WorldWideScience

Sample records for santa barbara wildfire

  1. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  2. Contours--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps (see sheets 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara...

  3. Habitat--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor (see sheet 7, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The vector...

  4. Folds--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  5. Faults--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California....

  6. Folds--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California....

  7. Faults--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  8. Faults--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  9. Folds--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for folds for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  10. Contours--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps (see sheets 1, 2, 3, 7, 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map...

  11. Bathymetry--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  12. Hyperspectral Ocean Color Science: Santa Barbara Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    goal of the PnB in situ sampling program is to develop state-of-the- art ocean color algorithms for Case II waters like those found in the Santa Barbara...S.Maritorena and W. Robinson, 1999: Atmospheric correction of satellite ocean color imagery: The black pixel assumption. Submitted to Applied Optics. Toole

  13. Preliminary geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Stone, Paul; Powell, Charles L.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Selting, Amy J.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents a new geologic digital map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map = 2,000 feet on the ground) and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. This preliminary map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Santa Barbara and Goleta 7.5' quadrangles. A planned second version will extend the mapping westward into the adjoining Dos Pueblos Canyon quadrangle and eastward into the Carpinteria quadrangle. The mapping presented here results from the collaborative efforts of geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey Southern California Areal Mapping Project (SCAMP) (Minor, Kellogg, Stanley, Stone, and Powell) and the tectonic geomorphology research group at the University of California at Santa Barbara (Gurrola and Selting). C.L. Powell, II, performed all new fossil identifications and interpretations reported herein. T.R. Brandt designed and edited the GIS database,performed GIS database integration and created the digital cartography for the map layout. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along a west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Los Angeles. The coastal plain region, which extends from the Santa Ynez Mountains on the north to the Santa Barbara Channel on the south, is underlain by numerous active and potentially active folds and partly buried thrust faults of the Santa Barbara fold and fault belt. Strong earthquakes that occurred in the region in 1925 (6.8 magnitude) and 1978 (5.1 magnitude) are evidence that such structures pose a significant earthquake hazard to the approximately 200,000 people living within the major coastal population centers of Santa Barbara and Goleta. Also, young landslide deposits along the steep lower flank of the Santa

  14. 77 FR 36955 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara Harbor, Santa Barbara, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... cruise ship located within 3 nautical miles of the Santa Barbara Harbor Breakwater Light (Light List... impact a terrorist attack against a cruise ship would have on the public interest, the Coast Guard... sea floor within a 100-yard radius of any cruise ship which is located within 3 nautical miles...

  15. Geologic Map of the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain Area, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Gurrola, Larry D.; Keller, Edward A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a newly revised and expanded digital geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain area at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map to 2,000 feet on the ground)1 and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying and adjacent to the coastal plain within the contiguous Dos Pueblos Canyon, Goleta, Santa Barbara, and Carpinteria 7.5' quadrangles. The new map supersedes an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002; revised 2006) that provided coastal coverage only within the Goleta and Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping to the west and east, geologic mapping in parts of the central map area has been significantly revised from the preliminary map compilation - especially north of downtown Santa Barbara in the Mission Ridge area - based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units, including several new units recognized in the areas of expanded mapping, are described in detail in the accompanying pamphlet. Abundant new biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault kinematic observations embedded in the digital map database are more complete owing to the addition of slip-sense determinations. Finally, the pamphlet accompanying the present report includes an expanded and refined summary of stratigraphic and structural observations and interpretations that are based on the composite geologic data contained in the new map compilation. The Santa Barbara coastal plain is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest

  16. 33 CFR 80.1126 - Santa Barbara Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. 80.1126 Section 80.1126 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1126 Santa Barbara Harbor, CA. A line...

  17. Santa Barbara Cluster Comparison Test with DISPH

    CERN Document Server

    Saitoh, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    The Santa Barbara cluster comparison project (Frenk et al. Frenk+1999) revealed that there is a systematic difference between entropy profiles of clusters of galaxies obtained by Eulerian mesh and Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) codes: Mesh codes gave a core with a constant entropy whereas SPH codes did not. One possible reason for this difference is that mesh codes are not Galilean invariant. Another possible reason is the problem of the SPH method, which might give too much "protection" to cold clumps because of the unphysical surface tension induced at contact discontinuities. In this paper, we apply the density independent formulation of SPH (DISPH), which can handle contact discontinuities accurately, to simulations of a cluster of galaxies, and compare the results with those with the standard SPH. We obtained the entropy core when we adopt DISPH. The size of the core is, however, significantly smaller than those obtained with mesh simulations, and is comparable to those obtained with qu...

  18. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  19. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  20. Backscatter B [USGS]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  1. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  2. Seafloor character--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the seafloor-character map (see sheet 5, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The raster data...

  3. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The vector...

  4. Backscatter A [CSUMB]--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for part of the acoustic-backscatter map (see sheet 3, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  5. Santa Barbara, California Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Santa Barbara, California Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST)...

  6. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This report presents bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data collected in July 2008 in the northern Santa Barbara Channel, California, using a bathymetric sidescan...

  7. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map (see sheet 10, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The vector...

  8. Seafloor character--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the seafloor-character map (see sheet 5, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The raster data...

  9. Santa Barbara Cluster Comparison Test with DISPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Takayuki R.; Makino, Junichiro

    2016-06-01

    The Santa Barbara cluster comparison project revealed that there is a systematic difference between entropy profiles of clusters of galaxies obtained by Eulerian mesh and Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) codes: mesh codes gave a core with a constant entropy, whereas SPH codes did not. One possible reason for this difference is that mesh codes are not Galilean invariant. Another possible reason is the problem of the SPH method, which might give too much “protection” to cold clumps because of the unphysical surface tension induced at contact discontinuities. In this paper, we apply the density-independent formulation of SPH (DISPH), which can handle contact discontinuities accurately, to simulations of a cluster of galaxies and compare the results with those with the standard SPH. We obtained the entropy core when we adopt DISPH. The size of the core is, however, significantly smaller than those obtained with mesh simulations and is comparable to those obtained with quasi-Lagrangian schemes such as “moving mesh” and “mesh free” schemes. We conclude that both the standard SPH without artificial conductivity and Eulerian mesh codes have serious problems even with such an idealized simulation, while DISPH, SPH with artificial conductivity, and quasi-Lagrangian schemes have sufficient capability to deal with it.

  10. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of SIM 3281 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps (see sheets 1, 2, SIM 3281) of the Offshore of Santa Barbara map area, California. The...

  11. California State Waters Map Series: offshore of Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Phillips, Eleyne L.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Greene, H. Gary; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Endris, Charles A.; Seitz, Gordon G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Gutierrez, Carlos I.; Wong, Florence L.; Yoklavich, Mary M.; Draut, Amy E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Conrad, James E.; Cochran, Susan A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath sonar data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow (to about 100 m) subsurface geology. The Offshore of Santa Barbara map area lies within the central Santa Barbara Channel region of the Southern California Bight. This geologically complex region forms a major biogeographic transition zone, separating the cold-temperate Oregonian province north of Point Conception from the warm-temperate California province to the south. The map area is in the southern part of the Western Transverse Ranges geologic province, which is north of the California Continental Borderland. Significant clockwise rotation—at least 90°—since the early Miocene has been proposed for the Western Transverse Ranges province, and geodetic studies indicate that the region is presently undergoing north-south shortening. Uplift rates (as much as 2.2 mm/yr) that are based on studies of onland marine terraces provide further evidence of significant shortening. The city of Santa Barbara, the main coastal population center in the map area, is part of a contiguous urban area that extends from Carpinteria to Goleta. This urban area was developed on the coalescing alluvial surfaces, uplifted marine terraces, and low hills that lie south of the east-west-trending Santa Ynez Mountains. Several beaches line the actively

  12. Groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Coastal Plain, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater provides more than 40 percent of California’s drinking water. To protect this vital resource, the State of California established the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The Priority Basin Project of the GAMA Program provides a comprehensive assessment of the State’s groundwater quality and increases public access to groundwater-quality information. The Santa Barbara Coastal Plain is one of the study units.

  13. UC Santa Barbara physicist wins prestigious European award

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The prestigious High Energy and Particle Physics Prize of the European Physical Society for 2003 has been awarded to David Gross, a professor of physics and director of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He shares the prize with two other Americans - Frank Wilczek of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology ... and David Politzer of the California Institute of Technology. They are the first Americans to ever receive the award" (1 page).

  14. Geologic Map of the Goleta Quadrangle, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Kellogg, Karl S.; Stanley, Richard G.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2007-01-01

    This map depicts the distribution of bedrock units and surficial deposits and associated deformation underlying those parts of the Santa Barbara coastal plain and adjacent southern flank of the Santa Ynez Mountains within the Goleta 7 ?? quadrangle at a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map = 2,000 feet on the ground) and with a horizontal positional accuracy of at least 20 m. The Goleta map overlaps an earlier preliminary geologic map of the central part of the coastal plain (Minor and others, 2002) that provided coverage within the coastal, central parts of the Goleta and contiguous Santa Barbara quadrangles. In addition to new mapping in the northern part of the Goleta quadrangle, geologic mapping in other parts of the map area has been revised from the preliminary map compilation based on new structural interpretations supplemented by new biostratigraphic data. All surficial and bedrock map units are described in detail in the accompanying map pamphlet. Abundant biostratigraphic and biochronologic data based on microfossil identifications are presented in expanded unit descriptions of the marine Neogene Monterey and Sisquoc Formations. Site-specific fault-kinematic observations (including slip-sense determinations) are embedded in the digital map database. The Goleta quadrangle is located in the western Transverse Ranges physiographic province along an east-west-trending segment of the southern California coastline about 100 km (62 mi) northwest of Los Angeles. The Santa Barbara coastal plain surface, which spans the central part of the quadrangle, includes several mesas and hills that are geomorphic expressions of underlying, potentially active folds and partly buried oblique and reverse faults of the Santa Barbara fold and fault belt (SBFFB). Strong earthquakes have occurred offshore within 10 km of the Santa Barbara coastal plain in 1925 (6.3 magnitude), 1941 (5.5 magnitude) and 1978 (5.1 magnitude). These and numerous smaller seismic events

  15. Seafloor character from air-photo data-Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Seafloor character was derived from interpretations of aerial photograph-derived kelp-distribution data available for Santa Cruz Island in the Santa Barbara Channel,...

  16. The Santa Barbara Basin is a symbiosis oasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, J M; Buck, K R; Farmer, M A; Bowser, S S

    2000-01-06

    It is generally agreed that the origin and initial diversification of Eucarya occurred in the late Archaean or Proterozoic Eons when atmospheric oxygen levels were low and the risk of DNA damage due to ultraviolet radiation was high. Because deep water provides refuge against ultraviolet radiation and early eukaryotes may have been aerotolerant anaerobes, deep-water dysoxic environments are likely settings for primeval eukaryotic diversification. Fossil evidence shows that deep-sea microbial mats, possibly of sulphur bacteria similar to Beggiatoa, existed during that time. Here we report on the eukaryotic community of a modern analogue, the Santa Barbara Basin (California, USA). The Beggiatoa mats of these severely dysoxic and sulphidic sediments support a surprisingly abundant protistan and metazoan meiofaunal community, most members of which harbour prokaryotic symbionts. Many of these taxa are new to science, and both microaerophilic and anaerobic taxa appear to be represented. Compared with nearby aerated sites, the Santa Barbara Basin is a 'symbiosis oasis' offering a new source of organisms for testing symbiosis hypotheses of eukaryogenesis.

  17. 76 FR 60405 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District, Sacramento Municipal Air Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality... proposing to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District (SBAPCD),...

  18. Coastal Processes Study of Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Revell, David L.; Hoover, Dan; Warrick, Jon; Brocatus, John; Draut, Amy E.; Dartnell, Pete; Elias, Edwin; Mustain, Neomi; Hart, Pat E.; Ryan, Holly F.

    2009-01-01

    The Santa Barbara littoral cell (SBLC) is a complex coastal system with significant management challenges. The coastline ranges broadly in exposure to wave energy, fluvial inputs, hard structures, and urbanization. Geologic influence (structural control) on coastline orientation exerts an important control on local beach behavior, with anthropogenic alterations and the episodic nature of sediment supply and transport also playing important roles. Short- and long-term temporal analyses of shoreline change, beach width, and volume change show no obvious trends in regional beach behavior. Extensive armoring along the SBLC has accreted the back beach, narrowing beach widths and in some cases increasing sediment transport. Unarmored beaches have exhibited mild erosion while maintaining similar widths. Harbor constructions have had notable impacts on downdrift beaches, but once the coastal system has equilibrated the signal becomes strongly dampened and littoral-drift gradients driven by natural shoreline orientation again become dominant. Sediment inputs from the Santa Clara River dominate sediment processes on beaches to the south. The SBLC is dominated by episodic flood and storm-wave events. Exceptionally large accretion signals along this stretch of coastline are closely tied to major flood events when large amounts of sediment are deposited in deltas. These deltas decay over time, supplying downdrift beaches with sediment. Storm-wave impacts and gradients in alongshore transport can lead to beach rotations and migrating erosion hotspots when geological controls are weak. Annual and seasonal rates of cross-shore and alongshore transport are at least 2-3 times higher for the more west- and southwest-facing beaches south of the Ventura River as compared to the more sheltered beaches to the west/north. Gross littoral transports are good approximations of net littoral transports for beaches west/north of Ventura as transport is almost purely unidirectional. However

  19. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Santa Barbara, California, is often called 'America's Riviera.' It enjoys a Mediterranean climate, a mountain backdrop, and a long and varied coastline. This perspective view of the Santa Barbara region was generated using data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced Landsat satellite image. The view is toward the northeast, from the Goleta Valley in the foreground to a snow-capped Mount Abel (elevation 2526 m or 8286 feet) along the skyline. The coast here generally faces south. Consequently, Fall and Winter sunrises occur over the ocean, which is unusual for the U.S. west coast. The Santa Barbara 'back country' is very rugged and largely remains as undeveloped wilderness and an important watershed for local communities. Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data match the 30-meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors approximate natural colors.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface.To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200-feet) long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise,Washington, D.C. JPL is a

  20. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Pete; Finlayson, David; Conrad, Jamie; Cochrane, Guy; Johnson, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, as part of the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) the U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology mapped a nearshore region of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in Southern California (fig 1). The CSMP is a cooperative partnership between Federal and State agencies, Universities, and Industry to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat basemap series to support the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) inititive. The program is supported by the California Ocean Protection Council and the California Coastal Conservancy. The 2008 mapping collected high resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data using a bathymetric side scan system within State waters from about the 10-m isobath out over 3-nautical miles. This Open-File Report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and FGDC metadata.

  1. 75 FR 45082 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) portion of the California State Implementation Plan (SIP... Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Ozone, Reporting... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County...

  2. Data for Southern Sea Otter Range Expansion and Habitat Use in the Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are .csv files of capture data from tagged sea otters in the Santa Barbara Channel Study. Sea otters were captured using highly specialized techniques...

  3. SRTM Perspective View with Landsat Overlay: Santa Barbara Coastline, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Santa Barbara, California, region provides a beautiful snapshot of the area's rugged mountains and long and varied coastline. Generated using data acquired from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced Landsat image this is a perspective view toward the northeast, from the Goleta Valley in the foreground to a snow-capped Mount Abel (elevation 2,526 m or 8,286 feet) along the skyline at the left. On a clear day, a pilot might see a similar view shortly before touching down on the east-west runway of the Santa Barbara Airport, seen just to the left of the coastline near the center of image. This area is one of the few places along the U.S. West Coast where because of a south-facing beach, fall and winter sunrises occur over the ocean.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data match the 30-meter(98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive. For visualization purposes, topographic heights displayed in this image are exaggerated two times. Colors approximate natural colors.The elevation data used in this image was acquired by SRTM aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11,2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of Earth's land surface. To collect the 3-D SRTM data, engineers added a mast 60 meters (about 200-feet)long, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense, and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise

  4. Metagenomes from two microbial consortia associated with Santa Barbara seep oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Erik R; Malfatti, Stephanie A; Pagani, Ioanna; Huntemann, Marcel; Chen, Amy; Foster, Brian; Copeland, Alexander; del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Pati, Amrita; Jansson, Janet R; Gilbert, Jack A; Tringe, Susannah Green; Lorenson, Thomas D; Hess, Matthias

    2014-12-01

    The metagenomes from two microbial consortia associated with natural oils seeping into the Pacific Ocean offshore the coast of Santa Barbara (California, USA) were determined to complement already existing metagenomes generated from microbial communities associated with hydrocarbons that pollute the marine ecosystem. This genomics resource article is the first of two publications reporting a total of four new metagenomes from oils that seep into the Santa Barbara Channel.

  5. Water-resources optimization model for Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A simulation-optimization model has been developed for the optimal management of the city of Santa Barbara's water resources during a drought. The model, which links groundwater simulation with linear programming, has a planning horizon of 5 years. The objective is to minimize the cost of water supply subject to: water demand constraints, hydraulic head constraints to control seawater intrusion, and water capacity constraints. The decision variables are montly water deliveries from surface water and groundwater. The state variables are hydraulic heads. The drought of 1947-51 is the city's worst drought on record, and simulated surface-water supplies for this period were used as a basis for testing optimal management of current water resources under drought conditions. The simulation-optimization model was applied using three reservoir operation rules. In addition, the model's sensitivity to demand, carry over [the storage of water in one year for use in the later year(s)], head constraints, and capacity constraints was tested.

  6. Mineralogical characterization of the argillaceous material from the Municipality of Santa Barbara, Para, Brazil; Caracterizacao mineralogica de material argiloso proveniente do municipio de Santa Barbara, Para, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrando, E.A., E-mail: edemarino@ufpa.b [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Maraba, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia de Materiais. Lab. de Materiais Ceramicos; Sheller, T.; Angelica, R.S. [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Geologia. Inst. de Geociencias; Neves, R.S. [Universidade Federal do Para (UFPA), Belem, PA (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Quimica. Inst. de Tecnologia

    2009-07-01

    In the present work were investigated mineralogical phases in a material with argillaceous characteristic of the region of Genipauba, Santa Barbara, State of Para. Characterization of the collected sample was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). The results of the assays indicate the presence of the clay minerals like kaolinite and muscovite, as well as minerals as quartz and anatase. (author)

  7. Nutrient contributions to the Santa Barbara Channel, California, from the ephemeral Santa Clara River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, J.A.; Washburn, L.; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Siegel, D.A.

    2005-01-01

    The Santa Clara River delivers nutrient rich runoff to the eastern Santa Barbara Channel during brief (???1-3 day) episodic events. Using both river and oceanographic measurements, we evaluate river loading and dispersal of dissolved macronutrients (silicate, inorganic N and P) and comment on the biological implications of these nutrient contributions. Both river and ocean observations suggest that river nutrient concentrations are inversely related to river flow rates. Land use is suggested to influence these concentrations, since runoff from a subwatershed with substantial agriculture and urban areas had much higher nitrate than runoff from a wooded subwatershed. During runoff events, river nutrients were observed to conservatively mix into the buoyant, surface plume immediately seaward of the Santa Clara River mouth. Dispersal of these river nutrients extended 10s of km into the channel. Growth of phytoplankton and nutrient uptake was low during our observations (1-3 days following runoff), presumably due to the very low light levels resulting from high turbidity. However, nutrient quality of runoff (Si:N:P = 16:5:1) was found to be significantly different than upwelling inputs (13:10:1), which may influence different algal responses once sediments settle. Evaluation of total river nitrate loads suggests that most of the annual river nutrient fluxes to the ocean occur during the brief winter flooding events. Wet winters (such as El Nin??o) contribute nutrients at rates approximately an order-of-magnitude greater than "average" winters. Although total river nitrate delivery is considerably less than that supplied by upwelling, the timing and location of these types of events are very different, with river discharge (upwelling) occurring predominantly in the winter (summer) and in the eastern (western) channel. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Environmental Assessment: Western Range Instrumentation Modernization Program Vandenberg Air Force Base, Santa Barbara County, and Pillar Point Air Force Station, San Mateo County California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-03

    Ynez, CA University of California, Library, Santa Barbara, CA University of California, Museum of Systematics & Ecology, Santa Barbara, CA U.S. Fish...Arnold, R.A. 1983. Ecological studies of six endangered butterflies ( Lepidoptera : Lycaenidae): island biogeography, patch dynamics, and the design of...of Vandenberg AFB, Santa Barbara County, California. Museum of Systematics and Ecology, Report No. 4, University of California, Santa Barbara, in

  9. 75 FR 77000 - South Coast Conduit/Upper Reach Reliability Project, Santa Barbara County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... Bureau of Reclamation South Coast Conduit/Upper Reach Reliability Project, Santa Barbara County, CA... (Reclamation), the Federal lead agency, and the Cachuma Operation and Maintenance Board (COMB), the State lead agency, have prepared a Final EIS/EIR for the South Coast Conduit/Upper Reach Reliability Project (SCC...

  10. 76 FR 60376 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control District... Control District, Sacramento Municipal Air Quality Management District and South Coast Air Quality... the environment. Section 110(a) of the CAA requires States to submit regulations that control...

  11. 78 FR 32274 - Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... National Park Service Scorpion Pier Replacement Project, Channel Islands National Park, Santa Barbara... analysis process for the proposed replacement and potential relocation of the existing Scorpion Pier at..., Attn: Scorpion Pier Project, 1901 Spinnaker Drive, Ventura, CA 93001 or electronically to...

  12. Holocene Intermediate Water Variability in the Northeast Pacific: A Santa Barbara Basin 14C Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friddell, J. E.; Thunell, B.; Guilderson, T.; Roark, B.

    2009-05-01

    Pairs of benthic and planktonic foraminiferal 14C dates from the Santa Barbara Basin, offshore southern California, are used to assess millennial-scale hydrographic changes in the northeast Pacific during the Holocene. Current models of North Pacific Intermediate Water formation during the last glacial and the Holocene vary widely in their predicted relationships between thermal conditions in the north Pacific, 14C age and oxygen content of the Santa Barbara Basin's sub-sill bottom waters, and productivity in the basin's surface waters. Using benthic-planktonic 14C age differences as a proxy for North Pacific Intermediate Water influence on the basin's bottom waters and biogenic silica and sedimentary bioturbation as records of past productivity and bottom-water oxygenation, we test our data against these various models. It appears that the different models can be reconciled by invoking bifurcation of eastward-moving intermediate water along the North American coast: Changes in the benthic-planktonic 14C age difference and other proxies in Santa Barbara Basin can be explained by movement of the bifurcation point to the north or south during warm and cool intervals of the Holocene. Inferred behavior of water at intermediate depths on the northeast Pacific margin is compared with surface conditions and with records of deep circulation from the North Atlantic, with the Santa Barbara Basin records supporting surface and intermediate connection between the two ocean basins at millennial time scales during the Holocene.

  13. The Santa Barbara Channel - Santa Maria Basin Study: Wind Measurements and Modeling Resolving Coastal Mesoscale Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, C. E.; Koracin, D.

    2002-12-01

    The importance of winds in driving the coastal ocean has long been recognized. Pre-World War II literature links wind stress and wind stress curl to coastal ocean responses. Nevertheless, direct measurements plausibly representative of a coastal area are few. Multiple observations on the scale of the simplest mesoscale atmospheric structure, such as the cross-coast variation along a linear coast, are even less frequent. The only wind measurements that we are aware of in a complicated coastal area backed by higher topography are in the MMS sponsored, Santa Barbara Channel/Santa Marina basin study. Taking place from 1994 to present, this study had an unheard of dense surface automated meteorological station array of up to 5 meteorological buoys, 4 oil platforms, 2 island stations, and 11 coastal stations within 1 km of the beach. Most of the land stations are maintained by other projects. Only a large, a well funded project with backed by an agency with the long-view could dedicate the resources and effort into filling the mesoscale "holes" and maintaining long-term, remotely located stations. The result of the MMS funded project is a sufficiently dense surface station array to resolve the along-coast and cross-coast atmospheric mesoscale wind structure. Great temporal and spatial variation is found in the wind, wind stress and the wind stress curl, during the extended summer season. The MM5 atmospheric mesoscale model with appropriate boundary layer physics and high-resolution horizontal and vertical grid structure successfully simulates the measured wind field from large scale down to the lower end of the mesoscale. Atmospheric models without appropriate resolution and boundary layer physics fail to capture significant mesoscale wind features. Satellite microwave wind measurements generally capture the offshore synoptic scale temporal and spatial scale in twice-a-day snap shots but fail in the crucial, innermost coastal waters and the diurnal scale.

  14. Submarine landslides in the Santa Barbara Channel as potential tsunami sources

    OpenAIRE

    Greene, H. G.; Murai, L. Y.; Watts, P; Maher, N. A.; Fisher, M. A.; Paull, C. E.; Eichhubl, P.

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Recent investigations using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institutes (MBARI) Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) "Ventana" and "Tiburon" and interpretation of MBARI's EM 300 30 kHz multibeam bathymetric data show that the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin has experienced massive slope failures. Of particular concern is the large (130 km2) Goleta landslide complex located off Coal Oil Point near the town of Goleta, that measures 14.6-km long extending from a ...

  15. Condensed matter research using the UCSB FEL. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara Free Electron Laser project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) Free Electron Laser (FEL) project was initiated in 1981 to test the idea of using an electrostatic accelerator in a recirculating beam mode to produce high-power, continuously tunable, coherent far infrared radiation. The development and application of this device to condensed matter research are briefly recounted. Emphasis was on semiconductor research and two-photon experiments. (RWR)

  16. A Statistical Analysis of Santa Barbara Ambulance Response in 2006: Performance Under Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang, Joshua C

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Ambulance response times in Santa Barbara County for 2006 are analyzed using point process techniques, including kernel intensity estimates and K-functions. Clusters of calls result in significantly higher response times, and this effect is quantified. In particular, calls preceded by other calls within 20 km and within the previous hour are significantly more likely to result in violations. This effect appears to be especially pronounced within semi-rural neighborhoods.[WestJEM. 2009;10:42-47.

  17. Southern sea otter range expansion and habitat use in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, M. Tim; Tomoleoni, Joseph; LaRoche, Nicole; Bowen, Lizabeth; Miles, A. Keith; Murray, Mike; Staedler, Michelle; Randell, Zachary

    2017-01-17

    The re-colonization of the Santa Barbara channel by sea otters brings these ESA-listed marine mammals closer to active oil and gas production facilities, shipping lanes and naturally occurring oil and gas seeps. However, the degree to which sea otters may actually be affected by human-caused oil spills or exposure to natural oil seeps is currently unknown. Between 2012 and 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey and collaborating agencies conducted a telemetry-based study of sea otters in Santa Barbara channel, in order to provide critical information for resource managers (specifically the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, henceforth BOEM, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, henceforth USFWS) about the spatial ecology, population status, and potential population threats to sea otters in Santa Barbara Channel, with particular reference to exposure to manmade structures and sources of oil and natural gas. Analysis of spatial monitoring data using a Bayesian-based synoptic model allowed for description of sea otter home ranges, identification of hot-spots of use, and insights into habitat selection behavior by male and female sea otters. Important findings included the deeper modal depth preferred by males versus females, strong preferences by both sexes for areas with persistent kelp canopy, and greater use of soft-sediment areas by males. The synoptic model also provided the ability to predict population-level density distribution for each sex in new habitats: by calculating the value of these probability density distributions at the known locations of natural seeps, we were able to identify those seeps with higher potential for sea otter encounters. The relative probability of occurrence at locations near to some seeps was sufficiently high (about 1% likelihood of occurrence for some of our study animals) that one would anticipate occasional encounters. Data on male and female survival, reproductive success, activity budgets, and body condition all indicated that

  18. Breschini and Haversat, eds.: Analysis of South-Central California Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of South-Central Californian Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties. Gary S. Breschmi and Trudy Haversat, eds. Salinas: Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory No. 23, 1988, xiv + 105 pp., 21 figs., 28 tables, $8.70, (paper).

  19. Developing and Validating a Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, S. B.; Rolinski, T.; DAgostino, B.; Vanderburg, S.; Fovell, R. G.; Cao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Santa Ana winds, common to southern California during the fall through spring, are a type of katabatic wind that originates from a direction generally ranging from 360°/0° to 100° and is usually accompanied by very low humidity. Since fuel conditions tend to be driest from late September through the middle of November, Santa Ana winds occurring during this period have the greatest potential to produce large, devastating fires when an ignition occurs. Such catastrophic fires occurred in 1993, 2003, 2007, and 2008. Because of the destructive nature of these fires, there has been a growing desire to categorize Santa Ana wind events in much the same way that tropical cyclones have been categorized. The Santa Ana Wildfire Threat index (SAWT) is an attempt to categorize such events with respect to fire activity, based on surface wind velocity, dew point depression, and forecasted fuel conditions. The index, a USDA Forest Service product, was developed by the Forest Service in collaboration with San Diego Gas and Electric Utility (SDG&E), the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at UCLA, The Desert Research Institute (DRI), and Vertum Partners. The methodology behind the SAWT index, along with the index itself will be presented in detail. Also, there will be a discussion on the construction of a 30-year climatology of the index, which includes various meteorological and fuel parameters. We will demonstrate the usefulness of the index as another decision support tool for fire agencies and first responders, and how it could assist the general public and private industry in the preparation of critical Santa Ana wind events.

  20. Conventional U-Pb dating versus SHRIMP of the Santa Barbara Granite Massif, Rondonia, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrenberger, I.; Bettencourt, Jorge S.; Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L.

    2002-01-01

    The Santa Ba??rbara Granite Massif is part of the Younger Granites of Rondo??nia (998 - 974 Ma) and is included in the Rondo??nia Tin Province (SW Amazonian Craton). It comprises three highly fractionated metaluminous to peraluminous within-plate A-type granite units emplaced in older medium-grade metamorphic rocks. Sn-mineralization is closely associated with the late-stage unit. U-Pb monazite conventional dating of the early-stage Serra do Cicero facies and late-stage Serra Azul facies yielded ages of 993 ?? 5 Ma and 989 ?? 13 Ma, respectively. Conventional multigrain U-Pb isotope analyses of zircon demonstrate isotopic disturbance (discordance) and the preservation of inherited older zircons of several different ages and thus yield little about the ages of Sn-granite magmatism. SHRIMP U-Pb ages for the Santa Ba??rbara facies association yielded a 207Pb/206Pb weighted-mean age of 978 ?? 13 Ma. The textural complexity of the zircon crystals of the Santa Ba??rbara facies association, the variable concentrations of U, Th and Pb, as well as the mixed inheritance of zircon populations are major obstacles to using conventional multigrain U-Pb isotopic analyses. Sm-Nd model ages and ??Nd (T) values reveal anomalous isotopic data, attesting to the complex isotopic behaviour within these highly fractionated granites. Thus, SHRIMP U-Pb zircon and conventional U-Pb monazite dating methods are the most appropriate to constrain the crystallization age of the Sn-bearing granite systems in the Rondo??nia Tin Province.

  1. Data for southern sea otter range expansion and habitat use in the Santa Barbara Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, M. Tim; Tomoleoni, Joseph; Staedler, Michelle M.; LaRoche, Nicole L.; Randell, Zachary; Bowen, Lizabeth; Murray, Michael J.; Miles, A. Keith

    2017-01-01

    The current study was designed to provide critical information for resource managers (specifically the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, henceforth BOEM, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, henceforth USFWS) about the spatial ecology, population status, and potential population threats to sea otters in Santa Barbara Channel, with particular reference to exposure to manmade structures and sources of oil and natural gas. Our four primary research objectives were: 1. Determine the extent of movements and spatial use patterns by sea otters along the southern California coast2. Identify important sea otter resting and foraging areas adjacent to manmade structures3. Assess sea otter distribution, behavior and habitat selection in the vicinity of natural oil and gas seep areas (e.g., Coal Oil Point, Santa Barbara County)4. Combine data on tagged animal movements, habitat use patterns and population distribution (acquired during this study and from previous studies and USGS monitoring activities), to create population-level “risk of exposure” models for spatially explicit threats such as natural oil seeps or hypothetical oil spill scenarios.These data were used to support the folowing publication:Tinker, M.T., Tomoleoni, Joseph, LaRoche, Nicole, Bowen, Lizabeth, Miles, A. Keith, Murray, Mike, Staedler, Michelle, and Randell, Zach, 2017, Southern sea otter range expansion and habitat use in the Santa Barbara Channel, California: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2017–1001 (OCS Study BOEM 2017-002), 76 p., http://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20171001.

  2. Potential earthquake faults offshore Southern California, from the eastern Santa Barbara Channel south to Dana Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, M.A.; Sorlien, C.C.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Urban areas in Southern California are at risk from major earthquakes, not only quakes generated by long-recognized onshore faults but also ones that occur along poorly understood offshore faults. We summarize recent research findings concerning these lesser known faults. Research by the U.S. Geological Survey during the past five years indicates that these faults from the eastern Santa Barbara Channel south to Dana Point pose a potential earthquake threat. Historical seismicity in this area indicates that, in general, offshore faults can unleash earthquakes having at least moderate (M 5-6) magnitude. Estimating the earthquake hazard in Southern California is complicated by strain partitioning and by inheritance of structures from early tectonic episodes. The three main episodes are Mesozoic through early Miocene subduction, early Miocene crustal extension coeval with rotation of the Western Transverse Ranges, and Pliocene and younger transpression related to plate-boundary motion along the San Andreas Fault. Additional complication in the analysis of earthquake hazards derives from the partitioning of tectonic strain into strike-slip and thrust components along separate but kinematically related faults. The eastern Santa Barbara Basin is deformed by large active reverse and thrust faults, and this area appears to be underlain regionally by the north-dipping Channel Islands thrust fault. These faults could produce moderate to strong earthquakes and destructive tsunamis. On the Malibu coast, earthquakes along offshore faults could have left-lateral-oblique focal mechanisms, and the Santa Monica Mountains thrust fault, which underlies the oblique faults, could give rise to large (M ??7) earthquakes. Offshore faults near Santa Monica Bay and the San Pedro shelf are likely to produce both strike-slip and thrust earthquakes along northwest-striking faults. In all areas, transverse structures, such as lateral ramps and tear faults, which crosscut the main faults, could

  3. Littoral transport rates in the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell: a process-based model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, E. P. L.; Barnard, Patrick L.; Brocatus, John

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the sediment transport patterns and pathways is essential for sustainable coastal zone management of the heavily modified coastline of Santa Barbara and Ventura County (California, USA). A process-based model application, based on Delft3D Online Morphology, is used to investigate the littoral transport potential along the Santa Barbara Littoral Cell (between Point Conception and Mugu Canyon). An advanced optimalization procedure is applied to enable annual sediment transport computations by reducing the ocean wave climate in 10 wave height - direction classes. Modeled littoral transport rates compare well with observed dredging volumes, and erosion or sedimentation hotspots coincide with the modeled divergence and convergence of the transport gradients. Sediment transport rates are strongly dependent on the alongshore variation in wave height due to wave sheltering, diffraction and focusing by the Northern Channel Islands, and the local orientation of the geologically-controlled coastline. Local transport gradients exceed the net eastward littoral transport, and are considered a primary driver for hot-spot erosion.

  4. 76 FR 67395 - Port Access Route Study: In the Approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach and in the Santa Barbara...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    ... Pacific Ocean, particularly the area south of San Miguel, Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, and Anacapa Islands; and north of San Nicolas, Santa Barbara, and Santa Catalina Islands where an increase in vessel traffic has..., precautionary areas, and deep-water routes. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background and Purpose The Coast...

  5. Status of groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Study Unit, 2011: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated in 2011 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. The study unit is mostly in Santa Barbara County and is in the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer system of California. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Santa Barbara study unit. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Santa Barbara study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.The status assessment for the Santa Barbara study unit was based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey from 23 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database for January 24, 2008–January 23, 2011. The data used for the assessment included volatile organic compounds; pesticides; pharmaceutical compounds; two constituents of special interest, perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA); and naturally present inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used to evaluate groundwater quality for those constituents that have federal or California regulatory and non

  6. 75 FR 67393 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Santa Barbara County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Lands in Santa Barbara County... following 7 parcels of public land are proposed for direct sale to the adjacent land owners in accordance..., and due to the shape of the parcels have no independent utility. The BLM is proposing a direct sale...

  7. Proceedings of the 2006 International Workshop on Multiscale Biological Imaging, Data Mining and Informatics, Santa Barbara, USA (BII06).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-10

    The 2006 International Workshop on Multiscale Biological Imaging, Data Mining and Informatics was held at Santa Barbara, on Sept 7-8, 2006. Based on the presentations at the workshop, we selected and compiled this collection of research articles related to novel algorithms and enabling techniques for bio- and biomedical image analysis, mining, visualization, and biology applications.

  8. 78 FR 21537 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego... Air Pollution Control District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD...

  9. 78 FR 21580 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego County Air...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara and San Diego... District (SBCAPCD) and San Diego County Air Pollution Control District (SDCAPCD) portions of the California...

  10. The Old Spanish Days Fiesta in Santa Barbara, California: Cultural Hybridity, Colonial Mythologies and the Romanticization of a Latino Heritage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ann Hardwick

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Old Spanish Days Fiesta is a tradition that was invented in 1924 by civic leaders in Santa Barbara, California to celebrate the periods of the Spanish settlement and the Mexican rule of California and to promote local tourism. This article will trace the historical narrative of the complex cultural and ethnic composition of Santa Barbara before interrogating the colonial and post-colonial histories of the Californian past that are so often romanticized during the events of the Santa Barbara Fiesta. Subsequent to the American appropriation of California, Anglo-American ideas of race and identity were imposed upon Latino Californians. This development led many Spanish-speaking Californians to cultivate a Spanish identity and de-emphasize their Mexican, Native American, or African ancestry as they attempted to maintain their land grants and social prominence under American rule. Official versions of Santa Barbara’s past promoted by Santa Barbara’s civic leaders and Old Spanish Days Fiesta literature tend to privilege romanticized historical interpretations that submerge and absorb California’s hybrid ethnic and cultural histories into an idealized Spanish colonial narrative. This article explores how many individual Santa Barbara Fiesteros choose to engage, negotiate, and/or subvert this simplified official civic narrative of Santa Barbara’s Spanish past through their own personal performances during the Fiesta. An analysis of how local festival participants envision their performance in the context of the festival allows outsiders to have a glimpse into how they create and embody their own personal and nuanced understandings of history during the Fiesta.

  11. Kirschenmann Road multi-well monitoring site, Cuyama Valley, Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, R.R.; Hanson, R.T.; Sweetkind, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Water Agency Division of the Santa Barbara County Department of Public Works, is evaluating the geohydrology and water availability of the Cuyama Valley, California (fig. 1). As part of this evaluation, the USGS installed the Cuyama Valley Kirschenmann Road multiple-well monitoring site (CVKR) in the South-Main subregion of the Cuyama Valley (fig. 1). The CVKR well site is designed to allow for the collection of depth-specific water-level and water-quality data. Data collected at this site provides information about the geology, hydrology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the local aquifer system, thus, enhancing the understanding of the geohydrologic framework of the Cuyama Valley. This report presents the construction information and initial geohydrologic data collected from the CVKR monitoring site, along with a brief comparison to selected supply and irrigation wells from the major subregions of the Cuyama Valley (fig. 1).

  12. A Review: Mesoporous Santa Barbara Amorphous-15, Types, Synthesis and Its Applications towards Biorefinery Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norhasyimi Rahmat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Santa Barbara Amorphous (SBA-15 is significant mesoporous silica with exclusive and important properties of highly ordered mesopores, hydrothermally stable and thick wall, profusely large surface area and huge pore volume which render it as promising catalyst for wide applications. However, the purely siliceous SBA-15 which lacks of acidity characteristic hinders its ideal capabilities as catalyst. Moreover, functionalization and modification of SBA-15 could enhance and optimize its catalytic activity. Conclusion/Recommendations: Thus, in this review, the various types and different synthesis of modifying SBA-15 are discussed in detail towards its application in biorefinery production. The catalytic activities in various operating conditions and reactions are also reviewed for future reference and scope of studies.

  13. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter-outer mainland shelf, eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Finlayson, David P.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Erdey, Mercedes D.

    2012-01-01

    In 2010 and 2011, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from the outer shelf region of the eastern Santa Barbara Channel, California. These surveys were conducted in cooperation with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). BOEM is interested in maps of hard-bottom substrates, particularly natural outcrops that support reef communities in areas near oil and gas extraction activity. The surveys were conducted using the USGS R/V Parke Snavely, outfitted with an interferometric sidescan sonar for swath mapping and real-time kinematic navigation equipment. This report provides the bathymetry and backscatter data acquired during these surveys in several formats, a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  14. Dad's in the Garage: Santa Barbara Physicists in the Long 1970s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Cyrus

    2013-03-01

    American physicists faced many challenges in the 1970s: declining research budgets; public skepticism of scientific authority; declining student enrollments; and pressure to shift to topics such as biomedicine, environmental remediation, alternative energy, public housing and transport, and disability technologies. This paper examines the responses to these challenges of a small group of Santa Barbara physicists. While this group is not representative of the American physics profession, the success and failure of their responses to changed conditions tells us something about how American physicists got through the 1970s, and about the origins of some features of American physics today. The three physicists examined here are Philip Wyatt, David Phillips, and Virgil Elings. In the late `60s, Wyatt left a defense think tank to found an instrumentation firm. The Santa Barbara oil spill and other factors pushed that firm toward civilian markets in biomedicine and pollution measurement. Phillips joined Wyatt's firm from UCSB, while also founding his own company, largely to sell electronic devices for parapsychology. Phillips was also the junior partner in a master's of scientific instrumentation degree curriculum founded by Elings in order to save UCSB Physics' graduate program. Through the MSI program, Elings moved into biomedical research and became a serial entrepreneur. By the 1990s, Wyatt, Phillips, and Elings' turn toward academic entrepreneurship, dual military-civilian markets for physics start-ups, and interdisciplinary collaborations between physicists and life scientists were no longer unusual. Together, their journey through the `70s shows how varied the physics' profession's response to crisis was, and how much it pivoted on new interactions between university and industry.

  15. Large-Scale Multi-Objective Optimization for the Management of Seawater Intrusion, Santa Barbara, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanko, Z. P.; Nishikawa, T.; Paulinski, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    The City of Santa Barbara, located in coastal southern California, is concerned that excessive groundwater pumping will lead to chloride (Cl) contamination of its groundwater system from seawater intrusion (SWI). In addition, the city wishes to estimate the effect of continued pumping on the groundwater basin under a variety of initial and climatic conditions. A SEAWAT-based groundwater-flow and solute-transport model of the Santa Barbara groundwater basin was optimized to produce optimal pumping schedules assuming 5 different scenarios. Borg, a multi-objective genetic algorithm, was coupled with the SEAWAT model to identify optimal management strategies. The optimization problems were formulated as multi-objective so that the tradeoffs between maximizing pumping, minimizing SWI, and minimizing drawdowns can be examined by the city. Decisions can then be made on a pumping schedule in light of current preferences and climatic conditions. Borg was used to produce Pareto optimal results for all 5 scenarios, which vary in their initial conditions (high water levels, low water levels, or current basin state), simulated climate (normal or drought conditions), and problem formulation (objective equations and decision-variable aggregation). Results show mostly well-defined Pareto surfaces with a few singularities. Furthermore, the results identify the precise pumping schedule per well that was suitable given the desired restriction on drawdown and Cl concentrations. A system of decision-making is then possible based on various observations of the basin's hydrologic states and climatic trends without having to run any further optimizations. In addition, an assessment of selected Pareto-optimal solutions was analyzed with sensitivity information using the simulation model alone. A wide range of possible groundwater pumping scenarios is available and depends heavily on the future climate scenarios and the Pareto-optimal solution selected while managing the pumping wells.

  16. Status of groundwater quality in the Santa Barbara Study Unit, 2011: California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.

