WorldWideScience

Sample records for sandy shoreline back-bay

  1. Shoreline Change Along Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Annual Monitoring Report, 2011-2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the first of a series of reports documenting the change in shoreline position along the ocean front of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. This report follows...

  2. Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction — Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Benzel, William M.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Hageman, Philip L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Adams, Monique; Berry, Cyrus J.; Fischer, Jeffrey; Fisher, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Some barrier-island dunes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Sandy's storm surges in October 2012 have been reconstructed using sediments dredged from back bays. These sand-, clay-, and iron sulfide-rich sediments were used to make berm-like cores for the reconstructed dunes, which were then covered by beach sand. In November 2013, we sampled and analyzed partially weathered materials collected from the cores of reconstructed dunes. There are generally low levels of metal toxicants in the reconstructed dune materials. However oxidation of reactive iron sulfides by percolating rainwater produces acid-sulfate pore waters, which evaporate during dry periods to produce efflorescent gypsum and sodium jarosite salts. The results suggest use of sulfidic sediments in dune reconstruction has both drawbacks (e.g., potential to generate acid runoff from dune cores following rainfall, enhanced corrosion of steel bulwarks) and possible benefits (e.g., efflorescent salts may enhance structural integrity).

  3. Environmental implications of the use of sulfidic back-bay sediments for dune reconstruction - Lessons learned post Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, Geoffrey S; Benzel, William M; Hoefen, Todd M; Hageman, Philip L; Morman, Suzette A; Reilly, Timothy J; Adams, Monique; Berry, Cyrus J; Fischer, Jeffrey M; Fisher, Irene

    2016-06-30

    Some barrier-island dunes damaged or destroyed by Hurricane Sandy's storm surges in October 2012 have been reconstructed using sediments dredged from back bays. These sand-, clay-, and iron sulfide-rich sediments were used to make berm-like cores for the reconstructed dunes, which were then covered by beach sand. In November 2013, we sampled and analyzed partially weathered materials collected from the cores of reconstructed dunes. There are generally low levels of metal toxicants in the reconstructed dune materials. However oxidation of reactive iron sulfides by percolating rainwater produces acid-sulfate pore waters, which evaporate during dry periods to produce efflorescent gypsum and sodium jarosite salts. The results suggest use of sulfidic sediments in dune reconstruction has both drawbacks (e.g., potential to generate acid runoff from dune cores following rainfall, enhanced corrosion of steel bulwarks) and possible benefits (e.g., efflorescent salts may enhance structural integrity).

  4. Uncertainties in sandy shorelines evolution under the Bruun rule assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonéri eLe Cozannet

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current practice of sandy shoreline change assessments, the local sedimentary budget is evaluated using the sediment balance equation, that is, by summing the contributions of longshore and cross-shore processes. The contribution of future sea-level-rise induced by climate change is usually obtained using the Bruun rule, which assumes that the shoreline retreat is equal to the change of sea-level divided by the slope of the upper shoreface. However, it remains unsure that this approach is appropriate to account for the impacts of future sea-level rise. This is due to the lack of relevant observations to validate the Bruun rule under the expected sea-level rise rates. To address this issue, this article estimates the coastal settings and period of time under which the use of the Bruun rule could be (invalidated, in the case of wave-exposed gently-sloping sandy beaches. Using the sedimentary budgets of Stive (2004 and probabilistic sea-level rise scenarios based on IPCC, we provide shoreline change projections that account for all uncertain hydrosedimentary processes affecting idealized coasts (impacts of sea-level rise, storms and other cross-shore and longshore processes. We evaluate the relative importance of each source of uncertainties in the sediment balance equation using a global sensitivity analysis. For scenario RCP 6.0 and 8.5 and in the absence of coastal defences, the model predicts a perceivable shift toward generalized beach erosion by the middle of the 21st century. In contrast, the model predictions are unlikely to differ from the current situation in case of scenario RCP 2.6. Finally, the contribution of sea-level rise and climate change scenarios to sandy shoreline change projections uncertainties increases with time during the 21st century. Our results have three primary implications for coastal settings similar to those provided described in Stive (2004 : first, the validation of the Bruun rule will not necessarily be

  5. The National Assessment of Shoreline Change:A GIS Compilation of Vector Shorelines and Associated Shoreline Change Data for the Sandy Shorelines of the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Reid, David

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive data clearinghouse of digital vector shorelines and shoreline change rates for the sandy shoreline along the California open coast. These data, which are presented herein, were compiled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project. Beach erosion is a chronic problem along many open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information including rates and trends of shoreline migration. There is also a critical need for shoreline change data that is consistent from one coastal region to another. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic, systematic, and internally consistent updates of shorelines and shoreline change rates can be made at a National Scale. This data compilation for open-ocean, sandy shorelines of the California coast is one in a series that already includes the Gulf of Mexico and the Southeast Atlantic Coast (Morton et al., 2004; Morton et al., 2005) and will eventually cover Washington, Oregon, and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. Short- and long-term shoreline change evaluations are determined by comparing the positions of three historical shorelines digitized from maps, with a modern shoreline derived from LIDAR (light detection and ranging) topographic surveys. Historical shorelines generally represent the following time-periods: 1850s-1880s, 1920s-1930s, and late 1940s-1970s. The most recent shoreline is from data collected between 1997 and 2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated by linear regression using all four shorelines. Short-term rates of change are end-point rate calculations using the two most recent shorelines. Please refer to our full report on shoreline change of the

  6. TOXICITY TRENDS DURING AN OIL SPILL BIOREMEDIATION EXPERIMENT ON A SANDY SHORELINE IN DELAWARE, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 13-week, refereed, inter-agency toxicity testing program involving five bioassay methods was used to document the effectiveness of shoreline bioremediation to accelerate toxicity reduction of an oiled sandy shoreline at Fowler Beach, Delaware, USA. The study was part of an inte...

  7. Back Bay Wilderness area description

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a description of the lands located within the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Within these lands, it designates which area is suitable for...

  8. National Assessment of Shoreline Change Part 3: Historical Shoreline Change and Associated Coastal Land Loss Along Sandy Shorelines of the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Reid, David; Richmond, Bruce M.; Ruggiero, Peter; List, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    Beach erosion is a chronic problem along many open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. One purpose of this work is to develop standard repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally that are systematic and internally consistent. In the case of this study, the shoreline being measured is the boundary between the ocean water surface and the sandy beach. This report on the California Coast represents the first of two reports on long-term sandy shoreline change for the western U.S., the second of which will include the coast of the Pacific NW, including Oregon and Washington. A report for the Gulf of Mexico shoreline was completed in 2004 and is available at: http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2004/1043/. This report summarizes the methods of analysis, interprets the results, provides explanations regarding long-term and short-term trends and rates of change, and describes how different coastal communities are responding to coastal erosion. Shoreline change evaluations are based on comparing three historical shorelines digitized from maps, with a recent shoreline derived from lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) topographic surveys. The historical shorelines generally represent the following periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, and 1950s-1970s, whereas the lidar shoreline is from 1998-2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated using all

  9. Hurricane Sandy beach response and recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline, beach profile data, and breach shoreline data: October 2012 to June 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rachel E.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen T.; Reynolds, Billy J.

    2017-01-01

    Fire Island, New York is the site of a long term coastal morphologic change and processes project conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). One of the objectives of the project was to understand the morphologic evolution of the barrier system on a variety of time scales (months–years–decades–centuries). In response to Hurricane Sandy (October 2012), this effort continued with the intention of resolving storm impacts, post-storm beach response, and recovery. The day before Hurricane Sandy made landfall a USGS field team conducted surveys at Fire Island National Seashore (FIIS) to quantify the pre-storm morphologic state of the beach and dunes. The area was re-surveyed after the storm, as soon as access to the island was possible. In order to fully capture the recovery of the barrier system, the USGS Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Fire Island Study was established to include regular surveying in the weeks, months, and years following the storm. As part of the USGS Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Fire Island Study, the beach is monitored periodically to enable better understanding of post-Sandy recovery. The alongshore state of the beach is recorded using a differential global positioning system (DGPS) to collect data around the mean high water (MHW; 0.46 meter North American Vertical Datum of 1988) to derive a shoreline, and the cross-shore response and recovery are measured along a series of 15 profiles (Figure 1). Monitoring continued in the weeks following Hurricane Sandy with additional monthly collection through April 2013, and repeat surveys every 2–3 months thereafter until October 2014. Additional bi-annual surveys have been collected through September 2016. Beginning in October 2014 the USGS also began collecting a shoreline at the Wilderness breach, in the location of Old Inlet, in the Otis Pike High Dunes Wilderness area. The shoreline collected was an approximation of the MHW shoreline. The operator walked along an estimated MHW elevation above

  10. How kilometric sandy shoreline undulations correlate with wave and morphology characteristics: preliminary analysis on the Atlantic coast of Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idier, D.; Falqués, A.

    2014-04-01

    Sandy coasts are characterized by a number of rhythmic patterns like, amongst others, shoreline undulations or sandwaves at a kilometric scale. One hypothesis for their formation is that high angle waves (large incidence angle with respect to shore normal) could induce an instability of the shoreline (Ashton et al., 2001). More recently, a scaling for their wavelength has also been proposed (van den Berg et al., 2014). The existing studies rely mainly on modelling but quantitative field tests are lacking. We aim at investigating how both the formation hypothesis of these shoreline undulations and the theoretical scaling do fit with nature at a global scale. The first step, which is the goal of this paper, is to set up the methodology by analyzing the Atlantic African coast as test site. First, based on global databases, shoreline wavelength LS, wave characteristics (obliquity θW and wavelength λW) and mean shoreface slope β are determined. Then the wave obliquity is confronted with the presence of shoreline undulations. Finally the values of the ratio β LS / λW are estimated and discussed in comparison with the estimate of van den Berg et al. (2014). It is found that the correlation between shoreline sandwave occurrence and wave obliquity is very good, allowing the identification of 5 new potential unstable shoreline stretches, whereas the results on the scaling are not conclusive and deserve further investigations.

  11. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Master Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located in the city of Virginia Beach, Virginia, comprises 4,608 acres of barrier beach, fresh and brackish marsh, small...

  12. Back Bay Wilderness study : Public hearing analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is an analysis of the public hearing that took place on May 15th, 1974 which discussed the Back Bay Wilderness. The analysis shows that there is...

  13. Back Bay Stormwater Monitoring Project Final Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this project was to assess the influx of nutrients and solid material into Back Bay and its tributaries during and immediately following such storm...

  14. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge regulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a collection of regulations pertaining to the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Most of the regulations concern motor vehicle use on the refuge.

  15. Back Bay Wilderness study : Proposed recommendations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a list of recommendations for the proposed wilderness area on the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The recommendations come as a result of the...

  16. OahuS_shorelines - Shorelines of the southern coastal region of Oahu, Hawaii, from Barbers Point to Sandy Beach, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  17. Shorelines of the New Jersey North coastal region used in shoreline change analysis from Sandy Hook to Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey (NewJerseyN_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  18. OahuS_shorelines - Shorelines of the southern coastal region of Oahu, Hawaii, from Barbers Point to Sandy Beach, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  19. Fishery Management Program Progress Report: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum containing summary of fishery biologist's visit to Back Bay to remove carp from impoundments at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

  20. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Mean-high-water shoreline

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Mean-high-water (MHW) shoreline for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines were derived from lidar data collected...

  1. PAH concentrations in Coquina (Donax spp.) on a sandy beach shoreline impacted by a marine oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Richard A; Vestal, Alexandra; Welch, Christina; Barnes, Gracie; Pelot, Robert; Ederington-Hagy, Melissa; Hileman, Fredrick

    2014-06-15

    The BP MC252 well failure in the Gulf of Mexico, April 2010 caused concern for crude oil and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) exposure along the sandy beaches of the Florida Panhandle. We began collections of Coquina clams (Donax spp.) from the surf zone of Florida Panhandle beaches to monitor PAH contamination to compliment analysis of surf zone sand samples. These clams had higher levels of PAHs relative to ambient sand, and this allowed us to continue to monitor PAH levels after sand concentrations fell below limits of detection. PAH levels in the Coquina tissues were highly variable, perhaps indicative of the heterogeneous distribution of oil and tar on the beaches and exposure to tar particles. Overall, PAH levels decreased continuously in both sand and Coquina tissues, reaching limits of detection within one and two years respectively after oil landed on Florida Panhandle beaches. Our work suggests these surf zone molluscs may be used to monitor pollutant exposure along high energy sandy beach shorelines.

  2. Hurricane Sandy beach response and recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline and beach profile data, October 2012 to October 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehre Henderson, Rachel E.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Brenner, Owen T.; Reynolds, Billy J.

    2015-04-30

    In response to the forecasted impact of Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall on October 29, 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a substantial data-collection effort to assess the morphological impacts to the beach and dune system at Fire Island, New York. Global positioning system (GPS) field surveys of the beach and dunes were conducted just prior to and after landfall and these data were used to quantify change in several focus areas. In order to quantify morphologic change along the entire length of the island, pre-storm (May 2012) and post-storm (November 2012) lidar and aerial photography were used to assess changes to the shoreline and beach.As part of the USGS Hurricane Sandy Supplemental Fire Island Study, the beach is monitored periodically to enable better understanding of post-Sandy recovery. The alongshore state of the beach is recorded using a differential global positioning system (DGPS) to collect data around the mean high water (MHW; 0.46 meter North American Vertical Datum of 1988) to derive a shoreline, and the cross-shore response and recovery are measured along a series of 10 profiles.Overall, Hurricane Sandy substantially altered the morphology of Fire Island. However, the coastal system rapidly began to recover after the 2012­–13 winter storm season and continues to recover in the form of volume gains and shoreline adjustment.

  3. Ground motions on rocky, cliffed, and sandy shorelines generated by ocean waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Adam P.; Guza, Robert T.; Dickson, Mark E.; O'Reilly, William C.; Flick, Reinhard E.

    2013-12-01

    We compare ground motions observed within about 100 m of the waterline on eight sites located on shorelines with different morphologies (rock slope, cliff, and sand beaches). At all sites, local ocean waves generated ground motions in the frequency band 0.01-40 Hz. Between about 0.01 and 0.1 Hz, foreshore loading and gravitational attraction from ocean swell and infragravity waves drive coherent, in-phase ground flexing motions mostly oriented cross-shore that decay inland. At higher frequencies between 0.5 and 40 Hz, breaking ocean waves and wave-rock impacts cause ground shaking. Overall, seismic spectral shapes were generally consistent across shoreline sites and usually within a few orders of magnitude despite the diverse range of settings. However, specific site response varied and was influenced by a combination of tide level, incident wave energy, site morphology, ground composition, and signal decay. Flexing and shaking increased with incident wave energy and was often tidally modulated, consistent with a local generation source. Flexing magnitudes were usually larger than shaking, and flexing displacements of several mm were observed during relatively large incident wave conditions (Hs 4-5 m). Comparison with traffic noise and earthquakes illustrate the relative significance of local ocean-generated signals in coastal seismic data. Seismic observations are not a simple proxy for wave-cliff interaction.

  4. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Fur Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Fur Management Plan directs the management and regulation of trapping. The furbearer management program directly supports the...

  5. Results of Back Bay Nutrient Sampling, April 1986 - March 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine nutrient levels in Back Bay, water samples were collected monthly from April, 1986 through March, 1987. Surface water samples were collected at six...

  6. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Anuran Data Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Species richness, average call index, and total number of calls recorded for each anuran species detected at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge from 2000-2004.

  7. Migratory Bird Disease Contingency Plan: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1938 to provide habitat and protection for migratory birds. Management objectives have since been expanded to...

  8. The Trail Inventory of Back Bay NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  9. The Trail Inventory of Back Bay NWR [Cycle 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  10. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1976

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1976 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to...

  11. Environmental Assessment: Impoundment Rehabilitation on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to rehabilitate the wetland impoundments of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The environmental assessment describes the...

  12. Letter to President [Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter from the Assistant Secretary of the Interior to the President regarding the establishment of the Back Bay Wilderness area. The letter...

  13. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Back Bay NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  14. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Fire Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan considers fire on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge as a tool for management and as a potential problem to be dealt with. This document discusses...

  15. Trapping Management Plan: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge trapping plan outlines trapping areas, species, regulations, equipment, and seasons. This plan will allow harvest of a...

  16. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Fur Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Fur Management Plan directs the management and regulation of trapping. The furbearer management program directly supports the...

  17. Final wilderness proposal : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a memorandum announcing completion of the wilderness study for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. It details the results of the study and...

  18. Vehicular regulations announced for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is an announcement pertaining to regulations published in the Federal Register concerning the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The regulations all...

  19. Fact sheet : Wilderness proposal [Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a fact sheet of information about the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Pertinent information such as the area of the refuge, information on the...

  20. Marsh and Water Management Plan: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Marsh and Water Management Plan has been developed to meet the station objectives set forth in the Master Plan. The purpose of...

  1. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Croplands Management Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Cropland Management Plan focuses on the production of supplemental grain and browse foods to maintain wildlife populations at...

  2. Species List for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a species list of fish, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles that are either common to the Back Bay area or have ranges that extend into this region. This list...

  3. Shorelines_Oct2012_Sept2014: Hurricane Sandy Beach Response and Recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline and Beach Profile Data, October 2012 to October 2014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile consists of Fire Island, NY pre- and post-storm shoreline data collected from October 2012 to September 2014. This dataset contains 13 Mean High Water...

  4. Shorelines_Oct2012_Sept2014: Hurricane Sandy Beach Response and Recovery at Fire Island, New York: Shoreline and Beach Profile Data, October 2012 to October 2014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile consists of Fire Island, NY pre- and post-storm shoreline data collected from October 2012 to September 2014. This dataset contains 13 Mean High...

  5. Lidar-derived beach morphology (dune crest, dune toe, and shoreline) for U.S. sandy coastlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Kara; Long, Joseph W.; Birchler, Justin; Brenner, Owen T.; Hardy, Matthew; Morgan, Karen L. M.; Stockdon, Hilary F.; Torres, Miguel Loubriel

    2017-01-01

    The USGS National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project aims to identify areas of the nation’s coastline that are most vulnerable to extreme storms and long-term shoreline change. These assessments require coastal elevation data across diverse geographic regions and covering a time span of many years.  The datasets published here, organized by individual field activity numbers (FANs), define the dune crest (denoted by DC in the feature_type attribute), dune toe (denoted by DT in the feature_type attribute), and shoreline (denoted by SL in the feature_type attribute) at 10m intervals alongshore for each processed lidar elevation survey. Beach width and beach slope as calculated from dune toe to shoreline are also included at each shoreline location.

  6. Back Bay, Virginia: A literature review and synthesis of natural resource status and trends

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Several trends have been observed over time in Back Bay. The salinity of Back Bay has fluctuated up and down between saline, slightly brackish, and a nearly...

  7. Shorelines of the Greater Boston coastal region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, used in shoreline change analysis (GreaterBoston_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  8. Shorelines of the Greater Boston coastal region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, used in shoreline change analysis (GreaterBoston_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  9. 75 FR 15721 - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, City of Virginia Beach, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, City of Virginia Beach, VA AGENCY: Fish... environmental assessment (EA) for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) for a 30-day public review and comment... by the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 (Improvement......

  10. Final Environmental Assessment: Proposal to Expand the Boundary of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Historically recognized for its large wintering waterfowl populations and its sport fishery, the Back Bay area is undergoing land use changes that will potentially...

  11. Annual Marsh and Water Management Program: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Marsh and water management activities have been conducted for nearly thirty years at Back Bay NWR. Annual programs were submitted for many years. In the early 1970's...

  12. The Trail Inventory of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are eligible...

  13. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  14. Back Bay-Currituck Sound Data Report: Waterfowl Studies, Volume II

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary objectives of the waterfowl studies, done in conjunction with the overall ecological investigation of Back Bay, Virginia, and Currituck Sound, North...

  15. Back Bay, Fisherman Island, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  16. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge narrative report : September - December 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Movements of a loggerhead sea turtle found on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Nesting females were monitored on the beach between Sandbridge and the North Carolina state line by personnel from the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge (BBNWR). On...

  18. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : September - December 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  19. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  20. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  1. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  2. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge narrative report : September - December 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  5. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  6. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  7. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1986 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  8. Back Bay, Fisherman Island, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  9. Back Bay, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  10. Back Bay-Currituck Sound Data Report: Fish Studies, Volume IV

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This data report is the fourth and final volume of data and preliminary analysis of data on the cooperative study of the ecology of Back Bay, Virginia, and Currituck...

  11. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  12. Back Bay, Fisherman Island, Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of...

  13. Development of a stormwater monitoring plan and geographic information system at Back Bay, Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The initial objective of the Service's Back Bay Initiative will be to implement the first phase of a multi-year stormwater monitoring study to identify the main...

  14. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year - 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : May - August, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  17. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : September - December, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  18. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : January - April, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the...

  19. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : September - December, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  20. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge narrative report : January - April 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  1. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge narrative report : January - April 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  2. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge...

  3. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge...

  4. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge...

  5. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge...

  6. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge...

  7. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Plum Tree National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge...

  8. Back Bay-Currituck Sound Data Report: Introduction and Vegetation Studies, Volume I

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The factors affecting the brackish to freshwater estuaries of Back Bay, Virginia, and Currituck Sound, North Carolina, have been a subject of considerable...

  9. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge narrative report : January - April 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  10. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : January - April, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. 94th Congress : 1st Session : S. 1050 [Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a bill meant to designate certain lands in the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge as wilderness. It was introduced in the 94th Congress by Mr....

  12. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year - 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : May - August, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year - 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR and Mackay Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge narrative report : September - December 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge narrative report : January - April 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  17. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Refuge narrative report : May - August 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  18. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative report : May, June, July and August 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Back Bay NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  19. Survey of Nesting Osprey at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and False Cape State Park

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of nesting Osprey (Pandion Haliaetus) was conducted during the nesting season of 1990. The survey was conducted in the bay waters of Back Bay National...

  20. Survey of Nesting Osprey at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and False Cape State Park

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of nesting Osprey (Pandion Haliaetus) was conducted during the nesting season of 1989. The survey was conducted in the bay waters of Back Bay National...

  1. A Checklist of the Herpetofauna of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a list of amphibians and reptiles of the Back Bay/False Gape Natural Area. This list includes the relative abundance of each species. The author...

  2. Anuran Survey Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: With Recommendations for Future Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To establish baseline data and to monitor change over time to the Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge's(BBNWR) anuran populations the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,...

  3. CapeCodBay_shorelines_uncertainty.dbf - uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software. Renamed from: GreaterBoston_shorelines_uncertainty.dbf - uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software for the Greater Boston region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  4. NorthShoreB_shorelines_uncertainty.dbf - uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software Renamed from: GreaterBoston_shorelines_uncertainty.dbf for the Greater Boston region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  5. SouthShore_shorelines_uncertainty.dbf - uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software Renamed from: NewEnglandN_shorelines_uncertainty.dbf for the Greater Boston region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  6. OahuS_baseline - Offshore baseline used to cast shore-perpendicular transects for measurement of historical shoreline positions along South Oahu, Hawaii (Barbers Point to Sandy Beach)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  7. Offshore baseline for New Jersey North coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates from Sandy Hook to Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey (NJN_baseline.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  8. Numerical Modeling of Shoreline Undulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg

    The present thesis considers undulations on sandy shorelines. The aim of the study is to determine the physical mechanisms which govern the morphologic evolution of shoreline undulations, and thereby to be able to predict their shape, dimensions and evolution in time. In order to do so a numerical...... model has been developed which describes the longshore sediment transport along arbitrarily shaped shorelines. The numerical model is based on a spectral wave model, a depth integrated flow model, a wave-phase resolving sediment transport description and a one-line shoreline model. First the theoretical...... length of the shoreline undulations is determined in the linear regime using a shoreline stability analysis based on the numerical model. The analysis shows that the length of the undulations in the linear regime depends on the incoming wave conditions and on the coastal profile. For larger waves...

  9. 75 FR 63713 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Back Bay of Biloxi, Harrison County, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Back Bay of Biloxi, Harrison County...'Iberville, Harrison County, Mississippi. This deviation is necessary to allow timely bridge rehabilitation... D'Iberville, Harrison County, Mississippi, has a vertical clearance of 60 feet above mean high...

  10. Department of the Interior Environmental Assessment: Public Deer Hunting on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to initiate an annual public hunt for white-tailed deer on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. It is the purpose of the...

  11. Behavior Response of Greater Yellowlegs, Snowy Egrets and Mallards to Human Disturbance at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The study was conducted at Back Bay NWR, Virginia Beach, Virginia. The objective was to measure the effect of human disturbance on snowy egrets, female mallards, and...

  12. Distribution and biological effects of agricultural chemicals and other environmental contaminants in the sediments of Back Bay, Virginia

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Back Bay is the northernmost extension of the Albemarle- Pamlico-Currituck Sound estuary. It is located entirely within the city limits of Virginia Beach, Virginia....

  13. Narrative report : Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge : Mackay Island National Wildlife Refuge : Fisherman Island National Wildlife Refuge : Calendar year 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Back Bay NWR, Mackay Island NWR, and Fisherman Island NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report...

  14. Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.1 Transects with Long-Term Rate Calculations for the Greater Boston region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts (GreaterBoston_LT.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  15. OahuS_ST- Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.2 transects with short-term weighted linear regression rate calculations for the Oahu south region from Barbers Point to Sandy Beach, Hawaii.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  16. Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.1 Transects with Long-Term Rate Calculations for the Greater Boston region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts (GreaterBoston_LT.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  17. Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.1 Transects with Short-Term Rate Calculations for the Greater Boston region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts (GreaterBoston_ST.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  18. Offshore baseline for Greater Boston coastal region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates (GreaterBoston_baseline.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  19. OahuS_LT - Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.2 transects with long-term weighted linear regression rate calculations for the Oahu south region from Barbers Point to Sandy Beach, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  20. OahuS_ST- Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.2 transects with short-term weighted linear regression rate calculations for the Oahu south region from Barbers Point to Sandy Beach, Hawaii.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  1. Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.1 Transects with Long-Term Rate Calculations for the New Jersey North region from Sandy Hook to Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey (NewJerseyN_LT.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  2. Offshore baseline for Greater Boston coastal region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates (GreaterBoston_baseline.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  3. OahuS_LT - Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.2 transects with long-term weighted linear regression rate calculations for the Oahu south region from Barbers Point to Sandy Beach, Hawaii

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  4. Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.1 Transects with Short-Term Rate Calculations for the Greater Boston region from the southern side of Cape Ann, Massachusetts to Sandy Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts (GreaterBoston_ST.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  5. Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.1 Transects with Short-Term Rate Calculations for the New Jersey North region from Sandy Hook to Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey (NewJerseyN_ST.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  6. Species composition and seasonal numbers of shorebirds at Pea Island, Mattamuskeet, Back Bay, Cape Romain, and Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Wildlife inventory data were used to determined species composition and seasonal shorebird numbers at Back Bay, Pea Island, Mattamuskeet, Cape Romain and Merritt...

  7. Decoupling processes and scales of shoreline morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Henderson, Rachel E.; Schwab, William C.; Nelson, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Behavior of coastal systems on time scales ranging from single storm events to years and decades is controlled by both small-scale sediment transport processes and large-scale geologic, oceanographic, and morphologic processes. Improved understanding of coastal behavior at multiple time scales is required for refining models that predict potential erosion hazards and for coastal management planning and decision-making. Here we investigate the primary controls on shoreline response along a geologically-variable barrier island on time scales resolving extreme storms and decadal variations over a period of nearly one century. An empirical orthogonal function analysis is applied to a time series of shoreline positions at Fire Island, NY to identify patterns of shoreline variance along the length of the island. We establish that there are separable patterns of shoreline behavior that represent response to oceanographic forcing as well as patterns that are not explained by this forcing. The dominant shoreline behavior occurs over large length scales in the form of alternating episodes of shoreline retreat and advance, presumably in response to storms cycles. Two secondary responses include long-term response that is correlated to known geologic variations of the island and the other reflects geomorphic patterns with medium length scale. Our study also includes the response to Hurricane Sandy and a period of post-storm recovery. It was expected that the impacts from Hurricane Sandy would disrupt long-term trends and spatial patterns. We found that the response to Sandy at Fire Island is not notable or distinguishable from several other large storms of the prior decade.

