, and qualified with a Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery degree from the University of Cape Town (UCT) in 1950. After passing the Conjoint Diploma in ...

  15. Counselling Psychology in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country's socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country's mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country's health care and education systems.

  16. Eosinophilic Oesophagitis | Abuelhassan | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Gastroenterology Review. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 3 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. SOUTH AFRICA: POLITICAL LIFE TODAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Shubin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available South Africa is currently facing several political dilemmas that influence the entire social organization of the country. Thus, the historicity of the political processes that permeate South African society today,  the power plays of the country's elites, as well as the external influences that act internally through the political parties of South Africa, and the presence of important African nation within the scope of the BRICS, are essential elements for understanding the South African policy context. Through of experiences in loco, this article establishes a comprehensive analysis of the situation, not only pointing out the political agents which actively intervene in this game, but also constructing possible scenarios for the unfolding of the events.

  18. Counselling Psychology in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country’s socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country’s mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country’s health care and education systems. PMID:27867261

  19. Neuropsychology in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truter, Sharon; Mazabow, Menachem; Morlett Paredes, Alejandra; Rivera, Diego; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2017-03-21

    This survey forms part of an international research study conducted in 39 countries and is the first to describe the characteristics of individuals engaged in the practice of neuropsychology in South Africa (SA). The purpose was to analyze the characteristics of individuals working in the profession of neuropsychology in order to understand their background, professional training, current work situation, assessment and diagnostic procedures, rehabilitation techniques, teaching responsibilities, and research activities. Ninety-five professionals working in neuropsychology completed an online survey between July and November 2015. The majority of participants were female and the mean age was 46.97 years. The majority of professions working in neuropsychology have a background in psychology, with additional specialized training and supervised clinical practice. Over half work in private practice and are on average satisfied with their work. Participants identified as clinicians primarily work with TBI and ADHD individuals. The main limitation for the use of neuropsychological instruments is the lack of normative data in SA and the main barrier to the field is the lack of academic training programs. There is a need to improve graduate curriculums, enhance existing clinical training, develop professional certification programs, validate existing neuropsychological tests, and create new, culturally relevant instruments.

  20. The South Pole Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Cho, H.M.; Crawford,T.; Dobbs, M.; Greer, C.H.; Halverson, N.W.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Lanting,T.M.; Lee, A.T.; Leitch, E.M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mohr, J.J.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Runyan, M.C.; Schwan, D.; Sharp, M.K.; Spieler, H.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A.A.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.

  1. Meconium aspiration in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ct Dis cand virus of uman. 991; us ion in une tes in. 1-179. a- eral infants g el is of om. ; 9: l acute us. Meconium aspiration in. South Africa. M. Adhikari, E. Gouws. This retrospective study of 569 cases of meconium aspiration from 11 institutions in South Africa reveals a high incidence varying from 4 to 11/1 000 and a ...

  2. Evidence of Variscan and Alpine tectonics in the structural and thermochronological record of the central Serbo-Macedonian Massif (south-eastern Serbia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antić, Milorad D.; Kounov, Alexandre; Trivić, Branislav; Spikings, Richard; Wetzel, Andreas

    2017-07-01

    The Serbo-Macedonian Massif (SMM) represents a composite crystalline belt within the Eastern European Alpine orogen, outcropping from the Pannonian basin in the north to the Aegean Sea in the south. The central parts of this massif (south-eastern Serbia) consist of the medium- to high-grade Lower Complex and the low-grade Vlasina Unit. Outcrop- and micro-scale ductile structures in this area document three major stages of ductile deformation. The earliest stage D1 is related to isoclinal folding, commonly preserved as up to decimetre-scale quartz-feldspar rootless fold hinges. D2 is associated with general south-eastward tectonic transport and refolding of earlier structures into recumbent metre- to kilometre-scale tight to isoclinal folds. Stages D1 and D2 could not be temporally separated and probably took place in close sequence. The age of these two ductile deformation stages was constrained to the Variscan orogeny based on indirect geological evidence (i.e. ca. 408-ca. 328). During this period, the SMM was involved in a transpressional amalgamation of the western and eastern parts of the Galatian super-terrane and subsequent collision with Laurussia. Outcrop-scale evidence of the final stage D3 is limited to spaced and crenulation cleavage, which are probably related to formation of large-scale open upright folds as reported previously. 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology was applied on hornblende, muscovite, and biotite samples in order to constrain the age of tectonothermal events and activity along major shear zones. These 40Ar/39Ar data reveal three major cooling episodes affecting the central SMM. Cooling below greenschist facies conditions in the western part of the Vlasina Unit took place in a post-orogenic setting (extensional or transtensional) in the early Permian (284 ± 1 Ma). The age of activity along the top-to-the-west shear zone formed within the orthogneiss in the Božica area of the Vlasina Unit was constrained to Middle Triassic (246 ± 1 Ma). This

  3. South Africa in the BRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Harrison

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available South Africa’s membership of the BRICS has stirred controversy. A number of observers have argued that South Africa is too small in terms of economy and population to be considered an authentic member of this group. In this article, the author accepts that South Africa may have no place in the analytical construct that Jim O’Neill of Goldman Sachs invented in 2001, but also argues that South Africa is a valuable and legitimate member of the political construct that we know today as the BRIC(S. South Africa has the “soft power” needed to play a constructive role in the rebalancing of geopolitical power globally, and is a potential voice for the continent of Africa. However, South Africa’s position in the BRICS must be understood in terms of its own contested role as a leader in Africa; the ambiguous outcomes of the BRICS engagement with this continent; and the danger that the BRICS may become an exclusive self-selected grouping rather than a potent force for greater global equity.

  4. Gallbladder cancer: South American experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Gerardo F; Gentile, Alberto; Parada, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    Large differences in terms of incidence and mortality due to gallbladder cancer (GBC) have been reported worldwide. Moreover, it seems that GBC has unique characteristics in South America. We surveyed the literature looking for information about the epidemiology, basic and translational research, and clinical trials performed in South America in order to critically analyze the magnitude of this health problem in the region. Compared to other geographic areas, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for GBC in women are very high, particularly in many western areas of South America. Genetic, as well as dietary and environmental factors likely contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease in the area. Compared to other regions the profile of abnormalities of key genes such as KRAS and TP53 in GBC seems to slightly differ in South America, while the clinical behavior appears to be similar with a median overall survival (OS) of 6.5 to 8 months in advanced GBC. In contrast to Europe and USA, prophylactic cholecystectomy is a common practice in western areas of South America. GBC particularly affects women in South America, and represents a significant public health problem. It appears to have peculiarities that pose an urgent need for additional research aimed to discover risk factors, molecular events associated with its development and new treatment options for this lethal disease.

  5. Food Allergy in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Claudia L

    2017-06-01

    Whilst food allergy seems to have increased significantly in many developed countries in the past few decades, quality data on the burden of food allergy in many developing countries is scanty. Until recently, South Africa had a dearth of robustly designed food allergy studies. This article summarizes some of the recent research and observations regarding food allergy from the South African setting. South Africa has recently seen two important food allergy prevalence studies in selected and unselected populations. Both show allergy rates in keeping with those in several westernized countries. The major difference between sensitization and allergy rates in these studies emphasizes the vital role of the food challenge in differentiating true food allergy from asymptomatic sensitisation in equivocal cases. Eczema, young age and living in an urban population are important risk factors for food allergy in South Africa. Egg and peanut allergy are the most common food allergies in both selected and unselected populations in South Africa. In peanut allergy, Ara h 2 is the most useful component in differentiating true allergy from tolerance in peanut-sensitized patients. Use of internationally derived 95% positive predictive values for peanut and egg allergy produced many false positives in South African studies. Studies in South Africa show a trend towards more conservative introduction of peanut in eczema patients, which needs to be addressed in the light of recent studies showing a protective effect of earlier introduction of peanut. "Novel" allergies such as galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose allergy, food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome and eosinophilic oesophagitis are being described with increasing frequency in South Africa. The surprisingly high prevalence of food allergy in South Africa points towards possible involvement of South Africa in the so-called "food allergy epidemic". This has major implications on the planning of health services in the allergy sector

  6. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  7. South China Sea kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibuet, J. C.; Gao, J.; Zhao, M.; Wu, J.; Ding, W.; Yeh, Y. C.; Lee, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic modeling shows that the age of the youngest South China Sea (SCS) oceanic crust is controversial (e.g. 15.5 Ma (Briais et al., JGR 1993) and 20.5 Ma (Barckhausen et al., MPG 2014)). Recently, Sibuet et al. (Tectonophysics 2016) pointed out that post-spreading magmatic activity ( 8-13 Ma) largely masks the spreading fabric, in particular near the previously identified E-W portion of the extinct ridge axis of the East sub-basin. Their compilation of available swath bathymetric data shows that, if post-spreading volcanics hide the seafloor spreading magnetic fabric mostly along and near the extinct spreading axis, the whole SCS is globally characterized by rift directions following three directions: N055°in the youngest portion of the SCS, N065° and N085° in the oldest portions of the SCS, suggesting the extinct ridge axis is N055° trending instead of E-W. We present an updated version of the whole SCS structural sketch based on previously published swath bathymetric trends and new detailed magnetic lineations trends compiled from an extremely dense set of magnetic data. The new structural sketch shows: - The distribution of conjugate kinematic domains, - The early opening of the NW and East sub-basins, before a jump of the rift axis, - A second ridge jump in the East basin, - The different expressions of the post-spreading magmatism in the East and SW sub-basins. In the East sub-basin, crustal magmatic intrusions led to the formation of extrusive basalts associated with the presence of numerous volcanoes (Wang et al., Geological Journal 2016). In the SW sub-basin, crustal magmatic intrusions deformed and uplifted the already formed oceanic crust and oldest overlying sediments, resulting in the formation of a double post-spreading ridge belt previously identified as the shoulders of the extinct spreading rift axis. This preliminary work will be used to identify magnetic lineations not polluted by the post-spreading magmatism. The unfolded Manila trench

  8. Book Review:Victimology in South Africa | Hargovan | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Title: Victimology in South Africa, Author: Robert Peacock (Editor), Publisher: Van Schaik Publishers, Pages: 221, Price: R359, ISBN: 978-0627030208. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sacq.v47i1.5 · AJOL African ...

  9. Vitamin D status of older South Africans | Charlton | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To detennine the vitamin D status of older 'coloured' South Africans who had not sustained a fracture. Design: Cross-sectional analytic study. Methods: A random sample of 200 non-institutionalised subjects in Cape Town aged ≥65 years was drawn using a two-stage cluster design. Trained fieldworkers ...

