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Sample records for sanguinicola infection clinical

  1. Six cases of Aerococcus sanguinicola infection: Clinical relevance and bacterial identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibler, K.; Jensen, K.T.; Ostergaard, C.

    2008-01-01

    were associated with infective endocarditis. Most patients were elderly (median age 70 y) and had underlying neurological disorders including dementia, cerebral degeneration, and myelomeningocele. The primary focus of infection was the urinary tract in 3 cases and the gallbladder in 1; no focus...

  2. Genomic characterization, phylogenetic analysis, and identification of virulence factors in Aerococcus sanguinicola and Aerococcus urinae strains isolated from infection episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carkaci, Derya; Højholt, Katrine; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen

    2017-01-01

    Aerococcus sanguinicola and Aerococcus urinae are emerging pathogens in clinical settings mostly being causative agents of urinary tract infections (UTIs), urogenic sepsis and more seldomly complicated infective endocarditis (IE). Limited knowledge exists concerning the pathogenicity of these two...... species. Eight clinical A. sanguinicola (isolated from 2009 to 2015) and 40 clinical A. urinae (isolated from 1984 to 2015) strains from episodes of UTIs, bacteremia, and IE were whole-genome sequenced (WGS) to analyze genomic diversity and characterization of virulence genes involved in the bacterial....... In conclusion, this is the first study dealing with WGS and comparative genomics of clinical A. sanguinicola and A. urinae strains from episodes of UTIs, bacteremia, and IE. Gene homologs associated with antiphagocytosis and bacterial adherence were identified and genetic variability was observed within A...

  3. Sanguinicola platyrhynchi n. sp. (Digenea: Sanguinicolidae parasite of visceral cavity of Hemisorubim platyrhynchos (Valenciennes, 1840 (Pisces: Pimelodidae from the floodplain of the upper Paraná River, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUIDELLI G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A new species is of the genus Sanguinicola Plehn, 1905 described, Sanguinicola platyrhynchi n. sp., digenetic parasite of visceral cavity of Hemisorubim platyrhynchos (Valenciennes, 1840 from the floodplain of the upper Paraná River, Brazil. The species has been thus included because of the presence of separate dorsal genital pores, while differing from other species of the same genus mainly in digestive apparatus features, genital pore position, and infection site. Emendation of generic diagnosis is included.

  4. Clinical and microbiological features of infective endocarditis caused by aerococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunnerhagen, Torgny; Nilson, Bo; Olaison, Lars; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2016-04-01

    To define the clinical presentation of aerococcal infective endocarditis (IE) and the prevalence of synergy between penicillin and gentamicin on aerococcal isolates. Cases of aerococcal IE between 2002 and 2014 were identified in the Swedish Registry of Infective Endocarditis (SRIE). MALDI-TOF MS was used to confirm species determination. The medical records were analysed and compared to cases reported to the SRIE caused by other pathogens. Sixteen cases of aerococcal IE, fourteen with Aerococcus urinae and two with Aerococcus sanguinicola, were confirmed. Etest-based methods and time-kill experiments suggested synergy between penicillin and gentamicin towards seven of fifteen isolates. The patients with aerococcal IE were significantly older than those with streptococci or Staphylococcus aureus IE. Most of the patients had underlying urinary tract diseases or symptoms suggesting a urinary tract focus of the infection. Seven patients with aerococcal IE presented with severe sepsis but ICU treatment was needed only in one patient and there was no fatality. Valve exchange surgery was needed in four patients and embolization was seen in three patients. This report is the largest on aerococcal IE and suggests that the prognosis is relatively favourable despite the fact that the patients are old and have significant comorbidities.

  5. Trichinella infection and clinical disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Meyer, C N; Krantz, T

    1996-01-01

    Trichinellosis is caused by ingestion of insufficiently cooked meat contaminated with infective larvae of Trichinella species. The clinical course is highly variable, ranging from no apparent infection to severe and even fatal disease. We report two illustrative cases of trichinellosis. Returning....... Life-threatening cardiopulmonary, renal and central nervous system complications developed. The patient recovered after several months. Her husband, who also ate the pork, did not have clinical symptoms, but an increased eosinophil count and a single larva in a muscle biopsy confirmed infection....... The epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of trichinellosis are reviewed....

  6. Periprosthetic Joint Infections: Clinical and Bench Research

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    Laurence Legout

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication with high morbidity and substantial cost. The incidence is low but probably underestimated. Despite a significant basic and clinical research in this field, many questions concerning the definition of prosthetic infection as well the diagnosis and the management of these infections remained unanswered. We review the current literature about the new diagnostic methods, the management and the prevention of prosthetic joint infections.

  7. HIV Infection: The Clinical Picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Robert R.; Burke, Donald S.

    1988-01-01

    Reports on the human immunodeficiency virus which causes disease that culminates in the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). States that the key to prolonging life and health is early detection of the infection which usually occurs years before symptoms emerge. (RT)

  8. Clinical features of anaerobic orthopaedic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Dan; Kressmann, Benjamin; Gjoni, Shpresa; Zenelaj, Besa; Grosgurin, Olivier; Marti, Christophe; Zingg, Matthieu; Uçkay, Ilker

    2017-02-01

    Some patient populations and types of orthopaedic surgery could be at particular risk for anaerobic infections. In this retrospective cohort study of operated adult patients with infections from 2004 to 2014, we assessed obligate anaerobes and considered first clinical infection episodes. Anaerobes, isolated from intra-operative samples, were identified in 2.4% of 2740 surgical procedures, of which half (33/65; 51%) were anaerobic monomicrobial infections. Propionibacterium acnes, a penicillin and vancomycin susceptible pathogen, was the predominantly isolated anaerobe. By multivariate analysis, the presence of fracture fixation plates was the variable most strongly associated with anaerobic infection (odds ratio: 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3-3.5). Anaerobes were also associated with spondylodesis and polymicrobial infections. In contrast, it revealed less likely in native bone or prosthetic joint infections and was not related to prior antibiotic use. In conclusion, obligate anaerobes in our case series of orthopaedic infections were rare, and mostly encountered in infections related to trauma with open-fracture fixation devices rather than clean surgical site infection. Anaerobes were often co-pathogens, and cultures most frequently recovered P. acnes. These observations thus do not support changes in current practices such as broader anaerobe coverage for perioperative prophylaxis.

  9. Clinical profile of HIV infection

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    Khopkar Uday

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV seropositivity rate of 14 percent was observed amongst STD cases. Heterosexual contact with prostitutes was the main risk factor. Fever, anorexia, weight loss, lymphadenopathy and tuberculosis were useful clinical leads. Genital ulcers, especially chancroid, were common in seropositivies. Alopecia of unknown cause, atypical pyoderma, seborrhea, zoster, eruptive mollusca and sulfa-induced erythema multiforme were viewed with suspicion in high risk groups. Purpura fulminans, fulminant chancroid, vegetating pyoderma and angioedema with purpura were unique features noted in this study.

  10. Intracranial Infections: Clinical and Imaging Characteristics

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    Foerster, B.R.; Thurnher, M.M.; Malani, P.N.; Petrou, M.; Carets-Zumelzu, F.; Sundgren, P.C. [Dept. of Radiology, and Divisions of Infectious Diseases and G eriatric Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The radiologist plays a crucial role in identifying and narrowing the differential diagnosis of intracranial infections. A thorough understanding of the intracranial compartment anatomy and characteristic imaging findings of specific pathogens, as well incorporation of the clinical information, is essential to establish correct diagnosis. Specific types of infections have certain propensities for different anatomical regions within the brain. In addition, the imaging findings must be placed in the context of the clinical setting, particularly in immunocompromised and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. This paper describes and depicts infections within the different compartments of the brain. Pathology-proven infectious cases are presented in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, with a discussion of the characteristic findings of each pathogen. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) characteristics for several infections are also discussed.

  11. Clinical proteomic analysis of scrub typhus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Edmond Changkyun; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Hayoung; Song, Hyun Seok; Jun, Sangmi; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Lee, Chang-Seop; Kim, Seung Il

    2018-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an acute and febrile infectious disease caused by the Gram-negative α-proteobacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi from the family Rickettsiaceae that is widely distributed in Northern, Southern and Eastern Asia. In the present study, we analysed the serum proteome of scrub typhus patients to investigate specific clinical protein patterns in an attempt to explain pathophysiology and discover potential biomarkers of infection. Serum samples were collected from three patients (before and after treatment with antibiotics) and three healthy subjects. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed to identify differentially abundant proteins using quantitative proteomic approaches. Bioinformatic analysis was then performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Proteomic analysis identified 236 serum proteins, of which 32 were differentially expressed in normal subjects, naive scrub typhus patients and patients treated with antibiotics. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of the identified proteins revealed up-regulation of proteins involved in immune responses, especially complement system, following infection with O. tsutsugamushi , and normal expression was largely rescued by antibiotic treatment. This is the first proteomic study of clinical serum samples from scrub typhus patients. Proteomic analysis identified changes in protein expression upon infection with O. tsutsugamushi and following antibiotic treatment. Our results provide valuable information for further investigation of scrub typhus therapy and diagnosis.

  12. [Streptococcus suis infection--clinical manifestations].

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    Dragojlović, Julijana; Milosević, Branko; Sasić, Neda; Pelemis, Mijomir; Sasić, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a bacterium causing a disease in pigs and rarely in humans. This zoonosis is mostly found as a sporadic disease in individuals that were in contact with the affected or infected pigs: farmers, veterinarians and workers engaged in fresh pork processing. It is assumed that the bacterium enters the body through a cut abrasion in the skin. Initially, the condition resembles a flu, followed by signs of bacteriemia and sepsis. The most frequent clinical manifestation of Streptococcus suis infection is meningitis, leading to hearing loss in over 75% of patients, and subsequent arthritis, endophtalmitis, endocarditis and pneumonia. Toxic shock syndrome with hemorhagic manifestations rarely develops. This study included five male patients aged 22 to 63 years treated in the Intensive Care Unit of the Institute of Infectious and Tropical Diseases in Belgrade, due to Streptococcus suis infection. The aim of this study was to point to the existence of this bacteria in our environment, to describe clinical manifestations of the disease and to point out the importance of its prevention. All patients had epidemiological evidence of being in contact with pork meat. There were no data about diseased pigs. The estimated incubation period was 4 to 8 days. All patients had meningeal signs. Clinical symptoms included shivering, fever, vomiting, headache, malaise, vertigo and tinitus. Three patients presented with alerterd level of awarrness. Four patients developed very severe bilateral hearing impairment, whereas one endophtalmtis and one developed endocarditis. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was opalescent in four patients, and only one patient presented with clear CSF. CSF examination showed typical changes characteristic for bacterial meningitis. Streptoccocus suis was isolated in CSF in all patients, and in one patient the bacteria was isolated in blood as well. All patients underwent treatement with II and III generation cephalosporins and one with one

  13. Clinical Patterns of Candida Infections in Bombay

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    J Pratiba Dalal

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred consecutive cases of candidiasis in Bombay were studied. In each case the suspicion was confirmed by isolation typing of the Candida species. The clinical was as follows: vulvo-vaginitis 30%; intertrigo 18%; onychia and paronychia 12%; thrush 16%; generalised cutaneous candidasis 8%, enteritis 3%; bronchitis 12% and urinary tract infection 1%. When compared to a study carried out in Bombay in 1966, there was an increase in the frequency of disseminated cutaneous candidiasis and a reduction in the cases of intertrigo and onychia and paronychia.

  14. [Clinical evaluation of flomoxef in neonatal infections].

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    Okura, K; Yamakawa, M; Kuroki, S; Haruta, T; Kobayashi, Y

    1991-11-01

    Serum concentrations, urinary excretion and clinical responses of flomoxef (FMOX) were studied. The results are summarized as follows. 1. Serum concentrations of FMOX were 17.4 micrograms/ml 1-hour after intravenous injection on the average in 5 cases who received approximately 10 mg/kg, 41.8 micrograms/ml in 2 cases given 20 mg/kg, and 69.6 micrograms/ml in 2 cases given 40 mg/kg, indicating that serum concentrations of FMOX changed in a dose-dependent manner in this range. Average serum half-life (T 1/2) in 4 mature babies was 2.48 hours and that in 6 premature babies was 3.17 hours, indicating that elimination rates in premature cases tend to be slower than those in mature cases. Urinary recovery rates averaged 39.2% in the first 6 hours in 5 cases examined. 2. Five newborns or premature babies received FMOX 33.1-80.2 mg/kg (b.i.d. or t.i.d.) via intravenous route for 5 to 8 days. FMOX showed excellent or good clinical effectiveness in the treatment of all patients including 1 case each of sepsis with urinary infection, furunclal otitis, impetigo, uterogenic fetus infection and urinary infection. Bacteriological responses were also studied, and eradication of identified organisms (Escherichia coli 3 strains and Staphylococcus aureus 2 strains) was obtained upon the FMOX treatment, but in 1 strain of S. aureus showed only a decrease. No adverse reactions were observed in any cases, but a slight elevation of eosinophil was noted in 1 patient receiving a dose of 210 mg a day. From the results obtained in these tests, FMOX appears to be very usefull and safe for the treatment of some infectious diseases in neonates.

  15. Clinical and microbiological findings of infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancan Gursul, Nur; Vardar, Ilknur; Demirdal, Tuna; Gursul, Erdal; Ural, Serap; Yesil, Murat

    2016-05-31

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infection that develops on the endothelial surface of the heart. Endocarditis is a major problem for the clinicians despite of the developments in diagnostic, surgical, and medical treatment methods. In this study, we aimed to evaluate symptoms, laboratory findings, treatment options, and clinical endpoint of the patients who were diagnosed with IE in a tertiary healthcare organization according to the literature data. Between January 2006 and March 2013, 80 IE patients who were diagnosed and treated in accordance with modified Duke criteria were enrolled in the study. Demographic features, symptoms, and laboratory and echocardiographic findings were recorded after reviewing the patient files. The mean age of the patients was 51.3 ± 16.0, and IE was more common in men (n = 56; 70%). Of 41 patients who had positive blood cultures, 20 patients had Staphylococcus spp. (48.7%) and 8 patients had Streptococcus spp. (19.5%). Brucella spp. was isolated from 5 patients (12.2%). While 48.7% (n = 39) of the patients had cardiac complications, 22 patients (27.5%) had embolic complication. Hospital mortality was observed in 20 patients (15%). In our patients, endocarditis was seen at a young age, and staphylococci were the most frequently isolated microorganism from blood culture. There were more patients with Brucella endocarditis compared to the general population. Complications are frequently seen in the course of endocarditis, and they cause problems for the clinicians during follow ups due to the high mortality rate of IE.

  16. Respiratory viral infections in infants with clinically suspected pertussis

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    Angela E. Ferronato

    2013-11-01

    Conclusion: the results suggest that viral infection can be present in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and etiological tests may enable a reduction in the use of macrolides in some cases. However, the etiological diagnosis of respiratory virus infection, by itself, does not exclude the possibility of infection with BP.

  17. Symptomatic HIV infection in infancy - clinical and laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in infancy - clinical and laboratory markers of infection. M P Meyer, Z Latief, C Haworlh, 5 Salie,. A van Dyk. Objective. To investigate the usefulness of immunological tests in the diagnosis of HIV infection in young symptomatic children « 15 months of age). Design. Tests were evaluated in HIV-infected (HIV antibody- and ...

  18. Clinical studies on hepatitis B, C, and E virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. This thesis describes clinical aspects of hepatitis B, C, and E virus infection. Part I focuses on hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This part describes immune responses of patients with acute HBV-infection,

  19. SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS: PREVALENCE, CLINICAL FEATURES

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    O N Egorova

    2008-12-01

    Subjects and methods. Sixty-seven patients with a 1-to-7 history of SLE who received first-line therapy were examined. Results. The analysis of the history data and the results of a serological survey identified 3 groups of patients: 1 35 patients with viral infection, of them 9 had mixed viral-and-bacterial infections; 2 14 with bacterial infections and 3 18 patients without viral-and-bacterial complications. The analysis of clinical symptoms established a correlation of high titers of antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV with symptoms, such as fever, arthritis, lymphadenopathy, carditis, hepatomegaly and erythema migrans eruption. However, having the similar clinical manifestations, CMV and EBV infections had some organ specificity. In SLE, concomitant comorbid infection, viral infection in particular, contributed to the development of the clinical picture polymorphism with the protracted, remitting inflammatory process and the inadequate efficiency of glucocorticoid and immunosuppressive therapy.

  20. Clinical analysis of deep neck space infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Atsushi; Ui, Naoya; Shigeta, Yasushi; Iimura, Jiro; Rikitake, Masahiro; Endo, Tomonori; Kimura, Akihiro

    2009-01-01

    Deep neck space infections, which affect soft tissues and fascial compartments of the head and neck, can lead to lethal complications unless treated carefully and quickly, even with the advanced antibiotics available. We reviewed our seventeen patients with deep neck abscesses, analyzed their location by reviewing CT images, and discussed the treatment. Deep neck space infections were classified according to the degree of diffusion of infection diagnosed by CT images. Neck space infection in two cases was localized to the upper neck space above the hyoid bone (Stage I). Neck space infection in 12 cases extended to the lower neck space (Stage II), and further extended to the mediastinum in one case (Stage III). The two cases of Stage I and the four cases of Stage II were managed with incision and drainage through a submental approach. The seven cases of Stage II were managed with incision and drainage parallel to the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, the ''Dean'' approach. The one case of Stage III received treatment through transcervicotomy and anterior mediastinal drainage through a subxiphodal incision. The parapharyngeal space played an important role in that the inflammatory change can spread to the neck space inferiorly. The anterior cervical space in the infrahyoid neck was important for mediastinal extension of parapharyngeal abscesses. It is important to diagnose deep neck space infections promptly and treat them adequately, and contrast-enhanced CT is useful and indispensable for diagnosis. The point is which kind of drainage has to be performed. If the surgical method of drainage is chosen according to the level of involvement in the neck space and mediastinum, excellent results may be obtained in terms of survival and morbidity. (author)

  1. Infections in orthopaedic surgery : clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogely, Henri Charles

    2000-01-01

    The diagnostic difficulties, variability in outcome and the heterogeinity of the problem of orthopaedic infections stimulated the author to a study of the literature, and several clinical and experimental studies. The diagnosis prosthesis-related infection can only be reached with an acceptable

  2. HIV INFECTION AND THE KIDNEY CLINICAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-04-04

    Apr 4, 2008 ... The causes of ARF in hospitalised HIV-infected patients may ... this group is divided into the 'classic' HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) with focal ... commonly dehydration), sepsis, liver failure, heart failure, pancreatitis, non- ... Adrenal insufficiency, acute or chronic kidney disease with tubular damage, ...

  3. Clinical Manifestations of Campylobacter concisus Infection in Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Linde; Engberg, Jørgen; Ejlertsen, Tove

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: There is only sparse information about the clinical impact of Campylobacter concisus infections in children. METHODS:: A study was performed during a two-year period to determine the clinical manifestations in C. concisus positive children with gastroenteritis. A case patient...... for more than two weeks and two-thirds of all children with C. concisus reported loose stools after six month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS:: Campylobacter concisus infection in children seems to have a milder course of acute gastroenteritis compared with C. jejuni/coli infection, but is associated with more...

  4. Classical clinical signs in rats experimemtally infected with Trypanosoma brucei

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    Nwoha Rosemary Ijeoma Ogechi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate clinical signs in Trypanosoma brucei infection in albino rats. Methods: Fourteen rats grouped into 2 with 7 rats in each group were used to determine classical clinical manifestation of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats. Group A rats were uninfected control and Group B rats were infected with Trypanosoma brucei. Results: Parasitaemia was recorded in Group B by (3.86±0.34 d and the peak of parasitaemia was observed at Day 5 post infection. Classical signs observed included squint eyes, raised whiskers, lethargy, no weight loss, pyrexia, isolation from the other rats, and starry hair coat. Conclusions: These signs could be diagnostic or aid in diagnosis of Trypanosoma brucei infection in rats.

  5. Exploring the context for effective clinical governance in infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halton, Kate; Hall, Lisa; Gardner, Anne; MacBeth, Deborough; Mitchell, Brett G

    2017-03-01

    Effective clinical governance is necessary to support improvements in infection control. Historically, the focus has been on ensuring that infection control practice and policy is based on evidence, and that there is use of surveillance and auditing for self-regulation and performance feedback. There has been less exploration of how contextual and organizational factors mediate an infection preventionists (IP's) ability to engage with evidence-based practice and enact good clinical governance. A cross sectional Web-based survey of IPs in Australia and New Zealand was undertaken. Questions focused on engagement in evidence-based practice and perceptions about the context, culture, and leadership within the infection control team and organization. Responses were mapped against dimensions of Scally and Donaldson's clinical governance framework. Three hundred surveys were returned. IPs appear well equipped at an individual level to undertake evidence-based practice. The most serious set of perceived challenges to good clinical governance related to a lack of leadership or active resistance to infection control within the organization. Additional challenges included lack of information technology solutions and poor access to specialist expertise and financial resources. Focusing on strengthening contextual factors at the organizational level that otherwise undermine capacity to implement evidence-based practice is key to sustaining current infection control successes and promoting further practice improvements. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical features and pathobiology of Ebolavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Aftab A

    2014-12-01

    There has clearly been a deluge of international press coverage of the recent outbreak of Ebolavirus in Africa and is partly related to the "fear factor" that comes across when one is confronted with the fact that once infected, not only is the speed of death in a majority of cases rapid but also the images of the cause of death such as bleeding from various orifices gruesome and frightening. The fact that it leads to infection and death of health care providers (10% during the current epidemic) and the visualization of protective gear worn by these individuals to contain such infection adds to this "fear factor". Finally, there is a clear perceived notion that such an agent can be utilized as a bioterrorism agent that adds to the apprehension. Thus, in efforts to gain an objective view of the growing threat Ebolavirus poses to the general public, it is important to provide some basic understanding for the lethality of Ebolavirus infection that is highlighted in Fig. 1. This virus infection first appears to disable the immune system (the very system needed to fight the infection) and subsequently disables the vascular system that leads to blood leakage (hemorrhage), hypotension, drop in blood pressure, followed by shock and death. The virus appears to sequentially infect dendritic cells disabling the interferon system (one of the major host anti-viral immune systems) then macrophages (that trigger the formation of blood clots, release of inflammatory proteins and nitric oxide damaging the lining of blood vessels leading to blood leakage) and finally endothelial cells that contribute to blood leakage. The virus also affects organs such as the liver (that dysregulates the formation of coagulation proteins), the adrenal gland (that destroys the ability of the patient to synthesize steroids and leads to circulation failure and disabling of regulators of blood pressure) and the gastro-intestinal tract (leading to diarrhea). The ability of the virus to disable such major

  7. Chalmydia trachomatis infection among asymptomatic males in an infertility clinic

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    Mania - Pramanik J

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis can lead to a variety of complications including tubal infertility. Similarly asymptomatic infection in male partner can also hinder conception. The prevalence of this infection among the infertile female in the Institute′s Infertility Clinic was observed to be 34%. Hence the present study was undertaken to find out these infection among the asymptomatic male partners of these infected women. Fifteen asymptomatic males who were not treated with any antibiotics in recent past were enrolled. First voided urine, semen and blood were collected from each individual for diagnosis of this infection. Chlamydia antigen was detected in 33.3% while Chlamydia antibody was detected in seven (46.7% of these cases. Of these seven, three cases were positive for antigen. This preliminary observation suggests that amongst the infertile couple a sizable percentage (60% of asymptomatic male partners remain infected with Chlamydia trachomatis.

  8. [Critical role of clinical laboratories in hospital infection control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    The hospital infection control and prevention is recognized to be more and more important according to the advances in modern medical treatment and care. Clinical microbiology laboratory play critical roles in the hospital infection control as a member of infection control team (ICT). They are the first in a hospital to identify outbreak of MRSA in NICU and molecular epidemiological analysis of the isolates lead proper intervention of ICT to the concerned ward. From a viewpoint of infectious disease specialist, rapid and precise microbiological information is essential for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Each medical technologist need to make efforts to understand the characteristics of the examinations for infectious diseases and send out information useful for clinical practices. In our hospital, with the participation of all members of medical technologists, rapid reporting system was developed for blood culture examinations, which greatly contribute to the appropriate treatment of bloodstream infections. Collaborations of clinical microbiology laboratory with other members of ICT realize high quality hospital infection control. They also need to be aware of themselves as good practitioners of infection control measures to prevent hospital infections.

  9. Diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Schor, Nestor

    2003-01-01

    A review about recent aspects on diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection (UTI) is presented. There is a wide variation in clinical presentation of UTI which include different forms as cystitis, pyelonephritis, urethral syndrome and the clinical relevance of asymptomatic bacteriuria and low-count bacteriuria that must be distinguished from contamination. Pathogenetic aspects concerning bacterial virulence as well as host factors in susceptibility to UTI as urinary tract ob...

  10. Aerococcus urinae and Aerococcus sanguinicola

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carkaci, Derya; Nielsen, Xiaohui C.; Fuursted, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    , cefotaxime, meropenem, vancomycin, linezolid, and rifampicin. Methods: Three susceptibility testing methods were used; disk diffusion according to The European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) standardized disk diffusion methodology and MIC determination with Etest and broth...... were found susceptible to all six antimicrobial agents: penicillin, cefotaxime, meropenem, vancomycin, linezolid, and rifampicin....

  11. What Makes Oral Candidiasis Recurrent Infection? A Clinical View

    OpenAIRE

    Azmi M. G. Darwazeh; Tamer A. Darwazeh

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oral Candida infection (candidiasis) is one of the common oral mucosal infections, and its management is usually frustrating due to either treatment failure or recurrence. Historically, oral candidiasis has been branded as disease of diseased. The unsuccessful management of oral candidiasis can due to either incorrect diagnosis, failure to identify (or correct) the underlying predisposing factor(s), or inaccurate prescription of antifungal agents. Failure to properly treat oral ca...

  12. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Chronic Infections and Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Joav

    2005-01-01

    The consciousness-based (holistic) medical toolbox might be useful in general practice and in cases of recurrent infections and chronic infection or inflammation. From our clinical experiences, there is hope for improvement from a number of diseases caused by disorders affecting the regulation of the immune system when the physician includes the holistic medical approach.Our scientific understanding of the connection between consciousness and cellular order is still limited. Consciousness-bas...

  13. Periprosthetic joint infections: a clinical practice algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Luigi; Indelli, Pier Francesco; Latella, Leonardo; Poli, Paolo; Yakupoglu, Jale; Marcucci, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) accounts for 25% of failed total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) and 15% of failed total hip arthroplasties (THAs). The purpose of the present study was to design a multidisciplinary diagnostic algorithm to detect a PJI as cause of a painful TKA or THA. from April 2010 to October 2012, 111 patients with suspected PJI were evaluated. The study group comprised 75 females and 36 males with an average age of 71 years (range, 48 to 94 years). Eighty-four patients had a painful THA, while 27 reported a painful TKA. The stepwise diagnostic algorithm, applied in all the patients, included: measurement of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels; imaging studies, including standard radiological examination, standard technetium-99m-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scan (if positive, confirmation by LeukoScan was obtained); and joint aspiration with analysis of synovial fluid. following application of the stepwise diagnostic algorithm, 24 out of our 111 screened patients were classified as having a suspected PJI (21.7%). CRP and ESR levels were negative in 84 and positive in 17 cases; 93.7% of the patients had a positive technetium-labeled bone scan, and 23% a positive LeukoScan. Preoperative synovial fluid analysis was positive in 13.5%; analysis of synovial fluid obtained by preoperative aspiration showed a leucocyte count of > 3000 cells μ/l in 52% of the patients. the present study showed that the diagnosis of PJI requires the application of a multimodal diagnostic protocol in order to avoid complications related to surgical revision of a misdiagnosed "silent" PJI. Level IV, therapeutic case series.

  14. Respiratory viral infections in infants with clinically suspected pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferronato, Angela E; Gilio, Alfredo E; Vieira, Sandra E

    2013-01-01

    to evaluate the frequency of respiratory viral infections in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and to analyze their characteristics at hospital admission and clinical outcomes. a historical cohort study was performed in a reference service for pertussis, in which the research of respiratory viruses was also a routine for infants hospitalized with respiratory problems. All infants reported as suspected cases of pertussis were included. Tests for Bordetella pertussis (BP) (polymerase chain reaction/culture) and for respiratory viruses (RVs) (immunofluorescence) were performed. Patients who received macrolides before hospitalization were excluded. Clinical data were obtained from medical records. Among the 67 patients studied, BP tests were positive in 44%, and 26% were positive for RV. There was no etiological identification in 35%, and RV combined with BP was identified in 5%. All patients had similar demographic characteristics. Cough followed by inspiratory stridor or cyanosis was a strong predictor of pertussis, as well as prominent leukocytosis and lymphocytosis. Rhinorrhea and dyspnea were more frequent in viral infections. Macrolides were discontinued in 40% of patients who tested positive for RV and negative for BP. the results suggest that viral infection can be present in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and etiological tests may enable a reduction in the use of macrolides in some cases. However, the etiological diagnosis of respiratory virus infection, by itself, does not exclude the possibility of infection with BP. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Changing clinical scenario in Chandipura virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A B Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    Phlebotomine sandflies are implicated as vectors due to their predominance in endemic areas, repeated virus isolations and their ability to transmit the virus by transovarial and venereal routes. Significant contributions have been made in the development of diagnostics and prophylactics, vaccines and antivirals. Two candidate vaccines, viz. a recombinant vaccine and a killed vaccine and siRNAs targeting P and M proteins have been developed and are awaiting clinical trials. Rhabdomyosarcoma and Phlebotomus papatasi cell lines as well as embryonated chicken eggs have been found useful in virus isolation and propagation. Despite these advancements, CHPV has been a major concern in Central India and warrants immediate attention from virologists, neurologists, paediatricians and the government for containing the virus.

  16. [Clinical studies on flomoxef in the perinatal period infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimura, T; Morisaki, N; Funayama, T

    1991-06-01

    We conducted clinical efficacy and safety tests of flomoxef (FMOX, 6315-S) in the perinatal infections and obtained the following results. 1. A total of 25 patients was treated: 16 patients with intrauterine infections, 2 patients with pelvioperitonitis, 4 patients with urinary tract infections and 3 patients with other infections. FMOX was injected at a daily dose of 2-4 g for 3-15 days (6-60 g for total dose) by intravenous drip infusion, intravenous injection or their combination. 2. The clinical efficacy rate was 96.0% of 25 patients: excellent in 4 cases (16.0%), good in 20 cases (80.0%) and poor in 1 case (4.0%). Bacteriological effects obtained were: eradicated in 14/16 cases (87.5%) replaced in 3 cases. 3. There were no subjective or objective side effects, nor were any abnormal laboratory test values attributable to the drug. From these findings, we consider that FMOX treatment appears to obtain good clinical and bacteriological responses and in safe in perinatal period infections.

  17. [Clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis and its mixed infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ai-Ping; Xue, Feng-Xia

    2010-12-01

    To investigate clinical characteristics of aerobic vaginitis (AV) and its mixed infections for diagnosis efficiently. From April 2008 to December 2008, 516 patients with vaginitis treated in Tianjin Medical University General Hospital were enrolled in this study. AV, bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), trichomonal vaginitis (TV), and cytolytic vaginosis (CV) were diagnosed based on symptoms, sign and vaginal discharge examination. Among 516 cases, AV cases were found in 14.7% (76/516), and AV was common vaginal infection. AV mixed infections was diagnosed in 58% (44/76), including mixed with BV (45%, 20/44), mixed with VVC (30%, 13/44), and mixed with TV (25%, 11/44). Those common symptom of AV were yellow vaginal discharge (63%, 20/32), more vaginal discharge (44%, 14/32). Vaginal pH value was usually more than 4.5 (84%, 27/32). Vaginal cleanliness mainly was grade III - IV (88%, 28/32). Six cases with enterococcus faecium and 4 cases with streptococci were frequently isolated. The symptom and sign of mixed AV infection was atypical. Aerobic vaginitis is a common lower vaginal infection and easily mixed with other pathogens, especially with BV, VVC or TV. When patients were diagnosed with AV or other vaginal infection, it should be mentioned whether those patients have mixed vaginal infection or AV.

  18. Clinical and radiographic findings of focally infected polycystic kidneys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothermel, F.J.; Miller, F.J. Jr.; Sanford, E.; Drago, J.; Rohner, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    Three patients with localized polycystic kidney infections are presented with the pertinent clinical, laboratory, and radiographic findings. Gallium-67 citrate and angiography play an important role in evaluation of these patients. Angiography in particular is valuable in the diagnosis and the exact localization of the inflammatory disease. Localization is extremely important in planning surgical treatment should conservative therapy fail

  19. (HIV) INFECTION AMONG ANTENATAL CLINIC ATTENDEES IN St ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DJFLEX

    The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was estimated among pregnant women attending clinic at St. ... percentage prevalence by educational status was: women with no formal education 37.5%; those with secondary education, 11.3% and ..... 81% at age 18. These young married girls lack proper.

  20. Short term clinical outcome of children with rotavirus infection at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rotavirus infection is the single most common cause of acute gastroenteritis in children under five years of age. Rotavirus gastroenteritis has a high morbidity and mortality in children in Kenya. Objectives: To determine the short term clinical outcome for children admitted to Kenyatta National Hospital with ...

  1. Cancer clinical trials in persons with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Richard F

    2017-01-01

    The era of modern HIV therapeutics is well underway. The cancer and infectious disease epidemiology of HIV disease has markedly altered as populations are availed to the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ARV). The types of cancers occurring among those with HIV infection has broadened but the case burden in absolute numbers is very low relative to the background population. There are fewer incident cases of the AIDS-defining cancers (aggressive B-cell lymphomas, Kaposi's sarcoma, and cervical cancer). There is an increased risk for certain non-AIDS-defining cancers, but these occur somewhat sporadically relative to clinical trial enrollment. The changing epidemiology of cancer in HIV poses challenges as well as opportunities for participation of persons with HIV in cancer therapy clinical trials. There are excellent examples of cancer trials that inform cancer therapy for patients with HIV infection. Examples include those from HIV-specific trials and from trials mainly focused on the background population that included patients with HIV infection. Interpretation of clinical trials to guide therapy for those with HIV infection and cancer largely depends on data that does not include HIV-infected patients. The ability to extend clinical trial findings to populations not included in clinical trials remains problematic for a variety of populations, including those with HIV or AIDS. Careful prioritization of studies designed to bridge this gap is needed. However, there are published studies that serve as excellent examples bridging these gaps and the portfolio of cancer therapy trials underway will inform HIV and cancer better than at any time in the past.

  2. Clinical Risk Factors for Infective Endocarditis in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Vincent Bryan D; Chapagain, Bikash; Joshi, Astha; Brennessel, Debra J

    2017-02-01

    Crucial to the management of staphylococcal bacteremia is an accurate evaluation of associated endocarditis, which has both therapeutic and prognostic implications. Because the clinical presentation of endocarditis can be nonspecific, the judicious use of echocardiography is important in distinguishing patients at high risk of developing endocarditis. In the presence of high-risk clinical features, an early transesophageal echocardiogram is warranted without prior transthoracic echocardiography. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical risk factors for staphylococcal infective endocarditis that might warrant earlier transesophageal echocardiography and to describe the incidence of endocarditis in cases of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by means of chart review of 91 patients consecutively admitted to a community hospital from January 2009 through January 2013. Clinical risk factors of patients with staphylococcal bacteremia were compared with risk factors of patients who had definite diagnoses of infective endocarditis. There were 69 patients with bacteremia alone (76%) and 22 patients with endocarditis (24%), as verified by echocardiography. Univariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus ( P =0.024), the presence of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator/pacemaker ( P =0.006) or a prosthetic heart valve ( P =0.003), and recent hospitalization ( P =0.048) were significantly associated with developing infective endocarditis in patients with S. aureus bacteremia. The incidence of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia was similar in the bacteremia and infective-endocarditis groups ( P =0.437). In conclusion, identified high-risk clinical factors in the presence of bacteremia can suggest infective endocarditis. Early evaluation with transesophageal echocardiography might well be warranted.

  3. A review of the clinical implications of anti-infective biomaterials and infection-resistant surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoccia, Davide; Montanaro, Lucio; Arciola, Carla Renata

    2013-11-01

    Infection is currently regarded as the most severe and devastating complication associated to the use of biomaterials. The important social, clinical and economic impacts of implant-related infections are promoting the efforts to obviate these severe diseases. In this context, the development of anti-infective biomaterials and of infection-resistant surfaces is being regarded as the main strategy to prevent the establishment of implant colonisation and biofilm formation by bacteria. In this review, the attention is focused on the biomaterial-associated infections, from which the need for anti-infective biomaterials originates. Biomaterial-associated infections differ markedly for epidemiology, aetiology and severity, depending mainly on the anatomic site, on the time of biomaterial application, and on the depth of the tissues harbouring the prosthesis. Here, the diversity and complexity of the different scenarios where medical devices are currently utilised are explored, providing an overview of the emblematic applicative fields and of the requirements for anti-infective biomaterials. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Clinical trials of flomoxef in complicated urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, N; Sudoko, H; Fukuta, K; Nakano, M; Ushiyama, T; Tajima, A; Aso, Y; Masuda, H; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K

    1987-10-01

    Flomoxef (6315-S, FMOX), a new oxacephem antibiotic was studied clinically in 27 patients with complicated urinary tract infections. FMOX was intravenously administered at a dose of 1.0 g twice daily for 5 days. Clinical effect of FMOX on patients with complicated urinary tract infections were excellent in 11.5%, moderate in 57.7% and overall clinical efficacy rate was 69.2%. During the treatment with FMOX, urticaria was observed in 1 case. In laboratory tests, a decrease of RBC, Hb and Ht in 1 case, a decrease of WBC in 1 case and an elevation of GPT in another case were observed. But these abnormal values were slight and transient.

  5. Candida bloodstream infection: a clinical microbiology laboratory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongrácz, Júlia; Kristóf, Katalin

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) has been on the rise in several countries worldwide. Species distribution is changing; an increase in the percentage of non-albicans species, mainly fluconazole non-susceptible C. glabrata was reported. Existing microbiology diagnostic methods lack sensitivity, and new methods need to be developed or further evaluation for routine application is necessary. Although reliable, standardized methods for antifungal susceptibility testing are available, the determination of clinical breakpoints remains challenging. Correct species identification is important and provides information on the intrinsic susceptibility profile of the isolate. Currently, acquired resistance in clinical Candida isolates is rare, but reports indicate that it could be an issue in the future. The role of the clinical microbiology laboratory is to isolate and correctly identify the infective agent and provide relevant and reliable susceptibility data as soon as possible to guide antifungal therapy.

  6. Clinical requirements in the treatment of today's respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höffken, G

    1993-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are among the most frequent infections in man and lower tract infections account substantially for the overall mortality in hospitals. Regarding the etiology of pneumonias, one has to consider different pathogenic mechanisms, age of the patients, underlying diseases, concomitant medications, symptomatologies, seasonal influences, and clinical conditions, e.g. intensive care environment and mechanical ventilation. To optimize the rational management of respiratory infections, identification of the etiologic agent would be desirable. The decision of how to treat is often based on epidemiologic, clinical, and radiological assessments. Epidemiologic studies have shown a pronounced difference in the etiologic spectrum between community- and hospital-acquired RTIs. In community-acquired pneumonias, pneumococci, Haemophilus influenzae, Legionella, Mycoplasma and viruses predominate, whereas in nosocomially acquired pneumonias, Enterobacteriaceae, e.g. Klebsiella, Proteus, Enterobacter as well as Pseudomonas and staphylococci comprise the most frequent isolates. Empirical therapy has to cover all possible etiologic pathogens which most likely cause the infection. In addition, an adequate kinetic profile, e.g. once or twice daily dosing, sufficient pulmonary tissue or fluid penetration, and acceptable tolerance and costs are prerequisites for optimal therapy. Drugs of choice for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia are aminobenzylpenicillins or macrolides. Oral cephalosporins exhibit excellent activity against many bacterial pathogens of typical community-acquired pneumonia, and are active against beta-lactamase-producing H. influenzae.

  7. [Clinical efficacy of flomoxef in neonatal bacterial infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, H; Hirano, Y; Maruyama, S

    1993-03-01

    One hundred and seventy one neonates were treated with flomoxef (FMOX) and the clinical efficacy and safety were evaluated. The ages of the patients ranged from 0 to 28 days, and their body weights from 450 to 4300 g. Dose levels were 12.4 to 24.9 mg/kg every 8 or 12 hours for 1 to 10 days. Fifty two patients who responded to the FMOX treatment included 5 neonates with sepsis, 17 with suspected sepsis, 9 with urinary tract infections, 12 with pneumonia, 8 with intrauterine infections, and 1 with omphalitis. The other neonates could not be retrospectively diagnosed as bacterial infections. Of 52 patients, clinical results were excellent in 15, good in 34, fair in 1, and poor in 2. And the FMOX treatment was effective in 13 out of 14 patients in which causative bacteria were identified. The drug was well tolerated, but 6 neonates out of 33 over 5 days old had diarrhea. From these results, empiric treatment with FMOX against neonatal bacterial infection was as clinically useful as that of combination with ampicillin and gentamicin or cefotaxime and ampicillin in our neonatal intensive care unit. But, as this study did not include neonate with meningitis, efficacy to meningitis was not evaluated.

  8. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in chronic hepatitis B (CHB. These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN and nucleot(side analogue (NA treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  9. The Clinical Risks of Infection Associated with Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair E Cowen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The cleaning of flexible endoscopes is difficult and time consuming. Any method of attempted sterilization or high level disinfection will fail if prior cleaning has been defective. Inadequate reprocessing of endoscopes may result in patient to patient transmission of serious bacterial and viral diseases or infection with endemic hospital pathogens. Antibiotic prophylaxis is required to prevent septicemia and bacterial endocarditis in high risk patients undergoing specific endoscopic procedures. Prevention of serious endoscopy-associated clinical infections requires strict compliance with detailed reprocessing protocols by specially trained nursing staff.

  10. Nosocomial infections at Clinical Centre in Kragujevac: Prevalence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Milena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Nosocomial infections (NIs are a serious health problem in hospitals worldwide and are followed by a series of consequences, medical, judicial, ethical and economic. Objective The main aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of NIs at the Clinical Centre in Kragujevac. Methods A prevalence study of nosocomial infections was conducted from 16th till 20th May, 2005, within Second National Prevalence Study of Niš in the Republic of Serbia. Results The study included 866 patients. 40 patients had a NI, thus the prevalence of patients with NIs and prevalence of NIs was the same, 4.6%. Among NIs, the most frequent were urinary infections (45.0% followed by surgical-site infections (17.5%, skin and soft tissue infections (15% and pneumonia (12.5%. The rate of NIs was highest at departments of orthopaedics and traumatological surgery (12.0%, followed by intensive care units (8.0%. Overall, 67.5% (27/40 NIs were culture-proved; the leading pathogens were Escherichia coli (40.0%, followed by gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas species, Proteus mirabilis, Enterobacteriaceae with equal frequency of 8.0%. Nosocomial infections were significantly more frequent in patients aged ≥65 years (p<0.05, with longer hospitalization ≥8 days (p<0.00, in intensive care patients (p<0.05, patients with an intravenous catheter (p<0.00, urinary catheter (p<0.00, and those under antibiotic therapy (p<0.00. Conclusion This study showed that the prevalence of nosocomial infections in our hospital is similar to the prevalence in the developed countries. The study of prevalence provides a prompt insight into basic epidemiological and ethiological characteristics of nosocomial infections, hence identification of hospital priorities and the need to undertake appropriate prevention measures. .

  11. Cytokine responses to Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection differ between patient cohorts that have different clinical courses of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNicholas, Sinead; Talento, Alida Fe; O'Gorman, Joanne; Hannan, Margaret M; Lynch, Maureen; Greene, Catherine M; Humphreys, Hilary; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre

    2014-11-15

    The clinical course of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection is unpredictable and bacterial virulence, host immune response and patient characteristics are among the factors that contribute to the clinical course of infection. To investigate the relationship between cytokine response and clinical outcome, circulating cytokine levels were investigated in response to S. aureus bloodstream infection in patients with different clinical courses of infection. A prospective study was carried out in 61 patients with S. aureus bloodstream infection and circulating levels of IL-6, GRO-γ, RANTES and leptin were assessed over the course of the infection. Levels were compared in patients with complicated courses of infection (e.g. infective endocarditis) versus uncomplicated courses of S. aureus bloodstream infection and methicillin-resistant S. aureus Vs methicillin-susceptible S. aureus infection. Significantly lower leptin levels (p < 0.05) and significantly higher IL-6 levels (p < 0.05) were detected at laboratory diagnosis in patients with complicated compared to uncomplicated S. aureus bloodstream infection. Significantly higher levels of GRO-γ were associated with MRSA infection compared to MSSA infection. IL-6 may be an early inflammatory marker of complicated S. aureus bloodstream infection. Leptin may be protective against the development of a complicated S. aureus bloodstream infection.

  12. Clinical role of Cefixime in community-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreshaj, Sh; Doda-Ejupi, T; Tolaj, I Q; Mustafa, A; Kabashi, S; Shala, N; Geca, Nj; Aliu, A; Daka, A; Basha, N

    2011-01-01

    Cefixime is an oral third generation cephalosporin, frequently used in respiratory tract infections (RTI) in the pediatric population. However, in some publications cefixime has demonstrated poor efficacy against staphylococci and streptococci. of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cefixime in the treatment of community-acquired infections in a country where parenteral third generation cephalosporins have been used for a long time. The present study was designed to assess the clinical efficacy, bacteriological eradication rates and tolerability of cefixime in children with community-acquired upper RTI (URTI), lower RTI (LRTI) and uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). The study was prospective, open, and included 89 patients, from 6 months to 28 years, of both sexes, with the diagnosis of community-acquired URTI, LRTI and UTI. The treatment with cefixime was successful in 30/30 (100%) patients suffering from acute otitis media (AOM), in 10/12 (83.3%) with acute sinusitis, in 12/12 patients (100%) with pneumonia, in 31/35 (88.57) with uncomplicated UTI. The antibiotic was well tolerated. In 10 days treatment we recorded one case (1.3%) with acute gastroenteritis and two cases (2.6%) of maculopapular rash. Side-effects were transient and disappeared after finishing therapy in all three of the cases. Community-acquired infections, such as AOM, LRTI and UTI, caused by susceptible pathogens, can be treated with cefixime, as a good choice for a successful clinical response.

  13. Clinical signs, diagnosis, and case reports of Vaccinia virus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Carla Medeiros Silva

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus is responsible for a zoonosis that usually affects cattle and human beings in Brazil. The initial clinical signs of the infection are focal red skin areas, fever, and general symptoms similar to those of a cold. Then, pustules and ulcerated lesions surrounded by edema and erythema follow, as well as local lymphadenopathy that can last for weeks. Cure and healing of the lesions occur over several weeks, leaving a typical scar in the skin of people and animals affected. The infection definitive diagnosis is made through morphological characterization of the virus by use of electron microscopy, followed by PCR for specific viral genes. Since 1963, circulating orthopoxviruses in infectious outbreaks in several regions of Brazil have been reported. Later, the etiological agent of those infections was characterized as samples of Vaccinia virus. In addition, the widespread use of those viruses in research laboratories and mass vaccination of militaries have contributed to increase the cases of those infections worldwide. Thus, several epidemiological and clinical studies are required, as well as studies of viral immunology, public health, and economic impact, because little is known about those Vaccinia virus outbreaks in Brazil.

  14. [Clinical studies on flomoxef in respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanegae, H; Yamada, H; Yamaguchi, T; Kuroki, S; Katoh, O

    1987-10-01

    Flomoxef (FMOX, 6315-S) is a new oxacephem with a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. We used FMOX for treatment of 13 patients with respiratory tract infections including 4 cases of pneumonia, 5 of lung abscess and 4 of exacerbation of the chronic airway diseases. FMOX showed excellent in vitro antimicrobial activities against clinical isolates including 4 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2 strains of Haemophilus influenzae and each one strain of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Clinical responses were excellent in 3 cases, good in 7 and fair or poor in 3. No side effect was observed, but abnormal laboratory findings caused by FMOX administration were found in 2 cases; hypertransaminasemia and eosinophilia. However, neither of them was severe. From the above results, it is considered that FMOX will be useful for treatment of patients with respiratory tract infections.

  15. Development of a Clinical Data Warehouse for Hospital Infection Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Mary F.; Kieszkowski, Piotr; Zagorski, Brandon M.; Trick, William E.; Sommers, Michael; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Existing data stored in a hospital's transactional servers have enormous potential to improve performance measurement and health care quality. Accessing, organizing, and using these data to support research and quality improvement projects are evolving challenges for hospital systems. The authors report development of a clinical data warehouse that they created by importing data from the information systems of three affiliated public hospitals. They describe their methodology; difficulties encountered; responses from administrators, computer specialists, and clinicians; and the steps taken to capture and store patient-level data. The authors provide examples of their use of the clinical data warehouse to monitor antimicrobial resistance, to measure antimicrobial use, to detect hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, to measure the cost of infections, and to detect antimicrobial prescribing errors. In addition, they estimate the amount of time and money saved and the increased precision achieved through the practical application of the data warehouse. PMID:12807807

  16. Development of a clinical data warehouse for hospital infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Mary F; Kieszkowski, Piotr; Zagorski, Brandon M; Trick, William E; Sommers, Michael; Weinstein, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    Existing data stored in a hospital's transactional servers have enormous potential to improve performance measurement and health care quality. Accessing, organizing, and using these data to support research and quality improvement projects are evolving challenges for hospital systems. The authors report development of a clinical data warehouse that they created by importing data from the information systems of three affiliated public hospitals. They describe their methodology; difficulties encountered; responses from administrators, computer specialists, and clinicians; and the steps taken to capture and store patient-level data. The authors provide examples of their use of the clinical data warehouse to monitor antimicrobial resistance, to measure antimicrobial use, to detect hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, to measure the cost of infections, and to detect antimicrobial prescribing errors. In addition, they estimate the amount of time and money saved and the increased precision achieved through the practical application of the data warehouse.

  17. Fidaxomicin in Clostridium difficile infection: latest evidence and clinical guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Kathleen

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has risen 400% in the last decade. It currently ranks as the third most common nosocomial infection. CDI has now crossed over as a community-acquired infection. The major failing of current therapeutic options for the management of CDI is recurrence of disease after the completion of treatment. Fidaxomicin has been proven to be superior to vancomycin in successful sustained clinical response to therapy. Improved outcomes may be due to reduced collateral damage to the gut microflora by fidaxomicin, bactericidal activity, inhibition of Clostridial toxin formation and inhibition of new sporulation. This superiority is maintained in groups previously reported as being at high risk for CDI recurrence including those: with relapsed infection after a single treatment course; on concomitant antibiotic therapy; aged >65 years; with cancer; and with chronic renal insufficiency. Because the acquisition cost of fidaxomicin far exceeds that of metronidazole or vancomycin, in order to rationally utilize this agent, it should be targeted to those populations who are at high risk for relapse and in whom the drug has demonstrated superiority. In this manuscript is reviewed the changing epidemiology of CDI, current treatment options for this infection, proposed benefits of fidaxomicin over currently available antimicrobial options, available analysis of cost effectiveness of the drug, and is given recommendations for judicious use of the drug based upon the available published literature.

  18. Clinical indicators for bacterial co-infection in Ghanaian children with P. falciparum infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Verena Nielsen

    Full Text Available Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40% of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0% of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%, followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%. Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl, a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6-48.9, dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0-166.0 and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7-118.6. In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4-15.8, severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0-11.1 and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9-24.2. Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the

  19. Clinical course of primary HIV infection: consequences for subsequent course of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Lindhardt, B O; Jensen, B L

    1989-01-01

    of symptoms or had mild illness. All six patients who developed AIDS had had longlasting primary illnesses. Three year progression rates to a CD4 lymphocyte count less than 0.5 X 10(9)/l and to recurrence of HIV antigenaemia were significantly higher for those who had longlasting primary illnesses than those......OBJECTIVE--To investigate the impact of the clinical course of the primary HIV infection on the subsequent course of the infection. DESIGN--Prospective documenting of seroconversion, follow up at six month intervals, and analysis of disease progression by life tables. PATIENTS--86 Men in whom...... seroconversion occurred within 12 months. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURE--Progression of HIV infection, defined as CD4 lymphocyte count less than 0.5 X 10(9)/l, recurrence of HIV antigenaemia, or progression to Centers for Disease Control group IV. MAIN RESULTS--Median follow up was 670 (range 45-1506) days. An acute...

  20. Grepafloxacin Clinical Program for Lower Respiratory Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne C Rodloff

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper evaluates the clinical trial program in lower respiratory tract infections treated with a new fluoroquinolone antibiotic, grepafloxacin. Unlike older quinolones, grepafloxacin has excellent activity against Gram-positive organisms, which include Streptococcus pneumoniae and “atypical” pathogens Legionella species. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Grepafloxacin has a long half-life of 12 to 15 h, which allows once daily dosing. Six studies have been conducted regarding community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTls, four about community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and two about acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB . In these studies, grepafloxacin demonstrated clinical equivalence with standard therapies. but, in patients with documented infections. grepafloxacin was statistically superior to amoxycillin in both CAP and ABECB. The new fluoroquinolone has a good safety profile, comparable with that of ciprofloxacin. The most common adverse effects of grepafloxacin were nausea and a metallic taste; however, these effects resulted in only a few discontinuations of therapy. With the increasing prevalence of resistance in pathogens isolated from community-acquired LRTIs, grepafloxacin offers a good alternative for monotherapy in these patients.

  1. Clinical aspects of feline immunodeficiency and feline leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Katrin

    2011-10-15

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) are retroviruses with a global impact on the health of domestic cats. The two viruses differ in their potential to cause disease. FIV can cause an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome that increases the risk of developing opportunistic infections, neurological diseases, and tumors. In most naturally infected cats, however, FIV itself does not cause severe clinical signs, and FIV-infected cats may live many years without any health problems. FeLV is more pathogenic, and was long considered to be responsible for more clinical syndromes than any other agent in cats. FeLV can cause tumors (mainly lymphoma), bone marrow suppression syndromes (mainly anemia) and lead to secondary infectious diseases caused by suppressive effects of the virus on bone marrow and the immune system. Today, FeLV is less important as a deadly infectious agent as in the last 20 years prevalence has been decreasing in most countries. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilberg, Ita Pfeferman; Schor, Nestor

    2003-01-01

    A review about recent aspects on diagnosis and clinical management of urinary tract infection (UTI) is presented. There is a wide variation in clinical presentation of UTI which include different forms as cystitis, pyelonephritis, urethral syndrome and the clinical relevance of asymptomatic bacteriuria and low-count bacteriuria that must be distinguished from contamination. Pathogenetic aspects concerning bacterial virulence as well as host factors in susceptibility to UTI as urinary tract obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux, indwelling bladder catheters, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, sexual activity, contraceptive methods, prostatism, menopause, advanced age and renal transplantation are discussed. Diagnostic criteria and the most common tests utilized for differentiation between lower and upper UTI have been reviewed. The authors conclude that a careful evaluation of the underlying factors is required for the correct diagnosis of UTI and to prevent recurrence and that appropriate strategies and specific therapeutic regimens may maximize the benefit while reducing costs and adverse reactions.

  3. [Clinical evaluations of flomoxef in respiratory tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikasa, K; Sawaki, M; Ako, H; Narita, N

    1987-10-01

    Flomoxef (FMOX, 6315-S), a new antibacterial drug, was administered to 9 cases with respiratory tract infections for a duration of 8 approximately 16 days at a daily dose of 2 g. Diagnosis of these patients were bronchopneumonia 5 cases, chronic bronchitis 3 cases and acute bronchitis 1 case. From transtracheal aspiration several organisms were isolated; Haemophilus influenzae was isolated in 3 cases, Streptococcus pneumoniae in 3 cases, H. influenzae plus Branhamella catarrhalis in 1 case, Streptococcus dysgalactiae plus Neisseria meningitidis in 1 case and Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum in 1 case. The clinical efficacy was good in all 9 cases, the efficacy rate was 100%. All the bacteria were eliminated. Side effects were not observed. From these results, it appears that FMOX is a valuable drug in the treatment of respiratory tract infections.

  4. Severe scrub typhus infection: Clinical features, diagnostic challenges and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, John Victor; Sudarsan, Thomas I; Prakash, John Anthony J; Varghese, George M

    2015-01-01

    Scrub typhus infection is an important cause of acute undifferentiated fever in South East Asia. The clinical picture is characterized by sudden onset fever with chills and non-specific symptoms that include headache, myalgia, sweating and vomiting. The presence of an eschar, in about half the patients with proven scrub typhus infection and usually seen in the axilla, groin or inguinal region, is characteristic of scrub typhus. Common laboratory findings are elevated liver transaminases, thrombocytopenia and leukocytosis. About a third of patients admitted to hospital with scrub typhus infection have evidence of organ dysfunction that may include respiratory failure, circulatory shock, mild renal or hepatic dysfunction, central nervous system involvement or hematological abnormalities. Since the symptoms and signs are non-specific and resemble other tropical infections like malaria, enteric fever, dengue or leptospirosis, appropriate laboratory tests are necessary to confirm diagnosis. Serological assays are the mainstay of diagnosis as they are easy to perform; the reference test is the indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) for the detection of IgM antibodies. However in clinical practice, the enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay is done due to the ease of performing this test and a good sensitivity and sensitivity when compared with the IFA. Paired samples, obtained at least two weeks apart, demonstrating a ≥ 4 fold rise in titre, is necessary for confirmation of serologic diagnosis. The mainstay of treatment is the tetracycline group of antibiotics or chloramphenicol although macrolides are used alternatively. In mild cases, recovery is complete. In severe cases with multi-organ failure, mortality may be as high as 24%. PMID:26261776

  5. [Nitrofurantoin--clinical relevance in uncomplicated urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-07-01

    The nitrofuran derivative nitrofurantoin has been used for more than 60 years for the antibacterial therapy of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI). Despite its long application, this antibiotic retained good activity against Escherichia coli and some other pathogens of uncomplicated urinary tract infections such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Enterococcus species. Nitrofurantoin therapy has been shown to be accompanied by numerous adverse drug effects. Among these, there are also serious side effects such as pulmonary reactions and polyneuropathy, which mainly occur in long-term use. Recent studies, however, have shown a good efficacy and tolerability of short-term nitrofurantoin therapy comparable to previous established standard therapeutic regimens applying cotrimoxazole or quinolones. Because of these data and the alarming resistance rates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli to cotrimoxazole and quinolones that have been increased markedly in several countries, the clinical significance ofnitrofurantoin has been raised again. In many current treatment guidelines, e. g., the international clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, nitrofurantoin has been recommended as one first-line antibiotic of empiric antibacterial treatment of uncomplicated cystitis in otherwise healthy women. In Germany, however, nitrofurantoin should only be applied if more effective and less risky antibiotics cannot be used. Nitrofurantoin is contraindicated in the last three months of pregnancy and in patients suffering from renal impairment of each degree. Despite compatibility concerns, nitrofurantoin has also been recommended for the re-infection prophylaxis of recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Germany and several other countries.

  6. [Viral respiratory co-infections in pediatric patients admitted for acute respiratory infection and their impact on clinical severity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Pamela; Cordero, Jaime; Valverde, Cristián; Unanue, Nancy; Dalmazzo, Roberto; Piemonte, Paula; Vergara, Ivonne; Torres, Juan P

    2012-04-01

    Respiratory viruses are the leading cause of acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) in children. It has been reported that viral respiratory co-infection could be associated with severe clinical course. To describe the frequency of viral co-infection in children admitted for AlRI and evaluate whether this co-infection was associated with more severe clinical course. Prospective, descriptive study in pediatric patients who were hospitalized for ARI, with molecular detection of at least 1 respiratory virus in nasopharyngeal sample studied by PCR-Microarray for 17 respiratory viruses. 110 out of 147 patients with detection of > 1 respiratory virus were included. Viral co-infection was detected in 41/110 (37%). 22/110 children (20%) were classified as moderate to severe clinical course and 88/110 (80%) were classified as mild clinical course. In the group of moderate to severe clinical course, viral respiratory co-infection was detected in 6/22 (27.3%), compared to 35/88 (39.8 %) in the mild clinical course group. No statistically significant difference was found regarding the presence of co-infection between groups (p = 0.33). We detected high rates of viral co-infection in children with ARI. It was not possible to demonstrate that viral co-infections were related with severe clinical course in hospitalized children.

  7. Problem-oriented clinical microbiology and infection. 2nd. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilary Humphreys; William, L. Irving [Royal College of Surgeons (Ireland)

    2004-08-01

    This medical textbook is problem-based, in line with current medical teaching, and covers 70 clinical cases. This second edition has been updated to include new material on AIDS/HIV, emerging antibiotic-resistant bacteria and new viral pathogens such as SARS. Sections are headed; Skin and mucous membranes; Respiratory tract; Gastrointestinal system which includes a case study entitled: Bob, a 55-year-old retired coal miner with abdominal pain; Genito-urinary system; Central nervous system; Systemic infections; Pregnancy and the neonate; and Miscellaneous. 29 ills., 125 photos.

  8. Analysis of clinical features and risk factors for infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Zhao Liangping; Xu Weiting; Chen Jianchang; Tong Guangming; Hong Xiaosu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical features of infective endocarditis (IE) and explore the risk factors for it's prognosis. Methods: Clinical data of 65 patients with IE were acquired retrospectively, and its causes, clinical characteristics, pathogenic microorganism, clinical outcomes were analyzed. Results: The major occurring heart diseases for IE in all patients were rheumatic heart disease, congenital heart disease, and there was no any previously known heart disease. The major clinical manifestations included fever and anemia. The major pathogenic bacteria is streptococcus, but percentage of other bacteria increased gradually. Thirteen patients were refractory, in hospital. Haematoglobin and seralbumin were significantly lower, and leucocyte, hsCRP, erythrocyte sedimentation were significantly higher in refractory group. Anaemia, lower seralbumin, higher hsCRP were independent predictors for bad prognosis. Conclusion: The proportion of rheumatic heart disease is decreasing as one of the risk factors for IE in recent years. Streptococcus is major pathogen of IE, and the mortality of IE is still very high. Anaemia, lower seralbumin, higher hsCRP are independent predictors for bad prognosis. (authors)

  9. Genital herpes simplex virus infections: clinical manifestations, course, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, L; Adams, H G; Brown, Z A; Holmes, K K

    1983-06-01

    The clinical course and complications of 268 patients with first episodes and 362 with recurrent episodes of genital herpes infection were reviewed. Symptoms of genital herpes were more severe in women than in men. Primary first-episode genital herpes was accompanied by systemic symptoms (67%), local pain and itching (98%), dysuria (63%), and tender adenopathy (80%). Patients presented with several bilaterally distributed postular ulcerative lesions that lasted a mean of 19.0 days. Herpes simplex virus was isolated from the urethra, cervix, and pharynx of 82%, 88%, and 13% of women with first-episode primary genital herpes, and the urethra and pharynx of 28% and 7% of men. Complications included aseptic meningitis (8%), sacral autonomic nervous system dysfunction (2%), development of extragenital lesions (20%), and secondary yeast infections (11%). Recurrent episodes were characterized by small vesicular or ulcerative unilaterally distributed lesions that lasted a mean of 10.1 days. Systemic symptoms were uncommon and 25% of recurrent episodes were asymptomatic. The major concerns of patients were the frequency of recurrences and fear of transmitting infection to partners or infants.

  10. Clinical Manifestations and Outcomes of West Nile Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Sejvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the emergence of West Nile virus (WNV in North America in 1999, understanding of the clinical features, spectrum of illness and eventual functional outcomes of human illness has increased tremendously. Most human infections with WNV remain clinically silent. Among those persons developing symptomatic illness, most develop a self-limited febrile illness. More severe illness with WNV (West Nile neuroinvasive disease, WNND is manifested as meningitis, encephalitis or an acute anterior (polio myelitis. These manifestations are generally more prevalent in older persons or those with immunosuppression. In the future, a more thorough understanding of the long-term physical, cognitive and functional outcomes of persons recovering from WNV illness will be important in understanding the overall illness burden.

  11. Genital herpes simplex virus infection: clinical course and attempted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L G; Keeney, R E

    1981-06-01

    The epidemiology, clinical course, diagnosis, and attempted treatments of herpes genitalis are reviewed. Herpes genitalis is an increasingly common sexually transmitted disease for which there is no effective treatment. It can occur in either sex and is mot commonly first found in patients 14 to 29 years old. Initial exposure to the virus may result in prolonged local symptoms (pain, itching, discharge) and signs (ulcerative lesions) as well as fever, malaise, myalgias, and fatigue. After the initial exposure, the virus may be found in a latent stage in the dorsal nerve root ganglia in the sacral area, and recurrences of disease may ensue. The frequency and clinical course of recurrent genital herpes can be of varying duration and severity. Although antiviral substances, immune potentiators, topical surfactants, and photodynamic inactivation have been used to treat genital herpes infections, there is no proven effective therapy.