    2016-10-03

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated in 2011 as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project. The study unit is mostly in Santa Barbara County and is in the Transverse and Selected Peninsular Ranges hydrogeologic province. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey in collaboration with the California State Water Resources Control Board and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.The GAMA Priority Basin Project was designed to provide a statistically unbiased, spatially distributed assessment of the quality of untreated groundwater in the primary aquifer system of California. The primary aquifer system is defined as that part of the aquifer corresponding to the perforation interval of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database for the Santa Barbara study unit. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifer system of the Santa Barbara study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors.The status assessment for the Santa Barbara study unit was based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey from 23 sites and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health database for January 24, 2008–January 23, 2011. The data used for the assessment included volatile organic compounds; pesticides; pharmaceutical compounds; two constituents of special interest, perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA); and naturally present inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used to evaluate groundwater quality for those constituents that have federal or California regulatory and non

  17. Coastal groundwater dynamics off Santa Barbara, California: combining geochemical tracers, electromagnetic seepmeters, and electrical resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W.; Izbicki, John A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents repeat field measurements of 222Rn and 223,224,226,228Ra, electromagnetic seepage meter-derived advective fluxes, and multi-electrode, stationary and continuous marine resistivity surveys collected between November 2005 and April 2007 to study coastal groundwater dynamics within a marine beach in Santa Barbara, California. The study provides insight into magnitude and dynamics of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) and associated nutrient loadings into near-shore coastal waters, where the predominant SGD drivers can be both spatially and temporally separated. Rn-222 and 223,224,226,228Ra were utilized to quantify the total and saline contribution, respectively, of SGD. The two short-lived 224,223Ra isotopes provided an estimate of apparent near-shore water mass age, as well as an estimate of the Ra-derived eddy diffusion coefficient, Kh (224Ra = 2.86 ?? 0.7 m2 s-1; 223Ra = 1.32 ?? 0.5 m2 s-1). Because 222Rn (t1/2 = 3.8 day) and 224Ra (t1/2 = 3.66 day) have comparable half-lives and production terms, they were used in concert to examine respective water column removal rates. Electromagnetic seepage meters recorded the physical, bi-directional exchange across the sediment/water interface, which ranged from -6.7 to 14.5 cm day-1, depending on the sampling period and position relative to the low tide line. Multi-day time-series 222Rn measurements in the near-shore water column yielded total (saline + fresh) SGD rates that ranged from 3.1 ?? 2.6 to 9.2 ?? 0.8 cm day-1, depending on the sampling season. Offshore 226Ra (t1/2 = 1600 year) and 222Rn gradients were used with the calculated Kh values to determine seabed flux estimates (dpm m-2 day-1), which were then converted into SGD rates (7.1 and 7.9 cm day-1, respectively). Lastly, SGD rates were used to calculate associated nutrient loads for the near-shore coastal waters off Santa Barbara. Depending on both the season and the SGD method utilized, the following SGD-derived nutrient inputs were

  18. CNTR10M - 10 meter bathymetric contours of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Santa Barbara Bay. (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Data layer containing 10 meter bathymetric contours for the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary and Santa Barbara Bay. Data are derived from 1:250,000-scale...

  19. Report on data from the Nearshore Sediment Transport Study experiment at Leadbetter Beach, Santa Barbara, California, January-February 1980 (NODC Accession 8200080)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — THIS DATA SET CONSISTS OF THE RESULTS OF THE NEARSHORE SEDIMENT Nearshore Sediment Transport Study at Leadbetter Beach, Santa Barbara, California. These data from 28...

  20. A simulation-optimization model for water-resources management, Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    In times of drought, the local water supplies of the city of Santa Barbara, California, are insufficient to satisfy water demand. In response, the city has built a seawater desalination plant and gained access to imported water in 1997. Of primary concern to the city is delivering water from the various sources at a minimum cost while satisfying water demand and controlling seawater intrusion that might result from the overpumping of ground water. A simulation-optimization model has been developed for the optimal management of Santa Barbara?s water resources. The objective is to minimize the cost of water supply while satisfying various physical and institutional constraints such as meeting water demand, maintaining minimum hydraulic heads at selected sites, and not exceeding water-delivery or pumping capacities. The model is formulated as a linear programming problem with monthly management periods and a total planning horizon of 5 years. The decision variables are water deliveries from surface water (Gibraltar Reservoir, Cachuma Reservoir, Cachuma Reservoir cumulative annual carryover, Mission Tunnel, State Water Project, and desalinated seawater) and ground water (13 production wells). The state variables are hydraulic heads. Basic assumptions for all simulations are that (1) the cost of water varies with source but is fixed over time, and (2) only existing or planned city wells are considered; that is, the construction of new wells is not allowed. The drought of 1947?51 is Santa Barbara?s worst drought on record, and simulated surface-water supplies for this period were used as a basis for testing optimal management of current water resources under drought conditions. Assumptions that were made for this base case include a head constraint equal to sea level at the coastal nodes; Cachuma Reservoir carryover of 3,000 acre-feet per year, with a maximum carryover of 8,277 acre-feet; a maximum annual demand of 15,000 acre-feet; and average monthly capacities for the

  1. Methane oxidation in permeable sediments at hydrocarbon seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treude, T.; Ziebis, W.

    2010-03-01

    A shallow-water area in the Santa Barbara Channel (California), known collectively as the Coal Oil Point seep field, is one the largest natural submarine oil and gas emission areas in the world. Both gas and oil are seeping constantly through a predominantly sandy seabed into the ocean. This study focused on the methanotrophic activity within the surface sediments (0-15 cm) of the permeable seabed in the so-called Brian Seep area at a water depth ~10 m. Detailed investigations of biogeochemical parameters in the sediment surrounding active gas vents indicated that methane seepage through the permeable seabed induces a convective transport of fluids within the surface sediment layer, which results in a deeper penetration of oxidants (oxygen, sulfate) into the sediment, as well as in a faster removal of potentially inhibiting reduced end products (e.g. hydrogen sulfide). Methanotrophic activity was often found close to the sediment-water interface, indicating the involvement of aerobic bacteria. However, biogeochemical data suggests that the majority of methane is consumed by anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction below the surface layer (>15 cm), where sulfate is still available in high concentrations. This subsurface maximum of AOM activity in permeable sands is in contrast to known deep-sea seep habitats, where upward fluid advection through more fine-grained sediments leads to an accumulation of AOM activity within the top 10 cm of the sediments, because sulfate is rapidly depleted.

  2. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U.C. Santa Barbara campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, R.; Nicholson, C.; Steidl, J.; Gurrola, L.; Alex, C.; Cochran, E.; Ely, G.; Tyler, T. [University of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The University of California Campus-Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is an integrated 3 year effort involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and four UC campuses - Los Angeles (UCLA), Riverside (UCR), Santa Barbara (UCSB), and San Diego (UCSD) - plus additional collaborators at San Diego State University (SDSU), at Los Alamos National Laboratory and in industry. The primary purpose of the project is to estimate potential ground motions from large earthquakes and to predict site-specific ground motions for one critical structure on each campus. This project thus combines the disciplines of geology, seismology, geodesy, soil dynamics, and earthquake engineering into a fully integrated approach. Once completed, the CLC project will provide a template to evaluate other buildings at each of the four UC campuses, as well as provide a methodology for evaluating seismic hazards at other critical sites in California, including other UC locations at risk from large earthquakes. Another important objective of the CLC project is the education of students and other professional in the application of this integrated, multidisciplinary, state-of-the-art approach to the assessment of earthquake hazard. For each campus targeted by the CLC project, the seismic hazard study will consist of four phases: Phase I - Initial source and site characterization, Phase II - Drilling, logging, seismic monitoring, and laboratory dynamic soil testing, Phase III - Modeling of predicted site-specific earthquake ground motions, and Phase IV - Calculations of 3D building response. This report cover Phase I for the UCSB campus and incudes results up through March 1997.

  3. Groundwater-quality data in the Santa Barbara study unit, 2011: results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy A.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the 48-square-mile Santa Barbara study unit was investigated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from January to February 2011, as part of the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program’s Priority Basin Project (PBP). The GAMA-PBP was developed in response to the California Groundwater Quality Monitoring Act of 2001 and is being conducted in collaboration with the SWRCB and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Santa Barbara study unit was the thirty-fourth study unit to be sampled as part of the GAMA-PBP. The GAMA Santa Barbara study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of untreated-groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system, and to facilitate statistically consistent comparisons of untreated-groundwater quality throughout California. The primary aquifer system is defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforation intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database for the Santa Barbara study unit. Groundwater quality in the primary aquifer system may differ from the quality in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. In the Santa Barbara study unit located in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, groundwater samples were collected from 24 wells. Eighteen of the wells were selected by using a spatially distributed, randomized grid-based method to provide statistical representation of the study unit (grid wells), and six wells were selected to aid in evaluation of water-quality issues (understanding wells). The groundwater samples were analyzed for organic constituents (volatile organic compounds [VOCs], pesticides and pesticide degradates, and pharmaceutical compounds); constituents of special interest (perchlorate and N-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA]); naturally occurring inorganic constituents (trace

  4. Mass and heat balances in the Santa Barbara Channel: estimation, description and forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auad, Guillermo; Hendershott, Myrl C.; Winant, Clinton D.

    1999-01-01

    Current meter, temperature and wind observations from the 1984 MMS experiment are used to estimate the mass and heat budgets in the Santa Barbara Channel. The mass transports estimated at the western, eastern and southern boundaries of the channel are characterized by fluctuations whose energy is concentrated around three different periods: 5, 14 and 2.8 days respectively. These three transports fluctuate along with the dominant EOF modes obtained at those 3 entrances respectively. The mean transport passing through the channel from east to west is about 0.28 Sv. There are two frequency bands where winds and mass transports are coherent: 2.5-3.0 and 4.7-5.2 day bands. Winds on the northern shelf lead the transports in both bands by about 1.0 day. At the western half of the channel there is a recirculating (counterclockwise) mean transport of about 0.30 Sv. The time dependent part of the recirculating transport is coherent with the wind in the 4.7-5.2 day band where it also shows an absolute maximum of variance. The recirculating transport lags the local downwelling-favorable winds by about 1.5 day and seems to be the channel response to wind relaxations with respect to its most persistent upwelling-favorable state. The main mean balance in the channel-integrated heat equation is between the heat transport passing through the western mouth, which cools off the channel, and the heat transport caused by the mass transport (the transport heat flux), which warms up the channel. This latter transport results from the advection of the temperature difference between the channel boundaries (mainly east and west) by the mass transport. There are no two terms that dominate the heat equation for the time dependent heat transports, but it can be simplified by balancing the along channel heat divergence (heat transport passing through the mouth plus transport heat flux), the vertical heat flux and the local change of heat. A clear thermal-wind balance at the eastern and western

  5. Submarine landslides in the Santa Barbara Channel as potential tsunami sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, H. Gary; Murai, L.Y.; Watts, P.; Maher, N.A.; Fisher, M.A.; Paull, C.E.; Eichhubl, P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent investigations using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institutes (MBARI) Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) "Ventana" and "Tiburon" and interpretation of MBARI's EM 300 30 kHz multibeam bathymetric data show that the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin has experienced massive slope failures. Of particular concern is the large (130 km2) Goleta landslide complex located off Coal Oil Point near the town of Goleta, that measures 14.6-km long extending from a depth of 90 m to nearly 574 m deep and is 10.5 km wide. We estimate that approximately 1.75 km3 has been displaced by this slide during the Holocene. This feature is a complex compound submarine landslide that contains both surfical slump blocks and mud flows in three distinct segments. Each segment is composed of a distinct head scarp, down-dropped head block and a slide debris lobe. The debris lobes exhibit hummocky topography in the central areas that appear to result from compression during down slope movement. The toes of the western and eastern lobes are well defined in the multibeam image, whereas the toe of the central lobe is less distinct. Continuous seismic reflection profiles show that many buried slide debris lobes exist and comparison of the deformed reflectors with ODP Drill Site 149, Hole 893 suggest that at least 200 000 years of failure have occurred in the area (Fisher et al., 2005a). Based on our interpretation of the multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles we modeled the potential tsunami that may have been produced from one of the three surfical lobes of the Goleta slide. This model shows that a 10 m high wave could have run ashore along the cliffs of the Goleta shoreline. Several other smaller (2 km2 and 4 km2) slides are located on the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin, both to the west and east of Goleta slide and on the Concepcion fan along the western flank of the basin. One slide, named the Gaviota slide, is 3.8 km2, 2.6 km long and 1.7 km wide. A

  6. Submarine landslides in the Santa Barbara Channel as potential tsunami sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. G. Greene

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent investigations using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institutes (MBARI Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs 'Ventana' and 'Tiburon' and interpretation of MBARI's EM 300 30 kHz multibeam bathymetric data show that the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin has experienced massive slope failures. Of particular concern is the large (130 km2 Goleta landslide complex located off Coal Oil Point near the town of Goleta, that measures 14.6-km long extending from a depth of 90 m to nearly 574 m deep and is 10.5 km wide. We estimate that approximately 1.75 km3 has been displaced by this slide during the Holocene. This feature is a complex compound submarine landslide that contains both surfical slump blocks and mud flows in three distinct segments. Each segment is composed of a distinct head scarp, down-dropped head block and a slide debris lobe. The debris lobes exhibit hummocky topography in the central areas that appear to result from compression during down slope movement. The toes of the western and eastern lobes are well defined in the multibeam image, whereas the toe of the central lobe is less distinct. Continuous seismic reflection profiles show that many buried slide debris lobes exist and comparison of the deformed reflectors with ODP Drill Site 149, Hole 893 suggest that at least 200 000 years of failure have occurred in the area (Fisher et al., 2005a. Based on our interpretation of the multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles we modeled the potential tsunami that may have been produced from one of the three surfical lobes of the Goleta slide. This model shows that a 10 m high wave could have run ashore along the cliffs of the Goleta shoreline. Several other smaller (2 km2 and 4 km2 slides are located on the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin, both to the west and east of Goleta slide and on the Conception fan along the western flank of the basin. One slide, named the Gaviota slide, is 3.8 km2, 2.6 km long and 1

  7. Submarine landslides in the Santa Barbara Channel as potential tsunami sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, H. G.; Murai, L. Y.; Watts, P.; Maher, N. A.; Fisher, M. A.; Paull, C. E.; Eichhubl, P.

    2006-01-01

    Recent investigations using the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institutes (MBARI) Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) "Ventana" and "Tiburon" and interpretation of MBARI's EM 300 30 kHz multibeam bathymetric data show that the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin has experienced massive slope failures. Of particular concern is the large (130 km2) Goleta landslide complex located off Coal Oil Point near the town of Goleta, that measures 14.6-km long extending from a depth of 90 m to nearly 574 m deep and is 10.5 km wide. We estimate that approximately 1.75 km3 has been displaced by this slide during the Holocene. This feature is a complex compound submarine landslide that contains both surfical slump blocks and mud flows in three distinct segments. Each segment is composed of a distinct head scarp, down-dropped head block and a slide debris lobe. The debris lobes exhibit hummocky topography in the central areas that appear to result from compression during down slope movement. The toes of the western and eastern lobes are well defined in the multibeam image, whereas the toe of the central lobe is less distinct. Continuous seismic reflection profiles show that many buried slide debris lobes exist and comparison of the deformed reflectors with ODP Drill Site 149, Hole 893 suggest that at least 200 000 years of failure have occurred in the area (Fisher et al., 2005a). Based on our interpretation of the multibeam bathymetry and seismic reflection profiles we modeled the potential tsunami that may have been produced from one of the three surfical lobes of the Goleta slide. This model shows that a 10 m high wave could have run ashore along the cliffs of the Goleta shoreline. Several other smaller (2 km2 and 4 km2) slides are located on the northern flank of the Santa Barbara Basin, both to the west and east of Goleta slide and on the Conception fan along the western flank of the basin. One slide, named the Gaviota slide, is 3.8 km2, 2.6 km long and 1.7 km wide. A

  8. Coccolithophore response to climate and surface hydrography in Santa Barbara Basin, California, AD 1917–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grelaud

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The varved sedimentary AD 1917–2004 record from the depositional center of the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB, California was analyzed with monthly to annual resolution to yield relative abundances of six coccolithophore species representing at least 96% of the coccolithophore assemblage. Seasonal/annual relative abundances respond to climatic and surface hydrographic conditions in the SBB, whereby (i the three species G. oceanica, H. carteri and F. profunda are characteristic of the strength of the northward flowing warm California Counter Current, (ii the two species G. ericsonii and G. muellerae are associated with the cold equatorward flowing California Current, (iii and E. huxleyi appears to be endemic to the SBB. Spectral analyses on relative abundances of these species show that all are influenced by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO and/or by the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO. Increased relative abundances of G. oceanica and H. carteri are associated with warm ENSO events, G. muellerae responds to warm PDO events, and the abundance of G. ericsonii increases during cold PDO events. Morphometric parameters measured on E. huxleyi, G. muellerae and G. oceanica indicate increasing coccolithophore calcification from ~1917 until 2004 concomitant with rising pCO2 and sea surface temperature in the region of the SBB.

  9. Sedimentary pyrite δ34S differs from porewater sulfide in Santa Barbara Basin: Proposed role of organic sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, Morgan Reed; Sessions, Alex L.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Adkins, Jess F.

    2016-08-01

    Santa Barbara Basin sediments host a complex network of abiotic and metabolic chemical reactions that knit together the carbon, sulfur, and iron cycles. From a 2.1-m sediment core collected in the center of the basin, we present high-resolution profiles of the concentrations and isotopic compositions of all the major species in this system: sulfate, sulfide (∑H2S), elemental sulfur (S0), pyrite, extractable organic sulfur (OS), proto-kerogen S, total organic and dissolved inorganic carbon, and total and reducible iron. Below 10 cm depth, the core is characterized by low apparent sulfate reduction rates (biogeochemical cycles and redox structure in sedimentary paleoenvironments.

  10. Fluvial Tufa Evidence of Late Pleistocene Wet Intervals from Santa Barbara, Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Y.; Corsetti, F. A.; Feakins, S. J.; Rhodes, E. J.; Kirby, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Past pluvials in the western United States provide valuable context for understanding regional hydroclimate variability. Here we report evidence of conditions substantially wetter than today from fluvial tufa deposits located near Zaca Lake, Santa Barbara County, California that have been dated by radiocarbon (14C) and Infra-Red Stimulated Luminescence (IRSL). Two successions of tufa deposition occur within a small catchment that drains Miocene Monterey Formation bedrock: 1) a fluvial deposit (0-0.5 m thick, 200 m in extent) that formed along a narrow valley below a modern spring, and 2) a perched deposit about 10 m higher (2 m thick, 15 m in extent). IRSL and radiocarbon dating of the perched carbonates suggests at least two episodes of carbonate growth: one at 19.4 ± 2.4 (1σ) through 17.8 ± 2.8 (1σ) ka and another at 11.9 ± 1.5 (1σ) ka verified with a charcoal 14C age of 10.95 ± 0.12 (2σ) cal ka BP. The relationship between the perched and fluvial spring deposits is inferred to represent a drop in the water table of more than 10 m associated with a transition from a wet climate in the late glacial to a dry Holocene today. The wet period indicated by tufa growth between 19.4 and 17.8 ka is relatively consistent with other California climate records both north and south of Zaca Lake. However, tufa growth ca. 12 to 11 ka demonstrates wet conditions occurred as far south as Zaca Lake during the Younger Dryas event, in contrast to climate records farther south in Lake Elsinore indicating persistently dry conditions through this interval. A small shift north in the average position of the winter season storm track could explain wet winters at Zaca while at the same time generating dry winters at Lake Elsinore, 275 km southwest of Zaca. If true, these data indicate that rather small latitudinal shifts in the average winter season storm track can produce large changes in regional hydroclimate.

  11. Quantification of CH 4 loss and transport in dissolved plumes of the Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Susan; Heintz, Monica B.; Valentine, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) emitted into the coastal ocean faces two primary fates: escape to the atmosphere or prolonged dissolution that allows sufficient time for oxidation by methanotrophic bacteria. The partitioning of CH4 between these fates is modulated by physical, chemical and biological factors, including the distribution of CH4 in the water, temperature, wind speed, water movement, and the biological CH4 oxidation rate. Because of the underlying complexity, studies rarely quantify all of these factors in unison, thereby leaving gaps in our understanding of CH4 biogeochemistry in the coastal ocean. In this study we estimated the partitioning of CH4 between transport, microbial oxidative loss, and sea-air transfer in a defined plume of dissolved CH4 originating from one of the world's largest seep fields, near Coal Oil Point (COP) in the Santa Barbara Channel, California. Depth distributions of CH4 concentration, biologically mediated oxidation rate, and current velocity were quantified at 12 stations in a 198 km2 area down-current from COP on July 4-5, 2007. Six stations were sampled again on July 7, 2007 to evaluate temporal plume variability. The observed CH4 distribution revealed two distinct CH4 plumes: a shallow plume centered at ∼40 m and a deeper plume centered at ∼200 m. The shallow plume originates at COP; the source of the deeper CH4 plume is not known. Cross-sections of both plumes were used to calculate transport and loss terms for dissolved CH4. The results indicate that the majority of the dissolved CH4 is advected and diffuses horizontally by turbulence whereas microbial oxidation, sea-air gas transfer, and vertical turbulent diffusion are less significant. Based on rates estimated in the study area, a model was developed to simulate the fate of the dissolved CH4. The model results suggest that 60% of the CH4 of the sampled plumes will ultimately be microbially oxidized and 40% will be transferred to the atmosphere by sea-air gas exchange under the

  12. Constraining the variability of optical properties in the Santa Barbara Channel, CA: A phytoplankton story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Rebecca Katherine

    The research presented in this dissertation evaluates the direct relationships of phytoplankton community composition and inherent optical properties (IOP); that is, the absorption and scattering of light in the ocean. Phytoplankton community composition affect IOPs in both direct and indirect ways, thus creating challenges for optical measurements of biological and biogeochemical properties in aquatic systems. Studies were performed in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC), CA where an array of optical and biogeochemical measurements were made. Phytoplankton community structure was characterized by an empirical orthogonal functional analysis (EOF) using phytoplankton accessory pigments. The results showed that phytoplankton community significantly correlated to all IOPs, e.g. phytoplankton specific absorption, detrital absorption, CDOM absorption and particle backscattering coefficients. Furthermore, the EOF analysis was unique in splitting the microphytoplankton size class into separate diatom and dinoflagellate regimes allowing for assessment optical property differences within the same size class, a technique previously not systematically achievable. The phytoplankton functional group dinoflagellates were particularly influential to IOPs in surprising ways. Dinoflagellates showed higher backscattering efficiencies than would be predicted based on Mie theory, and significantly influenced CDOM absorption via direct association with dissolved mycosproine-like amino acid absorption (MAA) peaks in CDOM spectra. A new index was developed in this work to quantify MAA absorption peaks in CDOM spectra, and was named the MAA Index. Prior to this research dissolved MAA absorption in natural waters was never quantified, and CDOM data containing these peaks were often disregarded and discarded from analysis. CDOM dynamics in the SBC were assessed for a 15-year study period, and this work shows that significantly large MAA Index values, e.g. MAA Index > 1, were present in

  13. Development of Multiscale Biological Image Data Analysis: Review of 2006 International Workshop on Multiscale Biological Imaging, Data Mining and Informatics, Santa Barbara, USA (BII06)

    OpenAIRE

    Auer, Manfred; Peng, Hanchuan; Singh, Ambuj

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 International Workshop on Multiscale Biological Imaging, Data Mining and Informatics was held at Santa Barbara, on Sept 7–8, 2006. Based on the presentations at the workshop, we selected and compiled this collection of research articles related to novel algorithms and enabling techniques for bio- and biomedical image analysis, mining, visualization, and biology applications.

  14. Evaluation of Ocean Color Scanner (OCS) photographic and digital data: Santa Barbara Channel test site, 29 October 1975 overflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, S. P.; Estes, J. E.; Kronenberg, M. R.; Hajic, E. J.

    1977-01-01

    A summary of Ocean Color Scanner data was examined to evaluate detection and discrimination capabilities of the system for marine resources, oil pollution and man-made sea surface targets of opportunity in the Santa Barbara Channel. Assessment of the utility of OCS for the determination of sediment transport patterns along the coastal zone was a secondary goal. Data products provided 1975 overflight were in digital and analog formats. In evaluating the OCS data, automated and manual procedures were employed. A total of four channels of data in digital format were analyzed, as well as three channels of color combined imagery, and four channels of black and white imagery. In addition, 1:120,000 scale color infrared imagery acquired simultaneously with the OCS data were provided for comparative analysis purposes.

  15. Distinguishing between water column and sedimentary denitrification in the Santa Barbara Basin using the stable isotopes of nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, D. M.; Robinson, R.; Knapp, A. N.; van Geen, A.; McCorkle, D. C.; Brandes, J. A.; Thunell, R. C.

    2003-05-01

    Below its sill depth, the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) is commonly suboxic ([O2] ˜ 3 μM), with only brief periods of ventilation. Associated with development of suboxia, the concentration of nitrate decreases with depth into the basin without an associated decrease in phosphate, indicating that a substantial fraction of the nitrate supplied to the basin is removed by denitrification. Coincident with the decrease in nitrate concentration across the "redoxcline" (the interface between oxic and suboxic waters) within the SBB, there is an increase in the 15N/14N of that nitrate, as would be anticipated from the isotopic fractionation associated with denitrification. However, the increase in 15N/14N of nitrate is much smaller than occurs in the open eastern tropical North Pacific (ETNP) for a comparable amount of nitrate loss. Both the concentrations of N species within the basin and measurements of nitrate 18O/16O suggest that the lower-than-expected 15N enrichment in the suboxic SBB involves denitrification, rather than being due to some unknown source of low-15N/14N N to the deep SBB. Calculations with a range of models of nitrate supply and consumption indicate that the degree of nitrate consumption in the basin is too small for differences in water circulation to explain the isotopic differences between the Santa Barbara Basin and the open ETNP. Previous studies indicate that the isotope effect of sedimentary denitrification is negligible due to nitrate diffusion in sediment pore waters. Thus we infer that the small magnitude of the isotopic enrichment of SBB water column nitrate is due to the importance of sedimentary denitrification within the basin. Assuming that water column and sedimentary denitrification have isotope effects of 25 and 1.5 per mil, respectively, our results suggest that sedimentary denitrification accounts for more than 75% of the nitrate loss within the suboxic SBB.

  16. Discerning Between Water Column and Sedimentary Denitrification in the Santa Barbara Basin Using the Nitrogen Isotopes of Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, A. N.; Sigman, D. M.; van Geen, L.; McCorkle, D. C.; Brandes, J. A.; Thunell, R. C.

    2001-05-01

    Below its sill depth, the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) is seasonally anoxic, making the basin suitable for denitrification in both the water column and the sediments. Deviations of nitrate and phosphate concentrations from Redfield ratios provide quantitative estimates of the nitrate consumed by denitrification in the SBB. However, there are no integrative constraints on whether denitrification occurs predominantly in the water column or in the sediments. Associated with a sharp increase in the nitrate deficit across the oxic/anoxic interface within the SBB, there is an increase in the d15N of water column nitrate, as would be expected from denitrification. However, given the size of the nitrate deficit, the increase of d15N of nitrate is much smaller than would be expected from the accepted intrinsic isotope effect of denitrification of 20-30 per mil, assuming a Rayleigh model for uptake. In situations where both transport and removal are important, the Rayleigh model provides only an approximation of the actual fractionation. However, model calculations suggest that transport within the water column cannot explain the observed d15N discrepancy in the SBB. Benthic lander studies of Puget Sound sediments have demonstrated that the isotope effect of sedimentary denitrification is negligible, due to the effects of substrate diffusion in sediment porewaters (Brandes and Devol, 1997). We present new porewater measurements from the Carolina slope in the North Atlantic that confirm this conclusion for other sedimentary environments. Thus, we infer that the small magnitude of the isotopic enrichment of SBB water column nitrate is due to the importance of denitrification in the sediments relative to the water column. Assuming that water column and sedimentary denitrification have isotope effects of 25 and 0 per mil, respectively, model calculations indicate that sedimentary denitrification accounts for more than 75% of the nitrate loss within the anoxic Santa Barbara Basin.

  17. 3D Structural and Stratigraphic Architecture of the Northwest Santa Barbara Basin: Implications for Slope Stability and Submarine Landslide Occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A.; Brothers, D. S.; Kluesner, J.; Johnson, S. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Multiple submarine landslides have been documented on the north flank of the Santa Barbara Basin and such failures are considered capable of generating local tsunami hazards to the Santa Barbara region. Past 2D seismic reflection data has provided a general view of the regional framework geology resulting from north-south compression, but fails to identify along-strike variations of faults and folds. This study uses industry 3D seismic reflection data encompassing the slope surrounding the 3.8 km2-Gaviota submarine landslide to investigate structural and stratigraphic controls of slope failure in this region. The 3D depth-migrated volume shows a complex network of faults that result in both broad and local zones of compression, folding, and uplift along the slope. One localized zone of enhanced anticlinal folding and uplift associated with small-scale thrust faults is located directly beneath the Gaviota slide, while another is beneath a seafloor fissure west of the slide inferred to represent incipient failure. New high-resolution 2D transects constrain the character of shallow deformation above the locally uplifted blocks. 3D isopach maps indicate the seafloor fissures trend along a key threshold of thickness between the seafloor and a shallow horizon; the fissures are also coincide with an apparent zone of shallow, gas-charged strata that onlap the steeply dipping flanks of local anticlinal deformation. Because the seafloor gradient near the Gaviota slide is significantly lower than the internal friction angle for fine-grained marine sediments, we propose that a combination of active deformation, sediment compaction, and gas charging acted to precondition the slope of the Gaviota landslide for failure by reducing the shear strength. Similar factors occur beneath intact sections of the slope adjacent to the slide, which should be considered prone to future landsliding.

  18. Geologic map of the southern White Ledge Peak and Matilija quadrangles, Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Scott A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a digital geologic strip map of the southern parts of the contiguous White Ledge Peak and Matilija 7.5’ quadrangles in coastal southern California. With a compilation scale of 1:24,000 (one inch on the map to 2,000 feet on the ground), the map depicts the distribution of bedrock units, surficial deposits, and associated deformation adjacent to and south of the Arroyo Parida fault and in the southern Ojai Valley east of the Ventura River. This new compilation, combined with a recently published geologic map of the Santa Barbara coastal plain (U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3001), completes a 69-km-long east-west mapping transect from Goleta to Ojai by the U.S. Geological Survey. These two contiguous geologic maps provide new insights and constraints on Neogene-through-Quaternary tectonic deformation and consequent landscape change, including geohazards in the urbanized southern flank of the Santa Ynez Mountains.

  19. Facts relating to Well No. 5, Lease OCS-P 0234, Pitas Point Unit area, and the earthquake of August 13, 1978, Santa Barbara Channel, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayland, Russell G.; Acuff, A. Dewey; McCulloh, Thane M.; Raleigh, C. Barry; Vedder, John G.; Yenne, Keith A.

    1978-01-01

    A build-up of pressures developed in an exploratory well being drilled in the Santa Barbara Channel during the period August 9 to 15, 1978. Nearly coincidentally, a sharp earthquake occurred 2 miles south of the city of Santa Barbara at 3:55 p.m. PDT on August 13, 1978. A task group was formed by the Director, Geological Survey, on August 14, mainly because of concern over the high down-hole pressures in the well. The charge to the task group was to study the situation fully in order that appropriate and immediate measures could be directed to protect against a fracturing of rock formations in the vicinity of the hole that might permit the escape of gas or oil to the surface. The task group was also asked to look into the possibility of any relationship between the well problems and the earthquake.

  20. Landslides: Geomorphology and Sea Cliff Hazard Potential, Santa Barbara - Isla Vista, California J.F. Klath and E.A. Keller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klath, J. F.; Keller, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal areas are often characterized by high population densities in an ever changing, dynamic environment. The world's coasts are often dominated by steeply sloping sea cliffs, the morphology of which reflects rock type, wave erosion, and surface erosion, as well as human activities such changing vegetation, urban runoff, and construction of coastal defenses. The Santa Barbara and Goleta area, with over 17 km of sea cliffs and beaches, extends from Santa Barbara Point west to the hamlet of Isla Vista. A deeper understanding of the local geology and the physical processes generating slope failure and, thus, landward cliff retreat is important for general public safety, as well as future development and planning. Our research objective includes assessment of landslide hazard potential through investigation of previous landslides and how these events relate to various physical variables and characteristics within the surrounding bedrock. How does landslide frequency, volume, and type relate to varying local bedrock and structure? Two geologic formations dominate the sea cliffs of the Santa Barbara area: Monterey shale (upper, middle, and lower) and Monterey Sisquoc shale. Geology varies from hard cemented shale and diatomaceous, low specific gravity shale to compaction shale. Variations in landslide characteristics are linked closely to the geology of a specific site that affects how easily rock units are weathered and eroded by wave erosion, naturally occurring oil and water seeps, burnt shale events, and landslide type and frequency on steeply dipped bedding planes/daylighting beds. Naturally occurring features linked to human processes often weaken bedrock and, thus, increase the likelihood of landslides. We categorize landslide frequency, type, and triggers; location of beach access, drainage pipes, and water; and oil and tar seeps in order to develop suggestions to minimize landslide potential. Lastly, using previously published erosion cliff retreat rates and

  1. Analyses of hydrocarbons in BLM sediment intercalibration sample from Santa Barbara basin and spiked with API South Louisiana crude oil. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrington, J W; Tripp, B W; Sass, J

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary report is made of a BLM intercalibration sediment sample from the Santa Barbara basin spiked with South Louisiana crude oil. The two subsamples reported were analyzed by a procedure described in the appendix for which a separate abstract was written. Because of the high oil content of the sediment the usual thin layer chromatography procedure resulted in an overloaded plate. An appendix was indexed separately. (JSR)

  2. Calcification of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides and carbonate ion concentration: Results from the Santa Barbara Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Emily B.; Thunell, Robert C.; Marshall, Brittney J.; Holm, Jessica A.; Tappa, Eric J.; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Cai, Wei-Jun; Chen, Baoshan

    2016-08-01

    Planktonic foraminiferal calcification intensity, reflected by shell wall thickness, has been hypothesized to covary with the carbonate chemistry of seawater. Here we use both sediment trap and box core samples from the Santa Barbara Basin to evaluate the relationship between the calcification intensity of the planktonic foraminifera species Globigerina bulloides, measured by area density (µg/µm2), and the carbonate ion concentration of seawater ([CO32-]). We also evaluate the influence of both temperature and nutrient concentration ([PO43-]) on foraminiferal calcification and growth. The presence of two G. bulloides morphospecies with systematically different calcification properties and offset stable isotopic compositions was identified within sampling populations using distinguishing morphometric characteristics. The calcification temperature and by extension calcification depth of the more abundant "normal" G. bulloides morphospecies was determined using δ18O temperature estimates. Calcification depths vary seasonally with upwelling and were used to select the appropriate [CO32-], temperature, and [PO43-] depth measurements for comparison with area density. Seasonal upwelling in the study region also results in collinearity between independent variables complicating a straightforward statistical analysis. To address this issue, we use additional statistical diagnostics and a down core record to disentangle the respective roles of each parameter on G. bulloides calcification. Our results indicate that [CO32-] is the primary variable controlling calcification intensity while temperature influences shell size. We report a modern calibration for the normal G. bulloides morphospecies that can be used in down core studies of well-preserved sediments to estimate past [CO32-].

  3. Holocene dinoflagellate cyst record of climate and marine primary productivity change in the Santa Barbara Basin, southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospelova, Vera; Mertens, Kenneth N.; Hendy, Ingrid, L.; Pedersen, Thomas F.

    2015-04-01

    High-resolution sedimentary records of dinoflagellate cysts and other marine palynomorphs from the Santa Barbara Basin (Ocean Drilling Program Hole 893A) demonstrate large variability of primary productivity during the Holocene, as the California Current System responded to climate change. Throughout the sequence, dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are characterized by the dominance of cysts produced by heterotrophic dinoflagellates, and particularly by Brigantedinium, accompanied by other upwelling-related taxa such as Echinidinium and cysts of Protoperidinium americanum. During the early Holocene (~12-7 ka), the species richness is relatively low (16 taxa) and genius Brigantedinium reaches the highest relative abundance, thus indicating nutrient-rich and highly productive waters. The middle Holocene (~7-3.5 ka) is characterized by relatively constant cyst concentrations, and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are indicative of a slight decrease in sea-surface temperature. A noticeable increase and greater range of fluctuations in the cyst concentrations during the late Holocene (~3.5-1 ka) indicate enhanced marine primary productivity and increased climatic variability, most likely related to the intensification of El Niño-like conditions. Keywords: dinoflagellate cysts, Holocene, North Pacific, climate, primary productivity.

  4. Natural Offshore Oil Seepage and Related Tarball Accumulation on the California Coastline - Santa Barbara Channel and the Southern Santa Maria Basin: Source Identification and Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Hostettler, Frances D.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Peters, Kenneth E.; Dougherty, Jennifer A.; Kvenvolden, Keith A.; Gutmacher, Christina E.; Wong, Florence L.; Normark, William R.

    2009-01-01

    Oil spillage from natural sources is very common in the waters of southern California. Active oil extraction and shipping is occurring concurrently within the region and it is of great interest to resource managers to be able to distinguish between natural seepage and anthropogenic oil spillage. The major goal of this study was to establish the geologic setting, sources, and ultimate dispersal of natural oil seeps in the offshore southern Santa Maria Basin and Santa Barbara Basins. Our surveys focused on likely areas of hydrocarbon seepage that are known to occur between Point Arguello and Ventura, California. Our approach was to 1) document the locations and geochemically fingerprint natural seep oils or tar; 2) geochemically fingerprint coastal tar residues and potential tar sources in this region, both onshore and offshore; 3) establish chemical correlations between offshore active seeps and coastal residues thus linking seep sources to oil residues; 4) measure the rate of natural seepage of individual seeps and attempt to assess regional natural oil and gas seepage rates; and 5) interpret the petroleum system history for the natural seeps. To document the location of sub-sea oil seeps, we first looked into previous studies within and near our survey area. We measured the concentration of methane gas in the water column in areas of reported seepage and found numerous gas plumes and measured high concentrations of methane in the water column. The result of this work showed that the seeps were widely distributed between Point Conception east to the vicinity of Coal Oil Point, and that they by in large occur within the 3-mile limit of California State waters. Subsequent cruises used sidescan and high resolution seismic to map the seafloor, from just south of Point Arguello, east to near Gaviota, California. The results of the methane survey guided the exploration of the area west of Point Conception east to Gaviota using a combination of seismic instruments. The

  5. Planktonic foraminiferal shell weight reflects sea surface temperature over the past 150 years in Santa Barbara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, D. K.; Clayman, L.; Weaver, J.; Schimmelmann, A.; Hendy, I. L.

    2011-12-01

    Size-normalized foraminiferal shell weight has been used as a proxy for past carbonate ion concentration in seawater, assuming that reduced carbonate ion concentration and pH lead to lower calcification rates and lighter, thinner shells. Previous research suggested that the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and ocean acidification over the last century has resulted in lower shell weight, but this has not yet been documented at high resolution. Here, we present an approximately annual record of size-normalized shell weight and Mg/Ca of the near-surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides to investigate the relationship between shell weight and sea surface temperature in Santa Barbara Basin, California (34° 16.847' N, 120° 02.268' W), over the last 150 years. Results indicate that foraminiferal shell weight is inversely correlated with instrumental sea surface temperature since 1850. Foraminiferal shell weights were highest between 1900 and 1920, corresponding to the lowest instrumental and Mg/Ca-derived sea surface temperatures. Shell weights gradually decreased to their lowest values after the mid-1970s, coincident with northeast Pacific warming as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation shifted from cool to warm phase. G. bulloides Mg/Ca temperatures also gradually increased after 1970, from 13 ± 1°C to 14.5 ± 1°C. Scanning electron microscopy indicates that the lowest shell-weight foraminifera, those deposited since the mid-1970s shift, exhibit a distinctive smooth shell texture devoid of spine bases, in contrast with higher shell-weight foraminifera, which have numerous spine bases and large pores. The smooth-shell surface morphology is replicated in laboratory dissolution experiments, consistent with removal of an outer layer of calcite during shell thinning and partial dissolution of G. bulloides. These results suggest that G. bulloides calcification rates were related to sea surface temperatures over the last 150 years, and that shells deposited

  6. High resolution sedimentary record of dinoflagellate cysts reflects decadal variability and 20th century warming in the Santa Barbara Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringué, Manuel; Pospelova, Vera; Field, David B.

    2014-12-01

    We present a continuous record of dinoflagellate cysts from a core of laminated sediments collected in the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB), off Southern California. The core spans the last ∼260 years and is analysed at biennial (two-year) resolution. Variations in dinoflagellate cyst assemblages are compared with 20th century historical changes, and are used to examine changes in primary productivity and species composition, which are bound to the variability in upwelling and sea-surface temperature (SST) in the region. Cysts produced by heterotrophic dinoflagellates dominate the assemblages. In particular, Brigantedinium spp. (on average 64.2% of the assemblages) are commonly associated with high levels of primary productivity, typically observed under active upwelling conditions, when nutrient supply is higher. Other heterotrophic taxa such as cysts of Protoperidinium americanum, Protoperidinium fukuyoi, Protoperidinium minutum and Archaeperidinium saanichi, all Echinidinium species, Quinquecuspis concreta and Selenopemphix undulata are more abundant in the early part of the record (∼1750s-1870s). These taxa are generally associated with high primary productivity and are observed predominantly during intervals marked by relatively variable conditions of SST, stratification and nutrient loading. The 20th century is marked by an increase in several species of autotrophic affinity, primarily Lingulodinium machaerophorum and Spiniferites ramosus. In recent surface sediments from the region, these species are more abundant in the Southern California Bight, and they are associated with conditions of relaxed upwelling in the SBB (typically observed during summer and fall), when SST is higher and nutrient supply is moderate. Their increasing concentrations since the early 20th century reflect warmer SST and possibly stronger stratification during the warmest season. Taken together, the changes in cyst assemblages provide further evidence that persistently warmer conditions

  7. santa_barbara.grd

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC builds and distributes high-resolution, coastal digital elevation models (DEMs) that integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography to support NOAA's mission to...

  8. Tracking Identity: Opportunity, Success, and Affiliation with Science among Fifth-Grade Latina/o Youth of Santa Barbara, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Grayson Ford

    This dissertation is an investigation into the American public education system at the elementary school level. It highlights important factors that shape the organizational structure of schools and classrooms, and in turn, how they engender disparities in the ways students experience education, namely, in the opportunities made available to them to achieve and succeed at a high level. This dissertation operates at the confluence of notions about class, gender, language, and race, especially as they revolve around public education and the hegemonic meritocratic discourse on which it is founded. This dissertation engages and contributes to scholarship within the following areas: The political economy of education; discourse and the dialectical relationship between agency and structure; cultural perspectives on identity, voice, and learning; and, Latinas/os in science education. The data that serve as the basis for the findings presented in this dissertation were collected throughout a three-phase yearlong ethnographic study of the two tracked fifth-grade classrooms at Amblen Elementary School, serving a socioeconomically disadvantaged Latina/o student population in Santa Barbara, California. In classrooms all across the nation, while it remains true that Latina/o students disproportionally take up space in the lower-tracked courses and not in the higher ones, this study does not examine inequality in tracking assignments made along ethnic/racial lines (as 100% of the students that participated in this research identify as Latina/o), rather, it investigates the consequences of what happens when Latina/o students are tracked according to symbolic markers of their ethnic/racial identity, that is, their varying levels of English language competency. Using data from participant observation, semi-structured interviews, students' drawings, as well as free-list and rank-order exercises, I was able to answer the following central research questions: In what ways do the

  9. Prehistoric fires and the shaping of colonial transported landscapes in southern California: A paleoenvironmental study at Dune Pond, Santa Barbara County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejarque, Ana; Anderson, R. Scott; Simms, Alexander R.; Gentry, Beau J.

    2015-03-01

    Using a novel combination of paleoecologic proxies including pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs (NPPs), macroscopic charcoal, and Spheroidal Carbonaceous Particles (SCPs), 5000 years of landscape change, fire history and land-use have been reconstructed from Dune Pond, Santa Barbara County, California. The pond was sensitive to Holocene regional climatic variability, showing different phases of lower (4600-3700 cal yr BP, 2100-700 cal yr BP, historical period) and higher (3700-2100 cal yr BP, 700-150 cal yr BP) local moisture availability. During this period the landscape was dominated by a coastal mosaic vegetation including dune mats, coastal scrub and salt marshes on the dunes and backdunes, with chaparral and oak woodland growing in the valley plains and foothills. Fire was intimately linked with such dominating mosaic vegetation, and the combination of wet conditions and the presence of nearby human settlement were a trigger favoring coastal fires for at least two periods: from 3100 to 1500 cal yr BP and from 650 cal yr BP until the 18th century. In both cases fire was an important tool to keep an open coastal landscape attractive to hunting wildlife. Finally, matching this varied range of high-resolution paleoecological proxies with historical records we could characterize the development of colonial transported landscapes following the Euro-American settlement of Santa Barbara. The introduction of livestock grazing by Spanish colonists favored erosive processes and the introduction of fecal-borne parasites in freshwater bodies, negatively impacted salt and brackish coastal marshes, and promoted the invasion of alien grasses and ruderals. This agro-pastoral landscape was consolidated during the American period, with a greater role for cultivation, the development of industrial activities and increased population. Despite negative environmental consequences such as the loss of native habitats, exotic land-uses and plants introduced during the historical period

  10. The Deserted Merced. Possesion and Duty of Properties in Maiz Gordo and Santa Barbara (Jujuy, Argentina, from 1850 to 1910

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia A. Fandos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the processes of constitution of public land in the 19th century in Argentina, this article is focused in the particular case of Maíz Gordo y Santa Bárbara (province of Jujuy, where a special phenomenon of the state control occured due to ignore the private rights of a land that was supposed to be deserted. We intend to investigate the different forms and evolution of property rights during this whole event, considering, on the one hand, the expropriated actors and the new owners, and on the other hand, the people who effectively populated them (tenants, ocuppants of fact, etc..