  8. Living Shorelines: Coastal Resilience with a Blue Carbon Benefit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny L Davis

    Full Text Available Living shorelines are a type of estuarine shoreline erosion control that incorporates native vegetation and preserves native habitats. Because they provide the ecosystem services associated with natural coastal wetlands while also increasing shoreline resilience, living shorelines are part of the natural and hybrid infrastructure approach to coastal resiliency. Marshes created as living shorelines are typically narrow (< 30 m fringing marshes with sandy substrates that are well flushed by tides. These characteristics distinguish living shorelines from the larger meadow marshes in which most of the current knowledge about created marshes was developed. The value of living shorelines for providing both erosion control and habitat for estuarine organisms has been documented but their capacity for carbon sequestration has not. We measured carbon sequestration rates in living shorelines and sandy transplanted Spartina alterniflora marshes in the Newport River Estuary, North Carolina. The marshes sampled here range in age from 12 to 38 years and represent a continuum of soil development. Carbon sequestration rates ranged from 58 to 283 g C m-2 yr-1 and decreased with marsh age. The pattern of lower sequestration rates in older marshes is hypothesized to be the result of a relative enrichment of labile organic matter in younger sites and illustrates the importance of choosing mature marshes for determination of long-term carbon sequestration potential. The data presented here are within the range of published carbon sequestration rates for S. alterniflora marshes and suggest that wide-scale use of the living shoreline approach to shoreline management may come with a substantial carbon benefit.

  9. National assessment of shoreline change: A GIS compilation of updated vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the Southeast Atlantic coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzmann, Meredith; Himmelstoss, Emily; Thieler, E. Robert

    2017-01-01

    Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country.The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion.  In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards.  One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood feature representing the historical location of a beach position through time. All data can be viewed on the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards Portal at https://marine.usgs.gov/coastalchangehazardsportal/

  10. Coastal topography–Northeast Atlantic coast, post-hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Doran, Kara S.; Sopkin, Kristin L.; Smith, Kathryn E.L.; Fredericks, Xan

    2013-01-01

    This Data Series contains lidar-derived bare-earth (BE) topography, dune elevations, and mean-high-water shoreline position datasets for most sandy beaches for Fire Island, New York, and from Cape Henlopen, Delaware to Cape Lookout, North Carolina. The data were acquired post-Hurricane Sandy, which made landfall as an extratropical cyclone on October 29, 2012.

  11. National assessment of shoreline change: historical shoreline change along the Pacific Northwest coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggerio, Peter; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Reid, David; Allan, Jonathan; Kaminsky, George

    2013-01-01

    Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to increase and infrastructure is threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along the open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska, and the Great Lakes. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic, systematic, and internally consistent updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally. In the case of the analysis of shoreline change in the Pacific Northwest (PNW), the shoreline is the interpreted boundary between the ocean water surface and the sandy beach. This report on the PNW coasts of Oregon and Washington is the seventh in a series of regionally focused reports on historical shoreline change. Previous investigations include analyses and descriptive reports of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (Morton and others, 2004), the southeastern Atlantic (Morton and Miller, 2005), the sandy shorelines (Hapke and others, 2006) and coastal cliffs (Hapke and Reid, 2007) of California, the New England and mid-Atlantic coasts (Hapke and others, 2011), and parts of the Hawaii coast (Fletcher and others, 2012). Like the earlier reports in this series, this report summarizes the methods of analysis, interprets the results of the analysis, provides explanations regarding long- and short-term trends and rates of shoreline change, and describes how different coastal communities are responding to coastal erosion. This report differs from the early USGS reports in the series in that those

  12. Sandbar Migration and Shoreline Change on the Chirihama Coast, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatoshi Yuhi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sandy beaches play a key role in regional tourism. It is important to understand the principal morphological processes behind preserving attractive beaches. In this study, morphological variation on the Chirihama Coast, Japan, an important local tourism resource, was investigated using two sets of field surveys. The objective was to analyze and document the multi-scale behaviors of the beach. First, long-term shoreline changes were examined based on shoreline surveys over the last two decades. Then, the middle-term behavior of multiple bar systems was analyzed based on the cross-shore profile surveys from 1998 to 2010. An empirical orthogonal function (EOF analysis was conducted to capture the principal modes of the systematic bar migration. The shoreline analysis indicated a long-term eroding trend and showed that the seasonal variation has recently tended to increase. The profile analysis demonstrated that net offshore migrations of bars have been repeated with a return period of approximately four years. This general behavior of the bar system is similar to the net offshore migration phenomena observed at other sites in the world. EOF analysis revealed a relationship between bar configuration and middle-term variations in shoreline location; when a new bar is generated near the shoreline and a triple bar configuration is established, the shoreline tends to temporarily retreat, whereas the shoreline experiences an advance when the outer bar has most evolved.

  13. Historical shoreline for New Jersey (1839 to 1875): T-sheets and vector digital data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrano, Joseph F.; Smith, Kathryn E. L.

    2016-01-01

    Historical shoreline surveys were conducted by the National Ocean Service (NOS), dating back to the early 1800s. The maps resulting from these surveys, often called t-sheets, provide a reference of historical shoreline position that can be compared to modern data to identify shoreline change. The t-sheets are stored at the National Archives and many have been scanned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and are available on the NOAA Shoreline website (http://www.shoreline.noaa.gov/data/datasheets/t-sheets.html). While some scanned t-sheets were georeferenced and digitized by NOAA, others remain as non-georeferenced raster files (http://nosimagery.noaa.gov/images/shoreline_surveys/survey_scans/NOAA_Shoreline_Survey_Scans.html).This data set features georeferenced t-sheets and digitized historic shoreline for the New Jersey coastline from 1839 to 1875. The data were scanned by NOAA, but were not georeferenced. The t-sheets included in this data release are: T-121 (1839), T-119 Part 1 (1841), T-1084 (1868), T-1166 (1870), T-1333 (1871), T-1315a (1872), T-1371 (1874), T-1407 (1875). Digital files were georeferenced, corrected to a modern datum, and shorelines digitized to provide a vector polyline depicting the historical shoreline position. All shorelines, including the foreshore, backshore, mainland and island shorelines were delineated and digitized for each survey using ArcMap 10.3.1. This data release includes 8 raster t-sheets and 1 vector shoreline. These shorelines were digitized for use in long-term shoreline and wetland analyses for Hurricane Sandy wetland physical change assessment.

  14. Calibration of Numerical Model for Shoreline Change Prediction Using Satellite Imagery Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Sutikno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for calibration of numerical model for shoreline change prediction using satellite imagery data in muddy beach. Tanjung Motong beach, a muddy beach that is suffered high abrasion in Rangsang Island, Riau province, Indonesia was picked as study area. The primary numerical modeling tool used in this research was GENESIS (GENEralized Model for Simulating Shoreline change, which has been successfully applied in many case studies of shoreline change phenomena on a sandy beach.The model was calibrated using two extracted coastlines satellite imagery data, such as Landsat-5 TM and Landsat-8 OLI/TIRS. The extracted coastline data were analyzed by using DSAS (Digital Shoreline Analysis System tool to get the rate of shoreline change from 1990 to 2014. The main purpose of the calibration process was to find out the appropriate value for K 1 and K coefficients so that the predicted shoreline change had an acceptable correlation with the output of the satellite data processing. The result of this research showed that the shoreline change prediction had a good correlation with the historical evidence data in Tanjung Motong coast. It means that the GENESIS tool is not only applicable for shoreline prediction in sandy beach but also in muddy beach.

  15. NOAA Shoreline Website

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The original intent of this site was to alleviate confusion about shorelines generated by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) agencies. However,...

  16. The National Assessment of Shoreline Change: A GIS Compilation of Vector Shorelines and Associated Shoreline Change Data for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Tara L.; Morton, Robert A.; Sallenger, Asbury H.; Moore, Laura J.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines and shoreline change rates for the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. These data, which are presented herein, were compiled as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project. Beach erosion is a chronic problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information including rates and trends of shoreline migration. There is also a critical need for shoreline change data that is consistent from one coastal region to another. One purpose of this work is to develop standard repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally that are systematic and internally consistent. This data compilation for open-ocean, sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico is the first in a series that will eventually include the Atlantic Coast, Pacific Coast, and parts of Hawaii and Alaska. Short- and long-term shoreline change evaluations are based on merging three historical shorelines with a modern shoreline derived from lidar (light detection and ranging) topographic surveys. Historical shorelines generally represent the following time periods: 1800s, 1920s-1930s, and 1970s. The most recent shoreline is derived from data collected over the period of 1998-2002. Long-term rates of change are calculated by linear regression using all four shorelines. Short-term rates of change are simple end-point rate calculations using the two most recent shorelines. Please refer to our full report on shoreline change in the Gulf of Mexico, National Assessment of Shoreline Change: Part 1, Historical Shoreline Changes and Associated Coastal Land Loss Along the U.S. Gulf of Mexico (USGS Open File

  17. Hurricane Sandy and earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    MAVASHEV BORIS; MAVASHEV IGOR

    2013-01-01

    Submit for consideration the connection between formation of a hurricane Sandy and earthquakes. As a rule, weather anomalies precede and accompany earthquakes. The hurricane Sandy emerged 2 days prior to strong earthquakes that occurred in the area. And the trajectory of the hurricane Sandy matched the epicenter of the earthquakes. Possibility of early prediction of natural disasters will minimize the moral and material damage.

  18. A numerical shoreline model for shorelines with large curvature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new numerical model for shoreline change which can be used to model the evolution of shorelines with large curvature. The model is based on a one-line formulation in terms of coordinates which follow the shape of the shoreline, instead of the more common approach where the two...... orthogonal horizontal directions are used. The volume error in the sediment continuity equation which is thereby introduced is removed through an iterative procedure. The model treats the shoreline changes by computing the sediment transport in a 2D coastal area model, and then integrating the sediment...... transport field across the coastal profile to obtain the longshore sediment transport variation along the shoreline. The model is used to compute the evolution of a shoreline with a 90° change in shoreline orientation; due to this drastic change in orientation a migrating shoreline spit develops...

  19. USGS Northern California Shoreline Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive data clearinghouse of digital vector shorelines and shoreline...

  20. Predicting Decades of Shoreline Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. D.; McNinch, J.

    2016-12-01

    Nearshore morphology models predicting storm-scale erosion have been in use for the past several decades. These tools have typically focused on a single time-scale, which limits the utilization. The present effort details the development of a physics-based numerical model that incorporates the cross-shore profile evolution as well as the alongshore variation at two distinct time-scales. The new method assumes that frequent (seconds) bed-level updates due to cross-shore transport gradients are necessary, while the longshore sediment balance can be accumulated numerically over times of about a day before the resultant bottom evolution is imposed. The new model remains consistent for use in a single storm as well as predictions for evolution over several decades. Some limitations exist on the longshore uniformity, and appropriate applications include shorelines with gentle variations in the alongshore conditions arising from nonuniform bathymetry or gradients in wave conditions. Sand transport predictions account for wave and current interaction, bedload and suspended load, and wave-related sediment transport. An initial comparison of 20 years of morphological evolution is conducted for Onslow Beach, NC, a gently-varying contiguous sandy barrier island. Shoreline position data are available for the 10 km of coast fronting the Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune. Wave conditions from the long-term WIS wave hindcast are used, while water levels are developed from the available NOAA tide gauge records. With a complete set of boundary and initial conditions, numerical model results constitute a complete 20 year history of transport and morphological evolution. The wave energy directional spectrum is nearly symmetric relative to the shore-normal transect, and although large sand transport is predicted to the North and to the South at times, a relatively small average residual longshore transport is computed. The measured morphological changes are mixed along the length of

  1. Interferometric shoreline mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, C.G. van; Groot, J.S.; Vogelzang, J.; Dierikx-Platschorre, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Information on the location and evolution of shorelines is valuable. This information can be obtained from satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. Direct, unsupervised classifications methods give poor results because of the high noise level in SAR images and the scattering properties of (

  2. National assessment of shoreline change: a GIS compilation of vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the north coast of Alaska, U.S.-Canadian border to Icy Cape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Ann E.; Karen A. Ohman,; Richmond, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native communities, and encompasses unique habitats of global significance. Coastal erosion along the Arctic coast is chronic, widespread, and may be accelerating, which threatens defense- and energy-related infrastructure, natural shoreline habitats, and Native communities. There is an increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present shoreline changes across the United States. To meet these national needs, the Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey is compiling existing reliable historical shoreline data along sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Alaska and Hawaii under the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (hereafter referred to as the "National Assessment project";http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/). A comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines and rates of shoreline change for Alaska, from the U.S.-Canadian border to Icy Cape, is presented in this report as part of the National Assessment project.

  3. Nitrogen Loads in Groundwater Entering Back Bays and Ocean from Fire Island National Seashore, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christopher E.; deVries, M. Peter; Finch, Anne J.

    2010-01-01

    depletion, decreases in size of estuarine fish and shellfish communities, and loss of submerged seagrass habitat through light limitation (Valiela and others, 1992). The FIIS boundary extends roughly 1.2 km (0.8 mi) into the back-barrier estuaries of Great South Bay, Narrow Bay, and Moriches Bay (fig. 1). Within this estuarine zone are extensive areas of seagrass, shellfish, and finfish habitat, as well as intense recreational activity (Bokuniewicz and others, 1993). Management strategies for protection of these habitats require data on (1) concentrations and movement of nutrients and other human-derived contaminants that enter the groundwater system from on-site septic systems, and (2) aquifer characteristics and groundwater flow patterns. These data can then be used in three-dimensional flow models of the shallow aquifer system to predict the rates of groundwater discharge to the marine surface waters that bound Fire Island and the concentrations of nitrogen entering these water bodies from the aquifer's discharge zones. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the NPS, began a 3-year investigation to (1) measure groundwater levels within four local study areas at FIIS, (2) collect groundwater samples from these areas for nutrient (nitrogen) analysis, (3) develop a three-dimensional model of the hydrologic system and adjacent saltwater bodies for groundwater-flow delineation and particle tracking, and (4) apply the results of groundwater-discharge simulations to calculate the annual nitrogen loads in these discharges, particularly those entering Great South Bay, which together with the other back bays receives an estimated 80 percent of the total groundwater discharge from Fire Island. The four areas on which the investigation focused were the communities of Kismet and Robbins Rest, the NPS Visitor Center at Watch Hill, and the undeveloped Otis Pike Fire Island High Dune Wilderness (shown in panels A, B, C, and D in fig. 2); these were

  4. Multidecadal shoreline changes in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabuth, Alina Kristin; Kroon, Aart; Pedersen, Jørn Bjarke Torp

    2014-01-01

    Multidecadal shoreline changes along ca. 7000 km coastline around Denmark were computed for the time interval between 1862 AD and 2005 AD and were connected with a geomorphological coastal classification. The shoreline data set was based on shoreline positions from historical and modern topographic...... maps. Coastal landforms were identified on a digital terrain model in combination with aerial photographs. Two shoreline-change computation methods were evaluated at a test site, aiming for optimized time efficiency and accuracy of the countrywide application: a Nearest Neighbor search and a cross...... were, therefore, computed with the DSAS method. Patterns in coastline dynamics were identified through the connection of shoreline-change rates with the occurrence of coastal landforms. Short-term changes and alterations of shoreline evolution through coastal structures were not resolved in this study...

  5. Analyzing Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, Angelyn; Meyer, Stephan; Edwards, Becca

    2015-03-01

    Post-tropical Storm Sandy underwent extratropical transition shortly before making landfall in southern New Jersey October 29 2012. Data from this system was compared with data from Hurricane Ike (2008) which represents a classic hurricane with a clear eye wall and symmetry after landfall. Storm Sandy collided with a low pressure system coming in from the north as the hurricane made landfall on the US East coast. This contributed to Storm Sandy acting as a non-typical hurricane when it made landfall. Time histories of wind speed and wind direction were generated from data provided by Texas Tech's StickNet probes for both storms. The NOAA Weather and Climate program were used to generate radar loops of reflectivity during the landfall for both storms; these loops were compared with time histories for both Ike and Sandy to identify a relationship between time series data and storm-scale features identified on radar.

  6. Land-cover types, shoreline positions, and sand extents derived From Landsat satellite imagery, Assateague Island to Metompkin Island, Maryland and Virginia, 1984 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Julie C.; Douglas, Steven H.; Terrano, Joseph F.; Barras, John A.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2015-12-17

    The U.S. Geological Survey has a long history of responding to and documenting the impacts of storms along the Nation’s coasts and incorporating these data into storm impact and coastal change vulnerability assessments. These studies, however, have traditionally focused on sandy shorelines and sandy barrier-island systems, without consideration of impacts to coastal wetlands. The goal of the Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment project is to integrate a wetland-change assessment with existing coastal-change assessments for the adjacent sandy dunes and beaches, initially focusing on Assateague Island along the Maryland and Virginia coastline. Assateague Island was impacted by waves and storm surge associated with the passage of Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, including erosion and overwash along the ocean-facing sandy shoreline as well as erosion and overwash deposition in the back-barrier and estuarine bay environments.

  7. Threats to sandy beach ecosystems: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defeo, Omar; McLachlan, Anton; Schoeman, David S.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Dugan, Jenifer; Jones, Alan; Lastra, Mariano; Scapini, Felicita

    2009-01-01

    We provide a brief synopsis of the unique physical and ecological attributes of sandy beach ecosystems and review the main anthropogenic pressures acting on the world's single largest type of open shoreline. Threats to beaches arise from a range of stressors which span a spectrum of impact scales from localised effects (e.g. trampling) to a truly global reach (e.g. sea-level rise). These pressures act at multiple temporal and spatial scales, translating into ecological impacts that are manifested across several dimensions in time and space so that today almost every beach on every coastline is threatened by human activities. Press disturbances (whatever the impact source involved) are becoming increasingly common, operating on time scales of years to decades. However, long-term data sets that describe either the natural dynamics of beach systems or the human impacts on beaches are scarce and fragmentary. A top priority is to implement long-term field experiments and monitoring programmes that quantify the dynamics of key ecological attributes on sandy beaches. Because of the inertia associated with global climate change and human population growth, no realistic management scenario will alleviate these threats in the short term. The immediate priority is to avoid further development of coastal areas likely to be directly impacted by retreating shorelines. There is also scope for improvement in experimental design to better distinguish natural variability from anthropogenic impacts. Sea-level rise and other effects of global warming are expected to intensify other anthropogenic pressures, and could cause unprecedented ecological impacts. The definition of the relevant scales of analysis, which will vary according to the magnitude of the impact and the organisational level under analysis, and the recognition of a physical-biological coupling at different scales, should be included in approaches to quantify impacts. Zoning strategies and marine reserves, which have not

  8. Hurricane Sandy Washover Deposits on Southern Long Beach Island, NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. M.; Richmond, B. M.; Kane, H. H.; Lunghino, B.

    2015-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy washover deposits were investigated at Forsyth National Wildlife Refuge (FNWR) on Southern Long Beach Island, New Jersey in order to map deposit thickness and characterize the sedimentary deposits. FNWR was chosen as a field area because there has been relatively little anthropogenic shoreline modification since washover deposition from Hurricane Sandy. Sediment, elevation, and geophysical data were collected during the April 2015 field campaign, approximately two and a half years after the storm. Sediment deposit data included trenches, stratigraphic descriptions, bulk sediment samples, push cores, Russian cores, and photos. Computed tomography (CT) scanning was conducted on push cores in order to acquire high resolution imaging of density, grain size, and sedimentary structure. Profiles of washover elevation were measured using Differential GPS with Real Time Kinematic processing. Ground Penetrating Radar data was collected to image the depth of the deposit and identify sedimentary structures. These data sets are compared to pre- and post -Sandy lidar surveys in order to determine post-Sandy modification in the two and a half years following the hurricane. We compare sediment thickness and sedimentary characteristics to hurricane Sandy deposits elsewhere along the U.S. eastern seaboard and to tsunami deposits.

  9. USGS science for the Nation's changing coasts; shoreline change assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Hapke, Cheryl J.

    2011-01-01

    The coastline of the United States features some of the most popular tourist and recreational destinations in the world and is the site of intense residential, commercial, and industrial development. The coastal zone also has extensive and pristine natural areas, with diverse ecosystems providing essential habitat and resources that support wildlife, fish, and human use. Coastal erosion is a widespread process along most open-ocean shores of the United States that affects both developed and natural coastlines. As the coast changes, there are a wide range of ways that change can affect coastal communities, habitats, and the physical characteristics of the coast?including beach erosion, shoreline retreat, land loss, and damage to infrastructure. Global climate change will likely increase the rate of coastal change. A recent study of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coast, for example, found that it is virtually certain that sandy beaches will erode faster in the future as sea level rises because of climate change. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for conducting research on coastal change hazards, understanding the processes that cause coastal change, and developing models to predict future change. To understand and adapt to shoreline change, accurate information regarding the past and present configurations of the shoreline is essential. A comprehensive, nationally consistent analysis of shoreline movement is needed. To meet this national need, the USGS is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean coasts of the conterminous United States and parts of Alaska and Hawaii, as well as the coasts of the Great Lakes.

  10. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Historic Shorelines by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  11. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Historic Shorelines by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  12. National Assessment of Shoreline Change; historical shoreline change along the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; List, Jeffrey H.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2011-01-01

    Beach erosion is a chronic problem along many open-ocean shores of the United States. As coastal populations continue to grow and community infrastructures are threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There is also a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline movement that is consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska, and the Great Lakes. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline movement so that periodic, systematic, internally consistent updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally. In the case of this study, the shoreline is the interpreted boundary between the ocean water surface and the sandy beach. This report on the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts is the fifth in a series of reports on historical shoreline change. Previous investigations include analyses and descriptive reports of the Gulf of Mexico, the Southeast Atlantic, and, for California, the sandy shoreline and the coastal cliffs. The rates of change presented in this report represent conditions up to the date of the most recent shoreline data and therefore are not intended for predicting future shoreline positions or rates of change. Because of the geomorphology of the New England and Mid-Atlantic (rocky coastlines, large embayments and beaches) as well as data gaps in some areas, this report presents beach erosion rates for 78 percent of the 1,360 kilometers of the New England and Mid-Atlantic coasts. The New England and Mid-Atlantic shores were subdivided into a total of 10 analysis regions for the purpose of reporting regional trends in shoreline change rates. The average rate of long

  13. County Boundaries with Shorelines (National)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — County boundaries with shorelines cut in (NTAD). The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) that are an extract of selected geographic and...

  14. NOAA Coastal Mapping Shoreline Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Mapping Shoreline Products from the Remote Sensing Division are primarily for application to the nautical charts produced by NOAA's Office of Coast...

  15. NOAA Composite Shoreline - Vectorized Shoreline Derived From NOAA-NOS Coastal Survey Maps and Aerial Photographs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Composite Shoreline is primarily intended for high-resolution cartographic representation of the shoreline. It is a high-resolution vector shoreline based...

  16. California Shoreline Sand Retention: Existing Structure Performance and Future Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsman, N. E.; Griggs, G. B.

    2008-12-01

    Amidst rising sea level, climate change and expanding coastal populations, sandy beaches are frequently exposed to erosional processes. Effective sea level rise will lead to recreational beach loss as a result of coastal inundation. Beach nourishment is growing in popularity as a mitigation approach to meet the increasing need to protect coastal resources. The practice of beach nourishment along high energy shorelines, such as in California, is often improved by the construction of sediment retention structures (groins) to enhance project lifespans. However, our current ability to design effective littoral barriers is extremely limited. An underutilized and cost-effective resource for critically analyzing engineered retention structure performance is the record of existing structures within California. The impacts of 205 structures along California's 1700 km shoreline have been systematically explored though measurements collected from aerial imagery and historic shoreline positions. The findings of this study suggest that approximately 30 million m3 of sand and 18% of California's total exposed sandy beach area is presently retained in fillet and salient beaches associated with man-made structures such as groins, breakwaters, piers and jetties. Preliminary results suggest statistically significant correlations between structure effectiveness and key characteristics such as orientation, littoral cell position and construction materials. The central product of this study is a complete and robust GIS catalog of retention structures along California's coastline. A detailed analysis of historic structure performance combined with a systematically measured record of structure characteristics for the entire state results in a useful product to help coastal planners use the lessons of the past to plan future beach management.

  17. Back-Island and Open-Ocean Shorelines, and Sand Areas of the Undeveloped Areas of New Jersey Barrier Islands, March 9, 1991, to July 30, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Kristy K.

    2015-11-09

    Assessing the physical change to shorelines and wetlands is critical for determining the resiliency of wetland systems that protect adjacent habitat and communities. The wetland and back-barrier shorelines of the New Jersey barrier islands were changed by wave action and storm surge from Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program is assessing the impact of Hurricane Sandy to understand its historical context and the vulnerability of wetland systems. These assessments require data that document physical changes over time, such as maps, aerial photographs, satellite imagery, and lidar elevation data.

  18. Hydrodynamic Modeling for Channel and Shoreline Stabilization at Rhodes Point, Smith Island, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    levels for Hurricane Sandy indicated a maximum water level of 5 ft (~1.5 m) along the western shore of Smith Island. 2.10 Performance of...Chesapeake Bay. Numerical results indicated Alternative 1, with a shore -connected north jetty nearly normal to the north shoreline at the channel...reducing wave energy inside the channel and along the shores . Alternative 2 with two parallel jetties provided similar wave energy reduction in the

  19. Estuarine shoreline changes in Jamaica Bay, New York City: implications for management of an urban national park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boger, Rebecca; Connolly, James; Christiano, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The Jamaica Bay portion of Gateway National Recreation Area, located next to highly urbanized New York City, faces many challenges to preserve and protect its natural, cultural, and recreational resources. To aid in the management of the park resources, detailed estuarine shoreline analyses of Jamaica Bay were undertaken using imagery taken in 1951, 1974, and 2006. A 15-class land use/land cover (LULC) classification scheme was created after doing an initial examination of the types of LULC in the 2006 orthoimagery and then applied in the analyses of the previous years. By quantifying how and where the shoreline has changed over the past 60 years, park managers can better assess the impact of management practices by comparing LULC of the shoreline within the park boundary to the LULC of the shoreline outside the park boundary before and after the park was created in 1972. Despite the heavy development of New York City and the trend for shoreline modification, the overall shoreline of Jamaica Bay has maintained large percentages of undeveloped vegetation and sandy beaches. Much of the LULC change has occurred in the creeks as a result of dredging and shape modification for residential and commercial uses. Park management has been effective in limiting the alteration of undeveloped shoreline although there have been significant changes in the relative percentages of sand and vegetated beaches between 1974 and 2006.

  20. The Cosmic Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    in 2004 when there were just two transiting exoplanets to consider. The trend was well-defined by late 2007. Figure 1 shows how matters stood in Dec 2012 with approx.240 exoplanets. The figure shows that the boundary between planets with and without active volatiles - the cosmic shoreline, as it were - is both well-defined and follows a power law.

  1. OR_shorelines.shp - Shorelines of the Oregon coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  2. Back Bay Wilderness burning support

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a memorandum concerning prescribed burns between members of the Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife. It states that burning should be supported...

  3. Sediment Chemistry and Toxicity in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey: Pre- and Post- Hurricane Sandy, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanok, Kristin; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Timothy J.; Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Barnegat Bay, October, 29, 2012, damaging shorelines and infrastructure. Estuarine sediment chemistry and toxicity were investigated before and after to evaluate potential environmental health impacts and to establish post-event baseline sediment-quality conditions. Trace element concentrations increased throughout Barnegat Bay up to two orders of magnitude, especially north of Barnegat Inlet, consistent with northward redistribution of silt. Loss of organic compounds, clay, and organic carbon is consistent with sediment winnowing and transport through the inlets and sediment transport modeling results. The number of sites exceeding sediment quality guidance levels for trace elements tripled post-Sandy. Sediment toxicity post-Sandy was mostly unaffected relative to pre-Sandy conditions, but at the site with the greatest relative increase for trace elements, survival rate of the test amphipod decreased (indicating degradation). This study would not have been possible without comprehensive baseline data enabling the evaluation of storm-derived changes in sediment quality.