  12. Urinary tract infections in older women: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-02-26

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in older women are commonly encountered in outpatient practice. To review management of asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic UTI and review prevention of recurrent UTIs in older community-dwelling women. A search of Ovid (Medline, PsycINFO, Embase) for English-language human studies conducted among adults aged 65 years and older and published in peer-reviewed journals from 1946 to November 20, 2013. The clinical spectrum of UTIs ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria, to symptomatic and recurrent UTIs, to sepsis associated with UTI requiring hospitalization. Recent evidence helps differentiate asymptomatic bacteriuria from symptomatic UTI. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is transient in older women, often resolves without any treatment, and is not associated with morbidity or mortality. The diagnosis of symptomatic UTI is made when a patient has both clinical features and laboratory evidence of a urinary infection. Absent other causes, patients presenting with any 2 of the following meet the clinical diagnostic criteria for symptomatic UTI: fever, worsened urinary urgency or frequency, acute dysuria, suprapubic tenderness, or costovertebral angle pain or tenderness. A positive urine culture (≥105 CFU/mL) with no more than 2 uropathogens and pyuria confirms the diagnosis of UTI. Risk factors for recurrent symptomatic UTI include diabetes, functional disability, recent sexual intercourse, prior history of urogynecologic surgery, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence. Testing for UTI is easily performed in the clinic using dipstick tests. When there is a low pretest probability of UTI, a negative dipstick result for leukocyte esterase and nitrites excludes infection. Antibiotics are selected by identifying the uropathogen, knowing local resistance rates, and considering adverse effect profiles. Chronic suppressive antibiotics for 6 to 12 months and vaginal estrogen therapy effectively reduce

  13. Early diagnosis of dengue virus infection in clinically suspected cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, N.K.; Ahmed, S.; Ali, N.; Khan, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) capture enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for diagnosis of dengue virus infection in first week of illness in clinically suspected patients of dengue fever. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) Rawalpindi from Jan 2013 to Nov 2013. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study including 68 clinically suspected patients of dengue fever according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. IgM capture ELISA and RT PCR for dengue virus ribonucleic acid (RNA) was performed on samples collected from patients having fever for 1 to 7 days. These were divided into two groups. Patients in group 1 presented with fever of 4 days or less, patients in group 2 had fever of 5 to 7 days duration. Results: In group 1, 72 percent of the patients were positive by RT PCR while 31 percent were positive by IgM capture ELISA. In group 2, 43 percent of the patients were positive by RT PCR while 97 percent were positive by ELISA. Conclusion: RT PCR can be used for early detection of dengue virus infection in the first few days of fever while IgM ELISA is diagnostic afterwards. (author)

  14. Clinical Outcome of Cytomegalovirus Infection on Low Birth Weight Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Usman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a DNA virus and a marker of the herpes virus groups. This virus was found only in human and the infection occurs for a long time. The transmission of CMV infection to fetus/neonates is via congenital infections or perinatal infections. Clinical manifestation of symptomatic CMV infection of the fetus has two presentations, early and second early manifestations. Diagnosis of neonatal CMV infection may be done by serologic test based on detection of IgM of CMV infection. The objective of this study is to asses clinical outcome of CMV infection of low birth weight infants delivery with long term sequelae. An observational study was conducted since March 2010 until December 2011 in Advent and Hermina Pasteur Hospital, all subjects were low birth weight infants (LBWI. The inclusion criterias are all LBWI who were delivered in those hospital or were a referred neonates. The exclusion criterias are major congenital defect, which is not related to congenital CMV infection and neonates’ death before one week of life. Every neonate was examine both their physical and peripher blood count, glucose, Ca. Liver function test done for neonates with acute hepatitis and titre IgG and IgM CMV serial, head ultrasound serial and head CT scan/MRI used for babies with intracranial bleeding and hydrocephaly.  During the period of this study there were 50 cases of LBWI, consisted of 41 preterm babies, and 30 small for gestational age babies. Clinical manifestation of acute hepatitis were found in 20% subjects, all of them with the  elevation of liver function test. Microcephaly which occured in the first untill three weeks of life were 8%. Ventricular dilatation were 10% in the first week of life and increased up to 48% after three weeks. Cases with intracranial haemorrhage were found in 6% and 10% with cerebral calcification on head while sensorineural hearing loss were 8%. All of LBWI have 100% serorespon immune IgG. IgM CMV

  15. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Fusobacterium Species Infections in a Ten-Year Follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Carretero Rafael

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although uncommon, Fusobacterium infections have a wide clinical spectrum, ranging from local pharyngeal infections to septic shock. Our aim was to characterize and analyze the clinical features and outcomes in patients with Fusobacterium infections, and determine which variables were able to predict a poor outcome.

  16. Clinical experience of infective endocarditis complicated by acute cerebrovascular accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chan-Yang; Chi, Nai-Hsin; Wang, Shoei-Shen; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Yu, Hsi-Yu

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical results of patients with infective endocarditis (IE) complicated by acute cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs). A total of 44 patients with IE complicated by CVA at admission were retrospectively analyzed in a single medical institute from 2005 to 2011. At the time of admission, 18 patients were diagnosed with hemorrhagic stroke, and 26 patients were diagnosed with ischemic stroke. Fifteen patients received surgical intervention during hospitalization. The hospital mortality rate was 38.9% for the hemorrhagic stroke group and 42.3% for the ischemic stroke group (p = 0.821). The mortality rate was 33.3% for the surgical group and 44.8% for the nonsurgical group (p = 0.531). At 30 days of hospitalization, 45.8% of the patients experienced an adverse event (defined as death due to organ failure, restroke, cardiogenic shock, or septic shock during the treatment period), and the attrition rate was 1.5% per day. Surgery performed after the adverse events increased mortality (80.0%) compared with surgery performed on patients with no adverse events (10.0%; p = 0.017). A Cox regression analysis revealed that creatinine > 2 mg/dL, diabetes, and staphylococcal infection were the risk factors of the adverse events. Early surgical intervention for IE with ischemic stroke may prevent adverse events, particularly in patients with impaired renal function, diabetes, or staphylococcal infection. A delay in operation of > 30 days is recommended after hemorrhagic stroke. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  17. Clinical and demographic trends in a sexually transmitted infection clinic in Mumbai (1994-2006): an epidemiologic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Maninder S; Jerajani, Hemangi R; Brassard, Paul; Boivin, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    People presenting to sexually transmitted infections (STIs) clinics represent an important risk group for HIV infection; prevention strategies will depend on the clinical attendance. The demographic and clinical changes in clinic attendees in Mumbai, as well as the factors associated with HIV infection in this clinic over a 13-year period, were assessed. STI clinic data in 3417 individuals (1994 to 2006) were analyzed: clinical presentation, types of STIs, and serology over the 13-year period. We used a logistic regression model to assess socio-demographic and clinical associations with HIV infection. The clinic evaluated 689 patients in 1994 and the number had dropped to 97 in 2006. In 1994, the majority of STIs seen in the clinic were bacterial (53%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 50% to 57%); however, this proportion had dropped in 2006 (28%, 95% CI: 19% to 38%). There was a proportional increase in viral STIs during the same time period. Although women attending the clinic were younger than men, they were more likely to be married. The overall seropositivity for HIV was 28%. Viral STIs were more likely to be associated with HIV than bacterial infections (odds ratio: 1.5, 95% CI: 1.2 to 1.9). Viral infections were the most common STIs in recent years in a tertiary care center in Mumbai. HIV prevalence was high in this population. Thus, these clinical data suggest that STI patients were and continue to be an important group for HIV prevention in the country.

  18. Viral and atypical bacterial infections in the outpatient pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Nielsen, Lars P; Schiotz, Peter Oluf

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory viral and atypical bacterial infections are associated with pulmonary exacerbations and hospitalisations in cystic fibrosis patients. We wanted to study the impact of such infections on children attending the outpatient clinic. METHODS: Seventy-five children were followed...

  19. Clinical Diagnosis of Bordetella Pertussis Infection: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Mark H; Marchello, Christian; Callahan, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis (BP) is a common cause of prolonged cough. Our objective was to perform an updated systematic review of the clinical diagnosis of BP without restriction by patient age. We identified prospective cohort studies of patients with cough or suspected pertussis and assessed study quality using QUADAS-2. We performed bivariate meta-analysis to calculate summary estimates of accuracy and created summary receiver operating characteristic curves to explore heterogeneity by vaccination status and age. Of 381 studies initially identified, 22 met our inclusion criteria, of which 14 had a low risk of bias. The overall clinical impression was the most accurate predictor of BP (positive likelihood ratio [LR+], 3.3; negative likelihood ratio [LR-], 0.63). The presence of whooping cough (LR+, 2.1) and posttussive vomiting (LR+, 1.7) somewhat increased the likelihood of BP, whereas the absence of paroxysmal cough (LR-, 0.58) and the absence of sputum (LR-, 0.63) decreased it. Whooping cough and posttussive vomiting have lower sensitivity in adults. Clinical criteria defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were sensitive (0.90) but nonspecific. Typical signs and symptoms of BP may be more sensitive but less specific in vaccinated patients. The clinician's overall impression was the most accurate way to determine the likelihood of BP infection when a patient initially presented. Clinical decision rules that combine signs, symptoms, and point-of-care tests have not yet been developed or validated. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  20. Clinical Infectious Outcomes Associated with Biofilm-related Infections: a Retrospective Chart Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-07

    infectious outcomes. Methods: 221 clinical isolates collected from 2005 to 2012 and previously characterized for biofilm formation were studied. Clinical...chronic infection on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Bacteria species, but not clinical characteristics, were associated with biofilm formation on...the implication of biofilms in a majority of human infections [2]. Biofilm formation also has been linked with poor wound healing [3], burn wound

  1. [Clinical guidelines for the prevention of infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Lescure Picarzo, J; Crespo Marcos, D; Centeno Malfaz, F

    2014-03-01

    This article sets out the recommendations for the prevention of infective endocarditis (IE), contained in the guidelines developed by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), from which the recommendations of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease have been agreed. In recent years, there has been a considerable change in the recommendations for the prevention of IE, mainly due to the lack of evidence on the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention, and the risk of the development of antibiotic resistance. The main change is a reduction of the indications for antibiotic prophylaxis, both in terms of patients and procedures considered at risk. Clinical practice guidelines and recommendations should assist health professionals in making clinical decisions in their daily practice. However, the ultimate judgment regarding the care of a particular patient must be taken by the physician responsible. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Features of Herpes Zoster Infections in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Çölgeçen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Herpes zoster (HZ is a rare disease in childhood and encountered especially in immunosuppressed patients. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical features of HZ in children. Materials and methods: Records of 24 children, who had a diagnosis of HZ and were referred to the dermatology and pediatric outpatient clinic during February 2009-February 2011, were evaluated retrospectively. Results: Twenty-four patients, - 14 female (58.3%, 10 male (41.7% -, aged between 4 and 16 years were assessed. The mean age of the patients was 10.6±3.7 years. The most frequent complaint was pruritus (54.2%. Sixteen patients had thoracic involvement, whilst the rest had lumbar (n: 4, trigeminal (n: 3 and sacral (n: 1 involvements, respectively. Eleven children were distressed and 2 children had physical trauma. Ten patients were treated with acyclovir orally, 3 were given valacyclovir orally and the rest had only local treatment. No complications were reported. Conclusion: HZ may be seen in healthy children with no immunosuppresion and the infection in these patients has a favorable course.

  3. Respiratory viral infections in infants with clinically suspected pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela E. Ferronato

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the frequency of respiratory viral infections in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and to analyze their characteristics at hospital admission and clinical outcomes. Methods: a historical cohort study was performed in a reference service for pertussis, in which the research of respiratory viruses was also a routine for infants hospitalized with respiratory problems. All infants reported as suspected cases of pertussis were included. Tests for Bordetella pertussis (BP (polymerase chain reaction/culture and for respiratory viruses (RVs (immunofluorescence were performed. Patients who received macrolides before hospitalization were excluded. Clinical data were obtained from medical records. Results: Among the 67 patients studied, BP tests were positive in 44%, and 26% were positive for RV. There was no etiological identification in 35%, and RV combined with BP was identified in 5%. All patients had similar demographic characteristics. Cough followed by inspiratory stridor or cyanosis was a strong predictor of pertussis, as well as prominent leukocytosis and lymphocytosis. Rhinorrhea and dyspnea were more frequent in viral infections. Macrolides were discontinued in 40% of patients who tested positive for RV and negative for BP. Conclusion: the results suggest that viral infection can be present in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and etiological tests may enable a reduction in the use of macrolides in some cases. However, the etiological diagnosis of respiratory virus infection, by itself, does not exclude the possibility of infection with BP. Resumo: Objetivo: avaliar a frequência das infecções por vírus respiratórios em lactentes hospitalizados com suspeita clínica de coqueluche e analisar suas características admissionais e evolutivas. Métodos: foi realizado um estudo de coorte histórica, em um serviço sentinela para coqueluche, no qual a pesquisa de v

  4. Functional dyspepsia and dyspepsia associated with Helicobacter pylori infection: Do they have different clinical characteristics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Rodríguez-García

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: The patients with dyspepsia infected with Helicobacter pylori had similar clinical characteristics to the non-infected patients and could not be differentiated a priori. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with functional dyspepsia was 58% and increased with age.

  5. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  6. Deep-neck infection. Clinical analysis of 299 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Kanako; Kodama, Satoru; Noda, Kenji; Watanabe, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    Deep-neck infection (DNI) remains potentially fatal. We retrospectively analyzed 299 surgically treated DNI cases between January 1997 and October 2007 by reviewing computed tomography (CT) results and discuss treatment and risk factors. Subjects were divided into two groups by abscess-site; peritonsillar abscess (PTA) (n=251) and deep-neck abscess (DNA) (n=48). Age, smoking habits, body mass index (BMI) and bacteriological histories were collected from clinical records and compared by group. DNI and PTA severity parameters were C-reactive protein (CRP) titer and hospitalization length. Median subject age in DNI was 51.0 years and peak incidence in the 50 s. Median subject age in PTA was 31.0 years and the peak incidence in the 20 s. Smoker prevalence was higher in both groups than in normal healthy subjects. The DNI group had higher BMI and diabetes mellitus. Factors potentially most affecting illness were complications such as obesity and diabetes mellitus in DNI and age in PTA. (author)

  7. Clinical Manifestations and Management of Left Ventricular Assist Device–Associated Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Nienaber, Juhsien Jodi C.; Kusne, Shimon; Riaz, Talha; Walker, Randall C.; Baddour, Larry M.; Wright, Alan J.; Park, Soon J.; Vikram, Holenarasipur R.; Keating, Michael R.; Arabia, Francisco A.; Lahr, Brian D.; Sohail, M. Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    We report the clinical manifestations and management of continuous-flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) infections from a large multicenter cohort. On the basis of these observations, a management algorithm is derived to assist clinical decision making for LVAD infection.

  8. Clinical Staging of HIV Infection as a Surrogate for CD4 Count in HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    naive HIV-infected children. METHODS: Newly diagnosed HIV-infected children, antiretroviral-naïve attending a paediatric infectious diseases unit were enrolled. The clinical manifesta-tions, age, sex, and. WHO clinical stage of each patient were ...

  9. Clinical and diagnostic pathways in pediatric fungal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Castagnola

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, in pediatrics the patients mostly affected by fungal infections are hematological patients, followed by those with solid tumors, and transplant recipients. Candida infections generally occur just after birth, whereas Aspergillus infections are age-related, and increase their incidence with age. However, among infections, the incidence of bacteremias are still greater than that of mycoses. In pediatrics, in Italy the immunocompromised patients – thus particularly susceptible to fungal infections – are mainly those with severe combined immunodeficiency, chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, and chronic granulomatous disease. Particular Aspergillus or Scedosporium infections should be considered in peculiar kinds of patients, such as those affected by cystic fibrosis. Finally, different kinds of fungi should be considered in those who come from or spend a lot time in specific areas, such as South America (e.g. coccidioidomycoses, for which differential diagnosis is with tuberculosis.http://dx.doi.org/10.7175/rhc.v4i1S.859

  10. Role of the clinical microbiology laboratory in infection control - a Danish perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J

    2001-01-01

    for standardization and documentation of quality. Currently a national standard for infection control is being prepared. It consists of a main standard defining requirements for the management system and 12 subsidiary standards defining requirements for specific areas of infection control. Adoption of the standard...... will undoubtedly require additional resources for infection control at a local level, and some organizational changes may also be needed. Infection control should be maintained as an integrated part of clinical microbiology....

  11. Clinical data and CT findings of pulmonary infection caused by different pathogens after kidney transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Tao; Xue Feng; Zheng Xuan; Yu Hong; Tao Xiaofeng; Xiao Xiangsheng; Liu Shiyuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The overall objective was to review clinical data and CT findings of pulmonary infection caused by different pathogens after kidney transplantation in an attempt to help early clinical qualitative diagnosis. Materials and methods: 446 cases of clinically confirmed pulmonary infection after kidney transplantation in recent 10 years were evaluated with respect to the time of occurrence and 89 cases with complete CT data and pathogenic diagnosis were further analyzed for pathogen types and CT manifestations. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test. Results: Pulmonary infection reached the peak in 3 months after transplantation. Bacterial infection and mixed infection were predominant between 1 and 6 months. And most tuberculosis occurred after one year. Bacterial (38.2%) and mixed infections (38.2%) were the common types. The next was fungal infection, tuberculosis and viral infection (10.1%, 7.9% and 5.6%, respectively). CT manifestations of pulmonary infections after kidney transplantation were diverse and complex, lacking characteristic signs. Conclusion: More than 3/4 of pulmonary infections after kidney transplantation can be attributed to bacteria and mixed pathogens. The combination of time course, clinical data and CT manifestations plays an important role in the early clinical qualitative diagnosis.

  12. MYCOPLASMA INFECTION: CLINICAL TYPES, VARIATIONS OF CLINICAL COURSE AND DIAGNOSTIC MISTAKES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Savenkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to assess clinical course of various types of mycoplasma infection during the last epidemic (September 2012 – February 2013 according to the positive results of serological analyses. Patients and methods: 3553 laboratory tests were performed, 177 (20% positive results of mycoplasma were detected. During the study clinical types, gender and age of patients were analyzed; special characteristics of clinical course of mycoplasma pneumonia were identified. Results: among 78 patients with pneumonia severe form was detected only in one. Twenty five percent of patients had ENT-diseases. The authors performed comparative analysis of antibacterial treatment (first-line and macrolides. The duration of X-ray changes depended on treatment scheme; the best results were achieved in children who were administered combined treatment with first-line (cephalosporin and macrolide in suspension. Conclusions: during the period of 2012–2013 yy pneumonia has had a moderate clinical course, rarely — with complications. In 25% of children diseases of ENT organs were diagnosed. Mycoplasma was most often associated with chlamydia and types 1 and 2 of herpes simplex viruses, which is necessary to be considered in determination of therapy regimen. In treatment it is preferably to use combination of cephalosporin and macrolide in suspension.

  13. The Clinical Spectrum and Financial Burden of HIV Infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: HIV infection has become a common risk factor for hospital admission and a major contributor to childhood morbidity in South Africa. There remains a paucity of data describing the cost of hospitalisation of HIV-infected children in South Africa. The aim of this study was to describe basic demographics and ...

  14. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL FEATURES OF COMBINED RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shkarin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Presents a review of publications on the problem of combined respiratory infections among children. Viral-bacterial associations are registered  in a group of often ill children in 51.7%. More than half of the patients have herpesvirus infection in various combinations. The presence of a combined acute respiratory viral infection among children in the group from 2 to 6 years was noted in 44.2% of cases, among which, in addition to influenza viruses, RS-, adeno-, etc., metapneumovirus and bocavirus plays an important role.The increase in severity of acute respiratory viral infection with combined  infection, with chlamydia  and mycoplasma infection is shown. A longer and more severe course of whooping cough was observed when combined with respiratory viruses.The revealed facts of frequency of distribution of combined  respiratory infections in children, the severity and duration of their course with the development of various complications and the formation of chronic pathology dictate the need to improve diagnosis and treatment tactics of these forms of infections.

  15. CLINICAL EFFECT OF HEMOPARASITE INFECTIONS IN SNOWY OWLS ( BUBO SCANDIACUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kendra C; Rettenmund, Christy L; Sander, Samantha J; Rivas, Anne E; Green, Kaitlin C; Mangus, Lisa; Bronson, Ellen

    2018-03-01

    Vector-borne hemoparasites are commonly found in avian species. Plasmodium spp., the causative agent of avian malaria, are intraerythrocytic parasites that can cause signs ranging from subclinical infection to severe acute disease. In raptor species, most hemoparasites are associated with subclinical infection and are generally not treated when seen on blood evaluation. This case series reviews five cases of hemoparasite infection in snowy owls ( Bubo scandiacus). These animals were infected with a variety of hemoparasites, including Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, and Leukocytozoon spp. Death of one of these birds due to hemoparasite burden led to a change in the monitoring for and treatment of subclinical hemoparasitic infections in this species. Three subsequently infected snowy owls have been treated with primaquine and chloroquine. The birds that were treated survived infection, and parasite burdens in peripheral blood diminished. Postulated reasons for increased morbidity and mortality associated with hemoparasitic infections in captive snowy owls, as opposed to other raptor species, include stress, concurrent disease, novel pathogen exposure, and elevated environmental temperatures.

  16. Impact of Helminth Infection on the Clinical and Microbiological Presentation of Chagas Diseases in Chronically Infected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Salvador

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical countries, coexisting in Chagas disease endemic areas. Helminth infections in humans may modulate the host immune system, changing the Th1/Th2 polarization. This immunological disturbance could modify the immune response to other infections. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between clinical, microbiological and epidemiological characteristics of Chagas disease patients, with the presence of helminth infection.A prospective observational study was conducted at Vall d'Hebron University Hospital (Barcelona, Spain. Inclusion criteria were: age over 18 years, diagnosis of Chagas disease, and not having received specific treatment for Chagas disease previously to the inclusion. The study protocol included Chagas disease assessment (cardiac and digestive evaluation, detection of T. cruzi DNA measured by PCR in peripheral blood, and helminth infection diagnosis (detection of IgG anti-Strongyloides stercoralis by ELISA, microscopic examination of stool samples from three different days, and specific faecal culture for S. stercoralis larvae.Overall, 65 patients were included, median age was 38 years, 75.4% were women and most of them came from Bolivia. Cardiac and digestive involvement was present in 18.5% and 27.7% of patients respectively. T. cruzi PCR was positive in 28 (43.1% patients. Helminth infection was diagnosed in 12 (18.5% patients. No differences were observed in clinical and epidemiological characteristics between patients with and without helminth infection. Nevertheless, the proportion of patients with positive T. cruzi PCR was higher among patients with helminth infection compared with patients without helminth infection (75% vs 35.8%, p = 0.021.We observed a high prevalence of S. stercoralis infection among chronic Chagas disease patients attended in our tropical medicine unit. Strongyloidiasis was associated with significantly higher proportion of

  17. Korean clinical practice guidelines for preventing the transmission of infections in hemodialysis facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayne Cho Park

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving hemodialysis are vulnerable to infectious diseases due to their impaired immunity and high risk of exposure to pathogens. To protect patients, staff, and visitors from potential infections, each hemodialysis unit should establish and follow standard infection control and prevention measures. Therefore, clinical practice guidelines were developed by a working group of nephrologists and infection control specialists to provide evidence-based guidance for dialysis physicians and nurses, with the aim of preventing infection transmission and controlling infection sources in hemodialysis facilities. The areas of infection control covered by these guidelines include standard precautions, isolation strategies, vascular access, water treatment, cleaning/disinfecting/sterilizing, and vaccination. This special report summarizes the key recommendations from the Korean clinical practice guidelines for preventing the transmission of infections in hemodialysis facilities.

  18. CLINICAL INFECTION OF TWO CAPTIVE ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS) WITH ELEPHANT ENDOTHELIOTROPIC HERPESVIRUS 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuery, Angela; Tan, Jie; Peng, RongSheng; Flanagan, Joseph P; Tocidlowski, Maryanne E; Howard, Lauren L; Ling, Paul D

    2016-03-01

    The ability of prior infection from one elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) type to protect against clinical or lethal infection from others remains an important question. This report describes viremia and subsequent shedding of EEHV1B in two juvenile 4-yr-old Asian elephants within 3 wk or 2 mo following significant infections caused by the rarely seen EEHV4. High levels of EEHV1B shedding were detected in the first elephant prior to emergence of infection and viremia in the second animal. The EEHV1B virus associated with both infections was identical to the strain causing infection in two herd mates previously. High EEHV viremia correlated with leukopenia and thrombocytopenia, which was followed by leukocytosis and thrombocytosis when clinical signs started to resolve. The observations from these cases should be beneficial for helping other institutions monitor and treat elephants infected with EEHV1, the most common virus associated with lethal hemorrhagic disease.

  19. [Vaginal infections in a Family Health Clinic in the Metropolitan Region, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseca, Rodrigo; Ovalle, Alfredo; Amaya, Fernando; Labra, Bayron; Escalona, Natalia; Lizana, Paola; Montoya, M José; Lillo, Eduardo; Martínez, M Angélica

    2015-02-01

    Vaginal infections are a frequent cause for consultation, but their prevalence and etiology vary in different populations. To determine the prevalence and etiologies of vaginal infection in women attending a family health center in the Metropolitan Region of Chile. The microbiological diagnosis was made by wet mount and Gram stain. Diagnosis of trichomoniasis was performed by wet mount, culture and polymerase chain reaction. 101 women aged 15-54, not selected by signs or symptoms of vaginal infection, 46 of them pregnant were included. In 47 women (46.5%), vaginal infections were diagnosed. An association was observed between age and frequency of vaginal infection. The proportion of infections among pregnant and non-pregnant women was similar. The most frequent infections were bacterial vaginosis (16.8%), vulvovaginal candidiasis (11.9%) and co-infections (6.9%). We found 5.9% of intermediate microbiota cases, 3% of trichomoniasis and 2% of aerobic vaginitis. Symptoms of vaginal infection had poor agreement with microbiological findings. Otherwise physical signs had good agreement with the presence of infection, but low to moderate concordance with a specific etiology. We found a high prevalence of vaginal infections in the study population. It is necessary to improve the definitions and criteria of microbiological diagnosis of co-infections and intermediate microbiota, for them to be diagnosed in the clinical practice. More descriptive questionnaires are recommended to enhance the usefulness of clinical examination.

  20. ENTEROVIRUS INFECTION: VARIETY OF ETIOLOGICAL FACTORS AND CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Kanaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Enteroviruses are widely distributed human infectious pathogens. In spite of infection a disease does not manifest in majority number of cases. However, in some infected persons the different kind of symptoms can be observed; from common cold signs up to  aseptic (serous meningitis and myocarditis. Severe enteroviral cases with lethal outcomes are rarely reported. Ability of enteroviruses to cause large outbreaks and even epidemic distribution is very significant for health care systems. Taking in account a high genetic diversity of enteroviruses it is possible appearance of new highly pathogenic strains in the future. In some countries including the Russian Federation the permanent surveillance for enteroviral infections is provided besides of WHO polio elimination program. The laboratory diagnostics of enterovirus infections is complicated by numerous of pathogen serotypes. Thus, classical virological methods should be supported by molecular-biological tools to sequence pathogen genome and to define phylogenetic relations between different enterovirus strains.

  1. Clinical outcome after treatment of infected primary total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-six consecutive cases of infected primary total knee arthroplasties were treated at our institution from 1989 through 2000. Eleven patients had debridement and irrigation performed within 2 months of index arthroplasty or hematogenous spread; only one infection was eradicated. Twenty......-five patients had their prostheses removed; 17 had two-stage revision arthroplasty, following which infection was eradicated in 15; one had a permanent spacer, 7 had arthrodesis (following failed revision arthroplasty in one) and 2 had a femur amputation (following failed revision arthroplasty in one) at follow......-up of mean 24 months. Infections were cured equally well with revision arthroplasty and arthrodesis. Among the 15 patients who ended up with revision arthroplasty, 11 had a better range of motion compared to the index arthroplasty, but 8 had daily pain. We present our treatment protocol, which eradicated 15...

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Nosocomial Rotavirus Infection in Children in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Te Lee

    2008-10-01

    Conclusion: NRI may cause significant morbidity in hospitalized children, especially young infants and those with underlying diseases. Infection control with hospital surveillance, strict isolation and cohort care should be adopted to prevent the spread of rotavirus among special care units.

  3. Clinical experience of infective endocarditis complicated by acute cerebrovascular accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Yang Hsu

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Early surgical intervention for IE with ischemic stroke may prevent adverse events, particularly in patients with impaired renal function, diabetes, or staphylococcal infection. A delay in operation of > 30 days is recommended after hemorrhagic stroke.

  4. Infections in British clinical laboratories, 1986-87.

    OpenAIRE

    Grist, N R; Emslie, J A

    1989-01-01

    During 1986-87 this continuing survey showed 15 specific infections in the staff of 235 laboratories, representing 28,524 person years of exposure. The community was the probable source of four of the five cases of tuberculosis and one of the five cases of salmonellosis. Occupational exposure was the probable cause of four infections by Shigella flexneri, three by Salmonella typhimurium, and one by S typhi, all affecting medical laboratory scientific officers (MLSOs) in microbiology. Occupati...

  5. Laboratory and Clinical Aspects of Human Herpesvirus 6 Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnafous, Pascale; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a widespread betaherpesvirus which is genetically related to human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and now encompasses two different species: HHV-6A and HHV-6B. HHV-6 exhibits a wide cell tropism in vivo and, like other herpesviruses, induces a lifelong latent infection in humans. As a noticeable difference with respect to other human herpesviruses, genomic HHV-6 DNA is covalently integrated into the subtelomeric region of cell chromosomes (ciHHV-6) in about 1% of the general population. Although it is infrequent, this may be a confounding factor for the diagnosis of active viral infection. The diagnosis of HHV-6 infection is performed by both serologic and direct methods. The most prominent technique is the quantification of viral DNA in blood, other body fluids, and organs by means of real-time PCR. Many active HHV-6 infections, corresponding to primary infections, reactivations, or exogenous reinfections, are asymptomatic. However, the virus may be the cause of serious diseases, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. As emblematic examples of HHV-6 pathogenicity, exanthema subitum, a benign disease of infancy, is associated with primary infection, whereas further virus reactivations can induce severe encephalitis cases, particularly in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Generally speaking, the formal demonstration of the causative role of HHV-6 in many acute and chronic human diseases is difficult due to the ubiquitous nature of the virus, chronicity of infection, existence of two distinct species, and limitations of current investigational tools. The antiviral compounds ganciclovir, foscarnet, and cidofovir are effective against active HHV-6 infections, but the indications for treatment, as well as the conditions of drug administration, are not formally approved to date. There are still numerous pending questions about HHV-6 which should stimulate future research works on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and

  6. The relationships between clinical variables and renal parenchymal disease in pediatric clinically suspected urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Lim Byun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the significance of clinical signs and laboratory findings as predictors of renal parenchymal lesions and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in childhood urinary tract infection (UTI. Methods : From July 2005 to July 2008, 180 patients admitted with a first febrile UTI at the Pediatric Department of Konkuk University Hospital were included in this study. The following were the clinical variables: leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP, positive urine nitrite, positive urine culture, and fever duration both before and after treatment. We evaluated the relationships between clinical variables and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA scan and voiding cystourethrography (VCUG results. Results : VCUG was performed in 148 patients; of them, 37 (25.0% had VUR: 18 (12.2% had low-grade (I-II VUR, and 19 (10.5% had high-grade (III-V VUR. Of the 95 patients who underwent DMSA scanning, 29 (30.5% had cortical defects, of which 21 (63.6% had VUR: 10 (30.3%, low-grade (I-II VUR; and 11 (33.3%, high-grade VUR. Of the 57 patients who were normal on DMSA scan, 8 (14.0% had low-grade VUR and 6 (10.5% had high-grade VUR. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the DMSA scan in predicting high-grade VUR were 64.7%, 69.9%, 33.3%, and 89.5%, respectively. Leukocytosis, elevated CRP, and prolonged fever (?#243;6 hours after treatment were significantly correlated with the cortical defects on DMSA scans and high-grade VUR. Conclusion : Clinical signs, including prolonged fever after treatment, elevated CRP, and leukocytosis, are positive predictors of acute pyelonephritis and high-grade VUR.

  7. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hepatitis B virus in HIV-infected patients in Guangdong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S M; Cai, W P; Hu, F Y; Lan, Y; Liao, B L; Chen, Y P; Tang, X P

    2016-09-01

    This study investigated the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in HIV-infected adults at the time of antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in Guangdong province, China. A total of 2793 HIV-infected adults were enrolled between January 2004 and September 2011. Demographic data and laboratory parameters were collected, HBV-DNA levels were measured, and HBV genotypes were identified before ART initiation. The prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in HIV-infected patients was 13.2%. A total of 266 HIV/HBV co-infected patients and 1469 HIV mono-infected patients were recruited. The median alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels of HIV/HBV co-infected patients were higher than HIV mono-infected patients (32 U/L vs. 22 U/L, p HIV/HBV co-infected patients was lower than HIV mono-infected patients (59 cells/mm(3) vs. 141 cells/mm(3), p study indicates a high prevalence of HBsAg in HIV-infected adults in Guangdong. The level of CD4 cell count in HIV/HBV co-infected patients was much lower than HIV mono-infected patients, especially in patients who were HBeAg-positive and had a high level of HBV-DNA. The predominant HBV genotype in HIV/HBV co-infected patients is genotype B. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Epidemiological and Clinical profile of HIV-infected patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Treatment and care services for HIV patients in Tanzania began 2004 with free access to anti-retroviral therapy (ART). More than 1000 HIV clinics have been established to-date. Each clinic is obliged to provide statistical and clinical feedback for further improvement. Broad objective: The objective of this study ...

  9. Clinical, Pathological and Immunological Aspects of Transplacental PRRS Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes Danish research activities on porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) with emphasis on experimental infections in pregnant swine. The first case of PRRS was diagnosed in Denmark in 1992 and subsequently the disease spread to most other parts of the country...... PRRSV in the previously unaffected Danish pig population. Acute PRRS like disease was observed in non-vaccinated as well as in vaccinated herds, and it was demonstrated that the vaccine strain had reverted to virulence. By experimental infection of late term pregnant sows, we demonstrated that a field....... The first animal experiments elucidated the pathogenicity of Danish PRRS virus (PRRSV) isolates in pregnant sows together with the effects of infection at various stages of gestation. In 1996, the introduction of a vaccination program using an attenuated live PRRS vaccine led to an epidemic of American type...

  10. [Prevalence and clinical characteristics of coronavirus NL63 infection in children hospitalized for acute lower respiratory tract infections in Changsha].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Bing; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Gao, Han-Chun; Zhao, Xin; Zhong, Li-Li; Zhou, Qiong-Hua; Hou, Yun-De; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to explore the prevalence and clinical characteristics of human coronavirus NL63 infection in hospitalized children with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRTI) in Changsha. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) samples were collected from 1185 hospitalized children with ALRTI at the People's Hospital of Hunan province, between September 2008 and October 2010. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed to screen for coronavirus NL63, which is a 255 bp fragment of a part of N gene. All positive amplification products were confirmed by sequencing and compared with those in GenBank. The overall frequency of coronavirus NL63 infection was 0.8%, 6 (60%) out of the coronavirus NL63 positive patients were detected in summer, 2 in autumn, 1 in spring and winter, respectively. The patients were from 2 months to two and a half years old. The clinical diagnosis was bronchopneumonia (60%), bronchiolitis (30%), and acute laryngotracheal bronchitis (10%). Four of the 10 cases had critical illness, 4 cases had underlying diseases, and 7 cases had mixed infection with other viruses. The homogeneity of coronavirus NL63 with those published in the GenBank at nucleotide levels was 97%-100%. Coronavirus NL63 infection exists in hospitalized children with acute lower respiratory tract infection in Changsha. Coronavirus NL63 infections are common in children under 3 years of age. There is significant difference in the infection rate between the boys and the girls: the boys had higher rate than the girls. The peak of prevalence of the coronavirus NL63 was in summer. A single genetic lineage of coronavirus NL63 was revealed in human subjects in Changsha. Coronavirus NL63 may also be one of the lower respiratory pathogen in China.

  11. The clinical features of respiratory infections caused by the Streptococcus anginosus group

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Naito, Keisuke; Akata, Kentaro; Shimabukuro, Ikuko; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Background The Streptococcus anginosus group (SAG) play important roles in respiratory infections. It is ordinarily difficult to distinguish them from contaminations as the causative pathogens of respiratory infections because they are often cultured in respiratory specimens. Therefore, it is important to understand the clinical characteristics and laboratory findings of respiratory infections caused by the SAG members. The aim of this study is to clarify the role of the SAG bacteria in respi...

  12. Pulmonary infection in patients with cyclosporine, azathioprine, and corticosteroids after cardiac transplantation; Clinical and radiographic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Ikezoe, Junpei; Godwin, J.D.; Marglin, S.I.; Allen, M.D. (University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1991-07-01

    Between November 1985 and November 1989, 54 patients have undergone 55 cardiac transplants, 5 of whom died during operation or one week after transplantation. The remaining 49 patients with a minimum follow-up of 5 months were studied to examine pulmonary infection clinically and radiologically while receiving triple drug immunosuppression consisting of cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisolone. Pulmonary infection occurred in 14 patients (29%) with a total of 21 occasions. Causative organisms were identified in 9 occasions, with the most common organism being Cytomegalovirus (CMV). One patient died of pulmonary infection with Aspergillus. Causative organisms occurring in the remaining 12 occasions of pulmonary infection were unknown, which did not lead to death. Because pulmonary infection of unknown organisms rapidly responded to convensional antibiotics, it seemed to have been caused by bacteria. Pulmonary infection of unknown organism occurred 13.2{+-}3.2 months after transplantation, as compared with 3.3{+-}1.0 months in pulmonary infection of known organisms. Chest plain radiographic features fell into four types: (1) interstitial shadow seen in pulmonary infection of CMV, Pneumocystis carinii, or Hemophilia influenza, (2) patchy, and basilar and lobular consolidation shadows in bacterial pneumonia, (3) localized nodular shadow in aspergillosis, and (4) multiple patchy and confluent opacity patterns occurring in herpes simplex viral infection. Pulmonary infection of influenza bacteria for one patient and pulmonary infection of unknown organisms for 4 patients were difficult to identify from pulmonary infection of CMV. (N.K.).

  13. Clinical Presentation of Soft-tissue Infections and its Management: A Study of 100 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baldev; Singh, Sukha; Khichy, Sudhir; Ghatge, Avinash

    2017-01-01

    Soft-tissue infections vary widely in their nature and severity. A clear approach to the management must allow their rapid identification and treatment as they can be life-threatening. Clinical presentation of soft-tissue infections and its management. A prospective study based on 100 patients presenting with soft-tissue infections was done. All the cases of soft-tissue infections were considered irrespective of age, sex, etiological factors, or systemic disorders. The findings were evaluated regarding the pattern of soft-tissue infections in relation to age and sex, clinical presentation, complications, duration of hospital stay, management, and mortality. The most commonly involved age group was in the range of 41-60 years with male predominance. Abscess formation (45%) was the most common clinical presentation. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was the most common associated comorbid condition. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common culture isolate obtained. The most common complication seen was renal failure. Patients with surgical site infections had maximum duration of stay in the hospital. About 94% of the cases of soft-tissue infections were managed surgically. Mortality was mostly encountered in the cases of complications of cellulitis. Skin and soft-tissue infections are among the most common infections encountered by the emergency physicians. Ignorance, reluctance to treatment, economic constraints, and illiteracy delay the early detection and the initiation of proper treatment. Adequate and timely surgical intervention in most of the cases is of utmost importance to prevent the complications and reduce the mortality.

  14. Clinical Forms of Chronic Epstein — Barr Virus Infection: Questions of Modern Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.K. Duda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discussed in detail the questions of clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of Epstein — Barr virus infection. The basic methods of modern laboratory diagnosis of this disease are given, and the list of examinations which must be indicated to a patient with suspected Epstein — Barr virus infection is provided.

  15. The prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in HIV-infected patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Badsberg, Jens Henrik

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence and clinical significance of intestinal parasites in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, faecal specimens from 96 HIV-infected patients were submitted to microbiological analyses, including microscopy and polymerase chain reaction for protozoa and e...

  16. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in a University Health Population: Clinical Manifestations, Epidemiology, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Robert; Aierstuck, Sara; Williams, Elizabeth A.; Melby, Bernette

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors described clinical presentations of oral and genital herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections in a university health population and implications of these findings. Participants and Methods: Using a standardized data collection tool, 215 records of patients with symptomatic culture-positive HSV infections were reviewed. Results:…

  17. Clinical Presentation of Soft‑tissue Infections and its Management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... Background: Soft‑tissue infections vary widely in their nature and severity. A clear approach to the management must allow their rapid identification and treatment as they can be life‑threatening. Objective: Clinical presentation of soft‑tissue infections and its management. Materials and Methods: A ...

  18. Clinical evaluation and outcomes of naturally acquired West Nile virus infection in raptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Nicole M; Kratz, Gail E; Bates, Rebecca; Scherpelz, Judy A; Bowen, Richard A; Komar, Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection and associated disease and mortality have been documented in numerous North American raptor species. Information regarding clinical presentations and long-term outcomes of WNV-infected raptors is important in the clinic for the diagnosis, treatment, and assessment of prognosis, as well as for understanding potential population level effects on raptor species. Raptors of 22 species admitted to a rehabilitation clinic were tested, from 2002 to 2005, for previous and acute WNV infection, while comparing clinical syndromes, trauma, and rehabilitation outcomes. Forty-two percent of admitted raptors (132/314) had been infected with WNV, and these presented with a WNV-attributed clinical disease rate of 67.4% (89/132). West Nile virus-infected raptors were less likely to be released (79/132 [59.8%]) than negative raptors (138/182 [75.8%]) and more likely to die or be euthanized (47/132 [35.6%] for WNV-infected vs. 32/182 [17.6%] for WNV-negative). However, WNV-infected raptors with neurologic disease were no less likely to be released (29/53 [54.7%]) than those without neurologic disease (50/79 [63.3%]). Clinical WNV-associated syndromes varied among species. Great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) were more likely to have neurologic signs, whereas American kestrels (Falco sparverius) and Swainson's hawks (Buteo swainsonii) were less likely to have neurologic signs. These results suggest that free-ranging raptors are frequently infected with WNV and that clinical syndromes differ among species. WNV has potentially devastating effects on raptors; however, rehabilitation of WNV-infected raptors can lead to positive outcomes, even for those having had severe neurologic disease.

  19. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of Mycobacterium haemophilum infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.A.; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L.E.; Soolingen, D. van; Prins, J.M.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium haemophilum is a slowly growing acid-fast bacillus (AFB) belonging to the group of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) frequently found in environmental habitats, which can colonize and occasionally infect humans and animals. Several findings suggest that water reservoirs are a likely

  20. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of Mycobacterium haemophilum infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindeboom, J.A.; Bruijnesteijn van Coppenraet, L.E.S.; van Soolingen, D.; Prins, J.M.; Kuijper, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium haemophilum is a slowly growing acid-fast bacillus (AFB) belonging to the group of nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) frequently found in environmental habitats, which can colonize and occasionally infect humans and animals. Several findings suggest that water reservoirs are a likely

  1. The clinical appearance of neonatal rotavirus infection: Association ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BackgroundRotavirus is the most important aetiological agent causing severe gastroenteritis in children <2 years of age in South Africa and worldwide. Most endemic neonatal nursery strains are thought to be asymptomatic. However, serious conditions have been reported to be associated with rotavirus infection, such as ...

  2. Independent and interactive effects of HIV infection, clinical stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There is still limited to no evidence on the independent and interactive effects of HIV infection, disease stage, baseline disease severity and other important comorbidities on mortality risk among young children treated for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in South Africa (SA, using the World Health Organization ...

  3. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection as a Cause of Outpatient Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... predictors of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) as a cause of pediatric outpatient department ... with pediatric UTI (1,4,5). Effective management of patients suffering ..... patients. J of. Resear in Medical and Dental Sci 2014; 2(1). 17.

  4. KIR : HLA association with clinical manifestations of HBV infection in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious health prob- lem in developing and ... superfamily and C-type lectin superfamily (McQueen and. Parham 2002). Among ... KIR : HLA genes in HBV patients from south India and found out that KIR ...

  5. Acinetobacter baumannii-Infected Vascular Catheters Collected from Horses in an Equine Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Vaneechoutte, Mario; Devriese, Luc A.; Dijkshoorn, Lenie; Lamote, Benedicte; Deprez, Piet; Verschraegen, Gerda; Haesebrouck, Freddy

    2000-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii was isolated from tips clipped from seven intravenous jugular catheters collected from horses in the Ghent University equine clinic. They originated from seven different horses. Three of the seven showed evidence of local infection.

  6. A Large Outbreak of Hepatitis C Virus Infections in a Hemodialysis Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc B.; Gutowski, Jennifer; Ghiselli, Margherita; Cheng, Tabitha; Hamdounia, Shadia Bel; Suryaprasad, Anil; Xu, Fujie; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Hayden, Tonya; Forbi, Joseph C.; Xia, Guo-liang; Arduino, Matthew J.; Patel, Ami; Patel, Priti R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In November and December 2012, 6 patients at a hemodialysis clinic were given a diagnosis of new hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. OBJECTIVE To investigate the outbreak to identify risk factors for transmission. METHODS A case patient was defined as a patient who was HCV-antibody negative on clinic admission but subsequently was found to be HCV-antibody positive from January 1, 2008, through April 30, 2013. Patient charts were reviewed to identify and describe case patients. The hypervariable region 1 of HCV from infected patients was tested to assess viral genetic relatedness. Infection control practices were evaluated via observations. A forensic chemiluminescent agent was used to identify blood contamination on environmental surfaces after cleaning. RESULTS Eighteen case patients were identified at the clinic from January 1, 2008, through April 30, 2013, resulting in an estimated 16.7% attack rate. Analysis of HCV quasispecies identified 4 separate clusters of transmission involving 11 case patients. The case patients and previously infected patients in each cluster were treated in neighboring dialysis stations during the same shift, or at the same dialysis station on 2 consecutive shifts. Lapses in infection control were identified. Visible and invisible blood was identified on multiple surfaces at the clinic. CONCLUSIONS Epidemiologic and laboratory data confirmed transmission of HCV among numerous patients at the dialysis clinic over 6 years. Infection control breaches were likely responsible. This outbreak highlights the importance of rigorous adherence to recommended infection control practices in dialysis settings. PMID:26573412

  7. Evaluation of Clinical and Laboratory Data in Patients with Recurrent Infections and Suspected Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ahanchian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent infections is among the most frequent clinical dilemmas for primary care physicians. Immunodeficiency disorders are a heterogeneous group of illnesses that predispose patients to the recurrent infections, autoimmunity and malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory data collected for the final diagnosis of patients referred with recurrent infections and suspected immunodeficiency to a local immunodeficiency clinic.   Methods: This epidemiological study was carried out between April 2010 and September 2012 at the Immunodeficiency Clinic of Mashhad. All patients with clinical manifestations of immunodeficiency who were referred to our clinic during this period of time were included in this study. 41 patients aged from 10 months to 51 years, were evaluated. Results: Forty one patients, aged between 10 months and 51 years were evaluated. Eleven patients had a primary immunodeficiency, four cases had a secondary immunodeficiency, in three patients an underlying structural disease were found, eight patients were predisposed to recurrent infections as a result of allergies and finally, fifteen cases were found to be normal individuals.   Discussion: Most patients with recurrent infection have a normal immune system. Allergic disorders are the most common predisposing factor to recurrent infection. However, as immunodeficiency disorders are potentially serious, early diagnosis can improve the quality of life and outcome and prevent severe sequels in future.

  8. Epidemiology of anal HPV infection in high-risk men attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic in Puerto Rico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Colón-López

    Full Text Available Recent studies in Puerto Rico have reported an increasing incidence of anal cancer in Puerto Rican men. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among men attending an STI clinic in Puerto Rico.We conducted a cross-sectional study among 205 men 18 years and older. A comprehensive survey was administered that included a demographic and a behavioral assessment. Separate logistic regression models were performed to determine factors associated with any, high-risk (HR, and multiple anal HPV infection.The mean age of the study sample was 38.0±13.5 years. The most common HR types were 58, 51 and 31. Overall, HR anal HPV infection was found in 53.5% of the participants. Multiple HPV types in the anal canal were found in 47.6% of the sample. A third (29.8% of participants reported being men who had sex with men (MSM. MSM had a significantly higher prevalence of any, HR and multiple HPV infection (p-value<0.05. Separate multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that being MSM was associated with any (OR = 4.5; [95%CI: 1.9-10.7], HR (OR = 3.4; [95%CI: 1.1-10.3 and multiple anal HPV infection (OR = 3.6; [95%CI: 1.5-9.1. HIV was marginally associated with multiple anal HPV infection in multivariate analysis (OR = 3.3; 95%CI = 1.0-11.0.Anal HPV is common among sexually active men attending this STI clinic, with higher likelihood of anal HPV infection among MSM.

  9. Clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga Eduardo Lorens

    Full Text Available Co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is increasingly common and affects the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has improved the life expectancy of HIV infected patients, but, by extending survival, it permits the development of HCV cirrhosis. This study tried to evaluate clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV. We evaluated 134 HCV-infected patients: i group A - 65 co-infected HCV/HIV patients, ii group B - 69 mono-infected HCV patients. The impact of HIV infection on HCV liver disease was analyzed using Child's score, ultrasound findings and liver histology. Patients were subjected to HCV genotyping and anti-HBs dosage. Patients mean age was 42.4 years (±9.1 and 97 (72.4% were males. Injected drug use and homo/bisexual practice were more frequently encountered in the co-infected group: 68.3% and 78.0%, respectively. Antibodies against hepatitis B virus (anti-HBs were found in only 38.1% of the patients (66.7% group A x 33.3% group B. Ten out of 14 individuals (71.4% who had liver disease (Child B or C and 25 out of 34 (73.5% who showed ultrasound evidence of chronic liver disease were in the co-infection group. HCV genotype-2/3 was more frequently encountered in co-infected patients (36.9% group A vs. 21.8% group B. Conclusions: a HIV infection seems to adversely affect the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C, b injected drug use, bi/homosexual practice and genotype-2/3 were more frequently encountered in co-infected patients, c immunization against HBV should be encouraged in these patients.

  10. Raoultella spp.-clinical significance, infections and susceptibility to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sękowska, Alicja

    2017-05-01

    The genus Raoultella belongs to the family of Enterobacteriaceae. Raoultella spp. are Gram-negative, aerobic, non-motile rods. This genus can be distinguished from the genus Klebsiella, in that genus use histamine as the only source of carbon in the medium. Also, Raoultella grow at 4 °C and do not produce gas from lactose at 44.5 °C. Raoultella sp. is known to inhabit natural environments (water, soil, plants). The reservoir of Raoultella is the gastrointestinal tract and upper respiratory tract. Raoultella spp. are opportunistic bacteria, which usually cause infections of the biliary tract, pneumonia and bacteraemia in oncologic and with lower immunity patients. Raoultella planticola and Raoultella ornithinolytica are the most frequently encountered human pathogens among the genus Raoultella. In this review, the current knowledge on Raoultella infections is summarized.

  11. Co-Infections and Sero-Prevalence of HIV, Syphilis, Hepatitis B and C Infections in Sexually Transmitted Infections Clinic Attendees of Tertiary Care Hospital in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattar, Sonali; Aggarwal, Prabhav; Sahani, Satyendra Kumar; Bhalla, Preena

    2016-01-01

    HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B and C (HBV & HCV) infections modify the epidemiology and presentation of each other. This study aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of these infections and their co-infections in sexually transmitted infections (STI) clinic attendees in New Delhi, India. A retrospective study including 220 patients was conducted during May 2014 through December 2014. Serodiagnosis of HIV was performed as per Strategy III of NACO guidelines; syphilis by VDRL followed by TPHA; HBV and HCV by rapid immuno-chromatographic test followed by ELISA. Male subjects were slightly more in number as compared to females (56.36% vs. 43.63%). Twelve (5.45%), 14 (6.36%), three (1.36 %) and one (0.45%) were reactive for HIV, VDRL, HBV and HCV, respectively. Three were both HIV and syphilis positive and one was both HIV and HBV positive; no co-infections of HBV/HCV, HIV/HBV/HCV and HIV/HBV/HCV/syphilis coexisted. High prevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis in STI clinic attendees mandate routine screening to detect co-infections and follow prompt therapy in order to minimize their sequelae.

  12. Clinical and biological differences between recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straus, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    The major features that distinguish recurrent herpes simplex virus infections from zoster are illustrated in this article by two case histories. The clinical and epidemiologic features that characterize recurrent herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections are reviewed. It is noted that herpesvirus infections are more common and severe in patients with cellular immune deficiency. Each virus evokes both humoral and cellular immune response in the course of primary infection. DNA hybridization studies with RNA probes labelled with sulfur-35 indicate that herpes simplex viruses persist within neurons, and that varicella-zoster virus is found in the satellite cells that encircle the neurons

  13. Acute Appendicitis as the Initial Clinical Presentation of Primary HIV-1 Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleimann, Mariane H; Leth, Steffen; Krarup, Astrid R

    2018-01-01

    We report a case of an adolescent who presented at our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. While the initial diagnosis was acute appendicitis, a secondary and coincidental diagnosis of primary HIV-1 infection was made. Concurrent and subsequent clinical and molecular biology findings ...... form the basis of our argument that primary HIV-1 infection was the cause of acute appendicitis in this individual.......We report a case of an adolescent who presented at our emergency department with acute abdominal pain. While the initial diagnosis was acute appendicitis, a secondary and coincidental diagnosis of primary HIV-1 infection was made. Concurrent and subsequent clinical and molecular biology findings...

  14. Influenza and Respiratory Syncytial viral infections in Malaysia: Demographic and Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M M; Wong, K K; Hanafiah, A; Isahak, I

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major public health problem worldwide. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of respiratory syncytial and influenza virus infections and analyzed in respect to demography and clinical perspective. Methods : The specimens were processed by cell culture and immunofluorescent assay (IFA) and real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR (rRT-PCR) for detection of respiratory viruses. Results : Out of 505 specimens 189 (37.8%) were positive, in which RSV was positive in 124(24.8%) cases and influenza A was positive in 65(13%) cases. Positive cases for influenza virus A and RSV were analyzed based on demography: age, gender, ethnicity and clinical symptoms. There were no significant differences among gender, ethnicity and clinical symptoms in both RSV and influenza A virus infections. It was observed that children below 3 years of ages were more prone to RSV infections. On the contrary, influenza virus A infected all age groups of humans. RSV infects mostly child below 3 years of age and influenza virus infects all age group. No specificity of RSV and influenza infection in relation to demography.

  15. Bacterial infections in horses: a retrospective study at the University Equine Clinic of Bern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchaud, Y; Gerber, V; Rossano, A; Perreten, V

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial infections present a major challenge in equine medicine. Therapy should be based on bacteriological diagnosis to successfully minimize the increasing number of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. The present study is a retrospective analysis of bacteriological results from purulent infections in horses admitted at the University Equine Clinic of Bern from 2004 to 2008. From 378 samples analyzed, 557 isolates were identified, of which Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus and coliforms were the most common. Special attention was paid to infections with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) ST398 and a non-MRSA, multidrug-resistant S. aureus clone ST1 (BERN100). Screening of newly-admitted horses showed that 2.2 % were carriers of MRSA. Consequent hygiene measures taken at the Clinic helped to overcome a MRSA outbreak and decrease the number of MRSA infections.

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Patterns of Post-Operative Spinal Infection: Relationship between the Clinical Onset of Infection and the Infection Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seon-Jeong; Lee, Sang Hoon; Chung, Hye Won; Lee, Min Hee; Shin, Myung Jin; Park, Seoung Woo

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the patterns of postoperative spinal infection according to the passage of time. Institutional review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was not obtained for the retrospective review of patients' medical records. A total of 43 patients (27 men and 16 women; mean age, 64) diagnosed with postoperative spinal infection were included in this study. We retrospectively reviewed the MRI findings and the medical records and categorized the infection sites based on MRI, i.e., anterior, posterior, and both parts. The duration of the clinical onset from surgery was divided, i.e., acute (≤2 weeks), subacute (2-4 weeks), and late (>4 weeks). Postoperative spinal infection was involved in the posterior part in 31 (72%), anterior part in two (4.7%), and both parts in 10 patients (23.3%). Abscess or phlegmon in the back muscles and laminectomy site were the most common MRI findings. The number of patients with acute, subacute, and late clinical onset were 35, two, and six, respectively (mean, 33.4 days; range, 1-730 days). The mean duration of the clinical onset was 12 days in the posterior part, 15.2 days in both parts, and 456.5 days in the anterior part. Postoperative spinal infection usually occurred within four weeks in the posterior part and over time the infection was considered to spread into the anterior part. For the evaluation of postoperative spinal infection, the posterior surgical field was more important than the vertebral body or the disc space on MRI.

  17. Epidemiology of clinical feline herpesvirus infection in zoo-housed cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Carmel L; Lamberski, Nadine; Rideout, Bruce A; Vaida, Florin; Citino, Scott B; Barrie, Michael T; Haefele, Holly J; Junge, Randall E; Murray, Suzan; Hungerford, Laura L

    2017-10-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine the incidence of and risk factors for clinical feline herpesvirus (FHV) infection in zoo-housed cheetahs and determine whether dam infection was associated with offspring infection. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. ANIMALS 144 cheetah cubs born in 6 zoos from 1988 through 2007. PROCEDURES Data were extracted from the health records of cheetahs and their dams to identify incident cases of clinical FHV infection and estimate incidence from birth to 18 months of age. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models, controlling for correlations among cheetahs with the same dam, were used to identify risk factors for incident FHV infection. RESULTS Cumulative incidence of FHV infection in cheetah cubs was 35% (50/144). No significant association between dam and offspring infection was identified in any model. Factors identified as significant through multivariable analysis varied by age group. For cheetahs up to 3 months of age, the most important predictor of FHV infection was having a dam that had received a preparturition FHV vaccine regimen that included a modified-live virus vaccine versus a dam that had received no preparturition vaccine. Other risk factors included being from a small litter, being born to a primiparous dam, and male sex. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE This study provided the first population-level characterization of the incidence of and risk factors for FHV infection in cheetahs, and findings confirmed the importance of this disease. Recognition that clinical FHV infection in the dam was not a significant predictor of disease in cubs and identification of other significant factors have implications for disease management.

  18. Characterization of HIV Recent Infection Among High-Risk Men at Public STI Clinics in Mumbai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hong-Ha M; Fatch, Robin; Grant, Robert M; Mathur, Meenakshi; Kumta, Sameer; Jerajani, Hemangi; Kellogg, Timothy A; Lindan, Christina P

    2018-02-16

    We examined associations with HIV recent infection and estimated transmitted drug resistance (TDR) prevalence among 3345 men at sexually transmitted infection clinics in Mumbai (2002-2005). HIV seroincidence was 7.92% by the BED-CEIA and was higher at a clinic located near brothels (12.39%) than at a hospital-based clinic (3.94%). HIV recent infection was associated with a lifetime history of female sex worker (FSW) partners, HSV-2, genital warts, and gonorrhea. TDR prevalence among recent infection cases was 5.7%. HIV testing services near sex venues may enhance case detection among high-risk men who represent a bridging population between FSWs and the men's other sexual partners.

  19. Staphylococcus aureus ocular infection: methicillin-resistance, clinical features, and antibiotic susceptibilities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chun Chuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection is an important public health issue. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of ocular infections caused by MRSA and to identify the clinical characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility of ocular MRSA infections by comparing those of ocular methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The medical records of the patients (n = 519 with culture-proven S. aureus ocular infections seen between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and seventy-four patients with MRSA and 245 with MSSA ocular infections were identified. The average rate of MRSA in S. aureus infections was 52.8% and the trend was stable over the ten years (P value for trend  = 0.228. MRSA ocular infections were significantly more common among the patients with healthcare exposure (P = 0.024, but 66.1% (181/274 patients with MRSA ocular infections had no healthcare exposure. The most common clinical presentation for both MRSA and MSSA ocular infections was keratitis; MRSA and MSSA caused a similar disease spectrum except for lid infections. MRSA was significantly more resistant than MSSA to clindamycin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (all P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated a paralleled trend of ocular MRSA infection in a highly prevalent MRSA country by hospital-based survey. Except for lid disorder, MRSA shared similar spectrum of ocular pathology with MSSA. Since S. aureus is a common ocular pathogen, our results raise clinician's attention to the existence of highly prevalent MRSA.

  20. Clinical analysis of 28 patients with deep neck infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Shoichiro; Kobayashi, Taisuke; Nakamura, Koshiro

    2008-01-01

    Although the number of patients with deep neck infection has been decreasing with the development of antibiotics, this condition sometimes shows a poor prognosis. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important for good results. In this study, 28 patients (21 males, 7 females) with deep neck infection treated between April 1991 and March 2004 at Department of Otolaryngology, Ehime Prefectural Central Hospital were investigated retrospectively. Twenty-seven of those patients resulted in good recovery, while one patient died the day after admission because of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Surgical drainage was performed for 19 of 28 patients and tracheostomy or postoperative endotracheal intubation was performed in eight patients. The average interval between admission and surgery was 1.2 days, which was shorter than that in other previous reports. Early diagnosis using CT with enhancement and surgical drainage are important in order to prevent progression of abscess into the mediastinum, which is sometimes fatal. Tracheostomy or postoperative endotracheal intubation is necessary when upper aiway stenosis is occurs. (author)

  1. [Clinical aspects of human infection by the avian influenza virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubau, P

    2009-01-01

    The species barrier is not perfect for Influenza A and numerous transmissions of the virus from pigs or poultry to humans have been described these years. Appearing in 1997 and becoming epidemic in 2003, influenza A/H5N1 provoked many deadly enzootics in poultry batteries (highly pathogenic avian influenza of HPAI). Starting in Asia, many countries throughout Africa and Europe were affected. Sporadic human cases were described in direct contact with diseased chicken or other poultry. Half of the cases are lethal, but human to human transmission occurs with difficulty. From January 2003 to August 11th 2009, 438 cases were declared worldwide with 262 deaths. Many countries declared cases, but recently most cases occurred in Egypt. Measures in hospital were taken which were copied from the measures for SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), but these were probably excessive in this case, considering the low rate of secondary cases with A/H5N1. In many human infections, signs of severe respiratory distress develop and multi organ failure. It was feared that this deadly virus could become easily transmitted between humans, leading to a new pandemic. This was not the case up to now. The strong pathogenicity of the virus is still not completely explained, but the deep location of infection in the lungs and the deregulation of cytokine production by the target cells, particularly macrophages, may be part of the explanation.

  2. Feline babesiosis : signalment, clinical pathology and concurrent infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schoeman

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-six cats with naturally occurring Babesia felis infection were studied. No breed or sex predilection could be identified, but there was an apparent predilection for young adult cats less than 3 years of age. Macrocytic, hypochromic, regenerative anaemia was present in 57 % of the cats and in-saline agglutination tests were positive in 16 %. No characteristic changes were observed in total or differential leukocyte counts. Thrombocyte counts were variable and thrombocytopaenia was an inconsistent finding. Hepatic cytosol enzyme activity and total bilirubin concentrations were elevated in the majority of cats. Serum protein values were mostly normal, but increased values were occasionally observed and polyclonal gammopathies were observed in all cats with increased total globulin concentrations. No remarkable changes in renal parameters were observed. A variety of electrolyte abnormalities occurred in a number of cats, but no consistent pattern of change could be identified. A close correlation was evident between peripheral and central parasite counts. Concurrent infections with Haemobartonella felis, feline immunodeficiency virus and/or feline leukemia virus were identified in a number of cats.

  3. CLINICAL AND VIROLOGIC FOUNDATION FOR PATHOGENETIC THERAPY OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS TYPE 6 INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Myukke

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Information about an infection caused by human herpes virus type 6, its' epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical variants, is reviewed. Clinical cases, diagnosed at a time of study, are briefly reviewed.Key words: human herpes virus type 6, exanthema subitum (roseola infantum, fever of unknown origin, mononucleosis like syndrome, meningoencephalitis, children.

  4. Quantitation of respiratory viruses in relation to clinical course in children with acute respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Rogier R.; Schinkel, Janke; dek, Irene; Koekkoek, Sylvie M.; Visser, Caroline E.; de Jong, Menno D.; Molenkamp, Richard; Pajkrt, Dasja

    2010-01-01

    Quantitation of respiratory viruses by PCR could potentially aid in clinical interpretation of PCR results. We conducted a study in children admitted with acute respiratory tract infections to study correlations between the clinical course of illness and semiquantitative detection of 14 respiratory

  5. (HIV) infection among pregnant women in an antenatal clinic in Port

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Women attending ante-natal clinic in Nigeria are routinely screened for HIV/AIDS. A retrospective study was conducted between 2000 and 2004 to investigate the prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic in Braithwalte Memorial Hospital (BMH), Port ...

  6. [Clinical analysis of two cases of imported children Zika virus infection in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, C G; Xu, Y; Jiang, H Q; Yin, Y X; Zhang, J H; Zhu, W J; Liang, X J; Chen, M X; Ye, J W; Tan, L M; Luo, D; Gong, S T

    2016-05-01

    To analyze the clinical characteristics, outcome and diagnosis of two cases of imported children Zika virus infection in China. A retrospective analysis was performed on clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome of two cases of imported children with Zika virus infection in February 2016 in Enping People's Hospital of Guangdong. Two cases of children with imported Zika virus infection resided in an affected area of Venezuela, 8-year-old girl and her 6 year-old brother. The main findings on physical examination included the following manifestations: fever, rash, and conjunctivitis. The rash was first limited to the abdomen, but extended to the torso, neck and face, and faded after 3-4 d. The total number of white blood cells was not high and liver function was normal. The diagnosis of two cases of Zika virus infection was confirmed by the expert group of Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, according to the epidemiological history, clinical manifestations and Zika virus nucleic acid detection results.Treatment of Zika virus infection involves supportive care. Two Zika virus infection children had a relatively benign outcome. At present, Zika virus infection in children is an imported disease in China. No specific therapy is available for this disease. Information on long-term outcomes among infants and children with Zika virus disease is limited, routine pediatric care is advised for these infants and children.

  7. [An analysis of clinical characteristic and related risk factors in 208 cirrhotic patients complicated with infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G H; Wang, M; Wang, L; Wang, X M; Wang, Y; Ou, X J; Jia, J D

    2018-02-01

    Objective: To analyze the clinical features and risk factors of cirrhotic patients complicated with infections. Methods: The clinical and laboratory characteristics of cirrhotic patients complicated with infections hospitalized from April 2014 to June 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. Relevant risk factors for infection and mortality were explored. Results: The overall incidence of infections was 17.6% in 1 670 hospitalized cirrhotic patients. Among the recruited 208 patients in this study, alcoholic, viral hepatitis B or C and autoimmune liver diseases accounted for 29.8% (62/208), 26.0% (54/208), and 22.1% (46/208), respectively. The most common infection site was respiratory tract (70.2%), followed by urinary tract, intestinal and intra-abdomen. Forty-six pathogens were isolated from 32 patients, including 22 (47.8%) Gram negative bacteria, 16 (34.8%) Gram positive bacteria and 2(4.3%) mycobacterium tuberculosis, 5 (10.9%) fungi and 1 (2.2%) mycoplasma. The mortality in patients with nosocomial infections (16.7%,7/42) was higher than that in patients with community-acquired infections (6.0%,10/166, P =0.025). All 17 deaths occurred in decompensated cirrhosis. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that hepatic encephalopathy and prothrombin time were independent risk factors of mortality. Conclusions: Patients with decompensated cirrhosis are more susceptible to infections. Hepatic encephalopathy and prothrombin time are independent risk factors for death.