  10. Human fascioliasis in South Africa | Black | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human fascioliasis has the widest latitudinal, longitudinal and altitudinal distribution of any vector-borne disease, yet only 3 cases have been reported from South Africa, the last in 1964. We report 2 cases from the same geographic area associated with local consumption of watercress, suggesting an endemic focus.

  11. An overview of Agricultural Extension in South Africa | Koch | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The first 69 years of agricultural extension saw the establishment of a diversity of compartmentalized services: to the commercial (white) sector and to the black, Indian and Coloured communities. Agricultural co-operatives, community organizations and the private sector also rendered services. The South African Society for ...

  12. Access to public healthcare in South Africa | Plaks | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Access to healthcare is considered to be a basic human right. This paper explores the concept of access to public healthcare, with a particular focus on affordability, accessibility and accommodation. Furthermore, it highlights certain issues around the concept of access in the South African setting, by analysing the results ...

  13. Taxation of life insurance in South Africa revisited | Clover | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes the theoretical framework underlying the four-funds basis for taxing life insurance in South Africa and records the historical steps in the development of the basis from inception to its current form. It goes on to evaluate the basis in its current form and to propose possible changes that should be ...

  14. An inventory of the South african fitness industry | Draper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Sports Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 18, No 3 (2006) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  15. An inventory of the South african fitness industry | Draper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The aim of this study was to create an inventory of fitness facilities in South Africa, their location, equipment and services offered, and the demographics, education and training of the staff working in these facilities. Design. A total of 750 facilities were identified, and descriptive data were gathered from 442 facilities ...

  16. Palmar Dermatoglyphs of South Mrican Indians | Grace | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with similar data from South African Blacks and Coloureds of the Durban area. A vary high prevalence of loops in area III of both hands is an Indian characteristic; a high frequency of ulnar loops in the hypothenar area, and a low pattern intensity in area IV are caucasoid features which the Indians share with Europeans.

  17. Paediatric triage in South Africa | Cheema | South African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Child Health. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 2 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  18. Asbestos exposure and mesothelioma in South Africa | Rees | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To describe the exposure experiences of South African mesothelioma cases, with emphasis on the contribution made to the caseload by different fibre types, the proportion of subjects with no recall of asbestos exposure and only environmental contact, and the importance of putative causes other than asbestos.

  19. X-linked hypophosphataemia in South Africa | Basu | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives.To investigate the pattern of clinical presentation in a series of South African subjects with X-linked hypophosphataemia (XLH) with particular reference to ethnic differences in presentation and inheritance, and to determine the perceptions and psychosocial problems associated with the disease. Design and ...

  20. Pulmonary scar carcinoma in South Africa | Jenkins | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The association between lung scarring and the subsequent development of cancer remains controversial. South Africa has one of the highest incidences of tuberculosis in the world, and resultant scarring may predispose to malignancy. The country also carries a very high burden of smoking and ...

  1. Demand for actuarial resources in South Africa | Terblanche | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    developments, such as international accounting standards and Solvency II, are creating demand. At the same time, emigration of actuaries and actuarial students creates shortages and a much tighter actuarial resource market. This paper covers the current demographics of the membership of the Actuarial Society of South ...

  2. Cannabis use trends in South Africa | Peltzer | South African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Psychiatry. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 13, No 4 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  3. Learning from south-south comparison: the education systems of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare two education systems in the southern hemisphere and particularly from the SADEC countries, namely, Madagascar and South Africa. Research was done by means of field observation as well as through discussions and interviews with role players at regional education ...

  4. Eradication of poliomyelitis in South Africa | Blecher | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An international campaign under the leadership of the World Health Organisation is underway to eradicate polio from the world by the year 2000. South Africa may already be free of polio. However, to ensure eradication we need to move from a polio control programme to a polio eradication programme. This necessitates ...

  5. South African Hepatitis C management guidelines | Botha | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JF Botha, C Kassianides, HR Schneider, E Song, CWN Spearman, SW van der Merwe. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Gastroenterology Review Vol. 3(1) 2005: 18-21. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sagr.v3i1.30725.

  6. [South-South cooperation: what role for the North?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lery, A

    1997-09-01

    The First African Meeting for South-South Cooperation in Reproductive Health/Family Planning and Population was held in Tunis in July 1997. Tunisian participants from the Ministry of Public Health and other officials met with representatives of 12 Francophone African countries, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations. The meetings were intended to assist each country in establishing partnerships to facilitate projects related to reproductive health, family planning, and population. The meeting was an initiative of the Partnership in Population and Development, an outgrowth of the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo. The Partnership establishes networks and strategic action alliances among all parties currently or potentially interested in reproductive health to promote exchanges of information and experience, technical assistance, and technology transfers. The Partnership countries are Bangladesh, Colombia, Egypt, Kenya, Indonesia, Mexico, Morocco, Thailand, Tunisia, and Zimbabwe. Several other countries have participated in Partnership projects. France and the principal French public and private organizations interested in population and development problems should follow the progress of the South-South Partnership. The Partnership should demonstrate its effectiveness and its willingness to work in close cooperation with the northern hemisphere countries in technical as well as financial aspects.

  7. 15Th South African Psychology Congress, Cape Town, South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Test

    South Africa. The congress, under the theme Psychology: Past, Present and Future, took place from 11 to 14 August 2009. The first day was taken up by workshops that focused on, amongst other topics, forensic and neuropsychology, early interventions of alcohol, and ethics. The authors feel that the theme of the congress ...

  8. Haiti: The South African perspective | van Hoving | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and problem statement. The South African response to the Haitian earthquake consisted of two independent nongovernment organisations (NGOs) working separately with minimal contact. Both teams experienced problems during the deployment, mainly owing to not following the International Search and ...

  9. Understanding the epidemic of HIV in South Africa | Williams | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To investigate the magnitude and the time course of the HIV epidemic in the provinces of South Africa from the antenatal clinic HIV surveys. Design. We analysed the data on the provincial prevalences of HIV infection from 1990 to 1996 using maximum likelihood methods to determine the intrinsic growth rate and ...

  10. Rural health and transformation in South Africa | Reid | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Abstract. South African Medical Journal Vol. 96(8) 2006: 676-677. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors. OTHER RESOURCES... Journal Quality ...

  11. Multiple sclerosis in South Africa | Modi | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since there are no well-documented epidemiological studies on multiple sclerosis (MS) in South Africa, we devised a questionnaire to determine qualitative data. Responses were obtained from 430 patients: 91% had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, 64% had lumbar punctures and 49% had evoked potentials to ...

  12. South Korea's Current Status of FMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moon, Hyoungill

    2007-01-01

    .... This thesis looks at where South Korea stands on FMS from the U.S, considering its economy, technology development, military expenditure, and dispute condition using Multiple Regression model. South Korea...

  13. pressure in South Africa in 2000

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    attributable fractions were calculated and applied to revised burden of disease estimates for the relevant disease categories for South Africa in 2000. Monte Carlo simulation- modelling techniques were used for uncertainty analysis. Setting. South Africa.

  14. The dynamics of EMS in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents some of the empirical findings of four companies in the automobile industry in South Africa.......The paper presents some of the empirical findings of four companies in the automobile industry in South Africa....

  15. South African red data book - fishes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skelton, PH

    1977-07-01

    Full Text Available Data sheets are provided for 28 threatened South African fish species, of which five are considered to be endangered (Barbus trevelyani, Klegethon, Treurensis, Oveodaimon quathlambae and Clarias cavernicola), one to be endangered in South Africa...

  16. Comparative embryogenesis of Australian and South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinidae, Teleostei),from the Cape south coast of South Africa and from Australia, with comparative remarks on the development of juveniles in oviparous species. The sperm intromitted into the female duct fertilise the eggs within the follicles.

  17. Bibliography of marine biology in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Darracott, DA

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography was sponsored by the Marine Biology Section of the South African National Committee for Oceanographic Research (SANCOR). It has been attempted to include all publications which appeared before the end of 1977, either in South...

  18. Archives: South African Journal of Higher Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 53 ... Archives: South African Journal of Higher Education. Journal Home > Archives: South African Journal of Higher Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. Southern Ocean - South African cooperative research programme.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    SANCOR

    1979-05-01

    Full Text Available South African research in the Southern Ocean has already produced some important and illuminating results. Most of these efforts, however, were of an individual and uncoordinated nature. Due to increasing interest in the ocean- in South Africa...

  20. South African Journal of Botany: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mailing Address. South African Journal of Botany Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development University of Natal Pietermaritzburg Private Bag X01 Scottsville 3209, South Africa Street address: Carbis Road, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3201 ...

  1. South African Journal of Education: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Education: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > South African Journal of Education: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Libraries in South Carolina: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/southcarolina.html Libraries in South Carolina To use the sharing features ... Columbia University of South Carolina School of Medicine Library 6311 Garners Ferry Road Columbia, SC 29208 803- ...

  3. Evaluation of wind energy potential in the south-south geopolitical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... wind energy as an alternative to conventional fossil fuel. However, there is limited report on the potentials of wind energy generation in the South-. South geopolitical zone of Nigeria. Therefore, this paper aims at evaluating wind energy potentials in the south-south region to select an appropriate location for ...

  4. Science councils in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR celebrated its 60th anniversary in 2006 by taking a long, hard look at its continuing role in South Africa. This paper was written by the CSIR Fellows, at the invitation of the Department of Science and Technology, to capture some...

  5. South African Crime Quarterly 56

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edited by Chandré Gould and Andrew Faull

    Caroline Agboola holds a National Research Foundation Scarce. Skills Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Sociology,. University of Johannesburg. She obtained her PhD in Sociology from the University of South Africa. Her research on women ex- prisoners was supported by the National Research Foundation.

  6. South African Crime Quarterly 59

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and Others v South African Rugby Football. Union and Others, an .... administration and administrative activities to ensure that the exercise of public powers does not adversely affect the rights of individuals.47. It is clear that administrative law effectively regulates what the administration may or may not do, and what ...

  7. Conservation Education in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Keira

    2012-01-01

    Lawrence Anthony is a conservationist for whom actions speak far louder than words. An imposing figure, Anthony does not take "no" for an answer and uses his commitment, enthusiasm and indefatigable drive to change situations, both in his native South Africa and around the world. Anthony has worked tirelessly alongside tribal leaders…

  8. Sedating children in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regarding 'Sedation for paediatric auditory electrophysiology in. South Africa1 we thank the authors for publishing their research thereby giving us documentary proof of what we know to be widespread practice. Sedation has, for many years, been poorly documented and not subject to the standards in respect of monitoring ...