  4. Sediment chemistry and toxicity in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey: Pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanok, Kristin M; Szabo, Zoltan; Reilly, Timothy J; Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil K

    2016-06-30

    Hurricane Sandy made landfall in Barnegat Bay, October, 29, 2012, damaging shorelines and infrastructure. Estuarine sediment chemistry and toxicity were investigated before and after to evaluate potential environmental health impacts and to establish post-event baseline sediment-quality conditions. Trace element concentrations increased throughout Barnegat Bay up to two orders of magnitude, especially north of Barnegat Inlet, consistent with northward redistribution of silt. Loss of organic compounds, clay, and organic carbon is consistent with sediment winnowing and transport through the inlets and sediment transport modeling results. The number of sites exceeding sediment quality guidance levels for trace elements tripled post-Sandy. Sediment toxicity post-Sandy was mostly unaffected relative to pre-Sandy conditions, but at the site with the greatest relative increase for trace elements, survival rate of the test amphipod decreased (indicating degradation). This study would not have been possible without comprehensive baseline data enabling the evaluation of storm-derived changes in sediment quality.

  5. Shoreline dissipation of infragravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bakker, A. T. M.; Tissier, M. F. S.; Ruessink, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    Infragravity waves (0.005-0.05 Hz) have recently been observed to dissipate a large part of their energy in the short-wave (0.05-1 Hz) surf zone, however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we analyse two new field data sets of near-bed pressure and velocity at up to 13 cross-shore locations in ≲2.5 m depth on a ≈1:80 and a ≈1:30 sloping beach to quantify infragravity-wave dissipation close to the shoreline and to identify the underlying dissipation mechanism. A frequency-domain Complex Eigenfunction analysis demonstrated that infragravity-wave dissipation was frequency dependent. Infragravity waves with a frequency larger than ≈0.0167-0.0245 Hz were predominantly onshore progressive, indicative of strong dissipation of the incoming infragravity waves. Instead, waves with a lower frequency showed the classic picture of cross-shore standing waves with minimal dissipation. Bulk infragravity reflection coefficients at the shallowest position (water depth ≈0.7 m) were well below 1 (≈0.20), implying that considerable dissipation took place close to the shoreline. We hypothesise that for our data sets infragravity-wave breaking is the dominant dissipation mechanism close to the shoreline, because the reflection coefficient depends on a normalised bed slope, with the higher infragravity frequencies in the mild-sloping regime where breaking is known to dominate dissipation. Additional numerical modelling indicates that, close to the shoreline of a 1:80 beach, bottom friction contributes to infragravity-wave dissipation to a limited extent, but that non-linear transfer of infragravity energy back to sea-swell frequencies is unimportant.

  6. Multidecadal Shoreline Evolution Due to Large-scale Beach Nourishment in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, M.; Takewaka, S.; Kuriyama, Y.

    2016-12-01

    A large-scale beach nourishment in the Netherlands, the Sand Engine, is getting attention as a new type of nourishment. As a similar case in Japan, here, we investigated morphological changes from 1961 to 2013 on the Hasaki coast, where approximately 50 million cubic meters of sands were dumped into the nearshore zone. The Hasaki coast, which is located in the eastern Japan facing the Pacific Ocean, has 16 km long sandy beach. From 1965 to 1977, approximately 50 million cubic meters of sediments were dumped into the nearshore zone on the north side of the beach for disposal of the earth and sand generated during the construction of the Kashima Port, which is an artificially-excavated port. A part of the shoreline-advanced area due to the dump was reclaimed for a land space. Therefore, in practice, approximately 26 million cubic meters of them was the volume of the sediment supply contributed to the morphological change. The volume is comparable to the nourishment of the Sand Engine, of which the volume is 21.5 million cubic meters. An increase in the sediment budgets due to the dump resulted in the mean shoreline advance of approximately 40 meters from 1969 to 1984. After that, although the advance was abated from 1984 to 1993, the shoreline began to advance again from 1993. As the result, the mean shoreline position in 2013 was located approximately 70 meters seaward compared to the position in 1961.

  7. Preliminary study of soil liquefaction hazard at Terengganu shoreline, Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, H.; Suhatril, M.; Hashim, R.

    2017-06-01

    Terengganu is a shoreline state located in Peninsular Malaysia which is a growing hub for port industries and tourism centre. The northern part offers pristine settings of a relax beach areas whereas the southern part are observed to be a growing centre for development. The serious erosion on soil deposit along the beach line presents vulnerable soil condition to soil liquefaction consists of sandy with low plasticity and shallow ground water. Moreover, local earthquake from nearby fault have present significant tremors over the past few years which need to be considered in the land usage or future development in catering the seismic loading. Liquefaction analysis based on field standard penetration of soil is applied on 546 boreholes scattered along the shoreline areas ranging 244 km of shoreline stretch. Based on simplified approach, it is found that more than 70% of the studied areas pose high liquefaction potential since there are saturated loose sand and silt deposits layer ranges at depth 3 m and up to 20 m. The presence of clay deposits and hard stratum at the remaining 30% of the studied areas shows good resistance to soil liquefaction hence making the area less significant to liquefaction hazard. Result indicates that liquefaction improving technique is advisable in future development of shoreline areas of Terengganu state.

  8. A shoreline sand wave formation event at Dungeness, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falqués, A.; Arriaga, J.; Francesca, R.; Eddie, C.

    2016-12-01

    Alongshore rhythmic morphological patterns at different length scales are quite common along sandy beaches. Well known examples are megacusps and crescentic bars/rip channel systems with alongshore wavelengths ˜ 100-1000 m. At larger scales (˜ 1-10 km or more) there are the km-scale shoreline sand waves. During the last two decades there has been much research to unravel the origin of such intriguing patterns and to get insight into their dynamics. The hypothesis that they emerge out of positive feedbacks between hydrodynamics and morphology has been amply confirmed by mathematical modelling. In particular, the potential role of high-angle waves (large incidence angles with respect to shore) in driving km-scale shoreline sand waves has been investigated (Ashton et al., 2001, van den Berg et al., 2012). However, direct tests with nature are very difficult and are inexistent to our knowledge. This is so because these tests would require detailed measurements of the bathymetry and the wave conditions at the moment of their formation from a featureless morphology. Dungeness beach is located at the English shore of the Dover straight facing northeast part of a cuspate foreland. It is a gravel beach (D50=6-10 mm) quite steep until 1 m depth (β≈0.13) and gentle until 3 m depth (β≈0.005) without shore-parallel bars. Bathymetric maps of this beach are available since 2007 and the wave conditions are also known from a wave buoy in 43 m depth. The shorelines from 2007 until 2013 show some subtle and evolving undulations. But remarkably, in 2014 a series of two undulations develop with a wavelength of about 0.5 km. They persist until 2016 and migrate to the N. This is a clear formation event that provides a unique opportunity to compare observations with the outputs of morphodynamic models for the initial formation of such features. Therefore, the objectives are: 1) Characterize the bathymetric evolution and the wave conditions prior/during the formation event, 2) run

  9. SOCAL_BIASVALUES - Southern California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  10. NORCAL_BIASVALUES - Northern California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  11. SOCAL_BIASVALUES - Southern California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  12. CENCAL_BIASVALUES - Central California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  13. NORCAL_BIASVALUES - Northern California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  14. CENCAL_BIASVALUES - Central California Shoreline Bias Values

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital vector shorelines by compiling shoreline positions from pre-existing historical shoreline databases and by...

  15. Shoreline changes at the mouths of the Mekong River delta over the last 50 years: fluctuating sediment supply and shoreline cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, E.; Besset, M.; Brunier, G.; Dussouillez, P.; Dolique, F.; Nguyen, V. L.; Goichot, M.

    2014-12-01

    characterise the prograding mouths sector of the Mekong; (2) linking shoreline stability/instability with coastal sand supply by the Mekong River and the impacts of human activities on this supply; (3) shoreline management and defence planning in the critical sandy river-mouth sector of this densely populated delta.

  16. Sandy PMO Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 Financial Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Sandy PMO: Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (Sandy Supplemental Bill) Financial Data. This is the Sandy Supplemental Quarterly Financial Datasets that are...

  17. Spatial and temporal scales of shoreline morphodynamics derived from video camera observations for the island of Sylt, German Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossier, Brice; Bryan, Karin R.; Daly, Christopher J.; Winter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Spatial and temporal scales of beach morphodynamics were assessed for the island of Sylt, German Wadden Sea, based on continuous video camera monitoring data from 2011 to 2014 along a 1.3 km stretch of sandy beach. They served to quantify, at this location, the amount of shoreline variability covered by beach monitoring schemes, depending on the time interval and alongshore resolution of the surveys. Correlation methods, used to quantify the alongshore spatial scales of shoreline undulations, were combined with semi-empirical modelling and spectral analyses of shoreline temporal fluctuations. The data demonstrate that an alongshore resolution of 150 m and a monthly survey time interval capture 70% of the kilometre-scale shoreline variability over the 2011-2014 study period. An alongshore spacing of 10 m and a survey time interval of 5 days would be required to monitor 95% variance of the shoreline temporal fluctuations with steps of 5% changes in variance over space. Although monitoring strategies such as land or airborne surveying are reliable methods of data collection, video camera deployment remains the cheapest technique providing the high spatiotemporal resolution required to monitor subkilometre-scale morphodynamic processes involving, for example, small- to middle-sized beach nourishment.

  18. Spatial and temporal scales of shoreline morphodynamics derived from video camera observations for the island of Sylt, German Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossier, Brice; Bryan, Karin R.; Daly, Christopher J.; Winter, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Spatial and temporal scales of beach morphodynamics were assessed for the island of Sylt, German Wadden Sea, based on continuous video camera monitoring data from 2011 to 2014 along a 1.3 km stretch of sandy beach. They served to quantify, at this location, the amount of shoreline variability covered by beach monitoring schemes, depending on the time interval and alongshore resolution of the surveys. Correlation methods, used to quantify the alongshore spatial scales of shoreline undulations, were combined with semi-empirical modelling and spectral analyses of shoreline temporal fluctuations. The data demonstrate that an alongshore resolution of 150 m and a monthly survey time interval capture 70% of the kilometre-scale shoreline variability over the 2011-2014 study period. An alongshore spacing of 10 m and a survey time interval of 5 days would be required to monitor 95% variance of the shoreline temporal fluctuations with steps of 5% changes in variance over space. Although monitoring strategies such as land or airborne surveying are reliable methods of data collection, video camera deployment remains the cheapest technique providing the high spatiotemporal resolution required to monitor subkilometre-scale morphodynamic processes involving, for example, small- to middle-sized beach nourishment.

  19. Hurricane Sandy Poster (October 29, 2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hurricane Sandy poster. Multi-spectral image from Suomi-NPP shows Hurricane Sandy approaching the New Jersey Coast on October 29, 2012. Poster size is approximately...

  20. Effects of Shoreline Dynamics on Saltmarsh Vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shailesh; Goff, Joshua; Moody, Ryan M; McDonald, Ashley; Byron, Dorothy; Heck, Kenneth L; Powers, Sean P; Ferraro, Carl; Cebrian, Just

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the impact of shoreline dynamics on fringing vegetation density at mid- and low-marsh elevations at a high-energy site in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Particularly, we selected eight unprotected shoreline stretches (75 m each) at a historically eroding site and measured their inter-annual lateral movement rate using the DSAS method for three consecutive years. We observed high inter-annual variability of shoreline movement within the selected stretches. Specifically, shorelines retrograded (eroded) in year 1 and year 3, whereas, in year 2, shorelines advanced seaward. Despite shoreline advancement in year 2, an overall net erosion was recorded during the survey period. Additionally, vegetation density generally declined at both elevations during the survey period; however, probably due to their immediate proximity with lateral erosion agents (e.g., waves, currents), marsh grasses at low-elevation exhibited abrupt reduction in density, more so than grasses at mid elevation. Finally, contrary to our hypothesis, despite shoreline advancement, vegetation density did not increase correspondingly in year 2 probably due to a lag in response from biota. More studies in other coastal systems may advance our knowledge of marsh edge systems; however, we consider our results could be beneficial to resource managers in preparing protection plans for coastal wetlands against chronic stressors such as lateral erosion.

  1. The protection of sandy shores - Can we afford to ignore the contribution of seagrass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maike

    2017-08-15

    Shore nourishment is considered an effective soft coastal protection measure for sandy shorelines. However, sand demand and costs are high, especially as nourishment has to be repeated regularly due to ongoing erosion. Seagrass meadows are able to trap and stabilise sediment by reducing bed shear stress. Moreover, they reduce flow velocity and wave energy in regions beyond their boundaries. Especially small species may not provide these ecosystem services sufficiently to protect shorelines from erosion, but they may stabilise beach profiles enough to increase nourishment intervals. This review discusses the potential benefits of integrating ecosystem services provided by seagrass meadows, both existing and newly planted, in nourishment plans, and also addresses potential limitations such as unsuitable hydrodynamic conditions and seasonality. Finally, it highlights knowledge gaps that should be addressed by interdisciplinary research to improve nourishment plans and use seagrass ecosystem services to their full potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. On Sandy Shores. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Craig; And Others

    The activities in this guide (for grades 2-4) transport students to the sandy shore, one of the most fascinating ecosystems on the planet. At this ecological juncture a multiplicity of life forms find ways to survive, thrive, and interact with each other. Using a wide variety of learning formats, students explore and deepen their understanding of…

  3. Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 6/15/2012 – 9/15/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline ” 5a. CONTRACT...this project. The paper, “Sea Spray Generation at Rocky Shoreline ” by Ed Andreas was accepted for publication and as of July 2016 was being...13 Sea Spray Generation at a Rocky Shoreline 14 15 16 17 Edgar L Andreas 18 19 NorthWest Research Associates, Inc. 20 Lebanon, New

  4. 36 CFR 327.31 - Shoreline management fee schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shoreline management fee... THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS § 327.31 Shoreline management fee schedule. A charge will be made for Shoreline... permits for vegetative modification on Shoreline areas. In all cases the total administrative charge...

  5. Historical Shoreline for Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, NOAA (2001) [shoreline_la_NOAA_1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — These data were automated to provide a suitable geographic information system (GIS) data layer depicting the historical shoreline for Louisiana. These data are...

  6. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Shoreline REST Services

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats for the U.S. and its territories, classified according to the...

  7. Numerical prediction of shoreline adjacent to breakwater

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mahadevan, R.; Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.

    Existing mathematical models for prediction of shoreline changes in the vicinity of a breakwater were reviewed The analytical and numerical results obtained from these models have been compared Under the numerical approach, two different implicit...

  8. Archaeological sites as indicators of ancient shorelines

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vora, K.H.; Gaur, A.S.; Sundaresh; Tripati, S.

    an acknowledge- able role by providing food security and water routes for the overseas trade and commerce. However, sea level fluctuations have played a significant role for the coastal settlement. Since the earliest time, study suggests, shoreline and sea...

  9. Shoreline response to seismically induced land-level changes - A case study from West Aceh, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monecke, K.; Meilianda, E.; Walstra, D. J.; Hill, E.; Mc Adoo, B. G.; Qiu, Q.; Storms, J. E. A.; Masputri, A. S.; Mayasari, C. D.; Nasir, M.; Riandi, I.; Setiawan, A.; Templeton, C. K.

    2016-12-01

    A cross-shore morphodynamic model can be used to simulate shoreline recovery after extreme events, as shown here for the coast of West Aceh, Indonesia, a region largely affected by the December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and ensuing Indian Ocean tsunami. Subsidence of 50-100 cm and tsunami scouring during the 2004 event caused the complete destruction of the beach and the landward displacement of the western Acehnese coast by an average of 110 m. Modeled post-seismic land elevation changes as a result of afterslip and viscoelastic mantle relaxation, indicate rapid uplift of 4.4 cm/year in the year following the earthquake, but more moderate uplift rates of 1.4 cm/year since mid-2006. Comparing a series of topographic surveys and satellite images, we reconstruct the build-up of a new beach ridge along a 10 km long stretch of coastline in the years following the event. We then use the cross-shore model UNIBEST-TC developed for a wave-dominated sandy shoreline to determine the controlling factors of shoreline recovery. Input parameters include bathymetric data measured in 2015, grain size characteristics of offshore sediment samples, modeled wave data computed in 7m water depth and tidal elevation data from a nearby tide gauge station. After establishing a cross-shore profile in equilibrium with the prevailing hydrodynamic conditions, we simulate post-seismic land level changes for up to 10 years and compare to the observed coastal development. Our data indicates that the recovery of the Western Acehnese shoreline after the 2004 event was incomplete with the shoreline stabilizing 40-80 meter landward of its pre-2004 tsunami position. Measured variability in shoreline position in the order of a few tens of meters since 2009 can be attributed to seasonal wave climate variability related to the monsoon cycle. The effect of postseismic uplift on shoreline position is small and in the order of only a few meters over 10 years. In the near future, continuing post

  10. Late Quaternary MIS 6-8 shoreline features of pluvial Owens Lake, Owens Valley, eastern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, A.S.; Bacon, S.N.

    2008-01-01

    The chronologic history of pluvial Owens Lake along the eastern Sierra Nevada in Owens Valley, California, has previously been reported for the interval of time from ca. 25 calibrated ka to the present. However, the age, distribution, and paleoclimatic context of higher-elevation shoreline features have not been formally documented. We describe the location and characteristics of wave-formed erosional and depositional features, as well as fluvial strath terraces that grade into an older shoreline of pluvial Owens Lake. These pluvial-lacustrine features are described between the Olancha area to the south and Poverty Hills area to the north, and they appear to be vertically deformed -20 ?? 4 m across the active oblique-dextral Owens Valley fault zone. They occur at elevations from 1176 to 1182 m along the lower flanks of the Inyo Mountains and Coso Range east of the fault zone to as high as -1204 m west of the fault zone. This relict shoreline, referred to as the 1180 m shoreline, lies -20-40 m higher than the previously documented Last Glacial Maximum shoreline at -1160 m, which occupied the valley during marine isotope stage 2 (MIS 2). Crosscutting relations of wave-formed platforms, notches, and sandy beach deposits, as well as strath terraces on lava flows of the Big Pine volcanic field, bracket the age of the 1180 m shoreline to the time interval between ca. 340 ?? 60 ka and ca. 130 ?? 50 ka. This interval includes marine oxygen isotope stages 8-6 (MIS 8-6), corresponding to 260-240 ka and 185-130 ka, respectively. An additional age estimate for this shoreline is provided by a cosmogenic 36Cl model age of ca. 160 ?? 32 ka on reefal tufa at ???1170 m elevation from the southeastern margin of the valley. This 36Cl model age corroborates the constraining ages based on dated lava flows and refines the lake age to the MIS 6 interval. Documentation of this larger pluvial Owens Lake offers insight to the hydrologic balance along the east side of the southern Sierra

  11. The Projection of Shoreline Based on the MIROC-ESM Climate Model along the Coast of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritphring, S.; Udo, K.

    2013-12-01

    Thailand is littoral country with the coastal zone including the Gulf of Thailand and the Andaman Sea. They are economic important areas where 23 provinces are located with approximately 12 millions of population living in this areas. The coasts are characterized by geologic nature of landforms as sandy beach and dunes, coastal wetland, rocky coast, cliff coast and islands. Thailand's coast has been developed significantly since the last 3 decades; moreover, population growth and the demand for coastal living are ongoing pressures. Therefore, the potential impacts of climate change on existing coastal hazards are likely to increase. The impacts of sea level rise are probable to lead to the greater coastal inundation and erosion that may cause damage and loss to property, infrastructure and the environment. Although Thailand has approximately 2,700 km of shoreline, few researches have been conducted on coastal zone impacts and adaptations to climate change until now. Therefore, this study aimed to project the shoreline change along Thailand's coast due to the global sea level rise based on the climate scenario MIROC-ESM RCP4.5. The projection shoreline analysed by Bruun based on the assumption that in response to sea level rise, shore profiles would respond by acting to maintain their morphology relative to still water levels. It is a simple geometric model of nearshore profile evolution under rising sea level that is often assumed to work on all sandy shorelines. Moreover, the influences of land subsidence associated with sea level rise were taken into account in this study. The observed data as well as secondary data were used for modelling the 23 representative sandy beaches along the coast. Beach slope were observed as well as grain size sampling for model input. Wave buoys located along the coast were used for wave height and period detection. The results indicated shoreline retreat more than 2 m at the end of century when the land subsidence was not considered

  12. 2014 NOAA Post Hurricane Sandy Topobathymetric LiDAR Mapping for Shoreline Mapping

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data were collected by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Geodetic Survey Remote Sensing Division using a Riegl VQ820G system. The data...

  13. Cultural Resources Reconnaissance Survey of the Shoreline of Big Sandy Reservoir, Aitkin County, Minnesota: 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-15

    Battle Is- land and Brown’s Point; the affinities of the latter sites seem to be with the Dakota who lived at Kathio before 1730 ( Woolworth 1969...portage can be found in Woolworth (1969). Several small-scale in- vestigations of potential site areas were also conducted in the summer of 1982. A field...parallel- flaked Paleo-Indian projectile points have been reported from near the eastern end of the Savanna Portage ( Woolworth 1969:2). As far as we could

  14. Boston_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics Boston coastal region from Carson Beach in South Boston to Weymouth River, including the Boston Harbor Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  15. Habitat structure and zonation patterns of northwestern Mediterranean shoreline strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Mariani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the habitat structure (macrofaunal assemblages and bottom types and zonation patterns of 29 unvegetated shoreline strands along the 900-km coast of Catalonia (NW Mediterranean Sea. Organisms were sampled with grabs, pitfall traps, sticky traps, clam nets and spades to ensure capture of the different proportions of macrofaunal assemblages from the supra-, medio- and infralittoral levels. We collected 211 taxa: 194 animals and 17 algae. The most abundant and dominant organisms collected with van Veen grabs were Nematoda, Oligochaeta and Collembola at the supralittoral level; the polychaetes Saccocirrus spp. and Pisione remota, the amphipod Corophium orientale, Nematoda, and Turbellaria at the mediolittoral level; and Nematoda at the upper infralittoral level. SIMPER analysis revealed great dissimilarity between the organisms inhabiting the supralittoral and the other littoral levels. Regarding the epifauna, the sticky traps used at the supralittoral level mainly collected Collembola, which were nearly absent in pitfall traps. The qualitative study performed with a clam net and a small spade revealed that Nematoda, Saccocirrus spp., Turbellaria, Nemertea and the polychaete P. remota were the most abundant animals at both the medio- and the infralittoral levels and no differences were found between these levels. Different qualitative sampling methodologies showed that in fine sediments the bivalves Donax trunculus and D. semistriatus determined more than 97% of dissimilarity from coarse-sand sites. Richness increased in protected sandy and cobble shores. Littoral level and bottom-type features were only to a certain extent valid indicators of specific biotic components for a specific habitat.

  16. MS_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Mississippi Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  17. AL_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Alabama Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  18. FL_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Florida Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  19. TX_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Texas Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  20. LA_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Louisiana Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  1. A model integrating longshore and cross-shore processes for predicting long-term shoreline response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Sean; Barnard, Patrick; Limber, Patrick W; Erikson, Li; Cole, Blake

    2017-01-01

    We present a shoreline change model for coastal hazard assessment and management planning. The model, CoSMoS-COAST (Coastal One-line Assimilated Simulation Tool), is a transect-based, one-line model that predicts short-term and long-term shoreline response to climate change in the 21st century. The proposed model represents a novel, modular synthesis of process-based models of coastline evolution due to longshore and cross-shore transport by waves and sea-level rise. Additionally, the model uses an extended Kalman filter for data assimilation of historical shoreline positions to improve estimates of model parameters and thereby improve confidence in long-term predictions. We apply CoSMoS-COAST to simulate sandy shoreline evolution along 500 km of coastline in Southern California, which hosts complex mixtures of beach settings variably backed by dunes, bluffs, cliffs, estuaries, river mouths, and urban infrastructure, providing applicability of the model to virtually any coastal setting. Aided by data assimilation, the model is able to reproduce the observed signal of seasonal shoreline change for the hindcast period of 1995-2010, showing excellent agreement between modeled and observed beach states. The skill of the model during the hindcast period improves confidence in the model's predictive capability when applied to the forecast period (2010-2100) driven by GCM-projected wave and sea-level conditions. Predictions of shoreline change with limited human intervention indicate that 31% to 67% of Southern California beaches may become completely eroded by 2100 under sea-level rise scenarios of 0.93 to 2.0 m.

  2. A model integrating longshore and cross-shore processes for predicting long-term shoreline response to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitousek, Sean; Barnard, Patrick L.; Limber, Patrick; Erikson, Li; Cole, Blake

    2017-04-01

    We present a shoreline change model for coastal hazard assessment and management planning. The model, CoSMoS-COAST (Coastal One-line Assimilated Simulation Tool), is a transect-based, one-line model that predicts short-term and long-term shoreline response to climate change in the 21st century. The proposed model represents a novel, modular synthesis of process-based models of coastline evolution due to longshore and cross-shore transport by waves and sea level rise. Additionally, the model uses an extended Kalman filter for data assimilation of historical shoreline positions to improve estimates of model parameters and thereby improve confidence in long-term predictions. We apply CoSMoS-COAST to simulate sandy shoreline evolution along 500 km of coastline in Southern California, which hosts complex mixtures of beach settings variably backed by dunes, bluffs, cliffs, estuaries, river mouths, and urban infrastructure, providing applicability of the model to virtually any coastal setting. Aided by data assimilation, the model is able to reproduce the observed signal of seasonal shoreline change for the hindcast period of 1995-2010, showing excellent agreement between modeled and observed beach states. The skill of the model during the hindcast period improves confidence in the model's predictive capability when applied to the forecast period (2010-2100) driven by GCM-projected wave and sea level conditions. Predictions of shoreline change with limited human intervention indicate that 31% to 67% of Southern California beaches may become completely eroded by 2100 under sea level rise scenarios of 0.93 to 2.0 m.

  3. Recent Shifts in Shoreline Orientation along a Cuspate Coast Potentially Linked to Climate Change, North Carolina Outer Banks, USA (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, L. J.; Brenner, O.; McNamara, D.; Murray, A. B.

    2009-12-01

    Recent modeling (e.g., Ashton and Murray, 2006a) and observations (Ashton and Murray 2006b) suggest that sandy coastlines self-organize into large-scale plan-view shapes that depend sensitively on the regional wave climate. Subsequent modeling (Slott et al., 2007) shows that even moderate changes in wave climate, likely to arise as storm behaviors shift, may cause coastlines to change shape rapidly. Such large-scale shape changes involve greatly accentuated rates of local erosion and highly variable erosion/accretion rates. A recent analysis of wave records from the Southeastern U.S. (Komar and Allen, 2007) indicates that wave climates have already been changing over the past three decades; the heights of waves attributable to tropical storms have been increasing, changing the angular distribution of wave influences. Changes in coastline shape resulting from changes in the regional wave climate identified by Komar and Allen (2007) will likely be difficult to detect along most coastlines due to short-term variability in shoreline position and limits to the resolution at which shoreline changes can be measured over a 30-year time period. However, adjustments in coastline shape are likely to occur most quickly, and therefore to be most pronounced, on cuspate shorelines along and adjacent to cape tips because rapid changes in shoreline orientation make these locations particularly sensitive to deep-water wave approach angles. To test for the presence of detectable climate-change related shifts in coastline shape along a cuspate shoreline we conduct an historical (1852 - 1974) and recent (1974 - 2004) shoreline change analysis for Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout, North Carolina. Results indicate a recent shift in shoreline-change patterns, with trends toward more-erosional/less-accretional shoreline response and more-accretional/less-erosional response in roughly consistent locations (relative to cape tips) on the flanks of both capes. These changes in shoreline response

  4. Medium-term shoreline evolution of the mediterranean coast of Andalusia (SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Vincenzo; Manno, Giorgio; Messina, Enrica; Anfuso, Giorgio; Suffo, Miguel

    2015-04-01

    Coastal environment is a dynamic system in which numerous natural processes are continuously actuating and interacting among them. As a result, geomorphologic, physical and biological characteristics of coastal environments are constantly changing. Such dynamic balance is nowadays seriously threatened by the strong and increasing anthropic pressure that favors erosion processes, and the associated loss of environmental, ecologic and economic aspects. Sandy beaches are the most vulnerable environments in coastal areas. The aim of this work was to reconstruct the historical evolution of the Mediterranean coastline of Andalusia, Spain. The investigated area is about 500 km in length and includes the provinces of Cadiz, Malaga, Granada and Almeria. It is essentially composed by cliffed sectors with sand and gravel pocket beaches constituting independent morphological cells of different dimensions. This study was based on the analysis of aerial photos and satellite images covering a period of 55 years, between 1956 and 2011. Aerial photos were scanned and geo-referenced in order to solve scale and distortion problems. The shoreline was considered and mapped through the identification of the wet / dry sand limit which coincides with the line of maximum run-up; this indicator - representing the shoreline at the moment of the photo - is the most easily identifiable and representative one in microtidal coastal environments. Since shoreline position is linked to beach profile characteristics and to waves, tide and wind conditions at the moment of the photo, such parameters were taken into account in the calculation of shoreline position and changes. Specifically, retreat/accretion changes were reconstructed applying the DSAS method (Digital Shoreline Analysis System) proposed by the US Geological Survey. Significant beach accretion was observed at Playa La Mamola (Granada), with +1 m/y, because the construction of five breakwaters, and at Playa El Cantal (Almeria) and close

  5. National assessment of shoreline change—Summary statistics for updated vector shorelines and associated shoreline change data for the Gulf of Mexico and Southeast Atlantic coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Kratzmann, Meredith G.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2017-07-18

    Long-term rates of shoreline change for the Gulf of Mexico and Southeast Atlantic regions of the United States have been updated as part of the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Assessment of Shoreline Change project. Additional shoreline position data were used to compute rates where the previous rate-of-change assessment only included four shoreline positions at a given location. The long-term shoreline change rates also incorporate the proxy-datum bias correction to account for the unidirectional onshore bias of the proxy-based high water line shorelines relative to the datum-based mean high water shorelines. The calculation of uncertainty associated with the long-term average rates has also been updated to match refined methods used in other study regions of the National Assessment project. The average rates reported here have a reduced amount of uncertainty relative to those presented in the previous assessments for these two regions.