  8. Effect of vaccination against sub-clinical Porcine Circovirus type 2 infection in a high-health finishing pig herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte Blach; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Haugegaard, John

    2017-01-01

    During the last decade, the clinical manifestation of Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections has mostly changed from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome and high mortality to sub-clinical infections manifested only through impaired production parameters. However, co-infection with oth...

  9. Pattern Of Sexually Transmitted Infections In A Reference Clinic Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A prospective study with respect to the spectrum of STIs among patients who attended the Skin/STI clinic and who were physically examined and ... of STI recorded followed by HIV/AIDS 13 (14.44%), pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) 12 (13.33%), genital warts 9 (10%) and non – gonococcal urethritis (NGU), ...

  10. Infections Disease in the Dental Clinical Nigerian Dentists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dental clinic is a potential source of transmission of infectious disease due to the invasive nature of many dental procedures. Infectious disease therefore constitutes serious occupational hazards to all oral health care workers. This descriptive study aims to assess the knowledge of dentists on common transmissible ...

  11. Clinical, serological, and parasitological analysis of snakes naturally infected with Cryptosporidium serpentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Philipp Ricardo S O; Grego, Kathleen F; Lima, Valéria M F; Nakamura, Alex A; da Silva, Deuvânia C; Meireles, Marcelo V

    2013-11-15

    Infection by Cryptosporidium serpentis is one of the most important diseases in reptiles and is characterized by chronic clinical or subclinical infection and the presence of hypertrophic gastritis, food regurgitation, progressive weight loss, mortality, and intermittent or continuous shedding of oocysts in the feces. The objectives of this study were to standardize an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect antibodies against C. serpentis and to evaluate the clinical, parasitological, and humoral immune response in snakes naturally infected with C. serpentis. Twenty-one snakes naturally infected with C. serpentis and housed at the Butantan Institute, São Paulo, Brazil, underwent clinical and parasitological analyses for C. serpentis infection through daily records of clinical signs and a monthly survey of fecal shedding of oocysts using the Kinyoun's acid-fast staining. The serological evaluation was performed monthly by indirect ELISA using crude total antigen from oocysts of C. serpentis to detect anti-C. serpentis antibodies. Clinical symptoms consisted of food regurgitation, inappetence, and progressive weight loss. The parasitological analysis revealed intermittent fecal shedding of a variable number of oocysts in all snakes, with positivity in 85.32% (157/184) of the samples. The indirect ELISA was positive in 68.25% (86/126) of the samples. A humoral immune response was observed in most animals; however, fluctuating antibodies levels, leading to alternating positive and negative results, were observed in most snakes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Variation in clinical phenotype of human infection among genetic groups of Blastomyces dermatitidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meece, Jennifer K.; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Gruszka, Sarah; Sloss, Brian L.; Sullivan, Bradley; Reed, Kurt D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Blastomyces dermatitidis, the etiologic agent of blastomycosis, has 2 genetic groups and shows varied clinical presentation, ranging from silent infections to fulminant respiratory disease and dissemination. The objective of this study was to determine whether clinical phenotype and outcomes vary based on the infecting organism's genetic group.Methods. We used microsatellites to genotype 227 clinical isolates of B. dermatitidis from Wisconsin patients. For each isolate, corresponding clinical disease characteristics and patient demographic information were abstracted from electronic health records and Wisconsin Division of Health reportable disease forms and questionnaires.Results. In univariate analysis, group 1 isolates were more likely to be associated with pulmonary-only infections (P 1 month (P smoking status (P = .0001) remained predictors for group 2 infections.Conclusions. This study identified previously unknown associations between clinical phenotype of human infection and genetic groups of B. dermatitidis and provides a framework for further investigations of the genetic basis for virulence in B. dermatitidis.

  13. Molecular and Clinical Characterization of Chikungunya Virus Infections in Southeast Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Landeros, Erik; Delgado-Gallegos, Juan L.; Caballero-Sosa, Sandra; Malo-García, Iliana R.

    2018-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is an arthropod-borne infection caused by Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Even though clinical features of Chikungunya fever in the Mexican population have been described before, there is no detailed information. The aim of this study was to perform a full description of the clinical features in confirmed Chikungunya-infected patients and describe the molecular epidemiology of CHIKV. We evaluated febrile patients who sought medical assistance in Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico, from June through July 2015. Infection was confirmed with molecular and serological methods. Viruses were isolated and the E1 gene was sequenced. Phylogeny reconstruction was inferred using maximum-likelihood and maximum clade credibility approaches. We studied 52 patients with confirmed CHIKV infection. They were more likely to have wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and knee arthralgia. Two combinations of clinical features were obtained to differentiate between Chikungunya fever and acute undifferentiated febrile illness. We obtained 10 CHIKV E1 sequences that grouped with the Asian lineage. Seven strains diverged from the formerly reported. Patients infected with the divergent CHIKV strains showed a broader spectrum of clinical manifestations. We defined the complete clinical features of Chikungunya fever in patients from Southeastern Mexico. Our results demonstrate co-circulation of different CHIKV strains in the state of Chiapas. PMID:29747416

  14. Molecular and Clinical Characterization of Chikungunya Virus Infections in Southeast Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kame A. Galán-Huerta

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya fever is an arthropod-borne infection caused by Chikungunya virus (CHIKV. Even though clinical features of Chikungunya fever in the Mexican population have been described before, there is no detailed information. The aim of this study was to perform a full description of the clinical features in confirmed Chikungunya-infected patients and describe the molecular epidemiology of CHIKV. We evaluated febrile patients who sought medical assistance in Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico, from June through July 2015. Infection was confirmed with molecular and serological methods. Viruses were isolated and the E1 gene was sequenced. Phylogeny reconstruction was inferred using maximum-likelihood and maximum clade credibility approaches. We studied 52 patients with confirmed CHIKV infection. They were more likely to have wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and knee arthralgia. Two combinations of clinical features were obtained to differentiate between Chikungunya fever and acute undifferentiated febrile illness. We obtained 10 CHIKV E1 sequences that grouped with the Asian lineage. Seven strains diverged from the formerly reported. Patients infected with the divergent CHIKV strains showed a broader spectrum of clinical manifestations. We defined the complete clinical features of Chikungunya fever in patients from Southeastern Mexico. Our results demonstrate co-circulation of different CHIKV strains in the state of Chiapas.

  15. Characterization of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in a culture collection

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    C.C.S. Zanetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa stored in our culture collection did not grow or grew poorly and showed lysis on the culture plates when removed from the collection and inoculated on MacConkey agar. One hypothesis was that bacteriophages had infected and killed those clinical isolates. To check the best storage conditions to maintain viable P. aeruginosa for a longer time, clinical isolates were stored at various temperatures and were grown monthly. We investigated the presence of phage in 10 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa stored in our culture collection. Four strains of P. aeruginosa were infected by phages that were characterized by electron microscopy and isolated to assess their ability to infect. The best condition to maintain the viability of the strains during storage was in water at room temperature. Three Siphoviridae and two Myoviridae phages were visualized and characterized by morphology. We confirmed the presence of bacteriophages infecting clinical isolates, and their ability to infect and lyse alternative hosts. Strain PAO1, however, did not show lysis to any phage. Mucoid and multidrug resistant strains of P. aeruginosa showed lysis to 50% of the phages tested.

  16. Clinical Practice Guidelines and Helicobacter pylori Infection in Children

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    Colin Macarthur

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to review the principles, methods and issues behind the development of clinical practice guidelines. Practice guidelines have been defined as “systematically developed statements to assist practitioner and patient decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances”. The ultimate goal of guidelines is to improve patient outcomes; however, they may also be used as tools to decrease health care costs, improve medical education and enhance quality assurance. Evidence-based guidelines use explicit methods to link recommendations to the quality of the underlying research. Following development of the guideline, implementation and evaluation are key steps. The ultimate aim of guideline development is to influence physician knowledge, attitudes and behaviour.

  17. European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) guidelines for the clinical management and treatment of HIV-infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clumeck, N; Pozniak, A; Raffi, F

    2008-01-01

    A working group of the European AIDS Clinical Society (EACS) have developed these guidelines for European clinicians to help them in the treatment of adults with HIV infection. This third version of the guidelines includes, as new topics, the assessment of patients at initial and subsequent clinic...... virological failure and the treatment of HIV during pregnancy. In Europe, there is a wide range of clinical practices in antiretroviral therapy depending on various factors such as drug registration, national policies, local availability, reimbursement and access to treatment. These can vary greatly from one...

  18. INCIDENCE AND CLINICAL FEATURES OF TUBERCULOSIS IN HIV-INFECTED CHILDREN IN THE SVERDLOVSK REGION

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    N. V. Eismont

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the structure of HIV-infected children who was ill with tuberculosis in the Sverdlovsk Region in 2004-2012. The incidence of tuberculosis in children aged 0 to 14 years in the Sverdlovsk Region showed a 79.4% increase in the above period due to the introduction of Russian innovative technologies for the diagnosis of this disease in children. At the same time there was a rise in both the number of HIV-infected children aged 0 to 14 years and the proportion of same-age children with late-stage HIV infection. Simultaneously, the incidence of tuberculosis in the non-HIV-infected children aged 0 to 14 years was 55.2-193.2 times lower than that in the HIV-infected children. In 2004-2014, the Sverdlovsk Region notified fewer new cases of tuberculosis among the children without HIV infection than among those with its late stages. Non-HIV-infected children of both sexes were also ill with tuberculosis less frequently than HIV-infected boys and girls. HIV-infected children 1-3 and 7-14 years of age proved to be most vulnerable to tuberculosis. Among those who fell ill with tuberculosis, there was a preponderance of patients with late-stage HIV infection; moreover, the majority (79.6% received highly active antiretroviral therapy. 63.3% of the cases were in contact with a tuberculosis patient, only every five patients had chemoprophylaxis for this disease. High-quality vaccination against tuberculosis prevented complications and bacterial excretion in children with comorbidity. Out of the clinical forms of tuberculosis in children with HIV infection, there was a predominance of primary tuberculous complex and intrathoracic lymph node tuberculosis. The latter was less common in children without HIV infection than in those with this disease; the same was true of bacterial excretion in respiratory tuberculosis.

  19. Clinical presentation of soft-tissue infections and its management: A study of 100 cases

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    Baldev Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Soft-tissue infections vary widely in their nature and severity. A clear approach to the management must allow their rapid identification and treatment as they can be life-threatening. Objective: Clinical presentation of soft-tissue infections and its management. Materials and Methods: A prospective study based on 100 patients presenting with soft-tissue infections was done. All the cases of soft-tissue infections were considered irrespective of age, sex, etiological factors, or systemic disorders. The findings were evaluated regarding the pattern of soft-tissue infections in relation to age and sex, clinical presentation, complications, duration of hospital stay, management, and mortality. Results: The most commonly involved age group was in the range of 41–60 years with male predominance. Abscess formation (45% was the most common clinical presentation. Type 2 diabetes mellitus was the most common associated comorbid condition. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common culture isolate obtained. The most common complication seen was renal failure. Patients with surgical site infections had maximum duration of stay in the hospital. About 94% of the cases of soft-tissue infections were managed surgically. Mortality was mostly encountered in the cases of complications of cellulitis. Conclusion: Skin and soft-tissue infections are among the most common infections encountered by the emergency physicians. Ignorance, reluctance to treatment, economic constraints, and illiteracy delay the early detection and the initiation of proper treatment. Adequate and timely surgical intervention in most of the cases is of utmost importance to prevent the complications and reduce the mortality.

  20. Clinical characteristics, diagnostic evaluation, and antibiotic prescribing patterns for skin infections in nursing homes

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    Norihiro Yogo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The epidemiology and management of skin infections in nursing homes has not been adequately described. We reviewed the characteristics, diagnosis and treatment of skin infections among residents of nursing homes to identify opportunities to improve antibiotic use. Methods: A retrospective study involving 12 nursing homes in the Denver metropolitan area. For residents at participating nursing homes diagnosed with a skin infection between July 1, 2013 and June 30, 2014, clinical and demographic information was collected through manual chart review.Results: Of 100 cases included in the study, the most common infections were non-purulent cellulitis (n=55, wound infection (n=27, infected ulcer (n=8, and cutaneous abscess (n=7. In 26 cases, previously published minimum clinical criteria for initiating antibiotics (Loeb criteria were not met. Most antibiotics (n=52 were initiated as a telephone order following a call from a nurse, and 41 patients were not evaluated by a provider within 48 hours after initiation of antibiotics. Nearly all patients (n=95 were treated with oral antibiotics alone. The median treatment duration was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR] 7-10; 43 patients received treatment courses of ≥ 10 days.Conclusions: Most newly diagnosed skin infections in nursing homes were non-purulent infections treated with oral antibiotics. Antibiotics were initiated by telephone in over half of cases, and lack of a clinical evaluation within 48 hours after starting antibiotics was common. Improved diagnosis through more timely clinical evaluations and decreasing length of therapy are important opportunities for antibiotic stewardship in nursing homes.

  1. Prevalence and clinical outcomes of hepatitis B virus infection in patients with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Gao, Qing; He, Qiulian; Tan, Jing

    2017-10-01

    The association of HBV infection with other hematopoietic diseases has been discussed previously. However, the clinical significance and clinical outcomes of HBV infection in AA patients have not been clarified. In this study, we sought to investigate the prevalence and related events of HBV in patients with AA who received immunosuppressive therapy. We retrospectively analyzed 245 patients with acquired AA. The HBsAg positivity rate was 14.69% in this group of AA patients. No significant difference was observed in the severity of AA patients with HBV infection and in those without (P = 0.6358). HBV reactivation occurred in 4.76% of HBsAg-positive patients who received ATG/ALG + CsA treatment without anti-viral prophylaxis. HBV-infected patients who received CsA alone did not develop reactivation. Patients with HBV reactivation showed favorable clinical outcomes, with no HBV-related deaths. There was no significant difference in overall probability of survival in patients with different HBV infection status (P = 0.8617). Given the low rate of reactivation and favorable outcomes after reactivation in AA patients, close monitoring of HBV DNA, hepatic function and patient immune status may be a more effective approach than routine prophylaxis for AA patients with HBV infection undergoing ATG/ALG + CsA treatment. Further studies are warranted to clarify the optimal time to initiate anti-viral treatment.

  2. Pathological and Clinical Correlation between Celiac Disease and Helicobacter Pylori Infection; a Review of Controversial Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Javad Ehsani-Ardakani, Mohammad; Assadzadeh, Hamid; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ierardi, Enzo; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Zojaji, Homayon; Alizadeh, Amirhoshang Mohammad; Naderi, Nosratollah; Sadeghi, Amir; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2016-04-01

    There are overwhelming reports and descriptions about celiac associated disorders. Although there is a clear genetic association between celiac disease (CD) and some gastrointestinal disorders, there are controversial reports claiming an association between CD and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Different studies indicated the possible association between lymphocytic gastritis and both CD and H. pylori infection, although this evidence is not consistently accepted. Also it was shown that an increase in intraepithelial lymphocytes count is associated with both H. pylori infection and celiac disease. Therefore the following questions may raise: how far is this infection actually related to CD?, which are the underlying patho-mechanisms for these associations? what are the clinical implications? what is the management? and what would be the role of gluten free diet in treating these conditions? PubMed (PubMed Central), Ovid, ISI of web knowledge, and Google scholar were searched for full text articles published between 1985 and 2015. The associated keywords were used, and papers described particularly the impact of pathological and clinical correlation between CD and H. pylori infection were identified. In this review we tried to answer the above questions and discussed some of the recent developments in the pathological and clinical aspects of CD and H. pylori infection.

  3. Nuclear Medicine imaging of infection and inflammation Part 3: Clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnanasegaran, G.; Croasdale, J.; Buscombe, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Prompt localization of infection sites is essential for initiating appropriate therapeutic measures. There have been major advances in the management of patients suffering from infective and/or inflammatory disorders as a result of introduction of newer drugs with high sensitivity and specificity. However diagnosis of infection / inflammation still remains a major clinical problem. Although the typical signs of infection and inflammation are useful in localizing the pathology at superficial sites, infection and inflammation of internal structures are often difficult to localize without the aid of imaging procedures. Radionuclide imaging is an important diagnostic tool for the evaluation of patho-physiological processes of infection and inflammation. A spectrum of radiopharmaceuticals and a number of imaging protocols have been used in clinical practice. However every method differs in its potential to gather information at the cellular and molecular level. This review addresses some of the applications of radionuclide infection imaging procedures in musculoskeletal system, lymphatic system, in immunocompromised patients and in patients suffering from fever of unknown origin. (author)

  4. [Cytomegalovirus: congenital infection and clinical presentation in infants with respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Contreras, Angélica; Lira, Rosalía; Soria-Rodríguez, Carmen; Hori-Oshima, Sawako; Maldonado-Rodríguez, Angélica; Rojas-Montes, Othón; Ayala-Figueroa, Rafael; Estrada-Guzmán, Julia; Álvarez-Muñoz, Ma Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a multifactorial and common disease that varies from 15 to 50 % in the newborn, causing 50 % of mortality. The RDS may be associated with bacterial and viral infections, and one of the most common viral agents is the cytomegalovirus (CMV). In the neonatal period the virus incidence goes from 0.4 to 2.5 % with a seroprevalence of 50 to 75 %; the incidence of infection in newborn with RDS is unknown. The objective was to determine the frequency of CMV infection in neonates with RDS and identify the risk factors associated with infection. The CMV-DNA was identified in plasma by quantitative PCR; maternal and neonatal variables that defined the clinical findings were analyzed by logistic regression.The CMV-DNA was identified in plasma by quantitative PCR; maternal and neonatal variables that defined the clinical findings were analyzed by logistic regression. The frequency of CMV infection in 197 infants with RDS was 8.6 % (95 % CI, 4.7-12.5). The significant variables in newborn were: neutropenia (p = 0.012), thrombocytopenia (p = 0.021), mottled skin (p = 0.03), and the maternal significant variable was cervicovaginitis (p = 0.05). We reported for the first time the highest frecuency of CMV infection in newborns with RDS and the association of various risk factors with CMV infection.

  5. Clinical and Morphological Studies on Spontaneous Cases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in Birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Dinev1, S Denev2* and G Beev2

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical, pathoanatomical, histological, and bacteriological studies were performed on broiler chickens, growing broiler parents, and growing egg layers, in three different poultry farms, after an outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. The method of contamination of the birds was established. Several local and systemic clinico-morphological forms of spontaneous P. aeruginosa infections in various categories of stock birds were described: cases of P. aeruginosa infection resulting from injection of contaminated vaccines; case of P. aeruginosa infections through contaminated aerosol vaccine and cases of pododermatitis, periarthritis and arthritis in broiler chickens associated with P. aeruginosa infection. In different cases mortality range between 0.5 and 50%. The results showed that apart from embryonic mortality in hatcheries, and septicemic infections in newly hatched chickens, the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa was associated with localized and systemic lesions in this category, as well as in young and growing birds. On one hand, these results have a theoretical significance, contributing for the confirmation and expansion of the wide array of clinico-morphological forms of P. aeruginosa infections in birds. On the other hand, the knowledge on these forms has a purely practical significance in the diagnostics of P. aeruginosa infections by poultry pathologists and veterinary practitioners.

  6. Clinical Trial of Imipenem/Cilastatin in Severely Burned and Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-01

    34"OT FILE CO.Y CLINICAL TRIAL OF IMIPENEM /CILASTATIN IN SEVERELY BURNED AND INFECTED PATIENTS Gary R. Culbertson, M.D., Albert T. McManus, PH.D., D T...NOV 1 3 1987 San Antonio, Texas b H Imipenem /cilastatin was examined for safety and effi- ,-;Opportunistic organisms causing infections in cacy in a...All of the clinical failures were in the pulmonary in ec- imipenem /cilastatin, a novel thienamycin alti- tion group. No serious toxicity or side

  7. Clinical and Epidemiological Characteristics of HIV Infection/AIDS in Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetagic, Sead; Porobić-Jahic, Humera; Piljic, Dilista; Custovic, Amer; Sabitovic, Damir; Zepic, Denis

    2015-02-01

    More than three decades after recognition of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States, the pandemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has dramatically changed the global burden of disease. The main goal of this research is retrospective analysis of epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 28 HIV infected patients, who were diagnosed and treated at the Clinic for Infectious Diseases in University Clinical Center Tuzla in the period from 1996 until the end of 2013. Retrospective analysis was performed using the medical records of 28 HIV-infected persons. Two rapid tests were used for HIV testing: OraQuick Advance test, Vikia HIV1/2, Elisa combo test, HIV RNA test. AIDS disease was determined by using the criteria from WHO. Among a total of 28 HIV-infected persons, 23 (82.14%) were males and 5 (17.86%) were females, with the male: female ratio of 4,6:1. In terms of the transmission route, a large proportion of cases were infected through heterosexual contact 19 (67.86%). At the time of the first visit, 16 (57.15%) patients showed asymptomatic HIV infection, 4 (14.28%) HIV infection with symptoms other than the AIDS defining diseases, and 8 (28.57) had AIDS. At the time of first hospital visit, the CD4 + cells count ranged from 40 to 1795/µl (conducted in 19 patients), and mean value of CD4 + cells was 365,31/µl, and mean HIV RNA titer was 287 118 copies/ml³. Of 28 HIV-infected persons 39 cases of opportunistic diseases developed in 12 patients (42.9%). In terms of the frequency of opportunistic diseases, tuberculosis (12 cases, 42.9%). Among a total of 28 HIV-infected patients, 6 (21.4%) of them died. This study characterizes the epidemiological and clinical patterns of HIV-infected patients in Tuzla region of Bosnia and Herzegovina to accurately understand HIV infection/AIDS in our region, in the hope to contribute in the establishment of effective HIV guidelines in the Tuzla region of B&H in the future.

  8. Clinical features and prognostic factors of anaerobic infections: a 7-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonseon; Choi, Jun Young; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, June Myung

    2009-03-01

    Risk factors for mortality resulting from anaerobic infection are incompletely defined. The clinical significance of a broad range of pathogenic obligate anaerobic organisms was examined, and factors independently associated with mortality were identified in patients with clinically significant anaerobic infections. The medical records of 1,050 patients with anaerobic infections were retrospectively reviewed at Severance Hospital in Seoul, Korea. The mean age of the patients was 54.1+/-16.8 years, and 57.7% were men. Overall, 320 (30.5%) patients with case-defined illness experienced pain at the affected site, and 230 (21.9%) experienced pus flow from lesions. Ten (1.4%) patients presented with shock, and 80.3% of the clinically significant cases were polymicrobial anaerobic infections. The mean number of pathogens, including aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, was 3.7+/-1.0 (minimum 1, maximum 5), and the number of anaerobic organisms was 1.0+/-0.3 in each specimen. The major pathogens by rank were the Bacteroides fragilis group, which accounted for 41.8% of anaerobic infections, followed by Clostridium spp. (11.8%), Prevotella spp. (9.4%), and Peptostreptococcus spp. (8.4%). Escherichia coli (17.5%), Staphylococcus aureus (7.5%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.5%) were common concomitant aerobic organisms. The overall crude mortality rate resulting from anaerobic infection was 29.7%. Among the determining factors associated with mortality, liver disease (p=0.003) and old age (p=0.005) were significant in multivariate analysis. Anaerobic infection is polymicrobial and has a significant role in morbidity and mortality. Underlying liver disease was associated with poor prognosis in anaerobic infection.

  9. Correlation of serotype-specific dengue virus infection with clinical manifestations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S Halsey

    Full Text Available Disease caused by the dengue virus (DENV is a significant cause of morbidity throughout the world. Although prior research has focused on the association of specific DENV serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 with the development of severe outcomes such as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, relatively little work has correlated other clinical manifestations with a particular DENV serotype. The goal of this study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of non-hemorrhagic clinical manifestations of DENV infection by serotype.Between the years 2005-2010, individuals with febrile disease from Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Paraguay were enrolled in an outpatient passive surveillance study. Detailed information regarding clinical signs and symptoms, as well as demographic information, was collected. DENV infection was confirmed in patient sera with polyclonal antibodies in a culture-based immunofluorescence assay, and the infecting serotype was determined by serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies. Differences in the prevalence of individual and organ-system manifestations were compared across DENV serotypes. One thousand seven hundred and sixteen individuals were identified as being infected with DENV-1 (39.8%, DENV-2 (4.3%, DENV-3 (41.5%, or DENV-4 (14.4%. When all four DENV serotypes were compared with each other, individuals infected with DENV-3 had a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal manifestations, and individuals infected with DENV-4 had a higher prevalence of respiratory and cutaneous manifestations.Specific clinical manifestations, as well as groups of clinical manifestations, are often overrepresented by an individual DENV serotype.

  10. Correlation of Serotype-Specific Dengue Virus Infection with Clinical Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Eric S.; Marks, Morgan A.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Fiestas, Victor; Suarez, Luis; Vargas, Jorge; Aguayo, Nicolas; Madrid, Cesar; Vimos, Carlos; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Disease caused by the dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity throughout the world. Although prior research has focused on the association of specific DENV serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4) with the development of severe outcomes such as dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome, relatively little work has correlated other clinical manifestations with a particular DENV serotype. The goal of this study was to estimate and compare the prevalence of non-hemorrhagic clinical manifestations of DENV infection by serotype. Methodology and Principal Findings Between the years 2005–2010, individuals with febrile disease from Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, and Paraguay were enrolled in an outpatient passive surveillance study. Detailed information regarding clinical signs and symptoms, as well as demographic information, was collected. DENV infection was confirmed in patient sera with polyclonal antibodies in a culture-based immunofluorescence assay, and the infecting serotype was determined by serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies. Differences in the prevalence of individual and organ-system manifestations were compared across DENV serotypes. One thousand seven hundred and sixteen individuals were identified as being infected with DENV-1 (39.8%), DENV-2 (4.3%), DENV-3 (41.5%), or DENV-4 (14.4%). When all four DENV serotypes were compared with each other, individuals infected with DENV-3 had a higher prevalence of musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal manifestations, and individuals infected with DENV-4 had a higher prevalence of respiratory and cutaneous manifestations. Conclusions/Significance Specific clinical manifestations, as well as groups of clinical manifestations, are often overrepresented by an individual DENV serotype. PMID:22563516

  11. Contrasting clinical outcomes in two cohorts of cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M.; Litster, Annette; Lin, Tsang Long; Mellor, Dominic J.; Willett, Brian J.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite over 25 years of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) research, relatively little is known about the longitudinal course of FIV infection following natural infection. In contrast to published reports of experimental infections using lethal strains of the virus, clinical signs of naturally acquired FIV infection can be mild or inapparent, rather than life-threatening. In this prospective, longitudinal controlled study, based in Chicago, IL (n = 17) and Memphis, TN (n = 27), we investigated two cohorts of privately owned, naturally infected cats kept under different housing conditions. Cats in the Chicago cohort (Group 1) were kept in households of ≤2 cats, while the Memphis cohort (Group 2) comprised part of a large multi-cat household of over 60 cats kept indoors only, with unrestricted access to one another. The majority of cats from Group 1 did not display clinical signs consistent with immunodeficiency during the 22-month observation period. In contrast, the outcome of infection in Group 2 was dramatically different; 17/27 (63%) of cats lost a median of 51.3% of their bodyweight (P cats classified as ‘healthy’ and ‘not healthy’ at either cohort. FIV load at enrolment was significantly lower in Group 1 than in Group 2 (P cats at either group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that management and housing conditions impact on disease progression and survival times of FIV-positive cats. PMID:25595267

  12. Urinary tract infection in Children Hospitalized at Constanta Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital

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    Pînzaru Anca Daniela

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In pediatrics, the urinary tract infection is one of the most frequent bacterial infection, representing an important health problem due to its high incidence, wide etiology, asymptomatic evolution, and multiple and sever complications, relapses and sequelae.” Material and Method: We evaluated 45 children, aged between 6 months and 16 years, diagnosed and treated for urinary tract infection at the Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital, of Constanta County, in a period of 3 years and 6 months. Results: During studied period, between January 2014 and June 2017 from a total of 9343 patients admitted to the Constanta Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital, we selected 45 children (4.81‰ diagnosed with urinary tract infection. The average age of children with urinary tract infections was 5 years and 5 months. The gender distribution revealed a 2:1 balance in girl’s favor. The most affected group of age was 1-3 years. Fever was the dominating symptom. Urine cultures were positive for 37 cases, meanwhile for eight cases had been negative. The predominant germs are E. coli for female and for male Proteus. We noticed that for E. coli the highest sensitivity is preserved to Ertapenem -15 cases, followed by Ceftriaxone and Ciprofloxacin -10 cases each, and Gentamycin -9 cases. Conclusions: Pediatric urinary tract infection should be considered in every patient under 3 years with unexplained fever.

  13. Pneumococcal pneumonia: clinical features, diagnosis and management in HIV-infected and HIV noninfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Giordano; Fois, Alessandro Giuseppe; Pirina, Pietro; Mura, Maria Stella

    2009-05-01

    In this review, we focus on the clinical features, diagnosis and management of pneumococcal pneumonia in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, with particular attention to the most recent advances in this area. Classical clinical features are found in young adults, whereas atypical forms occur in immunocompromised patients including HIV-infected individuals. Bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia is more frequently observed in HIV-infected and also in low-risk patients, according to the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Pneumococcal pneumonia diagnostic process includes physical examination, radiologic findings and microbiologic diagnosis. However, etiologic diagnosis using traditional culture methods is difficult to obtain. In this setting, urinary antigen test, which recognizes Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall C-polysaccharide, increases the probability of etiologic diagnosis. A correct management approach is crucial in reducing pneumococcal pneumonia mortality. The use of the PSI helps clinicians in deciding between inpatient and outpatient management in immunocompetent individuals, according to Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA)-American Thoracic Society (ATS) guidelines. Recent findings support PSI utility also in HIV-infected patients. Recently, efficacy of pneumococcal vaccine in reducing pneumococcal disease incidence has been evidenced in both HIV-infected and noninfected individuals. Rapid diagnosis and correct management together with implementation of preventive measures are crucial in order to reduce pneumococcal pneumonia related incidence and mortality in HIV-infected and noninfected patients.

  14. Clinical application of 99mTc-HMPAO labeled leucocytes imaging in detecting bone joint infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Biao; Barthe, N.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.

    1995-01-01

    99m Tc-MDP scintigraphy and 99m Tc-HMPAO-leucocytes imaging were performed in twenty five patients with clinically suspected bone joint infection. All of the 25 cases were confirmed by surgery, microbiological and histologic examinations. Among them 21 cases were definitively diagnosed as infections, while 3 cases were non-infection. The results of 99m Tc-MDP scintigraphy showed that all of 25 cases demonstrated anomalous accumulation of radioactivity in the clinically suspected infections sites, while in 99m Tc-HMPAO-leucocytes imaging, concentrated radioactivity in proved infectious sites was observed in 19 cases, non-anomalous radioactivity found in 4 cases of non-infectious sites, but there were 2 cases false negative with long term antibiotics treatment, none of the case was false positive. Thereby a sensitivity of the labelled leucocytes imaging of 90.5%, a specificity of 100%, and a accuracy of about 92% were found. Present research work concluded that 99m Tc-HMPAO labelled leucocytes imaging provided a non-invasive, effective, and reliable diagnostic method in detecting patients with clinically suspected bone joint infection and afforded strong evidence for effective therapy

  15. A CLINICAL STUDY ON POSTOPERATIVE WOUND INFECTIONS IN RIMS, KADAPA- 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ramanaiah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical wound infections continue to consume a considerable portion of healthcare finance. Even though, the complete elimination of wound infections is not possible, a reduction of the observed wound infection rate to a minimum level could have marked benefits in terms of both patient comfort and resources used. 1 MATERIALS AND METHODS The clinical study of postoperative wound infection conducted at RIMS General Hospital, Kadapa, during the period of 2013 to 2016. RESULTS In this clinical study, 150 patients were clinically diagnosed of having SSIs out of 925 patients who underwent major surgeries in Department of General Surgery, an incidence of 16.2%. Dirty type of surgeries have high incidence of SSI at 63.6%. SSI occurred more in patients who didn’t receive preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. prior to surgery, i.e. 32.1%. Most of the patients presented with discharge through the wound (81.3%. The most common type of discharge was purulent (52.5%. CONCLUSION Preoperative preparation <24 hrs., preoperative bathing and preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. before surgery help in reducing surgical site infections. Early diagnosis of SSI and prompt management by isolation of organism causing SSI using sensitive antibiotics and regular dressing help in reducing morbidity for the patients.

  16. From Clinical Microbiology to Infection Pathogenesis: How Daring To Be Different Works for Staphylococcus lugdunensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Kristi L.; del Pozo, José Luis; Patel, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis has gained recognition as an atypically virulent pathogen with a unique microbiological and clinical profile. S. lugdunensis is coagulase negative due to the lack of production of secreted coagulase, but a membrane-bound form of the enzyme present in some isolates can result in misidentification of the organism as Staphylococcus aureus in the clinical microbiology laboratory. S. lugdunensis is a skin commensal and an infrequent pathogen compared to S. aureus and S. epidermidis, but clinically, infections caused by this organism resemble those caused by S. aureus rather than those caused by other coagulase-negative staphylococci. S. lugdunensis can cause acute and highly destructive cases of native valve endocarditis that often require surgical treatment in addition to antimicrobial therapy. Other types of S. lugdunensis infections include abscess and wound infection, urinary tract infection, and infection of intravascular catheters and other implanted medical devices. S. lugdunensis is generally susceptible to antimicrobial agents and shares CLSI antimicrobial susceptibility breakpoints with S. aureus. Virulence factors contributing to this organism's heightened pathogenicity remain largely unknown. Those characterized to date suggest that the organism has the ability to bind to and interact with host cells and to form biofilms on host tissues or prosthetic surfaces. PMID:18202439

  17. The barriers and motivators to learning infection control in clinical placements: interviews with midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Deborah J

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the barriers to and motivators for learning infection prevention and control as identified by midwifery students. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 15 undergraduate midwifery students within one large university. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis. Barriers to good clinical practice were identified by students which were concordant with previous literature related to reasons for non-compliance with infection control precautions. Issues such as competing demands specific to midwifery were also identified. Factors which act as barriers to learning good practice in placements included conflicting information and practices from different staff and placement areas and staff attitudes towards students who tried to comply with precautions. Motivators to good practice included the perceived vulnerability of infants to infection, the role modelling of good practice to new mothers and the monitoring of practice. This study demonstrated that midwifery students perceive barriers and motivators to learning infection prevention and control in their clinical placements. Many of the barriers identified are related to the attitudes and practices of qualified staff. Some of the motivators are related specifically to midwifery practice. Midwives need to be aware of the effects of what is observed in practice on midwifery students and how their practices and attitudes can influence learning both positively and negatively. As healthcare-associated infection and poor compliance with precautions are a global problem, this research should be of benefit to midwives and midwifery educators worldwide in terms of addressing barriers and ensuring better clinical education. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and therapeutic differences in tuberculosis disease in patients with and without HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sanz, Javier; Lago-Gómez, María Rosa; Rodríguez-Zurita, María Elena; Martín-Echevarría, Esteban; Torralba, Miguel

    2018-04-23

    Our objective is to analyze the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) in our population and to compare the characteristics of patients with and without HIV infection. Clinical-epidemiological retrospective cohort study that included patients diagnosed with TB with and without HIV infection between 2005-2016 in the province of Guadalajara (Spain). Epidemiological, clinical, microbiological and therapeutic variables were assessed, including microbiological resistances. TB was diagnosed in 261 patients. There were 25 patients (9.6%) who had HIV infection. Patients with HIV infection were predominantly males, had higher incidence of hepatitis C virus, a higher percentage of extrapulmonary TB, a higher prevalence of resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin, a greater paradoxical response and a longer average hospital stay. On the other hand, they had a lower percentage of positive tuberculin skin test and positive sputum smear (microscopy). A significant percentage of TB patients had no serology for HIV. Patients with HIV infection show remarkable differences in epidemiological, clinical and resistance variables to antituberculosis drugs. A high percentage of patients with TB were not tested for HIV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of prosthetic joint infection caused by small colony variant staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J; Osmon, Douglas R; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Mabry, Tad M; Hanssen, Arlen D; Patel, Robin

    2014-09-30

    Small colony variants (SCVs) are naturally occurring subpopulations of bacteria. The clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with prosthetic joint infection (PJI) caused by staphylococcal SCVs are unknown. This study was a retrospective series of 113 patients with staphylococcal PJI, with prospective testing of archived sonicate fluid samples. SCVs were defined using two-investigator review. Treatment failure was defined as (i) subsequent revision surgery for any reason, (ii) PJI after the index surgery, (iii) prosthesis nonreimplantation due to ongoing infection, or (iv) amputation of the affected limb. There were 38 subjects (34%) with SCVs and 75 (66%) with only normal-phenotype (NP) bacteria. Subjects with SCVs were more likely to have been on chronic antimicrobials prior to surgery (P = 0.048), have had prior surgery for PJI (P = 0.03), have had a longer duration of symptoms (P = 0.0003), and have had a longer time since joint implantation (P = 0.007), compared to those with only NP bacteria. Over a median follow-up of 30.6 months, 9 subjects (24%) with SCVs and 23 (32%) with only NP bacteria experienced treatment failure (P = 0.51). Subjects infected with Staphylococcus aureus were more likely to fail than were those infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis (hazard ratio [HR], 4.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80 to 9.04). While frequently identified in subjects with PJI and associated with several potential predisposing factors, SCVs were not associated with excess treatment failure compared to NP infections in this study, where they were primarily managed with two-stage arthroplasty exchange. Bacteria with the small colony variant (SCV) phenotype are described in small case series as causing persistent or relapsing infection, but there are insufficient data to suggest that they should be managed differently than infection with normal-phenotype bacteria. In an effort to investigate the clinical importance of this phenotype, we

  20. Identification of clinical target areas in the brainstem of prion‐infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabile, Ilaria; Jat, Parmjit S.; Brandner, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Aims While prion infection ultimately involves the entire brain, it has long been thought that the abrupt clinical onset and rapid neurological decline in laboratory rodents relates to involvement of specific critical neuroanatomical target areas. The severity and type of clinical signs, together with the rapid progression, suggest the brainstem as a candidate location for such critical areas. In this study we aimed to correlate prion pathology with clinical phenotype in order to identify clinical target areas. Method We conducted a comprehensive survey of brainstem pathology in mice infected with two distinct prion strains, which produce different patterns of pathology, in mice overexpressing prion protein (with accelerated clinical onset) and in mice in which neuronal expression was reduced by gene targeting (which greatly delays clinical onset). Results We identified specific brainstem areas that are affected by prion pathology during the progression of the disease. In the early phase of disease the locus coeruleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the pre‐Bötzinger complex were affected by prion protein deposition. This was followed by involvement of the motor and autonomic centres of the brainstem. Conclusions Neurodegeneration in the locus coeruleus, the nucleus of the solitary tract and the pre‐Bötzinger complex predominated and corresponded to the manifestation of the clinical phenotype. Because of their fundamental role in controlling autonomic function and the overlap with clinical signs in sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease, we suggest that these nuclei represent key clinical target areas in prion diseases. PMID:25311251

  1. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections among women attending antenatal clinics in Tanga, north eastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiduo, M; Theilgaard, Z P; Bakari, V

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among HIV-infected and uninfected pregnant women in Tanga, Tanzania. Retrospective data on syphilis and HIV status during 2008-2010 were collected from antenatal clinic (ANC) records. Prospective data were...... collected from HIV-infected (n = 105) and HIV-uninfected pregnant women (n = 100) attending ANCs between April 2009 and August 2010. Syphilis prevalence showed a declining trend (3.1%, 1.4% and 1.3%), while HIV prevalence was stable (6.1%, 6.4% and 5.4%) during 2008-2010. HIV-infected women had...... significantly higher prevalence of trichomoniasis (18.8% versus 5.0%; P HIV-uninfected women. There were no statistically significant...

  2. Effect of vaccination against sub-clinical Porcine Circovirus type 2 infection in a high-health finishing pig herd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gitte Blach; Nielsen, Jens Peter; Haugegaard, John

    2017-01-01

    During the last decade, the clinical manifestation of Porcine Circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections has mostly changed from postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome and high mortality to sub-clinical infections manifested only through impaired production parameters. However, co-infection with other...... respiratory pathogens often results in a larger effect on production, sometimes with clinical signs. Little is known about the impact of a moderate level PCV2 infection without co-infections, particularly in terms of feed conversion ratio and antimicrobial consumption. The purpose of the study was to evaluate...... the effect of vaccination against PCV2 in a sub-clinically infected, high-health finishing herd in terms of viral load in serum, feed conversion ratio and antimicrobial treatments. The study was conducted as a randomised clinical field trial with a parallel group design. Vaccination against PCV2...

  3. Prevalence of asinine herpesvirus type 5 (AsHV-5) infection in clinically normal Lipizzaner horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, James Oliver; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Nell, Barbara; Nowotny, Norbert

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent of asinine herpesvirus (AsHV) type 5 infection in 'closed' populations of clinically normal Lipizzaner horses. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells plus nasal and conjunctival swabs were obtained on four occasions over an 18 month period from 266 animals as part of a health surveillance programme. Sequence analysis of samples that were positive by nested consensus herpesvirus PCR but negative using quantified equid herpesvirus (EHV) type 2 and 5 PCR, revealed a total of 51 samples from 39 horses positive for AsHV-5. No statistically significant association between animal age, gender or geographical location and infection status was identified. The findings suggest sub-clinical AsHV-5 infection may be encountered more frequently than previously reported. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M

    2015-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Oral and dental infections with anaerobic bacteria: clinical features, predominant pathogens, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, A; Stillman, N

    1993-06-01

    Microbial populations colonizing the teeth are a major source of pathogens responsible for oral and dental infections, including periodontal diseases, gingivitis, pericoronitis, endodontitis, peri-implantitis, and postextraction infections. Each entity has distinct clinical and microbial features. Bacterial species associated with oral infections include Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Bacteroides forsythus, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium species, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eikenella corrodens, and Peptostreptococcus micros. Treponema pallidum-related spirochetes have been associated with acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis. Porphyromonas endodontalis appears to be specifically related to endodontic infections. Oral infections in medically compromised patients, including those with AIDS, are associated with similar species and are usually complicated by superinfection with enteric and Candida species. Isolation of species causing oral infections requires the collection of appropriate samples and the use of strictly anaerobic techniques. Rapid selective culture, immunofluorescence, and DNA probe methods have been developed for the identification of these oral species. The varied measures required in the management of oral and dental infections may include antimicrobial therapy. Accurate microbiological diagnosis, including antibiotic susceptibility testing, is indicated for cases that do not respond to therapy.

  6. Prevalence and clinical symptoms of human metapneumovirus infection in hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.G. van den Hoogen (Bernadette); G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard); J.C. Fockens (John); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); R. de Groot (Ronald); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDuring a 17-month period, we performed retrospective analyses of the prevalence of and clinical symptoms associated with human metapneumovirus (hMPV) infection, among patients in a university hospital in The Netherlands. All available nasal-aspirate, throat-swab, sputum, and

  7. Cyanoacrylate Skin Microsealant for Preventing Surgical Site Infection after Vascular Surgery : A Discontinued Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vierhout, Bastiaan P.; Ott, Alewijn; Reijnen, Michel M. P. J.; Oskam, Jacques; Ott, Alewijn; van den Dungen, Jan J. A. M.; Zeebregts, Clark J.

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) after vascular surgery are related to substantial morbidity. Restriction of bacterial access to the site of surgery with a cyanoacrylate sealant is a new concept. We performed a randomized clinical trial to assess the effect of the sealing of skin with a

  8. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Alternative Stress Management Interventions in Persons with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCain, Nancy L.; Gray, D. Patricia; Elswick, R. K., Jr.; Robins, Jolynne W.; Tuck, Inez; Walter, Jeanne M.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney

    2008-01-01

    Research in psychoneuroimmunology suggests that immunosuppression associated with perceived stress may contribute to disease progression in persons with HIV infection. While stress management interventions may enhance immune function, few alternative approaches have yet been tested. This randomized clinical trial was conducted to test effects of…

  9. friendly clinic on retention of HIV-infected children in care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-08-22

    Aug 22, 2017 ... space where a child feels both physically and emotion- ally secure and at ... experience, retention in care and loss to follow up of. HIV-infected children. ... The clinic area was painted with artistic drawings in child-friendly ...

  10. Respiratory viruses in transplant recipients: more than just a cold. Clinical syndromes and infection prevention principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Abbas

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: RVIs are associated with high morbidity and mortality among SOT and HSCT recipients. Management options are currently limited or lack strong clinical evidence. As community and nosocomial spread has been reported for all reviewed RVIs, strict adherence to infection control measures is key to preventing outbreaks.

  11. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection in pregnancy: a review of prevalence, clinical features, diagnosis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Zin W; Scott, Gillian M; Shand, Antonia; Hamilton, Stuart T; van Zuylen, Wendy J; Basha, James; Hall, Beverly; Craig, Maria E; Rawlinson, William D

    2016-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is under-recognised, despite being the leading infectious cause of congenital malformation, affecting ~0.3% of Australian live births. Approximately 11% of infants born with congenital CMV infection are symptomatic, resulting in clinical manifestations, including jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, petechiae, microcephaly, intrauterine growth restriction and death. Congenital CMV infection may cause severe long-term sequelae, including progressive sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay in 40-58% of symptomatic neonates, and ~14% of initially asymptomatic infected neonates. Up to 50% of maternal CMV infections have nonspecific clinical manifestations, and most remain undetected unless specific serological testing is undertaken. The combination of serology tests for CMV-specific IgM, IgG and IgG avidity provide improved distinction between primary and secondary maternal infections. In pregnancies with confirmed primary maternal CMV infection, amniocentesis with CMV-PCR performed on amniotic fluid, undertaken after 21-22 weeks gestation, may determine whether maternofetal virus transmission has occurred. Ultrasound and, to a lesser extent, magnetic resonance imaging are valuable tools to assess fetal structural and growth abnormalities, although the absence of fetal abnormalities does not exclude fetal damage. Diagnosis of congenital CMV infection at birth or in the first 3 weeks of an infant's life is crucial, as this should prompt interventions for prevention of delayed-onset hearing loss and neurodevelopmental delay in affected infants. Prevention strategies should also target mothers because increased awareness and hygiene measures may reduce maternal infection. Recognition of the importance of CMV in pregnancy and in neonates is increasingly needed, particularly as therapeutic and preventive interventions expand for this serious problem. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  12. [Infective endocarditis in intensive cardiac care unit - clinical and biochemical differences of blood-culture negative infective endocarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaziród-Wolski, Karol; Sielski, Janusz; Ciuraszkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-01-23

    Diagnosis and treatment of infective endocarditis (IE) is still a challenge for physicians. Group of patients with the worst prognosis is treated in Intensive Cardiac Care Unit (ICCU). Etiologic agent can not be identified in a substantial number of patients. The aim of study is to find differences between patients with blood culture negative infective endocarditis (BCNIE) and blood culture positive infective endocarditis (BCPIE) treated in ICCU by comparing their clinical course and laboratory parameters. Retrospective analysis of 30 patients with IE hospitalized in ICCU Swietokrzyskie Cardiac Centre between 2010 and 2016. This group consist of 26 men (86,67%) and 4 women (13,3%). Mean age was 58 years ±13. Most of the cases were new disease, recurrence of the disease was observed in 2 cases (6,7%). 8 patients (26,7%) required artificial ventilation, 11 (36,7%) received inotropes and 6 (20%) vasopresors. In 14 (46,7%) cases blood cultures was negative (BCNIE), the rest of patients (16, 53,3%) was blood cultures - positive infective endocarditis (BCIE). Both of the groups were clinically similar. There were no statistically significant differences in incidence of cardiac implants, localization of bacterial vegetations, administered catecholamines, antibiotic therapy, artificial ventilation, surgical treatment, complication and in-hospital mortality. Incidence of cardiac complications in all of BCNIE cases and in 81,3% cases of BCPIE draws attention, but it is not statistically significant difference (p=0,08). There was statistically significant difference in mean BNP blood concentration (3005,17 ng/ml ±2045,2 vs 1013,42 ng/ml ±1087,6; p=0,01), but there were no statistically significant differences in rest of laboratory parameters. BCNIE group has got higher mean BNP blood concentration than BCPIE group. There were no statistically significant differences between these groups in others laboratory parameters, clinical course and administered antibiotic therapy

  13. Simple clinical and laboratory predictors of Chikungunya versus dengue infections in adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon J Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue and chikungunya are co-circulating vector-borne diseases with substantial overlap in clinical presentations. It is important to differentiate between them during first presentation as their management, especially for dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, is different. This study compares their clinical presentation in Singapore adults to derive predictors to assist doctors in diagnostic decision-making. METHODS: We compared 117 patients with chikungunya infection diagnosed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR with 917 dengue RT-PCR-positive adult patients (including 55 with DHF. We compared dengue fever (DF, DHF, and chikungunya infections by evaluating clinical characteristics of dengue and chikungunya; developing classification tools via multivariate logistic regression models and classification trees of disease etiology using clinical and laboratory factors; and assessing the time course of several clinical variables. FINDINGS: At first presentation to hospital, significantly more chikungunya patients had myalgia or arthralgia, and fewer had a sore throat, cough (for DF, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, anorexia or tachycardia than DF or DHF patients. From the decision trees, platelets <118 × 10(9/L was the only distinguishing feature for DF versus chikungunya with an overall correct classification of 89%. For DHF versus chikungunya using platelets <100 × 10(9/L and the presence of bleeding, the overall correct classification was 98%. The time course analysis supported platelet count as the key distinguishing variable. INTERPRETATION: There is substantial overlap in clinical presentation between dengue and chikungunya infections, but simple clinical and laboratory variables can predict these infections at presentation for appropriate management.

  14. THE CHANGING CLINICAL PERFORMANCE OF DENGUE VIRUS INFECTION IN THE YEAR 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soegeng Soegijanto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue (DEN virus, the most important arthropod-borne human pathogen, represents a serious public health threat. DEN virus is transmitted to humans by the bite of the domestic mosquito, Aedes aegypti, and circulates in nature as four distinct serological types DEN-1 to 4. The aim of Study: To identify Dengue Virus Serotype I which showed mild clinical performance in five years before and afterward showed severe clinical performance. Material and Method: Prospective and analytic observational study had been done in Dr. Soetomo Hospital and the ethical clearance was conduct on January 01, 2009. The population of this research is all cases of dengue virus infection. Diagnosis were done based on WHO 1997. All of these cases were examined for IgM & IgG anti Dengue Virus and then were followed by PCR examination to identify Dengue Virus serotype. Result and Discussion: DEN 2 was predominant virus serotype with produced a spectrum clinical illness from asymptomatic, mild illness to classic dengue fever (DF to the most severe form of illness (DHF. But DEN 1 usually showed mild illness. Helen at al (2009–2010 epidemiologic study of Dengue Virus Infection in Health Centre Surabaya and Mother and Child Health Soerya Sidoarjo found many cases of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever were caused by DEN 1 Genotype IV. Amor (2009 study in Dr. Soetomo Hospital found DEN 1 showed severe clinical performance of primary Dengue Virus Infection as Dengue Shock Syndrome two cases and one unusual case. Conclusion: The epidemiologic study of Dengue Virus Infection in Surabaya and Sidoarjo; in the year 2009 found changing predominant Dengue Virus Serotype from Dengue Virus II to Dengue Virus 1 Genotype IV which showed a severe clinical performance coincident with primary infection.

  15. Evaluation of Nucleic Acid Isothermal Amplification Methods for Human Clinical Microbial Infection Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett E. Etchebarne

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Battling infection is a major healthcare objective. Untreated infections can rapidly evolve toward the condition of sepsis in which the body begins to fail and resuscitation becomes critical and tenuous. Identification of infection followed by rapid antimicrobial treatment are primary goals of medical care, but precise identification of offending organisms by current methods is slow and broad spectrum empirical therapy is employed to cover most potential pathogens. Current methods for identification of bacterial pathogens in a clinical setting typically require days of time, or a 4- to 8-h growth phase followed by DNA extraction, purification and PCR-based amplification. We demonstrate rapid (70–120 min genetic diagnostics methods utilizing loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP to test for 15 common infection pathogen targets, called the Infection Diagnosis Panel (In-Dx. The method utilizes filtration to rapidly concentrate bacteria in sample matrices with lower bacterial loads and direct LAMP amplification without DNA purification from clinical blood, urine, wound, sputum and stool samples. The In-Dx panel was tested using two methods of detection: (1 real-time thermocycler fluorescent detection of LAMP amplification and (2 visual discrimination of color change in the presence of Eriochrome Black T (EBT dye following amplification. In total, 239 duplicate samples were collected (31 blood, 122 urine, 73 mucocutaneous wound/swab, 11 sputum and two stool from 229 prospectively enrolled hospital patients with suspected clinical infection and analyzed both at the hospital and by In-Dx. Sensitivity (Se of the In-Dx panel targets pathogens from urine samples by In-Dx was 91.1% and specificity (Sp was 97.3%, with a positive predictive value (PPV of 53.7% and a negative predictive value (NPV of 99.7% as compared to clinical microbial detection methods. Sensitivity of detection of the In-Dx panel from mucocutaneous swab samples was 65.5% with a

  16. Parainfluenza virus infections in a tropical city: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Mota Moura Fé

    Full Text Available Little information on the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of human parainfluenza virus (HPIV infections, especially in children from tropical countries, has been published. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of HPIV infections in children attended at a large hospital in Fortaleza in Northeast Brazil, and describe seasonal patterns, clinical and epidemiological characteristics of these infections. From January 2001 to December 2006, a total of 3070 nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from children were screened by indirect immunofluorescence for human parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, and 3 (HPIV-1, 2 and 3 and other respiratory viruses. Viral antigens were identified in 933 samples and HPIV in 117. The frequency of HPIV-3, HPIV-1 and HPIV-2 was of 83.76%, 11.96% and 4.27%, respectively. Only HPIV-3 showed a seasonal occurrence, with most cases observed from September to November, and with an inverse relationship to the rainy season. Most HPIV-3 infections seen in outpatients were diagnosed as upper respiratory tract infections.

  17. Surveillance of Intrahospital Infections at the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Čustović

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Intrahospital infections (IHI and antibiotics resistance are the problems which exist in virtually all hospitals in the world.The main aim of the present research is establishing of epidemiological surveillance over occurrence of IHI at the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics at the University Clinical Center Tuzla and thus identifies: types of bacteria which cause IHI, types of infection according to anatomical localization and research resistance organisms causing of IHI on antimicrobial drugs. A study was implemented on all patients admitted to Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics during the period of one year and who subsequently developed infection. Determination of intrahospital infections was done according to criteria defined by the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention from the United States.The results of our work have shown that both urinary tract infections and surgical site infections are the most frequent. As IHI causers the most found are gram-negative organisms (73,7%, such as Escherichia coli (29,8%, right after that Klebsiella pneumoniae (24,6%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (14% and Proteus mirabilis (5,3% (p<0,05. Gram-positive organisms as causers of IHI are registered in 26,3% cases. Out of that Streptococcus species are isolated in 10,5% cases, Staphylococcus aureus (8,8% and coagulasa negative staphylococci (7% (p>0,05. High percent resistance of bacteria was evident to beta-lactams, aminoglycosids and cephalosporin’s of third generation. Gram-positive organisms were 100% sensitive to vancomycin, while gram-negative organisms manifested the high percent of sensibility to imipenem and cefepime.

  18. Cutaneous non-tuberculous Mycobacterial infections: a clinical and histopathological study of 17 cases from Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, O; Marrouch, N; Kattar, M M; Zeynoun, S; Kibbi, A G; Rached, R A; Araj, G F; Ghosn, S

    2011-01-01

    Only a few studies characterized cutaneous non-tuberculous Mycobacterium (NTM) infections in this region of the world. Objective  The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological, clinical and histological findings of cutaneous NTM infections in Lebanon. Retrospective study of 17 patients (19 histological specimens) diagnosed with cutaneous NTM infections and confirmed by culture-based partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene at the American University of Beirut Medical Center between 2005 and 2008. Of 17 cases, 14 were caused by Mycobacterium marinum. All patients were immunocompetent except for one. Clinically, the most common presentation was multiple sporotrichoid lesions over an extremity (8/17). Many patients had peculiar presentations including bruise-like patches, herpetiform lesions, annular ulcerated plaques, symmetrical nodules over the buttocks and locally disseminated lesions with surrounding pale halo. Almost all patients cleared their infection on either minocycline or clarithromycin monotherapies. Histologically, a dermal small vessel proliferation with mixed inflammation (granulation tissue-like changes) was identified in 58% of specimens. The most common type of granulomatous inflammation was the suppurative (47%) followed by the tuberculoid (30%), sarcoidal (11%), and palisading (5%) types. Lichenoid granulomatous dermatitis was noted in 42% of cases. Special staining highlighted mycobacteria in only two specimens. The incidence of cutaneous NTM infections is high in our area. Many patients had peculiar clinical presentations. Our study is the second to report the common presence of granulation tissue-like changes as a good histological indicator of cutaneous NTM infections. Minocycline and clarithromycin remain the drugs of choice in our area. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. Prevalence and clinical aspects of CMV congenital Infection in a low-income population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Lauro Juliano; Santos de Carvalho Cardoso, Emanuelle; Bispo Sousa, Sandra Mara; Debortoli de Carvalho, Luciana; Marques Filho, Marcílio F; Raiol, Mônica Regina; Gadelha, Sandra Rocha

    2016-08-31

    CMV is the most common cause of congenital infection in the whole world (0.2 to 2.2 %). That infection may be symptomatic or asymptomatic at birth and, although asymptomatic cases at birth are more common, some children may develop late sequelae, and require medical intervention. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of CMV congenital infections in children who were born in a public hospital in Ilhéus, Brazil, and to evaluate the clinical progression in infected newborns. CMV congenital infection was determined by detecting viral DNA through nested PCR. The viral DNA was detected in 25 newborns, showing a prevalence of 1.19 % (25/2100) of CMV congenital infection. In regards to the risk factors from mothers, only the variables: age of mothers (p = 0.003), number of children (p = 0.011), and use of medications (p CMV. Late symptoms can be mistaken for other diseases or even go unnoticed.

  20. Clinical management of rapidly growing mycobacterial cutaneous infections in patients after mesotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, Stéphanie; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Guihot, Amelie; Deforges, Lionel; Carbonne, Anne; Bricaire, François; Caumes, Eric

    2009-11-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are expressing an interest in mesotherapy as a method of reducing body fat. Cutaneous infections due to rapidly growing mycobacteria are a common complication of such procedures. We followed up patients who had developed cutaneous infections after undergoing mesotherapy during the period October 2006-January 2007. Sixteen patients were infected after mesotherapy injections performed by the same physician. All patients presented with painful, erythematous, draining subcutaneous nodules at the injection sites. All patients were treated with surgical drainage. Microbiological examination was performed on specimens that were obtained before and during the surgical procedure. Direct examination of skin smears demonstrated acid-fast bacilli in 25% of the specimens that were obtained before the procedure and 37% of the specimens obtained during the procedure; culture results were positive in 75% of the patients. Mycobacterium chelonae was identified in 11 patients, and Mycobacterium frederiksbergense was identified in 2 patients. Fourteen patients were treated with antibiotics, 6 received triple therapy as first-line treatment (tigecycline, tobramycin, and clarithromycin), and 8 received dual therapy (clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin). The mean duration of treatment was 14 weeks (range, 1-24 weeks). All of the patients except 1 were fully recovered 2 years after the onset of infection, with the mean time to healing estimated at 6.2 months (range, 1-15 months). This series of rapidly growing mycobacterial cutaneous infections highlights the difficulties in treating such infections and suggests that in vitro susceptibility to antibiotics does not accurately predict their clinical efficacy.

  1. Clinical evaluation of technetium-99m infecton for the localisation of bacterial infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.; Vinjamuri, S.; Hall, A.V.; Solanki, K.; Siraj, Q.H.; Bomanji, J.; Das, S.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to distinguish infection from inflammation in patients with suspected infection using technetium-99m Infecton. Ninety-nine patients (102 studies) referred for infection evaluation underwent imaging with 400 MBq 99m Tc-Infecton at 1 and 4 h. Most patients had appropriate microbiological tests and about half (56) had radiolabelled white cell scans as well. No adverse effects were noted in any patient. The clinical efficacy of 99m Tc-Infecton depended in part on whether imaging was undertaken during antibiotic therapy for infection or not. In consultation with the microbiologist, 5-14 days of appropriate and successful antibiotic therapy was considered adequate to classify some results as true-negatives. The figures for sensitivity and specificity of 99m Tc-Infecton for active or unsuccessfully treated infection were 83% and 91% respectively. It is concluded that 99m Tc-Infecton imaging contributed to the differential diagnosis of inflammation. It is being used as the first imaging modality when bacterial infection is suspected. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab

  2. Bird's Eye View of a Neonatologist: Clinical Approach to Emergency Neonatal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Kuei Huang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Though the incidence of neonatal infection in term and near-term infants is relatively low, incidence of infection in preterm very low birth weight infants is as high as 20–30% and may result in neurodevelopmental impairment or mortality. Pediatricians should be familiar with recognition and emergency management of life-threatening neonatal infections, such as congenital pneumonia, early onset sepsis, late onset sepsis, bacterial and fungal meningitis, disseminated neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV, and HSV meningoencephalitis. For the pediatrician, it is logical to approach the management of these infections by time of onset, i.e., early versus late onset of infection. Perinatal risk factors and simple laboratory tests, such as total white blood-cell count, immature/total ratio, and C-reactive protein are helpful in guiding the decision of antibiotics therapy. Successful management of these critical infections depends upon early diagnosis and timely administration of adequate antibiotics. Empiric antibiotic therapy must cover the most likely pathogens according to the risk factors of each individual neonate, and therapy duration is dependent upon culture results, clinical course, and the microorganism. Future research may focus on developing a practical neonatal sepsis score system based on risk factors and common biomarkers, which are readily available at bedside to make early accurate decisions and achieve better outcomes.

