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Sample records for sandy loam soil

  1. Effect of Tractor Forward Speed on Sandy Loam Soil Physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field studies were conducted at the National Centre for Agricultural Mechanization (NCAM), Ilorin on a sandy loam soil to evaluate the effect of the imposition of different levels of tractor forward speed during tillage on some soil physical properties. The forward speed was varied from 1.0 to 10.6km/h: The depth of tillage was ...

  2. effect of tractor forward speed on sandy loam soil physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    . 51 ... Ilorin on a sandy loam soil to evaluate the effect of the imposition of different levels of tractor forward speed during tillage on some soil physical .... reported to have negative impacts to root growth and development (Negi; et al., 1980,.

  3. Leaching behaviour of azoxystrobin in sandy loam soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr HMM Mzimela

    2014-08-01

    Aug 1, 2014 ... Key words: Leaching, azoxystrobin, sandy loam soil, column, residues. INTRODUCTION. Pesticides are one of the major technological developments of twentieth century. Whether natural or synthetic, they have toxicological significance and pose a potential risk when they persist in the environment. The.

  4. Effect of Application of Increasing Concentrations of Contaminated Water on the Different Fractions of Cu and Co in Sandy Loam and Clay Loam Soils

    OpenAIRE

    John Volk; Olusegun Yerokun

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to establish the fate of copper (Cu) and cobalt (Co) in sandy loam and clay loam soils that had been irrigated with increasing concentrations of contaminated water. A sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the fractions of Cu and Co in these soils. The concentration of bioavailable Cu and Co on clay loam was 1.7 times that of sandy loam soil. Cu on sandy loam soil was largely in the organic > residual > exchangeable > water-soluble > carbonate fract...

  5. Respirable dust and quartz exposure from three South African farms with sandy, sandy loam, and clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanepoel, Andrew J; Kromhout, Hans; Jinnah, Zubair A; Portengen, Lützen; Renton, Kevin; Gardiner, Kerry; Rees, David

    2011-07-01

    To quantify personal time-weighted average respirable dust and quartz exposure on a sandy, a sandy loam, and a clay soil farm in the Free State and North West provinces of South Africa and to ascertain whether soil type is a determinant of exposure to respirable quartz. Three farms, located in the Free State and North West provinces of South Africa, had their soil type confirmed as sandy, sandy loam, and clay; and, from these, a total of 298 respirable dust and respirable quartz measurements were collected between July 2006-November 2009 during periods of major farming operations. Values below the limit of detection (LOD) (22 μg · m(-3)) were estimated using multiple 'imputation'. Non-parametric tests were used to compare quartz exposure from the three different soil types. Exposure to respirable quartz occurred on all three farms with the highest individual concentration measured on the sandy soil farm (626 μg · m(-3)). Fifty-seven, 59, and 81% of the measurements on the sandy soil, sandy loam soil, and clay soil farm, respectively, exceeded the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit value (TLV) of 25 μg · m(-3). Twelve and 13% of respirable quartz concentrations exceeded 100 μg · m(-3) on the sandy soil and sandy loam soil farms, respectively, but none exceeded this level on the clay soil farm. The proportions of measurements >100 μg · m(-3) were not significantly different between the sandy and sandy loam soil farms ('prop.test'; P = 0.65), but both were significantly larger than for the clay soil farm ('prop.test'; P = 0.0001). The percentage of quartz in respirable dust was determined for all three farms using measurements > the limit of detection. Percentages ranged from 0.5 to 94.4% with no significant difference in the median quartz percentages across the three farms (Kruskal-Wallis test; P = 0.91). This study demonstrates that there is significant potential for over-exposure to respirable quartz in

  6. Electrical Resistivity Based Empirical Model For Delineating Some Selected Soil Properties On Sandy-Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrical Resistivity ER survey was conducted on a Sandy-loam soil with a view to evaluate some selected soil properties. Electrical Resistivity was measured from the soil surface at 0 0.3 m ER30 and 0 0.9 m ER90 soil depths using multi-electrode Wenner array and Miller 400D resistance meter. Soil samples were collected to a depth 0.3 m at points where ER was measured and analyzed for properties such as Organic Matter OM Cation Exchange Capacity CEC Soil Water Content SWC Sand Silt and Clay contents using standard methods. The results indicated that lower ER areas exhibit higher content of soil properties than higher ER areas. The ER90 correlates insignificantly to the soil properties while ER30 correlates significantly to the soil properties except clay r 0.63 - 0.75. The relationship between ER30 and soil properties were best fitted to multiple linear regression R2 0.90 and Boltzmann distribution R2 0.80 - 0.84. The study indicates the ability of ER to delineate some soil properties influencing yield on sandy-loam soil. This will help farmers take decisions that can improve yields.

  7. Optimising crude oil biodegradation in a sandy loam soil using a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The impacts of addition of cow dung and poultry manure alone and in combination with surfactants and/or alternate carbon substrates on crude oil biodegradation in a sandy loam soil were investigated. At a 1.0% (w/w) concentration of the mixture of cow dung and poultry manure, addition of the alternate carbon substrates ...

  8. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd 2+ on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohamed E. EL-Hefnawy; Elmetwaly M. Selim; Faiz F. Assaad; Ali I. Ismail

    2014-01-01

      Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts...

  9. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd2+on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    EL-Hefnawy, Mohamed E; Selim, Elmetwaly M; Assaad, Faiz F; Ismail, Ali I

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts...

  10. The effect of chloride and sulfate ions on the adsorption of Cd2+ on clay and sandy loam Egyptian soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    El-Hefnawy, Mohamed E; Selim, Elmetwaly M; Assaad, Faiz F; Ismail, Ali I

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd(2+) on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts...

  11. Effect of Application of Increasing Concentrations of Contaminated Water on the Different Fractions of Cu and Co in Sandy Loam and Clay Loam Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Volk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to establish the fate of copper (Cu and cobalt (Co in sandy loam and clay loam soils that had been irrigated with increasing concentrations of contaminated water. A sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the fractions of Cu and Co in these soils. The concentration of bioavailable Cu and Co on clay loam was 1.7 times that of sandy loam soil. Cu on sandy loam soil was largely in the organic > residual > exchangeable > water-soluble > carbonate fractions, whereas on clay loam soil the element was largely in organic > exchangeable > residual > carbonate > water-soluble fractions. Co was largely observed in the exchangeable, water-soluble, and carbonate fractions, but with no particular trend observed in both soil types. When crops are grown on sandy soils that have a low capacity to hold heavy metals, the resulting effect would be high uptake of the heavy metals in crop plants. Because the predominant forms of Cu and Co vary in soils, it is expected that the metals will behave differently in the soils.

  12. Leaching behaviour of azoxystrobin in sandy loam soil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mr HMM Mzimela

    2014-08-01

    Aug 1, 2014 ... respiration in fungi. It also inhibits mycelial growth, along with spore production and germination. It is active at very low doses against a wide range of fungal pathogens. Laboratory studies show that azoxystrobin is moderately persistent in soil in the absence of light and moderately mobile in soil profile.

  13. Assessment of Fate of Thiodicarb Pesticide in Sandy Clay Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bajeer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study the fate of thiodicarb pesticide in sandy clay loam soil was investigated through its adsorption and leaching using HPLC. Experimental results revealed that thiodicarb follows first order kinetic with rate constant value of 0.711 h-1 and equilibrium study showed that Freundlich model was best fitted with multilayer adsorption capacity 3.749 mol/g and adsorption intensity 1.009. Therefore, adsorption of thiodicarb was multilayer, reversible and non-ideal. Leaching study has indicated intermediate mobility of thiodicarb with water due to its solubility, while field study showed the non-leacher nature. However both adsorption and leaching were heavily affected by soil characteristics. As the soil taken was sandy clay loam hence due to clay texture adsorption was higher because of vacant sites existing and greater surface area. For this the pesticide has remained adsorbed in above 20 cm soil layer as clearly seen from field study, minor amount was recorded in third layer of soil having 21-30 cm depth. The leached amount of thiodicarb in first and last part of water was 1.075 and 0.003 ng/µl. The general trend observed for adsorption in column and field soil was decreased downwards from 2.027 to 0.618 and 5.079 to 0.009 ng/µl.

  14. Effects of biochar and manure amendments on water vapor sorption in a sandy loam soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    properties of soils, especially on water retention at low matric potentials. To overcome this knowledge gap, the effects of combined BC (0 to 100 Mg ha-1) and manure (21 and 42 Mg ha-1) applications on water vapor sorption and specific surface area was investigated for a sandy loam soil. In addition......, potential impacts of BC aging were evaluated. All considered BC-amendment rates led to a distinct increase of water retention, especially for low matric potentials. The observed increases were attributed to a significant increase of soil organic matter contents and specific surface areas in BCamended soils....... Hysteresis of the water vapor sorption isotherms increased with increasing BC application rates. Biochar age did not significantly affect vapor sorption and SSA....

  15. Eleven years' effect of conservation practices for temperate sandy loams: II. Soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfallah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    Conservation agriculture (CA) is regarded by many as a sustainable intensification strategy. Minimal soil disturbance in combination with residue retention are important CA components. This study examined the long-term effects of crop rotation, residue retention, and tillage on soil pore...... characteristics of two Danish sandy loams. Rotation R2 is a rotation of winter crops (mainly cereals) with residues retained, rotation R3 a mix of winter and spring crops (mainly cereals) with residues removed, and rotation R4 the same mix of winter and spring crops, but with residues retained. Each rotation...... included the tillage treatments: moldboard plowing to 20-cm depth (MP), harrowing to 8- to 10-cm depth (H) and direct drilling (D). Soil cores were taken from the topsoil (4–8, 12–16, 18–27 cm) in mid-autumn 2013 and early spring 2014. Water retention, air permeability, and gas diffusivity was determined...

  16. Leaching and ponding of viral contaminants following land application of biosolids on sandy-loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin; Harrigan, Tim; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2012-12-15

    Much of the land available for application of biosolids is cropland near urban areas. Biosolids are often applied on hay or grassland during the growing season or on corn ground before planting or after harvest in the fall. In this study, mesophilic anaerobic digested (MAD) biosolids were applied at 56,000 L/ha on a sandy-loam soil over large containment lysimeters seeded to perennial covers of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), or planted annually to maize (Zea mays L.). Portable rainfall simulators were to maintain the lysimeters under a nearly saturated (90%, volumetric basis) conditions. Lysimeter leachate and surface ponded water samples were collected and analyzed for somatic phage, adenoviruses, and anionic (chloride) and microbial (P-22 bacteriophage) tracers. Neither adenovirus nor somatic phage was recovered from the leachate samples. P-22 bacteriophage was found in the leachate of three lysimeters (removal rates ranged from 1.8 to 3.2 log(10)/m). Although the peak of the anionic tracer breakthrough occurred at a similar pore volume in each lysimeter (around 0.3 pore volume) the peak of P-22 breakthrough varied between lysimeters (worm holes or other natural phenomena. The concentration of viral contaminants collected in ponded surface water ranged from 1 to 10% of the initial concentration in the applied biosolids. The die off of somatic phage and P-22 in the surface water was fit to a first order decay model and somatic phage reached background level at about day ten. In conclusion, sandy-loam soils can effectively remove/adsorb the indigenous viruses leached from the land-applied biosolids, but there is a potential of viral pollution from runoff following significant rainfall events when biosolids remain on the soil surface. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phytotoxicity and uptake of nitroglycerin in a natural sandy loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Kuperman, Roman G; Dodard, Sabine G; Sarrazin, Manon; Savard, Kathleen; Paquet, Louise; Hawari, Jalal; Checkai, Ronald T; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2011-11-15

    Nitroglycerin (NG) is widely used for the production of explosives and solid propellants, and is a soil contaminant of concern at some military training ranges. NG phytotoxicity data reported in the literature cannot be applied directly to development of ecotoxicological benchmarks for plant exposures in soil because they were determined in studies using hydroponic media, cell cultures, and transgenic plants. Toxicities of NG in the present studies were evaluated for alfalfa (Medicago sativa), barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli), and ryegrass (Lolium perenne) exposed to NG in Sassafras sandy loam soil. Uptake and degradation of NG were also evaluated in ryegrass. The median effective concentration values for shoot growth ranged from 40 to 231 mg kg(-1) in studies with NG freshly amended in soil, and from 23 to 185 mg kg(-1) in studies with NG weathered-and-aged in soil. Weathering-and-aging NG in soil did not significantly affect the toxicity based on 95% confidence intervals for either seedling emergence or plant growth endpoints. Uptake studies revealed that NG was not accumulated in ryegrass but was transformed into dinitroglycerin in the soil and roots, and was subsequently translocated into the ryegrass shoots. The highest bioconcentration factors for dinitroglycerin of 685 and 40 were determined for roots and shoots, respectively. Results of these studies will improve our understanding of toxicity and bioconcentration of NG in terrestrial plants and will contribute to ecological risk assessment of NG-contaminated sites. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Depth distribution of preferential flow patterns in a sandy loam soil as affected by tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. T. Petersen

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye-tracer studies using the anionic dye Brilliant Blue FCF were conducted on a structured sandy loam soil (Typic Agrudalf. 25 mm of dye solution was applied to the surface of 11 1.6 x 1.6 m field plots, some of which had been subjected to conventional seed bed preparation (harrowing while others had been rotovated to either 5 or 15 cm depth before sowing. The soil was excavated to about 160 cm depth one or two days after dye application. Flow patterns and structural features appearing on vertical or horizontal cross sections were examined and photographed. The flow patterns were digitized, and depth functions for the number of activated flow pathways and the degree of dye coverage were calculated. Dye was found below 100 cm depth on 26 out of 33 vertical cross sections made in conventionally tilled plots showing that preferential flow was a prevailing phenomenon. The depth-averaged number of stained flow pathways in the 25-100 cm layer was significantly smaller in a plot rotovated to 5 cm depth than in a conventionally tilled plot, both under relatively dry initial soil conditions and when the entire soil profiles were initially at field capacity. There were no examples of dye penetration below 25 cm depth one month after deep rotovation. Distinct horizontal structures in flow patterns appearing at 20-40 cm depth coupled with changes in flow domains indicated soil layering with abrupt changes in soil structure and hydraulic properties.

  19. Retention and transport of mecoprop on acid sandy-loam soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradelo Núñez, Remigio; Conde Cid, Manuel; Abad, Elodie Martin; Fernández Calviño, David; Nóvoa Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias Estévez, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Interaction with soil components is one of the key processes governing the fate of agrochemicals in the environment. In this work, we have studied the adsorption/desorption and transport of mecoprop in four acid sandy-loam soils with different organic matter contents. Kinetics of adsorption and adsorption/desorption at equilibrium have been studied in batch experiments, whereas transport was studied in laboratory columns. Adsorption and desorption are linear or nearly-linear. The kinetics of mecoprop adsorption are relatively fast in all cases (less than 24 h). Adsorption and desorption were adequately described by the linear and Freundlich models, with KF values that ranged from 0.7 to 8.8 Ln µmol1-n kg-1 and KD values from 0.3 to 3.6 L kg-1. High desorption percentages (>50%) were found, indicative of a high reversibility of the adsorption process. The results of the transport experiments showed that the retention of mecoprop by soil was very low (less than 6.2%). The retention of mecoprop by the soils in all experiments increased with organic matter content. Overall, it was observed that mecoprop was weakly adsorbed by the soils, what would result in a high risk of leaching of this compound.

  20. Transport and Retention of Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts in Loamy Sand and Sandy Loam Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsey, E. N.; Korte, C.; L'Ollivier, C.; Dubey, J. P.; Aurélien, D.; Darnault, C. J. G.

    2016-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most prevalent parasites affecting warm-blooded animals and humans. It has a complex life cycle that involves a wide variety of intermediate hosts with felids as a definitive host. Humans may contract it through consumption of infected, undercooked meat or by water or food sources contaminated with the oocyst form of the parasite. Infection of pregnant women can cause stillbirth, neurological effects or blindness. Because of the prevalence of cats, including on farms where oocyst-contaminated cat feces, animal feed, soil and water have been found, T. gondii is spread almost throughout the entire globe. It has been implicated or suspected in waterborne infections since the 1990s. This study aims to characterize the transport and retention of T. gondii oocysts in field soils. The four soils used were collected from fallow and cultivated fields in Illinois and Utah, USA. They are classified as loamy sands and sandy loams. Soil columns were subjected to continuous artificial rainfall until they reached steady state at which point pulses that included 2.5 million T. gondii oocysts (Me49 strain) and KBr as a tracer were added. After the pulse infiltrated, continuous rainfall was resumed. Rain applied all columns was a 1 mM KCl solution. Leachate samples were collected, analyzed using qPCR for T. gondii and bromide ions and breakthrough curves were produced. Soil was sliced into 1 to 2 cm sections, for which water content and T. gondii concentration were measured to access degree of saturation and oocyst retention.

  1. Soil water retention, air flow and pore structure characteristics after corn cob biochar application to a tropical sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amoakwah, Emmanuel; Frimpong, Kwame Agyei; Okae-Anti, D

    2017-01-01

    corn cob biochar contributed to changes in soil water retention, air flow by convection and diffusion, and derived soil structure indices in a tropical sandy loam. Intact soil cores were taken from a field experiment that had plots without biochar (CT), and plots each with 10 t ha− 1 (BC-10), 20 t ha...... by 15 to 85% in the BC-amended soils. The moderate impact of corn cob biochar on soil water retention, and minimal improvements in convective and diffusive gas transport provides an avenue for an environmentally friendly disposal of crop residues, particularly for corn cobs, and structural improvement...

  2. The fate of fresh and stored 15N-labelled sheep urine and urea applied to a sandy and a sandy loam soil using different application strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    The fate of nitrogen from N-15-labelled sheep urine and urea applied to two soils was studied under field conditions. Labelled and stored urine equivalent to 204 kg N ha(-1) was either incorporated in soil or applied to the soil surface prior to sowing of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.),...... mineralized in the sandy loam soil, when urine was applied prior to sowing. Thus, the fertilizer effect of urine N may be significantly lower than that of urea N on fine-textured soils, even when gaseous losses of urine N are negligible.......The fate of nitrogen from N-15-labelled sheep urine and urea applied to two soils was studied under field conditions. Labelled and stored urine equivalent to 204 kg N ha(-1) was either incorporated in soil or applied to the soil surface prior to sowing of Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum L.......), or it was applied to ryegrass one month after sowing. In a sandy loam soil, 62% of the incorporated urine N and 78% of the incorporated urea N was recovered in three cuts of herbage after 5 months. In a sandy soil, 51-53% of the labelled N was recovered in the herbage and the distribution of labelled N in plant...

  3. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd 2+ on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    OpenAIRE

    EL-Hefnawy, Mohamed E.; Selim, Elmetwaly M.; Assaad, Faiz F.; Ismail, Ali I.

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts. Kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were calculated at two different electrolyte concentrations: 0.05 N and 0.15 N. The adsorption was described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Results showed that lower concentration of the NaCl or Na2SO4 electrolytes (0....

  4. Uncertainty of Deardorff’s soil moisture model based on continuous TDR measurements for sandy loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandyk Andrzej

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge on soil moisture is indispensable for a range of hydrological models, since it exerts a considerable influence on runoff conditions. Proper tools are nowadays applied in order to gain in-sight into soil moisture status, especially of uppermost soil layers, which are prone to weather changes and land use practices. In order to establish relationships between meteorological conditions and topsoil moisture, a simple model would be required, characterized by low computational effort, simple structure and low number of identified and calibrated parameters. We demonstrated, that existing model for shallow soils, considering mass exchange between two layers (the upper and the lower, as well as with the atmosphere and subsoil, worked well for sandy loam with deep ground water table in Warsaw conurbation. GLUE (Generalized Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation linked with GSA (Global Sensitivity Analysis provided for final determination of parameter values and model confidence ranges. Including the uncertainty in a model structure, caused that the median soil moisture solution of the GLUE was shifted from the one optimal in deterministic sense. From the point of view of practical model application, the main shortcoming were the underestimated water exchange rates between the lower soil layer (ranging from the depth of 0.1 to 0.2 m below ground level and subsoil. General model quality was found to be satisfactory and promising for its utilization for establishing measures to regain retention in urbanized conditions.

  5. Eleven years' effect of conservation practices for temperate sandy loams: I. Soil physical properties and topsoil carbon content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfallah; Getahun, Gizachew Tarekegn; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2017-01-01

    Conservation agriculture (CA) has been suggested as a means of making intensification of agriculture sustainable. The purpose of this study was to understand and quantify long-term individual and combined effects of key conservation practices on soil physical properties and topsoil C content. Field...... experiments were conducted in 11- to 12-yr-old experiments on two Danish sandy loams at Foulum and Flakkebjerg. Three crop rotations/residue management treatments were compared and tillage was included as a splitplot factor. The tillage systems were moldboard plowing to a depth of 20 cm (MP), direct drilling....... However, H and D in combination with residue retention gave the best structural stability. Residue retention alleviated negative effects of reduced tillage on PR and improved wet stability in the MP treatment at the Foulum site. Clay and SOC correlated well with soil physical parameters, confirming...

  6. Soil resistance and resilience to mechanical stresses for three differently managed sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Schjønning, Per; Møldrup, Per

    2012-01-01

    To improve our understanding of how clay-organic carbon dynamics affect soil aggregate strength and physical resilience, we selected three nearby soils (MFC,Mixed Forage Cropping; MCC,Mixed Cash Cropping; CCC, Cereal Cash Cropping)with identical clay content and increasing contents of organic...... carbon (CCCresilience of the three soils to compaction using air permeability (ka), void ratio (e) and air-filled porosity (ε) as functional indicators and to characterise aggregate stability, strength and friability. Aggregate tensile strength...... the compression index and a proposed functional index,was significantly greater for theMFC soil compared to the other two soils. The change in compression index with initial void ratio was significantly less for the MFC than the other soils. Plastic reorganisation of the soil particles immediately after...

  7. Influence of tebuconazole and copper hydroxide on phosphatase and urease activities in red sandy loam and black clay soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, B; Rekhapadmini, A; Rangaswamy, V

    2016-06-01

    The efficacy of two selected fungicides i.e., tebuconazole and coppoer hydroxide, was conducted experiments in laboratory and copper hydroxide on the two specific enzymes phosphatase and urease were determined in two different soil samples (red sandy loam and black clay soils) of groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) from cultivated fields of Anantapuramu District, Andhra Pradesh. The activities of the selected soil enzymes were determined by incubating the selected fungicides-treated (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 kg ha-1) and -untreated groundnut soil samples at 10 day intervals. By determining the effective concentration, the rate of selected enzyme activity was estimated by adding the suitable substrate at 10, 20, 30 and 40 days of soil incubation. Both the enzyme activities were increased up to 5.0 kg ha-1 level of fungicide in both soil samples significantly at 10 days of soil incubation and further enhanced up to 20 days of incubation. The activity of the phosphatase and urease decreased progressively at 30 and 40 days of incubation. From overall studies, higher concentrations (7.5 and 10.0 kg ha-1) of both tebuconazole and copper hydroxide were toxic to phosphatase and urease activities, respectively, in both soil samples.

  8. Microstructure and stability of two sandy loam soils with different soil management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, J.

    1969-01-01

    A practical problem initiated this study. In the Haarlemmermeer, a former lake reclaimed about 1850, several farmers had difficulties with soil structure. Land, plowed in autumn, was very wet in spring. Free water was sometimes present on the soil surface. Planting and seeding were long delayed in

  9. Effects of Nitramine Explosive CL-20 on the Soil Microinvertebrate Community in a Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    using high-gradient extractor (Merchant and Crossley, 1970). The most abundant microarthropods were sorted to acarine suborders Prostigmata...Survival data was normalized using square root (x + 1) transformation prior to regression analyses; the exception was predatory nematode survival data...Ecosyst. Environ. 1991, 34, 201–207. Merchant, V.A.; Crossley, D.E., Jr. An Inexpensive, High-Efficiency Tullgren Extractor for Soil

  10. Nitrogen Amendment Stimulated Decomposition of Maize Straw-Derived Biochar in a Sandy Loam Soil: A Short-Term Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weiwei; Ding, Weixin; Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Huanjun; Luo, Jiafa; Bolan, Nanthi

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of nitrogen (N) on biochar stability in relation to soil microbial community as well as biochar labile components using δ13C stable isotope technology. A sandy loam soil under a long-term rotation of C3 crops was amended with biochar produced from maize (a C4 plant) straw in absence (BC0) and presence (BCN) of N and monitored for dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) flux, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) profile and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content. N amendment significantly increased the decomposition of biochar during the first 5 days of incubation (P biochar carbon (C) were 2.30% and 3.28% in BC0 and BCN treatments, respectively, during 30 days of incubation. The magnitude of decomposed biochar C was significantly (P biochar (1.75%) and part of relatively recalcitrant biochar C was mineralized in both treatments. N amendment increased soil PLFAs concentration at the beginning of incubation, indicating that microorganisms were N-limited in test soil. Furthermore, N amendment significantly (P biochar C, which in turn reduced the stability of maize straw-derived biochar in test soil. PMID:26192282

  11. The effect of chloride and sulfate ions on the adsorption of Cd2+ on clay and sandy loam Egyptian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hefnawy, Mohamed E; Selim, Elmetwaly M; Assaad, Faiz F; Ismail, Ali I

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of Cd(2+) on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial) and sandy loam (calcareous), was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts. Kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were calculated at two different electrolyte concentrations: 0.05 N and 0.15 N. The adsorption was described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Results showed that lower concentration of the NaCl or Na2SO4 electrolytes (0.05 N) had higher adsorption capacity. Also, the maximum adsorption of cadmium when using sulfate counter ion is about two to three times higher than that when using chloride (544 μg/g for alluvial soil and 170 μg/g for calcareous soil when using 0.05 N). Using NaCl as matrix electrolyte, Freundlich isotherms showed bi-linear fits that probably mean a two energy level adsorption. This might be explained by either the competition of Cd(2+) with Na(+) or its complexation with Cl(-).

  12. The Effect of Chloride and Sulfate Ions on the Adsorption of Cd2+ on Clay and Sandy Loam Egyptian Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. EL-Hefnawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of Cd2+ on two types of Egyptian soils: clay (alluvial and sandy loam (calcareous, was studied. Effect of changing the matrix electrolyte type and concentration was used to mimic the natural soil salts. Kinetics and thermodynamic parameters of the adsorption were calculated at two different electrolyte concentrations: 0.05 N and 0.15 N. The adsorption was described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Results showed that lower concentration of the NaCl or Na2SO4 electrolytes (0.05 N had higher adsorption capacity. Also, the maximum adsorption of cadmium when using sulfate counter ion is about two to three times higher than that when using chloride (544 μg/g for alluvial soil and 170 μg/g for calcareous soil when using 0.05 N. Using NaCl as matrix electrolyte, Freundlich isotherms showed bi-linear fits that probably mean a two energy level adsorption. This might be explained by either the competition of Cd2+ with Na+ or its complexation with Cl−.

  13. Biochar increases plant-available water in a sandy loam soil under an aerobic rice crop system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melo Carvalho, de M.T.; Holanda Nunes Maia, de A.; Madari, B.E.; Bastiaans, L.; Oort, van P.A.J.; Heinemann, A.B.; Soler da Silva, M.A.; Petter, F.A.; Marimon-Junior, B.H.; Meinke, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of biochar rate (0, 8, 16 and 32 Mg ha-1) on the water retention capacity (WRC) of a sandy loam Dystric Plinthosol. The applied biochar was a by-product of slow pyrolysis (~450 °C) of eucalyptus wood, milled to pass through a 2000 µm sieve

  14. The influence of clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Getahun, Gizachew Tarekegn; Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Schjønning, Per

    2016-01-01

    Tillage and residue management influence soil organic carbon (SOC) and lead to changes in soil physical behav-iour and functioning. We examined the effect of the clay-to-carbon ratio on soil physical properties in a humid sandy loam soil with contrasting tillage and residue management. Soil...... and DD and MP soil at 10–20 cm, while MP was higher than DD at 10–20 cm depth (p b 0.05). However, there was no difference in the effect of the contrasting tillage manage-ments on carbon sequestration when an equivalent soil mass and the entire topsoil layer were considered. In the top 10 cm soil, DD...

  15. Nitrogen Amendment Stimulated Decomposition of Maize Straw-Derived Biochar in a Sandy Loam Soil: A Short-Term Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Lu

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of nitrogen (N on biochar stability in relation to soil microbial community as well as biochar labile components using δ13C stable isotope technology. A sandy loam soil under a long-term rotation of C3 crops was amended with biochar produced from maize (a C4 plant straw in absence (BC0 and presence (BCN of N and monitored for dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2 flux, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs profile and dissolved organic carbon (DOC content. N amendment significantly increased the decomposition of biochar during the first 5 days of incubation (P < 0.05, and the proportions of decomposed biochar carbon (C were 2.30% and 3.28% in BC0 and BCN treatments, respectively, during 30 days of incubation. The magnitude of decomposed biochar C was significantly (P < 0.05 higher than DOC in biochar (1.75% and part of relatively recalcitrant biochar C was mineralized in both treatments. N amendment increased soil PLFAs concentration at the beginning of incubation, indicating that microorganisms were N-limited in test soil. Furthermore, N amendment significantly (P < 0.05 increased the proportion of gram-positive (G+ bacteria and decreased that of fungi, while no noticeable changes were observed for gram-negative (G- bacteria and actinobacteria at the early stage of incubation. Our results indicated that N amendment promoted more efficiently the proliferation of G+ bacteria and accelerated the decomposition of relatively recalcitrant biochar C, which in turn reduced the stability of maize straw-derived biochar in test soil.

  16. Overall assessment of soil quality on humid sandy loams: Effects of location, rotation and tillage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Hansen, Elly Møller; Rickson, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Conservation tillage and diversified crop rotations have been suggested as appropriate alternative soil management systems to sustain soil quality. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effect of implementing three crop rotations (R2–R4) on soil structural changes and the “productivity...... function” of soil. R2 is a winter-dominated crop rotation (winter wheat was the main crop) with straw residues incorporated. R3 is a mix of winter and spring crops with straw residues removed. R4 is the same mix of crops as in R3, but with straw residues incorporated. Three tillage systems were used...... the correlation between the soil quality indices and relative crop yield. Relevant soil properties for calculating the soil quality indices were measured or obtained from previous publications. Crop rotation affected the soil structure and RY. The winter-dominated crop rotation (R2) resulted in the poorest soil...

  17. Determination of Selenium Toxicity for Survival and Reproduction of Enchytraeid Worms in a Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Jefferson Davis Highway , Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no...ecotoxicological benchmarks for developing the ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSLs) for risk assessments of contaminated soils. For the present study, we...invertebrate-based Eco-SSL for Se. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ecological soil screening level (Eco-SSL) Selenium Natural soil Enchytraeus crypticus Selenate

  18. Assessment of structural stability of a degraded sandy clay loam soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil aggregates under grass treatment had the lowest range of Potential Structural Deformation Index (PSDI) values (14.63 - 20.13 %) compared to aggregates under legume treatment (24.07 - 27.17 %).The PSDI values indicated that soils under vegetative cover were on the average twice more stable to rain drop impact ...

  19. Effect of biochar on aerobic processes, enzyme activity, and crop yields in two sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Bruun, Esben; Arthur, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Biochar added to agricultural soils may sequester carbon and improve physico-chemical conditions for crop growth, due to effects such as increased water and nutrient retention in the root zone. The effects of biochar on soil microbiological properties are less certain. We addressed the effects...

  20. Clinoptilolite zeolite influence on inorganic nitrogen in silt loam and sandy agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of best management practices can help improve inorganic nitrogen (N) availability to plants and reduce nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching in soils. This study was conducted to determine the influence of the zeolite mineral Clinoptilolite (CL) additions on NO3-N and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4...

  1. Crop residues as driver for N2O emissions from a sandy loam soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugesgaard, Siri; Petersen, Søren O.; Chirinda, Ngonidzashe

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) cycling within agriculture constitutes a source of direct and indirect emissions of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O). We analysed relationships between N2O emissions and C and N balances of four arable cropping systems under conventional or organic management within a long......-term experiment on a loamy sand soil at Foulum in Denmark. All cropping systems included winter wheat, a leguminous crop (faba bean or grass-clover), potato and spring barley grown in different 4-crop rotations varying in strategies for N supply (fertilizer/manure type and rate, use of catch crops and green...... manure). Crops in both organic and conventional systems received N at rates below the optimum for crop production. Soil N2O emissions were monitored in 2008–2009 in six selected crops which could be combined with data from other monitoring programs to calculate N2O emission factors for each of the 16...

  2. Effect of rainfall and tillage direction on the evolution of surface crusts, soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation for a sandy loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Babacar; Esteves, Michel; Vandervaere, Jean-Pierre; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Vauclin, Michel

    2005-06-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rainfall and tillage-induced soil surface characteristics on infiltration and runoff on a 2.8 ha catchment located in the central region of Senegal. This was done by simulating 30 min rain storms applied at a constant rate of about 70 mm h -1, on 10 runoff micro-plots of 1 m 2, five being freshly harrowed perpendicularly to the slope and five along the slope (1%) of the catchment. Runoff was automatically recorded at the outlet of each plot. Hydraulic properties such as capillary sorptivity and hydraulic conductivity of the sandy loam soil close to saturation were determined by running 48 infiltration tests with a tension disc infiltrometer. That allowed the calculation of a mean characteristic pore size hydraulically active and a time to ponding. Superficial water storage capacity was estimated using data collected with an electronic relief meter. Because the soil was subject to surface crusting, crust-types as well as their spatial distribution within micro-plots and their evolution with time were identified and monitored by taking photographs at different times after tillage. The results showed that the surface crust-types as well as their tillage dependent dynamics greatly explain the decrease of hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity as the cumulative rainfall since tillage increases. The exponential decaying rates were found to be significantly greater for the soil harrowed along the slope (where the runoff crust-type covers more than 60% of the surface after 140 mm of rain) than across to the slope (where crusts are mainly of structural (60%) and erosion (40%) types). That makes ponding time smaller and runoff more important. Also it was shown that soil hydraulic properties after about 160 mm of rain were close to those of untilled plot not submitted to any rain. That indicates that the effects of tillage are short lived.

  3. Mobility and dissipation of chlorpyriphos and quinalphos in sandy clay loam in an agroecosystem-a laboratory-based soil column study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    G P, Bindumol; C C, Harilal

    2017-09-15

    Leaching potential of pesticides, apart from climatological factors, depends on soil physical properties, soil-pesticide interaction and chemical nature of the molecule. Recent investigations have revealed the presence of various organophosphate pesticides in various agroecosystems. The present study investigated the soil transport mechanism of commonly used organophosphate pesticides in acidic sandy clay loam soils of Kerala State, India. Packed soil column experiment was undertaken under laboratory condition for 30 days. Unsaturated flow was carried out using distilled water/0.01 M CaCl2 solution after applying chlorpyriphos and quinalphos at the rate of 0.04% a.i.ha-1 and 0.025% a.i.ha-1, respectively. The study revealed the retention of residues of chlorpyriphos and quinalphos in the top 5-cm layer. Irrespective of the applied concentration of chlorpyriphos and quinalphos, the relative concentration of the pesticides in soil was similar. About 56% of the applied chemicals were dissipated in 30 days of unsaturated flow. A new dissipation compound iron, tricarbonyl [N-(phenyl-2-pyridinylmethyene) benzenamine-N, N'], was detected in GCMS analysis of soil extract from distilled water percolated soil. The dissipation of chlorpyriphos and quinalphos was faster in 0.01 M CaCl2-treated soil column. Among the pesticides analysed, the residue of quinalphos was detected in leachate.