  6. Shoreline clean-up methods : biological treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoura, S.T. [Oil Spill Response Limited, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The cleanup of oil spills in shoreline environments is a challenging issue worldwide. Oil spills receive public and media attention, particularly in the event of a coastal impact. It is important to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of cleanup methods when defining the level of effort and consequences that are appropriate to remove or treat different types of oil on different shoreline substrates. Of the many studies that have compared different mechanical, chemical and biological treatments for their effectiveness on various types of oil, biological techniques have received the most attention. For that reason, this paper evaluated the effectiveness and effects of shoreline cleanup methods using biological techniques. It summarized data from field experiments and oil spill incidents, including the Exxon Valdez, Sea Empress, Prestige, Grand Eagle, Nakhodka, Guanabara Bay and various Gulf war oil spills. Five major shoreline types were examined, notably rocky intertidal, cobble/pebble/gravel, sand/mud, saltmarsh, and mangrove/sea-grass. The biological techniques that were addressed were nutrient enrichment, hydrocarbon-utilizing bacteria, vegetable oil biosolvents, plants, surf washing, oil-particle interactions and natural attenuation. The study considered the oil type, volume and fate of stranded oil, location of coastal materials, extent of pollution and the impact of biological techniques. The main factors that affect biodegradation of hydrocarbons are the volume, chemical composition and weathering state of the petroleum product as well as the temperature, oxygen availability of nutrients, water salinity, pH level, water content, and microorganisms in the shoreline environment. The interaction of these factors also affect the biodegradation of oil. It was concluded that understanding the fate of stranded oil can help in the development of techniques that improve the weathering and degradation of oil on complex shoreline substrates. 39 refs.

  7. Eureka Littoral Cell CRSMP Humboldt Bay Shoreline Types 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In 2011 Aldaron Laird walked and kayaked the entire shoreline of Humboldt Bay mapping the shoreline conditions onto 11x17 laminated fieldmaps at a scale of 1' = 200'...

  8. 1950 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — 1950 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector shoreline data that were derived from a set of National Ocean Service...

  9. 1922 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — 1922 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector shoreline data that were derived from a set of National Ocean Service...

  10. Eureka Littoral Cell CRSMP Humboldt Bay Shoreline Types 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — In 2011 Aldaron Laird walked and kayaked the entire shoreline of Humboldt Bay mapping the shoreline conditions onto 11x17 laminated fieldmaps at a scale of 1' = 200'...

  11. 1869 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — 1869 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector shoreline data that were derived from a set of National Ocean Service...

  12. 1950 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — 1950 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83) consists of vector shoreline data that were derived from a set of National Ocean Service...

  13. Shorelines of the Western Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Colville River to Point Barrow) used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes shorelines from 65 years ranging from 1947 to 2012 for the north coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow. Shorelines were...

  14. Shorelines of the Central Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Hulahula River to the Colville River) used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes shorelines from 63 years ranging from 1947 to 2010 for the north coast of Alaska between the Hulahula River and the Colville River. Shorelines...

  15. Aerial_Shorelines_1940_2015.shp - Dauphin Island, Alabama Shoreline Data Derived from Aerial Imagery from 1940 to 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Aerial_WDL_Shorelines.zip features digitized historic shorelines for the Dauphin Island coastline from October 1940 to November 2015. This dataset contains 10 Wet...

  16. Observations of shoreline-sandbar coupling on an embayed beach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Lageweg, W.I.; Bryan, K.R.; Coco, G.; Ruessink, B.G.

    2013-01-01

    We analyse a seven-year dataset (1999–2005) of shoreline and sandbar variations derived from video observations at the embayed Tairua Beach, New Zealand, to explore sandbar–shoreline coupling and to determine how this coupling is related to alongshore-averaged sandbar–shoreline separation and beach

  17. Human recreation alters behaviour profiles of non-breeding birds on open-coast sandy shores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Nielsen, Tara; Weston, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    Sandy beaches are primarily valued for their amenity and property values rather than for their ecological functions and properties. Some human usage of beaches potentially conflicts with the conservation and management of wildlife, such as beach-dwelling birds, on sandy shorelines. Because responses by birds to environmental change, including disturbance by humans, often involve behaviours that carry fitness costs, we quantify behaviour profiles of birds in relation to human occurrence along 200 km of sandy shoreline in Eastern Australia, including the large conservation area of Fraser Island. Disturbance to birds on these shores was considerable: 1) birds encountered motorized vehicles (cars, trucks, buses etc.) during 80% of focal bird observation bouts, 2) birds were flushed in over half (up to 86% in individual species) of all bouts, and 3) individuals spent, on average, one-third of their time on disturbance-related behaviours; this was particularly prevalent for Crested Terns (Thalasseus bergii) which were alert 42% of the time and spent 12% of their time escaping from human stimuli. Overall, this study demonstrated that motorized traffic is the prime agent of disturbance to birds on these beaches, resulting in frequent and time-consuming escape behaviours. These findings also emphasize that management of vehicle-based recreation on beaches needs to be re-aligned to meet conservation requirements in addition to providing leisure opportunities in National Parks and beyond; we identify some salient issue for this development: a) encouragement of social norms that promote environmentally benign beach use not involving motor vehicles, b) creation of spatial refuges for beach wildlife from traffic and other non-compatible uses, and c) investment in developing complementary management actions such as effective set-back distances.

  18. Freshman Orientation Evaluation, Shoreline Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Gordon

    Evaluation of the freshman orientation program at Shoreline Community College (Washington) was approached through the use of several criteria: (l) results of the Brown-Holtzman Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes (SSHA), (2) comparison of first-quarter grade averages with orientation program attendance records, (3) the completion of a…

  19. A Coordinated USGS Science Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.; Buxton, H. T.; Andersen, M.; Dean, T.; Focazio, M. J.; Haines, J.; Hainly, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy came ashore during a spring high tide on the New Jersey coastline, delivering hurricane-force winds, storm tides exceeding 19 feet, driving rain, and plummeting temperatures. Hurricane Sandy resulted in 72 direct fatalities in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, and widespread and substantial physical, environmental, ecological, social, and economic impacts estimated at near $50 billion. Before the landfall of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS provided forecasts of potential coastal change; collected oblique aerial photography of pre-storm coastal morphology; deployed storm-surge sensors, rapid-deployment streamgages, wave sensors, and barometric pressure sensors; conducted Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) aerial topographic surveys of coastal areas; and issued a landslide alert for landslide prone areas. During the storm, Tidal Telemetry Networks provided real-time water-level information along the coast. Long-term networks and rapid-deployment real-time streamgages and water-quality monitors tracked river levels and changes in water quality. Immediately after the storm, the USGS serviced real-time instrumentation, retrieved data from over 140 storm-surge sensors, and collected other essential environmental data, including more than 830 high-water marks mapping the extent and elevation of the storm surge. Post-storm lidar surveys documented storm impacts to coastal barriers informing response and recovery and providing a new baseline to assess vulnerability of the reconfigured coast. The USGS Hazard Data Distribution System served storm-related information from many agencies on the Internet on a daily basis. Immediately following Hurricane Sandy the USGS developed a science plan, 'Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy-A U.S. Geological Survey Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery'. The plan will ensure continuing coordination of internal USGS activities as well as

  20. The role of shelf morphology and antecedent setting in the preservation of palaeo-shoreline (beachrock and aeolianite) sequences: the SE African shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrew N.; Cooper, J. Andrew G.; Salzmann, Leslee

    2017-06-01

    On the SE African shelf, a submerged shoreline at a depth of 60 m is examined and its attributes compared between two shelf sectors with different morphologies, yet similar energy regimes. The aim is to assess the controls of antecedent conditioning on shoreline development and later preservation from transgressive ravinement. Using a combination of multibeam bathymetry and single-channel seismic profiles, the stratigraphy and morphology of the shoreline is investigated. Low-gradient bedrock examples reveal several distinctive seismic facies, including onlapping chaotic reflector packages which are interpreted as calcarenite rubble fields. These palaeo-shorelines possess planform equilibrium morphologies, including parabolic dunes and blowout forms along with relict shore platforms. They are strongly associated with incised valleys of last glacial maximum age which underlie the shoreline locations; these provide wide, back-barrier accommodation space during transgression. In contrast, palaeo-shorelines on the steeper-gradient shelf have a simpler stratigraphic arrangement. They are not as well preserved, are generally covered by thick drapes of sediment, and lack the elaborate planform morphologies of their lower-shelf gradient equivalents. Isolated incised valleys and the steep bedrock gradient limit accommodation space. The comparison indicates that antecedent bedrock slope and available accommodation are amongst the dominant controls on overstepping, and thus potential preservation, of palaeo-shorelines on the shelf. Lower-gradient shelves not only promote rapid shoreline translation but, together with wide, sandy back-barrier accommodation, also foster larger barrier volumes. In suitable climates such as in the Mediterranean and other sub-tropical areas, the ensuing shoreline stability promotes rapid and effective cementation of the barrier. In comparison, steep bedrock profiles with limited back-barrier accommodation have much lower preservation potential

  1. IMPLEMENTASI SANDI HILL UNTUK PENYANDIAN CITRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JJ Siang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Hill's code is one of text encoding technique. In this research, Hill's code is extended to image encoding. The image used is BMP 24 bit format. 2x2 and 3x3 matrices is used as a key. The results show that Hill's code is suitable for image whose RGB values vary highly. On the contrary, it is not suitable for less varied RGB images since its original pattern is still persisted in encrypted image. Hill's code for image encoding has also disadvantage in the case that the key matrix is not unique. However, for daily application, with good key matrix, Hill's code can be applied to encode image since it's process only deals with simple matrix operation so it become fast. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Sandi Hill merupakan salah satu teknik penyandian teks. Dalam penelitian ini, pemakaian sandi Hill diperluas dari teks ke citra bertipe BMP 24 bit. Matriks yang dipakai berordo 2x2 dan 3x3. Hasil percobaan menunjukkan bahwa sandi Hill cocok untuk enkripsi citra dengan variasi nilai RGB antar piksel berdekatan yang tinggi (seperti foto, tapi tidak cocok untuk citra dengan variasi nilai RGB yang rendah (seperti gambar kartun karena pola citra asli masih tampak dalam citra sandi. Sandi Hill juga memiliki kelemahan dalam hal tidak tunggalnya matriks kunci yang dapat dipakai. Akan tetapi untuk pemakaian biasa, dengan pemilihan matriks kunci yang baik, sandi Hill dapat dipakai untuk penyandian karena hanya melibatkan operasi matriks biasa sehingga prosesnya relatif cepat. Kata kunci: Sandi Hill, Citra, Relatif Prima.

  2. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for the administration of hunting activity and for the development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Back...

  3. Geodetic Leveling for Back Bay NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the project is to identify existing or establish new (as needed) survey elevation benchmarks for the purpose of providing accurate orthometric heights...

  4. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge litigation letter

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a memorandum between Ecos, Inc. and the Department of the Interior. It threatens litigation against the Department of the Interior in the event of...

  5. Shoreline Response to Climate Change and Human Manipulations in a Model of Large-Scale Coastal Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slott, J. M.; Murray, A. B.; Valvo, L.; Ashton, A.

    2005-12-01

    Gradients in wave-driven alongshore sediment transport cause long-term change in the shape of sandy coastlines. Recent modeling work (Ashton, et. al. 2001) suggests coastlines can attain shapes that are in quasi-equilibrium with a regional wave climate (the distribution of wave influences as a function of wave-approach angles). Mid-latitude winter storms and tropical cyclones, for example, dominate the wave climate off of the Southeast coast of the United States. The resulting wave distribution likely determines the basic shape of the Carolina Capes, which extends along 400 kilometers of coastline. Global warming-related changes in storm (and therefore wave) patterns will likely cause this coastline pattern to adjust. In preliminary computer simulations, Murray, et. al. (in review) demonstrate coastline evolution accelerating by a factor of two to three times for a 5% increase in storminess and four to five times for a 10% increase in storminess after 200 years. Accelerated coastal change will undoubtedly place greater demand on shoreline stabilization techniques. Beach nourishment and seawalls ameliorate the effects shoreline erosion and migration have on homes and roads built on or near the beach. Beach nourishment rebuilds the beach using sand typically dredged from off-shore. Seawalls are hardened structures which prevent the shore from eroding farther landward. Scientific research on shoreline stabilization has focused on the local and short-term effects of these manipulations. In contrast, we study the longer-term (decades to centuries) and the larger scale (10's to 100's of kilometers) consequences of shoreline stabilization, coupling our experiments to scenarios of greatly-accelerated coastal migration induced by changes in global climate. Our modeling approach builds upon one-line coastal engineering models. It incorporates wave shadowing; protruding coastal features may shadow other parts of the coast from waves. Using the model, Ashton, et. al. (2001

  6. Shorelines of the southern North Carolina (NCsouth) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  7. Shorelines of the Texas west (TXwest) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  8. Shorelines of the Mississippi coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  9. Shorelines of the Alabama coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  10. Shorelines of the Texas east (TXeast) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  11. Shorelines of the Louisiana coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  12. Shorelines of the Georgia (GA) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  13. Shorelines of the western North Carolina (NCwest) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  14. Shorelines of the South Carolina (SC) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  15. Shorelines of the southeastern Florida (FLse) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  16. Shorelines of the central North Carolina (NCcentral) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  17. Shorelines of the Florida west (FLwest) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  18. EAARL Coastal Topography-Sandy Hook 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A first surface/bare earth elevation map (also known as a Digital Elevation Model, or DEM) of the Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey...

  19. Heterotrophic bacterial populations in tropical sandy beaches

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Distribution pattern of heterotrophic bacterial flora of three sandy beaches of the west coast of India was studied. The population in these beaches was microbiologically different. Population peaks of halotolerant and limnotolerant forms were...

  20. Shoreline oiling from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Zachary; Zengel, Scott; Baker, Mary; Steinhoff, Marla; Fricano, Gail; Rouhani, Shahrokh; Michel, Jacqueline

    2016-06-15

    We build on previous work to construct a comprehensive database of shoreline oiling exposure from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill by compiling field and remotely-sensed datasets to support oil exposure and injury quantification. We compiled a spatial database of shoreline segments with attributes summarizing habitat, oiling category and timeline. We present new simplified oil exposure classes for both beaches and coastal wetland habitats derived from this database integrating both intensity and persistence of oiling on the shoreline over time. We document oiling along 2113km out of 9545km of surveyed shoreline, an increase of 19% from previously published estimates and representing the largest marine oil spill in history by length of shoreline oiled. These data may be used to generate maps and calculate summary statistics to assist in quantifying and understanding the scope, extent, and spatial distribution of shoreline oil exposure as a result of the DWH incident.

  1. Shoreline monitoring programs for oil spills-of-opportunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harper, J.R; Owens, E.H

    1985-01-01

    This report outlines procedures for conducting shoreline monitoring programs of opportunity for accidental oil spills, the procedures outlined apply to documentation of oil contamination levels only...

  2. Extended Kalman Filter framework for forecasting shoreline evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Joseph; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2012-01-01

    A shoreline change model incorporating both long- and short-term evolution is integrated into a data assimilation framework that uses sparse observations to generate an updated forecast of shoreline position and to estimate unobserved geophysical variables and model parameters. Application of the assimilation algorithm provides quantitative statistical estimates of combined model-data forecast uncertainty which is crucial for developing hazard vulnerability assessments, evaluation of prediction skill, and identifying future data collection needs. Significant attention is given to the estimation of four non-observable parameter values and separating two scales of shoreline evolution using only one observable morphological quantity (i.e. shoreline position).

  3. National assessment of shoreline change: historical change along the north coast of Alaska, U.S.-Canadian border to Icy Cape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Ann E.; Richmond, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Beach erosion is a persistent problem along most open-ocean shores of the United States. Along the Arctic coast of Alaska, coastal erosion is widespread, may be accelerating, and is threatening defense and energy-related infrastructure, coastal habitats, and Native communities. As coastal populations continue to expand and infrastructure and habitat are increasingly threatened by erosion, there is increased demand for accurate information regarding past and present trends and rates of shoreline movement. There also is a need for a comprehensive analysis of shoreline change with metrics that are consistent from one coastal region to another. To meet these national needs, the U.S. Geological Survey is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along the open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Hawaii, Alaska, and the Great Lakes. One purpose of this work is to develop standard, repeatable methods for mapping and analyzing shoreline change so that periodic, systematic, and internally consistent updates regarding coastal erosion and land loss can be made nationally.

  4. Human effects on estuarine shoreline decadal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilo, A.; Freire, P.; Ceia, R.; Mendes, R. N.; Catalão, J.; Taborda, R.

    2012-04-01

    Due to their sheltered conditions and natural resources, estuaries were always attractive to human activities (industrial, agriculture, residential and recreation). Consequently, the complex interactions between anthropogenic and natural drivers increase estuarine shoreline vulnerability to climate changes impacts. The environmental sustainability of these systems depends on a fragile balance between societal development and natural values that can be further disturbed by climate change effects. This challenging task for scientific community, managers and stakeholders can only be accomplished with interdisplinary approaches. In this context, it seems clear that estuarine management plans should incorporate the concept of change into the planning of policy decisions since these natural dynamic areas are often under human pressure and are recognized as sensitive to climate change effects. Therefore, the knowledge about historical evolution of estuarine shoreline is important to provide new insights on the spatial and temporal dimensions of estuarine change. This paper aims to present and discuss shoreline changes due to human intervention in Tagus estuary, located on the west coast of Portugal. Detailed margins cartography, in a 550m fringe (drawn inland from the highest astronomical tide line), was performed based on 2007 orthophotos (spatial resolution of 0.5 m) analysis. Several classification categories were considered, as urbanized areas, industrial, port and airport facilities, agriculture spaces, green areas and natural zones. The estuarine bed (area bellow the highest astronomical tide line) was also mapped (including human occupation, natural habitats, morpho-sedimentary units) based on the geographic information above and LANSAT 7 TM+ images using image processing techniques. Aerial photographs dated from 1944, 1946, 1948, 1955 and 1958 were analyzed for a set of pilot zones in order to fully understand the decadal shoreline change. Estuarine bed presents

  5. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan K. La Peyre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  6. Vector shorelines and associated shoreline change rates derived from Lidar and aerial imagery for Dauphin Island, Alabama: 1940-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Rachel; Nelson, Paul R.; Long, Joseph W.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2017-01-01

    In support of studies and assessments of barrier island evolution in the Gulf of Mexico, rates of shoreline change for Dauphin Island, Alabama, were calculated using two different shoreline proxy datasets with a total temporal span of 75 years.  Mean High Water line (MHW) shorelines were generated from 14 lidar datasets from 1998 to 2014, and Wet Dry Line (WDL) shorelines were digitized from ten sets of georeferenced aerial images from 1940 to 2015. Rates of change for the open-ocean (south-facing) and back-barrier (north-facing) coast were calculated for three groups of shorelines:  MHW (lidar), WDL (aerial) and MHW and WDL shorelines combined. Calculations were performed using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3, an ArcGIS extension developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (Thieler and others, 2009).  Thieler, E.R., Himmelstoss, E.A., Zichichi, J.L., and Ergul, Ayhan, 2009, Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.0—An ArcGIS extension for calculating shoreline change: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1278, https://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/DSAS/version4/.

  7. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPeyre, Megan K.; Serra, Kayla; Joyner, T. Andrew; Humphries, Austin T.

    2015-01-01

    Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed) and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y−1. Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  8. Assessing shoreline exposure and oyster habitat suitability maximizes potential success for sustainable shoreline protection using restored oyster reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Peyre, Megan K; Serra, Kayla; Joyner, T Andrew; Humphries, Austin

    2015-01-01

    Oyster reefs provide valuable ecosystem services that contribute to coastal resilience. Unfortunately, many reefs have been degraded or removed completely, and there are increased efforts to restore oysters in many coastal areas. In particular, much attention has recently been given to the restoration of shellfish reefs along eroding shorelines to reduce erosion. Such fringing reef approaches, however, often lack empirical data to identify locations where reefs are most effective in reducing marsh erosion, or fully take into account habitat suitability. Using monitoring data from 5 separate fringing reef projects across coastal Louisiana, we quantify shoreline exposure (fetch + wind direction + wind speed) and reef impacts on shoreline retreat. Our results indicate that fringing oyster reefs have a higher impact on shoreline retreat at higher exposure shorelines. At higher exposures, fringing reefs reduced marsh edge erosion an average of 1.0 m y(-1). Using these data, we identify ranges of shoreline exposure values where oyster reefs are most effective at reducing marsh edge erosion and apply this knowledge to a case study within one Louisiana estuary. In Breton Sound estuary, we calculate shoreline exposure at 500 random points and then overlay a habitat suitability index for oysters. This method and the resulting visualization show areas most likely to support sustainable oyster populations as well as significantly reduce shoreline erosion. Our results demonstrate how site selection criteria, which include shoreline exposure and habitat suitability, are critical to ensuring greater positive impacts and longevity of oyster reef restoration projects.

  9. 75 FR 8997 - National Environmental Policy Act; Wallops Flight Facility Shoreline Restoration and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Environmental Policy Act; Wallops Flight Facility Shoreline Restoration... Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) Shoreline Restoration and Infrastructure Protection Program (SRIPP). SUMMARY... from the Wallops Island shoreline and the infrastructure behind it. Alternative One, NASA's...

  10. Penetration grouting reinforcement of sandy gravel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; PENG Zhen-bin; TANG Yi-qun; PENG Wen-xiang; HE Zhong-ming

    2008-01-01

    To study the relationship between grouting effect and grouting factors, three factors (seven parameters) directionless pressure and small cycle grouting model experiment on sandy gravel was done, which was designed according to uniform design method. And regressing was applied to analysis of the test data. The two models test results indicate that when the diffusing radius of grout changes from 26 to 51 era, the grouted sandy gravel compressing strength changes fTom 2.13 to 12.30 MPa; the relationship between diffusing radius(R) and water cement ratio(m), permeability coefficient(k), grouting pressure(p), grouting time(t) is R=19.953m0.121k0.429p0.412t0.437, the relationship between compressing strength(P) and porosity(n), water cement ratio, grouting pressure, grouting time is P=0.984n0.517m-1.488p0.118t0.031.So the porosity of sandy gravel, the permeability coefficient of sandy gravel, grouting pressure, grouting time, water cement ratio are main factors to influence the grouting effect. The grouting pressure is the main factor to influence grouting diffusing radius, and the water cement ratio is the main factor to influence grouted sandy gravel compressing strength.

  11. Numerical Modeling System for Shoreline Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    the cross-shore transport term, q. Thus, the gain or loss of sediment will be constant in time and independent of variations in the wave cli- mate...file, arid then read again from the beginning. A simple way to represent a wave climate which is constant in time , for test purposes, is to place only...presented. The offshore (d 40 m) wave climate was held constant in time (Ho = 1 m, ao = 30 degrees, and T = 5 seconds), and the initial shoreline was

  12. Geometry and earthquake potential of the shoreline fault, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardebeck, Jeanne L.

    2013-01-01

    The Shoreline fault is a vertical strike‐slip fault running along the coastline near San Luis Obispo, California. Much is unknown about the Shoreline fault, including its slip rate and the details of its geometry. Here, I study the geometry of the Shoreline fault at seismogenic depth, as well as the adjacent section of the offshore Hosgri fault, using seismicity relocations and earthquake focal mechanisms. The Optimal Anisotropic Dynamic Clustering (OADC) algorithm (Ouillon et al., 2008) is used to objectively identify the simplest planar fault geometry that fits all of the earthquakes to within their location uncertainty. The OADC results show that the Shoreline fault is a single continuous structure that connects to the Hosgri fault. Discontinuities smaller than about 1 km may be undetected, but would be too small to be barriers to earthquake rupture. The Hosgri fault dips steeply to the east, while the Shoreline fault is essentially vertical, so the Hosgri fault dips towards and under the Shoreline fault as the two faults approach their intersection. The focal mechanisms generally agree with pure right‐lateral strike‐slip on the OADC planes, but suggest a non‐planar Hosgri fault or another structure underlying the northern Shoreline fault. The Shoreline fault most likely transfers strike‐slip motion between the Hosgri fault and other faults of the Pacific–North America plate boundary system to the east. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the entire known length of the Shoreline fault would have a moment magnitude of 6.4–6.8. A hypothetical earthquake rupturing the Shoreline fault and the section of the Hosgri fault north of the Hosgri–Shoreline junction would have a moment magnitude of 7.2–7.5.

  13. [Simulation alfalfa growth in Wulanbuhe sandy region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wenming; Bao, Xuemei

    2002-12-01

    Based on the theories of accumulated temperature and on the physio-ecological characteristics of Medicago sativa, a simulation model for its growth under soil water stress in arid sandy region was developed. The model was mainly composed of four modules: the stage module of growth, the dynamic module of leaf area index, the accumulated module of dry matter, and the distributive module of dry matter. After simulating and calculating, the model could be used to predict the growing progress and dynamic changes of leaf area and yield for herbage in sandy region. The result shows that the application of the model to production is usually effective.

  14. Numerical modeling of shoreline undulations part 1: Constant wave climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the non-linear development of alongshore undulations up to fully developed quasi-steady equilibrium. A numerical model which describes the longshore sediment transport along arbitrarily shaped shorelines is applied, based on a spectral wave model, a depth...... integrated flow model, a wave-phase resolving sediment transport description and a one-line shoreline model.First the length of the shoreline undulations is determined in the linear regime using a stability analysis. Next the further evolution from the linear to the fully non-linear regime is described....... In the fully non-linear regime down-drift spits and migrating shoreline undulations are described.Three different shoreline shapes are found depending on the wave conditions: undulations with no spits, undulations with shore parallel spit and undulations with reconnecting spits. © 2012 Published by Elsevier B.V....

  15. NOAA's Shoreline Survey Maps - Raster NOAA-NOS Shoreline Survey Manuscripts that define the shoreline and alongshore natural and man-made features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOS coastal survey maps (often called t-sheet or tp-sheet maps) are special use planimetric or topographic maps that precisely define the shoreline and alongshore...

  16. Automated Large-Scale Shoreline Variability Analysis From Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearre, N. S.