  11. A History of Warming Sea Surface Temperature and Ocean Acidification Recorded by Planktonic Foraminifera Geochemistry from the Santa Barbara Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, E.; Thunell, R.; Bizimis, M.; Buckley, W. P., Jr.; benitez-Nelson, C. R.; Chartier, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemistry of foraminiferal shells has been widely used to reconstruct past conditions of the ocean and climate. Since the onset of the Industrial Revolution, anthropogenically produced CO2 has resulted in an increase in global temperatures and a decline in the mean pH of the world's oceans. The California Current System is a particularly susceptible region to ocean acidification due to natural upwelling processes that also cause a reduction in seawater pH. The trace element concentration of magnesium and boron in planktonic foraminiferal shells are used here as proxies for temperature and carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]), respectively. Newly developed calibrations relating Mg/Ca ratios to temperature (R2 0.91) and B/Ca ratios to [CO32-] (R2 0.84) for the surface-mixed layer species Globogerina bulloides were generated using material collected in the Santa Barbara Basin sediment trap time-series. Using these empirical relationships, temperature and [CO32-] are reconstructed using a 0.5 meter long multi-core collected within the basin. 210Pb activities were used to determine a sedimentation rate for the core to estimate ages for core samples (sedimentation rate: 0.341 cm/yr). A spike in 137Cs activity is used as a tie-point to the year 1965 coinciding with the peak of nuclear bomb testing. Our down-core record extends through the mid-19th century to create a history of rising sea surface temperatures and declining [CO32-] as a result of anthropogenic CO2 emissions.

  12. Satellite assessment of particulate matter and phytoplankton variations in the Santa Barbara Channel and its surrounding waters: Role of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderikx Freitas, Fernanda; Siegel, David A.; Maritorena, Stéphane; Fields, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Satellite observations of chlorophyll in coastal waters are often described in terms of changes in productivity in response to regional upwelling processes while optical backscattering coefficients are more often linked to episodic inputs of suspended sediments from storm runoff. Here we show that the surface gravity wave resuspension of sediments has a larger role in controlling backscatter than previously considered. Almost 18 years of SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS, and VIIRS satellite imagery of the Santa Barbara Channel, California and its surrounding waters spectrally merged with the Garver-Siegel-Maritorena bio-optical model were used to assess the controls on suspended particle distributions. Analysis revealed that chlorophyll blooms in the warmer portions of the domain occur in phase with SST minima, usually in early spring, while blooms in the cooler regions lag SST minima and occur simultaneously to the strongest equatorward winds every year, often in the summer. Tight coupling between the optical variables was seen in offshore areas, as expected for productive waters. However, values of backscatter near the coast were primarily modulated by surface waves. This relationship holds throughout all seasons and is stronger within the 100 m isobath, but often extends tens of kilometers offshore. This forcing of particle resuspension by surface waves is likely a feature ubiquitous in all coastal oceans characterized by fine sediments. The implication of surface wave processes determining suspended particle loads far beyond the surf zone has large consequences for the interpretation of satellite ocean color signals in coastal waters and potentially redefines the extent of the littoral zone.

  13. Extending the High-Resolution Global Climate Record in Santa Barbara Basin: Developing a More Continuous Composite Section from Overlapping Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behl, R. J.; Kennett, J. P.; Hill, T. M.; Pak, D.; Schimmelmann, A.; Cannariato, K. G.; Nicholson, C.; Sorlien, C. C.; Hopkins, S. E.; Team, S.

    2005-12-01

    More than thirty ~2 to 5m-long piston cores were recovered from an eroded, breached anticline on the Mid-Channel Trend of the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB). Precision placement of cores enabled us to build several composite stratigraphic sections of overlapping cores. This was accomplished by continuous shipboard evaluation and feedback between pre-existing and concurrently acquired high-resolution seismic data and immediate sedimentologic core analysis to determine subsequent core locations. Overlap was confirmed by correlated stratigraphic patterns of alternating laminated vs. massive intervals, gray flood layers, spectrophotometric and MST density/porosity data. These cores were acquired to provide a semi-continuous, composite paleoceanographic record of the Quaternary SBB and the California Margin that extends beyond the fertile ODP Site 893 core, to possibly as old as 450 to 600 ka, an age previously unreachable by conventional methods. Most cores were mantled by glauconitic sand or a thin carbonate hardground encrusted with sessile organisms, including solitary corals. Underlying the condensed Holocene sand or hardground deposits are alternating layers of Pleistocene laminated and massive/bioturbated sediment with minor sand and sandy clay layers. The style, continuity, and variability of laminated fabric and the nature of bedding contacts are similar to that observed at ODP Site 893 where glacial episodes were associated with oxygenated, bioturbated sediment and interglacial and interstadial sediment were associated with dysoxic, laminated sediment. Laminated sediment comprises 38% of the hemipelagic deposits which is nearly identical with the ratio of laminated to massive sediment over the past 160 ky at Site 893. By extrapolation, despite accumulating in a mobile, deforming, active margin basin, the earlier Pleistocene deposits seem to record similar behavior to the last 160 ky recorded at ODP Site 893. In some intervals, gray layers are thicker and more

  14. Barbara Cooney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Jackie C.

    2000-01-01

    Profiles the life/work of the award winning picture-book author-illustrator Barbara Cooney. Includes her early development as an artist; early attempts at the picture-book form; experimentation with different media: watercolor, pen/ink with wash, charcoal, acrylics, pastels, and collage; later work that draws upon folk-art traditions; her love of…

  15. Barbara Cooney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Jackie C.

    2000-01-01

    Profiles the life/work of the award winning picture-book author-illustrator Barbara Cooney. Includes her early development as an artist; early attempts at the picture-book form; experimentation with different media: watercolor, pen/ink with wash, charcoal, acrylics, pastels, and collage; later work that draws upon folk-art traditions; her love of…

  16. Oceanic loading of wildfire-derived organic compounds from a small mountainous river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsinger, G.B.; Mitra, Siddhartha; Warrick, J.A.; Alexander, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Small mountainous rivers (SMRs) export substantial amounts of sediment into the world's oceans. The concomitant yield of organic carbon (OC) associated with this class of rivers has also been shown to be significant and compositionally unique. We report here excessively high loadings of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), lignin, and levoglucosan, discharged from the Santa Clara River into the Santa Barbara Channel. The abundance of PAHs, levoglucosan, and lignin in Santa Barbara Channel sediments ranged from 201.7 to 1232.3 ng gdw-1, 1.3 to 6.9 ??g gdw-1, and 0.3 to 2.2 mg per 100 mg of the sedimentary OC, respectively. Assuming a constant rate of sediment accumulation, the annual fluxes of PAHs, levoglucosan, and lignin, to the Santa Barbara Channel were respectively, 885.5 ?? 170.2 ng cm-2 a-1, 3.5 ?? 1.9 ??g cm-2 a-1 and 1.4 ?? 0.3 mg per 100 mg OC cm-2 a-1, over ???30 years. The close agreement between PAHs, levoglucosan, and lignin abundance suggests that the depositional flux of these compounds is largely biomass combustion-derived. To that end, use of the Santa Clara River as a model for SMRs suggests this class of rivers may be one of the largest contributors of pyrolyzed carbon to coastal systems and the open ocean. Wildfire associated carbon discharged from other high yield fluvial systems, when considered collectively, may be a significant source of lignin, pyrolytic PAHs, and other pyrogenic compounds to the ocean. Extrapolating these methods over geologic time may offer useful historical information about carbon sequestration and burial in coastal sediments and affect coastal carbon budgets. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. The Santa Barbara County Health Care Services program: birth weight change concomitant with screening for and treatment of glucose-intolerance of pregnancy: a potential cost-effective intervention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic-Peterson, L; Bevier, W; Peterson, C M

    1997-04-01

    Macrosomic infants still suffer birth trauma in excess of the general population; thus, while debated, the medical and legal sequelae of macrosomia appear to be costly. The clinical role of maternal hyperglycemia below the threshold for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) in the etiology of macrosomia remains an area of controversy. Based on the hypothesis that increasing glucose levels result in an increasing prevalence of macrosomia, we designed a study to observe the impact on birth weight and on cost of a treatment program for glucose-intolerant pregnant women in The Santa Barbara County Health Care Services (SBCHCS). In 1985, 18% of 4364 births (85% Mexican-American in origin) in the SBCHCS were > 90th percentile birth weight. In 1986, we began a program to treat all glucose-intolerant pregnant women who had a positive glucose challenge test (GCT > 140 mg/dL after a 50-g oral glucose load), even if they had a negative glucose tolerance test. All glucose-tolerant pregnant women were placed on a 40% carbohydrate, 1800 kcal diet and taught to monitor their blood glucose. Insulin was begun if the fasting blood glucose was > 90 mg/dL and/or the 1-hour post meal was > 120 mg/dL. After introduction of the screening/ treatment program, the prevalence of macrosomia in 1992 was 7% and the cesarean section rate had dropped from 30 to 20%. The cost to SBCHC to educate and treat the additional glucose-intolerant women was $233,650. Assuming that there would have been an additional 398 macrosomic infants with some requiring cesarean delivery and intensive care, total potential savings could be estimated at $833,870 per year. Thus, treatment of glucose-intolerant pregnant women was associated with a decrease in macrosomia and may be cost-effective.

  18. High-resolution paleoclimatology of the Santa Barbara Basin during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and early Little Ice Age based on diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages in Kasten core SPR0901-02KC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, David B.; Hendy, Ingrid L.

    2015-01-01

    Diatom and silicoflagellate assemblages documented in a high-resolution time series spanning 800 to 1600 AD in varved sediment recovered in Kasten core SPR0901-02KC (34°16.845’ N, 120°02.332’ W, water depth 588 m) from the Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) reveal that SBB surface water conditions during the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) and the early part of the Little Ice Age (LIA) were not extreme by modern standards, mostly falling within one standard deviation of mean conditions during the pre anthropogenic interval of 1748 to 1900. No clear differences between the character of MCA and the early LIA conditions are apparent. During intervals of extreme droughts identified by terrigenous proxy scanning XRF analyses, diatom and silicoflagellate proxies for coastal upwelling typically exceed one standard deviation above mean values for 1748-1900, supporting the hypothesis that droughts in southern California are associated with cooler (or La Niña-like) sea surface temperatures (SSTs). Increased percentages of diatoms transported downslope generally coincide with intervals of increased siliciclastic flux to the SBB identified by scanning XRF analyses. Diatom assemblages suggest only two intervals of the MCA (at ~897 to 922 and ~1151 to 1167) when proxy SSTs exceeded one standard deviation above mean values for 1748 to 1900. Conversely, silicoflagellates imply extreme warm water events only at ~830 to 860 (early MCA) and ~1360 to 1370 (early LIA) that are not supported by the diatom data. Silicoflagellates appear to be more suitable for characterizing average climate during the 5 to 11 year-long sample intervals studied in the SPR0901-02KC core than diatoms, probably because diatom relative abundances may be dominated by seasonal blooms of a particular year.

  19. Response of diatoms and silicoflagellates to climate change in the Santa Barbara Basin during the past 250 years and the rise of the toxic diatom Pseudo-nitzschia australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, John A.; Bukry, David; Field, David B.; Finney, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Diatoms and silicoflagellate assemblages were examined in two year-increments of varved samples spanning the interval from 1748 through 2007 in Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) box core SBBC0806 to determine the timing and impact of possible 20th century warming on several different components of the plankton. Diatoms (Thalassionema nitzschioides =TN) and silicoflagellates (Distephanus speculum s.l. =DS) indicative of cooler waters and a shallow thermocline begin to decline in the 1920s and persistently compose a lower percentage of the assemblage in the SBB by about 1940. Prior to 1940, TN constituted on average ~30% of the Chaetoceros-free diatom sediment assemblage and DS on average ~36% of the silicoflagellate assemblage. Between 1940 and 1996 these relative abundances were ~20% (TN) and ~8% (DS). These results are consistent with results from planktonic foraminifera and radiolarians that indicate an influence of 20th century warming on marine ecosystems before most scientific observations began. Cooling of surface waters coincident with the one of the strongest La Niña events of the 20th century (and a return to negative PDO conditions) in late 1998 brought about a return to pre-1940 values of these cool water taxa (TN ~31%, DS ~25%). However, this recent regional cooling appears to have been accompanied by profound changes in the diatom assemblage. Pseudo-nitzschia australis, and Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries, diatom species associated with domoic acid, a neurotoxin that causes shellfish poisoning and marine mammal deaths, rapidly became dominant in the SBB sediment record at the time of the regional cooling (1999) and increased substantially in numbers as a bloom-forming taxon (relative to Chaetoceros spores) in 2003. Prior to 2003 diatom blooms recorded in the SBB sediment record consisted predominantly of Chaetoceros spores and less commonly of Rhizosolenia-related species (Neocalyptrella robusta and R. setigera). Fecal pellets dominated by valves of P. australis

  20. Santa Barbara, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  1. Santa Barbara Littoral Cell CRSMP Beaches 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Several criteria were used for beach selection. BEACON 's Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plan included all of the most popular beaches in the two counties...

  2. Santa Barbara Littoral Cell CRSMP Beaches 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Several criteria were used for beach selection. BEACON 's Coastal Regional Sediment Management Plan included all of the most popular beaches in the two counties...

  3. Analysis of the effects of combustion emissions and Santa Ana winds on ambient ozone during the October 2007 southern California wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Bytnerowicz; D. Cayan; P. Riggan; S. Schilling; P. Dawson; M. Tyree; L. Wolden; R. Tissell; H. Preisler

    2010-01-01

    Combustion emissions and strong Santa Ana winds had pronounced effects on patterns and levels of ambient ozone (O3) in southern California during the extensive wildland fires of October 2007. These changes are described in detail for a rural receptor site, the Santa Margarita Ecological Reserve, located among large fires in San Diego and Orange counties. In addition,...

  4. 77 FR 65621 - Security Zone; Cruise Ships, Santa Barbara Harbor, Santa Barbara, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... waters from the surface to the sea floor within a 100-yard radius of any cruise ship located within 3... prevent the catastrophic impact that a terrorist attack against a cruise ship would have on the public... to the sea floor within a 100-yard radius of any cruise ship which is located within 3 nautical...

  5. Wildfire Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fire Safety Checklist - Haitian Wild Fire Safety Checklist - Korean Wild Fire Safety Checklist - Spanish Wild Fire Safety Checklist - Tagalog Wild Fire Safety Checklist - Vietnamese Learn More How to Prevent Wildfires Learn How We ...

  6. Monitoring Effects of Wildfire Mitigation Treatments on Water Budget Components: A Paired-Basin Study in the Santa Fe River Watershed, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    A paired basin study in the Upper Santa Fe River watershed following forest restoration measured water budget components in a treated and untreated basin. The paired basin study was established to investigate questions that have arisen with regards to changes in the amount and timing of water yield following forest treatments. Precipitation, stream flow, soil moisture, chloride concentrations in precipitation and stream flow were measured to quantify the water budget components. While the study is ongoing, the results from six water years show a high degree of confidence in the techniques applied. The total inflow from precipitation for each integration period minus the outflow of stream flow, evapotranspiration, recharge and soil moisture leaves a remainder of less than 1%, thus most of the water is accounted for. Volume-weighted chloride concentration in precipitation ranges from 0.20 to 0.23 mg/L for the three integration periods. The annual volume-weighted chloride concentration in stream flow for the same periods ranges from 2.18 to 3.32 mg/L in the treated basin and 0.93 to 1.35 mg/L in the control basin. Based on the ratio of chloride in precipitation to the concentration in stream flow, evapotranspiration is estimated to be about 90 to 96 percent in the treated basin and 76 to 85 percent in the untreated basin for the three integration periods of the ongoing investigation. Higher evapotranspiration rates in the treated basin may be due to the change in vegetation or to a greater area at a lower elevation with a west facing slope. While no increase in stream flow in the treated basin from the forest treatments has been detected, the intensity of runoff appear to be reduced from pre-treatment to post-treatment conditions. With continued monitoring as the vegetation reestablishes to the desired "restored" condition, we will be able to track changes in the water budget.A paired basin study in the Upper Santa Fe River watershed following forest restoration

  7. Barbara Stanwyck's Anklet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Rabinowitz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Los objetos tienen siempre un poder ineludible como significantes. El género fílmico negro está también dotado de una identidad propia a partir de un conjunto de imágenes, argumentos, estilos visuales y objetos por ejemplo, encendedores, persianas y, como elemento central de este trabajo, zapatos. El zapato como emblema de la muerte e icono sexual deviene fundamental en la puesta en escena del género negro. Cuando la “femme fatale” Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck, por ejemplo, desciende la escalera para encontrarse con el corredor de seguros Walter Neff (Fred Mc Murray en la película de Billy Wilder Persuasión (1944, la cámara enfoca sus piernas blancas y relucientes hasta alcanzar sus pies y sus tobillos, con el fin de evocar el poder fetichista del pie de una mujer a la hora de controlar a un hombre.

  8. SECRUHAB -- Habitat polygons for Southeast Santa Cruz Island (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Benthic habitat polygon coverages have been created for marine reserve locations surrounding the Santa Barbara Basin. Diver, ROV and submersible video transects,...

  9. SECRUHAB -- Habitat polygons for Southeast Santa Cruz Island (UTM 10N, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Benthic habitat polygon coverages have been created for marine reserve locations surrounding the Santa Barbara Basin. Diver, ROV and submersible video transects,...

  10. Protocol, Engineering Research Center, University of California, Santa Barbara

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Raymond Klefstad * Juan Colmenares , Graduate Student Researcher • Shruti Gorappa, Graduate Student Researcher * Trevor Harmon, Graduate Student Researcher...Technology and Applications Symposium, Washington ,D.C., May - June 2000. K. Raman, Y. Zhang, M. Panahi, J. A. Colmenares and R. Klefstad, "RTZen...Systems, September 2005, Vienna, Austria. K. Raman, Y. Zhang, M. Panahi, J. A. Colmenares and R. Klefstad, "Patterns and tools for achieving

  11. Seafloor character from lidar data-Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Seafloor character was derived from interpretations of lidar data available for the mainland coast within the study area from the California State Waters Mapping...

  12. Santa Barbara Littoral Cell CRSMP Sensitive Habitat Areas 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Ecological areas as identified and collected by BEACON and submitted to CSMW as part of the Central Coast (from Pt. Conception to Pt. Mugu) Coastal Regional Sediment...

  13. Santa Barbara Littoral Cell CRSMP Sensitive Habitat Sites 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Ecological areas as identified and collected by BEACON and submitted to CSMW as part of the Central Coast (from Pt. Conception to Pt. Mugu) Coastal Regional Sediment...

  14. Santa Barbara Littoral Cell CRSMP Offshore Sand Sources 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Offshore sand sources exist at four known locations and potentially other yet to be explored regions within the nearshore coastal shelf. Significant reserves of fine...

  15. Santa Barbara Littoral Cell CRSMP Offshore Sand Sources 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Offshore sand sources exist at four known locations and potentially other yet to be explored regions within the nearshore coastal shelf. Significant reserves of fine...

  16. Seafloor character from lidar data-Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Seafloor character was derived from interpretations of lidar data available for the mainland coast within the study area from the California State Waters Mapping...

  17. Green Science: Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palliser, Janna

    2012-01-01

    Every summer, fires rage in different areas of the western United States. They are often massive, out of control, and extremely destructive. How do these fires begin and how are they controlled? What are the overall impacts of a wildfire? Are there any benefits of a wildfire? These questions will be addressed in this article. (Contains 3 online…

  18. Wildfire Smoke Health Watch

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-23

    Smoke from wildfires can be dangerous to your health. In this podcast, you will learn the health threats of wildfire smoke and steps you can take to minimize these effects.  Created: 7/23/2012 by Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (PHPR).   Date Released: 7/23/2012.

  19. Wildfire Disasters and Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Patricia Frohock

    2016-12-01

    Multiple factors contribute to wildfires in California and other regions: drought, winds, climate change, and spreading urbanization. Little has been done to study the multiple roles of nurses related to wildfire disasters. Major nursing organizations support disaster education for nurses. It is essential for nurses to recognize their roles in each phase of the disaster cycle: mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery. Skills learned in the US federal all-hazards approach to disasters can then be adapted to more specific disasters, such as wildfires, and issues affecting health care. Nursing has an important role in each phase of the disaster cycle.

  20. Santa Muerte

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, A.; The Photographers' Gallery; Trolley Books; Bar-Tur Foundation; Arts Council England

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Santa Muerte - a religion/cult that has been denounced as satanic by the Mexican Catholic Church - can be dated back hundreds of years. It was developed through a syncretism between indigenous Mesoamerican and Spanish Catholic beliefs and practices. Only in the last decade however has it become more predominant in Mexican society, where many commentators have noted its rise with the killing and violence associated with the war between rival drug cartels and the Mexican Governme...

  1. Mapping wildfire susceptibility in Southern California using live and dead fractions of vegetation derived from Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis of MODIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, P.; Roberts, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Wildfire is a significant natural disturbance mechanism in Southern California. Assessing spatial patterns of wildfire susceptibility requires estimates of the live and dead fractions of vegetation. The Fire Potential Index (FPI), which is currently the only operationally computed fire susceptibility index incorporating remote sensing data, estimates such fractions using a relative greenness measure based on time series of vegetation index images. This contribution assesses the potential of Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) for deriving such fractions from single MODIS images without the need for a long remote sensing time series, and investigates the applicability of such MESMA-derived fractions for mapping dynamic fire susceptibility in Southern California. Endmembers for MESMA were selected from a library of reference endmembers using Constrained Reference Endmember Selection (CRES), which uses field estimates of fractions to guide the selection process. Fraction images of green vegetation, non-photosynthetic vegetation, soil, and shade were then computed for all available 16-day MODIS composites between 2000 and 2006 using MESMA. Initial results indicate that MESMA of MODIS imagery is capable of providing reliable estimates of live and dead vegetation fraction. Validation against in situ observations in the Santa Ynez Mountains near Santa Barbara, California, shows that the average fraction error for two tested species was around 10%. Further validation of MODIS-derived fractions was performed against fractions from high-resolution hyperspectral data. It was shown that the fractions derived from data of both sensors correlate with R2 values greater than 0.95. MESMA-derived live and dead vegetation fractions were subsequently tested as a substitute to relative greenness in the FPI algorithm. FPI was computed for every day between 2000 and 2006 using the derived fractions. Model performance was then tested by extracting FPI values for

  2. On Shaw’s Major Barbara

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕊茁

    2013-01-01

    George Bernard Shaw was a progressive mankind. He advocated the forces in revolution and democracy in their strug-gle against imperialism and reaction. Major Barbara is an excellent play which sharply satirized the capitalist society and powerful-ly revealed the outstanding characteristics of capitalism and capitalists. It intensively shows Shaw ’s art of comedy. The story main-ly tells that Undershaft, a millionaire weapon dealer, loves money and despises poverty. Even he thinks poverty is a crime. His vig-orous daughter Barbara, however, is a devout major in the Salvation Army. She treats her father as just another soul to be saved. But when the Salvation Army needs funds to keep running , it is Undershaft who saves the day. At this time, she finally compro-mises, and believes that it was whisky king and the armament dealer that saved the poor. The main theme of Major Barbara is cen-tered on conflicting social and moral ethics, one realistic and the other idealistic. The chief merit of the play lies in the fact that what Undershaft does and says reveals the true nature of monopoly capitalism.

  3. Wildfire and abrupt ecosystem disruption on California's Northern Channel Islands at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary (13.0-12.9 ka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, D. J.; Kennett, J. P.; West, G. J.; Erlandson, J. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Hendy, I. L.; West, A.; Culleton, B. J.; Jones, T. L.; Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.

    2008-12-01

    Sedimentary records from California's Northern Channel Islands and the adjacent Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) indicate intense regional biomass burning (wildfire) at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary (˜13.0-12.9 ka) (All age ranges in this paper are expressed in thousands of calendar years before present [ka]. Radiocarbon ages will be identified and clearly marked " 14C years".). Multiproxy records in SBB Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site 893 indicate that these wildfires coincided with the onset of regional cooling and an abrupt vegetational shift from closed montane forest to more open habitats. Abrupt ecosystem disruption is evident on the Northern Channel Islands at the Ållerød-Younger Dryas boundary with the onset of biomass burning and resulting mass sediment wasting of the landscape. These wildfires coincide with the extinction of Mammuthus exilis [pygmy mammoth]. The earliest evidence for human presence on these islands at 13.1-12.9 ka (˜11,000-10,900 14C years) is followed by an apparent 600-800 year gap in the archaeological record, which is followed by indications of a larger-scale colonization after 12.2 ka. Although a number of processes could have contributed to a post 18 ka decline in M. exilis populations (e.g., reduction of habitat due to sea-level rise and human exploitation of limited insular populations), we argue that the ultimate demise of M. exilis was more likely a result of continental scale ecosystem disruption that registered across North America at the onset of the Younger Dryas cooling episode, contemporaneous with the extinction of other megafaunal taxa. Evidence for ecosystem disruption at 13-12.9 ka on these offshore islands is consistent with the Younger Dryas boundary cosmic impact hypothesis [Firestone, R.B., West, A., Kennett, J.P., Becker, L., Bunch, T.E., Revay, Z.S., Schultz, P.H., Belgya, T., Kennett, D.J., Erlandson, J.M., Dickenson, O.J., Goodyear, A.A., Harris, R.S., Howard, G.A., Kloosterman, J.B., Lechler, P

  4. Wildfire risk adaptation: propensity of forestland owners to purchase wildfire insurance in the southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianbang Gan; Adam Jarrett; Cassandra Johnson Gaither

    2014-01-01

    Economic and ecological damages caused by wildfire are alarming, and such damages are expected to rise with changes in wildfire regimes, calling for more effective wildfire mitigation and adaptation strategies. Among wildfire adaptation options for forestland owners is purchasing wildfire insurance, which provides compensation to those insured if a wildfire damages...

  5. Structure and ultrastructure of fresh and preserved biological membranes of Santa Inês sheep (Ovis aries, L., 1758)

    OpenAIRE

    Roméria Rodrigues Barbosa; Leonardo Martins Leal; Leandro Luis Martins; Sergio Pinter Garcia Filho; Andréa Cristina Scarpa Bosso; Márcia Rita Fernandes Machado

    2012-01-01

    The use of biological implants, of animal or synthetic origin, is recommended for the reconstruction of tissue defects. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyze the morphological structure and ultrastructure of the parietal peritoneum, parietal pericardium, tunica vaginalis and fascia lata of 15 Santa Inês sheep, which were adult males from Estância Santa Barbara, in the city of Poloni – SP. The membranes were collected immediately after the animals were slaughtered, individually...

  6. Wildfire and landscape change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, P.; Cannon, S.; DeGraff, J.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is a worldwide phenomenon that is expected to increase in extent and severity in the future, due to fuel accumulations, shifting land management practices, and climate change. It immediately affects the landscape by removing vegetation, depositing ash, influencing water-repellent soil formation, and physically weathering boulders and bedrock. These changes typically lead to increased erosion through sheetwash, rilling, dry ravel, and increased mass movement in the form of floods, debris flow, rockfall, and landslides. These process changes bring about landform changes as hillslopes are lowered and stream channels aggrade or incise at increased rates. Furthermore, development of alluvial fans, debris fans, and talus cones are enhanced. The window of disturbance to the landscape caused by wildfire is typically on the order of three to four years, with some effects persisting up to 30 years.

  7. Wildfire Decision Making Under Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Decisions relating to wildfire management are subject to multiple sources of uncertainty, and are made by a broad range of individuals, across a multitude of environmental and socioeconomic contexts. In this presentation I will review progress towards identification and characterization of uncertainties and how this information can support wildfire decision-making. First, I will review a typology of uncertainties common to wildfire management, highlighting some of the more salient sources of uncertainty and how they present challenges to assessing wildfire risk. This discussion will cover the expanding role of burn probability modeling, approaches for characterizing fire effects, and the role of multi-criteria decision analysis, and will provide illustrative examples of integrated wildfire risk assessment across a variety of planning scales. Second, I will describe a related uncertainty typology that focuses on the human dimensions of wildfire management, specifically addressing how social, psychological, and institutional factors may impair cost-effective risk mitigation. This discussion will encompass decision processes before, during, and after fire events, with a specific focus on active management of complex wildfire incidents. An improved ability to characterize uncertainties faced in wildfire management could lead to improved delivery of decision support, targeted communication strategies, and ultimately to improved wildfire management outcomes.

  8. An interview with Dr Barbara A. Carper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Elizabeth R

    2015-01-01

    In 1978, Dr Barbara A. Carper's foundational work, "Fundamental Patterns of Knowing in Nursing," arguably created a paradigm shift in nursing. However, her voice has been absent from the nursing literature in recent years. I was privileged to conduct a personal interview with Dr Carper in 2014. The edited interview includes a synopsis of her background, career trajectory, sources of inspiration, and her perspective on the current state of nursing. She reaffirmed her passion for reflective nursing practice, the importance incorporating the arts and humanities into nursing education, and using an integrated approach with the patterns of knowing in nursing.

  9. Mentors, Muses, and Mutuality: Honoring Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    I describe feminist community psychology principles that have the potential to expand and enrich mentoring and that honor Barbara Snell Dohrenwend, a leader who contributed to the research, theory, and profession of community psychology. I reflect on the affect that Barbara Dohrenwend had on life and on the development of feminist community…

  10. Mentors, Muses, and Mutuality: Honoring Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    I describe feminist community psychology principles that have the potential to expand and enrich mentoring and that honor Barbara Snell Dohrenwend, a leader who contributed to the research, theory, and profession of community psychology. I reflect on the affect that Barbara Dohrenwend had on life and on the development of feminist community…

  11. Rannus mängitakse suvel Barbara lugu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Augustis on Rannus näitlejate ja näitejuhtide suvekool, mille tipphetk on ühine vabaõhuetendus "Barbara lugu", lavastajaks Jüri Lumiste. Artiklis ka lühidalt Barbara von Tiesenhuseni, kes oli Rannu lossi Tiesenhusenite 12 lapsest noorim, saatusest

  12. Rannus mängitakse suvel Barbara lugu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Augustis on Rannus näitlejate ja näitejuhtide suvekool, mille tipphetk on ühine vabaõhuetendus "Barbara lugu", lavastajaks Jüri Lumiste. Artiklis ka lühidalt Barbara von Tiesenhuseni, kes oli Rannu lossi Tiesenhusenite 12 lapsest noorim, saatusest

  13. Barbara Grier and the world she built.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passet, Joanne E

    2014-01-01

    Mentored in the art of lesbian literary detection by Jeannette Howard Foster, Barbara Grier became part of a vibrant print-based network of lesbians through her involvement with The Ladder. Building on that foundation, she developed Naiad Press into a successful lesbian business, one that opened doors for lesbian writers and preserved lesbian classics for new generations of readers. Shaped by her class and the times in which she came of age, Grier understood the power of print to change women's lives. Some challenged her commitment to lesbian feminism, but few questioned her dedication to building Naiad into a press that heightened lesbian visibility, fostered self-understanding, and contributed to the creation of community.

  14. Wildfires Tracked by Minnesota DNR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This theme shows the locations of wildfires for which the DNR was the primary responding agency. These include fires not only on state lands, but also rural private...

  15. Surging wildfire activity in a grassland biome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Victoria M.; Wonkka, Carissa L.; Twidwell, Dirac

    2017-06-01

    Rapid changes in wildfire patterns are documented globally, increasing pressure to identify regions that may experience increases in wildfire in future decades. Temperate grassland and savanna biomes were some of the most frequently burned regions on Earth; however, large wildfires have been largely absent from the Great Plains of North America over the last century. In this paper, we conduct an in-depth analysis of changes in large wildfire (>400 ha) regime characteristics over a 30 year period across the Great Plains. For the entire biome, (i) the average number of large wildfires increased from 33.4 ± 5.6 per year from 1985 to 1994 to 116.8 ± 28.8 wildfires per year from 2005 to 2014, (ii) total area burned by large wildfires increased 400%, (iii) over half the ecoregions had greater than a 70% probability of a large wildfire occurring in the last decade, and (iv) seasonality of large wildfires remained relatively similar.

  16. UAS Developments Supporting Wildfire Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosia, V. G.; Dahlgren, R. P.; Watts, A.; Reynolds, K. W.; Ball, T.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfires are regularly occurring emergency events that threaten life, property, and natural resources in every U.S. State and many countries around the world. Despite projections that $1.8 billion will be spent by U.S. Federal agencies alone on wildfires in 2014, the decades-long trend of increasing fire size, severity, and cost is expected to continue. Furthermore, the enormous potential for UAS (and concomitant sensor systems) to serve as geospatial intelligence tools to improve the safety and effectiveness of fire management, and our ability to forecast fire and smoke movements, remains barely tapped. Although orbital sensor assets are can provide the geospatial extent of wildfires, generally those resources are limited in use due to their spatial and temporal resolution limitations. These two critical elements make orbital assets of limited utility for tactical, real-time wildfire management, or for continuous scientific analysis of the temporal dynamics related to fire energy release rates and plume concentrations that vary significantly thru a fire's progression. Large UAS platforms and sensors can and have been used to monitor wildfire events at improved temporal, spatial and radiometric scales, but more focus is being placed on the use of small UAS (sUAS) and sensors to support wildfire observation strategies. The use of sUAS is therefore more critical for TACTICAL management purposes, rather than strategic observations, where small-scale fire developments are critical to understand. This paper will highlight the historical development and use of UAS for fire observations, as well as the current shift in focus to smaller, more affordable UAS for more rapid integration into operational use on wildfire events to support tactical observation strategies, and support wildfire science measurement inprovements.

  17. Review of Barbara K. Seeber, Jane Austen and Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda Cole

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this review of Barbara K. Seeber's Jane Austen and Animals (Ashgate, 2013 Lucinda Cole summarizes this foundational book and emphasizes the role of animal studies scholars in linking feminism and environmental issues.

  18. 76 FR 31242 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... from boilers, steam generators and process heaters with a rated heat input rate greater than 2 million... Boilers, Steam 01/17/08 07/18/08 Generators and Process Heaters. SBCAPCD 333 Control of Emissions 06/19/08... District. (1) Rule 361, ``Small Boilers, Steam Generators and Process Heaters,'' adopted on January...

  19. Kirkemusik i stramme tøjler. Om alternatim-messer til Santa Barbara i Mantova

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Peter Woetmann

    2002-01-01

    Vokalmusik, messe, alternatim, Mantova, orgelmusik, Guglielmo Gonzaga, Giaches de Wert, Palestrina, Francesco Rovigo, Giovanni Contino, Giangiacomo Gastoldi, Allessandro Striggio, Tridentinerkonciliet, reform.......Vokalmusik, messe, alternatim, Mantova, orgelmusik, Guglielmo Gonzaga, Giaches de Wert, Palestrina, Francesco Rovigo, Giovanni Contino, Giangiacomo Gastoldi, Allessandro Striggio, Tridentinerkonciliet, reform....

  20. Santa Barbara Littoral Cell CRSMP Potential Coastal & Inland Sediment Sources 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Relic sediment deposits within the Goleta Slough, Carpinteria Salt Marsh, Ormond Beach wetlands, and Mugu Lagoon contain unknown reserves of sand that may present...

  1. Seroprevalence of Baylisascaris procyonis infection among humans, Santa Barbara County, California, USA, 2014–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Sara B.; Lake, Camille M.; Chastain, Holly M.; Fisk, David; Handali, Sukwan; Kahn, Philip L.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Kuris, Armand M.; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis (raccoon roundworm) infection is common in raccoons and can cause devastating pathology in other animals, including humans. Limited information is available on the frequency of asymptomatic human infection. We tested 150 adults from California, USA, for B. procyonis antibodies; 11 were seropositive, suggesting that subclinical infection does occur.

  2. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Santa Barbara Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  3. 78 FR 21542 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    .... ``Issues Relating to VOC Regulation Cutpoints, Deficiencies, and Deviations,'' EPA, May 25, 1988 (the... environmental effects with practical, appropriate, and legally permissible methods under Executive Order...

  4. Intensive Cultural Resources Survey for the Goleta Flood Protection Program, Santa Barbara County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-04-01

    8217m . .. . ... ... ..r i i ... .. ;; ] ’ ’ ’’ ’ ’ : Mexico , named after the legend. From the time of Portola onward the name...de Borica, who forwarded Goycoehea’s plan to the Viceroy in * Mexico (California Archives 50:226-233). 20 Goycoechea’s proposal met with opposition...may have served to integrate localized political and economic groups within portions of the Chumash region. A fiesta system is known to have existed

  5. 76 FR 5319 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Control District, Placer County Air Pollution Control District, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Control District (SBAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD), Antelope Valley...

  6. Seafloor character from multibeam echo sounder data-Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Substrate was classified using the method of (Cochrane 2008) for this study multibeam sonar. Sea floor character derived from multibeam sonar data is available for...

  7. First International Conference on Winter Vehicle Mobility, Santa Barbara, California, June 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    the effectiveness of the UHMWPE snow were made of annealed 17.2 -.;aitiless steel, which was scoops. Before each test, adata set was taken with all the...equations, and explicit Gr(I+ 1• •U + 1- 1 ))u2] methods have to be used. This, unfortunately, poses a ( - 2 V) ax 12 (1-2 x 22 big limitation on the...34 Field Artillery’s big guns. In addition to carrying troops Why is now this vehicle so fantastic? The secret lies and equipment, evacuating injured

  8. Hotell "Santa Barbara" Roosikrantsi tänavas Tallinnas / Andres Alver, Tiit Trummal, Martinus Schuurman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Andres, 1953-

    1997-01-01

    projekteeritud sajandi alguses rajatud paemüüridele; projekteerija, sisekujunduse üldlahendus: Alver Trummal Arhitektid ; sisekujundus: M. Schuurman; 2 joon.: asendiplaan, I korruse plaan ; 3 välisvaadet, foto ; 5 sisevaadet, foto, värv.

  9. 78 FR 21581 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara County Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ...- 2012-0828, by one of the following methods: 1. Federal eRulemaking Portal: www.regulations.gov . Follow... should avoid the use of special characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or...

  10. Seafloor character from multibeam echo sounder data-Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Substrate was classified using the method of (Cochrane and Lafferty, 2002) for this study. Sea floor character derived from towed sidescan sonar data is available...

  11. California State Waters Map Series--Santa Barbara Channel Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  12. Remote Sensing Information Sciences Research Group: Santa Barbara Information Sciences Research Group, year 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, John E.; Smith, Terence; Star, Jeffrey L.

    1987-01-01

    Information Sciences Research Group (ISRG) research continues to focus on improving the type, quantity, and quality of information which can be derived from remotely sensed data. Particular focus in on the needs of the remote sensing research and application science community which will be served by the Earth Observing System (EOS) and Space Station, including associated polar and co-orbiting platforms. The areas of georeferenced information systems, machine assisted information extraction from image data, artificial intelligence and both natural and cultural vegetation analysis and modeling research will be expanded.

  13. Remote Sensing Information Sciences Research Group, Santa Barbara Information Sciences Research Group, year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, J. E.; Smith, T.; Star, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Research continues to focus on improving the type, quantity, and quality of information which can be derived from remotely sensed data. The focus is on remote sensing and application for the Earth Observing System (Eos) and Space Station, including associated polar and co-orbiting platforms. The remote sensing research activities are being expanded, integrated, and extended into the areas of global science, georeferenced information systems, machine assissted information extraction from image data, and artificial intelligence. The accomplishments in these areas are examined.

  14. Data for Southern Sea Otter Range Expansion and Habitat Use in the Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are .csv files of tagged sea otter re-sighting locations (henceforth, resights) collected in the field using a combination of VHF radio telemetry and...

  15. Hotell "Santa Barbara" Roosikrantsi tänavas Tallinnas / Andres Alver, Tiit Trummal, Martinus Schuurman

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alver, Andres, 1953-

    1997-01-01

    projekteeritud sajandi alguses rajatud paemüüridele; projekteerija, sisekujunduse üldlahendus: Alver Trummal Arhitektid ; sisekujundus: M. Schuurman; 2 joon.: asendiplaan, I korruse plaan ; 3 välisvaadet, foto ; 5 sisevaadet, foto, värv.

  16. Evaluation of Defense Hotline Allegations at the Defense Contract Audit Agency Santa Barbara Suboffice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-08

    ONLY FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (b) (4) Resident Office. The original auditor was rotated out of the (b) (4) Suboffice in November 2006. The second...During the review, we visited the Suboffice and interviewed the complainant, auditors , supervisors, and managers to assess whether the problems...3.a-e, F.2.a-c, G.2.a and b Resident Auditor , FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY (b) (4) Resident Office F.3.a-c DODIG-2015-005 │ iii

  17. 76 FR 5277 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Santa Barbara Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... Control District, Antelope Valley Air Quality Management District, Ventura County Air Pollution Control District and Placer County Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the...

  18. 77 FR 34991 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of California, Santa Barbara, Repository of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ... obsidian), 162 flakes, 5 ochre fragments, 1 quartz crystal, 157 unmodified olivella shells, 68 olivella beads, 3 clam shells, 4 abalone shell fragments, 17 bone projectile points, 3 turtle shells, 4 bird... funerary objects are present. Site CA-SBA-37 is a prehistoric shell midden; however, the age of the human...

  19. El Plan de Santa Barbara; A Chicano Plan for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicano Coordinating Council on Higher Education, Santa Barbara, CA.

    Published by La Causa Publications, the document is a Chicano plan for higher education in the universities and colleges in California. The manifesto found in the booklet states that "the self-determination of our community is now the only acceptable mandate for social and political action; it is the essence of Chicano commitment....Chicanos…

  20. California State Waters Map Series--Santa Barbara Channel Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  1. 75 FR 65646 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, Santa Barbara County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-26

    ... U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), have received an application from Pacific Renewable Energy... extension 224. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: We have received an application from Pacific Renewable Energy... County, California. We invite comments from the public on the application and associated documents, and...

  2. California State Waters Map Series--Offshore of Santa Barbara Web Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of...

  3. The Santa Barbara Cluster Comparison Project: A Comparison of Cosmological Hydrodynamics Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenk, C. S.; White, S. D. M.; Bode, P.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, G. L.; Cen, R.; Couchman, H. M. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Gnedin, N.; Jenkins, A. (and others)

    1999-11-10

    We have simulated the formation of an X-ray cluster in a cold dark matter universe using 12 different codes. The codes span the range of numerical techniques and implementations currently in use, including smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and grid methods with fixed, deformable, or multilevel meshes. The goal of this comparison is to assess the reliability of cosmological gasdynamical simulations of clusters in the simplest astrophysically relevant case, that in which the gas is assumed to be nonradiative. We compare images of the cluster at different epochs, global properties such as mass, temperature and X-ray luminosity, and radial profiles of various dynamical and thermodynamical quantities. On the whole, the agreement among the various simulations is gratifying, although a number of discrepancies exist. Agreement is best for properties of the dark matter and worst for the total X-ray luminosity. Even in this case, simulations that adequately resolve the core radius of the gas distribution predict total X-ray luminosities that agree to within a factor of 2. Other quantities are reproduced to much higher accuracy. For example, the temperature and gas mass fraction within the virial radius agree to within about 10%, and the ratio of specific dark matter kinetic to gas thermal energies agree to within about 5%. Various factors, including differences in the internal timing of the simulations, contribute to the spread in calculated cluster properties. Based on the overall consistency of results, we discuss a number of general properties of the cluster we have modeled. (c) 1999 The American Astronomical Society.

  4. Seafloor character from multibeam echo sounder data-Santa Barbara Channel

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Substrate was classified using the method of (Cochrane 2008) for this study multibeam sonar. Sea floor character derived from multibeam sonar data is available for...

  5. H09752: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Punta Gorda to Santa Barbara Point, California, 1978-03-28

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  6. 78 FR 53680 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Placer, Santa Barbara and Ventura County...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... should avoid the use of special characters, any form of encryption, and be free of any defects or viruses... advance. However, in the Proposed Rules section of this Federal Register, we are simultaneously proposing.... * * * * * (428) New and amended regulations for the following APCDs was submitted on February 6, 2013, by the...

  7. Santa and the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, P.

    2012-01-01

    This article reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands. The appearanc

  8. Santa and the Moon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, P.

    This article reflects on the use of illustrations of the Moon in images of Santa Claus, on Christmas gift-wrapping paper and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: the USA and the Netherlands. The

  9. Net benefits of wildfire prevention education efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey P. Prestemon; David T. Butry; Karen L. Abt; Ronda. Sutphen

    2010-01-01

    Wildfire prevention education efforts involve a variety of methods, including airing public service announcements, distributing brochures, and making presentations, which are intended to reduce the occurrence of certain kinds of wildfires. A Poisson model of preventable Florida wildfires from 2002 to 2007 by fire management region was developed. Controlling for...

  10. Wildfire on Karst: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleborn, K.; Lupingna, A.; Flemons, I.; Nagra, G.; Treble, P. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Baker, A.; Tozer, M.; Fairchild, I. J.; Baker, A.; Meehan, S.