  4. Soil precompression stress, penetration resistance and crop yields in relation to differently-trafficked, temperate-region sandy loam soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; Lamandé, Mathieu; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2016-01-01

    treatment (labelled M8-1), the soil was loaded only in the first year. A tricycle-like machine with a single pass of wide tyres each carrying 12 Mg (treatment S12) was included at one site. Traffic treatments were applied in a randomized block design with four replicates and with treatments repeated in four......Compaction of the subsoil due to heavy traffic in moist and wet soil is widespread in modern agriculture. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects from realistic field traffic on soil penetration resistance and barley crop yield for three Luvisols developed from glacial till...

  5. Physical-hydraulic properties of a sandy loam typic paleudalf soil under organic cultivation of 'montenegrina' mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Valverde dos Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are the most important fruit species in the world, with emphasis to oranges, mandarins and lemons. In Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, most fruit production is found on small properties under organic cultivation. Soil compaction is one of the factors limiting production and due to the fixed row placement of this crop, compaction can arise in various manners in the interrows of the orchard. The aim of this study was to evaluate soil physical properties and water infiltration capacity in response to interrow management in an orchard of mandarin (Citrus deliciosa Tenore 'Montenegrina' under organic cultivation. Interrow management was performed through harrowing, logs in em "V", mowing, and cutting/knocking down plants with a knife roller. Soil physical properties were evaluated in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, between the wheel tracks (BWT, and in the area under the line projection of the canopy (CLP, with undisturbed soil samples collected in the 0.00-0.15, 0.15-0.30, 0.30-0.45, and 0.45-0.60 m layers, with four replicates. The soil water infiltration test was performed using the concentric cylinder method, with a maximum time of 90 min for each test. In general, soil analysis showed a variation in the physical-hydraulic properties of the Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico arênico (sandy loam Typic Paleudalf in the three sampling sites in all layers, regardless of the management procedure in the interrows. Machinery traffic leads to heterogeneity in the soil physical-hydraulic properties in the interrows of the orchard. Soil porosity and bulk density are affected especially in the wheel tracks of the tractor (WT, which causes a reduction in the constant rate of infiltration and in the accumulated infiltration of water in this sampling site. The use of the disk harrow and mower leads to greater harmful effects on the soil, which can interfere with mandarin production.

  6. The improvement of multi-contaminated sandy loam soil chemical and biological properties by the biochar, wood ash, and humic substances amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukalchik, Maria; Mercl, Filip; Panova, Maria; Břendová, Kateřina; Terekhova, Vera A; Tlustoš, Pavel

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays trace metal contamination of soils represents an important environmental hazard. Nevertheless, the use of some secondary waste products as amendments may restore the common soil functions. This paper focuses on the chemical and biological influence of wood biochar (BC), wood ash (WA) and humic substances (HS), alone and in the mixtures, on a heavily multi-contaminated sandy loam soil. The soil was amended by above-mentioned materials to follow a pH-increasing design (pH Ca from 6.0 to 6.5, 7.0 and 7.5); soil samples were analyzed after 3, 30, and 60 days using a set of variables, namely the plant-available trace element concentrations (Cu, Cd, and Zn), microbial biomass carbon (Cmic), and microbial quotient (qCO 2 ), as well as toxicity to Sinapis alba and Daphnia magna. Wood ash and WA + HS were the most efficient treatments to decrease mobile Cd and Zn concentrations in the soil, while HS, BC, and BC + HS combinations were the most effective in reducing the Cu mobility. The effect of BC and WA on the Cmic and qCO 2 was mostly negative, whereas adding HS markedly increased Cmic and reduced qCO 2 in soil. After amendment applications, the root elongation of mustard was significantly increased in HS and combined treatments (BC + HS, WA + HS). Additionally, BC + HS, WA + HS and WA 8.4% significantly decreased the toxicity of leachates to D. magna to the low-, or non-toxic levels. Our results suggest that the combination of amendments with HS can be a suitable remediation strategy for heavily contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Changes in soil organic matter over 70 years in continuous arable and ley-arable rotations on a sandy loam soil in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A E; Poulton, P R; Coleman, K; Macdonald, A J; White, R P

    2017-05-01

    The sequestration in soil of organic carbon (SOC) derived from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) by replacing arable crops with leys, has been measured over 70 years on a sandy loam soil. The experiment was designed initially to test the effect of leys on the yields of arable crops. A 3-year grazed grass with clover (grass + clover) ley in a 5-year rotation with arable crops increased percentage organic carbon (%OC) in the top 25 cm of the soil from 0.98 to 1.23 in 28 years, but with little further increase during the next 40 years with all-grass leys given fertilizer nitrogen (N). In this second period, OC inputs were balanced by losses, suggesting that about 1.3% OC might be near the equilibrium content for this rotation. Including 3-year lucerne (Medicago sativa) leys had little effect on %OC over 28 years, but after changing to grass + clover leys, %OC increased to 1.24 during the next 40 years. Eight-year leys (all grass with N or grass + clover) in 10-year rotations with arable crops were started in the 1970s, and after three rotations %OC had increased to ca. 1.40 in 2000-2009. Over 70 years, %OC declined from 0.98 to 0.94 in an all-arable rotation with mainly cereals and to 0.82 with more root crops. Applications of 38 t ha-1 farmyard manure (FYM) every fifth year increased %OC by 0.13% by the mid-1960s when applications ceased. Soil treated with FYM still contained 0.10% more OC in 2000-2009. Changes in the amount of OC have been modelled with RothC-26.3 and estimated inputs of C for selected rotations. Little of the OC input during the 70 years has been retained; most was retained in the grazed ley rotation, but 9 t ha-1 only of a total input of 189 t ha-1. In other rotations more than 98% of the total OC input was lost. Despite large losses of C, annual increases in OC of 4‰ are possible on this soil type with the inclusion of grass or grass + clover leys or the application of FYM, but only for a limited

  8. Biochar effects on wet and dry regions of the soil water retention curve of a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Moldrup, Per; Sun, Zhencai

    2014-01-01

    Reported beneficial effects of biochar on soil physical properties and processes include decreased soil density, and increased soil water transport, water holding capacity and retention (mainly for the wet region). Research is limited on biochar effects on the full soil water retention curve (wet...... treatments. Six months after the last biochar application, intact and disturbed soil samples were collected for analyses. Soil water retention was measured from −1 kPa to −100 kPa using tension tables and ceramic plates and from −10 MPa to −480 MPa using a Vapor Sorption Analyzer. Soil specific area......+2012). Although a similar trend of increased water retention was observed from −100 MPa to −480 MPa, there was little difference among the different biochar rates. Increases in soil specific surface area for biochar treatments were consistent with rates and slurry application. Apparent hysteresis of the dry...

  9. Study and Estimation of the Ratio of 137CS and 40K Specific Activities in Sandy and Loam Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Mikalauskienė

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article describes changes in specific activities and fluctuations in the ratio of natural 40K and artificial 137Cs radionuclides in soil samples taken from different places of Lithuanian territory. The samples of soil have been selected from the districts polluted after the accident in Chernobyl nuclear plant performing nuclear testing operations. The study has established the main physical and chemical properties of soil samples and their impact on the concentration of 40K activities. 137Cs/40K specific activities in soil have been observed under the dry weight of the sample that varied from 0.0034 to 0.0240. The results of the study could be used for establishing and estimating 137Cs and 40K transfer in the system “soil-plant”.Article in Lithuanian

  10. Toxicity of Nitro-Heterocyclic and Nitroaromatic Energetic Materials to Folsomia candida in a Natural Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    terrestrial invertebrates, the enchytraeid worm (Enchytraeus crypticus) and the collembolan (F. candida), in soils amended with up to 1,000 mg kg–1 of...Determination of Explosive Contaminated Soil Leachates to Daphnia magna Using an Adapted Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure; ERDEC-TR-030; U.S. Army...Aerobic Biodegradation Potential of RDX, TNT, GAP, and NC. In Environmental Biotechnology: Principles and Applications ; Moo-Young, M., Anderson, W.A

  11. The Effects of Land Configuration and Wood-Shavings Mulch on the Properties of a Sandy Loam Soil in Northeast Nigeria. 2. Changes in Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiroma, AM.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mulching and ridge tillage are proven technologies for improving soil productivity in semi-arid regions. Yet data quantifying the combined influences of these practices are limited. Our objectives were to determine the changes in selected physical properties of a sandy loam after 4-years of annual tillage and wood-shavings mulching. The tillage and wood-shavings treatments consisted of: Flat bed (FB, Open ridge (OR, Tiedridge (TR, FBM, ORM and TRM were same as FB, OR and TR, respectively except that wood-shavings at a rate of 10 t/ha were surface applied ≈ 2 weeks after sowing each year to serve as both a mulch and an organic amendment. At the end of the trial in 2002, bulk density, penetration resistance, total porosity and soil water content from each of 0-0.075, 0.075-0.15 and 0.15-0.30 m depths were determined. Composite samples from the surface (0.075 and 0.075-0.15 m layers from 3 replicates of each treatment were also collected for the determination of wet aggregate stability and from 0-0.15 m and 0.15-0.30 m layers for determination of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat. After 4 years of annual tillage and addition of woodshavings, soil bulk density and penetration resistance were consistently lower and total porosity higher in the FBM, ORM and TRM treatments than in the FB, OR and TR treatments. Penetration resistance in all treatments was strongly related to soil water content. A 'hoe pan' was established below 0.15 m depth beneath the furrows of the ridged treatments. This could be attributed to human traffic during field operations and ponding of water, which occurred in the furrows following heavy rains. Wet aggregate stability estimated as the proportion of aggregates of size > 0.25 mm (macro-aggregates in the 0-0.15 m layer were significantly (P< 0.05 higher under FBM, ORM and TRM than under FB, OR or TR treatments. Ksat was not influenced by either tillage or wood-shavings treatments but were higher for the mulched plots

  12. State-space prediction of field-scale soil water content time series in a sandy loam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendroth, O.; Rogasik, H.; Koszinski, S.; Ritsema, C.J.; Dekker, L.W.; Nielsen, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    The description of field soil water content time series can be affected by uncertainty due to measurement errors of the respective state variables, errors due to assumptions underlying the model, and errors in the determination of boundary conditions. In this study, a simple state-equation was

  13. The impact of long-term application of inorganic nitrogen fertilizers and manure on changes of selected properties of organic matter in sandy loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara MURAWSKA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to assess the effect of long-term application of different doses of nitrogen fertilizers with or without manure to changes in the total organic carbon content, total nitrogen content, evaluation of dissolved organic carbon content and the value of absorbance coefficient (A4/6 in sandy loam soil. The base of research was the long-term field experiment, established in 1979 at the Wierzchucinek Experimental Station close to Bydgoszcz city - Poland. The experiment was carried out in the three-course crop rotation, potato, rye, rye in randomized split-plot design. The experimental treatments were four levels of N fertilizers in 0, 47, 93, and 140 kg*ha-1*yr-1 (N0, N1, N2, N3 as a 1st factor of experiment, and the same doses of N fertilizers with farmyard manure application (30 t*ha-1 as a 2nd factor. After 36 years of experiment the content of total organic carbon was 26% lower and the content of total nitrogen 13% higher compared to the values determined before the experiment foundation (1979. The consequence of changes in the content of organic carbon and total nitrogen, are changes in the ratio of organic carbon content and total nitrogen content. It was noticed that the use of manure and different nitrogen doses resulted in a decrease of organic carbon content and total nitrogen content value. After application of different nitrogen doses, organic carbon content ranged from 122.4 to 152.2 mg*kg-1. The same nitrogen doses applied simultaneously with farmyard manure increased the organic carbon content, which ranged from 133.5 to 166.7 mg*kg-1. The changes of the organic carbon content did not effect on percentage of this fraction in the total organic carbon. Percentage of organic carbon content in total organic carbon content was on averaged 1.6%. After the application of different nitrogen doses, humic acids of analyzed soils were characterized by lower average value of A4/6 (5.4. However, the application of nitrogen

  14. Peanut plant growth and yield as influenced by co-inoculation with Bradyrhizobium and some rhizo-microorganisms under sandy loam soil conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Sh.F. Badawi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of tested rhizomicrobial isolates (Serratia marcescens and Trichoderma harzianum along with a strain of root nodule bacteria (Bradyrhizobium spp. to exhibit some PGP-properties was evaluated in vitro conditions. The main PGP-properties, namely the ability to solubilize-P and production of IAA, as well as production of siderophores and HCN were examined. Additionally, field trials were conducted on sandy loam soil at El-Tahrir Province during two successive summer seasons to study the effect of co-inoculation with Bradyrhizobium either individually or together with S. marcescens and/or T. harzianum on nodulation, some plant growth characters, peanut yield and its yield components. The in vitro experiment revealed that all of the tested microorganisms were apparently able to trigger PGP-properties. Phosphate solubilization was the common feature of the employed microorganisms. However, T. harzianum appeared to be superior to other microorganisms, and Bradyrhizobium displayed the lowest capacity. The ability of the microorganisms to produce indole compounds showed that S. marcescens was more effective in IAA production and followed by Bradyrhizobium. Capacity of S. marcescens and T. harzianum to excrete ferric-specific ligands (siderophores and HCN was detected, while Bradyrhizobium failed to produce such compounds. Results of field trials showed that the uninoculated peanut had the least nodulation status, N2-ase activity and all vegetative growth characters in both studied seasons. Bacterization of peanut seeds with bradyrhizobia exerted considerable improvement in number and mass of root nodules, increased the rate of acetylene reduction and all growth characters in comparison to the uninoculated control. The synergy inoculation between bradyrhizobia and any of the tested microorganisms led to further increases of all mentioned characters and strengthened the stimulating effect of the bacterial inoculation. However, the promotive

  15. Dissipation behavior of phorate and its toxic metabolites in the sandy clay loam soil of a tropical sugarcane ecosystem using a single-step sample preparation method and GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramanian, Thirumalaiandi; Paramasivam, Mariappan

    2016-10-01

    The dissipation of phorate in the sandy clay loam soil of tropical sugarcane ecosystem was studied by employing a single-step sample preparation method and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The limit of quantification of the method was 0.01 μg/g. The recoveries of phorate, phorate sulfoxide, phorate sulfone, and phorate oxon were in the range 94.00-98.46% with relative standard deviations of 1.51-3.56% at three levels of fortification between 0.01 and 0.1 μg/g. The Half-life of phorate and the total residues, which include phorate, phorate sulfoxide and phorate sulfone, was 5.5 and 19.8 days, respectively at the recommended dose of insecticide. Phorate rapidly oxidized into its sulfoxide metabolite in the sandy clay loam soil. Phorate sulfoxide alone accounted for more than 20% of the total residues within 2 h post-application and it was more than 50% on the fifth day after treatment irrespective of the doses applied. Phorate sulfoxide and phorate sulfone reached below the detectable level on 105 and 135 days after treatment, respectively as against 45 days after treatment for phorate residues at the recommended dose. Thus, the reasonably prolonged efficacy of phorate against soil pests may be attributed to longer persistence of its more toxic sulfoxide and sulfone metabolites. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Effects of soil management practices and tillage systems on soil moisture conservation and maize yield on a sandy loam in semiarid Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Gicheru, P.T.; Gachene, C.K.K.; Mbuvi, J.P.

    2006-01-01

    Metadata only record This journal article illustrates the effect of seven different tillage and soil management practices on water conservation and the yield of maize. Maize is a vital crop in the semiarid parts of Africa, and the amount of water in the soil greatly affects the productivity of this plant. The soil moisture is affected by the different infiltration rates and structural stability of the soil resulting from the different techniques studied: bare with conventional tillage (BC)...

  17. Metribuzin transport in undisturbed soil cores under controlled water potential conditions: experiments and modelling to evaluate the risk of leaching in a sandy loam soil profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pot, Valérie; Benoit, Pierre; Le Menn, Mona; Eklo, Ole-Martin; Sveistrup, Tore; Kvaerner, Jens

    2011-04-01

    Mobility of pesticides in soils is often evaluated and characterised in the surface soil layers rather than at different depths where soil characteristics such as soil organic matter, microbial biomass or clay contents can strongly change pesticide behaviour. The objective of this work was to characterise the reactivity of the herbicide metribuzin in three main soil horizons found in the 0-80 cm profile of an alluvial soil of southern Norway under dynamic transport conditions. A laboratory infiltrometer was used to perform percolation experiments in soil cores sampled in the three horizons Ap, Bw and Bw/C, at a fixed matric potential of -10 cm, thus preventing pores of equivalent radii higher than 0.015 cm from contributing to water flow. The physical equilibrium transport model correctly described the transport of water tracer (bromide). The distribution coefficient K(d) values were estimated to be 0.29, 0.17 ± 0.02 and 0.15 ± 0.00 L kg(-1) for horizons Ap, Bw and Bw/C respectively, in close agreement with batch sorption data. Degradation was found only for the surface horizon with a short half-life of about 5 days, in disagreement with longer half-lives found in batch and field degradation data. For all horizons, a kinetic sorption model was needed for better description of metribuzin leaching. Chemical non-equilibrium was greatest in the Bw horizon and lowest in the Bw/C horizon. Overall, metribuzin exhibited a greater mobility in the deeper horizons. The risk of metribuzin transfer to groundwater in such alluvial soils should therefore be considered. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Effect of rainfall and tillage direction on the evolution of surface crusts, soil hydraulic properties and runoff generation for a sandy loam soil

    OpenAIRE

    Ndiaye, B.; Esteves, Michel; Vandervaere, J.P.; Lapetite, Jean-Michel; Vauclin, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of rainfall and tillage-induced soil surface characteristics on infiltration and runoff on a 2.8 ha catchment located in the central region of Senegal. This was done by simulating 30 min rain storms applied at a constant rate of about 70 mm h(-1), on 10 runoff microplots of 2 m(2), five being freshly harrowed perpendicularly to the slope and five along the slope (1%) of the catchment. Runoff was automatically recorded at the outlet of each plot. Hy...

  19. Effect of Simulated Weathering and Aging of TNT in Amended Sandy Loam Soil on Toxicity to the Enchytraeid Worm, Enchytreaeus Crypticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    Checkai, R.T.; Wentsel, R.S. 1993. Toxicity of selected munitions and munition-contaminated soil on the earthworm ( Eisenia foetida ). pp 1-22...earthworms Eisenia andrei and Lumbricus terrestris exposed to TNT contaminated soils (Johnson et al., 2000; Renoux et al., 2000; Robidoux et al., 2000...TNT metabolites in the earthworm Eisenia andrei exposed to amended forest soil. Chemosphere 55, pp 1339-1348. Linz, D.G.; Nakles, D.V., Eds. 1997

  20. Enhancement of physical and hydrological properties of a sandy loam soil via application of different biochar particle sizes during incubation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Esmaeelnejad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In spite of many studies that have been carried out, there is a knowledge-gap as to how different sizes of biochars alter soil properties. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different sizes of biochars on soil properties. The biochars were produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (350 and 550°C from two feedstocks (rice husk and apple wood chips. Produced biochars were prepared at two diameters (1-2 mm and <1 mm and mixed with soil at a rate of 2% (w/w. Multiple effects of type, temperature and size of biochars were significant, so as the mixture of soil and finer woodchip biochars produced at 550°C had significant effects on all soil properties. Soil aggregation and stabilization of macro-aggregates, values of mean weight diameter and water stable aggregates were improved due to increased soil organic matter as binding agents and microbial biomass. In addition, plant available water capacity, air capacity, S-index, meso-pores and water retention content were significantly increased compared to control. But, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks was reduced due to blockage of pores by biochar particles, reduction of pore throat size and available space for flow and also, high field capacity of biochars. So, application of biochar to soil, especially the finest particles of high-tempered woody biochars, can improve physical and hydrological properties of coarse-textured soils and reduce their water drainage by modification of Ks.

  1. Enhancement of physical and hydrological properties of a sandy loam soil via application of different biochar particle sizes during incubation period

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esmaeelnejad, L.; Shorafa, M.; Gorji, M.; Hosseini, S.M.

    2016-11-01

    In spite of many studies that have been carried out, there is a knowledge-gap as to how different sizes of biochars alter soil properties. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different sizes of biochars on soil properties. The biochars were produced at two pyrolysis temperatures (350 and 550°C) from two feedstocks (rice husk and apple wood chips). Produced biochars were prepared at two diameters (1-2 mm and <1 mm) and mixed with soil at a rate of 2% (w/w). Multiple effects of type, temperature and size of biochars were significant, so as the mixture of soil and finer woodchip biochars produced at 550°C had significant effects on all soil properties. Soil aggregation and stabilization of macro-aggregates, values of mean weight diameter and water stable aggregates were improved due to increased soil organic matter as binding agents and microbial biomass. In addition, plant available water capacity, air capacity, S-index, meso-pores and water retention content were significantly increased compared to control. But, saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) was reduced due to blockage of pores by biochar particles, reduction of pore throat size and available space for flow and also, high field capacity of biochars. So, application of biochar to soil, especially the finest particles of high-tempered woody biochars, can improve physical and hydrological properties of coarse-textured soils and reduce their water drainage by modification of Ks. (Author)

  2. The Effects of Land Configuration and Wood-Shavings Mulch on the Properties of a Sandy Loam Soil in Northeast Nigeria. 1. Changes in Chemical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiroma, AM.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the savanna region of Nigeria, the search continues for practices that will improve the productivity of the fragile soils characterized by low organic matter and plant nutrients, poor structure and very high permeability. A 4-year (1999-2002 field experiment was conducted to determine the effects of land configuration and wood-shavings mulch on soil chemical properties under rainfed sorghum. The treatments were Flat Bed (FB as control, Open-ridge (OR, Tied-ridge (TR, Flat bed with wood-shavings mulch (FBM, Open-ridge with wood-shaving mulch (ORM and Tied-ridge with wood-shavings mulch (TRM. Wood-shavings at the rate of 5 t/ha were used in 1999 but the rate was increased to 10 t/ha during subsequent years to ensure adequate soil coverage. Soil samples from 0.075 m depth were obtained at the end of the third (2001 and fourth (2002 cropping seasons and analysed for pH, organic carbon (OC, total nitrogen (TN, available P (AP, exchangeable acidity, exchangeable K+, Ca++ Mg++ and Na+. The results indicate that over the 4-year study period, the topsoil in all the treatments acidified but the rate of acidification was much faster in bare treatments (FB, OR and TR than in the mulched treatments (FBM, ORM and TRM, irrespective of tillage methods. In 2002; OC, TN and AP in the top 0-0.075 m layer of the wood-shavings amended soil were 24-29, 15-23 and 92-112% higher, respectively, than in the unamended control. OC in this soil layer correlated with TN (r= 0.98** and AP (r= 0.97**. Similarly, the three bare treatments experienced a rapid loss in exchangeable K+, Ca++ Mg++ and Na+ between 1999 and 2002 but the reduction was much greater in OR and TR treatments compared to the FB treatment. FBM, ORM and TRM treatments significantly improved the topsoil fertility with respect to exchangeable K+, Ca++ and Mg++ content. This was attributed to the release of these exchangeable cations from the decomposing organic mulch. These results demonstrate the potential

  3. Yield-scaled N2O emissions were effectively reduced by biochar amendment of sandy loam soil under maize - wheat rotation in the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuhui; Chen, Zengming; Müller, Christoph; Zaman, Monhammad M.; Kim, Donggill; Yu, Hongyan; Ding, Weixin

    2017-12-01

    It is increasingly recognized that the addition of biochar to soil has potential to mitigate climate change and increase soil fertility by enhancing carbon (C) storage. However, the effect of biochar on yield and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from upland fields remains unclear. In this study, a one-year field experiment was conducted in an area of calcareous fluvo-aquic soil to assess and quantify the effect of maize straw biochar in reducing N2O loss during 2014-2015 in the North China Plain. Eight treatments were designed as follows: no nitrogen (N) fertilizer (control, CK); biochar application at rates of 3 (B3), 6 (B6) and 12 (B12) t ha-1; chemical fertilizer (NPK) application at 200 kg N ha-1 (F); and fertilizer plus biochar application at rates of 3 (FB3), 6 (FB6) and 12 (FB12) t ha-1. Crop yield, N2O fluxes, soil mineral N concentrations, and soil auxiliary parameters were measured following the application of treatments during each season. During the maize growing season, N2O emission was 0.57 kg N2O-N ha-1 under CK treatment, and increased to 0.88, 0.93 and 1.10 kg N2O-N ha-1 under B3, B6 and B12, respectively. In contrast, N2O emissions were significantly reduced by 31.4-39.9% (P effect of fertilizer and biochar on N2O emissions (P biochar had no effect on N2O emissions regardless of the fertilizer regime. Biochar application did not affect maize yield; however, a significant increase in wheat yield of 16.6-25.9% (P biochar rate of 12 t ha-1 with fertilization. Overall, under maize cropping, N2O emissions per unit yield of grain, biomass, grain N and biomass N (yield-scaled N2O emissions) were significantly reduced by 32.4-39.9% under FB compared with F treatment, regardless of the biochar application rate. Biochar did not affect yield-scaled N2O emissions in wheat. Decreased soil bulk density with biochar is suggested to reduce the denitrification potential and N2O emissions; while increased retention capacity of fertilizer N in biochar-added soil

  4. Compaction Behaviour of Akure Sandy Clay Loamy Soils | Manuwa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory investigations were conducted to study the behaviors of sandy clay loam soil under uni-axial compression loading. The effects of applied pressure and moisture content on bulk density of soils were observed and subjected to regression analysis. The effect of applied pressure on bulk density could be described ...

  5. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY-SODICITY AND GLYPHOSATE FORMULATIONS – AVANS PREMIUM 360 SL ON PHOSPHOMONOESTERASE ACTIVITIES IN SANDY LOAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Płatkowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to determine the influence of NaCl and glyphosate-based herbicide Avans Premium 360 SL on acid and alkaline phosphomonoesterase activities in sandy loam. The experiment was carried out in laboratory conditions on sandy loam with Corg content 10.90 g/kg. Soil was divided into half kilogram samples and adjusted to 60% of maximum water holding capacity. In the experiment dependent variables were: I – dosages of Avans Premium 360 SL (0, a recommended field dosage – FD, a tenfold higher dosage – 10 FD and hundredfold higher dosage – 100 FD, II – amount of NaCl (0, 3% and 6%, III – day of experiment (1, 7, 14, 28 and 56. On days of experiment the activity of alkaline and acid phosphomonoesterase activity was assayed spectrophotometrically. The obtained result showed that the application of Avans Premium 360 SL decreased in acid and alkaline phosphomonoesterase activity in clay soil. Significant interaction effect between the dosage of Avans Premium 360 SL, NaCl amount and day of experiment was reported in the experiment. The inhibitory effect of Avans Premium 360 SL was the highest in soil with NaCl at the amount of 6%.

  6. Hidráulica do escoamento e transporte de sedimentos em sulcos em solo franco-argilo-arenoso Flow hydraulics and sediment transport in rills of a sandy clay loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ramon Barros Cantalice

    2005-07-01

    capacity to deform the rill and alter flow hydraulics, responsible for rill formation dynamics. The objective of this study was to evaluate flow hydraulic conditions that can provide important information on erosion relationships, soil erodibility and sediment transport in furrows of a recently-tilled Palleudult. Rills were pre-formed in a sandy clay loam soil with an average slope of 0.067 m m-1. Simulated rainfall with an intensity of 74 mm h-1 was applied during 80 min, while rainfall and extra inflows of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 L min-1 were jointly applied for the last 20 min of each run in the rill. Results indicated that the rill flow regime varied from transitional subcritical to turbulent subcritical. The rill erosion detachment rates were linear to shear stress. Rill erodibility (Kr was 0.0024 kg-1 s-1 N and critical shear stress (tauc was 2.75 Pa. Two functions to predict sediment transport based on stream power explained 53% of data variability, which indicates the inherent difficulty of predicting solid transport through shallow flows on eroding agricultural lands, and the physical and mineralogical diversity of particles and aggregates of the studied soil.

  7. Predictivity strength of the spatial variability of phenanthrene sorption across two sandy loam fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Antonio; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Møldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    at the unsaturated zone, bulk topsoil samples were taken from the plough layer along two sandy loam fields with different texture and organic carbon (OC) content (140 samples in total). Batch experiments were performed by using the single-point adsorption method. Both related ranges for the contaminant partition...... coefficient, KD (L kg-1) and the organic carbon partition coefficient, KOC (L kg-1) agreed with the most frequently used models for PAH partitioning, as OC revealed a higher affinity towards sorption. More complex models, by applying different OC components, such as non-complexed organic carbon (NCOC......), and complexed organic carbon (COC) separately, were related with these findings, in particular if considering a sub-set of samples that included samples with Dexter n models proved...

  8. Impact of tillage intensity on clay loam soil structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daraghmeh, Omar; Petersen, Carsten; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    was to improve the knowledge of precision tillage practices through characterizing the effect of varied tillage intensities on structural properties of a clay loam soil. A field experiment was conducted using a randomized complete block design with two main factors, i.e. operational speed (OS, 2 levels...... with high RS (630 rpm) showed significantly higher air permeability than the other treatments. Log-transformed air permeability was 17% lower for the WT treatment than for the NWT treatments at T2. Treatments with the high OS (6.3 km/h) and thus lowest tillage intensity, generally showed lower clay and silt...

  9. Variabilidade espacial das características químicas do solo e produtividade de milho em um Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo distrófico arênico Spatial variability of chemical soil properties and corn yield on a sandy loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. R. Silva

    2003-12-01

    soil properties can help plan and optimize research studies, and be used for commercial agricultural cultivation aiming at precision agriculture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the spatial variability and dependence of several chemical soil properties and of corn yield on a sandy loam Paleudalf. The area was treated with lime and phosphorus by plowing the fertilizers into the soil along with oat residues two months prior to soil sampling. To quantify the soil properties in the field, soil samples were collected at 6 m intervals in the east-west direction and 6 m in the north-south direction. The soil pH in water, SMP index, available phosphorus, exchangeable cations (potassium, calcium, magnesium, and aluminum, organic matter percentage, and corn yield were determined. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and geostatistics, by fitting semivariogram models. The spatial dependence of all studied plant and soil properties was moderate to strong. The spherical model was adjusted for pH in water, SMP value, available phosphorous, and base saturation; the gaussian model described the spatial dependence of exchangeable potassium and organic matter; and the exponential model was adjusted to corn yield and to exchangeable cations (aluminum, calcium, and magnesium, H + Al. The range of spatial dependence was 4.5 m for corn yield and very close to exchangeable aluminum, aluminum saturation, and H + Al. The range for soil pH in water, SMP value, exchangeable cations (potassium, calcium, and magnesium, effective CTC, and base saturation was 20 m. Recent soil management operations probably had a part in the increased variability of soil characteristics like phosphorus and potassium.

  10. Degradation of estrogenic hormones in a silt loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Richeng; Blassengale, Alma A; Wang, Qiquan

    2008-10-08

    Estrogenic hormones are endocrine-disrupting compounds, which disrupt the endocrine system function of animals and humans by mimicking and/or antagonizing endogenous hormones. With the application of sludge biosolid and animal manure as alternative fertilizers in agricultural lands, estrogens enter the soil and become an environmental concern. The degradation kinetics of 17beta-estradiol, an estrogenic hormone of major concern, in a silt loam soil were investigated in this study. It was found that 17beta-estradiol degraded rapidly in nonsterilized soil with a half-life of 0.17 day. The degradation rate constant was proportional to the percentage of nonsterilized soil, indicating that microorganisms are directly responsible for the rapid degradation of 17beta-estradiol in soil. The half-life of 17beta-estradiol in 20% nonsterilized soil was slightly shortened from 1.3 to 0.69 day with the increase of soil moisture from 10 to 20% and was greatly decreased from 4.9 to 0.92 day with the increase of temperature from 15 to 25 degrees C. The coexistence of 40 micromol kg (-1) sulfadimethoxine, a veterinary antibiotic, decreased the degradation rate constant of 17beta-estradiol from 0.750 +/- 0.038 to 0.492 +/- 0.016 day (-1). The degradation kinetics of another three estrogenic hormones, including 17alpha-estradiol, estrone, and estriol, were also investigated and compared. Estrone was identified as a degradation product of 17beta-estradiol and the most persistent hormone among the four investigated estrogens. Estriol was observed in the degradation of estrone and 17alpha-estradiol.

  11. Effects of cropping system and rates of nitrogen in animal slurry and mineral fertilizer on nitrate leaching from a sandy loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag; Hansen, Jørgen Frederik; Kjellerup, Viggo K.

    1993-01-01

    Leaching of nitrate from a sandy loam cropped with spring barley, winter wheat and grass was compared in a 4-year lysimeter study. Crops were grown continuously or in a sequence including sugarbeet. Lysimeters were unfertilized or supplied with equivalent amounts of inorganic nitrogen in calcium...... ley of perennial ryegrass wheat grown in rotation wheat

  12. Field performance of three real-time moisture sensors in sandy loam and clay loam soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study was conducted to evaluate HydraProbe (HyP), Campbell Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) and Watermarks (WM) moisture sensors for their ability to estimate water content based on calibrated neutron probe measurements. The three sensors were in-situ tested under natural weather conditions over ...

  13. Pore Structure Characteristics after 2 Years of Biochar Application to a Sandy Loam Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Arthur, Emmanuel; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2015-01-01

    Soil pore structure comprises the size and shape of soil pores and has a major impact on water retention and gas movement. The porous nature of biochar suggests that its application to soil can potentially alter soil pore structure characteristics, and the purpose of this study was to evaluate...... of biochar effects on soil functions and services. © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved....

  14. Influence of tillage practices on physical properties of a sandy loam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    15 cm and 15-30 cm), for determination of volumetric (.v) moisture content, bulk density (Bd), and total porosity (TP) of the soil at selected dates, while soil penetration resistance (PR) was determined using hand held digital penetrometer. Tillage systems significantly (p = 0.05) affected. Bd and TP of the soil at two of the four ...

  15. Contrasting effects of biochar on N2O emission and N uptake at different N fertilizer levels on a temperate sandy loam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhencai; Sänger, Anja; Rebensburg, Philip; Lentzsch, Peter; Wirth, Stephan; Kaupenjohann, Martin; Meyer-Aurich, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Biochar has been frequently suggested as an amendment to improve soil quality and mitigate climate change. To investigate the optimal management of nitrogen (N) fertilization, we examined the combined effect of biochar and N fertilizer on plant N uptake and N 2 O emissions in a cereal rotation system in a randomized two-factorial field experiment on a sandy loam soil in Brandenburg, Germany. The biochar treatment received 10Mgha -1 wood-derived biochar in September 2012. Four levels of N fertilizer, corresponding to 0, 50%, 100%, 130% of the recommended fertilizer level, were applied in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)) and winter rye (Secale cereal L.) in 2013 and 2014 followed by the catch crop oil radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiformis). Biomass and N uptake of winter wheat and winter rye were significantly affected by the level of N fertilizer but not by biochar. For N uptake of oil radish an interaction effect was observed for biochar and N fertilizer. Without applied fertilizer, 39% higher N uptake was found in the presence of biochar, accompanied by higher soil NH 4 + content and elevated cumulative CO 2 emissions. At 130% of the recommended fertilizer level, 16% lower N uptake and lower cumulative N 2 O emissions were found in the biochar-mediated treatment. No significant change in abundance of microbial groups and nosZ gene were observed. Our results highlight that biochar can have a greenhouse gas mitigation effect at high levels of N supply and may stimulate nutrient uptake when no N is supplied. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of wood-derived biochar on the compactibility and strength of silt loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ahmed; Gariepy, Yvan; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2017-04-01

    Biochar is proven to enhance soil fertility and increase crop productivity. Given that the influence of biochar on soil compaction remains unclear, selected physico-mechanical properties of soil amended with wood-derived biochar were assessed. For unamended silt loam, the bulk density, maximum bulk density, optimum moisture content, plastic limit, liquid limit, and plasticity index were 1.05 Mg m-3, 1.69 Mg m-3, 16.55, 17.1, 29.3, and 12.2%, respectively. The penetration resistance and shear strength of the unamended silt loam compacted in the standard compaction Proctor mold and at its optimum moisture content were 1800 kPa and 850 kPa, respectively. Results from amending the silt loam with 10% particle size ranges (0.5-212 μm) led to relative decreases of 18.1, 17.75, 66.66, and 97.4% in bulk density, maximum bulk density, penetration resistance, and shear strength, respectively; a 26.8% relative increase in optimum moisture content; along with absolute increases in plastic limit, liquid limit, and plasticity index of 5.3, 13.7, and 8.4%, respectively. While the biochar-amended silt loam soil was more susceptible to compaction, however, soil mechanical impedance enhanced.