    2006-12-01

    Land-based video has been used to quantify changes in nearshore conditions for over twenty years. By combining the ability to track rapid, short-term shoreline change and changes associated with longer term or seasonal processes, video has proved to be a cost effective and versatile tool for coastal science. Previous video-based studies of shoreline change have typically examined the position of the shoreline along a small number of cross-shore lines as a proxy for the continuous coast. The goal of this study is twofold: (1) to further develop automated shoreline extraction algorithms for continuous shorelines, and (2) to track the evolution of a nourishment project at Rehoboth Beach, DE that was concluded in June 2005. Seven cameras are situated approximately 30 meters above mean sea level and 70 meters from the shoreline. Time exposure and variance images are captured hourly during daylight and transferred to a local processing computer. After correcting for lens distortion and geo-rectifying to a shore-normal coordinate system, the images are merged to form a composite planform image of 6 km of coast. Automated extraction algorithms establish shoreline and breaker positions throughout a tidal cycle on a daily basis. Short and long term variability in the daily shoreline will be characterized using empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis. Periodic sediment volume information will be extracted by incorporating the results of monthly ground-based LIDAR surveys and by correlating the hourly shorelines to the corresponding tide level under conditions with minimal wave activity. The Delaware coast in the area downdrift of the nourishment site is intermittently interrupted by short groins. An Even/Odd analysis of the shoreline response around these groins will be performed. The impact of groins on the sediment volume transport along the coast during periods of accretive and erosive conditions will be discussed. [This work is being supported by DNREC and the

  17. FL_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Florida Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  18. SC_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for South Carolina Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  19. NC_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for North Carolina Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  20. GA_INTERSECTS - Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Georgia Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  1. Massachusetts Shoreline Change Mapping and Analysis Project, 2013 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Smith, Theresa L.; Knisel, Julia M.; Sampson, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Information on rates and trends of shoreline change can be used to improve the understanding of the underlying causes and potential effects of coastal erosion on coastal populations and infrastructure and can support informed coastal management decisions. In this report, we summarize the changes in the historical positions of the shoreline of the Massachusetts coast for the 165 years from 1844 through 2009. The study area includes the Massachusetts coastal region from Salisbury to Westport, including Cape Cod, as well as Martha’s Vineyard, Nantucket, and the Elizabeth Islands. New statewide shoreline data were developed for approximately 1,804 kilometers (1,121 miles) of shoreline using color aerial orthoimagery from 2008 and 2009 and topographic lidar from 2007. The shoreline data were integrated with existing historical shoreline data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) to compute long- (about 150 years) and short-term (about 30 years) rates of shoreline change. A linear regression method was used to calculate long- and short-term rates of shoreline change at 26,510 transects along the Massachusetts coast. In locations where shoreline data were insufficient to use the linear regression method, short-term rates were calculated using an end-point method. Long-term rates of shoreline change are calculated with (LTw) and without (LTwo) shorelines from the 1970s and 1994 to examine the effect of removing these data on measured rates of change. Regionally averaged rates are used to assess the general characteristics of the two-rate computations, and we find that (1) the rates of change for both LTw and LTwo are essentially the same; (2) including more data slightly reduces the uncertainty of the rate, which is expected as the number of shorelines increases; and (3) the data for the shorelines from the 1970s and 1994 are not outliers with respect to the long-term trend. These findings are true for regional

  2. Integrating data types to enhance shoreline change assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J.; Henderson, R.; Plant, N. G.; Nelson, P. R.

    2016-12-01

    Shorelines represent the variable boundary between terrestrial and marine environments. Assessment of geographic and temporal variability in shoreline position and related variability in shoreline change rates are an important part of studies and applications related to impacts from sea-level rise and storms. The results from these assessments are used to quantify future ecosystem services and coastal resilience and guide selection of appropriate coastal restoration and protection designs. But existing assessments typically fail to incorporate all available shoreline observations because they are derived from multiple data types and have different or unknown biases and uncertainties. Shoreline-change research and assessments often focus on either the long-term trajectory using sparse data over multiple decades or shorter-term evolution using data collected more frequently but over a shorter period of time. The combination of data collected with significantly different temporal resolution is not often considered. Also, differences in the definition of the shoreline metric itself can occur, whether using a single or multiple data source(s), due to variation the signal being detected in the data (e.g. instantaneous land/water interface, swash zone, wrack line, or topographic contours). Previous studies have not explored whether more robust shoreline change assessments are possible if all available data are utilized and all uncertainties are considered. In this study, we test the hypothesis that incorporating all available shoreline data will lead to both improved historical assessments and enhance the predictive capability of shoreline-change forecasts. Using over 250 observations of shoreline position at Dauphin Island, Alabama over the last century, we compare shoreline-change rates derived from individual data sources (airborne lidar, satellite, aerial photographs) with an assessment using the combination of all available data. Biases or simple uncertainties in the

  3. Interstitial meiofauna of Namib sandy beaches

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-03-16

    Mar 16, 1988 ... sandy beaches on the Namibian coast, Langstrand and Cape Cross. A transverse ... prominent in the mid-shore at Cape Cross but occurred in low numbers at Langstrand , where archiannelids ... Koop (1983) recorded the faunal composition of local .... four replicate sediment cores were taken at 15 cm.

  4. Bibliography of sandy beaches and sandy beach organisms on the African continent

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bally, R

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography covers the literature relating to sandy beaches on the African continent and outlying islands. The bibliography lists biological, chemical, geographical and geological references and covers shallow marine sediments, surf zones off...

  5. 77 FR 74341 - Establishing the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-14

    ... the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force By the authority vested in me as President by the.... Hurricane Sandy made landfall on October 29, 2012, resulting in major flooding, extensive structural damage... assist the affected region. A disaster of Hurricane Sandy's magnitude merits a comprehensive...

  6. Sand resources, regional geology, and coastal processes for shoreline restoration: case study of Barataria shoreline, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Kulp, Mark; Penland, Shea; Britsch, Louis D.

    2002-01-01

    The Louisiana barrier shoreline of Barataria Basin, which lies within the western Mississippi River delta, has undergone significant retreat during the past 100 years. The most practical restoration method to rebuild these shorelines is sand nourishment. Seismic and sonar interpretations verified with geologic samples (vibracores and borings) indicate that there are nine sand targets within the Barataria study area that meet or exceed the minimum criteria for potential resource sites. However, the near surface lithology in the basin is typically silts and clays. Locating suitable sand resources for shoreline restoration is challenging. The sand units are associated with geologic depositional systems such as ebb-tidal deltas, distributary mouth bars, and channel fill (undifferentiated fluvial or tidal inlet channels). The nine potential sand targets consist primarily of fine sand and can be delineated into three surficial and six buried features. The surficial features contain approximately 10% of the total sand resources identified. At least 90% of the sand resources need overburden sediment removed prior to use; almost 570 million yd3 (438.5 mil m3) of overburden will need to be removed if the entire resource is mined. In this study, we identified 396 to 532 mil yd3 (305.8 to 410.8 mil m3) of potential sand deposits for shoreline restoration. Previous studies using less dense survey methods greatly over-estimated sand resources available in this area. Many fluvial channels reported previously as sand-filled are mud-filled. Contrary to these previous studies, few fluvial subsystems in this region have abundant sand resources.

  7. A Numerical Model for Predicting Shoreline Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    problem of Figure 9(A). Of interest is that the undulatory patterns of the shoreline in Figure 9(A) dis- appear in Figure 9(B). Hence, diffraction...Mi clli;ia (south oh’ 1i .11 shio%\\ 1hat more t han 39 26 V --2i \\ \\’ . + ,i24Z 4 DEPTH IN FEET. MAR . 1973 ALL DEPTHS ARE REFERRED MAR . 1974 TO LOW...SS’,O averages for IHolland Ilarbor.1 Mont h If II., (’t) (tt) (s) .ali . ,1.3 4.3 0. 1 Feb. .4.0 3.6 6.0 Mar . 3.5 1.9 0. 3 Apr. 2. 6 2.. S. 5 Jlay 2.3

  8. Shoreline change analysis of Vedaranyam coast, Tamil Nadu, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Usha; Thulasiraman, N; Deepthi, K; Kathiravan, K

    2013-06-01

    The coastal zone is one of the nation's greatest environmental and economic assets. The present research aims at studying the shoreline changes along Vedaranyam coast using conventional and modern techniques including field sampling, remote sensing, and geographical information system (GIS). The study area was divided into three zones. Dynamic Land/Sea polygon analysis was performed to obtain the shore line changes at different time periods between 1930 and 2005. From the multidate shoreline maps, the rate of shoreline change was computed using linear regression rate and end point rate. Further, the shoreline was classified into eroding, accreting, and stable regions through GIS analysis. The eroding, accreting, and stable coastal stretch along Vedaranyam is observed as 18 %, 80.5 %, and 1.5 %, respectively. Net shoreline movement is seaward, i.e., the coast is progressive with an average rate of 5 m/year. A maximum shoreline displacement of 1.3 km towards the sea is observed near Point Calimere. During the Asian Tsunami 2004, the eastern part of the study area showed high erosion. Sediment transport paths derived from the grain size analysis of beach sediments collected during different seasons help to identify the major sediment source and sinks. Point Calimere acts as the major sink for sediments whereas Agastiyampalli and Kodiakkarai are found to be the major sources for the sediment supply along the Vedaranyam coast. Shoreline change study from field and satellite data using GIS analysis confirms that Vedaranyam coast is accreting in nature.

  9. Historical shoreline mapping (I): improving techniques and reducing positioning errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Danforth, William W.

    1994-01-01

    A critical need exists among coastal researchers and policy-makers for a precise method to obtain shoreline positions from historical maps and aerial photographs. A number of methods that vary widely in approach and accuracy have been developed to meet this need. None of the existing methods, however, address the entire range of cartographic and photogrammetric techniques required for accurate coastal mapping. Thus, their application to many typical shoreline mapping problems is limited. In addition, no shoreline mapping technique provides an adequate basis for quantifying the many errors inherent in shoreline mapping using maps and air photos. As a result, current assessments of errors in air photo mapping techniques generally (and falsely) assume that errors in shoreline positions are represented by the sum of a series of worst-case assumptions about digitizer operator resolution and ground control accuracy. These assessments also ignore altogether other errors that commonly approach ground distances of 10 m. This paper provides a conceptual and analytical framework for improved methods of extracting geographic data from maps and aerial photographs. We also present a new approach to shoreline mapping using air photos that revises and extends a number of photogrammetric techniques. These techniques include (1) developing spatially and temporally overlapping control networks for large groups of photos; (2) digitizing air photos for use in shoreline mapping; (3) preprocessing digitized photos to remove lens distortion and film deformation effects; (4) simultaneous aerotriangulation of large groups of spatially and temporally overlapping photos; and (5) using a single-ray intersection technique to determine geographic shoreline coordinates and express the horizontal and vertical error associated with a given digitized shoreline. As long as historical maps and air photos are used in studies of shoreline change, there will be a considerable amount of error (on the

  10. CapeCodBay_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from Cape Cod Bay coastal region from the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  11. SouthShore_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  12. MarthasVineyard_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from the Martha's Vineyard coastal region including Vineyard Sound, Nantucket Sound, and the Atlantic Ocean-facing coasts of Martha's Vineyard and Nomans Land.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  13. OuterCapeCod_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from the Outer Cape Cod coastal region from Long Point in Provincetown to Monomoy Island, Massachusetts.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  14. ElizabethIslands_shorelines.shp - Shorelines used to calculate shoreline change statistics from the Elizabeth Islands coastal region of Massachusetts from Nonamesset Island southwest of Woods Hole to Cuttyhunk Island north of Martha's Vineyard.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  15. Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics for the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  16. The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) Version 4.0 - An ArcGIS extension for calculating shoreline change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Zichichi, Jessica L.; Ergul, Ayhan

    2009-01-01

    The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.0 is a software extension to ESRI ArcGIS v.9.2 and above that enables a user to calculate shoreline rate-of-change statistics from multiple historic shoreline positions. A user-friendly interface of simple buttons and menus guides the user through the major steps of shoreline change analysis. Components of the extension and user guide include (1) instruction on the proper way to define a reference baseline for measurements, (2) automated and manual generation of measurement transects and metadata based on user-specified parameters, and (3) output of calculated rates of shoreline change and other statistical information. DSAS computes shoreline rates of change using four different methods: (1) endpoint rate, (2) simple linear regression, (3) weighted linear regression, and (4) least median of squares. The standard error, correlation coefficient, and confidence interval are also computed for the simple and weighted linear-regression methods. The results of all rate calculations are output to a table that can be linked to the transect file by a common attribute field. DSAS is intended to facilitate the shoreline change-calculation process and to provide rate-of-change information and the statistical data necessary to establish the reliability of the calculated results. The software is also suitable for any generic application that calculates positional change over time, such as assessing rates of change of glacier limits in sequential aerial photos, river edge boundaries, land-cover changes, and so on.

  17. The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) Version 4.0 - An ArcGIS Extension for Calculating Shoreline Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Zichichi, Jessica L.; Ergul, Ayhan

    2009-01-01

    The Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.0 is a software extension to ESRI ArcGIS v.9.2 and above that enables a user to calculate shoreline rate-of-change statistics from multiple historic shoreline positions. A user-friendly interface of simple buttons and menus guides the user through the major steps of shoreline change analysis. Components of the extension and user guide include (1) instruction on the proper way to define a reference baseline for measurements, (2) automated and manual generation of measurement transects and metadata based on user-specified parameters, and (3) output of calculated rates of shoreline change and other statistical information. DSAS computes shoreline rates of change using four different methods: (1) endpoint rate, (2) simple linear regression, (3) weighted linear regression, and (4) least median of squares. The standard error, correlation coefficient, and confidence interval are also computed for the simple and weighted linear-regression methods. The results of all rate calculations are output to a table that can be linked to the transect file by a common attribute field. DSAS is intended to facilitate the shoreline change-calculation process and to provide rate-of-change information and the statistical data necessary to establish the reliability of the calculated results. The software is also suitable for any generic application that calculates positional change over time, such as assessing rates of change of glacier limits in sequential aerial photos, river edge boundaries, land-cover changes, and so on.

  18. 基于多源信息的辽东湾顶东部海岸时空变化研究%Multi-Source-Based Space-Time Analysis of Shoreline Changes in Eastern Liaodong Bay Top

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武芳; 苏奋振; 平博; 吴文周; 朱良

    2013-01-01

    Due to the development of the local economy and exploitation of the shoreline, Liaodong Bay has changed. The analysis of shoreline changes plays a pivotal role in the development of the economy and policy. Prior to the 1990s, wetland degradation, sandy shoreline erosion and man-made land projects were responsible for changes in Liaodong Bay' s shoreline. We analyze changes in the shoreline across the study area, examining the impacts of comprehensive development and management, and raise scientific alternatives for improved outcomes. Since RS and GIS based spatial analysis can detect shoreline changes immediately and accurately, this research adopted band 7, band 4 and band 1 TM data to compose false color images using ArcGIS. We propose six principles to distinguish different types of shoreline. According to field surveys and monitoring data, we found that trends in the length of shoreline have not changed and show a consistent increase in length while curvature is declining. The shape of the coast has trended from arc to jagged and has been driven by man-made development. Wetland resources have been converted from dimension change to qualitative change. The area of man-made land has shown index increase and breakwater is effective to reduce erosion of the sandy shoreline. These patterns indicate that in a relatively stable environment, social and economic factors are the main causes of shoreline change. Different institutions and different shaping shoreline policies cause various impacts. A combination of short-term high-density shoreline detection and traditional large scale detection will be highly effective in analyzing the impact caused by human activities. Monitoring shoreline development and management as well as intervention will also benefit from combined detection.%根据对辽东湾顶东部的实地考察,本文综合利用RS/GIS技术方法,提出了岸线解译原则,采用多期TM/ETM+影像、CEBERS-02B高分辨率多

  19. 2012 Pre-Hurricane Sandy Fire Island National Seashore, USGS Lidar-Derived Dune Crest, Toe and Shoreline

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards component of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project focuses on understanding the magnitude and...

  20. 2014 Post-Hurricane Sandy SC to NY NOAA NGS Lidar-Derived Dune Crest, Toe and Shoreline

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Storm-Induced Coastal Change Hazards component of the National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project focuses on understanding the magnitude and...

  1. Distribution of genetic markers of fecal pollution on a freshwater sandy shoreline in proximity to wastewater effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmiller, Jessica J; Hicks, Randall E; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2013-04-02

    Water, sand, and sediment from a Lake Superior harbor site continuously receiving wastewater effluent was sampled monthly for June to October 2010 and from May to September 2011. Understanding the dynamics of genetic markers of fecal bacteria in these matrices is essential to accurately characterizing health risks. Genetic markers for enterococci, total Bacteroides, and human-associated Bacteroides were measured in site-water, sand, and sediment and in final effluent by quantitative PCR. The similarity between the quantity of molecular markers in the water column and effluent indicated that the abundance of genetic markers in the water column was likely controlled by effluent inputs. Effluent turbidity was positively correlated (p ≤ 0.05) with AllBac and HF183 in final effluent and AllBac in the water column. In sand and sediment, Entero1 and AllBac were most abundant in the upper 1-3 cm depths, whereas HF183 was most abundant in the upper 1 cm of sand and at 7 cm in sediment. The AllBac and Entero1 markers were 1- and 2-orders of magnitude more abundant in sand and sediment relative to the water column per unit mass. These results indicate that sand and sediment may act as reservoirs for genetic markers of fecal pollution at some freshwater sites.

  2. NewEnglandS_shorelines.shp - Shorelines of the New England South coastal region used in shoreline change analysis from Dartmouth, Massachusetts to Napatree Point, Rhode Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  3. Shorelines of the Cape Cod coastal region from Provincetown to the southern end of Monomoy Island, Massachusetts, used in shoreline change analysis (CapeCod_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  4. Shorelines of the New Jersey South coastal region used in shoreline change analysis from Little Egg Inlet to Cape May, New Jersey (NewJerseyS_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  5. KauaiE_shorelines - Shorelines of the eastern coastal region of Kauai, Hawaii, from Papaa to Nawiliwili, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  6. WA_shorelines_uncertainty.dbf - uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software for Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  7. MauiW_shorelines - Shorelines of the western coastal region of Maui, Hawaii, from Ukumehame to Honolua, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  8. Shorelines of the New England South coastal region used in shoreline change analysis from Dartmouth, Massachusetts to Napatree Point, Rhode Island (NewEnglandS_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  9. OahuW_shorelines - Shorelines of the western coastal region of Oahu, Hawaii, from Yokohama to Tracks Beach, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  10. OahuE_shorelines - Shorelines of the eastern coastal region of Oahu, Hawaii, from Kahuku to Makapuu, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  11. MA_Islands_shorelines.shp - Shorelines of the Massachusetts Islands coastal region including Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket, used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  12. OahuW_shorelines - Shorelines of the western coastal region of Oahu, Hawaii, from Yokohama to Tracks Beach, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  13. MauiN_shorelines - Shorelines of the northern coastal region of Maui, Hawaii, from Waihee to Kuau, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  14. MauiK_shorelines - Shorelines of the Kihei coastal region of Maui, Hawaii, from Maalaea to Makena, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  15. KauaiS_shorelines - Shorelines of the southern coastal region of Kauai, Hawaii, from Waimea to Kipu Kai, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  16. Shorelines of the Cape Cod coastal region from Provincetown to the southern end of Monomoy Island, Massachusetts, used in shoreline change analysis (CapeCod_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  17. Shorelines of the New Jersey South coastal region used in shoreline change analysis from Little Egg Inlet to Cape May, New Jersey (NewJerseyS_shorelines.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  18. MauiK_shorelines - Shorelines of the Kihei coastal region of Maui, Hawaii, from Maalaea to Makena, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  19. OahuN_shorelines - Shorelines of the northern coastal region of Oahu, Hawaii, from Camp Erdman to Kahuku, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  20. KauaiS_shorelines - Shorelines of the southern coastal region of Kauai, Hawaii, from Waimea to Kipu Kai, used in shoreline change analysis.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  1. 2010 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) digital ortho imagery collected on May 10, 2010. This dataset contains digitized...

  2. Rapid Characterization of Shorelines using a Georeferenced Video Mapping System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Michael G.; Judd, Chaeli; Marcoe, K.

    2012-09-01

    Increased understanding of shoreline conditions is needed, yet current approaches are limited in ability to characterize remote areas or document features at a finer resolution. Documentation using video mapping may provide a rapid and repeatable method for assessing the current state of the environment and determining changes to the shoreline over time. In this study, we compare two studies using boat-based, georeferenced video mapping in coastal Washington and the Columbia River Estuary to map and characterize coastal stressors and functional data. In both areas, mapping multiple features along the shoreline required approximation of the coastline. However, characterization of vertically oriented features such as shoreline armoring and small features such as pilings and large woody debris was possible. In addition, end users noted that geovideo provides a permanent record to allow a user to examine recorded video anywhere along a transect or at discrete points.

  3. Rocky Mountain Arsenal Lower Derby Lake shoreline expansion project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Project Completion Report is to document the completion of the Lower Derby Lake Shoreline Expansion Project and summarize project highlights....

  4. Alabama ESI: ESI (Shoreline Types - Lines and Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines and polygons representing the shoreline and coastal habitats for Alabama, classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity...

  5. 2014 Vectorized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from a U.S. Geological Survey topographic lidar survey that was conducted on January 16-18, 2014 over Breton Island, Louisiana and released...

  6. 1983 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from the National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) program. The NHAP was coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey as an interagency project...

  7. Rebuilding Habitat and Shoreline Resilience through Improved Flood Control Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the SFBWQP Rebuilding Habitat and Shoreline Resilience through Improved Flood Control Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  8. 1983 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from the National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) program. The NHAP was coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey as an interagency project...

  9. 2013 Vectorized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from a U.S. Geological Survey topographic lidar survey that was conducted on July 12-14, 2013 over Dauphin Island, Alabama and Chandeleur,...

  10. 2007 Digitized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from the National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) digital ortho imagery collected on October 11, 2007. This dataset contains digitized...

  11. 2013 Vectorized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from a U.S. Geological Survey topographic lidar survey that was conducted on July 12-14, 2013 over Dauphin Island, Alabama and Chandeleur,...

  12. 2014 Vectorized Shoreline for Breton Island, Louisiana (Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines were derived from a U.S. Geological Survey topographic lidar survey that was conducted on January 16-18, 2014 over Breton Island, Louisiana and released...

  13. Louisiana ESI: ESI (Environmental Sensitivity Index Shoreline Types - Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains vector lines representing the shoreline and coastal habitats of Louisiana classified according to the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI)...

  14. Effects of shoreline erosion on infrastructure development along the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of shoreline erosion on infrastructure development along the coastal belt of Ghana: Case ... environment and affected the socio-economic life of local populations, threatened cultural heritage and hindered coastal tourism development.

  15. Decadal changes in shoreline patterns in Sundarbans, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterjee, N.; Mukhopadhyay, R.; Mitra, D.

    , 248 001, Uttarakhand, India 1. IntroductionErosion and accretion processes are common phenomena acrossthe shoreline that demarcates land and sea, and the rate of suchchange in shoreline is an indicator of coastal dynamics (NRC Report1990... erosion because of strong tidal current,vigorous wave action and other factors including the land-fall oftropical cyclone (Allison and Kepple 2001). Rapid subsidence,perhaps tectonic but accentuated by compaction and dewatering ofsediments has been...

  16. Lake Shorelines: Earth Analogs for Hypothesized Martian Coastal Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Williams, S. H.; Johnston, A. K.; Head, James W.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of oceans on Mars has generated a lot of interest in the science community, but conclusive evidence supporting or refuting the ocean hypothesis has remained somewhat elusive. Precise topographic measurements of fresh-appearing shorelines from glacial Lake Lahontan were collected recently in an effort to obtain well-constrained data for comparison with the hypothesized Martian shorelines. This report summarizes the first results of the on-going research project.

  17. Estuarine Back-barrier Shoreline and Beach Sandline Change Model Skill and Predicted Probabilities: Event-driven backshore shoreline change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline...

  18. Screening of cellulose decomposing fungi in sandy dune soil of Horqin Sandy Land

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShaoKun Wang; XueYong Zhao; XiaoAn Zuo; XinPing Liu; Hao Qu; Wei Mao; JianYing Yun

    2015-01-01

    Cellulose decomposing fungi play an important role in litter decomposition and are decisive in nutrient cycling in sandy land ecosystems. Thirty-one strains were isolated to select efficient cellulose decomposers, and four efficient cellulose decomposing fungi (NM3-1, NM3-2, NM3-3, and NM3-4) were screened using a CMC (carboxymethyl cellulose) carbon source in dune soil of Horqin Sandy Land. They were identified as Asperigillus calidoustus, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani, and Hypocrea lixii by rDNA-ITS molecular biological methods. Cloth decomposition rates were 15.71%, 15.89%, 17.29%, and 17.89%by the four efficient decomposers incubated for 30 days, respectively. Screening of efficient cellulose decomposers can not only increase the dune soil functional microbe bank, but can also accelerate litter decom-position and available nutrient input in the Horqin Sandy Land.

  19. Hurricane Sandy 2013 National Wetlands Inventory Habitat Classification (habitat analysis of coastal federal lands located within high impact zones of Hurricane Sandy, October 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy directly hit the Atlantic shoreline of New Jersey during several astronomical high tide cycles in late October, 2012. The eastern seaboard areas are subject to sea level rise and increased severity and frequency of storm events, prompting habitat and land use planning changes. Wetland Aquatic Research Center (WARC) has conducted detailed mapping of marine and estuarine wetlands and deepwater habitats, including beaches and tide flats, and upland land use/land cover, using specially-acquired aerial imagery flown at 1-meter resolution.These efforts will assist the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) continuing endeavors to map the barrier islands adhering to Coastal Barrier Resources Act (CBRA) guidelines. Mapped areas consist of selected federal lands including, National Park Service areas, USFWS National Wildlife Refuges, and selected CBRA Units, including barrier islands and marshes in New York and New Jersey. These vital wetland areas are important for migratory waterfowl and neotropical bird habitats, wildlife food chain support and nurseries for shellfish and finfish populations. Coastal wetlands also play an important function as storm surge buffers. This project includes mapping of dominant estuarine wetland plant species useful for wetland functional analysis and wildlife evaluation and management concerns. It also aims to integrate with and offer updated databases pertinent to: USFWS NWR and NWI programs, NOAA tide flats and beaches data, FEMA flood zone data, Natural Heritage Endangered and Threated Species, watershed management, and state and local land use planning.

  20. Evolving Shoreline Change Rates Along the US Pacific Northwest Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. L.; Ruggiero, P.; Allan, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal change hazards are increasingly affecting economically important areas, including those used for infrastructure, commerce, and public recreation. Quantifying shoreline change rates and understanding the contributing factors is crucial to protect these areas and to assist federal, state, and local agencies in developing long-term management plans. A recent study by the USGS National Assessment of Shoreline Change project analyzed the historical shoreline record along the U.S. Pacific Northwest with emphasis on both century-scale (1800s--2002) and decadal-scale (1960-80s--2002) change rates (Ruggiero, P., Kratzmann, M.A., Himmelstoss, E.G., Reid, D., Allan, J., and Kaminsky, G., 2013: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2012-1007, 55 p.). The study was the first consistent state-wide coastal change assessment for Oregon and revealed a significant increase in erosion hazards in the near-term. The coastal landscape in Oregon is particularly dynamic and includes beaches that are backed by both cliffs and dunes, and range in texture from sand to cobble. The high wave energy in the Pacific Northwest results in a morphology with primarily intermediate to dissipative beaches. Resistant rocky headlands separate the Oregon coast into 18 distinct littoral cells, greatly influencing how the shoreline changes with time. While the century-scale average of all 560 km of Oregon coastline suggests the shore is prograding at 0.4 m/yr, the decadal-scale record indicates that 13 of the 18 littoral cells either are accreting at a slower rate, have changed from accretional to erosional, or are eroding at a faster rate. This apparent increase in erosion-affected coasts may be caused by several factors including sea-level rise, increasing storm wave heights, tectonic uplift, and climatic events (eg., El Niño), but overall it indicates a shifting trend in shoreline change rates. In the present study, we quantify shoreline change rates on a third timescale, seasonal to

  1. Revisiting the deformed high shoreline of Lake Bonneville

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christine Y.; Maloof, Adam C.

    2017-03-01

    Since G. K. Gilbert's foundational work in the eastern Great Basin during the late 1800s, the late Pleistocene Lake Bonneville (30-10 ka) has been recognized as a natural laboratory for various Quaternary studies, including lithospheric deformation due to surface loading and climate-forced water balance changes. Such studies rely on knowledge of the elevations of Lake Bonneville's paleoshoreline features and depositional landforms, which record a complex history of lake level variations induced by deglacial climate change. In this paper, we present (1) a new compilation of 178 elevation measurements of shoreline features marking Lake Bonneville's greatest areal extent measured using high-precision differential GPS (dGPS), and (2) a reconstructed outline of the highest shoreline based on dGPS measurements, submeter-resolution aerial imagery, topographic digital elevation models (DEMs), and field observations. We also (3) devise a simplified classification scheme and method for standardizing shoreline elevation measurement for different shoreline morphologies that includes constraints on the position of the still water level (SWL) relative to each feature type. The deformation pattern described by these shoreline features can help resolve the relative effects of local hydro-isostasy due to the lake load and regional solid earth deflection due to the Laurentide ice sheet, with potential implications for Earth rheology, glacial isostatic adjustment, and eustatic sea level change.