    2015-12-01

    Wildfires dramatically change the surface environment by removing vegetation and soil microbial communities and altering soil structure and geochemistry. Karst subsurface processes such as dissolution, cave formation and speleothem deposition are sensitive to environmental change, which is precisely why speleothems have been widely used as recorders of surface and climate change at an annual to millennial temporal scale. The effect of fire on karst processes is poorly understood. We hypothesise that a wildfire induced change at the surface will impact karst dissolution and precipitation processes. Firstly, sterilisation of the soil by heating causes a reduction in soil CO2 concentration which is a key component in dissolution processes. Secondly, removal of vegetation alters surface albedo and soil water storage properties. This could change the hydrology and isotopic signature of speleothem-forming drip water. We also hypothesise that a wildfire will produce a unique biogeochemical signature due to a change in the organic and inorganic properties of soil, which can be transported into speleothem forming drip water. Fire changes the organic matter character which is an important component in the mobilisation and transport of trace metals. Combustion of vegetation results in addition of ash derived minerals to the soil. Quantifying the biogeochemical signature from a burnt landscape will enable us to determine whether this wildfire signature is preserved in speleothems. This would provide the opportunity to use speleothems as recorders of fire history for the first time. Determining the impact of fire on karst processes would inform fire management and karst conservation policies.

  11. Effects of Wildfire on Fluvial Sediment Regime through Perturbations in Dry-Ravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florsheim, J. L.; Chin, A.; Kinoshita, A. M.; Nourbakhshbeidokhti, S.; Storesund, R.; Keller, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    In steep chaparral ecosystems with Mediterranean climate, dry ravel is a natural process resulting from wildfire disturbance that supplies sediment to fluvial systems. When dense chaparral vegetation burns, sediment accumulated on steep hillslopes is released for dry-season transport (dry ravel) down steep hillslopes during or soon after the wildfire. Results of a field study in southern California's Transverse Ranges illustrate the effect of wildfire on fluvial sediment regime in an unregulated chaparral system. Big Sycamore Canyon in the steep Santa Monica Mountains burned during the May 2013 Springs Fire and experienced one small sediment-transporting stormflow during the following winter. We conducted pre- and post-storm field campaigns during the fall and winter following the fire to quantify the effect of wildfire on the fluvial sediment regime. We utilized a sediment mass balance approach in which: 1) sediment supply, consisting primarily of dry ravel-derived deposits composed of relatively fine grained-sediment, was measured in the upstream basin and in the hillslope-channel margin adjacent to the study reach; 2) changes in storage in the study reach were quantified by analyzing the difference between pre- and post-storm channel topography derived from Terrestrial LiDAR Scanning (TLS) and field surveys; and 3) transport from the study reach was estimated as the difference between supply and change in storage where uncertainty is estimated using calculated sediment transport as a comparison. Results demonstrate channel deposition caused by changes in the short-term post-wildfire sediment regime. The increased sediment supply and storage are associated with significant changes in morphology, channel bed-material characteristics, and ecology. These results suggest that dry-ravel processes are an important factor to consider in post-wildfire sediment management.

  12. Barbara Thayer-Bacon on Knowers and the Known

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Jim

    2002-01-01

    Barbara Thayer-Bacon (1999) objects to the minimum proficiency examinations that are mandated for school students in Ohio. Similar tests are required by, or are under consideration by, governments in many other parts of the world. Various writers have objected to one or other of these tests by arguing that they are crude, invalid, unreliable,…

  13. Barbara Bodichon's Travel Writing: Her Epistolary Articulation of "Bildung"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Martin, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    English painter Barbara Bodichon received a dynamic home education, consisting of engaging lessons, reading sessions, family discussions, sketching excursions, and trips at home and abroad. As an adult, Bodichon led a nomadic life, living between Algeria and England and travelling across Europe and America. Seeking to unpack travelling and travel…

  14. Barbara Ryder to head Department of Computer Science

    OpenAIRE

    Daniilidi, Christina

    2008-01-01

    Barbara G. Ryder, professor of computer science at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, will become the computer science department head at Virginia Tech, starting in fall 2008. She is the first woman to serve as a department head in the history of the nationally ranked College of Engineering.

  15. Barbara Bodichon's Travel Writing: Her Epistolary Articulation of "Bildung"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Martin, Meritxell

    2016-01-01

    English painter Barbara Bodichon received a dynamic home education, consisting of engaging lessons, reading sessions, family discussions, sketching excursions, and trips at home and abroad. As an adult, Bodichon led a nomadic life, living between Algeria and England and travelling across Europe and America. Seeking to unpack travelling and travel…

  16. Epidemic cholera spreads like wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Manojit; Zinck, Richard D.; Bouma, Menno J.; Pascual, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Cholera is on the rise globally, especially epidemic cholera which is characterized by intermittent and unpredictable outbreaks that punctuate periods of regional disease fade-out. These epidemic dynamics remain however poorly understood. Here we examine records for epidemic cholera over both contemporary and historical timelines, from Africa (1990-2006) and former British India (1882-1939). We find that the frequency distribution of outbreak size is fat-tailed, scaling approximately as a power-law. This pattern which shows strong parallels with wildfires is incompatible with existing cholera models developed for endemic regions, as it implies a fundamental role for stochastic transmission and local depletion of susceptible hosts. Application of a recently developed forest-fire model indicates that epidemic cholera dynamics are located above a critical phase transition and propagate in similar ways to aggressive wildfires. These findings have implications for the effectiveness of control measures and the mechanisms that ultimately limit the size of outbreaks.

  17. Ilha de Santa Catarina

    OpenAIRE

    Nopes, Adriano

    2007-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Filosofia E Ciências Humanas. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Sociologia Política Este trabalho tem como foco de análise o processo de modernização na Praia dos Ingleses, um bairro atual situado no extremo norte da Ilha de Santa Catarina. Como referencial teórico da modernidade, utilizamos pensadores contemporâneos como Berman, Giddens e Habermas; para estes autores a modernização é compreendida como um fenômeno comple...

  18. Effect of Wildfire on Sediment Sorting in a Steep Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florsheim, J. L.; Chin, A.; O'Hirok, L.; Storesund, R.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfire is an external forcing factor in the landscape. In chaparral environments, wildfire initiates transport of well-sorted fine sediment through dry-ravel processes on hillslopes and facilitates delivery of sediment to stream channels. In turn, this periodic post-fire sediment influx governs sorting of channel-bed material during subsequent floods that mobilize and transport the sediment downstream. We investigated the effects of the May 2013 Springs Wildfire in the Santa Monica Mountains in semi-arid southern California with field measurements and terrestrial LiDAR scanning. Before the fire, sediment sorting within the heterogeneous bed material present in Big Sycamore Creek was controlled by organized step-pool bedforms. Boulders formed steps with relatively finer cobbles, gravel, and sand filling the pools. Before the fire, the grain size distribution present in the substrate between boulder steps was relatively coarse (D84 = 250 mm), in contrast to that in the influx of sediment contributed by post-fire dry-ravel processes deposited at channel margins (D84 = 8 mm). Flow shear stress during one small flood in 2014 (post-fire) was adequate to mobilize fine dry ravel- related sediment. Transport capacity was sufficient to mobilize and transport this sediment within a study reach; however, it was not adequate to flush the fine material downstream. Shear stress required to mobilize sediment contributed by dry ravel was substantially less than that required to transport the substrate material present before the wildfire. The small flood deposited fine sediment (D84 = 16 mm) as flow lost capacity. Resulting deposition buried bedforms, changing the step-pool profile to a plane bed. The relatively poorly sorted, coarse, rough bed changed to a well sorted, fine, smooth, bed. These changes have implications for sediment transport dynamics and aquatic ecology. In steep, semi-arid, chaparral fluvial systems, sediment derived from dry-ravel processes influences the

  19. The Santa Ana Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournoyer, David, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    One of the priority interests of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation is to connect the knowledge and resources of institutions with communities in order to improve the quality of life in community. Partnerships achieve uncommon results. In Santa Ana, California, an unusual partnership of public schools, community college, universities, community…

  20. The Influence of Wildfire on Hillslope Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengers, F. K.; Inbar, A.; Sheridan, G. J.; Nyman, P.

    2014-12-01

    In southeastern Australia wildfire occurs regularly, resulting in increased hillslope erosion. However, post-wildfire erosion processes differ depending on hillslope aspect. Equatorial (north)-facing slopes are drier than polar (south)-facing slopes and experience overland flow erosion after wildfire. By contrast, overland flow is not an active process on polar-facing slopes, even after high-intensity wildfires. These differences in post-wildfire erosion processes are accompanied by observations that slope angle and curvature also differ by hillslope aspect. An airborne LiDAR dataset flown over our study area in the Kinglake National Park, Victoria shows that the mean slope angle of polar-facing slopes is nearly 5 degrees steeper than equatorial-facing slopes. We have sought to test the hypothesis that aspect differences in post-wildfire erosion processes are sufficient to create differences in hillslope geometry. In order to test this hypothesis, we use a simple 1D model that simulates hillslope evolution over thousands of years. We limit our model to low-drainage area hillslopes where debris-flows are unlikely to occur. Erosion is modeled as nonlinear diffusion regardless of aspect during non-wildfire model years. Wildfire is modeled by changing the erosional processes on each slope aspect to reflect the effects of post-wildfire erosion according to a wildfire recurrence interval. For two years following a model wildfire we allow overland flow erosion to erode equatorial-facing slopes, whereas polar-facing slopes erode according to nonlinear diffusion for only one year following a wildfire. The erosion parameters on the polar-facing slopes are changed during this period to reflect higher post-wildfire erosion. In addition to erosional processes, we use an exponential soil production law to simulate new soil formation every model year. Our preliminary results suggest that changes in erosional magnitude associated with the different wildfire erosional processes are

  1. Improving European Wildfire Emergency Information Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielski, Conrad; Whitmore, Ceri; O'Brien, Victoria; Zeug, Gunter; Kalas, Milan; Porras, Ignasi; Solé, Josep Maria; Gálvez, Pedro; Navarro, Maria; Nurmi, Pertti; Kilpinen, Juha; Ylinen, Kaisa; Furllanelo, Cesare; Maggio, Valerio; Alikadic, Azra; Dolci, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    European wildfires are a seasonal natural hazard that many regions must battle regularly. However, as European urbanization continues to encroach on natural areas and the climate changes it is likely that the frequency of wildfires will increase likewise the number of areas prone to wildfires. It is therefore paramount not only to increase public awareness of this natural hazard but also to be prepared by improving wildfire hazard forecasting, monitoring, and mapping. As part of the H2020 funded project entitled Improving Resilience to Emergencies through Advanced Cyber Technologies: I-REACT (Grant Agreement #700256) , there is a task with the goal to develop models and implement technologies to improve the support around the entire emergency management cycle with respect to wildfire hazards. Based on operational weather forecasts, pan-European geospatial data as well as regularly acquired Earth Observation imagery through the Copernicus program, and other sources of information such as social media channels a European wildfire service is being developed. This will be achieved by improving on the successes of the European Forest Fire Information Service (EFFIS) and the guidance of emergency managers experienced in wildfire hazards. Part of the research will be to reduce the number of false alarms. However, once a wildfire has been identified, the system focuses on the disaster region to provide situational information to the decision makers applying state-of-the-art approaches to improve disaster response. Post-wildfire information will continue to be produced for damage and recovery assessments. Ultimately, I-REACT expects to reduce wildfire costs to life, property and livelihood. This work will improve wildfire disaster emergency management through the development and integration of new data and technologies respectively as well as the knowledge from emergency managers who not only understand the hazard itself but also can provide insights into the information

  2. Lesbis sustineo! Naiad press authors remember Barbara Grier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from semi-structured interviews with some of Naiad Press's most celebrated women, including Katherine V. Forrest, Barbara's supervising editor at Naiad from 1983-1993; Sheila Ortiz Taylor, author of what is considered by many to be the first lesbian novel with a Chicana heroine; and the incomparable Lee Lynch, this work aims to sustain an ongoing remembrance of Grier's life and work by encouraging memory exploration--a symphonic blending of the printed and spoken word.

  3. Barbara Carnevali, Le apparenze sociali. Una filosofia del prestigio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Confalonieri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Non sempre la prima frase di un libro è rappresentativa del suo intero contenuto; non sempre la prima nota a piè di pagina lascia emergere con chiarezza le origini della ricerca, le sue ragioni. Entrambe le cose, invece, accadono nel presente volume di Barbara Carnevali, e un buon modo di ricostruirne l’insieme può essere quello di combinare gli elementi che vengono messi a disposizione del lettore da questi due passaggi testuali d’apertura.

  4. Wildfire communication and climate risk mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyn S. Wilson; Sarah M. McCaffrey; Eric. Toman

    2017-01-01

    Throughout the late 19th century and most of the 20th century, risks associated with wildfire were addressed by suppressing fires as quickly as possible. However, by the 1960s, it became clear that fire exclusion policies were having adverse effects on ecological health, as well as contributing to larger and more damaging wildfires over time. Although federal fire...

  5. Wind erosion of soils burned by wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. S. Wagenbrenner; M. J. Germino; B. K. Lamb; R. B. Foltz; P. R. Robichaud

    2011-01-01

    Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are largely unstudied in the post-wildfire environment, but recent studies have shown that wind erosion can play a major role in burned landscapes. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned area (Figure 1). This paper...

  6. Optimal timing of wildfire prevention education

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. T. Butry; J. P. Prestemon; K. L. Abt

    2010-01-01

    Public outreach and wildfire education activities have been shown to limit the number of unintentional human-caused ignitions (i.e., 'accidental' wildfires). Such activities include the airing of public service announcements, visiting with homeowners in at-risk areas, distributing informative brochures and flyers, hosting of public forums (with presentations...

  7. Santa Ana Winds and Fire Regimes of Southern California National Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendix, J.

    2015-12-01

    In Southern California, it has long been understood that foehn-type Santa Ana winds are an important factor in the occurrence of large wildfires. Although a variety of anecdotal observations and statistical analyses have confirmed the importance of these winds to wildfire, particularly in the Fall months when Santa Ana winds overlap with dry fuels from summer drought, many of the details of those winds' impacts on fire remain obscure. This paper uses data regarding individual fires from California's Fire and Resource Assessment Program database and a compilation of Santa Ana Wind days (SAW days) published by Abatzoglou et al. in 2013 to assess the relationship of Santa Ana winds to fire occurrence and size in Southern California. The analysis included 474 fires larger than 20 ha (~50 acres).that burned on the four Southern California national forests (Angeles, Cleveland, Los Padres and San Bernardino) between 1948 and 2010. Overall, just 10.3% of the fires started on SAW days, and 14.4% experienced at least one SAW day between start and containment dates. The impact of Santa Ana winds is greater, however, with increasing fire size. For fires > 4000 ha, 18.4% began on SAW days, with 30.4% experiencing at least one SAW day before containment. And 20% of fires > 20000 ha started on SAW days, with 50% including one or more SAW days. Fires beginning on SAW days were larger, with a mean of 6239 ha compared to 2150 ha for fires that began on non-SAW days. Only 2% of the fires that began on SAW days were started by lightning, suggesting that the impact of Santa Ana winds on Southern California fire regimes may be enhanced by humans' role in ignitions.

  8. Santa and the moon

    CERN Document Server

    Barthel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Happy end-of-the-year evening and night events provide good opportunities to explain the phases of the moon. The need for such moon phase education is once again demonstrated, through an investigation of illustrations on Santa Claus and Christmas gift wrap and in children's books, in two countries which have been important in shaping the image of Santa Claus and his predecessor Sinterklaas: The Netherlands and the USA. The moon on Halloween illustrations is also considered. The lack of knowledge concerning the physical origin of the moon phases, or lack of interest in understanding, is found to be widespread in The Netherlands but is also clearly present in the USA, and is quite possibly global. Definitely incomplete, but surely representative lists compiling both scientifically correct and scientifically incorrect gift wrap and children's books are also presented.

  9. Before, During, and After a Wildfire

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    More and more people are making their homes in woodland settings – in or near forests, rural areas, or remote mountain sites - areas in which wildfires are more likely to occur. Wildfires often begin unnoticed. They spread quickly, igniting brush, trees, and homes. CDC recommends taking steps before, during, and after local wildfires to reduce the effect they have on your life.  Created: 11/1/2007 by Emergency Communications System.   Date Released: 11/1/2007.

  10. On culture and human development: Interview with Barbara Rogoff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2011-01-01

    child and participating, from early on, in their various rituals and practices. Building on and enriching cultural psychological sources, Professor Rogoff offers us a comprehensive framework with which to understand both cultural and developmental phenomena and, above all, their multiple intersections......In this interview Professor Barbara Rogoff explores the many ways in which culture shapes the course of human development, and illustrates this with several findings from her past as well as most recent work. These reveal the vital importance of growing up in a family and a community for the human...

  11. Introduction: the influence and legacy of Barbara Grier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuth, Danielle M

    2014-01-01

    This special issue of the Journal of Lesbian Studies focuses on the life and legacy of the lesbian publisher, editor, and author Barbara Grier. Through Grier's "Lesbiana" column in Daughters of Bilitis's magazine The Ladder, three editions of The Lesbian in Literature (1967, 1975, 1985), to her role as publisher of the Naiad Press from 1973-2003, Grier introduced hundreds of new lesbian books to readers and kept several lesbian classics on the literary horizon. The articles in this issue focus on Grier's biography, history, and impact through archival analysis, interviews, and content analysis. This introduction contextualizes and outlines the articles in this special issue.

  12. Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blog NFPA Xchange™ Podcasts Press Room RSS feeds Social media Training & Events By type Toggle this sub-menu open or closed Certifications Classroom Training Conferences Hands-on Online Training On-Site ...

  13. Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants Power Outages Pandemic Radiological Dispersion Device Severe Weather Snowstorms & Extreme ... Landslides & Debris Flow Nuclear Blast Nuclear Power Plants Power Outages Pandemic Radiological Dispersion Device Severe Weather Snowstorms & Extreme ...

  14. Wildfire risk as a socioecological pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, A. Paige; Spies, Thomas A; Steelman, Toddi A; Moseley, Cassandra; Johnson, Bart R.; Bailey, John D.; Ager, Alan A; Bourgeron, Patrick S.; Charnley, Susan; Collins, Brandon M.; Kline, Jeffrey D; Leahy, Jessica E; Littell, Jeremy; Millington, James D. A.; Nielsen-Pincus, Max; Olsen, Christine S; Paveglio, Travis B; Roos, Christopher I.; Steen-Adams, Michelle M; Stevens, Forrest R; Vukomanovic, Jelena; White, Eric M; Bowman, David M J S

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire risk in temperate forests has become a nearly intractable problem that can be characterized as a socioecological “pathology”: that is, a set of complex and problematic interactions among social and ecological systems across multiple spatial and temporal scales. Assessments of wildfire risk could benefit from recognizing and accounting for these interactions in terms of socioecological systems, also known as coupled natural and human systems (CNHS). We characterize the primary social and ecological dimensions of the wildfire risk pathology, paying particular attention to the governance system around wildfire risk, and suggest strategies to mitigate the pathology through innovative planning approaches, analytical tools, and policies. We caution that even with a clear understanding of the problem and possible solutions, the system by which human actors govern fire-prone forests may evolve incrementally in imperfect ways and can be expected to resist change even as we learn better ways to manage CNHS.

  15. Wildfire and the future of water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladon, Kevin D; Emelko, Monica B; Silins, Uldis; Stone, Micheal

    2014-08-19

    In many parts of the world, forests provide high quality water for domestic, agricultural, industrial, and ecological needs, with water supplies in those regions inextricably linked to forest health. Wildfires have the potential to have devastating effects on aquatic ecosystems and community drinking water supply through impacts on water quantity and quality. In recent decades, a combination of fuel load accumulation, climate change, extensive droughts, and increased human presence in forests have resulted in increases in area burned and wildfire severity-a trend predicted to continue. Thus, the implications of wildfire for many downstream water uses are increasingly concerning, particularly the provision of safe drinking water, which may require additional treatment infrastructure and increased operations and maintenance costs in communities downstream of impacted landscapes. A better understanding of the effects of wildfire on water is needed to develop effective adaptation and mitigation strategies to protect globally critical water supplies originating in forested environments.

  16. US Forest Service Wildfire Hazard Potential 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — The wildfire hazard potential (WHP) is a raster geospatial product at 270-meter resolution covering all lands in the conterminous United States. It can help to...

  17. Wildfires in Chile: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Úbeda, Xavier; Sarricolea, Pablo

    2016-11-01

    This paper reviews the literature examining the wildfire phenomenon in Chile. Since ancient times, Chile's wildfires have shaped the country's landscape, but today, as in many other parts of the world, the fire regime - pattern, frequency and intensity - has grown at an alarming rate. In 2014, > 8000 fires were responsible for burning c. 130,000 ha, making it the worst year in Chile's recent history. The reasons for this increase appear to be the increment in the area planted with flammable species; the rejection of these landscape modifications on the part of local communities that target these plantations in arson attacks; and, the adoption of intensive forest management practices resulting in the accumulation of a high fuel load. These trends have left many native species in a precarious situation and forest plantation companies under considerable financial pressure. An additional problem is posed by fires at the wildland urban interface (WUI), threatening those inhabitants that live in Chile's most heavily populated cities. The prevalence of natural fires in Chile; the relationship between certain plant species and fire in terms of seed germination strategies and plant adaptation; the relationship between fire and invasive species; and, the need for fire prevention systems and territorial plans that include fire risk assessments are some of the key aspects discussed in this article. Several of the questions raised will require further research, including just how fire-dependent the ecosystems in Chile are, how the forest at the WUI can be better managed to prevent human and material damage, and how best to address the social controversy that pits the Mapuche population against the timber companies.

  18. Wildfire Risk Management: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M.; Calkin, D. E.; Hand, M. S.; Kreitler, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation we address federal wildfire risk management largely through the lens of economics, targeting questions related to costs, effectiveness, efficiency, and tradeoffs. Beyond risks to resources and assets such as wildlife habitat, watersheds, and homes, wildfires present financial risk and budgetary instability for federal wildfire management agencies due to highly variable annual suppression costs. Despite its variability, the costs of wildfire management have continued to escalate and account for an ever-growing share of overall agency budgets, compromising abilities to attain other objectives related to forest health, recreation, timber management, etc. Trends associated with a changing climate and human expansion into fire-prone areas could lead to additional suppression costs in the future, only further highlighting the need for an ability to evaluate economic tradeoffs in investments across the wildfire management spectrum. Critically, these economic analyses need to accurately capture the complex spatial and stochastic aspects of wildfire, the inherent uncertainty associated with monetizing environmental impacts of wildfire, the costs and effectiveness of alternative management policies, and linkages between pre-fire investments and active incident management. Investing in hazardous fuels reduction and forest restoration in particular is a major policy lever for pre-fire risk mitigation, and will be a primary focus of our presentation. Evaluating alternative fuel management and suppression policies could provide opportunities for significant efficiency improvements in the development of risk-informed management fire management strategies. Better understanding tradeoffs of fire impacts and costs can help inform policy questions such as how much of the landscape to treat and how to balance investments in treating new areas versus maintaining previous investments. We will summarize current data needs, knowledge gaps, and other factors

  19. Anatomical study of encephalic arterial circuit in Eira barbara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Costa de Macedo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eira barbara is a mustelid with a wide distribution in Latin America, and it is commonly known as the grey-headed tayra. In view of the lack of information regarding the anatomy of mustelids, as well the importance of a vascular model for the understanding of neurological lesions in the central nervous system, this study aimed to determine the morphology and composition of the encephalic arterial circuit of E. barbara, to provide data for future studies. Accordingly, we used two young male specimens, obtained from the area of the Paragominas Bauxite Mine, PA, Brazil, donated to LaPMA after their death. The arterial system was filled with red-colored neoprene latex, and the specimens were then fixed in 10% formaldehyde and dissected for systematization of the blood vessels. The specimens showed the arterial circuit in the base of the brain supplied by the internal carotid arteries and basilar artery. The internal carotid artery, after crossing the dura mater, continued cranially giving rise to the medial cerebral arteries and ending as cranial cerebral arteries that anastomose, closing the arterial circuit rostrally. The caudal communicating arteries integrated the basilar artery with the arterial circle and gave rise to the caudal cerebral and rostral cerebellar arteries. The basilar artery formed the main branches, the medial and caudal cerebellar arteries.

  20. Risk preferences in strategic wildfire decision making: A choice experiment with U.S. wildfire managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Wibbenmeyer; Michael S. Hand; David E. Calkin; Tyron J. Venn; Matthew P. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Federal policy has embraced risk management as an appropriate paradigm for wildfire management. Economic theory suggests that over repeated wildfire events, potential economic costs and risks of ecological damage are optimally balanced when management decisions are free from biases, risk aversion, and risk seeking. Of primary concern in this article is how managers...

  1. The 2003 and 2007 wildfires in southern California: Chapter 5 in Natural Disasters and Adaptation to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.; Syphard, Alexandra D.; Fotheringham, C.J.; Boulter, Sarah; Palutikof, Jean; Karoly, David John; Guitart, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Although many residents of southern California have long recognised that wildfires in the region are an ongoing, constant risk to lives and property, the enormity of the regional fire hazard caught the world’s attention during the southern California firestorms of 2003 (Figure 5.1). Beginning on 21 October, a series of fourteen wildfires broke out across the five-county region under severe Santa Ana winds, and within two weeks, more than 300,000 ha had burned (Keeley et al., 2004). The event was one of the costliest in the state’s history, with more than 3,600 homes damaged or destroyed and twenty-four fatalities. Suppression costs for the 12,000 firefighters have been estimated at US$120 million, and the total response and damage cost has been estimated at more than US$3 billion (COES, 2004). [Excerpt

  2. Critical Issues in Foster Care: Lessons the Children's Ark Learned from Barbara and Nathan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Janet; Kretchmar, Molly D.; Worsham, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Using an attachment theory framework, this article explores several critical issues in foster care as reflected in the case of Barbara and her 9-month-old son, Nathan. Barbara and Nathan participated in The Children's Ark, an innovative intervention for families in foster care that allowed mothers who had lost custody of their children to live,…

  3. Barbara Kavemann, Heike Rabe (Hg.: Das Prostitutionsgesetz. Aktuelle Forschungsergebnisse, Umsetzung und Weiterentwicklung. Opladen u.a.: Verlag Barbara Budrich 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Lembke

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Der von Barbara Kavemann und Heike Rabe herausgegebene Sammelband zum Prostitutionsgesetz zeichnet sich dadurch aus, dass die Thematik aus verschiedensten Blickwinkeln beleuchtet wird und insbesondere auch jene zu Wort kommen, die in der medialen Debatte oft keine Stimme haben: Prostituierte in sehr unterschiedlichen Lebens- und Arbeitssituationen ebenso wie Bordellbetreiber/-innen, Praktiker/-innen aus der Sozialen Arbeit ebenso wie aus Verwaltung und Justiz. Dadurch gelingt es, ein differenziertes und realistisches Bild von Prostitution und ihrer Regulierung in Deutschland zu zeichnen sowie weitere Hilfs- und Handlungsbedarfe überzeugend aufzuzeigen, aber auch wegweisende Modelle aus der Praxis vorzustellen.The collected volume on prostitution law, edited by Barbara Kavemann and Heike Rabe, is unique in its discussion of the topic from a variety of perspectives. It allows particularly those perspectives to come to the fore that often do not have a voice in the media debates, including prostitutes in very different life and work situations as well as brothel managers and practitioners from the areas of social work, administration, and justice. In so doing, the editors convincingly portray a differentiated and realistic image of prostitution and its regulation in Germany as well as identify areas of need for further help and action. They also offer up groundbreaking praxis-based models.

  4. Predicting the effect of climate change on wildfire behavior and initial attack success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, William; Fried, Jeremy S.; Gilless, J. Keith; Riley, William J.; Moody, Tadashi J.; Simon de Blas, Clara; Hayhoe, Katharine; Moritz, Max; Stephens, Scott; Torn, Margaret

    2007-12-01

    This study focused on how climate change-induced effects on weather will translate into changes in wildland fire severity and outcomes in California, particularly on the effectiveness of initial attack at limiting the number of fires that escape initial attack. The results indicate that subtle shifts in fire behavior of the sort that might be induced by the climate changes anticipated for the next century are of sufficient magnitude to generate an appreciable increase in the number of fires that escape initial attack. Such escapes are of considerable importance in wildland fire protection planning, given the high cost to society of a catastrophic escape like those experienced in recent decades in the Berkeley-Oakland, Santa Barbara, San Diego, or Los Angeles areas. However, at least for the three study areas considered, it would appear that relatively modest augmentations to existing firefighting resources might be sufficient to compensate for change-induced changes in wildland fire outcomes.

  5. The Santa AnaWinds of Southern California in the context of Fire Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang

    The Santa Ana winds represent a high-impact weather event owing to the intimate relationship between the extremely dry, fast winds and the wildfire threat. The winds can be locally gusty, particularly in the complex terrain of San Diego county, where the airflow has characteristics of downslope windstorms. These winds can cause and/or rapidly spread wildfires, the threat of which is particularly acute during the autumn season before the onset of winter rains. It remains a day-to-day challenge to accurately predict wind gust speed, especially in the mountainous regions. Our study employs large physics ensembles composed of high-resolution simulations of severe downslope windstorms that involve an exhaustive examination of available model physical parameterizations. Model results are calibrated and validated against the San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) mesonet observations, a dense, homogenous, and well-positioned network with uniform high quality. Results demonstrate model horizontal resolution, model physics, random perturbations and landuse database can have a material effect on the strength, location and timing of Santa Ana winds in real-data simulations. A large model physics ensemble reveals the land surface model to be most crucial in skillful wind predictions, which are particularly sensitive to the surface roughness length. A surprisingly simple gust parameterization is proposed for the San Diego network, based on the discovery that this homogeneous mesonet has a nearly invariant network-averaged gust factor. The gust forecast technique is of special interest in the context of routine weather combined with atmospheric humidity and fuel moisture information. A real-time wildfire threat warning system, the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTI), has been developed to effectively communicate the upcoming Santa Ana wind strength with respect to the anticipated fire danger to first responders and the public. In addition to the wind and gust forecast techniques

  6. Macroinvertebrados bentônicos como indicadores de qualidade de água na Barragem Santa Bárbara, Pelotas, RS, Brasil Zoobenthics as indicators of the water quality in the Santa Bárbara Dam, Pelotas, RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Renato Noguez Piedras

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar o impacto de dois afluentes da barragem Santa Bárbara sobre o ambiente da mesma, utilizando a ocorrência de invertebrados bentônicos e características químicas da água. Durante nove meses foram realizadas coletas e análises da água e de invertebrados bentônicos nos afluentes Sanga da Barbuda e Sanga do Passo do Cunha e também no interior da bacia de acumulação da barragem. Os resultados mostram que, embora a Sanga da Barbuda e a Sanga do Passo do Cunha apresentem características químicas abaixo do recomendável, no limite aceitável pela legislação que determina os padrões de qualidade da água para abastecimento público, estes afluentes estão, ainda, sendo diluídos de forma satisfatória na bacia de acumulação da barragem. O estudo das relações entre variáveis químicas e invertebrados bentônicos mostra haver correlação significativa entre os baixos níveis de oxigênio dissolvido e a presença de Oligochaeta, sendo que o aumento do número de Oligochaeta indica uma situação de anoxia na barragem Santa Bárbara.The objective of this work was to study the impact of two tributaries from the Santa Bárbara Dam on this environment using the occurrence of zoobenthics and some water chemical characteristics. Monthly gathering and analysis from the water and zoobenthics were done during nine months in the tributaries Sanga da Barbuda and Sanga Passo do Cunha as well as in the inner part of the accumulation basin in the Santa Barbara dam. The results demonstrate that, though Sanga da Barbuda and Sanga Passo do Cunha present chemical characteristics lower than the recommended but still in the limits acceptable by the law that regulates the water quality standards for the supply, these tributaries are being diluted in a satisfactory way in the accumulation basin in the Santa Barbara dam. The study of the relations between chemical variables and zoobenthics show a significant correlation

  7. Wildfires Rage in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Large plumes of smoke rising from devastating wildfires burning near Los Angeles and San Diego on Sunday, October 26, 2003, are highlighted in this set of images from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). These images include a natural color view from MISR's nadir camera (left) and an automated stereo height retrieval (right). The tops of the smoke plumes range in altitude from 500 - 3000 meters, and the stereo retrieval clearly differentiates the smoke from patches of high-altitude cirrus. Plumes are apparent from fires burning near the California-Mexico border, San Diego, Camp Pendleton, the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains, and in and around Simi Valley. The majority of the smoke is coming from the fires near San Diego and the San Bernardino Mountains.The Multiangle Imaging Spectro Radiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82o north and 82o south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbit 20510. The panels cover an area of 329 kilometers x 543 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 62 to 66 within World Reference System-2 path 40.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  8. Risk preferences in strategic wildfire decision making: a choice experiment with U.S. wildfire managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbenmeyer, Matthew J; Hand, Michael S; Calkin, David E; Venn, Tyron J; Thompson, Matthew P

    2013-06-01

    Federal policy has embraced risa management as an appropriate paradigm for wildfire management. Economic theory suggests that over repeated wildfire events, potential economic costs and risas of ecological damage are optimally balanced when management decisions are free from biases, risa aversion, and risa seeking. Of primary concern in this article is how managers respond to wildfire risa, including the potential effect of wildfires (on ecological values, structures, and safety) and the likelihood of different fire outcomes. We use responses to a choice experiment questionnaire of U.S. federal wildfire managers to measure attitudes toward several components of wildfire risa and to test whether observed risa attitudes are consistent with the efficient allocation of wildfire suppression resources. Our results indicate that fire managers' decisions are consistent with nonexpected utility theories of decisions under risa. Managers may overallocate firefighting resources when the likelihood or potential magnitude of damage from fires is low, and sensitivity to changes in the probability of fire outcomes depends on whether probabilities are close to one or zero and the magnitude of the potential harm. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  9. Small fatigue cracks; Proceedings of the Second International Conference/Workshop, Santa Barbara, CA, Jan. 5-10, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, R.O.; Lankford, J.

    1986-01-01

    Topics discussed in this volume include crack initiation and stage I growth, microstructure effects, crack closure, environment effects, the role of notches, analytical modeling, fracture mechanics characterization, experimental techniques, and engineering applications. Papers are presented on fatigue crack initiation along slip bands, the effect of microplastic surface deformation on the growth of small cracks, short fatigue crack behavior in relation to three-dimensional aspects and the crack closure effect, the influence of crack depth on crack electrochemistry and fatigue crack growth, and nondamaging notches in fatigue. Consideration is also given to models of small fatigue cracks, short crack theory, assessment of the growth of small flaws from residual strength data, the relevance of short crack behavior to the integrity of major rotating aero engine components, and the relevance of short fatigue crack growth data to the durability and damage tolerance analyses of aircraft.

  10. In the Beginning … An Interview with Debra Lieberman, PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Someone once said the difference between creativity and innovation is that creativity is original thought, whereas innovation is new impactful action. Were it not for my guest in this issue's Q&A, games for health would not be making the contributions they are today. Debra Lieberman is both a creator and an innovator, and her relentless quest for new and better ways to improve human well-being began before the Internet and put her in the company of similar-minded people across the educational and media landscapes. As such, Debra worked on the research and design of several noteworthy early games for learning and health behavior change. I am pleased to say that Debra, an Associate Editor of Games for Health Journal, is modest, cheerful, and a wealth of knowledge, and her story is both informative and enjoyable.

  11. LEOS 1993 - Summer Topical Meeting Digest Held in Santa Barbara, California on July 19-30, 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Foundation" and the Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture of Japan for Scientific Research on Priority Areas "Crystal Growth...average soliton condition is not fully satisfied. [1] D. Marcuse Journal of Lightwave Technology, 1991, 9, pp. 356-361. [21 E. Jannone, et. al. El. Letters...France, 1991), paper WeC7-2. (5] D. Marcuse , IEEE 1. Ughtwave Tech., LT-9(1991), p.356. [6] G. P. Agrawal, "Nonlinear Fiber Optics"(Academic Press

  12. Using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography to explore the geochemistry of the Santa Barbara oil seeps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Christopher; Nelson, Robert

    2013-03-27

    The development of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) has expanded the analytical window for studying complex mixtures like oil. Compared to traditional gas chromatography, this technology separates and resolves at least an order of magnitude more compounds, has a much larger signal to noise ratio, and sorts compounds based on their chemical class; hence, providing highly refined inventories of petroleum hydrocarbons in geochemical samples that was previously unattainable. In addition to the increased resolution afforded by GC x GC, the resulting chromatograms have been used to estimate the liquid vapor pressures, aqueous solubilities, octanol-water partition coefficients, and vaporization enthalpies of petroleum hydrocarbons. With these relationships, powerful and incisive analyses of phase-transfer processes affecting petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures in the environment are available. For example, GC x GC retention data has been used to quantitatively deconvolve the effects of phase transfer processes such as water washing and evaporation. In short, the positive attributes of GC x GC-analysis have led to a methodology that has revolutionized the analysis of petroleum hydrocarbons. Overall, this research has opened numerous fields of study on the biogeochemical "genetics" (referred to as petroleomics) of petroleum samples in both subsurface and surface environments. Furthermore, these new findings have already been applied to the behavior of oil at other seeps as well, for petroleum exploration and oil spill studies.

  13. Effect of Organic Amendment Application Rate on Greenhouse Gas Emissions at an Organic Farm in Santa Barbara County, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyewole, M.; King, J. Y.; Cleveland, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Though greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) from mineral fertilizer application in agriculture have been well studied, the effect of organic amendment (OA) application rate on GHGEs is not yet understood. Application of multiple OAs can improve different properties that control soil fertility, including nutrient availability, aggregate stability, and water-holding capacity. We measured nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) flux at an organic farm in Goleta, CA in order to understand how OA application rate affects GHGEs and crop yield from agricultural soils. Based on management practices in the region, we asked farm managers to establish high compost (HC) and low compost (LC) treatments during the growing season of an annual crop (18.2, 9.13 Mg ha-1, respectively), and we measured GHGEs in beds and furrows using static chambers. Organic fertilizer (672 kg ha-1) was applied equally to HC and LC beds six weeks after compost application. Overall, emissions of N2O and CO2 were higher in HC than LC, but yield-scaled emissions were higher in LC. Importantly, treatment differences in both N2O and CO2 emissions were not apparent until after mid-season fertilizer application. Net CH4 uptake was higher in HC than LC in the furrows, but there was no difference in the beds. Our data suggest that high compost application rates likely increased SOM mineralization, soil water content, and nitrification and denitrification rates in HC relative to LC, which led to higher N2O emissions during the growing season. Fertilization primed SOM decomposition and increased soil respiration, which led to increased CO2 emissions. Our results suggest that improved management of application rate and timing during use of multiple OAs could reduce GHGEs while maintaining high crop yield. Understanding the mechanisms by which OA application rates alter the balance between GHGEs and yield is an important step toward reducing agriculture's contribution to climate change through policy.

  14. The Fourth International Symposium on the Intraductal Approach to Breast Cancer, Santa Barbara, California, 10–13 March 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bonnie L; Love, Susan M; Rochman, Susan; Kim, Julian A

    2005-01-01

    Intraductal approaches encompass procedures and technologies that are designed to access and interrogate the ductal–alveolar systems of the human breast, and include nipple aspiration, ductal lavage, random periareolar fine needle aspiration, and ductoscopy. These approaches are being used to collect and analyze fluids and cells to develop methods for breast cancer detection and risk assessment; to introduce imaging technologies to explore the mammary tree for abnormalities; to administer therapeutic and/or preventive agents directly to the breast tissue; and to explore the biology of the normal mammary gland. The latest research findings in these areas, presented at The 4th International Symposium on the Intraductal Approach to Breast Cancer in 2005, are summarized in this report. PMID:16168138

  15. International Conference on Snow Engineering (1st) Held in Santa Barbara, California on July 10-15 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    modalli-ig tbhs is the more difficult of t)e two procesoes . tork is cu-rently in progress to obtain a more cpmete representaticsn cf t[-e deformation...Niigata, Japan 950-21. 346 SM IeS -J 8.5 Go N LB] 3.137 5 (A) (B) Figure 1(A). Diagram of Figure 1(B). Dimensions cylindrical viscometer. of rotor (in...mm). M: synchronized motor; P: plate; S: spindle; G: speed exchanger; L: slush surface. S: Spring; P: spring indicator; B: rotor . types of rotor , the

  16. LEOS 1992 - Summer Topical Meeting Digest Held in Santa Barbara, California on July 29-12 August, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    InGaAuInP MOW Absorber -. Polylmlde Solder Sond Metal Contact 3V lilicon IC 1.46 1.1.7 Wavelength (grm) Fig. 1. Cross-sclion of inverted AFPM. Fig.2...crosstalk-induced noise. To this end, Fig. 1(a) shows the eye diagram for current through a dummy load in a four- element transmitter array with four

  17. Post-irradiation Examination Plan for ORNL and University of California Santa Barbara Assessment of UCSB ATR-2 Irradiation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanstad, R. K. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Yamamoto, T. [University of California Santa Barbara; Sokolov, M. A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2014-01-25

    New and existing databases will be combined to support development of physically based models of transition temperature shifts (TTS) for high fluence-low flux (φ < 10{sup 11}n/cm{sup 2}-s) conditions, beyond the existing surveillance database, to neutron fluences of at least 1×10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). All references to neutron flux and fluence in this report are for fast neutrons (>1 MeV). The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) task of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is working with various organizations to obtain archival surveillance materials from commercial nuclear power plants to allow for comparisons of the irradiation-induced microstructural features from reactor surveillance materials with those from similar materials irradiated under high flux conditions in test reactors

  18. Human Machine Interfaces for Teleoperators and Virtual Environments: Conference Held in Santa Barbara, California on 4-9 March 1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Word Processing Computing Materials Processing RECREATION Tasks Reading Film & Video Performing Arts Graphic Arts Sports Social Interaction 58 < U...86-014. Durlach, N. 1. and Pang, X. D. (1986) Interaural magnification. J. Acoust. Soc. Am., 80, 1849-1850. Edwards, A. D. N. (1989) Soundtrack : An

  19. Rehabilitation and Cheatgrass Suppression Following Great Basin Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    The occurrence of wildfires in Great Basin environments has become an annual event. The introduction and subsequent invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) plays a very large role in the frequency and size of these wildfires. With each passing wildfire season, more and more habitats are converted...

  20. Risk preferences, probability weighting, and strategy tradeoffs in wildfire management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Hand; Matthew J. Wibbenmeyer; Dave Calkin; Matthew P. Thompson

    2015-01-01

    Wildfires present a complex applied risk management environment, but relatively little attention has been paid to behavioral and cognitive responses to risk among public agency wildfire managers. This study investigates responses to risk, including probability weighting and risk aversion, in a wildfire management context using a survey-based experiment administered to...

  1. The importance of considering external influences during presuppression wildfire planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc R. Wiitala; Andrew E. Wilson

    2008-01-01

    Few administrative units involved in wildland fire protection are islands unto themselves when it comes to wildfire activity and suppression. If not directly affected by the wildfire workload of their neighbors, they are affected by the availability of nationally shared resources impacted by wildfire activity at the regional and national scale. These external...

  2. The national wildfire prediction program: a key piece of the wildfire solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossert, J E; Bradley, M M; Hanson, H P; Schomer, C L; Sumikawa, D A

    1999-08-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed an initiative for a National Wildfire Prediction Program. The program provides guidance for fire managers throughout the country, assisting them to efficiently use limited fire-fighting resources. To achieve maximum cost leveraging, the program builds upon existing physics-based atmospheric and wildfire modeling efforts, a proven emergency response infrastructure, state-of-the-art computer science, and the world's most advanced supercomputers to create a comprehensive wildfire prediction system.

  3. Wildfire safety with wireless sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Somov

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the Wireless Sensor Network (WSN paradigm is extensively used for the environmental monitoring including wildfires. Like other disasters, this phenomenon, if not detected early, may have grave consequences, e.g. a significant pecuniary loss, or even lead to human victims. This paper surveys the approaches to early wildfire detection using WSN facilities with a special focus on real deployments and hardware prototypes. In our work we propose not merely a description, but a classification of the fire detection methods which are divided into three groups: gas sensing, sensing of environmental parameters, and video monitoring. Then the methods are comparatively analyzed from the viewpoints of the cost, power consumption, and implementation complexity. Finally, we summarize our vision of the prospects of resolving the wildfire detection problem using WSNs.

  4. Public Health Impact of Wildfire Emissions: Up-date on the Wildfire Smoke Guide, Public Health Information and Communications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Tools and Resources Webinar: Public Health Impact of Wildfire Smoke Emissions Specific strategies to reduce smoke exposure and the Smoke Sense App As the start of the summer wildfire season approaches, public officials, communities and individuals need up-to-date wildfire smo...