  3. The effect of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection on clinical mastitis occurrence in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, G; Grohn, Y T; Schukken, Y H; Smith, R L

    2017-09-01

    Endemic diseases can be counted among the most serious sources of losses for livestock production. In dairy farms in particular, one of the most common diseases is Johne's disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Infection with MAP causes direct costs because it affects milk production, but it has also been suspected to increase the risk of clinical mastitis (CM) among infected animals. This might contribute to further costs for farmers. We asked whether MAP infection represents a risk factor for CM and, in particular, whether CM occurrences were more common in MAP-infected animals. Our results, obtained by survival analysis, suggest that MAP-infected cows had an increased probability of experiencing CM during lactation. These results highlight the need to account for the interplay of infectious diseases and other health conditions in economic and epidemiological modeling. In this case, accounting for MAP-infected cows having an increased CM occurrence might have nonnegligible effects on the estimated benefit of MAP control. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The clinical features of respiratory infections caused by the Streptococcus anginosus group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Naito, Keisuke; Akata, Kentaro; Shimabukuro, Ikuko; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2015-10-26

    The Streptococcus anginosus group (SAG) play important roles in respiratory infections. It is ordinarily difficult to distinguish them from contaminations as the causative pathogens of respiratory infections because they are often cultured in respiratory specimens. Therefore, it is important to understand the clinical characteristics and laboratory findings of respiratory infections caused by the SAG members. The aim of this study is to clarify the role of the SAG bacteria in respiratory infections. A total of 30 patients who were diagnosed with respiratory infections which were caused by the SAG bacteria between January 2005 and February 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Respiratory infections caused by the SAG were mostly seen in male patients with comorbid diseases and were typically complicated with pleural effusion. Pleural effusion was observed in 22 (73.3%) patients. Empyema was observed in half of the 22 patients with pleural effusion. S. intermedius, S. constellatus and S. anginosus were detected in 16 (53.3 %), 11 (36.7 %) and 3 (10.0 %) patients, respectively. Six patients had mixed-infections. The duration from the onset of symptoms to the hospital visit was significantly longer in "lung abscess" patients than in "pneumonia" patients among the 24 patients with single infections, but not among the six patients with mixed-infection. The peripheral white blood cell counts of the "pneumonia" patients were higher than those of the "lung abscess" patients and S. intermedius was identified significantly more frequently in patients with pulmonary and pleural infections (pneumonia and lung abscess) than in patients with bacterial pleurisy only. In addition, the patients in whom S. intermedius was cultured were significantly older than those in whom S. constellatus was cultured. Respiratory infections caused by the SAG bacteria tended to be observed more frequently in male patients with comorbid diseases and to more frequently involve purulent formation. In

  5. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases: update of the treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debast, S.B.; Bauer, M.P.; Kuijper, E.J.; et al.,

    2014-01-01

    In 2009 the first European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infection (ESCMID) treatment guidance document for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) was published. The guideline has been applied widely in clinical practice. In this document an update and review on the comparative effectiveness

  6. Biofilm formation by clinical isolates and the implications in chronic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Carlos J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor contributing to the chronicity of infections. To date few studies have evaluated biofilm formation in infecting isolates of patients including both Gram-positive and Gram-negative multidrug-resistant (MDR species in the context of numerous types of infectious syndromes. Herein, we investigated the biofilm forming capacity in a large collection of single patient infecting isolates and compared the relationship between biofilm formation to various strain characteristics. Methods The biofilm-forming capacity of 205 randomly sampled clinical isolates from patients, collected from various anatomical sites, admitted for treatment at Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC from 2004–2011, including methicillin-resistant/methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA/MSSA (n=23, Acinetobacter baumannii (n=53, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=36, Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=54, and Escherichia coli (n=39, were evaluated for biofilm formation using the high-throughput microtiter plate assay and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Relationships between biofilm formation to clonal type, site of isolate collection, and MDR phenotype were evaluated. Furthermore, in patients with relapsing infections, serial strains were assessed for their ability to form biofilms in vitro. Results Of the 205 clinical isolates tested, 126 strains (61.4% were observed to form biofilms in vitro at levels greater than or equal to the Staphylococcus epidermidis, positive biofilm producing strain, with P. aeruginosa and S. aureus having the greatest number of biofilm producing strains. Biofilm formation was significantly associated with specific clonal types, the site of isolate collection, and strains positive for biofilm formation were more frequently observed to be MDR. In patients with relapsing infections, the majority of serial isolates recovered from these individuals were observed to be strong biofilm producers in vitro

  7. The clinical value of 14C-urea breath test for diagnosis of helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shuwen; Zhang Yongxian; Zhang Jinming; Ding Yong; Shao Mingzhe; Liu Zilai; Tian Jiahe

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate a rapid microdose 14 C-urea breath test ( 14 C-UBT) with a simplified protocol for detecting the infection of helicobacter pylori (HP). 244 fasting patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms undergo the 14 C-UBT and 124 cases appear positive. 89 patients of those undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and confirmed as HP infection. The sensitivity and specificity of the 14 C-UBT is 100% when compared with the endoscopy. The test has good diagnostic accuracy with minimal radiation exposure and low cost. Thus, the test is reliable, safe, convenient and cost-effective to clinical use

  8. Clinical investigation on Theileria equi and Babesia caballi infections in Italian donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laus, Fulvio; Spaterna, Andrea; Faillace, Vanessa; Veronesi, Fabrizia; Ravagnan, Silvia; Beribé, Francesca; Cerquetella, Matteo; Meligrana, Marina; Tesei, Beniamino

    2015-04-28

    Interest in the welfare and diseases of donkeys is constantly increasing in several countries. Despite this, clinical research into donkeys needs to be in continual development since they show different reactions compared to horses in many conditions, including infectious diseases, and need specific clinical and therapeutic approaches. No reports are currently available on clinical and clinical pathology data regarding donkeys with natural piroplasms infection. Venous blood samples were taken from one hundred and thirty eight donkeys and underwent indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) to detect IgG antibodies against Theileria equi and Babesia caballi and real-time polimerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect Babesia spp. and Theileria spp. Clinical examinations, haematological analyses and serum bilirubin evaluation were also performed and compared with positive or negative status. A seroprevalence of 40.6% and 47.8% was found for T. equi and B. caballi, respectively; double positivity was detected in 19.6% of the animals. PCR results showed that 17.4% of the animals tested positive for T.equi and 3.6% for B. caballi with no double positivity. Twelve donkeys (8.7%) had clinical signs consistent with chronic forms of the disease and no acute forms were detected. Fifty-eight donkeys had haematological and serum bilirubin alterations and 56 (96.6%) of them were IFAT and/or PCR positive. Changes in erythrocyte number, packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, platelets number and total bilirubin were significantly associated with positive and symptomatic animals. Nonspecific clinical presentation seems to be very common in donkeys and several clinical pathology alterations persist after natural infection. Therefore, apparently healthy donkeys can have masked but severe clinical pathology alterations. Acute forms are very seldom observed in donkeys. Clinical monitoring of chronically infected donkeys is recommended since such animals

  9. Cohort study on maternal cytomegalovirus seroprevalence and prevalence and clinical manifestations of congenital infection in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiwen; Wang, Tongzhan; Zhang, Wenqiang; Liu, Xiaolin; Wang, Xiaofang; Wang, Haiyan; He, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Shunxian; Xu, Shuhui; Yu, Yang; Jia, Xingbing; Wang, Maolin; Xu, Aiqiang; Ma, Wei; Amin, Minal M.; Bialek, Stephanie R.; Dollard, Sheila C.; Wang, Chengbin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the leading viral cause of birth defects and developmental disabilities in developed countries. However, CMV seroprevalence and burden of congenital CMV infection are not well defined in China. Cohort of newborns from 5 birthing hospitals in 2 counties of Shandong Province, China, were enrolled from March 2011 to August 2013. Dried blood spots (DBS) and saliva were collected within 4 days after birth for IgG testing for maternal seroprevalence and real-time PCR testing for congenital CMV infection, respectively. Among 5020 newborns tested for CMV IgG, 4827 were seropositive, resulting in CMV maternal seroprevalence of 96.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]:95.6%–96.7%). Of the 10,933 newborns screened for congenital CMV infection, 75 had CMV detected, resulting in an overall prevalence of 0.7% (95% CI: 0.5%–0.9%), with prevalences of 0.4% (14/3995), 0.6% (66/10,857), and 0.7% (52/7761) for DBS, wet saliva, and dried saliva specimens screened, respectively. Prevalence of congenital CMV infection decreased with increasing maternal age (0.9%, 0.6%, and 0.3% among newborns delivered from mothers aged 16–25, 26–35, and >35 years, respectively; P = 0.03), and was higher among preterm infants than full term infants (1.3% vs 0.6%, P = 0.04), infants with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) than those without (1.8% vs 0.7%, P = 0.03), and twins or triplets than singleton pregnancies (2.8% vs 0.7%, P = 0.04). None of the 75 newborns exhibited symptomatic congenital CMV infection, and there was no difference in clinical characteristics and newborn hearing screening results between infants with and without congenital CMV infection at birth. Congenital CMV infection prevalence was lower and the clinical manifestations were milder in this relatively developed region of China compared to populations from other countries with similarly high maternal seroprevalence. Follow-up on children with congenital

  10. First clinical case report of Cytauxzoon sp. infection in a domestic cat in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legroux, Jean-Pierre; Halos, Lénaïg; René-Martellet, Magalie; Servonnet, Marielle; Pingret, Jean-Luc; Bourdoiseau, Gilles; Baneth, Gad; Chabanne, Luc

    2017-03-29

    Feline cytauxzoonosis is an emerging infection caused by tick-transmitted apicomplexan parasites of the genus Cytauxzoon. The association of clinical disease with Cytauxzoon infection appears to be limited to C. felis infections in the Americas. Sporadic infections of wild and domestic felids with Cytauxzoon sp. were recently described in European countries but clinical reports of the infection are rare and incomplete. This case report brings new interesting information on cytauxzoonosis expression in Europe. A 9-years-old castrated European shorthair cat living in rural area of north-eastern France (Saint Sauveur, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté region), without any travel history was presented for consultation due to hyperthermia, anorexia, depression and prolonged fever that didn't respond to antibiotic therapy. The cat had outdoor access with a history of vagrancy and was adequately vaccinated (core vaccines and FeLV vaccine). During biological investigations, intraerythrocytic inclusions were observed on blood smear and were further investigated by PCR analysis and sequencing. Molecular analyses confirmed Cytauxzoon sp. infection. The cat was treated with a subcutaneous injection of imidocarb dipropionate (3.5 mg/kg). One week after treatment, the cat improved clinically, although parasitic inclusions within erythrocytes persisted, and only a mild lymphocytosis was found. Two weeks after treatment, the cat appeared in excellent health, appetite was normal and parasitemia was negative. However, one month after treatment the cat relapsed with hyperthermia, anorexia, and depression. Blood smears and PCR were once again positive. Subsequently, the cat received an additional dose of imidocarb dipropionate (3.5 mg/kg SC) and recovered rapidly without other clinical signs. Two weeks after the second imidocarb injection, the cat was hit by a car and died. This case provides the first clinical description of infection by Cytauxzoon sp. in a domestic cat in France. These

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Aerococcus christensenii CCUG 28831T, Aerococcus sanguinicola CCUG 43001T, Aerococcus urinae CCUG 36881T, Aerococcus urinaeequi CCUG 28094T, Aerococcus urinaehominis CCUG 42038 BT, and Aerococcus viridans CCUG 4311T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carkaci, Derya; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui Chen

    2016-01-01

    Strains belonging to the genus Aerococcus are causative agents of human and animal infections, including urogenital infections, bacteremia/septicemia, and infective endocarditis. This study reports the first fully closed and complete genome sequences of six type strains belonging to the genus Aer...

  12. Herpes simplex and varicella zoster CNS infections: clinical presentations, treatments and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewpoowat, Quanhathai; Salazar, Lucrecia; Aguilera, Elizabeth; Wootton, Susan H; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    To describe the clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics, imaging studies and prognostic factors of adverse clinical outcomes (ACO) among adults with herpes simplex virus (HSV) or varicella zoster virus (VZV) CNS infections. Retrospective review of adult patients with positive HSV or VZV polymerase chain reaction on CSF from an observational study of meningitis or encephalitis in Houston, TX (2004-2014), and New Orleans, LA (1999-2008). Ninety-eight adults patients were identified; 25 had encephalitis [20 (20.4 %) HSV, 5 (5.1 %) VZV], and 73 had meningitis [60 (61.1 %) HSV and 13 (13.3 %) VZV]. HSV and VZV had similar presentations except for nausea (P 1 and an encephalitis presentation were independently associated with an ACO. The treatment for HSV meningitis was variable, and all patients had a good clinical outcome. Alpha herpes CNS infections due to HSV and VZV infections have similar clinical and laboratory manifestations. ACO was observed more frequently in those patients with comorbidities and an encephalitis presentation.

  13. Congenital toxoplasma infection: monthly prenatal screening decreases transmission rate and improves clinical outcome at age 3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, M; Peyron, F; Cornu, C; Vinault, S; Abrahamowicz, M; Kopp, C Bonithon; Binquet, C

    2013-05-01

    Toxoplasma infection during pregnancy exposes the fetus to risks of congenital infection and sequelae that depend heavily on gestational age (GA) at time of infection. Accurate risk estimates by GA are necessary to counsel parents and improve clinical decisions. We analyzed data from pregnant women diagnosed with acute Toxoplasma infection in Lyon (France) from 1987 to 2008 and assessed how the risks of congenital toxoplasmosis and of clinical signs at age 3 years vary depending on GA at the time of maternal infection. Among 2048 mother-infant pairs, 93.2% of mothers received prenatal treatment and 513 (24.7%) fetuses were infected. Because of a significant reduction in risk since 1992 when monthly screening was introduced (59.4% vs 46.6% at 26 GA weeks; P = .038), probabilities of infection were estimated on the basis of maternal infections diagnosed after mid-1992 (n = 1624). Probabilities of congenital infection were <10% for maternal infections before 12 weeks of gestation, rose to 20.0% at 19 weeks, and then continued increasing to 52.3% and almost 70% at 28 and 39 GA weeks, respectively. Because of a significant reduction in risk of clinical signs of congenital toxoplasmosis in infected children born from mothers diagnosed after 1995 when polymerase chain reaction testing on amniotic fluid was initiated (87/794 vs 46/1150; P = .012), probabilities of clinical signs at 3 years were estimated based on 1015 maternal infections diagnosed after 1995 including 207 infected children, with symptoms in 46 (22.2%). These analyses demonstrated that introduction of monthly prenatal screening and improvement in antenatal diagnosis were associated with a significant reduction in the rate of congenital infection and a better outcome at 3 years of age in infected children. Our updated estimates will improve individual management and counseling in areas where genotype II Toxoplasma is predominant.

  14. Antimicrobial therapies for odontogenic infections in children and adolescents. Literature review and clinical recomendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Caviglia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral infections are caused by an imbalance in the patient’s indigenous flora which changes from commensal to opportunistic. Odontogenic infections are the most common reason for consultation in children and adolescents. Rational use of antibiotics is the best strategy to avoid microbial resistance. Dental infections should first receive proper local treatment, which can also be complemented with a systemic method. Appropriate drug selection and dosing should be made. Amoxicilin is the first choice for antimicrobial agents in pediatric dentistry. Clindamycin and clarithromycin are the best alternative for patients with penicillin hypersensibility. In this literature review, the authors intended to establish clear clinical management guidelines for emergency treatment and subsequent final resolution.

  15. [A new approach to clinical and laboratory diagnosis of systemic and local soft tissue infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhatova, N A

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of blood TNF-a, IL-IRA, CRP, oligopeptide, and lactoferrin levels in patients with systemic and local soft tissue infections revealed direct correlation between them which allowed to use these indicators for the diagnosis of systemic infections. Results of clinical and laboratory analyses provided a basis for distinguishing short-term systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis and developing relevant diagnostic criteria. Sepsis combined with systemic inflammatory response syndrome persisting for more than 72 hours after the onset of adequate therapy was characterized by CRP levels > 30 mg/l, oligopeptides > 0.34 U, lactoferrin > 1900 ng/ml, TNF-a > 6 pg/ml, ILL-IRA systemic inflammatory response syndrome for less than 72 hours had lower TNF-a, CRP, oligopeptide, and lactoferrin levels with IL-IRA > 1500 pg/ml. This new approach to early diagnosis of systemic infections makes it possible to optimize their treatment and thereby enhance its efficiency.

  16. Contrasting clinical outcomes in two cohorts of cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bęczkowski, Paweł M; Litster, Annette; Lin, Tsang Long; Mellor, Dominic J; Willett, Brian J; Hosie, Margaret J

    2015-03-23

    Despite over 25 years of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) research, relatively little is known about the longitudinal course of FIV infection following natural infection. In contrast to published reports of experimental infections using lethal strains of the virus, clinical signs of naturally acquired FIV infection can be mild or inapparent, rather than life-threatening. In this prospective, longitudinal controlled study, based in Chicago, IL (n=17) and Memphis, TN (n=27), we investigated two cohorts of privately owned, naturally infected cats kept under different housing conditions. Cats in the Chicago cohort (Group 1) were kept in households of ≤2 cats, while the Memphis cohort (Group 2) comprised part of a large multi-cat household of over 60 cats kept indoors only, with unrestricted access to one another. The majority of cats from Group 1 did not display clinical signs consistent with immunodeficiency during the 22-month observation period. In contrast, the outcome of infection in Group 2 was dramatically different; 17/27 (63%) of cats lost a median of 51.3% of their bodyweight (P<0.0005) and died during the study period, with lymphoma being the most common cause of mortality. Although the decrease in CD4+ T cell count between enrolment and terminal disease was significant (P=0.0017), the CD4:CD8 ratio at the time of enrolment did not reliably distinguish FIV-positive cats classified as 'healthy' and 'not healthy' at either cohort. FIV load at enrolment was significantly lower in Group 1 than in Group 2 (P<0.0001), but there were no significant differences at enrolment between healthy and not healthy cats at either group. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that management and housing conditions impact on disease progression and survival times of FIV-positive cats. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical profile and antibiotics sensitivity in childhood urinary tract infection at Dhulikhel Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S D; Madhup, S K

    2013-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection implies presence of actively multiplying organisms in the urinary tract. Although it is infrequently associated with mortality, it is still a significant cause of morbidity. Early diagnosis is critical to preserve renal function of growing kidney. Our purpose was to determine the clinical, microbiologic profile and antibiotic sensitivity of such infections in pediatric Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) patients at Dhulikhel Hospital. A hospital based prospective descriptive study of 135 children from 2 months to 16 years, with clinical diagnosis of urinary tract infection who visited the pediatric department of Dhulikhel Hospital over the period of 15 months were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent routine urine analysis and culture. Children with recurrent UTI underwent micturating cystourethrogram (MCUG). Children with recurrent UTI of more than two years and with feature of pyelonephritis underwent USG abdomen as well. Complications and response of the treatment was observed in all cases of UTI. All data were entered in Epidata and data analysis was done using spss 16 version. Among 135 children, 32.5% were male and 67.4% were female. Fever was the most common presenting symptom in 74.80% of patients followed by dysuria in 54.1%. Among these children 95.6% had significant pyuria and 45% had culture positive infection. Children who showed positive for bacteriuria, Escherichia coli (78.7%) was the most common organism and are more than 80% sensitive to Amikacin, Gentamicin, Ceftriaxone, Ofloxacin, Nalidixic acid, Imipenem and Vancomycin. Co-trimoxazole was the most common drug used for treatment with a mean drug respond time of (mean+/-S.D) of 2.21+/-.78 days. 2+/-. Children who had recurrent UTI were more prone to develop culture positive UTI (p=0.0001). Urinary Tract Infection in female was almost twice more common than in male. Cotrimoxazole was the most common drug used for treatment, sensitivity of this drug was less than 50% for

  18. Clinical characteristics, microbiology, and outcomes of prosthetic joint infection in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jen-Chih; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Lo, Wan-Yu; Jiang, Ching-Chuan; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-04-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) after total knee or hip replacement is a devastating complication associated with substantial morbidity and economic cost. The incidence of prosthetic joint infection is increasing as the use of mechanical joint replacement increases. The treatment approach to prosthetic joint infection is based on different clinical situations such as a patient's comorbidities, epidemic microbiology data, and surgical procedures. The aim of our study was to understand clinical characteristics of prosthetic joint infection, the microbiology of the prosthetic joint infection, and the outcomes of different treatment strategies during 2006-2011. We retrospectively collected cases of prosthetic joint infection in the National Taiwan University Hospital between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2011. The patients' characteristics, microbiology, outcomes, and factors associated with treatment success were recorded. One hundred and forty-four patients were identified as having PJI. Of these, 92 patients were entered into per-protocol analysis. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common causative organism (29.9%), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococci (16.7%), and Enterococci (9.7%). The overall treatment success rate was 50%. Patients who received a two-stage revision had a better outcome, compared to patients who underwent other types of surgeries (70% vs. 32.7%, respectively; p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, the two-stage revision was significantly associated with treatment success (odds ratio = 3.923, 95% confidence interval = 1.53-10.04). Our study demonstrates that Staphylococcus aureus was the most common causative organisms in PJI. Performing two-stage revisions was significantly associated with a better outcome. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Clinical Presentation, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Hematogenous Prosthetic Joint Infection in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J; Palraj, Bharath Raj; Osmon, Douglas R; Berbari, Elie F; Baddour, Larry M; Lohse, Christine M; Steckelberg, James M; Wilson, Walter R; Sohail, M Rizwan

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is a life-threatening condition that may lead to metastatic infection, including prosthetic joint infection. To assess clinical factors associated with hematogenous prosthetic joint infection, we retrospectively reviewed all patients with a joint arthroplasty in place at the time of a first episode of S. aureus bacteremia over a 5-year period at our institution. Patients with postsurgical prosthetic joint infection without hematogenous prosthetic joint infection were excluded. There were 85 patients (143 arthroplasties) with either no prosthetic joint infection (n = 50; 58.8%) or hematogenous prosthetic joint infection in at least one arthroplasty (n = 35; 41.2%). The odds of hematogenous prosthetic joint infection was significantly increased among patients with community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] 18.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.64-infinity; P = .001), as compared with nosocomial S. aureus bacteremia, in which there were no patients with hematogenous prosthetic joint infection. After adjusting for S. aureus bacteremia classification, the presence of ≥3 joint arthroplasties in place was associated with a nearly ninefold increased odds of hematogenous prosthetic joint infection as compared with those with 1-2 joint arthroplasties in place (OR 8.55; 95% CI 1.44-95.71; P = .012). All but one joint with prosthetic joint infection demonstrated at least one clinical feature suggestive of infection. There were 4 additional S. aureus prosthetic joint infections diagnosed during a median of 3.4 years of follow-up post hospitalization for S. aureus bacteremia. Prosthetic joint infection is frequent in patients with existing arthroplasties and concomitant S. aureus bacteremia, particularly with community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia and multiple prostheses. In contrast, occult S. aureus prosthetic joint infection without clinical features suggestive of prosthetic joint infection at the time of S. aureus bacteremia

  20. Nosocomial infections: knowledge and source of information among clinical health care students in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bello AI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajediran I Bello1, Eunice N Asiedu1, Babatunde OA Adegoke2, Jonathan NA Quartey1, Kwadwo O Appiah-Kubi1, Bertha Owusu-Ansah11Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; 2Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NigeriaBackground: This study determined and compared the knowledge of nosocomial infections among clinical health care students at the College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana.Methods: Two hundred undergraduate health care students from four academic programs participated in the study. The study sample was drawn from each academic program by a simple random sampling technique using the class directory from each course. The Infection Control Standardized Questionnaire (ICSQ was used to assess the knowledge of students about three main domains, ie, hand hygiene, nosocomial infections, and standard precautions. A maximum score of 50 was obtainable, and respondents with scores ≥70% were classified as having a satisfactory knowledge. The response on each item was coded numerically to generate data for statistical analysis. Comparison of knowledge on the domains among categories of students was assessed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, while associations between courses of study and knowledge about nosocomial infections were determined using the Chi-square test. All statistical tests had a significant level of 5% (P < 0.05Results: Overall mean percentage score of the participants on ICSQ was 65.4 ± 2.58, with medical, physiotherapy, radiography, and nursing students recording mean percentage scores of 70.58 ± 0.62, 65.02 ± 2.00, 64.74 ± 1.19, and 61.31 ± 2.35, respectively. The main source of information about the prevention of nosocomial infections as cited by participants was their routine formal training in class. There was no significant association (P > 0.05 between course of study and knowledge of

  1. The quest for anti-inflammatory and anti-infective biomaterials in clinical translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Griffith

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials are now being used or evaluated clinically as implants to supplement the severe shortage of available human donor organs. To date however, such implants have mainly been developed as scaffolds to promote the regeneration of failing organs due to old age or congenital malformations. In the real world, however, infection or immunological issues often compromise patients. For example, bacterial and viral infections can result in uncontrolled immunopathological damage and lead to organ failure. Hence, there is a need for biomaterials and implants that not only promote regeneration but also address issues that are specific to compromised patients such as infection and inflammation. Different strategies are needed to address the regeneration of organs that have been damaged by infection or inflammation for successful clinical translation. Therefore, the real quest is for multi-functional biomaterials with combined properties that can combat infections, modulate inflammation and promote regeneration at the same time. These strategies will necessitate the inclusion of methodologies for management of the cellular and signaling components elicited within the local microenvironment. In the development of such biomaterials, strategies range from the inclusion of materials that have intrinsic anti-inflammatory properties, such as the synthetic lipid polymer, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC, to silver nanoparticles that have anti-bacterial properties, to inclusion of nano- and micro-particles in biomaterials composites that deliver active drugs. In this present review, we present examples of both kinds of materials in each group along with their pros and cons. Thus, as a promising next generation strategy to aid or replace tissue/organ transplantation, an integrated smart programmable platform is needed for regenerative medicine applications to create and/or restore normal function at the cell and tissue levels. Therefore, now it is

  2. Clinical reactivations of herpes simplex virus type 2 infection and human immunodeficiency virus disease progression markers.

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    Bulbulgul Aumakhan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The natural history of HSV-2 infection and role of HSV-2 reactivations in HIV disease progression are unclear. METHODS: Clinical symptoms of active HSV-2 infection were used to classify 1,938 HIV/HSV-2 co-infected participants of the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS into groups of varying degree of HSV-2 clinical activity. Differences in plasma HIV RNA and CD4+ T cell counts between groups were explored longitudinally across three study visits and cross-sectionally at the last study visit. RESULTS: A dose dependent association between markers of HIV disease progression and degree of HSV-2 clinical activity was observed. In multivariate analyses after adjusting for baseline CD4+ T cell levels, active HSV-2 infection with frequent symptomatic reactivations was associated with 21% to 32% increase in the probability of detectable plasma HIV RNA (trend p = 0.004, an average of 0.27 to 0.29 log10 copies/ml higher plasma HIV RNA on a continuous scale (trend p<0.001 and 51 to 101 reduced CD4+ T cells/mm(3 over time compared to asymptomatic HSV-2 infection (trend p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: HIV induced CD4+ T cell loss was associated with frequent symptomatic HSV-2 reactivations. However, effect of HSV-2 reactivations on HIV disease progression markers in this population was modest and appears to be dependent on the frequency and severity of reactivations. Further studies will be necessary to determine whether HSV-2 reactivations contribute to acceleration of HIV disease progression.

  3. Excretion of [3H]prednisolone in clinically normal and experimentally infected bovine udders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geleta, J.N.; Shimoda, W.; Mercer, H.D.

    1984-01-01

    The excretion rate of [3H]prednisolone from clinically normal and experimentally infected udders of 10 lactating cows was studied. Each quarter of 6 cows was injected with a single dose of [3H]prednisolone mixed with non-radioactive prednisolone equivalent to 10 mg in 10 ml of peanut oil base. Each of the remaining 4 cows was given 40 mg of nonradioactive prednisolone and [3H]prednisolone in 60% ethanol IV. Control and postadministration samples of blood, milk, and urine were examined for radioactivity. The effects of [3H]prednisolone were evaluated in the same cows, first in clinically normal udders, then 2 weeks later in udders experimentally infected with Streptococcus agalactiae. Absorption and elimination of prednisolone were the same before and after induced infection. Within 3 hours after intramammary injection, 95% of the labeled prednisolone was absorbed systemically, less than 5% of this dose was recovered in milk, and 29% was excreted in urine. After IV injection of [3H]prednisolone, less than 0.2% of the total radioactivity was recovered in milk and less than 46% was excreted in urine. Clinical mastitis induced by S agalactiae was moderate. Circulating blood leukocytes and somatic cells in the milk of normal cows remained essentially unchanged. The leukocyte response to induced infection was rapid in blood and milk. Large numbers of leukocytes were noticed in the milk and a severe leukopenia occurred. Prednisolone treatment did not alter the number of somatic cells in milk or reduce the inflammatory response of experimentally infected cows

  4. Clinical manifestations and management of left ventricular assist device-associated infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienaber, Juhsien Jodi C; Kusne, Shimon; Riaz, Talha; Walker, Randall C; Baddour, Larry M; Wright, Alan J; Park, Soon J; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; Keating, Michael R; Arabia, Francisco A; Lahr, Brian D; Sohail, M Rizwan

    2013-11-01

    Infection is a serious complication of left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy. Published data regarding LVAD-associated infections (LVADIs) are limited by single-center experiences and use of nonstandardized definitions. We retrospectively reviewed 247 patients who underwent continuous-flow LVAD implantation from January 2005 to December 2011 at Mayo Clinic campuses in Minnesota, Arizona, and Florida. LVADIs were defined using the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation criteria. We identified 101 episodes of LVADI in 78 patients (32%) from this cohort. Mean age (± standard deviation [SD]) was 57±15 years. The majority (94%) underwent Heartmate II implantation, with 62% LVADs placed as destination therapy. The most common type of LVADIs were driveline infections (47%), followed by bloodstream infections (24% VAD related, and 22% non-VAD related). The most common causative pathogens included gram-positive cocci (45%), predominantly staphylococci, and nosocomial gram-negative bacilli (27%). Almost half (42%) of the patients were managed by chronic suppressive antimicrobial therapy. While 14% of the patients had intraoperative debridement, only 3 underwent complete LVAD removal. The average duration (±SD) of LVAD support was 1.5±1.0 years. At year 2 of follow-up, the cumulative incidence of all-cause mortality was estimated to be 43%. Clinical manifestations of LVADI vary on the basis of the type of infection and the causative pathogen. Mortality remained high despite combined medical and surgical intervention and chronic suppressive antimicrobial therapy. Based on clinical experiences, a management algorithm for LVADI is proposed to assist in the decision-making process.

  5. Excretion of (3H)prednisolone in clinically normal and experimentally infected bovine udders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geleta, J.N.; Shimoda, W.; Mercer, H.D.

    1984-08-01

    The excretion rate of (3H)prednisolone from clinically normal and experimentally infected udders of 10 lactating cows was studied. Each quarter of 6 cows was injected with a single dose of (3H)prednisolone mixed with non-radioactive prednisolone equivalent to 10 mg in 10 ml of peanut oil base. Each of the remaining 4 cows was given 40 mg of nonradioactive prednisolone and (3H)prednisolone in 60% ethanol IV. Control and postadministration samples of blood, milk, and urine were examined for radioactivity. The effects of (3H)prednisolone were evaluated in the same cows, first in clinically normal udders, then 2 weeks later in udders experimentally infected with Streptococcus agalactiae. Absorption and elimination of prednisolone were the same before and after induced infection. Within 3 hours after intramammary injection, 95% of the labeled prednisolone was absorbed systemically, less than 5% of this dose was recovered in milk, and 29% was excreted in urine. After IV injection of (3H)prednisolone, less than 0.2% of the total radioactivity was recovered in milk and less than 46% was excreted in urine. Clinical mastitis induced by S agalactiae was moderate. Circulating blood leukocytes and somatic cells in the milk of normal cows remained essentially unchanged. The leukocyte response to induced infection was rapid in blood and milk. Large numbers of leukocytes were noticed in the milk and a severe leukopenia occurred. Prednisolone treatment did not alter the number of somatic cells in milk or reduce the inflammatory response of experimentally infected cows.

  6. Primary vs. secondary antibody deficiency: clinical features and infection outcomes of immunoglobulin replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai S Duraisingham

    Full Text Available Secondary antibody deficiency can occur as a result of haematological malignancies or certain medications, but not much is known about the clinical and immunological features of this group of patients as a whole. Here we describe a cohort of 167 patients with primary or secondary antibody deficiencies on immunoglobulin (Ig-replacement treatment. The demographics, causes of immunodeficiency, diagnostic delay, clinical and laboratory features, and infection frequency were analysed retrospectively. Chemotherapy for B cell lymphoma and the use of Rituximab, corticosteroids or immunosuppressive medications were the most common causes of secondary antibody deficiency in this cohort. There was no difference in diagnostic delay or bronchiectasis between primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients, and both groups experienced disorders associated with immune dysregulation. Secondary antibody deficiency patients had similar baseline levels of serum IgG, but higher IgM and IgA, and a higher frequency of switched memory B cells than primary antibody deficiency patients. Serious and non-serious infections before and after Ig-replacement were also compared in both groups. Although secondary antibody deficiency patients had more serious infections before initiation of Ig-replacement, treatment resulted in a significant reduction of serious and non-serious infections in both primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients. Patients with secondary antibody deficiency experience similar delays in diagnosis as primary antibody deficiency patients and can also benefit from immunoglobulin-replacement treatment.

  7. Primary vs. Secondary Antibody Deficiency: Clinical Features and Infection Outcomes of Immunoglobulin Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraisingham, Sai S.; Buckland, Matthew; Dempster, John; Lorenzo, Lorena; Grigoriadou, Sofia; Longhurst, Hilary J.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary antibody deficiency can occur as a result of haematological malignancies or certain medications, but not much is known about the clinical and immunological features of this group of patients as a whole. Here we describe a cohort of 167 patients with primary or secondary antibody deficiencies on immunoglobulin (Ig)-replacement treatment. The demographics, causes of immunodeficiency, diagnostic delay, clinical and laboratory features, and infection frequency were analysed retrospectively. Chemotherapy for B cell lymphoma and the use of Rituximab, corticosteroids or immunosuppressive medications were the most common causes of secondary antibody deficiency in this cohort. There was no difference in diagnostic delay or bronchiectasis between primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients, and both groups experienced disorders associated with immune dysregulation. Secondary antibody deficiency patients had similar baseline levels of serum IgG, but higher IgM and IgA, and a higher frequency of switched memory B cells than primary antibody deficiency patients. Serious and non-serious infections before and after Ig-replacement were also compared in both groups. Although secondary antibody deficiency patients had more serious infections before initiation of Ig-replacement, treatment resulted in a significant reduction of serious and non-serious infections in both primary and secondary antibody deficiency patients. Patients with secondary antibody deficiency experience similar delays in diagnosis as primary antibody deficiency patients and can also benefit from immunoglobulin-replacement treatment. PMID:24971644

  8. Clinical and Pathophysiological Overview of Acinetobacter Infections: a Century of Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Travis B.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Luna, Brian; Spellberg, Brad

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Acinetobacter is a complex genus, and historically, there has been confusion about the existence of multiple species. The species commonly cause nosocomial infections, predominantly aspiration pneumonia and catheter-associated bacteremia, but can also cause soft tissue and urinary tract infections. Community-acquired infections by Acinetobacter spp. are increasingly reported. Transmission of Acinetobacter and subsequent disease is facilitated by the organism's environmental tenacity, resistance to desiccation, and evasion of host immunity. The virulence properties demonstrated by Acinetobacter spp. primarily stem from evasion of rapid clearance by the innate immune system, effectively enabling high bacterial density that triggers lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated sepsis. Capsular polysaccharide is a critical virulence factor that enables immune evasion, while LPS triggers septic shock. However, the primary driver of clinical outcome is antibiotic resistance. Administration of initially effective therapy is key to improving survival, reducing 30-day mortality threefold. Regrettably, due to the high frequency of this organism having an extreme drug resistance (XDR) phenotype, early initiation of effective therapy is a major clinical challenge. Given its high rate of antibiotic resistance and abysmal outcomes (up to 70% mortality rate from infections caused by XDR strains in some case series), new preventative and therapeutic options for Acinetobacter spp. are desperately needed. PMID:27974412

  9. Management of infection in myelosuppressed patients: clinical trials and common sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, W H

    1985-01-01

    In the past fifteen years, enormous research effort has been expended in pursuit of the "ideal" approach to the management of infection in the myelosuppressed, i.e., granulocytopenic, patient. In the welter of clinical trials, some "commonsense" fundamentals have been lost or submerged, while other ideas seem to have become "modern myths." Among those commonsense approaches that should not be forgotten are the following: Granulocytopenia often precludes even the most skilled observer from assessing whether a febrile patient is truly infected. The epidemiology of infection at the local institution should be the principal determinant of the empiric antibiotic regimen in use. There is no ideal empiric antibiotic regimen. In particular, there is no absolute necessity for antipseudomonal penicillins, for aminoglycosides or for combinations of antibiotics. Some modern myths that seem to have been widely accepted without adequate data are: Antibiotic "synergism" is an essential prerequisite to a successful outcome of infection in the granulocytopenic patient. In the febrile granulocytopenic patient who responds to treatment, antibiotics should be continued until the granulocytopenia resolves. In the febrile granulocytopenic patient who does not respond to treatment, all such patients should receive amphotericin B for empiric antifungal treatment. These and other modern myths and aspects of common sense will be discussed in light of recent clinical trials.

  10. [Clinical and demographic profile and risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Carlos; Pacheco, Carlos; Jaimes, Fabián

    2017-01-24

    Clostridium difficile infection is the leading cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea. The increasing incidence added to a lower rate of response to the initial treatment and higher rates of relapse has generated a higher burden of the disease. To determine the clinical characteristics of hospitalized patients with C. difficile infection. We made a nested case-cohort study. We reviewed medical records of the patients with nosocomial diarrhea for whom an assay for toxin A-B of C. difficile had been requested from February, 2010, to February, 2012. We defined case as a patient with diarrhea and a positive assay for the toxin, and control as those patients with a negative assay for the toxin. We collected data on demographic and clinical characteristics, risk factors, hospital length of stay, treatment, and complications. We collected data from 123 patients during the follow-up period, 30 of whom were positive for the toxin. Mean age in the study population was 49 years and 60% were men. The main symptoms were abdominal pain (35%) and fever (34%). The principal complications were electrolytic alteration and severe sepsis with secondary acute kidney injury. Mortality was 13% and independent factors associated to the appearance of the infection were the use of proton pump inhibitors and previous gastrointestinal tract surgery. The use of proton pump inhibitors and previous gastrointestinal tract surgery were factors associated to C. difficile infection.

  11. Progress in the Discovery of Treatments for C. difficile Infection: A Clinical and Medicinal Chemistry Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, Lissa S.; Owusu, Yaw B.; Hurdle, Julian G.; Sun, Dianqing

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an anaerobic, Gram-positive pathogen that causes C. difficile infection, which results in significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of C. difficile infection in developed countries has become increasingly high due to the emergence of newer epidemic strains, a growing elderly population, extensive use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and limited therapies for this diarrheal disease. Because treatment options currently available for C. difficile infection have some drawbacks, including cost, promotion of resistance, and selectivity problems, new agents are urgently needed to address these challenges. This review article focuses on two parts: the first part summarizes current clinical treatment strategies and agents under clinical development for C. difficile infection; the second part reviews newly reported anti-difficile agents that have been evaluated or reevaluated in the last five years and are in the early stages of drug discovery and development. Antibiotics are divided into natural product inspired and synthetic small molecule compounds that may have the potential to be more efficacious than currently approved treatments. This includes potency, selectivity, reduced cytotoxicity, and novel modes of action to prevent resistance. PMID:24236721

  12. Clinical importance of pharmacogenetics in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Adina Maria; MitruŢ, Paul; Kamal, Kamal Constantin; Tica, Oana Sorina; Niculescu, Mihaela; Alexandru, Dragoş Ovidiu; Tica, Andrei Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Globally, over 4% of the world population is affected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The current standard of care for hepatitis C infection is combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks, which yield a sustained virological response in only a little over half of the patients with genotype 1 HCV. We investigated the clinical importance of pharmacogenetics in treatment efficacy and prediction of hematotoxicity. A total of 148 patients infected with HCV were enrolled. All patients were treated for a period of 48 weeks or less with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Four genotypes were investigated: inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) rs1127354, C20orf194 rs6051702, interferon lambda (IFNL)3 rs8099917, IFNL3÷4 rs12979860 in the population from southwestern Romania. Genetic variants for rs129798660 and rs6051702 proved once more to represent an indisputable clinical tool for predicting sustained virological response (SVR) (69.23%, chi-square p=0.007846, ppharmacogenetics should play a constant role in treatment decisions for patients infected with hepatitis C virus.

  13. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Antibiotic Treatment of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, U-Syn; Lee, Seung-Ju; Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Min, Seung Ki; Lee, Heeyoung

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are infectious diseases that commonly occur in communities. Although several international guidelines for the management of UTIs have been available, clinical characteristics, etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns may differ from country to country. This work represents an update of the 2011 Korean guideline for UTIs. The current guideline was developed by the update and adaptation method. This clinical practice guideline provides recommendations for the diagnosis and management of UTIs, including asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, complicated pyelonephritis related to urinary tract obstruction, and acute bacterial prostatitis. This guideline targets community-acquired UTIs occurring among adult patients. Healthcare-associated UTIs, catheter-associated UTIs, and infections in immunocompromised patients were not included in this guideline. PMID:29637759

  14. HBV and HIV co-infection: Prevalence and clinical outcomes in tertiary care hospital Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Ali; Khan, Amer Hayat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Soo, Chow Ting; Khan, Kashifullah

    2016-03-01

    According to WHO, Malaysia has been classified as a concentrated epidemic country due to progression of HIV infection in the population of injecting drug users. The main objectives of current study are to determine the prevalence of HBV among HIV-positive individuals in a tertiary care hospital of Malaysia and to assess the predictors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients. A retrospective, cross-sectional study is conducted at Hospital Palau Pinang, Malaysia. The collection of socio-demographic data as well as clinical data is done with the help of data collection form. Data were analyzed after putting the collected values of required data by using statistical software SPSS version 20.0 and P > 0.05 is considered as significant. Results show that the overall prevalence of HBV was 86 (13%) including 495 (74.5%) males and 169 (25.5%) females among a total of 664 HIV-infected patients. It was observed that there is a high prevalence of HIV-HBV co-infection in males 76 (11.4%) as compared to females 10 (1.5%) (P = 0.002). The median age of the study population was 39 years. The statistical significant risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were observed in the variables of gender, age groups, and injecting drug users. The findings of the present study shows that the prevalence of HBV infection among HIV-positive patients was 13% and the risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were gender, age, and intravenous drug users. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Toledano-Sierra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  16. Does virus-bacteria coinfection increase the clinical severity of acute respiratory infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasio, Guilherme A C; Pereira, Luciane A; Moreira, Suzana D R; Duarte dos Santos, Claudia N; Dalla-Costa, Libera M; Raboni, Sonia M

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective cohort study investigated the presence of bacteria in respiratory secretions of patients hospitalized with acute respiratory infections and analyzed the impact of viral and bacterial coinfection on severity and the mortality rate. A total of 169 patients with acute respiratory infections were included, viruses and bacteria in respiratory samples were detected using molecular methods. Among all samples, 73.3% and 59.7% were positive for viruses and bacteria, respectively; 45% contained both virus and bacteria. Bacterial coinfection was more frequent in patients infected by community respiratory viruses than influenza A H1N1pdm (83.3% vs. 40.6%). The most frequently bacteria detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae. Both species were co-detected in 54 patients and identified alone in 22 and 21 patients, respectively. Overall, there were no significant differences in the period of hospitalization, severity, or mortality rate between patients infected with respiratory viruses alone and those coinfected by viruses and bacteria. The detection of mixed respiratory pathogens is frequent in hospitalized patients with acute respiratory infections, but its impact on the clinical outcome does not appear substantial. However, it should be noted that most of the patients received broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, which may have contributed to this favorable outcome. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Clinical significance of infection with cag A and vac A positive Helicobacter pylori strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokić-Milutinović, Aleksandra; Todorović, Vera; Milosavljević, Tomica

    2004-01-01

    Clinical relevance of infection with different Helicobacter pylori strains was reviewed in this paper. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection most probably include acne rosacea and chronic urticaria, while the importance of H. pylori infection for pathogenesis of growth retardation in children, iron deficiency anemia, coronary heart disease, stroke and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura remains vague. The expression of two H. pylori proteins, cytotoxin associated protein (cag A) and vacuolization cytotoxin (vac A) is considered to be related with pathogenicity of the bacterium. It is clear that presence of cag A+ strains is important for development of peptic ulcer; nevertheless, it is also protective against esophageal reflux disease. On the other hand, cag A+ strains are common in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma patients, but it seems that certain subtypes of vac A cytotoxin are more important risk factors. Infection with cag A+ strains is more common in patients with acne rosacea, stroke and coronary heart disease.

  18. Clinical significance of infection with cag A and vac A positive helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical relevance of infection with different Helicobacter pylori strains was reviewed in this paper. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection plays a role in pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. Extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection most probably include acne rosacea and chronic urticaria, while the importance of H. pylori infection for pathogenesis of growth retardation in children, iron deficiency anemia, coronary heart disease, stroke and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura remains vague. The expression of two H. pylori proteins, cytotoxin associated protein (cag A and vacuolization cytotoxin (vac A is considered to be related with pathogenicity of the bacterium. It is clear that presence of cag A+ strains is important for development of peptic ulcer; nevertheless, it is also protective against esophageal reflux disease. On the other hand, cag A+ strains are common in gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma patients, but it seems that certain subtypes of vac A cytotoxin are more important risk factors. Infection with cag A+ strains is more common in patients with acne rosacea, stroke and coronary heart disease.

  19. Clinical and pathological findings of concurrent poxvirus lesions and aspergillosis infection in canaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, Kheirandish; Nasrin, Askari; Mahmoud, Salehi

    2013-03-01

    To investigate clinical, pathological and mycological findings in canaries, in which pox lesions and Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) infection were observed simultaneously. This study was performed on a breeding colony (about 100 canaries) affected by fatal wasting disease. Necropsy was undertaken on 10 severely affected canaries, and gross lesions were recorded. Samples from internal organs displaying lesions were obtained for histopathological evaluation. Tracheal swap samples of internal organs of the all infected animals with lesions at necropsy were cultured in Sabouraud Dextrose Agar for mycological examination. At necropsy, caseous foci were determined in the lungs, on the air sacs, liver, spleen, heart. Swelling of the eyelids, diffuse hemorrhages in the subcutaneous tissue with small papular lesions of the skin were other typical necropsy findings. Histopathologically, pathognomonic eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, which called Bollinger bodies, in both skin cells and vacuolated air way epithelial cells confirmed canary pox infection. Moreover, histopathological examination of the white-yellowish caseous foci revealed necrotic granulomatous reaction consisting of macrophages, heterophil leukocytes and giant cells encapsulated with a fibrous tissue. After the culture of the tissue samples, the formation of bluish green colonies confirmed A. fumigatus infection. Canary pox has been known as the disease that can result in high losses in a short time, as a re-emerging disease that has not been present during recent years in canary flocks in Iran. So, the current paper provides useful information to prevent misdiagnosed of canary pox disease which can cause secondary mycotic infection.

  20. Enterovirus infections in Singaporean children: an assessment of neurological manifestations and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Wen Yi; Han, Audrey; Wang, S J Furene; Lin, Jeremy; Isa, Mas Suhaila; Koay, Evelyn Siew Chuan; Tay, Stacey Kiat-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Enterovirus infections in childhood can be associated with significant neurological morbidity. This study aimed to describe the prevalence and range of neurological manifestations, determine the clinical characteristics and assess differences in clinical outcomes for Singaporean children diagnosed with enterovirus infections. In this single-centre, case-control study, clinical data was collected retrospectively from patients admitted to National University Hospital, Singapore, from August 2007 to October 2011 and diagnosed with enterovirus infection, based on the enterovirus polymerase chain reaction test, or cultures from throat and rectal swabs or cerebrospinal fluid samples. The occurrence of neurological manifestations was reviewed and clinical outcomes were assessed. A total of 48 patients (age range: six days-17.8 years) were included in the study. Neurological manifestations were seen in 75.0% of patients, 63.9% of whom presented with aseptic meningitis. Other neurological manifestations included encephalitis, acute cerebellitis, transverse myelitis and autonomic dysfunction. The incidence of neurological manifestations was significantly higher in patients aged > 1 year as compared to younger patients (p = 0.043). In patients without neurological manifestations, a significantly higher proportion presented with hand, foot and mouth disease and poor feeding. Long-term neurological sequelae were seen in 16.7% of patients with neurological manifestations. A wide spectrum of neurological manifestations resulting in a relatively low incidence of long-term neurological sequelae was observed in our study of Singaporean children with enterovirus infections. As some of these neurological morbidities were severe, careful evaluation of children with neurological involvement is therefore necessary. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association

  1. Clinical presentation of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections in research and community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedo, Susan E; Seidlitz, Jakob; Kovacevic, Miro; Latimer, M Elizabeth; Hommer, Rebecca; Lougee, Lorraine; Grant, Paul

    2015-02-01

    The first cases of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) were described >15 years ago. Since that time, the literature has been divided between studies that successfully demonstrate an etiologic relationship between Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and those that fail to find an association. One possible explanation for the conflicting reports is that the diagnostic criteria proposed for PANDAS are not specific enough to describe a unique and homogeneous cohort of patients. To evaluate the validity of the PANDAS criteria, we compared clinical characteristics of PANDAS patients identified in two community practices with a sample of children meeting full research criteria for PANDAS. A systematic review of clinical records was used to identify the presence or absence of selected symptoms in children evaluated for PANDAS by physicians in Hinsdale, Illinois (n=52) and Bethesda, Maryland (n=40). RESULTS were compared against data from participants in National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research investigations of PANDAS (n=48). As described in the original PANDAS cohort, males outnumbered females (95:45) by ∼ 2:1, and symptoms began in early childhood (7.3±2.7 years). Clinical presentations were remarkably similar across sites, with all children reporting acute onset of OCD symptoms and multiple comorbidities, including separation anxiety (86-92%), school issues (75-81%), sleep disruptions (71%), tics (60-65%), urinary symptoms (42-81%), and others. Twenty of the community cases (22%) failed to meet PANDAS criteria because of an absence of documentation of GAS infections. The diagnostic criteria for PANDAS can be used by clinicians to accurately identify patients with common clinical features and shared etiology of symptoms. Although difficulties in documenting an association between GAS infection and symptom onset/exacerbations may

  2. The spatial context of clinic-reported sexually transmitted infection in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Shui-Shan; Ho, King-Man; Cheung, Georgiana MT

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The incidence and prevalence of sexually transmitted infection (STI) in China has been on the rise in the past decade. Delineation of epidemiologic pattern is often hampered by its uneven distribution. Spatial distribution is often a neglected aspect of STI research, the description of which may enhance epidemiologic surveillance and inform service development. Methods Over a one month-period, all first time attendees of 6 public STI clinics in Hong Kong were interviewed b...

  3. Clinical and laboratory profile of different dengue sub types in dengue virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Niloy Gan Chaudhuri; S. Vithyavathi; K. Sankar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dengue infection, an arthropod-borne viral hemorrhagic fever is caused by Arbovirus of Flavivirus genus and transmitted by Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus. Liver involvement in dengue fever is manifested by the elevation of transaminases representing reactive hepatitis, due to direct attack of virus itself or the use of hepatotoxic drugs. The objective of the study was to investigate clinical and laboratory profile of different dengue sub type's patients admitted for dengue fever....

  4. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia C. Dobler; Sinthia Bosnic-Anticevich; Carol L. Armour

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB) physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI), focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explain...

  5. Clinical and epidemiological features of coryneform skin infections at a tertiary hospital

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    Malcolm Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Skin infections caused by coryneform bacteria are common dermatological conditions. However, to the best of our knowledge, no studies are available on the clinical characteristics and epidemiological features of this group of disorders as one entity from India and abroad. Aims: To study the clinical and epidemiological features of coryneform skin infections Methods: A total of 75 patients presenting with clinically distinctive lesions of pitted keratolysis, erythrasma and trichobacteriosis to our hospital were included in the study. Cases were interviewed with particular emphasis on epidemiological features and the various clinical findings were recorded. Investigations like Gram's stain, Wood's light examination, 10% KOH scrapings, were done in selected cases to ascertain the diagnosis. Results: Pitted keratolysis was more common in the age group of 31-40 years (40% with a male preponderance (76.7%, most commonly affecting pressure bearing areas of the soles with malodour (86.7% and frequent contact with water (58.3% constituting the most important presenting symptom and provocating factor respectively. Erythrasma affected both male and female patients equally and was more commonly detected in patients with a BMI > 23kg/m2 (62.5% and in diabetics (50%. All patients with trichobacteriosis presented with yellow coloured concretions in the axillae. Bromhidrosis (71.4% and failure to regularly use an axillary deodorant (71.4% were the most common presenting symptom and predisposing factor respectively. Conclusion: Coryneform skin infections are common dermatological conditions, though epidemiological data are fragmentary. Hyperhidrosis is a common predisposing factor to all three coryneform skin infections. Asymmetrical distribution of pits has been reported in our study. Diabetic status needs to be evaluated in all patients with erythrasma. Woods lamp examination forms an indispensible tool to diagnose erythrasma and trichobacteriosis.

  6. Fungal Infections of the Central Nervous System in Small Animals: Clinical Features, Diagnosis, and Management.

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    Bentley, R Timothy; Taylor, Amanda R; Thomovsky, Stephanie A

    2018-01-01

    Small animal mycoses vary geographically. Different clinical presentations are seen in animals with infection of the central nervous system (CNS), including multifocal meningoencephalomyelitis, intracranial lesions that accompany sinonasal lesions, rapidly progressive ventriculitis, or solitary granuloma of the brain or spinal cord. Systemic, nasal, or extraneural clinical signs are common but, especially in granuloma cases, do not always occur. Surgery may have a diagnostic and therapeutic role in CNS granuloma. There have been recent advancements in serology. Fluconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole cross the blood-brain barrier, but voriconazole is neurotoxic to cats. Liposomal and lipid-encapsulated formulations of amphotericin B are preferred. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Available clinical markers of treatment outcome integrated in mathematical models to guide therapy in HIV infection.

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    Vergu, Elisabeta; Mallet, Alain; Golmard, Jean-Louis

    2004-02-01

    Because treatment failure in many HIV-infected persons may be due to multiple causes, including resistance to antiretroviral agents, it is important to better tailor drug therapy to individual patients. This improvement requires the prediction of treatment outcome from baseline immunological or virological factors, and from results of resistance tests. Here, we review briefly the available clinical factors that have an impact on therapy outcome, and discuss the role of a predictive modelling approach integrating these factors proposed in a previous work. Mathematical and statistical models could become essential tools to address questions that are difficult to study clinically and experimentally, thereby guiding decisions in the choice of individualized drug regimens.

  8. Cross-infection and infection control in dentistry: Knowledge, attitude and practice of patients attended dental clinics in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

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    Nahla K. Ibrahim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the level of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice (KAP of patients attended dental clinics at King Abdulaziz University Hospital (KAUH regarding cross infections and infection control in dentistry. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 225 patients who attended the dental clinics of KAUH, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 2014. A standardized, confidential, anonymous, interviewing questionnaire was used. Knowledge about dental infections was assessed by 12 MCQs. The attitudes were assessed through answering seven statements on a three- point Likert scale. Patients’ self reported practices were also evaluated. Descriptive and inferential statistics were done.Results of the study revealed that 39.5%, 38.7% and 21.8% of the participants obtained poor, fair and satisfactory level of knowledge about infections and infection control in dentistry, respectively. Social media was the commonest source of information about dental infection. Participant's educational level was significantly associated with the level of knowledge about dental infection. Patients had positive attitudes towards infection control in dentistry. Regarding self-reported practice, only few participants would ask dentists about sterilization of dental instruments (9.3%, wearing face mask (13.3% and gloves (16.4% if they don’t do so. In conclusion, our participants had good attitudes towards infection control in dentistry. However, their knowledge and practice need improvements. Conduction of educational programs is needed through social media, mass media, schools and public places. These programs involve both patients and providers. Keywords: Patient safety, Cross infection, Dental infection, Infection control, Emerging diseases, KAP

  9. Surgical site infections in women and their association with clinical conditions

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    Maria Zélia de Araújo Madeira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surgical site infections (SSIs can affect body tissues, cavities, or organs manipulated in surgery and constitute 14% to 16% of all infections. This study aimed to determine the incidence of SSIs in women following their discharge from a gynecology outpatient clinic, to survey different types of SSIs among women, and to verify the association of SSIs with comorbidities and clinical conditions. Methods Data were collected via analytical observation with a cross-sectional design, and the study was conducted in 1,026 women who underwent gynecological surgery in a teaching hospital in the municipality of Teresina, in the northeast Brazilian State of Piauí, from June 2011 to March 2013. Results The incidence of SSIs after discharge was 5.8% among the women in the outpatient clinic. The most prevalent surgery among the patients was hysterectomy, while the most prevalent type of SSI was superficial incisional. Comorbidities in women with SSIs included cancer, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Conclusions Surveillance of SSIs during the post-discharge period is critical for infection prevention and control. It is worth reflecting on the planning of surgical procedures for patients who have risk factors for the development of SSIs.

  10. Infection-triggered anorexia nervosa in children: clinical description of four cases.

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    Sokol, M S

    2000-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious illness with no definitive treatment. Clinical and research evidence led to the hypothesis that some children with AN may have a pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcus (PANDAS), similar in pathogenesis to other hypothesized PANDAS disorders. Four youngsters (ages, 11-15 years) with PANDAS AN were treated with an open trial of antibiotics, in addition to conventional treatment. They were evaluated for eating disorder and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and for weight gain. Evidence of streptococcal infection came from clinical evaluation, throat cultures, and two serological tests: anti-deoxyribonuclease B (anti-DNase B) and anti-streptolysin O (ASO) titers. The "rheumatic" marker D8/17 was also measured. This B-cell alloantigen is associated, in several publications, with poststreptococcal autoimmunity: Rheumatic fever (RF), Sydenham's chorea (SC), and possibly PANDAS obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and tic disorders. There was clinical evidence of possible antecedent streptococcal infection in all four patients, two of whom had comorbid OCD, with possible infection-triggered AN. All four had the rheumatic marker: A percentage of D8/17-positive B cells of 28-38%, with a mean of 33% (12% or more is considered positive for the marker). The patients responded to conventional treatment plus antibiotics with weight restoration and decreased eating disorder and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Three needed to gain weight and did so. There may be a link between infectious disease and some cases of AN, which raises the possibility of new treatment.

  11. Clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion associated with febrile urinary tract infection.

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    Okamoto, Takayuki; Sato, Yasuyuki; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Asako

    2014-04-01

    Common pathogens of clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion (MERS) are viruses, such as influenza virus. However, bacteria are rare pathogens for MERS. We report the first patient with MERS associated with febrile urinary tract infection. A 16-year-old lupus patient was admitted to our hospital. She had fever, headache, vomiting, and right back pain. Urinary analysis showed leukocyturia, and urinary culture identified Klebsiella pneumoniae. Cerebrospinal fluid examination and brain single-photon emission computed tomography showed no abnormalities. Therefore, she was diagnosed with febrile urinary tract infection. For further examinations, 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scintigraphy showed right cortical defects, and a voiding cystourethrogram demonstrated right vesicoureteral reflux (grade II). Therefore, she was diagnosed with right pyelonephritis. Although treatment with antibiotics administered intravenously improved the fever, laboratory findings, and right back pain, she had prolonged headaches, nausea, and vomiting. T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and fluid attenuated inversion recovery images in brain magnetic resonance imaging showed high intensity lesions in the splenium of the corpus callosum, which completely disappeared 1 week later. These results were compatible with MERS. To the best of our knowledge, our patient is the first patient who showed clinical features of MERS associated with febrile urinary tract infection. In patients with pyelonephritis and an atypical clinical course, such as prolonged headache, nausea, vomiting, and neurological disorders, the possibility of MERS should be considered.

  12. Aerobic vaginitis and mixed infections: comparison of clinical and laboratory findings.

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    Fan, Aiping; Yue, Yingli; Geng, Nv; Zhang, Huiying; Wang, Yingmei; Xue, Fengxia

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the clinical features of aerobic vaginitis (AV) and mixed infections with AV to achieve efficient diagnosis. From April 2008 to August 2009, 657 consecutive outpatients with vaginal symptoms in gynecology clinic in the General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University were investigated. Samples were taken for examination of vaginal discharge and fresh wet mount microscopy. AV, bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC), and trichomonal vaginitis (TV) were diagnosed according to standardized definitions. Sixty patients with single AV were randomly selected over the same period. Each patient accepted moxifloxacin therapy. Two kinds of treatment course (400 mg qd, 6 days or 400 mg qd, 12 days) were given. Clinical features and laboratory test results in the first visit and follow-ups were recorded and statistically analyzed. Among the 657 cases, AV was found in 23.74 % of the cases (156/657). AV mixed infections were diagnosed in 53.85 % (84/156): the mixed infections included VVC (32/84, 38.10 %), BV (31/84, 36.90 %), and TV (21/84, 25.00 %). Common symptoms of AV were a change in the characteristics of the discharge (44/72, 61.11 %) and increased discharge (30/72, 41.67 %). Vaginal pH was usually higher than 4.5 (63/72, 87.50 %). Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus viridans, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were frequently isolated. There is no statistically significant difference between two moxifloxacin treatment groups (p > 0.05). Cure rate was 89.7 % in 6-day group, and 71.4 % in 12-day group. AV is a common vaginal infection, and it is often mixed with other infections, especially VVC, BV and TV. The symptoms and signs of AV mixed infections are atypical. If a patient has vaginal complaints, it is necessary to determine whether AV or mixed infections are present. Oral moxifloxacin is effective in treating AV, and an appropriate course should be selected taking the severity of AV into consideration.

  13. Borrelia persica infection in dogs and cats: clinical manifestations, clinicopathological findings and genetic characterization.

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    Baneth, Gad; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Halperin, Tamar; Hershko, Yizhak; Kleinerman, Gabriela; Anug, Yigal; Abdeen, Ziad; Lavy, Eran; Aroch, Itamar; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2016-05-10

    Relapsing fever (RF) is an acute infectious disease caused by arthropod-borne spirochetes of the genus Borrelia. The disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of fever that concur with spirochetemia. The RF borrelioses include louse-borne RF caused by Borrelia recurrentis and tick-borne endemic RF transmitted by argasid soft ticks and caused by several Borrelia spp. such as B. crocidurae, B. coriaceae, B. duttoni, B. hermsii, B. hispanica and B. persica. Human infection with B. persica is transmitted by the soft tick Ornithodoros tholozani and has been reported from Iran, Israel, Egypt, India, and Central Asia. During 2003-2015, five cats and five dogs from northern, central and southern Israel were presented for veterinary care and detected with borrelia spirochetemia by blood smear microscopy. The causative infective agent in these animals was identified and characterized by PCR from blood and sequencing of parts of the flagellin (flab), 16S rRNA and glycerophosphodiester phosphodiestrase (GlpQ) genes. All animals were infected with B. persica genetically identical to the causative agent of human RF. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that DNA sequences from these pet carnivores clustered together with B. persica genotypes I and II from humans and O. tholozani ticks and distinctly from other RF Borrelia spp. The main clinical findings in cats included lethargy, anorexia, anemia in 5/5 cats and thrombocytopenia in 4/5. All dogs were lethargic and anorectic, 4/5 were febrile and anemic and 3/5 were thrombocytopenic. Three dogs were co-infected with Babesia spp. The animals were all treated with antibiotics and the survival rate of both dogs and cats was 80 %. The cat and dog that succumbed to disease died one day after the initiation of antibiotic treatment, while survival in the others was followed by the rapid disappearance of spirochetemia. This is the first report of disease due to B. persica infection in cats and the first case series in dogs. Infection was

  14. Clinical and Histopathologic Ocular Findings in Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection after Cardiothoracic Surgery.

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    Zweifel, Sandrine A; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Curcio, Christine A; Barthelmes, Daniel; Thielken, Andrea; Keller, Peter M; Hasse, Barbara; Böni, Christian

    2017-02-01

    To investigate and characterize clinical and histopathologic ocular findings in patients with disseminated infection with Mycobacterium chimaera, a slow-growing nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM), subsequent to cardiothoracic surgery. Observational case series. Five white patients (10 eyes). Analysis of clinical ocular findings, including visual acuity, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT), fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and fluorescein angiography/indocyanine green (ICG) angiography findings, of patients with a disseminated M. chimaera infection. Biomicroscopic and multimodal imaging findings were compared with the histopathology of 1 patient. Clinical and histopathologic ocular findings of M. chimaera. The mean age of the 5 male patients, diagnosed with endocarditis or aortic graft infection, was 57.8 years. Clinical ocular findings included anterior and intermediate uveitis, optic disc swelling, and white-yellowish choroidal lesions. Multifocal choroidal lesions were observed bilaterally in all patients and were hyperfluorescent on fluorescein angiography, hypofluorescent on ICG angiography, and correlated with choroidal lesions on SD OCT. The extent of choroidal lesions varied from few in 2 patients to widespread miliary lesions in 3 patients leading to localized choroidal thickening with elevation of the overlying retinal layers. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography through regressing lesions revealed altered outer retinal layers and choroidal hypertransmission. The ocular findings were correlated with the course of the systemic disease. Patients with few choroidal lesions had a favorable outcome, whereas all patients with widespread chorioretinitis died of systemic complications of M. chimaera infection despite long-term targeted antimicrobial therapy. Ocular tissue was obtained from 1 patient at autopsy. Necropsy of 2 eyes of 1 patient revealed prominent granulomatous lymphohistiocytic choroiditis with

  15. Clinical presentation and prognostic factors of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis according to the focus of infection

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    Samuelsson Susanne

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a nationwide study in Denmark to identify clinical features and prognostic factors in patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae according to the focus of infection. Methods Based on a nationwide registration, clinical information's was prospectively collected from all reported cases of pneumococcal meningitis during a 2-year period (1999–2000. Clinical and laboratory findings at admission, clinical course and outcome of the disease including follow-up audiological examinations were collected retrospectively. The focus of infection was determined according to the clinical diagnosis made by the physicians and after review of the medical records. Results 187 consecutive cases with S. pneumoniae meningitis were included in the study. The most common focus was ear (30%, followed by lung (18%, sinus (8%, and other (2%. In 42% of cases a primary infection focus could not be determined. On admission, fever and an altered mental status were the most frequent findings (in 93% and 94% of cases, respectively, whereas back rigidity, headache and convulsion were found in 57%, 41% and 11% of cases, respectively. 21% of patients died during hospitalisation (adults: 27% vs. children: 2%, Fisher Exact Test, P P = 0.0005. Prognostic factors associated with fatal outcome in univariate logistic regression analysis were advanced age, presence of an underlying disease, history of headache, presence of a lung focus, absence of an otogenic focus, having a CT-scan prior to lumbar puncture, convulsions, requirement of assisted ventilation, and alterations in various CSF parameters (WBC P P = 0.005. Conclusion These results emphasize the prognostic importance of an early recognition of a predisposing focus to pneumococcal meningitis.

  16. CLINICAL PROFILE OF ACUTE LOWER RESPIRATORY TRACT INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN BETWEEN 2MONTHS TO 5 YEARS

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    Amitoj Singh Chhina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in under - five children in developing countries. Hence, the present study was undertaken to study the various risk factors, clinical profile and outcome of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI in children aged 2 month to 5 years. OBJECTIVE : clinical features, laborato ry assessment and morbidity and mortality pattern associated with acute lower respiratory tract infections in children aged 2 months to 5 years. METHODS: 100 ALRI cases fulfilling WHO criteria for pneumonia, in the age group of 2 month to 5 years were evaluated for clinical profile as per a predesigned proforma in a rural medical college. RESULTS : Of cases 61% were infants and remaining 39%12 - 60 months age group, males outnumbered females with sex ratio of 1.3;1. Elevated total leukocyte counts for age were observed in only 22% of cases, of these 3% were having pneumonia, 9% severe pneumonia and 10% very severe pneumonia. Significant association was found between leukocytosis and ALRI severity (p= 0.0001 Positive blood culture was obtained in 8% of cases and was significantly associated with ALRI severity (p=. 0.027. Among the ALRI cases, 84% required oxygen supplementation at any time during the hospital stay and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 1%; with 99% of cases recovering and getting discharged uneventfully. CONCLUSION : Among the clinical variables, the signs and symptoms of ALRI as per the WHO ARI Control Programme were found in almost all cases. Regarding the laboratory profile, leukocytosis and blood culture positivity w ere observed in a small percentage, but significant association with ALRI severity was observed for both. Thus, clinical signs, and not invasive blood tests are a better diagnostic tools, though the latter may provide additional therapeutic and prognostic information in severe disease

  17. CLINICAL-EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FEATURES AND OUTCOME OF GENERALIZED FORMS OF MENINGOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN

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    G. P. Martynova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to study clinical and epidemiological features and outcomes of generalized forms of meningococcal infection in children from Krasnoyarsk and Krasnoyarsk Territory during the period from 2012 to 2016. Materials and methods. A retrospective analysis of 57 medical records of hospital patients with generalized forms of meningococcal infection was carried out in the infectious and resuscitative departments of the Krasnoyarsk Clinical Hospital No. 1 from 2012 to 2016, including 12 protocols of pathologoanatomical studies of the deceased patients and 45 medical cards of ambulatory patients – convalescents of the disease from 2012 to 2016. Results. The epidemic situation for meningococcal infection in Krasnoyarsk Territory from 2012 to 2016 is characterized by signs of inter-epidemic period. Children of the first 3 years of life are in the group of high risk for the development of GFMI, which accounts for 74% of the total number of cases of children aged 14. There are signs of meningococcal infection «aging» – in the age structure the number of children in the first year of life decreased, while the proportion of children aged 4–7 and 7–14 increased compared to previous decades. There is a tendency to a decrease in the proportion of the combined forms with an increase in the frequency of «pure» meningococcemia. In recent years there has been an «atypical» course of generalized forms of the disease, when classical hemorrhagic necrotic rashes appear only on the 3rd – 4th day of the disease. In convalescents who underwent a combined form of MI and «pure» meningitis severe residual effects leading patients to disability are possible to develop. Conclusion. The use of polyvalent conjugated vaccines in potential risk groups will allow us to reduce the morbidity and mortality from generalized forms of meningococcal infection, including younger children.