  2. Regime shift in sandy beach microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Summers Engel

    Full Text Available Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales. Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales. These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment

  3. Human threats to sandy beaches: A meta-analysis of ghost crabs illustrates global anthropogenic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlacher, Thomas A.; Lucrezi, Serena; Connolly, Rod M.; Peterson, Charles H.; Gilby, Ben L.; Maslo, Brooke; Olds, Andrew D.; Walker, Simon J.; Leon, Javier X.; Huijbers, Chantal M.; Weston, Michael A.; Turra, Alexander; Hyndes, Glenn A.; Holt, Rebecca A.; Schoeman, David S.

    2016-02-01

    Beach and coastal dune systems are increasingly subjected to a broad range of anthropogenic pressures that on many shorelines require significant conservation and mitigation interventions. But these interventions require reliable data on the severity and frequency of adverse ecological impacts. Such evidence is often obtained by measuring the response of 'indicator species'. Ghost crabs are the largest invertebrates inhabiting tropical and subtropical sandy shores and are frequently used to assess human impacts on ocean beaches. Here we present the first global meta-analysis of these impacts, and analyse the design properties and metrics of studies using ghost-crabs in their assessment. This was complemented by a gap analysis to identify thematic areas of anthropogenic pressures on sandy beach ecosystems that are under-represented in the published literature. Our meta-analysis demonstrates a broad geographic reach, encompassing studies on shores of the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans, as well as the South China Sea. It also reveals what are, arguably, two major limitations: i) the near-universal use of proxies (i.e. burrow counts to estimate abundance) at the cost of directly measuring biological traits and bio-markers in the organism itself; and ii) descriptive or correlative study designs that rarely extend beyond a simple 'compare and contrast approach', and hence fail to identify the mechanistic cause(s) of observed contrasts. Evidence for a historically narrow range of assessed pressures (i.e., chiefly urbanisation, vehicles, beach nourishment, and recreation) is juxtaposed with rich opportunities for the broader integration of ghost crabs as a model taxon in studies of disturbance and impact assessments on ocean beaches. Tangible advances will most likely occur where ghost crabs provide foci for experiments that test specific hypotheses associated with effects of chemical, light and acoustic pollution, as well as the consequences of climate change (e

  4. Regime shift in sandy beach microbial communities following Deepwater Horizon oil spill remediation efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Annette Summers; Gupta, Axita A

    2014-01-01

    Sandy beaches support a wide variety of underappreciated biodiversity that is critical to coastal ecosystems. Prior to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the diversity and function of supratidal beach sediment microbial communities along Gulf of Mexico coastlines were not well understood. As such, it was unclear if microbial community compositional changes would occur following exposure to beached oil, if indigenous communities could biodegrade oil, or how cleanup efforts, such as sand washing and sediment redistribution, would impact microbial ecosystem resiliency. Transects perpendicular to the shoreline were sampled from public beaches on Grand Isle, Louisiana, and Dauphin Island, Alabama, over one year. Prior to oil coming onshore, elevated levels of bacteria associated with fecal contamination were detected (e.g., Enterobacteriales and Campylobacterales). Over time, significant shifts within major phyla were identified (e.g., Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria) and fecal indicator groups were replaced by taxa affiliated with open-ocean and marine systems (e.g., Oceanospirillales, Rhodospirillales, and Rhodobacterales). These new bacterial groups included putative hydrocarbon degraders, similar to those identified near the oil plume offshore. Shifts in the microbial community composition strongly correlated to more poorly sorted sediment and grain size distributional changes. Natural oceanographic processes could not account for the disrupted sediment, especially from the backshore well above the maximum high-tide levels recorded at these sites. Sand washing and tilling occurred on both open beaches from August through at least December 2010, which were mechanisms that could replace fecal indicator groups with open-ocean groups. Consequently, remediation efforts meant to return beaches to pre-spill compositions caused a regime shift that may have added potential ecosystem function, like hydrocarbon degradation, to the sediment. Future research will

  5. Morphosedimentary evolution of carbonate sandy beaches at decadal scale : case study in Reunion Island , Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabot, Marie-Myriam; Pennober, Gwenaelle; Suanez, Serge; Troadec, Roland; Delacourt, Christophe

    2017-04-01

    Global change introduce a lot of uncertainties concerning future trajectory of beaches by directly or indirectly modifying major driving factors. An improved understanding of the past shoreline evolution may help for anticipate future coastline response. However, in tropical environment, studies concerning carbonate beaches dynamics are scarce compared to open sandy beaches. Consequently, coral reef protected beaches morphological adjustment is still poorly understood and long-term evolution rate are poorly quantified in these specific environment. In this context, La Reunion Island, insular department of France located in Indian Ocean, constitute a favoured laboratory. This high volcanic island possesses 25 km of carbonate beaches which experience hydrodynamic forcing specific from tropical environment: cyclonic swell during summer and long period swell during winter. Because of degraded coral reef health and high anthropogenic pressure, 50% of the beaches are in erosion since 1970s. Beach survey has been conducted since 1990s by scientist and are now encompassed as pilot site within a French observatory network which guarantee long-term survey with high resolution observational techniques. Thus, La Reunion Island is one of the rare carbonate beach to be surveyed since 20 years. This study aims to examined and quantify beach response at decadal scale on carbonate sandy beaches of Reunion Island. The study focus on 12 km of beaches from Cap Champagne to the Passe de Trois-Bassins. The analyze of 15 beach profile data originated from historical and DGPS beach topographic data confirm long term trend to erosion. Sediment lost varies between 0.5 and 2 m3.yr-1 since 1998. However longshore current have led to accretion of some part of beach compartment with rate of 0.7 to 1.6 m3.yr-1. Wave climate was examined from in-situ measurement over 15 years and show that extreme waves associated with tropical cyclones and long period swell play a major role in beach dynamics

  6. Study on headland-bay sandy coast stability in South China coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Tao; Chen, Zi-Shen

    2011-03-01

    Headland-bay beach equilibrium planform has been a crucial problem abroad to long-term sandy beach evolution and stabilization, extensively applied to forecast long-term coastal erosion evolvement and the influences of coastal engineering as well as long-term coastal management and protection. However, little concern focuses on this in China. The parabolic relationship is the most widely used empirical relationship for determining the static equilibrium shape of headland-bay beaches. This paper utilizes the relation to predict and classify 31 headland-bay beaches and concludes that these bays cannot achieve the ultimate static equilibrium planform in South China. The empirical bay equation can morphologically estimate beach stabilization state, but it is just a referential predictable means and is difficult to evaluate headland-bay shoreline movements in years and decades. By using Digital Shoreline Analysis System suggested by USGS, the rates of shoreline recession and accretion of these different headland-bay beaches are quantitatively calculated from 1990 to 2000. The conclusions of this paper include that (a) most of these 31 bays maintain relatively stable and the rates of erosion and accretion are relatively large with the impact of man-made constructions on estuarine within these bays from 1990 to 2000; (b) two bays, Haimen Bay and Hailingshan Bay, originally in the quasi-static equilibrium planform determined by the parabolic bay shape equation, have been unstable by the influence of coastal engineering; and (c) these 31 bays have different recession and accretion characters occurring in some bays and some segments. On the one hand, some bays totally exhibit accretion, but some bays show erosion on the whole. Shanwei Bay, Houmen Bay, Pinghai Bay and Yazhou Bay have the similar planforms, characterized by less accretion on the sheltering segment and bigger accretion on the transitional and tangential segments. On the other hand, different segments of some

  7. Risk Evaluation of Sandy Coast Erosion Disaster in Hebei Province%河北省砂质海岸侵蚀灾害危险性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴丽娜; 刘松涛; 孙娟

    2016-01-01

    The coast erosion is a common phenomenon of marine geological disasters in the world. This article conducted the study of sandy coast erosion disaster by field surveys in Heibei province. According to the historical documents, six evaluation indexes were selected to evaluate the risk of erosion on the sandy coast, including the coast landform, shoreline curvature, erosion rate, beach development zone, sediment supplement and embankment project. As a consequence, the length of shoreline in high risk areas was 46.11 km, 102.54 km in the middle, and 59.95 km in the low areas, the proportion of shoreline accounts for 22.1%, 149.16%, 28.73%respectively.%海岸侵蚀是当今全球海岸普遍存在的海洋地质灾害现象,通过实地勘查对河北省砂质海岸侵蚀灾害进行研究,借助历史资料,选取了海岸地貌类型、岸线曲度、侵蚀速率、海滩发育空间、泥沙补给和堤防设施六个评价指标,对河北省砂质海岸侵蚀灾害进行了危险性评价。评价结果表明:高危区岸线长度46.11 km,中危区102.54 km,低危区59.95 km,所占岸线比例依次为22.11%、49.16%及28.73%。

  8. Hurricane Sandy science plan: coastal impact assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronko, Jakob M.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy devastated some of the most heavily populated eastern coastal areas of the Nation. With a storm surge peaking at more than 19 feet, the powerful landscape-altering destruction of Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. In response to this natural disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) received a total of $41.2 million in supplemental appropriations from the Department of the Interior (DOI) to support response, recovery, and rebuilding efforts. These funds support a science plan that will provide critical scientific information necessary to inform management decisions for recovery of coastal communities, and aid in preparation for future natural hazards. This science plan is designed to coordinate continuing USGS activities with stakeholders and other agencies to improve data collection and analysis that will guide recovery and restoration efforts. The science plan is split into five distinct themes: coastal topography and bathymetry, impacts to coastal beaches and barriers, impacts of storm surge, including disturbed estuarine and bay hydrology, impacts on environmental quality and persisting contaminant exposures, impacts to coastal ecosystems, habitats, and fish and wildlife. This fact sheet focuses assessing impacts to coastal beaches and barriers.

  9. USGS science for the Nation's changing coasts: shoreline change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The demands of increasing human population in the coastal zone create competition with coastal habitat preservation and with recreational and commercial uses of the coast and nearshore waters. As climate changes over the coming century, these problems facing coastal communities will likely worsen. Good management and policy decision-making require baseline information on the rates, trends, and scientific understanding of the processes of coastal change on a regional to national scale. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is engaged in a research project of national scope to measure, report, and interpret historical shoreline change along open-ocean coasts of the United States. One of the primary goals of this project is to understand shoreline change hazards using methods that are comparable from one area of the country to another and that will allow for future, repeatable analyses of shoreline movement, coastal erosion, and land loss.

  10. Shoreline as a controlling factor in commercial shrimp production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An ecological model was developed that relates marsh detritus export and shrimp production. It was based on the hypothesis that the shoreline is a controlling factor in the production of shrimp through regulation of detritus export from the marsh. LANDSAT data were used to develop measurement of shoreline length and areas of marsh having more than 5.0 kilometers of shoreline per square kilometer of area for the Louisiana coast, demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to provide important geographic information. These factors were combined with published tidal ranges and salinities to develop a mathematical model that predicted shrimp production for nine geographic units of the Louisiana coast, as indicated by the long term average commercial shrimp yield.

  11. Wave energy fluxes and multi-decadal shoreline changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabuth, Alina Kristin; Kroon, Aart

    2014-01-01

    Spatial patterns of multidecadal shoreline changes in two microtidal, low-energetic embayments of southern Zealand, Denmark, were investigated by using the directional distribution of wave energy fluxes. The sites include a barrier island system attached to moraine bluffs, and a recurved spit...... adjacent to a cliff coast. The barrier island system is characterized by cross-shore translation and by an alignment of the barrier alongshore alternating directions of barrier-spit progradation in a bidirectional wave field. The recurved spit adjacent to the cliff coast experienced shoreline rotation...... through proximal erosion and distal lateral accretion in a unidirectional wave climate. The multidecadal shoreline changes were coupled to a slope-based morphological coastal classification. All erosive shores occurred within a narrow range of onshore and offshore coastal slopes. The alongshore...

  12. Uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software for Alabama

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  13. Uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software for Louisiana

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  14. Uncertainty table for lidar-derived shorelines used when calculating rates in the Digital Shoreline Analysis System software for Mississippi

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Sandy ocean beaches are a popular recreational destination, often surrounded by communities containing valuable real estate. Development is on the rise despite the...

  15. Heavily Oiled Salt Marsh following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Ecological Comparisons of Shoreline Cleanup Treatments and Recovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zengel, Scott; Bernik, Brittany M; Rutherford, Nicolle; Nixon, Zachary; Michel, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill affected hundreds of kilometers of coastal wetland shorelines, including salt marshes with persistent heavy oiling that required intensive shoreline "cleanup" treatment...

  16. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  17. Historical Shoreline for New Jersey (1971 to 1978): Vector Digital Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — New_Jersey_1971_78_Digitized_Shoreline.zip features a digitized historic shoreline for the New Jersey coastline (Point Pleasant, NJ to Longport, NJ) from 1971 to...

  18. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines...

  19. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  20. MarthasVineyard_intersects_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics excluding the 1970-1979 and 1994 shorelines within the Martha's Vineyard coastal region including the Vineyard Sound-, Nantucket Sound- and Atlantic Ocean- facing coasts of Martha's Vineyard and Nomans Land

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  1. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (dates_meta.txt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  2. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  3. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  4. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  5. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines...

  6. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated...

  7. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  8. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines...

  9. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  10. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  11. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  12. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  13. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines...

  14. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  15. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Petit Bois Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated...

  16. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (dates_meta.txt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  17. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  18. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Ship Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  19. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  20. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  1. Historical Shoreline for New Jersey (1971 to 1978): Vector Digital Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — New_Jersey_1971_78_Digitized_Shoreline.zip features a digitized historic shoreline for the New Jersey coastline (Point Pleasant, NJ to Longport, NJ) from 1971 to...

  2. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Cat Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Combined Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  3. Shoreline changes in and around the Thubon River mouth, Central Vietnam

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mau, L.D.; Nayak, G.N.; SanilKumar, V.

    Application of GENESIS model (GENEralized model for Simulating Shoreline change) for studying the shoreline change in and around the Thubon River Mouth, Central Vietnam is presented in this paper The input parameters used are the near shore wave...

  4. OuterCapeCod_intersects_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics excluding the 1970's and 1994 shorelines within the Outer Cape Cod coastal region from Long Point in Provincetown to Monomoy Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  5. SouthShore_intersects_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics excluding the 1970-1979 and 1994 shorelines within the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  6. CapeCodBay_intersects_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics excluding the 1970-1979 and 1994 shorelines within the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  7. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polygon: Combined Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Dauphin Island, Alabama (Polygon: Combined Dates) is a polygon shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  8. Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Shorelines Extracted from 1984-2015 Landsat Imagery: Horn Island, Mississippi (Polyline: Individual Dates) is a line shapefile representing shorelines generated from...

  9. 78 FR 32296 - Second Allocation of Public Transportation Emergency Relief Funds in Response to Hurricane Sandy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Response to Hurricane Sandy: Response, Recovery & Resiliency AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA... recipients most severely affected by Hurricane Sandy: the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, New Jersey... Federal Register notice, bringing the total amount of Hurricane Sandy Emergency Relief funds allocated...

  10. Organic matter dynamics in coarse sandy calcareous soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, A.A.; Reuler, van H.

    2011-01-01

    The decomposition of organic matter in coarse sandy calcareous soils (beach sand) is thought to be much higher than in acid fine sandy soils but relatively little research is performed on these soils. Laboratory incubation experiments in which the release of soil carbon (C) is determined may overest

  11. 75 FR 10865 - Shoreline Management Initiative, Reservoirs in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Environmental Policy Act. In 1999, TVA adopted its current Shoreline Management Policy (SMP) to implement the preferred alternative in the November 1998 environmental impact statement (EIS) for the Shoreline Management... Shoreline Management Initiative, Reservoirs in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina...

  12. 78 FR 33051 - Non-Rock Alternatives to Shoreline Protection Demonstration Project (LA-16) Iberia, Jefferson...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-03

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Non-Rock Alternatives to Shoreline Protection Demonstration Project... environmental impact statement is not being prepared for the Non-Rock Alternatives to Shoreline Protection... rock structures. The shoreline protection systems will be demonstrated in up to three (3) test sites in...

  13. 40 CFR 227.10 - Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., shorelines or beaches. 227.10 Section 227.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Environmental Impact § 227.10 Hazards to fishing, navigation, shorelines or beaches. (a) Wastes which may... present a hazard to shorelines or beaches may be dumped only at sites and under conditions which...

  14. 18 CFR 1304.208 - Shoreline stabilization on TVA-owned residential access shoreland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Shoreline stabilization... OF STRUCTURES AND OTHER ALTERATIONS TVA-Owned Residential Access Shoreland § 1304.208 Shoreline... landowners to stabilize eroding shorelines on TVA-owned residential access shoreland. TVA will determine...

  15. 北部湾海湾岸线时空变化特征研究%Temporal and spatial characteristics of the shoreline along the Beibu Gulf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛振鹏; 戴志军; 谢华亮; 魏稳; 林益帆; 高近娟

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic activities have affected the ecosystem and environment of the Chinese gulf. The shoreline provides an important reflection of geo-environmental changes in the gulf, and therefore land-ocean interaction in the coastal zone is a focus of research attention. In the present study, the characteristics of the shoreline along the Beibu Gulf in 1991, 2005, and 2010 were examined by extracting and analyzing Landsat data using remote sensing and geographical information system tools. A total of 40 shoreline segments of the studied area were selected to analyze the state of erosion and accretion of the shoreline. The analysis yielded the fol owing conclusions. (1) There is an obvious straightening trend of the Beibu gulf shoreline over time, with the fractal dimension having decreased from 1.3375 in 1991 to 1.2615 in 2010. This trend may be a result of anthropogenic activities. (2) Deposition and erosion co-occurred during changes in the shoreline, whereby the accreting shoreline segments were located mainly in zone protected from the open ocean with a mean rate of accretion of 23 m/yr, and the eroding shoreline segments were located mainly in the zone exposed to the open ocean with a mean rate of erosion of 24 m/yr. (3) Among the different types of shoreline, the biological coast and sandy coast both retreated landward at a rate of 14 m/year. In contrast, the silt coast prograded at a rate of 9 m/yr, whereas the position of the rocky coast remained static.%人类活动对我国海湾生态环境的影响日趋严重,作为海湾变化的重要表征-海湾岸线自然成为陆海相互作用研究的主要内容之一。本文以西部大开发的前沿-北部湾海湾岸线为对象,利用Landsat系列影像反演1991、2005及2010年北部湾1595km的大陆岸线;选择1991~2010年间北部湾北部变化强烈的40个岸段,分析岸线的冲淤变化。结果表明:北部湾海湾曲折岸线的固有属性已发生改变,岸线平直化趋势

  16. Monazite in Atlantic shore-line features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Lincoln; Miller, Glen A.

    1954-01-01

    This report is a survey of present and potential production of monazite from part of the Maryland-Florida section of the Atlantic Coastal Plain. The part of the Coastal Plain covered here is the outer (shore-ward) half. In this area, all the large heavy-mineral placers so far discovered occur in sand bodies that, by their shape, size, orientation, and lithology, appear to be ancient beaches, spits, bars, or dunes. Smaller placers have produced from recent shore-line features. The inner part of the Coastal Plain, to be treated in another report, is underlain generally by older rocks, ranging in age from Cretaceous to older Pleistocene. Only two large heavy-mineral placers are now in production at Trail Ridge, and near Jacksonville, both in Florida. Production is planned for the near future near Yulee, Fla.: in Folkston, Ga.: and at one or two localities in eastern North Carolina. Each of these three will produce monazite as a byproduct; the total new reserve for the three placers is about 33,000 tons of monazite. In large heavy-mineral placers of this type, monazite has not been found to run more than about 1 percent of total heavy minerals. In some large placers, notably Trail Ridge, it is almost or completely lacking. No reason for its sporadic occurrence has been found in this investigation. Two placers of potential economic value have been found by this project in Virginia, one west and one east of Chesapeake Bay. Neither is of promise for monazite production, but if they serve to open up exploration or production in the area, there is a chance for monazite as a byproduct from other placers. A discovery of considerable scientific interest has to do with the occurrence of two different suites of heavy minerals in the Coastal Plain, at least south of Virginia. One, an “older” suite, lacks epidote, hornblende, and garnet; this suite occurs in all older formations and in Pleistocene deposits lying above about 50 or 60 feet above sea level. The other,

  17. Rediscovering community--reflections after Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Hoboken, New Jersey, is a town of 50,000 residents located across the Hudson River from New York City. Most of Hoboken's infrastructure was compromised during Hurricane Sandy as a result of flooding and power outages that rendered many businesses inoperable, including all of the pharmacies in town. Despite a focus on emergency preparedness since Hurricane Katrina and 9/11, there were no contingencies in place to facilitate and assess the medication needs of the community in the event of a natural disaster. This essay describes how the author rediscovered the meaning of community, and through working with colleagues in other health care disciplines and non-health care volunteers, provided care to patients in suboptimal circumstances.

  18. Hurricane Sandy science plan: New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Clarice N.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy is a stark reminder of why the Nation must become more resilient to coastal hazards. More than one-half of the U.S. population lives within 50 miles of a coast, and this number is increasing. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is one of the largest providers of geologic and hydrologic information in the world. Federal, State, and local partners depend on the USGS science to know how to prepare for hurricane hazards and reduce losses from future hurricanes. The USGS works closely with other bureaus within the Department of the Interior, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and many State and local agencies to identify their information needs before, during, and after hurricanes.

  19. Nitrate reduction in an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Boesen, Carsten; Kristiansen, Henning;

    1991-01-01

    Nitrate distribution and reduction processes were investigated in an unconfined sandy aquifer of Quaternary age. Groundwater chemistry was studied in a series of eight multilevel samplers along a flow line, deriving water from both arable and forested land. Results show that plumes of nitrate...... processes of O2 and NO3- occur at rates that are fast compared to the rate of downward water transport. Nitrate-contaminated groundwater contains total contents of dissolved ions that are two to four times higher than in groundwater derived from the forested area. The persistence of the high content...... of total dissolved ions in the NO3- free anoxic zone indicates the downward migration of contaminants and that active nitrate reduction is taking place. Nitrate is apparently reduced to N2 because both nitrite and ammonia are absent or found at very low concentrations. Possible electron donors...

  20. 15 CFR 923.25 - Shoreline erosion/mitigation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shoreline erosion/mitigation planning... erosion/mitigation planning. (a) The management program must include a planning process for assessing the... planning process may be within the broader context of coastal hazard mitigation planning. (b) The basic...

  1. Shoreline stability in the vicinity of Cochin Harbour

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Vethamony, P.

    , showing stability over a period of one year. The growth of shoreline north of Cochin harbour channel takes place at the cost of sediment that should have otherwise by-passed the estuarine mouth. During the southwest monsoon the development of opposing...

  2. Evaluation of the Coastal Features Mapping System for Shoreline Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    participating in the report preparation included: Ms. Karen Pitchford , Atlantic Research Corporation, who provided technical assistance and helped...40 Tanner, William F., 1978. "Standards for Measuring Shoreline Change", Proceedings of a Workshop, Florida State Univ., 85 pg. Wolf, Paul R., 1983

  3. Teachers' Curriculum Guide to the Hayward Shoreline, K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachle, Leo; And Others

    This teaching guide gives environmental education ideas for grades K-12. The field trips and activities all relate to the Hayward shoreline of the San Francisco, California, Bay. Included in the guide are 44 science activities, 15 social science activities, and 18 humanities activities. Each activity description gives the experience level, site…

  4. Shoreline development and degradation of coastal fish reproduction habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundblad, Göran; Bergström, Ulf

    2014-12-01

    Coastal development has severely affected habitats and biodiversity during the last century, but quantitative estimates of the impacts are usually lacking. We utilize predictive habitat modeling and mapping of human pressures to estimate the cumulative long-term effects of coastal development in relation to fish habitats. Based on aerial photographs since the 1960s, shoreline development rates were estimated in the Stockholm archipelago in the Baltic Sea. By combining shoreline development rates with spatial predictions of fish reproduction habitats, we estimated annual habitat degradation rates for three of the most common coastal fish species, northern pike (Esox lucius), Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis) and roach (Rutilus rutilus). The results showed that shoreline constructions were concentrated to the reproduction habitats of these species. The estimated degradation rates, where a degraded habitat was defined as having ≥3 constructions per 100 m shoreline, were on average 0.5 % of available habitats per year and about 1 % in areas close to larger population centers. Approximately 40 % of available habitats were already degraded in 2005. These results provide an example of how many small construction projects over time may have a vast impact on coastal fish populations.

  5. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF SHORELINE EVOLUTION NEAR COASTAL STRUCTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Ze-wei; Song Xiao-gang; Ye Chun-yang

    2003-01-01

    Numerical analysis was made for shoreline evolution in the vicinity of coastal structures, including spur dike, detached breakwaters. The nonlinear partial differential equation was derived, and numerical solutions were obtained by the finite difference method. The numerical results show good agreement with previous analytical results.

  6. Shoreline instability under low-angle wave incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idier, D.; Falqués, A.; Ruessink, B.G.; Garnier, R.

    2011-01-01

    The growth of megacusps as shoreline instabilities is investigated by examining the coupling between wave transformation in the shoaling zone, longshore transport in the surf zone, cross-shore transport, and morphological evolution. This coupling is known to drive a potential positive feedback in ca

  7. Shoaling and shoreline dissipation of low‐frequency waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dongeren, A.; Battjes, J.A.; Janssen, T.; Van Noorloos, J.; Steenhauer, K.; Steenbergen, G.; Reniers, A.

    2007-01-01

    The growth rate, shoreline reflection, and dissipation of low‐frequency waves are investigated using data obtained from physical experiments in the Delft University of Technology research flume and by parameter variation using the numerical model Delft3D‐SurfBeat. The growth rate of the shoaling inc

  8. Subtidal Bathymetric Changes by Shoreline Armoring Removal and Restoration Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Salish Sea, a region with a diverse coastline, is altered by anthropogenic shoreline modifications such as seawalls. In recent years, local organizations have moved to restore these shorelines. Current research monitors the changes restoration projects have on the upper beach, lower beach, and intertidal, however little research exists to record possible negative effects on the subtidal. The purpose of this research is to utilize multibeam sonar bathymetric data to analyze possible changes to the seafloor structure of the subtidal in response to shoreline modification and to investigate potential ecosystem consequences of shoreline alteration. The subtidal is home to several species including eelgrass (Zostera marina). Eelgrass is an important species in Puget Sound as it provides many key ecosystem functions including providing habitat for a wide variety of organisms, affecting the physics of waves, and sediment transport in the subtidal. Thus bathymetric changes could impact eelgrass growth and reduce its ability to provide crucial ecosystem services. Three Washington state study sites of completed shoreline restoration projects were used to generate data from areas of varied topographic classification, Seahurst Park in Burien, the Snohomish County Nearshore Restoration Project in Everett, and Cornet Bay State Park on Whidbey Island. Multibeam sonar data was acquired using a Konsberg EM 2040 system and post-processed in Caris HIPS to generate a base surface of one-meter resolution. It was then imported into the ArcGIS software suite for the generation of spatial metrics. Measurements of change were calculated through a comparison of historical and generated data. Descriptive metrics generated included, total elevation change, percent area changed, and a transition matrix of positive and negative change. Additionally, pattern metrics such as, surface roughness, and Bathymetric Position Index (BPI), were calculated. The comparison of historical data to new data

  9. Impact of an offshore wind farm on wave conditions and shoreline development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik Damgaard; Kristensen, Sten Esbjørn; Deigaard, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The influence of offshore wind farms on the wave conditions and impact on shoreline development is studied in a generic set-up of a coast and a shoreline. The objective was to estimate the impact of a typical sized offshore wind farm on a shoreline in a high wave energetic environment. Especially...... the shoreline’s sensitivity to the distance from the OWF to the shoreline was studied. The effect of the reduced wind speed inside and on the lee side of the offshore wind farm was incorporated in a parameterized way in a spectral wind wave model. The shoreline impact was studied with a one-line model....

  10. Landscape Visual Quality and Meiofauna Biodiversity on Sandy Beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Gabriela; Marenzi, Rosemeri C.; Polette, Marcos; Netto, Sérgio A.