  5. Analyzing wildfire exposure on Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salis, Michele; Ager, Alan A.; Arca, Bachisio; Finney, Mark A.; Alcasena, Fermin; Bacciu, Valentina; Duce, Pierpaolo; Munoz Lozano, Olga; Spano, Donatella

    2014-05-01

    We used simulation modeling based on the minimum travel time algorithm (MTT) to analyze wildfire exposure of key ecological, social and economic features on Sardinia, Italy. Sardinia is the second largest island of the Mediterranean Basin, and in the last fifty years experienced large and dramatic wildfires, which caused losses and threatened urban interfaces, forests and natural areas, and agricultural productions. Historical fires and environmental data for the period 1995-2009 were used as input to estimate fine scale burn probability, conditional flame length, and potential fire size in the study area. With this purpose, we simulated 100,000 wildfire events within the study area, randomly drawing from the observed frequency distribution of burn periods and wind directions for each fire. Estimates of burn probability, excluding non-burnable fuels, ranged from 0 to 1.92x10-3, with a mean value of 6.48x10-5. Overall, the outputs provided a quantitative assessment of wildfire exposure at the landscape scale and captured landscape properties of wildfire exposure. We then examined how the exposure profiles varied among and within selected features and assets located on the island. Spatial variation in modeled outputs resulted in a strong effect of fuel models, coupled with slope and weather. In particular, the combined effect of Mediterranean maquis, woodland areas and complex topography on flame length was relevant, mainly in north-east Sardinia, whereas areas with herbaceous fuels and flat areas were in general characterized by lower fire intensity but higher burn probability. The simulation modeling proposed in this work provides a quantitative approach to inform wildfire risk management activities, and represents one of the first applications of burn probability modeling to capture fire risk and exposure profiles in the Mediterranean basin.

  6. Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

  7. ciudad de Santa Marta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Alfredo Ferreira Ospino

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta investigación evalúa los resultados de un programa de Formación en Derechos con madres comunitarias para la solución de conflictos en la Comuna Ocho de la ciudad de Santa Marta. El programa buscó el desarrollo de la capacidad de análisis y discernimiento para la toma de decisiones, que les permitan participar activamente en la solución de problemas de la comunidad, tendientes a mejorar las condiciones de vida de los miembros de la ésta. El proyecto se enmarca en un diseño de investigación cuasiexperimental con grupo control y medida pre y post, de forma que puedan medirse no sólo los resultados del programa, sino su efectividad para la resolución de conflictos en la comunidad. Se utilizó el cuestionario adaptado a la Teoría de Rahim y otros autores de la teoría del conflicto con el fin de determinar la manera como se resuelven los conflictos en la comunidad. Esta investigación se centró en demostrar objetivamente la efectividad del programa y las diferencias deliberativas y discursivas más relevantes entre los sujetos que recibieron formación en derechos.

  8. Topografia vertebromedular de irara (Eira barbara Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Adami

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Um cadáver macho, adulto de irara (Eira barbara foi cedido pelo Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres (Cetas, localizado em Salvador/Bahia, ao Setor de Anatomia Veterinária da Escola de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia da Universidade Federal da Bahia. Trata-se de um mamífero carnívoro que pertence à Família Mustelidae e Subfamília Mustelinae que contém o Gênero Eira, representado apenas pela Espécie Eira barbara. Objetivamos a investigação da topografia vertebromedular do espécime e assim verificar a relação da medula espinal com o canal vertebral; a identificação, origem, emergência e quantificação dos nervos espinhais relacionados com a medula espinal. Pesquisa número 43245-1 autorizada pelo Sistema de Autorização e Informação em Biodiversidade (Sisbio-ICMBio/IBAMA. O exemplar foi fixado em solução de formaldeído a 10% e posteriormente dissecado e radiografado. Foram identificados oito pares de nervos espinhais cervicais, quatorze torácicos e na porção lombossacral da medula espinhal seis nervos espinais lombares, três sacrais e mais de três nervos espinhais caudais. O término da medula espinal ocorreu no nível quinta vértebra lombar. Os oito segmentos medulares cervicais localizaram-se entre a primeira e sétima vértebras cervicais. Os quatorze nervos espinais torácicos originaram-se na porção cranial das vértebras respectivas. Os segmentos medulares lombares, sacrais e caudais restringiram-se à região lombar da coluna vertebral. O deslocamento cranial dos segmentos medulares foi observado no oitavo cervical, terceiro, quarto e quinto lombares e todos os segmentos sacrais e caudais. As informações obtidas poderão ser utilizadas para análises comparativas com as demais espécies e com a adoção de medidas que visem proporcionar o bem-estar animal e a preservação da espécie.

  9. Geospatial Analysis Application to Forecast Wildfire Occurrences in South Carolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L. Sperry

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire occurrence and intensity have increased over the last few decades and, at times, have been national news. Wildfire occurrence is somewhat predictable based on physical factors like meteorological conditions, fuel loads, and vegetation dynamics. Socioeconomic factors have been not been widely used in wildfire occurrence models. We used a geospatial (or geographical information system analysis approach to identify socioeconomic variables that contribute to wildfire occurrence. Key variables considered were population change, population density, poverty rate, educational level, geographic mobility, and road density (transportation network. Hot spot analysis was the primary research tool. Wildfire occurrence seemed to be positively related to low population densities, low levels of population change, high poverty rate, low educational attainment level, and low road density. Obviously, some of these variables are correlated and this is a complex problem. However, socioeconomic variables appeared to contribute to wildfire occurrence and should be considered in development of wildfire occurrence forecasting models.

  10. Parim Claptoni jäljendaja Eestis. Barbara Hendricks Pärnus Promfestil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Eric Claptoni tribuutbändi Classic Clapton kontsertidest 4. ja 5. apr. Tartus ja Tallinnas. Ameerika laulja Barbara Hendricksi kontserdist 7. juunil Pärnu Kontserdimajas (kaastegev rootsi pianist Love Derwinger)

  11. Second President of Austrian National Council Mag. Barbara Prammer Visits China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the CPAFFC, a high-ranking delegation of the Austrian Association for Promotion of Friendship and Cultural Relations with China (AAPFCRC) led by Ms. Mag. Barbara Prammer, second president of the Aus-

  12. Parim Claptoni jäljendaja Eestis. Barbara Hendricks Pärnus Promfestil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Eric Claptoni tribuutbändi Classic Clapton kontsertidest 4. ja 5. apr. Tartus ja Tallinnas. Ameerika laulja Barbara Hendricksi kontserdist 7. juunil Pärnu Kontserdimajas (kaastegev rootsi pianist Love Derwinger)

  13. Wildfires Dynamics in Siberian Larch Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Evgenii I.; Kharuk, Viacheslav I.; Ranson, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire number and burned area temporal dynamics within all of Siberia and along a south-north transect in central Siberia (45deg-73degN) were studied based on NOAA/AVHRR (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and Terra/MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data and field measurements for the period 1996-2015. In addition, fire return interval (FRI) along the south-north transect was analyzed. Both the number of forest fires and the size of the burned area increased during recent decades (p forest fires, burned areas and air temperature (r = 0.5) and drought index (The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index, SPEI) (r = 0.43). Within larch stands along the transect, wildfire frequency was strongly correlated with incoming solar radiation (r = 0.91). Fire danger period length decreased linearly from south to north along the transect. Fire return interval increased from 80 years at 62 N to 200 years at the Arctic Circle (6633' N), and to about 300 years near the northern limit of closed forest stands (about 71+ N). That increase was negatively correlated with incoming solar radiation (r = 0.95). Keywords: wildfires; drought index; larch stands; fire return interval; fire frequency; burned area; climate-induced trends in Siberian wildfires

  14. Automated Wildfire Detection Through Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jerry; Borne, Kirk; Thomas, Brian; Huang, Zhenping; Chi, Yuechen

    2005-01-01

    We have tested and deployed Artificial Neural Network (ANN) data mining techniques to analyze remotely sensed multi-channel imaging data from MODIS, GOES, and AVHRR. The goal is to train the ANN to learn the signatures of wildfires in remotely sensed data in order to automate the detection process. We train the ANN using the set of human-detected wildfires in the U.S., which are provided by the Hazard Mapping System (HMS) wildfire detection group at NOAA/NESDIS. The ANN is trained to mimic the behavior of fire detection algorithms and the subjective decision- making by N O M HMS Fire Analysts. We use a local extremum search in order to isolate fire pixels, and then we extract a 7x7 pixel array around that location in 3 spectral channels. The corresponding 147 pixel values are used to populate a 147-dimensional input vector that is fed into the ANN. The ANN accuracy is tested and overfitting is avoided by using a subset of the training data that is set aside as a test data set. We have achieved an automated fire detection accuracy of 80-92%, depending on a variety of ANN parameters and for different instrument channels among the 3 satellites. We believe that this system can be deployed worldwide or for any region to detect wildfires automatically in satellite imagery of those regions. These detections can ultimately be used to provide thermal inputs to climate models.

  15. Water repellency diminishes peatland evaporation after wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettridge, Nick; Lukenbach, Max; Hokanson, Kelly; Devito, Kevin; Hopkinson, Chris; Petrone, Rich; Mendoza, Carl; Waddington, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are a critically important global carbon reserve. There is increasing concern that such ecosystems are vulnerable to projected increases in wildfire severity under a changing climate. Severe fires may exceed peatland ecological resilience resulting in the long term degradation of this carbon store. Evaporation provides the primary mechanisms of water loss from such environments and can regulate the ecological stress in the initial years after wildfire. We examine variations in evaporation within burned peatlands after wildfire through small scale chamber and large scale remote sensing measurements. We show that near-surface water repellency limits peatland evaporation in these initial years post fire. Water repellent peat produced by the fire restricts the supply of water to the surface, reducing evaporation and providing a strong negative feedback to disturbance. This previously unidentified feedback operates at the landscape scale. High surface temperatures that result from large reductions in evaporation within water repellent peat are observed across the 60,000 ha burn scar three months after the wildfire. This promotes high water table positions at a landscape scale which limit the rate of peat decomposition and supports the post fire ecohydrological recovery of the peatlands. However, severe burns are shown to exceed this negative feedback response. Deep burns at the peatland margins remove the hydrophobic layer, increasing post fire evaporation and leaving the peatland vulnerable to drying and associated ecological shifts.

  16. The estimation of territiry predeposition to wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, Ekaterina; Dukarev, Anatoly

    2010-05-01

    Wildfires have significant environmental effects. The indirect damages because of fires are an emission of various combustion products such as aerosols, greenhouse gases and carcinogen. Analysis of smoke emission show that from 1 ha burning area emitted aerosols from 0.2 to 1 ton. The aim of our research is to estimate biomass burning emission: Biomass Burning Emission=BA x FL x CE x EF, where BA is Burned Area (ha); FL is forest litter cover (cm); CE is Combustion Efficiency (0-1), depends on a class of fire danger; EF is Emission Factor (kg emitted / kg dry-mass burnt). Consequently for estimation of biomass burning emission it is necessary to analyze of territory predisposition to wildfires and give characteristic of combustion material types for detection fire hazard, for prognosis fire origin and extension. Prognosis of occurrence of wildfires and definition of emissions is possible by means of data of depth forest litter, types of vegetation and type of landscapes including concrete weather conditions (seasons, length of arid period, current temperature, wind speed and its direction). The investigated object is the territory Tomskii district near to the city of Tomsk (56° 31 N-85°08 E) - with the population more than 500 thousand people. The conducted analysis of investigated territory and the calculation will be basic prognostic model for researching wildfires.

  17. Big sagebrush seed bank densities following wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Big sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) is a critical shrub to many wildlife species including sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis). Big sagebrush is killed by wildfires and big sagebrush seed is generally short-lived and do not s...

  18. Avoiding Wildfire Damage: A Checklist for Homeowners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vegetation is fuel for a wildfire, though some trees and shrubs are more flammable than others. To reduce the ... the sides of the house. • Prune branches and shrubs within 15 feet of chimneys and stove pipes. • Remove tree limbs within 15 feet of the ground. • Thin ...

  19. Impact of wildfires on regional air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examine the impact of wildfires and agricultural/prescribed burning on regional air pollution and Air Quality Index (AQI) between 2006 and 2013. We define daily regional air pollution using monitoring sites for ozone (n=1595), PM2.5 collected by Federal Reference Method (n=10...

  20. Santa Claus ’Names

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寒冰

    2005-01-01

    A ustria—Christkind Belgium and the N etherlands—N oel Saint Nicholas C hristkind and Black Pete Brazil—Papa;N oel D enm ark—Julinisse England—Father Christm as Finland—O ld M an C hristm asFrance—Pere N oel or le Petit Germ any—K riss Kringle Christkind or Saint N icholas Italy—B efana Japan—Santa K urohsu M exico—Three Kings Poland—Star M an or W ise M en Spain—Three Kings R ussia—B asbouschka ?Santa Claus ’Names@寒冰

  1. LA LECTURE DE MERLEAU-PONTY PAR RENAUD BARBARAS (The reading of Merleau-Ponty by Renaud Barbaras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Pechar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Barbaras underscores the role of linguistics in the late philosophy of Merleau-Ponty. Analogically to words of a language also that perceived by senses relates to the whole of which it is a part: the perceived opens in every single case new dimension in relation to which all subsequent experience is perceived. Merleau-Ponty not only rejects autonomisation of Husserl’s essences but also demonstrates that the identity of ideas inscribed in the perceptible requires articulation of the visible with that visibility of the “invisible” which is the sayable. And because the origin of an expression in the world is linked to the other, it is precisely the other that corroborates first initiation in the invisible as such. Each perception is opened not only to other perceptions but also to every possible perception which means also to the perceptions of others. The perceptible and the intelligible need to be conceived as two organized sets both of which are separated but also have their equivalent in what they are not.

  2. Landowner response to wildfire risk: Adaptation, mitigation or doing nothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jianbang; Jarrett, Adam; Johnson Gaither, Cassandra

    2015-08-15

    Wildfire has brought about ecological, economic, and social consequences that engender human responses in many parts of the world. How to respond to wildfire risk is a common challenge across the globe particularly in areas where lands are controlled by many small private owners because effective wildfire prevention and protection require coordinated efforts of neighboring stakeholders. We explore (i) wildfire response strategies adopted by family forestland owners in the southern United States, one of the most important and productive forest regions in the world, through a landowner survey; and (ii) linkages between the responses of these landowners and their characteristics via multinomial logistic regression. We find that landowners used diverse strategies to respond to wildfire risk, with the most popular responses being "doing nothing" and combined adaptation and mitigation, followed by adaptation or mitigation alone. Landowners who had lost properties to wildfire, lived on their forestlands, had a forest management plan, and were better educated were more likely to proactively respond to wildfire risk. Our results indicate the possibility to enhance the effectiveness of collective action of wildfire risk response by private forestland owners and to coordinate wildfire response with forest conservation and certification efforts. These findings shed new light on engaging private landowners in wildfire management in the study region and beyond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. CNOOC Cooperates with Santa Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Sanyong; Wang Keyu

    1997-01-01

    @@ China National Offshore Oil Corporatian (CNOOC) signed the Petroleum Contract for 15/34 Block in the Pearl River Mouth Basin of South China Sea and the Petroleum Contract for 23/28 Block in the Beibu Gulf of South China Sea with Santa Fe Resources Inc. of the United States in Beijing on January 16, 1997.

  4. Wildfire Prediction to Inform Fire Management: Statistical Science Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, S. W.; Douglas G. Woolford; Dean, C. B.; Martell, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is an important system process of the earth that occurs across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A variety of methods have been used to predict wildfire phenomena during the past century to better our understanding of fire processes and to inform fire and land management decision-making. Statistical methods have an important role in wildfire prediction due to the inherent stochastic nature of fire phenomena at all scales. ¶ Predictive models have exploited several so...

  5. 2007 San Diego wildfires and asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Chirag; Renvall, Marian J; Chao, Peter; Ferguson, Paul; Ramsdell, Joe W

    2011-02-01

    This case series reports the changes in the respiratory health of eight asthmatic subjects and the relationship with air quality associated with the October 2007 firestorm in San Diego County of California. Participants were eight subjects with asthma enrolled in Asthma Clinical Research Network (ACRN) (NIH# U10-HL074218) studies at the University of California San Diego (UCSD), School of Medicine, who had study data collected immediately prior, during and 1 month after the 5-day firestorm in San Diego County. Air quality deteriorated to an extreme average of 71.5 mg/m(3) small particulate matter less than 2.5 μm (PM(2.5)) during the firestorm. Respiratory health data included morning and evening peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR), morning and evening Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV(1)), rescue medication usage, and sputum eosinophils. Morning and evening PEFR and FEV(1) rates remained stable. The two subjects tested during the fires had elevated eosinophil counts and rescue medication usage was increased in five of the eight subjects. Pulmonary function test values were stable during the wildfires for all eight subjects but there was a statistically significant increase in rescue medication usage during the wildfires that correlated with PM(2.5) values. The two subjects tested during the fires showed increases in sputum eosinophil counts consistent with increased airways inflammation. These findings suggest that poor air quality associated with wildfires resulted in an increase in airways inflammation in these asthmatic subjects, but pulmonary function tests remained stable, possibly due to increased rescue medication usage. This is especially pertinent as there is an increase in incidence of wildfires this decade.

  6. Design of a probabilistic wildfire alert system for Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Ben; Dacre, Helen; Lopez Saldana, Gerardo; Charlton-Perez, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    During the past 50 years over 200,000 wildfires have burned nearly 2.3 million hectares in Chile, leading to significant economic consequences. To improve wildfire warning capabilities, statistical models have been developed by the University of Chile for 15 different geographic regions of the country to quantify wildfire risk based on a set of specific meteorological variables (air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, accumulated precipitation, and time of year). Currently, the warning system uses data input from ground-based weather stations and alerts are issued one day ahead. This project improves upon the current system by using variables from ensemble weather prediction datasets (TIGGE archive from ECMWF) as input to the wildfire risk model. This allows development of a probabilistic alert system that takes into account uncertainties in the specific meteorological forecast variables used in the wildfire risk model. This also allows the wildfire risk index to be calculated up to seven days ahead. The integration of the statistical wildfire risk model with the ensemble weather prediction system provides additional information about uncertainty to improve resource allocation decisions. The new system is evaluated using MODIS satellite wildfire detection datasets from 2008-2015 for each of the 15 geographic wildfire risk regions. The prototype alert system is then compared to alerts made using forecast variables from the operational ensemble weather prediction system used by the Chilean Meteorological Service. Finally, a novel method to update the wildfire risk statistical model parameters in real time based on observed spatial and temporal wildfire patterns will be presented.

  7. The helminth fauna of the barbary partridge Alectoris barbara in Tenerife, Canary Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronda, P; Casanova, J C; Figueruelo, E; Abreu, N; Feliu, C

    2005-06-01

    The helminth fauna of the barbary partridge (Alectoris barbara) in Tenerife Island (Canary Archipelago) was studied from 2001 to 2002, as there were no records of helminths from this host in the Canary Islands. Seven helminth species were identified: two cestodes Choanotaenia infundibulum and Lyruterina nigropunctata, and five nematodes Aonchotheca caudinflata, Baruscapillaria obsignata, Eucoleus annulatus, Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum. Lyruterina nigropunctata, A. galli and E. annulatus are recorded for first time in A. barbara. An analysis of available data on Alectoris spp. reveals the importance of intermediate hosts such as arthropods and earthworms in the diet of partridges. Terrestrial helminths are dominant species, with monoxenous and heteroxenous species being present in similar numbers in different Alectoris species along their geographical distribution. Helminth species found in Tenerife from A. barbara are poor indicators of the host colonization from North Africa because these helminths are species that are commonly found in fowl with a cosmopolitan distribution.

  8. Santa Paulina, reconquista a territorialidade

    OpenAIRE

    Nascimento, José do

    2006-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Filosofia e Ciências Humanas. Programa de Pós-Graduação em História Esta dissertação trata de um estudo sobre a relação entre turismo e religiosidade a partir do estudo de caso do Santuário de Santa Paulina do Coração Agonizante de Jesus, em Nova Trento, no período de 1991 a 2005. Foi adotado o método de História Oral com a participação de diferentes atores, destacando-se os peregrinos ou passantes mais comumente de...

  9. 2009 Santa Fe Bone symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewiecki, E Michael; Bilezikian, John P; Laster, Andrew J; Miller, Paul D; Recker, Robert R; Russell, R Graham G; Whyte, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common skeletal disease with serious clinical consequences because of fractures. Despite the availability of clinical tools to diagnose osteoporosis and assess fracture risk, and drugs proven to reduce fracture risk, it remains a disease that is underdiagnosed and undertreated. When treatment is started, it is commonly not taken correctly or long enough to be effective. Recent advances in understanding of the regulators and mediators of bone remodeling have led to new therapeutic targets and the development of drugs that may offer advantages over current agents in reducing the burden of osteoporotic fractures. Many genetic factors that play a role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis and metabolic bone disease have now been identified. At the 2009 Santa Fe Bone Symposium, held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA, the links between advances in genetics, basic bone science, recent clinical trials, and new and emerging therapeutic agents were presented and explored. Socioeconomic challenges and opportunities in the care of osteoporosis were discussed. This is a collection of medical essays based on key presentations at the 2009 Santa Fe Bone Symposium.

  10. 43 CFR 4.416 - Appeals of wildfire management decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Appeals of wildfire management decisions... Board of Land Appeals § 4.416 Appeals of wildfire management decisions. The Board must decide appeals from decisions under § 4190.1 and § 5003.1(b) of this title within 60 days after all pleadings have...

  11. Wildfire Restoration and Rehabilitation: Triage in Pursuit of Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reports on the synthesis of "Wildfire Rehabilitation and Restoration" workshop that was part of a larger conference-workshop "Wildfires and Invasive Plants in American Deserts" sponsored by the Society for Range Management in Reno, Nevada in December 2008. The workshop started out with i...

  12. Assessing landscape vulnerability to wildfire in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M. Vaillant; Crystal A. Kolden; Alistair M. S. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire is an ever present, natural process shaping landscapes. Having the ability to accurately measure and predict wildfire occurrence and impacts to ecosystem goods and services, both retrospectively and prospectively, is critical for adaptive management of landscapes. Landscape vulnerability is a concept widely utilized in the ecosystem management literature that...

  13. Effects of wildfire on soil nutrients in Mediterranean ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caon, L.; Vallejo, V.R.; Ritsema, C.J.; Geissen, V.

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity and fast-spreading wildfires are natural in the Mediterranean basin. However, since 1960, wildfire occurrence has increased because of changes in land use, which resulted in extensive land abandonment, increases in the fuel load and continuity in the landscape. The level of soil degra

  14. Modeling spatio-temporal wildfire ignition point patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda S. Hering; Cynthia L. Bell; Marc G. Genton

    2009-01-01

    We analyze and model the structure of spatio-temporal wildfire ignitions in the St. Johns River Water Management District in northeastern Florida. Previous studies, based on the K-function and an assumption of homogeneity, have shown that wildfire events occur in clusters. We revisit this analysis based on an inhomogeneous K-...

  15. Suppression cost forecasts in advance of wildfire seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey P. Prestemon; Karen Abt; Krista Gebert

    2008-01-01

    Approaches for forecasting wildfire suppression costs in advance of a wildfire season are demonstrated for two lead times: fall and spring of the current fiscal year (Oct. 1–Sept. 30). Model functional forms are derived from aggregate expressions of a least cost plus net value change model. Empirical estimates of these models are used to generate advance-of-season...

  16. Non-Accidental Health Impacts of Wildfire Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssouf, Hassani; Liousse, Catherine; Roblou, Laurent; Assamoi, Eric-Michel; Salonen, Raimo O.; Maesano, Cara; Banerjee, Soutrik; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Wildfires take a heavy toll on human health worldwide. Climate change may increase the risk of wildfire frequency. Therefore, in view of adapted preventive actions, there is an urgent need to further understand the health effects and public awareness of wildfires. We conducted a systematic review of non-accidental health impacts of wildfire and incorporated lessons learned from recent experiences. Based on the literature, various studies have established the relationship between one of the major components of wildfire, particulate matter (particles with diameter less than 10 µm (PM10) and less than 2.5 µm (PM2.5)) and cardiorespiratory symptoms in terms of Emergency Rooms visits and hospital admissions. Associations between wildfire emissions and various subclinical effects have also been established. However, few relationships between wildfire emissions and mortality have been observed. Certain segments of the population may be particularly vulnerable to smoke-related health risks. Among them, people with pre-existing cardiopulmonary conditions, the elderly, smokers and, for professional reasons, firefighters. Potential action mechanisms have been highlighted. Overall, more research is needed to better understand health impact of wildfire exposure. PMID:25405597

  17. Coupling the biophysical and social dimensions of wildfire risk to improve wildfire mitigation planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan A. Ager; Jeffrey D. Kline; A. Paige Fisher

    2015-01-01

    We describe recent advances in biophysical and social aspects of risk and their potential combined contribution to improve mitigation planning on fire-prone landscapes. The methods and tools provide an improved method for defining the spatial extent of wildfire risk to communities compared to current planning processes. They also propose an expanded role for social...

  18. South Fork of the Santa Clara River, Santa Clarita Valley, California. Supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Santa Eriodictyon trichocalyx Eucrypta Eucrypta chrysanthemifolia LAMIACEAE Purple Sage Salvia leucophylla PAEONIACEAE Peony Paeonia californica...Bush Lupine Lupinus ex-cubitus HYDROPHYLLACEAE Yerba Santa Eriodictyon trichocaLx Eucrypta Eucrypta chrysanthemifolia LAMIACEAE Purple Sage Salvia

  19. WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

    2012-10-10

    This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled “WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard” (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their home’s vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.

  20. Impact of drought on wildfires in Iberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ana; Gouveia, Célia M.; DaCamara, Carlos; Sousa, Pedro; Trigo, Ricardo M.

    2015-04-01

    Southern European countries, and the Iberian Peninsula (IP) in particular, have been vastly affected by summer wildfires (Trigo et al., 2013). This condition is hampered by the frequent warm and dry meteorological conditions found in summer which play a significant role in the triggering and spreading of wildfires. These meteorological conditions are also particularly important for the onset and end of drought periods, a phenomenon that has recurrently affected the IP (Gouveia et al., 2012). Moreover, the IP corresponds to one of the most sensitive areas to current and future climate change, and recent and future trends towards a dryer and warmer Mediterranean climate (Sousa et al., 2014) will tend to exacerbate these problems. The main scope of this study was to investigate the impact of drought on wildfires' burned areas in the IP. The objective was to examine the correlation between drought, as expressed by both the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) (Vicente-Serrano et al., 2010), and wildfire burned areas. The SPI and SPEI were both calculated for 4 large regions (Northwestern, Northern, Southwestern and Eastern) whose spatial patterns and seasonal fire regimes were shown to be related with constraining factors such as topography, vegetation cover and climate conditions (Trigo et al., 2013). In this study, the drought indices were determined for the time scales of 3 and 6 months for August and for 12 months in September, thus representing the summer and annual drought. The correlation between drought and burned areas during July and August was particularly significant for the 3 months SPEI and SPI relatively to the 6 and 12 time scales, which indicates that drought and fires relation is a small-size scale process. Moreover, the correlation between drought and burned areas during July and August was particularly significant for the Northern and Southwestern regions both for SPEI for 3 and 6

  1. Wildfires Dynamics in Siberian Larch Forests

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire number and burned area temporal dynamics within all of Siberia and along a south-north transect in central Siberia (45°–73° N) were studied based on NOAA/AVHRR (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and Terra/MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data and field measurements for the period 1996–2015. In addition, fire return interval (FRI) along the south-north transect was analyzed. Both the number of forest fires a...

  2. ‘The Whole Question of Plinths’ in Barbara Hepworth’s 1968 Tate Retrospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Clayton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1968 Barbara Hepworth was honoured with a significant retrospective at the Tate Gallery. This paper offers a close reading of the archival documents relating to the exhibition, revealing the extent of Hepworth’s involvement in the design of the show and the intentions behind her curatorial decisions, especially her choice of plinths.

  3. 76 FR 28226 - Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-16

    ... Ndahendekire Barbara v. African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia; Alco Logistics, Llc; Brenda Alexander; and AIR 7 Seas... ``Complainant,'' against African Shipping; Njoroge Muhia, ALCO Logistics, LLC; Brenda Alexander; and Air 7 Seas Transport Logistics, Inc.; hereinafter ``Respondents''. Complainant asserts that she is acting agent...

  4. Late Style in the Novels of Barbara Pym and Penelope Mortimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt-Brown, Anne M.

    1988-01-01

    Evaluated novels written in old age by two contemporary British novelists, Barbara Pym and Penelope Mortimer, which revealed their late style was related to lifelong methods of adapting to changes in their situation. Found strength and direction of their creativity in old age fluctuated in response to their aging bodies and their new roles in…

  5. Influential Practical Holism and Interdisciplinary Bridge Building: "An Interview with Barbara Clark"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshon, Suzanna E.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Barbara Clark, a Professor Emeritus of the Charter College of Education, California State University, Los Angeles. She was named California State University, Los Angeles Outstanding Professor of 1978-1979 and was nominated twice for the California State Universities and Colleges Trustees Award for…

  6. The non-convex shape of (234) Barbara, the first Barbarian

    CERN Document Server

    Tanga, P; Colas, F; Delbo, M; Matter, A; Hanus, J; Lagoa, V Ali; Andrei, A H; Assafin, M; Audejean, M; Behrend, R; Camargo, J I B; Carbognani, A; Reyes, M Cedres; Conjat, M; Cornero, N; Coward, D; Crippa, R; Fantin, E de Ferra; Devogele, M; Dubos, G; Frappa, E; Gillon, M; Hamanowa, H; Jehin, E; Klotz, A; Kryszczynska, A; Lecacheux, J; Leroy, A; Manfroid, J; Manzini, F; Maquet, L; Morelle, E; Mottola, S; Polinska, M; Roy, R; Todd, M; Vachier, F; Hernandez, C Vera; Wiggins, P

    2015-01-01

    Asteroid (234) Barbara is the prototype of a category of asteroids that has been shown to be extremely rich in refractory inclusions, the oldest material ever found in the Solar System. It exhibits several peculiar features, most notably its polarimetric behavior. In recent years other objects sharing the same property (collectively known as "Barbarians") have been discovered. Interferometric observations in the mid-infrared with the ESO VLTI suggested that (234) Barbara might have a bi-lobated shape or even a large companion satellite. We use a large set of 57 optical lightcurves acquired between 1979 and 2014, together with the timings of two stellar occultations in 2009, to determine the rotation period, spin-vector coordinates, and 3-D shape of (234) Barbara, using two different shape reconstruction algorithms. By using the lightcurves combined to the results obtained from stellar occultations, we are able to show that the shape of (234) Barbara exhibits large concave areas. Possible links of the shape to...

  7. Wildfires Dynamics in Siberian Larch Forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii I. Ponomarev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Wildfire number and burned area temporal dynamics within all of Siberia and along a south-north transect in central Siberia (45°–73° N were studied based on NOAA/AVHRR (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/ Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer and Terra/MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer data and field measurements for the period 1996–2015. In addition, fire return interval (FRI along the south-north transect was analyzed. Both the number of forest fires and the size of the burned area increased during recent decades (p < 0.05. Significant correlations were found between forest fires, burned areas and air temperature (r = 0.5 and drought index (The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index, SPEI (r = −0.43. Within larch stands along the transect, wildfire frequency was strongly correlated with incoming solar radiation (r = 0.91. Fire danger period length decreased linearly from south to north along the transect.  Fire return interval increased from 80 years at 62° N to 200 years at the Arctic Circle (66°33’ N, and to about 300 years near the northern limit of closed forest stands (about 71°+ N. That increase was negatively correlated with incoming solar radiation (r = −0.95.

  8. Wildfire disasters: implications for rural nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Judith C; Edge, Dana; Smolenski, Stephanie

    2014-08-01

    As natural disasters are increasing globally, nursing's role in responding to disasters is evolving. Disaster nursing has emerged as a specialty that focuses on the care of groups and communities during disaster response. The role of rural nurses in disasters is less well defined. A review of peer-reviewed literature combined with the International Council of Nurses framework of Disaster Nursing Competencies was conducted to understand the roles and functions of nurses in rural areas that experience disasters. The authors' findings from investigating the effects of four wildfires in rural Canadian communities are also discussed. Six major themes derived from our wildfire studies were generated within the context of nursing practice and are useful in the preparation of rural nurses involved in disaster management and recovery. This adds to the current literature which by and large has not addressed nursing in rural catastrophes. Well-prepared and educated rural nurses who combine theoretical knowledge with their understanding of a rural community potentially can reduce the impact of a disaster. Other nursing roles include mentoring nursing students in disaster preparation and assisting in initiatives to address community recovery in the aftermath of a disaster. Copyright © 2014 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Is Managed Wildfire Protecting Yosemite National Park from Drought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisrame, G. F. S.; Thompson, S. E.; Stephens, S.; Collins, B.; Kelly, M.; Tague, N.

    2016-12-01

    Fire suppression in many dry forest types has left a legacy of dense, homogeneous forests. Such landscapes have high water demands and fuel loads, and when burned can result in catastrophically large fires. These characteristics are undesirable in the face of projected warming and drying in the Western US. This project explores the potential of managed wildfire - a forest management strategy in which fires caused by lightning are allowed to burn naturally as long as certain safety parameters are met - to reverse the effects of fire suppression. The Illilouette Creek Basin in Yosemite National Park has experienced 40 years of managed wildfire, reducing forest cover and increasing meadow and shrubland areas. We have collected evidence from field measurements and remote sensing which suggest that managed wildfire increases landscape and hydrologic heterogeneity, and likely improves resilience to disturbances such as fire and drought. Vegetation maps created from aerial photos show an increase in landscape heterogeneity following the introduction of managed wildfire. Soil moisture observations during the drought years of 2013-2016 suggest that transitions from dense forest to shrublands or meadows can increase summer soil moisture. In the winter of 2015-2016, snow depth measurements showed deeper spring snowpacks in burned areas compared to dense forests. Our study provides a unique view of relatively long-term effects of managed wildfire on vegetation change, ecohydrology, and drought resistance. Understanding these effects is increasingly important as the use of managed wildfire becomes more widely accepted, and as the likelihood of both drought and wildfire increases.

  10. Structure and ultrastructure of fresh and preserved biological membranes of Santa Inês sheep (Ovis aries, L., 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roméria Rodrigues Barbosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of biological implants, of animal or synthetic origin, is recommended for the reconstruction of tissue defects. Therefore, the objective of this study was to analyze the morphological structure and ultrastructure of the parietal peritoneum, parietal pericardium, tunica vaginalis and fascia lata of 15 Santa Inês sheep, which were adult males from Estância Santa Barbara, in the city of Poloni – SP. The membranes were collected immediately after the animals were slaughtered, individually identified and separated into two parts. The first part was stored in saline solution, and called the fresh sample. The other portion was stored in 98% glycerol for 15, 30, 60 and 90 days. All samples were subjected to standard histological techniques. Fresh samples and those preserved in glycerin for 30 days were also preparated and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. We concluded that the fresh and preserved membranes, parietal peritoneum, parietal pericardium, tunica vaginalis and fascia lata, of the adult male Santa Inês sheep had a single type of tissue, which was unmodeled, dense connective tissue. The 98% glycerin used as a preservation medium was effective in maintaining the structural integrity of the tissue membranes.

  11. Rezension zu: Barbara Kavemann, Heike Rabe (Hg.: Das Prostitutionsgesetz. Aktuelle Forschungsergebnisse, Umsetzung und Weiterentwicklung. Opladen u.a.: Verlag Barbara Budrich 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Lembke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Der von Barbara Kavemann und Heike Rabe herausgegebene Sammelband zum Prostitutionsgesetz zeichnet sich dadurch aus, dass die Thematik aus verschiedensten Blickwinkeln beleuchtet wird und insbesondere auch jene zu Wort kommen, die in der medialen Debatte oft keine Stimme haben: Prostituierte in sehr unterschiedlichen Lebens- und Arbeitssituationen ebenso wie Bordellbetreiber/-innen, Praktiker/-innen aus der Sozialen Arbeit ebenso wie aus Verwaltung und Justiz. Dadurch gelingt es, ein differenziertes und realistisches Bild von Prostitution und ihrer Regulierung in Deutschland zu zeichnen sowie weitere Hilfs- und Handlungsbedarfe überzeugend aufzuzeigen, aber auch wegweisende Modelle aus der Praxis vorzustellen.

  12. Airborne Wide Area Imager for Wildfire Mapping and Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An advanced airborne imaging system for fire detection/mapping is proposed. The goal of the project is to improve control and management of wildfires in order to...

  13. Wildfire: distributed, Grid-enabled workflow construction and execution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issac Praveen

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We observe two trends in bioinformatics: (i analyses are increasing in complexity, often requiring several applications to be run as a workflow; and (ii multiple CPU clusters and Grids are available to more scientists. The traditional solution to the problem of running workflows across multiple CPUs required programming, often in a scripting language such as perl. Programming places such solutions beyond the reach of many bioinformatics consumers. Results We present Wildfire, a graphical user interface for constructing and running workflows. Wildfire borrows user interface features from Jemboss and adds a drag-and-drop interface allowing the user to compose EMBOSS (and other programs into workflows. For execution, Wildfire uses GEL, the underlying workflow execution engine, which can exploit available parallelism on multiple CPU machines including Beowulf-class clusters and Grids. Conclusion Wildfire simplifies the tasks of constructing and executing bioinformatics workflows.

  14. Warning against the dangers of wildfires in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozny, M.; Bares, D.; Virag, M.; Stalmacher, J.

    2009-04-01

    Many fire risk models have been developed for various temporal and spatial scales and application purposes. The integrated warning service in the Czech Republic is used for wildfire risk assessment model of FDI (Fire Danger Index). The FDI model is being developed in the Doksany observatory based on evaluation of weather conditions. FDI model describes danger of wildfire for vegetation covered countryside. There are five levels of danger: 1 - very low risk, 2 - low risk, 3 - moderate risk, 4 - high risk, 5 - very high risk. Simply say higher index value, reflects to higher risk of wildfire. As input data, the model uses measured values from the Czech Hydrometeorological Institute stations network as well as ALADIN's model predicted conditions. The modelling process computes upper soil profile moisture, surface moistening and the spreading speed of fire. Early warning system for wildfires prevention in the Czech Republic is used since 2006.

  15. Wildfires: Information for Pregnant Women and Parents of Young Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weather: Wildfires Ready.gov (U.S. Department of Homeland Security) Are You Ready? (FEMA) American Red Cross Family Preparedness Guide (Florida Department of Health) Preparedness Information for Pregnant Women Pregnancy and Disaster Information from ...

  16. Some Wildfire Ignition Causes Pose More Risk of Destroying Houses than Others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathryn M; Penman, Trent D; Price, Owen F

    2016-01-01

    Many houses are at risk of being destroyed by wildfires. While previous studies have improved our understanding of how, when and why houses are destroyed by wildfires, little attention has been given to how these fires started. We compiled a dataset of wildfires that destroyed houses in New South Wales and Victoria and, by comparing against wildfires where no houses were destroyed, investigated the relationship between the distribution of ignition causes for wildfires that did and did not destroy houses. Powerlines, lightning and deliberate ignitions are the main causes of wildfires that destroyed houses. Powerlines were 6 times more common in the wildfires that destroyed houses data than in the wildfires where no houses were destroyed data and lightning was 2 times more common. For deliberate- and powerline-caused wildfires, temperature, wind speed, and forest fire danger index were all significantly higher and relative humidity significantly lower (P houses compared with wildfires where no houses were destroyed. For all powerline-caused wildfires the first house destroyed always occurred on the day of ignition. In contrast, the first house destroyed was after the day of ignition for 78% of lightning-caused wildfires. Lightning-caused wildfires that destroyed houses were significantly larger (P houses. Our results suggest that targeting fire prevention strategies around ignition causes, such as improving powerline safety and targeted arson reduction programmes, and reducing fire spread may decrease the number of wildfires that destroy houses.

  17. Land Management Practices Associated with House Loss in Wildfires

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Gibbons; Linda van Bommel; A Malcolm Gill; Cary, Geoffrey J.; Driscoll, Don A.; Bradstock, Ross A.; Emma Knight; Moritz, Max A.; Scott L Stephens; Lindenmayer, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Losses to life and property from unplanned fires (wildfires) are forecast to increase because of population growth in peri-urban areas and climate change. In response, there have been moves to increase fuel reduction--clearing, prescribed burning, biomass removal and grazing--to afford greater protection to peri-urban communities in fire-prone regions. But how effective are these measures? Severe wildfires in southern Australia in 2009 presented a rare opportunity to address this question emp...

  18. Network analysis of wildfire transmission and implications for risk governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Alan A.; Evers, Cody R.; Day, Michelle A.; Preisler, Haiganoush K.; Barros, Ana M. G.; Nielsen-Pincus, Max

    2017-01-01

    We characterized wildfire transmission and exposure within a matrix of large land tenures (federal, state, and private) surrounding 56 communities within a 3.3 million ha fire prone region of central Oregon US. Wildfire simulation and network analysis were used to quantify the exchange of fire among land tenures and communities and analyze the relative contributions of human versus natural ignitions to wildfire exposure. Among the land tenures examined, the area burned by incoming fires averaged 57% of the total burned area. Community exposure from incoming fires ignited on surrounding land tenures accounted for 67% of the total area burned. The number of land tenures contributing wildfire to individual communities and surrounding wildland urban interface (WUI) varied from 3 to 20. Community firesheds, i.e. the area where ignitions can spawn fires that can burn into the WUI, covered 40% of the landscape, and were 5.5 times larger than the combined area of the community core and WUI. For the major land tenures within the study area, the amount of incoming versus outgoing fire was relatively constant, with some exceptions. The study provides a multi-scale characterization of wildfire networks within a large, mixed tenure and fire prone landscape, and illustrates the connectivity of risk between communities and the surrounding wildlands. We use the findings to discuss how scale mismatches in local wildfire governance result from disconnected planning systems and disparate fire management objectives among the large landowners (federal, state, private) and local communities. Local and regional risk planning processes can adopt our concepts and methods to better define and map the scale of wildfire risk from large fire events and incorporate wildfire network and connectivity concepts into risk assessments. PMID:28257416

  19. Improving Access to Military Aircraft During Civilian Wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    natural regenerative properties and which is beneficial for long-term forest health. In an undated pamphlet, CAL FIRE (the California Department of...With its long history , the federal civilian wildfire community has utilized strategic planning to guide their “… Comprehensive national aviation...suppressing wildfires from the air. Two examples are California and Colorado. While California has a long history of utilizing aircraft in the suppression

  20. Black carbon and organic carbon emissions from wildfires in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    XÓCHITL CRUZ NÚÑEZ; LOURDES VILLERS RUIZ; CARLOS GAY GARCÍA

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, approximately 7650 wildfires occur annually, affecting 263 115 hectares of land. In addition to their impact on land degradation, wildfires cause deforestation, damage to ecosystems and promote land use change; apart from being the source of emissions of toxic substances to the environment (i.e., hydrogen cya - nide, black carbon and organic carbon). Black carbon is a short-lived greenhouse pollutant that also promotes snow and ice melting and decreased rainfall; it has an estimate...

  1. The SantaBot experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren Tranberg; Svenstrup, Mikael; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    interactive mobile agents into public urban transit area. To investigate the hypothesis, an experiment was carried out using a robot capable of navigating autonomously based on the input of an onboard laser scanner. The robot would detect and follow random people, who afterwards were asked to fill out......The video shows how an autonomous mobile robot dressed as Santa Claus is interacting with people in a shopping mall. The underlying hypothesis is that it is possible to create interesting new living spaces and induce value in terms of experiences, information or economics, by putting socially...... a questionnaire for quantitative analysis of the experiment. The presented video is the corresponding video documentation of the experiment used in the evaluation. The results showed that people were generally positive towards having mobile robots in this type of environment where shopping is combined...

  2. Negative consequences of positive feedbacks in US wildfire management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E Calkin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades wildfire activity, damage, and management cost within the US have increased substantially. These increases have been associated with a number of factors including climate change and fuel accumulation due to a century of active fire suppression. The increased fire activity has occurred during a time of significant ex-urban development of the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI along with increased demand on water resources originating on forested landscapes. These increased demands have put substantial pressure on federal agencies charged with wildfire management to continue and expand the century old policy of aggressive wildfire suppression. However, aggressive wildfire suppression is one of the major factors that drive the increased extent, intensity, and damage associated with the small number of large wildfires that are unable to be suppressed. In this paper we discuss the positive feedback loops that lead to demands for increasing suppression response while simultaneously increasing wildfire risk in the future. Despite a wealth of scientific research that demonstrates the limitations of the current management paradigm pressure to maintain the existing system are well entrenched and driven by the existing social systems that have evolved under our current management practice. Interestingly, US federal wildland fire policy provides considerable discretion for managers to pursue a range of management objectives; however, societal expectations and existing management incentive structures result in policy implementation that is straining the resilience of fire adapted ecosystems and the communities that reside in and adjacent to them.