  17. Nitrogen and Carbon Leaching in Repacked Sandy Soil with Added Fine Particulate Biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben W.; Petersen, Carsten; Strobel, Bjarne W.

    2012-01-01

    of leachate came to about 3.0 water filled pore volumes (WFPVs). Our study revealed a high mobility of labile C components originating from the fine particulate fast pyrolysis biochar. This finding highlights a potential risk of C leaching coupled with the use of fast pyrolysis biochars for soil amendment......Biochar amendment to soil may affect N turnover and retention, and may cause translocation of dissolved and particulate C. We investigated effects of three fine particulate biochars made of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) straw (one by slow pyrolysis and two by fast pyrolysis) on N and C leaching from...... repacked sandy soil columns (length: 51 cm). Biochar (2 wt%), ammonium fertilizer (NH4+, amount corresponding to 300 kg N ha-1) and an inert tracer (bromide) were added to a 3-cm top layer of sandy loam, and the columns were then irrigated with constant rate (36 mm d-1) for 15 d. The total amount...

  18. Stability of aggregates of some weathered soils in south-eastern ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    *According to Soil Survey Staff (1999), S = sand, SCL = sandy clay loam, SL = sandy loam, CL = clay loam, C = clay,. SC = sandy clay. ..... deformation index; SA: state of aggregation; AS: aggregate stability; CV: coefficient of variation. ..... Principal component analysis of aggregate stability indices after varimax rotation using.

  19. Effects of soil amendment on soil characteristics and maize yield in Horqin Sandy Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L.; Liu, J. H.; Zhao, B. P.; Xue, A.; Hao, G. C.

    2016-08-01

    A 4-year experiment was conducted to investigate the inter-annual effects of sandy soil amendment on maize yield, soil water storage and soil enzymatic activities in sandy soil in Northeast China in 2010 to 2014. We applied the sandy soil amendment in different year, and investigated the different effects of sandy soil amendment in 2014. There were six treatments including: (1) no sandy soil amendment application (CK); (2) one year after applying sandy soil amendment (T1); (3) two years after applying sandy soil amendment(T2); (4) three years after applying sandy soil amendment(T3); (5)four years after applying sandy soil amendment(T4); (6) five years after applying sandy soil amendment (T5). T refers to treatment, and the number refers to the year after application of the sandy soil amendment. Comparing with CK, sandy soil amendments improved the soil water storage, soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in different growth stages and soil layers, the order of soil water storage in all treatments roughly performed: T3 > T5 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. the order of soil urease, invertase, and catalase activity in all treatments roughly performed: T5 > T3 > T4 > T2 > T1 > CK. Soil application of sandy soil amendment significantly (p≤⃒0.05) increased the grain yield and biomass yield by 22.75%-41.42% and 29.92%-45.45% respectively, and maize yield gradually increased with the years go by in the following five years. Sandy soil amendment used in poor sandy soil had a positive effect on soil water storage, soil enzymatic activities and maize yield, after five years applied sandy soil amendment (T5) showed the best effects among all the treatments, and deserves further research.

  20. Soil nitrogen dynamics and Capsicum Annuum sp. plant response to biochar amendment in silt loam soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horel, Agota; Gelybo, Gyorgyi; Dencso, Marton; Toth, Eszter; Farkas, Csilla; Kasa, Ilona; Pokovai, Klara

    2017-04-01

    The present study investigated the growth of Capsicum Annuum sp. (pepper) in small-scale experiment to observe changes in plant growth and health as reflected by leaf area, plant height, yield, root density, and nitrogen usage. Based on field conditions, part of the study aimed to examine the photosynthetic and photochemical responses of plants to treatments resulting from different plant growth rates. During the 12.5 week long study, four treatments were investigated with biochar amount of 0, 0.5%, 2.5%, and 5.0% (by weight) added to silt loam soil. The plants were placed under natural environmental conditions, such that photosynthetic activities from photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the plants photochemical reflectance index (PRI) could be continuously measured after exposure to sunlight. In this study we found that benefits from biochar addition to silt loam soil most distinguishable occurred in the BC2.5 treatments, where the highest plant yield, highest root density, and highest leaf areas were observed compared to other treatments. Furthermore, data showed that too low (0.5%) or too high (5.0%) biochar addition to the soil had diminishing effects on Capsicum Annuum sp. growth and yield over time. At the end of the 12th week, BC2.5 had 22.2%, while BC0.5 and BC5.0 showed 17.4% and 15.7% increase in yield dry weight respectively compared to controls. The collected data also showed that the PRI values of plants growing on biochar treated soils were generally lower compared to control treatments, which could relate to leaf nitrogen levels. Total nitrogen amount showed marginal changes over time in all treatments. The total nitrogen concentration showed 28.6% and 17.7% increase after the 6th week of the experiment for BC2.5 and BC5.0, respectively, while inorganic nutrients of NO3-N and NH4+-N showed a continuous decrease during the course of the study, with a substantial drop during the first few weeks. The present study provides evidence for impact

  1. Advance of Wetting Front in Silt Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mahmood

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Under drip irrigation , the plant's root is concentrated inside the wetted bulb (region. Thus, the development of these roots and the plant production are greatly affected by the wetting pattern. Therefore, the wetting pattern of soil under drip irrigation must be taken into consideration in the design of drip irrigation system for both single dripping source or multi-overlapping wetting patterns of dripping water sources.2The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of initial water content of the soil and spacing between two adjacent dripping sources with different flow rate on the movement of the wetting front.This study included 16 tests for monitoring the advancement of the wetting front with time during and after the water application phase. The water advance and water distribution measurement are carried out for two cases of the soil profile: for the first case with initial volumetric water content of 4.08% and for the second case with initial volumetric water content of 12.24%. Two spacing between the emitter were tested 25cm and 50 cm using application flow rates of 0.606, 1.212, 1.818, and 2.424 cm3 /min/cm to show the combined effect of spacing and flow rate on the performance of two adjacent emitter.The study proposed a method for determining the spacing between the two emitting sources , the water application rate and watering time. The proposed method depends on a wetted zone whose depth is equal to the root zone depth with a values equals to the maximum vertical advance of the wetting front underneath the drip line at time when this depth is equal to the depth of wetting at mid­point between the drip line. the study revealed that both the vertical water advance in soil underneath the emitter and the horizontal advance of the wetting front is larger than those in the case of single emitter.Furthermore, the vertical water advance increases with the decrease spacing between the two drip lines. Also, the horizontal advance of the

  2. Degradation of roxarsone in a silt loam soil and its toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tengfang; Ke, Zhengchen; Chen, Qing; Liu, Li; Chen, Guowei

    2014-10-01

    The land application of poultry or swine litter, containing large amounts of roxarsone, causes serious arsenic pollution in soil. Understanding biotransformation process of roxarsone and its potential risks favors proper disposal of roxarsone-contaminated animal litter, yet remains not achieved. We report an experimental study of biotransformation process of roxarsone in a silt loam soil under various soil moisture and temperature conditions, and the toxicity of roxarsone and its products from degradation. Results showed that soil moisture and higher temperature promoted roxarsone degradation, associating with emergent pentavalent arsenic. Analysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis activity revealed that roxarsone does not exert acute toxic on soil microbes. With the release of inorganic arsenic, FDA hydrolysis activity was inhibited gradually, as evidenced by ecotoxicological assessment using Photobacterium leiognathi. The results shade new lights on the dynamic roxarsone biotransformation processes in soil, which is important for guiding appropriate disposal of poultry or swine litter in the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of biochar amendment on nitrate retention in a silty clay loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Libutti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Biochar incorporation into agricultural soils has been proposed as a strategy to decrease nutrient leaching. The present study was designed to assess the effect of biochar on nitrate retention in a silty clay loam soil. Biochar obtained from the pyrogasification of fir wood chips was applied to soil and tested in a range of laboratory sorption experiments. Four soil treatments were considered: soil only (control, soil with 2, 4 and 8% of biochar by mass. The Freundlich sorption isotherm model was used to fit the adsorbed amount of nitrate in the soil-biochar mixtures. The model performed very well in interpreting the experimental data according to a general linear regression (analysis of co-variance statistical approach. Nitrate retention in the soilbiochar mixtures was always higher than control, regardless the NO3 – concentration in the range of 0-400 mg L–1. Different sorption capacities and intensities were detected depending on the biochar application rate. The highest adsorption capacity was observed in the soils added with 2 and 4% of biochar, respectively. From the results obtained is possible to infer that nitrate retention is higher at lower biochar addition rate to soil (2 and 4% and at lower nitrate concentration in the soil water solution. These preliminary laboratory results suggest that biochar addition to a typical Mediterranean agricultural soil could be an effective management option to mitigate nitrate leaching.

  4. Effect of soil pH on sorption of salinomycin in clay and sandy soils

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    In this study, sorption of salinomycin was measured in four agricultural soils, a clay soil with low organic matter content (LOM), a clay soil with high organic matter content (HOM), a sandy soil with. HOM, and a loamy sandy (LOM) soils, at three pH levels, namely 4, 7 and 9. Desorption studies was carried out using the batch ...

  5. Mycorrhizal population on various cropping systems on sandy soil in dryland area of North Lombok, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WAHYU ASTIKO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Astiko W, Fauzi MT, Sukartono. 2016. Mycorrhizal population on various cropping systems on sandy soil in dryland area of North Lombok, Indonesia. Nusantara Bioscience 8: 66-70. Inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on maize in sandy soil is expected to have positive implications for the improvement of AMF population and nutrient uptake. However, how many increases in the AMF population and nutrient uptake in the second cycle of a certain cropping system commonly cultivated by the farmers after growing their corn crop have not been examined. Since different cropping systems would indicate different increases in the populations of AMF and nutrient uptake. This study aimed to determine the population AMF and nutrient uptake on the second cropping cycle of corn-based cropping systems which utilized indigenous mycorrhizal fungi on sandy soil in dryland area of North Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara, Indonesia. For that purpose, an experiment was conducted at the Akar-Akar Village in Bayan Sub-district of North Lombok, designed according to the Randomized Complete Block Design, with four replications and six treatments of cropping cycles (P0 = corn-soybean as a control, in which the corn plants were not inoculated with AMF; P1 = corn-soybean, P2 = corn-peanut, P3 = corn-upland rice, P4 = corn-sorghum, and P5 = corn-corn, in which the first cycle corn plants were inoculated with AMF. The results indicated that the mycorrhizal populations (spore number and infection percentage were highest in the second cycle sorghum, achieving 335% and 226% respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control. Increased uptake of N, P, K and Ca the sorghum plants at 60 DAS of the second cropping cycle reached 200%; 550%; 120% and 490% higher than in the control. The soil used in this experiment is rough-textured (sandy loam, so it is relatively low in water holding capacity and high porosity.

  6. Field-measured, hourly soil water evaporation stages in relation to reference evapotranspiration rate and soil to air temperature ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil water evaporation takes critical water supplies away from crops, especially in areas where both rainfall and irrigation water are limited. This study measured bare soil water evaporation from clay loam, silt loam, sandy loam, and fine sand soils. It found that on average almost half of the ir...

  7. Microstructure characteristics of cement-stabilized sandy soil using nanosilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asskar Janalizadeh Choobbasti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program was conducted to explore the impact of nanosilica on the microstructure and mechanical characteristics of cemented sandy soil. Cement agent included Portland cement type II. Cement content was 6% by weight of the sandy soil. Nanosilica was added in percentages of 0%, 4%, 8% and 12% by weight of cement. Cylindrical samples were prepared with relative density of 80% and optimum water content and cured for 7 d, 28 d and 90 d. Microstructure characteristics of cement-nanosilica-sand mixtures after 90 d of curing have been explored using atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD tests. Effects of curing time on microstructure properties of cemented sandy soil samples with 0% and 8% nanosilica have been investigated using SEM test. Unconfined compression test (for all curing times and compaction test were also performed. The SEM and AFM tests results showed that nanosilica contributes to enhancement of cemented sandy soil through yielding denser, more uniform structure. The XRD test demonstrated that the inclusion of nanosilica in the cemented soil increases the intensity of the calcium silicate hydrate (CSH peak and decreases the intensity of the calcium hydroxide (CH peak. The results showed that adding optimum percentages of nanosilica to cement-stabilized sandy soil enhances its mechanical and microstructure properties.

  8. Microfungi diversity isolation from sandy soil of Acapulco touristic beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microscopic fungi diversity in marine sandy soil habitats is associated with key functions of beach ecosystems. There are few reports on their presence in Mexican beaches. Although standard methods to obtain the fungi from soil samples are established, the aim of this pilot study was to test the pla...

  9. Leaching of trifluralin, metolachlor, and metribuzin in a clay loam soil of Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Feagley, Sam E

    2002-09-01

    Trifluralin[2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-(trifluormethyl)benzenamine], metolachlor[2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl)acetamide], and metribuzin[4-amino-6-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)one] were applied in field plots located on a Commerce clay loam soil near Baton Rouge, Louisiana at the rate of 1683 g/ha, 2759 g/ha and 609 g/ha, respectively. The half-lives of trifluralin, metolachlor, and metribuzin in the top 0-15 cm soil depth were found to be 54.7 days, 35.8 days and 29.8 days, respectively. The proportion of trifluralin, metolachlor, and metribuzin in the top 0-15 cm soil depth was 94.7%, 86.6%, and 75.4%, respectively of that found in the top 0-60 cm soil depth 30 days after application. Trifluralin concentrations were within a range of 0.026 ng/mL to 0.058 ng/mL in 1 m deep well water, and between 0.007 ng/mL and 0.039 ng/mL in 2 m deep well water over a 62 day period after application. Metolachlor concentrations in the 1 m and 2 m wells ranged from 3.62 ng/mL to 82.32 ng/mL and 8.44 ng/mL to 15.53 ng/mL, respectively. Whereas metribuzin concentrations in the 1 m and 2 m wells ranged from 0.70 ng/mL to 27.75 ng/mL and 1.71 ng/mL to 3.83 ng/mL, respectively. Accordingly, trifluralin was found to be strongly adsorbed on the soil and showed negligible leaching. Although metolachlor and metribuzin were also both readily adsorbed on the soil, their leaching potential was high. As a result, in the clay loam soil studied, metribuzin concentration in groundwater with shallow aquifers is likely to exceed the 10 mg/L US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) advisory level for drinking water early in the application season, whereas trifluralin and metolachlor concentrations are expected to remain substantially lower than their respective 2 ng/mL and 175 ng/mL EPA advisory levels.

  10. Direct and Indirect Short-term Effects of Biochar on Physical Characteristics of an Arable Sandy Loam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Moldrup, Per; Elsgaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    , the level of the pore organization (PO, k(a)/epsilon) was greater in the biochar-amended soil. Across the tested matric potentials, biochar amendment caused average increases of 28 to 34% in epsilon, 53 to 161% in D-p/D-o, and 69 to 223% in k(a), with the most significant increases occurring around natural...

  11. IMPACT OF THE REPEATED TRACTOR PASSES ON SOME PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SILTY LOAM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravko Filipović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to quantify soil compaction induced by tractor traffic on untilled wet silty loam soil (Mollic Fluvisol. Changes in penetration resistance, bulk density and total porosity were measured for detecting the soil compaction. Treatments include ten passes of a four-wheel drive tractor with the engine power of 54.0 kW and weight of 3560 kg (1580 kg on the front axle and 1980 kg on the rear axle, 2.41 m distance between axles. The tyres on the tractor were cross-ply, front 11.2-24 and rear 16.9-30, with the inflation pressure of 160 kPa and 100 kPa, respectively. The speed of tractor during passes over experimental plots was 5.0 km h-1. In comparison to control, each tractor pass induced an increase in soil penetration resistance at all depths, and the average increment ratios, determined as the average of all layers, were 9.8, 18.5 and 26.1% after one, five and ten passes, respectively. The bulk density also increased with number of tractor passes, but with less percentage increasing. The increment ratios comparison to the control were 3.6, 9.5 and 12.9% after one, five and ten passes, respectively. The total porosity decreased with the number of passes, and the decrement ratios were 4.5, 16.5 and 20.8% after one, five and ten passes, respectively.

  12. Environmental and agricultural benefits of a management system designed for sandy loam soils of the humid tropics Benefícios ambientais e agronômicos de um agrossistema definido para solos de textura franco arenosa do trópico úmido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana das Chagas Ferreira Aguiar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A sustainable management of soils with low natural fertility on family farms in the humid tropics is a great challenge and overcoming it would be an enormous benefit for the environment and the farmers. The objective of this study was to assess the environmental and agronomic benefits of alley cropping, based on the evaluation of C sequestration, soil quality indicators, and corn yields. Combinations of four legumes were used in alley cropping systems in the following treatments: Clitoria fairchildiana + Cajanus cajan; Acacia mangium + Cajanus cajan; Leucaena leucocephala + Cajanus cajan; Clitoria fairchildiana + Leucaena leucocephala; Leucaena leucocephala + Acacia mangium and a control. Corn was used as a cash crop. The C content was determined in the different compartments of soil organic matter, CEC, available P, base saturation, percentage of water saturation, the period of the root hospitality factor below the critical level and corn yield. It was concluded that alley cropping could substitute the slash and burn system in the humid tropics. The main environmental benefit of alley cropping is the maintenance of a dynamic equilibrium between C input and output that could sustain up to 10 Mg ha-1 of C in the litter layer, decreasing atmospheric CO2 levels. Alley cropping is also beneficial from the agricultural point of view, because it increases base saturation and decreases physical resistance to root penetration in the soil layer 0 - 10 cm, which ensures the increase and sustainability of corn yield.O manejo sustentável dos solos de baixa fertilidade natural na agricultura familiar do trópico tem sido um grande desafio, que, se vencido, resultará em vantagens para o ambiente e para os agricultores. Este trabalho foi realizado com o objetivo de avaliar os benefícios ambiental e agronômico de um cultivo em aleias, por meio da determinação do C sequestrado, dos indicadores da qualidade do solo e da produtividade da cultura do milho

  13. Remediation of Diesel Fuel Contaminated Sandy Soil using Ultrasonic Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulandari P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic cleaning has been used in industry for some time, but the application of ultrasonic cleaning in contaminated soil is just recently received considerable attention, it is a very new technique, especially in Indonesia. An ultrasonic cleaner works mostly by energy released from the collapse of millions of microscopic cavitations near the dirty surface. This paper investigates the use of ultrasonic wave to enhance remediation of diesel fuel contaminated sandy soil considering the ultrasonic power, soil particle size, soil density, water flow rate, and duration of ultrasonic waves application.

  14. Effect of soil and vegetation on growth of planted white spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald A. Perala

    1987-01-01

    White spruce container stock grew better on a sandy loam soil than on a silty clay, and much better without herbaceous competitions. Herbaceous competition was less vigorous on the sandy loam soil following glyphosate treatment, but was more vigorous on the silty clay. Certain spruce genotypes excelled under different field environments.

  15. Crop Growing by Brackish Water Drip Irrigaton in Sandy Soil

    OpenAIRE

    山根, 昌勝; 佐藤, 一郎

    1983-01-01

    Grain sorghum(Sorghum vulgare L.),cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.)and Japanese radish(Raphanus sativus L.)were grown in sandy soil under a plastic house,and irrigated either with fresh water, or with brackish water containing 2995 ppm of several dissolved salts,a nd using five kinds of drip irrigation emitters. The soil moisture contents of the brackish water plots were slight1l higher than those of the fresh water plots. In the brackish water plots,the pH values of soil suspension (H₂0,1:2.5) ...

  16. Sandy Soil Microaggregates: Rethinking Our Understanding of Hydraulic Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paradiś, Ashley; Brueck, Christopher; Meisenheimer, Douglas; Wanzek, Thomas; Dragila, Maria Ines

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the peculiar structure of microaggregates in coarse sandy soils that exhibit only external porosity and investigated their control on soil hydrology. The microstructure underpins a hydrologic existence that differs from finer textured soils where aggregates have internal porosity. Understanding the impact of these microaggregates on soil hydrology will permit improved agricultural irrigation management and estimates associated with ecosystem capacity and resiliency. Microstructure was investigated using a digital microscope, and aspects of the structure were quantified by sedimentation and computed microtomography. Sandy soil microaggregates were observed to be comprised of a solid sand-grain core that is coated with fines, presumably cemented by organic media. This microstructure leads to three distinct water pools during drainage: capillary water, followed by thick films (1–20 μm) enveloping the outer surfaces of the crusted microaggregates, followed by adsorbed thin films (<1 μm). The characteristics of the thick films were investigated using an analytical model. These films may provide as much as 10 to 40% saturation in the range of plant-available water. Using lubrication theory, it was predicted that thick film drainage follows a power law function with an exponent of 2. Thick films may also have a role in the geochemical evolution of soils and in ecosystem function because they provide contiguous water and gas phases at relatively high moisture contents. And, because the rough outer crust of these microaggregates can provide good niches for microbial activity, biofilm physics will dominate thick film processes, and consequently hydrologic, biologic, and geochemical functions for coarse sandy soils.

  17. Deep Compaction Control of Sandy Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bałachowski Lech

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibroflotation, vibratory compaction, micro-blasting or heavy tamping are typical improvement methods for the cohesionless deposits of high thickness. The complex mechanism of deep soil compaction is related to void ratio decrease with grain rearrangements, lateral stress increase, prestressing effect of certain number of load cycles, water pressure dissipation, aging and other effects. Calibration chamber based interpretation of CPTU/DMT can be used to take into account vertical and horizontal stress and void ratio effects. Some examples of interpretation of soundings in pre-treated and compacted sands are given. Some acceptance criteria for compaction control are discussed. The improvement factors are analysed including the normalised approach based on the soil behaviour type index.

  18. Mitigation of Liquefaction in Sandy Soils Using Stone Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Levent; Kayabalı, Kamil

    2010-05-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the leading causes of earthquake-induced damage to structures. Soil improvement methods provide effective solutions to reduce the risk of soil liquefaction. Thus, soil ground treatments are applied using various techniques. However, except for a few ground treatment methods, they generally require a high cost and a lot of time. Especially in order to prevent the risk of soil liquefaction, stone columns conctructed by vibro-systems (vibro-compaction, vibro-replacement) are one of the traditional geotechnical methods. The construction of stone columns not only enhances the ability of clean sand to drain excess pore water during an earthquake, but also increases the relative density of the soil. Thus, this application prevents the development of the excess pore water pressure in sand during earthquakes and keeps the pore pressure ratio below a certain value. This paper presents the stone column methods used against soil liquefaction in detail. At this stage, (a) the performances of the stone columns were investigated in different spacing and diameters of columns during past earthquakes, (b) recent studies about design and field applications of stone columns were presented, and (c) a new design method considering the relative density of soil and the capacity of drenage of columns were explained in sandy soil. Furthermore, with this new method, earthquake performances of the stone columns constructed at different areas were investigated before the 1989 Loma Prieta and the 1994 Northbridge earthquakes, as case histories of field applications, and design charts were compiled for suitable spacing and diameters of stone columns with consideration to the different sandy soil parameters and earhquake conditions. Key Words: Soil improvement, stone column, excess pore water pressure

  19. The influence of 10 years reduced tillage on the potential carbon mineralization of silt loam soils under a temperate climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'haene, Karoline; Van den Bossche, Annemie; De Neve, Stefaan; Gabriels, Donald; Hofman, Georges

    2006-01-01

    The influence of 10 years reduced tillage (RT) on the potential carbon mineralization of the 0-5 cm layer of silt loam soils in Belgium under a temperate climate was investigated. Therefore, four fields at three locations under 10 years of RT and fields under conventional tillage (CT) with comparable crop rotation were selected. The higher % soil organic carbon in the upper layer resulted in a higher potential carbon mineralization of the RT fields. The small increase in % soil organic carbon and potential carbon mineralization of RT fields was contributed to the high soil disturbance due to incorporation of manure in the upper layer and the production of sugar beets and potatoes. Simulating ploughing by emptying and refilling the soil cores resulted mostly in a higher potential carbon mineralization. However, the differences were not significant due to the high variability in potential carbon mineralization.

  20. Runoff of trifluralin, metolachlor, and metribuzin from a clay loam soil of Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Ho; Feagley, Sam E

    2002-09-01

    Trifluralin[2,6-dinitro-N,N-dipropyl-4-(trifluormethyl)benzenamine], metolachlor[2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] and metribuzin[4-amino-6-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)one] were applied as pre-emergent herbicides to soybean plots in Louisiana (LA) at the rate of 1683 g/ha, 2759 g/ha and 609 g/ha, respectively. The concentrations of trifluralin in the runoff water ranged between 0.09 ng/mL and 0.02 ng/mL, which is lower than the 2 ng/mL US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) advisory level for trifuralin in drinking water. Metolachlor concentrations in the runoff water ranged from 9.0 ng/mL to 221.5 ng/mL, which is both lower and higher than the 175 ng/mL EPA advisory level for metolachlor. Similarly, metribuzin concentrations in the runoff water ranged between 1.5 ng/mL and 56.2 ng/mL, which is also lower and higher than the 10 ng/mL EPA advisory level for metribuzin. Accordingly, from the field plots located on a Commerce clay loam soil in LA, although the concentration of trifluralin in runoff water were substantially lower than the EPA advisory level, metolachlor and metribuzin concentrations are likely to exceed the EPA advisory levels early on in the application season with a subsequent rapid decrease to safe levels. The total loss of trifluralin in runoff water was 0.005% of the applied amount over an 89 day period after application. The total loss of metolachlor and metribuzin in the runoff water was 4.67% and 5.36% of the applied amount, respectively, over a 22 day period after application. As such, there was almost no movement of trifluralin in the runoff water, whereas metolachlor and metribuzin were much more easily moved.

  1. NLEAP model simulation of climate and management effects on N leaching for corn grown on sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, R. F.

    1995-12-01

    The Nitrate Leaching and Economic Analysis Package (NLEAP) model was used to evaluate effects of climate and N fertility on nitrate leaching from a 3-yr field experiment of continuous corn ( Zea mays L.). Half of the plots were randomly chosen to be either nonirrigated or irrigated (based upon calculated potential evapotranspiration). Three replications of nitrogen (N) fertility (56, 112 and 224 kg ha -1) were used. Soil was a Hecla sandy loam to loamy sand (Pachic Udic Haploboroll). Soil and climate data were from the upper Midwest U.S.A. database for NLEAP. On-site data were used in the model when available. This study shows that NLEAP is capable of integrating data collected for nonirrigated and irrigated conditions on sandy soil for a wide range of N treatments and predicting the nitrate available for leaching (NAL). Precipitation distribution and amount were different in each year. Calculated NAL provided an excellent indicator of potential nitrate leaching hazard. NLEAP output showed that leaching of residual N on this sandy soil is very sensitive to early-spring precipitation. The NLEAP model provided valuable insights concerning effects of climate and N and irrigation management on N leaching. To obtain optimum yields while minimizing nitrate leaching, this study indicates the need to use soil and plant-tissue testing, post-emergence N-fertilizer application, and modem irrigation-scheduling technology. Also, use of the NLEAP model along with field-plot experiments provide additional important information concerning timing of N-leaching events relative to climate and an additional assessment of the effectiveness of fertilizer-N management decisions.

  2. Extraction Efficiency of Belonolaimus longicaudatus from Sandy Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSorley, R; Frederick, J J

    1991-10-01

    Numbers of Belonolaimus longicaudatus extracted from sandy soils (91-92% sand) by sieving and centrifugation were only 40-55% of those extracted by sieving and incubation on a Baermann tray. Residues normally discarded at each step of the sieving plus Baermann tray extraction procedure were examined for nematodes to obtain estimates of extraction efficiencies. For third-stage and fourth-stage juveniles, males, and females, estimates of extraction efficiency ranged from 60 to 65% in one experiment and 73 to 82% in another. Estimated extraction efficiencies for second-stage juveniles were lower (33% in one experiment, 67% in another) due to losses during sieving. When sterilized soil was seeded with known numbers of B. longicaudatus, 60% of second-stage juveniles and 68-76% of other stages were recovered. Most stages of B. longicaudatus could be extracted from these soils by sieving plus Baermann incubation with an efficiency of 60-70%.

  3. Soil Failure Crescent Radii Measurement for Draft in Tillage Study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field clay loam and sandy loam soils were tilled with a chisel shaped tine at different tillage geometries. Soil cracks and the extent of their propagations in the front and to the sides of the tillage tool were observed and measured. These measurements provided the failure crescent radii and the soil furrow geometry used in ...

  4. Physicochemical Properties of the Soils of Wassaniya Forest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    collected at the depth of 0 to 15cm from each plot using a soil auger for laboratory analyses. Four other undisturbed soil samples were collected for bulk density determination using a core sampler. The soils at the four locations varied in texture from sandy loam (SL) at Yartagimba, clay loam (CL) at Wassaniya and Daiji to ...

  5. Effects of soil moisture content and temperature on methane uptake by grasslands on sandy soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-Van Dasselaar, van den A.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1998-01-01

    Aerobic grasslands may consume significant amounts of atmospheric methane (CH4). We aimed (i) to assess the spatial and temporal variability of net CH4 fluxes from grasslands on aerobic sandy soils, and (ii) to explain the variability in net CH4 fluxes by differences in soil moisture content and

  6. Maize productivity and mineral N dynamics following different soil fertility management practices on a depleted sandy soil in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chikowo, R.; Mapfumo, P.; Nyamugafata, P.; Giller, K.E.

    2004-01-01

    There is a need for an improved understanding of nitrogen (N) dynamics in depleted sandy soils in southern Africa. A field experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of different soil fertility improvement practices on a degraded granitic sandy soil in Zimbabwe. Legumes capable of

  7. Changes to soil water content and biomass yield under combined maize and maize-weed vegetation with different fertilization treatments in loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehoczky Éva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Especially during early developmental stages, competition with weeds can reduce crop growth and have a serious effect on productivity. Here, the effects of interactions between soil water content (SWC, nutrient availability, and competition from weeds on early stage crop growth were investigated, to better understand this problem. Field experiments were conducted in 2013 and 2014 using long-term study plots on loam soil in Hungary. Plots of maize (Zea mays L. and a weed-maize combination were exposed to five fertilization treatments. SWC was observed along the 0–80 cm depth soil profile and harvested aboveground biomass (HAB was measured.

  8. Changes in carbon stocks of Danish agricultural mineral soils between 1986 and 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taghizadeh-Toosi, Arezoo; Olesen, Jørgen E; Kristensen, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    decreased in loam soils and tended to increase in sandy soils. This trend is ascribed to dairy farms with grass leys being abundant on sandy soils while cereal cropping dominates on loamy soils. A statistical model including soil type, land use and management was applied separately to 0–25, 25–50 and 50...

  9. Effects Of Mixtures Of Pig Manure And Sandy Soil On The Growth Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out to evaluate the effects of mixtures of various levels of pig manure with sandy soil on the growth of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) seedlings. Pig manure was mixed with sandy soil at the rates of 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% respectively on volume/volume basis of the dry materials, the treatments ...

  10. Water flow and pesticide transport in cultivated sandy soils : experimental data on complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leistra, M.; Boesten, J.J.T.I.

    2010-01-01

    The risk of leaching of agricultural pesticides from soil to groundwater and water courses has to be evaluated. Complications in water flow and pesticide transport in humic-sandy and loamy-sandy soil profiles can be expected to increase the risk of leaching. Much of the precipitation water is

  11. Soil organic matter of a sandy soil influenced by agronomy and climate

    OpenAIRE

    ELLMER, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Long term field experiments are being conducted at Humboldt University of Berlin (Germany) to obtain information regarding sustainable management of arable land with sandy soils. In Thyrow, a location in the south of Berlin with silty and sandy soil (85 % sand, 12 % silt, 3 % clay, 0.5 % Corg, pH 5.5) several experiments have been carried out since 1937. They include the study of the long-term effects of the agronomic factors of: crop rotation; organic fertilization; mineral ferti...

  12. Impact of Sewage Sludge on Water Movement in Calcareous Sandy Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. AI-Omran

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to investigate the changes in soil physical properties and their effect on water movement under ponded irrigation. Sewage sludge was applied to 10 cm soil depth at rates of 0.25. 75  and 100 Mg-ha-1 to two disturbed soils differing in CaCO3 content. The results showed that cumulative infiltration (1 decreased with an increase in sewage sludge rates. Basic infiltration for slightly calcareous sandy soil was higher than that of moderately calcareous sandy soil, laboratory measurements showed an exponential decrease in saturated hydraulic conductivity and an increase in available water capacity with an increase in sewage sludge rates. For both soils, water diffusivity (D(Q decreased with an increase in sewage sludge rates. The (oral values of slightly calcareous sandy soils were higher than those of moderately calcareous sandy soils.

  13. Effect of nitrogen and water availability of three soil types on yield, radiation use efficiency and evapotranspiration in field-grown quinoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razzaghi, Fatemeh; Plauborg, Finn; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2012-01-01

    . This lead to higher interception of photosynthetic active radiation and higher seed yield on sandy clay loam (3.3 Mg ha−1) and sandy loam (3.0 Mg ha−1) than on sand (2.3 Mg ha−1). The soil with higher clay content had also the highest transpiration, crop evapotranspiration and yield due to the higher uptake...

  14. Phosphorus fractions in sandy soils of vineyards in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djalma Eugênio Schmitt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus (P applications to vineyards can cause P accumulation in the soil and maximize pollution risks. This study was carried out to quantify the accumulation of P fractions in sandy soils of vineyards in southern Brazil. Soil samples (layers 0-5, 6-10 and 11-20 cm were collected from a native grassland area and two vineyards, after 14 years (vineyard 1 and 30 years (vineyard 2 of cultivation, in Santana do Livramento, southern Brazil, and subjected to chemical fractionation of P. Phosphorus application, especially to the 30-year-old vineyard 2, increased the inorganic P content down to a depth of 20 cm, mainly in the labile fractions extracted by anion-exchange resin and NaHCO3, in the moderately labile fraction extracted by 0.1 and 0.5 mol L-1 NaOH, and in the non-labile fraction extracted by 1 mol L-1 HCl, indicating the possibility of water eutrophication. Phosphorus application and grapevine cultivation time increased the P content in the organic fraction extracted by NaHCO3 from the 0-5 cm layer, and especially in the moderately labile fraction extracted by 0.1 mol L-1 NaOH, down to a depth of 20 cm.

  15. Repeated freeze-thaw cycle effects on soil compaction in a clay loam in northeastern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been an increased global concern regarding the impact of soil compaction on crop production and soil quality in modern mechanized agricultural farming systems. Freeze-thaw processes influence the physical properties of soil, primarily soil compaction and structure. A 3-yr...

  16. Freeze-thaw cycles effects on soil compaction in a clay loam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inappropriate soil management practices and heavier farm machinery and equipment have led to an increase in soil compaction in the last two decades prompting increased global concern regarding the impact of soil compaction on crop production and soil quality in modern mechanized agriculture. A 3-yr ...

  17. Structural Stability and Hydraulic Conductivity Of Nkpologu Sandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were conducted in the runoff plots at the University of Nigeria Nsukka Teaching and Resesarch Farm in 2010 and 2011 to monitor the changes in structural stability and saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) of Nkpologu sandy loam soil under different cover management practices. The management practices were ...