    2016-10-01

    Sandy beaches are central economic assets, attracting more recreational users than other coastal ecosystems. However, urbanization and landscape modification can compromise both the functional integrity and the attractiveness of beach ecosystems. Our study aimed at investigating the relationship between sandy beach artificialization and the landscape perception by the users, and between sandy beach visual attractiveness and biodiversity. We conducted visual and biodiversity assessments of urbanized and semiurbanized sandy beaches in Brazil and Uruguay. We specifically examined meiofauna as an indicator of biodiversity. We hypothesized that urbanization of sandy beaches results in a higher number of landscape detractors that negatively affect user evaluation, and that lower-rated beach units support lower levels of biodiversity. We found that urbanized beach units were rated lower than semiurbanized units, indicating that visual quality was sensitive to human interventions. Our expectations regarding the relationship between landscape perception and biodiversity were only partially met; only few structural and functional descriptors of meiofauna assemblages differed among classes of visual quality. However, lower-rated beach units exhibited signs of lower environmental quality, indicated by higher oligochaete densities and significant differences in meiofauna structure. We conclude that managing sandy beaches needs to advance beyond assessment of aesthetic parameters to also include the structure and function of beach ecosystems. Use of such supporting tools for managing sandy beaches is particularly important in view of sea level rise and increasing coastal development.

  11. Extent and degree of shoreline oiling: Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Gulf of Mexico, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jacqueline; Owens, Edward H; Zengel, Scott; Graham, Andrew; Nixon, Zachary; Allard, Teresa; Holton, William; Reimer, P Doug; Lamarche, Alain; White, Mark; Rutherford, Nicolle; Childs, Carl; Mauseth, Gary; Challenger, Greg; Taylor, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented by shoreline assessment teams as stranding on 1,773 km of shoreline. Beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3% of the oiled shoreline. Shoreline cleanup activities were authorized on 660 km, or 73.3% of oiled beaches and up to 71 km, or 8.9% of oiled marshes and associated habitats. One year after the spill began, oil remained on 847 km; two years later, oil remained on 687 km, though at much lesser degrees of oiling. For example, shorelines characterized as heavily oiled went from a maximum of 360 km, to 22.4 km one year later, and to 6.4 km two years later. Shoreline cleanup has been conducted to meet habitat-specific cleanup endpoints and will continue until all oiled shoreline segments meet endpoints. The entire shoreline cleanup program has been managed under the Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) Program, which is a systematic, objective, and inclusive process to collect data on shoreline oiling conditions and support decision making on appropriate cleanup methods and endpoints. It was a particularly valuable and effective process during such a complex spill.

  12. Extent and degree of shoreline oiling: Deepwater Horizon oil spill, Gulf of Mexico, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Michel

    Full Text Available The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented by shoreline assessment teams as stranding on 1,773 km of shoreline. Beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3% of the oiled shoreline. Shoreline cleanup activities were authorized on 660 km, or 73.3% of oiled beaches and up to 71 km, or 8.9% of oiled marshes and associated habitats. One year after the spill began, oil remained on 847 km; two years later, oil remained on 687 km, though at much lesser degrees of oiling. For example, shorelines characterized as heavily oiled went from a maximum of 360 km, to 22.4 km one year later, and to 6.4 km two years later. Shoreline cleanup has been conducted to meet habitat-specific cleanup endpoints and will continue until all oiled shoreline segments meet endpoints. The entire shoreline cleanup program has been managed under the Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT Program, which is a systematic, objective, and inclusive process to collect data on shoreline oiling conditions and support decision making on appropriate cleanup methods and endpoints. It was a particularly valuable and effective process during such a complex spill.

  13. Extent and Degree of Shoreline Oiling: Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Gulf of Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jacqueline; Owens, Edward H.; Zengel, Scott; Graham, Andrew; Nixon, Zachary; Allard, Teresa; Holton, William; Reimer, P. Doug; Lamarche, Alain; White, Mark; Rutherford, Nicolle; Childs, Carl; Mauseth, Gary; Challenger, Greg; Taylor, Elliott

    2013-01-01

    The oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico was documented by shoreline assessment teams as stranding on 1,773 km of shoreline. Beaches comprised 50.8%, marshes 44.9%, and other shoreline types 4.3% of the oiled shoreline. Shoreline cleanup activities were authorized on 660 km, or 73.3% of oiled beaches and up to 71 km, or 8.9% of oiled marshes and associated habitats. One year after the spill began, oil remained on 847 km; two years later, oil remained on 687 km, though at much lesser degrees of oiling. For example, shorelines characterized as heavily oiled went from a maximum of 360 km, to 22.4 km one year later, and to 6.4 km two years later. Shoreline cleanup has been conducted to meet habitat-specific cleanup endpoints and will continue until all oiled shoreline segments meet endpoints. The entire shoreline cleanup program has been managed under the Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) Program, which is a systematic, objective, and inclusive process to collect data on shoreline oiling conditions and support decision making on appropriate cleanup methods and endpoints. It was a particularly valuable and effective process during such a complex spill. PMID:23776444

  14. Acidification of sandy grasslands - consequences for plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Pål Axel; Mårtensson, Linda-Maria; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Questions: (1) Does soil acidification in calcareous sandy grasslands lead to loss of plant diversity? (2) What is the relationship between the soil content of lime and the plant availability of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in sandy grasslands? Location: Sandy glaciofluvial deposits...... in south-eastern Sweden covered by xeric sand calcareous grasslands (EU habitat directive 6120). Methods: Soil and vegetation were investigated in most of the xeric sand calcareous grasslands in the Scania region (136 sample plots distributed over four or five major areas and about 25 different sites...

  15. On the Impact Angle of Hurricane Sandy's New Jersey Landfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Sobel, Adam H.

    2013-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy's track crossed the New Jersey coastline at an angle closer to perpendicular than any previous hurricane in the historic record, one of the factors contributing to recordsetting peak-water levels in parts of New Jersey and New York. To estimate the occurrence rate of Sandy-like tracks, we use a stochastic model built on historical hurricane data from the entire North Atlantic to generate a large sample of synthetic hurricanes. From this synthetic set we calculate that under long-term average climate conditions, a hurricane of Sandy's intensity or greater (category 1+) makes NJ landfall at an angle at least as close to perpendicular as Sandy's at an average annual rate of 0.0014 yr-1 (95% confidence range 0.0007 to 0.0023); i.e., a return period of 714 years (95% confidence range 435 to 1429).

  16. 2014 USGS CMGP Lidar: Post Sandy (Long Island, NY)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Long Island New York Sandy LIDAR lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G14PD00296 Woolpert...

  17. Hurricane Sandy: Rapid Response Imagery of the Surrounding Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The imagery posted on this site is of Hurricane Sandy. The aerial photography missions were conducted by the NOAA Remote Sensing Division. The images were acquired...

  18. 2008 USDA Forest Service Lidar: Sandy River Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Sandy River study area in collaboration with the USDA Forest Service. The areas...

  19. James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory @ Sandy Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, located on the New Jersey shore at Sandy Hook, is a state-of-the-art marine research facility shared by the National...

  20. Studies on Thiobacilli spp. isolated from sandy beaches of Kerala

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gore, P.S.; Raveendran, O.; Unnithan, R.V.

    Occurrence, isolation and oxidative activity of Thiobacilli spp. from some sandy beaches of Kerala are reported. These organisms were encountered in polluted beaches and were dominant during monsoon in all the beaches...

  1. James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory @ Sandy Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The James J. Howard Marine Sciences Laboratory, located on the New Jersey shore at Sandy Hook, is a state-of-the-art marine research facility shared by the National...

  2. 2014 USGS CMGP Lidar: Sandy Restoration (Delaware and Maryland)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Geographic Extent: SANDY_Restoration_DE_MD_QL2 Area of Interest covers approximately 3.096 square miles. Lot #5 contains the full project area Dataset Description:...

  3. Short Communication Energy and ash contents of sandy beach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    macrofauna found on three exposed sandy beaches on the west coast ... that they often form the predominant shore type (Bally,. McQuaid ... their sediments are given in Table I. Animals ..... The biochemical composition of the tropical intertida1 ...

  4. Monitoring human impacts on sandy shore ecosystems: a test of ghost crabs (Ocypode spp.) as biological indicators on an urban beach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucrezi, Serena; Schlacher, Thomas A; Walker, Simon

    2009-05-01

    Sandy beaches comprise one of the most important coastal resources worldwide, providing habitats to threatened vertebrates, supporting underappreciated invertebrate biodiversity, and delivering crucial ecosystem services and economic benefits to mankind. Monitoring of the natural resource condition of sandy beaches and assessments of the ecological impacts of human disturbance are, however, rare on sandy shores. Because a crucial step in developing beach monitoring is to identify and test biological indicators, we evaluated the utility of using population densities of ghost crabs (genus Ocypode) to measure how beach biota respond to human pressures. Densities of crabs--estimated via burrow counts--were quantified at two sites exposed to high and low levels of human disturbance on an urban beach in eastern Australia. Human disturbance consisted of pedestrian trampling and shoreline armouring which led to the loss of dune habitat. Overall, crab numbers were halved in disturbed areas, but contrasts between impact and control sites were not necessarily consistent over time and varied between different levels of the shore: stronger and more consistent effect sizes were recorded on the upper shore than further seawards. In addition to lowering crab densities, human disturbance also caused shifts in intertidal distributions, with a greater proportion of individuals occurring lower on the shore in the impacted beach sections. The number of visible burrow openings also changed in response to weather conditions (temperature and wind). We demonstrate that spatial contrasts of burrow counts are broadly useful to indicate the existence of a human-induced disturbance effect on urban beaches; we also highlight a number of critical, hitherto unknown, issues in the application of this monitoring technique; these encompass three broad dimensions: (1) a need for standardised protocols; (2) unresolved causal links between observed patterns and putative pressures; and (3) uncertainties

  5. Changes in beach shoreline due to sea level rise and waves under climate change scenarios: application to the Balearic Islands (western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez, Alejandra R.; Marcos, Marta; Álvarez-Ellacuría, Amaya; Orfila, Alejandro; Gomis, Damià

    2017-07-01

    This work assesses the impacts in reshaping coastlines as a result of sea level rise and changes in wave climate. The methodology proposed combines the SWAN and SWASH wave models to resolve the wave processes from deep waters up to the swash zone in two micro-tidal sandy beaches in Mallorca island, western Mediterranean. In a first step, the modelling approach has been validated with observations from wave gauges and from the shoreline inferred from video monitoring stations, showing a good agreement between them. Afterwards, the modelling set-up has been applied to the 21st century sea level and wave projections under two different climate scenarios, representative concentration pathways RCP45 and RCP85. Sea level projections have been retrieved from state-of-the-art regional estimates, while wave projections were obtained from regional climate models. Changes in the shoreline position have been explored under mean and extreme wave conditions. Our results indicate that the studied beaches would suffer a coastal retreat between 7 and up to 50 m, equivalent to half of the present-day aerial beach surface, under the climate scenarios considered.

  6. SOCAL_INTERSECTS_LT - Long-Term Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  7. SOCAL_INTERSECTS_LT - Long-Term Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  8. SOCAL_INTERSECTS_ST - Short-Term Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  9. SOCAL_INTERSECTS_ST - Short-Term Transect-Shoreline Intersection Points for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  10. Drivers of Coastal Shoreline Change: Case Study of Hon Dat Coast, Kien Giang, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai-Hoa; McAlpine, Clive; Pullar, David; Leisz, Stephen Joseph; Galina, Gramotnev

    2015-05-01

    Coastal shorelines are naturally dynamic, shifting in response to coastal geomorphological processes. Globally, land use change associated with coastal urban development and growing human population pressures is accelerating coastal shoreline change. In southern Vietnam, coastal erosion currently is posing considerable risks to shoreline land use and coastal inhabitants. The aim of this paper is to quantify historical shoreline changes along the Hon Dat coast between 1995 and 2009, and to document the relationships between coastal mangrove composition, width and density, and rates of shoreline change. The generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to quantify the major biophysical and land-use factors influencing shoreline change rates. Most significant drivers of the rates of change are cutting of mangroves, the dominant mangrove genus, changes in adjacent shoreline land use, changes of shoreline land cover, and width of fringing mangroves. We suggest that a possible and inexpensive strategy for robust mangrove shoreline defense is direct mangrove planting to promote mangrove density with the presence of breakwater structures. In the shorter term, construction of coastal barriers such as fence-structured melaleuca poles in combination with mangrove restoration schemes could help retain coastal sediments and increase the elevation of the accretion zone, thereby helping to stabilize eroding fringe shorelines. It also is recommended that implementation of a system of payments for mangrove ecosystem services and the stronger regulation of mangrove cutting and unsustainable land-use change to strengthen the effectiveness of mangrove conservation programs and coastal land-use management.

  11. Drivers of coastal shoreline change: case study of hon dat coast, Kien Giang, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hai-Hoa; McAlpine, Clive; Pullar, David; Leisz, Stephen Joseph; Galina, Gramotnev

    2015-05-01

    Coastal shorelines are naturally dynamic, shifting in response to coastal geomorphological processes. Globally, land use change associated with coastal urban development and growing human population pressures is accelerating coastal shoreline change. In southern Vietnam, coastal erosion currently is posing considerable risks to shoreline land use and coastal inhabitants. The aim of this paper is to quantify historical shoreline changes along the Hon Dat coast between 1995 and 2009, and to document the relationships between coastal mangrove composition, width and density, and rates of shoreline change. The generalized linear mixed-effects models were used to quantify the major biophysical and land-use factors influencing shoreline change rates. Most significant drivers of the rates of change are cutting of mangroves, the dominant mangrove genus, changes in adjacent shoreline land use, changes of shoreline land cover, and width of fringing mangroves. We suggest that a possible and inexpensive strategy for robust mangrove shoreline defense is direct mangrove planting to promote mangrove density with the presence of breakwater structures. In the shorter term, construction of coastal barriers such as fence-structured melaleuca poles in combination with mangrove restoration schemes could help retain coastal sediments and increase the elevation of the accretion zone, thereby helping to stabilize eroding fringe shorelines. It also is recommended that implementation of a system of payments for mangrove ecosystem services and the stronger regulation of mangrove cutting and unsustainable land-use change to strengthen the effectiveness of mangrove conservation programs and coastal land-use management.

  12. EAARL-B Coastal Topography--Eastern New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy, 2012: First Surface, Pre-Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ASCII xyz and binary point-cloud data, as well as a digital elevation model (DEM) of a portion of the New Jersey coastline, pre- and post-Hurricane Sandy (October...

  13. Impacts of shoreline erosion on coastal ecosystems in Songkhla Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nipaporn Chusrinuan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Songkhla Province is located on the eastern coast of the southern Thai Peninsula, bordering the Gulf of Thailand for approximately 107 km. Most of the basin’s foreshores have been extensively developed for housing, tourism and shrimp farming. The beaches are under deteriorating impacts, often causing sediment transport which leads to an unnaturally high erosion rate. This natural phenomenon is considered to be a critical problem in the coastal areas affected by the hazard of coastal infrastructure and reduced beach esthetics for recreation. In this study, shoreline changes were compared between 1975 and 2006 using aerial photographs and Landsat imageries using Geographic Information System (GIS. The results revealed that 18.5 km2 of the coastal areas were altered during the period. Of this, 17.3 km2 suffered erosion and 1.2 km2were subjected to accretion. The most significant changes occurred between 1975-2006. Shoreline erosion was found at Ban Paktrae, Ranot District, with an average erosion rate of 5.3 m/year, while accretion occurred at Laem Samila, MuangSongkhla District with an average accretion rate of 2.04 m/year. The occurrences of shoreline erosion have contributed to the degradation of coastal soil and water quality, destruction of beach and mangrove forests, loss of human settlements and livelihood.These processes have led to deterioration of the quality of life of the residents. Prevention and mitigation measures to lessen economic and social impacts due to shoreline erosion are discussed.

  14. Wave transformation and shoreline water level on Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beetham, Edward; Kench, Paul S.; O'Callaghan, Joanne; Popinet, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The influence of sea swell (SS) waves, infragravity (IG) waves, and wave setup on maximum runup (Rmax) is investigated across different tidal stages on Fatato Island, Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu. Field results illustrate that SS waves are tidally modulated at the shoreline, with comparatively greater wave attenuation and setup occurring at low tide versus high tide. A shoreward increase in IG wave height is observed across the 100 m wide reef flat at all tidal elevations, with no tidal modulation of IG wave height at the reef flat or island shoreline. A 1-D shock-capturing Green-Naghdi solver is used to replicate the field deployment and analyze Rmax. Model outputs for SS wave height, IG wave height and setup at the shoreline match field results with model skill >0.96. Model outputs for Rmax are used to identify the temporal window when geomorphic activity can occur on the beach face. During periods of moderate swell energy, waves can impact the beach face at spring low tide, due to a combination of wave setup and strong IG wave activity. Under mean wave conditions, the combined influence of setup, IG waves and SS waves results in interaction with island sediment at midtide. At high tide, SS and IG waves directly impact the beach face. Overall, wave activity is present on the beach face for 71% of the study period, a significantly longer duration than is calculated using mean water level and topographic data.

  15. Anthropogenic currents and shoreline water quality in Avalon Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Lin C; Litton, Rachel M; Grant, Stanley B

    2011-03-15

    Shoreline concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and fecal indicator viruses (FIV) in Avalon Bay (Catalina Island, California) display a marked diurnal pattern (higher at night and lower during the day) previously attributed to the tidal flux of sewage-contaminated groundwater and the tidal washing of contaminated sediments, coupled with light and dark die-off of FIB and FIV (Boehm, et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 2009, 43, 8046-8052). In this paper we document the existence of strong (peak velocities between 20 to 40 cm/s) transient currents in the nearshore waters of Avalon Bay that occur between 07:00 and 20:00 each day. These currents, which have a significant onshore component, are generated by anthropogenic activities in the Bay, including prop wash from local boat traffic and the docking practices of large passenger ferries. A budget analysis carried out on simultaneous measurements of FIB at two cross-shore locations indicates that anthropogenic currents contribute to the diurnal cycling of FIB concentrations along the shoreline, by transporting relatively unpolluted water from offshore toward the beach. The data and analysis presented in this paper support the idea that anthropogenic currents represent a significant, and previously overlooked, source of variability in shoreline water quality.

  16. The Shoreline Video Assessment Method (S-VAM): Using dynamic hyperlapse image acquisition to evaluate shoreline mangrove forest structure, values, degradation and threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Jock R; Duke, Norman C; Wood, Apanie L

    2016-08-30

    Climate change with human direct pressures represent significant threats to the resilience of shoreline habitats like mangroves. A rapid, whole-of-system assessment strategy is needed to evaluate such threats, better linking innovative remote sensing with essential on-ground evaluations. Using the Shoreline Video Assessment Method, we surveyed around 190km of the mostly mangrove-fringed (78%) coastline of Kien Giang Province, Vietnam. The aim was to identify anthropogenic drivers of degradation, establishing baseline for specific rehabilitation and protection strategies. Fish traps occupy at least 87% of shoreline mangroves, around which there were abundant human activities - like fishing, crabbing, farming, plus collecting firewood and foliage. Such livelihoods were associated with remnant, fringing mangrove that were largely degraded and threatened by erosion retreat, herbivory, and excessive cutting. Our assessment quantified associated threats to shoreline stability, along with previous rehabilitation intervention measures. The method offers key opportunities for effective conservation and management of vulnerable shoreline habitats.

  17. Brazilian sandy beach macrofauna production: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Petracco

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art of the studies on the production of Brazilian sandy beach macrofauna was analyzed on the basis of the data available in the literature. For this purpose, the representativeness of the production dataset was examined by latitudinal distribution, degree of exposure and morphodynamic state of beaches, taxonomic groups, and methods employed. A descriptive analysis was, further, made to investigate the trends in production of the more representative taxonomic groups and species of sandy beach macrofauna. A total of 69 macrofauna annual production estimates were obtained for 38 populations from 25 studies carried out between 22º56'S and 32º20'S. Production estimates were restricted to populations on beaches located on the southern and southeastern Brazilian coast. Most of the populations in the dataset inhabit exposed dissipative sandy beaches and are mainly represented by mollusks and crustaceans, with a smaller number of polychaetes. The trends in production among taxonomic groups follow a similar pattern to that observed on beaches throughout the world, with high values for bivalves and decapods. The high turnover rate (P/B ratio of the latter was due to the presence of several populations of the mole crab Emerita brasiliensis, which can attain high values of productivity, in the dataset. Most of the studies focus on the comparison of production and, especially, of P/B ratio according to life history traits in populations of the same species/taxonomic group. Despite the importance of life history-production studies, other approaches, such as the effect of man-induce disturbances on the macrofauna, should be undertaken in these threatened environments.O estado da arte dos estudos de produção da macrofauna de praias arenosas brasileiras foi analisado a partir de informações disponíveis na literatura. Para essa finalidade, a representatividade dos dados de produção foi examinada de acordo com a distribuição latitudinal

  18. Operational shoreline mapping with high spatial resolution radar and geographic processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangoonwala, Amina; Jones, Cathleen E; Chi, Zhaohui; Ramsey, Elijah W.

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive mapping technology was developed utilizing standard image processing and available GIS procedures to automate shoreline identification and mapping from 2 m synthetic aperture radar (SAR) HH amplitude data. The development used four NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) data collections between summer 2009 and 2012 and a fall 2012 collection of wetlands dominantly fronted by vegetated shorelines along the Mississippi River Delta that are beset by severe storms, toxic releases, and relative sea-level rise. In comparison to shorelines interpreted from 0.3 m and 1 m orthophotography, the automated GIS 10 m alongshore sampling found SAR shoreline mapping accuracy to be ±2 m, well within the lower range of reported shoreline mapping accuracies. The high comparability was obtained even though water levels differed between the SAR and photography image pairs and included all shorelines regardless of complexity. The SAR mapping technology is highly repeatable and extendable to other SAR instruments with similar operational functionality.

  19. Extraction of shoreline changes in Selangor coastal area using GIS and remote sensing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamat, S. N.; Maulud, K. N. Abdul; Jaafar, O.; Ahmad, H.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, coastal zones are facing shoreline changes that stemming from natural and anthropogenic effect. The process of erosion and accretion will affect the physical environment of the shoreline. Therefore, the study of shoreline changes is important to identify the patterns of changes over time. The rapid growth of technology nowadays has facilitated the study of shoreline changes. Geographical Information System (GIS) alongside Remote Sensing (RS) technology is a useful tool to study these changes due to its ability to generate information, monitoring, analysis and prediction of the shoreline changes. Hence, the future projection of the trend for a specific coastal area can be done effectively. This study investigates the impact of shoreline changes to the community in Selangor area which mainly focus on the physical aspects. This study presents preliminary result using satellite image from SPOT 5 to identify the shoreline changes from the year 1984 to 2013 at Selangor coastal area. Extraction of shoreline from satellite image is vital to analyze the erosion and accretion along the shoreline area. This study shows that a shoreline change for the whole area is a categorized as a medium case. The total eroded and accretion of Selangor area from 1984 to 2013 is 2558 hectares and 2583 hectares respectively. As a result, Kapar, Jugra, Telok Panglima Garang and Kelanang are categorized as high risk erosion area. Shoreline changes analysis provides essential information to determine on the shoreline changes trends. Therefore, the results of this study can be used as essential information for conservation and preservation of coastal zone management.

  20. Case Study: Sensitivity Analysis of the Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline Wetland Value Assessment Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Barrier Shoreline Wetland Value Assessment Model1 by S. Kyle McKay2 and J. Craig Fischenich3 OVERVIEW: Sensitivity analysis is a technique for...relevance of questions posed during an Independent External Peer Review (IEPR). BARATARIA BASIN BARRIER SHORELINE (BBBS) STUDY: On average...scale restoration projects to reduce marsh loss and maintain these wetlands as healthy functioning ecosystems. The Barataria Basin Barrier Shoreline

  1. Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

    2002-11-01

    The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years

  2. EAARL Coastal Topography - Sandy Hook 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Stevens, Sara; Yates, Xan; Bonisteel, Jamie M.

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL; the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Kingston, RI; and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. This project provides highly detailed and accurate datasets of Gateway National Recreation Area's Sandy Hook Unit in New Jersey, acquired on May 16, 2007. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532-nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking red-green-blue (RGB) digital camera, a high-resolution multi-spectral color infrared (CIR) camera, two precision dual-frequency kinematic carrier-phase GPS receivers and an integrated miniature digital inertial measurement unit, which provide for submeter georeferencing of each laser sample. The nominal EAARL platform is a twin-engine Cessna 310 aircraft, but the instrument may be deployed on a range of light aircraft. A single pilot, a Lidar operator, and a data analyst constitute the crew for most survey operations. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in measuring sub-aerial and submarine coastal topography within cross-environmental surveys. Elevation measurements were collected over the survey area using the EAARL system, and the resulting data were then

  3. HATTERAS_SHORELINES_1978_2002: Hatteras Island shorelines from 1978 to 2002: fourteen high water shorelines from Oregon Inlet to Cape Hatteras Point, North Carolina (geographic, WGS84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The shoreline of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, is experiencing long-term coastal erosion. In order to better understand and monitor the changing coastline,...

  4. Study on Headland-Bay Sandy Coast Stability in South China Coasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ji-tao; CHEN Zi-shen

    2011-01-01

    Headland-bay beach equilibrium planform has been a crucial problem abroad to long-term sandy beach evolution and stabilization,extensively applied to forecast long-term coastal erosion evolvement and the influences of coastal engineering as well as long-term coastal management and protection.However,little concern focuses on this in China.The parabolic relationship is the most widely used empirical relationship for determining the static equilibrium shape of headland-bay beaches.This paper utilizes the relation to predict and classify 31 headland-bay beaches and concludes that these bays cannot achieve the ultimate static equilibrium planform in South China.The empirical bay equation can morphologically estimate beach stabilization state,but it is just a referential predictable means and is difficult to evaluate headland-bay shoreline movements in years and decades.By using Digital Shoreline Analysis System suggested by USGS,the rates of shoreline recession and accretion of these different headland-bay beaches are quantitatively calculated from 1990 to 2000.The conclusions of this paper include that(a)most of these 31 bays maintain relatively stable and the rates of erosion and accretion are relatively large with the impact of man-made constructions on estuarine within these bays from 1990 to 2000;(b)two bays,Haimen Bay and Hailingshan Bay,originally in the quasi-static equilibrium planform determined by the parabolic bay shape equation,have been unstable by the influence of coastal engineering;and(c)these 31 bays have different recession and accretion characters occurring in some bays and some segments.On the one hand,some bays totally exhibit accretion,but some bays show erosion on the whole.Shanwei Bay,Houmen Bay,Pinghai Bay and Yazhou Bay have the similar planfotms,characterized by less accretion on the sheltering segment and bigger accretion on the transitional and tangential segments.On the other hand,different segments of some bays have two dissimilar

  5. Did Hurricane Sandy influence the 2012 US presidential election?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Joshua

    2014-07-01

    Despite drawing on a common pool of data, observers of the 2012 presidential campaign came to different conclusions about whether, how, and to what extent "October surprise" Hurricane Sandy influenced the election. The present study used a mixed correlational and experimental design to assess the relation between, and effect of, the salience of Hurricane Sandy on attitudes and voting intentions regarding President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney in a large sample of voting-aged adults. Results suggest that immediately following positive news coverage of Obama's handling of the storm's aftermath, Sandy's salience positively influenced attitudes toward Obama, but that by election day, reminders of the hurricane became a drag instead of a boon for the President. In addition to theoretical implications, this study provides an example of how to combine methodological approaches to help answer questions about the impact of unpredictable, large-scale events as they unfold.