  18. The Epidemiology and Clinical Features of Clostridium difficile Infection in Liver Transplant Recipients.

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    Sullivan, Timothy; Weinberg, Alan; Rana, Meenakshi; Patel, Gopi; Huprikar, Shirish

    2016-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is common after liver transplantation (LT); however, few studies have examined the risk factors, clinical manifestations, and outcomes of CDI in this population. A retrospective study of adults who underwent LT between January 1, 2011, and April 4, 2013, at The Mount Sinai Hospital was conducted. Potential risk factors were evaluated via univariate and multivariable analysis to determine predictors of CDI in this population. The clinical manifestations of CDI and patient outcomes were also reviewed. Clostridium difficile infection occurred in 27 (14%) of 192 patients after LT. In multivariable analysis, CDI was associated with having a model for end-stage liver disease score of 20 or greater (hazards ratio, 2.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-6.52; P = 0.010), and receiving a LT from a living donor (hazards ratio, 3.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.47-9.67; P = 0.006). Forty-one percent of CDI cases occurred within 1 week of LT. Seven percent of patients with CDI had a serum white blood cell count greater than 12 000 cells per μL, and 26% had a temperature greater than 38.0°C. After treatment 6 (22%) patients developed CDI relapse, and all were successfully treated. No patients died of CDI after a mean follow-up time of 1.8 years; however, overall survival was significantly lower among those with CDI (78% vs 92%; P = 0.033). Clostridium difficile infection after LT was associated with higher model for end-stage liver disease scores and receiving a LT from a living donor. Clostridium difficile infection often occurred soon after LT and was infrequently associated with leukocytosis or fever. Clostridium difficile infection in LT recipients was associated with lower overall survival.

  19. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus infections in patients with hematologic malignancy.

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    Jacobs, Samantha E; Lamson, Daryl M; Soave, Rosemary; Guzman, Brigitte Huertas; Shore, Tsiporah B; Ritchie, Ellen K; Zappetti, Dana; Satlin, Michael J; Leonard, John P; van Besien, Koen; Schuetz, Audrey N; Jenkins, Stephen G; George, Kirsten St; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-10-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs) are common causes of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) in hematologic malignancy (HM) patients. Predictors of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) including the impact of HRV species and types are poorly understood. This study aims to describe the clinical and molecular epidemiology of HRV infections among HM patients. From April 2012-March 2013, HRV-positive respiratory specimens from symptomatic HM patients were molecularly characterized by analysis of partial viral protein 1 (VP1) or VP4 gene sequence. HRV LRTI risk-factors and outcomes were analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. One hundred and ten HM patients presented with HRV URTI (n=78) and HRV LRTI (n=32). Hypoalbuminemia (OR 3.0; 95% CI, 1.0-9.2; p=0.05) was independently associated with LRTI, but other clinical and laboratory markers of host immunity did not differ between patients with URTI versus LRTI. Detection of bacterial co-pathogens was common in LRTI cases (25%). Among 92 typeable respiratory specimens, there were 58 (64%) HRV-As, 12 (13%) HRV-Bs, and 21 (23%) HRV-Cs, and one Enterovirus 68. LRTI rates among HRV-A (29%), HRV-B (17%), and HRV-C (29%) were similar. HRV-A infections occurred year-round while HRV-B and HRV-C infections clustered in the late fall and winter. HRVs are associated with LRTI in HM patients. Illness severity is not attributable to specific HRV species or types. The frequent detection of bacterial co-pathogens in HRV LRTIs further substantiates the hypothesis that HRVs predispose to bacterial superinfection of the lower airways, similar to that of other community-acquired respiratory viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Clinical predictors of dengue fever co-infected with leptospirosis among patients admitted for dengue fever - a pilot study.

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    Suppiah, Jeyanthi; Chan, Shie-Yien; Ng, Min-Wern; Khaw, Yam-Sim; Ching, Siew-Mooi; Mat-Nor, Lailatul Akmar; Ahmad-Najimudin, Naematul Ain; Chee, Hui-Yee

    2017-06-28

    Dengue and leptospirosis infections are currently two major endemics in Malaysia. Owing to the overlapping clinical symptoms between both the diseases, frequent misdiagnosis and confusion of treatment occurs. As a solution, the present work initiated a pilot study to investigate the incidence related to co-infection of leptospirosis among dengue patients. This enables the identification of more parameters to predict the occurrence of co-infection. Two hundred sixty eight serum specimens collected from patients that were diagnosed for dengue fever were confirmed for dengue virus serotyping by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Clinical, laboratory and demographic data were extracted from the hospital database to identify patients with confirmed leptospirosis infection among the dengue patients. Thus, frequency of co-infection was calculated and association of the dataset with dengue-leptospirosis co-infection was statistically determined. The frequency of dengue co-infection with leptospirosis was 4.1%. Male has higher preponderance of developing the co-infection and end result of shock as clinical symptom is more likely present among co-infected cases. It is also noteworthy that, DENV 1 is the common dengue serotype among all cases identified as dengue-leptospirosis co-infection in this study. The increasing incidence of leptospirosis among dengue infected patients has posed the need to precisely identify the presence of co-infection for the betterment of treatment without mistakenly ruling out either one of them. Thus, anticipating the possible clinical symptoms and laboratory results of dengue-leptospirosis co-infection is essential.

  1. Intestinal protozoa infections among patients with ulcerative colitis: prevalence and impact on clinical disease course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús K; Torijano-Carrera, Emma

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and microbiologic studies suggest that enteropathogenic microorganisms play a substantial role in the clinical initiation and relapses of inflammatory bowel disease. To explore the prevalence of intestinal protozoa in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and its impact on clinical disease course. A total of 215 patients with definitive diagnosis of UC were studied. Fresh feces samples taken from all UC patients were examined immediately using trichrome-staining methods. A total of 103 female and 112 male UC patients were analyzed. The mean age at diagnosis was 30.5 +/- 10.8 years. The prevalence of overall parasitic infections was 24% and distributed as follows: Blastocystis hominis in 22 patients (10%), Endolimax nana in 19 cases (9%), and Entamoebahistolytica in 11 cases (5%). A significantly increased frequency of protozoa infection was found in those patients with persistent activity and intermittent activity as compared to active than inactive group (p = 1 x 10(-7), OR 13.05, 95% CI 4.28-42.56, and p = 0.003, OR 1.42-14.47, respectively). Interestingly, this association remained significant when we compared the persistent activity group versus intermittent activity group (p = 0.003, OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.35-6.59). Subgroup analysis showed no association between protozoa infection (E. histolytica, B. hominis, and E. nana) and other clinical variables such as gender, extent of disease, extraintestinal complications, medical treatment and grade of disease activity. The prevalence of intestinal protozoa infections in Mexican UC patients was 24% and these microorganisms could be a contributing cause of persistent activity despite medical treatment in our population. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Severe Enterovirus Infections in Hospitalized Children in the South of England: Clinical Phenotypes and Causative Genotypes.

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    de Graaf, Hans; Pelosi, Emanuela; Cooper, Andrea; Pappachan, John; Sykes, Kim; MacIntosh, Iain; Gbesemete, Diane; Clark, Tristan W; Patel, Sanjay V; Faust, Saul N; Tebruegge, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Most enterovirus surveillance studies lack detailed clinical data, which limits their clinical usefulness. This study aimed to describe the clinical spectrum and outcome of severe enterovirus infections in children, and to determine whether there are associations between causative enterovirus genotypes and clinical phenotypes. Retrospective analysis of microbiological and clinical data from a tertiary children's hospital in the South of England over a 17-month period (2012-2013). In total, 30 patients were identified, comprising sepsis (n = 9), myocarditis (n = 8), meningitis (n = 8) and encephalitis (n = 5). Cases with sepsis or myocarditis were significantly younger than those with central nervous system disease (median age 21 and 15 days vs. 79 days; P = 0.0244 and P = 0.0310, respectively). There was considerable diversity in the causative genotypes in each of the clinical phenotypes, with some predominance of echoviruses in the meningitis group, and coxsackie B viruses in the myocarditis group. Thirteen cases required mechanical ventilation, 11 cases inotropic support, 3 cases dialysis and 3 cases extracorporal membrane oxygenation. The overall mortality was 10% (sepsis group, n = 1; myocarditis group, n = 2). Of the survivors, 5 (19%) had long-term sequelae (myocardial dysfunction, n = 2; neurological sequelae, n = 3). Patients with encephalitis had the longest hospital stay (median: 16 days), compared with 9, 6 and 3 days in patients with myocarditis, sepsis and meningitis, respectively (P = 0.005). Enterovirus infections, particularly enteroviral myocarditis and encephalitis, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. The results show that there are currently no strong associations between clinical phenotypes and particular causative enterovirus genotypes in the South of England.

  3. Clinical and economic burden of Clostridium difficile infection in Europe: a systematic review of healthcare-facility-acquired infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, P N; Nathwani, D; Wilcox, M H; Stephens, J; Shelbaya, A; Haider, S

    2012-05-01

    PubMed, EMBASE and conference abstracts were reviewed systematically to determine the clinical and economic burden associated with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) acquired and treated in European healthcare facilities. Inclusion criteria were: published in the English language between 2000 and 2010, and study population of at least 20 patients with documented CDI acquired/treated in European healthcare facilities. Data collection was completed by three unblinded reviewers using the Cochrane Handbook and PRISMA statement. The primary outcomes were mortality, recurrence, length of hospital stay (LOS) and cost related to CDI. In total, 1138 primary articles and conference abstracts were identified, and this was narrowed to 39 and 30 studies, respectively. Data were available from 14 countries, with 47% of studies from UK institutions. CDI mortality at 30 days ranged from 2% (France) to 42% (UK). Mortality rates more than doubled from 1999 to 2004, and continued to rise until 2007 when reductions were noted in the UK. Recurrent CDI varied from 1% (France) to 36% (Ireland); however, recurrence definitions varied between studies. Median LOS ranged from eight days (Belgium) to 27 days (UK). The incremental cost of CDI was £4577 in Ireland and £8843 in Germany, after standardization to 2010 prices. Country-specific estimates, weighted by sample size, ranged from 2.8% to 29.8% for 30-day mortality and from 16 to 37 days for LOS. CDI burden in Europe was most commonly described using 30-day mortality, recurrence, LOS and cost data. The continued spread of CDI and resultant healthcare burden underscores the need for judicious use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Norovirus infection: features of epidemiology and clinical and laboratory manifestations at the present stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Pronko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Among most significant for practical medicine infections, acute intestinal infections of viral etiology are becoming increasingly topical [2, 4]. According to domestic and foreign literature, up to 70 % of gastroenteritis occur during cold seasons of the year and are induced by viruses [3, 5]. The range of the factors producing viral diarrheas is rather wide. One of the comparatively new acute intestinal infections (AII producing factors is noroviruses [5, 6]. The prevalence of noroviruses has been little studied, and the clinical picture has been characterized insufficiently. This can be explained by insufficient diagnostics and registration of this infection [3, 6, 7]. Aim of the work: analysis of the morbidity and determination of clinical laboratory features of noroviral infection (NVI in children according to the data of the Regional Clinical Infectious Di­seases Hospital in Grodno. Materials and methods. A comprehensive clinical laboratory analysis of 1,105 case histories of children aged 1 month to 14 years with verified viral intestinal infection, who were admitted to Grodno Regional Clinical Infectious Diseases Hospital from January 2013 to December 2016, was carried out. The patients were divided according to the final clinical diagnosis in the following way: rotaviral infection (RVI was found in 676 (61.2 % individuals, adenoviral intestinal infection (AVI — in 212 (19.2 %, NVI was detected in 156 (14.1 % and enteroviral infection — in 61 (5.5 % persons. The examination was carried out according to the protocols approved by the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Belarus. Results. As our study showed, at the period analyzed the viral intestinal diseases amounted to 70.4 % of all the cases of diseases in the structure of AII in children. Patients hospitalized with viral diarrhea showed prevalence of RVI (61.2 %. NVI was the third by the incidence among viral diarrheas, and it was registered in 14.1 % of the cases

  5. [Clinical features of invasive candidiasis and risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection in children: a multicenter study in Urumqi, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai Er Ken, Ai Bi Bai; Ma, Zhi-Hua; Xiong, Dai-Qin; Xu, Pei-Ru

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the clinical features of invasive candidiasis in children and the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection. A retrospective study was performed on 134 children with invasive candidiasis and hospitalized in 5 tertiary hospitals in Urumqi, China, between January 2010 and December 2015. The Candida species distribution was investigated. The clinical data were compared between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection. The risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection were investigated using multivariate logistic regression analysis. A total of 134 Candida strains were isolated from 134 children with invasive candidiasis, and non-albicans Candida (NAC) accounted for 53.0%. The incidence of invasive candidiasis in the PICU and other pediatric wards were 41.8% and 48.5% respectively. Sixty-eight patients (50.7%) had Candida bloodstream infection, and 45 patients (33.6%) had Candida urinary tract infection. There were significant differences in age, rate of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, and incidence rates of chronic renal insufficiency, heart failure, urinary catheterization, and NAC infection between the patients with and without Candida bloodstream infection (Pcandidiasis is similar between the PICU and other pediatric wards. NAC is the most common species of invasive candidiasis. Candida bloodstream infection is the most common invasive infection. Younger age (1-24 months) and NAC infection are the risk factors for Candida bloodstream infection.

  6. Clinical and microbiological characterization of Clostridium difficile infection in a tertiary care hospital in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Danfeng; Peng, Yibing; Zhang, Lihua; Jiang, Cen; Wang, Xuefeng; Mao, Enqiang

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has emerged as a significant nosocomial infection, yet little has been reported from China. This study aimed to characterize the clinical and microbiological features of CDI from a hospital in Shanghai. Patients with CDI seen between December 2010 and March 2013 were included in this study, of which clinical data were retrospectively collected. The microbiological features of corresponding isolates were analyzed including genotype by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST), antimicrobial susceptibility, toxin production, sporulation capacity, biofilm formation, and motility. Ninety-four cases of CDI were included during this study period, 12 of whom were severe cases. By reviewing the clinical data, all patients were treated empirically with proton pump inhibitor or antibiotics or both, and they were distributed widely across various wards, most frequently to the digestive ward (28/94, 29.79%). Comparing the severe with mild cases, no significant differences were found in the basic epidemiological data or the microbiological features. Among the 94 isolates, 31 were toxin A-negative toxin B-positive all genotyped as ST37. They generated fewer toxins and spores, as well as similar amounts of biofilm and motility percentages, but exhibited highest drug resistance to cephalosporins, quinolones, macrolide-lincosamide and streptogramin (MLSB), and tetracycline. No specific clinical genotype or microbiological features were found in severe cases; antimicrobial resistance could be the primary reason for epidemic strains leading to the dissemination and persistence of CDI.

  7. Oral candidiasis as clinical manifestation of HIV/AIDS infection in Airlangga University hospital patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putranti, A.; Asmarawati, T. P.; Rachman, B. E.; Hadi, U.; Nasronudin

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis as its clinical manifestation at Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya. This is a descriptive analytic research with cross-sectional design using Chi-Square statistic test. Samples of this study consist of 34 patients using total sampling methods. Those patients were all HIV/AIDS infected patients with oral candidiasis clinical manifestations, who were admitted to Airlangga University Hospital Surabaya from January 2016 to September 2017. Results showed that mostly HIV/AIDS patients with oral candidiasis are male (79.4%), old age (40-75years) total amounted to 58.8%, heterosexual as main risk factor (70%), clinical stadium mostly in stage IV (61.8%), 26% of patients with chronic diarrhea and 56% with pulmonary TB, clinical stages of patients have a significant relation to the incidence of oral candidiasis infection (p=0.024). The most common oral lesions found in people with HIV are Candidiasis. The best management is through routine dental examination and dental precautions to maintain health and achieve a better quality of life.

  8. [Identifying gaps between guidelines and clinical practice in Clostridium difficile infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martín, C; Serrano-Morte, A; Sánchez-Muñoz, L A; de Santos-Castro, P A; Bratos-Pérez, M A; Ortiz de Lejarazu-Leonardo, R

    2016-01-01

    The first aim was to determine whether patients are being treated in accordance with the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA/SHEA) Clostridium difficile guidelines and whether adherence impacts patient outcomes. The second aim was to identify specific action items in the guidelines that are not being translated into clinical practice, for their subsequent implementation. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted over a 36 month period, on patients with compatible clinical symptoms and positive test for C. difficile toxins A and/or B in stool samples, in an internal medicine department of a tertiary medical centre. Patient demographic and clinical data (outcomes, comorbidity, risk factors) and compliance with guidelines, were examined A total of 77 patients with C. difficile infection were identified (87 episodes). Stratified by disease severity criteria, 49.3% of patients were mild-moderate, 35.1% severe, and 15.6% severe-complicated. Full adherence with the guidelines was observed in only 40.2% of patients, and was significantly better for mild-moderate (71.0%), than in severe (7.4%) or severe-complicated patients (16.6%) (PClostridium difficile infection was poor, especially in severe and severe-complicated patients, being associated with worse clinical outcomes. Educational interventions aimed at improving guideline adherence are warranted. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical and laboratory profile of Zika virus infection in dengue suspected patients: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernanda Estofolete, Cássia; Terzian, Ana Carolina Bernardes; Parreira, Ricardo; Esteves, Aida; Hardman, Lucas; Greque, Gilmar Valdir; Rahal, Paula; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2016-08-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arthropod-borne virus related to the dengue virus (DENV), and shows a similar clinical profile as other arboviral diseases, such as dengue and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Historically, ZIKV has been associated with sporadic cases of human infection, but is now responsible for outbreaks worldwide. In Brazil, cases have been reported since 2015, with some cases causing severe disease. To identify clinical symptoms of Zika in patients in Dengue suspected patients. Description of a series of cases, wherein we analyzed 100 clinical samples collected from patients who exhibited acute febrile disease for ≤5days, from January to February 2016. In this study, we report 13 cases of ZIKV infection in adults presenting dengue-like symptoms in a DENV endemic area. All patients presented with fever, with myalgia being the second most frequently observed symptom. Two patients had rashes, but none of them had conjunctivitis. Other less frequent manifestations included headache, arthralgia, diarrhea, and nausea. The co-circulation of ZIKV and DENV is a serious public health concern, since it represents both a clinical and diagnostic challenge in endemic areas, as well as in the field of travel medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Frequency and clinical relevance of human bocavirus infection in acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix C Ringshausen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Felix C Ringshausen1, Ai-Yui M Tan1, Tobias Allander2, Irmgard Borg1, Umut Arinir1, Juliane Kronsbein1, Barbara M Hauptmeier1, Gerhard Schultze-Werninghaus1, Gernot Rohde11Clinical Research Group “Significance of viral infections in chronic respiratory diseases of children and adults,” University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Department of Internal Medicine III–Pneumology, Allergology and Sleep Medicine, Bochum, Germany; 2Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, and Department of Clinical Microbiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, SwedenObjective: Human bocavirus (HBoV is a recently discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract infections in children. The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency and clinical relevance of HBoV infection in adult patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AE-COPD.Methods: We retrospectively tested 212 COPD patients, 141 (66.5% with AE-COPD and 71 (33.5% with stable disease, of whom nasal lavage and induced sputum had been obtained for the presence of HBoV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA. The specificity of positive polymerase chain reaction results was confirmed by sequencing.Results: Two hundred two of 212 patients for whom PCR results were available both for nasal lavage and induced sputum samples were eligible for data analysis. HBoV DNA was detected in three patients (1.5%. Of those, only one patient had AE-COPD. Thus, the frequency of HBoV infection demonstrated to be low in both AE-COPD (0.8% and stable COPD (2.9%. HBoV was found in two sputum and one nasal lavage sample in different patients, respectively. Sequencing revealed >99% sequence identity with the reference strain.Conclusion: HBoV detection was infrequent. Since we detected HBoV in both upper and lower respiratory tract specimens and in AE-COPD as well as stable disease, a major role of HBoV infection in adults with AE-COPD is unlikely

  11. Experimental infection of human volunteers with Haemophilus ducreyi: fifteen years of clinical data and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Diane M; Ofner, Susan; Katz, Barry P; Spinola, Stanley M

    2009-06-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi causes chancroid, which facilitates transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. To better understand the biology of H. ducreyi, we developed a human inoculation model. In the present article, we describe clinical outcomes for 267 volunteers who were infected with H. ducreyi. There was a relationship between papule formation and estimated delivered dose. The outcome (either pustule formation or resolution) of infected sites for a given subject was not independent; the most important determinants of pustule formation were sex and host effects. When 41 subjects were infected a second time, their outcomes segregated toward their initial outcome, confirming the host effect. Subjects with pustules developed local symptoms that required withdrawal from the study after a mean of 8.6 days. There were 191 volunteers who had tissue biopsy performed, 173 of whom were available for follow-up analysis; 28 (16.2%) of these developed hypertrophic scars, but the model was otherwise safe. Mutant-parent trials confirmed key features in H. ducreyi pathogenesis, and the model has provided an opportunity to study differential human susceptibility to a bacterial infection.

  12. Clinical and epidemiological aspects of parvovirus B19 infections in Ireland, January 1996-June 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nicolay, N

    2009-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 infection may be mistakenly reported as measles or rubella if laboratory testing is not performed. As Europe is seeking to eliminate measles, an accurate diagnosis of fever\\/rash illnesses is needed. The main purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiological pattern of parvovirus B19, a common cause of rash, in Ireland between January 1996 and June 2008, using times series analysis of laboratory diagnostic data from the National Virus Reference Laboratory. Most diagnostic tests for presumptive parvovirus B19 infection were done in children under the age of five years and in women of child-bearing age (between 20-39 years-old). As a consequence, most of the acute diagnoses of B19 infection were made in these populations. The most commonly reported reasons for testing were: clinical presentation with rash, acute arthritis, influenza-like symptoms or pregnancy. The time series analysis identified seasonal trends in parvovirus B19 infection, with annual cycles peaking in late winter\\/spring and a six-year cycle for parvovirus B19 outbreaks in Ireland.

  13. Viral phenotype, antiretroviral resistance and clinical evolution in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, M J; Cilleruelo, M J; Ortiz, M; Villota, J; García, M; Perez-Jurado, M L; Barreiro, G; Martín-Fontelos, P; Bernal, A

    1997-11-01

    The syncytium-inducing (SI) viral phenotype and the emergence of viral strains resistant to zidovudine have been described in persons infected with HIV, and in some cases they have been associated with poor prognosis. HIV isolates obtained from 37 HIV-infected children were analyzed to determine whether the SI viral phenotype and the mutation on the 215 position of the reverse transcriptase (M215) could be used as markers of disease progression. We performed peripheral blood coculture mononuclear cells, and we analyzed the induction of syncytia using the MT-2 cell line. The emergence of mutations on the 215 position was determined by PCR. We found a statistically significant association (P < 0.05) between SI viral phenotype and (1) recurrent serious bacterial infections, (2) absolute CD4+ cell counts <2 SD, (3) progression to AIDS and (4) death. Sixty percent of the children treated with zidovudine developed 215 mutant viral strains without statistically significant association with clinical or immunologic findings. The SI viral phenotype was statistically associated with the presence of the 215 mutation (P < 0.05). SI viral phenotype is a marker associated with a poor clinical and immunologic progression of the disease and it may facilitate the emergence of mutant strains in children treated with zidovudine.

  14. Revision of clinical case definitions: influenza-like illness and severe acute respiratory infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasmieh, Saba; Mounts, Anthony Wayne; Alexander, Burmaa; Besselaar, Terry; Briand, Sylvie; Brown, Caroline; Clark, Seth; Dueger, Erica; Gross, Diane; Hauge, Siri; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Jorgensen, Pernille; Katz, Mark A; Mafi, Ali; Malik, Mamunur; McCarron, Margaret; Meerhoff, Tamara; Mori, Yuichiro; Mott, Joshua; Olivera, Maria Teresa da Costa; Ortiz, Justin R; Palekar, Rakhee; Rebelo-de-Andrade, Helena; Soetens, Loes; Yahaya, Ali Ahmed; Zhang, Wenqing; Vandemaele, Katelijn

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The formulation of accurate clinical case definitions is an integral part of an effective process of public health surveillance. Although such definitions should, ideally, be based on a standardized and fixed collection of defining criteria, they often require revision to reflect new knowledge of the condition involved and improvements in diagnostic testing. Optimal case definitions also need to have a balance of sensitivity and specificity that reflects their intended use. After the 2009–2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic, the World Health Organization (WHO) initiated a technical consultation on global influenza surveillance. This prompted improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of the case definition for influenza – i.e. a respiratory disease that lacks uniquely defining symptomology. The revision process not only modified the definition of influenza-like illness, to include a simplified list of the criteria shown to be most predictive of influenza infection, but also clarified the language used for the definition, to enhance interpretability. To capture severe cases of influenza that required hospitalization, a new case definition was also developed for severe acute respiratory infection in all age groups. The new definitions have been found to capture more cases without compromising specificity. Despite the challenge still posed in the clinical separation of influenza from other respiratory infections, the global use of the new WHO case definitions should help determine global trends in the characteristics and transmission of influenza viruses and the associated disease burden. PMID:29403115

  15. Nannizziopsis guarroi infection in 2 Inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps): clinical, cytologic, histologic, and ultrastructural aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Donne, Viviana; Crossland, Nicholas; Brandão, João; Sokolova, Yuliya; Fowlkes, Natalie; Nevarez, Javier G; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Gaunt, Stephen D

    2016-06-01

    Chrysosporium-related infections have been increasingly reported in reptiles over the last 2 decades. In this report, we describe clinical, cytologic, histopathologic, and ultrastructural aspects of Chrysosporium-related infection in 2 Inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps). Case 1 was presented for an enlarging raised lesion over the left eye and multiple additional masses over the dorsum. Case 2 was submitted to necropsy by the referring veterinarian for suspected yellow fungus disease. Impression smears of the nodules in case 1 revealed granulomatous to pyogranulomatous inflammation and many septate, variably long, 4-10 μm wide, often undulated hyphae, and very rare conidia. Postmortem impression smears of the superficial lesions of case 2 contained large numbers of solitary conidia and arthroconidia and low numbers of hyphae with similar morphology to case 1. Histopathology of the 2 cases revealed severe, multifocal, chronic, ulcerative, nodular pyogranulomatous dermatitis, with myriad intralesional septate hyphae, and arthroconidia. Fungal culture and molecular sequencing in both cases indicated infection with Nannizziopsis guarroi. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  16. [Imported malaria and HIV infection in Madrid. Clinical and epidemiological features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Olivencia, G; Herrero, M D; Subirats, M; de Juanes, J R; Peña, J M; Puente, S

    2012-01-01

    Few data are available in Spain data on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients coinfected with malaria. This study has aimed to determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of imported malaria in patients coinfected with HIV. A case-series retrospective study was performed using the patient's medical records. The study population consisted on patients diagnosed with malaria attended in our center from january 1, 2002 to december 31, 2007. A total of 484 episodes of malaria, 398 of which were included in this study, were identified. Co-infection with HIV was described in 32 cases. All of them occurred in individuals presumably with some degree of semi-immunity. In the coinfected group, there were 13 cases (40.6%) asymptomatic, whereas this event occurred in 99 cases of patients not coinfected (37.2%) (P=0.707). The greater presence of anemia in co-infected patients (62.5% vs 32.3% in non-coinfected [P=0.001]) stands out. In present study, the clinical presentation forms were similar, regardless of the presence or absence of HIV infection. Although the study population does not reflect all possible scenarios of malaria and HIV coinfection, our results indicate the reality of patients attended in the Autonomous Community of Madrid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. CLINICAL INFECTION OF CAPTIVE ASIAN ELEPHANTS (ELEPHAS MAXIMUS) WITH ELEPHANT ENDOTHELIOTROPIC HERPESVIRUS 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuery, Angela; Browning, Geoffrey R; Tan, Jie; Long, Simon; Hayward, Gary S; Cox, Sherry K; Flanagan, Joseph P; Tocidlowski, Maryanne E; Howard, Lauren L; Ling, Paul D

    2016-03-01

    Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) can cause lethal hemorrhagic disease in juvenile Asian elephants. A number of EEHV types and subtypes exist, where most deaths have been caused by EEHV1A and EEHV1B. EEHV4 has been attributed to two deaths, but as both diagnoses were made postmortem, EEHV4 disease has not yet been observed and recorded clinically. In this brief communication, two cases of EEHV4 infection in juvenile elephants at the Houston Zoo are described, where both cases were resolved following intensive treatment and administration of famciclovir. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detected EEHV4 viremia that correlated with clinical signs. High levels of EEHV4 shedding from trunk wash secretions of the first viremic elephant correlated with subsequent infection of the second elephant with EEHV4. It is hoped that the observations made in these cases--and the successful treatment regimen used--will help other institutions identify and treat EEHV4 infection in the future.

  18. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection: an Ongoing Conundrum for Clinicians and for Clinical Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Clostridium difficile is a formidable nosocomial and community-acquired pathogen, causing clinical presentations ranging from asymptomatic colonization to self-limiting diarrhea to toxic megacolon and fulminant colitis. Since the early 2000s, the incidence of C. difficile disease has increased dramatically, and this is thought to be due to the emergence of new strain types. For many years, the mainstay of C. difficile disease diagnosis was enzyme immunoassays for detection of the C. difficile toxin(s), although it is now generally accepted that these assays lack sensitivity. A number of molecular assays are commercially available for the detection of C. difficile. This review covers the history and biology of C. difficile and provides an in-depth discussion of the laboratory methods used for the diagnosis of C. difficile infection (CDI). In addition, strain typing methods for C. difficile and the evolving epidemiology of colonization and infection with this organism are discussed. Finally, considerations for diagnosing C. difficile disease in special patient populations, such as children, oncology patients, transplant patients, and patients with inflammatory bowel disease, are described. As detection of C. difficile in clinical specimens does not always equate with disease, the diagnosis of C. difficile infection continues to be a challenge for both laboratories and clinicians. PMID:23824374

  19. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Experience in a Multidisciplinary Clinic in a Tertiary Hospital (2010-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ribera, N; Fuertes-de Vega, I; Blanco-Arévalo, J L; Bosch-Mestres, J; González-Cordón, A; Estrach-Panella, T; García-de Olalla, P; Alsina-Gibert, M

    2016-04-01

    The number of consultations for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is increasing in Spain. The aim of this study was to describe and analyze the epidemiological, behavioral, clinical, and microbiological characteristics of patients registered at the STI unit of a tertiary hospital. This was a retrospective, single-center descriptive study carried out between 2010 and 2013 in a multidisciplinary unit specialized in STIs, situated in a tertiary hospital. Epidemiological, clinical, and behavioral data were gathered using a face-to-face interview and a standardized questionnaire. Samples were collected for microbiology analysis. The study included 546 patients: 96% were men, 41% had human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and 56% were men who have sex with men. The reasons for consultation were the following: urethritis; genital, anal, or perianal ulcers; proctitis; oral ulcers; sexual contact with a person with a known STI; and high-risk sexual contact. The most common microbiological diagnoses were Neisseria gonorrhoeae in urethritis, Treponema pallidum in genital and anal or perianal ulcers, and Chlamydia trachomatis lymphogranuloma venereum serovars in proctitis. The highest prevalences of the main STIs studied occurred in homosexual men with HIV infection. This study confirms the increase in the incidence of STIs in recent years and the epidemiological characteristics of the HIV/STI epidemic in Spain. Copyright © 2015 AEDV. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the WHO clinical case definition for pediatric HIV infection in Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gend, Christine L; Haadsma, Maaike L; Sauer, Pieter J J; Schoeman, Cornelius J

    2003-06-01

    The WHO clinical case definition for pediatric HIV infection has been designed to be used in countries where diagnostic laboratory resources are limited. We evaluated the WHO case definition to determine whether it is a useful instrument to discriminate between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children. In addition, clinical features not included in this case definition were recorded. We recorded clinical data from 300 consecutively admitted children in a state hospital in Bloemfontein, South Africa, and tested these children for HIV infection. A total of 222 children were included in the study; 69 children (31.1 per cent) were HIV positive. The sensitivity of the WHO case definition in this study was 14.5 per cent, the specificity was 98.6 per cent. Apart from weight loss and generalized dermatitis, the signs of the WHO case definition were significantly more often seen in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative children. Of the clinical signs not included in the WHO case definition, marasmus and hepatosplenomegaly especially occurred more frequently in HIV-positive children. Based on these findings we composed a new case definition consisting of four signs: marasmus, hepatosplenomegaly, oropharyngeal candidiasis, and generalized lymphadenopathy. HIV infection is suspected in a child presenting with at least two of these four signs. The sensitivity of this case definition was 63.2 per cent, the specificity was 96.0 per cent. We conclude that in this study the WHO case definition was not a useful instrument to discriminate between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children, mainly because its sensitivity was strikingly low. The simplified case definition we propose, proved to be more sensitive than the WHO case definition (63.2 vs. 14.5 per cent), whilst its specificity remained high.

  1. Apoptosis and clinical severity in patients with psoriasis and HCV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami A Gabr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been proposed that hepatitis C virus (HCV antigens are involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis and may contribute to severity of the disease. Increased expression of the apoptosis-regulating proteins p53 and tTG and decreased levels of bcl-2 in the keratinocytes of the skin of psoriatic patients have been reported. Aim: This study aims to identify the serum levels of apoptosis-regulating proteins in patients with psoriasis and without HCV infection and to study the relation between clinical severity of psoriasis and the presence of HCV infection. Materials and Methods: Disease severity was assessed by psoriasis area severity index score (PASI of 90 patients with psoriasis grouped as mild (n = 30, moderate (n = 30 and severe (n = 30; 20 healthy individuals were used as controls. All groups were subjected for complete history taking, clinical examination, and tests for liver function and HCV infection. The serum levels of apoptosis related proteins: p53, tTG and bcl-2 were estimated by enzyme linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA. Results: There was a statistically significant (P < 0.001 correlation between clinical severity of psoriasis and presence of HCV antibodies and HCV-mRNA. In addition, significantly (P < 0.001 raised serum p53 and tTG, and reduced bcl-2 were observed among HCV-positive patients as compared to HCV-negative patients and control patients. Conclusion: These results conclude that clinical severity of psoriasis is affected by the presence of HCV antibodies and overexpression of apoptotic related proteins. In addition, altered serum levels of apoptosis-regulating proteins could be useful prognostic markers and therapeutic targets of psoriatic disease.

  2. Acute HIV infection (AHI) in a specialized clinical setting: case-finding, description of virological, epidemiological and clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammassari, Adriana; Abbate, Isabella; Orchi, Nicoletta; Pinnetti, Carmela; Rozera, Gabriella; Libertone, Raffaella; Pierro, Paola; Martini, Federico; Puro, Vincenzo; Girardi, Enrico; Antinori, Andrea; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of HIV infection during early stages is mandatory to catch up with the challenge of limiting HIV viral replication and reservoirs formation, as well as decreasing HIV transmissions by immediate cART initiation. Aims were to describe (a) virological characteristics of AHI identified, (b) epidemiological and clinical factors associated with being diagnosed with AHI. Cross-sectional, retrospective study. All individuals diagnosed with AHI according to Fiebig's staging between Jan 2013 and Mar 2014 at the INMI "L. Spallanzani" were included. Serum samples reactive to a fourth generation HIV-1/2 assay (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo, Abbott) were retested with another fourth generation assay (VIDAS DUO HIV Ultra, Biomérieux) and underwent confirmation with HIV-1 WB (New Lav I Bio-Rad) and/or with Geenius confirmatory assay (Bio-Rad). WHO criteria (two env products reactivity) were used to establish positivity of confirmatory assays. In case of clinically suspected AHI, HIV-1 RNA (Real time, Abbott) and p24 assay (VIDAS HIV P24 Bio-Rad) were also performed. Avidity test was carried out, on confirmed positive samples lacking p31 reactivity, to discriminate between recent (true Fiebig V phase) and late infections; to avoid possible misclassifications, clinical data were also used. Demographic, epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data are routinely, and anonymously recorded in the SENDIH and SIREA studies. During the study period, we observed 483 newly HIV diagnosed individuals, of whom 40 were identified as AHI (8.3%). Fiebig classification showed: 7 stage II/III, 13 stage IV, 20 stage V. Demographic, epidemiological, and clinical characteristics of patients are shown in the Table. Overall, the study population had a median S/Co ratio at fourth generation EIA (Architect) of 49.50 (IQR, 23.54-98.05): values were significantly lower in Fiebig II-IV than in Fiebig V (38.68 [IQR, 20.08-54.84] vs 75.72 [IQR, 42.66-249.80], p=0.01). Overall, median HIV-1 RNA was 5

  3. Gastrointestinal trichostrongylosis can predispose ewes to clinical mastitis after experimental mammary infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogianni, V S; Papadopoulos, E; Gougoulis, D A; Gallidis, E; Ptochos, S; Fragkou, I A; Orfanou, D C; Fthenakis, G C

    2017-10-15

    Objective was to study, in an experimental model, the possible role of gastrointestinal nematode infection in predisposing ewes to mastitis during the lactation period. Twenty-four ewes (A or B [n=12]), free from nematode and trematode helminths, were used. Group A animals received 5000 third-stage larvae of a trichostrongylid helminth cocktail and group B ewes were unparasitised controls. Animals in group A developed gastrointestinal trichostrongylosis confirmed by >500epg in faecal samples; mean epg of group B ewes were Ewes were challenged by deposition of Mannheimia haemolytica into the teat duct. In group A, 7 ewes developed clinical and 5 subclinical mastitis; no ewe in group B developed clinical mastitis, but only subclinical (12 ewes) (P=0.002). M. haemolytica was isolated from 132/132 and 121/132 udder samples from group A or B, respectively (Pewes that developed clinical mastitis than in others which did not (0.709 and 0.162 versus 0.662 and 0.136, respectively; Pewes with subclinical mastitis (in group A or B), inducible-lymphoid-follicles were observed in the teat, which were not observed in ewes with clinical disease. Total pathology scores summed over all days were 127 and 73 for group A or B ewes, respectively (maximum possible 192; Pewes that developed clinical mastitis. It is concluded that, in view of bacterial challenge, gastrointestinal trichostrongylosis and particularly Teladorsagia infection, might lead to clinical mastitis, through various pathogenetic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical and morphological characteristics of chronic uretheroprostatitis associated with chlamydial and mycoplasmal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Kondratyeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical symptoms, features of morphological structure of prostate in patients with chronic recurrent prostatitis associated with chlamydial and mycoplasmal infections. 60 male patients were examined. Anamnesis and interview data, results of laboratory and instrumental tests were analyzed. In 73.3% of cases cultural test and PCR allowed to identify M. hominis, U. urealiticum, M. genitalium, C. trachomatis in patients with chronic uretheroprostatitis. Out of 16 patients (26,6% of all examined with chronic recurrent uretheroprostatitis for whom neither chlamidial nor mycoplasmal infection was diagnosed by laboratory tests, for 14 patients (87,5% it was confirmed that patogenic urogenital infectious agents were localized intracellularly. Pathomorphological investigation of prostate bioptates allowed to estimate the type and degree of specific changes in the prostate tissue in cases of recurrent uretheroprostatitis resistant to the therapy and with frequent relapses.

  5. Treatment of helicobacter pylori infection; a controlled randomized comparative clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, A.; Usmanghani, K.; Mohiuddin, E.; Akram, M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces chronic inflammation of the underlying gastric mucosa and is strongly linked to the development of duodenal and gastric carcinoma. A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Pylorex, a herbal formulation, for treatment of H. pylori infection as compared to triple allopathic therapy (Omeprazole, Amoxicillin, Metronidazole). The therapeutic evaluations of these medicines were conducted on 97 clinically and immunologically diagnosed cases of H. pylori infection. H. pylori was eradicated in 16 (32.6%) out of 49 patients by the use of triple allopathic therapy (Control drugs), and in 9 (18.7%) out of 48 patients by the use of Pylorex (Test drug). Pylorex possesses a therapeutic value for the treatment of H. pylori associated symptoms but the eradication rate is superior in triple allopathic therapy. (author)

  6. Clinical and Emotional Factors Related to Erectile Dysfunction in HIV-Infected Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumaz, Carmina R; Ayestaran, Aintzane; Perez-Alvarez, Nuria; Muñoz-Moreno, Jose A; Ferrer, Maria Jose; Negredo, Eugenia; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2017-05-01

    The prevalence and associated factors of erectile dysfunction (ED) in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected men remain controversial. The authors evaluated ED, clinical, and emotional variables in a group of 501 HIV-infected men in a cross-sectional 4-month observational study. ED was assessed using the International Index of Erectile Function-5 and emotional status using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire. Median age (interquartile range) was 42 (35, 48) years. Time since HIV diagnosis was 6.3 (2.6, 17.1) years, 92% were taking antiretroviral treatment and 81.8% had an HIV-RNA viral load emotional status seemed to play a fundamental role in its presence.

  7. A Clinical Prediction Algorithm to Stratify Pediatric Musculoskeletal Infection by Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Michael A; An, Thomas J; Mignemi, Megan E; Martus, Jeffrey E; Mencio, Gregory A; Lovejoy, Stephen A; Thomsen, Isaac P; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; Williams, Derek J

    2016-01-01

    Objective There are currently no algorithms for early stratification of pediatric musculoskeletal infection (MSKI) severity that are applicable to all types of tissue involvement. In this study, the authors sought to develop a clinical prediction algorithm that accurately stratifies infection severity based on clinical and laboratory data at presentation to the emergency department. Methods An IRB-approved retrospective review was conducted to identify patients aged 0–18 who presented to the pediatric emergency department at a tertiary care children’s hospital with concern for acute MSKI over a five-year period (2008–2013). Qualifying records were reviewed to obtain clinical and laboratory data and to classify in-hospital outcomes using a three-tiered severity stratification system. Ordinal regression was used to estimate risk for each outcome. Candidate predictors included age, temperature, respiratory rate, heart rate, C-reactive protein, and peripheral white blood cell count. We fit fully specified (all predictors) and reduced models (retaining predictors with a p-value ≤ 0.2). Discriminatory power of the models was assessed using the concordance (c)-index. Results Of the 273 identified children, 191 (70%) met inclusion criteria. Median age was 5.8 years. Outcomes included 47 (25%) children with inflammation only, 41 (21%) with local infection, and 103 (54%) with disseminated infection. Both the full and reduced models accurately demonstrated excellent performance (full model c-index 0.83, 95% CI [0.79–0.88]; reduced model 0.83, 95% CI [0.78–0.87]). Model fit was also similar, indicating preference for the reduced model. Variables in this model included C-reactive protein, pulse, temperature, and an interaction term for pulse and temperature. The odds of a more severe outcome increased by 30% for every 10-unit increase in C-reactive protein. Conclusions Clinical and laboratory data obtained in the emergency department may be used to accurately

  8. Clinical, immunological and virological response to different antiretroviral regimens in a cohort of HIV-2-infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, Marchina E.; Prins, Jan M.; Brinkman, Kees; Keuter, Monique; Veenstra, Jan; Danner, Sven A.; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schutten, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical, immunological and virological response and the emergence of resistance towards antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a cohort of HIV-2-infected patients. Design: Observational study. Patients: HIV-2-infected patients residing in the Netherlands. Results: From 1995 to

  9. Prognostic factors for the clinical effectiveness of fluconazole in the treatment of oral candidiasis in HIV-1-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koks, C. H. W.; Crommentuyn, K. M. L.; Mathôt, R. A. A.; Mulder, J. W.; Meenhorst, P. L.; Beijnen, J. H.

    2002-01-01

    To identify prognostic factors for the clinical effectiveness of fluconazole in HIV-1-infected patients with oropharyngeal candidiasis. The study was designed as a prospective, open label, non-comparative, dose escalating, single centre trial. Thirty-four HIV-1-infected patients with oropharyngeal

  10. HIV infection and its association with an excess risk of clinical fractures : a nationwide case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Güerri-Fernández, Robert; De Vries, Frank; Lalmohamed, Arief; Bazelier, Marloes; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Cooper, Cyrus; Vestergaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different studies have reported an association between HIV infection, antiretroviral therapies, and impaired bone metabolism, but data on their impact on fracture risk are scarce. We studied the association between a clinical diagnosis of HIV infection and fracture risk. METHODS: We

  11. HIV infection and its association with an excess risk of clinical fractures: A nationwide case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel; Güerri-Fernández, Robert; De Vries, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/303546670; Lalmohamed, Arief|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357580680; Bazelier, Marloes|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341589802; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Cooper, Cyrus; Vestergaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Different studies have reported an association between HIV infection, antiretroviral therapies, and impaired bone metabolism, but data on their impact on fracture risk are scarce. We studied the association between a clinical diagnosis of HIV infection and fracture risk. METHODS: We

  12. Clinical condition and comorbidity as determinants for blood culture positivity in patients with skin and soft-tissue infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, F. V.; Kallen, M. C.; van den Bosch, C. M. A.; Hulscher, M. E. J. L.; Geerlings, S. E.; Prins, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    The utility of performing blood cultures in patients with a suspected skin infection is debated. We investigated the association between blood culture positivity rates and patients' clinical condition, including acute disease severity and comorbidity. We performed a retrospective study, including

  13. Clinical features and seasonality of parechovirus infection in an Asian subtropical city, Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace P K Chiang

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of human parechovirus (HPeV in Asia remains obscure. We elucidated the prevalence, seasonality, type distribution and clinical presentation of HPeV among children in Hong Kong.A 24-month prospective study to detect HPeV in children ≤36 months hospitalized for acute viral illnesses.2.3% of the 3911 children examined had HPeV infection, with most (87.5% concentrated in September-January (autumn-winter. 81.3% were HPeV1 and 12.5% were HPeV4, while HPeV3 was rare (2.5%. HPeV was a probable cause of the disease in 47.7% (42/88, mostly self-limiting including acute gastroenteritis, upper respiratory tract infection and maculopapular rash. A neonate developed severe sepsis-like illness with HPeV3 as the only pathogen detected. A high proportion (60.0% of children coinfected with HPeV and other respiratory virus(es had acute bronchiolitis or pneumonia. Six children with HPeV coinfections developed convulsion / pallid attack. Most rash illnesses exhibited a generalized maculopapular pattern involving the trunk and limbs, and were more likely associated with HPeV4 compared to other syndrome groups (36.4% vs. 3.1%, p = 0.011.In Hong Kong, HPeV exhibits a clear seasonality (autumn-winter and was found in a small proportion (2.3% of young children (≤36 months admitted with features of acute viral illnesses. The clinical presentation ranged from mild gastroenteritis, upper respiratory tract infection and febrile rash to convulsion and severe sepsis-like illness. HPeV3, which is reported to associate with more severe disease in neonates, is rare in Hong Kong. HPeV coinfection might associate with convulsion and aggravate other respiratory tract infections.

  14. Optimized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting cytomegalovirus infections during clinical trials of recombinant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnon, Anke; Piras, Fabienne; Gimenez-Fourage, Sophie; Dubayle, Joseline; Arnaud-Barbe, Nadège; Hessler, Catherine; Caillet, Catherine

    2017-11-01

    In clinical trials of cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein B (gB) vaccines, CMV infection is detected by first depleting serum of anti-gB antibodies and then measuring anti-CMV antibodies with a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, with confirmation of positive findings by immunoblot. Identification of CMV immunoantigens for the development of an ELISA that detects specifically CMV infection in clinical samples from individuals immunized with gB vaccines. Sensitivity and specificity of ELISAs using antigenic regions of CMV proteins UL83/pp65, UL99/pp28, UL44/pp52, UL80a/pp38, UL57, and UL32/pp150 were measured. An IgG ELISA using a UL32/pp150 [862-1048] capture peptide was the most specific (93.7%) and sensitive (96.4%) for detecting CMV-specific antibodies in sera. The ELISA successfully detected CMV-specific antibodies in 22 of 22 sera of subjects who had been vaccinated with a gB vaccine but who had later been infected with CMV. The ELISA was linear over a wide range of CMV concentrations (57-16,814 ELISA units/mL) and was reproducible as indicated by a 5% intra-day and 7% inter-day coefficients of variation. The signal was specifically competed by UL32/pp150 [862-1048] peptide but not by CMV-gB or herpes simplex virus 2 glycoprotein D. Lipid and hemoglobin matrix did not interfere with the assay. The UL32/pp150 [862-1048] IgG ELISA can be used for the sensitive and specific detection of CMV infection in gB-vaccinated individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical definition of respiratory viral infections in young children and potential bronchiolitis misclassification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megalaa, Rosemary; Perez, Geovanny F; Kilaikode-Cheruveettara, Sasikumar; Kotwal, Nidhi; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E; Nino, Gustavo

    2018-01-01

    Viral respiratory infections are often grouped as a single respiratory syndrome named 'viral bronchiolitis', independently of the viral etiology or individual risk factors. Clinical trials and guidelines have used a more stringent definition of viral bronchiolitis, including only the first episode of wheezing in children less than 12 months of age without concomitant respiratory comorbidities. There is increasing evidence suggesting that this definition is not being followed by pediatric care providers, but it is unclear to what extent viral respiratory infections are currently misclassified as viral bronchiolitis using standard definitions. We conducted a retrospective analysis of hospitalized young children (≤3 years) due to viral respiratory infections. Bronchiolitis was defined as the first wheezing episode less than 12 months of age. Demographic variables and comorbidities were obtained by electronic medical record review. The study comprised a total of 513 hospitalizations (n=453). Viral bronchiolitis was diagnosed in 144 admissions (28.1%). Notably, we identified that the majority of children diagnosed with bronchiolitis (63%) were misclassified as they had prior episodes of wheezing. Many children with bronchiolitis misclassification had significant comorbidities, including prematurity (51%), neuromuscular conditions (9.8%), and congenital heart disease (9.8%). Misclassification of bronchiolitis is a common problem that may lead to inappropriate management of viral respiratory infections in young children. A comprehensive approach that takes into consideration viral etiology and individual risk factors may lead to a more accurate clinical assessment of this condition and would potentially prevent bronchiolitis misclassification. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. FDG PET/CT in infection and inflammation—current and emerging clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Patel, C.N.; Scarsbrook, A.F.; Chowdhury, F.U.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with the glucose analogue, 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), is an evolving hybrid imaging technique in the evaluation of an important and diverse group of pathological conditions, which are characterised by infection and aseptic inflammation. With a rapidly expanding body of evidence, it is being increasingly recognised that, in addition to its established role in oncological imaging, FDG PET/CT also has clinical utility in suspected infection and inflammation. The technique can identify the source of infection or inflammation in a timely fashion ahead of morphological changes on conventional anatomical imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), map the extent and severity of disease, identify sites for tissue sampling, and assess therapy response. FDG PET/CT exhibits distinct advantages over traditional radionuclide imaging techniques in terms of shorter duration of examination, higher spatial resolution, non-invasive nature of acquisition, ability to perform quantitative analyses, and the provision of a synergistic combination of functional and anatomical imaging. With the use of illustrative clinico-radiological cases, this article discusses the current and emerging evidence for the use of FDG PET/CT in a broad spectrum of disorders, such as fever of unknown origin, sarcoidosis, large vessel vasculitis, musculoskeletal infections, joint prosthesis or implant-related complications, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related infections, and miscellaneous indications, such as IgG4-related systemic disease. It will also briefly summarise the role of more novel tracers such as FDG-labelled leukocytes and gallium-68 PET tracers in this arena

  17. Evaluation of clinical and serological findings for diagnosis of cutaneous anthrax infection after an outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulseren, Duygu; Süzük-Yıldız, Serap; Çelebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk

    2017-09-01

    Anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, is one of the oldest documented infectious diseases in both livestock and humans. We aimed to evaluate clinical findings and risk factors of patients with cutaneous anthrax infection and report anti-lethal factor (LF) IgG and anti-protective antigen (PA) IgG titers in the serologic diagnosis of disease. In this study, serum samples of 18 cutaneous anthrax patients were collected and anti-LF IgG and anti-PA IgG titers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Twelve (67%) males and 6 (33%) females, with a mean age of 36.06 ± 16.58 years were included in the study. Risk factors identified in the patient population studied were slaughtering (28%), flaying (56%), chopping meat (67%), burying diseased animal corpses (17%) and milking (6%) livestock. Black eschar formation (94%), pruritus (78%) and painful lymphadenopathy (61%) were first three common clinical signs and symptoms, respectively. Fourteen (78%) patients produced a positive IgG response against PA, 11 (61%) patients produced against LF. Three (17%) patients had no response to either antigen. A detailed history of contact with sick animals or animal products along with clinical findings should be taken at the first step for the diagnosis of cutaneous anthrax infection. Serologic detection of anti-LF IgG and anti-PA IgG with ELISA may be useful auxillary method for establishing the diagnosis.

  18. Clinical Manifestations and Outcomes of Rickettsia australis Infection: A 15-Year Retrospective Study of Hospitalized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Stewart

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Queensland tick typhus (QTT; Rickettsia australis is an important cause of community-acquired acute febrile illness in eastern Australia. Cases of QTT were identified retrospectively from 2000 to 2015 at five sites in Northern Brisbane through a pathology database. Those included had a fourfold rise in spotted fever group (SFG-specific serology, a single SFG-specific serology ≥ 256 or SFG-specific serology ≥ 128 with a clinically consistent illness. Cases were excluded on the basis of clinical unlikelihood of QTT infection. Thirty-six cases were included. Fever was found in 34/36 (94% patients. Rash occurred in 83% of patients with maculopapular being the dominant morphology (70%. Thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia, and raised transaminases were common and occurred in 58%, 69%, and 89% of patients, respectively. Thirty-one of 36 (86% patients received antibiotic therapy (usually doxycycline and the time to correct antibiotic (from admission ranged from 3 to 120 h (mean 45.5 h. Four of 36 (11% required intensive care unit (ICU admission for severe sepsis and end-organ support. There were no deaths. QTT has a wide range of clinical and laboratory features. Early and appropriate antimicrobial therapy is important and may prevent severe disease. Further prospective studies are required to identify factors associated with severe infection and sepsis.

  19. Clinical Classification and Prognosis of Isolated Right-Sided Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Carlos; López, Javier; García, Héctor; Sevilla, Teresa; Revilla, Ana; Vilacosta, Isidre; Sarriá, Cristina; Olmos, Carmen; Ferrera, Carlos; García, Pablo Elpidio; Sáez, Carmen; Gómez, Itziar; San Román, José Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Abstract From an epidemiologic point of view, right-sided infective endocarditis (RSIE) affects different types of patients: intravenous drug users (IDUs), cardiac device carriers (pacemakers and implantable automatic defibrillators), and the “3 noes” endocarditis group: no left-sided, no IDUs, no cardiac devices. Our objective is to describe and compare the clinical profile and outcome of these groups of patients. Every episode of infective endocarditis (IE) consecutively diagnosed in 3 tertiary centers from 1996 to 2012 was included in an ongoing multipurpose database. We assessed 85 epidemiologic, clinical, echocardiographic, and outcome variables in patients with isolated RSIE. A bivariated comparative analysis between the 3 groups was conducted. Among 866 IE episodes, 121 were classified as isolated RSIE (14%): 36 IDUs (30%), 65 cardiac device carriers (54%), and 20 “3 noes” group (16%). IDUs were mainly young men (36 ± 7 years) without previous heart disease, few comorbidities, and frequent previous endocarditis episodes (28%). Human immunodeficiency virus infection was frequent (69%). Cardiac device carriers were older (66 ± 15 years) and had less comorbidities (34%). Removal of the infected device was performed in 91% of the patients without any death. The “3 noes” endocarditis group was composed mainly by middle-age men (56 ± 18 years), health care related infections (50%), and had many comorbidities (75%). Whereas Staphylococcus aureus were the most frequent cause in IDUs (72% vs 34% in device carriers and 34% in the “3 noes” group, P = 0.001), coagulase negative Staphylococci predominated in the device carriers (58% vs 11% in drug users and 35% in the “3 noes”, P < 0.001). Significant differences in mortality were found (17% in drug users, 3% in device carriers, and 30% in the “3 noes” group; P < 0.001). These results suggest that RSIE should be separated into 3 groups (IDUs, cardiac device carriers, and

  20. Clinical efficacy of Saccharomyces boulardii or metronidazole in symptomatic children with Blastocystis hominis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Eren, Makbule; Dogan, Nihal; Reyhanioglu, Serap; Yargic, Zeynel Abidin; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2011-03-01

    Although many Blastocystis infections remain asymptomatic, recent data suggest it also causes frequent symptoms. Therapy should be limited to patients with persistent symptoms and a complete workup for alternative etiologies. The goal of this study was to compare the natural evolution (no treatment) to the efficacy of Saccharomyces boulardii (S. boulardii) or metronidazole for the duration of diarrhea and the duration of colonization in children with gastrointestinal symptoms and positive stool examination for Blastocystis hominis. This randomized single-blinded clinical trial included children presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea-vomiting, flatulence) more than 2 weeks and confirmed B. hominis by stool examination (B. hominis cysts in the stool with microscopic examination of the fresh stool). The primary end points were clinical evaluation and result of microscopic stool examination at day 15. Secondary end points were the same end points at day 30. Randomization was performed by alternating inclusion: group A, S. boulardii (250 mg twice a day, Reflor®) during 10 days; group B, metronidazole (30 mg/kg twice daily) for 10 days; group C, no treatment. At day 15 and 30 after inclusion, the patients were re-evaluated, and stool samples were examined microscopically. On day 15, children that were still symptomatic and/or were still B. hominis-infected in group C were treated with metronidazole for 10 days. There was no statistically significant difference between the three study groups for age, gender, and the presence of diarrhea and abdominal pain. On day 15, clinical cure was observed in 77.7% in group A (n, 18); in 66.6% in group B (n, 15); and 40% in group C (n:15) (p boulardii has potential beneficial effects in B. hominis infection (symptoms, presence of parasites). These findings challenge the actual guidelines.

  1. Emerging souvenirs-clinical presentation of the returning traveller with imported arbovirus infections in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerle, I; Briciu, V T; Ergönül, Ö; Lupşe, M; Papa, A; Radulescu, A; Tsiodras, S; Tsitou, C; Drosten, C; Nussenblatt, V R; Reusken, C B; Sigfrid, L A; Beeching, N J

    2018-03-01

    Arboviruses are an emerging group of viruses that are causing increasing health concerns globally, including in Europe. Clinical presentation usually consists of a nonspecific febrile illness that may be accompanied by rash, arthralgia and arthritis, with or without neurological or haemorrhagic syndromes. The range of differential diagnoses of other infectious and noninfectious aetiologies is broad, presenting a challenge for physicians. While knowledge of the geographical distribution of pathogens and the current epidemiological situation, incubation periods, exposure risk factors and vaccination history can help guide the diagnostic approach, the nonspecific and variable clinical presentation can delay final diagnosis. This narrative review aims to summarize the main clinical and laboratory-based findings of the three most common imported arboviruses in Europe. Evidence is extracted from published literature and clinical expertise of European arbovirus experts. We present three cases that highlight similarities and differences between some of the most common travel-related arboviruses imported to Europe. These include a patient with chikungunya virus infection presenting in Greece, a case of dengue fever in Turkey and a travel-related case of Zika virus infection in Romania. Early diagnosis of travel-imported cases is important to reduce the risk of localized outbreaks of tropical arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya and the risk of local transmission from body fluids or vertical transmission. Given the global relevance of arboviruses and the continuous risk of (re)emerging arbovirus events, clinicians should be aware of the clinical syndromes of arbovirus fevers and the potential pitfalls in diagnosis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Pathology, clinical signs, and tissue distribution of Toxoplasma gondii in experimentally infected reindeer (Rangifer tarandus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Émilie Bouchard

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic parasite found in vertebrates worldwide for which felids serve as definitive hosts. Despite low densities of felids in northern Canada, Inuit people in some regions show unexpectedly high levels of exposure, possibly through handling and consumption of Arctic wildlife. Free-ranging caribou (Rangifer tarandus are widely harvested for food across the Canadian North, show evidence of seroexposure to T. gondii, and are currently declining in numbers throughout the Arctic. We experimentally infected three captive reindeer (conspecific with caribou with 1000, 5000 or 10,000 oocysts of T. gondii via stomach intubation to assess clinical signs of infection, pathology, and tissue distribution. An unexposed reindeer served as a negative control. Signs of stress, aggression, and depression were noted for the first two weeks following infection. By 4 weeks post infection, all infected reindeer were positive on a modified agglutination test at the highest titer tested (1:200 for antibodies to T. gondii. At 20 weeks post infection, no gross abnormalities were observed on necropsy. Following histopathology and immunohistochemistry, tissue cysts were visualized in the reindeer given the highest and lowest dose of oocysts. Focal pleuritis and alveolitis were associated with respiratory problems in reindeer given the middle dose. DNA of T. gondii was detected following traditional DNA extraction and conventional PCR on 25 mg samples from 17/33 muscles and organs, and by magnetic capture DNA extraction from 100 g samples from all 26 tissues examined. This research demonstrated that reindeer/caribou can serve as intermediate hosts for T. gondii, and that the parasite may be associated with health effects in wildlife. The presence of T. gondii in all tissues tested, many of which are commonly consumed raw, smoked, or dried in northern communities, suggests that caribou may serve as a source of human exposure to T

  3. Microparticles provide a novel biomarker to predict severe clinical outcomes of dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punyadee, Nuntaya; Mairiang, Dumrong; Thiemmeca, Somchai; Komoltri, Chulaluk; Pan-Ngum, Wirichada; Chomanee, Nusara; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Tangthawornchaikul, Nattaya; Limpitikul, Wannee; Vasanawathana, Sirijitt; Malasit, Prida; Avirutnan, Panisadee

    2015-02-01

    Shedding of microparticles (MPs) is a consequence of apoptotic cell death and cellular activation. Low levels of circulating MPs in blood help maintain homeostasis, whereas increased MP generation is linked to many pathological conditions. Herein, we investigated the role of MPs in dengue virus (DENV) infection. Infection of various susceptible cells by DENV led to apoptotic death and MP release. These MPs harbored a viral envelope protein and a nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) on their surfaces. Ex vivo analysis of clinical specimens from patients with infections of different degrees of severity at multiple time points revealed that MPs generated from erythrocytes and platelets are two major MP populations in the circulation of DENV-infected patients. Elevated levels of red blood cell-derived MPs (RMPs) directly correlated with DENV disease severity, whereas a significant decrease in platelet-derived MPs was associated with a bleeding tendency. Removal by mononuclear cells of complement-opsonized NS1-anti-NS1 immune complexes bound to erythrocytes via complement receptor type 1 triggered MP shedding in vitro, a process that could explain the increased levels of RMPs in severe dengue. These findings point to the multiple roles of MPs in dengue pathogenesis. They offer a potential novel biomarker candidate capable of differentiating dengue fever from the more serious dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue is the most important mosquito-transmitted viral disease in the world. No vaccines or specific treatments are available. Rapid diagnosis and immediate treatment are the keys to achieve a positive outcome. Dengue virus (DENV) infection, like some other medical conditions, changes the level and composition of microparticles (MPs), tiny bag-like structures which are normally present at low levels in the blood of healthy individuals. This study investigated how MPs in culture and patients' blood are changed in response to DENV infection. Infection of cells led to programmed

  4. An intrepreneurial innovative role: integration of the clinical nurse specialist and infection prevention professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Paula A

    2013-01-01

    Hospital quality and financial sustainability rely on reducing healthcare-associated events/infections, length of stay, and readmissions. This project focused on designing an integrated role for the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) and the infection prevention professional (IPP) to proactively manage the delivery of evidence-based practice to high-risk surgical patients. The healthcare industry is in the midst of a paradigm shift driven by changing health policy focusing on quality indicators, patient satisfaction, and lowering costs. Coupled with these indicators is the expectation and responsibility to provide evidence-based practice at all levels of the healthcare continuum. This paradigm shift places healthcare facilities in a very competitive atmosphere as they rally for the revenue of a fixed payer mix. A literature search using CINHAL, PubMed, and the CNS national listserve databases was completed to identify if there was any previously written information available on an integrated role of the CNS/IPP. An online business plan template was used to communicate the significance, implications, and return on organizational investment to practice with establishing this role. Chronic health conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, and colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms can place patients at an increased risk for developing a surgical site infection or complications. The CNS/IPP will proactively manage these risk factors, including the patient and family in a preventive care model to manage the acute inpatient high-risk surgical patient. Care management will include coordinated, collaborative, and consultative follow-up by the CNS/IPP in the acute care, long-term care facilities, and home settings. The infection prevention skill set brings a level of clinical expertise that makes a unique CNS. The IPP is immersed in using epidemiological principles that examine the impact of comorbidities and the added risk that can

  5. The spatial context of clinic-reported sexually transmitted infection in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shui-Shan; Ho, King-Man; Cheung, Georgiana M T

    2010-09-21

    The incidence and prevalence of sexually transmitted infection (STI) in China has been on the rise in the past decade. Delineation of epidemiologic pattern is often hampered by its uneven distribution. Spatial distribution is often a neglected aspect of STI research, the description of which may enhance epidemiologic surveillance and inform service development. Over a one month-period, all first time attendees of 6 public STI clinics in Hong Kong were interviewed before clinical consultation using a standard questionnaire to assess their demographic, clinical and behavioural characteristics. A GIS (geographic information system)-based approach was adopted with mapping performed. The cases attending the clinics in different locations were profiled. A comparison was made between neighbourhood cases (patients living near a clinic) and distant cases (those farther off), by calculating the odds ratio for demographic, behavioural and geographic characteristics. Of the 1142 STI patients evaluated, the residence locations of 1029 (90.1%) could be geocoded, of which 95.6% were ethnic Chinese and 63.4% male. Geographically only about a quarter lived in the same district as the clinic. STI patients aged 55 or above were more likely to be living in the vicinity of the clinic, located in the same or adjacent tertiary planning unit (a small geographic unit below district level). A majority of patients came from locations a few kilometers from the clinic, the distance of which varies between clinics. Overall, more syphilis cases were reported in patients residing in the same or adjacent tertiary planning unit, while distant cases tended to give a higher risk of inconsistent condom use. There were otherwise no significant clinical and epidemiologic differences between neighbourhood and distant STI cases. There was no specific relationship between STI and the residence location of patients as regards their clinical and epidemiologic characteristics in the territory of Hong Kong

  6. The spatial context of clinic-reported sexually transmitted infection in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung Georgiana MT

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence and prevalence of sexually transmitted infection (STI in China has been on the rise in the past decade. Delineation of epidemiologic pattern is often hampered by its uneven distribution. Spatial distribution is often a neglected aspect of STI research, the description of which may enhance epidemiologic surveillance and inform service development. Methods Over a one month-period, all first time attendees of 6 public STI clinics in Hong Kong were interviewed before clinical consultation using a standard questionnaire to assess their demographic, clinical and behavioural characteristics. A GIS (geographic information system-based approach was adopted with mapping performed. The cases attending the clinics in different locations were profiled. A comparison was made between neighbourhood cases (patients living near a clinic and distant cases (those farther off, by calculating the odds ratio for demographic, behavioural and geographic characteristics. Results Of the 1142 STI patients evaluated, the residence locations of 1029 (90.1% could be geocoded, of which 95.6% were ethnic Chinese and 63.4% male. Geographically only about a quarter lived in the same district as the clinic. STI patients aged 55 or above were more likely to be living in the vicinity of the clinic, located in the same or adjacent tertiary planning unit (a small geographic unit below district level. A majority of patients came from locations a few kilometers from the clinic, the distance of which varies between clinics. Overall, more syphilis cases were reported in patients residing in the same or adjacent tertiary planning unit, while distant cases tended to give a higher risk of inconsistent condom use. There were otherwise no significant clinical and epidemiologic differences between neighbourhood and distant STI cases. Conclusions There was no specific relationship between STI and the residence location of patients as regards their clinical and

  7. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections in Research and Community Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidlitz, Jakob; Kovacevic, Miro; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Hommer, Rebecca; Lougee, Lorraine; Grant, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The first cases of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) were described>15 years ago. Since that time, the literature has been divided between studies that successfully demonstrate an etiologic relationship between Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and those that fail to find an association. One possible explanation for the conflicting reports is that the diagnostic criteria proposed for PANDAS are not specific enough to describe a unique and homogeneous cohort of patients. To evaluate the validity of the PANDAS criteria, we compared clinical characteristics of PANDAS patients identified in two community practices with a sample of children meeting full research criteria for PANDAS. Methods: A systematic review of clinical records was used to identify the presence or absence of selected symptoms in children evaluated for PANDAS by physicians in Hinsdale, Illinois (n=52) and Bethesda, Maryland (n=40). Results were compared against data from participants in National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research investigations of PANDAS (n=48). Results: As described in the original PANDAS cohort, males outnumbered females (95:45) by ∼ 2:1, and symptoms began in early childhood (7.3±2.7 years). Clinical presentations were remarkably similar across sites, with all children reporting acute onset of OCD symptoms and multiple comorbidities, including separation anxiety (86–92%), school issues (75–81%), sleep disruptions (71%), tics (60–65%), urinary symptoms (42–81%), and others. Twenty of the community cases (22%) failed to meet PANDAS criteria because of an absence of documentation of GAS infections. Conclusions: The diagnostic criteria for PANDAS can be used by clinicians to accurately identify patients with common clinical features and shared etiology of symptoms. Although difficulties in documenting an association

  8. Clinical and molecular epidemiology of Acinetobacter baumannii bloodstream infections in an endemic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchaim, Dror; Levit, Dana; Zigron, Roy; Gordon, Michal; Lazarovitch, Tsillia; Carrico, Joao A; Chalifa-Caspi, Vered; Moran-Gilad, Jacob

    2017-03-01

    The transmission dynamics of Acinetobacter baumannii in endemic settings, and the relation between microbial properties and patients' clinical outcomes, are yet obscure and hampered by insufficient metadata. Of 20 consecutive patients with A. baumannii bloodstream infection that were thoroughly analyzed at a single center, at least one transmission opportunity was evident for 85% of patients. This implies that patient-to-patient transmission is the major mode of A. baumannii acquisitions in health facilities. Moreover, all patients who died immediately (baumannii ST457 lineage compared with other strains.