  18. Connectivity and percolation of pore networks in a cultivated silt loam soil quantified by X-ray tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats

    2016-04-01

    The connectivity of macropore networks is thought to exert an important control on transport processes in soil. However, little progress has been made towards quantifying these effects for natural soils in the field, partly because of the experimental difficulties but also because the concept of connectivity lacks a unique mathematical definition. To investigate this question, X-ray tomography was used to measure pore volume, size distribution and connectivity at an image resolution of 65 microns for 64 samples taken in two consecutive years in the harrowed and ploughed layers of a silt loam soil a few weeks after spring cultivation. Three different connectivity metrics were evaluated and compared: one local metric, the Euler number, and two global measures, the connection probability and the probability of percolation (the fraction of the porosity which is continuous across the sample). The connection probability was found to be a good measure of the long-range connectivity (i.e. continuity) of the pore networks. In contrast, the Euler number was not a sensitive measure of global connectivity, although all samples with negative Euler numbers did percolate. We also found that the way connection is defined in the image analysis (either by 6 or 26 nearest neighbours) did not influence the calculations of percolating porosity. The results also demonstrate that harrowing has a clear homogenizing effect on the distribution of the pore space. However, a comparison with random field simulations and the evidence of small percolation thresholds shows that the macropore system developed in the recently harrowed soil was far from completely random or disordered. In some samples, more than one pore cluster percolated, while in others the percolating cluster was not the largest one. Nevertheless, the macropore networks in this cultivated silt loam soil displayed some key features predicted by percolation theory: a strong relationship was found between the percolating fraction

  19. Phosphorus leaching from biosolids-amended sandy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, H A; O'Connor, G A; Brinton, S

    2002-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on phosphorus (P)-based nutrient management underscores the need to understand P behavior in soils amended with biosolids and manures. Laboratory and greenhouse column studies characterized P forms and leachability of eight biosolids products, chicken manure (CM), and commercial fertilizer (triple superphosphate, TSP). Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) was grown for 4 mo on two acid, P-deficient Florida sands, representing both moderate (Candler series: hyperthermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments) and very low (Immokalee series: sandy, siliceous, hyperthermic Arenic Alaquods) P-sorbing capacities. Amendments were applied at 56 and 224 kg P(T) ha(-1), simulating P-based and N-based nutrient loadings, respectively. Column leachate P was dominantly inorganic and lower for biosolids P sources than TSP. For Candler soil, only TSP at the high P rate exhibited P leaching statistically greater (alpha = 0.05) than control (soil-only) columns. For the high P rate and low P-sorbing Immokalee soil, TSP and CM leached 21 and 3.0% of applied P, respectively. Leachate P for six biosolids was biological P removal process, exhibited significantly greater leachate P in both cake and pelletized forms (11 and 2.5% of applied P, respectively) than other biosolids. Biosolids P leaching was correlated to the phosphorus saturation index (PSI = [Pox]/[Al(ox) + Fe(ox)]) based on oxalate extraction of the pre-applied biosolids. For hiosolids with PSI < or = approximately 1.1, no appreciable leaching occurred. Only Largo cake (PSI = 1.4) and pellets (PSI = 1.3) exhibited P leaching losses statistically greater than controls. The biosolids PSI appears useful for identifying biosolids with potential to enrich drainage P when applied to low P-sorbing soils.

  20. Responses of Young Slash Pine on Poorly Drained to Somewhat Poorly Drained Silt Loam Soils to Site Preparation and Fertilization Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    James D. Haywood

    1995-01-01

    Slash pines (Pinus elliottii Engelm. var. elliottii) were planted on poorly drained Wrightsville and somewhat poorly drained Vidrine silt loam soils in southwest Louisiana. Neither flat disking nor bedding increased pine growth and yield substantially after nine growing seasons, but broadcast application of triple superphoshate...

  1. Experiences of soil fertility management through legume based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mo

    used the mother-baby trial approach in implementing the farmer and researcher managed trials. ... due to the escalating prices as a direct consequence of market .... the baby trials. These legume crops were grown on different soil types. 44.9 % grow the legumes in sandy soil, 38.2 % in sandy clay loam soils and 13.5% in ...

  2. Soil structure and earthworm activity in an marine silt loam under pasture versus arable land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, A.G.; Pulleman, M.M.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Agricultural management influences soil organic matter (SOM) and earthworm activity which interact with soil structure. We aimed to describe the change in earthworm activity and related soil (micro)structure and SOM in a loamy Eutrodept as affected by permanent pasture (PP) and conventional arable

  3. Field wind tunnel testing of two silt loam soils on the North American Central High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wind erosion is a soil degrading process that threatens agricultural sustainability and environmental quality globally. Protecting the soil surface with cover crops and plant residues is a highly effective method for shielding the soil surface from the erosive forces of wind. Recently, advances in...

  4. Degradation and sorption of metribuzin and primary metabolites in a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Trine; Svensmark, Bo; Juhler, René K

    2004-01-01

    Leaching to the ground water of metabolites from the herbicide metribuzin [4-amino-6-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-3-(methylthio)-1,2,4-triazin-5-one] has been measured in a Danish field experiment in concentrations exceeding the European Union threshold limit for pesticides at 0.1 microg/L. In the present work, degradation and sorption of metribuzin and the metabolites desamino-metribuzin (DA), diketo-metribuzin (DK), and desamino-diketo-metribuzin (DADK) were studied in a Danish sandy loam topsoil and subsoil from the field in question, using accelerated solvent extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Fast dissipation of metribuzin and the metabolites was observed in the topsoil, with 50% disappearance within 30 to 40 d. A two-compartment model described degradation of metribuzin and DA, whereas that of DADK could be described using first-order kinetics. Part of the dissipation was probably due to incorporation into soil organic matter. Degradation in subsoil occurred very slowly, with extrapolated half-lives of more than one year. Sorption in the topsoil followed the order DA > metribuzin > DK > DADK. Subsoil sorption was considerably lower, and was hardly measurable for metribuzin and DK. Abiotic degradation was considerably higher in the topsoil than the subsoil, especially concerning the de-amination step, indicating that organic matter may be related to the degradation process. The present results confirm observations of metribuzin and transformation product leaching made in the field experiment and demonstrate the need for knowledge on primary metabolites when assessing the risk for pesticide leaching.

  5. Removal of non aqueous phase liquid liquid (NAPL) from a loam soil monitored by time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    comegna, alessandro; coppola, Antonio; dragonetti, giovanna; ajeel, ali; saeed, ali; sommella, angelo

    2016-04-01

    Non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) are compounds with low or no solubility with water. These compounds, due to the several human activities, can be accidentally introduced in the soil system and thus constitute a serious geo-environmental problem, given the toxicity level and the high mobility. The remediation of contaminated soil sites requires knowledge of the contaminant distribution in the soil profile and groundwater. Methods commonly used to characterize contaminated sites are coring, soil sampling and the installation of monitoring wells for the collection of groundwater samples. The main objective of the present research is to explore the potential application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique in order to evaluate the effect of contaminant removal in a loam soil, initially contaminated with NAPL and then flushed with different washing solutions. The experimental setup consist of: i) a Techtronix cable tester; ii) a three-wire TDR probe with wave guides 14.5 cm long inserted vertically into the soil samples; iii) a testing cell of 8 cm in diameter and 15 cm high; iv) a peristaltic pump for upward injection of washing solution. In laboratory, soil samples were oven dried at 105°C and passed through a 2 mm sieve. Known quantities of soil and NAPL (corn oil, a non-volatile and non-toxic organic compound) were mixed in order to obtain soil samples with different degrees of contamination. Once a soil sample was prepared, it was repacked into a plastic cylinder and then placed into the testing cell. An upward injection of washing solution was supplied to the contaminated sample with a rate q=1.5 cm3/min, which corresponds to a darcian velocity v=6.0 cm/h. The out coming fluid, from the soil column was collected, then the washing solution and oil was separated. Finally both the amount of oil that was remediated and the dielectric permittivity (measured via TDR) of the contaminated soil sample were recorded. Data collected were employed to implement a

  6. Validation of regression models for nitrate concentrations in the upper groundwater in sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Brus, D.J.; Roelsma, J.

    2010-01-01

    For Dutch sandy regions, linear regression models have been developed that predict nitrate concentrations in the upper groundwater on the basis of residual nitrate contents in the soil in autumn. The objective of our study was to validate these regression models for one particular sandy region

  7. Soil contamination and mobility of As, Cd, Mo, Pb and Zn in sandy loam soil columns with coal fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Neves Lange

    2012-01-01

    Elementos tóxicos podem provocar impacto na qualidade ambiental dos solos e representar risco à saúde humana. As cinzas leves de carvão são uma fonte de elementos tóxicos e são comumente dispostas de maneira inadequada sobre o solo nas proximidades das usinas termelétricas, onde esses elementos podem ser lixiviados pela chuva, transportados para as fontes de águas naturais e absorvidos pela fauna e flora do solo, podendo assim, entrar na cadeia alimentar humana. Neste estudo foi avaliada a mo...

  8. Effects of biochar and alkaline amendments on cadmium immobilization, selected nutrient and cadmium concentrations of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) in two contrasting soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldetsadik, Desta; Drechsel, Pay; Keraita, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    To assess the efficiency of seven treatments including biochars produced from dried faecal matter and manures as stabilizing agents of cadmium (Cd)-spiked soils, lettuce was grown in glasshouse on two contrasting soils. The soils used were moderately fertile silty loam and less fertile sandy loam...

  9. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofelia Andrea Valdés-Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots. The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14±5% (mean ± standard deviation. Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil.

  10. Seasonal dynamics in wheel load-carrying capacity of a loam soil in the Swiss Plateau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gut, S.; Chervet, A.; Stettler, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Subsoil compaction is a major problem in modern agriculture caused by the intensification of agricultural production and the increase in weight of agricultural machinery. Compaction in the subsoil is highly persistent and leads to deterioration of soil functions. Wheel load-carrying capacity (WLCC......) is defined as the maximum wheel load for a specific tyre and inflation pressure that does not result in soil stress in excess of soil strength. The soil strength and hence WLCC is strongly influenced by soil matric potential (h). The aim of this study was to estimate the seasonal dynamics in WLCC based...... and cropping systems (mouldboard ploughing, direct drilling, permanent grassland), and the computed WLCC was compared with real wheel loads to obtain the number of trafficable days (NTD) for various agricultural machines. Wheel load-carrying capacity was higher for the top than the standard tyres...

  11. Assessing potential of biochar for increasing water‐holding capacity of sandy soils

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Basso, Andres S; Miguez, Fernando E; Laird, David A; Horton, Robert; Westgate, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Increasing the water‐holding capacity of sandy soils will help improve efficiency of water use in agricultural production, and may be critical for providing enough energy and food for an increasing global population...

  12. Effect of Particle Size and Soil Compaction on Gas Transport Parameters in Variably Saturated, Sandy Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2009-01-01

    the water retention curve), both exhibiting similar and exponential relationships with D50. Under variably saturated conditions, higher Dp and ka in coarser sand (larger D50) were observed due to rapid gas diffusion and advection through the less tortuous large-pore networks. In addition, soil compaction......The soil gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) and air permeability (ka) and their dependency on soil air content ( ) control gas diffusion and advection in soils. This study investigated the effects of average particle size (D50) and dry bulk density ( b) on Dp and ka for six sandy soils under variably...... saturated conditions. Data showed that particle size markedly affects the effective diameter of the drained pores active in leading gas through the sample at –100 cm H2O of soil water matric potential (calculated from Dp and ka) as well as the average pore diameter at half saturation (calculated from...

  13. Influence of red alder on chemical properties of a clay loam soil in western Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.S. DeBell; M.A. Radwan; J.M. Kraft

    1983-01-01

    Chemical characteristics of mineral soil beneath red alder (Alnus rubra Bong.) stands of various ages were studied. Total nitrogen (N) of the 0-to 20-centimeter (0- to 8-inch) soil layer increased with stand age, and pH of both the 0- to 20-centimeter and 20- to 50-centimeter (8- to 20-inch) layers decreased with stand age. Contents of some mineral...

  14. Microbial functional diversity responses to 2 years since biochar application in silt-loam soils on the Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Xia; Xiao, Qian; Shen, Yu-Fang; Li, Shi-Qing

    2017-10-01

    The structure and function of soil microbial communities have been widely used as indicators of soil quality and fertility. The effect of biochar application on carbon sequestration has been studied, but the effect on soil microbial functional diversity has received little attention. We evaluated effects of biochar application on the functional diversities of microbes in a loam soil. The effects of biochar on microbial activities and related processes in the 0-10 and 10-20cm soil layers were determined in a two-year experiment in maize field on the Loess Plateau in China. Low-pyrolysis biochar produced from maize straw was applied into soils at rates of 0 (BC0), 10 (BC10) and 30 (BC30)tha -1 . Chemical analysis indicated that the biochar did not change the pH, significantly increased the amounts of organic carbon and nitrogen, and decreased the amount of mineral nitrogen and the microbial quotient. The biochar significantly decreased average well colour development (AWCD) values in Biolog EcoPlates™ for both layers, particularly for the rate of 10tha -1 . Biochar addition significantly decreased substrate richness (S) except for BC30 in the 0-10cm layer. Effects of biochar on the Shannon-Wiener index (H) and Simpson's dominance (D) were not significant, except for a significant increase in evenness index (E) in BC10 in the 10-20cm layer. A principal component analysis clearly differentiated the treatments, and microbial use of six categories of substrates significantly decreased in both layers after biochar addition, although the use of amines and amides did not differ amongst the three treatments in the deeper layer. Maize above ground dry biomass and height did not differ significantly amongst the treatments, and biochar had no significant effect on nitrogen uptake by maize seedlings. H was positively correlated with AWCD, and negatively with pH. AWCD was positively correlated with mineral N and negatively with pH. Our results indicated that shifts in soil

  15. Modeling of Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Surface Drip Irrigationin Clay Loam Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    foroogh abbasi teshnizi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Water for agriculture is one of the most important factors in arid and semi-arid areas and municipal wastewater treatment is an important resource for this purpose. Therefore, potential of transfer contaminations is a serious problem regarding use of treated wastewater for agriculture. Due to the risk of transfer contaminations through the use of wastewater, the study of transfer microbes in soil in recent decades has been of interest to researchers. In the present study, the transfer of bacteria fecal coliform was investigated in a lysimeter and the HYDRUS-1D model was used to simulate water flow and the fecal coliform in the soil. For calibration of the model and estimating the model input parameters, soil hydraulic and transport parameters, were inversely estimated. Results represented that the HYDRUS-1D with reasonably accurately simulated the outlet flow. To simulate the transfer of the bacteria in the soil, one site sorption model, two kinetic sites model (particle transport using attachment/detachment and one kinetic site model were used. In the simulation of bacterial transfer, one site sorption model was selected as the proper model for this study. One site sorption model estimated solid-phase growth coefficient ( about sextuple more than liquid-phase. It showed that deposited cells had a higher division rate compared with the cell in liquid-phase. The calibrated model was used for surveying the effect various irrigation intervals and irrigation times on bacterial transfer. The results showed that by increasing irrigation times, more bacteria leached out from the soil. Also by increasing irrigation intervals, more bacteria observed in the soil profile, due to favorable environmental conditions and food for the bacteria growth. According to the results, the best interval and irrigation times were one day and four hours, respectively.

  16. Modeling of Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Surface Drip Irrigationin Clay Loam Soil

    OpenAIRE

    foroogh abbasi teshnizi; M. Kouchakzadeh; F. Abbasi

    2017-01-01

    Water for agriculture is one of the most important factors in arid and semi-arid areas and municipal wastewater treatment is an important resource for this purpose. Therefore, potential of transfer contaminations is a serious problem regarding use of treated wastewater for agriculture. Due to the risk of transfer contaminations through the use of wastewater, the study of transfer microbes in soil in recent decades has been of interest to researchers. In the present study, the transfer of bact...

  17. Geotechnical application of geological information on Kanto loam; Kanto loam ni okeru chishitsugaku no jiban kogaku eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, E. [Kanto Gakuin University, Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    Quantitative relationship between the allophane clay minerals in the Kanto Loam is cited to describe the relationship between their stratigraphic features and geotechnical features. The Kanto Loam is a soil of weathered Diluvial volcanic ash deposited on hills and plateaus. The Tachikawa loam is the newest, followed by the Musashino loam, Shimosueyoshi loam, and Tama loam, named in the order from new to old. The Tachikawa and Musashino loams are relatively new loams formed approximately several tens of thousand years ago, and are different from each other in the percentage of allophanes (Ap), which is 50% or higher for the Tachikawa loam and 40% or lower for the Musashino loam, and in the equivalent liquid limit (Ap equivalent index number), which is 115% or higher for the Tachikawa loam and 105% or lower for the Musashino loam. The new loam behaves like the Ap-governed volcanic ash while the old loam behaves like the alluvial clay. There is a linear, proportional relationship between Ap of the new loam and the geotechnical index number. The physical and dynamic behavior of the new loam is all under control of the aggregate structure formed of allophanic clay minerals, the loam behaving like sand when not disturbed and like clay when disturbed. The physical and dynamic properties are also discussed. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Sensitivity of leachate and fine contents on electrical resistivity variations of sandy soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, G L; Park, J B

    2001-06-29

    Laboratory pilot tests were performed to investigate the relationship between electrical resistivity and contaminated soil properties. Three different sandy soils and leachate collected from one of the industrial waste landfill sites in Korea were mixed to simulate contaminated soil conditions. The values of electrical resistivity of the soils were measured using laboratory scaled resistivity cone penetrometer probe. In the experiments, electrical resistivity was observed in terms of water content, unit weight, saturation degree of the soils, and leachate concentration. The experimental results show that the electrical resistivity of the sandy soils depends largely on the water content and electrical properties of pore water rather than unit weight and types of soils. The amount of fines can have significant effect on electrical properties of soils. Direct correlation with contamination in such soils may not be valid here. The results suggest that the electrical resistivity measurement is well suited and applicable for monitoring and delineation of contaminants in the subsurface.

  19. Effect of increasing biochar application rate on soil hydraulic properties of an artificial sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, V.; Ghezzehei, T. A.

    2013-12-01

    Biochar, a product of the pyrolysis of biomass, has become an increasingly studied subject of interest as an agricultural soil amendment to address issues of carbon emission, population density, and food scarcity. Biochar has been reported to increase content and retention of nutrients, pH, cation-exchange capacity, vegetative growth, microbial community, and carbon sequestration. A number of studies addressing the usefulness of biochar as a soil amendment have focused on chemical and biological properties, disregarding the effects on soil physical properties of amended soil. Aside from biochar, lime (calcium carbonate) addition to soils has also been utilized in agricultural practices, typically to raise the pH value of acidic soils, increase microbial activity, and enhance soil stability and productivity as a result. Both biochar and lime amendments may be beneficial in increasing the soil physical properties, particularly through the formation of aggregates. In previous studies an increase in soil particle aggregates resulted in higher rates of biological activity, infiltration rates, pore space, and aeration, all of which are a measure of soil quality. While the effectiveness of biochar and lime as soil amendments has been independently documented, their combined effectiveness on soil physical properties is less understood. This study aims to provide a further understanding on the effect of increasing biochar application rate on soil particle aggregation and hydraulic properties of a low reactive pre-limed artificial sandy soil with and without microbial communities. Microbial communities are known to increase soil aggregates by acting as cementing agents. Understanding the impact of biochar addition on soil physical properties will have implications in the development of sustainable agricultural practices, especially in systems undergoing climate stress and intensive agriculture.

  20. Pine Woodchip Biochar Impact on Soil Nutrient Concentrations and Corn Yield in a Silt Loam in the Mid-Southern U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy E. Brantley

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biochar has altered plant yields and soil nutrient availability in tropical soils, but less research exists involving biochar additions to temperate cropping systems. Of the existing research, results vary based on soil texture, crop grown, and biochar properties. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of pine (Pinus spp. woodchip biochar at 0, 5, and 10 Mg·ha−1 rates combined with urea nitrogen (N on soil chemical properties and corn (Zea mays L. yield under field conditions in the first growing season after biochar addition in a silt-loam alluvial soil. Biochar combined with fertilizer numerically increased corn yields, while biochar alone numerically decreased corn yields, compared to a non-amended control. Corn nitrogen uptake efficiency (NUE was greater with 10 Mg·ha−1 biochar compared to no biochar. There were limited biochar effects on soil nutrients, but biochar decreased nitrate, total dissolved N, and Mehlich-3 extractable sulfur and manganese concentrations in the top 10 cm. Pine woodchip biochar combined with N fertilizer has the potential to improve corn production when grown in silt-loam soil in the mid-southern U.S. by improving NUE and increasing yield. Further research will be important to determine impacts as biochar ages in the soil.

  1. Lasting effects of soil health improvements with management changes in cotton-based cropping systems in a sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soil microbial component is essential for sustainable agricultural systems and soil health. This study evaluated the lasting impacts of 5 years of soil health improvements from alternative cropping systems compared to intensively tilled continuous cotton (Cont. Ctn) in a low organic matter sandy...

  2. Responses of 1-year-old cottonwood to increasing soil moisture tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.T. Bonner

    1967-01-01

    Cottonwood cuttings planted in sandy loam and clay soils showed a sensitive control of water loss as soil moisture tension increased. Transpiration rates began decreasing at leaf water deficits of 2.5 percent in sandy loam and 4.5 percent in clay. There were no significant differences in rates per unit of leaf area or shoot dry weight between plants grown in the two...

  3. Interactions between soil texture and placement of dairy slurry application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia Andersen; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton

    2011-01-01

    -textured soil. Smaller active flow volumes and higher proportions of preferential flow were observed with increasing soil clay content. Injection of slurry in the loam soil significantly enhanced diffusion of applied bromide into the large fraction of small pores compared with surface application. The resulting...... soils. We compared leaching of slurry-applied bromide through intact soil columns (20 cm diam., 20 cm high) of differing textures following surface application or injection of slurry. The volumetric fraction of soil pores >30 μm ranged from 43% in a loamy sand to 28% in a sandy loam and 15% in a loam...... physical protection against leaching of bromide was reflected by 60.2% of the bromide tracer was recovered in the effluent after injection, compared with 80.6% recovery after surface application. No effect of slurry injection was observed in the loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Our findings point to soil...

  4. Testing PESTLA using two modellers for bentazone and ethoprophos in a sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Gottesb ren, B.

    2000-01-01

    Two modellers tested the PESTLA model (version 2.3.1) against results of a field study on bentazone and ethoprophos behaviour in a sandy soil. Both modellers achieved an acceptable description of the measured moisture profiles but only after calibration of the soil hydraulic properties. Both could

  5. Contribution of individual sorbents to the control of heavy metal activity in sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weng, L.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2001-01-01

    A multisurface model is used to evaluate the contribution of various sorption surfaces to the control of heavy metal activity in sandy soil samples at pH 3.7-6.1 with different sorbent contents. This multisurface model considers soil as a set of independent sorption surfaces, i.e. organic matter

  6. Amelioration of sandy soils in drought stricken areas through use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil moisture shortage is a major limiting factor to agricultural production in eastern Africa, in view of increased drought incidences and seasonal rainfall variability. This study evaluated the potential for Ca-bentonite (a 2:1 clay mineral) as a possible amendment for increased moisture retention by sandy soils in drought ...

  7. Effects of a new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on nitrate and potassium leaching in two soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Fu; Wu, Liang-Huan; Shi, Qi-Wei; Wang, Zhong-Qiang; Chen, Xian-You; Li, Yong-Shan

    2007-01-01

    In this study, soil column was used to study the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on nitrate (NO3(-)-N) and potassium (K) leaching in the sandy loam soil and clay loam soil. The results showed that DMPP with ammonium sulphate nitrate (ASN) ((NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3) or urea could reduce NO3(-)-N leaching significantly, whereas ammonium (NH4(+)-N) leaching increased slightly. In case of total N (NO3(-)-N+NH4(+)-N), losses by leaching during the experimental period (40 d) were 37.93 mg (urea), 31.61 mg (urea+DMPP), 108.10 mg (ASN), 60.70 mg (ASN+DMPP) in the sandy loam soil, and 30.54 mg (urea), 21.05 mg (urea+DMPP), 37.86 mg (ASN), 31.09 mg (ASN+DMPP) in the clay loam soil, respectively. DMPP-amended soil led to the maintenance of relatively high levels of NH4(+)-N and low levels of NO3(-)-N in soil, and nitrification was slower. DMPP supplementation also resulted in less potassium leached, but the difference was not significant except the treatment of ASN and ASN+DMPP in the sandy loam soil. Above results indicate that DMPP is a good nitrification inhibitor, the efficiency of DMPP seems better in the sandy loam soil than in the clay loam soil and lasts longer.

  8. Effect of Plant-derived Hydrophobic Compounds on Soil Water Repellency in Dutch Sandy Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Jiefei; Dekker, Stefan C.; Nierop, Klaas G. J.

    2013-04-01

    Soil water repellency or hydrophobicity is a common and important soil property, which may diminish plant growth and promotes soil erosion leading to environmentally undesired situations. Hydrophobic organic compounds in the soil are derived from vegetation (leaves, roots, mosses) or microorganisms (fungi, bacteria), and these compounds induce soil water repellency (SWR) and can be called SWR-biomarkers. As common hydrophobic constituents of organic matter, plant lipids are mainly from wax layers of leaves and roots, whereas cutins and suberins as aliphatic biopolyesters occur in leaves and roots, respectively. Their unique compositions in soil can indicate the original vegetation sources. To investigate the individual or combined effects of the hydrophobic compounds on SWR and their possible associations with each other, we conducted experiments to analyse the organic composition of Dutch coastal dune sandy soils in relation to SWR. DCM/MeOH solvent is used to remove solvent soluble lipids. BF3-methanol is utilized to depolymerize cutins and suberins from isopropanol/NH3 extractable organic matter. Total organic carbon (TOC) has a positive linear relation with SWR only for those soils containing low TOC (

  9. Compost amendment of sandy soil affects soil properties and greenhouse tomato productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Cornelis, W.; Razzaghi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Sandy soils, with low productivity, could be improved by compost application to sustain crop production. This study aimed to examine the effect of three compost types (vegetable, fruit and yard waste compost, garden waste compost, and spent mushroom compost) on basic properties of a loamy sand...... and significantly decreased bulk density, with no effect on plant available water compared to the control. Fresh and dry fruit weights were significantly increased after compost addition. Plant height, leaf number, stem diameter, and total biomass did not significantly improve after compost addition. Spent mushroom...

  10. Effect of Coated Urea with Humic-Calcium on Transformation of Nitrogen in Coastal Sandy Soil: A Soil Column Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulakhudin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Coated Urea with Humic-Calcium on Transformation of Nitrogen in Coastal Sandy Soil: A Soil ColumnMethod (Sulakhudin, A Syukur, D Shiddieq and T Yuwono: In coastal sandy soil, mainly nitrogen losses due toleaching resulted to low fertilizer efficiency. Slow-release N fertilizers are proposed to minimize these losses, andhumic-calcium coated urea has been examined. A soil column method was used to compare the effects of coated ureawith humic-calcium on transformation and leaching loss of N in coastal sandy soil. The experiment aid to compare twokinds sources of humic substances (cow manure and peat which mixed with calcium as coated urea on transformation,vertical distribution and leaching N in coastal sandy soil. The concentration of humic-calcium coated urea i.e.1%, 5%and 10% based on their weight. The results showed that urea coated with humic-calcium from cow manure (UCHMand humic-calcium from peat (UCHP increased the N total and available N in the soil and decreased leaching loss ofN from the soil column. Compared to UCHP, UCHM in all concentration showed N-nitrate higher than N-ammonium onincubation length 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The N leached from a costal sandy soil with application coated urea with UCHMranged from 21.18% to 23.72% of the total N added as fertilizer, for coated urea with UCHP they ranged between21.44% and 23.25%, whereas for urea (control reached 29.48%. Leaching losses of mineral N were lower when ureacoated with UCHM compared to urea coated with UCHP or urea fertilizer. The study concluded that the UCHM isbetter than UCHP in decreasing N leached from coastal sandy soil

  11. Cultivos de cobertura: efectos sobre la macroporosidad y la estabilidad estructural de un suelo franco-limoso Cover crops: effects on soil macroporosity and soil structural stability in a silt loam soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Florencia Varela

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Los suelos franco-limosos manejados con siembra directa a menudo poseen porosidad estructural baja e inestable. Con el objetivo de determinar la capacidad de los cultivos de cobertura (CC de mejorar la porosidad y estabilidad estructural de estos suelos se llevaron a cabo experimentos de campo y de invernáculo. Ambos tuvieron tratamientos con y sin CC (avena, Avena sativa L., en rotación con soja (Glicine max L. Merr.. Luego de los CC se midieron densidad aparente (DA, el índice de inestabilidad estructural (IE y en el ensayo de invernáculo además, se midió la evolución de la distribución de tamaño de poros (DTP. En ambos ensayos la introducción de CC no disminuyó la DA, aunque incrementó la estabilidad del suelo (PNo- till (NT silt loam topsoils have often a low and unstable structural porosity. The objective of this study was to determine the capability of cover crops (CC of improving the structural porosity and stability of silt loam soils under NT. Greenhouse and field experiments were carried out on a silt loam soil (Typic Argiudoll with and without CC (oat, Avena sativa L. in crop sequences with soybean (Glicine max L. Merr.. Soil bulk density (DA and aggregate instability index (IE were measured after the CC in both experiments. In the greenhouse experiment, soil pore size distribution (DTP was measured. The use of CC did not change DA, but soil IE was significantly lower in crop sequences with CC (P < 0.05 both under field and greenhouse conditions. Stability increases were likely due to the effect of CC residues and root mass. No differences in DTP were found between treatments, although a significant effect of sampling date was observed (P<0.05. Changes in DTP were due to significant increases in mesopore (517.5% and macropore (52.7% volumes. Such changes occurred in all the treatments, probably due to the soil wetting-drying cycles. The results found in this study agree with other studies carried out on silt loams in the

  12. Effects of sodium polyacrylate on water retention and infiltration capacity of a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Wenhua; Li, Longguo; Liu, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Based on the laboratory study, the effects of sodium polyacrylate (SP) was investigated at 5 rates of 0, 0.08, 0.2, 0.5, and 1%, on water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity(Ks), infiltration characteristic and water distribution profiles of a sandy soil. The results showed that water retention and available water capacity effectively increased with increasing SP rate. The Ks and the rate of wetting front advance and infiltration under certain pond infiltration was significantly reduced by increasing SP rate, which effectively reduced water in a sandy soil leaking to a deeper layer under the plough layer. The effect of SP on water distribution was obviously to the up layer and very little to the following deeper layers. Considering both the effects on water retention and infiltration capacity, it is suggested that SP be used to the sandy soil at concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 0.5%.

  13. Assessment of grass root effects on soil piping in sandy soils using the pinhole test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatek-Jakiel, Anita; Vannoppen, Wouter; Poesen, Jean

    2017-10-01

    Soil piping is an important land degradation process that occurs in a wide range of environments. Despite an increasing number of studies on this type of subsurface erosion, the impact of vegetation on piping erosion is still unclear. It can be hypothesized that vegetation, and in particular plant roots, may reduce piping susceptibility of soils because roots of vegetation also control concentrated flow erosion rates or shallow mass movements. Therefore, this paper aims to assess the impact of grass roots on piping erosion susceptibility of a sandy soil. The pinhole test was used as it provides quantitative data on pipeflow discharge, sediment concentration and sediment discharge. Tests were conducted at different hydraulic heads (i.e., 50 mm, 180 mm, 380 mm and 1020 mm). Results showed that the hydraulic head was positively correlated with pipeflow discharge, sediment concentration and sediment discharge, while the presence of grass roots (expressed as root density) was negatively correlated with these pipeflow characteristics. Smaller sediment concentrations and sediment discharges were observed in root-permeated samples compared to root-free samples. When root density exceeds 0.5 kg m- 3, piping erosion rates decreased by 50% compared to root-free soil samples. Moreover, if grass roots are present, the positive correlation between hydraulic head and both sediment discharge and sediment concentration is less pronounced, demonstrating that grass roots become more effective in reducing piping erosion rates at larger hydraulic heads. Overall, this study demonstrates that grass roots are quite efficient in reducing piping erosion rates in sandy soils, even at high hydraulic head (> 1 m). As such, grass roots may therefore be used to efficiently control piping erosion rates in topsoils.

  14. Toxicity of Nitro-Heterocyclic and Nitroaromatic Energetic Materials to Terrestrial Plants in a Natural Sandy Loam Soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocheleau, Sylvie; Martel, Majorie; Bardai, Ghalib; Sarrazin, Manon; Dodard, Sabine; Paquet, Louise; Corriveau, Alain; Kuperman, Roman G; Checkai, Ronald T; Simini, Michael

    2005-01-01

    .... Standardized toxicity tests were selected and used, on the basis of their ability to measure chemical toxicity to ecologically relevant test species, and their inclusion of growth component among...

  15. Toxicity of a New Polynitramine Energetic Material, CL-20, to the Enchytraeid Worm, Enchytraeus Crypticus, in a Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    and its reduction products 2-amino-4,6- dinitrotoluene (2-ADNT), 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4-ADNT), 2,4-diamino-6- nitrotoluene (2,4-DANT) and 2,6...diamino-4- nitrotoluene (2,6-DANT). The authors reported LC5 0 values for adult mortality from exposure to TNT, 4-ADNT, or 2-ADNT, of 132, 105, and 215...D., Nadler, M., Nissan, R., Vanderah, D., 1998. Synthesis of polyazapolycyclic caged polynitramine. Tetrahedron 54, 11793-11812. Nielsen, A.T

  16. Toxicity of Nitro-Heterocyclic and Nitroaromatic Energetic Materials to Terrestrial Plants in a Natural Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    bacteria and pre-incubated at room temperature , and Buttercrunch lettuce seeds were used for the range-finding tests to determine the three most sensitive...range-finding tests and based on seeding emergence and shoot growth measurement endpoints (Table 40), no toxic effects were observed for RDX and HMX at...kg-1 RDX (Cataldo et al., 1989), and bush bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris ) was also hydroponically exposed to 10 mg L-1 RDX for 1 or 7 days (Harvey et al

  17. DEPENDENCE OF SUFFOSION STABILITY OF SANDY SOILS OF VARIOUS GENESES ON THE TYPE OF FILTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potapov Ivan Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of calculations and experimental researches of suffosion stability of sandy soils are provided in the article. The authors have assessed the prospects for the application of standard methodologies to demonstrate the need to take account of the filtrate properties in the course of projecting potential suffusion process development patterns typical for sandy soils. The principal attention must be driven to the value of the kinematic viscosity of filtered liquids. Any assessment of filtration-related interaction of the flow of liquid with sandy soils must be backed by the gradation analysis of soils and the analysis of their homogeneity, as well as the mineralogical and morphological analysis. The morphological study of sands of various geneses, performed hereunder, is based on the methodology that takes account of both the shape of sand particles and the structure of their surface. The proposed methodology makes it possible to assess extensive sand specimen rather than separate sand particles to assure the representative sampling to assure the accuracy of the morphological analysis. The authors provide the data that cover the research of sands of various geneses demonstrating varied granulometric and mineral composition, as well as various morphological peculiarities of correlation with the filtrates that have different values of kinematic viscosity. The methodological research completed by the authors has indicated an urgent need to perform laboratory and field researches of suffosion instability of sandy soils in varied geoecological environments typical for urban lands exposed to anthropogenic pollutions.