  9. Developing healthcare in South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Need. The provision of healthcare in South Sudan is offered by a 'mixed economy' of public hospitals and clinics, private hospitals and clinics, international aid organisations, and traditional community practice. Yet for most of the 11.7 million population [1], the provision of both primary and secondary healthcare is ...

  10. ENSO forecasts in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The SST prediction systems currently being used at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and the South African Weather Service (SAWS) are presented. In particular, the skill of these systems to predict Niño3.4 SST and how...

  11. Language Laboratories in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blacquiere, Arie

    1992-01-01

    Reviews trends in language instruction and the use of language laboratories in South African higher education from 1962 to 1990, paying particular attention to racial differences and the movement from an audio-lingual method to a communicative language technique. Questions the wisdom of equipping institutions with sophisticated hardware without…

  12. Training psychiatrists in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    published study questioned whether, in relation to otolaryngology specialist training, South African universities provide equivalent training. The findings were that they do not. The authors cited a lack of oversight by the HPCSA.3 If there is a national exit exam, there must be equivalent training across all academic platforms ...

  13. Political killings in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The NFP, on the other hand, raised questions about whether the judgment was correct, pointing out that Mthembu had been receiving threats at the time when he was killed.3. ESTABLISHING THE FACTS ABOUT. POLITICAL KILLINGS. There is no established system for collecting data on political killings in South Africa ...

  14. South African Journal of Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Education (SAJE) publishes original research articles reporting on research that fulfils the criteria of a generally accepted research paradigm; review articles, intended for the professional scientist and which critically evaluate the research done in a specific field in education; and letters in which ...

  15. South African Actuarial Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Where possible, published works should be cited in preference to unpublished works. A statute should be referred to as, e.g., 'the Pension Funds Act, 1956, 3 with a footnote giving its full name and number and except in the case of the Parliament of South Africa, the legislature. 3.6.5 In the text, except where the citation itself ...

  16. Chikungunya Outbreak, South India, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Prabhdeep; Ponniah, Manickam; Murhekar, Manoj V.; Ramachandran, Vidya; Ramachandran, Ramakrishnan; Raju, Hari Kishan; Perumal, Vanamail; Mishra, Akhilesh C.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated chikungunya outbreaks in South India and observed a high attack rate, particularly among adults and women. Transmission was facilitated by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in peridomestic water containers, as indicated by a high Breteau index. We recommended vector control measures and health education to promote safe water storage practices. PMID:18826830

  17. South Africa and the BRICS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owiso, Michael; Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    South Africa and the BRICS: A critical appraisal Michael Omondi Owiso and Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt Abstract The objective of the BRICS was originally supposed to merge economic synergies and create an alternative voice in the global governance system. Debates around the ability of the BRICS to ...

  18. South African Crime Quarterly 59

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In February this year, Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) released the findings of the 2015/16 Victims of Crime Survey, and announced that it would release the 2016/17 results in November. Victim surveys, though not without fault, capture valuable data relating to crime, justice and safety that are not typically collected by ...

  19. Life in South Korea Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Seok-Choon

    1988-01-01

    Characterizes the past 40 years in South Korea as a time of modernization, industrialization, urbanization, and internationalization. Discusses Korean religion and social values; family, kinship, and social life; education; housing, food, and clothing; leisure and sports; and the maintenance of national identity. Examines the Korean synthesis of…

  20. Human fascioliasis in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intermediate host of the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica, in South Africa. J S Afr Vet Assoc 2003;74(4):117-122. 10. Ajona R, Riancho JA, Aguado JM, Salesa R, Gonzalez-Macias J. Fascioliasis in developed countries: A review of classic and aberrant forms of the disease. Medicine 1995;74(1):13-23. Accepted 11 July 2013.

  1. Inclusive Education in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the current implementation of inclusive education in South Korea and discuss its challenges. The history of special education is first described followed by an introduction to policies relevant to special and inclusive education. Next, a critical discussion of the state of inclusive education follows built…

  2. South Texas Maquiladora Suppliers Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, J. Michael

    This project was undertaken to assist South Texas industries in improving export to nearby Mexican maquiladoras (factories). The maquiladora program is based on co-production by two plants under a single management, one on each side of the border. Activities addressed four objectives: (1) to determine the dollar value, quantity, and source of the…

  3. tional antipsychotic in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    report cost advantages or cost neutrality for these new agents. However, considerable differences in health care service pro- vision make it difficult to generalise these findings to South. Africa. Method. We compared the direct costs (private and public sector) of treating schizophrenia with an atypical antipsychotic quetiapine ...

  4. Getting Skills Right: South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This report identifies effective strategies to tackle skills imbalances in South Africa. It provides an assessment of practices and policies in the following areas: the collection and use of information on skill needs to foster a better alignment of skills acquisitions with labour market needs; education and training policies targeting skills…

  5. South Asians in College Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad-Stout, David J.; Nath, Sanjay R.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this article is to provide information on the assessment and treatment of South Asian college students for mental health practitioners. We provide a brief historical review of the cultures from which these students come and the process of migration to the United States and also make recommendations for work with these students in the…

  6. South African Journal of Geomatics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Geomatics (SAJG) publishes peer-reviewed original papers within the broad discipline of Geomatics (including surveying techniques, technology and applications, mine surveying, hydrographic surveying, cadastral systems, land tenure, development planning, GIS, photogrammetry and remote ...

  7. South African Crime Quarterly 57

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institute for Security Studies/UCT

    iNStitute for SeCurity StuDieS & uNiverSity of CAPe towN. 8. In South Africa, criminal prosecutions of people driving while .... The following data and information were evaluated for each specimen: date of sample acquisition (i.e. date of .... measure of quality assurance. It is for this reason that appropriate quality controls and.

  8. Television, Censorship and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffard, C. Anthony; Cohen, Lisa

    Network television news has often been accused of inciting and prolonging incidents of public violence, whether riots or terrorism, and in South Africa this type of thinking has led to increasingly stringent restrictions on both domestic and foreign media covering the violent unrest there. A study determined a chronology of events and analyzed the…

  9. South African Homelands as Frontiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of frontier zones, the homelands emerge as areas in which the future of the South African postcolony is being renegotiated, contested and remade with hyper-real intensity. This is so because the many fault lines left over from apartheid (its loose ends, so to speak) – between white and black; between...

  10. Collection Development: Sporty South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Loraine; Pulver, A. Issac

    2010-01-01

    This summer, sports-crazy South Africa, recently named by the "New York Times" as one of the "31 Places To Go in 2010," will become the first African nation to host the FIFA World Cup. Soccer fans making the trip will be rewarded with world-class facilities, modern infrastructure, and a nation of startling contrasts and…

  11. South Africa: some ethical issues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa: some ethical issues. Trefor Jenkins. Blood transfusion has become an essential component of modern medical practice. However, worldwide epidemics of viral diseases — in particular, HIV/ AIDS — have made the practice of blood transfusion therapy hazardous, motivating scientists to devise techniques and ...

  12. Monitoring in South African grasslands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mentis, MT

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this document is to propose how ecological monitoring might be developed in the Grassland Biome of South Africa. Monitoring is defined as the maintenance of regular surveillance to test the null hypothesis of no change...

  13. The South African pleuronectiform ichthyofauna is diverse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Eastern Cape waters of South. Africa. S. Afr. J. Zool. 20(3): 97–108. SMALE, M. J. and P. D. COWLEY 1992 — The feeding ecology of skates (Batoidea: Rajidae) off the Cape south coast,. South Africa. In Benguela Trophic Functioning. Payne ...

  14. German Submarine Offensives and South African Countermeasures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evert

    'Good Hunting': German Submarine Offensives and South African. Countermeasures off the South African Coast during the Second World. War, 1942-1945. Evert Kleynhans. •. Abstract .... wolf packs south, Dönitz had hoped to cause a diversionary effect whereby the Allies would be forced to split their defensive forces ...

  15. South Africa : tous les projets | Page 3 | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Région: Americas, Brazil, South America, Asia, China, Far East Asia, India, South and Central Asia, Global, Africa, South Africa, South of Sahara. Programme: Emploi et ... Sujet: Social Policy, SOCIAL WELFARE, SOCIAL SECURITY, HOUSEHOLD INCOME, YOUTH UNEMPLOYMENT. Région: Africa, South Africa, South of ...

  16. South-South REDD: A Brazil-Mozambique initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Duncan

    2011-06-15

    The South-South REDD initiative - that aims to help facilitate the development of a National Action Plan for REDD+ for Mozambique based on sound baselines and monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV), clear analysis of the causes of deforestation and degradation, and appropriate benefit sharing mechanisms in support of activities to address them - is now in its second year. Extensive national consultations have led to the development of a National Action Plan for REDD+ which is currently being used as the basis for developing the countries REDD-Readiness Preparation Proposal (R-PP) for submission to the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF). The National Action Plan for REDD+ seeks to create favourable conditions for the progressive reduction of the current rate of deforestation (0.58%) to 0.21% by 2025 and ultimately to zero, simultaneously reducing the rate of degradation and encouraging forest restoration to sequester 30 million tonnes of carbon by 2025.

  17. Metabolic syndrome in South Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Pandit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available South Asia is home to one of the largest population of people with metabolic syndrome (MetS. The prevalence of MetS in South Asians varies according to region, extent of urbanization, lifestyle patterns, and socioeconomic/cultural factors. Recent data show that about one-third of the urban population in large cities in India has the MetS. All classical risk factors comprising the MetS are prevalent in Asian Indians residing in India. The higher risk in this ethnic population necessitated a lowering of the cut-off values of the risk factors to identify and intervene for the MetS to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Some pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are underway in MetS to assess the efficacy in preventing the diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this ethnic population.