  9. Prediction of clinical infection in women with preterm labour with intact membranes: a score based on ultrasonographic, clinical and biological markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayem, Gilles; Maillard, Françoise; Schmitz, Thomas; Jarreau, Pierre H; Cabrol, Dominique; Breart, Gérard; Goffinet, François

    2009-07-01

    To predict maternal and neonatal clinical infection at admission in women hospitalized for preterm labour (PTL) with intact membranes. Prospective study of 371 women hospitalized for preterm labour with intact membranes. The primary outcome was clinical infection, defined by clinical chorioamnionitis at delivery or early-onset neonatal infection. Clinical infection was identified in 21 cases (5.7%) and was associated with earlier gestational age at admission for PTL, elevated maternal C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC), shorter cervical length, and a cervical funnelling on ultrasound. We used ROC curves to determine the cut-off values that minimized the number of false positives and false negatives. The cut-off points chosen were 30 weeks for gestational age at admission, 25 mm for cervical length, 8 mg/l for CRP and 12,000 c/mm(3) for WBC. Each of these variables was assigned a weight on the basis of the adjusted odds ratios in a clinical infection risk score (CIRS). We set a threshold corresponding to a specificity close to 90%, and calculated the positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratios of each marker and of the CIRS. The CIRS had a sensitivity of 61.9%, while the sensitivity of the other markers ranged from 19.0% to 42.9%. Internal cross-validation was used to estimate the performance of the CIRS in new subjects. The diagnostic values found remained close to the initial values. A clinical infection risk score built from data known at admission for preterm labour helps to identify women and newborns at high risk of clinical infection.

  10. Clinical features and prognosis of patients with primary biliary cholangitis complicated by hepatitis virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Dantong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features and prognosis of patients with primary biliary cholangitis(PBC complicated by hepatitis virus infection. MethodsA total of 16 patients who were admitted to Beijing YouAn Hospital from October 2004 to October 2012 and diagnosed with PBC complicated by hepatitis virus infection were enrolled, among whom 7 had chronic hepatitis B virus infection, 3 had hepatitis C, 4 had hepatitis E, 1 had hepatitis B and hepatitis C, and 1 had hepatitis A. A total of 76 hospitalized patients with PBC alone were enrolled as controls. The two groups were compared in terms of clinical features, laboratory markers, and autoantibodies, and follow-up visits were performed to investigate prognostic features. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of normally distributed continuous data, and the Mann-Whitney U rank sum test was used for comparison of non-normally distributed continuous data; the chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test was used for comparison of categorical data. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival rates and the log-rank test was used to compare survival rates between groups. ResultsCompared with the control group, the PBC-hepatitis virus infection group had significantly lower proportion of female patients (χ2=12.22, P=0.002, alkaline phosphatase (U=225.00, P<0.001, CHO (U=363.50, P=0.036, and IgG level (t=2.79, P=0.007, and no patients in the PBC-hepatitis virus infection group experienced abdominal wall varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, or hepatic encephalopathy. The PBC-hepatitis virus infection group had various autoantibodies including anti-nuclear antibody, smooth muscle antibody, anti-parietal cell antibody (APCA, anti-liver specific protein antibody, and anti-myocardial antibody, as well as a significantly higher APCA positive rate than the control group (25% vs 3.9%, χ2=5.608, P=0.016. The median follow-up time was 49.5 months (2-312 months. The PBC

  11. Common sports-related infections: a review on clinical pictures, management and time to return to sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadinejad, Zahra; Alijani, Neda; Mansori, Sedigeh; Ziaee, Vahid

    2014-03-01

    There is a relationship between exercise and changes in immunity. So athletes are prone to different medical problems such as injuries and infections. Infection is an important medical problem which could be a reason for athletes' absence from training. The relationship between physical activity and immune system, characteristics of different types of infections in athletes with emphasis on special clinical presentations or complications, time to return to physical activity and training and strategies to prevent development and transmission of infections in athletes or physically active people are the main topics of this review.

  12. Clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection and molecular characterization of the isolated strains in a cohort of Danish hospitalized patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søes, Lillian Marie; Brock, Inger; Persson, Søren

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare clinical features of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) to toxin gene profiles of the strains isolated from Danish hospitalized patients. C. difficile isolates were characterized by PCR based molecular typing methods including toxin gene profiling...... A and B compared to patients infected by C. difficile harbouring only toxin A and B. In conclusion, infection by C. difficile harbouring genes encoding both toxin A, toxin B and the binary toxin were associated with hospital acquisition, higher leukocyte counts and severe clinical disease....

  13. Infection,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-16

    characteristic in severe gram-negative sepsis. Hypertriglyceridemia results from an increase in hepatic synthesis in combination with diminished activity of...induced stress, and tissue repair (1). The magnitude and type of nutritional losses caused by an infection reflect both the severity and duration of an... several functional forms of nutrient loss must be anticipated. Functional losses are defined as the within-body losses of nutrients due to infection

  14. Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage could be a risk for development of clinical infections in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Selva Martínez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although nasal carriage has been described as a risk factor for Staphylococcus aureus infections in humans, there is a scarcity of studies about S. aureus nasal carriers in animals. In rabbits, S. aureus is one of the most important pathogens responsible for a number of different types of infections. This study was designed to determine the extent of staphylococcal nasal carriage and to establish whether a relationship exists between nasal carriage and development of lesions. One hundred and sixteen rabbits with and without chronic signs of staphylococcosis from 6 industrial rabbitries were monitored. Nasal swabs for microbiological assessments were obtained from all animals. Microbiological results showed that 56% of the animals carried S. aureus in their nasal cavities with significantly higher incidence in animals with staphylococcal-related lesions (84.2% compared to apparently healthy animals (28.8%. Additionally, the S. aureus strains isolated from the nasal cavity and lesions were clonally related in 91.7% of animals. This suggests that nasal carriage of S. aureus in rabbits could be a risk for development of clinical infections.

  15. Intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses in dogs with severe Angiostrongylus vasorum infection: clinical, radiographic, and echocardiographic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo Matos, J; Malbon, A; Dennler, M; Glaus, T

    2016-06-01

    In both humans and dogs the pulmonary vasculature is able to recruit large-diameter anatomical intrapulmonary arteriovenous anastomoses (IPAVAs). In healthy people the opening of these anastomoses affects the degree of exercise-induced increase in pulmonary arterial pressure. The presence of these IPAVAs can be demonstrated using saline contrast echocardiography. The aims of the present study were to characterize severely affected, naturally infected dogs with Angiostrongylus vasorum, to evaluate if these dogs can open IPAVAs, and to assess if the recruitment of such anastomoses affects the severity of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Eight client-owned dogs with severe A. vasorum infection were recruited. Dogs with A. vasorum infection that presented with severe dyspnea and/or syncope were prospectively screened by echocardiography for the presence of PH and IPAVAs. Only severely affected dogs, based on a combination of clinical, radiographic and echocardiographic abnormalities, were enrolled. Opening of IPAVAs could be demonstrated in three dogs with no to moderate PH, and could not be demonstrated in five dogs with severe PH. In two dogs thoracic radiographs showed only mild interstitial changes, while computer tomography and postmortem examination revealed severe pulmonary interstitial and vascular disease. These results suggest that dogs may open IPAVAs and that opening of such anastomoses may play a regulatory role in the development of PH. There may be a marked discrepancy between radiographic changes and disease severity in A. vasorum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Experimental Cowpox Virus (CPXV) Infections of Bank Voles: Exceptional Clinical Resistance and Variable Reservoir Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Annika; Ulrich, Rainer G; Weber, Saskia; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Keller, Markus; Hoffmann, Donata; Beer, Martin

    2017-12-19

    Cowpox virus (CPXV) is a zoonotic virus and endemic in wild rodent populations in Eurasia. Serological surveys in Europe have reported high prevalence in different vole and mouse species. Here, we report on experimental CPXV infections of bank voles ( Myodes glareolus ) from different evolutionary lineages with a spectrum of CPXV strains. All bank voles, independently of lineage, sex and age, were resistant to clinical signs following CPXV inoculation, and no virus shedding was detected in nasal or buccal swabs. In-contact control animals became only rarely infected. However, depending on the CPXV strain used, inoculated animals seroconverted and viral DNA could be detected preferentially in the upper respiratory tract. The highest antibody titers and virus DNA loads in the lungs were detected after inoculation with two strains from Britain and Finland. We conclude from our experiments that the role of bank voles as an efficient and exclusive CPXV reservoir seems questionable, and that CPXV may be maintained in most regions by other hosts, including other vole species. Further investigations are needed to identify factors that allow and modulate CPXV maintenance in bank voles and other potential reservoirs, which may also influence spill-over infections to accidental hosts.

  17. Parasitemia due to Sarcocystis neurona-like infection in a clinically ill domestic cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzer, Nina C; Marsh, Antoinette E; Burkhard, Mary Jo; Radin, M Judith; Wellman, Maxey L; Jugan, Maria; Parker, Valerie

    2017-09-01

    An 8-year-old, 6-kg, male neutered Domestic Shorthair cat was presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center (OSU-VMC) for difficulty breathing. Physical examination and thoracic radiographs indicated pneumonia, a soft-tissue mass in the left caudal lung lobe, and diffuse pleural effusion. The effusion was classified as modified transudate. Rare extracellular elongated (~5-7 μm × 1-2 μm) zoites with a central round to oval-shaped purple to deep purple vesicular nucleus with coarsely stippled chromatin and light blue cytoplasm were seen on a peripheral blood smear. Serum IgG and IgM were positive for Sarcocystis sp. antibodies and negative for Toxoplasma gondii antibodies, suggesting that the infection was acute rather than a recrudescence of prior infection. This organism was most consistent with either Sarcocystis neurona or Sarcocystis dasypi based on DNA sequence analysis of PCR products using COC ssRNA, ITS-1, snSAG2, and JNB25/JD396 primer sets. This is the first report to visualize by light microscopy circulating Sarcocystis sp. merozoites in the peripheral blood of a domestic cat. Therefore, Sarcocystis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cats with suspected systemic protozoal infection. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  18. Age, Stigma, Adherence and Clinical Indicators in HIV-Infected Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Katryna; Higgins, Melinda; Zuñiga, Julie Ann; Holstad, Marcia McDonnell

    Stigma has become a gendered phenomenon that affects increasing numbers of HIV-infected women worldwide. This study examined the role of age as a possible moderator of the relationship between stigma and antiretroviral therapy adherence, CD4% and viral load among 120 HIV-infected women. A secondary analysis was conducted using data from the Keeping Healthy and Active with Risk Reduction and Medication Adherence (KHARMA) Project, an National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded randomized controlled trial to improve Antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence and reduce risky behaviors in HIV-infected women at five clinical sites in a South-eastern city from 2005 to 2008. Stigma was measured using the Perceived Personal Stigma of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) scale. Among participants stigma was negatively associated with CD4% (r =-.26, p=.02). For the 30 participants >50 years old, age was not significantly associated with viral load, stigma or CD4%, and there was no significant association between stigma and CD4% (r=.07, p=.70). These findings indicate the need for further study regarding this potential moderating effect and possible interventions to address the susceptibility of younger women to the harmful effects of stigma.

  19. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Antimicrobial Management of Invasive Salmonella Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Gordon, Melita A.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Salmonella enterica infections are common causes of bloodstream infection in low-resource areas, where they may be difficult to distinguish from other febrile illnesses and may be associated with a high case fatality ratio. Microbiologic culture of blood or bone marrow remains the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in Salmonella enterica, initially to the traditional first-line drugs chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility and then fluoroquinolone resistance have developed in association with chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and also by plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has occurred more often in nontyphoidal than in typhoidal Salmonella strains. Azithromycin is effective for the management of uncomplicated typhoid fever and may serve as an alternative oral drug in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is common. In 2013, CLSI lowered the ciprofloxacin susceptibility breakpoints to account for accumulating clinical, microbiologic, and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data suggesting that revision was needed for contemporary invasive Salmonella infections. Newly established CLSI guidelines for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published in CLSI document M100 in 2015. PMID:26180063

  20. Diagnosis of genital herpes simplex virus infection in the clinical laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Since the type of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection affects prognosis and subsequent counseling, type-specific testing to distinguish HSV-1 from HSV-2 is always recommended. Although PCR has been the diagnostic standard method for HSV infections of the central nervous system, until now viral culture has been the test of choice for HSV genital infection. However, HSV PCR, with its consistently and substantially higher rate of HSV detection, could replace viral culture as the gold standard for the diagnosis of genital herpes in people with active mucocutaneous lesions, regardless of anatomic location or viral type. Alternatively, antigen detection—an immunofluorescence test or enzyme immunoassay from samples from symptomatic patients--could be employed, but HSV type determination is of importance. Type-specific serology based on glycoprotein G should be used for detecting asymptomatic individuals but widespread screening for HSV antibodies is not recommended. In conclusion, rapid and accurate laboratory diagnosis of HSV is now become a necessity, given the difficulty in making the clinical diagnosis of HSV, the growing worldwide prevalence of genital herpes and the availability of effective antiviral therapy. PMID:24885431

  1. Clinical features and risk factors for development of urinary tract infections in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Ruzafa, Ivan; Kruger, John M; Miller, RoseAnn; Swenson, Cheryl L; Bolin, Carole A; Kaneene, John B

    2012-10-01

    The clinical and diagnostic features of 155 cats with urinary tract infection (UTI) and 186 controls with negative urine culture/s were characterized retrospectively (signalment, clinical signs, urinalysis, urine culture, concurrent diseases, lower urinary tract diagnostic/therapeutic procedures). Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors associated with UTI. Cats of all ages were affected by UTI with no sex/breed predisposition. Lower urinary tract signs were absent in 35.5% of cats with UTI. Pyuria and bacteriuria had sensitivities of 52.9% and 72.9%, and specificities of 85.5% and 67.7% for detection of UTI, respectively. Risk factors significantly associated with increased odds of UTI were urinary incontinence [odds ratio (OR)=10.78, P=0.0331], transurethral procedures (OR=8.37, Purinary tract anatomic abnormalities improved statistical model performance and contributed to UTI.

  2. Clinical implications of aging with HIV infection: perspectives and the future medical care agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaraldi, Giovanni; Palella, Frank J

    2017-06-01

    : The increasing number of aging HIV-infected (HIV+) persons comprises a unique population at risk for illnesses and syndromes traditionally associated with the elderly. As a result, similar to the current need for primary care providers to manage chronic noninfectious comorbidities among aging persons with well controlled HIV infection, HIV clinical care will need to routinely involve geriatric medicine in a new HIV-geriatric discipline. The objective of this article is to provide a conceptual framework in which HIV and geriatric management considerations for healthcare professionals caring for HIV+ persons are integrated. The provision of contemporary HIV clinical care extends well beyond the achievement of HIV virologic suppression and antiretroviral therapy management and includes a need for careful characterization of geriatric syndromes based upon functional capacity and extent of disability. Screening for geriatric syndromes is both a multidisciplinary and multidimensional process, designed to evaluate an older person's functional ability, physical health, cognition, overall mental health, and socio-environmental circumstances. Although routine incorporation of geriatric assessment into clinical trials involving HIV+ persons is feasible, a current challenge is the availability of a consensus clinical definition of frailty or vulnerability. To maximize the efficiency, value, and convenience of outpatient care visits for older HIV+ persons, these visits should include encounters with multiple providers, including primary care clinicians, social workers, and geriatricians. Challenges may exist in the routine provision of these assessments to older HIV+ persons, but clearly such cross-disciplinary collaboration will not only markedly enhance the care of aging HIV+ persons but may also constitute a model of successful healthcare management that can be applied to all aging persons with changing healthcare needs.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of clinical and blood examination for sepsis in potentially infected neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ari Mulyani

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Neonatal sepsis remains a diagnostic challenge due to its nonspesific symptoms and signs. Blood culture as the gold standard is still a problem because it takes time, is expensive, and not every health facility is able to perionn. Objective To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of clinical symptoms, hematologic findings, and C-reactive protein (CRP in neonatal sepsis. Methods Samples were taken from potentially infected neonates admitted to the Matemal-Perinatal Unit of Sardjito Hospital, between December 1st, 2000 and March 31st, 2001 using at least one of the criteria: prematurity, very low birth weight infants, matemal pyrexia during delivery, premature membrane rupture, or thick, cloudy amniotic fluid. Clinical symptoms, total leukocyte, neutrophil, platelet count, CRP, and blood culture as the gold standard were examined. Results Among 99 neonates enrolled, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of clinical symptoms were 79.3%, 75.7%, 57.5%, and 89.9%, respectively; leukopenia/leukocytosis were 27.6%, 85.7%, 44.4%, and 74.1%; neutropenia! neutrophilia were 41.4%, 71.4%, 37.5%, and 74.6%; thrombocytopenia were 79.3%, 51.8%, 40.4%, and 85.7%; positive CRP were 58.6%,78.6%,53.1%, and 82.1%. Parallel tests increased the sensitivity up to 89.7%. Specificity, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratio were 44.3%, 40%, 91.2%, and 1.6, respectively. Serial tests increased the specificity up to 88.6%. Sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value, and likelihood ratio were 58.6%, 68%, 83.8%, and 5.1, respectively. Conclusion Clinical sepsis, thrombocytopenia, and CRP are sufficiently accurate as diagnostic tests for sepsis in potentially infected neonates. Parallel tests will increase the sensitivity, while serial tests increase the specificity.

  4. Clinical and laboratory alterations in dogs naturally infected by Leishmania chagasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Cláudio Carneiro de Freitas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL is a zoonotic disease with different clinical manifestations. Parasitism often occurs in bone marrow, but changes have been observed in peripheral blood and serum biochemical parameters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hematological and biochemical parameters in dogs naturally infected by Leishmania chagasi. METHODS: Eighty-five adult dogs of both sexes and various weights and ages from the Zoonosis Control Center of Fortaleza (CCZ were used, selected by immunofluorescence assay (IFA and considered positive with IFA titers greater than 1:40 and by visualizing amastigotes of Leishmania chagasi in smears obtained by bone marrow aspiration. The dogs (n = 85 were grouped according to clinical signs: negative (CN = 7, subclinical (CS = 10, and clinical (CC = 68. Blood samples were collected for determination of hematological and biochemical serum values. The experimental protocol was approved by the CEUA/UECE. RESULTS: The most frequent clinical signs were cachexia (77.9%, keratitis (61.8%, and lymphadenopathy (55.9%, and 86.8% of the animals showed more than one clinical sign characteristic of CVL. In CC were observed reductions in red blood cells (63%, hematocrit (72%, and hemoglobin (62%, as well as leukocytosis (33%, neutropenia (28%, thrombocytopenia (50%, uremia (45%, hyperproteinemia (53%, p<0.05, hypergammaglobulinemia (62%, p<0.01, and hypoalbuminemia (58%. CONCLUSIONS: Animals with the clinical form of the disease demonstrate hematological and biochemical changes consistent with anemia, uremia, hyperproteinemia, and hyperglobulinemia, which present themselves as strong clinical markers of visceral leishmaniasis associated with the signs previously reported.

  5. The Diagnosis of Urinary Tract Infection in Young Children (DUTY) Study Clinical Rule: Economic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, William; Busby, John; Butler, Christopher C; O'Brien, Kathryn; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Hood, Kerenza; Little, Paul; Lawton, Michael; Birnie, Kate; Thomas-Jones, Emma; Harman, Kim; Hay, Alastair D

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a two-step clinical rule using symptoms, signs and dipstick testing to guide the diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of urinary tract infection (UTI) in acutely unwell young children presenting to primary care. Decision analytic model synthesising data from a multicentre, prospective cohort study (DUTY) and the wider literature to estimate the short-term and lifetime costs and healthcare outcomes (symptomatic days, recurrent UTI, quality adjusted life years) of eight diagnostic strategies. We compared GP clinical judgement with three strategies based on a 'coefficient score' combining seven symptoms and signs independently associated with UTI and four strategies based on weighted scores according to the presence/absence of five symptoms and signs. We compared dipstick testing versus laboratory culture in children at intermediate risk of UTI. Sampling, culture and antibiotic costs were lowest in high-specificity DUTY strategies (£1.22 and £1.08) compared to clinical judgement (£1.99). These strategies also approximately halved urine sampling (4.8% versus 9.1% in clinical judgement) without reducing sensitivity (58.2% versus 56.4%). Outcomes were very similar across all diagnostic strategies. High-specificity DUTY strategies were more cost-effective than clinical judgement in the short- (iNMB = £0.78 and £0.84) and long-term (iNMB =£2.31 and £2.50). Dipstick tests had poorer cost-effectiveness than laboratory culture in children at intermediate risk of UTI (iNMB = £-1.41). Compared to GPs' clinical judgement, high specificity clinical rules from the DUTY study could substantially reduce urine sampling, achieving lower costs and equivalent patient outcomes. Dipstick testing children for UTI is not cost-effective. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical, Radiographic, and Microbiologic Features of Infective Endocarditis in Patients With Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Jason R; Anavekar, Nandan S; Bhatia, Subir; O'Horo, John C; Geske, Jeffrey B; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy; Wilson, Walter R; Baddour, Larry M; Gersh, Bernard J; DeSimone, Daniel C

    2018-02-15

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infection of the inner lining of the heart with high morbidity and mortality despite medical and surgical advancements in recent decades. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC) is one of several medical conditions that have been linked to an increased risk of IE, but there is a paucity of data on this association. We therefore sought to define the clinical phenotype of IE in patients with HC at a single tertiary care center. A retrospective cohort of 30 adult patients with HC diagnosed with IE between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2016 at Mayo Clinic Rochester were identified. Similar rates of aortic (n = 14) and mitral (n = 16) valve involvement by IE were noted (47% vs 53%). This finding persisted even in patients with left-ventricular outflow tract obstruction and systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. Symptomatic embolic complications occurred in 10 cases (33%). Surgical intervention was performed in 11 cases (37%). One-year mortality was remarkably low at 7%. In conclusion, in the largest single-center cohort of IE complicating HC, there were similar rates of both mitral and aortic valve involvement regardless of the presence of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction, which is contrary to a long-standing tenet regarding the association of HC and IE. Moreover, no "high risk" IE subset was identified based on HC-related parameters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Association between Bacteroides forsythus in the infected root canals and clinical symptoms of chronic apical periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ding-ming; Fu, Chun-hua; Zhou, Xue-dong

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the distribution of Bacteroides forsythus in root canals with chronic apical periodontitis and to determine its associations with clinical symptoms. Thirty-eight tooth root canals from 31 subjects were studied with a 16S rDNA-directed polymerase chain reaction (PCR). These teeth were classified into symptomatic and asymptomatic groups according to the clinical symptoms and signs, including spontaneous pain, percussion pain, sinus tract and swelling, respectively. Ten of the 38 root canal samples were positive for B. forsythus. The prevalence of B. forsythus was 26.3% for 38 root canals, 45.5% for spontaneous pain group, 39.1% for percussion pain group, 29.4% for sinus tract group, 42.9% for swelling group, respectively. Significant positive associations were observed between B. forsythus in infected root canals and the spontaneous pain, percussion pain, and swelling of apical periodontitis, respectively (OR=infinity, 9, 12; Papical periodontitis (OR=1.33). B. forsythus colonized in the infected root canals. It is the putative pathogen of apical periodontitis.

  8. Clinical manifestations of Clostridium difficile infection in a medical center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Tan, Che-Kim; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) at a medical center in Taiwan. Patients with CDI were identified from medical records at the National Taiwan University Hospital (Taipei, Taiwan). The following information was gathered and analyzed to better understand the clinical manifestations of CDI: age; sex; underlying immunocompromised conditions; laboratory data; in-hospital mortality; and previous use of drugs such as antimicrobial agents, steroids, and antipeptic ulcer agents. During the years 2000-2010, 122 patients were identified as having CDI. This included 92 patients with nontoxigenic CDI (i.e., positive stool culture for C. difficile but negative results for toxins A and B) and 30 patients with toxigenic CDI (i.e., positive stool culture cultures for C. difficile and positive results for toxins A and B). Of the 122 patients, 48 (39%) patients were older than 65 years and most patients acquired the CDI while in the hospital. Active cancer was the most common reason for hospitalization, followed by diabetes mellitus, and end-stage renal disease. More than 90% of the patients had received antibiotics before acquiring CDI. The results of fecal leukocyte examinations were positive in 33 (27%) patients. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 26.2%. There were no significant differences between patients with nontoxigenic CDI and patients with toxigenic CDI. Clostridium difficile infection can develop in healthcare facilities and in community settings, especially in immunocompromised patients. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. First clinical and microbiological characterization of Clostridium difficile infection in a Croatian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Anita; Spigaglia, Patrizia; Barbanti, Fabrizio; Goic-Barisic, Ivana; Tonkic, Marija

    2014-12-01

    Clinical background and molecular epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in the University Hospital Centre Split were investigated from January 2010 to December 2011. In total, 54 patients with first episode of CDI were consecutively included in the study based on the positive EIA test specific for A and B toxins. Demographic and clinical data were prospectively analyzed from medical records. CDI incidence rate was 0.6 per 10,000 patient-days. Thirty six cases (70.6%) were healthcare-associated, twelve cases (23.5%) were community-associated and three (5.9%) were indeterminate. Six patients (11.7%) had suffered one or more recurrences and 37 patients (72.5%) showed severe CDI. Prior therapy with third generation cephalosporin was significantly associated with severe CDI (Pdifficile strains were isolated and 50 of them were available for PCR-ribotyping. Sixteen different PCR-ribotypes were identified. The most prevalent were PCR-ribotype 001 (27.8%) and 014/020 (24.1%). Twenty three strains were resistant to at least one of the antibiotics tested. Among resistant strains, three (13.0%)--all PCR-ribotype 001--were multi-resistant. Resistance to fluoroquinolones was significantly higher in strains that caused infection after previous use of fluoroquinolones (P=0.04). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Could Urinary Tract Infection Cause Female Stress Urinary Incontinence? A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Fatemeh; Motaghed, Zahra; Abbaszadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), the most common type of urinary incontinence (UI), is usually defined as leakage of urine during movement or activity which puts pressure on the bladder, such as coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting. It is reported in most countries that 15% to 40% of women struggle with SUI and its severe implications for daily life, including social interactions, sexuality, and psychological wellbeing. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between urinary tract infection and the severity of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). This research was a cross-sectional study conducted in a public urology clinic in Tehran. The study population was all females with complaints of SUI who visited the clinic during 2014. We compared Valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP) in two groups of patients, with and without history of urinary tract infection (UTI). According to the findings of our study, the mean VLPP was 83.10 cm H2O in the group with UTI history, and 81.29 cm H2O in those without history of UTI. The difference in VLPP between the two groups was not significant (P < 0.05), even after controlling for confounding variables including age, body mass index, history of hysterectomy and number of deliveries. Our study did not confirm a significant relationship between UTI and severity of SUI as measured by VLPP. A decisive opinion would require extensive future studies by prospective methods.

  11. Development and clinical applications of novel antibodies for prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, Asuncion; Garcia-Maurino, Cristina; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Rosa; Peeples, Mark E; Ramilo, Octavio

    2017-01-11

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in infants and young children, immunocompromised patients and the elderly. Despite the high disease burden, an effective and safe vaccine is lacking, although several candidates are currently in development. Current treatment for RSV infection remains largely supportive and RSV-specific options for prophylaxis are limited to palivizumab. In the past few years, novel therapeutic options including nanobodies, polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have emerged and there are several products in preclinical and Phase-I, -II or -III clinical trials. The major target for antiviral drug development is the surface fusion (F) glycoprotein, which is crucial for the infectivity and pathogenesis of the virus. Solving the structures of the two conformations of the RSV F protein, the prefusion and postfusion forms, has revolutionized RSV research. It is now known that prefusion F is highly superior in inducing neutralizing antibodies. In this section we will review the stages of development and availability of different antibodies directed against RSV for the prevention and also for treatment of acute RSV infections. Some of these newer anti-RSV agents have shown enhanced potency, are being explored through alternative routes of administration, have improved pharmacokinetic profiles with an extended half-life, and may reduce design and manufacturing costs. Management strategies will require targeting not only high-risk populations (including adults or immunocompromised patients), but also previously healthy children who, in fact, represent the majority of children hospitalized with RSV infection. Following treated patients longitudinally is essential for determining the impact of these strategies on the acute disease as well as their possible long-term benefits on lung morbidity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical prediction and diagnosis of neurosyphilis in HIV-infected patients with early Syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumaresq, Jeannot; Langevin, Stéphanie; Gagnon, Simon; Serhir, Bouchra; Deligne, Benoît; Tremblay, Cécile; Tsang, Raymond S W; Fortin, Claude; Coutlée, François; Roger, Michel

    2013-12-01

    The diagnosis of neurosyphilis (NS) is a challenge, especially in HIV-infected patients, and the criteria for deciding when to perform a lumbar puncture (LP) in HIV-infected patients with syphilis are controversial. We retrospectively reviewed demographic, clinical, and laboratory data from 122 cases of HIV-infected patients with documented early syphilis who underwent an LP to rule out NS, and we evaluated 3 laboratory-developed validated real-time PCR assays, the Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA) assay, the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) assay, and the line immunoassay INNO-LIA Syphilis, for the diagnosis of NS from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of these patients. NS was defined by a reactive CSF-VDRL test result and/or a CSF white blood cell (WBC) count of >20 cells/μl. Thirty of the 122 patients (24.6%) had early NS. Headache, visual symptoms, a CD4 cell count of FTA-ABS, TPPA, and INNO-LIA assays had sensitivities of 58%, 100%, 68%, and 100%, specificities of 67%, 12%, 49%, and 13%, and negative predictive values of 85%, 100%, 84%, and 100%, respectively. Visual disturbances, headache, uncontrolled HIV-1 viremia, and a CD4 cell count of <500 cells/μl were predictors of NS in HIV-infected patients with early syphilis, while blood serum RPR titers were not; therefore, RPR titers should not be used as the sole criterion for deciding whether to perform an LP in early syphilis. When applied to CSF samples, the INNO-LIA Syphilis assay easily helped rule out NS.

  13. The effect of Trim5 polymorphisms on the clinical course of HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniëlle van Manen

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral factor tripartite interaction motif 5alpha (Trim5alpha restricts a broad range of retroviruses in a species-specific manner. Although human Trim5alpha is unable to block HIV-1 infection in human cells, a modest inhibition of HIV-1 replication has been reported. Recently two polymorphisms in the Trim5 gene (H43Y and R136Q were shown to affect the antiviral activity of Trim5alpha in vitro. In this study, participants of the Amsterdam Cohort studies were screened for polymorphisms at amino acid residue 43 and 136 of the Trim5 gene, and the potential effects of these polymorphisms on the clinical course of HIV-1 infection were analyzed. In agreement with the reported decreased antiviral activity of Trim5alpha that contains a Y at amino acid residue 43 in vitro, an accelerated disease progression was observed for individuals who were homozygous for the 43Y genotype as compared to individuals who were heterozygous or homozygous for the 43H genotype. A protective effect of the 136Q genotype was observed but only after the emergence of CXCR4-using (X4 HIV-1 variants and when a viral load of 10(4.5 copies per ml plasma was used as an endpoint in survival analysis. Interestingly, naive CD4 T cells, which are selectively targeted by X4 HIV-1, revealed a significantly higher expression of Trim5alpha than memory CD4 T cells. In addition, we observed that the 136Q allele in combination with the -2GG genotype in the 5'UTR was associated with an accelerated disease progression. Thus, polymorphisms in the Trim5 gene may influence the clinical course of HIV-1 infection also underscoring the antiviral effect of Trim5alpha on HIV-1 in vivo.

  14. The Effect of Trim5 Polymorphisms on the Clinical Course of HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Daniëlle; Rits, Maarten A. N; Beugeling, Corrine; van Dort, Karel; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A

    2008-01-01

    The antiviral factor tripartite interaction motif 5α (Trim5α) restricts a broad range of retroviruses in a species-specific manner. Although human Trim5α is unable to block HIV-1 infection in human cells, a modest inhibition of HIV-1 replication has been reported. Recently two polymorphisms in the Trim5 gene (H43Y and R136Q) were shown to affect the antiviral activity of Trim5α in vitro. In this study, participants of the Amsterdam Cohort studies were screened for polymorphisms at amino acid residue 43 and 136 of the Trim5 gene, and the potential effects of these polymorphisms on the clinical course of HIV-1 infection were analyzed. In agreement with the reported decreased antiviral activity of Trim5α that contains a Y at amino acid residue 43 in vitro, an accelerated disease progression was observed for individuals who were homozygous for the 43Y genotype as compared to individuals who were heterozygous or homozygous for the 43H genotype. A protective effect of the 136Q genotype was observed but only after the emergence of CXCR4-using (X4) HIV-1 variants and when a viral load of 104.5 copies per ml plasma was used as an endpoint in survival analysis. Interestingly, naive CD4 T cells, which are selectively targeted by X4 HIV-1, revealed a significantly higher expression of Trim5α than memory CD4 T cells. In addition, we observed that the 136Q allele in combination with the −2GG genotype in the 5′UTR was associated with an accelerated disease progression. Thus, polymorphisms in the Trim5 gene may influence the clinical course of HIV-1 infection also underscoring the antiviral effect of Trim5α on HIV-1 in vivo. PMID:18248091

  15. HIV-1 subtype D infections among Caucasians from Northwestern Poland--phylogenetic and clinical analysis.

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    Miłosz Parczewski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 subtype D infections, which are associated with a faster rate of progression and lymphocyte CD4 decline, cognitive deficit and higher mortality, have rarely been found in native Europeans. In Northwestern Poland, however, infections with this subtype had been identified. This study aimed to analyze the sequence and clinical data for patients with subtype D using molecular phylogeography and identify transmission clusters and ancestry, as well as drug resistance, baseline HIV tropism and antiretroviral treatment efficacy. METHODS: Phylogenetic analyses of local HIV-1 subtype D sequences were performed, with time to the most recent common ancestor inferred using bayesian modeling. Sequence and drug resistance data were linked with the clinical and epidemiological information. RESULTS: Subtype D was found in 24 non-immigrant Caucasian, heterosexually infected patients (75% of females, median age at diagnosis of 49.5 years; IQR: 29-56 years. Partial pol sequences clustered monophyletically with the clades of Ugandan origin and no evidence of transmission from other European countries was found. Time to the most common recent ancestor was 1989.24 (95% HPD: 1968.83-1994.46. Baseline drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors was observed in 54.5% of cases (mutations: M41L, K103N, T215S/D with evidence of clustering, no baseline integrase or protease resistance and infrequent non-R5 tropism (13.6%. Virologic failure was observed in 60% of cases and was associated with poor adherence (p<0.001 and subsequent development of drug resistance (p = 0.008, OR: 20 (95%CI: 1.7-290. CONCLUSIONS: Local subtype D represented an independently transmitted network with probably single index case, high frequency of primary drug resistance and evidence of transmission clusters.

  16. Experimental infection of dogs with a Brazilian strain of Rickettsia rickettsii: clinical and laboratory findings

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    Eliane M Piranda

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii is the etiological agent of an acute, severe disease called Rocky Mountain spotted fever in the United States or Brazilian spotted fever (BSF in Brazil. In addition to these two countries, the disease has also been reported to affect humans in Mexico, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia and Argentina. Like humans, dogs are also susceptible to R. rickettsii infection. However, despite the wide distribution of R. rickettsii in the Western Hemisphere, reports of R. rickettsii-induced illness in dogs has been restricted to the United States. The present study evaluated the pathogenicity for dogs of a South American strain of R. rickettsii. Three groups of dogs were evaluated: group 1 (G1 was inoculated ip with R. rickettsii; group 2 (G2 was infested by R. rickettsii-infected ticks; and the control group (G3 was infested by uninfected ticks. During the study, no clinical abnormalities, Rickettsia DNA or R. rickettsii-reactive antibodies were detected in G3. In contrast, all G1 and G2 dogs developed signs of rickettsial infection, i.e., fever, lethargy, anorexia, ocular lesions, thrombocytopenia, anemia and detectable levels of Rickettsia DNA and R. rickettsii-reactive antibodies in their blood. Rickettsemia started 3-8 days after inoculation or tick infestation and lasted for 3-13 days. Our results indicate that a Brazilian strain of R. rickettsii is pathogenic for dogs, suggesting that canine clinical illness due to R. rickettsii has been unreported in Brazil and possibly in the other South American countries where BSF has been reported among humans.

  17. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P Mucorales growth than for wounds with non-Mucorales growth (median, 17 days versus 13 days; P Mucorales and Aspergillus spp. growth were compared, there was no significant difference in wound closure timing. Trauma wounds with SSTIs were often polymicrobial, yet the presence of invasive molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Clinical presentation and management of Fasciola hepatica infection: Single-center experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Muhsin; Beştaş, Remzi; Çetin, Sedat

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To identify the characteristic clinical, laboratory and radiological findings and response to treatment in patients with fascioliasis. METHODS: Patients who were diagnosed with Fasciola hepatica infection were included in this prospective study. Initial clinical, laboratory and radiological findings were recorded. All patients were followed until a complete response was achieved or for 6 mo after treatment discontinuation. RESULTS: Fasciola hepatica infection was diagnosed in 30 patients (24 females; mean age: 42.6 years) between January 2008 and February 2011. Twenty-two (73%) patients had hepatic phase fascioliasis, 5 patients had biliary phase, and 3 patients had biliary phase associated with acute pancreatitis. Of the 8 patients with biliary phase fascioliasis, 2 patients displayed features that overlapped with both hepatic and biliary phase. Abdominal pain and right upper abdominal tenderness were the most prominent signs and symptoms in all patients. Eosinophilia was the most prominent laboratory abnormality in both patients with hepatic and biliary phase (100% and 50%, respectively). Multiple nodular lesions like micro-abscesses on abdominal computerized tomography were the main radiological findings in patients with hepatic phase. Small linear filling defects in the distal choledochus were the main endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) findings in patients with biliary phase. Patients with hepatic phase were treated with triclabendazole alone, and patients with biliary phase were treated with triclabendazole and had live Fasciola hepatica extracted from the bile ducts during ERCP. CONCLUSION: Fasciola hepatica infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with hepatic or biliary disease and/or acute pancreatitis associated with eosinophilia. PMID:22171131

  19. Clinical, microbiological and pathological findings of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection in three Australian Possum species.

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    Carolyn R O'Brien

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Buruli ulcer (BU is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, with endemicity predominantly in sub-Saharan Africa and south-eastern Australia. The mode of transmission and the environmental reservoir(s of the bacterium and remain elusive. Real-time PCR investigations have detected M. ulcerans DNA in a variety of Australian environmental samples, including the faeces of native possums with and without clinical evidence of infection. This report seeks to expand on previously published findings by the authors' investigative group with regards to clinical and subclinical disease in selected wild possum species in BU-endemic areas of Victoria, Australia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Twenty-seven clinical cases of M. ulcerans infection in free-ranging possums from southeastern Australia were identified retrospectively and prospectively between 1998-2011. Common ringtail possums (Pseudocheirus peregrinus, a common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula and a mountain brushtail possum (Trichosurus cunninghami were included in the clinically affected cohort. Most clinically apparent cases were adults with solitary or multiple ulcerative cutaneous lesions, generally confined to the face, limbs and/or tail. The disease was minor and self-limiting in the case of both Trichosurus spp. possums. In contrast, many of the common ringtail possums had cutaneous disease involving disparate anatomical sites, and in four cases there was evidence of systemic disease at post mortem examination. Where tested using real-time PCR targeted at IS2404, animals typically had significant levels of M. ulcerans DNA throughout the gut and/or faeces. A further 12 possums without cutaneous lesions were found to have PCR-positive gut contents and/or faeces (subclinical cases, and in one of these the organism was cultured from liver tissue. Comparisons were made between clinically and subclinically affected possums, and 61 PCR-negative, non-affected individuals

  20. Mycoplasma bovis infections and co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. with different clinical manifestations in affected cattle herds in eastern region of Poland

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    Szacawa Ewelina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of Mycoplasma bovis infection and co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. infections in cattle. The tested population was one in the eastern region of Poland containing 66 dairy cows and 23 calves showing different clinical signs and suffering from pneumonia, mastitis, and arthritis. The incidence of M. bovis in co-infections with other Mycoplasma spp. was examined using serological traditional mycoplasma culture methods, and the molecular methods - PCR and polymerase chain reaction/denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR/DGGE. The PCR/DGGE method for detecting Mycoplasma spp. in cattle was used for the first time in Poland. The seroprevalence of M. bovis in the affected cattle herds in the eastern region of Poland was 47.8% in calves and 19.7% in dairy cows. The direct detection and identification of M. bovis from nasopharyngeal swabs by PCR revealed that 56.5% of calves were positive, but all of the dairy cows were negative. The PCR/DGGE identified eight (34.8% instances of M. arginini and eight (26.1% instances of M. bovirhinis co-infecting with M. bovis in ten calves. The seroprevalence of M. bovis in the tested population was 33.7%. Any future attempts to control mycoplasma infections require an insight into the current epidemiological situation of M. bovis infection and its relationship to other mycoplasmas in causing clinical disease in cattle. Using these diagnostic methods we have demonstrated that mycoplasmal infections are often caused by multiple species of Mycoplasma and not just the primary M. bovis pathogen.

  1. Does chronic hepatitis B infection affect the clinical course of acute hepatitis A?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Su Rin; Moh, In Ho; Jung, Sung Won; Kim, Jin Bae; Park, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hyoung Su; Jang, Myung Kuk; Lee, Myung Seok

    2013-01-01

    The impact of chronic hepatitis B on the clinical outcome of acute hepatitis A remains controversial. The aim of present study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of acute hepatitis A in cases with underlying chronic hepatitis B compared to cases of acute hepatitis A alone. Data on 758 patients with acute hepatitis A admitted at two university-affiliated hospitals were reviewed. Patients were classified into three groups: group A, patients with both acute hepatitis A and underlying chronic hepatitis B (n = 27); group B, patients infected by acute hepatitis A alone whose sexes and ages were matched with patients in group A (n  = 54); and group C, patients with acute hepatitis A alone (n = 731). None of the demographic features of group A were significantly different from those of group B or C, except for the proportion of males and body weight, which differed from group C. When comparing to group B, clinical symptoms were more frequent, and higher total bilirubin and lower albumin levels were observed in group A. When comparing to group C, the albumin levels were lower in group A. There were no differences in the duration of hospital stay, occurrence of acute kidney injury, acute liver failure, prolonged cholestasis, or relapsing hepatitis. This study revealed that clinical symptoms and laboratory findings were less favorable for patients with acute hepatitis A and chronic hepatitis B compared to those with acute hepatitis A alone. However, there were no differences in fatal outcomes or serious complications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Toxoplasmosis can be a sexually transmitted infection with serious clinical consequences. Not all routes of infection are created equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegr, J; Klapilová, K; Kaňková, S

    2014-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infects about 30% of the human population. Common sources of infection are oocysts in cat faeces contaminating drinking water or unwashed vegetables, undercooked meat containing tissue cysts, and organ transplants from infected donors containing tissue cysts. However, very often, it is not possible to identify any potential source of infection in mothers of children with congenital toxoplasmosis. Here we present a hypothesis suggesting that toxoplasmosis is transmitted from infected men to noninfected women during unprotected sexual intercourse, which can result in the most serious form of disease, congenital toxoplasmosis. Arguments for the hypothesis: (1) Toxoplasma tachyzoites are present in the seminal fluid and tissue of the testes of various animals including humans. In some species infection of females by artificial insemination with semen from infected males has been observed. (2) Up to two thirds of Toxoplasma infections in pregnant women cannot be explained by the known risk factors. (3) Prevalence of toxoplasmosis in women in child-bearing age covaries with the incidence of sexually transmitted diseases in particular countries. (4) In some countries, an increased incidence of toxoplasmosis has been reported in women (but not men) aged 25-35 years. This second peak of infection could be associated with women having regular unprotected sex after marriage. (5) Toxoplasmosis triggers schizophrenia in predisposed subjects. Onset of schizophrenia is about 2-3 years earlier in men than in women. However, this difference in the onset can be found only between Toxoplasma-infected patients. The increased onset of schizophrenia in infected women could be associated with the already mentioned second peak of toxoplasmosis incidence. (6) The prevalence of toxoplasmosis decreases in developed countries in last 20 years. This trend could be a result of decrease in promiscuity and increase in safe sex practices, both associated with the AIDS pandemics

  3. Divergent cellular responses during asymptomatic subclinical and clinical states of disease in cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of the host with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) results in a chronic and progressive enteritis that traverses both subclinical and clinical stages. The mechanism(s) for the shift from asymptomatic subclinical disease state to advanced clinical disease are not fully under...

  4. A Multi-Center Prospective Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Tool for Severe Clostridium difficile Infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Na, Xi

    2015-04-23

    Prediction of severe clinical outcomes in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is important to inform management decisions for optimum patient care. Currently, treatment recommendations for CDI vary based on disease severity but validated methods to predict severe disease are lacking. The aim of the study was to derive and validate a clinical prediction tool for severe outcomes in CDI.

  5. Integration of outpatient infectious diseases clinic pharmacy services and specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Elise M; Gerzenshtein, Lana

    2016-06-01

    The integration of specialty pharmacy services and existing outpatient clinical pharmacy services within an infectious diseases (ID) clinic to optimize the care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is described. The management of HIV-infected patients is a highly specialized area of practice, often requiring use of complex medication regimens for reduction of HIV-associated morbidity and mortality prophylaxis and treatment of opportunistic infections, and prevention of HIV transmission. To maximize the effectiveness and safety of treatment with antiretroviral agents and associated pharmacotherapies, an interdisciplinary team is often involved in patient care. At Chicago-based Northwestern Medicine (NM), the outpatient ID clinic has long worked with an interdisciplinary care team including physicians, clinical pharmacists, nurses, and social workers to care for patients with HIV infection. In April 2014, specialty pharmacy services for patients with HIV infection were added to the NM ID clinic's care model to help maintain continuity of care and enhance patient follow-up. The care model includes well-defined roles for clinical pharmacists, pharmacy residents and students on rotation, and licensed pharmacy technicians. Specialty pharmacy services, including medication education, prescription fulfillment, assistance with medication access (e.g., navigation of financial assistance programs, completion of prior-authorization requests), and treatment monitoring, allow for closed-loop medication management of the HIV-infected patient population. Integration of specialty pharmacy services with the interdisciplinary care provided in the outpatient NM ID clinic has enhanced continuity of care for patients with HIV infection in terms of prescription filling, medication counseling, and adherence monitoring. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Acute Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Adult Hospitalised Patients

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    Dilista Piljić

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI cause a great number of morbidity and mortality. These infections are serious complications in pregnancy, patients with diabetes, polycystic kidneys disease, sickle cell anaemia, kidney transplant and in patients with functional or structural anomalies of the urinary tract. The aim of this investigation was to determine a dominant causative agents of UTI and some of the clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired UTI in adult hospitalised patients. We studied 200 adult patients with acute community-acquired UTI hospitalised in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases Tuzla from January 2006 to December 2007. The patients were divided into two groups: a group of patients with E. coli UTI (147 and a group of patients with non-E. coli UTI (53. In these two groups, the symptoms and signs of illness, blood test and urine analysis results were analysed. Our results have shown that the patients with E. coli UTI frequently had fever higher than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001, chills (p=0,0349, headache (p=0,0499, cloudy urine (p<0,0001, proteinuria (p=0,0011 and positive nitrite-test (p=0,0002. The patients with non-E. coli UTI frequently had fever lower than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001 and urine specific gravity <1015 (p=0,0012. There was no significant difference in blood test results between patients with E. coli and non-E. coli UTI. These clinical and laboratory findings can lead us to early etiological diagnosis of these UTI before urine culture detection of causative agents, which takes several days. Early etiological diagnosis of the E. coli and non-E. coli UTI is necessary for an urgent administration of appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. This is very important in prevention of irreversible kidney damage, prolonged treatment, complications, as well as recidives and chronicity of the illness.

  7. Fournier′s gangrene developing secondary to infected hydrocele: A unique clinical scenario

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    Umran Sarwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first case of Fournier′s gangrene (FG developing secondary to an infected hydrocele worldwide. We present a case report with a brief overview of the literature relating to FG and its aetiology, diagnosis and management. A 70 year-old male was referred by his General Practitioner with a 2 week history of worsening symptoms of scrotal discomfort and swelling. Following clinical examination, an initial diagnosis of an infected right-sided hydrocele was made and treatment, consisting of antibiotics, was initiated. Despite showing good clinical improvement, several days later, necrotic areas were observed over the right hemiscrotum with spreading cellulitis. A diagnosis of FG was made. The patient was started on triple-therapy antibiotics and taken to the operating room for urgent surgical debridement. Necrotic skin and subcutaneous tissue extending over the perineum and lower anterior abdomen was debrided down to healthy tissue. A further debridement took place 2 days later. The patient continued to improve and was eventually discharged under the care of Plastic Surgeons for reconstruction of the soft tissue defect. FG is a type of necrotising fasciitis predominantly affecting the male perineal, perianal, genital and anterior abdominal wall regions. It has a significant mortality rate, and the key to survival is early detection and treatment consisting of antibiotics and surgical debridement of the affected area. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of FG developing secondary to an existing hydrocele without any prior urological intervention. The case highlights the important clinical diagnostic and therapeutic interventions required to prevent complications associated with this, potentially fatal, condition.

  8. Clinical risk factors predicting genital fungal infections with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor treatment: The ABCD nationwide dapagliflozin audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Ken Yan; Yadagiri, Mahender; Barnes, Dennis Joseph; Morris, David Stuart; Chowdhury, Tahseen Ahmad; Chuah, Ling Ling; Robinson, Anthony Michael; Bain, Stephen Charles; Adamson, Karen Ann; Ryder, Robert Elford John

    2018-02-01

    Treatment of type 2 diabetes with sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors may result in genital fungal infections. We investigated possible risk factors for developing such infections among patients treated with the SGLT2 inhibitor dapagliflozin. The Association of British Clinical Diabetologists (ABCD) collected data on patients treated with dapagliflozin in routine clinical practice from 59 diabetes centres. We assessed possible associations of patient's age, diabetes duration, body mass index, glycated haemoglobin, renal function, patient sex, ethnicity and prior genital fungal infection, urinary tract infection, urinary incontinence or nocturia, with the occurrence of ≥1 genital fungal infection within 26 weeks of treatment. 1049 out of 1116 patients (476 women, 573 men) were analysed. Baseline characteristics were, mean±SD, age 56.7±10.2years, BMI 35.5±6.9kg/m 2 and HbA 1c 9.4±1.5%. Only patient sex (13.2% women vs 3.3% men) and prior history of genital fungal infection (21.6% vs 7.3%) were found to be associated with occurrence of genital fungal infections after dapagliflozin treatment, adjusted OR 4.22 [95%CI 2.48,7.19], Prisks of developing genital fungal infections with dapagliflozin treatment. Copyright © 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. All rights reserved.

  9. SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS: CLINICAL AND DIAGNOSTIC PARALLELS AND IMAGINARY MIMICRY

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    S. P. Filonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study – draw attention to the differential diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and infective endocarditis.Materials and methods. Patient A., 44 years old, was admitted to the cardiologic department of Ryazan Regional Clinical Cardiology Clinic diagnosed with probable infective subacute endocarditis, glomerulonephritis, with complaints of weakness, fatigue, increase in body temperature up to 37.7 °C preferably in the evening, dry cough, shortness of breath on mild exertion, swelling of legs and feet. In early October 2015, the patient's body temperature increased up to 37.8 °C, there was a dry cough. Patient was treated on an outpatient basis for acute respiratory viral infections with antibiotics, decreased body temperature. Acute deterioration of the condition was observed in mid-October: severe shortness of breath even on mild physical exertion, heart rate increased, as well as lower limb edema, blood pressure (BP increased up to 240/140 mmHg. The patient was hospitalized in the therapeutic department. Against the background of the treatment (antibiotics, antihypertensive agents, diuretics, digoxin patient’s condition was improved: shortness of breath decreased, as well as the heart rate, limb edema, blood pressure down to 180/110–190/120 mmHg. However, there was persistent proteinuria (0.33–1.65–3.3 g/L, low grade fever persisting in the evening. On admission to the cardiological department of Ryazan Regional Clinical Cardiology Clinic patient underwent the following survey: assessment of lab parameters in dynamics, electrocardiography, heart echocardiography, computed tomography (CT of lungs.Results. We revealed left ventricular hypertrophy on heart ultrasonography; an increase in the volume of left atrium, right ventricle, right atrium; mitral, aortic, tricuspid valve insufficiency (grade II regurgitation; pulmonary hypertension; on lung CT – the picture of hydrothorax on the right side, hydropericardium

  10. [Clinical treatment of infective endocarditis with vegetations in pregnant women and the outcomes of gestation].

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    Chu, L; Zhang, J; Li, Y N; Meng, X; Liu, Y Y

    2016-05-25

    To investigate the clinical treatment of infective endocarditis with vegetations in pregnant women and the outcomes of the gestation. Nine cases of pregnant women diagnosed as infective endocarditis with vegetations in Beijing Anzhen Hospital, Capital Medical University from January 2001 to October 2015 were enrolled in retrospective analysis. Consultations were held by doctors from department of obstetrics, anesthesiology, cardiology, cardial surgery and extracorporeal circulation to decide the individualized treatment plan for the 9 cases of pregnant women after admissions. Clinical treatments including general treatment, anti-infection treatment, cardiac surgery, and termination of pregnancy surgery were completed through collaboration among related departments. The clinical characters, therapeutic regimens, maternal and neonatal outcomes of the 9 cases were analyzed. (1) Clinical characters: the ages of the 9 cases of pregnant women were from 25 to 36 years old. The onset gestational ages were from 19 to 36 weeks. fever, cough, sputum and progressive anemia were the main symptoms. Patients had cyanosis of lips, could not lie on the back or even be orthopnea, when heart failure happened. Heart murmur was audible and splenomegaly was touched in physical examination. Blood cultures were positive. Basic heart disease types: 7 cases of congenital heart diseases included 2 cases of aortic insufficiency, 1 case of mitral insufficiency, 1 case of patent ductus arteriosus, 1 case of right ventricular outflow tract stenosis and 2 cases of ventricular septal defect.Two cases of rheumatic heart diseases included 1 case of mitral stenosis, 1 case of mitral stenosis after artificial disc changed and jammed. According to endocardial vegetations attached position there were 3 cases of mitral valve vegetations, 2 cases of pulmonary valve vegetations, 3 cases of aortic vegetations and 1 case of right ventricular outflow tract neoplasm. Preoperative heart function classification

  11. Clinical correlates and outcomes in a group of Puerto Ricans with systemic lupus erythematosus hospitalized due to severe infections

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    Jordán-González, Patricia; Shum, Lee Ming; González-Sepúlveda, Lorena

    2018-01-01

    Objective: Infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus patients hospitalized due to infections vary among different ethnic populations. Thus, we determined the outcomes and associated factors in a group of Hispanics from Puerto Rico with systemic lupus erythematosus admitted due to severe infections. Methods: Records of systemic lupus erythematosus patients admitted to the Adult University Hospital, San Juan, Puerto Rico, from January 2006 to December 2014 were examined. Demographic parameters, lupus manifestations, comorbidities, pharmacologic treatments, inpatient complications, length of stay, readmissions, and mortality were determined. Patients with and without infections were compared using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results: A total of 204 admissions corresponding to 129 systemic lupus erythematosus patients were studied. The mean (standard deviation) age was 34.7 (11.6) years; 90% were women. The main causes for admission were lupus flare (45.1%), infection (44.0%), and initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (6.4%). The most common infections were complicated urinary tract infections (47.0%) and soft tissue infections (42.0%). In the multivariate analysis, patients admitted with infections were more likely to have diabetes mellitus (odds ratio: 4.20, 95% confidence interval: 1.23–14.41), exposure to aspirin prior to hospitalization (odds ratio: 4.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.03–15.80), and higher mortality (odds ratio: 6.00, 95% confidence interval: 1.01–35.68) than those without infection. Conclusion: In this population of systemic lupus erythematosus patients, 44% of hospitalizations were due to severe infections. Patients with infections were more likely to have diabetes mellitus and higher mortality. Preventive and control measures of infection could be crucial to improve survival in these patients.

  12. Clinical presentation, convalescence, and relapse of rocky mountain spotted fever in dogs experimentally infected via tick bite.

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    Michael L Levin

    Full Text Available Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF is a tick-borne disease caused by R. rickettsii in North and South America. Domestic dogs are susceptible to infection and canine RMSF can be fatal without appropriate treatment. Although clinical signs of R. rickettsii infection in dogs have been described, published reports usually include descriptions of either advanced clinical cases or experimental infections caused by needle-inoculation of cultured pathogen rather than by tick bite. The natural progression of a tick-borne R. rickettsii infection has not been studied in sufficient detail. Here, we provide a detailed description of clinical, hematological, molecular, and serological dynamics of RMSF in domestic dogs from the day of experimental exposure to infected ticks through recovery. Presented data indicate that neither the height/duration of fever nor detection of rickettsial DNA in dogs' blood by PCR are good indicators for clinical prognosis. Only the apex and subsequent subsidence of neutrophilia seem to mark the beginning of recovery and allow predicting a favorable outcome in Rickettsia-infected dogs, even despite the continuing persistence of mucosal petechiae and skin rash. On the other hand the appropriate (doxycycline antibiotic therapy of sufficient duration is crucial in prevention of RMSF relapses in dogs.

  13. Clinical presentation, convalescence, and relapse of rocky mountain spotted fever in dogs experimentally infected via tick bite.

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    Levin, Michael L; Killmaster, Lindsay F; Zemtsova, Galina E; Ritter, Jana M; Langham, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne disease caused by R. rickettsii in North and South America. Domestic dogs are susceptible to infection and canine RMSF can be fatal without appropriate treatment. Although clinical signs of R. rickettsii infection in dogs have been described, published reports usually include descriptions of either advanced clinical cases or experimental infections caused by needle-inoculation of cultured pathogen rather than by tick bite. The natural progression of a tick-borne R. rickettsii infection has not been studied in sufficient detail. Here, we provide a detailed description of clinical, hematological, molecular, and serological dynamics of RMSF in domestic dogs from the day of experimental exposure to infected ticks through recovery. Presented data indicate that neither the height/duration of fever nor detection of rickettsial DNA in dogs' blood by PCR are good indicators for clinical prognosis. Only the apex and subsequent subsidence of neutrophilia seem to mark the beginning of recovery and allow predicting a favorable outcome in Rickettsia-infected dogs, even despite the continuing persistence of mucosal petechiae and skin rash. On the other hand the appropriate (doxycycline) antibiotic therapy of sufficient duration is crucial in prevention of RMSF relapses in dogs.

  14. Immunostimulation using bacterial antigens – mechanism ofaction and clinical practice inviral respiratory tract infections

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    Wojciech Feleszko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent respiratory tract infections constitute a significant problem in the practice of a general practitioner and paediatrician. Antibiotic resistance of bacterial strains, which has been growing for years, prompts the search for alternative ways of combating pathogens. One of them is the usage of preparations based on cell lysis of various bacterial strains. Bacterial lysates have been available in Europe for many years. In preclinical trials, they are characterised by the capability of reducing infections caused by bacteria and viruses that are not the components of the preparations. A range of clinical trials have demonstrated their usefulness in reducing the frequency of seasonal respiratory tract infections and antibiotic use. Moreover, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease gain an additional advantage in the form of the reduction of the risk of hospitalization due to disease exacerbations and a positive influence on the survival curve. The action of bacterial lysates is based on oral immunostimulation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, which results in increased antibody production. Moreover, they activate a range of mucosal mechanisms of non-specific immunity, mainly by enhancing the activity of TLR-dependent mechanisms. The efficacy of this group of drugs has been confirmed in a range of clinical trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Recent studies also indicate their immunoregulatory potential, suggesting that they might be used in the future in preventing allergies, asthma and autoimmune diseases. To conclude, physicians (paediatricians, laryngologists, pulmonologists should consider reducing the use of antibiotics in their daily practice. Instead, they should offer preparations that promote the immune system, thus controlling infections in a better way.

  15. Could home sexually transmitted infection specimen collection with e-prescription be a cost-effective strategy for clinical trials and clinical care?

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    Blake, Diane R; Spielberg, Freya; Levy, Vivian; Lensing, Shelly; Wolff, Peter A; Venkatasubramanian, Lalitha; Acevedo, Nincoshka; Padian, Nancy; Chattopadhyay, Ishita; Gaydos, Charlotte A

    2015-01-01

    Results of a recent demonstration project evaluating feasibility, acceptability, and cost of a Web-based sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and e-prescription treatment program (eSTI) suggest that this approach could be a feasible alternative to clinic-based testing and treatment, but the results need to be confirmed by a randomized comparative effectiveness trial. We modeled a decision tree comparing (1) cost of eSTI screening using a home collection kit and an e-prescription for uncomplicated treatment versus (2) hypothetical costs derived from the literature for referral to standard clinic-based STI screening and treatment. Primary outcome was number of STIs detected. Analyses were conducted from the clinical trial perspective and the health care system perspective. The eSTI strategy detected 75 infections, and the clinic referral strategy detected 45 infections. Total cost of eSTI was $94,938 ($1266/STI detected) from the clinical trial perspective and $96,088 ($1281/STI detected) from the health care system perspective. Total cost of clinic referral was $87,367 ($1941/STI detected) from the clinical trial perspective and $71,668 ($1593/STI detected) from the health care system perspective. Results indicate that eSTI will likely be more cost-effective (lower cost/STI detected) than clinic-based STI screening, both in the context of clinical trials and in routine clinical care. Although our results are promising, they are based on a demonstration project and estimates from other small studies. A comparative effectiveness research trial is needed to determine actual cost and impact of the eSTI system on identification and treatment of new infections and prevention of their sequelae.