  18. Effects of gasification biochar on plant-available water capacity and plant growth in two contrasting soil types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Petersen, Carsten Tilbæk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gasification biochar (GB) contains recalcitrant carbon that can contribute to soil carbon sequestration and soil quality improvement. However, the impact of GB on plant-available water capacity (AWC) and plant growth in diverse soil types still needs to be explored. A pot experiment...... with spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) was conducted to investigate the effect of soil amendment by 1% straw and wood gasification biochar (SGB and WGB), respectively, on AWC and plant growth responses under two levels of water supply in a temperate sandy loam and a coarse sandy subsoil. In the sandy loam...

  19. Effect of soil coarseness on soil base cations and available micronutrients in a semi-arid sandy grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Linyou; Wang, Ruzhen; Liu, Heyong; Yin, Jinfei; Xiao, Jiangtao; Wang, Zhengwen; Zhao, Yan; Yu, Guoqing; Han, Xingguo; Jiang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    Soil coarseness is the main process decreasing soil organic matter and threatening the productivity of sandy grasslands. Previous studies demonstrated negative effect of soil coarseness on soil carbon storage, but less is known about how soil base cations (exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, and Na) and available micronutrients (available Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn) response to soil coarseness. In a semi-arid grassland of Northern China, a field experiment was initiated in 2011 to mimic the effect of soil coarseness on soil base cations and available micronutrients by mixing soil with different mass proportions of sand: 0 % coarse elements (C0), 10 % (C10), 30 % (C30), 50 % (C50), and 70 % (C70). Soil coarseness significantly increased soil pH in three soil depths of 0-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm with the highest pH values detected in C50 and C70 treatments. Soil fine particles (smaller than 0.25 mm) significantly decreased with the degree of soil coarseness. Exchangeable Ca and Mg concentrations significantly decreased with soil coarseness degree by up to 29.8 % (in C70) and 47.5 % (in C70), respectively, across three soil depths. Soil available Fe, Mn, and Cu significantly decreased with soil coarseness degree by 62.5, 45.4, and 44.4 %, respectively. As affected by soil coarseness, the increase of soil pH, decrease of soil fine particles (including clay), and decline in soil organic matter were the main driving factors for the decrease of exchangeable base cations (except K) and available micronutrients (except Zn) through soil profile. Developed under soil coarseness, the loss and redistribution of base cations and available micronutrients along soil depths might pose a threat to ecosystem productivity of this sandy grassland.

  20. Plant functional diversity enhances associations of soil fungal diversity with vegetation and soil in the restoration of semiarid sandy grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Xiaoan; Wang, Shaokun; Lv, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Zhao, Xueyong; Zhang, Tonghui; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    The trait-based approach shows that plant functional diversity strongly affects ecosystem properties. However, few empirical studies show the relationship between soil fungal diversity and plant functional diversity in natural ecosystems. We investigated soil fungal diversity along a restoration gradient of sandy grassland (mobile dune, semifixed dune, fixed dune, and grassland) in Horqin Sand Land, northern China, using the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 18S rRNA and gene sequencing. We also examined associations of soil fungal diversity with plant functional diversity reflected by the dominant species' traits in community (community-weighted mean, CWM) and the dispersion of functional trait values (FD is). We further used the structure equation model (SEM) to evaluate how plant richness, biomass, functional diversity, and soil properties affect soil fungal diversity in sandy grassland restoration. Soil fungal richness in mobile dune and semifixed dune was markedly lower than those of fixed dune and grassland (P functional diversity explained nearly 70% variances of soil fungal richness. Strong association of soil fungal richness with the dominant species in the community supported the mass ratio hypothesis. Our results clearly highlight the role of plant functional diversity in enhancing associations of soil fungal diversity with community structure and soil properties in sandy grassland ecosystems.

  1. Assessment of physical and chemical indicators of sandy soil quality for sustainable crop production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiec, Jerzy; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Sandy soils are used in agriculture in many regions of the world. The share of sandy soils in Poland is about 55%. The aim of this study was to assess spatial variability of soil physical and chemical properties affecting soil quality and crop yields in the scale of field (40 x 600 m) during three years of different weather conditions. The experimental field was located on the post glacial and acidified sandy deposits of low productivity (Szaniawy, Podlasie Region, Poland). Physical soil quality indicators included: content of sand, silt, clay and water, bulk density and those chemical: organic carbon, cation exchange capacity, acidity (pH). Measurements of the most soil properties were done at spring and summer each year in topsoil and subsoil layer in 150 points. Crop yields were evaluated in places close to measuring points of the soil properties. Basic statistics including mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis minimal, maximal and correlations between the soil properties and crop yields were calculated. Analysis of spatial dependence and distribution for each property was performed using geostatistical methods. Mathematical functions were fitted to the experimentally derived semivariograms that were used for mapping the soil properties and crop yield by kriging. The results showed that the largest variations had clay content (CV 67%) and the lowest: sand content (5%). The crop yield was most negatively correlated with sand content and most positively with soil water content and cation exchange capacity. In general the exponential semivariogram models fairly good matched to empirical data. The range of semivariogram models of the measured indicators varied from 14 m to 250 m indicate high and moderate spatial variability. The values of the nugget-to-sill+nugget ratios showed that most of the soil properties and crop yields exhibited strong and moderate spatial dependency. The kriging maps allowed identification of low yielding sub-field areas that

  2. USE OF THE "RothC" MODEL TO SIMULATE SOIL ORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS ON A SILTY-LOAM INCEPTISOL IN NORTHERN ITALY UNDER DIFFERENT FERTILIZATION PRACTICES

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Francaviglia; Claudio Baffi; Antonio Nassisi; Chiara Cassinari; Roberta Farina

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of the RothC model to simulate Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) dynamics after 12 years of organic and mineral fertilization practices in a study area located in northern Italy, on a silty-loam Inceptisol with a rotation including tomato, maize and alfalfa. The model performance was assessed by RMSE and EF coefficients. RothC simulated well observed SOC decreases in 71 samples (RMSE=7.42; EF=0.79), while performed with less accuracy when considering all samples (96 sample...

  3. [Simulation of effects of soil properties and plants on soil water-salt movement with reclaimed water irrigation by ENVIRO-GRO model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Si-Dan; Chen, Wei-Ping; Wang, Mei-E

    2012-12-01

    In order to promote safe irrigation with reclaimed water and prevent soil salinisation, the dynamic transport of salts in urban soils of Beijing under irrigation of reclaimed water was simulated by ENVIRO-GRO model in this study. The accumulation trends and profile distribution of soil salinity were predicted. Simultaneously, the effects of different soil properties and plants on soil water-salt movement and salt accumulation were investigated. Results indicated that soil salinity in the profiles reached uniform equilibrium conditions by repeated simulation, with different initial soil salinity. Under the conditions of loam and clay loam soil, salinity in the profiles increased over time until reaching equilibrium conditions, while under the condition of sandy loam soil, salinity in the profiles decreased over time until reaching equilibrium conditions. The saturated soil salinity (EC(e)) under equilibrium conditions followed an order of sandy loam soil salinity were also different in these three types of plants. In addition, the growth of the plants was not influenced by soil salinity (except clay loam), but mild soil salinization occurred under all conditions (except sandy loam).

  4. Use of olive mill wastewater (OMW) to decrease hydrophobicity in sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diamantis, V.; Pagorogon, L.; Gazani, E.; Doerr, S.H.; Pliakas, F.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the potential effectiveness of olive mill wastewater (OMW) as an alternative to industrial surfactants in decreasing hydrophobicity in sandy soil. The OMW was obtained from a storage lagoon and characterized by high concentrations of short-chain fatty acids, mainly butyric,

  5. Amelioration of sandy soils in drought stricken areas through use of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Uganda Journal of Agricultural Sciences by National Agricultural Research Organisation is licensed under a Creative ... Under field conditions, Ca-bentonite was applied on sandy soils in the drought-prone Lwabiyata sub county, Nakasongola district in ... standard methods (Okalebo et al., 1993). To study the effect of ...

  6. Irrigation initiation timing in soybean grown on sandy soils in Northeast Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrigation initiation timing was evaluated in furrow-irrigated soybean field with sandy soils in Mississippi County, AR. A major objective of this 2015 study was to validate and expand irrigation timing recommendations that pair plant growth measures with weather cues including use of local weather ...

  7. Soil, crop and emission responses to seasonal-controlled traffic in organic vegetable farming on loam soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, G.D.; Mosquera Losada, J.

    2009-01-01

    Some organic arable and vegetable farms in the Netherlands use cm-precise guidance of machinery to restrict wheel traffic to fixed traffic lanes and to achieve non-trafficked cropping zones with optimized soil structure in between the lanes. Contrary to controlled traffic farming (CTF) the traffic

  8. Cementation in a matrix of loose sandy soil using biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Man-made materials varying from cement-based to chemical-based have been injected into soils to improve their engineering properties (shear strength, compressibility, permeability, bearing capacity etc.). Soil type in general plays important role in determination of treatment material and method. Materials used for soil ...

  9. Flow and transport in water repellent sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritsema, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Water repellency in soils is currently receiving increasing attention from scientists and policy makers, due to the adverse and sometimes devastating effects of soil water repellency on environmental quality and agricultural crop production. Soil water repellency often leads to severe

  10. Solid beef cattle manure application impacts on soil properties and 17β-estradiol fate in a clay loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Emmanuelle; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Hao, Xiying; Sheedy, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Livestock manure applied to agricultural land is one of the ways natural steroid estrogens enter soils. To examine the impact of long-term solid beef cattle (Bos Taurus) manure on soil properties and 17β-estradiol sorption and mineralization, this study utilized a soil that had received beef cattle manure over 35 years. The 17β-estradiol was strongly sorbed and sorption significantly increased (P manure. The 17β-estradiol mineralization half-life was significantly negatively correlated, and the total amount of 17β-estradiol mineralized at 90 days (MAX) was significantly positively correlated with 17β-estradiol sorption. The long-term rate of manure application had no significant effect on MAX, but the addition of fresh beef cattle manure in the laboratory resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) smaller MAX values. None of the treatments showed MAX values exceeding one-third of the 17β-estradiol applied. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  11. Termite Infestation Associated with Type of Soil in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Majid, Abdul Hafiz Ab; Ahmad, Abu Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Nine soil samples from nine buildings infested with Coptotermes gestroi in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, were tested for the type of soil texture. The soil texture analysis procedures used the hydrometer method. Four of nine buildings (44%) yielded loamy sand-type soil, whereas five of nine buildings (56%) contained sandy loam-type soil.

  12. Impact of biochar addition on thermal properties of a sandy soil: modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usowicz, Boguslaw; Lipiec, Jerzy; Lukowski, Mateusz; Bis, Zbigniew; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Jerzy

    2017-04-01

    Adding biochar can alter soil thermal properties and increase the water holding capacity and reduce the mineral soil fertilization. Biochar in the soil can determine the heat balance on the soil surface and the temperature distribution in the soil profile through changes in albedo and the thermal properties. Besides, amendment of soil with biochar results in improvement of water retention, fertility and pH that are of importance in sandy and acid soils, widely used in agriculture. In this study we evaluated the effects of wood-derived biochar (0, 10, 20, and 40 Mg ha-1) incorporated to a depth of 0-15 cm on the thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity and porosity in sandy soil under field conditions. In addition, soil-biochar mixtures of various percentages of biochar were prepared to determine the thermal properties in function of soil water status and density in laboratory. It was shown that a small quantity of biochar added to the soil does not significantly affect all the thermal properties of the soil. Increasing biochar concentration significantly enhanced porosity and decreased thermal conductivity and diffusivity with different rate depending on soil water status. The soil thermal conductivity and diffusivity varied widely and non-linearly with water content for different biochar content and soil bulk density. However, the heat capacity increased with biochar addition and water content linearly and was greater at higher than lower soil water contents. The measured and literature thermal data were compared with those obtained from the analytic model of Zhang et al. (2013) and statistical-physical model (Usowicz et al., 2016) based on soil texture, biochar content, bulk density and water content.

  13. Potential of miscanthus biochar to improve sandy soil health, in situ nickel immobilization in soil and nutritional quality of spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Waqas-Ud-Din; Ramzani, Pia Muhammad Adnan; Anjum, Shazia; Abbas, Farhat; Iqbal, Muhammad; Yasar, Abdullah; Ihsan, Muhammad Zahid; Anwar, Muhammad Naveed; Baqar, Mujtaba; Tauqeer, Hafiz Muhammad; Virk, Zaheer Abbas; Khan, Shahbaz Ali

    2017-10-01

    The complex interaction of biochar (BC) with soil health reflecting properties, the feedstock used to prepare BC and application rate of BC in sandy soil is still a question for the researchers. An incubation study was conducted where nine different sorts of BC, each prepared from the different feedstock, were applied at 2% rate to evaluate their relative suitability to improve sandy soil health. Results revealed that BC prepared from miscanthus (MIB) significantly increased soil medium and fine pores, available water content (AWC), electrical conductivity (EC), and cation exchange capacity (CEC) while decreased soil wide pores, pH, bulk density (BD) and particle density (PD) compared to the rest sorts of BC. Later, spinach was grown in pots containing same soil but spiked with 50 ppm nickel (Ni) and amended with 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5% rates of MIB. The results showed a significant increment in spinach biomass, reduction in the concentrations of Ni in spinach tissues and DTPA-extractable Ni with the increasing rate of MIB till 3% and later, no significant changes with 4 and 5% rates thereafter. However, significant improvement in the activities of antioxidant enzymes, chemical and biochemical attributes of spinach were observed at 5% MIB when compared to lower rates. Similarly, post-harvest soil physicochemical and enzymatic parameters were also significantly (P spinach, sandy soil health and can reduce Ni concentrations in spinach tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Influencing mechanism of several shrubs and subshrubs on soil fertility in Keerqin sandy land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yongzhong; Zhao, Halin; Zhang, Tonghui

    2002-07-01

    Keerqin sandy land is one of serious desertification areas in the semiarid zone of north China, and shrubs are the dominant plant life form and play an important role in the region. The effects of "fertile island" and rhizosphere of several shrubs and subshrubs were studied. The results showed that the concentrations of organic C, total N and total P, and values of electrical conductivity (EC) in the soils under the canopy of shrubs increased by 56%, 51%, 37%, and 51%, respectively, compared with those of the soils in open spaces, but there was no significant difference in pH value between the soils under shrub canopies and in open spaces. Shrub rhizosphere soils had significant higher contents of organic C, total N, and values of EC as well as lower pH value compared to the bulk soils, but there was no significant difference in total P between rhizosphere and bulk soils. There were close relationships between the properties in soils under shrub canopies and the rhizosphere soils, indicating that the development of "fertile island" were favorable to root growth and induced greater amount of rhizodeposition, and vice versa. Soils under Artemisia frigida and Caragada microphylla canopies and rhizospheres had significant higher organic C and total N contents than those of Artemisia halodendron and Salix gordejvii. This results suggested that shrubs were of vital importance for accumulation of nutrients and maintenance of soil fertility in Keerqin sandy land ecosystem.

  15. Mineralization-immobilization and plant uptake of nitrogen as influenced by the spatial distribution of cattle slurry in soils of different texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.; Jensen, E.S.

    1995-01-01

    were insignificant. Consequently, the availability of slurry N to plants was mainly influenced by the mineralization-immobilization processes. The apparent utilization of slurry NH4+-N mixed into soil was 7%, 14% and 24% lower than the utilization of (NH4)(2)SO4-N in a sand soil, a sandy loam soil...... and a loam soil, respectively. Thus, the net immobilization of N due to slurry application increased with increasing soil clay content, whereas the recovery in plants of N-15-labelled NH4+-N from slurry was similar on the three soils. A parallel incubation experiment showed that the immobilization of slurry......% higher than the utilization of (NH4)(2)SO4-N in the sand, the sandy loam and the loam soil, respectively. It is concluded that the spatial distribution of slurry in soil influenced the net mineralization of N to the same degree as did the soil type....

  16. Volatilisation of o-Xylene from Sandy Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Bo; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Brun, Adam

    1994-01-01

    The diffusive release of o-xylene from two soils with different contents of organic carbon (1.1 % and 0.11 % TOC) and with two different water contents (app. 5 % w/w and 15 % w/w was studied in the laboratory. The soils were spiked with o-xylene in the laboratory. The fluxes were measured over...

  17. Use of dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers to reduce phosphorus leaching from sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G C; He, Z L; Stoffella, P J; Yang, X E; Yu, S; Calvert, D

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing concern over P leaching from sandy soils applied with water-soluble P fertilizers. Laboratory column leaching experiments were conducted to evaluate P leaching from a typical acidic sandy soil in Florida amended with DPR fertilizers developed from dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) and N-Viro soil. Ten leaching events were carried out at an interval of 7 days, with a total leaching volume of 1,183 mm equivalent to the mean annual rainfall of this region during the period of 2001-2003. Leachates were collected and analyzed for total P and inorganic P. Phosphorus in the leachate was dominantly reactive, accounting for 67.7-99.9% of total P leached. Phosphorus leaching loss mainly occurred in the first three leaching events, accounting for 62.0-98.8% of the total P leached over the whole period. The percentage of P leached (in the total P added) from the soil amended with water-soluble P fertilizer was higher than those receiving the DPR fertilizers. The former was up to 96.6%, whereas the latter ranged from 0.3% to 3.8%. These results indicate that the use of N-Viro-based DPR fertilizers can reduce P leaching from sandy soils.

  18. Changes in physical properties of sandy soil after long-term compost treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranyos, József Tibor; Tomócsik, Attila; Makádi, Marianna; Mészáros, József; Blaskó, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    Studying the long-term effect of composted sewage sludge application on chemical, physical and biological properties of soil, an experiment was established in 2003 at the Research Institute of Nyíregyháza in Hungary. The applied compost was prepared from sewage sludge (40%), straw (25%), bentonite (5%) and rhyolite (30%). The compost was ploughed into the 0-25 cm soil layer every 3rd year in the following amounts: 0, 9, 18 and 27 Mg ha-1 of dry matter. As expected, the compost application improved the structure of sandy soil, which is related with an increase in the organic matter content of soil. The infiltration into soil was improved significantly, reducing the water erosion under simulated high intensity rainfall. The soil compaction level was reduced in the first year after compost re-treatment. In accordance with the decrease in bulk density, the air permeability of soil increased tendentially. However, in the second year the positive effects of compost application were observed only in the plots treated with the highest compost dose because of quick degradation of the organic matter. According to the results, the sewage sludge compost seems to be an effective soil improving material for acidic sandy soils, but the beneficial effect of application lasts only for two years.

  19. Impacts of acid deposition on concentrations and fluxes of solutes in acid sandy forest soils in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Grinsven, van J.J.M.; Breemen, van N.; Leeters, E.E.J.M.; Jansen, P.C.

    1995-01-01

    This article summarizes the most important impacts of acid atmospheric deposition on the soil solution chemistry of acid sandy forest soils in the Netherlands, by comparing and interpreting data from soil solution monitoring studies (18 stands) and a national soil solution survey (150 stands).

  20. Garlic mustard and its effects on soil microbial communities in a sandy pine forest in central Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander B. Faulkner; Brittany E. Pham; Truc-Quynh D. Nguyen; Kenneth E. Kitchell; Daniel S. O' Keefe; Kelly D. McConnaughay; Sherri J. Morris

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the impacts of garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), an invasive species, on soil microbial community dynamics in a pine plantation on sandy soils in central Illinois. In situ soil carbon dioxide efflux was significantly greater in invaded sites. Similarly, in vitro carbon mineralization was significantly greater for soils...

  1. Controlled Environment Soil-Core Microcosm Unit (CESMU) for Investigating Fate, Transport, and Transformation of Chemicals in Site-Specific Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    types. These four soil types included Wheeling sandy loam (Fine-loamy, mixed mesic Ultic Hapludalfs], Lexington silt loam [Fine-silty, mixed thermic ... thermic Typic Paleudults]. The intact soil cores were collected using a hydraulically controlled probe, delivering the soil with minimal disturbance...sunlight, sufficient for plant growth; however, they can instead be covered with an opaque insulated cover spanning all columns to eliminate photo

  2. Influence of soil compaction on microfungal community structure in two soil types in Bartin Province, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Omer; Bolat, Ilyas

    2007-10-01

    Soil compaction negatively influences physical properties of soil (bulk density and pore space), and may consequently limit soil microfungi, which are significant for nutrient bioavailability. We measured microfungal community responses to compaction in a sandy loam and a clay loam soil at picnic sites. Soil bulk density increased significantly in the compacted samples. However, microfungal numbers and community composition were unrelated to changes in soil bulk density. With increases in bulk density from 1.22 to 1.37 g cm(-3) in the clay soil and from 1.38 to 1.54 g cm(-3) in the sandy loam soil, the total number of fungi declined or showed insignificant increases. In the compacted samples as well as the control sites, the most frequently occurring genera in the clay soil were Penicillium, Aspergillus, and Gliocladium. However, the most prominent feature occurring within the sandy loam soil was the exhibition of the greatest increase in the frequency of the Fusarium genus. When comparing compacted and control soils, fungal community composition corresponded more closely within each soil texture. The two microfungal soil communities, therefore, tolerated compaction. In contrast, a difference occurred in the fungal communities between the two soil textures. This is more likely due to the variability in the controlling factors of microfungal abundance and composition, such as soil characteristics, tree species, and competitive ability of fungal genera.

  3. Performance evaluation of an ox-drawn ridging plough in a soil-bin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An ox-drawn ridging plough was developed using the Godwin-Spoor narrow tine soil force prediction model. The plough was evaluated in a sandy loam soil in the soil-bin at Cranfield University, Silsoe. The objectives were to compare predicted with measured draught and vertical forces, and cross-sectional area of soil ...

  4. Effect of pore-size distribution on the collapse behaviour of anthropogenic sandy soil deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baille Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the former open-pit mines of the Lusatian region in Germany, several liquefaction events have occurred during the recent years in the anthropogenic deposits made of very loose sandy soils. These events are related to the rising ground water table after the stop of controlled ground water lowering. The very loose state is due to the formation of sand aggregates (pseudo-grains during the deposition process. The pseudo-grains enclose larger voids of dimension greater than the single sand grain. Wetting induced collapse of the pseudo-grains is presumed to be one of the possible mechanisms triggering liquefaction. In the present study, the effect of larger voids on the wetting induced deformation behaviour of sandy soils is experimentally investigated by laboratory box tests. The deformation field in the sample during wetting was measured using Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique. The results show that the observed deformations are affected by the pore size distribution, thus the amount of voids between the pseudo-grains (macro-void ratio and the voids inside the pseudo-grains (matrix void ratio. The global void ratio of a sandy soil is not sufficient as single state parameter, but the pore size distribution has to be taken into account, experimentally as well as in modelling.

  5. Relation of some Soil Water-transmission Characteristics to some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine soil physical properties of an Alfisol constituting the soil of a proposed tillage and irrigation water management field laboratory and to relate the physical properties to the water transmission characteristics. The soil was found to be mainly sandy loam on the surface with high infiltration ...

  6. Evaluation of the soil organic carbon, nitrogen and available ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The upland soils of the Nigerian savanna zones are low in fertility and their agricultural potentials for sustainable crops and livestock production is low. The surface soils of the area are sandy loam dominated by low activity clay and low content of organic matter. The soils are also shallow in nature and they have higher ...

  7. Saturate hydraulic conductivity, water stable aggregates and soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saturate hydraulic conductivity, water stable aggregates and soil organic matter in a sandy-loam soil in Ikwuano lga of Abia state. ... Samples were analyzed for soil properties like; Ksat, WSA (%) and percent organic carbon (OC %), Data from the analysis were subjected to ANOVA using a split plot in RCBD. Results ...

  8. [Effects of land use and management on soil quality of Heerqin sandy land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yongzhong; Zhao, Halin

    2003-10-01

    The changes of soil physical, chemical and biological properties under different land use and management lasted for 14 years were investigated on the Heerqin sandy land. The results showed that among various land use systems marked differences exhibited in soil quality indicators, including soil particle composition, porosity distribution, bulk density, water-holding capacity, organic matter and nutrient contents, pH, and enzyme activities. Most of these soil quality indicators were the highest in the orchard intercropped with crops and perennial grass (agroforestry systems), intermediate in the well-management irrigated farmland, and the lowest in the less-management dry farmland. Compared to the primary grassland soil, although some soil properties, including porosity distribution, water-holding capacity, phosphorus content, and enzyme activities, were improved in the well-management systems, soil organic matter and nitrogen contents were significantly lower. It suggested that a long-term input of organic matter was needed for the restoration and reestablishment of soil carbon and nitrogen pools in the seriously degraded ecosystem. Inappropriate land use and management could rapidly worsen soil quality, and hence, from a perspective of soil resource conservation, a preferable way for preventing soil degradation and achieving sustainable land use should be to give up the cultivation of degraded dry farmlands, and to adopt more effective and appropriate soil management and cultivation practices.

  9. Availability of N amino sugar fraction and response to nitrogen fertilization ({sup 15}N) on soils containing increasing concentrations of organic matter; Disponibilidade da fracao N amino-acucar e resposta a fertilizacao nitrogenada ({sup 15}N) em solos com teores crescentes de materia organica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvao, Sandra R. da S.; Salcedo, Ignacio H.; Menezes, Romulo S.C. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear]. E-mail: reginassg@uol.com.br; salcedo@ufpe.br; rmenezes@ufpe.br; Tiessen, Holm [Goettingen Universitaet (Germany)]. E-mail: tiessen@sask.usask.ca

    2005-07-01

    It has been proposed that the soil N amino sugar fraction (N amino), obtained by chemical extraction, represents a reservoir of labile N for the plants. To test the availability of this fraction and how it affects the response to N fertilization ({sup 15}N), we conducted a pot experiment with twenty soil samples containing increasing concentrations of total N, ten of which were sandy clay loam and ten sandy loam. PVC pots containing 500 cm{sup 3} of soil were divided in two groups: one group received 40 mg N kg{sup -1} as NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} enriched with 2,5 atoms- % of {sup 15}N while the other group did not receive nitrogen. All the soil samples were supplied with 25 mg P kg{sup -1} and cultivated with buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) during 60 days. Total soil N and N amino contents were greater in fine textured samples, in average, than in sandy loams. Dry matter production and N uptake were positively related with N amino concentrations and were greater (p < 0,1) in sandy clay loams than in sandy loams, independently of N fertilization. Ndds% was greater also in fine textured samples than in sandy loams, while Nddf%, in average, did not vary with texture. The use efficiency of fertilizer-N oscillated between 78 and 98%, but the percent yield response decreased from 404% to 47% with the increase in N amino concentrations. (author)

  10. Gas diffusion-derived tortuosity governs saturated hydraulic conductivity in sandy soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masis Melendez, Federico; Deepagoda Thuduwe Kankanamge Kelum, Chamindu; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) is essential for the development of better distributed hydrological models and area-differentiated risk assessment of chemical leaching. The saturated hydraulic conductivity is often estimated from basic soil properties such as particle...... size distribution or, more recently, soil-air permeability. However, similar links to soil gas diffusivity (Dp/Do) have not been fully explored even though gas diffusivity is a direct measure of connectivity and tortuosity of the soil pore network. Based on measurements for a coarse sandy soil....../Do model to measured data, and subsequently linked to the cementation exponent of the wellestablished Revil and Cathles predictive model for saturated hydraulic conductivity. Furthermore, a two-parameter model, analogue to the Kozeny-Carman equation, was developed for the Ksat - Dp/Do relationships. All 44...

  11. Biochar Application in Malaysian Sandy and Acid Sulfate Soils: Soil Amelioration Effects and Improved Crop Production over Two Cropping Seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theeba Manickam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of biochar as an agricultural soil improvement was tested in acid sulfate and sandy soils from Malaysia, cropped with rice and corn. Malaysia has an abundance of waste rice husks that could be used to produce biochar. Rice husk biochar was produced in a gasifier at a local mill in Kelantan as well as in the laboratory using a controlled, specially designed, top lift up draft system (Belonio unit. Rice husk biochar was applied once to both soils at two doses (2% and 5%, in a pot set up that was carried out for two cropping seasons. Positive and significant crop yield effects were observed for both soils, biochars and crops. The yield effects varied with biochar type and dosage, with soil type and over the cropping seasons. The yield increases observed for the sandy soil were tentatively attributed to significant increases in plant-available water contents (from 4%–5% to 7%–8%. The yield effects in the acid sulfate soil were likely a consequence of a combination of (i alleviation of plant root stress by aluminum (Ca/Al molar ratios significantly increased, from around 1 to 3–5 and (ii increases in CEC. The agricultural benefits of rice husk biochar application to Malaysian soils holds promise for its future use.

  12. USE OF THE “ROTHC” MODEL TO SIMULATE SOIL ORGANIC CARBON DYNAMICS ON A SILTY-LOAM INCEPTISOL IN NORTHERN ITALY UNDER DIFFERENT FERTILIZATION PRACTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Francaviglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the efficiency of the RothC model to simulate Soil Organic Carbon (SOC dynamics after 12 years of organic and mineral fertilization practices in a study area located in northern Italy, on a silty-loam Inceptisol with a rotation including tomato, maize and alfalfa. The model performance was assessed by RMSE and EF coefficients. RothC simulated well observed SOC decreases in 71 samples (RMSE=7.42; EF=0.79, while performed with less accuracy when considering all samples (96 samples; RMSE=12.37; EF=0.58, due to the fact that the model failed in case of measured SOC increases (25 samples; RMSE=20.77; EF=-0.038. The model was used to forecast the SOC dynamics over a 50 year period under the same pedoclimatic conditions. Only clay contents >15% allowed to predict increasing levels of SOC respect to the starting values.

  13. Phosphorus leaching in a soil textural gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton

    2009-01-01

    exceeded the in situ leaching. However, the two application techniques did not vary significantly. In a sandy and a clay loam preferential flow paths within the soil columns caused high P leaching when slurry was applied at the soil surface. The effect increased with increasing clay content. Injection...

  14. Escarificação mecânica e biológica para a redução da compactação em argissolo franco-arenoso sob plantio direto Mechanical and biological chiseling to reduce compaction of a sandy loam alfisol under no-tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Abreu

    2004-06-01

    saturado, em médio prazo, a "escarificação biológica" (CM-crot mostrou-se mais eficaz na ruptura da camada compactada e estabelecimento de poros condutores de água do que a escarificação mecânica (Esc-soja do solo. Em contrapartida, se o indicador for a RP, o resultado é inverso. Assim, a propriedade hídrica ou mecânica do solo a ser usada como indicadora para a avaliação da eficácia da ruptura da camada compactada do solo depende do processo físico priorizado: a infiltração e redistribuição de água ou a penetração e crescimento de raízes.Soil management alters the physical soil properties and changes the soil air, water, and solute dynamics. Physical soil properties as affected by conservationist soil management systems were studied in a sandy loam Typic Hapludalf. The treatments were established on a soil that has been under no-tillage for 10 years, and consisted of: no-tillage soybeans, chisel tillage soybeans, reduced tillage Crotalaria, and bare soil without tillage. The evaluated soil properties were soil penetration resistance, bulk density, porosity, pore size distribution, saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, water infiltration using concentric rings or natural rainfall, variation of the volumetric soil moisture throughout the cropping cycle, and water retention curve. Soil penetration resistance (PR was highest at 0.075 m and 0.175 m depth in no-tillage and chiseled soil, respectively. Soil subsurface mobilization with chiseling and surface mobilization due to disking and sowing did not influence the bulk density (BD after the crop harvest. No-till soil under soybean crop had greater macroporosity than reduced tillage crotalaria and bare soil at 0.02 to 0.05 m depth, resulting in a greater saturated hydraulic conductivity and lower water retention during periods of low water availability. Among the analyzed soil physical-mechanical properties, PR seemed to be more sensitive to detect soil compaction than BD or porosities

  15. Decomposition of the organic matter of natural and concentrated vinasse in sandy and clayey soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possignolo-Vitti, Nadia Valério; Bertoncini, Edna Ivani; Vitti, André Cesar

    2017-07-01

    Vinasse has been used as fertilizer by sugarcane growers, due to its potential to completely replace mineral fertilizers. However, if the application is not adequate, this practice may cause environmental contamination. This study used a respirometry test to evaluate the organic matter (OM) decomposition present in natural vinasse and concentrated vinasse (CV), with or without urea addition. The experiment involved two soil types and two types of vinasse at different application rates. The vinasse chemical characterization showed high levels of pseudo-total potassium (K) in both vinasses, which are not considered in the application rates. Decomposition rates above 90% and between 70 and 80% were obtained for sandy and clayey soils, respectively, over a brief 41-day period, indicating rapid OM decomposition. Positive priming effect was observed for CV and CV + urea treatments in sandy soil. An important implication of these findings revealed that K not available in vinasse was released in the soil solution by the OM mineralization, indicating the possibility of overestimation in the vinasse application rates. Therefore, K pseudo-total values should be considered in the calculation of the vinasse application rates. However, studies involving K mobility into soil are needed to validate this hypothesis.

  16. Microbial and physical properties as indicators of sandy soil quality under cropland and grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frac, Magdalena; Lipiec, Jerzy; Usowicz, Boguslaw; Oszust, Karolina; Brzezinska, Malgorzata

    2017-04-01

    Land use is one of the key factor driving changes in soil properties influencing on soil health and quality. Microbial diversity and physical properties are sensitive indicators for assessing soil health and quality. The alterations of microbial diversity and physical properties following land use changes have not been sufficiently elucidated, especially for sandy soils. We investigated microbial diversity indicators including fungal communities composition and physical properties of sandy acid soil under cropland and more than 20-yr-old grassland (after cropland) in Trzebieszów, Podlasie Region, Poland (N 51° 59' 24", E 22° 33' 37"). The study included four depths within 0-60 cm. Microbial genetic diversity was assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (t-RFLP) analysis, fungal community composition was evaluated by next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis and functional diversity was determined by Biolog EcoPlate method. Overall microbial activity was assessed by soil enzymes (dehydrogenases, β-glucosidase) and respiration test. At the same places soil texture, organic carbon content, pH, bulk density, water holding capacity were determined. Our results showed that grassland soil was characterized by higher activity of soil enzymes than cropland. The average well color development of soil microorganisms, the microbial functional diversity and the number of carbon source utilization were significantly affected by land use type and were differentiated among soil depths. In grassland compared to cropland soil a significant increase of carboxylic acids and decrease of amino acids utilization was observed. The quantitative and qualitative differences were found in community of ammonia oxidizing archaea in cropland and grassland soil. The results of fungal community composition help to explain the soil health of grassland and cropland based on the appearance of phytopathogenic and antagonistic fungi. In general bulk density and field water

  17. Investigating tree foliar preference by the earthworms Aporrectodea longa and Allolobophora chlorotica in reclaimed and loam soil

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwood, F; Butt,Kevin Richard; Doick, KJ; Vanguelova, EI

    2017-01-01

    Afforestation can improve the delivery of ecosystem services from reclaimed landfill sites. Tree health is a key determinant of ecosystem service delivery, and is directly impacted by soil quality; which is driven by biological processes in the soil, reliant on leaf litter inputs to function. Different tree species have different litter quality, affecting the degree to which they support biological processes in soils and the development of abundant and diverse soil faunal communities. In reco...