  18. South Africa makes some decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1996-08-01

    The potential heritage of apartheid still affects energy availability in South Africa. This article describes a new Energy Policy White paper, to be presented to Parliament, which will start to rectify current inequalities. Most of the black citizens have no access to electricity, while the affluent white minority have cheap electricity readily available to them. The complexities of funding necessary changes are addressed. South Africa`s low-cost coal reserves, mined from opencast pits next to power stations, are likely to continue to be exploited. As yet the country`s solar potential is unlikely to be developed because of the availability of coal. The production of electricity and the future of liquid fuel industries are likely to remain in crisis, even after the White Paper`s implementation. (UK)

  19. DESIGNING DEMOCRACY IN SOUTH AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erinaldo Ferreira Carmo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, when South America pulled away the shadow of authoritarianism and again to breathe the air of freedom, the democratization process has been strengthened in the region, within a very dynamic and not uniform among the states. In this chapter we describe the construction of regional democracy and the changes occurring every decade, including the prospects for this ongoing, with reference to the historical and political process of each South American State, including the ostensible expansion of citizenship rights and political involvement of citizen, but 186. GeoTextos, vol. 8, n. 2, dez. 2012. E. Carmo, S. Pacheco. 185-210 without ceasing to understand the fragility of political institutions, the drama of corruption, the obstacles posed by drug trafficking and the guerrilla groups, the constraints to economic growth and rising, but still incipient, organization of the Southern Common Market – Mercosul.

  20. Mythologizing History in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Andronova, Larisa A.; Abrosimova, Ekaterina S.

    2015-01-01

    The South Korea as the any other country has some nationalistic influence in history interpretation. In the question of mythologizing history the Korean nationalism uses the standard myths which we can find in the official history of any country, for example in Russia history. Some Korea historical myths are enough famous especially among Korean studies scholars. This paper attempts to find out the most wide spreading historical myths, analyze them and show their influence on the day-by-day l...

  1. Foreign workers in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Lim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In today’s global age many people cross national borders in search of better work and more wages. According to IOM, more than 100 000 000 workers leave their homeland and migrate to another country for this reason. Europe and North America have already experienced increase in foreign labor for many decades but nowadays, it is very common to see foreign laborers in Asian countries. As the number of foreign laborers rapidly increased, however, so did many social problems in relation to these workers. No country is safe from or immune to such social problems in regards to the foreign workers especially with a much easier and more efficient transportation system. In case of South Korea, the history of foreign labor may not be as long as other nations but as of 2007, it boasts of more than 250 000 foreign laborers and is thus facing just as many social problems as well. In order to investigate such social issues, this article explores the history of foreign laborers and their current situation in South Korea. Furthermore, this artticle examines both internal and external factors which may have caused exponential growth of foreign labor market in South Korea in the past decade.

  2. CIVIL JUSTICE IN SOUTH AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Van Loggerenberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The South African adversarial system of civil procedure in the High Court owes its origin to that of England. As with all civil procedural systems, the South African system is not stagnant. Its primary sources, namely Acts of Parliament and rules of court, are constantly amended in an attempt to meet the changing needs of society. Court delay and costinefficient procedural mechanisms, however, contribute to public dismay. The High Court, in the exercise of its inherent power to regulate its process, do so with the purpose of enhancing access to justice. The advantage of the system lies in the fact that it is not cast in stone but could, subject to the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, be developed to make it more accessible to the public whilst protecting the public’s fundamental rights entrenched in the Constitution and, in this regard, particularly the right to afair trial embedded in sec. 34 of the Constitution. This contribution gives an overview of the system with reference to the court structure, the judiciary, the process in the High Court and its underlying principles, appeals, class actions and alternative civil dispute resolution mechanisms.

  3. Breaking away to South America

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    In December 2010, Peter Dreesen of CERN’s Technology Department (TE) returned from a long trip to South America. In four months he traversed the entire Andean range, from the equator to a latitude of 55 degrees south—on a bicycle!   Peter Dreesen on the Salar de Uyuni Lake, Bolivia. 11 000 kilometres is one long bike ride! And yet, that’s what Peter Dreesen did, travelling from Quito, Ecuador to Ushuaia, Argentina. Peter, an engineer in the TE Department, is no novice: the year before, he cycled from Paris to Peking, a distance of 13 500 kilometres, in just over four months. His latest voyage began last August, when he loaded his bicycle and boarded a plane for South America. In the saddle. After a week of acclimatisation at three thousand metres altitude, Peter left Quito on 6 August 2010. He arrived in Ushuaia (el fin del mundo, the end of the world, as it’s known in South America) on 12 December 2010. He recounts: “It was a bizarre sensation...

  4. Sex trafficking in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, S

    2006-09-01

    Economic and social inequalities and political conflicts have led to the movement of persons within each country and across the borders in South Asia. Globalization has encouraged free mobility of capital, technology, experts and sex tourism. Illiteracy, dependency, violence, social stigma, cultural stereotypes, gender disparity and endemic poverty, among other factors, place women and children in powerless, non-negotiable situations that have contributed to the emergence and breeding of the cavernous problem of sex trafficking in the entire region. This alarming spread of sex trafficking has fuelled the spread of HIV infection in South Asia, posing a unique and serious threat to community health, poverty alleviation and other crucial aspects of human development. Although the SAARC (South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation) Convention on Trafficking in Women and Children has been an important breakthrough, most of the countries in the region do not have anti-trafficking legislation or means to protect the victims. Countries of the region should make a concerted effort to treat trafficking victims as "victims" of human rights violations in all anti-trafficking strategies and actions.

  5. {sup 14}C dating of the Early to Late Bronze Age stratigraphic sequence of Aegina Kolonna, Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, E.M., E-mail: Eva.Maria.Wild@univie.ac.a [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics - Isotope Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Gauss, W. [Austrian Archaeological Institute at Athens, Leof. Alexandras 26, Gr10683 Athens (Greece); Forstenpointner, G. [University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna, Dept. of Pathobiology, Institute of Anatomy, Unit on Archaeozoology and Comparative Morphology, Veterinaerplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna (Austria); Lindblom, M. [Dept. of Archaeology and Ancient History Uppsala, University Box 626, SE-751 26 Uppsala (Sweden); Smetana, R. [Altertumswissenschaften, University of Salzburg, Residenzplatz 1/I, A-5020 Salzburg (Austria); Steier, P. [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics - Isotope Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Thanheiser, U. [Vienna Institute for Archaeological Science (VIAS), Althanstrasse 14, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weninger, F. [VERA Laboratory, Faculty of Physics - Isotope Research, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 17, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

    2010-04-15

    Aegina Kolonna, located in the center of the Saronic Gulf in the Aegean Mediterranean (Greece), is one of the major archaeological sites of the Aegean Bronze Age with a continuous stratigraphic settlement sequence from the Late Neolithic to the Late Bronze Age. Due to its position next to the maritime cross roads between central mainland Greece, the northeast Peloponnese, the Cyclades and Crete, the island played an important role in the trade between these regions. In the course of new excavations, which focused on the exploration of the Early, Middle and Late Bronze Age at Kolonna, several short lived samples from different settlement phases have been {sup 14}C-dated with the AMS method at the VERA laboratory. Bayesian sequencing of the {sup 14}C data according to the stratigraphic position of the samples in the profile was performed to enable estimates of the transition time between the cultural phases. The Aegina Kolonna {sup 14}C sequence is one of the longest existing so far for the Aegean Bronze Age, and therefore of major importance for the absolute Bronze Age chronology in this region. Preliminary results indicate that the Middle Helladic period seems to have started earlier and lasted longer than traditionally assumed. Further, at the present stage of our investigation we can give also a very tentative time frame for the Santorini volcanic eruption which seems to be in agreement with the science derived VDL date.

  6. Social factors associated with pulmonary hydatid cyst in Aegean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pulmonary hydatid cysts are caused by larval forms of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatid disease, which is endemic in Turkey, is an important health problem in agricultural and stockbreeding areas where there are insufficient environmental health and preventive medicine services. Previous ...

  7. South-South Cooperation, North-South Aid and the Prospect of International Aid Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meibo Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available South-South Cooperation (SSC and North-South Aid (NSA arise from different historical conditions and there are great differences between their philosophies, principles and paradigms. Against the background of a changing global environment, developed countries realized that the original development aid architecture must be reformed on one hand, and that developing countries are increasingly important in the aid architecture on the other. Hence, Western donors began to rethink their aid principles and methods, and accepted the concept of development effectiveness gradually, an attempt to establish global development forum and global partnership including emerging donors, beneficiary countries, civil society and the private sector. Nevertheless, being developing countries themselves, emerging donors are faced with unsolved domestic poverty issues and imperfect aid management institutions, which means that the emerging donors are unable to take a dominant position in the current aid architecture. Hence, the future dialogue and cooperation between traditional and emerging donors should feature the principle that the responsibilities taken by each party are collective but not identical, with developing countries bearing the main responsibilities in promoting poverty reduction and economic development in developing countries. They should be mutually tolerant about the different philosophies and share useful experiences. Moreover, emerging donors should promote development capacity building in recipient countries through win-win cooperation and solve their domestic development issues at the same time.

  8. South America in a new world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto van Klaveren

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available South American countries participate on the new international stage in very diverse ways, reflecting their different political models and preferences. The big changes that have seriously affected the international system have had a profound impact on South America. The United States are no longer the dominant power in the world, nor in their old backyard, South America. Europe retains a certain role in the area, but the crisis it is undergoing is limiting its influence in the region. Relations between South American counties are increasing, but not within the framework of a single, coherent integration process. China, India, Korea, and other Asian countries are joining Japan’s traditional and always discreet presence in the area, but up to now Asia has confined itself to economic exchanges with South America. In general, South America is consolidating itself as the second-largest emerging region on the planet, after Asia, and is projecting that reality in its international relations.

  9. Amnesty, Reconciliation, and Reintegration in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-22

    Amnesty, Reconciliation, and Reintegration in South Africa A Monograph by MAJOR Timothy M. Bairstow United States Marine Corps School of...SUBTITLE Amnesty, Reconciliation, and Reintegration in South Africa 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...ABSTRACT Amnesty, reconciliation, and reintegration (AR2) are typically regarded as a post-conflict processes. In South Africa AR2 occurred before

  10. Aspects of Digital Forensics in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques Ophoff; Alastair Irons

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the issues facing digital forensics in South Africa. It examines particular cyber threats and cyber threat levels for South Africa and the challenges in addressing the cybercrimes in the country through digital forensics. The paper paints a picture of the cy-bercrime threats facing South Africa and argues for the need to develop a skill base in digi-tal forensics in order to counter the threats through detection of cybercrime, by analyzing cybercrime reports, consideration...

  11. South-South Migration and Sino-African Small Traders: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , trade networks, socio-economic development. 1. Introduction. South-South cooperation is growing in the framework of the world political economy in general and the cooperation between Africa and emerging powers such as China, India and ...