  16. Evaluation of mupirocin ointment in control of central venous catheter related infections: a randomized clinical trial

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    Rezaei J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Central venous catheter (CVC related infections are important complications of cathter application. This study assessed the usefulness of mupirocin in prevention and control of these infections."n"nMethods: In this randomized clinical trial, consecutive surgical patients requiring central venous catheter (for more than 2 days in Amir-Alam Hospital from 2006-2008 were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups; in "case group" patients received topical mupirocin 2% every 48 hours at the time of insertion of catheter and dressing change and for "control group" mupirocin was not used. All of the patients received chlorhexidine and enoxoparin as complementary treatments. Two groups were comparable in regard of age, sex and risk factors."n"nResults: One hundred eighteen patients enrolled in the study (57 in case and 61 in control group completed the study. 84 catheters in case group and 88 catheters in control group were inserted. The catheters in 90% of patients were inserted in jugular vein. At the end of study 29(16.8% patients (16 in control versus 13 in case group had catheter colonization (p=NS. Catheter related bloodstream infection was observed in 16(9.3% patients (6 in

  17. Syphilis and HIV infections among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Republic of Congo.

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    Niama, Roch Fabien; Loukabou Bongolo, Nadia Claricelle; Bayonne Kombo, Edith Sophie; Yengo, Ruth; Mayengue, Pembe Issamou; Mandingha Kosso, Etoka-Beka; Louzolo, Igor; Macosso, Lucette; Dzeret, Ghislain; Dzabatou Babeaux, Angélie Serge Patrick; Puruehnce, Marie-Francke; Parra, Henri Joseph

    2017-01-01

    HIV and syphilis during pregnancy remain a public health concern especially in developing countries. Pregnant women attending antenatal clinics sites for the first time between September and December 2011 and who accepted to participate in the study were enrolled. The objective was to estimate the syphilis and HIV infection rate in this population. A study was conducted in 44 selected ANCs from 12 departments (5 urban and 7 rural). Pregnant women who accepted to participate in the study, attending selected sentinel ANCs sites for the first time between September and December 2011 were enrolled. To detect HIV antibodies, two consecutive ELISA assays were used (Genscreen Ultra HIV Ag/Ac, (BioRad, France) and Enzygnostic Intergral II (Siemens, GMBH, Marbug-Germany). In case of discordant results, the Western blot test II, HIV1 and 2 (Bio-Rad, Marne la Coquette, France) was used as the reference method. The RPR (Bio-Scan, Karnataka, India) test was performed to detect syphilis infection. The RPR positive results were confirmed using the TPHA test (Biotech, Cambridge, UK). Data were analyzed using SPSS 17.0 software. A total of 2979 pregnant women attending ANCs were enrolled. The global HIV infection rate was estimated to be 3.6% (CI: 95%; 3.0-4.4). As expected, HIV prevalence was significantly higher in women aged above 25 years (4.4% (3.4-5.6), p = 0.026) and those attending urban ANCs (5.04%, p pregnant women (3.92%). The risk for syphilis occurrence was significantly higher among the single women compared to the married ones (4.4% VS 2.7%; p HIV and syphilis coinfection occurred in 22 cases (0.73%). The prevalence's of syphilis and HIV were relatively low. Marital status and sentinel site location were a risk factor associated with HIV and syphilis infections respectively. Therefore, substantial effort is needed to reinforce prevention strategies in this population to prevent mother-to-child and further horizontal transmissions of these infections.

  18. Clinical manifestations and hematological and serological findings in children with dengue infection

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    Mulya Rahma Karyanti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF is endemic to Indonesia and remains a public health problem, with its highest incidence in children. There have been few reports on the clinical, hematological and serological data in children \\\\lith dengue. Objective To assess the clinical and laboratory profiles of children \\\\lith dengue infection in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods Clinical, hematological and serological infonnation from children diagnosed v.ith dengue infection in Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital were collected from 2007 to 2009. Results Of611 children admitted with dengue, 143 (23.4% had dengue fever (DF, 252 (41.2% had DHF grades I and II; and 216 (35.4% had DHF grades III and IV. Of the 81 cases where dengue serotypes were identified, 12.3% were DENV1, 35.8% were DENV-2, 48.2% were DENV-3 and 3.7% were DENV-4. Mean age of subjects was 8.9 years (SD 4.4, and 48.4% of cases were boys. The mean length of fever before hospital admission was 4.2 days (SD 1.1 and mean length of stay in the hospital was 4 days (SD 2.7. Common symptoms observed were petechiae, hepatomegaly and epistaxis. Complications found mostly in those with dengue shock syndrome (DSS were hematemesis (30 cases, 4.9% of all patients, encephalopathy (19 cases, 3.1 % and melena (17 cases, 2.8%. Conclusion Signs and symptoms of fever, bleeding manifestations and thrombocytopenia were present in children 'With DF and DHF, while signs of increased vascular permeability were found only in those 'With DHF. Encephalopathy and gastrointestinal bleeding were found mostly in DSS cases. At admission, leukopenia was found in more DF patients than in DHF patients. Absence of leukopenia may be a sign of more severe dengue infection.

  19. Chikungunya: an emerging viral infection with varied clinical presentations in Bangladesh: Reports of seven cases.

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    Rahim, Muhammad Abdur; Uddin, Khwaja Nazim

    2017-08-15

    Chikungunya is an emerging and rapidly spreading viral infection in many parts of the world including Bangladesh. It shares many epidemiological and clinical characteristics with dengue. So, a sound knowledge is required for its detection and differentiation from dengue, specially in endemic regions. We present seven confirmed cases of chikungunya having different clinical presentations occurring among middle aged males and females from different socio-economic background in Dhaka city, the capital of Bangladesh. All patients had fever and aches and pains. Less common features were rash, diarrhea, vomiting and altered liver biochemistry. Dengue was excluded in six patients. Paracetamol remained the mainstay of treatment during febrile periods, but over 50% of the patients had prolonged joint symptoms requiring non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In spite of being a self-limiting disease, chikungunya may have different presentations and a protracted clinical course. During the febrile episode, exclusion of dengue is equally important. Physicians should be aware of the condition and public health initiatives are necessary to break the disease transmission.

  20. [Pharmacokinetic and clinical experience with flomoxef in bacterial infection in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoda, T; Ichioka, T; Miyao, M

    1987-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic and clinical studies were performed on flomoxef (FMOX, 6315-S), a new oxacephem antibiotic, as follows. 1. Pharmacokinetics Serum concentrations of FMOX were measured in 2 cases given 20 mg/kg bolus injection. In the 2 cases, peak concentrations of the drug were 44.3 and 197 micrograms/ml at 15 minutes, T1/2 (beta) were 0.76 and 0.47 hour and AUC were 44.8 and 169.5 micrograms.hr/ml, respectively. Urinary recovery rates for these cases during 6 hours were 83.1 and 54.9%, respectively. The extremely high peak serum concentration in one case may be attributed to dehydration. 2. Clinical efficacy FMOX was administrated intravenously to 12 patients, 6 with pneumonia, 2 with cellulitis, 1 each with bronchitis, tonsillitis, purulent lymphadenitis and subcutaneous abscess, in doses of 55.0-120.0 mg/kg (average 82.2 mg/kg) t.i.d. for 4-13 days (average 6.2 days). The overall efficacy rate was 100%, with excellent responses in 10 and good in 2. Bacteriological efficacy was excellent; 4 of 5 strains were eradicated and 1 strain was decreased. No clinical side effect was observed. Laboratory abnormality was observed in 1 case with transient eosinophilia. The above results suggested that FMOX would be an useful antibiotic for treating pediatric bacterial infections.

  1. Factors in Dry Period Associated with Intramammary Infection and Subsequent Clinical Mastitis in Early Postpartum Cows

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    Kansuda Leelahapongsathon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine cow characteristics and farm management factors during the dry period associated with early postparturient intramammary infection (IMI and subsequent clinical mastitis (CM. Data were collected three times: before drying off (P1, during the dry period (P2, and 5 to 14 days after calving (P3, using questionnaires and farm investigation. Milk samples were aseptically collected for bacterial identification at P1 and P3. Factors associated with IMI and CM were analyzed using multiple logistic regression models. The final model showed that IMI in early postpartum was significantly associated with full insertion of dry cow antibiotic, dry cows in barns with a combination of tie and free stalls, body condition score (BCS in dry period and after calving, and milk yield before drying off. For IMI cows, factors significantly associated with clinical expression of mastitis were having daily barn cleaning, teat disinfected with alcohol before administration of dry cow therapy, BCS before drying off, milk yield before drying off, and days in milk at drying off. In conclusion, both cow and farm management factors are associated with the IMI rate and subsequent expression of clinical signs of mastitis in early postpartum cows.

  2. Risky sexual practices among youth attending a sexually transmitted infection clinic in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

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    Mhalu F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Youth have been reported to be at a higher risk of acquiring STIs with significant adverse health and social consequences. Knowledge on the prevailing risky practices is an essential tool to guide preventive strategies. Methods Youth aged between 18 and 25 years attending an STI clinic were recruited. Social, sexual and demographic characteristics were elicited using a structured standard questionnaire. Blood samples were tested for syphilis and HIV infections. Urethral, high vaginal and cervical swabs were screened for common STI agents. Results A total of 304 youth were studied with mean age of 21.5 and 20.3 years for males and females respectively. 63.5% of youth were seeking STI care. The mean age of coitache was 16.4 and 16.2 years for males and females respectively. The first sexual partner was significantly older in females compared to male youth (23.0 vs 16.8 years (p Conclusion Most female youth seen at the STI clinic had their first sexual intercourse with older males. Youth were engaging in high risk unprotected sexual practices which were predisposing them to STIs and unplanned pregnancies. There is a great need to establish more youth-friendly reproductive health clinics, encourage consistent and correct use of condoms, delay in sexual debut and avoid older sexual partners in females.

  3. Direct amplification, sequencing and profiling of Chlamydia trachomatis strains in single and mixed infection clinical samples.

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    Sandeep J Joseph

    Full Text Available Sequencing bacterial genomes from DNA isolated directly from clinical samples offers the promise of rapid and precise acquisition of informative genetic information. In the case of Chlamydia trachomatis, direct sequencing is particularly desirable because it obviates the requirement for culture in mammalian cells, saving time, cost and the possibility of missing low abundance strains. In this proof of concept study, we developed methodology that would allow genome-scale direct sequencing, using a multiplexed microdroplet PCR enrichment technology to amplify a 100 kb region of the C. trachomatis genome with 500 1.1-1.3 kb overlapping amplicons (5-fold amplicon redundancy. We integrated comparative genomic data into a pipeline to preferentially select conserved sites for amplicon design. The 100 kb target region could be amplified from clinical samples, including remnants from diagnostics tests, originating from the cervix, urethra and urine, For rapid analysis of these data, we developed a framework for whole-genome based genotyping called binstrain. We used binstrain to estimate the proportion of SNPs originating from 14 C. trachomatis reference serotype genomes in each sample. Direct DNA sequencing methods such as the one described here may have an important role in understanding the biology of C. trachomatis mixed infections and the natural genetic variation of the species within clinically relevant ecological niches.

  4. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection.

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    Dobler, Claudia C; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Armour, Carol L

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB) physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI), focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explaining the concept of latency (in particular to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds) and providing guidance to patients while still framing treatment decisions as a choice. Tailored estimates of the risk of developing TB and the risk of developing an adverse effect from LTBI treatment were considered the most important information for decision making and discussion with patients. Physicians acknowledged that there is a significant amount of unwarranted treatment variation, which they attributed to the lack of evidence about the risk-benefit balance of LTBI treatment in certain scenarios and guidelines that refer to the need for case-by-case decision making in many instances. In order to successfully implement LTBI treatment at a clinical level, consideration should be given to research on how to best address communication challenges arising in clinical encounters.

  5. Physicians' perspectives on communication and decision making in clinical encounters for treatment of latent tuberculosis infection

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    Claudia C. Dobler

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to explore the views of tuberculosis (TB physicians on treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI, focusing on decision making and communication in clinical practice. 20 Australian TB physicians participated in a semistructured interview in person or over the telephone. Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. The study identified challenges that physicians face when discussing treatment for LTBI with patients. These included difficulties explaining the concept of latency (in particular to patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds and providing guidance to patients while still framing treatment decisions as a choice. Tailored estimates of the risk of developing TB and the risk of developing an adverse effect from LTBI treatment were considered the most important information for decision making and discussion with patients. Physicians acknowledged that there is a significant amount of unwarranted treatment variation, which they attributed to the lack of evidence about the risk–benefit balance of LTBI treatment in certain scenarios and guidelines that refer to the need for case-by-case decision making in many instances. In order to successfully implement LTBI treatment at a clinical level, consideration should be given to research on how to best address communication challenges arising in clinical encounters.

  6. Surgical-site infections and postoperative complications: agreement between the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database and a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Sofie L; Meyhoff, Christian Sylvest; Lundvall, Lene

    2011-01-01

    between November 2006 and October 2008 and data from the DGCD. METHODS: Outcomes within 30 days from the trial and the database were compared and levels of agreements were calculated with kappa-statistics. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was surgical-site infection. Other outcomes included re-operation...... registered in the PROXI trial, but not in the DGCD. Agreements between secondary outcomes were very varying (kappa-value 0.77 for re-operation, 0.37 for urinary tract infections, 0.19 for sepsis and 0.18 for pneumonia). CONCLUSIONS: The randomized trial reported significantly more surgical-site infections......OBJECTIVE: Surgical-site infections are serious complications and thorough follow-up is important for accurate surveillance. We aimed to compare the frequency of complications recorded in a clinical quality database with those noted in a randomized clinical trial with follow-up visits. DESIGN...

  7. Clinical course and core variability in HBV infected patients without detectable anti-HBc antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Olympia E; Widera, Marek; Verheyen, Jens; Korth, Johannes; Gerken, Guido; Helfritz, Fabian A; Canbay, Ali; Wedemeyer, Heiner; Ciesek, Sandra

    2017-08-01

    The presence of anti-HBc antibodies indicates direct encounter of the immune system with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Aim of our study was to seek for anti-HBc negative but HBV replicating patients and analyze their clinical course and preconditions. From 1568 HBV-DNA positive patients, 29 patients (1.85%) tested negative for anti-HBc. The absence of anti-HBc could be confirmed in 19 patients using an alternative assay. In 16 of 19 cases, a partial or full HBV genome analysis was performed with NGS sequencing to evaluate if specific mutations were associated with anti-HBc absence. As a control group samples from 32 matched HBV infected patients with detectable anti-HBc were sequenced. Patients with detectable HBV-DNA and sequenced HBV core region in the confirmed absence of anti-HBc were diagnosed with acute HBV infection (n=3), HBV reactivation (n=9) and chronic hepatitis B (n=4). Most patients (12/16) were immunosuppressed: 3/16 patients had an HIV coinfection, 7/16 patients suffered from a malignant disease and 4/16 patients underwent solid organ transplantation (from which 2/4 had a malignant disease). Compared to the control cohort, HBV variants from anti-HBc negative patients showed less variability in the core region. In the absence of anti-HBc, HBV-DNA was most often found in immunocompromised hosts. Distinct mutations or deletions in the core region did not explain anti-HBc negativity. It would be advisable not to rely only on a single result of anti-HBc negativity to exclude HBV infection in immunocompromised hosts, but to measure anti-HBc repeatedly or with different methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Hepatitis E virus infection in patients with clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, Dioselina; Hoyos, María Cristina; Rendón, Julio César; Mantilla, Carolina; Ospina, Martha Cecilia; Cortés-Mancera, Fabián; Pérez, Olga Lucía; Contreras, Lady; Estepa, Yaneth; Arbeláez, María Patricia; Navas, María Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emergent virus of global importance; it is the etiological agent of sporadic cases and outbreaks of hepatitis. The epidemiology of this infection in Colombia is unknown. To determine the seropositivity for hepatitis E virus in Colombia in cases with clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Serum samples from patients that were sent to the Instituto Nacional de Salud during the period 2005-2010 (group 1) and samples sent to the Laboratorio Departamental de Salud Pública de Antioquia during the 2008-2009 period were included in this study (group 2). Serum samples were analyzed by immunoassay with commercial kits. From the 344 analyzed samples, 8.7% were positive for anti-HEV; the frequency of anti-HEV IgM was 1.74% (6/344) and the frequency of anti-HEV IgG was 7.5% (26/344). A difference in frequency of anti-HEV between group 1 (6.3%) and group 2 (1.3%) was observed. The cases were identified in nine departments of Colombia. This is the first study of hepatitis E virus infection in patients with diagnosis of hepatitis in Colombia. The frequency of anti-HEV described in this population of patients in Colombia is similar to that described in other Latin American countries like Brazil, Perú and Uruguay. Considering the results of this study, it could be necessary to include hepatitis E virus infection serological markers in the differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis in Colombia.

  9. Study of compartmentalization in the visna clinical form of small ruminant lentivirus infection in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central nervous system (CNS disease outbreak caused by small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV has triggered interest in Spain due to the rapid onset of clinical signs and relevant production losses. In a previous study on this outbreak, the role of LTR in tropism was unclear and env encoded sequences, likely involved in tropism, were not investigated. This study aimed to analyze heterogeneity of SRLV Env regions - TM amino terminal and SU V4, C4 and V5 segments - in order to assess virus compartmentalization in CNS. Results Eight Visna (neurologically affected sheep of the outbreak were used. Of the 350 clones obtained after PCR amplification, 142 corresponded to CNS samples (spinal cord and choroid plexus and the remaining to mammary gland, blood cells, bronchoalveolar lavage cells and/or lung. The diversity of the env sequences from CNS was 11.1-16.1% between animals and 0.35-11.6% within each animal, except in one animal presenting two sequence types (30% diversity in the CNS (one grouping with those of the outbreak, indicative of CNS virus sequence heterogeneity. Outbreak sequences were of genotype A, clustering per animal and compartmentalizing in the animal tissues. No CNS specific signature patterns were found. Conclusions Bayesian approach inferences suggested that proviruses from broncoalveolar lavage cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells represented the common ancestors (infecting viruses in the animal and that neuroinvasion in the outbreak involved microevolution after initial infection with an A-type strain. This study demonstrates virus compartmentalization in the CNS and other body tissues in sheep presenting the neurological form of SRLV infection.

  10. Clinical and economic outcomes of Acinetobacter vis a vis non-Acinetobacter infections in an Indian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyendu Asim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Acinetobacter infections are a major nosocomial infection causing epidemics of infection in the Intensive Care Units (ICU. Aims: This study estimates the clinical and economic outcomes of Acinetobacter infections and compares them with those of non-Acinetobacter bacterial infections. Settings and Design: Prospective cross-sectional observational study carried out for 6 months in the medicine ICU of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients were divided in two groups, one group with Acinetobacter infections and the other with non-Acinetobacter infections. The data was collected for infection, length of stay (LOS, mortality and cost along with patient demographics from the hospital records for analysis. Statistical Analysis Used: The data was analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences Version 15.0. The LOS and cost of treatment (COT for the two groups were compared using the nonparametric Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: A total of 220 patients were studied out of which 91 had Acinetobacter infections. The median LOS was 20 days in Group-A and 12 days in Group-B (P < 0.0001. The median COT was INR 125,862 in Group-A and INR 68,228 in the Group-B (P < 0.0001. Mortality in Group-A and Group-B was 32.97 and 32.56 (P = 0.949 respectively. Conclusion: The burden of Acinetobacter infections in ICUs is increasing with the increase in LOS and COT for the patients. The infection control team has to play a major role in reducing the rate of nosocomial infections.

  11. Development of a novel vaccine against canine parvovirus infection with a clinical isolate of the type 2b strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon Ah; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Hwi Yool; Lee, Joong-Bok; Lee, Nak-Hyung

    2012-07-01

    In spite of an extensive vaccination program, parvoviral infections still pose a major threat to the health of dogs. We isolated a novel canine parvovirus (CPV) strain from a dog with enteritis. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence analysis of the isolate showed that it is a novel type 2b CPV with asparagine at the 426th position and valine at the 555th position in VP2. To develop a vaccine against CPV infection, we passaged the isolate 4 times in A72 cells. The attenuated isolate conferred complete protection against lethal homologous CPV infection in dogs such that they did not develop any clinical symptoms, and their antibody titers against CPV were significantly high at 7-11 days post infection. These results suggest that the virus isolate obtained after passaging can be developed as a novel vaccine against paroviral infection.

  12. Clinical update on linezolid in the treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Sally; Gould, Kate

    2012-01-01

    Gram-positive pathogens are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in both community and health care settings. Glycopeptides have traditionally been the antibiotics of choice for multiresistant Gram-positive pathogens but there are problems with their use, including the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant strains, tissue penetration, and achieving and monitoring adequate serum levels. Newer antibiotics such as linezolid, a synthetic oxazolidinone, are available for the treatment of resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Linezolid is active against a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria and has been generally available for the treatment of Gram-positive infections since 2000. There are potential problems with linezolid use, including its bacteriostatic action and the relatively high incidence of reported adverse effects, particularly with long-term use. Long-term use may also be complicated by the development of resistance. However, linezolid has been shown to be clinically useful in the treatment of several serious infections where traditionally bacteriocidal agents have been required and many of its adverse effects are reversible on cessation. It has also been shown to be a cost-effective treatment option in several studies, with its high oral bioavailability allowing an early change from intravenous to oral formulations with consequent earlier patient discharge and lower inpatient costs. PMID:22787406

  13. Presumed Cases of Mumps in Pregnancy: Clinical and Infection Control Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svjetlana Lozo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a mumps outbreak in New York and New Jersey was reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Subsequently, the dissemination of the disease was rapid, and, from June 28th 2009 through January 29th 2010, a total of 1,521 cases of mumps were reported in New York and New Jersey. Seven presumed cases occurred in pregnant women cared for at our institution. Mumps diagnosis as per the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene was based on clinical manifestations, particularly parotitis. Prior immunizations with mumps vaccine and negative IgM were not adequate to rule out mumps infections. All of our seven patients had exposure to mumps in either their household or their community, and some of the them had symptoms of mumps. Due to the difficulties in interpreting serologies of these patients, their cases led to a presumed diagnosis of mumps. The diagnosis of mumps lead to the isolation of patients and health care personnel that were in contact with them. In this paper, we detail the presenting findings, diagnostic dilemmas and infection control challenges associated with presumed cases of mumps in pregnancy.

  14. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of acute respiratory virus infections in Vietnamese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, D N; Trinh, Q D; Pham, N T K; Vu, M P; Ha, M T; Nguyen, T Q N; Okitsu, S; Hayakawa, S; Mizuguchi, M; Ushijima, H

    2016-02-01

    Information about viral acute respiratory infections (ARIs) is essential for prevention, diagnosis and treatment, but it is limited in tropical developing countries. This study described the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of ARIs in children hospitalized in Vietnam. Nasopharyngeal samples were collected from children with ARIs at Ho Chi Minh City Children's Hospital 2 between April 2010 and May 2011 in order to detect respiratory viruses by polymerase chain reaction. Viruses were found in 64% of 1082 patients, with 12% being co-infections. The leading detected viruses were human rhinovirus (HRV; 30%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV; 23·8%), and human bocavirus (HBoV; 7·2%). HRV was detected all year round, while RSV epidemics occurred mainly in the rainy season. Influenza A (FluA) was found in both seasons. The other viruses were predominant in the dry season. HRV was identified in children of all age groups. RSV, parainfluenza virus (PIV) 1, PIV3 and HBoV, and FluA were detected predominantly in children aged 24 months, respectively. Significant associations were found between PIV1 with croup (P < 0·005) and RSV with bronchiolitis (P < 0·005). HBoV and HRV were associated with hypoxia (P < 0·05) and RSV with retraction (P < 0·05). HRV, RSV, and HBoV were detected most frequently and they may increase the severity of ARIs in children.

  15. An evaluation of the infection control potential of a UV clinical podiatry unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Paul N; Davies, Chris S; Rout, Simon

    2014-02-28

    Infection control is a key issue in podiatry as it is in all forms of clinical practice. Airborne contamination may be particularly important in podiatry due to the generation of particulates during treatment. Consequently, technologies that prevent contamination in podiatry settings may have a useful role. The aims of this investigation were twofold, firstly to determine the ability of a UV cabinet to protect instruments from airborne contamination and secondly to determine its ability to remove microbes from contaminated surfaces and instruments. A UV instrument cabinet was installed in a University podiatry suite. Impact samplers and standard microbiological techniques were used to determine the nature and extent of microbial airborne contamination. Sterile filters were used to determine the ability of the UV cabinet to protect exposed surfaces. Artificially contaminated instruments were used to determine the ability of the cabinet to remove microbial contamination. Airborne bacterial contamination was dominated by Gram positive cocci including Staphylococcus aureus. Airborne fungal levels were much lower than those observed for bacteria. The UV cabinet significantly reduced (p podiatry settings due to the presence of S. aureus. The use of a UV instrument cabinet can reduce the risk of contamination by airborne microbes. The UV cabinet tested was unable to decontaminate instruments and as such could pose an infection risk if misused.

  16. Profile of sexually transmitted infections (STI in patients attending ‘SURAKSHA’ clinics of Madhya Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Dubey

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reproductive tract infections (RTIs and sexually transmitted infections (STIs present a huge burden of disease amongst youth in India (approx. 6%. Methods: To study the profile of population affected by STI/RTI and spread amongst both sexes and classify STI according to its various types the present cross sectional study was conducted from Jan 2011 to September 2011.  A 12 days training was imparted followed by 3 days refresher training every quarter to counselors. The information was entered in a standardized Computerized Monitoring and Information System format designed by NACO and modified by state AIDS control society on daily basis. Results: There were 1, 22, 000 patients of STI/RTI in designated clinics of the state. Out of which females were 75.49% and males 24.4%. Vaginal Cervical Discharge contributed for 59.94% among the STI/RTI patients. The second major cause of STI/RTI is Lower abdominal pain 20.36%. Genital ulcer (Herpitic 2%, Non-Herpitic ulcer is 3%. The overall prevalence in MP is 5.95%. Conclusions: STI/RTI is more prevalent in females as compared to males possibly because of certain established biological factors. Vaginal Cervical Discharge remains the commonest presenting complaint in STD OPD’s amongst females followed by Lower Abdominal Pain. Indore, Bhopal, Sagar, Jabalpur and Dewas are amongst the high STI prevalent districts.

  17. Brain Microstructural Correlates of Cognitive Dysfunction in Clinically and Biochemically Normal Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Deep, Amar; Gupta, Rakesh K; Atam, Virendra; Mohindra, Samir

    2017-09-01

    This study examined correlates of the brain's neurocognitive performance among clinically and biochemically normal adult patient with hepatitis C virus (HCV). We hypothesized that anti-HCV positive individuals would demonstrate structural brain abnormalities and neurocognitive dysfunction as well as the changes in cell component and extracellular space in the white matter regions of brain in asymptomatic HCV infection by using diffusion tensor tractrography (DTT) metrics. Anti-HCV positive patient ( n  = 40), and healthy controls ( n  = 31), fulfilling inclusion criteria (incidentally detected anti-HCV positive) and able to provide informed consent were screened and recruited for the study. All these subjects and controls underwent subjective assessment of their quality of life related symptoms, neuropsychometric tests (NPT) and magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were subjected to neuroimaging as well as psychological testing. There was no significant difference in basic laboratory parameters in these two groups. Independent t -test reveals significantly lower neuropsychological functioning as compared to healthy control. A significantly decreased FA values and myoinsitol were observed in HCV subjects on sensory, inferior longitudinal fascicules, and STR fiber bundles as compared to healthy control. Bivariate correlation analysis reveals that neuropsychological scores are significantly positive. Our result show that HCV positive individuals would demonstrate structural brain abnormalities and neurocognitive dysfunction as well as the changes in cell component and extracellular space in the white matter regions of brain in asymptomatic HCV infection by using DTT metrics.

  18. Clinical course and therapeutic approach to varicella zoster virus infection in children with rheumatic autoimmune diseases under immunosuppression

    OpenAIRE

    Leuvenink, Raphael; Aeschlimann, Florence; Baer, Walter; Berthet, Gerald; Cannizzaro, Elvira; Hofer, Michael; Kaiser, Daniela; Schroeder, Silke; Heininger, Ulrich; Woerner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background To analyze the clinical presentation and complications of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection in children with rheumatic diseases treated with immunosuppressive medication such as biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) and/or conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs), and to analyze the therapeutic approach to VZV infections with respect to the concomitant immunosuppressive treatment. Methods Retrospective multicenter study using the Swiss ...

  19. Effects of albendazole on the clinical outcome and immunological responses in helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients: a double blind randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, E; Elias, D; Getachew, A; Alemu, S; Diro, E; Britton, S; Aseffa, A; Stendahl, O; Schön, T

    2015-02-01

    Despite several review papers and experimental studies concerning the impact of chronic helminth infection on tuberculosis in recent years, there is a scarcity of data from clinical field studies in highly endemic areas for these diseases. We believe this is the first randomised clinical trial investigating the impact of albendazole treatment on the clinical and immunological outcomes of helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of albendazole (400mg per day for 3 days) in helminth-positive tuberculosis patients was conducted in Gondar, Ethiopia. The primary outcome was clinical improvement (ΔTB score) after 2 months. Among secondary outcomes were changes in the levels of eosinophils, CD4+ T cells, regulatory T cells, IFN-γ, IL-5 and IL-10 after 3 months. A total of 140 helminth co-infected tuberculosis patients were included with an HIV co-infection rate of 22.8%. There was no significant effect on the primary outcome (ΔTB score: 5.6±2.9 for albendazole versus 5.9±2.5 for placebo, P=0.59). The albendazole-treated group showed a decline in eosinophil cells (P=0.001) and IL-10 (P=0.017) after 3 months. In an exploratory analysis after 12 weeks, the albendazole treated group showed a trend towards weight gain compared with the placebo group (11.2±8.5 kg versus 8.2±8.7 kg, P=0.08)). The reductions in eosinophil counts and IL-10 show that asymptomatic helminth infection significantly affects host immunity during tuberculosis and can be effectively reversed by albendazole treatment. The clinical effects of helminth infection on chronic infectious diseases such as tuberculosis merit further characterisation. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mild Clinical Course of Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Infection in an Elderly Japanese Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Ohagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS is an emerging infectious and hemorrhagic disease recently described in China and western Japan. A 71-year-old healthy Japanese woman noticed a tick biting her after harvesting in an orchard and removed it herself. She developed diarrhea, anorexia, and chills eight days later. Because these symptoms continued, she visited a primary care physician 6 days after the onset. Laboratory data revealed thrombocytopenia, leukocytopenia, and elevated liver enzymes. She was then referred to our hospital. Although not completely fulfilling the diagnostic criteria used in a retrospective study in Japan, SFTS was suspected, and we detected SFTS virus in the patient’s blood using RT-PCR. However, she recovered without intensive treatment and severe complications 13 days after the onset. In this report, we present a mild clinical course of SFTS virus infection in Japan in detail.

  1. Molecular testing for clinical diagnosis and epidemiological investigations of intestinal parasitic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Jaco J; Stensvold, C Rune

    2014-04-01

    Over the past few decades, nucleic acid-based methods have been developed for the diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Advantages of nucleic acid-based methods are numerous; typically, these include increased sensitivity and specificity and simpler standardization of diagnostic procedures. DNA samples can also be stored and used for genetic characterization and molecular typing, providing a valuable tool for surveys and surveillance studies. A variety of technologies have been applied, and some specific and general pitfalls and limitations have been identified. This review provides an overview of the multitude of methods that have been reported for the detection of intestinal parasites and offers some guidance in applying these methods in the clinical laboratory and in epidemiological studies.

  2. Viral etiology and clinical profiles of children with severe acute respiratory infections in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    Full Text Available No comprehensive analysis is available on the viral etiology and clinical characterization among children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI in China during 2009 H1N1 pandemic and post-pandemic period.Cohort of 370 hospitalized children (1 to 72 months with SARI from May 2008 to March 2010 was enrolled in this study. Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA specimens were tested by a commercial assay for 18 respiratory viral targets. The viral distribution and its association with clinical character were statistically analyzed.Viral pathogen was detected in 350 (94.29% of children with SARI. Overall, the most popular viruses were: enterovirus/rhinovirus (EV/RV (54.05%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (51.08%, human bocavirus (BoCA (33.78%, human parainfluenzaviruse type 3 (PIV3 (15.41%, and adenovirus (ADV (12.97%. Pandemic H1N1 was the dominant influenza virus (IFV but was only detected in 20 (5.41% of children. Moreover, detection rate of RSV and human metapneumovirus (hMPV among suburb participants were significantly higher than that of urban area (P<0.05. Incidence of VSARI among suburb participants was also significant higher, especially among those of 24 to 59 months group (P<0.05.Piconaviruses (EV/RV and paramyxoviruses are the most popular viral pathogens among children with SARI in this study. RSV and hMPV significantly increase the risk of SARI, especially in children younger than 24 months. Higher incidence of VSARI and more susceptibilities to RSV and hMPV infections were found in suburban patients.

  3. [Relationship between viral load of human bocavirus and clinical characteristics in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Bing; Zhong, Li-Li; Xie, Le-Yun; Xiao, Ni-Guang

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the prevalence of human bocavirus (HBoV) in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection and to explore the relationship between the viral load of HBoV and the clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children. A total of 1 554 nasopharyngeal aspirates from children who were hospitalized due to acute lower respiratory tract infection between March 2011 and March 2014 were collected. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect 12 RNA and 2 DNA viruses, adenovirus (ADV) and HBoV, and to measure the viral load of HBoV in HBoV-positive children. A comprehensive analysis was performed with reference to clinical symptoms and indicators. In the 1 554 specimens, 1 212 (77.99%) were positive for viruses, and 275 (17.70%) were HBoV-positive. In HBoV-positive cases, 94.9% were aged infection, and 230 (83.64%) had mixed infection. There was no significant difference in viral load between children with single infection and mixed infection (P>0.05). The patients with fever had a significantly higher viral load than those without fever (Pacute lower respiratory tract infection (P>0.05). HBoV is one of the important pathogens of acute lower respiratory tract infection in children. Children with a higher viral load of HBoV are more likely to experience symptoms such as fever and wheezing. However, the severity of disease and mixed infection are not significantly related to viral load.

  4. Bacterial infections in patients with liver cirrhosis: clinical characteristics and the role of C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Melanie; Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Andreadis, Ioannis; Giannaris, Markos; Kontos, George; Kranidioti, Hariklia; Pirounaki, Maria; Koskinas, John

    2018-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients may be difficult, because of the absence of classical signs such as fever and raised white blood cell count. The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in this context has not been clearly defined. Methods: Clinical and laboratory characteristics of 210 consecutive cirrhotic patients with (n=100) or without (n=110) bacterial infection were compared with a control group of non-cirrhotic patients with infection (n=106). Results: Significantly fewer patients with cirrhosis had a body temperature ≥37°C when presenting with bacterial infection (56% cirrhotic vs. 85.5% non-cirrhotic patients, P=0.01). Mean leukocyte count was 6.92 × 103/mm3 in patients with cirrhosis and infection, 5.75 × 103/mm3 (P=0.02) in cirrhotic patients without infection, and 11.28 × 103/mm3 in non-cirrhotic patients with infection (P10 mg/L indicated the presence of infection with a sensitivity of 68%, a specificity of 84.5% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.8197. CRP cutoff level differed according to the severity of the liver disease: Child-Pugh score (CPS) A: 21.3 mg/L, B: 17 mg/L, and C: 5.78 mg/L. Conclusions: CRP at admission could help diagnose infection in cirrhotic patients. Since the severity of liver disease seems to affect the CRP values, lower CRP levels might indicate infection. Clinical suspicion is necessary to avoid delay in diagnosis and initiate antibiotic treatment. PMID:29333070

  5. Bacterial infections in patients with liver cirrhosis: clinical characteristics and the role of C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Melanie; Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Andreadis, Ioannis; Giannaris, Markos; Kontos, George; Kranidioti, Hariklia; Pirounaki, Maria; Koskinas, John

    2018-01-01

    The diagnosis of bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients may be difficult, because of the absence of classical signs such as fever and raised white blood cell count. The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in this context has not been clearly defined. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of 210 consecutive cirrhotic patients with (n=100) or without (n=110) bacterial infection were compared with a control group of non-cirrhotic patients with infection (n=106). Significantly fewer patients with cirrhosis had a body temperature ≥37°C when presenting with bacterial infection (56% cirrhotic vs. 85.5% non-cirrhotic patients, P=0.01). Mean leukocyte count was 6.92 × 10 3 /mm 3 in patients with cirrhosis and infection, 5.75 × 10 3 /mm 3 (P=0.02) in cirrhotic patients without infection, and 11.28 × 10 3 /mm 3 in non-cirrhotic patients with infection (P10 mg/L indicated the presence of infection with a sensitivity of 68%, a specificity of 84.5% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.8197. CRP cutoff level differed according to the severity of the liver disease: Child-Pugh score (CPS) A: 21.3 mg/L, B: 17 mg/L, and C: 5.78 mg/L. CRP at admission could help diagnose infection in cirrhotic patients. Since the severity of liver disease seems to affect the CRP values, lower CRP levels might indicate infection. Clinical suspicion is necessary to avoid delay in diagnosis and initiate antibiotic treatment.

  6. Serum Cytokine Responses over the Entire Clinical-Immunological Spectrum of Human Leishmania (L. infantum chagasi Infection

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    Patrícia Karla Ramos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical-immunological spectrum of human Leishmania (L. infantum chagasi infection in Amazonian Brazil was recently reviewed based on clinical, DTH, and IFAT (IgG evaluations that identified five profiles: three asymptomatic (asymptomatic infection, AI; subclinical resistant infection, SRI; and indeterminate initial infection, III and two symptomatic (symptomatic infection, SI; American visceral leishmaniasis, AVL; and subclinical oligosymptomatic infection, SOI. TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 serum cytokines were analyzed using multiplexed Cytometric Bead Array in 161 samples from endemic areas in the Brazilian Amazon: SI [AVL] (21 cases, III (49, SRI (19, SOI (12, AI (36, and a control group [CG] (24. The highest IL-6 serum levels were observed in the SI profile (AVL; higher IL-10 serum levels were observed in SI than in SOI or CG and in AI and III than in SOI; higher TNF-α serum levels were seen in SI than in CG. Positive correlations were found between IL-6 and IL-10 serum levels in the SI and III profiles and between IL-6 and TNF-α and between IL-4 and TNF-α in the III profile. These results provide strong evidence for associating IL-6 and IL-10 with the immunopathogenesis of AVL and help clarify the role of these cytokines in the infection spectrum.

  7. Clinical and epidemiological features of chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in patients with HIV/AIDS in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchetrit, Andrés Guillermo; Fernández, Marisa; Bava, Amadeo Javier; Corti, Marcelo; Porteiro, Norma; Martínez Peralta, Liliana

    2018-02-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi reactivation in HIV patients is considered an opportunistic infection, usually with a fatal outcome. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiological and clinical features of T. cruzi infection in HIV patients and to compare these findings between patients with and without Chagas disease reactivation. The medical records of T. cruzi-HIV co-infected patients treated at the Muñiz Infectious Diseases Hospital from January 2005 to December 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Epidemiological and clinical features were assessed and compared between patients with and without Chagas disease reactivation. The medical records of 80 T. cruzi-HIV co-infected patients were reviewed. The most likely route of T. cruzi infection was vector-borne (32/80 patients), followed by intravenous drug use (12/80). Nine of 80 patients had reactivation. Patients without reactivation had a significantly higher CD4 T-cell count at diagnosis of T. cruzi infection (144 cells/μl vs. 30 cells/μl, p=0.026). Chagas disease serology was negative in two of nine patients with reactivation. Serological assays for T. cruzi infection may be negative in severely immunocompromised patients. Direct parasitological techniques should be performed in the diagnosis of patients for whom there is a suspicion of T. cruzi reactivation. HIV patients with a lower CD4 count are at higher risk of reactivation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. [Human enterovirus infection status and clinical characteristics of 274 patients with viral encephalitis in Henan Province, 2011-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H X; Pan, J J; Li, Y; Kang, K; Huang, X Y; You, A G; Xu, B L

    2017-02-06

    Objective: To investigate human enterovirus (HEV) infection and clinical characteristics of viral encephalitis patients in Pingdingshan, Henan Province. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid specimens and epidemiological information were collected from 274 viral encephalitis patients in the departments of pediatrics and neurology in hospitals in Pingdingshan, Henan Province, from April 2011 to August 2012. Patients with bacterial infections were excluded from the study. Demographic information was collected by questionnaires and clinical information was mainly obtained from hospital examinations. Viral RNA was extracted using magnetic bead extraction. Real-time RT-PCR was then performed for HEV, CV-A16, and EV-A71 testing. SPSS statistical software was statistical analyses. Significant differences were determined using the chi-squared test ( P15 years old age groups, HEV infections comprised 31.5% (53/168), 52.9% (18/34), 53.0% (35/66), and 16.7% (1/6) (χ(2)=13.10, P= 0.003), respectively. The EV-A71 infection rates were 17.9% (30/168), 23.5% (8/34), 6.1% (4/66), and 0 (χ(2)=8.04, P= 0.045), respectively. The other enterovirus (OEV) infection rates were 12.5% (21/168), 29.4% (10/34), 48.5% (32/66), and 16.7% (1/6) (χ(2)=35.19, P< 0.001), respectively. The rate of vomiting in OEV and EV-A71 infected patients was 73% (44/60) and 26% (11/42), respectively, while the frequency of skin rash in OEV and EV-A71 infected patients was 32% (19/60) and 79% (33/42), respectively. Approximately 95% (99/104) of patients infected with HEV had a fever, and the breathing rhythm change rate was 19% (20/104), which was lower than that of patients without HEV infection (36.8% (60/163)) (χ(2)=9.35, P= 0.002). Conclusion: In Pingdingshan, HEV was a major causative agent of viral encephalitis and the rate of OEV infection was high, especially in children aged 3-15 years old. Fever was a common clinical symptom of patients infected with HEV. Patients infected with OEV primarily exhibited

  9. Clinical efficacy of melittin in the treatment of cats infected with the feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Anja D; Wilhelm, Natalie; Erfle, Volker; Hartmann, Katrin

    2016-12-05

    The bee venom melittin shows an antiviral efficacy against the human immunodeficiency virus in cell culture. It was shown to be non-toxic for cats. Aim of this pilot study was to investigate the clinical efficacy and side-effects of melittin in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). The study was performed as a prospective, placebo-controlled double-blinded trial. Twenty cats were included, of which 10 cats each were treated with either melittin (500 µg/kg body weight) or phosphate-buffered saline (placebo) subcutaneously twice per week. During the treatment period of 6 weeks, the cats' general health status, determined by the Karnofsky's score, and the severity of clinical signs (conjunctivitis and stomatitis) using a clinical scoring system were evaluated. Haematology, biochemistry profiles, lymphocyte subpopulations, CD4/CD8 ratio, and pterines (biopterine, 7-xanthopterine) as surrogate parameters were also compared. The general health status and the clinical scores for conjunctivitis and stomatitis improved in cats treated with melittin. A statistically significant improvement however could only be detected for conjunctivitis in cats treated with melittin compared to cats treated with placebo which was likely due to different scores between both groups at the beginning. No influence on the lymphocyte subpopulations, CD4/CD8 ratio, and pterine concentrations was observed. No side effects occurred in this study. In the protocol used in the present study, no significant efficacy of melittin could be detected. However, efficacy of melittin, especially if applied in a higher dosage as in the present study or for a longer period, could be evaluated in further studies. Synergistic effects if used in combination with classic antiretroviral drugs could be an interesting future approach.

  10. Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of tcdA-negative variant clostridium difficile infections

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    Kim Jieun

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tcdA-negative variant (A-B+ of Clostridium difficile is prevalent in East Asian countries. However, the risk factors and clinical characteristics of A-B+C. difficile infections (CDI are not clearly documented. The objective of this study was to investigate these characteristics. Methods From September 2008 through January 2010, the clinical characteristics, medication history and treatment outcomes of CDI patients were recorded prospectively. Toxin characterization and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed on stool isolates of C. difficile. Results During the study period, we identified 22 cases of CDI caused by tcdA-negative tcdB-positive (A-B+ strains and 105 cases caused by tcdA-positive tcdB-positive (A+B+ strains. There was no significant difference in disease severity or clinical characteristics between the two groups. Previous use of clindamycin and young age were identified as significant risk factors for the acquisition of A-B+ CDI (OR = 4.738, 95% CI 1.48–15.157, p = 0.009 and OR = 0.966, 95% CI 0.935–0.998, p = 0.038, respectively in logistic regression. Rates of resistance to clindamycin were 100% and 69.6% in the A-B+ and A+B+ isolates, respectively (p = 0.006, and the ermB gene was identified in 17 of 21 A-B+ isolates (81%. Resistance to moxifloxacin was also more frequent in the A-B+ than in the A+B+ isolates (95.2% vs. 63.7%, p = 0.004. Conclusions The clinical course of A-B+ CDI is not different from that of A+B+ CDI. Clindamycin use is a significant risk factor for the acquisition of tcdA-negative variant strains.

  11. Clinical and laboratory features of urinary tract infections in young infants

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    Denise Swei Lo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI is the most common serious bacterial infection in young infants. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific. Objectives: To describe clinical, demographic and laboratory features of UTI in infants ≤ 3 months old. Methods: Cross-sectional study of infants ≤ 3 months old with UTI diagnosed in a pediatric emergency department, for the period 2010-2012. UTI was defined as ≥ 50,000 colony-forming units per milliliter of a single uropathogen isolated from bladder catheterization. Paired urinalysis and urine culture from group culture-positive and group culture-negative were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of pyuria and nitrite tests in detecting UTI. Results: Of 519 urine cultures collected, UTI was diagnosed in 65 cases (prevalence: 12.5%; with male predominance (77%. The most common etiologies were Escherichia coli (56.9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (18.5% and Enterococcus faecalis (7.7%. Frequent clinical manifestations were fever (77.8%, irritability (41.4% and vomiting (25.4%. The median temperature was 38.7°C. The sensitivity of the nitrite test was 30.8% (95%CI:19.9-43.4%, specificity of 100% (95%CI:99.2-100%. Pyuria ≥ 10,000/mL had a sensitivity of 87.7% (95%CI:77.2-94.5%, specificity of 74.9% (95%CI:70.6 -78.8%. The median peripheral white blood cell count was 13,150/mm3; C-reactive protein levels were normal in 30.5% of cases. Conclusions: The male: female ratio for urinary tract infection was 3.3:1. Non-Escherichia coli etiologies should be considered in empirical treatment. Fever was the main symptom. Positive nitrite is highly suggestive of UTI but has low sensitivity; whereas pyuria ≥ 10,000/mL revealed good sensitivity, but low specificity. Peripheral white blood cell count and C-reactive protein concentration have limited usefulness to suggest UTI.

  12. Clinical and laboratory features of urinary tract infections in young infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Denise Swei; Rodrigues, Larissa; Koch, Vera Hermina Kalika; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common serious bacterial infection in young infants. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific. To describe clinical, demographic and laboratory features of UTI in infants ≤ 3 months old. Cross-sectional study of infants ≤ 3 months old with UTI diagnosed in a pediatric emergency department, for the period 2010-2012. UTI was defined as ≥ 50,000 colony-forming units per milliliter of a single uropathogen isolated from bladder catheterization. Paired urinalysis and urine culture from group culture-positive and group culture-negative were used to determine the sensitivity and specificity of pyuria and nitrite tests in detecting UTI. Of 519 urine cultures collected, UTI was diagnosed in 65 cases (prevalence: 12.5%); with male predominance (77%). The most common etiologies were Escherichia coli (56.9%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (18.5%) and Enterococcus faecalis (7.7%). Frequent clinical manifestations were fever (77.8%), irritability (41.4%) and vomiting (25.4%). The median temperature was 38.7°C. The sensitivity of the nitrite test was 30.8% (95%CI:19.9-43.4%), specificity of 100% (95%CI:99.2-100%). Pyuria ≥ 10,000/mL had a sensitivity of 87.7% (95%CI:77.2-94.5%), specificity of 74.9% (95%CI:70.6 -78.8%). The median peripheral white blood cell count was 13,150/mm3; C-reactive protein levels were normal in 30.5% of cases. The male: female ratio for urinary tract infection was 3.3:1. Non-Escherichia coli etiologies should be considered in empirical treatment. Fever was the main symptom. Positive nitrite is highly suggestive of UTI but has low sensitivity; whereas pyuria ≥ 10,000/mL revealed good sensitivity, but low specificity. Peripheral white blood cell count and C-reactive protein concentration have limited usefulness to suggest UTI.

  13. [Neurological complications of infective endocarditis in Burkina Faso. Clinical features, management and evolutionary profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaméogo, N V; Seghda, A; Kagambèga, L J; Diallo, O; Millogo, G R C; Toguyéni, B J Y; Samadoulougou, A K; Niakara, A; Simporé, J; Zabsonré, P

    2015-04-01

    Neurological complications are the most frequent extracardiac complications of infective endocarditis (IE). This study aimed to describe the epidemiological, clinical and paraclinical aspects, and outcome of neurological complications of infective endocarditis in three hospitals in the city of Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso. From 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012, we included all patients suffering from IE and selected those in whom a neurological complication was objectified. Neurological involvement was sought on clinical examination but especially CT brain (ischemic infarcts, hemorrhages, aneurysms and abscesses). Blood cultures were systematic. Echocardiography was done for vegetations and characteristics. Among 63 cases of IE, neurological complications were found in 14 patients (22.2%). The average age of patients with neurological complications was 37.4 ± 5.8 years. The sex ratio was 1.3 for women. Neurological damage consisted of nine cases of stroke (64.3%), three cases of hemorrhagic stroke (21.4%) and two cases of brain abscess (14.3%). Neurological complications had already occurred before hospitalization in 4 cases. Blood cultures were positive in 8 cases. Germs found were predominantly Staphylococcus aureus (5 cases) and Streptococcus a- viridans (2 cases). All cases of S. aureus were complicated by stroke. At echocardiography, vegetation was found in all cases. It was found on the mitral in 7 cases, the aorta in 3 cases, the mitral and aortic in 2 cases and the mitral and tricuspid in 2 cases also. The EI had occurred on a native valve in 11 cases, prosthesis in 4 cases (2 mitral and 2 aortic). The vegetations average diameter was 11.2 ± 2.1 mm (6.4 and 1 7.7 mm). Vegetations were mobile in 12 cases. The treatment consisted of antibiotics adapted to the antibiogram, neurological and cardiovascular monitoring. The evolution was marked by seven deaths (50%), including 5 deaths related to cerebral complication (71.4% of deaths). This study shows that

  14. Characteristics of substance abuse treatment programs providing services for HIV/AIDS, hepatitis C virus infection, and sexually transmitted infections: the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lawrence S; Kritz, Steven Allan; Goldsmith, R Jeffrey; Bini, Edmund J; Rotrosen, John; Baker, Sherryl; Robinson, Jim; McAuliffe, Patrick

    2006-06-01

    Illicit drug users sustain the epidemics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), hepatitis C (HCV), and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Substance abuse treatment programs present a major intervention point in stemming these epidemics. As a part of the "Infections and Substance Abuse" study, established by the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, sponsored by National Institute on Drug Abuse, three surveys were developed; for treatment program administrators, for clinicians, and for state and District of Columbia health and substance abuse department administrators, capturing service availability, government mandates, funding, and other key elements related to the three infection groups. Treatment programs varied in corporate structure, source of revenue, patient census, and medical and non-medical staffing; medical services, counseling services, and staff education targeted HIV/AIDS more often than HCV or STIs. The results from this study have the potential to generate hypotheses for further health services research to inform public policy.

  15. Comparative strain analysis of Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection and clinical outcomes in a canine model of granulocytic anaplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorpio, Diana G; Dumler, J Stephen; Barat, Nicole C; Cook, Judith A; Barat, Christopher E; Stillman, Brett A; DeBisceglie, Kristen C; Beall, Melissa J; Chandrashekar, Ramaswamy

    2011-03-01

    A pilot study was conducted to determine whether existing human or canine strains of Anaplasma phagocytophilum would reproduce clinical disease in experimentally inoculated dogs similar to dogs with naturally acquired granulocytic anaplasmosis. Six hounds were inoculated intravenously with one human and two canine strains of A. phagocytophilum that were propagated in vitro in HL-60 cells or in infected autologous neutrophils. Infected dogs were monitored for lethargy, anorexia, petechiae, lymphadenopathy, and fever. Dogs were assessed for complete blood count (CBC), serum chemistry, and serology (IFA and SNAP® 4Dx®); for A. phagocytophilum blood load by quantitative polymerase chain reaction; and for cytokine production. Prominent clinical signs were generalized lymphadenopathy and scleral injection; only one dog developed fever lasting 4 days. Notable laboratory alterations included sustained leukopenia and thrombocytopenia in all dogs. A. phagocytophilum morulae were noted in blood between days 10 and 11, although all dogs retained A. phagocytophilum DNA in blood through day 60. All dogs seroconverted by days 10-15 by IFA, and by days 17-30 by SNAP 4Dx; cytokine analyses revealed 10-fold increases in interleukin-2 and interleukin-18 in the neutrophil-propagated 98E4 strain-infected dog. All A. phagocytophilum strains produced infection, although canine 98E4 strain reproduced clinical signs, hematologic changes, and inflammatory cytokine elevations most consistent with granulocytic anaplasmosis when recognized clinically. Therefore, this strain should be considered for use in future studies of A. phagocytophilum canine infection models.

  16. Effect of precipitation on clinic-diagnosed enteric infections in children in Rwanda: an observational study

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    Miles Kirby, PhD

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enteric infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in low-income and middle-income countries, particularly among children younger than 5 years. Climate change projections for Rwanda predict increases in average temperature, along with increases in total precipitation and frequency of extreme rainfall events. Previous research in Rwanda has found that extreme rainfall events increase the risk of contaminated drinking water, a substantial contributor to diarrhoea in this setting. Relatively little is known about the effect of precipitation on more severe clinic-diagnosed infections in rural, low-income settings such as Rwanda. In the context of a randomised controlled trial to assess the effect of a national environmental health campaign in Rwanda, we did a substudy to assess the effect of total and extreme rainfall on enteric infections in children younger than 5 years. Methods: For this observational study, we collected data from all government health facilities in Rusizi District, Western Province, for the year 2015. Patient data for children younger than 5 years from 150 study villages were extracted from paper-based registers. Gridded daily precipitation data were downloaded from the Tropical Applications of Meteorology using SATellite and ground based observations (TAMSAT rainfall dataset in addition to local weather station data. We modelled the effect of total rainfall (in mm and occurrence of an extreme rainfall event (95th percentile in the past 2 years on daily health facility visits for enteric symptoms (diarrhoea, gastroenteritis, or vomiting, using Poisson regression with a Newey-West estimator to adjust for serial autocorrelation. We examined total and extreme rainfall within the previous 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks, controlling for weekend day because we observed a consistent reduction in case counts on weekends. Findings: Data were extracted from 46 facilities, with a study catchment area of approximately 12

  17. Cost and efficiency of public sector sexually transmitted infection clinics in Andhra Pradesh, India

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    Ramesh YK

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Control of sexually transmitted infections (STIs is an important part of the effort to reduce the risk of HIV/AIDS. STI clinics in the government hospitals in India provide services predominantly to the poor. Data on the cost and efficiency of providing STI services in India are not available to help guide efficient use of public resources for these services. Methods Standardised methods were used to obtain detailed cost and output data for the 2003–2004 fiscal year from written records and interviews in 14 government STI clinics in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. The economic cost per patient receiving STI treatment was calculated, and the variations of total and unit costs across the STI clinics analysed. Multivariate regression technique was used to estimate incremental unit costs. The optimal number of STIs that could be handled by the clinics was estimated. Results 18807 STIs were diagnosed and treated at the 14 STI clinics in fiscal year 2003–2004 (range 323–2784, median 1199. The economic cost of treating each STI varied 5-fold from Indian Rupees (INR 225.5 (US$ 4.91 to INR 1201.5 (US$ 26.15 between 13 clinics, with one other clinic having a very high cost of INR 2478.5 (US$ 53.94. The average cost per STI treated for all 14 clinics combined was INR 729.5 (US$ 15.88. Personnel salaries made up 76.2% of the total cost. The number of STIs treated per doctor full-time equivalent and cost-efficiency for each STI treated had a significant direct non-linear relation (p 2 = 0.81; power function. With a multiple regression model, apart from the fixed costs, the incremental cost for each STI detected and cost of treatment was INR 55.57 (US$ 1.21 and for each follow-up visit was INR 3.75 (US$ 0.08. Based on estimates of optimal STI cases that could be handled without compromising quality by each doctor full-time equivalent available, it was projected that at 8 of the 14 clinics substantially more STI cases could be

  18. Outbreak of Zika virus infection in Singapore: an epidemiological, entomological, virological, and clinical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    An outbreak of Zika virus infection was detected in Singapore in August, 2016. We report the first comprehensive analysis of a national response to an outbreak of Zika virus infection in Asia. In the first phase of the outbreak, patients with suspected Zika virus infection were isolated in two national referral hospitals until their serum tested negative for the virus. Enhanced vector control and community engagement measures were deployed in disease clusters, including stepped-up mosquito larvicide and adulticide use, community participation in source reduction (destruction of mosquito breeding sites), and work with the local media to promote awareness of the outbreak. Clinical and epidemiological data were collected from patients with confirmed Zika virus infection during the first phase. In the second phase, admission into hospitals for isolation was stopped but vector control efforts continued. Mosquitoes were captured from areas with Zika disease clusters to assess which species were present, their breeding numbers, and to test for Zika virus. Mosquito virus strains were compared with human strains through phylogenetic analysis after full genome sequencing. Reproductive numbers and inferred dates of strain diversification were estimated through Bayesian analyses. From Aug 27 to Nov 30, 2016, 455 cases of Zika virus infection were confirmed in Singapore. Of 163 patients with confirmed Zika virus infection who presented to national referral hospitals during the first phase of the outbreak, Zika virus was detected in the blood samples of 97 (60%) patients and the urine samples of 157 (96%) patients. There were 15 disease clusters, 12 of which had high Aedes aegypti breeding percentages. Captured mosquitoes were pooled into 517 pools for Zika virus screening; nine abdomen pools (2%) were positive for Zika virus, of which seven head and thorax pools were Zika-virus positive. In the phylogenetic analysis, all mosquito sequences clustered within the outbreak lineage

  19. Comprehensive clinical and epidemiological assessment of colonisation and infection due to carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Baena, Zaira R; Oteo, Jesús; Conejo, Carmen; Larrosa, M Nieves; Bou, Germán; Fernández-Martínez, Marta; González-López, Juan José; Pintado, Vicente; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Merino, María; Pomar, Virginia; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Rivera, María Alba; Oliver, Antonio; Ruiz-Carrascoso, Guillermo; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Zamorano, Laura; Bautista, Verónica; Ortega, Adriana; Morales, Isabel; Pascual, Álvaro; Campos, José; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2016-02-01

    Most available information on carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) is usually associated with specific types of infection or patient or with descriptions of outbreaks. The aim of this study was to comprehensively analyse the clinical epidemiology, clinical features and outcomes of colonisation and infections due to CPE in Spain. A multicentre prospective cohort study was carried out in 34 Spanish hospitals from February to May 2013. All new patients testing positive for CPE in clinical samples were included. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of mortality. Overall, 245 cases were included. The most frequent organism was Klebsiella pneumoniae (74%) and the carbapenemases belonged to the OXA-48 (74%), metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) (24%) and KPC (2%) groups. Acquisition was nosocomial in 145 cases (60%) and healthcare-associated (HCA) in 91 (37%); 42% of the latter were nursing home residents, in whom OXA-48-producing K. pneumoniae ST405 predominated. MBLs and OXA-48 predominated in ICU and medical patients, respectively. Overall, 67% of patients had infections. The most frequent infections identified in this study were urinary tract (43%) and skin structure (21%) infections, and 10% of infections were bacteraemic. Crude mortality was 20%. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy was independently associated with an increased risk of death (OR = 3.30; 95% CI: 1.34-8.11). We found some differences in the epidemiology of CPE depending on the type of carbapenemase produced. Although a low proportion of CPE infections were bacteraemic, active antibiotic therapy was a protective factor for reducing mortality. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cervicitis aetiology and case definition: a study in Australian women attending sexually transmitted infection clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, M Josephine; Garden, Frances L; Rawlinson, William D; Naing, Zin W; Cumming, Robert G; Konecny, Pam

    2016-05-01

    Studies examining cervicitis aetiology and prevalence lack comparability due to varying criteria for cervicitis. We aimed to outline cervicitis associations and suggest a best case definition. A cross-sectional study of 558 women at three sexually transmitted infection clinics in Sydney, Australia, 2006-2010, examined pathogen and behavioural associations of cervicitis using three cervicitis definitions: 'microscopy' (>30 pmnl/hpf (polymorphonuclear leucocytes per high-powered field on cervical Gram stain)), 'cervical discharge' (yellow and/or mucopurulent cervical discharge) or 'micro+cervical discharge' (combined 'microscopy' and 'cervical discharge'). Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Mycoplasma genitalium (MG), Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) had the strongest associations with cervicitis definitions 'micro+cervical discharge': CT adjusted prevalence ratio (APR)=2.13 (95% CI 1.38 to 3.30) p=0.0006, MG APR=2.21 (1.33 to 3.69) p=0.002, TV APR=2.37 (1.44 to 3.90) p=0.0007 NG PR=4.42 (3.79 to 5.15) pdefinitions with best clinical utility and pathogen prediction were 'cervical discharge' and 'micro+cervical discharge'. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  1. Clinical Features and Laboratory Findings of Travelers Returning to South Australia with Dengue Virus Infection

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    Emma J. Quinn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reported cases of dengue are rising in South Australia (SA in travellers returning from dengue-endemic regions. We have undertaken a retrospective analysis to identify the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients returning to SA with suspected dengue virus (DENV infection. From 488 requests, 49 (10% were defined by serology as acute dengue, with the majority of patients (75% testing as non-structural protein 1 (NS1 and/or IgM positive. Dengue was most commonly acquired in Indonesia (42.9% with clinical features of fever (95%, headache (41% and myalgia/arthralgia (56%. The presence of rash (36% and laboratory findings of neutropenia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, but not elevated C-reactive protein, were distinct from findings in DENV-seronegative patients. Available dengue seropositive samples were analysed by RT-PCR, with 14/32 (43.8% positive by a serotype non-specific DENV assay, but 28/32 positive (87.5% when also assessed by serotype-specific RT-PCR. Serotype analysis revealed the predominance of DENV-1 and DENV-2 and the presence of DENV-3, but not DENV-4 or Zika virus (ZIKV. Thus, dengue in returned travellers in SA presents in a manner consistent with World Health Organization (WHO definitions, with symptoms, travel history and laboratory results useful in prioritising the likelihood of dengue. This definition will assist the future management in DENV-non-endemic regions, such as SA.

  2. [Clinical and epidemiological characteristics of HIV infection in Latin-American immigrants: comparative analysis from clinical records in a clinical care centre in Santiago in the last decade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, M Fernanda; Wolff, Marcelo; Cortés, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    There has been an increasing number of immigrants to Chile in the last years, especially from South American countries. The phenomenon of immigration and its consequences has been studied by international literature, and different health care needs have been reported for this group as compared with local population. In Chile this phenomenon is poorly studied and HIV prevention campaigns are focused on national population needs. To determine baseline clinical and epidemiological characteristics of the HIV infection in Latin-American immigrants presenting to a referral HIV clinical care centre between the years 2003-2013. Retrospective analysis. Baseline characteristics of Latin-American immigrants at admission to the infectious disease unit were compared to a peered group of Chileans in the same unit. There was an increase in the number of immigrants trough out the observation period. Foreigners presented larger proportion of women (26% vs. 9%) and heterosexual conduct as compared to nationals (37% vs 22%). The majority of immigrants came from Peru (55%) and Colombia (12%). There were significant differences in regards to gender and sexual behavior. This brings up the need to address different prevention strategies with more emphasis in women and heterosexual population in this vulnerable group.

  3. Infection by rhinovirus: similarity of clinical signs included in the case definition of influenza IAn/H1N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oña Navarro, Maria; Melón García, Santiago; Alvarez-Argüelles, Marta; Fernández-Verdugo, Ana; Boga Riveiro, Jose Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Although new influenza virus (IAn/H1N1) infections are mild and indistinguishable from any other seasonal influenza virus infections, there are few data on comparisons of the clinical features of infection with (IAn/H1N1) and with other respiratory viruses. The incidence, clinical aspects and temporal distribution of those respiratory viruses circulating during flu pandemic period were studied. Respiratory samples from patients with acute influenza-like symptoms were collected from May 2009 to December 2009. Respiratory viruses were detected by conventional culture methods and genome amplification techniques. Although IAn/H1N1 was the virus most frequently detected, several other respiratory viruses co-circulated with IAn/H1N1 during the pandemic period, especially rhinovirus. The similarity between clinical signs included in the clinical case definition for influenza and those caused by other respiratory viruses, particularly rhinovirus, suggest that a high percentage of viral infections were clinically diagnosed as case of influenza. Our study offers useful information to face future pandemics caused by influenza virus, indicating that differential diagnoses are required in order to not overestimate the importance of the pandemic. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Interventions to Increase Male Attendance and Testing for Sexually Transmitted Infections at Publicly-Funded Family Planning Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, David; Warner, Lee; Salomon, Sarah; Johnson, David M

    2017-07-01

    We assessed the impact of staff, clinic, and community interventions on male and female family planning client visit volume and sexually transmitted infection testing at a multisite community-based health care agency. Staff training, clinic environmental changes, in-reach/outreach, and efficiency assessments were implemented in two Family Health Center (San Diego, CA) family planning clinics during 2010-2012; five Family Health Center family planning programs were identified as comparison clinics. Client visit records were compared between preintervention (2007-2009) and postintervention (2010-2012) for both sets of clinics. Of 7,826 male client visits during the time before intervention, most were for clients who were aged male visits (4,004 to 8,385; Δ = +109%); for comparison clinics, male visits increased modestly (3,822 to 4,500; Δ = +18%). The proportion of male clinic visits where chlamydia testing was performed increased in intervention clinics (35% to 42%; p males yielded similar findings for male client volume and chlamydia testing. The number of female visits declined nearly 40% in both comparison (21,800 to 13,202; -39%) and intervention clinics (30,830 to 19,971; -35%) between preintervention and postintervention periods. Multilevel interventions designed to increase male client volume and sexually transmitted infection testing services in family planning clinics succeeded without affecting female client volume or services. Copyright © 2017 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. New therapies for chronic hepatitis C infection: a systematic review of evidence from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L Y; Tong, C Y W; Wong, T; Wilkinson, M

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects approximately 3% of the world population. The current standard of care for treatment of HCV is a combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Approximately 10% of patients will stop treatment and 30% of patients require dose reduction because of side effects. For genotype 1 HCV-infected patients, only 40% of patients will achieve undetectable viral load 26 weeks posttreatment. The objectives of this review were to identify new treatments that are in clinical trials. These include boceprevir and telaprevir which are in routine clinical use and form part of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) 2011 guidelines as well as drugs based on observational studies, improving/modifying ribavirin or interferon-based therapies, modifying the host response and finally the use of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA).   MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched from 2008 to 2011 for treatments for hepatitis C. Furthermore, abstracts and poster presentations for the annual European Association Study of the Liver, AASLD, Digestive Disease Week and Asian Pacific Association for the study of the Liver were searched for relevant material. All four classes of DAA; NS3/NS4a serine protease inhibitors, cyclophilin inhibitors, NS5b polymerase inhibitors and NS5a inhibitors, show good success rates. Trials have been performed without ribavirin or interferon and demonstrate good antiviral activity with a decreased side effect profile. Combinations of DAA are a promising area of research with a high success rate. Clinical trials show that future HCV therapy could be personalised, achieve higher success rates with decreased adverse incidents. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Epidemiological, clinical and pathological features of canine parvovirus 2c infection in dogs from southern Brazil

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    Pablo S.B. de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Canine parvovirus type 2c (CPV-2c emerged in Europe in the early 2000’s and rapidly spread out worldwide. Clinical and molecular data have demonstrated its circulation in Brazilian dogs, yet detailed descriptions of cases are still lacking. This article describes the epidemiological, clinical and pathological features of 24 cases of CPV-2c-associated disease in dogs submitted to veterinary clinics and laboratory diagnosis in southern Brazil (2014-2016. Most affected dogs presented signs/lesions suggestive of parvovirus enteritis: diarrhea, vomiting, hyperemia and hemorrhage of the serous membrane of the small intestine, diffuse segmental granulation, atrophy of the villi, necrosis and fusion of crypts, squamous metaplasia and epithelial syncytia. A number of cases presented features divergent from the classical presentations, including a wide variation in the color of feces (reddish and/or yellowish, light-brownish, orange-brown and brownish, involvement of adults (4/24 and vaccinated dogs (12/24, extensive involvement of the small intestine (8/20 and the presence of pulmonary edema (7/24 and convulsions (3/24. Feces and intestinal fragments submitted to PCR for the CPV-2 VP2 gene and to virus isolation in cell culture yielded positive results in 100% and 58.3% (14/24 of the cases, respectively. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a high nucleotide identity in VP2 (99.4 to 100% and a consistent mutation at amino acid 426 (asparagine to glutamic acid, considered a signature of CPV-2c. These results confirm the involvement of CPV-2c in the described cases and demonstrate the importance of CPV-2c infection among Brazilian dogs, calling attention of veterinarians to correctly diagnose the disease, mainly considering the frequent atypical presentations.