  18. Influence of biochar on the physical, chemical and retention properties of an amended sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiamonte, Giorgio; De Pasquale, Claudio; Parrino, Francesco; Crescimanno, Giuseppina

    2017-04-01

    Soil porosity plays an important role in soil-water retention and water availability to crops, potentially affecting both agricultural practices and environmental sustainability. The pore structure controls fluid flow and transport through the soil, as well as the relationship between the properties of individual minerals and plants. Moreover, the anthropogenic pressure on soil properties has produced numerous sites with extensive desertification process close to residential areas. Biochar (biologically derived charcoal) is produced by pyrolysis of biomasses under low oxygen conditions, and it can be applied for recycling organic waste in soils and increase soil fertility, improving soil structure and enhancing soil water storage and soil water movement. Soil application of biochar might have agricultural, environmental and sustainability advantages over the use of organic manures or compost, as it is a porous material with a high inner surface area. The main objectives of the present study were to investigate the possible application of biochar from forest residues, derived from mechanically chipped trunks and large branches of Abies alba M., Larix decidua Mill., Picea excelsa L., Pinus nigra A. and Pinus sylvestris L. pyrolysed at 450 °C for 48h, to improve soil structural and hydraulic properties (achieving a stabilization of soil). Different amount of biochar were added to a desertic sandy soil, and the effect on soil porosity water retention and water available to crops were investigated. The High Energy Moisture Characteristic (HEMC) technique was applied to investigate soil-water retention at high-pressure head levels. The adsorption and desorption isotherms of N2 on external surfaces were also determined in order to investigate micro and macro porosity ratio. Both the described model of studies on adsorption-desorption experiments with the applied isotherms model explain the increasing substrate porosity with a particular attention to the macro and micro

  19. Creating a soil data base in a reconnaissance soil fertility study of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The soils were sandy clay loam and the pH indicated a moderate to strong acid status with low content of organic matter, percentage nitrogen, available phosphorus, potassium, calcium and magnesium. A reforestation programme with the planting of acacia for soil rehabilitation was recommended for the reserve as the tree ...

  20. Toluene Removal from Sandy Soils via In Situ Technologies with an Emphasis on Factors Influencing Soil Vapor Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mohammad Mehdi; Hatamipour, Mohammad Sadegh; Nourmoradi, Heshmatollah; Farhadkhani, Marzieh; Mohammadi-Moghadam, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    The integration of bioventing (BV) and soil vapor extraction (SVE) appears to be an effective combination method for soil decontamination. This paper serves two main purposes: it evaluates the effects of soil water content (SWC) and air flow rate on SVE and it investigates the transition regime between BV and SVE for toluene removal from sandy soils. 96 hours after air injection, more than 97% removal efficiency was achieved in all five experiments (carried out for SVE) including 5, 10, and 15% for SWC and 250 and 500 mL/min for air flow rate on SVE. The highest removal efficiency (>99.5%) of toluene was obtained by the combination of BV and SVE (AIBV: Air Injection Bioventing) after 96 h of air injection at a constant flow rate of 250 mL/min. It was found that AIBV has the highest efficiency for toluene removal from sandy soils and can remediate the vadose zone effectively to meet the soil guideline values for protection of groundwater. PMID:24587723

  1. Toluene Removal from Sandy Soils via In Situ Technologies with an Emphasis on Factors Influencing Soil Vapor Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Amin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of bioventing (BV and soil vapor extraction (SVE appears to be an effective combination method for soil decontamination. This paper serves two main purposes: it evaluates the effects of soil water content (SWC and air flow rate on SVE and it investigates the transition regime between BV and SVE for toluene removal from sandy soils. 96 hours after air injection, more than 97% removal efficiency was achieved in all five experiments (carried out for SVE including 5, 10, and 15% for SWC and 250 and 500 mL/min for air flow rate on SVE. The highest removal efficiency (>99.5% of toluene was obtained by the combination of BV and SVE (AIBV: Air Injection Bioventing after 96 h of air injection at a constant flow rate of 250 mL/min. It was found that AIBV has the highest efficiency for toluene removal from sandy soils and can remediate the vadose zone effectively to meet the soil guideline values for protection of groundwater.

  2. Zeolite and Hucalcia as Coating Material for Improving Quality of NPK Fertilizer in Costal Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulakhudin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available he growth and yield of plants are mainly a function of the quantity of fertilizer and water. In coastal sandy soil, nutrient losses and dry soils are seriously problems. The objective of the research was to study effect of zeolite and hucalci concentrations as NPK coating materials on NPK qualities i.e. water adsorption and release of N, P and K. The research used a coastal sandy soil as media. It was conducted in a laboratory of Soil Science Department, Gadjah Mada University from July to August 2009. Experimental design used was a factorial in a completely randomized design. The first factor was hucalci concentration, consisted of 10% (H1, 20% (H2, and 30% (H3. The second factor was zeolite concentration, consisted of 25% (Z1, 50% (Z2, 75% (Z3, and 100% (Z4. NPK fertilizer (without coating used as a control. The results showed that hucalci and zeolite had a capability to increase water adsorption and to retard the release of N, P, K. The coated NPK with hucalci 30% and zeolite 100% had the highest quality in water absorption, water retention and release of nutrients.

  3. Does thermal carbonization (Biochar) of organic material increase more merits for their amendments of sandy soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Xu, G.; Sun, J. N.; Shao, H. B.

    2014-02-01

    Organic materials (e.g. furfural residue) are generally believed to improve the physical and chemical properties of the soils with low fertility. Recently, biochar have been received more attention as a possible measure to improve the carbon balance and improve soil quality in some degraded soils. However, little is known about their different amelioration of a sandy saline soil. In this study, 56d incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the influence of furfural and its biochar on the properties of saline soil. The results showed that both furfural and biochar greatly reduced pH, increased soil organic carbon (SOC) content and cation exchange capacity (CEC), and enhanced the available phosphorus (P) in the soil. Furfural is more efficient than biochar in reducing pH: 5% furfural lowered the soil pH by 0.5-0.8 (soil pH: 8.3-8.6), while 5% biochar decreased by 0.25-0.4 due to the loss of acidity in pyrolysis process. With respect to available P, 5% of the furfural addition increased available P content by 4-6 times in comparison to 2-5 times with biochar application. In reducing soil exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), biochar is slightly superior to furfural because soil ESP reduced by 51% and 43% with 5% furfural and 5% biochar addition at the end of incubation. In addition, no significant differences were observed between furfural and biochar about their capacity to retain N, P in leaching solution and to increase CEC in soil. These facts may be caused by the relatively short incubation time. In general, furfural and biochar have different amendments depending on soil properties: furfural was more effectively to decrease pH and to increase available P, whereas biochar played a more important role in increasing SOC and reducing ESP of saline soil.

  4. Effect of successive cauliflower plantings and Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-1 inoculations on disease suppressiveness of a suppressive and a conducive soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, J.; Scheper, R.W.A.; Schilder, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    Disease suppressiveness against Rhizoctonia solani AG 2-1 in cauliflower was studied in two marine clay soils with a sandy loam texture. The soils had a different cropping history. One soil had a long-term (40 years) cauliflower history and was suppressive, the other soil was conducive and came from

  5. Effect of gas on shear wave velocity of sandy soils densified with explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Vega-Posada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Shear wave velocity tests (Vs are commonly used to estimate the increase in resistance of explosive densified soils. In some historical cases, Vs tests performed after the soil improvement process do not show a significant increase in soil resistance, even though the soil surface sits more than 0.50 m. It is believed that this response is due to the presence of gas on the soil mass. Method: This paper presents the results of monotonic triaxial tests performed on samples of dense gaseous sandy soils to evaluate the effect of occluded gas on the response to the shear wave velocity in densified sands with explosives. For sand sampling, it was collected from a loose sand deposit located in South Carolina, USA. These samples were densified in-situ with explosives, and consolidated to the in-situ effective stress conditions, which are considered representative in the conditions of effort at the moment of the densification with explosives. Results: Triaxial tests were performed under global non-drained conditions. The results of these tests show that gas causes the shear wave velocity values obtained for the gaseous sands to approximate the shear wave velocity values obtained in the saturated samples tested under drained conditions. In addition, behavior tends to be more pronounced as the soil is denser. Conclusions: These response may offer some insights as to why the shear wave velocity does not increase significantly in densified soils with explosives, even though the density increases considerably.

  6. Soil compaction effects on growth of young ponderosa pine following litter removal in California's Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Gomez; R. F. Powers; M. J. Singer; W. R. Horwath

    2002-01-01

    Increased use of heavy equipment and more frequent entry into forest stands has increased the potential for soil compaction and decreased productivity. We examined compaction and tree growth relationships on three California soils of contrasting textures (clayey, loamy, and sandy loam) on plots from which the organic soil horizon had been removed. Compacted and...

  7. Estimation of nitrogen pools in irrigated potato production on sandy soil using the model SUBSTOR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Prasad

    Full Text Available Recent increases in nitrate concentrations in the Suwannee River and associated springs in northern Florida have raised concerns over the contributions of non-point sources. The Middle Suwannee River Basin (MSRB is of special concern because of prevalent karst topography, unconfined aquifers and sandy soils which increase vulnerability of the ground water contamination from agricultural operations--a billion dollar industry in this region. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. production poses a challenge in the area due to the shallow root system of potato plants, and low water and nutrient holding capacity of the sandy soils. A four-year monitoring study for potato production on sandy soil was conducted on a commercial farm located in the MSRB to identify major nitrogen (N loss pathways and determine their contribution to the total environmental N load, using a partial N budget approach and the potato model SUBSTOR. Model simulated environmental N loading rates were found to lie within one standard deviation of the observed values and identified leaching loss of N as the major sink representing 25 to 38% (or 85 to 138 kg ha(-1 N of the total input N (310 to 349 kg ha(-1 N. The crop residues left in the field after tuber harvest represented a significant amount of N (64 to 110 kg ha(-1 N and posed potential for indirect leaching loss of N upon their mineralization and the absence of subsequent cover crops. Typically, two months of fallow period exits between harvest of tubers and planting of the fall row crop (silage corn. The fallow period is characterized by summer rains which pose a threat to N released from rapidly mineralizing potato vines. Strategies to reduce N loading into the groundwater from potato production must focus on development and adoption of best management practices aimed on reducing direct as well as indirect N leaching losses.

  8. Estimation of nitrogen pools in irrigated potato production on sandy soil using the model SUBSTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rishi; Hochmuth, George J; Boote, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Recent increases in nitrate concentrations in the Suwannee River and associated springs in northern Florida have raised concerns over the contributions of non-point sources. The Middle Suwannee River Basin (MSRB) is of special concern because of prevalent karst topography, unconfined aquifers and sandy soils which increase vulnerability of the ground water contamination from agricultural operations--a billion dollar industry in this region. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production poses a challenge in the area due to the shallow root system of potato plants, and low water and nutrient holding capacity of the sandy soils. A four-year monitoring study for potato production on sandy soil was conducted on a commercial farm located in the MSRB to identify major nitrogen (N) loss pathways and determine their contribution to the total environmental N load, using a partial N budget approach and the potato model SUBSTOR. Model simulated environmental N loading rates were found to lie within one standard deviation of the observed values and identified leaching loss of N as the major sink representing 25 to 38% (or 85 to 138 kg ha(-1) N) of the total input N (310 to 349 kg ha(-1) N). The crop residues left in the field after tuber harvest represented a significant amount of N (64 to 110 kg ha(-1) N) and posed potential for indirect leaching loss of N upon their mineralization and the absence of subsequent cover crops. Typically, two months of fallow period exits between harvest of tubers and planting of the fall row crop (silage corn). The fallow period is characterized by summer rains which pose a threat to N released from rapidly mineralizing potato vines. Strategies to reduce N loading into the groundwater from potato production must focus on development and adoption of best management practices aimed on reducing direct as well as indirect N leaching losses.

  9. INFLUENCE OF VERMICOMPOST ON THE PHYSICO-CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL PROPERTIES IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF SOIL ALONG WITH YIELD AND QUALITY OF THE PULSE CROP-BLACKGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Parthasarathi, M. Balamurugan, L. S. Ranganathan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Field experiments were conducted during 2002-2003 on clay loam, sandy loam and red loam soil at Sivapuri, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu, to evaluate the efficacy of vermicompost on the physico-chemical and biological characteristics of the soils and on the yield and nutrient content of blackgram - Vigna mungo, in comparison to inorganic fertilizers nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium. Vermicompost had increased the pore space, reduced particle and bulk density, increased water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity, reduced pH and electrical conductivity, increased organic carbon content, available nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium and microbial population and activity in all the soil types, particularly clay loam. The yield and quality (protein and sugar content in seed of blackgram was enhanced in soils, particularly clay loam soil. On the contrary, the application of inorganic fertilizers has resulted in reduced porosity, compaction of soil, reduced carbon and reduced microbial activity.

  10. Transport of humic and fulvic acids in relation to metal mobility in a copper-contaminated acid sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weng, L.; Fest, E.P.M.J.; Filius, J.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The transport of inorganic and organic pollutants in water and soil can be strongly influenced by the mobility of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this paper, the transport of a humic acid (HA) and a fulvic acid (FA) in a copper-contaminated acid sandy soil was studied. The data showed

  11. Hydrological Components of a Young Loblolly Pine Plantation on a Sandy Soil with Estimates of Water Use and Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah A. Abrahamson; Phillip M. Dougherty; Stanley J. Zarnoch

    1998-01-01

    Fertilizer and irrigation treatments were applied in a 7- to l0-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation on a sandy soil near Laurinburg, North Carolina. Rainfall, throughfall, stemflow, and soil water content were measured throughout the study period. Monthly interception losses ranged from 4 to 15% of rainfall. Stemflow ranged from 0.2...

  12. Biochar reduces copper toxicity in Chenopodium quinoa Willd. In a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Wolfram; Kammann, Claudia; Koyro, Hans-Werner

    2012-01-01

    Mining, smelting, land applications of sewage sludge, the use of fungicides containing copper (Cu), and other human activities have led to widespread soil enrichment and contamination with Cu and potentially toxic conditions. Biochar (BC) can adsorb several substances, ranging from herbicides to plant-inhibiting allelochemicals. However, the range of potential beneficial effects on early-stage plant growth with regard to heavy metal toxicity is largely unexplored. We investigated the ameliorating properties of a forestry-residue BC under Cu toxicity conditions on early plant growth. Young quinoa plants () were grown in the greenhouse in the presence of 0, 2, and 4% BC application (w/w) added to a sandy soil with 0, 50, or 200 μg g Cu supplied. The plants without BC showed severe stress symptoms and reduced growth shortly after Cu application of 50 μg g and died at 200 μg Cu g. Increasing BC concentrations in the growth medium significantly increased the plant performance without Cu toxicity or under Cu stress. At the 4% BC application rate, the plants with 200 μg g Cu almost reached the same biomass as in the control treatment. In the presence of BC, less Cu entered the plant tissues, which had reduced Cu concentrations in the order roots, shoots, leaves. The amelioration effect also was reflected in the plant-soil system CO gas exchange, which showed clear signs of improvement with BC presence. The most likely ameliorating mechanisms were adsorption of Cu to negatively charged BC surfaces and an improvement of the water supply. Overall, BC seems to be a beneficial amendment with the potential to ameliorate Cu toxicity in sandy soils. Further research with a broad spectrum of different soil types, BCs, and crop plants is required. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. Influence of manganese fertilizer on efficiency of grapes on sandy soils of the Chechen Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batukaev A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a result of the studies, there has been obtained new information about the manganese influence on productivity of grape plantations, on sandy soils of the Chechen Republic. Manganese fertilizing of 4 kg active ingredient per 1 ha, against the background of nitrogen 90 kg, phosphorus 90 kg and potassium 90 kg/ha, made it into a phase of grape sap flow, which contributes to higher yields, increase of the sugar content of the berries and a significant decrease in juice acidity, in comparison with other options.

  14. Effect of Zinc-Phosphorus Interaction on Corn Silage Grown on Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Drissi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the response of corn silage to different combinations of zinc (Zn and phosphorus (P soil supply when grown in sandy soil. The soil was naturally poor in extractable Zn and rich in plant-available P. The experiment was conducted in outdoor containers. The treatments consisted of soil supply combinations of 3 levels of Zn (0, 5 and 10 mg Zn kg−1 of dry soil and 4 levels of P (0, 12, 36 and 72 mg P2O5 kg−1 of dry soil. The results showed the absence of a significant effect (at p ≤ 0.05 of Zn-P interaction on plant growth, plant mineral content or total aerial dry weight at harvest. P application depressed Zn shoot content, and conversely, Zn supply slightly reduced P shoot content. The total aerial dry weight at harvest was not enhanced by P application. However, it was significantly increased by Zn supply of 5 mg·kg−1 only for the highest P (72 mg·kg−1 application (at p ≤ 0.05. This increase was around 15% compared to no Zn soil supply. It was especially linked to kernel dry weight and particularly to pollination rate. For the highest level of P supply, Zn applications significantly enhanced (at p ≤ 0.05 the kernel dry weight and the pollination rate by 22.1% and 38.4% respectively, compared to no Zn supply.

  15. Dynamics of carbon pools in post-agrogenic sandy soils of southern taiga of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyuri Dmitriy I

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, a lot of arable lands were abandoned in many countries of the world and, especially, in Russia, where about half a million square kilometers of arable lands were abandoned in 1961-2007. The soils at these fallows undergo a process of natural restoration (or self-restoration that changes the balance of soil organic matter (SOM supply and mineralization. Results A soil chronosequence study, covering the ecosystems of 3, 20, 55, 100, and 170 years of self-restoration in southern taiga zone, shows that soil organic content of mineral horizons remains relatively stable during the self-restoration. This does not imply, however, that SOM pools remain steady. The C/N ratio of active SOM reached steady state after 55 years, and increased doubly (from 12.5 - 15.6 to 32.2-33.8. As to the C/N ratio of passive SOM, it has been continuously increasing (from 11.8-12.7 to 19.0-22.8 over the 170 years, and did not reach a steady condition. Conclusion The results of the study imply that soil recovery at the abandoned arable sandy lands of taiga is incredibly slow process. Not only soil morphological features of a former ploughing remained detectable but also the balance of soil organic matter input and mineralization remained unsteady after 170 years of self-restoration.

  16. Biochar application to sandy and loamy soils for agricultural nutrient management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronwald, Marco; Don, Axel; Tiemeyer, Baerbel; Helfrich, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Soil fertility of agricultural soils is challenged by nutrients losses and increasing soil acidification. Furthermore, leached nutrients negatively affect the quality of ground and surface water 1]. In addition to the possible soil carbon sequestration by applying biochars, many positive soil-improving properties are attributed to biochars. The application of biochars to agricultural - especially sandy - soils could reduce leaching of nutrients and may improve their availability 1,2]. Thus, biochar application to agricultural fields could be an ecologically and economically viable option to improve soils' fertility. However, biochar properties strongly depend on their feedstock and production process 3]. Various types of biochars (pyrolysis char, hydrochar (produced at 200 and 250° C); feedstocks: digestate, Miscanthus and wood chips) were used to determine sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms for the major nutrients Ca, Mg, K, NH4 and NO3 as a function of biochar types in different soil substrates (sand, loess). In addition, the biochars were washed to create free binding sites on the chars' surface that simulate aged char. We compared the simulated aged char with biochars that was aged in-situ at a field experiment for seven months. The first results showed that pyrochars have the largest retention potential for NO3 and hydrochars have retention potential for NH4. Washing of biochars turned them from a PO4 and NH4 source into an adsorber, especially for hydrochars. Highest leaching was observed for biochars from digestates likely due to the high nutrient content of digestates. But the different ions may lead to pH-dependent interactions between each other and the chars' surface that override the adsoption effects. In this context, cation-bridge and ligand bindings 4,5] need to be further investigated. Most of the fresh, unwashed biochars were a source of nutrients with hardly any detectable nutrient retention. Pyrochars showed the highest potential for anion

  17. Effect of Poultry Manure and Vertisols Matter on Availability and Leaching of Macronutrients in Coastal Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Djadmo Kertonegoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The poultry manure and vertisols matter have potency for reclaiming a soil. The research objectives was to study the effect of poultry manure (PM and vertisols matter (VM on availability and leaching of macro nutrient in coastal sandy soil treated by rainfall simulation. A laboratory experiment was conducted with lesymeters to measure nutrient leaching. The factorial 4 × 4 treatment applied was arranged by randomized completely block design with three replications. The first factor was level of PM consisted of 0, 20, 40, and 60 Mg ha-1. The second one was the level of VM consisted of 0, 5, 10, and 15%. Variables observed were soil physical and chemical properties such as bulk density (BD, particle density (PD, porosity, pF 2.54, pF 4.2, available water capacity (AWC, permeabi- lity, cation exchange capacity (CEC, available macro nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S by Morgan Wolf extraction, and the rate of macro nutrient leaching measuared by Spectrophotometry and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry. Result of the research showed that application of PM and VM in the sandy soil decreased soil PD and BD, increased soil porosity and AWC, decreased soil permeability, and slightly increased soil CEC. Application of PM and VM increased soil available nutrient in the sandy soil. Up to 60 Mg ha-1 dose PM increased soil available nutrient, while 10 to 15% dose, VM did not increased it. The rank of nutrient leaching from high to low by rain simulation was N-NO3-> SO4= > K+ > Ca2+. Leaching of K and N-NH4+ could be reduced by soil amendment. Combination of PM 60 Mg ha-1 and VM 10% was the best soil amendment for increasing nutrient availability and decreasing nutrient leaching in the sandy soil.

  18. Different Behavior of Enteric Bacteria and Viruses in Clay and Sandy Soils after Biofertilization with Swine Digestate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongaro, Gislaine; García-González, María C; Hernández, Marta; Kunz, Airton; Barardi, Célia R M; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2017-01-01

    Enteric pathogens from biofertilizer can accumulate in the soil, subsequently contaminating water and crops. We evaluated the survival, percolation and leaching of model enteric pathogens in clay and sandy soils after biofertilization with swine digestate: PhiX-174, mengovirus (vMC0), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were used as biomarkers. The survival of vMC0 and PhiX-174 in clay soil was significantly lower than in sandy soil (iT90 values of 10.520 ± 0.600 vs. 21.270 ± 1.100 and 12.040 ± 0.010 vs. 43.470 ± 1.300, respectively) and PhiX-174 showed faster percolation and leaching in sandy soil than clay soil (iT90 values of 0.46 and 2.43, respectively). S. enterica Typhimurium was percolated and inactivated more slowly than E. coli O157:H7 (iT90 values of 9.340 ± 0.200 vs. 6.620 ± 0.500 and 11.900 ± 0.900 vs. 10.750 ± 0.900 in clay and sandy soils, respectively), such that E. coli O157:H7 was transferred more quickly to the deeper layers of both soils evaluated (percolation). Our findings suggest that E. coli O157:H7 may serve as a useful microbial biomarker of depth contamination and leaching in clay and sandy soil and that bacteriophage could be used as an indicator of enteric pathogen persistence. Our study contributes to development of predictive models for enteric pathogen behavior in soils, and for potential water and food contamination associated with biofertilization, useful for risk management and mitigation in swine digestate recycling.

  19. Different Behavior of Enteric Bacteria and Viruses in Clay and Sandy Soils after Biofertilization with Swine Digestate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongaro, Gislaine; García-González, María C.; Hernández, Marta; Kunz, Airton; Barardi, Célia R. M.; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2017-01-01

    Enteric pathogens from biofertilizer can accumulate in the soil, subsequently contaminating water and crops. We evaluated the survival, percolation and leaching of model enteric pathogens in clay and sandy soils after biofertilization with swine digestate: PhiX-174, mengovirus (vMC0), Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were used as biomarkers. The survival of vMC0 and PhiX-174 in clay soil was significantly lower than in sandy soil (iT90 values of 10.520 ± 0.600 vs. 21.270 ± 1.100 and 12.040 ± 0.010 vs. 43.470 ± 1.300, respectively) and PhiX-174 showed faster percolation and leaching in sandy soil than clay soil (iT90 values of 0.46 and 2.43, respectively). S. enterica Typhimurium was percolated and inactivated more slowly than E. coli O157:H7 (iT90 values of 9.340 ± 0.200 vs. 6.620 ± 0.500 and 11.900 ± 0.900 vs. 10.750 ± 0.900 in clay and sandy soils, respectively), such that E. coli O157:H7 was transferred more quickly to the deeper layers of both soils evaluated (percolation). Our findings suggest that E. coli O157:H7 may serve as a useful microbial biomarker of depth contamination and leaching in clay and sandy soil and that bacteriophage could be used as an indicator of enteric pathogen persistence. Our study contributes to development of predictive models for enteric pathogen behavior in soils, and for potential water and food contamination associated with biofertilization, useful for risk management and mitigation in swine digestate recycling. PMID:28197137

  20. Fertility Capability Classification of Some Soils with Aquic Moisture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fertility capability classification system in which Types, Substrate Types and Modifers were used in classifying the soils based on the results of the physico- chemical properties evaluated. The results of the study showed that the texture of the soils ranged from clayey in the mangrove swamps to loamy and sandy loam in ...

  1. Conservation and conventional tillage effects on soil properties and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four conservation tillage practices and two conventional tillage practices were evaluated for two years to determine their effects on soil properties (moisture content, bulk density, porosity, shear strength, cone index), weed control, germination, growth and yield of soybean (Glycine max (L) Merril). The soil was sandy loam ...

  2. Biochar pyrolyzed at two temperatures affects Escherichia coli transport through a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, Carl H; Abit, Sergio M

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of biochar into soils has been proposed as a means to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. An added environmental benefit is that biochar has also been shown to increase soil retention of nutrients, heavy metals, and pesticides. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether biochar amendments affect the transport of Escherichia coli through a water-saturated soil. We looked at the transport of three E. coli isolates through 10-cm columns packed with a fine sandy soil amended with 2 or 10% (w/w) poultry litter biochar pyrolyzed at 350 or 700°C. For all three isolates, mixing the high-temperature biochar at a rate of 2% into the soil had no impact on transport behavior. When added at a rate of 10%, a reduction of five orders of magnitude in the amount of E. coli transported through the soil was observed for two of the isolates, and a 60% reduction was observed for the third isolate. Mixing the low-temperature biochar into the soil resulted in enhanced transport through the soil for two of the isolates, whereas no significant differences in transport behavior were observed between the low-temperature and high-temperature biochar amendments for one isolate. Our results show that the addition of biochar can affect the retention and transport behavior of E. coli and that biochar application rate, biochar pyrolysis temperature, and bacterial surface characteristics were important factors determining the transport of E. coli through our test soil. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  3. Capillary rise simulation of saline waters of different concentrations in sandy soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthawit Jitrapinate

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity causes corrosion of engineering structures worldwide. The main cause of soil salinization is capillary rise of saline groundwater. Soil salinity can be mitigated once the capillary rise of saline groundwater in soils is understood. The objective of this paper is to present experimental results of capillary rising rates of different salt concentration waters in three sandy soils. Each sample comprised of a soil column 300-mm height and 50-mm in diameter steeped in a 25-mm deep saline water pool for a time period to allow for the capillary action to develop. The salinity strength varied from fresh water, EC = 2 dS/m, to medium saline (50, 100, and 150 dS/m, and to high saline water (200 dS/m. It was found that the highest rate of capillary rise occurred in medium saline waters, while the lowest is the fresh water. The very saline water has lower rate than the medium ones but higher than fresh water.

  4. Geotechnical response of pipelines shallowly embedded in clayey and sandy soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Jose Renato M.S. [Military Institute of Engineering (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Borges, Ricardo G. [Centro de Pesquisa Leopoldo A. Miguez de Melo (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Feitoza, Jaquelline; Almeida, Maria C.F.; Almeida, Marcio S.S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    2009-07-01

    Offshore and onshore pipelines used for oil and gas transportation are often buried to avoid eventual damages and also to provide movement constraint. The soil cover supply resistance against upward and lateral displacements of the pipe caused by thermally-induced axial loading, which can lead to structural buckling. The clear understanding of this behavior is critical for the development of new analysis tools and new design criteria which could minimize future accidents. In this way, research on pipe-soil interaction behavior has been undertaken using both clayey and sandy soils through physical and numerical simulations. This paper is part of a research effort to provide a pipe-soil interaction guideline suitable for application in pipeline design along the Brazilian coast. This work presents a comprehensive set of lateral buckling simulation tests using the COPPE-UFRJ geotechnical centrifuge. The chosen soils are typical of the Brazilian coast and therefore very representative of tropical regions. Physical and numerical results are compared and other research works are considered in order to assess the overall uplift resistance. In flight T-bar and cone penetration tests were undertaken to provide a soil resistance profile which was used to trace dimensionless curves that could be adopted in similar design situations. (author)

  5. Relation between soil P test values and mobilization of dissolved and particulate P from the plough layer of typical Danish soils from a long-term field experiment with applied P fertilizers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaesner, N.; Kjaergaard, C.; Rubaek, G. H.

    2013-01-01

    and particulate P through the plough layer of a typical Danish sandy loam soil subjected to three different P fertilizer regimes in a long-term field experiment established in 1975. The leaching experiment used intact soil columns (20cm diameter, 20cm high) during unsaturated conditions. The three soils had small...

  6. Utilization of Sandy Soil as the Primary Raw Material in Production of Unfired Bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilan Tao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, attempts were made to use sandy soil as the main raw material in making unfired bricks. The sprayed-cured brick specimens were tested for compressive and flexural strength, rate of water absorption, percentage of voids, bulk density, freezing/thawing, and water immersion resistance. In addition, the microstructures of the specimens were also studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD technique. The test results show that unfired brick specimens with the addition of ground-granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBS tend to achieve better mechanical properties when compared with the specimens that added cement alone, with GGBS correcting particle size distribution and contributing to the pozzolanic reactions and the pore-filling effects. The test specimens with the appropriate addition of cement, GGBS, quicklime, and gypsum are dense and show a low water absorption rate, a low percentage of voids, and an excellent freezing/thawing and water immersion resistance. The SEM observation and XRD analysis verify the formation of hydrate products C–S–H and ettringite, providing a better explanation of the mechanical and physical behavior and durability of the derived unfired bricks. The results obtained suggest that there is a technical approach for the high-efficient comprehensive utilization of sandy soil and provide increased economic and environmental benefits.

  7. Projectile Penetration into Sandy Soil Confined by a Honeycomb-Like Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HPS (Honeycomb-like Protective Structure is a newly proposed protective structure filled with sandy soil. In order to investigate the penetration resistance of the structure, numerical simulations based on SPH method had been carried out by using LS-DYNA, which are corresponding to the experiments. The calibrated model leads to reasonable predictions of the dynamic responses and damage modes of the HPS. More situations were carried out taking factors influencing the penetration into consideration, including point of impact, angle of impact, and projectile caliber. Penetration mode was established by analyzing the energy dissipation and investigating the mechanism from the phenomenological viewpoint. Simulation results show that the resisting forces and the torque that act on the long rod projectile would be greater than those acting on the short one when instability occurred. Besides, approximate 45° angle of impact was formed in the case of off-axis, which has a certain influence on the ballistic stability, resulting in more kinetic energy of projectile dissipating in HPS and less depth of penetration. The kinetic energy of projectile dissipated in sandy soil largely and the strip slightly, and the former was greater than the sum of the latter.

  8. Saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat) in relation to some soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results of the study showed that the particle size fractions of the soils varied from sandy loam to clay loam. Bulk density and particle density were low to moderate with mean values of 1.44 gcm-3 and 2.34 gcm-3. Total porosity was low with mean value of 38.06% and a coefficient of variation of 9.56%. Saturated hydraulic ...

  9. Effects of Green Manure and Clay on the Soil Characteristics, Growth and Yield of Peanut at the Coastal Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchtar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Poor physical properties and limited amount of available nutrients wereregarded as two main constraints possessed by coastal sandy soil for agricultural production. The objective of thestudy was to identify the effect of green manure and clay soil applications toward soils characteristic, growth andyield of peanut (Arachis hypogeae L. in the coastal sand soil. A completely randomized design with factorialpattern 4 x 5 was applied in this experiment. The first factors were the rate of green manure application consisted offour levels, i.e. control, 5 Mg ha-1, 10 Mg ha-1 and 15 Mg ha-1 of green manures. The second factors were the additionof five different levels of clay, i.e. control, Vertisol, Alfisol, Inceptisol and Vertisol + Alfisol + Inceptisol. Eachtreatment combinations were replicated three times. Results of the study showed that the vertisol soil affectingphysical characteristics of soil. The addition of Inceptisol soil affected chemical characteristic of soil, increasedgrowth and yield of peanut. Application of 15 Mg ha-1 of green manures affected toward the characteristic of soilsexcept of the crop yields. However, there was no significant interaction effect from both materials to all variablesobserved.

  10. [Soil sandy desertification and salinization and their interrelationships in Yanghuang irrigated area of Hongsipu, Ningxia of northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin-guo; Song, Nai-ping

    2011-09-01

    By the methods of controlled and typical sampling, this paper analyzed the texture, salinization characteristics, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and their correlations in the 0-40 cm soil profiles of corn land, medlar land, and non-utilized land in Yanghuang irrigated area of Hongsipu, Northwest China. Under controlled sampling, the salt content in the soil profiles was 0.69-1.30 g x kg(-1) (except in non-utilized land where the 0-10 cm soil salt content was up to 1.74 g x kg(-1)), with no obvious salinization. The sodium adsorption ratio and exchangeable sodium percentage in the 20-40 cm soil layer of medlar land were 12.18 and 14.1%, respectively, and the total content of clay and silt in the 0-40 cm soil profile of medlar land was up to 37.3% whereas that in the 0-20 cm soil layer of corn land was only 13.5%. In the 20-40 cm soil layer of corn land, the indices of sandy desertification and salinization had significant correlations under controlled sampling but no correlations under typical sampling, while the CEC and the sandy desertification and salinization indices had significant correlations under typical sampling. In different land use types in the study area, soil sandy desertification and salinization had complicated interrelationships, and CEC could be used as the indicator for the changes in soil environmental quality.

  11. Modeling hydrology, metribuzin degradation and metribuzin transport in macroporous tilled and no-till silt loam soil using RZWQM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Robert W; Ma, Liwang; Wauchope, R Don; Ahuja, Lajpat R; Rojas, Kenneth W; Ma, Qingli; Warner, Richard; Byers, Matt

    2004-03-01

    Due to the complex nature of pesticide transport, process-based models can be difficult to use. For example, pesticide transport can be effected by macropore flow, and can be further complicated by sorption, desorption and degradation occurring at different rates in different soil compartments. We have used the Root Zone Water Quality Model (RZWQM) to investigate these phenomena with field data that included two management conditions (till and no-till) and metribuzin concentrations in percolate, runoff and soil. Metribuzin degradation and transport were simulated using three pesticide sorption models available in RZWQM: (a) instantaneous equilibrium-only (EO); (b) equilibrium-kinetic (EK, includes sites with slow desorption and no degradation); (c) equilibrium-bound (EB, includes irreversibly bound sites with relatively slow degradation). Site-specific RZWQM input included water retention curves from four soil depths, saturated hydraulic conductivity from four soil depths and the metribuzin partition coefficient. The calibrated parameters were macropore radius, surface crust saturated hydraulic conductivity, kinetic parameters, irreversible binding parameters and metribuzin half-life. The results indicate that (1) simulated metribuzin persistence was more accurate using the EK (root mean square error, RMSE = 0.03 kg ha(-1)) and EB (RMSE = 0.03 kg ha(-1)) sorption models compared to the EO (RMSE = 0.08 kg ha(-1)) model because of slowing metribuzin degradation rate with time and (2) simulating macropore flow resulted in prediction of metribuzin transport in percolate over the simulation period within a factor of two of that observed using all three pesticide sorption models. Moreover, little difference in simulated daily transport was observed between the three pesticide sorption models, except that the EB model substantially under-predicted metribuzin transport in runoff and percolate >30 days after application when transported concentrations were relatively low

  12. Influence of drainage status on soil and water chemistry, litter decomposition and soil respiration in central Amazonian forests on sandy soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Ocimar Manzi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Central Amazonian rainforest landscape supports a mosaic of tall terra firme rainforest and ecotone campinarana, riparian and campina forests, reflecting topography-induced variations in soil, nutrient and drainage conditions. Spatial and temporal variations in litter decomposition, soil and groundwater chemistry and soil CO2 respiration were studied in forests on sandy soils, whereas drought sensitivity of poorly-drained valley soils was investigated in an artificial drainage experiment. Slightly changes in litter decomposition or water chemistry were observed as a consequence of artificial drainage. Riparian plots did experience higher litter decomposition rates than campina forest. In response to a permanent lowering of the groundwater level from 0.1 m to 0.3 m depth in the drainage plot, topsoil carbon and nitrogen contents decreased substantially. Soil CO2 respiration decreased from 3.7±0.6 µmol m-2 s-1 before drainage to 2.5±0.2 and 0.8±0.1 µmol m-2 s-1 eight and 11 months after drainage, respectively. Soil respiration in the control plot remained constant at 3.7±0.6 µmol m-2 s-1. The above suggests that more frequent droughts may affect topsoil carbon and nitrogen content and soil respiration rates in the riparian ecosystem, and may induce a transition to less diverse campinarana or short-statured campina forest that covers areas with strongly-leached sandy soil.