  12. Terrestrial ecology in South Africa and South West Africa – project abstracts for 1979

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ecosystems Programmes, Cooperative Scientific Programmes

    1981-05-01

    Full Text Available Brief descriptions of over 200 research projects undertaken during 1979 in South African and South West African terrestrial ecosystems are presented. The abstracts are arranged alphabetically according to author name and a keyword index is provided...

  13. Tufa stromatolite ecosystems on the South African south coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Perissinotto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Following the first description of living marine stromatolites along the South African east coast, new investigations along the south coast have revealed the occurrence of extensive fields of actively calcifying stromatolites. These stromatolites have been recorded at regular distances along a 200-km stretch of coastline, from Cape Recife in the east to the Storms River mouth in the west, with the highest density found between Schoenmakerskop and the Maitland River mouth. All active stromatolites are associated with freshwater seepage streams flowing from the dune cordon, which form rimstone dams and other accretions capable of retaining water in the supratidal platform. Resulting pools can reach a maximum depth of about 1 m and constitute a unique ecosystem in which freshwater and marine organisms alternate their dominance in response to vertical mixing and the balance between freshwater versus marine inflow. Although the factors controlling stromatolite growth are yet to be determined, nitrogen appears to be supplied mainly via the dune seeps. The epibenthic algal community within stromatolite pools is generally co-dominated by cyanobacteria and chlorophytes, with minimal diatom contribution.

  14. Unsung heroes in the South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    While recognizing the important role played by lesbian women in HIV/AIDS prevention in many countries, and as members of some gay organizations in the South, this article focuses only on gay men. Even though formidable societal proscriptions against homosexuality exist in many developing countries and Eastern European countries, gay men served duty on the front lines as AIDS educators and care givers. The threat of the AIDS crisis impelled some to openly acknowledge their sexuality in an effort to reach gay men at risk. In the West, gay organizations had already laid a 10 year foundation of organization and community trust, when the AIDS epidemic appeared in the public spot light. This fact allowed them to act as effective educators of their own gay communities. They were so effective that the number of new HIV cases has leveled off in the gay community. In Central and South America, gay movement cohered in 1976 and responded quickly to AIDS in 1983. In Africa, homosexuality is often considered a contamination of the West and national gay organizations (NGOs) have only recently been formed in Ghana, Tanzania, and Nigeria. The only AIDS services organizations (ASOs) for black men exist in Zimbabwe and South Africa. In Asia NGOs are a new phenomenon that exist only in Hong Kong, Indonesia, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand. All NGOs have several things in common. Governments are rarely interested in working with NGOs so they are forced to find their own funding and develop their own education campaigns. Even in countries that recognize the implications and magnitude of the AIDS crisis, their education programs and policies are often homophobic or anti-gay. In the countries where the government is sympathetic to the gay community they rely upon NGOs to help them develop national education programs for both gays and the rest of the population.

  15. Growing pains in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, S

    1997-08-01

    This article describes some negative effects from modernization and urban growth in South America, including disease, pesticides, occupational hazards, poor environmental controls of water and garbage, sanitation, and environmental degradation. South America is following the global trend toward urbanization and the problems that accompany it. Agricultural expansion led to an expanded market for pesticides that includes the deadly DDT, paraquat, and heptachlor. Brazil and Colombia are the largest consumers. Latin American officials justify use of DDT, which is banned in the US and many European countries, as an effective means of combating mosquitos that carry malaria. Exposure occurs during harvesting, transporting, forestry, livestock farming, and vector control activities. Methyl bromide, which is used post-harvest and as a soil fumigant, is dangerous enough to be banned in the US in 2001, and in developing countries in 2002. Exposure to toxic chemicals can severely inhibit enzyme action that is necessary for neurological functioning. A hot climate, which prevents protective clothing, lack of education on proper application, and absence of water to wash exposed skin, make pesticide protection very difficult. Over 40 million agricultural workers are at risk of pesticide poisoning. Habitat destruction has contributed to increased mosquito infestations. Children in the workplace are at even greater risk of noise pollution and chemical poisoning. South America pollutes almost 11 times more fresh water per capita than Europe. About 70% of domestic garbage is collected, and about 30% is disposed of correctly. Only 10% of urban wastewater is treated before discharge into waterways. The loss of coastal wetlands reduces the ability of waterways to filter and absorb nutrients. Environmental health problems suggest an interlinkage between environmental sustainability, human health, and economic growth.

  16. South-South medical tourism and the quest for health in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crush, Jonathan; Chikanda, Abel

    2015-01-01

    Intra-regional South-South medical tourism is a vastly understudied subject despite its significance in many parts of the Global South. This paper takes issue with the conventional notion of South Africa purely as a high-end "surgeon and safari" destination for medical tourists from the Global North. It argues that South-South movement to South Africa for medical treatment is far more significant, numerically and financially, than North-South movement. The general lack of access to medical diagnosis and treatment in SADC countries has led to a growing temporary movement of people across borders to seek help at South African institutions in border towns and in the major cities. These movements are both formal (institutional) and informal (individual) in nature. In some cases, patients go to South Africa for procedures that are not offered in their own countries. In others, patients are referred by doctors and hospitals to South African facilities. But the majority of the movement is motivated by lack of access to basic healthcare at home. The high demand and large informal flow of patients from countries neighbouring South Africa has prompted the South African government to try and formalise arrangements for medical travel to its public hospitals and clinics through inter-country agreements in order to recover the cost of treating non-residents. The danger, for 'disenfranchised' medical tourists who fall outside these agreements, is that medical xenophobia in South Africa may lead to increasing exclusion and denial of treatment. Medical tourism in this region and South-South medical tourism in general are areas that require much additional research. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Near East and South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-27

    adulteration, the arrest of the owner of a gas station for mixing benzene with kerosene, and the arrest of 24 fans of the Suez Soccer Team. In...being case No 3310, misdemeanors, al-Fayyum District, 1986. Then there is the case of the 24 fans of the Suez Soccer Team who were arrested not...JPRS-NEA-88-087 27 DECEMBER 1988 /1IIU !■■■«■ ■■■■■I FOREIGN BROADCAST INFORMATION SERVICE JP/?S Report— Near East & South Asia 19990510

  18. Impact craters in South America

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, Rogelio Daniel; Ponce, Juan Federico; Stinco, Sergio G

    2015-01-01

    A complete and updated catalogue of impact craters and structures in South America from 2014 is presented here. Approximately eighty proven, suspected and disproven structures have been identified by several sources in this continent. All the impact sites of this large continent have been exhaustively reviewed: the proved ones, the possible ones and some very doubtful. Many sites remain without a clear geological ""in situ"" confirmation and some of them could be even rejected. Argentina and Brazil are leading the list containing almost everything detected. In Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Guyana,

  19. Namibia [South-West Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Namibia, a country of 1,051,700 inhabitants of whom 85.6% are blacks of diverse ethnic and linguistic origins, 7.5% are white, and the rest are of mixed ancestry, has been illegally administered by South Africa since 1966, when a League of Nations mandate was revoked by the UN. The Namibian Desert was a barrier to European expansion until the late 18th century, when the area came under German and British influence. Efforts to bring about an orderly and peaceful transition to independent status are hampered at present by the lack of parallel progress toward withdrawal of Cuban combat forces from Angola. Beginning in 1980, considerable executive power was transferred from the administrator general appointed by the South African Government to an interim 3-tier system of elected representatives dividing responsibility between central, ethnic, and local authorities. The judicial structure has separate overlapping systems for whites, westernized blacks and coloreds and for indigenous blacks. Namibian society is highly politicized, with 4 white and about 40 nonwhite political groups. The South West Africa People's Organization (SWAPO) remains an active party inside Namibia despite simultaneous detention of its entire leadership in 1979 by the South African Government. Namibia's economy is dual, with a modern market sector of mining, ranching and fishing producing most of the wealth and a traditional subsistence sector supporting most of the labor force. About 60% of the work force of 500,000 in 1981 worked in agriculture, 19% in industry and commerce, 6% in mining, 8% in services, and 7% in government. Namibia's gross domestic product in 1980 was $1.712 billion, representing an average growth rate of 2.5% from 1970-80. However, real growth since 1978 has been negative because of persistent drought, political uncertainty, low demand for mineral products, and previous overfishing. Namibia has no separate representation in any international body. The country may have the

  20. South American Flight Test Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    SOUTH AM RCANFIGTIp NAES AN RE SS 10 aRGh -~ 3LEEN APROCTTS Wrigh-Paterso AFBRIN OH 543 AF ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 8 WrightC Aeonut calN Laoaoisv..NUMBER (.)AGE 14...a, I.3 u RELATIVE RECEIVED SIGNAL LEVEL in dB 21 AFWAL-TR-80-1079 IcrI 7-0 + I L4LL1 4L 9 D d CD 1 1 ~CD CZ 1. -I r[ ----- 0 -~ -- tD 0 CD - C.4

  1. North-South Business Linkages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Olav Jull; Kuada, John

    2006-01-01

    Based on empirical studies of linkages between TNCs and local firms in India, Malaysia, Vietnam, Ghana and South Africa, five themes are discussed and related to present theoretical perspectives. The themes are (1) Linakge Governance; (2) Globalisation and the dynamics in developing countries (the...... TNC-driven markets in developing countries); (3) The upgrading impact of FDI; (4) Non-equity linkages as a platform for business development, and (5) The learning perspective on international business linakges. The chapter offers at the end a three-dimanional model for impacts of business linkages....

  2. Xenophobic Attacks On Black Non-South Africans In South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Xenophobic Attacks On Black Non-South Africans In South Africa: The Communication Imperatives. ... He also goes on to propound a refinement of the definition of xenophobia in such a way as to include its specific target, because, as he rightly observes: in South Africa, not all foreigners are uniformly victimised. Rather ...

  3. Herpetological surveys of south-western and south-eastern regions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The herpetofauna of part of the south-western (Lagos, Ogun and Oyo States) and south-eastern (Cross River State) regions were investigated. Specimens were located opportunistically during visual surveys. Both regions fall in the tropical zone, and the south-western region surveyed, was mostly lowland, degraded forests ...

  4. South-South Migration and Sino-African Small Traders: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study is to see how migration patterns have expanded from South-North to South-South (particularly in the case of Sino-African relations) that today is the mainstream of international migration. It explores the composition, background, profile, business organisation and networks of Chinese traders in ...

  5. Harnessing the power of South-South partnerships to build capacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15, No. 1, June 2017. 8. Harnessing the power of South-South partnerships to build capacity for the prevention of sexual and intimate partner violence ... Sexual Violence Research Initiative, South African Medical Research Council ... programmes on IPV prevention and transforming men and masculinities show promise.