  6. Hurricane Sandy, Disaster Preparedness, and the Recovery Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane Sandy was the second largest and costliest hurricane in U.S. history to affect multiple states and communities. This article describes the lived experiences of 24 occupational therapy students who lived through Hurricane Sandy using the Recovery Model to frame the research. Occupational therapy student narratives were collected and analyzed using qualitative methods and framed by the Recovery Model. Directed content and thematic analysis was performed using the 10 components of the Recovery Model. The 10 components of the Recovery Model were experienced by or had an impact on the occupational therapy students as they coped and recovered in the aftermath of the natural disaster. This study provides insight into the lived experiences and recovery perspectives of occupational therapy students who experienced Hurricane Sandy. Further research is indicated in applying the Recovery Model to people who survive disasters. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  7. Family Structures, Relationships, and Housing Recovery Decisions after Hurricane Sandy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nejat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the recovery phase of a disaster cycle is still in its infancy. Recent major disasters such as Hurricane Sandy have revealed the inability of existing policies and planning to promptly restore infrastructure, residential properties, and commercial activities in affected communities. In this setting, a thorough grasp of housing recovery decisions can lead to effective post-disaster planning by policyholders and public officials. The objective of this research is to integrate vignette and survey design to study how family bonds affected rebuilding/relocating decisions after Hurricane Sandy. Multinomial logistic regression was used to investigate respondents’ family structures before Sandy and explore whether their relationships with family members changed after Sandy. The study also explores the effect of the aforementioned relationship and its changes on households’ plans to either rebuild/repair their homes or relocate. These results were compared to another multinomial logistic regression which was applied to examine the impact of familial bonds on respondents’ suggestions to a vignette family concerning rebuilding and relocating after a hurricane similar to Sandy. Results indicate that respondents who lived with family members before Sandy were less likely to plan for relocating than those who lived alone. A more detailed examination shows that this effect was driven by those who improved their relationships with family members; those who did not improve their family relationships were not significantly different from those who lived alone, when it came to rebuilding/relocation planning. Those who improved their relationships with family members were also less likely to suggest that the vignette family relocate. This study supports the general hypothesis that family bonds reduce the desire to relocate, and provides empirical evidence that family mechanisms are important for the rebuilding/relocating decision

  8. Spatial data integration for analyzing the dynamics of Albanian Adriatic shoreline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapi, Luan; Nikolli, Pal; Kovaçi, Sander

    2016-04-01

    Shoreline mapping and shoreline change detection are critical subjects for coastal resource management, coastal environmental protection and sustainable coastal development and planning. Coastal changes are attracting more focus since they are important environmental indicators that directly impact coastal economic development and land management. Changes in the shape of shoreline may essentially affect the environment of the coastal zone. These may be caused by natural processes and human activities. The undertaken work focuses on analyzing the Adriatic shoreline dynamics, using spatial temporal data, by taking advantage of Geographic Informatin System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS). Shoreline mapping focuses on some specific issues such as mapping methods used to acquire shoreline data, models and database design used to represent shoreline in the spatial database and shoreline -change analysis methods. The study area extends from the mouth of Buna River in the north to Vlora Bay in the south covering a total length of about 220 km. Detection and future assessment of Albanian Adriatic shoreline spatial position is carried out through integration of multi scale resolution of spatial temporal data and different processing methods. We have combined topographic maps at different scales (1:75 000, 1918; 1:50 000, 1937; 1:25 000, 1960, 1986 and 1:10 000, 1995), digital aerial photographs of 2007 year, satellite images of Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+ and field observed GIS data. Generation of spatial data is carried out through vectorization process and image processing. Monitoring the dynamics of shoreline position change requires understanding the coastal processes as well as coastal mapping methods. The net rates of variations in the position of the shoreline are calculated according to transects disposed perpendicularly to the baseline and spaced equally along the coast. Analysis of the relative impact of the natural factors and human activities, it is fundamental

  9. The Relationship Between Shoreline Change and Surf Zone Sand Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miselis, J. L.; McNinch, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    There is a lack of information concerning surf zone geologic processes and their relationship to shoreline behavior despite the consensus that the two are intimately linked. Variations in sand thickness over a highly irregular migration surface close to the shoreline may influence wave dynamics and sediment transport and thus may be connected to hotspot formation. A nearshore survey, spanning 40km from north of the USACE-FRF pier in Duck, NC to just north of Oregon Inlet, was conducted using an interferometric swath bathymetry system and a chirp sub-bottom profiler. The study was conducted within 1km of the shore (in the surf zone) to investigate the processes that may be responsible for the behavior of shoreline hotspots in the area. The topmost reflector and the seafloor of the seismic profile were digitized and the depth difference between them was calculated. Though no ground truths were done in the survey area, cores collected from just north of the site suggest that the topmost reflector is a pre-modern ravinement surface (cohesive muds with layers of sand and gravel) upon which the Holocene sands migrate. An isopach map was generated and shows that the layer of sand above the first sub-bottom reflector is very thin and in some places, exposed. There are many variables that may influence hotspot behavior, including bar position and wave conditions, however, the purpose of this study is to determine if there is a spatial correlation between a thin or absent (exposed reflector) nearshore sand layer and the presence of a shoreline hotspot. In an area associated with a hotspot approximately 14km south of the USACE-FRF pier in Duck, the maximum thickness of Holocene sands was less than 2.5m. The average thickness was less than 1m (0.705m). Thicknesses that were less than 0.2m were classified as areas where the reflector was exposed and accounted for 5 percent of those calculated. It seems the thin layer of sand may represent a deficient nearshore sand source

  10. The Road Inventory of Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — To determine the relative needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) was asked to inventory all public access and...

  11. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Phragmites Control Program Results - 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Phragmites control effort of 1993 was initiated as part of a cooperative program with the state of Virginia's Division of Natural Heritage, called the "Southern...

  12. Station Management Plan: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following plan is the result of a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Region Five initiative to produce general management guidance for individual field stations...

  13. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge Phragmites Control Program Results - 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Phragmites control was initiated during the second week of September this year. The pesticide applied was RODEO. Application was by helicopter flying very low over...

  14. Land Protection Plan: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this Land Protection Plan is to provide landowners with a brief document that details the Service's potential acquisition methods, policy, and...

  15. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: 2001 Marshbird Callback Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes marshbird callback survey results for 2000. Last year's selection of points based on three mini-surveys was used as the basis of the route...

  16. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: 2000 Marshbird Callback Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes marshbird callback survey results for 2000. Last year's selection of points based on three mini-surveys was used as the basis of the route...

  17. Instantaneous Shoreline Extraction Utilizing Integrated Spectrum and Shadow Analysis From LiDAR Data and High-resolution Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.-Chieh

    Shoreline delineation and shoreline change detection are expensive processes in data source acquisition and manual shoreline delineation. These costs confine the frequency and interval of shoreline mapping periods. In this dissertation, a new shoreline delineation approach was developed targeting on lowering the data source cost and reducing human labor. To lower the cost of data sources, we used the public domain LiDAR data sets and satellite images to delineate shorelines without the requirement of data sets being acquired simultaneously, which is a new concept in this field. To reduce the labor cost, we made improvements in classifying LiDAR points and satellite images. Analyzing shadow relations with topography to improve the satellite image classification performance is also a brand-new concept. The extracted shoreline of the proposed approach could achieve an accuracy of 1.495 m RMSE, or 4.452m at the 95% confidence level. Consequently, the proposed approach could successfully lower the cost and shorten the processing time, in other words, to increase the shoreline mapping frequency with a reasonable accuracy. However, the extracted shoreline may not compete with the shoreline extracted by aerial photogrammetric procedures in the aspect of accuracy. Hence, this is a trade-off between cost and accuracy. This approach consists of three phases, first, a shoreline extraction procedure based mainly on LiDAR point cloud data with multispectral information from satellite images. Second, an object oriented shoreline extraction procedure to delineate shoreline solely from satellite images; in this case WorldView-2 images were used. Third, a shoreline integration procedure combining these two shorelines based on actual shoreline changes and physical terrain properties. The actual data source cost would only be from the acquisition of satellite images. On the other hand, only two processes needed human attention. First, the shoreline within harbor areas needed to be

  18. Changes in the Position of the Zambales Shoreline Before and After the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo Eruption: Controls of Shoreline Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siringan

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Shoreline changes along the southern Zambales coast, both short-term - a few to several tens of years - and long-term - hundreds to a few thousands of years - have been determined from bathymetric and topographic maps, satellite images, space shuttle data, and aerial photographs. The dramatic increase of sediment input along the Zambales coast due to the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption resulted in immediate, extensive, and rapid rates of coastal progradation at and adjacent to river mouths. The Bucao River mouth experienced the highest rates of progradation following the eruption, but rapid retreats also occurred. Furthermore, similar advances and retreats of this shoreline were also observed prior to the 1991 eruption; thus, the net change in shoreline position has been minimal. In contrast, progradation has been more pronounced along the discharge area of the Pamatawan and Sto. Tomas Rivers. This is surprising, given that their combined sediment yield is less than that of the Bucao River. Along the more southern segment of the coast, there has been greater progradation which may be attributed to the relatively gentler gradient of the adjacent shelf. Off the Bucao River, a submarine canyon taps the river mouth directly; thus, most of the sediments bypass the coast and shelf.The deltaic promontory that now characterizes the mouth of Sto. Tomas River was formed only after 1944. The delta formation cannot be due to the shifting of the river mouth because the Sto. Tomas River had been emptying at the same point even before the delta buildup. An increase in precipitation in the early 60's increased the river's discharge, which could have elevated the sediment yield leading to the delta buildup.Autocyclic changes in the distributary system of the Sto. Tomas alluvial fan redirected the flow of sediment to the Pamatawan River probably during the two episodes of eruption of Mt. Pinatubo prior to 1991. This resulted in the buildup of a delta much larger than

  19. Lidar_MHW_Shorelines_1998_2014.shp - Mean High Water (MHW) Shorelines Extracted from Lidar Data for Dauphin Island, Alabama from 1998 to 2014.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This shapefile consists of Dauphin Island, AL shorelines extracted from lidar data collected from November 1998 to January 2014. This dataset contains 14 Mean High...

  20. Estuarine Back-barrier Shoreline and Sandline Change Model Skill and Predicted Probabilities: Long-term back-barrier shoreline change

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Barrier Island and Estuarine Wetland Physical Change Assessment was created to calibrate and test probability models of barrier island estuarine shoreline...

  1. HATTERAS_TRANSECTS: Hatteras Island shoreline transects and shoreline change rate calculations: Oregon Inlet to Cape Hatteras Point, North Carolina (geographic, WGS84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The shoreline of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, is experiencing long-term coastal erosion. In order to better understand and monitor the changing coastline,...

  2. LA_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Louisiana Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  3. AL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Alabama Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  4. TX_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Texas Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  5. FL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Florida Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  6. NC_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for North Carolina Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  7. GA_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Georgia Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  8. SC_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for South Carolina Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  9. FL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Florida Atlantic Coast Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  10. Sand spit and shoreline dynamics near Terekhol river mouth, Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajasekaran, C.; Jayakumar, S.; Gowthaman, R.; Jishad, M.; Yadhunath, E.M.; Pednekar, P.S.

    between the sediment discharge from the river and the littoral transport Around 2km stretch of shoreline is under severe erosion in which a stretch of 500m of sea wall is completely damaged Sand spit present in the northern part of the shoreline plays a...

  11. 78 FR 23289 - Public Review of Draft National Shoreline Data Content Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... Data Content Standard is intended to enhance the shoreline framework by providing technical guidance on... Shoreline Data Content Standard and a summary analysis of the changes will be made available to the public... boundaries, developing nautical charts, and engaging in marine planning and other academic research and...

  12. Numerical modeling of shoreline undulations part 2: Varying wave climate and comparison with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard, Kasper Hauberg; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    the observed shoreline features qualitatively and quantitatively. The model slightly over-predicts the scale of the feature and, associated with this, slightly under-predicts the migration speeds of the features. On the second shoreline, the west coast of Denmark, the shore is exposed to waves with an angle...

  13. Inferring autogenically induced depositional discontinuities from observations on experimental deltaic shoreline trajectories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikes, D.; ten Veen, J.H.; Postma, G.; Steel, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Palaeo shoreline is a commonly used proxy for palaeo sea level, but only if deposition is continuous and constant will shoreline trajectory T(l) completely capture sea-level time-series E(t). Artificial deltas were generated in the Eurotank flume facility under stepwise tectonic subsidence, periodic

  14. Oil characterization and distribution in shoreline sediments of Pensacola Bay, Florida following the Deepwater Horizon spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrier islands of Northwest Florida were heavily oiled during the Deepwater Horizon spill, but less is known about the impacts to the shorelines of the associated estuaries. Shoreline sediment oiling was investigated at 18 sites within the Pensacola Bay, Florida system prior to...

  15. MS_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Mississippi Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS with the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 2.0, an ArcView extension...

  16. SOCAL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Southern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  17. CENCAL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Central California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  18. NORCAL_BASELINES - Offshore Baseline for Northern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  19. CENCAL_BASELINE - Offshore Baseline for Central California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  20. NORCAL_BASELINES - Offshore Baseline for Northern California Generated to Calculate Shoreline Change Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rates of long-term and short-term shoreline change were generated in a GIS using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 3.0; An ArcGIS extension for...

  1. Integrated Shoreline Extraction Approach with Use of Rasat MS and SENTINEL-1A SAR Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, N.; Oy, S.; Erdem, F.; Şeker, D. Z.; Bayram, B.

    2017-09-01

    Shorelines are complex ecosystems and highly important socio-economic environments. They may change rapidly due to both natural and human-induced effects. Determination of movements along the shoreline and monitoring of the changes are essential for coastline management, modeling of sediment transportation and decision support systems. Remote sensing provides an opportunity to obtain rapid, up-to-date and reliable information for monitoring of shoreline. In this study, approximately 120 km of Antalya-Kemer shoreline which is under the threat of erosion, deposition, increasing of inhabitants and urbanization and touristic hotels, has been selected as the study area. In the study, RASAT pansharpened and SENTINEL-1A SAR images have been used to implement proposed shoreline extraction methods. The main motivation of this study is to combine the land/water body segmentation results of both RASAT MS and SENTINEL-1A SAR images to improve the quality of the results. The initial land/water body segmentation has been obtained using RASAT image by means of Random Forest classification method. This result has been used as training data set to define fuzzy parameters for shoreline extraction from SENTINEL-1A SAR image. Obtained results have been compared with the manually digitized shoreline. The accuracy assessment has been performed by calculating perpendicular distances between reference data and extracted shoreline by proposed method. As a result, the mean difference has been calculated around 1 pixel.

  2. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Derived products of a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012...

  3. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Lidar-extracted dune features

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dune crest and toe positions along a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October...

  4. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Derived products of a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012 hurricane...

  5. 2012 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Lidar: Northeast Atlantic Coast Post-Hurricane Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Binary point-cloud data were produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an...

  6. Coastal Topography--Northeast Atlantic Coast, Post-Hurricane Sandy, 2012: Digital elevation model (DEM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A DEM was produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an October 2012...

  7. 2012 U.S. Geological Survey Topographic Lidar: Northeast Atlantic Coast Post-Hurricane Sandy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Binary point-cloud data were produced for a portion of the New York, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina coastlines, post-Hurricane Sandy (Sandy was an...

  8. STATUS, CAUSES AND COMBATING SUGGESTIONS OF SANDY DESERTIFICATION IN QINGHAI-TIBET PLATEAU

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-hua; DONG Guang-rong; LI Sen; DONG Yu-xiang

    2005-01-01

    The Qinghai-Tibet Plateau is one of the major sandy desertification regions of China. Based on the recent investigation on sandy desertification, this paper analyses the status such as the type, area, distribution and damage of sandy land desertification in the plateau. Through the analysis on the factors affecting sandy desertification in the region's natural and socio-economic systems as well as the processes and their interrelations, it can be concluded that sandy desertification in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau resulted from the combined actions of normal natural sand drift processes, natural sandy desertification processes caused by climatic changes and man-made sandy desertification caused by improper human activities. In addition, it also predicts the possible developmental trend including the increase in desertification area and the enhancement in desertification developmental degree with the exacerbation of the complex processes, and finally puts forward some strategic suggestions to combat sandy desertification in the coming years.

  9. Shoreline Delineation and Land Reclamation Change Detection Using Landsat Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, M. I.; Ahmad, M. A.; Kaamin, M.; Izhar, M. F. N.

    2016-07-01

    This study is conducted on the usage of remote sensing images from several different years in order to analyze the changes of shoreline and land cover of the area. Remote sensing images used in this study are the data captured by the Landsat satellite. The images are projecting the land surface in 30 by 30 meter resolution and it is processed by the ENVI software. ENVI is able to change each digital number of the pixels on the images into specific value according to the applied model for classification in which could be used as an approach in calculating the area different classes based from the images itself. Therefore, using this method, the changes on the coastal area are possible to be determined. Analysis of the shoreline and land reclamation around the coastal area is integrated with the land use changes to determine its impact. The study shows that Batu Pahat area might have undergone land reclamation whereas in Pasir Gudang is experiencing substantial amount of erosion. Besides, the changes of land use in both areas were considered to be rapid and due to the results obtained from this study, the issues may be brought about for the local authority awareness action.

  10. Radiation dates of Holocene shorelines in Peninsula Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjia, H.D. (National Univ. of Malaysia, Bangi, Selangor); Fuji, S. (Toyama Univ. (Japan)); Kigoshi, K. (Gakushuin Univ., Tokyo (Japan))

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen newly determined radiocarbon dates indicate the presence of former shorelines up to 3 meters above present high tide level in the tectonically stable Peninsula of Malaysia. The sea level indicators consist of oysters in growth position (9 samples), molluscs in beach deposits (2), corals in growth position (3), and beachrock (1). In the Peninsula living oysters occur up to or slightly above high tide, modern beach deposits may occur as high as 1.5 meters above high tide, and corals live up to low tide level. The literature shows that high tide, and corals live up to low tide level. The literature shows that beachrock marks intertidal zones. Combined with seven previously published ages of raised shorelines in the region, strong evidence is presented for one or more high Holocene, eustatic sea level stands in the continental part of Southeast Asia. Periods of high sea levels occur between 2500 and 2900 yr BP, and between 4200 and 5700 yr BP. There is also some indication of high sea level between 8300 and 9500 yr BP.

  11. Searching for shoreline change at Titan's north pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Chase; MacKenzie, Shannon; Barnes, Jason W.

    2016-10-01

    Titan, Saturn's largest moon, is the only other place in the solar system with an active "hydrological" cycle. The conditions in Titan's thick, hazy atmosphere are suitable for methane to play that same role that water does here on Earth. In the ''hydrological cycle", methane rains down, flows across the surface into lakes, and eventually evaporates back into the atmosphere. As such, Titan's surface is dynamic: Cassini has found evidence for fluvial and pluvial activity and erosion. Additionally, evaporites (leftover solid hydrocarbon "salts") along the shores of some lakes demonstrate that lake levels have changed. The question of how fast lake filling or desiccation might happen is still unanswered. Hayes et al. (2011) found that Ontario Lacus experienced up to 9-11 km of shoreline retreat in 4 years on the southwestern margin, but Cornet et al. (2012) found no change in their analysis of the same data. Our project aims to clarify the discrepancy and search for shoreline changes in the north polar lakes during the extent of the Cassini mission. We survey lakes with multiple good resolution images in two Cassini datasets (those of the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer and RADAR). Our results inform a better understanding of the local and global climate, and constrain the timescale for lake-level changes on Titan.

  12. Effects of soil amendment on soil characteristics and maize yield in Horqin Sandy Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Liu, J. H.; Zhao, B. P.; Xue, A.; Hao, G. C.

    2016-08-01

    A 4-year experiment was conducted to investigate the inter-annual effects of sandy soil amendment on maize yield, soil water storage and soil enzymatic activities in sandy soil in Northeast China in 2010 to 2014. We applied the sandy soil amendment in different year, and investigated the different effects of sandy soil amendment in 2014. There were six treatments including: (1) no sandy soil amendment application (CK); (2) one year after applying sandy soil amendment (T1); (3) two years after applying sandy soil amendment(T2); (4) three years after applying sandy soil amendment(T3); (5)four years after applying sandy soil amendment(T4); (6) five years after applying sandy soil amendment (T5). T refers to treatment, and the number refers to the year after application of the sandy soil amendment. Comparing with CK, sandy soil amendments improved the soil water storage, soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in different growth stages and soil layers, the order of soil water storage in all treatments roughly performed: T3 > T5 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. the order of soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in all treatments roughly performed: T5 > T3 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. Soil application of sandy soil amendment significantly (p≤⃒0.05) increased the grain yield and biomass yield by 22.75%-41.42% and 29.92%-45.45% respectively, and maize yield gradually increased with the years go by in the following five years. Sandy soil amendment used in poor sandy soil had a positive effect on soil water storage, soil enzymatic activities and maize yield, after five years applied sandy soil amendment (T5) showed the best effects among all the treatments, and deserves further research.

  13. BuzzardsBay_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 in the Buzzards Bay coastal region from Nobska Point in Woods Hole, to Westport at the Rhode Island border.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  14. NorthShore_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 within the North Shore coastal region from North Salisbury at the New Hampshire border to the west side of Deer Island in Boston Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  15. NorthShore_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics for the North Shore coastal region from North Salisbury at the New Hampshire border to the west side of Deer Island in Boston Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  16. Nantucket_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics within the Nantucket coastal region including the Nantucket Sound- and Atlantic Ocean- facing coasts of Nantucket, Muskeget and Tuckernuck Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  17. MarthasVineyard_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics within the Martha's Vineyard coastal region including the Vineyard Sound-, Nantucket Sound- and Atlantic Ocean- facing coasts of Martha's Vineyard and Nomans Land

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  18. Boston_intersects_LTw.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics for the Boston coastal region from Carson Beach in South Boston to Weymouth River, including the Boston Harbor Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  19. Nantucket_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate) shoreline change statistics within the Nantucket coastal region including the Nantucket Sound- and Atlantic Ocean- facing coasts of Nantucket, Muskeget and Tuckernuck Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  20. CapeCodBay_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate) shoreline change statistics for the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  1. Boston_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 in the Boston coastal region from Carson Beach in South Boston to Weymouth River, including the Boston Harbor Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  2. CapeCodBay_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 within the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  3. ElizabethIslands_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 in the Elizabeth Islands coastal region from Nonamesset Island southwest of Woods Hole to Cuttyhunk Island north of Martha's Vineyard.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  4. Boston_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics for the Boston coastal region from Carson Beach in South Boston to Weymouth River, including the Boston Harbor Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  5. SouthCapeCod_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate) shoreline change statistics for the South Cape Cod coastal region from Stage Harbor Light in Chatham to Nobska Point in Woods Hole.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  6. BuzzardsBay_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate) shoreline change statistics for the Buzzards Bay coastal region from Nobska Point in Woods Hole, to Westport at the Rhode Island border.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  7. SouthCapeCod_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 within the South Cape Cod coastal region from Stage Harbor Light in Chatham to Nobska Point in Woods Hole.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  8. SouthShore_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (End Point Rate)shoreline change statistics for the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  9. SouthShore_intersects_STlr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term linear regression rate (LRR) shoreline change statistics for the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  10. SouthShore_transects_rates_LTwo.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 transects and long-term linear regression shoreline change statistics without shorelines from 1970-1979 and 1994 within the South Shore coastal region from Hewitts Cove in Hingham to the Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  11. CapeCodBay_intersects_LTw.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate long-term shoreline change statistics for the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  12. CapeCodBay_intersects_STepr.shp - Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 shoreline intersection points used to calculate short-term (Linear Regression Rate) shoreline change statistics for the Cape Cod Bay coastal region from Cape Cod Canal in Sandwich to Long Point in Provincetown

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Due to continued coastal population growth and increased threats of erosion, current data on trends and rates of shoreline movement are required to inform shoreline...

  13. The Impacts of Back-Beach Barriers on Sandy Beach Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-beach barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California beaches each year. Beaches in California are an important component of the state and federal economy and provide hundreds of thousands of jobs. Approximately 14% of the California coast from Marin County to the Mexican border is artificially armored with seawalls, rip rap, or revetment, more than half of which protects back-beach developments or lower-lying dynamic regions like harbors and dunes. Many sandy beaches that do not have back-beach armoring are still restricted by commercial and residential infrastructure, parking lots, and roadways. Although these types of coastal infrastructure are not back-beach barriers by intentional design like seawalls and rip rap, they still restrict beaches from landward migration and can cause significant placement loss of the beach. Nearly 67 km, or 44% of the total length of sandy coastline from Long Beach to the U.S.-Mexico border is backed by such infrastructure. This study is part of a broader effort to catalog the extent to which California’s beaches are restricted in the back beach, to describe the effects of back-beach barriers on sandy beach morphology, and to predict how these different beaches might behave with future sea-level rise. Beach morphology, shoreface characteristics, and historical rates of shoreline change were compared between select beaches with back-beach barriers and unrestricted beaches using 1997 LiDAR data and shoreline rates of change published in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Assessment of Shoreline Change report. Although preliminary results of the morphological analysis show that there is no statistically

  14. Deaths associated with Hurricane Sandy - October-November 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit the northeastern U.S. coastline. Sandy's tropical storm winds stretched over 900 miles (1,440 km), causing storm surges and destruction over a larger area than that affected by hurricanes with more intensity but narrower paths. Based on storm surge predictions, mandatory evacuations were ordered on October 28, including for New York City's Evacuation Zone A, the coastal zone at risk for flooding from any hurricane. By October 31, the region had 6-12 inches (15-30 cm) of precipitation, 7-8 million customers without power, approximately 20,000 persons in shelters, and news reports of numerous fatalities (Robert Neurath, CDC, personal communication, 2013). To characterize deaths related to Sandy, CDC analyzed data on 117 hurricane-related deaths captured by American Red Cross (Red Cross) mortality tracking during October 28-November 30, 2012. This report describes the results of that analysis, which found drowning was the most common cause of death related to Sandy, and 45% of drowning deaths occurred in flooded homes in Evacuation Zone A. Drowning is a leading cause of hurricane death but is preventable with advance warning systems and evacuation plans. Emergency plans should ensure that persons receive and comprehend evacuation messages and have the necessary resources to comply with them.

  15. Hurricane Sandy: An Educational Bibliography of Key Research Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2013-01-01

    There, undoubtedly, will be a flurry of research activity in the "Superstorm" Sandy impact area on a myriad of disaster-related topics, across academic disciplines. The purpose of this study was to review the disaster research related specifically to hurricanes in the educational and social sciences that would best serve as a compendium…

  16. Patterns of species richness in sandy beaches of South America

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Species richness of the intertidal macroinfauna of exposed sandy beaches around South America is reviewed in relation ... The middle shore is prim

  17. Microfungi diversity isolation from sandy soil of Acapulco touristic beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microscopic fungi diversity in marine sandy soil habitats is associated with key functions of beach ecosystems. There are few reports on their presence in Mexican beaches. Although standard methods to obtain the fungi from soil samples are established, the aim of this pilot study was to test the pla...

  18. Estimation of shoreline position and change using airborne topographic lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdon, H.F.; Sallenger, A.H.; List, J.H.; Holman, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for estimating shoreline position from airborne scanning laser data. This technique allows rapid estimation of objective, GPS-based shoreline positions over hundreds of kilometers of coast, essential for the assessment of large-scale coastal behavior. Shoreline position, defined as the cross-shore position of a vertical shoreline datum, is found by fitting a function to cross-shore profiles of laser altimetry data located in a vertical range around the datum and then evaluating the function at the specified datum. Error bars on horizontal position are directly calculated as the 95% confidence interval on the mean value based on the Student's t distribution of the errors of the regression. The technique was tested using lidar data collected with NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) in September 1997 on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Estimated lidar-based shoreline position was compared to shoreline position as measured by a ground-based GPS vehicle survey system. The two methods agreed closely with a root mean square difference of 2.9 m. The mean 95% confidence interval for shoreline position was ?? 1.4 m. The technique has been applied to a study of shoreline change on Assateague Island, Maryland/Virginia, where three ATM data sets were used to assess the statistics of large-scale shoreline change caused by a major 'northeaster' winter storm. The accuracy of both the lidar system and the technique described provides measures of shoreline position and change that are ideal for studying storm-scale variability over large spatial scales.

  19. 76 FR 18216 - Dominion Virginia Power/North Carolina Power; Notice of Availability of Shoreline Management Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... Shoreline Management Plan Update for the Shoshone Falls Project and Soliciting Comments, Motions To... Commission and is available for public inspection: a. Application Type: Revised Shoreline Management Plan. b... revised Shoreline Management Plan (SMP) for the project. ] The SMP is a comprehensive plan to protect...

  20. 78 FR 46999 - Additional Waivers and Alternative Requirements for Hurricane Sandy Grantees in Receipt of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Additional Waivers and Alternative Requirements for Hurricane Sandy Grantees in... impacted and distressed areas declared a major disaster due to Hurricane Sandy (see 78 FR 14329, published....) (Stafford Act), due to Hurricane Sandy and other eligible events in calendar years 2011, 2012, and 2013....