  7. Blood stream infections caused by Acinetobacter baumannii group in Japan - Epidemiological and clinical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikura, Yuji; Yuki, Atsushi; Hamamoto, Takaaki; Kawana, Akihiko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2016-06-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex, especially A. baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii and Acinetobacter nosocomialis, constitutes an important group of nosocomial pathogens; however, epidemiological or clinical characteristics and prognosis is limited in Japan. From 2009 to 2013, 47 blood stream infection cases resulting from A. baumannii group were reviewed at the National Defense Medical College, an 800-bed tertiary hospital. To determine the genospecies, further comparative nucleotide sequence analyses of the RNA polymerase b-subunit (rpoB) gene were performed. Sequence analysis of rpoB gene showed that 25 (49.0%), 17 (33.3%) and 5 (9.8%) cases were caused by A. baumannii, A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, respectively. The 30-day and in-hospital mortality rates of A. baumannii were 8.5% and 25.5%, respectively, and there were no significant differences between Acinetobacter species. Clinical characteristics were statistically insignificant. Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter species were detected in 3 cases (5.9%) with same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) pattern and A. baumannii was less susceptible to amikacin and levofloxacin. In this study, the mortality and clinical characteristics were similar among A. baumannii group isolate cases despite some showing drug resistance. However, identification of Acinetobacter species helps to initiate appropriate antibiotic therapy in earlier treatment phase, because A. baumannii shows some drug resistance. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical and demographic factors associated with urinary tract infection in young febrile infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorc, Joseph J; Levine, Deborah A; Platt, Shari L; Dayan, Peter S; Macias, Charles G; Krief, William; Schor, Jeffrey; Bank, David; Shaw, Kathy N; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2005-09-01

    Previous research has identified clinical predictors for urinary tract infection (UTI) to guide urine screening in febrile children or =38 degrees C) infants who were pediatric emergency departments from October through March 1999-2001 were eligible. Clinical appearance was evaluated using the Yale Observation Scale. UTI was defined as growth of a known bacterial pathogen from a catheterized specimen at a level of (1) > or =50000 cfu/mL or (2) > or =10000 cfu/mL in association with a positive dipstick test or urinalysis. We used bivariate tests and multiple logistic regression to identify demographic and clinical factors that were associated with the likelihood of UTI. A total of 1025 (67%) of 1513 eligible patients were enrolled; 9.0% of enrolled infants received a diagnosis of UTI. Uncircumcised male infants had a higher rate of UTI (21.3%) compared with female (5.0%) and circumcised male (2.3%) infants. Infants with maximum recorded temperature of > or =39 degrees C had a higher rate of UTI (16.3%) than other infants (7.2%). After multivariable adjustment, UTI was associated with being uncircumcised (odds ratio: 10.4; bias-corrected 95% confidence interval: 4.7-31.4) and maximum temperature (odds ratio: 2.4 per degrees C; 95% confidence interval: 1.5-3.6). Factors that were reported previously to be associated with risk for UTI in infants and toddlers, such as white race and ill appearance, were not significantly associated with risk for UTI in this cohort of young infants. Being uncircumcised and height of fever were associated with UTI in febrile infants who were < or =60 days of age. Uncircumcised male infants were at particularly high risk and may warrant a different approach to screening and management.

  9. Microbial Pathogens Implicated in Reproductive Health Infections in a Special Treatment Clinic in Ibadan, Nigeria

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    Adenike Ogunshe

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The lack of adequate recognition of health importance of non-HIV reproductive health infections (RHIs in Nigeria has led into this study, which was to determine clinical pathogens in non-HIV RHI in Nigeria using a tertiary health facility as case study.Materials and Methods: A nine-year investigation was carried out between 1997 and 2005 on 4047 (n = 1626 males; n = 2421 females patients presenting at Special Treatment Clinic (STC of University College Hospital (UCH Ibadan, Nigeria. Routine laboratory procedures using appropriate culture media, culture conditions, and current phenotypic taxonomic tools for classification of isolated pathogens were employed.Results: Age (p = 0.019 and gender (p<0.0001 were related to the recovery rates of pathogens Candida species (55.6 %, Neisseria gonorrhoae (11.1%, Gardenella vaginalis (10.3%, Escherichia coli (9.2 %, Klebsiella sp. (4.2%, streptococci (4.0%, Staphylococcus aureus (2.3%, Proteus sp., (1.8%, Haemophilus ducreyi (0.5%, Trichomonas vaginalis (0.44% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.18%. Candida and Gardenella vaginalis species were mostly recovered from female patients, while N.gonorrhoeae were mostly isolated from male patients. Age brackets for the recovery of pathogens were Neisseria gonorrhoeae (16-30 years; Gardenella vaginalis (21-25 and 31-35 years and C.albicans (21-30 years.Conclusion: Candida, Neisseria gonorrhoea and Gadrenella vaginalis were the most recovered pathogens from patients presenting at Special Treatment Clinic of a tertiary health institution in Nigeria, and the relationship between age, gender and the aetiological agents was statistically significant.

  10. [Clinical and bacteriological profiles of the urinary infections associated the VIH/AIDS in hospital area of Bamako, Mali].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, S; Oumar, A A; Dembele, J P; Noutache, J L; Fongoro, S; Maiga, I; Bougoudogo, F

    2007-01-01

    The syndrome of immunodepression is the bed of multiple infections of which urinary infections. The goal of this study was to determine the aspects clinical and bacteriological urinary infections during the AIDS with the service of the infectious diseases of the hospital of the Point G of February 1, 2003 to June 30 2005. The diagnosis of the urinary infection was retained on the basis of bacteria number > or =10(4) bacteriury and or leucocytes count > or =10(5)/mm3. The prevalence of the urinary infection was estimated at 8.85%. The principal clinical aspects were a symptomatic pyelonephritis 73.5%, the leucocytiury 11.8%, the cystitis 8.8%, and acute prostatitis 5.9%. Escherichia coli was the most frequent bacterium (46.7%). The sensitivity of the germs was 91.7% with the aminosides, 90.9% with the fluoroquinolones, from 63.6 to 80% respectively with the cephalosporines of first and second generation. Resistance to ampicilline, chloramphenicol and sulfamides was about 72 and 80%. The systematic research of the urinary infection is necessary during the AIDS and the antibiotherapy of choice in first intention in absence of etiologic possibility of diagnosis should be the aminosides and or the fluoroquinolones.

  11. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of infections caused by various Nocardia species in Taiwan: a multicenter study from 1998 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W L; Lai, C C; Ko, W C; Chen, Y H; Tang, H J; Huang, Y L; Huang, Y T; Hsueh, P R

    2011-11-01

    This multicenter study in Taiwan investigated the clinical presentations of various Nocardia species infections based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Patients with nocardiosis in four large medical centers from 1998 to 2010 were included. A total of 100 preserved nonduplicate isolates causing human infection were identified as Nocardia species. Sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA confirmed that 35 of 36 N. asteroides isolates identified by conventional tests were non-asteroides Nocardia species, and that two of 50 N. brasiliensis isolates had also been initially misidentified. N. brasiliensis (50%) was the most common pathogen, followed by N. cyriacigeorgica (18%). In addition, several rare pathogens were identified, including N. asiatica, N. rhamnosiphila, N. abscessus, N. transvalensis, N. elegans, and N. carnea. Primary cutaneous infection was the most common presentation, noted in 55 (55%) patients, while pulmonary infection presented in 26 (26%) patients. The crude mortality rate was 6.7% (6/89), and was lowest for primary cutaneous infection (2.2%) and highest for disseminated disease and pulmonary infection (16.7%). In conclusion, N. brasiliensis and N. cyriacigeorgica were the most common pathogens causing nocardiosis in Taiwan. Molecular methods for identifying Nocardia to the species level are mandatory for better understanding the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of patients with nocardiosis.

  12. Epidemiological, virological and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in 223 HIV co-infected patients: a French multi-centre collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Vincent; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Colson, Philippe; Gozlan, Joël; Schnepf, Nathalie; Trimoulet, Pascale; Pallier, Coralie; Saune, Karine; Branger, Michel; Coste, Marianne; Thoraval, Francoise Roudot

    2013-03-15

    Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a clinical concern in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals due to substantial prevalence, difficulties to treat, and severe liver disease outcome. A large nationwide cross-sectional multicentre analysis of HIV-HBV co-infected patients was designed to describe and identify parameters associated with virological and clinical outcome of CHB in HIV-infected individuals with detectable HBV viremia. A multicenter collaborative cross-sectional study was launched in 19 French University hospitals distributed through the country. From January to December 2007, HBV load, genotype, clinical and epidemiological characteristics of 223 HBV-HIV co-infected patients with an HBV replication over 1000 IU/mL were investigated. Patients were mostly male (82%, mean age 42 years). Genotype distribution (A 52%; E 23.3%; D 16.1%) was linked to risk factors, geographic origin, and co-infection with other hepatitis viruses. This genotypic pattern highlights divergent contamination event timelines by HIV and HBV viruses. Most patients (74.7%) under antiretroviral treatment were receiving a drug with anti-HBV activity, including 47% receiving TDF. Genotypic lamivudine-resistance detected in 26% of the patients was linked to duration of lamivudine exposure, age, CD4 count and HIV load. Resistance to adefovir (rtA181T/V) was detected in 2.7% of patients. Advanced liver lesions were observed in 54% of cases and were associated with an older age and lower CD4 counts but not with viral load or genotype. Immune escape HBsAg variants were seldom detected. Despite the detection of advanced liver lesions in most patients, few were not receiving anti-HBV drugs and for those treated with the most potent anti-HBV drugs, persistent replication suggested non-optimal adherence. Heterogeneity in HBV strains reflects epidemiological differences that may impact liver disease progression. These findings are strong arguments to further optimize clinical management

  13. Clinical significance of elevated serum aminotransferases levels in asymptomatic individuals with hepatitis C infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafees, M.; Ditta, A.; Jafferi, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C is a common and important cause of chronic liver disease that often remains asymptomatic and most of the times discovered incidentally by routine serologic or biochemical testing. Aminotransferases (AST and ALT) reflect alterations in liver function/inflammation in liver diseases. The current study was conducted to examine the utilization and limitations of these biochemical markers in subjects with asymptomatic HCV infection. Aims and Objectives: To find out how many subjects with asymptomatic HCV infection have normal or elevated serum AST and ALT levels. Subjects and Methods: Study Design: Cross sectional. Study Duration: Seven months from November 2008 to July 2009. Study Universe: Services Hospital, Lahore. Study Population: This study included 413 subjects attending the outpatient departments of hospital with minor complaints. The random population of subjects was referred to the clinical laboratory of Services Hospital, Lahore for LFTs, HBsAg and anti-HCV screening from OPD department of the hospital. A total of 413 persons of all ages were analyzed during this study. There were 263 subjects who were sero - positive for anti-HCV (141 females, 122 males; median age 35 +- 11.34 years) and 150 in the control group (80 of them were females and 70 males with median age 32 +- 12.97 years) were sero-negative for both HBsAg and anti - HCV. Subjects Selection Criteria: In this study, only anti - HCV sero - positive subjects were included who was sero - negative for HBsAg or dual infection (both HBsAg and anti - HCV) and not on anti - viral therapy. Control group was sero - negative for both - HBsAg and anti - HCV antibodies. Data Collection: We assayed levels of serum aminotransferases (AST and ALT) and screened blood for HBsAg and anti-HCV. ELISA technique was used for viral hepatitis markers. Results: Out of 263 subjects tested positive for anti-HCV antibodies in their blood, 90.76 % and 87.45 % had elevated AST and ALT levels (ALT = 40 U

  14. Clinical management of Brucella suis infection in dogs and implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, D R; Golovsky, G; Thornton, J M; Goodchild, L; Havlicek, M; Martin, P; Krockenberger, M B; Marriott, Dje; Ahuja, V; Malik, R; Mor, S M

    2017-01-01

    Brucellosis caused by Brucella suis is a notifiable disease that has recently emerged in dogs in New South Wales (NSW). Given the potential for zoonotic transmission, euthanasia of affected dogs is recommended, but this action is not mandatory. We report the clinical management of three dogs that underwent treatment at their owners' request. A 14-month-old spayed female crossbreed originally obtained from an urban animal shelter underwent extensive investigations in 2011-12 for lameness and back pain, culminating in decompressive laminectomy. Diagnosis of multifocal discospondylitis and spinal empyema was made, with B. suis cultured from surgical biopsy specimens. The dog responded to long-term treatment using rifampicin and doxycycline. A second case of B. suis infection was diagnosed in January 2016 in a 3-year-old crossbreed pig-hunting dog with unilateral testicular enlargement. Following serological diagnosis the dog was given preliminary therapy using rifampicin and doxycycline, the affected testis was resected and the patient given a further month of combination therapy. In March 2016 a 7-year-old crossbreed pig-hunting dog with brucellosis was handled similarly, although both testes were removed. Brucellosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of back pain, discospondylitis, lameness, abortion, prostatic abscessation and testicular/epididymal enlargement in dogs, especially if there is exposure to feral pigs or consumption of uncooked feral pig meat. Euthanasia is the only guarantee of reducing the public health risk to zero. However, where treatment is desired by the owner, combination therapy using rifampicin and doxycycline appears to be effective, when combined with surgical resection of infected tissues. Further monitoring of dogs during and after treatment is required to document cure. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  15. Lack of clinical utility of urine gram stain for suspected urinary tract infection in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Joseph B; Gaviria-Agudelo, Claudia; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Doern, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in children. Urine culture remains the gold standard for diagnosis, but the utility of urine Gram stain relative to urinalysis (UA) is unclear. We reviewed 312 pediatric patients with suspected UTI who had urine culture, UA, and urine Gram stain performed from a single urine specimen. UA was considered positive if ≥10 leukocytes per oil immersion field were seen or if either nitrates or leukocyte esterase testing was positive. Urine Gram stain was considered positive if any organisms were seen. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using urine culture as the gold standard. Thirty-seven (12%) patients had a culture-proven UTI. Compared to urine Gram stain, UA had equal sensitivity (97.3% versus 97.5%) and higher specificity (85% versus 74%). Empirical therapy was prescribed before the Gram stain result was known in 40 (49%) patients and after in 42 (51%) patients. The antibiotics chosen did not differ between the two groups (P=0.81), nor did they differ for patients with Gram-negative rods on urine Gram stain compared to those with Gram-positive cocci (P=0.67). From these data, we conclude that UA has excellent negative predictive value that is not enhanced by urine Gram stain and that antibiotic selection did not vary based on the urine Gram stain result. In conclusion, the clinical utility of urine Gram stain does not warrant the time or cost it requires. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. [Epidemiologic and therapeutic study on gonococcal infections--clinical efficacy of cefetamet pivoxil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, M; Kumamoto, Y; Hirose, T; Hayashi, K; Tsukamoto, T; Gohro, T; Ikegaki, S; Kamito, H; Inoke, T; Henmi, I

    1990-07-01

    We studied the epidemiology of 109 cases of gonococcal infections (105 males with urethritis and 4 females with cervicitis), together with the basic and clinical effects of cefetamet pivoxil in the cases. The peak of age distribution of the male patients was in the younger half of their twenties, and all of the 4 female cases were between 20 and 39 years old. The major source of infections in the males younger than 25 years old was their girl friends or so-called pick-up friends, and that of the males older than 25 years old workers serving at an amusement center, for example, bars and so-called special massage parlor, which accounted for about three fourths of the male cases between 35 and 44 years old. The distribution of the MIC (inoculum size; 10(6) CFU/ml) of Cefetamet against beta-lactamase non penicillinase producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (non-PPNG) ranged from 0.025 to 0.1 microgram/ml and that against beta-lactamase producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae ranged from 0.025 to 0.05 microgram/ml. The isolation rate of PPNG was 10.2% (9/88). In male patients with gonococcal urethritis, the efficacy rate was 100% on days 3 and 7 for 1,000 mg single dose and 7-day treatment and 500 mg single dose treatment. One of the cases treated with 250 mg single dose therapy was unchanged at 3, but the efficacy rate of the remaining cases was 100% at day 7. Complicated urethritis with C. trachomatis was noticed in 25.7% (5/105) of the male urethritis and in 25.0% (1/4) of the female cervicitis cases. The only side effect was diarrhea observed in 1 of the 124 case (0.8%).

  17. Metaproteome analysis of endodontic infections in association with different clinical conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Claudio Provenzano

    Full Text Available Analysis of the metaproteome of microbial communities is important to provide an insight of community physiology and pathogenicity. This study evaluated the metaproteome of endodontic infections associated with acute apical abscesses and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions. Proteins persisting or expressed after root canal treatment were also evaluated. Finally, human proteins associated with these infections were identified. Samples were taken from root canals of teeth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis before and after chemomechanical treatment using either NaOCl or chlorhexidine as the irrigant. Samples from abscesses were taken by aspiration of the purulent exudate. Clinical samples were processed for analysis of the exoproteome by using two complementary mass spectrometry platforms: nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap quadrupole Velos Orbitrap and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight. A total of 308 proteins of microbial origin were identified. The number of proteins in abscesses was higher than in asymptomatic cases. In canals irrigated with chlorhexidine, the number of identified proteins decreased substantially, while in the NaOCl group the number of proteins increased. The large majority of microbial proteins found in endodontic samples were related to metabolic and housekeeping processes, including protein synthesis, energy metabolism and DNA processes. Moreover, several other proteins related to pathogenicity and resistance/survival were found, including proteins involved with adhesion, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance, stress proteins, exotoxins, invasins, proteases and endopeptidases (mostly in abscesses, and an archaeal protein linked to methane production. The majority of human proteins detected were related to cellular processes and metabolism, as well as immune defense. Interrogation of the metaproteome of endodontic microbial communities provides information on the

  18. Metaproteome analysis of endodontic infections in association with different clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, José Claudio; Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Domingues, Romênia R; Paes Leme, Adriana F; Silva, Márcia R S

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of the metaproteome of microbial communities is important to provide an insight of community physiology and pathogenicity. This study evaluated the metaproteome of endodontic infections associated with acute apical abscesses and asymptomatic apical periodontitis lesions. Proteins persisting or expressed after root canal treatment were also evaluated. Finally, human proteins associated with these infections were identified. Samples were taken from root canals of teeth with asymptomatic apical periodontitis before and after chemomechanical treatment using either NaOCl or chlorhexidine as the irrigant. Samples from abscesses were taken by aspiration of the purulent exudate. Clinical samples were processed for analysis of the exoproteome by using two complementary mass spectrometry platforms: nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled with linear ion trap quadrupole Velos Orbitrap and liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight. A total of 308 proteins of microbial origin were identified. The number of proteins in abscesses was higher than in asymptomatic cases. In canals irrigated with chlorhexidine, the number of identified proteins decreased substantially, while in the NaOCl group the number of proteins increased. The large majority of microbial proteins found in endodontic samples were related to metabolic and housekeeping processes, including protein synthesis, energy metabolism and DNA processes. Moreover, several other proteins related to pathogenicity and resistance/survival were found, including proteins involved with adhesion, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance, stress proteins, exotoxins, invasins, proteases and endopeptidases (mostly in abscesses), and an archaeal protein linked to methane production. The majority of human proteins detected were related to cellular processes and metabolism, as well as immune defense. Interrogation of the metaproteome of endodontic microbial communities provides information on the physiology and

  19. Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections in Brazilian Pediatric Patients: Microbiology, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carlos Alberto Pires; Marra, Alexandre R.; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Pignatari, Antônio Carlos Campos; Sukiennik, Teresa; Behar, Paulo Renato Petersen; Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo; Ribeiro, Julival; Girão, Evelyne; Correa, Luci; Guerra, Carla; Carneiro, Irna; Brites, Carlos; Reis, Marise; de Souza, Marta Antunes; Tranchesi, Regina; Barata, Cristina U.; Edmond, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality and are the most frequent type of nosocomial infection in pediatric patients. Methods We identified the predominant pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibilities of nosocomial bloodstream isolates in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age) in the Brazilian Prospective Surveillance for nBSIs at 16 hospitals from 12 June 2007 to 31 March 2010 (Br SCOPE project). Results In our study a total of 2,563 cases of nBSI were reported by hospitals participating in the Br SCOPE project. Among these, 342 clinically significant episodes of BSI were identified in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age). Ninety-six percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-negative organisms caused 49.0% of these BSIs, Gram-positive organisms caused 42.6%, and fungi caused 8.4%. The most common pathogens were Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (21.3%), Klebsiella spp. (15.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (10.6%), and Acinetobacter spp. (9.2%). The crude mortality was 21.6% (74 of 342). Forty-five percent of nBSIs occurred in a pediatric or neonatal intensive-care unit (ICU). The most frequent underlying conditions were malignancy, in 95 patients (27.8%). Among the potential factors predisposing patients to BSI, central venous catheters were the most frequent (66.4%). Methicillin resistance was detected in 37 S. aureus isolates (27.1%). Of the Klebsiella spp. isolates, 43.2% were resistant to ceftriaxone. Of the Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 42.9% and 21.4%, respectively, were resistant to imipenem. Conclusions In our multicenter study, we found a high mortality and a large proportion of gram-negative bacilli with elevated levels of resistance in pediatric patients. PMID:23861860

  20. A multi-level spatial analysis of clinical malaria and subclinical Plasmodium infections in Pailin Province, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M. Parker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The malaria burden is decreasing throughout the Greater Mekong Subregion, however transmission persists in some areas. Human movement, subclinical infections and complicated transmission patterns contribute to the persistence of malaria. This research describes the micro-geographical epidemiology of both clinical malaria and subclinical Plasmodium infections in three villages in Western Cambodia. Methods: Three villages in Western Cambodia were selected for the study based on high reported Plasmodium falciparum incidence. A census was conducted at the beginning of the study, including demographic information and travel history. The total population was 1766. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted every three months from June 2013 to June 2014. Plasmodium infections were detected using an ultra-sensitive, high-volume, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (uPCR technique. Clinical episodes were recorded by village health workers. The geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude were collected for all houses and all participants were linked to their respective houses using a demographic surveillance system. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Results: Most clinical episodes and subclinical infections occurred within a single study village. Clinical Plasmodium vivax episodes clustered spatially in each village but only lasted for a month. In one study village subclinical infections clustered in geographic proximity to clusters of clinical episodes. The largest risk factor for clinical P. falciparum episodes was living in a house where another clinical P. falciparum episode occurred (model adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 6.9; CI: 2.3–19. 8. Subclinical infections of both P. vivax and P. falciparum were associated with clinical episodes of the same species (AOR: 5.8; CI: 1.5–19.7 for P. falciparum and AOR: 14.6; CI: 8.6–25.2 for P. vivax and self-reported overnight visits to forested areas (AOR = 3.8; CI: 1.8

  1. Clinical implications of malnutrition in childhood cancer patients-infections and mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeffen, E. A. H.; Brinksma, A.; Miedema, K. G. E.; de Bock, G. H.; Tissing, W. J. E.

    In childhood cancer patients, malnutrition has been proposed to increase infection rates and reduce survival. We investigated whether malnutrition at diagnosis and during treatment and weight loss during treatment are prognostic factors for infection rates and survival, within a heterogeneous

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Pharmacy Education on Infection Management Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in an Indonesian Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Nasution, Azizah; Sulaiman, SA. Syed; Shafie, A.A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the clinical and economic impacts of clinical pharmacy education (CPE) on infection management among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 4 and 5 in Haji Adam Malik Hospital, Indonesia. Methods A quasi-experimental economic evaluation comparing CPE impact on 6-month CKD mortality was conducted on the basis of payer perspective. The experimental group (n = 63) received care by health care providers who were given CPE on drug-related probl...

  3. Clinical study of pulmonary infection caused by mycobacterium avium complex. Evaluation of radiographic features on the primary pulmonary infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yasuko; Harada, Susumu; Kitahara, Yoshinari; Kajiki, Akira; Maruyama, Masao; Takamoto, Masahiro; Ishibashi, Tsuneo

    1996-01-01

    During the 13 year period of 1982 to 1994 we had 103 patients with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections. All met the criteria of atypical mycobacteriosis (Japanese Mycobacteriosis Research Group of the National Chest Hospitals). Of 103 patients 70 had no underlying pulmonary diseases and classified as primary type. Radiographic features of chest X-rays or computed tomography (CT) of primary infection were evaluated. Results obtained were as follows: Primary infection of MAC was classified into two types. One was localized type. This type was further classified into three patterns; tuberculosis-like pattern, pneumonia pattern in the lingual and/or middle lobe and pneumonia pattern in other lobes. Another one was diffuse type. Tuberculosis-like pattern was most common in males. On the other hand, the pneumonia pattern and the diffuse type were most common in females. Four characteristic features were seen as follows (Type 1-4) in the chest CT examination of diffuse pattern. Type 1: Nodules near the pleura. Type 2: Nodules with subpleural thickening. Type 3: Bronchial wall thickening and ectatic change of the draining bronchi. Type 4: Cystic bronchiectatic change associated with atelectasis of the segment or the lobe. Bronchiectatic changes became severe and widespreaded in all lung fields as the disease progressed slowly. These findings were more prevalent in the lingual and/or middle lobe than the other lobes. (author)

  4. Reduction in Clinical Response to Empiric Antimicrobial Therapy of Febrile Granulocytopenic Patients Receiving TMP/SMX Infection Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Bow

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In the course of a multicentre clinical trial evaluating two antibacterial regimens for the empiric treatment of suspected infection in febrile neutropenic cancer patients, a suboptimal response was noted among recipients of antibacterial prophylaxis with trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (TMP/SMX. Multivariate analysis identified TMP/SMX prophylaxis as a predictor of poor outcome independent of other variables such as classification of infection, marrow recovery, neutrophil count at first fever, indwelling central venous catheter use, and underlying disease. This effect appeared to be restricted to recipients of tobramycin plus ticarcillin (TT. TMP/SMX suppresses potentially pathogenic aerobic Gram-negative bacilli and allows colonization and subsequent infection by Gram-positive microorganisms against which TT-like regimens have limited activity. Recognition of this phenomenon may permit a more appropriate selection of antibacterial agents for the therapy of suspected infection in the neutropenic patient.

  5. Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010373 Eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis:a clinical and cerebrospinal fluid cytology report of 9 cases. GUAN Hongzhi(关鸿志),et al. Dept Neurol,PUMC & CAMS,Bejing 100730. Chin J Neurol 2010;43(4):268-271. Objective To report 9 cases of eosinophilic meningitis caused by Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Beijing,and to evaluate

  6. Clinical and molecular features of one case of human infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum from Podlaskie Province in eastern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Welc-Falęciak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA caused by Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection in one of 28 patients (3.6%; n=1/28 tested samples with early Lyme borreliosis. The clinical and laboratory results of a 42-year-old patient fulfilled criteria of confirm anaplasmosis and suggest an acute stage of illness. The described case provides strong presumptive evidence that infection in this patient was acquired with a pathogenic strain of A. phagocytophilum through a tick bite. A positive DNA with PCR for A. phagocytophilum infection was sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. Physicians should consider the possibility of anaplasmosis in patients with early Lyme borreliosis, and A. phagocytophilum should be considered as a differential diagnosis in all patients from an endemic region of potential high risk factors for tick-borne diseases.

  7. Hepatitis B virus infection in Chinese patients with hepatitis C virus infection: prevalence, clinical characteristics, viral interactions and host genotypes: a nationwide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li-Bo; Rao, Hui-Ying; Ma, Yuan-Ji; Bai, Lang; Chen, En-Qiang; Du, Ling-Yao; Yang, Rui-Feng; Wei, Lai; Tang, Hong

    2016-10-12

    Little is known about hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in China. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence, clinical characteristics, viral interactions and host genotypes of HBV/HCV dual infection compared with HCV monoinfection. A cross-sectional study. China. 997 patients with HCV from 28 university-affiliated hospitals in China were enrolled in this research. Patients were divided into two subgroups. The prevalence of HBV infection in patients with HCV was 4.11% (41/997). The age-specific prevalence of HBsAg was 0.70%, 3.97% and 5.85% in groups aged 18-30, 30-50 and >50 years old (p=0.057), respectively. Patients with HBV/HCV dual infection and patients with HCV monoinfection had similar HCV viral loads (5.80±0.89 vs 5.83±1.00 log10 IU/mL, p=0.904). The dominant HCV genotype was 1b in both groups (53.65% vs 56.90%, p=0.493). The protective C allele in IL-28B (rs12979860) was also the dominant allele type in both patient groups (85.36% vs 83.99%, p=0.814). Patients with HBV/HCV dual infection had a higher ratio of liver cirrhosis and hepatic decompensation than patients with HCV monoinfection (39.02% vs 17.69%, p=0.001; 31.70% vs 12.13%, p=0.001). The HBV burden was moderate in HCV-infected patients in China. Liver cirrhosis was more common in patients with HBV/HCV dual infection, suggesting the need for closer monitoring of dual-infected individuals. NCT01293279; Post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Periprosthetic hip joint infection with Aspergillus terreus: A clinical case and a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bartash

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fungal periprosthetic joint infections due to Aspergillus species are rare but are associated with significant cost and morbidity. We present a case of Asperigillus terreus prosthetic joint infection of the hip. The patient was successfully treated with a prolonged course of systemic antifungals along with surgical management. Keywords: Fungal prosthetic joint infection, Aspergillus terreus

  9. Infection prevention in the surgical intensive care unit using selective decontamination : epidemiology, bacteriology and clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W.M. Tetteroo (Geert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn Part A the extent of the problems in infection-prevention is described in Chapter 1 and nosocomial infections are defined in Chapter 2, in which also the difficulties of infection diagnosis in critically ill patients are reviewed. Chapter 3 describes the history of antibiotic

  10. Association of clinical signs after acute Schmallenberg virus infection with milk production and fertility in Swiss dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Isabel; Wüthrich, Marianne; Meylan, Mireille; van den Borne, Bart H P; Schüpbach-Regula, Gertraud

    2017-10-01

    Since its first occurrence in August 2011 in Germany and the Netherlands, the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) spread rapidly across Europe, where it caused production losses and abortions in ruminants as well as congenital malformations in the offspring of affected animals. Several studies have investigated the impact of SBV on fertility and production parameters in dairy cows at herd level. However, the impact of clinical disease at the animal level remained undetermined. This study aimed at estimating the impact of clinical disease during and after an infection with SBV on production and fertility parameters in individual Swiss dairy cows. Sixty-seven case and twenty-four control herds were selected according to whether cows had been showing clinical signs indicative of SBV during the epidemic from July to December 2012 in Switzerland. Of these 91 farms, production and fertility data from 388 cows with clinical signs from case herds were collected over a time period of four years, and compared to data from 932 cows without clinical signs originating from case or control herds. Milk yield, somatic cell count, number of inseminations and non-return at day 56 were analysed by means of hierarchical multivariable regression analysis. A significant drop in milk yield was observed in all groups during the SBV epidemic compared to the time before the infection, which amounted to 1.9kg per test day for clinical animals, 1.1kg for non-clinical animals from case herds and 0.6kg for non-clinical animals from control herds. A prolonged effect on milk yield was observed in clinical cows for about one year, suggesting that animals with clinical disease might not return to their previous milk production level in the current lactation after an acute infection with SBV. Clinical animals showed a significantly higher somatic cell count during the epidemic compared to the time before the infection. The number of inseminations per cow and production cycle was higher for clinical animals

  11. Association between Proton Pump Inhibitors and Respiratory Infections: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Sultan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs have become the mainstay of treatment for and prevention of many serious gastrointestinal diseases. Laboratory and clinical evidence suggests that the increase in gastric pH caused by PPIs may be linked to increased bacterial colonization of the stomach and may predispose patients to an increased risk for respiratory infections.

  12. Effectiveness of a risk-based visitor-prioritizing system at a sexually transmitted infection outpatient clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, Titia L. J.; van der Bij, Akke K.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; van Leent, Edwin J. M.; Thiesbrummel, Harold F. J.; Fennema, Han S. A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to study the efficacy/effectiveness of a risk-based visitor-prioritizing system at a sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic aimed to improve screening capacity by providing tailored service. In April 2004, a prioritizing system was implemented that classifies

  13. Effectiveness of a risk-based visitor-prioritizing system at a sexually transmitted infection outpatient clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijman, T.L.J.; van der Bij, A.K.; de Vries, H.J.C.; van Leent, E.J.M.; Thiesbrummel, H.F.J.; Fennema, H.S.A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to study the efficacy/effectiveness of a risk-based visitor-prioritizing system at a sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic aimed to improve screening capacity by providing tailored service. Study Design: In April 2004, a prioritizing system was

  14. Oncogenic human papillomavirus genital infection in southern Iranian women: population-based study versus clinic-based data

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    Eghbali Seyed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies on genital human papilloma viruses infection (HPVs in general population are crucial for the implementation of health policy guidelines for developing the strategies to prevent the primary and secondary cervical cancer. In different parts of Iran, there is a lack of population-based studies to determine the prevalence of HPV in the general population. The aim of this population-based study is to compare the prevalence rate of genital HPV infection among reproductive women with our previous clinic-based data, which showed a prevalence rate of 5% in women in southern Iran. Results Using general primers for all genotypes of HPV, of 799 randomly selected women, five (0.63%, 95% CI 0.23-1.55% tested positive for HPV DNA. Overall, seven different HPV genotypes were detected: six types (16, 18, 31, 33, 51 and 56 were carcinogenic, or “high risk genotypes” and one genotype (HPV-66 was “probably carcinogenic.” Conclusions In a population-based study, the prevalence of HPV infection among southern Iranian women was lower than that observed worldwide. However, our gynaecological clinic-based study on the prevalence of HPV infection showed results comparable with other studies in the Middle East and Persian Gulf countries. Since gynaecological clinic-based data may generally overestimate HPV prevalence, estimates of prevalence according to clinic-based data should be adjusted downward by the population-based survey estimates.

  15. Clinical effects of sinus surgery and adjuvant therapy in cystic fibrosis patients - can chronic lung infections be postponed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanaes, K; Johansen, H K; Skov, M

    2013-01-01

    The paranasal sinuses can be a bacterial reservoir for pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) METHODOLOGY: In this prospective, non-randomised, uncontrolled, intervention cohort study, the clinical effect of sinus surgery followed by two weeks` intravenous antibiotics, 6 month...

  16. Clinical and bacteriological effects of pivmecillinam for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae in urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansåker, Filip; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Sjögren, Ingegerd

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae is increasing and the therapeutic options are limited, especially in primary care. Recent indications have suggested pivmecillinam to be a suitable option. Here, we...... evaluated the clinical and bacteriological effects of pivmecillinam in UTIs caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae....

  17. Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008350 A comparative evaluation of enzyme linked immunospot assay and IS6110 polymerase chain reaction for early diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis. QUAN Chao(全超), et al. Dept Neurol, Huashan Hosp, Shanghai, Med Coll, Fudan Univ, Shanghai 200040. Chin J Neurol 2008;41(3):176-179.Objective To establish an early diagnostic testfor tuberculous meningitis(TBM)with good sensitivity and specificity.Methods Twenty-five patients with a clinical

  18. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy in children with febrile urinary tract infection: a prospective randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiri Kalmarzi R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acute pyelonephritis may lead to permanent renal scarring. The standard recommendation for treatment of febrile children with urinary tract infection (UTI is hospitalization for intravenous antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of outpatient intravenous ceftriaxone and cefixime versus inpatient of the same regimen for children with febrile UTI.   "nMethods: In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of administration two days intravenous ceftriaxone followed by an oral cefixime for eight days (as outpatient group versus four days intravenous ceftriaxone followed by an oral cefixime for six days (as inpatient group, in 203 children (99 cases in outpatient group and 104 cases in inpatient group 3 months to 15 years of age with febrile UTI, in terms of short-term clinical outcomes (sterilization of the urine and defeverescence and long-term morbidity (incidence of reinfection and renal scarring documented by DMSA scintigraphy. "nResults: Repeat urine cultures were sterile within 48 hours in all children, mean time to defeverescence was 27.58 (SD=±12.62 and 31.44 (SD=±17.06 hours for children in outpatient and inpatient groups, respectively (P=0.067. Reinfection occurred in 9.1% of outpatient and 13.4% of inpatient group (P=0.326. Renal scarring developed in 11% of children of outpatient and 7.6% of children of inpatient group (P=0.884. There was no significant difference between the two groups in respect of renal scarring. "nConclusions: Outpatient ceftriaxone for two days followed by cefixime to complete a 10 days course can be recommended as a safe and effective treatment for children with febrile UTI.

  19. Clinical Characteristic and Outcome of Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

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    Krystle Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infection (ALRTI is the leading cause of deaths in children under 5 years of age worldwide, and has high morbidity and mortality in children with Congenital Heart Disease (CHD. The objective of this study was to obtain the incidence, clinical characteristic, and outcome of ALRTI children with CHD. Methods: A retrospective hospital-based study was conducted from January 2007–December 2011 to medical record of child patients with ALRTI and CHD in the Department of Child Health of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital, Bandung. The diagnosis of CHD was determined by echocardiography. The collected data was analyzed and presented in percentage shown in tables. Results : From 3,897 children who had ALRTI, there were 149 children with CHD (3.8%, with 11.4% of whom founded with recurrent episodes. This happened often in girls than boys with quite similar ratio of 1.37: 1.The majority of children (80% was under 1 year old of age, 72.5% with malnutrition, and 24.8% with severe malnutrition. Clinical symptoms mostly found were difficulty of breathing (98%, fever (85.2%, cough (75.2%, and runny nose (63.1%. The most common types of CHD were Patent Ductus Arteriosus (47.6%, followed by Ventricular Septal Defect (47%. Bronchopneumonia (86.6% was the common type of ALRTI. The length of stay was mostly less than 10 days (70.5%. From all the children 43.7% had complications, and 6.7% died. Conclusions: The ALRTI in children with CHD is not common and has good outcome. The majority for CHD lesions are Patent Ductus Arteriosus and Ventricular Septal Defect while for ALRTI is Bronchopneumonia.

  20. Clinical and economic benefits of fidaxomicin compared to vancomycin for Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Jason C; Reilly, Joseph P; Navalkele, Bhagyashri; Downham, Gemma; Haynes, Kevin; Trivedi, Manish

    2015-11-01

    We studied the clinical and economic impact of a protocol encouraging the use of fidaxomicin as a first-line drug for treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients hospitalized during a 2-year period. This study evaluated patients who received oral vancomycin or fidaxomicin for the treatment of CDI during a 2-year period. All included patients were eligible for administration of fidaxomicin via a protocol that encouraged its use for selected patients. The primary clinical endpoint was 90-day readmission with a diagnosis of CDI. Hospital charges and insurance reimbursements for readmissions were calculated along with the cost of CDI therapy to estimate the financial impact of the choice of therapy. Recurrences were seen in 10/49 (20.4%) fidaxomicin patients and 19/46 (41.3%) vancomycin patients (P = 0.027). In a multivariate analysis that included determinations of severity of CDI, serum creatinine increases, and concomitant antibiotic use, only fidaxomicin was significantly associated with decreased recurrence (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12 to 0.93). The total lengths of stay of readmitted patients were 183 days for vancomycin and 87 days for fidaxomicin, with costs of $454,800 and $196,200, respectively. Readmissions for CDI were reimbursed on the basis of the severity of CDI, totaling $151,136 for vancomycin and $107,176 for fidaxomicin. Fidaxomicin drug costs totaled $62,112, and vancomycin drug costs were $6,646. We calculated that the hospital lost an average of $3,286 per fidaxomicin-treated patient and $6,333 per vancomycin-treated patient, thus saving $3,047 per patient with fidaxomicin. Fidaxomicin use for CDI treatment prevented readmission and decreased hospital costs compared to use of oral vancomycin. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. The clinical and microbiological characteristics of infections in burn patients from the Formosa Fun Coast Dust Explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Chao; Wu, Rui-Xin; Chiu, Chih-Chien; Yang, Ya-Sung; Lee, Yi; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2018-04-01

    Bloodstream infection is a leading cause of mortality among burn patients. This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors, causative pathogens, and the relationship between bloodstream infections and other infections among burn patients from the Formosa Fun Coast Dust Explosion. This retrospective study evaluated the demographic and clinical characteristics, infection types, causative pathogen(s), and isolates' antibiotic susceptibilities from patients who were hospitalized between June 27 and September 31, 2015. Fifty-eight patients were admitted during the study period (36 males, mean age: 22.6 years). The mean burned total body surface area (TBSA) was 40% for all patients. Eighteen (31%) patients with mean TBSA of 80% had 66 episodes of bloodstream infections caused by 92 isolates. Twelve (18.2%) episodes of bloodstream infections were polymicrobial. Acinetobacter baumannii (19, 20.7%), Ralstonia pickettii (17, 18.5%), and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum (13, 14.1%) were the most common pathogens causing bloodstream infections. A high concordance rate of wound cultures with blood cultures was seen in Staphylococcus aureus (3, 75%) and C. meningosepticum (8, 61.5%) infections. However, no Ralstonia isolate was found in burn wounds of patients with Ralstonia bacteremia. A high concordance rate of central venous catheter cultures with blood cultures was noted in Ralstonia mannitolilytica (5, 62.5%) and Chryseobacterium indologenes (3, 60%) infections. Approximately 21.1% of A. baumannii strains were resistant to carbapenem. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to methicillin. Waterborne bacteria should be considered in patients of burns with possible water contact. Empirical broad-spectrum antibiotics should be considered for patients who were hospitalized for severe sepsis, or septic shock with a large burn. Antibiotic treatment should be administered based on the specific pathogens and their detection points. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The clinical and microbiological characteristics of infections in burn patients from the Formosa Fun Coast Dust Explosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chao Lin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Purpose: Bloodstream infection is a leading cause of mortality among burn patients. This study aimed to evaluate the risk factors, causative pathogens, and the relationship between bloodstream infections and other infections among burn patients from the Formosa Fun Coast Dust Explosion. Methods: This retrospective study evaluated the demographic and clinical characteristics, infection types, causative pathogen(s, and isolates' antibiotic susceptibilities from patients who were hospitalized between June 27 and September 31, 2015. Results: Fifty-eight patients were admitted during the study period (36 males, mean age: 22.6 years. The mean burned total body surface area (TBSA was 40% for all patients. Eighteen (31% patients with mean TBSA of 80% had 66 episodes of bloodstream infections caused by 92 isolates. Twelve (18.2% episodes of bloodstream infections were polymicrobial. Acinetobacter baumannii (19, 20.7%, Ralstonia pickettii (17, 18.5%, and Chryseobacterium meningosepticum (13, 14.1% were the most common pathogens causing bloodstream infections. A high concordance rate of wound cultures with blood cultures was seen in Staphylococcus aureus (3, 75% and C. meningosepticum (8, 61.5% infections. However, no Ralstonia isolate was found in burn wounds of patients with Ralstonia bacteremia. A high concordance rate of central venous catheter cultures with blood cultures was noted in Ralstonia mannitolilytica (5, 62.5% and Chryseobacterium indologenes (3, 60% infections. Approximately 21.1% of A. baumannii strains were resistant to carbapenem. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to methicillin. Conclusions: Waterborne bacteria should be considered in patients of burns with possible water contact. Empirical broad-spectrum antibiotics should be considered for patients who were hospitalized for severe sepsis, or septic shock with a large burn. Antibiotic treatment should be administered based on the specific pathogens and their detection

  3. Cranberry juice for prophylaxis of urinary tract infections--conclusions from clinical experience and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowack, Rainer; Schmitt, Wilhelm

    2008-09-01

    Cranberry juice (Vaccinium macrocarpon) is a widely used and recommended North-American folk remedy for prophylaxis of urinary tract infections (UTI). Clinical trials have documented its efficacy in women with recurrent UTI, but so far not in other groups of patients. The composition of effective cranberry products and its dosage in UTI prophylaxis have not been defined. Intriguing experimental research has identified an anti-adhesive mechanism of cranberry juice that prevents docking of bacteria on host tissues. This efficacy mechanism can be traced in patients' urine following oral intake of cranberry products and appears to be due to proanthocyanidins with an A-type linkage of flavanols. The application of this anti-adhesion mechanism of cranberry-proanthocyandins is currently also investigated in other common diseases of bacterial pathogenesis, for example Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and dental caries/periodontal disease. The use of cranberry products appears to be safe and provide additional benefits by anti-oxidant and cholesterol-lowering activity.

  4. Development and clinical evaluation of a rapid diagnostic kit for feline leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Shik; Chong, Chom-Kyu; Kim, Hak-Yong; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Jeong, Wooseog; An, Dong-Jun; Jeoung, Hye-Young; Lee, Jae-In; Lee, Young-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) causes a range of neoplastic and degenerative diseases in cats. To obtain a more sensitive and convenient diagnosis of the disease, we prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for the FeLV p27 to develop a rapid diagnostic test with enhanced sensitivity and specificity. Among these antibodies, we identified two clones (hybridomas 8F8B5 and 8G7D1) that specifically bound to FeLV and were very suitable for a diagnostic kit. The affinity constants for 8F8B5 and 8G7D1 were 0.35 × 10⁸ and 0.86 × 10⁸, respectively. To investigate the diagnostic abilities of the rapid kit using these antibodies, we performed several clinical studies. Assessment of analytical sensitivity revealed that the detection threshold of the rapid diagnostic test was 2 ng/mL for recombinant p27 and 12.5 × 10⁴ IU/mL for FeLV. When evaluating 252 cat sera samples, the kit was found to have a kappa value of 0.88 compared to polymerase chain reaction (PCR), indicating a significant correlation between data from the rapid diagnostic test and PCR. Sensitivity and specificity of the kit were 95.2% (20/21) and 98.5% (257/261), respectively. Our results demonstrated that the rapid diagnostic test would be a suitable diagnostic tool for the rapid detection of FeLV infection in cats.

  5. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY CHARACTERISTICS OF THE INFECTION CAUSED BY ENTEROVIRUS-71

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Simovanyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse course of enterovirus-71 infection (EVI-71 in children, frequent development of the nervous system pathology determine the need for early disease diagnosis. The study included 139 children aged 6 months to 13 years. Modern EVI-71 features is a frequent defeat of children aged from 3 to 7 years, attending organized groups, the priority development of combined moderate severity forms without nervous system pathology. EVI-71 is characterized by cyclical course, appearance in the first two disease days fever, murrain-like, catarrhal, lymphoproliferative syndromes, conjunctivitis, headaches. The second stage of the disease (3— 6 days in 37.9% children accompanied by attaching of meningitis and meningoencephalitis symptoms (common cerebral, meningeal and encephalic syndromes, changes in cerebrospinal fluid. In the EVI-71 diagnosis must be observed epidemiological history, clinical and laboratory parameters, detection of enterovirus-71 and its RNA from feces, oropharyngeal mucus and cerebrospinal fluid. Patients with EVI-71 need for combined treatment, including causal agents and pathogenetic therapy. 

  6. Dependency Traits, Relationship Power, and Health Risks in Women Receiving Sexually-Transmitted Infection Clinic Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benotsch, Eric G; Sawyer, Ashlee N; Martin, Aaron M; Allen, Elizabeth S; Nettles, Christopher D; Richardson, Doug; Rietmeijer, Cornelis A

    2017-01-01

    In prior research, having traits consistent with a personality disorder has been shown to be related to substance use and high-risk sexual activity; however, few studies have examined relationships between dependency traits and health-jeopardizing behaviors. Individuals with traits consistent with dependent personality disorder may be more likely to be in a primary relationship characterized by unhealthy conditions, including physical abuse from a partner, low assertiveness in sexual situations, and partner infidelity. In addition, dependency traits may be associated with unhealthy coping (e.g., through substance use). To examine associations between dependent personality traits and these types of health-related behaviors, 198 women seeking sexually transmitted infection clinic services completed a computer-assisted assessment of dependent personality traits, substance use, unhealthy conditions in primary relationships, perceived sexual and relationship power, and sexual risk related to condom use. Dependency trait scores were correlated with the use of cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine. Participants high in dependency traits reported low perceived power within their relationships and less say in sexual behaviors, including condom use. In a series of multivariate analyses, dependency traits significantly predicted having been hit by a partner, staying with a partner after he cheated, having sex because of threats, and fear of asking a partner to use a condom. Dependency traits were also associated with lower past condom use and lower future condom use intentions. Results suggest that dependent personality traits may place women at higher risk for physical abuse and harmful health behaviors.

  7. [Clinical and histopathological characterization of oral leukoplakia in patients with HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Westhausen, A M; Reichart, P A; Gross, U

    1999-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of oral leukoplakia (OL) in HIV-positive patients and to evaluate the clinical and histopathological features and the presence of Candida hyphae and viral infections (HSV 1, 2, HPV, EBV and CMV) by immunocytochemical methods using mono- or polyclonal antibodies. A total of 269 HIV-seropositive patients, (222 men, median age 36.7 years and 47 women, median age 32 years) were registered. OL occurred in 20/269 (7.4%) patients (men, smokers, median age 38 years); the non-homogeneous form was observed in 11%. A lesional biopsy specimen was obtained from 8/20 patients. Specimens did not show signs of epithelial dysplasia. Candida hyphae were evident in 2/8 cases. Two patients tested positive for HPV and CMV; antibodies against EBV, HSV1 and 2 were negative. In conclusion, the prevalence of OL is comparatively high in this group of HIV-seropositive patients (7.4% vs. 0.9-2.2%). Moreover, the mean age of the study group at the time of diagnosis for OL was lower (38 years vs. 60 years).

  8. Differential body composition effects of protease inhibitors recommended for initial treatment of HIV infection: A randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Esteban; Gonzalez-Cordon, Ana; Ferrer, Elena; Domingo, Pere; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Felix; Portilla, Joaquin; Curran, Adrià; Podzamczer, Daniel; Ribera, Esteban; Murillas, Javier; Bernardino, Jose I.; Santos, Ignacio; Carton, Jose A.; Peraire, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    This article has been accepted for publication in Clinical Infectious Diseases ©2014 The Authors .Published by Oxford University Press on Clinical Infectious Disease 60.5. DOI: 10.1093/cid/ciu898 Background. It is unclear whether metabolic or body composition effects may differ between protease inhibitor-based regimens recommended for initial treatment of HIV infection. Methods. ATADAR is a phase IV, open-label, multicenter randomized clinical trial. Stable antiretroviral-naive HIV-in...

  9. The Infectious Diseases Society of America emerging infections network: bridging the gap between clinical infectious diseases and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Satish K; Beekmann, Susan E; Santibanez, Scott; Polgreen, Philip M

    2014-04-01

    In 1995, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention granted a Cooperative Agreement Program award to the Infectious Diseases Society of America to develop a provider-based emerging infections sentinel network, the Emerging Infections Network (EIN). Over the past 17 years, the EIN has evolved into a flexible, nationwide network with membership representing a broad cross-section of infectious disease physicians. The EIN has an active electronic mail conference (listserv) that facilitates communication among infectious disease providers and the public health community, and also sends members periodic queries (short surveys on infectious disease topics) that have addressed numerous topics relevant to both clinical infectious diseases and public health practice. The article reviews how the various functions of EIN contribute to clinical care and public health, identifies opportunities to further link clinical medicine and public health, and describes future directions for the EIN.

  10. Pink-pigmented non-fermentative gram-negative rods associated with human infections: a clinical and diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, R; Graves, M; Moler, S; Janda, J M

    2007-06-01

    Over the past several decades, the appearance of pink-pigmented bacteria in clinical specimens has gone from being a microbiologic curiosity in the clinical laboratory to the recognition of these aerobic microorganisms as etiologic agents of human disease, most notably bloodstream infections. Advances in the fields of molecular taxonomy and phylogenetics indicate that at least four distinct genera and eight different species are associated with clinical infections in susceptible patient populations. However, these bacteria are slow growing and present multiple diagnostic challenges to the microbiology laboratory including culture, isolation, and identification to species rank. This article provides a current review of these unusual non-fermentative chromogenic bacteria including their disease spectrum, taxonomy, and laboratory identification. The review also highlights the pitfalls or shortcomings we currently have in our knowledge of these microbes and their disease-producing capabilities.

  11. [Active tuberculosis in a cohort of HIV-infected inmates in a prison in Mexico City: clinical and epidemiological characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-León, Christian; Badial-Hernández, Florentino; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Sierra-Madero, Juan G; Martínez-Gamboa, Areli; Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Bautista-Arredondo, Sergio; González-Aguirre, Adrián; Guerrero-Almeida, María de Lourdes; del Valle, J Miriam Bobadilla; González-Rodríguez, Andrea; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2012-01-01

    To determine the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of prison inmates with active tuberculosis in HIV-positive prison populations. We conducted a cohort study in HIV-infected subjects in a prison in Mexico City, with the aim of determining clinical and epidemiological characteristics of cases with active TB. We detected 172 HIV infected inmates and TB in 28 of them (16.3%) - 21 (12.2) with pulmonary TB--with an incidence rate of 7.7/100 persons/year for active TB and 4.7/100 persons/year for pulmonary TB. No drug resistance was found. Two clusters (4 and 2 subjects) were observed after RFLP-typing of 18 isolates, with a transmission rate of 11% by molecular and clinical analysis. The prevalence of active TB was found to be a thousand times greater than in the general population. Evidence of transmission inside the prison was also found.

  12. Clinical and microscopic signs of cervicitis and urethritis: correlation with Chlamydia trachomatis infection in female STI patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Matilda; Tunbäck, Petra

    2013-03-27

    Chlamydia trachomatis is among the most prevalent genital infections and is an important cause of tubal factor infertility. The majority of infected females are asymptomatic. Evidence on the reliability of signs of inflammation used to predict chlamydia in female patients is inconsistent. This study examined associations between criteria routinely used in many Scandinavian sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics and a positive chlamydia test in a high-prevalence population. Clinical and microscopic signs of cervicitis and urethritis were recorded in 99 women attending due to chlamydia infection in a sexual partner. Mucopurulent cervical discharge, easily induced bleeding from the cervix, and more polymorpho-nuclear cells than epithelial cells in vaginal wet smear all correlated significantly with a positive Chlamydia trachomatis test (odds ratios: 3.4, 4.0 and 4.8, respectively). Increased numbers of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (>30 and ≥ 5 respectively) in stained cervical and urethral smears were not significantly correlated with chlamydia infection. Hence, routine collection of cervical and urethral smears in female STI patients is questionable.

  13. Clinical and bacteriological influence of diabetes mellitus on deep neck infection: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Hidaka, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Hasegawa, Jun; Yano, Hisakazu; Kakuta, Risako; Ozawa, Daiki; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Katori, Yukio

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been recognized as the most common systemic disease associated with deep neck infection. We report the first systematic review and meta-analysis of the influence of diabetes on clinical and bacteriological characteristics of deep neck infection. Articles were retrieved from PubMed, EMBASE, and the Japan Medical Abstracts Society database. A critical review of 227 studies identified 20 studies eligible for quantitative synthesis. Diabetes was associated with higher prevalences of multispace spread of infection, complications, and failure to identify pathogenesis, with risk ratios (RRs) of 1.96, 2.42, and 1.29, respectively. Bacteriologically, patients with diabetes showed a higher prevalence of culture identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae (RR, 3.28), and lower prevalences of Streptococcus spp. (RR, 0.57) and anaerobes (RR, 0.54). Deep neck infection with diabetes differs from that without in several clinical aspects. Again, bacteriological differences imply that diabetic infections might be populated by different bacterial flora. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Clinical analysis of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y-H; Li, G-Q; Guo, S-M; Che, Y-N; Wang, X; Cheng, F-T

    2017-10-01

    To analyze the related influencing factors of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). A total of 343 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia admitted to this hospital from January 2013 to December 2016, were selected and treated by TURP. Patients were divided into infection group and non-infection group according to the occurrence of urinary tract infection after operation. The possible influencing factors were collected to perform univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. There were 53 cases with urinary tract infection after operation among 343 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, accounting for 15.5%. The univariate analysis displayed that the occurrence of urinary tract infection in patients undergoing TURP was closely associated with patient's age ≥ 65 years old, complicated diabetes, catheterization for urinary retention before operation, no use of antibiotics before operation and postoperative indwelling catheter duration ≥ 5 d (p urinary tract infection in patients receiving TURP (p urinary tract infection after TURP, while preoperative prophylactic utilization of anti-infective drugs can reduce the occurrence of postoperative urinary tract infection.

  15. Chikungunya virus infection in Aruba: Diagnosis, clinical features and predictors of post-chikungunya chronic polyarthralgia.

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    Ralph Huits

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV emerged in Aruba for the first time in 2014. We studied the clinical presentation of acute CHIKV infection and the contribution of serologic and molecular assays to its diagnosis. In a cohort of confirmed CHIKV cases, we analysed the frequency, duration and predictors of post-chikungunya chronic polyarthralgia (pCHIK-CPA, defined as joint pains lasting longer than 6 weeks or longer than 1 year.Patient sera obtained within 10 days of symptom onset were tested for CHIKV, using an indirect immunofluorescence test for the detection of CHIKV-specific Immunoglobulin M (IgM and post-hoc, by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. CHIKV was isolated from selected samples and genotyped. For confirmed CHIKV cases, clinical data from chart review were complemented by a Telephone survey, conducted 18-24 months after diagnosis. When joint pain was reported, the duration, presence of inflammatory signs, type and number of joints affected, were recorded. Joint involvement was scored according to the 2010 'American College of Rheumatology/ European League Against Rheumatism' criteria for seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (ACR-score. Risk factors for pCHIK-CPA were identified by logistic regression.Acute CHIKV infection was diagnosed in 269 of 498 sera, by detection of IgM (n = 105, by RT-PCR (n = 59, or by both methods (n = 105. Asian genotype was confirmed in 7 samples. Clinical data were complete for 171 of 248 (69.0% patients, aged 15 years or older (median 49.4 [35.0-59.6]. The female-to-male ratio was 2.2. The main acute symptoms were arthralgia (94%, fever (85%, myalgia (85%, headache (73% and rash (63%. In patients with arthralgia (n = 160, pCHIK-CPA longer than 6 weeks was reported by 44% and longer than 1 year by 26% of cases. Inflammatory signs, stiffness, edema and redness were frequent (71%, 39% and 21%, respectively. Joints involved were knees (66%, ankles (50%, fingers (52%, feet (46%, shoulders (36

  16. CLINICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL FEATURES OF KIDNEY TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS WITH CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION MANIFESTATION IN THE EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD

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    L. V. Limareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To optimize the management of postoperative renal allograft recipients through the introduction of methods for predicting risk of manifestation of cytomegalovirus infection on the basis of a comprehensive assessment of the clinical and immunological status. Materials and methods. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 303 patients with end-stage renal disease, among them – were the recipients of renal allograft – 136, among whom 29 within 2 months after the operation had clinical signs of CMV infection. Assessable "CMV syndrome", laboratory evidence of CMV infection, the incidence of antigens (genes of HLA A, B and DRB *1, calculated goodness of fit χ2 and relative risk RR, changes MCP-1 in urine. Results. In renal allograft recipients with clinical and laboratory evidence of CMV infection in the early postoperative period, significantly more (χ2 > 3,8 met antigen B35. A positive association with CMV infection was detected also for DRB1 * 08, B21, B22, B41, A24 (9, B51 (5, DRB1*14 and DRB1*15. Protective effects possessed antigens / alleles of genes A26 (10, B14, B38 (16 B61 (40 and DRB1*16. MCP-1 levels in this group of recipients were raised to 2174,7 ± 296,3 pg/ml with a strong negative correlation with the levels of urea and creatinine in serum (r = 0,9, p < 0.001. Conclusion. Immunological markers of risk manifestation of CMV infection in recipients of kidneys in the early postoperative period are: the carriage of В35 и В55,56(22, В49(21, В41, DRB1*08 и DRB1*15, an increase of levels of MCP-1 in urine without increasing the levels of urea and creatinine in the serum. 

  17. Oral candidiasis as a clinical marker of highly active antiretroviral treatment failure in HIV-infected patients

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    Sandra Lopez-Verdin

    Full Text Available Introduction: Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infection that is readily detectable in the clinic. It has been used to assess the immune status of HIV patients as well as the effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Objective: To determine the frequency of oral candidiasis infection among various indicators associated with antiretroviral therapy effectiveness. Material and methods: Cross-sectional and analytical study, in which groups were initially created based on the use or not of antiretroviral therapy. Participants were subjected to questions on factors related to Candida infection, salivary flow measurements and a clinical examination of the oral cavity to determine the frequency of candidiasis Results: The difference in the frequency of oral candidiasis between groups with and without antiretroviral therapy was significant (OR 2.6 IC95% 1.5-4.4. There were also a significant association with decreased number of CD4 lymphocytes.. Discussion: Resistance to anti-retroviral therapy constitutes one of the fundamental barriers to a successful treatment in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus, as do toxicities and adherence problems. Clinical markers such oral candidiasis is an easily and accesible parameter for the early detection of treatment failure.

  18. Pharyngeal squamous cell papilloma in adult Japanese: comparison with laryngeal papilloma in clinical manifestations and HPV infection.

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    Hirai, Ryoji; Makiyama, Kiyoshi; Higuti, Yusho; Ikeda, Atsuo; Miura, Masatoshi; Hasegawa, Hisashi; Kinukawa, Noriko; Ikeda, Minoru

    2012-10-01

    A number of reports have investigated the relationship between laryngeal papilloma and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection. On the other hand, it is unclear whether the HPV infection is involved in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma. We hypothesized that HPV infection was involved in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma similarly to laryngeal papilloma. To verify this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of HPV infection. Furthermore, clinical manifestations of pharyngeal papilloma, which had rarely been reported, were discussed. A male-to-female ratio, solitary or multiple occurrences, and koilocytosis were examined in cases with pharyngeal papilloma. HPV DNA was examined with unfixed surgically resected specimens of pharyngeal papilloma. A screening test by the liquid-phase hybridization method was carried out for the HPV high-risk group (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 56, 58, 59, and 68) and HPV low-risk group (6, 11, 42, 43, 44). As a control, 15 cases with laryngeal papilloma for which the same screening test was carried out were employed. Pharyngeal papilloma occurred as a solitary lesion more often, whereas laryngeal papilloma occurred as multiple tumors more frequently. The HPV infection rate was 0% in pharyngeal papilloma cases, which was in stark contrast with 66.7% in the HPV low-risk group in laryngeal papilloma cases. Pharyngeal papilloma occurred as a solitary lesion in females more frequently. Contrary to our hypothesis, the involvement of HPV infection was unlikely in the occurrence of pharyngeal papilloma.

  19. How Can Viral Dynamics Models Inform Endpoint Measures in Clinical Trials of Therapies for Acute Viral Infections?

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    Carolin Vegvari

    Full Text Available Acute viral infections pose many practical challenges for the accurate assessment of the impact of novel therapies on viral growth and decay. Using the example of influenza A, we illustrate how the measurement of infection-related quantities that determine the dynamics of viral load within the human host, can inform investigators on the course and severity of infection and the efficacy of a novel treatment. We estimated the values of key infection-related quantities that determine the course of natural infection from viral load data, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The data were placebo group viral load measurements collected during volunteer challenge studies, conducted by Roche, as part of the oseltamivir trials. We calculated the values of the quantities for each patient and the correlations between the quantities, symptom severity and body temperature. The greatest variation among individuals occurred in the viral load peak and area under the viral load curve. Total symptom severity correlated positively with the basic reproductive number. The most sensitive endpoint for therapeutic trials with the goal to cure patients is the duration of infection. We suggest laboratory experiments to obtain more precise estimates of virological quantities that can supplement clinical endpoint measurements.

  20. Awareness and knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection among high-risk men of Hispanic origin attending a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI clinic

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    Colón-López Vivian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genital Human papilloma virus (HPV is one of the most commonly diagnosed Sexually Transmitted Infection (STIs in men and women. Knowledge about HPV infection among men is limited. This study aims to determine correlates of adequate knowledge of HPV infection among men who attend an STI clinic in Puerto Rico. Methods A cross-sectional study of 206 men was conducted at an STI clinic in San Juan, PR. Adequate knowledge was defined as a score of at least 70% of correct responses among those men who reported having ever heard of HPV. Variables that achieved statistical significance in the bivariate analysis (p Results Although 52.5% of men reported having heard of HPV infection before the surve