  3. Is the Central Europe more inclinable to wildfires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozny, M.; Virag, M.; Bares, D.; Trnka, M.; Zalud, Z.; Hlavinka, P.

    2009-09-01

    Many studies indicate a gradual increase in danger of wildfire in Central Europe. The risk of wildfire differs greatly among individual areas (whether regions or districts), and this difference remains, irrespective of the methods used to describe the danger of wildfires. For this study was used the calculation of the FDI (Fire Danger Index) for 200 stations on the territory of Czech Republic in the period 1961-2008. The FDI model is being developed in the Doksany observatory based on evaluation of weather conditions. FDI model describes danger of wildfire for vegetation covered countryside. There are five levels of danger: 1 - very low risk, 2 - low risk, 3 - moderate risk, 4 - high risk, 5 - very high risk. During processing the model compute upper soil profile moisture, surface moistening and the speed of spread of wildfire. Between years 1991-2008 there was an increase in the average monthly FDI indices in comparison to the period 1961-1990. During this period, a statistically significant trend toward higher indices was found (0.02 FDI index/year). The trend of danger of wildfires growth was evident in all months.

  4. Negative consequences of positive feedbacks in US wildfire management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David E Calkin; MattheWP Thompson; Mark A Finney

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades wildfire activity, damage, and management cost within the US have increased substantially. These increases have been associated with a number of factors including climate change and fuel accumulation due to a century of active fire suppression. The increased fire activity has occurred during a time of significant ex-urban development of the Wildland Urban Interface (WUI) along with increased demand on water resources originating on forested landscapes. These increased demands have put substantial pressure on federal agencies charged with wildfire management to continue and expand the century old policy of aggressive wildfire suppression. However, aggressive wildfire suppression is one of the major factors that drive the increased extent, intensity, and damage associated with the small number of large wildfires that are unable to be suppressed. In this paper we discuss the positive feedback loops that lead to demands for increasing suppression response while simultaneously increasing wildfire risk in the future. Despite a wealth of scientific research that demonstrates the limitations of the current management paradigm pressure to maintain the existing system are well entrenched and driven by the existing social systems that have evolved under our current management practice. Interestingly, US federal wildland fire policy provides considerable discretion for managers to pursue a range of management objectives;however, societal expectations and existing management incentive structures result in policy implementation that is straining the resilience of fire adapted ecosystems and the communities that reside in and adjacent to them.

  5. Reviews by Barbara Santini, Andrea Mecacci, Mariagrazia Portera, Francesca Zugno, and Alberto Ricci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Cercignani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of Daniele Goldoni’s book Gratitudine. Voci di Hölderlin (2013, by Barbara Santini.Review of Laura Anna Macor’s book La fragilità delle virtù. Dall’antropologia alla morale e ritorno nell’epoca di Kant (2011, by Andrea Mecacci.Review of the collection of essays Friedrich Hölderlin. Pensiero e poesia, ed. by Elena Polledri (special volume of the journal «Humanitas», 2012, by Mariagrazia Portera.Review of Barbara Santini’s book Soggetto e fondamento in Hölderlin tra filosofia trascendentale e pensiero speculativo (2013, by Francesca Zugno.Review of Francesca Zugno’s book Hölderlin oltre Kant. Verso Hyperion. 1794-1797 (2011, by Alberto Ricci.

  6. The hidden cost of wildfires: Economic valuation of health effects of wildfire smoke exposure in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, L.A.; Champ, P.A.; Loomis, J.B.

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing concern that human health impacts from exposure to wildfire smoke are ignored in estimates of monetized damages from wildfires. Current research highlights the need for better data collection and analysis of these impacts. Using unique primary data, this paper quantifies the economic cost of health effects from the largest wildfire in Los Angeles County's modern history. A cost of illness estimate is $9.50 per exposed person per day. However, theory and empirical research consistently find that this measure largely underestimates the true economic cost of health effects from exposure to a pollutant in that it ignores the cost of defensive actions taken as well as disutility. For the first time, the defensive behavior method is applied to calculate the willingness to pay for a reduction in one wildfire smoke induced symptom day, which is estimated to be $84.42 per exposed person per day. ?? 2011.

  7. 75 FR 76453 - CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., (CARE), and Barbara Durkin v. National Grid, Cape Wind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission CAlifornians for Renewable Energy, Inc., (CARE), and Barbara Durkin v. National Grid, Cape Wind, and the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities; Notice of...

  8. Early Detection of Lightning Caused Wildfires and Prediction of Wildfire Behavior through Energy Distribution, Atmospherics, Geophysics, the Sun's Azimuth, and Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesige, C.; Nava, E.

    2016-12-01

    In the midst of a changing climate we have seen extremes in weather events: lightning, wildfires, hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes. All of these ride on an imbalance of magnetic and electrical distribution about the earth including what goes on from the atmospheric and geophysic levels. There is relevance to the important role the sun plays in developing and feeding of the extreme weather events along with the sun's role helping to create a separation of charges on earth furthering climactic extremes. Focusing attention in North America and on how the sun, atmospheric and geophysic winds come together producing lightning events, there are connections between energy distribution in the environment, lightning caused wildfires, and extreme wildfire behavior. Lightning caused wildfires and extreme fire behavior have become enhanced with the changing climate conditions. Even with strong developments in wildfire science, there remains a lack in full understanding of connections that create a lightning caused wildfire event and lack of monitoring advancements in predicting extreme fire behavior. Several connections have been made in our research allowing us to connect multiple facets of the environment in regards to electric and magnetic influences on wildfires. Among them include: irradiance, winds, pressure systems, humidity, and topology. The connections can be made to develop better detection systems of wildfires, establish with more accuracy areas of highest risk for wildfire and extreme wildfire behavior, and prediction of wildfire behavior. A platform found within the environment can also lead to further understanding and monitoring of other extreme weather events in the future.

  9. La Ex Hacienda de Santa Cruz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Pinto de Estrada

    1975-06-01

    Full Text Available Ex hacienda Santa Cruz was chosen to show the differences in the geographic and economic structure, and the historic causes that originated them, as an example of ihe situation in the northem part of Campeche.

  10. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  11. Faults--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  12. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  13. Folds--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  14. Faults--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  15. Bathymetry--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  16. Habitat--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  17. Habitat--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  18. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  19. Contours--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  20. Bathymetry--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  1. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  2. Backscatter [SWATH]--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Santa Cruz map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as three separate...

  3. Bathymetry Hillshade--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore Santa Cruz, California. The raster data file is included in...

  4. Contours--Offshore Santa Cruz, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Offshore Santa Cruz map area, California. The vector data file is...

  5. Wildfire air pollution hazard during the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Wolfgang; Dentener, Frank; Lamarque, Jean-François; Jiang, Leiwen; Arneth, Almut

    2017-07-01

    Wildfires pose a significant risk to human livelihoods and are a substantial health hazard due to emissions of toxic smoke. Previous studies have shown that climate change, increasing atmospheric CO2, and human demographic dynamics can lead to substantially altered wildfire risk in the future, with fire activity increasing in some regions and decreasing in others. The present study re-examines these results from the perspective of air pollution risk, focussing on emissions of airborne particulate matter (PM2. 5), combining an existing ensemble of simulations using a coupled fire-dynamic vegetation model with current observation-based estimates of wildfire emissions and simulations with a chemical transport model. Currently, wildfire PM2. 5 emissions exceed those from anthropogenic sources in large parts of the world. We further analyse two extreme sets of future wildfire emissions in a socio-economic, demographic climate change context and compare them to anthropogenic emission scenarios reflecting current and ambitious air pollution legislation. In most regions of the world, ambitious reductions of anthropogenic air pollutant emissions have the potential to limit mean annual pollutant PM2. 5 levels to comply with World Health Organization (WHO) air quality guidelines for PM2. 5. Worst-case future wildfire emissions are not likely to interfere with these annual goals, largely due to fire seasonality, as well as a tendency of wildfire sources to be situated in areas of intermediate population density, as opposed to anthropogenic sources that tend to be highest at the highest population densities. However, during the high-fire season, we find many regions where future PM2. 5 pollution levels can reach dangerous levels even for a scenario of aggressive reduction of anthropogenic emissions.

  6. Perceived and actual wildfire danger: an economic and spatial analysis study in Colorado (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaval, Pamela

    2009-04-01

    Over the last 20 years, costs for wildfire initial attack in the U.S. have increased significantly. The increased cost relates to wildfire suppression practices, as well as the growing number of homes in the wildland urban interface. Requiring wildland urban interface residents to pay an annual tax for their wildfire risk could lower costs to the general taxpayer. Willingness-to-pay for wildfire prevention, in relation to both perceived and actual wildfire danger, was the focus of this study. Surveyed Colorado wildland urban interface residents were found to have a high awareness of wildfire risk and were willing-to-pay over $400 annually to reduce this risk. Respondents' beliefs about wildfire frequency were comparable to the wildfire regimes of their areas' pre-European settlement.

  7. Warming and earlier spring increase Western U.S. forest wildfire activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerling, A.L.; Hidalgo, H.G.; Cayan, D.R.; Swetnam, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Western United States forest wildfire activity is widely thought to have increased in recent decades, yet neither the extent of recent changes nor the degree to which climate may be driving regional changes in wildfire has been systematically documented. Much of the public and scientific discussion of changes in western United States wildfire has focused instead on the effects of 19th- and 20th-century land-use history. We compiled a comprehensive database of large wildfires in western United States forests since 1970 and compared it with hydroclimatic and land-surface data. Here, we show that large wildfire activity increased suddenly and markedly in the mid-1980s, with higher large-wildfire frequency, longer wildfire durations, and longer wildfire seasons. The greatest increases occurred in mid-elevation, Northern Rockies forests, where land-use histories have relatively little effect on fire risks and are strongly associated with increased spring and summer temperatures and an earlier spring snowmelt.

  8. Rezension von: Barbara Holland-Cunz: Gefährdete Freiheit. Über Hannah Arendt und Simone de Beauvoir. Opladen u.a.: Verlag Barbara Budrich 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Dierkes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Von Barbara Holland-Cunz, die sich mit Simone de Beauvoir und Hannah Arendt bereits einzeln beschäftigt hat, liegt nun ein Band vor, in dem sie sich diesen herausragenden Denkerinnen des 20. Jahrhunderts gemeinsam widmet. In einer beinahe synoptisch anmutenden Herangehensweise fokussiert sie dabei auf den Begriff der Freiheit, der bei beiden von eminenter Bedeutung für das jeweilige Theoriegebäude ist. Holland-Cunz zufolge verstehen beide, bei einigen Unterschieden, Freiheit so, dass sie sich vor allem durch eine in sich eingeschriebene Gefährdung auszeichnet: Diese resultiert aus einem heroisch-emphatischen Gestus, der in paradoxer Weise gepaart wird mit einem abgeklärten Realismus. Über weite Strecken liest sich der Weg zu dieser Deutung, v. a. auch wegen einer teilweise sympathisch unkonventionellen und originellen Herangehensweise, sehr anregend und überzeugend.

  9. Computational Modeling of Large Wildfires: A Roadmap

    KAUST Repository

    Coen, Janice L.

    2010-08-01

    Wildland fire behavior, particularly that of large, uncontrolled wildfires, has not been well understood or predicted. Our methodology to simulate this phenomenon uses high-resolution dynamic models made of numerical weather prediction (NWP) models coupled to fire behavior models to simulate fire behavior. NWP models are capable of modeling very high resolution (< 100 m) atmospheric flows. The wildland fire component is based upon semi-empirical formulas for fireline rate of spread, post-frontal heat release, and a canopy fire. The fire behavior is coupled to the atmospheric model such that low level winds drive the spread of the surface fire, which in turn releases sensible heat, latent heat, and smoke fluxes into the lower atmosphere, feeding back to affect the winds directing the fire. These coupled dynamic models capture the rapid spread downwind, flank runs up canyons, bifurcations of the fire into two heads, and rough agreement in area, shape, and direction of spread at periods for which fire location data is available. Yet, intriguing computational science questions arise in applying such models in a predictive manner, including physical processes that span a vast range of scales, processes such as spotting that cannot be modeled deterministically, estimating the consequences of uncertainty, the efforts to steer simulations with field data ("data assimilation"), lingering issues with short term forecasting of weather that may show skill only on the order of a few hours, and the difficulty of gathering pertinent data for verification and initialization in a dangerous environment. © 2010 IEEE.

  10. Near-Real-Time Earth Observation Data Supporting Wildfire Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosia, V. G.; Zajkowski, T.; Quayle, B.

    2013-12-01

    During disaster events, the most critical element needed by responding personnel and management teams is situational intelligence / awareness. During rapidly-evolving events such as wildfires, the need for timely information is critical to save lives, property and resources. The wildfire management agencies in the US rely heavily on remote sensing information both from airborne platforms as well as from orbital assets. The ability to readily have information from those systems, not just data, is critical to effective control and damage mitigation. NASA has been collaborating with the USFS to mature and operationalize various asset-information capabilities to effect improved knowledge of fire-prone areas, monitor wildfire events in real-time, assess effectiveness of fire management strategies, and provide rapid, post-fire assessment for recovery operations. Specific examples of near-real-time remote sensing asset utility include daily MODIS data employed to assess fire potential / wildfire hazard areas, and national-scale hot-spot detection, airborne thermal sensor collected during wildfire events to effect management strategies, EO-1 ALI 'pointable' satellite sensor data to assess fire-retardant application effectiveness, and Landsat 8 and other sensor data to derive burn severity indices for post-fire remediation work. These cases of where near-real-time data is used operationally during the previous few fire seasons will be presented.

  11. Real-time estimation of wildfire perimeters from curated crowdsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xu; Duckham, Matt; Chong, Derek; Tolhurst, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    Real-time information about the spatial extents of evolving natural disasters, such as wildfire or flood perimeters, can assist both emergency responders and the general public during an emergency. However, authoritative information sources can suffer from bottlenecks and delays, while user-generated social media data usually lacks the necessary structure and trustworthiness for reliable automated processing. This paper describes and evaluates an automated technique for real-time tracking of wildfire perimeters based on publicly available “curated” crowdsourced data about telephone calls to the emergency services. Our technique is based on established data mining tools, and can be adjusted using a small number of intuitive parameters. Experiments using data from the devastating Black Saturday wildfires (2009) in Victoria, Australia, demonstrate the potential for the technique to detect and track wildfire perimeters automatically, in real time, and with moderate accuracy. Accuracy can be further increased through combination with other authoritative demographic and environmental information, such as population density and dynamic wind fields. These results are also independently validated against data from the more recent 2014 Mickleham-Dalrymple wildfires.

  12. 令人陶醉的Santa Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘小松

    1999-01-01

    假如用汉字代替Santa Fe,这个名字就失去了许多诗意。四百多年来,Santa Fe市吸引了全世界的人们。人们惊叹她的新墨西哥式的自然美,享受那里宜人的气候,赞美那丰富的西班牙和印第安文化。Santa Fe是美国最早的行政首府,也是贸易和宗教的中枢,还是音乐、建筑、美术和休闲的胜地。Santa Fe蜿蜒的小路、长着当地花草的园子和四周的山景都叫人心旷神怡。在美国没有别的城市像Santa Fe这样保护自己的文化并为之感到骄傲。她的自然美和人文传统赢得了神圣的赞誉。Santa Fe坐落在落基山脚下,每晚日落时分,这里一片鲜红,人们称之为"基督的血"。远在清教徒登陆普利茅斯之前,西班牙人就在Santa Fe建立了政府。今天,这座城市是世界旅游胜地,是美国第三大美术作品

  13. The evolution of Smokey Bear: Environmental education about wildfire for youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidi L. Ballard; Emily Evans; Victoria E. Sturtevant; Pamela. Jakes

    2012-01-01

    Many environmental education programs in the United States educate youth about the prevention of wildfire and its role in ecosystems.We reviewed 50 wildfire education programs for youth (WEY) in the U.S. through an Internet search and interviews with program providers. We investigated whether they reflect current wildfire science, environmental education (EE)...

  14. Uncertainty and probability in wildfire management decision support: An example from the United States [Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Thompson; David Calkin; Joe H. Scott; Michael. Hand

    2017-01-01

    Wildfire risk assessment is increasingly being adopted to support federal wildfire management decisions in the United States. Existing decision support systems, specifically the Wildland Fire Decision Support System (WFDSS), provide a rich set of probabilistic and risk‐based information to support the management of active wildfire incidents. WFDSS offers a wide range...

  15. 50 CFR 35.7 - Control of wildfires, insects, pest plants, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT General Rules § 35.7 Control of wildfires, insects, pest plants, and disease. To the extent necessary, the Director shall prescribe measures to control wildfires, insects, pest plants, and disease to... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Control of wildfires, insects, pest plants...

  16. The 2002 Rodeo-Chediski Wildfire's impacts on southwestern ponderosa pine ecosystems, hydrology, and fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; Cody L. Stropki; Hui Chen; Daniel G. Neary

    2011-01-01

    The Rodeo-Chediski Wildfire burned nearly 462,600 acres in north-central Arizona in the summer of 2002. The wildfire damaged or destroyed ecosystem resources and disrupted the hydrologic functioning within the impacted ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests in a largely mosaic pattern. Impacts of the wildfire on ecosystem resources, factors important to hydrologic...

  17. Pathology of wildfire risk: A characterization of social and ecological dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Paige Fischer; Thomas A Spies; Toddi A Steelman; Cassandra Moseley; Bart R Johnson; John D Bailey; Alan A Ager; Patrick Bourgeron; Susan Charnley; Brandon M Collins; Jeffrey D Kline; Jessica E Leahy; Jeremy S Littell; James DA Millington; Max Nielsen-Pincus; Christine S Olsen; Travis B Paveglio; Christopher I Roos; Michelle M Steen-Adams; Forrest R Stevens; Jelena Vukomanovic; Eric M White; David M. J. S. Bowman

    2016-01-01

    Despite dramatic increases in suppression spending, the risk of life and property loss associated with wildfire has continued to rise in recent decades. Economic losses from wildfires have doubled in the United States and suppression expenses have tripled between 2002 and 2012 compared to the decade prior. Loss of property to wildfire has outpaced efforts to reduce...

  18. Factors related to building loss due to wildfires in the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia M. Alexandre; Susan I. Stewart; Nicholas S. Keuler; Murray K. Clayton; Miranda H. Mockrin; Avi Bar-Massada; Alexandra D. Syphard; Volker C. Radeloff

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire is globally an important ecological disturbance affecting biochemical cycles and vegetation composition, but also puts people and their homes at risk. Suppressing wildfires has detrimental ecological effects and can promote larger and more intense wildfires when fuels accumulate, which increases the threat to buildings in the wildland- urban interface...

  19. The Evolution of Smokey Bear: Environmental Education about Wildfire for Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Heidi L.; Evans, Emily; Sturtevant, Victoria E.; Jakes, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many environmental education programs in the United States educate youth about the prevention of wildfire and its role in ecosystems. We reviewed 50 wildfire education programs for youth (WEY) in the U.S. through an Internet search and interviews with program providers. We investigated whether they reflect current wildfire science, environmental…

  20. The TUBIN nanosatellite mission for wildfire detection in thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barschke, Merlin F.; Bartholomäus, Julian; Gordon, Karsten; Lehmann, Marc; Brieß, Klaus

    2017-06-01

    The increasing number of wildfires has significant impact on the Earth's climate system. Furthermore, they cause severe economic damage in many parts of the world. While different land and airborne wildfire detection and observation systems are in use in some areas of the world already, spaceborne systems offer great potential regarding global and continuous observation. TUBIN is a proof-of-concept mission to demonstrate the capabilities of a nanosatellite carrying lightweight infrared microbolometer arrays for spaceborne detection of wildfires and other high-temperature events. To this end, TUBIN carries two infrared microbolometers complemented by a CMOS imager. The TUBIN space segment is based on the TUBiX20 nanosatellite platform of Technische Universität Berlin and is the first mission that implements the full-scale attitude determination and control system of TUBiX20. Thereby, the TUBIN mission will demonstrate the platform's ability to support a challenging Earth observation mission.

  1. Wildfire Prediction to Inform Fire Management: Statistical Science Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, S W; Dean, C B; Martell, David L

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is an important system process of the earth that occurs across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A variety of methods have been used to predict wildfire phenomena during the past century to better our understanding of fire processes and to inform fire and land management decision-making. Statistical methods have an important role in wildfire prediction due to the inherent stochastic nature of fire phenomena at all scales. Predictive models have exploited several sources of data describing fire phenomena. Experimental data are scarce; observational data are dominated by statistics compiled by government fire management agencies, primarily for administrative purposes and increasingly from remote sensing observations. Fires are rare events at many scales. The data describing fire phenomena can be zero-heavy and nonstationary over both space and time. Users of fire modeling methodologies are mainly fire management agencies often working under great time constraints, thus, complex models have t...

  2. Macroeconomia do Turismo Argentino em Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Meurer

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo O Estado de Santa Catarina experimentou um considerável crescimento do setor de turismo nas últimas décadas. O fluxo turístico de origem argentina revelou-se um ingrediente importante dessa trajetória. Este artigo focaliza um aspecto pouco explorado, aparentemente, da participação argentina no turismo estadual: a relação entre a situação macroeconômica do país vizinho e a demanda turística por Santa Catarina lá originada. Começa-se abordando brevemente a problemática geral da macroeconomia do turismo. Depois, discorre-se sobre o crescimento desse setor em Santa Catarina, destacando a presença de argentinos. A terceira parte desenvolve uma análise baseada em tratamento estatístico de dados sobre demanda e receita geradas por esses turistas no estado, com exame das correlações envolvendo taxa de câmbio e taxa de crescimento do PIB da Argentina. Palavras-chave: turismo; Santa Catarina; turistas argentinos; economia argentina Abstract The State of Santa Catarina has witnessed a considerable development of its tourist sector in the last decades. The demand from Argentina has proved to be an important factor of that growth. This article deals with a feature of the presence of Argentinians in the state which seems to be scarcely studied: the relationship between the macroeconomic situation of Argentina and the tourist demand in Santa Catarina originated from that country. The first part of the article considers briefly the general issue of tourism macroeconomics. The second one looks upon tourism growth in Santa Catarina, stressing the presence of visitors from Argentine. The third section develops an analysis based on statistical treatment of data concerning demand and income generated by such tourists in Santa Catarina, involving correlations that consider aspects like exchange rate and the rate of GDP increase in Argentina. Keywords: tourism; Santa Catarina; tourists from Argentina; Argentina’s economy

  3. Multivariate statistical analysis of wildfires in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ricardo; Caramelo, Liliana; Pereira, Mário

    2013-04-01

    Several studies demonstrate that wildfires in Portugal present high temporal and spatial variability as well as cluster behavior (Pereira et al., 2005, 2011). This study aims to contribute to the characterization of the fire regime in Portugal with the multivariate statistical analysis of the time series of number of fires and area burned in Portugal during the 1980 - 2009 period. The data used in the analysis is an extended version of the Rural Fire Portuguese Database (PRFD) (Pereira et al, 2011), provided by the National Forest Authority (Autoridade Florestal Nacional, AFN), the Portuguese Forest Service, which includes information for more than 500,000 fire records. There are many multiple advanced techniques for examining the relationships among multiple time series at the same time (e.g., canonical correlation analysis, principal components analysis, factor analysis, path analysis, multiple analyses of variance, clustering systems). This study compares and discusses the results obtained with these different techniques. Pereira, M.G., Trigo, R.M., DaCamara, C.C., Pereira, J.M.C., Leite, S.M., 2005: "Synoptic patterns associated with large summer forest fires in Portugal". Agricultural and Forest Meteorology. 129, 11-25. Pereira, M. G., Malamud, B. D., Trigo, R. M., and Alves, P. I.: The history and characteristics of the 1980-2005 Portuguese rural fire database, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 3343-3358, doi:10.5194/nhess-11-3343-2011, 2011 This work is supported by European Union Funds (FEDER/COMPETE - Operational Competitiveness Programme) and by national funds (FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology) under the project FCOMP-01-0124-FEDER-022692, the project FLAIR (PTDC/AAC-AMB/104702/2008) and the EU 7th Framework Program through FUME (contract number 243888).

  4. Determinants and predictability of global wildfire emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Knorr

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Biomass burning is one of the largest sources of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols globally. These emissions have a major impact on the radiative balance of the atmosphere and on air quality, and are thus of significant scientific and societal interest. Several datasets have been developed that quantify those emissions on a global grid and offered to the atmospheric modelling community. However, no study has yet attempted to systematically quantify the dependence of the inferred pyrogenic emissions on underlying assumptions and input data. Such a sensitivity study is needed for understanding how well we can currently model those emissions and what the factors are that contribute to uncertainties in those emission estimates.

    Here, we combine various satellite-derived burned area products, a terrestrial ecosystem model to simulate fuel loads and the effect of fire on ecosystem dynamics, a model of fuel combustion, and various emission models that relate combusted biomass to the emission of various trace gases and aerosols. We carry out simulations with varying parameters for combustion completeness and fuel decomposition rates within published estimates, four different emissions models and three different global burned-area products. We find that variations in combustion completeness and simulated fuel loads have the largest impact on simulated global emissions for most species, except for some with highly uncertain emission factors. Variation in burned-area estimates also contribute considerably to emission uncertainties. We conclude that global models urgently need more field-based data for better parameterisation of combustion completeness and validation of simulated fuel loads, and that further validation and improvement of burned area information is necessary for accurately modelling global wildfire emissions. The results are important for chemical transport modelling studies, and for simulations of biomass burning impacts on the

  5. Limiting the immediate and subsequent hazards associated with wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGraff, Jerome V.; Cannon, Susan H.; Parise, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is a unique natural hazard because it poses immediate threats to life and property as well as creating conditions that can lead to subsequent debris flows. In recent years, the immediate destructive force of wildfires has been decreased through better understanding of fire behavior. Lightning detection networks now identify the number and locations of this common ignition source. Measurements of wind speed, temperature, slope, fuel types and fire boundaries are routinely incorporated into models for fire spread, permitting real-time adjustments to fire-fighting strategies, thus increasing fire-fighting effectiveness.

  6. Nine endangered taxa, one recovering ecosystem: Identifying common ground for recovery on Santa Cruz Island, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachern, A. Kathryn; Wilken, Dieter H.

    2011-01-01

    It is not uncommon to have several rare and listed taxa occupying habitats in one landscape or management area where conservation amounts to defense against the possibility of further loss. It is uncommon and extremely exciting, however, to have several listed taxa occupying one island that is managed cooperatively for conservation and recovery. On Santa Cruz Island, the largest of the northern California island group in the Santa Barbara Channel, we have a golden opportunity to marry ecological knowledge and institutional "good will" in a field test of holistic rare plant conservation. Here, the last feral livestock have been removed, active weed control is underway, and management is focused on understanding and demonstrating system response to conservation management. Yet funding limitations still exist and we need to plan the most fiscally conservative and marketable approach to rare plant restoration. We still experience the tension between desirable quick results and the ecological pace of system recovery. Therefore, our research has focused on identifying fundamental constraints on species recovery at individual, demographic, habitat, and ecosystem levels, and then developing suites of actions that might be taken across taxa and landscapes. At the same time, we seek a performance middle ground that balances an institutional need for quick demonstration of hands-on positive results with a contrasting approach that allows ecosystem recovery to facilitate species recovery in the long term. We find that constraints vary across breeding systems, life-histories, and island locations. We take a hybrid approach in which we identify several actions that we can take now to enhance population size or habitat occupancy for some taxa by active restoration, while allowing others to recover at the pace of ecosystem change. We make our recommendations on the basis of data we have collected over the last decade, so that management is firmly grounded in ecological observation.

  7. Is timber insurable? A study of wildfire Risks in the U.S. forest sector using spatio-temporal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan Chen; Barry K. Goodwin; Jeffrey P. Prestemon

    2014-01-01

    In the U.S. forest products industry, wildfire is one of the leading causes of damage and economic losses. While individual wildfire behavior is well studied, new literature is emerging on broad-scale (e.g., county-level) wildfire risks. Our paper studies wildfire risks using crucial informational vari­ ables across both spatio units and time periods....

  8. Technical Papers Presented at the Defense Nuclear Agency Global Effects Review Held in Santa Barbara, California on 7-9 April 1987. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-19

    Radio- therapy for Ankylosing Spondylitis ," Br. Med. J., Vol. 2, 1965, pp. 1327-1332. * 21. Brucer, M. B. (comp.), The Acute Radiation Syndrome: A...1955, pp. 75-85. 19. Brown, W. M. Court, and R. Doll, Leukemia and Aplastic Anemia in Patients Irradiated for Ankylosing Spondylitis , British Medical...NCAR mesoscale model will be initially used. A number of physics parameterizations will be added to the current version of the model. These include a

  9. International Symposium on Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (2nd) Held in Santa Barbara, California on 12-17 July 1992 (Extended Abstracts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    LINE MODEL S.G. Real, A.C. Elias and J.R. Vilche Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicoquimicas Te6ricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas ...Aplicadas (INIFTA),Facultad de Ciencias Exactas , Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Suc. 4. C.C. 16, (1900) La Plata, Argentina. ( ) Instituto de...Te6ricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas , Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, (1900) La Plata

  10. 1984 Gordon Research Conference on Chemistry and Biology of Peptides Held at Santa Barbara, California on 5-10 February 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    human tumor pancreatic GRF and co-elutes with it on HPLC . They have not found h-GRF in normal pancreas. The structure of the gene encoding for prepro...a lower celing, such as vasopressin, catecholamines [via ei1 receptor ], oxytocin and angiotensin 11 seem to augment the response to CRF. A hepatoma... OXYTOCIN Dr. Manning reviewed already published work on design of antagonists for these systems. T. G. Flynn - CARDIONATRIN Dr. Flynn discussed the

  11. 75 FR 17562 - Port Access Route Study: In the Approaches to Los Angeles-Long Beach and in the Santa Barbara...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... the Long Beach Approach to a 355 deg. True inbound course. Deepening of the Long Beach Approach...? If so, please describe. 4. What costs and benefits are associated with the potential study recommendations listed above? What measures do you think are most cost- effective? 5. What impacts, both...

  12. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  13. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geographic extent of projected coastal flooding, low-lying vulnerable areas, and maxium/minimum flood potential (flood uncertainty) associated with the sea-level...

  14. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geographic extent of projected coastal flooding, low-lying vulnerable areas, and maxium/minimum flood potential (flood uncertainty) associated with the sea-level...

  15. Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data from FIXED PLATFORMS in support of the Santa Barbara Channel project from 13 March 1984 (NODC Accession 8500085)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave spectra, meteorological, and other data were collected from FIXED PLATFORMS from 13 March 1984. Data were collected by the Science Applications, Inc. - Raleigh...

  16. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  17. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 ocean-currents projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System...

  18. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geographic extent of projected coastal flooding, low-lying vulnerable areas, and maxium/minimum flood potential (flood uncertainty) associated with the sea-level...

  19. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  20. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geographic extent of projected coastal flooding, low-lying vulnerable areas, and maxium/minimum flood potential (flood uncertainty) associated with the sea-level...

  1. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  2. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  3. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  4. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  5. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 ocean-currents projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System...

  6. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 ocean-currents projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System...

  7. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  8. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: 1-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geographic extent of projected coastal flooding, low-lying vulnerable areas, and maxium/minimum flood potential (flood uncertainty) associated with the sea-level...

  9. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 ocean-currents projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System...

  10. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  11. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  12. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geographic extent of projected coastal flooding, low-lying vulnerable areas, and maxium/minimum flood potential (flood uncertainty) associated with the sea-level...

  13. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geographic extent of projected coastal flooding, low-lying vulnerable areas, and maxium/minimum flood potential (flood uncertainty) associated with the sea-level...

  14. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  15. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 ocean-currents projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System...

  16. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  17. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 flood-hazard projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Geographic extent of projected coastal flooding, low-lying vulnerable areas, and maxium/minimum flood potential (flood uncertainty) associated with the sea-level...

  18. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 water-level projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived total water levels (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  19. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 ocean-currents projections: average conditions in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System...

  20. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  1. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 wave-hazard projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived significant wave height (in meters) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) makes...

  2. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 ocean-currents projections: 20-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System...

  3. CoSMoS (Coastal Storm Modeling System) Southern California v3.0 Phase 2 ocean-currents projections: 100-year storm in Santa Barbara County

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Model-derived ocean current velocities (in meters per second) for the given storm condition and sea-level rise (SLR) scenario. The Coastal Storm Modeling System...

  4. Paleoceanographic influences on compositional trends in the Monterey Formation, western Santa Barbara coastal area, California: Contrasts between banktop and distal slope settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.R. (Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States). Program in Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    The modern ocean-atmosphere system, consisting of cold polar regions, strong latitudinal temperature gradient, and strong thermocline, evolved as a consequence of Miocene paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic transitions, which were contemporaneous with deposition of the organic-rich Monterey Formation. Deep sea records show mid-Miocene enrichment shifts in C-13 (ca17.5 to ca13.5 Ma), lagged by C-18 (beginning around 15 Ma), suggesting that reverse greenhouse cooling led to intensified cryosphere development. Graphic correlation of Sr isotope and biostratigraphic data indicates that the South Ellwood section contains a more continuous record of organic accumulation. At Naples, highest organic contents are associated with the hardground-bearing carbonaceous marl member, which is condensed between strata bearing Luisian and Early Mohnian benthic foraminifera. Duration of the condensed interval is unresolved by biostratigraphy and Sr isotope estimates over a wide time range (7.5 to 15.7 Ma), but ages younger than 13 Ma are generally inferred for timing of maximum organic carbon accumulation. In contrast, richest organic facies at South Ellwood occur within a 300 to 400 foot interval containing Relizian and Luisian fauna, spanning the 18 to 13 Ma interval. Stable isotope data from the South Ellwood section document a trend of C-13 enrichment on the order of 1% which closely follows, but slightly lags, deposition of richest organic strata. Distinct enrichment in [delta]O-18 begins near the peak of maximum carbon enrichment, and continues into the upper siliceous facies. Thus, the Monterey Hypothesis is supported by the more basinal South Ellwood record, while rejected in the Naples Beach banktop record.

  5. Why not use niche modelling for computing risk of wildfires ignition and spreading?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A forest fire can be a true ecological calamity, regardless of whether it is caused by natural forces or human actions. Although it is impossible to control nature, it is possible to map wildfire risk zones, and thence minimize the frequency of wildfires and prevent damages. Wildfire risk zones are locations where a fire is likely to start, and from where it can spread to other areas. Predictions of wildfires ignitions are critical aspects of biodiversity conservation and management, and they are only possible when a reliable fire risk zone map is available. I suggest in this paper that wildfire ignition risk computed from points of past wildfires obeys the same conceptual and mathematical rules of niche models commonly applied to points of sampled plants or animals. Therefore, niche modeling can also be an inductive approach for an effective and inexpensive computation of wildfires ignition and spreading likelihood.

  6. 78 FR 66982 - Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster #NM-00039

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION Santa Clara Pueblo Disaster NM-00039 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice... for the Santa Clara Pueblo (FEMA- 4151-DR), dated 10/29/2013. Incident: Severe Storms and Flooding... disaster: Primary Areas: Santa Clara Pueblo. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage:...

  7. 27 CFR 9.126 - Santa Clara Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Santa Clara Valley. 9.126... Santa Clara Valley. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Santa Clara Valley.” (b) Approved Maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the...

  8. Why is particulate matter produced by wildfires toxic to lung macrophages?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzi, Lisa M.; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Williams, Keisha M.; Last, Jerold A., E-mail: jalast@ucdavis.edu

    2011-12-15

    The mechanistic basis of the high toxicity to lung macrophages of coarse PM from the California wildfires of 2008 was examined in cell culture experiments with mouse macrophages. Wildfire PM directly killed macrophages very rapidly in cell culture at relatively low doses. The wildfire coarse PM is about four times more toxic to macrophages on an equal weight basis than the same sized PM collected from normal ambient air (no wildfires) from the same region and season. There was a good correlation between the extent of cytotoxicity and the amount of oxidative stress observed at a given dose of wildfire PM in vitro. Our data implicate NF-{kappa}B signaling in the response of macrophages to wildfire PM, and suggest that most, if not all, of the cytotoxicity of wildfire PM to lung macrophages is the result of oxidative stress. The relative ratio of toxicity and of expression of biomarkers of oxidant stress between wildfire PM and 'normal' PM collected from ambient air is consistent with our previous results in mice in vivo, also suggesting that most, if not all, of the cytotoxicity of wildfire PM to lung macrophages is the result of oxidative stress. Our findings from this and earlier studies suggest that the active components of coarse PM from the wildfire are heat-labile organic compounds. While we cannot rule out a minor role for endotoxin in coarse PM preparations from the collected wildfire PM in our observed results both in vitro and in vivo, based on experiments using the inhibitor Polymyxin B most of the oxidant stress and pro-inflammatory activity observed was not due to endotoxin. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wildfire coarse PM kills macrophages at lower doses than coarse. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wildfire coarse PM activates the NF-kB pathway at lower doses than ambient. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wildfire coarse PM in vitro and in vivo kill macrophages by oxidative stress.

  9. Detection of Wildfires with Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umphlett, B.; Leeman, J.; Morrissey, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Currently fire detection for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) using satellite data is accomplished with algorithms and error checking human analysts. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been shown to be more accurate than algorithms or statistical methods for applications dealing with multiple datasets of complex observed data in the natural sciences. ANNs also deal well with multiple data sources that are not all equally reliable or equally informative to the problem. An ANN was tested to evaluate its accuracy in detecting wildfires utilizing polar orbiter numerical data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). Datasets containing locations of known fires were gathered from the NOAA's polar orbiting satellites via the Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). The data was then calibrated and navigation corrected using the Environment for Visualizing Images (ENVI). Fires were located with the aid of shapefiles generated via ArcGIS. Afterwards, several smaller ten pixel by ten pixel datasets were created for each fire (using the ENVI corrected data). Several datasets were created for each fire in order to vary fire position and avoid training the ANN to look only at fires in the center of an image. Datasets containing no fires were also created. A basic pattern recognition neural network was established with the MATLAB neural network toolbox. The datasets were then randomly separated into categories used to train, validate, and test the ANN. To prevent over fitting of the data, the mean squared error (MSE) of the network was monitored and training was stopped when the MSE began to rise. Networks were tested using each channel of the AVHRR data independently, channels 3a and 3b combined, and all six channels. The number of hidden neurons for each input set was also varied between 5-350 in steps of 5 neurons. Each configuration was run 10 times, totaling about 4,200 individual network evaluations. Thirty

  10. Rill Erosion in Post Wildfire Forests after Salvage Logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, Peter; Wagenbrenner, Joseph; Brown, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Despite the dominance of concentrated flow or rill erosion in the erosion processes especially in steep forest environments that have been affected by wildfire or management activities few studies have quantified these effects on rill erosion. This study quantified the effects of wildfire and post-fire timber salvage operations on rill runoff quantity, runoff velocity, and rill erosion. Simulated rill experiments were conducted at various sites in the Western US after wildfire and timber salvage operations. The onsite conditions consists of burned only, salvage logged, skid or snig trail, or skid trails with extra logging debris added. For each rill experiment, concentrated flow was applied at the top of the plot through an energy dissipater at five inflow rates for 12 min each. Runoff was sampled every 2 min and runoff volume and sediment concentration were determined for each sample. The runoff velocity was measured using a dyed calcium chloride solution and two conductivity probes placed a known distance apart. Runoff volume, runoff velocities, and sediment concentrations increased with increasing levels of disturbance. The burned only plots had lower runoff rates and sediment concentrations than any of the other disturbances. The salvage logged plots had greater responses than the burn only plots and the mitigation treatment had a marginal effect on runoff ratios, runoff velocities and sediment concentrations. These results suggest that additional disturbance after a wildfire can increase the erosional response and that proper erosion control mitigation may be an important consideration for post fire management to reduce onsite erosion.

  11. Risk Preferences, Probability Weighting, and Strategy Tradeoffs in Wildfire Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Michael S; Wibbenmeyer, Matthew J; Calkin, David E; Thompson, Matthew P

    2015-10-01

    Wildfires present a complex applied risk management environment, but relatively little attention has been paid to behavioral and cognitive responses to risk among public agency wildfire managers. This study investigates responses to risk, including probability weighting and risk aversion, in a wildfire management context using a survey-based experiment administered to federal wildfire managers. Respondents were presented with a multiattribute lottery-choice experiment where each lottery is defined by three outcome attributes: expenditures for fire suppression, damage to private property, and exposure of firefighters to the risk of aviation-related fatalities. Respondents choose one of two strategies, each of which includes "good" (low cost/low damage) and "bad" (high cost/high damage) outcomes that occur with varying probabilities. The choice task also incorporates an information framing experiment to test whether information about fatality risk to firefighters alters managers' responses to risk. Results suggest that managers exhibit risk aversion and nonlinear probability weighting, which can result in choices that do not minimize expected expenditures, property damage, or firefighter exposure. Information framing tends to result in choices that reduce the risk of aviation fatalities, but exacerbates nonlinear probability weighting. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  12. Uncertainties in Predicting Debris Flow Hazards Following Wildfire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyde, K.D.; Riley, Karin; Stoof, C.R.

    2016-01-01

    Wildfire increases the probability of debris flows posing hazardous conditions where values-at-risk exist downstream of burned areas. Conditions and processes leading to postfire debris flows usually follow a general sequence defined here as the postfire debris flow hazard cascade: biophysical setti

  13. Experimental Forecasts of Wildfire Pollution at the Canadian Meteorological Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Radenko; Beaulieu, Paul-Andre; Chen, Jack; Landry, Hugo; Cousineau, Sophie; Moran, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Environment and Climate Change Canada's Canadian Meteorological Centre Operations division (CMCO) has been running an experimental North American air quality forecast system with near-real-time wildfire emissions since 2014. This system, named FireWork, also takes anthropogenic and other natural emission sources into account. FireWork 48-hour forecasts are provided to CMCO forecasters and external partners in Canada and the U.S. twice daily during the wildfire season. This system has proven to be very useful in capturing short- and long-range smoke transport from wildfires over North America. Several upgrades to the FireWork system have been made since 2014 to accommodate the needs of operational AQ forecasters and to improve system performance. In this talk we will present performance statistics and some case studies for the 2014 and 2015 wildfire seasons. We will also describe current limitations of the FireWork system and ongoing and future work planned for this air quality forecast system.

  14. Land suitability for establishing rainwater harvesting systems for fighting wildfires

    Science.gov (United States)

    José María León Villalobos; Manuel Anaya Garduño; Enrique Ojeda Trejo; Dante Arturo Rodríguez Trejo; José Luis Oropeza Mota; Jorge Luis García Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Rainwater harvesting systems (RHSs) can be used to improve the efficiency of helicopter firefighting operations. To this end, RHSs need to be strategically located in areas with high wildfire occurrence to maximize their usefulness. In this study, spatial analysis was carried out to determine suitable sites for establishing RHSs intended for air attack operations in...

  15. Briefing: Climate and wildfire in western U.S. forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony Westerling; Tim Brown; Tania Schoennagel; Thomas Swetnam; Monica Turner; Thomas Veblen

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire in western U.S. federally managed forests has increased substantially in recent decades, with large (>1000 acre) fires in the decade through 2012 over five times as frequent (450 percent increase) and burned area over ten times as great (930 percent increase) as the 1970s and early 1980s. These changes are closely linked to increased temperatures and a...

  16. Improving Air Support for Wildfire Management in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    with seasonal dry periods, more protracted drought and/or insect outbreaks to trigger wildfires.”14 The second assumption is that the current...commissions and congressional oversight committees. The transparency of structure and evolutionary nature within the U.S. military forms an adaptable culture

  17. Just blowing smoke? Residents’ social construction of communication about wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis Paveglio; Matthew S. Carroll; James D. Absher; Todd. Norton

    2009-01-01

    This study uses social constructionism as a basis for understanding the effectiveness of communication about wildfire risk between agency officials and wildland-urban interface (WUI) residents. Risk communication literature demonstrates a welldocumented difference in the way land managers and stakeholders conceptualize risk. This is especially true of fire because...

  18. Best management practices for creating a community wildfire protection plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela J. Jakes; Christine Esposito; Sam Burns; Antony S. Cheng; Kristen C. Nelson; Victoria E. Sturtevant; Daniel R. Williams

    2012-01-01

    A community wildfire protection plan (CWPP) is a means of bringing local solutions to wildland fire management. In developing and implementing CWPPs, communities assume a leadership role in reducing wildfi re risk on federal and nonfederal land. In this publication, we identify best management practices for CWPP development and implementation based on the experiences...

  19. Trends in global wildfire potential in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Y. Liu; J.A. Stanturf; S.L. Goodrick

    2009-01-01

    The trend in global wildfire potential under the climate change due to the greenhouse effect is investigated. Fire potential is measured by the Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI), which is calculated using the observed maximum temperature and precipitation and projected changes at the end of this century (2070–2100) by general circulation models (GCMs) for present and...