  6. All projects related to south africa | Page 3 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: SOUTH AFRICA, Mining, Economic and social development, CANADA, UNIVERSITIES, RESEARCH, TRAINING. Region: South Africa, Canada. Program: ... Region: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Somalia, China, Kenya, Sierra Leone, Turkey, Zambia, Republic of Congo, South Africa. Program: Governance and ...

  7. South Africa : tous les projets | Page 8 | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, PATENT LAW, PHARMACEUTICALS, PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY, ESSENTIAL DRUGS, ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY. Région: India, South Africa, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, North and Central America, South America, Central Asia, ...

  8. South Africa : tous les projets | Page 5 | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: INTERNATIONAL FINANCE, INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MARKET, FINANCIAL POLICY, DEMOGRAPHY, DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE, DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION. Région: Brazil, South America, China, Far East Asia, India, South Africa, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, North and Central America, Central Asia, ...

  9. All projects related to South Africa | Page 4 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: INTERNATIONAL FINANCE, INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MARKET, FINANCIAL POLICY, DEMOGRAPHY, DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE, DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION. Region: Brazil, South America, China, Far East Asia, India, South Africa, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, North and Central America, Central Asia, ...

  10. All projects related to South Africa | Page 11 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY, PATENT LAW, PHARMACEUTICALS, PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY, ESSENTIAL DRUGS, ACCESS TO HEALTH CARE, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY. Region: India, South Africa, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, North and Central America, South America, Central Asia, ...

  11. South America Province Boundaries, 1999 (prv6ag)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — South America is part of Region 6 (Central and South America) for the World Energy Assessment. South America was divided into 107 geologic provinces as background...

  12. South Africa : tous les projets | Page 6 | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: EMPLOYMENT POLICY, LABOUR POLICY, LABOUR LAW, MINIMUM WAGE, FORMAL SECTOR, INFORMAL SECTOR, UNEMPLOYMENT, UNDEREMPLOYMENT. Région: Argentina, South America, Costa Rica, North and Central America, South Africa, South of Sahara. Programme: Emploi et croissance.

  13. A case for South-South collaboration for trachoma elimintion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwele Malecela

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The East Africa NTD/Trachoma Cross-Border Partnership brings together represent- atives from the same ‘neighbourhood’ – Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda – to share experiences of common interest in the delivery of trachoma and other neglected tropical disease (NTD programmes. These countries understand that they will never reach their individual elimination targets without working together: they are all home to nomadic populations of pastoralists who live on both sides of an international border and are bound more closely by relations, socio-cultural activities and trade than by borders.There are also common programmatic challenges because of shared histories, ethnicities, and languages, an understanding and appreciation of which are critical to provide effective public health services.

  14. Archives: South African Journal of Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 65 ... Archives: South African Journal of Education. Journal Home > Archives: South African Journal of Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 ...

  15. 0007. SOUTH AFRICAN MILITARY BUILDINGS PHOTOGRAPHED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    orientation. Women, in particular, will enjoy many of the stories, which usu- ally manage to convey a sense of the wartime atmosphere in South Africa. Those who are unacquainted with. South Africa's military past will find the ... showson which page each new letter of the alphabet starts. This, together. Milifaria. 23/2 1993. 45.

  16. A Visit to the South Pole

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    to fight not at the Indo-Pak border but at the South Polar Ice-Cap against the awful blizzards and the cryogenic environs of Antarctica where no Indian had ever wintered over earlier. My parents encouraged me to go ahead with the Antarctic Expedition and explore the South Pole. The Deputy High Commissioner of Australia ...

  17. Inglased peavad "South Parki" liiga karmiks

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Inglise kooliõpetajaid teeb murelikuks ropp dialoog animafilmis "South Park : suurem, pikem ja lõikamata" ("South Park . Bigger, Longer & Uncut") : Stsenaristid Trey Parker ja Matt Stone : režissöör Trey Parker : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1999

  18. Robotics and automation activities in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Utete, S

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Second in the series of articles focusing on the state of robotics and automation in the BRICS countries: Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa, this article provides an overview on South Africa written by researchers from the Council...

  19. South Africa's Defence Industrial Participation in Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    jvdyk

    2014-03-31

    Mar 31, 2014 ... civil purchases (e.g. passenger aircraft).3 As a result of the biggest defence transaction in. South Africa, the Strategic Defence Package. (SDP) of December 1999, incurred R15 billion worth of DIP obligations. This article. Scientia Militaria, South African. Journal of Military Studies, Vol. 44, No. 2, 2016, pp.

  20. SOUTH AFRICA AT WAR, 1912-1982

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In June 1950 Communist North Korea invaded. South Korea, and by 16 November 2 Squadron. SAAF was flying its first missions from Pusan. Equipped with outdated. F-51 Mustangs the. South Africans flew ground-strike missions against the enemy's supply lines, In July 1951 the Squadron encountered the first MiG fighters ...

  1. EDITORIAL Understanding persistent postoperative pain in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding persistent postoperative pain in South Africa. There are few studies documenting the prevalence of chronic pain in. South Africa. Igumbor et al1 cite a prevalence of 42.3% amongst people living in rural communities, whilst Rauf et al2 report a similarly high prevalence of 41% in a more urban population in ...

  2. Researching Postgraduate Educational Research in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, J.; Balfour, R.; Moletsane, R.; Pillay, G.

    2009-01-01

    This article is about the national project to gather together information about postgraduate education research (PPER) in South Africa conducted over a ten-year period, namely 1995-2004, being the first decade in the democratic era for South Africa. The ideas informing the PPER Project are provided and the complex process of developing the PPER…

  3. Environmental management systems in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg; Smink, Carla

    2004-01-01

    The article presents som empirical findings regarding environmental management systems of four companies in the automotive industry in South Africa.......The article presents som empirical findings regarding environmental management systems of four companies in the automotive industry in South Africa....

  4. Transnational Telecommunications Capital Expanding From South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANBR

    element in South Africa's economic transformation, (BB)BEE is an important imperative placed on foreign MNCs by the South African government, discussed in the third section. This part of the paper also makes the historical link with other attempts at black empowerment on the continent, particularly in Nigeria and Ghana.

  5. Rare abdominal wall hernias in South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If no prosthesis is used,. Rare abdominal wall hernias in South Sudan. This article is dedicated to the memory of Professor Giuseppe Meo who died in January and who initiated, and devoted many years to, the surgical missions in South Sudan (see obituary page 46). Elena Codognottoa, alberto Kissa, Giuseppe Meoa, ...

  6. South African universities, research and positive psychology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to highlight pioneering and fundamental contributions by South African researchers to establishing a new paradigm in psychology, namely positive psychology. The article provides an overview of the national and international historic development of this field. Current and completed South ...

  7. Spirometry of healthy adult South African men

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-07-07

    Jul 7, 1996 ... Spirometry of healthy adult. South African men. Part I. Normative values. S. J. Louw, J. G. Goldin, G. Joubert. Aim. To detennine normative spirometric values for black and white South African men. Methods. A population of 796 bank personnel were. sUbjected to spirometry and anthropometric.

  8. South's Schools Pass Milestone on Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viadero, Debra

    2007-01-01

    According to a new report, the South region in the U.S. now has a "new majority" in its public schools: students from low-income families. Poor children, for the first time in at least 40 years, now constitute 54 percent of students in public schools across that part of the country. While that makes the South the nation's first…

  9. South African Journal of Higher Education: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Please monitor the website to see the status of the article as it may need amendments. Correspondence. All correspondence and enquiries should be directed to: The Editor-in-Chief. South African Journal of Higher Education. Faculty of Education. Stellenbosch University. Private Bag X1. Matieland. 7602. Republic of South ...

  10. for environmental education in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Towards a “language of probability” for environmental education in South Africa. Lesley Le Grange. Department of Didactics, Faculty of Education, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland, 7602 South Africa llg@.sun.ac.za. In the current phase of our history, crises abound in many spheres of life — political, ...

  11. Australia's South African war 1899-19021

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based on estimates arrived at in Chamberlain, Australians in the South African war, pp 79, 88-9. The standard works on the ... American war, was a consequence of this. As war in South Africa loomed in mid-1899 the ... 1899 the uitlander cause enjoyed a quiet sympathy in many families. As the war broke out, hundreds of ...

  12. Coal supply from a South African perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sealey, A. [Randcoal (South Africa)

    1994-12-31

    In 1993 South African coal accounted for 24% of the total seaborne trade of 200 million tons. If South Africa is to maintain this share of the market by the year 2000 exports would be required to grow to 72 million tons of steam coal. The conditions necessary to achieve this are the focus of this paper. 12 figs.

  13. South African Journal of Higher Education: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Principal Contact. Prof Yusef Waghid Editor-in-Chief South African Journal of Higher Educatio. South African Journal of Higher Education Faculty of Education Stellenbosch University. Private Bag X1 Matieland 7602. Phone: +27 (021) 8082419. Fax: +27 (021) 8082283. Email: yw@sun.ac.za ...

  14. Gravity derived Moho for South America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meijde, M.; Julia, J.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-01-01

    Crustal structure in South America is one of the least understood among the Earth's continental areas. Variations in crustal thickness are still poorly constrained over large portions of the continent because of scarce or unevenly distributed crustal thickness estimates throughout South America. To

  15. R-HPDC in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Curle, A

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenomena 2013/ Vol. 192-193, pp 3-15 R-HPDC in South Africa CURLE Ulyate A.a, MÖLLER Heinrichb and GOVENDER Gonasagrenc Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Materials Science and Manufacturing, Pretoria, South Africa a ucurle...

  16. How DO SOUTH AFRICAN OBSTETRICIANS MANAGE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African obstetricians manage hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. RESULTS. MATERIALS AND METHODS pre-eclampsia, 247 of the respondents (58%) said they would prescribe Iow-dose aspirin. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that South African obstetricians show great uniformity in terms of the treatment.