  13. Long-term effects of fallow, tillage and manure application on soil organic matter and nitrogen fractions and on sorghum yield under Sudano-Sahelian conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mando, A.; Ouattara, B.; Somado, A.E.; Wopereis, M.C.S.; Stroosnijder, L.; Breman, H.

    2005-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) controls the physical, chemical and biological properties of soil and is a key factor in soil productivity. Data on SOM quantity and quality are therefore important for agricultural sustainability. In 1990, an experiment was set up at Saria, Burkina Faso on a sandy loam

  14. Influence of legume crops on content of organic carbon in sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajduk Edmund

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a 3-year field experiment designed to evaluate the content of organic carbon in brown soil (Haplic Cambisol Dystric developed from a light loamy sand under legumes cultivation. Experimental factors were: species of legume crop (colorful-blooming pea (Pisum sativum, chickling vetch (Lathyrus sativus, narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius, methods of legumes tillage (legumes in pure culture and in mixture with naked oats and mineral N fertilization (0, 30, 60, 90 kg N·ha−1. Cultivation of legumes on sandy soil did not result in an increase of organic carbon content in the soil after harvest as compared to the initial situation, i.e. 7.39 vs. 7.76 g·kg−1 dry matter (DM, on average, respectively. However, there was the beneficial effect of this group of plants on soil abundance in organic matter, the manifestation of which was higher content of organic carbon in soils after legume harvest as compared to soils with oats grown (7.21 g·kg−1 DM, on average. Among experimental crops, cultivation of pea exerted the most positive action to organic carbon content (7.58 g·kg−1, after harvest, on average, whereas narrow-leaved lupin had the least effect on organic carbon content (7.23 g·kg−1, on average. Pure culture and greater intensity of legume cultivation associated with the use of higher doses of mineral nitrogen caused less reduction in organic carbon content in soils after harvest.

  15. Laboratory and field study of the performance of helical piles in sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Nabizadeh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Developing different method in construction of deep footing plays a major role in optimized and economized performing of civil projects especially in problematic soils. One of the common types of deep footing is helical piles which have several advantages such as fast procedure, useful in different soil types, performing without noise and vibration, effective in pressure and tension and etc. In this paper, the performance of 1-helix & 2-helixes and 3-helixes in an un-grouted and grouted with the field and laboratory studies are discussed. Field studies include of helical piles behavior in sand. Laboratory tests with physical FCV modeling is also carried out on the soil of the site. Grouting effect on helical piles resistance is evaluated. Comparison load test results with analytical method were compared. Results show that performance cylindrical in sandy soils in helical piles is not suitable and increasing helical number pile capacity is decreases. Also, after grouting helical pile with three helixes increases more resistant compare to one helix and double helixes.

  16. Environmental adaptability of Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta to sandy ash soil of Merapi Volcano, Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Wardoyo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies on volcanic ash of Mount Merapi erupted in 2010 are limited to only characterization of mineralogical, physical, chemical, and biological properties of the volcanic ash. In order to speed up rehabilitation of soils affected by the volcanic ash, it is necessary to study the application of suitable plant species, which is called bio-mechanic conservation. The purpose of this study was to test the environmental adaptability of Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta in sandy soil covered by volcanic ash of Mount Merapi. This study was carried out using 2x4 Split-plot randomized block design with three replicates. The main plot of the design was plant species (Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta, while the sub plot was the dose of organic matter application (0, 20, 40, and 60 t / ha. Soil parameters measured were N-total, P-total, available P, available K, and organic matter contents. Plant parameters measured were plant dry weight and plant height. The results showed no significant differences in soil N, P and K contents of all treatments tested in this study after 9 weeks, except C organic content. Canavalia virosa grew well until 9 weeks, whereas Flemingia congesta started to die a 9 weeks after planting.

  17. Multiple benefits of manure: the key to maintenance of soil fertility and restoration of depleted sandy soils on African smallholder farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zingore, S.; Delve, R.J.; Nyamangara, J.; Giller, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    Manure is a key nutrient resource on smallholder farms in the tropics, especially on poorly buffered sandy soils, due to its multiple benefits for soil fertility. Farmers preferentially apply manure to fields closest to homesteads (homefields), which are more fertile than fields further away

  18. Biochar application does not improve the soil hydrological function of a sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeffery, S.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Stoof, C.R.; Bezemer, T.M.; Voorde, van de T.F.J.; Mommer, L.; Groenigen, van J.W.

    2015-01-01

    Biochar application to soil is currently being widely posited as a means to improve soil quality and thereby increase crop yield. Next to beneficial effects on soil nutrient availability and retention, biochar is assumed to improve soil water retention. However, evidence for such an effect in the

  19. Effect of Plant-derived Hydrophobic Compounds on Soil Water. Repellency in Dutch Sandy Soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, J.; Dekker, S.C.; Nierop, K.G.J.

    2013-01-01

    Soil water repellency or hydrophobicity is a common and important soil property, which may diminish plant growth and promotes soil erosion leading to environmentally undesired situations. Hydrophobic organic compounds in the soil are derived from vegetation (leaves, roots, mosses) or microorganisms

  20. Degradation of metribuzin in two soil types of Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Randa; Coste, Camille M; Kawar, Nasri S

    2006-01-01

    The degradation of metribuzin [4-amino-6-tert-butyl-3-methylthio-1,2,4-triazin-5(4H)-one] as influenced by soil type, temperature, humidity, organic fertilizers, soil sterilization, and ultra-violet radiation was studied in two soil types of Lebanon under laboratory conditions. The two soil types were sandy loam and clay. Deamination of metribuzin in the sandy loam soil to its deaminometribuzin (DA) derivative was basically a result of biological activity. In the clay soil the first metabolite diketometribuzin (DK) was a result of oxidative desulfuration, while diketo-deaminometribuzin (DADK) was the product of reductive deamination. The two soils represented major differences in the pesticide transformation processes. Photodecomposition on the soil surface and in aqueous media was also an important process in the degradation of metribuzin. Furthermore, the increase in soil organic matter enhanced degradation.

  1. Volatilization of tri-allate, ethoprophos and parathion measured with four methods after spraying on a sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bor, G.; Berg, van den F.; Smelt, J.H.; Smidt, R.A.; Peppel-Groen, van de A.E.; Leistra, M.

    1995-01-01

    At about eleven times after application of tri-allate, ethoprophos and parathion to a sandy soil, their rates of volatilization were determined by the aerodynamic method (AD), the Bowen-ratio method (BR), the theoretical-profile method (TP) and the Box method. The volatilization was highest for

  2. Movement of water, bromide ion and the pesticides ethoprophos and bentazone measured in a sandy soil in Vredepeel (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Pas, van der L.J.T.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to collect a data set suitable for testing pesticide leaching models in the case of a Dutch sandy soil with a shallow groundwater table. The movement of water, bromide ion and the behaviour of the pesticides ethoprophos and bentazone was studied. The substances were applied

  3. Movement of water, bromide and the pesticides ethoprophos and bentazone in a sandy soil: the Vredepeel data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, J.J.T.I.; Pas, van der L.J.T.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to collect a data set suitable for testing pesticide leaching models in the case of a Dutch sandy soil with a shallow groundwater table. The movement of water, bromide ion and the behaviour of the pesticides ethoprophos and bentazone was studied. The substances were applied

  4. Woodland dynamics as a result of settlement relocation on Pleistocene sandy soils in The Netherlands (200 BC – 1400 AD).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewoudt, B.; Spek, Mattheus

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the potential of charcoal kilns as indicators (proxy data) of the interaction between settlement dynamics and the history of woodland presence, composition and structure. The results demonstrate that in our research area (Pleistocene sandy soils of the Netherlands)

  5. Effects of polyacrylamide, biopolymer, and biochar on decomposition of soil organic matter and 14C-labeled plant residues as determined by enzyme activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud Awad, Yasser; Ok, Young Sik; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2014-05-01

    Application of polymers for the improvement of aggregate structure and reduction of soil erosion may alter the availability and decomposition of plant residues. In this study, we assessed the effects of anionic polyacrylamide (PAM), synthesized biopolymer (BP), and biochar (BC) on the decomposition of 14C-labeled maize residue in sandy and sandy loam soils. Specifically, PAM and BP with or without 14C-labeled plant residue were applied at 400 kg ha-1, whereas BC was applied at 5000 kg ha-1, after which the soils were incubated for 80 days at 22 oC. Initially, plant residue decomposition was much higher in untreated sandy loam soil than in sandy soil. Nevertheless, the stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were more pronounced in sandy soil, where it accounted for 13.4% and 23.4% of 14C input, respectively, whereas in sandy loam soil, the acceleration of plant residue decomposition by BP and BC did not exceed 2.6% and 14.1%, respectively, compared to untreated soil with plant residue. The stimulating effects of BP and BC on the decomposition of plant residue were confirmed based on activities of β-cellobiohydrolase, β-glucosidase, and chitinase in both soils. In contrast to BC and BP, PAM did not increase the decomposition of native or added C in both soils.

  6. Target Diameter Models for Leuce Poplar Stands Growing on Sandy Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RÉDEI, Károly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The fact that certain ecological factors fundamentally influencing tree growth have become unfavourable in Hungary in recent years, has led to the more extensive use of white poplar (and its hybrids in afforestation and forest regeneration. An intensive integrated research and development work has been carried out on the growth of Leuce poplars on sandy soils, including primarily the white poplar (Populus alba and its natural hybrid the grey poplar (Populus x canescens. The research revealed several factors influencing stand growth. The study presents a new, simplified tending operation model for Leuce poplar stands, as well as age, growing space and target diameter models suitable for qualitaty log production and for mass assortments. The simplicity of these practice-oriented models may foster the qualitative development of Leuce poplar management in Hungary.

  7. Effects Of Palm Oil Mill Effluents (Pome) On Soil Bacterial Flora And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sandy loam soil in Egbema, Rivers State was impacted with POME at different levels and analyzed for bacteriological quality and soil enzyme activities. Light application caused significant increase in total heterotrophic, phosphate solibilizing, nitrifying and lipolytic bacterial counts while heavy application caused a decrease ...

  8. Controlled release fertilizer increased phytoremediation of petroleum-contaminated sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartmill, Andrew D; Cartmill, Donita L; Alarcón, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to determine the effect of the application of controlled release fertilizer [(CRF) 0, 4,6, or 8 kg m(-3)] on Lolium multiflorum Lam. survival and potential biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (0, 3000, 6000, or 15000 mg kg(-1)) in sandy soil. Plant adaptation, growth, photosynthesis, total chlorophyll, and proline content as well as rhizosphere microbial population (culturable heterotrophic fungal and bacterial populations) and total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH)-degradation were determined. Petroleum induced-toxicity resulted in reduced plant growth, photosynthesis, and nutrient status. Plant adaptation, growth, photosynthesis, and chlorophyll content were enhanced by the application of CRF in contaminated soil. Proline content showed limited use as a physiological indicator of petroleum induced-stress in plants. Bacterial and filamentous fungi populations were stimulated by the petroleum concentrations. Bacterial populations were stimulated by CRF application. At low petroleum contamination, CRF did not enhance TPH-degradation. However, petroleum degradation in the rhizosphere was enhanced by the application of medium rates of CRF, especially when plants were exposed to intermediate and high petroleum contamination. Application of CRF allowed plants to overcome the growth impairment induced by the presence of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils.

  9. Chemical behavior of radioiodine in soils, (1). Studies on the sorption and desorption of iodide on sandy soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Kamada, Hiroshi (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Nakaminato, Ibaraki (Japan). Nakaminato Lab. Branch Office)

    1983-12-01

    Iodine-129 will be accumulated in the environment owing to its long half-life. In order to estimate its impact on man, it is necessary to obtain the information about its accumulation and movement in the environment over the long period. In this paper, the sorption and desorption of iodide (I/sup -/) on sandy soils were examined by using column and batch experiments. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Every breakthrough curves of I/sup -/ showed plateau, before the ratio of concentration (C/C/sub 0/) were reached 1.0. The ratio C/C/sub 0/ on plateau in the effluent was affected by the kind of soil and NaI concentration in the inflow solution. 2) Iodine once sorbed on soil would be scarcely removed with 5.0 x 10/sup -4/ mol/l CaCl/sub 2/ solution. 3) Chemical form of iodine in the effluent was identified, showing that, more than 90% was recovered as I/sup -/. 4) In batch experiment, the equilibrium period on the sorption of I/sup -/ by anion exchange resin and soil was examined. The equilibrum period on the sorption by anion exchange resin was within 3 hr, but the period by soil was more than 15 days. This means that the sorption phenomenon of I/sup -/ to soil is not always based on an ion exchange reaction on the surface of soil particle. 5) A new theory should be examined for evaluating the movement of I/sup -/ in a soil.

  10. Long-term effects of grass-clover ley on the structure of a silt loam soil in a cold temperate climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Nicholas; Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats; Taylor, Astrid; Kätterer, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Soil pore space structure is mediated by interacting biological and physical processes that can be strongly affected by land use or management change. The objective of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of grass-clover leys on the structure of a silt loam soil in a cold humid climate. The measurements were made in a long-term field trial established in 1956 at Offer in northern Sweden. This experiment includes four treatments with varying proportions of ley (1, 2, 3 or 5 years) in a 6-year forage-based rotation. We used X-ray tomography to quantify topsoil structural pore networks in the first year of arable cropping following the ley break, a few weeks after sowing in spring. Near-saturated infiltration was also measured as a proxy for soil structure in both topsoil and subsoil. Earthworm populations were quantified by both hand-digging and infiltration of mustard solution. In the topsoil, the treatments with a greater proportion of ley in the rotation had larger organic carbon contents, near-saturated hydraulic conductivity and earthworm biomass as well as smaller bulk densities and larger total porosities. In contrast, no treatment effects were found for the volume, size distribution, connectivity and heterogeneity of the X-ray imaged pore space. Topsoil structure is seasonally dynamic and it seems possible that significant effects of long-term cropping treatments on the architecture of these larger pore networks (image resolution of 65 microns) would have been found later in the season, as a result of the re-establishment of earthworm biopores after tillage. No individuals of deep-burrowing anecic earthworm species were found at the site. Previous work has also showed shallow rooting at this site, with almost all visible roots of spring barley confined to the uppermost 30 cm. Thus, it is perhaps not surprising that no effects of crop treatment on organic carbon content were found in the subsoil. Likewise, there were no apparent treatment

  11. Crop response to phosphate and lime on acid sandy soils high in zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilde, K.W.; Koukoulakis, P.; Van Luit, B.

    1974-12-01

    Beans, lettuce, tomatoes, cotton, maize, and Sudan grass were grown in glasshouse experiments, and potatoes and maize in field experiments on a Zn-polluted sandy soil (pH-KCl 4.3, 36-54 ppM AcONH/sub 4/-extractable Zn) to study the effects of added P and lime on dry matter production and mineral composition. Moreover, the effects of added P and lime on AcONH/sub 4/-extractable ('available') soil Zn, and of added Zn on water-soluble ('available') soil P were estimated. Beans, lettuce, tomatoes, and cotton required both lime and P to overcome the toxic effect of excess Zn, i.e. a Zn/P imbalance interfering with the P metabolism. Maize and Sudan grass, accumulating much smaller amounts of Zn from the unamended Zn-polluted soil, grew well and responded vigorously to P in the absence of applied lime. Potatoes were intermediate in behaviour. P and lime decreased Zn concentrations in the above-ground portions of all crops, mainly as a result of 'dilution' following a vigorous growth response. Only in cases where lime depressed growth (maize and Sudan grass at the lower P rates) was there some evidence of a direct inhibitive effect on Zn uptake by plant tops. Soil analyses indicated that the Zn-P antagonism could not be explained satisfactorily on the basis of chemical reactions involving mutual immobilization. It is postulated, therefore, that the Zn-P interaction is mainly a plant physiological characteristic.

  12. Transport of Pathogen Surrogates in Soil Treatment Units: Numerical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Morales

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Segmented mesocosms (n = 3 packed with sand, sandy loam or clay loam soil were used to determine the effect of soil texture and depth on transport of two septic tank effluent (STE-borne microbial pathogen surrogates—green fluorescent protein-labeled E. coli (GFPE and MS-2 coliphage—in soil treatment units. HYDRUS 2D/3D software was used to model the transport of these microbes from the infiltrative surface. Mesocosms were spiked with GFPE and MS-2 coliphage at 105 cfu/mL STE and 105–106 pfu/mL STE, respectively. In all soils, removal rates were >99.99% at 25 cm. The transport simulation compared (1 optimization; and (2 trial-and-error modeling approaches. Only slight differences between the transport parameters were observed between these approaches. Treating both the die-off rates and attachment/detachment rates as variables resulted in an overall better model fit, particularly for the tailing phase of the experiments. Independent of the fitting procedure, attachment rates computed by the model were higher in sandy and sandy loam soils than clay, which was attributed to unsaturated flow conditions at lower water content in the coarser-textured soils. Early breakthrough of the bacteria and virus indicated the presence of preferential flow in the system in the structured clay loam soil, resulting in faster movement of water and microbes through the soil relative to a conservative tracer (bromide.

  13. Quasi 3D modelling of water flow in the sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Meisam; Seuntjens, Piet; Joris, Ingeborg; Boënne, Wesley; De Pue, Jan; Cornelis, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring and modeling tools may improve irrigation strategies in precision agriculture. Spatial interpolation is required for analyzing the effects of soil hydraulic parameters, soil layer thickness and groundwater level on irrigation management using hydrological models at field scale. We used non-invasive soil sensor, a crop growth (LINGRA-N) and a soil hydrological model (Hydrus-1D) to predict soil-water content fluctuations and crop yield in a heterogeneous sandy grassland soil under supplementary irrigation. In the first step, the sensitivity of the soil hydrological model to hydraulic parameters, water stress, crop yield and lower boundary conditions was assessed after integrating models at one soil column. Free drainage and incremental constant head conditions were implemented in a lower boundary sensitivity analysis. In the second step, to predict Ks over the whole field, the spatial distributions of Ks and its relationship between co-located soil ECa measured by a DUALEM-21S sensor were investigated. Measured groundwater levels and soil layer thickness were interpolated using ordinary point kriging (OK) to a 0.5 by 0.5 m in aim of digital elevation maps. In the third step, a quasi 3D modelling approach was conducted using interpolated data as input hydraulic parameter, geometric information and boundary conditions in the integrated model. In addition, three different irrigation scenarios namely current, no irrigation and optimized irrigations were carried out to find out the most efficient irrigation regime. In this approach, detailed field scale maps of soil water stress, water storage and crop yield were produced at each specific time interval to evaluate the best and most efficient distribution of water using standard gun sprinkler irrigation. The results show that the effect of the position of the groundwater level was dominant in soil-water content prediction and associated water stress. A time-dependent sensitivity analysis of the hydraulic

  14. Efficacy of biochar amendments in limiting the transport of pathogenic bio-colloids in soils of different textures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar amendment has been shown to affect bacterial transport in soils. The effect of pyrolysis temperature of the added poultry litter biochar on the transport of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium through fine sand and sandy loam soils were investigated in water-saturated column ...

  15. The nematicidal effect of some bacterial biofertilizers on Meloidogyne incognita in sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E El-Hadad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In a greenhouse experiment, the nematicidal effect of some bacterial biofertilizers including the nitrogen fixing bacteria (NFB Paenibacillus polymyxa (four strains, the phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB Bacillus megaterium (three strains and the potassium solubilizing bacteria (KSB B. circulans (three strains were evaluated individually on tomato plants infested with the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita in potted sandy soil. Comparing with the uninoculated nematode-infested control, the inoculation with P. polymyxa NFB7, B. megaterium PSB2 and B. circulans KSB2, increased the counts of total bacteria and total bacterial spores in plants potted soil from 1.2 to 2.6 folds estimated 60 days post-inoculation. Consequently, the inoculation with P. polymyxa NFB7 increased significantly the shoot length (cm, number of leaves / plant, shoot dry weight (g / plant and root dry weight (g / plant by 32.6 %, 30.8 %, 70.3 % and 14.2 %, respectively. Generally, the majority treatments significantly reduced the nematode multiplication which was more obvious after 60 days of inoculation. Among the applied strains, P. polymyxa NFB7, B. megaterium PSB2 and B. circulans KSB2 inoculations resulted in the highest reduction in nematode population comparing with the uninoculated nematode-infested control. They recorded the highest reduction in numbers of hatched juveniles/root by 95.8 %, females/root by 63.75 % and juveniles/1kg soil by 57.8 %. These results indicated that these bacterial biofertilizers are promising double purpose microorganisms for mobilizing of soil nutrients (nitrogen, phosphate and potassium and for the biological control of M. incognita.

  16. The nematicidal effect of some bacterial biofertilizers on Meloidogyne incognita in sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hadad, M E; Mustafa, M I; Selim, Sh M; El-Tayeb, T S; Mahgoob, A E A; Abdel Aziz, Norhan H

    2011-01-01

    In a greenhouse experiment, the nematicidal effect of some bacterial biofertilizers including the nitrogen fixing bacteria (NFB) Paenibacillus polymyxa (four strains), the phosphate solubilizing bacteria (PSB) Bacillus megaterium (three strains) and the potassium solubilizing bacteria (KSB) B. circulans (three strains) were evaluated individually on tomato plants infested with the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita in potted sandy soil. Comparing with the uninoculated nematode-infested control, the inoculation with P. polymyxa NFB7, B. megaterium PSB2 and B. circulans KSB2, increased the counts of total bacteria and total bacterial spores in plants potted soil from 1.2 to 2.6 folds estimated 60 days post-inoculation. Consequently, the inoculation with P. polymyxa NFB7 increased significantly the shoot length (cm), number of leaves / plant, shoot dry weight (g) / plant and root dry weight (g) / plant by 32.6 %, 30.8 %, 70.3 % and 14.2 %, respectively. Generally, the majority treatments significantly reduced the nematode multiplication which was more obvious after 60 days of inoculation. Among the applied strains, P. polymyxa NFB7, B. megaterium PSB2 and B. circulans KSB2 inoculations resulted in the highest reduction in nematode population comparing with the uninoculated nematode-infested control. They recorded the highest reduction in numbers of hatched juveniles/root by 95.8 %, females/root by 63.75 % and juveniles/1kg soil by 57.8 %. These results indicated that these bacterial biofertilizers are promising double purpose microorganisms for mobilizing of soil nutrients (nitrogen, phosphate and potassium) and for the biological control of M. incognita.

  17. Effect of soil texture on phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, C. E.; Matzen, S. L.; Olson, A.

    2015-12-01

    Soil arsenic (As) contamination is a global problem, resulting in part from anthropogenic activities, including the use of arsenical pesticides and treated wood, mining, and irrigated agriculture. Phytoextraction using the hyperaccumulating fern Pteris vittata is a promising new technology to remediate soils with shallow arsenic contamination with minimal site disturbance. However, many challenges still lie ahead for a global application of phytoremediation. For example, remediation times using P. vittata are on the order of decades. In addition, most research on As phytoextraction with P. vittata has examined As removal from sandy soils, where As is more available, with little research focusing on As removal from clayey soils, where As is less available. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of soil texture and soil fertilization on As extraction by P. vittata, to optimize remediation efficiency and decrease remediation time under complex field conditions. A field study was established 2.5 years ago in an abandoned railroad grade contaminated with As (average 85.5 mg kg-1) with texture varying from sandy loam to silty clay loam. Organic N, inorganic N, organic P, inorganic P, and compost were applied to separate sub-plots; control ferns were grown in untreated soil. In a parallel greenhouse experiment, ferns were grown in sandy loam soil extracted from the field (180 mg As kg-1), with similar treatments as those used at the field site, plus a high phosphate treatment and treatments with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. In the field study, fern mortality was 24% higher in clayey soil than in sandy soil due to waterlogging, while As was primarily associated with sandy soil. Results from the sandy loam soil indicate that soil treatments did not significantly increase As phytoextraction, which was lower in phosphate-treated ferns than in control ferns, both in the field and greenhouse study. Under greenhouse conditions, ferns treated with organic N were

  18. Hydraulic conductivity of a sandy soil at low water content after compaction by various methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, John R.; Akstin, Katherine C.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate the degree to which compaction of a sandy soil influences its unsaturated hydraulic conductivity K, samples of Oakley sand (now in the Delhi series; mixed, thermic, Typic Xeropsamments) were packed to various densities and K was measured by the steady-state centrifuge method. The air-dry, machine packing was followed by centrifugal compression with the soil wet to about one-third saturation. Variations in (i) the impact frequency and (ii) the impact force during packing, and (iii) the amount of centrifugal force applied after packing, produced a range of porosity from 0.333 to 0.380. With volumetric water content θ between 0.06 and 0.12, K values were between 7 × 10−11 and 2 × 10−8 m/s. Comparisons of K at a single θ value for samples differing in porosity by about 3% showed as much as fivefold variation for samples prepared by different packing procedures, while there generally was negligible variation (within experimental error of 8%) where the porosity difference resulted from a difference in centrifugal force. Analysis involving capillary-theory models suggests that the differences in K can be related to differences in pore-space geometry inferred from water retention curves measured for the various samples.

  19. Thallium dynamics in contrasting light sandy soils--soil vulnerability assessment to anthropogenic contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Ales; Chrastný, Vladislav; Komárek, Michael; Galusková, Ivana; Drahota, Petr; Grygar, Tomás; Tejnecký, Václav; Drábek, Ondrej

    2010-01-15

    The influence of different soil conditions and the presence of LMWOA (Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids) on anthropogenic Tl dynamics were discussed in this study. A shift from the "labile" to the residual fraction during the ageing was identified, indicating Tl incorporation into stable phases (e.g., illite and/or amorphous silicates). The increased water-soluble Tl concentration (1.8-fold, in maximum) after the split application of LMWOA (simulating root exudation) was observed in all soils; partial dissolution of relatively "insoluble" Tl-bearing phases (silicates and eventually oxides) in the presence of LMWOA is suggested. Thermodynamic modeling showed that Tl mobilization in the presence of citric and oxalic acids was indirect and could be attributed to complexation of major elements (Ca, Mg, Al) originating from the dissolution of various soil phases. On the contrary, H(+)-promoted dissolution by acetic acid was assumed as the predominant mechanism of Tl mobilization. Manganese(III,IV) oxides, illite and probably amorphous silicates were evaluated as the dominant phases responsible for Tl retention in the soils. In carbonate-rich soils, Tl coprecipitation with the newly formed carbonates seems to be an important factor influencing Tl release. Therefore, we suggest data on CEC, pH(ZPC) and soil mineralogy to be critical for assessment of Tl behavior in soil systems.

  20. Correlation of soil organic carbon and nutrients (NPK) to soil mineralogy, texture, aggregation, and land use pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-11-01

    This work investigates the correlations existing among soil organic carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), potassium (K), and physicochemical properties like clay mineralogy, textural components, soil aggregation, and land use pattern. Seven different locations were chosen in the tropical rainforest climate region of Assam, India, for the work. The soil texture classifications were clay, sandy clay loam, and sandy loam with mixed clay mineralogy consisting of tectosilicates and phylosilicates. Two distinct compositions of total Fe/Al oxides≥11.5 and mineralogy suggested that the mineral, chlorite, favored retention of higher SOC content in a particular site. Under similar climatic and mineralogical conditions, both natural and anthropogenic soil disturbances destabilized SOC protection through SOM mineralization and soil aggregate destabilization as indicated by SOC protective capacity studies. Urbanization resulting in soil compaction contributed to enhanced SOC level through increased contact between the occluded organic carbon and the soil mineralogical constituents.

  1. Transport Modeling of Modified Magnetite Nanoparticles with Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate in a Saturated Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Farrokhian Firouzi

    2017-02-01

    . The response curve was followed by analyzing the concentration history of Cl-1 in the effluent. Then, the influent was switched back to the background solution to thoroughly elute the tracer. Following the tracer test, a modified magnetite nanoparticles with sodium dodecyl sulfate was introduced into the column and the nanoparticle breakthrough curves were obtained by measuring the concentration history of total Fe in the effluent. Total iron concentration was analyzed with a flame atomic-absorption spectrophotometer. One site and two site kinetic attachment-detachment models in HYDRUS-1D software were used to predict the nanoparticles transport. Also parameters of model efficiency coefficient (E, root mean square error (RMSE, geometric mean error ratio (GMER, and geometric standard deviation of error ratio (GSDER were used to determine the accuracy of the models. Results and Discussion: SEM measurements demonstrated that the particle size of nanoparticles was about 40-60 nm. The hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient (D for each medium was obtained by fitting the classic 1-D convection–dispersion equation (CDE to the experimental breakthrough data using the CXTFIT code (STANMOD software, USDA. The relative concentration of nanoparticles in comparison with chloride in the collected effluent from soil columns were much lower indicating a strong retention of nanoparticles in studied porous media, thereby attachment, deposition and possibly straining of nanoparticles. Modeling results showed that in all sites of both models (one site and two-site kinetic attachment-detachment models, attachment was rapid and detachment was slow. These attachment kinetic sites may be because of consistent charges of minerals with attachment. Therefore, considering to same attachment-detachment behavior in two sites of two-site kinetic model, it is concluded that the one site kinetic model had eligible estimation of nanoparticles breakthrough curve in the studied sandy soil columns lonely

  2. Soil water repellency patterns following long-term irrigation with waste water in a sandy calcareous soil, SE Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Solera, J.; García-Irles, L.; Morugán, A.; Doerr, S. H.; García-Orenes, F.; Atanassova, I.; Navarro, M. A.; Ayguadé, H.

    2009-04-01

    One of the consequences of long-term irrigation with waste water can be the development of soil water repellency (WR). Its emergence can affect soil-water balance, irrigation efficiency and crop yield. Water repellency development has been suggested to be controlled by parameters such as organic matter quantity and type present in the waste water, soil properties (particularly the texture), and the overall time period of irrigation. Here we examine the effect of long-term (~20 years) irrigation with low quality waste-water on soil wettability under a Populus alba tree stand used as a "green filter". The plot exhibited considerable micro-topography (ridges and furrows) and consisted of sandy calcareous soil (Xerofluvent). Water repellency and organic carbon content (OC) were studied in 160 samples taken from the plot and from an adjacent area used as control (no irrigated). From the control area 40 samples were taken from the first 5 cm of mineral soil (C samples). From the irrigated plot a total of 120 samples were collected. To account for the micro-topography of the terrain, 40 samples each were taken from ridges (R samples; 0-5 cm depth), furrows (F samples; 0-5 cm depth), and from furrows at depth (FD samples, 5-10 cm depth). Soil WR was assessed in the laboratory for all air dry samples using the water drop penetration time test (WDPT Test). Samples with WDPT ? 5 seconds were classified as non-repellent. Organic carbon content (OC) was analyzed in all samples by potassium dichromate oxidation method. We also carried out a detailed chemical characterisation of the organic matter in two furrow samples that exhibited contrasting wettability, but no major difference in OC content (F10: WDPT 9960s, OC 6.7%; F31: WDPT 10s, OC 7.5%). Following accelerated solvent extraction with Dichloro-methane/MeOH (95:5), the extract was analysed by GC-MS. All samples from the control area (C) were wettable (mean WDPT=1s). In the irrigated plot, water repellency was present for 48

  3. Volatilization of tri-allate, ethoprophos and parathion measured with four methods after spraying on a sandy soil

    OpenAIRE

    Bor, G.; Berg, van den, W.; Smelt, J.H.; Smidt, R.A.; Peppel - Groen, van de, A.E.; Leistra, M.

    1995-01-01

    At about eleven times after application of tri-allate, ethoprophos and parathion to a sandy soil, their rates of volatilization were determined by the aerodynamic method (AD), the Bowen-ratio method (BR), the theoretical-profile method (TP) and the Box method. The volatilization was highest for tri-allate and lowest for parathion. On the first day after application, the volatilization rate decreased sharply, but thereafter the decrease was more gradual. The differences in volatilization rate ...

  4. Effect of soil pH on sorption of salinomycin in clay and sandy soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Desorption of salinomycin with methanol over a 72 h period was 70% with a phosphate buffer (pH 7). Since the phosphate buffer would mimic, to some extent, the quality of water flowing through field soils containing various salts, it was concluded that salinomycin could pose ...

  5. ZINC MIGRATION IN THE SANDY SOIL AND ITS IMPACT ON THE BIOAVAILABILITY OF SOME NUTRIENT IN THE ROOT ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Drissi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of different leaching amounts on the downward movement of zinc applied, as fertilizer, on the surface of a sandy soil. The experiment was conducted in polyethylene bags filled to 30 cm depth with sandy soil. A zinc supply of 15.3 10-3 cmolc kg-1 was applied to the soil surface as a solution of zinc sulfate. Three leaching amounts were tested: 31 mm, 208 mm and 497 mm. Results showed the absence of zinc in the leachate for all leaching amounts. Within the soil profile, the highest content on exchangeable zinc (15.3 10-3 cmolc kg-1 was recorded in the top soil layer (0-10cm for all leaching amounts. In the middle (10-20 cm and in the lower (20-30 cm layers, the exchangeable zinc content remained similar to that recorded before leaching (0.76 10-3 cmolc kg-1. The percentage of the cation exchange capacity occupied by zinc in the top soil layer increased after leaching. It averaged 0.35% for all leaching amounts while it remained similar to that recorded before leaching (0.03% for the middle and the lower layers. This increase was linked to the adsorption saturations sites particularly released by manganese, potassium, calcium and ammonium after their downward movement.

  6. Use of 15N labeled Urea to Study Nitrogen Use Efficiencies in a Forage Corn-Oat Rotation Grown on Clay and Sandy Clay Loam Soils of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) is applied in large amounts to sustain high forage yield and quality to feed a dairy cattle population surpassing 440,000 heads in Comarca Lagunera, Mexico (25° 32´ N, 103° 14´W and 1150 masl). Traditional farm practices across this region overaplly organic (manure) and fertilizer N. We...

  7. Toxicity of RDX, HMX, TNB, 2,4-DNT, and 2,6-DNT to the Earthworm, Eisenia Fetida, in a Sandy Loam Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB... Enviromental Toxicol. Chem. 2001, 19, pp 1473-1480. 46 22. Robidoux, PY; Svendsen, C.; Caumartin, J.; Hawari, J.; Ampleman, G.; Thiboutot, S.; Weeks, J.M

  8. Effects of Soil Bulk Density on Gas Transport Parameters and Pore-Network Properties across a Sandy Field Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masis Melendez, Federico; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Chamindu, T K K Deepagoda

    2015-01-01

    The gas diffusion coefficient, air permeability, and their interrelations with air-filled porosity are crucial for characterization of diffusive and convective transport of gases in soils. Variations in soil bulk density can affect water retention, air-filled pore space, pore tortuosity...... and connectivity, and hence control gas diffusion and air permeability. Considering 86 undisturbed core samples with variable bulk density that were extracted on a grid from the top layer of a sandy field, the effects of soil bulk density on gas transport parameters and the soil water characteristic were...... to quantify gas transport and water retention processes across the field. Results revealed significant negative correlations between all six parameters and soil bulk density. Areas with higher bulk density exhibited reduced air-filled porosity and lower diffusivity- and air permeability-based connectivity...