  20. TA-54 (Area G) Risk Assessment from Extreme Wildfire Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, Rodman Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Koo, Eunmo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Honig, Kristen Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); White, Judith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, David John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and surrounding areas have been exposed to at least four significant wildfires since 1977 and there have been numerous others within 50 miles of LANL. Based on this history, wildfires are considered a risk to LANL facilities and their contents. While many LANL facilities are at risk to wildfire to some degree, they are found in a wide variety of conditions, thus they have varying sensitivities to wildfires. Additionally, LANL facilities have various functions and different assets, so they have a wide range of values or consequences if compromised. Therefore, determining the risks and precautions that are warranted to mitigate these risks must be done on a case-by-case basis. In an effort to assess possible wildfire risks to sensitive materials stored in a Perma-Con® in dome TA-54-0375, a conventional fire risk analysis was performed. This conventional risk analysis is documented in Engineering Evaluation Form AP-FIRE-001-FM1, which is dated 9/28/2015 and was titled ‘Wildland Fire Exposure Evaluation for Building TA-54-0375’ (Hall 2015). This analysis acknowledged that there was significant chance of wildfire in the vicinity of TA-54-0375, but the amount of combustible material surrounding the building was deemed low. The wildland fuels that were closest to the building were largely fine fuels and were not expected to have significant duration of heat release. The prevailing winds at this location are from the south and southwest and the nearest significant upwind fuels (tree crowns or unmown grasses) are at least 300 feet away. Based on these factors the conventional wildland fire risk to TA-54-0375 was deemed minimal, “Acceptable As Is, No Action Required.” This risk evaluation was based on a combined assessment of low probability of wildfires arriving at the site from other directions (where higher fuel loadings might be present) as well as the effective setback of fuels in the direction that fire is

  1. Wildfire susceptibility mapping: comparing deterministic and stochastic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mário; Leuenberger, Michael; Parente, Joana; Tonini, Marj

    2016-04-01

    Estimating the probability of wildfire-occurrence in a certain area under particular environmental conditions represents a modern tool to support forest protection plans and to reduce fires consequences. This can be performed by the implementation of wildfire susceptibility mapping, normally achieved employing more or less sophisticated models which combine the predisposing variables (as raster datasets) into a geographic information systems (GIS). The selection of the appropriate variables includes the evaluation of success and the implementation of prediction curves, as well as independent probabilistic validations for different scenarios. These methods allow to define the spatial pattern of wildfire-occurrences, characterize the susceptibility of the territory, namely for specific fire causes/types, and can also account for other factors such as human behavior and social aspects. We selected Portugal as the study region which, due to its favorable climatic, topographic and vegetation conditions, is by far the European country most affected by wildfires. In addition, Verde and Zêzere (2010) performed a first assessment and validation of wildfire susceptibility and hazard in Portugal which can be used as benchmarking. The objectives of the present study comprise: (1) assessing the structural forest fire risk in Portugal using updated datasets, namely, with higher spatial resolution (80 m to 25 m), most recent vegetation cover (Corine Land Cover), longer fire history (1975-2013); and, (2) comparing linear vs non-linear approaches for wildfire susceptibility mapping. The data we used includes: (i) a DEM derived from the Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission in a resolution of 1 arc-seconds (DEM-SRTM 25 m) to assess elevation and slope; (ii) the Corine Land Cover inventory provided by the European Environment Agency (http://www.eea.europa.eu/pt) to produce the land use land cover map; (iii) the National Mapping Burnt Areas (NMBA) provided by the Institute for the

  2. Santa Legends From Around the World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The tradition of children receiving gifts during the month of December is relatively the same no matter where you go in the world, but the character that brings the gifts can vary quite a bit from country to country. The following are the top five Santa legends from around the world.

  3. Ecotourism: The Santa Elena Rainforest Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearing, Stephen

    1993-01-01

    Describes an ecotourism project in which the community of Santa Elena, Costa Rica, are developing a rainforest reserve on government land leased permanently to the local high school. Discusses the impact of the project on the community's economy and environment. (Contains 30 references.) (MDH)

  4. Santa Fe Junior College, Gainesville, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, Rowlett and Scott, Architects, Houston, TX.

    The design of Santa Fe Junior College is examined, beginning with the development of an educational philosophy. Subsequent design decisions are based largely upon this philosophy which emphasizes the development of the individual student and the fulfillment of his needs. Further, the need for flexibility is recognized and is an important aspect of…

  5. Wildfire exposure and fuel management on western US national forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Alan A; Day, Michelle A; McHugh, Charles W; Short, Karen; Gilbertson-Day, Julie; Finney, Mark A; Calkin, David E

    2014-12-01

    Substantial investments in fuel management activities on national forests in the western US are part of a national strategy to reduce human and ecological losses from catastrophic wildfire and create fire resilient landscapes. Prioritizing these investments within and among national forests remains a challenge, partly because a comprehensive assessment that establishes the current wildfire risk and exposure does not exist, making it difficult to identify national priorities and target specific areas for fuel management. To gain a broader understanding of wildfire exposure in the national forest system, we analyzed an array of simulated and empirical data on wildfire activity and fuel treatment investments on the 82 western US national forests. We first summarized recent fire data to examine variation among the Forests in ignition frequency and burned area in relation to investments in fuel reduction treatments. We then used simulation modeling to analyze fine-scale spatial variation in burn probability and intensity. We also estimated the probability of a mega-fire event on each of the Forests, and the transmission of fires ignited on national forests to the surrounding urban interface. The analysis showed a good correspondence between recent area burned and predictions from the simulation models. The modeling also illustrated the magnitude of the variation in both burn probability and intensity among and within Forests. Simulated burn probabilities in most instances were lower than historical, reflecting fire exclusion on many national forests. Simulated wildfire transmission from national forests to the urban interface was highly variable among the Forests. We discuss how the results of the study can be used to prioritize investments in hazardous fuel reduction within a comprehensive multi-scale risk management framework.

  6. Standardization of the process of smelting for sands with self-forgeling resins in the Military Industry Santa Bárbara Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Consuelo Carvajal-Fernández

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the standardization of the smelting process for sands with self-forgeling resins in the Military Industry Santa Barbara Factory. The molding process was studied in the Smelter for six months, to set standards for workforce and raw materials, so that would allow truthfully evaluate the costs per kilogram of casting. 41 pieces of civil and military sectors throughout the development of the project were worked. Finally both standards were evaluated, labor as raw material for different parts, with results was evidenced improved process, essentially in workforce, while in raw material standards did not show significantly change, in this case is corroborated that existing ones are applicable to the process

  7. Wildfire in Northern Eurasia and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvidenko, A.; Schepaschenko, D.

    2012-04-01

    The presentation considers dynamics of fire regimes in Northern Eurasia (limited to territories of Russia) and their impacts on ecosystems and major global biogeochemical cycles. Historically, fire regimes in different regions were defined by natural climate variability, previous fire history and the level of direct human impact. The climate specifics over the last three decades in Russia substantially impacted fire extent, frequency and severity. Regular occurrence of mega(catastrophic) fires becomes a distinct feature of current fire regimes. Megafires (e.g., 1998, 2003, 2008, 2010) lead to degradation of ecosystems and the profound depletion of biodiversity, substantial increase of emissions, create special atmospheric and seasonal weather over large areas, cause considerable damage to the economy and infrastructure, as well as adversely affect the living conditions and health of the population in the regions of fire spread. Based on a synthesis of remote sensing and ground data, the total area of wildfire in Russia between 1998-2010 is assessed at 106.9 x 106 ha or 8.23 x 106 ha yr-1, varying from 4.2 (1999) up to 17.3 x 106 ha yr-1 (2003). The uncertainty of the assessment of burnt area was estimated at ± 9%, and direct emissions of carbon at ± 23% (CI 0.9). As a rule, ~90% of the burnt area is located in Asian Russia, mainly in its southern half. About two-thirds (65.1%) of the total burned area is situated on forest land, 18.9% happened on agricultural land, 8.7% - on grass- and shrubland, and 7.3% - on wetland. The total amount of fuel that was consumed between 1998-2010 was assessed at 1.57 x 109 t C, or 121.0 Tg C yr-1. Interannual variability of this value is high - from 50 (2000) up to 231 Tg C yr-1 (2003) depending on fire season type and geographical location of the fire. On average, our results are quite close to estimates given by the GFED3 - the latter are +11.5% by area, and +13.2% by emissions. The majority of carbon emissions were provided by

  8. Barbara Allen, Daniel Breslau organize 2009 annual meeting of Society for Social Studies of Science in Washington, D.C.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Organizing a conference with more than 1,000 attendees from around the globe is no small task. Just ask Barbara Allen, associate professor and director, Science and Technology Studies, National Capital Region; and her Blacksburg colleague, Daniel Breslau, associate professor, Science and Technology Studies, who co-chaired the 2009 annual meeting of the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S).

  9. "Romeo ja Julia" Liivimaa moodi? Barbara von Tiesenhauseni legend : ajalooline tagapõhi ja kirjanduslikud variatsioonid / Juhan Kreem, Liina Lukas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kreem, Juhan

    2008-01-01

    Käsitletakse järgnevaid ilukirjanduslikke teoseid: Fr. R. Kreutzwaldi ballaadi "Das Fräulein von Borkholm", Th. H. Panteniuse romaani "Die von Kelles" (e.k. "Kelleste omad. Romaan Liivimaa minevikust"), Marie Underi ballaadi "Porkuni preili", Aino Kallase novelli "Barbara von Tiesenhusen" ja Maimu Bergi romaani "Kirjutajad"

  10. Monitoring of the moisture and salt load in restoration plasters in St.-Barbara' s church in Culemborg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hees, R.P.J. van; Sanders, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    St. Barbara's Church in Culemborg in the Netherlands has a history of moisture and salt damage to the plaster. In the past several restorations were performed, without a durable results. Finally, in 1997 test panels were applied in oreder to bas the choice for new plastering on in practice proved

  11. A new species of Eimeria Schneider, 1875 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from Alectoris barbara (Aves: Phasianidae) from the Canary Islands (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, A; Modry, D; Foronda, P

    2016-05-01

    The present study was conducted with the objective of identifying the species of Eimeria present in a cynegetic farm. A new coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) species is described from Barbary partridge, Alectoris barbara, from the Canary Islands. Experimental infections were carried out in order to determine the prepatent period, sporulation time, site of infection, and morphology of endogenous stages. One species is described as new. Eimeria barbarae n. sp. has ellipsoidal oocysts, 20.0 × 14.4 (16-23 × 13-16) μm, with a shape-index (SI) of 1.39. Sporocysts are almond-shaped, 9.0 × 5.4 (6.5-11 × 4.5-6) μm, SI = 1.56. The endogenous development takes place along the intestine. The present study showed that E. barbarae causes severe pathologies in A. barbara chickens, with impact on their health condition. Control strategies needs to be implemented to reduce the loss due to coccidiosis at studied farm.

  12. "Romeo ja Julia" Liivimaa moodi? Barbara von Tiesenhauseni legend : ajalooline tagapõhi ja kirjanduslikud variatsioonid / Juhan Kreem, Liina Lukas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kreem, Juhan

    2008-01-01

    Käsitletakse järgnevaid ilukirjanduslikke teoseid: Fr. R. Kreutzwaldi ballaadi "Das Fräulein von Borkholm", Th. H. Panteniuse romaani "Die von Kelles" (e.k. "Kelleste omad. Romaan Liivimaa minevikust"), Marie Underi ballaadi "Porkuni preili", Aino Kallase novelli "Barbara von Tiesenhusen" ja Maimu Bergi romaani "Kirjutajad"

  13. Prospective thinking in a mustelid? Eira barbara (Carnivora) cache unripe fruits to consume them once ripened

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soley, Fernando G.; Alvarado-Díaz, Isaías

    2011-08-01

    The ability of nonhuman animals to project individual actions into the future is a hotly debated topic. We describe the caching behaviour of tayras ( Eira barbara) based on direct observations in the field, pictures from camera traps and radio telemetry, providing evidence that these mustelids pick and cache unripe fruit for future consumption. This is the first reported case of harvesting of unripe fruits by a nonhuman animal. Ripe fruits are readily taken by a variety of animals, and tayras might benefit by securing a food source before strong competition takes place. Unripe climacteric fruits need to be harvested when mature to ensure that they continue their ripening process, and tayras accurately choose mature stages of these fruits for caching. Tayras cache both native (sapote) and non-native (plantain) fruits that differ in morphology and developmental timeframes, showing sophisticated cognitive ability that might involve highly developed learning abilities and/or prospective thinking.

  14. Chirp seismic-reflection data of field activity 2014-645-FA; Santa Cruz Basin offshore Santa Barbara, southern California from 2014-11-12 to 2014-11-25

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release contains high-resolution seismic-reflection data collected in 2014 to explore to explore marine geologic hazards offshore of southern California....

  15. Pacific-Atlantic Ocean influence on wildfires in northeast China (1774 to 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qichao; Brown, Peter M.; Liu, Shirong; Rocca, Monique E.; Trouet, Valerie; Zheng, Ben; Chen, Haonan; Li, Yinchao; Liu, Duanyang; Wang, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Identification of effects that climate teleconnections, such as El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), have on wildfires is difficult because of short and incomplete records in many areas of the world. We developed the first multicentury wildfire chronologies for northeast China from fire-scarred trees. Regional wildfires occurred every 7 years from the 1700s to 1947, after which fire suppression policies were implemented. Regional wildfires occurred predominately during drought years and were associated with positive phases of ENSO and PDO and negative NAO. Twentieth century meteorological records show that this contingent combination of +ENSO/+PDO/-NAO is linked to low humidity, low precipitation, and high temperature during or before late spring fire seasons. Climate and wildfires in northeast China may be predictable based on teleconnection phases, although future wildfires may be more severe due to effects of climate change and the legacy of fire suppression.

  16. Águas minerais de Santa Catarina

    OpenAIRE

    Coitinho, João Batista Lins

    2000-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro Tecnológico. Esta pesquisa representa uma análise hidrogeológica das águas minerais de Santa Catarina. Em função de suas características físico-químicas, modo de ocorrência e relações com o ambiente geológico, as águas minerais do Estado foram associadas à províncias hidrogeológicas, as quais foram subdividas em domínios/aqüíferos. Destaque especial foi dado à Província Cristalina, Domínio Meridional, por apresentar um...

  17. Pervasive effects of wildfire on foliar endophyte communities in montane forest trees

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yu-ling; Devan, MM Nandi; U'Ren, Jana M; Furr, Susan H.; Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Plants in all terrestrial ecosystems form symbioses with endophytic fungi that inhabit their healthy tissues. How these foliar endophytes respond to wildfires has not been studied previously, but is important given the increasing frequency and intensity of severe wildfires in many ecosystems, and because endophytes can influence plant growth and responses to stress. The goal of this study was to examine effects of severe wildfires on endophyte communities in forest trees, with a focus on trad...

  18. Restoring forest structure and process stabilizes forest carbon in wildfire-prone southwestern ponderosa pine forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurteau, Matthew D; Liang, Shuang; Martin, Katherine L; North, Malcolm P; Koch, George W; Hungate, Bruce A

    2016-03-01

    Changing climate and a legacy of fire-exclusion have increased the probability of high-severity wildfire, leading to an increased risk of forest carbon loss in ponderosa pine forests in the southwestern USA. Efforts to reduce high-severity fire risk through forest thinning and prescribed burning require both the removal and emission of carbon from these forests, and any potential carbon benefits from treatment may depend on the occurrence of wildfire. We sought to determine how forest treatments alter the effects of stochastic wildfire events on the forest carbon balance. We modeled three treatments (control, thin-only, and thin and burn) with and without the occurrence of wildfire. We evaluated how two different probabilities of wildfire occurrence, 1% and 2% per year, might alter the carbon balance of treatments. In the absence of wildfire, we found that thinning and burning treatments initially reduced total ecosystem carbon (TEC) and increased net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB). In the presence of wildfire, the thin and burn treatment TEC surpassed that of the control in year 40 at 2%/yr wildfire probability, and in year 51 at 1%/yr wildfire probability. NECB in the presence of wildfire showed a similar response to the no-wildfire scenarios: both thin-only and thin and burn treatments increased the C sink. Treatments increased TEC by reducing both mean wildfire severity and its variability. While the carbon balance of treatments may differ in more productive forest types, the carbon balance benefits from restoring forest structure and fire in southwestern ponderosa pine forests are clear.

  19. Air quality impacts of European wildfire emissions in a changing climate

    OpenAIRE

    Knorr, Wolfgang; Dentener, Frank; Hantson, Stijn; Jiang, Leiwen; Klimont, Zbigniew; ARNETH Almut

    2016-01-01

    Wildfires are not only a threat to human property and a vital element of many ecosystems, but also an important source of air pollution. In this study, we first review the available evidence for a past or possible future climate-driven increase in wildfire emissions in Europe. We then introduce an ensemble of model simulations with a coupled wildfire– dynamic-ecosystem model, which we combine with published spatial maps of both wildfire and anthropogenic emissions of several major air polluta...

  20. Future respiratory hospital admissions from wildfire smoke under climate change in the Western US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco Liu, Jia; Mickley, Loretta J.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Yue, Xu; Peng, Roger D.; Dominici, Francesca; Bell, Michelle L.

    2016-12-01

    Background. Wildfires are anticipated to be more frequent and intense under climate change. As a result, wildfires may emit more air pollutants that can harm health in communities in the future. The health impacts of wildfire smoke under climate change are largely unknown. Methods. We linked projections of future levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) specifically from wildfire smoke under the A1B climate change scenario using the GEOS-Chem model for 2046-2051, present-day estimates of hospital admission impacts from wildfire smoke, and future population projections to estimate the change in respiratory hospital admissions for persons ≥65 years by county (n = 561) from wildfire PM2.5 under climate change in the Western US. Results. The increase in intense wildfire smoke days from climate change would result in an estimated 178 (95% confidence interval: 6.2, 361) additional respiratory hospital admissions in the Western US, accounting for estimated future increase in the elderly population. Climate change is estimated to impose an additional 4990 high-pollution smoke days. Central Colorado, Washington and southern California are estimated to experience the highest percentage increase in respiratory admissions from wildfire smoke under climate change. Conclusion. Although the increase in number of respiratory admissions from wildfire smoke seems modest, these results provide important scientific evidence of an often-ignored aspect of wildfire impact, and information on their anticipated spatial distribution. Wildfires can cause serious social burdens such as property damage and suppression cost, but can also raise health problems. The results provide information that can be incorporated into development of environmental and health policies in response to climate change. Climate change adaptation policies could incorporate scientific evidence on health risks from natural disasters such as wildfires.

  1. Human-started wildfires expand the fire niche across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Jennifer K.; Bradley, Bethany A.; Nagy, R. Chelsea; Fusco, Emily J.; Mahood, Adam L.

    2017-01-01

    The economic and ecological costs of wildfire in the United States have risen substantially in recent decades. Although climate change has likely enabled a portion of the increase in wildfire activity, the direct role of people in increasing wildfire activity has been largely overlooked. We evaluate over 1.5 million government records of wildfires that had to be extinguished or managed by state or federal agencies from 1992 to 2012, and examined geographic and seasonal extents of human-ignited wildfires relative to lightning-ignited wildfires. Humans have vastly expanded the spatial and seasonal “fire niche” in the coterminous United States, accounting for 84% of all wildfires and 44% of total area burned. During the 21-y time period, the human-caused fire season was three times longer than the lightning-caused fire season and added an average of 40,000 wildfires per year across the United States. Human-started wildfires disproportionally occurred where fuel moisture was higher than lightning-started fires, thereby helping expand the geographic and seasonal niche of wildfire. Human-started wildfires were dominant (>80% of ignitions) in over 5.1 million km2, the vast majority of the United States, whereas lightning-started fires were dominant in only 0.7 million km2, primarily in sparsely populated areas of the mountainous western United States. Ignitions caused by human activities are a substantial driver of overall fire risk to ecosystems and economies. Actions to raise awareness and increase management in regions prone to human-started wildfires should be a focus of United States policy to reduce fire risk and associated hazards. PMID:28242690

  2. Housing Arrangement and Location Determine the Likelihood of Housing Loss Due to Wildfire

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra D Syphard; Keeley, Jon E; Avi Bar Massada; Brennan, Teresa J.; Volker C Radeloff

    2012-01-01

    Surging wildfires across the globe are contributing to escalating residential losses and have major social, economic, and ecological consequences. The highest losses in the U.S. occur in southern California, where nearly 1000 homes per year have been destroyed by wildfires since 2000. Wildfire risk reduction efforts focus primarily on fuel reduction and, to a lesser degree, on house characteristics and homeowner responsibility. However, the extent to which land use planning could alleviate wi...

  3. A Finsler geodesic spray paradigm for wildfire spread modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    represents the local fire templates. The ‘paradigm’ part of the present proposal is thus concerned with the corresponding shift of attention from the actual fire-lines to consider instead the geodesic spray - the ‘fire-particles’ - which together, side by side, mold the fire-lines at each instant of time...... sensitive - geodesic solutions to the wildfire spread problem. The methods presented here stem directly from first principles of 2-dimensional Finsler geometry, and they can be readily extracted from the seminal monographs [10] and [11], but we will take special care to introduce and exemplify the necessary...... framework for the implementation of the geometric machinery into this new application - not least in order to facilitate and support the dialog between geometers and the wildfire modelling community. The ‘integration’ part alluded to above is obtained via the geodesics of the ensuing Finsler metric which...

  4. Dynamic resource allocation in disaster response: tradeoffs in wildfire suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Petrovic

    Full Text Available Challenges associated with the allocation of limited resources to mitigate the impact of natural disasters inspire fundamentally new theoretical questions for dynamic decision making in coupled human and natural systems. Wildfires are one of several types of disaster phenomena, including oil spills and disease epidemics, where (1 the disaster evolves on the same timescale as the response effort, and (2 delays in response can lead to increased disaster severity and thus greater demand for resources. We introduce a minimal stochastic process to represent wildfire progression that nonetheless accurately captures the heavy tailed statistical distribution of fire sizes observed in nature. We then couple this model for fire spread to a series of response models that isolate fundamental tradeoffs both in the strength and timing of response and also in division of limited resources across multiple competing suppression efforts. Using this framework, we compute optimal strategies for decision making scenarios that arise in fire response policy.

  5. Mitigating wildfire carbon loss in managed northern peatlands through restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granath, Gustaf; Moore, Paul A.; Lukenbach, Maxwell C.; Waddington, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Northern peatlands can emit large amounts of carbon and harmful smoke pollution during a wildfire. Of particular concern are drained and mined peatlands, where management practices destabilize an array of ecohydrological feedbacks, moss traits and peat properties that moderate water and carbon losses in natural peatlands. Our results demonstrate that drained and mined peatlands in Canada and northern Europe can experience catastrophic deep burns (>200 t C ha‑1 emitted) under current weather conditions. Furthermore, climate change will cause greater water losses in these peatlands and subject even deeper peat layers to wildfire combustion. However, the rewetting of drained peatlands and the restoration of mined peatlands can effectively lower the risk of these deep burns, especially if a new peat moss layer successfully establishes and raises peat moisture content. We argue that restoration efforts are a necessary measure to mitigate the risk of carbon loss in managed peatlands under climate change.

  6. Forecasting wind-driven wildfires using an inverse modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rios

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A technology able to rapidly forecast wildlfire dynamics would lead to a paradigm shift in the response to emergencies, providing the Fire Service with essential information about the on-going fire. The article at hand presents and explores a novel methodology to forecast wildfire dynamics in wind-driven conditions, using real time data assimilation and inverse modelling. The forecasting algorithm combines Rothermel's rate of spread theory with a perimeter expansion model based on Huygens principle and solves the optimisation problem with a tangent linear approach and a forward automatic differentiation. Its potential is investigated using synthetic data and evaluated in different wildfire scenarios. The results show the high capacity of the method to quickly predict the location of the fire front with a positive lead time (ahead of the event. This work opens the door to further advances framework and more sophisticated models while keeping the computational time suitable for operativeness.

  7. La subjetividad internacional de la Santa Sede

    OpenAIRE

    Mosquera Monelos, Susana

    2014-01-01

    Presentamos el caso de la subjetividad internacional de la Santa Sede como un ejemplo que nos permita afrontar un nuevo enfoque del concepto de sujeto para el derecho internacional. El cumplimiento de los requisitos clásicos de la subjetividad internacional se ha visto superado por la fuerza creadora del derecho que nuevos sujetos internacionales han impulsado: ONG, sociedad civil, transnacionales, sujetos atípicos. Analizando el mecanismo de atribución de personalidad internacional de la San...

  8. AEGIS: a wildfire prevention and management information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalabokidis, Kostas; Ager, Alan; Finney, Mark; Athanasis, Nikos; Palaiologou, Palaiologos; Vasilakos, Christos

    2016-03-01

    We describe a Web-GIS wildfire prevention and management platform (AEGIS) developed as an integrated and easy-to-use decision support tool to manage wildland fire hazards in Greece (http://aegis.aegean.gr). The AEGIS platform assists with early fire warning, fire planning, fire control and coordination of firefighting forces by providing online access to information that is essential for wildfire management. The system uses a number of spatial and non-spatial data sources to support key system functionalities. Land use/land cover maps were produced by combining field inventory data with high-resolution multispectral satellite images (RapidEye). These data support wildfire simulation tools that allow the users to examine potential fire behavior and hazard with the Minimum Travel Time fire spread algorithm. End-users provide a minimum number of inputs such as fire duration, ignition point and weather information to conduct a fire simulation. AEGIS offers three types of simulations, i.e., single-fire propagation, point-scale calculation of potential fire behavior, and burn probability analysis, similar to the FlamMap fire behavior modeling software. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were utilized for wildfire ignition risk assessment based on various parameters, training methods, activation functions, pre-processing methods and network structures. The combination of ANNs and expected burned area maps are used to generate integrated output map of fire hazard prediction. The system also incorporates weather information obtained from remote automatic weather stations and weather forecast maps. The system and associated computation algorithms leverage parallel processing techniques (i.e., High Performance Computing and Cloud Computing) that ensure computational power required for real-time application. All AEGIS functionalities are accessible to authorized end-users through a web-based graphical user interface. An innovative smartphone application, AEGIS App, also

  9. Land management practices associated with house loss in wildfires.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Gibbons

    Full Text Available Losses to life and property from unplanned fires (wildfires are forecast to increase because of population growth in peri-urban areas and climate change. In response, there have been moves to increase fuel reduction--clearing, prescribed burning, biomass removal and grazing--to afford greater protection to peri-urban communities in fire-prone regions. But how effective are these measures? Severe wildfires in southern Australia in 2009 presented a rare opportunity to address this question empirically. We predicted that modifying several fuels could theoretically reduce house loss by 76%-97%, which would translate to considerably fewer wildfire-related deaths. However, maximum levels of fuel reduction are unlikely to be feasible at every house for logistical and environmental reasons. Significant fuel variables in a logistic regression model we selected to predict house loss were (in order of decreasing effect: (1 the cover of trees and shrubs within 40 m of houses, (2 whether trees and shrubs within 40 m of houses was predominantly remnant or planted, (3 the upwind distance from houses to groups of trees or shrubs, (4 the upwind distance from houses to public forested land (irrespective of whether it was managed for nature conservation or logging, (5 the upwind distance from houses to prescribed burning within 5 years, and (6 the number of buildings or structures within 40 m of houses. All fuel treatments were more effective if undertaken closer to houses. For example, 15% fewer houses were destroyed if prescribed burning occurred at the observed minimum distance from houses (0.5 km rather than the observed mean distance from houses (8.5 km. Our results imply that a shift in emphasis away from broad-scale fuel-reduction to intensive fuel treatments close to property will more effectively mitigate impacts from wildfires on peri-urban communities.

  10. Land management practices associated with house loss in wildfires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Philip; van Bommel, Linda; Gill, A Malcolm; Cary, Geoffrey J; Driscoll, Don A; Bradstock, Ross A; Knight, Emma; Moritz, Max A; Stephens, Scott L; Lindenmayer, David B

    2012-01-01

    Losses to life and property from unplanned fires (wildfires) are forecast to increase because of population growth in peri-urban areas and climate change. In response, there have been moves to increase fuel reduction--clearing, prescribed burning, biomass removal and grazing--to afford greater protection to peri-urban communities in fire-prone regions. But how effective are these measures? Severe wildfires in southern Australia in 2009 presented a rare opportunity to address this question empirically. We predicted that modifying several fuels could theoretically reduce house loss by 76%-97%, which would translate to considerably fewer wildfire-related deaths. However, maximum levels of fuel reduction are unlikely to be feasible at every house for logistical and environmental reasons. Significant fuel variables in a logistic regression model we selected to predict house loss were (in order of decreasing effect): (1) the cover of trees and shrubs within 40 m of houses, (2) whether trees and shrubs within 40 m of houses was predominantly remnant or planted, (3) the upwind distance from houses to groups of trees or shrubs, (4) the upwind distance from houses to public forested land (irrespective of whether it was managed for nature conservation or logging), (5) the upwind distance from houses to prescribed burning within 5 years, and (6) the number of buildings or structures within 40 m of houses. All fuel treatments were more effective if undertaken closer to houses. For example, 15% fewer houses were destroyed if prescribed burning occurred at the observed minimum distance from houses (0.5 km) rather than the observed mean distance from houses (8.5 km). Our results imply that a shift in emphasis away from broad-scale fuel-reduction to intensive fuel treatments close to property will more effectively mitigate impacts from wildfires on peri-urban communities.

  11. When wildfire damage threatens humans, Landsat provides answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Steven

    2016-07-12

    A wildfire’s devastation of forest and rangeland seldom ends when the last embers die. In the western United States, rain on a scorched mountainside can turn ash into mudslides. Debris flows unleashed by rainstorms can put nearby homes into harm’s way and send people scrambling for safety. The infrared capabilities of Landsat satellite imagery provide vita information about potential dangers after a wildfire.

  12. Forecasting intentional wildfires using temporal and spatiotemporal autocorrelations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey P. Prestemon; María L. Chas-Amil; Julia M. Touza; Scott L. Goodrick

    2012-01-01

    We report daily time series models containing both temporal and spatiotemporal lags, which are applied to forecasting intentional wildfires in Galicia, Spain. Models are estimated independently for each of the 19 forest districts in Galicia using a 1999–2003 training dataset and evaluated out-of-sample with a 2004–06 dataset. Poisson autoregressive models of order P –...

  13. Santa Ana Winds Over Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution ocean surface wind data from NASA's Quick Scatterometer (QuikScat) illustrate the strength of Santa Ana winds that pounded Southern California this week, causing damage and spreading brush fires. The colored arrows represent various ranges of wind speed, which were still well in excess of 30 knots (34 miles per hour), even after reaching the ocean and weakening. Santa Ana winds are offshore and down-slope winds unique to Southern California that are usually channeled through mountain gaps. These Santa Ana winds extend more than 500 kilometers (310 miles) offshore before changing direction to flow along the shore.The wind speeds and directions are retrieved from range-compressed backscatter data measured by QuikScat that has much higher spatial resolution than QuikScat's standard data products. Useful applications of high-resolution science-quality wind products derived from range-compressed backscatter have been demonstrated in two scientific papers: one on Hurricane Floyd and the other on Catalina Eddies. This is the first demonstration on near-real-time retrieval applications.

  14. Regional modeling of large wildfires under current and potential future climates in Colorado and Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Amanda; Kumar, Sunil; Jarnevich, Catherine S.

    2016-01-01

    Regional analysis of large wildfire potential given climate change scenarios is crucial to understanding areas most at risk in the future, yet wildfire models are not often developed and tested at this spatial scale. We fit three historical climate suitability models for large wildfires (i.e. ≥ 400 ha) in Colorado andWyoming using topography and decadal climate averages corresponding to wildfire occurrence at the same temporal scale. The historical models classified points of known large wildfire occurrence with high accuracies. Using a novel approach in wildfire modeling, we applied the historical models to independent climate and wildfire datasets, and the resulting sensitivities were 0.75, 0.81, and 0.83 for Maxent, Generalized Linear, and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines, respectively. We projected the historic models into future climate space using data from 15 global circulation models and two representative concentration pathway scenarios. Maps from these geospatial analyses can be used to evaluate the changing spatial distribution of climate suitability of large wildfires in these states. April relative humidity was the most important covariate in all models, providing insight to the climate space of large wildfires in this region. These methods incorporate monthly and seasonal climate averages at a spatial resolution relevant to land management (i.e. 1 km2) and provide a tool that can be modified for other regions of North America, or adapted for other parts of the world.

  15. Synoptic patterns associated with wildfires caused by lightning in Castile and Leon, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. García-Ortega

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Iberian Peninsula presents the highest number of wildfires in Europe. In the NW of Spain in particular, wildfires are the natural risk with the greatest economic impact in this region. Wildfires caused by lightning are closely related to the triggering of convective phenomena. The prediction of thunderstorms is a very complex task because these weather events have a local character and are highly dependent on mesoscale atmospheric conditions. The development of convective storms is directly linked to the existence of a synoptic environment favoring convection. The aim of this study is to classify the atmospheric patterns that provide favorable environments for the occurrence of wildfires caused by lightning in the region of Castile and Leon, Spain. The database used for the study contains 376 wildfire days from the period 1987–2006. NCEP data reanalysis has been used. The atmospheric fields used to characterise each day were: geopotential heights and temperatures at 500 hPa and 850 hPa, relative humidity and the horizontal wind at 850 hPa. A Principal Component Analysis in T-mode followed by a Cluster Analysis resulted in a classification of wildfire days into five clusters. The characteristics of these clusters were analysed and described, focusing particularly on the study of those wildfire days in which more than one wildfire was detected. In these cases the main feature observed was the intensification of the disturbance typical of the cluster to which the wildfire belongs.

  16. What governs the presence of residual vegetation in boreal wildfires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Yikalo H.; Remmel, Tarmo K.; Perera, Ajith H.

    2016-04-01

    Wildfires are frequent boreal forest disturbances in Canada, and emulating their patterns with forest harvesting has emerged as a common forest management goal. Wildfires contain many patches of residual vegetation of various size, shape, and composition; understanding their characteristics provides insights for improved emulation criteria. We studied the occurrence of residual vegetation within eleven boreal wildfire events in a natural setting; fires ignited by lightning, no suppression efforts, and no prior anthropogenic disturbances. Relative importance of the measurable geo-environmental factors and their marginal effects on residual presence are studied using Random Forests. These factors included distance from natural firebreaks (wetland, bedrock and non-vegetated areas, and water), land cover, and topographic variables (elevation, slope, and ruggedness index). We present results at spatial resolutions ranging from four to 64 m while emphasizing four and 32 m since they mimic IKONOS- and Landsat-type images. Natural firebreak features, especially the proximity to wetlands, are among the most important variables that explain the likelihood residual occurrence. The majority of residual vegetation areas are concentrated within 100 m of wetlands. Topographic variables, typically important in rugged terrain, are less important in explaining the presence of residuals within our study fires.

  17. Smoke consequences of new wildfire regimes driven by climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Donald; Shankar, Uma; Keane, Robert E.; Stavros, E. Natasha; Heilman, Warren E.; Fox, Douglas G.; Riebau, Allen C.

    2014-02-01

    Smoke from wildfires has adverse biological and social consequences, and various lines of evidence suggest that smoke from wildfires in the future may be more intense and widespread, demanding that methods be developed to address its effects on people, ecosystems, and the atmosphere. In this paper, we present the essential ingredients of a modeling system for projecting smoke consequences in a rapidly warming climate that is expected to change wildfire regimes significantly. We describe each component of the system, offer suggestions for the elements of a modeling agenda, and provide some general guidelines for making choices among potential components. We address a prospective audience of researchers whom we expect to be fluent already in building some or many of these components, so we neither prescribe nor advocate particular models or software. Instead, our intent is to highlight fruitful ways of thinking about the task as a whole and its components, while providing substantial, if not exhaustive, documentation from the primary literature as reference. This paper provides a guide to the complexities of smoke modeling under climate change, and a research agenda for developing a modeling system that is equal to the task while being feasible with current resources.

  18. A transport model for prediction of wildfire behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, R.R.

    1997-07-01

    Wildfires are a threat to human life and property, yet they are an unavoidable part of nature. In the past people have tried to predict wildfire behavior through the use of point functional models but have been unsuccessful at adequately predicting the gross behavior of the broad spectrum of fires that occur in nature. The majority of previous models do not have self-determining propagation rates. The author uses a transport approach to represent this complicated problem and produce a model that utilizes a self-determining propagation rate. The transport approach allows one to represent a large number of environments including transition regions such as those with nonhomogeneous vegetation and terrain. Some of the most difficult features to treat are the imperfectly known boundary conditions and the fine scale structure that is unresolvable, such as the specific location of the fuel or the precise incoming winds. The author accounts for the microscopic details of a fire with macroscopic resolution by dividing quantities into mean and fluctuating parts similar to what is done in traditional turbulence modelling. The author develops a complicated model that includes the transport of multiple gas species, such as oxygen and volatile hydrocarbons, and tracks the depletion of various fuels and other stationary solids and liquids. From this model the author also forms a simplified local burning model with which he performs a number of simulations for the purpose of demonstrating the properties of a self-determining transport-based wildfire model.

  19. Forecasting wind-driven wildfires using an inverse modelling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Rios

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A technology able to rapidly forecast wildfire dynamics would lead to a paradigm shift in the response to emergencies, providing the Fire Service with essential information about the ongoing fire. This paper presents and explores a novel methodology to forecast wildfire dynamics in wind-driven conditions, using real-time data assimilation and inverse modelling. The forecasting algorithm combines Rothermel's rate of spread theory with a perimeter expansion model based on Huygens principle and solves the optimisation problem with a tangent linear approach and forward automatic differentiation. Its potential is investigated using synthetic data and evaluated in different wildfire scenarios. The results show the capacity of the method to quickly predict the location of the fire front with a positive lead time (ahead of the event in the order of 10 min for a spatial scale of 100 m. The greatest strengths of our method are lightness, speed and flexibility. We specifically tailor the forecast to be efficient and computationally cheap so it can be used in mobile systems for field deployment and operativeness. Thus, we put emphasis on producing a positive lead time and the means to maximise it.

  20. Application of Wildfire Risk Assessment Results to Wildfire Response Planning in the Southern Sierra Nevada, California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    How wildfires are managed is a key determinant of long-term socioecological resiliency and the ability to live with fire. Safe and effective response to fire requires effective pre-fire planning, which is the main focus of this paper. We review general principles of effective federal fire management planning in the U.S., and introduce a framework for incident response planning consistent with these principles. We contextualize this framework in relation to a wildland fire management continuum...

  1. Updates on the genus Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae) in Santa Catarina, Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassemer, Gustavo; Marques Da Silva, Otávio Luis; Funez, Luís Adriano

    2017-01-01

    This contribution presents updates to the knowledge of the species of Euphorbia that occur in Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil. More specifically, we here typify the names E. cyathophora, E. hirtella, E. paranensis and E. stenophylla, and present the first records of E. cyathophora, E. grami....... graminea, E. ophthalmica and E. thymifolia for Santa Catarina. Finally, we provide an updated identification key to all 30 species of Euphorbia that occur in Santa Catarina, including native, naturalised and cultivated species....

  2. A post-wildfire response in cave dripwater chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagra, Gurinder; Treble, Pauline C.; Andersen, Martin S.; Fairchild, Ian J.; Coleborn, Katie; Baker, Andy

    2016-07-01

    Surface disturbances above a cave have the potential to impact cave dripwater discharge, isotopic composition and solute concentrations, which may subsequently be recorded in the stalagmites forming from these dripwaters. One such disturbance is wildfire; however, the effects of wildfire on cave chemistry and hydrology remains poorly understood. Using dripwater data monitored at two sites in a shallow cave, beneath a forest, in southwest Australia, we provide one of the first cave monitoring studies conducted in a post-fire regime, which seeks to identify the effects of wildfire and post-fire vegetation dynamics on dripwater δ18O composition and solute concentrations. We compare our post-wildfire δ18O data with predicted dripwater δ18O using a forward model based on measured hydro-climatic influences alone. This helps to delineate hydro-climatic and fire-related influences on δ18O. Further we also compare our data with both data from Golgotha Cave - which is in a similar environment but was not influenced by this particular fire - as well as regional groundwater chemistry, in an attempt to determine the extent to which wildfire affects dripwater chemistry. We find in our forested shallow cave that δ18O is higher after the fire relative to modelled δ18O. We attribute this to increased evaporation due to reduced albedo and canopy cover. The solute response post-fire varied between the two drip sites: at Site 1a, which had a large tree above it that was lost in the fire, we see a response reflecting both a reduction in tree water use and a removal of nutrients (Cl, Mg, Sr, and Ca) from the surface and subsurface. Solutes such as SO4 and K maintain high concentrations, due to the abundance of above-ground ash. At Site 2a, which was covered by lower-middle storey vegetation, we see a solute response reflecting evaporative concentration of all studied ions (Cl, Ca, Mg, Sr, SO4, and K) similar to the trend in δ18O for this drip site. We open a new avenue for

  3. Forecasting European Wildfires Today and in the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Abellan, Maria; Porras Alegre, Ignasi; María Sole, Josep; Gálvez, Pedro; Bielski, Conrad; Nurmi, Pertti

    2017-04-01

    Society as a whole is increasingly exposed and vulnerable to natural disasters due to extreme weather events exacerbated by climate change. The increased frequency of wildfires is not only a result of a changing climate, but wildfires themselves also produce a significant amount of greenhouse gases that, in-turn, further contribute to global warming. I-REACT (Improving Resilience to Emergencies through Advanced Cyber Technologies) is an innovation project funded by the European Commission , which aims to use social media, smartphones and wearables to improve natural disaster management by integrating existing services, both local and European, into a platform that supports the entire emergency management cycle. In order to assess the impact of climate change on wildfire hazards, METEOSIM designed two different System Processes (SP) that will be integrated into the I-REACT service that can provide information on a variety of time scales. SP1 - Climate Change Impact The climate change impact on climate variables related to fires is calculated by building an ensemble based on the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and CORDEX data. A validation and an Empirical-Statistical Downscaling (ESD) calibration are done to assess the changes in the past of the climatic variables related to wildfires (temperature, precipitation, wind, relative humidity and Fire Weather Index). Calculations in the trend and the frequency of extreme events of those variables are done for three time scales: near-term (2011-2040), mid-term (2041-2070) and long term (2071-2100). SP2 - Operational daily forecast of the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) Using ensemble data from the ECMWF and from the GLAMEPS (multi-model ensemble) models, both supplied by the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), the Fire Weather Index (FWI) and its index components are produced for each ensemble member within a wide forecast time range, from a few hours up to 10 days resulting in a

  4. Israel wildfires: future trends, impacts and mitigation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg, Lea

    2017-04-01

    Forest fires in the Euro-Mediterranean region burn about 450,000 ha each year. In Israel, the frequency and extent of wildfires have been steadily increasing over the past decades, culminating in several large and costly fires in 2010, 2012 and 2016. The extensive development of forest areas since the 1950's and the accumulation of fuel in the forests, has led to increased occurrences of high intensity fires. Land-use changes and human population growth are the most prevailing and common determinant of wildfire occurrence and impacts. Climate extremes, possibly already a sign of regional climate change, are another frequent determinant of increasing wildfire risk. Therefore, the combination of extreme dry spells, high fuel loads and increased anthropogenic pressure on the open spaces result in an overall amplified wildfire risk. These fires not only cause loss of life and damage to properties but also carry serious environmental repercussions. Combustion of standing vegetation and the leaf litter leave the soil bare and vulnerable to runoff and erosion, thereby increasing risks of flooding. Today, all of Israel's open spaces, forests, natural parks, major metropolitan centers, towns and villages are embedded within the wildland urban interface (WUI). Typically, wildfires near or in the WUI occur on uplands and runoff generated from the burned area poses flooding risks in urban and agricultural zones located downstream. Post-fire management aims at reducing associated hazards as collapsing trees and erosion risk. Often the time interval between a major fire and the definition of priority sites is in the order of days-to-weeks since administrative procedures, financial estimates and implementation of post-fire salvage logging operations require time. Defining the magnitude of the burn scar and estimating its potential impact on runoff and erosion must therefore be done quickly. A post-fire burn severity, runoff and erosion model is a useful tool in estimating

  5. FIRESTORM: Modelling the water quality risk of wildfire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, C. I.; Sheridan, G. J.; Smith, H. G.; Jones, O.; Chong, D.; Tolhurst, K.