  17. Amphibians and reptiles of South Ossetia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris S. Tuniyev

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For the first time we have summarised the results of the study of batraho- and herpetofauna of the Republic of South Ossetia. We present an Annotated List of species as authentically living in the region, as well as ever mentioned for it in literature, field notebooks, museum collections and our own expeditions in South Ossetia. The batrachofauna of the Republic of South Ossetia counts nine species and the herpetofauna 19 species. It provides a complete inventory of all finds (65 localities. A number of confirmed species have been assigned for the first time in scientific literature for the territory of South Ossetia: Emys orbicularis, Darevskia mixta, Natrix megalocephala, Hierophis schmidti, Pelias dinniki, P. kaznakovi. We detected the morphological specificity of the South Ossetia' populations of Darevskia praticola, D. brauneri and D. caucasica. The Assessment of conservation status has been evaluated for all forms of amphibians and reptiles in the region. According to its results, five amphibian species and ten reptile species are recommended for inclusion into the Red Data Book of the Republic of South Ossetia. The central problem of environmental activities in the Region is the lack of a network of different rank protected areas covering all natural zones and altitudinal belts. The South Ossetian State Nature Reserve is the single protected area of South Ossetia, which provides protection only for three endangered species of amphibians and three species of reptiles.

  18. Dynamics of MODIS evapotranspiration in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jovanovic, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available dependent on rainfall and potential evapotranspiration (PET) in 4 climatically different regions of South Africa. Average ET in South Africa (2000–2012) was estimated to be 303 mm·a-1 or 481.4 x 109 m3·a1 (14% of PET and 67% of rainfall), mainly in the form...

  19. Aspects of Roaccutane prescription in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-09-01

    Sep 1, 1993 ... of the Muscular Dystrophy Foundation of South Africa. This study was funded by grants from the South African Medical. Research Council, the Mauerberger Foundation, the Harry. Crossley Foundation and the University of Cape Town Staff. Research Fund. REFERENCES. 1. Maser H. Duchenne muscular ...

  20. Ladybugs of South Dakota, 2nd edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Images of the 80 species of Coccinellidae, commonly known as lady beetles, that occur in South Dakota are presented in taxonomic order. The second edition updates information, including the addition of a species new to South Dakota. Information on each species includes genus-species name, sub-fami...

  1. German Submarine Offensives and South African Countermeasures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evert

    During 1935, Adolf Hitler, who had risen to power in Germany during 1933, .... ensure the maintenance of sea communications around the South African ..... It seemed to Witte and the BdU as if the wireless transmissions of neither U-172 nor U-68 .... Graph 2: Comparison of merchant tonnage lost in South African waters to ...

  2. Celebrity Humanitarianism and North-South Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    is an effective lens for viewing the multiple and diverse relationships that constitute the links between North and South. New empirical findings on celebrity humanitarianism on the ground in Thailand, Malawi, Bangladesh, South Africa, China, Haiti, Congo, US, Denmark and Australia illustrate the impact...

  3. LEISHMANIASIS IN SOUTH WEST AFRICA: PRELIMINARY NOTES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-03-13

    Mar 13, 1971 ... Leishmaniasis was first reported from South West. Africa in 1970.' All 4 cases had contracted cutaneous leishmaniasis, and all 4 occurred in White women. These cases appeared over a period of 3 years. Before this the nearest recorded case of leishmaniasis was from south- western Angola.' Cahill' has ...

  4. Diabetic nephropathy in Surinamese South Asian subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chandieshaw, Prataap Kalap; Chandie Shaw, Prataap Kalap

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the incidence and risk factors for nephropathy in diabetic and non-diabetic Surinamese South Asians. The Surinamese South Asians, originally descended from the North-East India. Due to the former colonial bounds with the Netherlands, a relatively

  5. waterborne South Africa Canoeists and diseases in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    waterborne. South Africa. Canoeists and diseases in. C. c. APPLETON, I. W. BAILEY. Summary. The prevalence of urinary schistosomiasis (Schistosoma haematobium) in canoeists in South Africa was estimated from examinations of urine samples taken from participants in the 1988 and 1989 Duzi Canoe Marathons on the ...

  6. TRIAGE — A SOUTH AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    M Phil EM degree at UCT. His dissertation topic is triage. TRIAGE — A SOUTH AFRICAN. PERSPECTIVE. The burden of acute medical and trauma presentations requiring emergency treatment by ambulance personnel and emergency units in South Africa is overwhelming. Fig. 1. Larrey's 'ambulance volantes' (adapted ...

  7. Indigenous chicken genetic resources in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    1ARC-Animal Production Institute, Private Bag X2, Irene, 0062, South Africa. 2Department of Animal Science, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland, 7602, South Africa. 3Institute of Farm Animal Genetics, Friedrich Loeffler Institut, Höltystr.10, 31535 Neustadt-Mariensee, Germany. 4Department of Livestock and ...

  8. Pesticides in South African fresh waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansara-Ross, T.; Wepener, V.; Brink, van den P.J.; Ross, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Public concern has recently escalated over pesticide contamination of South African aquatic ecosystems. This review of published literature on the occurrence of pesticides within South African freshwater systems indicates that fewer than 50 studies of selected pesticides have been undertaken, with

  9. Archives: South African Journal of Botany

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Archives: South African Journal of Botany. Journal Home > Archives: South African Journal of Botany. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. This journal has not ...

  10. Foreigners in the defence of South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gain world power. The Soviet Union is striving to subject South Africa to a communist regime which would enable it to gain access to the country's geostrategic facilities ... 20. Scientia Militaria, South African Journal of Military Studies, Vol 16, Nr 2, 1986. http://scientiamilitaria.journals.ac.za ... Battalion, the French regiments.

  11. The reinvigorated South African GRSS Chapter

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schwegmann, Colin P

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available accepted a GRSS plaque, a first for the South African GRSS Chapter. Opportunities to present current research being conducted in South Africa to the world at large and foster new international collabo- rations were the most valuable activities...

  12. South African Gastroenterology Review: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The South African Gastroenterology Review is written by specialists in the field. Its aim is to publish articles pertinent to the practising Gastroenterologist in South Africa. It is distributed to a broad spectrum of clinicians who have an interest in clinical gastroenterology and hepatology.

  13. South Asian American Writers: Geography and Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrak, Ketu H.

    1996-01-01

    Explores post-1965 South Asian American writers writing in English and the role of geography and memory and how political and societal factors of the "capitalist new world order" continue to determine the physical and metaphorical location of postcolonial writers in the diaspora. It examines South Asian American writers' compelling evocations of…

  14. South African red data book - Aves

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Siegfried, WR

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available Data sheets are provided on 101 South African bird species thought to be eligible for conservation attention. A list is also provided of 35 species which might qualify for inclusion in a revised South African Red Data Book....

  15. South Dakota ITS/CVO business plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This report defines an ITS/CVO program for the State of South Dakota. It is a Business Plan to guide the deployment of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) technology for improving commercial vehicle operations (CVO) in South Dakota. This ITS/CVO...

  16. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-01

    Feb 1, 2018 ... February 2018. ORIGINAL RESEARCH. Epidemiology of tuberculosis in South Sudan. TB is a major problem of public health in South Sudan. According to the WHO estimates for the year 2014: i) the prevalence of TB was 319 cases per 100,000 population, ii) 17,000 people were newly affected with TB,.

  17. South Africa's School Infrastructure Performance Indicator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibberd, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    While some South African schools have excellent infrastructure, others lack basic services such as water and sanitation. This article describes the school infrastructure performance indicator system (SIPIS) in South Africa. The project offers an approach that can address both the urgent provision of basic services as well as support the…

  18. in South Africa - African Journals Online

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. This study was conceptualised following pub- lication of two editorials by Professor Mike Lambert, in which he proposed a model for achieving sporting excel- lence in South Africa. A questionnaire based on the assumptions of the model was administered to the first 45 ranked swimmers in South Africa.

  19. South-central Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2005-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent south-central Alaska inventory conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). South-central Alaska has about 18.5 million acres, of which one-fifth (4 million acres) is forested. Species diversity is greatest in closed and open Sitka spruce forests, spruce...

  20. Bibliography on marine pollution in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Darracott, DA

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available The South African Committee in Oceanographic Research (SANCOR) has been requested to compile a comprehensive bibliography on marine biology in South Africa. It is hoped that it will appear in 1977. SANCOR has made funds available on its 1976 budget...

  1. Christians in South Africa: The statistical picture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Christians in South Africa; The statistical picture. Government censuses since 1960 indicate that the religious picture was already largely fixed by the 1950s. Already at that stage some 3 out of 4. South Africans identified themselves as 'Christians'. Since then this percentage grew steadily, mainly because of ...

  2. Development research in South Africa | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Ruled for decades by the systematic, violent injustice of apartheid, South Africa by the mid-1980s was subjected to international sanctions and near-universal condemnation. It was in this period — long before transition seemed likely — that IDRC opened its own new assessment of its approach to South Africa.

  3. Deprivation among unemployed South African youth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The troika of poverty, unemployment and inequality are hallmarks of the South African socio-economic landscape. With approximately one out of every four young people between the ages of 15 and 35 being employed, unemployment is a fact of life experienced by the majority of South African youth. This study sets out to ...

  4. African leafy vegetables in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5 University of Pretoria – Division of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Health Sciences, PO Box 667, Pretoria 0001, South Africa. 6 University of Pretoria ... communities of South Africa and to present information on the local nomenclature .... transform the leafy vegetables into dry products that have long shelf lives (Vorster et al., ...

  5. South African Music Studies - Vol 23 (2003)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A distinctive politics: Handel becomes historically informed in South Africa · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Rituals of Fertility and the Sacrifice of Desire: Nazarite Women's Performance in South Africa By Carol Ann Muller (1999) · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL ...

  6. Archives: South African Journal of Animal Science

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 185 ... Archives: South African Journal of Animal Science. Journal Home > Archives: South African Journal of Animal Science. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue ...

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions from South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1996-05-01

    Full Text Available South African greenhouse gas emissions contributed about 1.2% to the global increase in the greenhouse effect in 1988. South Africa generated trace gases with a radiation absorption potential over a 20-year period equivalent to 534 million tons...

  8. Feeding grounds of the eastern South Pacific humpback whale population include the South Orkney Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Dalla Rosa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on two photo-identified humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae that were sighted in different years in the proximity of the South Orkney Islands, at the boundary between the Scotia and Weddell seas (60°54.5'S—46°40.4'W and 60°42.6'S—45°33'W. One of the whales had been previously sighted off Ecuador, a breeding ground for the eastern South Pacific population. The other whale was subsequently resighted in Bransfield Strait, off the western Antarctic Peninsula, a well-documented feeding ground for the same population. These matches give support to a hypothesis that the area south of the South Orkney Islands is occupied by whales from the eastern South Pacific breeding stock. Consequently, we propose 40°W as a new longitudinal boundary between the feeding grounds associated with the eastern South Pacific and western South Atlantic breeding stocks.

  9. The Military of the New South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    African National Defence Force (SANDF) has played a critical and until now relatively unnoticed role in South Africa’s transition from international isolation as a “pariah” state and a source of instability to “peacemaker”. This will be explored by means of a comparative qualitative case-based analysis...... in the South African government’s foreign policy drive in Africa. However, the new foreign policy role prerequisite that the state uses it military tool, the SANDF, in accordance with internal law and dominant norms. The role of the defence force stand in stark contrast to the role played by the old South......Preface Today, you, South Africans, are for the world, for Africa, for France, a model. A model for harmony between communities with such different roots. A model for good governance. A model for cultural diversity…. (Dominique De Villepin, 2003) This book attempts to demonstrate that the South...

  10. Strengthening pharmacovigilance in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, U; Dheda, M; Steel, G; Blockman, M; Ntilivamunda, A; Maartens, G; Pillay, Y; Cohen, K

    2014-02-01

    This report outlines findings and recommendations of a national pharmacovigilance workshop held in August 2012 in South Africa (SA). A survey of current pharmacovigilance activities, conducted in preparation for the meeting, identified multiple programmes collecting drug safety data in SA, with limited co-ordination at national level. The meeting resolved that existing pharmacovigilance programmes need to be strengthened and consolidated to ensure that important local safety issues are addressed, data can be pooled and compared and outputs shared more widely. Pharmacovigilance activities should inform treatment guidelines with the goal of improving patient care. A variety of pharmaco-epidemiological approaches should be employed, including nesting drug safety studies within existing sentinel cohorts and the creation of a pregnancy exposure registry. The attendees agreed on key principles that will inform a national pharmacovigilance plan and compiled a list of priority pharmacovigilance issues facing public health programmes in SA.

  11. Healing spirits of South Kanara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, N K

    1987-12-01

    In South Kanara, India (formerly the kingdom of Tulunadu), and area stretching some 150 miles along the Arabian Sea and 25 to 50 miles inland, ancient forms of rural pageantry in honor of particular local Spirits are enacted yearly. These ritualized performances include elements of masked folk drama and epic recitation and serve a valued social role as a form of healing and counselling within village communities. Contemporary practitioner-patient interactions are part of an intricate tapestry partaking of customs occurring since times long past, such as the kinship structure (aliya-santana or nephew inheritance), the geopolitical milieu and the myths of Tulunadu. The power of these healing Spirits lies in their ability to reproduce social form through the cultural idiom of therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Ophthalmology of South american camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gionfriddo, Juliet R

    2010-11-01

    In the past 10 years, information about South American camelid anatomy, physiology, medicine, and surgery has increased exponentially, including information about the eye. Although trauma-related diseases are the most common eye problems for which camelids are presented to veterinarians, there have recently been many anecdotal reports and published case reports of camelids having ocular malignancies and potentially hereditary ocular abnormalities. The increased number of ocular diseases being reported may be because of increased recognition of camelid diseases or an increase in these diseases as a result of restricted gene pools as a consequence of inbreeding. As the popularity of camelids is steadily increasing, owners are becoming more knowledgeable about their animals, and there is more need for veterinarians who understand their ocular anatomy, physiology, disease susceptibility, and recommended treatments. This article provides the relevant information about the eye. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. South-South cooperation in health: bringing in theory, politics, history, and social justice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Emanuelle Birn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Since the mid-2000s, the practice of South-South cooperation in health (SSC has attracted growing attention among policymakers, health and foreign affairs ministries, global health agencies, and scholars from a range of fields. But the South-South label elucidates little about the actual content of the cooperation and conflates the “where” with the “who, what, how, and why”. While there have been some attempts to theorize global health diplomacy and South-South cooperation generally, these efforts do not sufficiently distinguish among the different kinds of practices and political values that fall under the South-South rubric, ranging from economic and geopolitical interests to social justice forms of solidarity. In the spirit of deepening theoretical, historical, and social justice analyses of SSC, this article: (1 critically revisits international relations theories that seek to explain SSC, exploring Marxian and other heterodox theories ignored in the mainstream literature; (2 traces the historical provenance of a variety of forms of SSC; and (3 introduces the concept of social justice-oriented South-South.

  14. South-South cooperation in health: bringing in theory, politics, history, and social justice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle; Muntaner, Carles; Afzal, Zabia

    2017-10-02

    Since the mid-2000s, the practice of South-South cooperation in health (SSC) has attracted growing attention among policymakers, health and foreign affairs ministries, global health agencies, and scholars from a range of fields. But the South-South label elucidates little about the actual content of the cooperation and conflates the "where" with the "who, what, how, and why". While there have been some attempts to theorize global health diplomacy and South-South cooperation generally, these efforts do not sufficiently distinguish among the different kinds of practices and political values that fall under the South-South rubric, ranging from economic and geopolitical interests to social justice forms of solidarity. In the spirit of deepening theoretical, historical, and social justice analyses of SSC, this article: (1) critically revisits international relations theories that seek to explain SSC, exploring Marxian and other heterodox theories ignored in the mainstream literature; (2) traces the historical provenance of a variety of forms of SSC; and (3) introduces the concept of social justice-oriented South-South.

  15. How Frequently Can a "Supervolcano" Erupt? Rapid Emplacement of Voluminous Compositionally Diverse Ignimbrites, Central San Juan Calderas, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, P. W.; McIntosh, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution single-crystal laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar age determinations on sanidine phenocrysts document sequential eruption of four multi-hundred cubic-kilometer ignimbrites and associated lavas flows from calderas in the central San Juan Mountains, Colorado within a cumulative time interval of less than 50-100 ka. The tight recurrence interval was not evident from previous incremental-heating 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages, which were stratigraphically inconsistent on time scales beyond analytical precision. The new single- crystal results show that three tuff sheets, Rat Creek (>150 km3), Cebolla Creek (>250 km3), and Nelson Mountain Tuffs Creek (>500 km3) from spatially overlapping sources in the San Luis- Cochetopa caldera complex, erupted between 26.92±0.05 and 26.91±0.03 Ma (9 separate samples). A sequence of four postcollapse lavas at Cochetopa erupted at 26.86±0.04 Ma (6 samples) while an andesitic stratocone grew within San Luis caldera complex. Concurrently, Snowshoe Mountain Tuff (>500 km3) erupted from the Creede caldera, 20 km to the south, at 26.87±0.05 Ma (5 samples). Within this limited time interval, eruptive compositions fluctuated widely. Rat Creek and Nelson Mountain Tuffs are compositionally zoned from crystal-poor low-Si rhyolite to cpx-bearing dacite, while the intervening Cebolla Creek Tuff is uniform mafic hbl-rich dacite. Cochetopa Dome lavas are nearly aphyric high-Si rhyolite, while Snowshoe Mountain Tuff is crystal-rich low-Si cpx-bearing dacite. For comparison, four ignimbrites from Aso caldera in southern Japan, with a cumulative volume of ~300 km3, erupted at 270, 140, 120, and 90 ka (Nakada et al., 2003); four overlapping caldera collapses at Santorini in the Aegean were each associated with silicic tuff with volumes of several tens of kilometers, at 203, ~100, 21, and 3.6 ka (Druitt, 1999). In contrast, larger "supervolcano" systems, such as Yellowstone, commonly have repose periods of 0.5- 1x106 m.y., even when eruptive compositions

  16. An overview of South African psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Saths; Nicholas, Lionel

    2012-01-01

    This overview of psychology in South Africa presents a concise and historical account of its science and practice, from its early origins in the late nineteenth century to the present, and traces seminal influences on the discipline. It is a review of how psychology in South Africa developed over more than a century to become one of the most popular subjects in universities and an established and recognized profession, whose members play a variety of roles in the South African polity and larger society. The impact that apartheid racism had on key aspects of psychology's development is traversed, and the influences that previous ruling party politics had on professional psychological organizations are delineated. The unification of psychology under the Psychological Society of South Africa, a few months before the advent of democracy in South Africa, is explicated. The protection of the title of psychologist in law and certain other changes in the legislative environment, enabling a greater role for psychologists, are reported. The primary research sites for psychology and its funding and the main university psychology programs are described, as are the requirements for registration and licensure. The genesis and the importance of the work of internationally acclaimed South African psychologists, such as J. Wolpe and A. A. Lazarus, are contextualized. With the increased participation of progressive black psychologists in leadership and research in the past two decades, a transformed psychology has the potential to play a significant role in addressing human issues confronting South Africa.

  17. The lightning climatology of South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Morné Gijben

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the South African Weather Service installed a state-of-the-art cloud-to-ground lightning detection network across the country. The data recorded by this network in 2006 was utilised in the development of an initial lightning climatology of South Africa. Until 2010, this climatology was based on data from a single year. This paper updates this climatology with the lightning data for the 2006–2010 period, which is the first actual lightning climatology by the South African Weather Serv...

  18. E-Voting: A South African Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanepoel, E.; Thomson, K.; van Niekerk, J. F.

    The South African democracy, despite being worthy of admiration, is in its infancy. As such its electoral processes still needs to be nurtured and protected. Since 1994 there has been four national elections. All of these have been declared "free and fair" by the Independent Electoral Commission. However, there has been some problems and growing pains. This paper firstly discusses the current electoral system in South Africa. It then examines E-voting systems and discusses the feasibility of such a voting system for use in the South African context.

  19. 21st Century South African Science Fiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARAIVAN LUIZA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses some aspects of South African science fiction, starting with its beginnings in the 1920s and focusing on some 21st century writings. Thus Lauren Beukes’ novels Moxyland (2008 and Zoo City (2010 are taken into consideration in order to present new trends in South African literature and the way science fiction has been marked by Apartheid. The second South African science fiction writer whose writings are examined is Henrietta Rose-Innes (with her novel Nineveh, published in 2011 as this consolidates women's presence in the SF world.

  20. Africa-Asia regional partnerships and South-South development cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2018-01-01

    , the current linkages between Africa and Asia such as those related to development cooperation form an alternative to development cooperation efforts initiated by European or North American countries. Furthermore, the African and Asian stakeholders have defined South-South Cooperation to encompass many other...... aspects of cooperation than development. In an attempt to answer the question how Africa-Asia regional partnerships and South-South development cooperation (SSDC) have influenced each other in shaping South-South cooperation (SSC) since the turn of the Millennium, this chapter identifies two shifts...... of the New Asia-Africa Strategic Partnership (NAASP) explicitly referred to the NEPAD framework. The second shift came ten years later at the second NAASP Summit in 2015, when a general climate of reconsidering the aid paradigm contributed to a move away from a development to a public-private partnership...