    2012-04-01

    Following wildfire, loss of vegetation and changes to soil properties may result in decreases in infiltration rates, less rainfall interception, and higher overland flow velocities. Rainfall events affecting burn areas before vegetation recovers can cause high magnitude erosion events that impact on downstream water quality. For cities and towns that rely upon fire-prone forest catchments for water supply, wildfire impacts on water quality represent a credible risk to water supply security. Quantifying the risk associated with the occurrence of wildfires and the magnitude of water quality impacts has important implications for managing water supplies. At present, no suitable integrative model exists that considers the probabilistic nature of system inputs as well as the range of processes and scales involved in this problem. We present FIRESTORM, a new model currently in development that aims to determine the range of sediment and associated contaminant loads that may be delivered to water supply reservoirs from the combination of wildfire and subsequent rainfall events. This Monte Carlo model incorporates the probabilistic nature of fire ignition, fire weather and rainfall, and includes deterministic models for fire behaviour and locally dominant erosion processes. FIRESTORM calculates the magnitude and associated annual risk of catchment-scale sediment loads associated with the occurrence of wildfire and rainfall generated by two rain event types. The two event types are localised, high intensity, short-duration convective storms, and widespread, longer duration synoptic-scale rainfall events. Initial application and testing of the model will focus on the two main reservoirs supplying water to Melbourne, Australia, both of which are situated in forest catchments vulnerable to wildfire. Probabilistic fire ignition and weather scenarios have been combined using 40 years of fire records and weather observations. These are used to select from a dataset of over 80

  6. Factor Analysis of Wildfire and Risk Area Estimation in Korean Peninsula Using Maximum Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Teayeon; Lim, Chul-Hee; Lee, Woo-Kyun; Kim, YouSeung; Heo, Seongbong; Cha, Sung Eun; Kim, Seajin

    2016-04-01

    The number of wildfires and accompanying human injuries and physical damages has been increased by frequent drought. Especially, Korea experienced severe drought and numbers of wildfire took effect this year. We used MaxEnt model to figure out major environmental factors for wildfire and used RCP scenarios to predict future wildfire risk area. In this study, environmental variables including topographic, anthropogenic, meteorologic data was used to figure out contributing variables of wildfire in South and North Korea, and compared accordingly. As for occurrence data, we used MODIS fire data after verification. In North Korea, AUC(Area Under the ROC Curve) value was 0.890 which was high enough to explain the distribution of wildfires. South Korea had low AUC value than North Korea and high mean standard deviation which means there is low anticipation to predict fire with same environmental variables. It is expected to enhance AUC value in South Korea with environmental variables such as distance from trails, wildfire management systems. For instance, fire occurred within DMZ(demilitarized zone, 4kms boundary from 38th parallel) has decisive influence on fire risk area in South Korea, but not in North Korea. The contribution of each environmental variables was more distributed among variables in North Korea than in South Korea. This means South Korea is dependent on few certain variables, and North Korea can be explained as number of variables with evenly distributed portions. Although the AUC value and standard deviation of South Korea was not high enough to predict wildfire, the result carries an significant meaning to figure out scientific and social matters that certain environmental variables has great weight by understanding their response curves. We also made future wildfire risk area map in whole Korean peninsula using the same model. In four RCP scenarios, it was found that severe climate change would lead wildfire risk area move north. Especially North

  7. Pattern and process of prescribed fires influence effectiveness at reducing wildfire severity in dry coniferous forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkle, Robert S.; Pilliod, David S.; Welty, Justin L.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effects of three early season (spring) prescribed fires on burn severity patterns of summer wildfires that occurred 1–3 years post-treatment in a mixed conifer forest in central Idaho. Wildfire and prescribed fire burn severities were estimated as the difference in normalized burn ratio (dNBR) using Landsat imagery. We used GIS derived vegetation, topography, and treatment variables to generate models predicting the wildfire burn severity of 1286–5500 30-m pixels within and around treated areas. We found that wildfire severity was significantly lower in treated areas than in untreated areas and significantly lower than the potential wildfire severity of the treated areas had treatments not been implemented. At the pixel level, wildfire severity was best predicted by an interaction between prescribed fire severity, topographic moisture, heat load, and pre-fire vegetation volume. Prescribed fire severity and vegetation volume were the most influential predictors. Prescribed fire severity, and its influence on wildfire severity, was highest in relatively warm and dry locations, which were able to burn under spring conditions. In contrast, wildfire severity peaked in cooler, more mesic locations that dried later in the summer and supported greater vegetation volume. We found considerable evidence that prescribed fires have landscape-level influences within treatment boundaries; most notable was an interaction between distance from the prescribed fire perimeter and distance from treated patch edges, which explained up to 66% of the variation in wildfire severity. Early season prescribed fires may not directly target the locations most at risk of high severity wildfire, but proximity of these areas to treated patches and the discontinuity of fuels following treatment may influence wildfire severity and explain how even low severity treatments can be effective management tools in fire-prone landscapes.

  8. Impact of wildfire-induced land cover modification on local meteorology: A sensitivity study of the 2003 wildfires in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Charles; Drobinski, Philippe; Turquety, Solène

    2015-10-01

    Wildfires alter land cover creating changes in dynamic, vegetative, radiative, thermal and hydrological properties of the surface. However, how so drastic changes induced by wildfires and how the age of the burnt scar affect the small and meso-scale atmospheric boundary layer dynamics are largely unknown. These questions are relevant for process analysis, meteorological and air quality forecast but also for regional climate analysis. Such questions are addressed numerically in this study on the case of the Portugal wildfires in 2003 as a testbed. In order to study the effects of burnt scars, an ensemble of numerical simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting modeling system (WRF) have been performed with different surface properties mimicking the surface state immediately after the fire, few days after the fire and few months after the fire. In order to investigate such issue in a seamless approach, the same modelling framework has been used with various horizontal resolutions of the model grid and land use, ranging from 3.5 km, which can be considered as the typical resolution of state-of-the art regional numerical weather prediction models to 14 km which is now the typical target resolution of regional climate models. The study shows that the combination of high surface heat fluxes over the burnt area, large differential heating with respect to the preserved surroundings and lower surface roughness produces very intense frontogenesis with vertical velocity reaching few meters per second. This powerful meso-scale circulation can pump more humid air from the surroundings not impacted by the wildfire and produce more cloudiness over the burnt area. The influence of soil temperature immediately after the wildfire ceases is mainly seen at night as the boundary-layer remains unstably stratified and lasts only few days. So the intensity of the induced meso-scale circulation decreases with time, even though it remains until full recovery of the vegetation

  9. Rita Braches-Chyrek, Jane Addams, Mary Richmond und Alice Salomon: Professionalisierung und Disziplinbildung Sozialer Arbeit. Opladen: Barbara Budrich 2013 (340 S.) [Rezension

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Dayana

    2013-01-01

    Rezension von: Rita Braches-Chyrek, Jane Addams, Mary Richmond und Alice Salomon: Professionalisierung und Disziplinbildung Sozialer Arbeit. Opladen: Barbara Budrich 2013 (340 S.; ISBN 978-3-8474-0015-8)

  10. Wildfire Ash: Chemical Composition, Ash-Soil Interactions and Environmental Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Hamzi, Seham; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Of the five classical factors of soil formation, climate, parent material, topography, time, organisms, and recently recognized human activity, it is the latter factor which discretely includes fire and post-burn impact. However, it is considered that soil undergoing fire just experience a temporary removal of the top organic horizon, thus slightly modified and often labeled as 'temporarily disturbed' soil or soil 'under restoration/rehabilitation'. In fact the suggested seventh factor, post-burned produced ash, can act both dependently and independently of the other soil forming factors (Levin et al., 2013; Certini 2013). They are interdependent in cases where ash influences occur on time scales similar to 'natural' soil formation (Keesstra et ai., 2014) such as changes in vegetation. On the other hand, in post-fire areas a strong dependency is expected between soil-water retention mechanism, climate and topography. Wild-land fires exert many changes on the physical, chemical, mineralogical, biological, and morphological properties of soil that, in turn, affect the soil's hydrology and nutrient flux, modifying its ability to support vegetation and resist erosion. The ash produced by forest fires is a complex mixture composed of organic and inorganic particles characterized by vary physical-chemical and morphological properties. The importance of this study is straightforwardly related to the frequency and large-scales wildfires in Mediterranean region. In fact, wildfires are major environmental and land management concern in the world, where the number and severity of wildfires has increased during the past decades (Bodi, 2013). Certini (2013) assumed that cumulatively all of the vegetated land is burned in about 31 years annually affecting 330-430 Mha (over 3% of the Earth's surface) and wide range of land cover types worldwide including forests, peatlands, shrublands and grasslands. Whereas, the fire is identified as an important factor in soil formation, the

  11. Chocho de Santa Catarina Ocotlan, Oaxaca (Chocho of Santa Catarina Ocotlan, Oaxaca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Chocho, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in Santa Catarina Ocotlan, in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling…

  12. Mixteco de Santa Maria Penoles, Oaxaca (Mixtec of Santa Maria Penoles, Oaxaca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Mixtec, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in Santa Maria Penoles in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling of the…

  13. Preliminary results from a survey of U.S. Forest Service wildfire managers' attitudes toward aviation personnel exposure and risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Wibbenmeyer; Michael Hand; David Calkin

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (USFS) has, in recent years, increasingly emphasized the importance of safety to its employees, but wildfire management remains a risky endeavor. While wildfire management decisions affecting safety and exposure of firefighters to the wildland fire environment may be aided by decision support tools such the Wildfire...

  14. Using field data to assess model predictions of surface and ground fuel consumption by wildfire in coniferous forests of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamie Lydersen; Brandon M. Collins; Carol Ewell; Alicia Reiner; Jo Ann Fites; Christopher Dow; Patrick Gonzalez; David Saah; John Battles

    2014-01-01

    Inventories of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from wildfire provide essential information to the state of California, USA, and other governments that have enacted emission reductions. Wildfires can release a substantial amount of GHGs and other compounds to the atmosphere, so recent increases in fire activity may be increasing GHG emissions. Quantifying wildfire...

  15. The influence of incident management teams on the deployment of wildfire suppression resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael Hand; Hari Katuwal; David E. Calkin; Matthew P. Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Despite large commitments of personnel and equipment to wildfire suppression, relatively little is known about the factors that affect how many resources are ordered and assigned to wildfire incidents and the variation in resources across incident management teams (IMTs). Using detailed data on suppression resource assignments for IMTs managing the highest complexity...

  16. Social amplification of wildfire risk: The role of social interactions and information sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah Brenkert-Smith; Katherine L. Dickinson; Patricia A. Champ; Nicholas Flores

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is a persistent and growing threat across much of the western United States. Understanding how people living in fire-prone areas perceive this threat is essential to the design of effective risk management policies. Drawing on the social amplification of risk framework, we develop a conceptual model of wildfire risk perceptions that incorporates the social...

  17. Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

    2011-12-13

    The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

  18. Evaluating the ecological benefits of wildfire by integrating fire and ecosystem simulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Eva Karau

    2010-01-01

    Fire managers are now realizing that wildfires can be beneficial because they can reduce hazardous fuels and restore fire-dominated ecosystems. A software tool that assesses potential beneficial and detrimental ecological effects from wildfire would be helpful to fire management. This paper presents a simulation platform called FLEAT (Fire and Landscape Ecology...

  19. Climate-induced variations in global wildfire danger from 1979 to 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. Matt Jolly; Mark A. Cochrane; Patrick H. Freeborn; Zachary A. Holden; Timothy J. Brown; Grant J. Williamson; David M. J. S. Bowman

    2015-01-01

    Climate strongly influences global wildfire activity, and recent wildfire surges may signal fire weather-induced pyrogeographic shifts. Here we use three daily global climate data sets and three fire danger indices to develop a simple annual metric of fire weather season length, and map spatio-temporal trends from 1979 to 2013. We show that fire weather seasons have...

  20. The economic cost of adverse health effects from wildfire-smoke exposure: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuho Kochi; Geoffrey H. Donovan; Patricia A. Champ; John B. Loomis

    2010-01-01

    The economic costs of adverse health effects associated with exposure to wildfire smoke should be given serious consideration in determining the optimal wildfire management policy. Unfortunately, the literature in this research area is thin. In an effort to better understand the nature of these economic costs, we review and synthesise the relevant literature in three...

  1. The effect of newspaper coverage and political pressure on wildfire suppression costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H Donovan; Jeffrey P Prestemon; Krista Gebert

    2011-01-01

    Controlling wildfire suppression expenditures has become a major public policy concern in the United States. However, most policy remedies have focused on the biophysical determinants of suppression costs: fuel loads and weather, for example. We show that two non-biophysical variables—newspaper coverage and political pressure—have a significant effect on wildfire...

  2. Earth, wind, and fire: Wildfire risk perceptions in a hurricane-prone environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soren M. Newman; Matthew S. Carroll; Pamela J. Jakes; Daniel R. Williams; Lorie L. Higgins

    2014-01-01

    Wildfire is one of several potential disturbances that could have extraordinary impacts on individuals and communities in fire-prone areas. In this article we describe disturbance risk perceptions from interviews with residents in three Florida communities that face significant wildfire and hurricane risk. Although they live in areas characterized by emergency managers...

  3. Post-wildfire seeding in forests of the western United States: An evidence-based review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donna Peppin; Peter Z. Fule; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Jan L. Beyers; Molly E. Hunter

    2010-01-01

    Broadcast seeding is one of the most widely used post-wildfire emergency response treatments intended to reduce soil erosion, increase vegetative ground cover, and minimize establishment and spread of non-native plant species. We conducted an evidence-based review to examine the effectiveness and effects of post-wildfire seeding treatments on soil stabilization, non-...

  4. Effects of wildfire on blue oak in the northern Sacramento Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc Horney; Richard B. Standiford; Douglas McCreary; Jerry Tecklin; Roy Richards

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a technique for rapidly determining the extent of wildfire damage to blue oaks (Quercus douglasii) that would be usable by landowners without requiring extensive training. In late winter 2000, 100 oaks of various sizes and degrees of damage were selected from 10 plots located where wildfires had burned in...

  5. Assessing the Impact of Active Land Management in Mitigating Wildfire Threat to Source Water Supply Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladon, K. D.; Silins, U.; Emelko, M. B.; Flannigan, M.; Dupont, D.; Robinne, F.; Wang, X.; Parisien, M. A.; Stone, M.; Thompson, D. K.; Tymstra, C.; Schroeder, D.; Kienzle, S. W.; Anderson, A.

    2014-12-01

    The vast majority of surface water supplies in Alberta originates in forested regions of the province, and supports approximately 94 municipal utilities, 208 communities, and 67% of the provincial population. These surface water supplies are highly vulnerable to contamination inputs and changing water conditions associated with wildfires. A provincial scale risk analysis framework is being used to investigate the magnitude and likelihood of wildfire occurrence in source water regions to evaluate the potential for altered water quality and quantity. The initial analysis identified which forested regions and which municipal drinking water treatment facilities are most at risk from wildfire. The efficacy of several current and potential landscape treatments to mitigate wildfire threats, along with the likely outcome of these treatments on mitigation of potential impacts of wildfire to drinking water treatment, are being modeled. A Monte Carlo modeling approach incorporating wildfire regime characteristics is used to simulate the ignition and growth of wildfires and generate outcome distributions for the different mitigation strategies. Cumulative changes in water quality at large river basin scales are being modeled and linked to water treatment impacts with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). A critical foundation of this approach is the close interaction of a large, trans-disciplinary team of researchers capable of integrating highly diverse issues of landscape wildfire dynamics, cross-scale water supply issues, and their linkage to downstream risks to drinking water treatment engineering.

  6. A Wildfire-relevant climatology of the convective environment of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian E. Potter; Matthew A. Anaya

    2015-01-01

    Convective instability can influence the behaviour of large wildfires. Because wildfires modify the temperature and moisture of air in their plumes, instability calculations using ambient conditions may not accurately represent convective potential for some fire plumes. This study used the North American Regional Reanalysis to develop a climatology of the convective...

  7. Wildfire hazard mapping: exploring site conditions in eastern US wildland—ruban interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew P. Peters; Louis R. Iverson; Stephen N. Matthews; Anantha M. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Wildfires are a serious threat for land managers and property owners, and over the last few decades this threat has expanded as a result of increased rural development. Most wildfires in the north-eastern US occur in the wildland—urban interface, those regions of intermingling urban and non-developed vegetated lands, where access to firefighting resources can...

  8. Air Quality Deterioration of Urban Areas Caused by Wildfires in a Natural Reservoir Forest of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Carbajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many regions of the world suffer loss of vegetation and reduced air quality due to wildfires. Studies on aerosol emissions by wildfires often discuss the negative effects of atmospheric contaminants from a regional or mesoscale perspective. The occurrence of wildfires reveals that a high percentage takes place close to large urban areas. Very high concentration of pollutants and PM10 particulate matter reach urban zones and millions of inhabitants. These events of high pollutant concentrations are seasonally recurrent. There are many large urban areas in the world that often undergo severe air deterioration due to wildfires smoke. We document the extreme impact of wildfire that occurs in the Protected Area of Flora and Fauna La Primavera located in neighborhood of Guadalajara, a large urban zone in Mexico. The simultaneous emissions of aerosols by 60 wildfires were simulated and compared with observed data. The plume generated by the wildfires reached large areas of the central part of Mexico. The principal characteristics of smog emissions (CO, NO2, and PM10 over the urban area were acceptably reproduced. Observed and modeled CO, PM10, and NO2 data indicated that aerosol plumes generated by the wildfires increased notably the concentrations over the metropolitan zone of Guadalajara.

  9. Addressing Wildfire Risk in Forest Management Planning with Multiple Criteria Decision Making Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susete Marques

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wildfires impact the outcomes of forest management plans. Addressing that impact is thus critical for effective forest ecosystem management planning. This paper presents research on the use of multiple criteria decision making (MCDM methods that integrate wildfire risk in planning contexts characterized by multiple objectives. Specifically, an a posteriori preference modeling approach is developed that adds wildfire criteria to a set of objectives representing ecosystem services supply values. Wildfire risk criteria are derived from stand-level wildfire occurrence and damage models as well as from the characteristics of neighboring stands that may impact wildfire probability and spread. A forested landscape classified into 1976 stands is used for testing purposes. The management planning criteria include the carbon stock, harvest volumes for three forest species, the volume of the ending inventory, and resistance to wildfire risk indicators. Results show the potential of multiple criteria decision making methods to provide information about trade-offs between wildfire risk and the supply of provisioning (timber as well as regulatory (carbon ecosystem services. This information may contribute to the effectiveness of forest ecosystem management planning.

  10. Wildfire and fuel treatment effects on forest carbon dynamics in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph C. Restiano; David L. Peterson

    2013-01-01

    Sequestration of carbon (C) in forests has the potential to mitigate the effects of climate change by offsetting future emissions of greenhouse gases. However, in dry temperate forests, wildfire is a natural disturbance agent with the potential to release large fluxes of C into the atmosphere. Climate-driven increases in wildfire extent and severity arc expected to...

  11. Diversity in forest management to reduce wildfire losses: implications for resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Charnley; Thomas A. Spies; Ana M. G. Barros; Eric M. White; Keith A. Olsen

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates how federal, state, and private corporate forest owners in a fire-prone landscape of southcentral Oregon manage their forests to reduce wildfire hazard and loss to high-severity wildfire. We evaluate the implications of our findings for concepts of social–ecological resilience. Using interview data, we found a high degree of "response...

  12. Repeating Cardiopulmonary Health Effects in Rural North Carolina Population During a Second Large Peat Wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular health effects of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure from wildfire smoke are neither definitive nor consistent with PM2.5 from other air pollution sources. Non-comparability among wildfire health studies limits research conclusions.METHODS:We exam...

  13. Assessing Lebanon's wildfire potential in association with current and future climatic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    George H. Mitri; Mireille G. Jazi; David McWethy

    2015-01-01

    The increasing occurrence and extent of large-scale wildfires in the Mediterranean have been linked to extended periods of warm and dry weather. We set out to assess Lebanon's wildfire potential in association with current and future climatic conditions. The Keetch-Byram Drought Index (KBDI) was the primary climate variable used in our evaluation of climate/fire...

  14. Mateship and the Female Body in Barbara Baynton's “Squeaker's Mate”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Scheidt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2015v68n2p67 “Mateship”, or companionship and loyalty in adverse situations, was a common theme for late 19th century Australian short stories. Women are excluded from the practice of mateship and are not usually the protagonists of these narratives, being either kept in the background as mothers and housewives, or not present at all in the plots.  Going against these stereotypes, in Barbara Baynton’s story “Squeaker’s Mate”, the “mate” is an independent, strong and hard-working woman. Baynton explores the gloomy consequences of this reversal of expected gender roles, especially after an accident leaves the protagonist paralysed and no longer in control of her body. What occurs in “Squeaker’s Mate” is a kind of “anti-mateship”, where irony serves as a device to expose gender relations and the exclusion of women from what is traditionally considered heroic and historical. In “Squeaker’s Mate”, Baynton questioned the adoption of “mateship” as an Australian value more than half a century before that discussion started to draw formal critical attention.

  15. Text as Locus, Inscription as Identity: On Barbara Honigmann's Roman von einem Kinde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn Sibley Fries

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Barbara Honigmann's Roman von einem Kinde (1986 constitutes the author's attempt at narrative self-definition. In this and other regards, it is similar to Christa Wolf's Kindheitsmuster (1976; Patterns of Childhood, 1980 , with which it is briefly compared. Honigmann's slim collection of stories, conceived by her as "sketches for self-portraits and landscapes," depicts the absolute isolation ofthe female Jewish narrator in the GDR and her search for community ( Heimat via language. Simultaneously, it records that narrator's desire to identify "places of transition," "boundaries at which conditions change" without fixing these in a static prison of text. The narrator-mother merges with the child born in the first story as, in the following ones, she comprehends the insignificance of her social (context, finally to simulate her own birth and the envied preverbal infant stage by means of self-expulsion—from the GDR via a "threefold salto mortale into the "Judaism of the Thora" in Strasbourg—into a "foreign language among foreign people." The narrator/author's position at a transitional boundary, underscored by the self-portrait that adorns the book's dust jacket, acknowledges the territory between two illegible texts and her reluctance to sacrifice "true reality" ( wahre Wirklichkeit by transforming "human being" into "text" ( Mensch into Schrift —a reluctance engendered by her meeting with Gershom Scholem in the central story of the volume.

  16. PRECENCIA DE LOS NEGROS EN SANTA MARTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Rey Sinning

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Partimos de señalar que las investigaciones sobre los negros en la Provincia de Santa Marta, son escasas; sin embargo, podemos afirmar que dos trabajos dan cuenta de su presencia en la ciudad y en todo su territorio. El primero, de ellos es la reciente publicación sobre la esclavitud entre los años 1791- 1851, de Dolcey Romero Jaramillo que revisa el papel de los negros en dicha provincia y ciudad. El otro es nuestro estudio sobre 10s negros llegados a Santa Marta desde el Departamento de Bolívar, en la década de los 80 del siglo pasado, titulado "Cristo Rey: Un Espacio para permanecer en el Tiempo". El presente artículo elabora una cronología de la presencia de los negros esclavos que llegaron a Santa Marta desde 1525, año de su fundación. Se señala cómo durante los primeros años se fueron autorizando dos (2 esclavos negros para algunas personas importantes, destinados a1 servicio doméstico. Política que se comienza a modificar a partir de 1535, cuando se le autorizan cien (100 esclavos al Gobernador Pedro Fernández de Lugo, y desde entonces, es importante su presencia en oficios varios, sobre todo en las actividades de las haciendas cercanas a Santa Marta, hasta el siglo XIX. A finales de ese siglo y comienzos del XX, es significativa su vinculación a] muelle -más tarde puerto-, como "muelleros" o "portuarios", asumiendo la responsabilidad de garantizar las actividades de carga y descarga del puerto samario. Igualmente se muestra su papel determinante en la construcción de las líneas férreas que unirían a la ciudad-puerto con la "Zona Bananera". Es para esta última actividad, que se traen negros desde Jamaica conocidos como "yumecas", llamados "yumecas" por los samarios.

  17. 2007款现代Santa Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    现代为了开发新款Santa Fe(圣达菲)投入了1.55亿美元的资金,整个研发过程历时26个月,仅从车身长度看,新车增加了175mm。达到4675mm,同时轴距增加到2700mm。而车宽也增加了45mm,达到1890mm。

  18. Genetic analyses of nickel tolerance in a North American serpentine endemic plant, Caulanthus amplexicaulis var. barbarae (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, A Millie; Hawkins, Angela K; Pepper, Alan E

    2012-11-01

    The evolution of metal tolerance in plants is an important model for studies of adaptation to environment, population genetics, and speciation. Here, we investigated nickel tolerance in the North American serpentine endemic Caulanthus amplexicaulis var. barbarae in comparison with its nonserpentine sister taxon C. amplexicaulis var. amplexicaulis. We hypothesized that the serpentine endemic would have a heritable growth advantage on nickel-containing substrates. We employed an artificial growth assay to quantify biomass accumulation. Study plants were crossed to create an F(2:3) population that was used to determine the heritability of nickel tolerance and to map quantitative trait loci (QTL). Nickel accumulation in both laboratory populations and native specimens was examined using energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The serpentine endemic had a dramatic growth advantage at concentrations of nickel >30 µmol/L. Caulanthus amplexicaulis var. barbarae and its nonserpentine sister taxon both accumulated nickel to substantial levels. Nickel tolerance was highly heritable (h(2) = 0.59) and not associated with accumulation. The QTL analyses identified two major loci for nickel tolerance, on linkage group 2 (LG2) and linkage group 9 (LG9). In our study, nickel tolerance was determined by two major loci with large effects. At both loci, alleles from the serpentine parent conferred positive effects on nickel tolerance, suggesting that they are adaptive in the natural serpentine environment. The mechanism of nickel tolerance in the serpentine plant was not exclusion of nickel. Nickel tolerance may have an inducible component in C. amplexicaulis var. barbarae.

  19. Sources and Implications of Bias and Uncertainty in a Century of US Wildfire Activity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, K.

    2013-12-01

    The statistical analysis of wildfire activity is a critical component of national wildfire planning, operations, and research in the United States (US). Wildfire activity data have been collected in the US for over a century. Yet, to this day, no single unified system of wildfire record-keeping exists. Data for analysis are generally harvested from archival summary reports from federal or interagency fire organizations; incident-level wildfire reporting systems of the federal, state, and local fire services; and, increasingly, remote-sensing programs. It is typical for research into wildfire activity patterns for all or part of the last century to require data from several of these sources and perhaps others. That work is complicated by the disunity of the various datasets and potentially compromised by inherent reporting biases, discussed here. The availability of wildfire records with the information content and geospatial precision generally sought for increasingly popular climatological analyses and the modeling of contemporary wildfire risk is limited to recent decades. We explain how the disunity and idiosyncrasies of US wildfire reporting have largely precluded true interagency, or all-lands, analyses of even recent wildfire activity and hamstrung some early risk modeling efforts. We then describe our efforts to acquire, standardize, error-check, compile, scrub, and evaluate the completeness of US federal, state, and local wildfire records from 1992-2011 for the national interagency Fire Program Analysis (FPA) application. The resulting FPA Fire-Occurrence Database (FPA FOD) includes nearly 1.6 million records from the 20-year period, with values for at least the following core data elements: location at least as precise as a Public Land Survey System section (2.6-km2 grid), discovery date, and final fire size. The FPA FOD is publicly available from the Research Data Archive of the US Department of Agriculture, Forest Service (http://dx.doi.org/10.2737/RDS

  20. Synthesising empirical results to improve predictions of post-wildfire runoff and erosion response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakesby, Richard A.; Moody, John A.; Martin, Deborah A.; Robichaud, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in research into wildfire impacts on runoff and erosion have demonstrated increasing complexity of controlling factors and responses, which, combined with changing fire frequency, present challenges for modellers. We convened a conference attended by experts and practitioners in post-wildfire impacts, meteorology and related research, including modelling, to focus on priority research issues. The aim was to improve our understanding of controls and responses and the predictive capabilities of models. This conference led to the eight selected papers in this special issue. They address aspects of the distinctiveness in the controls and responses among wildfire regions, spatiotemporal rainfall variability, infiltration, runoff connectivity, debris flow formation and modelling applications. Here we summarise key findings from these papers and evaluate their contribution to improving understanding and prediction of post-wildfire runoff and erosion under changes in climate, human intervention and population pressure on wildfire-prone areas.

  1. Re-envisioning community-wildfire relations in the U.S. West as adaptive governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse B. Abrams

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Prompted by a series of increasingly destructive, expensive, and highly visible wildfire crises in human communities across the globe, a robust body of scholarship has emerged to theorize, conceptualize, and measure community-level resilience to wildfires. To date, however, insufficient consideration has been given to wildfire resilience as a process of adaptive governance mediated by institutions at multiple scales. Here we explore the possibilities for addressing this gap through an analysis of wildfire resilience among wildland-urban interface communities in the western region of the United States. We re-engage important but overlooked components of social-ecological system resilience by situating rural communities within their state- to national-level institutional contexts; we then analyze two communities in Nevada and New Mexico in terms of their institutional settings and responses to recent wildfire events. We frame our analysis around the concepts of scale matching, linking within and across scales, and institutional flexibility.

  2. The Human and Physical Determinants of Wildfires and Burnt Areas in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Noam; Tessler, Naama; Smith, Andrew; McAlpine, Clive

    2016-09-01

    Wildfires are expected to increase in Mediterranean landscapes as a result of climate change and changes in land-use practices. In order to advance our understanding of human and physical factors shaping spatial patterns of wildfires in the region, we compared two independently generated datasets of wildfires for Israel that cover approximately the same study period. We generated a site-based dataset containing the location of 10,879 wildfires (1991-2011), and compared it to a dataset of burnt areas derived from MODIS imagery (2000-2011). We hypothesized that the physical and human factors explaining the spatial distribution of burnt areas derived from remote sensing (mostly large fires, >100 ha) will differ from those explaining site-based wildfires recorded by national agencies (mostly small fires, raising public awareness to fire risk are key considerations in reducing fire danger.

  3. 33 CFR 80.1102 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 80.1102 Section 80.1102 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1102 Santa Catalina Island, CA....

  4. 46 CFR 7.115 - Santa Catalina Island, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Santa Catalina Island, CA. 7.115 Section 7.115 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.115 Santa Catalina Island, CA. (a) A line drawn from the northernmost point of Lion Head...

  5. 33 CFR 80.1138 - Santa Cruz Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. 80.1138 Section 80.1138 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1138 Santa Cruz Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  6. Free inside: The Music Class at Santa Ana Jail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Joe

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the workings of the music class at the Santa Ana Jail in Santa Ana, California. It gives us insight into a jail system and a music class focused on helping inmates position themselves to become productive members of society. In this article I examine how the facility encourages inmates' good behaviour and why the music class…

  7. 27 CFR 9.31 - Santa Cruz Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Santa Cruz Mountains. 9.31... Cruz Mountains. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Santa Cruz Mountains.” (b) Approved maps. The 24 approved U.S.G.S. maps for determining the boundaries are 23...

  8. "Santa Maria" forever : Eesti ja Portugali kirjandussuhetest / Toomas Haug

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Haug, Toomas, 1956-

    2012-01-01

    Jaanuaris 1961 Portugali diktaatorlikule režiimile protestiks kaaperdatud laevast "Santa Maria", mis sai omamoodi vabaduse ja vastuhaku sümboliks ka okupeeritud Eestis. Artiklis käsitletakse sellest sündmusest mõjutatud teoseid, täpsemalt Aleksander Suumanni maali "Santa Maria" ja Paul-Eerik Rummo samanimelist luuletust

  9. "Santa Maria" forever : Eesti ja Portugali kirjandussuhetest / Toomas Haug

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Haug, Toomas, 1956-

    2015-01-01

    Jaanuaris 1961 Portugali diktaatorlikule režiimile protestiks kaaperdatud laevast "Santa Maria", mis sai omamoodi vabaduse ja vastuhaku sümboliks ka okupeeritud Eestis. Artiklis käsitletakse sellest sündmusest mõjutatud teoseid, täpsemalt Aleksander Suumanni maali "Santa Maria" ja Paul-Eerik Rummo samanimelist luuletust

  10. 77 FR 39726 - Land Acquisitions: Pueblo of Santa Clara

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs Land Acquisitions: Pueblo of Santa Clara AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs... into trust for the Pueblo of Santa Clara on January 27, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  11. "Santa Maria" forever : Eesti ja Portugali kirjandussuhetest / Toomas Haug

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Haug, Toomas, 1956-

    2012-01-01

    Jaanuaris 1961 Portugali diktaatorlikule režiimile protestiks kaaperdatud laevast "Santa Maria", mis sai omamoodi vabaduse ja vastuhaku sümboliks ka okupeeritud Eestis. Artiklis käsitletakse sellest sündmusest mõjutatud teoseid, täpsemalt Aleksander Suumanni maali "Santa Maria" ja Paul-Eerik Rummo samanimelist luuletust

  12. "Santa Maria" forever : Eesti ja Portugali kirjandussuhetest / Toomas Haug

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Haug, Toomas, 1956-

    2015-01-01

    Jaanuaris 1961 Portugali diktaatorlikule režiimile protestiks kaaperdatud laevast "Santa Maria", mis sai omamoodi vabaduse ja vastuhaku sümboliks ka okupeeritud Eestis. Artiklis käsitletakse sellest sündmusest mõjutatud teoseid, täpsemalt Aleksander Suumanni maali "Santa Maria" ja Paul-Eerik Rummo samanimelist luuletust

  13. Revisiting wildfires at the K-Pg boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joanna; Artemieva, Natalia; Goldin, Tamara

    2013-12-01

    discovery of large amounts of soot in clays deposited at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary and linked to the ~65 Ma Chicxulub impact crater led to the hypothesis that major wildfires were a consequence of the asteroid impact. Subsequently, several lines of evidence, including the lack of charcoal in North American sites, were used to argue against global wildfires. Close to the impact site fires are likely to be directly ignited by the impact fireball, whereas globally they could be ignited by radiation from the reentry of hypervelocity ejecta. To-date, models of the latter have yet to take into account that ejection—and thus the emission of thermal radiation—is asymmetric and dependent on impact angle. Here, we model: (1) the impact and ejection of material, (2) the ballistic continuation of ejecta around a spherical Earth, and (3) the thermal pulse delivered to the Earth's surface when ejecta reenters the atmosphere. We find that thermal pulses in the downrange direction are sufficient to ignite flora several thousand kilometers from Chicxulub, whereas pulses at most sites in the uprange direction are too low to ignite even the most susceptible plant matter. Our analyses and models suggest some fires were ignited by the impact fireball and ejecta reentry, but that the nonuniform distribution of thermal radiation across the surface of the Earth is inconsistent with the ignition of fires globally as a direct and immediate result of the Chicxulub impact. Instead, we propose that the desiccation of flora by ejecta reentry, as well as the effects of postimpact global cooling/darkness, left much of the terrestrial flora prone to fires, and that the volume of soot in the global K-Pg layer is explained by a combination of syn- and postimpact wildfires.

  14. Effects of Metals Associated with Wildfire Ash on Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, J.; Clark, A.; Correa, N.; Ali, A.; Blake, J.; Bixby, R.

    2015-12-01

    The forests of the western United States are impacted dramatically by climate change and have suffered from large-scale increases in wildfire activity. This rise in wildfires introduces additional ash to ecosystems and can represent a serious and ongoing threat to water quality in streams and rivers from storm event runoff in burn areas. The effect of metals associated with wildfire ash (from wood collected from the Valles Caldera National Preserve, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico) on solution pH and dissolved oxygen was assessed through a series of laboratory experiments. Microscopy and spectroscopy analyses were conducted to characterize the elemental content and oxidation state of metals in unreacted and reacted ash. Certain metals (e.g., Ca, K, Al, Mg) were detected in ash from ponderosa pine, one of the dominant species in the Valles Caldera, with mean concentrations ranging from 400-1750 mg kg-1. Other metals (e.g., Na, Fe, Mn, V, Zn, Ni) were present at lower mean concentrations ranging from 12-210 mg kg-1. The initial pH after conducting batch experiments reacting ash with water started at 9.9 and the alkalinity of the water was 110 mg L-1 as CaCO3. Solution pH decreased to 8.0 after 48 hours of reaction, which is almost a delta of two pH units. Dissolved oxygen concentrations decreased by 2 mg L-1 over the course of 12 hours before the rate of reaeration surpassed the rate of consumption. This presentation will discuss how redox-active metals, such as Fe and Mn, could contribute to the increased dissolved oxygen demand and fluctuation of the oxidation/reduction potential in the system.

  15. Quantifying Hillslope to Watershed Erosional Response Following Wildfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, S.; Pierson, F. B.; Williams, C. J.; Brooks, E. S.; Pierce, J. L.; Roehner, C.

    2016-12-01

    The frequency and severity of wildfires is increasing across western US sagebrush steppe rangelands as the result of warming climate conditions and invasive plant species. Following wildfire, the soil surface is left with little vegetation, exposing it to erosion by wind and water. Erosion following wildfires is a concern among land managers due to the threat it poses to resources, infrastructure, and human health. Most post-fire erosion research has used artificial rainfall. This study uses natural rainfall and a network of silt fences to quantify hillslope to watershed scale erosion response following the 2015 Soda Fire that burned 113,300 ha in southwestern Idaho and southeastern Oregon. In this study, we will evaluate the drivers of erosion over multiple spatial scales and assess the recovery of vegetation and soil water repellency for a two year period post-fire. We installed a network of silt fences over long and short hillslope distances and in swales within a 130 ha catchment within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwestern Idaho, USA. The overall study design consists of thirty silt fences spanning north and south facing aspects, an existing weir measuring watershed streamflow and sediment discharge, and two meteorological stations. The erosional response following the fire was mainly driven by wind and snowmelt. The swales produced the most sediment compared to the long and short hillslopes. On the south facing aspect the long and short hillslopes did not produce any sediment whereas on the north facing aspect the swales produced the most sediment. This presentation summarizes these preliminary first year hydrologic and erosion responses. The results provide data for determining the drivers for erosion at different spatial scales, advance understanding of post-fire hillslope to watershed erosional responses, and offer insight into recovery of vegetation and soil water repellency post-fire. This study will aid land management agencies

  16. Weather types and the regime of wildfires in Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, M. G.; Trigo, R. M.; Dacamara, C. C.

    2009-04-01

    An objective classification scheme, as developed by Trigo and DaCamara (2000), was applied to classify the daily atmospheric circulation affecting Portugal between 1980 and 2007 into a set of 10 basic weather types (WTs). The classification scheme relies on a set of atmospheric circulation indices, namely southerly flow (SF), westerly flow (WF), total flow (F), southerly shear vorticity (ZS), westerly shear vorticity (ZW) and total vorticity (Z). The weather-typing approach, together with surfacemeteorological variables (e.g. intensity and direction of geostrophic wind, maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation) were then associated to wildfire events as recorded in the official Portuguese fire database consisting of information on each fire occurred in the 18 districts of Continental Portugal within the same period (>450.000 events). The objective of this study is to explore the dependence of wildfire activity on weather and climate and then evaluate the potential of WTs to discriminate among recorded wildfires on what respects to their occurrence and development. Results show that days characterised by surface flow with an eastern component (i.e. NE, E and SE) account for a high percentage of daily burnt area, as opposed to surface westerly flow (NW, W and SW), which represents about a quarter of the total number of days but only accounts for a very low percentage of active fires and of burnt area. Meteorological variables such as minimum and maximum temperatures, that are closely associated to surface wind intensity and direction, also present a good ability to discriminate between the different types of fire events.. Trigo R.M., DaCamara C. (2000) "Circulation Weather Types and their impact on the precipitation regime in Portugal". Int J of Climatology, 20, 1559-1581.

  17. Particulate Air Pollution from Wildfires in the Western US under Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia Coco; Mickley, Loretta J; Sulprizio, Melissa P; Dominici, Francesca; Yue, Xu; Ebisu, Keita; Anderson, Georgiana Brooke; Khan, Rafi F A; Bravo, Mercedes A; Bell, Michelle L

    2016-10-01

    Wildfire can impose a direct impact on human health under climate change. While the potential impacts of climate change on wildfires and resulting air pollution have been studied, it is not known who will be most affected by the growing threat of wildfires. Identifying communities that will be most affected will inform development of fire management strategies and disaster preparedness programs. We estimate levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) directly attributable to wildfires in 561 western US counties during fire seasons for the present-day (2004-2009) and future (2046-2051), using a fire prediction model and GEOS-Chem, a 3-D global chemical transport model. Future estimates are obtained under a scenario of moderately increasing greenhouse gases by mid-century. We create a new term "Smoke Wave," defined as ≥2 consecutive days with high wildfire-specific PM2.5, to describe episodes of high air pollution from wildfires. We develop an interactive map to demonstrate the counties likely to suffer from future high wildfire pollution events. For 2004-2009, on days exceeding regulatory PM2.5 standards, wildfires contributed an average of 71.3% of total PM2.5. Under future climate change, we estimate that more than 82 million individuals will experience a 57% and 31% increase in the frequency and intensity, respectively, of Smoke Waves. Northern California, Western Oregon and the Great Plains are likely to suffer the highest exposure to widlfire smoke in the future. Results point to the potential health impacts of increasing wildfire activity on large numbers of people in a warming climate and the need to establish or modify US wildfire management and evacuation programs in high-risk regions. The study also adds to the growing literature arguing that extreme events in a changing climate could have significant consequences for human health.

  18. Transboundary Collaborations to Enhance Wildfire Suppression in Protected Areas of the Black Sea Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zaimes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For the most effective and efficient management of certain natural resources (e.g. protected areas and disasters (e.g. wildfires transboundary approaches are needed. In addition in the management of protected areas, the role of wildfire should be incorporated, something that was ignored in the past and led to catastrophic wildfires. The Black Sea is a region that wildfires in the protected areas are expected to increase. This has to do with the abandonment of rural areas and the higher temperatures, especially during summer, due to climate change. Interesting is also the fact that some countries of the region have extensive experience while other do not have neither the experience nor the necessary infrastructures to face large wildfires. A transboundary collaboration would be very beneficial to the countries with limited experiences and capacities to suppress wildfires. The objective of this study is to be proactive by developing innovative tools to help suppress wildfires and enhancing the knowledge on wildfires and protected areas. The innovative tools included 4 different research activities and products. Firstly, an online Digital Geodatabase for the six pilot areas was developed. Next forest fire fuels and maps were developed while a forest fire behavior model was run to create the overall fire risk maps for the pilot areas. To estimate water resources and watershed streamflows the hydrologic model SWAT was validated and calibrated for the pilot areas. The final activities included a multi-criteria decision analysis to select the optimal location of the water reservoirs and the use of spatial analyst to provide the optimal routes to reach reservoirs by the fire vehicles. To enhance the responsible agency personnel along with stakeholders knowledge of the region, a Neighborhood Network with regular quarterly meetings was established. Participants for all six project countries were present in the meetings. Overall, new tool that will enhance

  19. LANDFIRE 2010 - updated data to support wildfire and ecological management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Kurtis J.; Connot, Joel A.; Peterson, Birgit E.; Picotte, Joshua J.

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire is a global phenomenon that affects human populations and ecosystems. Wildfire effects occur at local to global scales impacting many people in different ways (Figure 1). Ecological concerns due to land use, fragmentation, and climate change impact natural resource use, allocation, and conservation. Access to consistent and current environmental data is a constant challenge, yet necessary for understanding the complexities of wildfire and ecological management. Data products and tools from the LANDFIRE Program help decision-makers to clarify problems and identify possible solutions when managing fires and natural resources. LANDFIRE supports the reduction of risk from wildfire to human lives and property, monitoring of fire danger, prediction of fire behavior on active incidents, and assessment of fire severity and impacts on natural systems [1] [2] [3]. LANDFIRE products are unique in that they are nationally consistent and provide the only complete geospatial dataset describing vegetation and wildland fuel information for the entire U.S. As such, LANDFIRE data are useful for many ecological applications [3]. For example, LANDFIRE data were recently integrated into a decision-support system for resource management and conservation decision-making along the Appalachian Trail. LANDFIRE is a joint effort between the U.S. Department of the Interior Office of Wildland Fire, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service Fire & Aviation Management, and The Nature Conservancy. To date, seven versions of LANDFIRE data have been released, with each successive version improving the quality of the data, adding additional features, and/or updating the time period represented by the data. The latest version, LANDFIRE 2010 (LF 2010), released mid-2013, represents circa 2010 landscape conditions and succeeds LANDFIRE 2008 (LF 2008), which represented circa 2008 landscape conditions. LF 2010 used many of the same processes developed for the LF 2008 effort [3]. Ongoing

  20. Hydrological and sediment connectivity in areas affected by wildfires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Murillo, Juan F.; Ruiz-Sinoga, José D.

    2016-04-01

    This study deals with the hydrological and sediment connectivity (HSC) process in burned areas, from detailed to wider spatial scales: -First of all, it is presented a brief review and analysis of meta-data, already published. -Secondly, some examples of HSC are shown from areas affected by wildfires in South of Spain. -Finally, it is an attempt of applying some indexes of hydrological connectivity to those areas. The study try to shed light on this complex process of connectivity from the hydrological and sedimentary point of view, a kew issue to improve the management of burned areas.