  9. Partitioning of organic matter and heavy metals in a sandy soil: Effects of extracting solution, solid to liquid ratio and pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fest, P.M.J.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Comans, R.N.J.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2008-01-01

    In sandy soils the behavior of heavy metals is largely controlled by soil organic matter (solid and dissolved organic matter; SOC and DOC). Therefore, knowledge of the partitioning of organic matter between the solid phase and soil solution is essential for adequate predictions of the total

  10. Water based microwave assisted extraction of thiamethoxam residues from vegetables and soil for determination by HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Rajib; Singh, Shashi Bala; Kulshrestha, Gita

    2012-02-01

    A microwave assisted extraction (MAE) method for determination of thiamethoxam residues in vegetable and soil samples was standardized. Insecticide spiked vegetable and soil samples were extracted by MAE using water as an extraction solvent, cleaned up by solid phase extraction and analysed by high performance liquid chromatography on photodiode array detector. The recoveries of the insecticide from various vegetable (tomato, radish, brinjal, okra, French been, sugarbeet) and soil (sandy loam, silty clay loam, sandy clay loam, loamy sand) samples at 0.1 and 0.5 μg g(-1) spiking levels ranged from 79.8% to 86.2% and from 82.1% to 87.0%, respectively. The recoveries by MAE were comparable to those obtained by the conventional blender and shake-flask extraction techniques. The precision of the MAE method was demonstrated by relative standard deviations of <3% for the insecticide.

  11. Spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at different scales in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoran; Zhao, Gengxing; Gao, Mingxiu; Chang, Chunyan

    2017-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the spatial variability of soil salinity in coastal saline soil at macro, meso and micro scales in the Yellow River delta, China. Soil electrical conductivities (ECs) were measured at 0-15, 15-30, 30-45 and 45-60 cm soil depths at 49 sampling sites during November 9 to 11, 2013. Soil salinity was converted from soil ECs based on laboratory analyses. Our results indicated that at the macro scale, soil salinity was high with strong variability in each soil layer, and the content increased and the variability weakened with increasing soil depth. From east to west in the region, the farther away from the sea, the lower the soil salinity was. The degrees of soil salinization in three deeper soil layers are 1.14, 1.24 and 1.40 times higher than that in the surface soil. At the meso scale, the sequence of soil salinity in different topographies, soil texture and vegetation decreased, respectively, as follows: depression >flatland >hillock >batture; sandy loam >light loam >medium loam >heavy loam >clay; bare land >suaeda salsa >reed >cogongrass >cotton >paddy >winter wheat. At the micro scale, soil salinity changed with elevation in natural micro-topography and with anthropogenic activities in cultivated land. As the study area narrowed down to different scales, the spatial variability of soil salinity weakened gradually in cultivated land and salt wasteland except the bare land.

  12. Fruit yield and composition in orange trees cv. 'Lane Late' in response to nitrogen fertilization in Sandy Typic Hapludalf soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Brunetto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Little is known about the impact of N fertilization on fruit production and composition in orange groves grown in soils with low or medium organic matter content in Rio Grande do Sul (RS. This study aimed to evaluate how N fertilization of orange trees cv. 'Lane Late' in a sandy soil may interfere in fruit yield and composition of fruit and juice. The experiment was conducted with orange trees cv. 'Lane Late' growing in Sandy Typic Hapludalf soil, in Rosário do Sul (RS. The plants received applications of 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140 and 160kg N ha-1. Total N in leaves, number of fruits per plant, yield, fresh weight, fruit diameter, peel thickness, percentage of fruit juice, peel color, juice color, ascorbic acid content, total soluble solids (TSS and total titratable acidity were evaluated in 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 crops. In the first crop, especially yield, number of fruits per plant, TSS content in fruit juice and ratio decreased with increasing N rate applied. However, in the second crop, the total titratable acidity of the fruit juice prominently increased with the dose of N applied. In both crops, results were highly influenced by rainfall distribution, which affect the plant physiology, soil N dynamics and, consequently, probability of response to N applied and the loss of mineral N in the soil.

  13. Soil development in OSL dated sandy dune substrates under Quercus robur Forest (Netherlands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, J. M.; Nierop, Ir. K.; Verstraten, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Coastal dune landscapes are very dynamic. The present distribution of vegetation and soil is the result of over 2000 years of natural processes and human management. The initial soil development was controlled by an increase of the organic matter content, which consisted mainly of decomposed roots of grasses (rhizomull), and a decrease of the soil pH to 3-4 by decalcification. This stage was followed by the development of a deciduous forest, which was dominated by Quercus robur. Since 1600 AD, a large part of the deciduous forest that dominated the east side of the coastal dune landscape transferred in expensive residential areas and urbanizations. Nevertheless some parts of the oak forest belt remained. The present forest soils are acid and the controlling soil processes are leaching of sesquioxides and storage of organic matter in mormoder humus forms. The sustainability of ecosystems is closely related to the quality of the humus form, controlling nutrient cycling and water supply. Therefore, improve of knowledge of humus form development and properties is important. We applied soil micromorphology and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to investigate more details of humus form development at two locations (Duivendrift and Hoek van Klaas) in the coastal dune area of the Amsterdamse Waterleidingduinen (near Haarlem, the Netherlands). However, to understand forest soil development, including the organic matter composition in the humus form, the age of the substrate and the forest is required. Therefore, we used tradition techniques as pollen analysis and radiocarbon dating but also the recently introduced optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating technique. OSL dating works excellent for aeolian sandy deposits with a high percentage of quartz grains. The OSL age is defined as the time after the last bleaching by solar radiation of mineral grains. Or in other words, the start of a stable period without sand drifting. In the Ah horizons we

  14. Effects of Nematophagous Fungi on Numbers and Death Rates of Bacterivorous Nematodes in Arable Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Bouwman, L. A.; Hoenderboom, G.A.J.; Maas, van der, P.J.; Ruiter, de, H.

    1996-01-01

    In a series of microcosm experiments with an arable, sandy loam soil amended with sugarbeet leaf, the short-term (8 weeks) dynamics of numbers of nematodes were measured in untreated soil and in γ-irradiated soil inoculated with either a field population of soil microorganisms and nematodes or a mixed population of laboratory-propagated bacterivorous nematode species. Sugarbeet leaf stimulated an increase in bacterivorous Rhabditidae, Cephalobidae, and a lab-cultivated Panagrolaimus sp. Diffe...

  15. Energetic Materials Effects on Essential Soil Processes: Decomposition of Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata) Litter in Soil Contaminated with Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    straw in Sassafras sandy loam (SSL) soil. Three pieces of 5-cm long internodular sections of straw were used to form a straw cluster. Pre-weighed straw ...acetone) control soil. After 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 months of exposure, one straw cluster was harvested from a set of randomly selected replicate...remove large debris and regularize distribution of soil organisms, then stored in covered plastic containers overnight to preserve the initial field

  16. Improvement of Faba Bean Yield Using Rhizobium/Agrobacterium Inoculant in Low-Fertility Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh H. Youseif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil fertility is one of the major limiting factors for crop’s productivity in Egypt and the world in general. Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF has a great importance as a non-polluting and a cost-effective way to improve soil fertility through supplying N to different agricultural systems. Faba bean (Vicia faba L. is one of the most efficient nitrogen-fixing legumes that can meet all of their N needs through BNF. Therefore, understanding the impact of rhizobial inoculation and contrasting soil rhizobia on nodulation and N2 fixation in faba bean is crucial to optimize the crop yield, particularly under low fertility soil conditions. This study investigated the symbiotic effectiveness of 17 Rhizobium/Agrobacterium strains previously isolated from different Egyptian governorates in improving the nodulation and N2 fixation in faba bean cv. Giza 843 under controlled greenhouse conditions. Five strains that had a high nitrogen-fixing capacity under greenhouse conditions were subsequently tested in field trials as faba bean inoculants at Ismaillia Governorate in northeast Egypt in comparison with the chemical N-fertilization treatment (96 kg N·ha−1. A starter N-dose (48 kg N·ha−1 was applied in combination with different Rhizobium inoculants. The field experiments were established at sites without a background of inoculation under low fertility sandy soil conditions over two successive winter growing seasons, 2012/2013 and 2013/2014. Under greenhouse conditions, inoculated plants produced significantly higher nodules dry weight, plant biomass, and shoot N-uptake than non-inoculated ones. In the first season (2012/2013, inoculation of field-grown faba bean showed significant improvements in seed yield (3.73–4.36 ton·ha−1 and seed N-yield (138–153 Kg N·ha−1, which were higher than the uninoculated control (48 kg N·ha−1 that produced 2.97 Kg·ha−1 and 95 kg N·ha−1, respectively. Similarly, in the second season (2013

  17. Analysis of the inhibitory effects of chloropicrin fumigation on nitrification in various soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongdong; Wang, Qiuxia; Li, Yuan; Ouyang, Canbin; Guo, Meixia; Cao, Aocheng

    2017-05-01

    Chloropicrin retards the conversion of ammonia to nitrite during the nitrification process in soil. In our study, the dynamic effect of chloropicrin fumigation on soil nitrification was evaluated in five different soil types to identify relationships between soil properties and the effect of fumigation on nitrification. Chloropicrin significantly inhibited nitrification in all soils; however, the recovery of nitrification varied greatly between the soils. Following chloropicrin fumigation, nitrification recovered to the control level in all soils, except in the acidic Guangxi soil. Nitrification recovered faster in fumigated sandy loam Beijing soil than in the other four fumigated soils. Soil texture and pH were two important factors that influenced chloropicrin's inhibitory effect on nitrification. An S-shaped function was fitted to soil NO3(-)-N content to assess the nitrification recovery tendency in different soils. The time taken to reach maximum nitrification (tmax) ranged from 2.4 to 3.0 weeks in all unfumigated soils. Results demonstrated that tmax was greater in all fumigated soils than in untreated soils. Correlation calculations showed that tmax was strongly correlated to soil texture. The correlation analysis results indicated that the recovery rate of nitrification after chloropicrin fumigation is much faster in sandy loam soil than silty loam soil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Soil fertility and upland rice yield after biochar application in the Cerrado

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petter, F.A.; Madari, B.E.; Silva, da M.A.S.; Carneiro, M.A.C.; Melo Carvalho, de M.T.; Marimon, B.; Pacheco, L.P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of biochar made from Eucalyptus on soil fertility, and on the yield and development of upland rice. The experiment was performed during two years in a randomized block design with four replicates, in a sandy loam Dystric Plinthosol. Four doses of

  19. Separation of oil palm kernel and shell mixture using soil and palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the possibility of separating oil palm kernel and shell mixture using media other than clay in wet separation. The separation efficiency of each medium ["Ikwube" (anthill), palm ash and sandy loam soil] was compared with that of clay. The effect of media type, specific gravity of the slurry, pH and slurry ...

  20. Predicting nitrous oxide emissions from manure properties and soil moisture: An incubation experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baral, Khagendra Raj; Arthur, Emmanuel; Olesen, Jørgen Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Field-applied manure is a source of essential plant nutrients, but benefits may be partly offset by high rates of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, as modified by manure characteristics and soil properties. In a 28-d incubation experiment we quantified short-term emissions of N2O from a sandy loam...

  1. Evidence For Different Reaction Pathways For Liquid And Granular Micronutrients In A Calcareous Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    The benefits of Mn and Zn fluid fertilizers over conventional granular products in calcareous sandy loam soils have been agronomically demonstrated. We hypothesized that the differences in the effectiveness between granular and fluid Mn and Zn fertilizers is due to different Mn ...

  2. Using Biochar composts for improving sandy vineyard soils while reducing the risk of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammann, Claudia; Mengel, Jonathan; Mohr, Julia; Muskat, Stefan; Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Löhnertz, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, biochar has increasingly been discussed as an option for sustainable environmentalmanagement, combining C sequestration with the aim of soil fertility improvement. Biochar has shownpositive effects in viticulture before (Genesio et al. 2015) which were largely attributed to improved water supply to the plants. However, in fertile temperate soils, the use of pure, untreated biochar does not guarantee economic benefits on the farm level (Ruysschaert et al., 2016). Hence, recent approaches started introducing biochar in management of nutrient-rich agricultural waste, e.g. in compost production (Kammann et al. 2015). Compost is frequently used in German vineyards for humus buildup and as a slow-release organic fertilizer. This, and increasingly mild, precipitation-rich winters, promoting mineralization, increase the risk of unwanted nitrate leaching losses into surface and ground waters during winter. To investigate if biochar pure, or biochar-compost mixtures and -products may have the potential to reduce nitrate leaching, we set up the following experiment: Either 30 or 60 t ha-1 of the following additives were mixed into the top 30 cm of sandy soil in large (120 L) containers, and planted with oneRiesling grapevine (Clone 198-30 GM) per container: Control (no addition), pure woody biochar, pure compost, biochar-compost (produced from the same organic feedstock than the compost, with 20 vol. - % of a woody biochar added), and pure compost plus pure biochar (same mixing ratio as in the former product). Once monthly, containers were exposed to simulated heavy rainfall that caused drainage. Leachates were collected from an outlet at the bottom of the containers, and analyzed for nutrients. The nutrient-rich additives containing compost all improved grape biomass and yield, most markedly pure compost and biochar-compost; same amendments were not significantly different. However,while the addition of the lower amount (30 t ha-1) of compost reduced nitrate

  3. Ameliorating soil acidity and physical properties of two contrasting texture Ultisols with wastewater sludge biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Yutong; Wang, Yefeng; Sheng, Ye; Wu, Chengfeng; Lu, Shenggao

    2017-06-21

    The production of biochar is a safe and beneficial disposal way for wastewater sludge. The biochar produced from wastewater sludge can be used as soil amendments for improving soil properties and for increasing crop yield. This work investigated the influences of wastewater sludge biochar (WSB) on the pH, exchangeable acidity, and physical properties of strongly acidic Ultisols with contrasting texture (clayey soil and sandy loam). Two soils were mixed with WSB at the rate of 0, 10, 20, and 40 g biochar kg-1 soil and incubated for 240 days at 75% field water capacity. Incubation experimental results indicated that WSB significantly increased soil pH and exchangeable Ca2+ and Mg2+ contents, and decreased soil exchangeable H+ and Al3+, compared with the control. The application of WSB enhanced the formation of 5-2-mm macroaggregate, and decreased the content of aggregate stability of soils, determined by mean weight diameter (MWD) of aggregate. WSB increased the field water capacity and available water content (AWC) of sandy loam while WSB was not found to increase significantly water-holding capacity and AWC of clayey soil. WSB significantly reduced plastic index and tensile strength (TS) of clayey soil and did not alter the TS of sandy loam. Overall results suggest that WSB is a suitable amendment for strongly acidic Ultisols with poor physical properties. However, the soil texture affected greatly the improvement effect of WSB on poor physical properties in soils.

  4. Effects of sandy desertified land rehabilitation on soil carbon sequestration and aggregation in an arid region in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yong Zhong; Wang, Xue Fen; Yang, Rong; Lee, Jaehoon

    2010-11-01

    The rehabilitation of sandy desertified land in semi-arid and arid regions has a great potential to increase carbon sequestration and improve soil quality. Our objective was to investigate the changes in the soil carbon pool and soil properties of surface soil (0-15 cm) under different types of rehabilitation management. Our study was done in the short-term (7 years) and long-term (32 years) desertification control sites in a marginal oasis of northwest China. The different management treatments were: (1) untreated shifting sand land as control; (2) sand-fixing shrubs with straw checkerboards; (3) poplar (Populus gansuensis) shelter forest; and (4) irrigated cropland after leveling sand dune. The results showed that the rehabilitation of severe sandy desertified land resulted in significant increases in soil organic C (SOC), inorganic C, and total N concentrations, as well as enhanced soil aggregation. Over a 7-year period of revegetation and cultivation, SOC concentration in the recovered shrub land, forest land and irrigated cropland increased by 4.1, 14.6 and 11.9 times compared to the control site (shifting sand land), and increased by 11.2, 17.0 and 23.0 times over the 32-year recovery period. Total N, labile C (KMnO(4)-oxidation C), C management index (CMI) and inorganic C (CaCO(3)-C) showed a similar increasing trend as SOC. The increased soil C and N was positively related to the accumulation of fine particle fractions. The accumulation of silt and clay, soil C and CaCO(3) enhanced the formation of aggregates, which was beneficial to mitigate wind erosion. The percentage of >0.25 mm dry aggregates increased from 18.0% in the control site to 20.0-87.2% in the recovery sites, and the mean weight diameter (MWD) of water-stable aggregates significantly increased, with a range of 0.09-0.30 mm at the recovery sites. Long-term irrigation and fertilization led to a greater soil C and N accumulation in cropland than in shrub and forest lands. The amount of soil C

  5. Evaluation of the ecotoxicological impact of the organochlorine chlordecone on soil microbial community structure, abundance, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Chloé; Devers, Marion; Béguet, Jérémie; Boggio, Baptiste; Rouard, Nadine; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    The insecticide chlordecone applied for decades in banana plantations currently contaminates 20,000 ha of arable land in the French West Indies. Although the impact of various pesticides on soil microorganisms has been studied, chlordecone toxicity to the soil microbial community has never been assessed. We investigated in two different soils (sandy loam and silty loam) exposed to different concentrations of CLD (D0, control; D1 and D10, 1 and 10 times the agronomical dose) over different periods of time (3, 7, and 32 days): (i) the fate of chlordecone by measuring (14)C-chlordecone mass balance and (ii) the impact of chlordecone on microbial community structure, abundance, and function, using standardized methods (-A-RISA, taxon-specific quantitative PCR (qPCR), and (14)C-compounds mineralizing activity). Mineralization of (14)C-chlordecone was inferior below 1 % of initial (14)C-activity. Less than 2 % of (14)C-activity was retrieved from the water-soluble fraction, while most of it remained in the organic-solvent-extractable fraction (75 % of initial (14)C-activity). Only 23 % of the remaining (14)C-activity was measured in nonextractable fraction. The fate of chlordecone significantly differed between the two soils. The soluble and nonextractable fractions were significantly higher in sandy loam soil than in silty loam soil. All the measured microbiological parameters allowed discriminating statistically the two soils and showed a variation over time. The genetic structure of the bacterial community remained insensitive to chlordecone exposure in silty loam soil. In response to chlordecone exposure, the abundance of Gram-negative bacterial groups (β-, γ-Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, and Bacteroidetes) was significantly modified only in sandy loam soil. The mineralization of (14)C-sodium acetate and (14)C-2,4-D was insensitive to chlordecone exposure in silty loam soil. However, mineralization of (14)C-sodium acetate was significantly reduced in soil

  6. Improvement of the bioavailability of hydrocarbons by applying nonionic surfactants during the microbial remediation of a sandy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeser, C. [Bauer und Mourik Umwelttechnik GmbH and Co. Schrobenhausen (Germany); Seidel, H.; Zehnsdorf, A.; Hoffmann, P. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Sektion Sanierungsforschung Leipzig (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    During the microbial treatment of a sandy model soil artificially contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a large residual pollution was found. The remaining PAHs were sorbed into the micropores of the soil and were therefore not bioavailable. Using a lab-scale percolator, the microbially pretreated soil was subjected to aftertreatment with surfactants with the aim of further degradation of its pollution. Two commercial noionic surfactants of the polyethoxylate type, Praewozell F1214/5 N and Sapogenat T-300, were used. The surfactants differ both in their physicochemical properties (CMC value, PAH solubilization capacity, adsorption onto soil) and in their microbial degradability. During aftertreatment under permanently aerobic conditions, only a weak PAH accumulation in the liquid phase was observed, which was due to a low solubilization rate as well as to simultaneous microbial degradation of the dissolved PAHs. Temporary anaerobiosis successfully suppressed the microbial degradation of both the surfactant and the solubilized PAHs, resulting in a more intensive PAH accumulation. But the PAH content of the soil - the essential criterion for evaluating the efficiency of surfactant application - was not decreased to a larger extent with surfactants than without them. To find out why the surfactants failed to act, the surfactant and hydrocarbon distribution among the liquid and solid phases was studied in mixtures of phenanthrene-spiked soils and Praewozell-containing liquids; at heavy phenanthrene loading, the aqueous phase was saturated with PAH; at weak loading, it was unsaturated. Model-aided data analysis showed that the soil may contain PAH in two fractions: strongly sorbed into soil pores and, in the case of heavy loading, also weakly attached to the soil surface. The latter is easily extractable, resulting in a PAH-saturated liquid, while strongly adsorbed PAH is only partially dissolved due to competition between the micelles and the soil

  7. Rehabilitation of the nematode fauna in a phytostabilized, heavily zinc-contaminated, sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.A.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2004-01-01

    Background, Aim and Scope. The Maatheide in Lommel, Belgium, is an extremely metal contaminated, sandy area where vegetation has disappeared over ca. 130 hectares due to the activities of a former pyrometallurgical zinc smelter. To reduce the environmental impact of this area a rehabilitation

  8. Effect of Stabilized Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles on Nitrate Removal from Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nooralivand

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During the recent decades, the use of N fertilizers has undeniable development regardless of their effects on the soil and environment. Increasing nitrate ion concentration in soil solution and then, leaching it into groundwater causes increase nitrate concentration in the water and raise the risk suffering from the people to some diseases. World health organization recommended maximum concentration level for nitrate and nitrite in the drinking water 50 and 3 mg/l, respectively. There are different technologies for the removal of nitrate ions from aqueous solution. The conventional methods are ion exchange, biological denitrification, reverse osmosis and chemical reduction. Using nanoscale Fe0 particles compared to other methods of nitrate omission was preferred because of; its high surface area, more reactive, lower cost and higher efficiency. More studies on the reduction of nitrate by zero-valent iron nanoparticles have been in aqueous solutions or in the soil in batch scale. Nanoparticles surface modified with poly-electrolytes, surfactants and polymers cause colloidal stability of the particles against the forces of attraction between particles and increases nanoparticle transport in porous media. The objectives of this study were to synthesize carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized zero-valent iron nanoparticles and consideration of their application for nitrate removal from sandy soil. Materials and Methods: The nanoparticles were synthesized in a lab using borohydride reduction method and their morphological characteristics were examined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier Transmission Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR. Experiments were conducted on packed sand column (40 cm length and 2.5 cm inner diameter under conditions of different nanoparticle concentration (1, 2, and 3 g1-1and high initial NO3- concentration (150, 250, and 350 mgl-1. Homogeneous soil column was filled with the wet packed

  9. Effects of different nitrogen and potassium sources on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. yield in a sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Awaad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lettuce plants were grown under sandy soil conditions in the private farm of Ahmed Orabi organization, Cairo Governorate Egypt, between 15th November 2009 and 15 January 2010. The experiment was conducted to assess the effects of different nitrogen sources, slow release N (urea-formaldehyde and fast release N (urea containing fertilizers at the rates of 0, 60, 90 and 120 kg N ha-1 applied alone or combined with potassium sulphate, on lettuce plant yield. Results indicated that application of different sources of N alone or combined with potassium sulphate gave the highest fresh dry weight per plant and total lettuce yield per hectare compared with the control. The highest dry weight of lettuce was achieved with the combination of urea and potassium sulphate. Although fertilization made with the combination of urea and potassium sulphate resulted in the highest P, K, Zn and Mn contents in lettuce plant, fertilization with urea alone gave the highest N and Fe contents. The lowest content of nitrate in lettuce plants was recorded with the fertilization of urea only or with the combination of urea and potassium sulphate. Application of the combination of urea and potassium sulphate induced the highest protein content in plants. The results indicated that application of urea-formaldehyde as a slow release nitrogen fertilizer solely or combined with potassium sulphate significantly improved yield and yield quality of lettuce plants grown in sandy soil.

  10. Influence of crust formation under natural rain on physical attributes of soils with different textures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Cristina de Pierri Castilho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the main negative anthropic effects on soil is the formation of crusts, resulting in soil degradation. This process of physical origin reduces soil water infiltration, causing increased runoff and consequently soil losses, water erosion and/or soil degradation. The study and monitoring of soil crusts is important for soil management and conservation, mainly in tropical regions where research is insufficient to explain how soil crusts are formed and how they evolve. The purpose of this study was to monitor these processes on soils with different particle size distributions. Soil crusts on a sandy/sandy loam Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo (Typic Hapludult, sandy loam Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo (Typic Hapludox and a clayey Nitossolo Vermelho eutroférrico (Rhodic Kandiudalf were monitored. The soil was sampled and data collected after 0, 3, 5 and 10 rain storms with intensities above 25 mm h-1, from December 2008 to May 2009. Soil chemical and particle size distribution analysis were performed. The changes caused by rainfall were monitored by determining the soil roughness, hydraulic conductivity and soil water retention curves and by micromorphological analysis. Reduced soil roughness and crust formation were observed for all soils during the monitored rainfall events. However, contrary to what was expected according to the literature, crust formation was not always accompanied by reductions in total porosity, hydraulic conductivity and soil water retention.

  11. Regional analysis of groundwater phosphate concentrations under acidic sandy soils: Edaphic factors and water table strongly mediate the soil P-groundwater P relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabilde, Lisa; De Neve, Stefaan; Sleutel, Steven

    2017-12-01

    Historic long-term P application to sandy soils in NW-Europe has resulted in abundant sorption, saturation and eventually leaching of P from soil to the groundwater. Although many studies recognize the control of site-specific factors like soil texture and phosphate saturation degree (PSD), the regional-scaled relevance of effects exerted by single factors controlling P leaching is unclear. Very large observational datasets of soil and groundwater P content are furthermore required to reveal indirect controls of soil traits through mediating soil variables. We explored co-variation of phreatic groundwater orthophosphate (o-P) concentration and soil factors in sandy soils in Flanders, Belgium. Correlation analyses were complemented with an exploratory model derived using 'path analysis'. Data of oxalate-extractable Al, Fe, P and pH KCl , phosphate sorption capacity (PSC) and PSD in three depth layers (0-30, 30-60, 60-90 cm), topsoil SOC, % clay and groundwater depth (fluctuation) were interpolated to predict soil properties on exact locations of a very extensive net of groundwater monitoring wells. The mean PSD was only poorly correlated to groundwater o-P concentration, indicating the overriding control of other factors in the transport of P to the groundwater. A significant (P soil pH and groundwater table depth than by PSD indicates the likely oversimplification of the latter index to measure the long-term potential risk of P leaching. Accounting for controls on leaching not included in PSD via an alternative index, however, seems problematic as in Flanders for example groundwater o-P turned out to be higher in finer textured soils or soils with higher pedogenic Fe content, probably because of their lower pedogenic Al content and higher soil pH. Path analysis of extensive soil and groundwater datasets seems a viable way to identify prime local determinants of soil P leaching and could be further on used for 'ground-truthing' more complex P-migration simulation

  12. Influence of soil types and osmotic pressure on growth and 137Cs accumulation in blackgram (Vigna mungo L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Thuzar; Oo, Aung Zaw; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea

    2017-04-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of soil types and osmotic levels on growth and 137Cs accumulation in two blackgram varieties differing in salinity tolerance grown in Fukushima contaminated soils. The contamination levels of the sandy clay loam and clay soil were 1084 and 2046 Bq kg-1 DW, respectively. The 137Cs activity was higher in both plants grown on the sandy clay loam than on the clay soil regardless of soil 137Cs activity concentration. No significant differences were observed in all measured growth parameters between the two varieties under optimal water conditions for both types of soil. However, the growth, leaf water contents and 137Cs activity concentrations in both plants were lower in both soil types when there was water stress induced by addition of polyethylene glycol. Water stress-induced reduction in total leaf area and total biomass, in addition to leaf relative water content, were higher in salt sensitive 'Mut Pe Khaing To' than in salt tolerant 'U-Taung-2' plants for both soil types. Varietal difference in decreased 137Cs uptake under water stress was statically significant in the sandy clay loam soil, however, it was not in the clay soil. The transfer of 137Cs from soil to plants (i.e., root, stem and leaf) was higher for the sandy clay loam for both plants when compared with those of the clay soil. The decreased activity of 137Cs in the above ground samples (leaf and stem) in both plants in response to osmotic stress suggested that plant available 137Cs decreased when soil water is limited by osmotic stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of soil texture, moisture, and surface cracks on the performance of a root-feeding flea beetle, Longitarsus bethae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent for Lantana camara (Verbenaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simelane, David O

    2007-06-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the influence of soil texture, moisture and surface cracks on adult preference and survival of the root-feeding flea beetle, Longitarsus bethae Savini and Escalona (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a natural enemy of the weed, Lantana camara L. (Verbenaceae). Adult feeding, oviposition preference, and survival of the immature stages of L. bethae were examined at four soil textures (clayey, silty loam, sandy loam, and sandy soil), three soil moisture levels (low, moderate, and high), and two soil surface conditions (with or without surface cracks). Both soil texture and moisture had no influence on leaf feeding and colonization by adult L. bethae. Soil texture had a significant influence on oviposition, with adults preferring to lay on clayey and sandy soils to silty or sandy loam soils. However, survival to adulthood was significantly higher in clayey soils than in other soil textures. There was a tendency for females to deposit more eggs at greater depth in both clayey and sandy soils than in other soil textures. Although oviposition preference and depth of oviposition were not influenced by soil moisture, survival in moderately moist soils was significantly higher than in other moisture levels. Development of immature stages in high soil moisture levels was significantly slower than in other soil moisture levels. There were no variations in the body size of beetles that emerged from different soil textures and moisture levels. Females laid almost three times more eggs on cracked than on noncracked soils. It is predicted that clayey and moderately moist soils will favor the survival of L. bethae, and under these conditions, damage to the roots is likely to be high. This information will aid in the selection of suitable release sites where L. bethae would be most likely to become established.

  14. Phenanthrene Sorption on Biochar-Amended Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumari, K. G I D; Moldrup, Per; Paradelo, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    on their influences on the sorption of environmental contaminants. In a field-based study at two experimental sites in Denmark, we investigated the effect of birch wood-derived biochar (Skogans kol) on the sorption of phenanthrene in soils with different properties. The soil sorption coefficient, Kd (L kg-1......), of phenanthrene was measured on sandy loam and loamy sand soils which have received from zero up to 100 t ha-1 of biochar. Results show that birch wood biochar had a higher Kd compared to soils. Furthermore, the application of birch wood biochar enhanced the sorption of phenanthrene in agricultural soils...

  15. Soil and vegetation under Bison bonasus grazing in the Kaluzhskie Zaseki Reserve (Central European Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanina, Larisa; Bobrovsky, Maxim; Shashkov, Maxim; Ivanova, Natalia; Ivashchenko, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    Plant diversity and soil characteristics including soil macrofauna and microbial biomass were studied in two areas of the Reserve affected by grazing of semi-free-ranging European bison population during the decade. The study areas are surrounded by broad-leaved forest co-dominated by Quercus robur, Fraxinus excelsior, Tilia cordata, Ulmus glabra, Acer platanoides and A. campestre. Aiming to assess impacts of the bison population on soil and vegetation, we studied two series of conjugated biotopes: (1) a meadow with feeder, (2) a transition zone: the forest edge with damaged tree trunks, trampled soil and fragmented ground vegetation and (3) a forest without visible signs of bison activities. One biotope series was located on loamy soils and other one on sandy-loams. The following samplings of soil and vegetation were conducted in each biotope in two areas: (1) plant species list with their coverage in three vegetation layers in 5 square plots of 100 m2 was compiled; (2) earthworms were sampled in 8 monoliths of 25x25x35 cm and handy sorted to estimate earthworm diversity, number and biomass; (3) soil was also sampled from 0 to 10 cm soil depths with 4 replications to estimate soil physico-chemical characteristics and soil microbial biomass. Preliminary results showed relatively high ecological difference of the areas on loams and sandy-loams: soil on loams was richer in the main chemical elements, such as C, N, Ca and K. At that, in both areas, meadow soils were richer than forest soils in C, N, Ca, P and K. The highest values of C and N were observed in the transition zones and they were closed to values observed in the meadow soils. Total amount of exchangeable cations and Ca most strongly decreased from meadow to forest soils with the intermediate values in the transition zones. Despite the ecological differences of the areas, paired biotopes were similar to each other in structure of vegetation communities. For 10 years of grazing, forest vegetation was

  16. Community-specific impacts of exotic earthworm invasions on soil carbon dynamics in a sandy temperate forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumsey, Jasmine M; Le Moine, James M; Capowiez, Yvan; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Larson, Sandra C; Kling, George W; Nadelhoffer, Knute J

    2013-12-01

    Exotic earthworm introductions can alter above- and belowground properties of temperate forests, but the net impacts on forest soil carbon (C) dynamics are poorly understood. We used a mesocosm experiment to examine the impacts of earthworm species belonging to three different ecological groups (Lumbricus terrestris [anecic], Aporrectodea trapezoides [endogeic], and Eisenia fetida [epigeic]) on C distributions and storage in reconstructed soil profiles from a sandy temperate forest soil by measuring CO2 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) losses, litter C incorporation into soil, and soil C storage with monospecific and species combinations as treatments. Soil CO2 loss was 30% greater from the Endogeic x Epigeic treatment than from controls (no earthworms) over the first 45 days; CO2 losses from monospecific treatments did not differ from controls. DOC losses were three orders of magnitude lower than CO2 losses, and were similar across earthworm community treatments. Communities with the anecic species accelerated litter C mass loss by 31-39% with differential mass loss of litter types (Acer rubrum > Populus grandidentata > Fagus grandifolia > Quercus rubra > or = Pinus strobus) indicative of leaf litter preference. Burrow system volume, continuity, and size distribution differed across earthworm treatments but did not affect cumulative CO2 or DOC losses. However, burrow system structure controlled vertical C redistribution by mediating the contributions of leaf litter to A-horizon C and N pools, as indicated by strong correlations between (1) subsurface vertical burrows made by anecic species, and accelerated leaf litter mass losses (with the exception of P. strobus); and (2) dense burrow networks in the A-horizon and the C and N properties of these pools. Final soil C storage was slightly lower in earthworm treatments, indicating that increased leaf litter C inputs into soil were more than offset by losses as CO2 and DOC across earthworm community treatments.

  17. Effects of organic versus conventional arable farming on soil structure and organic matter dynamics in a marine loam in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulleman, M.M.; Jongmans, A.G.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.; Bouma, J.

    2003-01-01

    We compared the effects of conventional and organic arable farming on soil organic matter (SOM) content, soil structure, aggregate stability and C and N mineralization, which are considered important factors in defining sustainable land management. Within one soil series, three different farming

  18. Water flow and nitrate leaching in a layered silt loam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.A.; Hesterberg, D.L.R.; Raats, P.A.C.

    2000-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3) leaching was studied for a winter leaching period in a layered calcareous silt loam with tile-drains at about 1-m depth and 12-m spacing. Groundwater levels, drain discharge rates, and NO3 concentrations in the drainage water were monitored, and the soil hydraulic characteristics were

  19. Using Agricultural Residue Biochar to Improve Soil Quality of Desert Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhe Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory study was conducted to test the effects of biochars made from different feedstocks on soil quality indicators of arid soils. Biochars were produced from four locally-available agricultural residues: pecan shells, pecan orchard prunings, cotton gin trash, and yard waste, using a lab-scale pyrolyzer operated at 450 °C under a nitrogen environment and slow pyrolysis conditions. Two local arid soils used for crop production, a sandy loam and a clay loam, were amended with these biochars at a rate of 45 Mg·ha−1 and incubated for three weeks in a growth chamber. The soils were analyzed for multiple soil quality indicators including soil organic matter content, pH, electrical conductivity (EC, and available nutrients. Results showed that amendment with cotton gin trash biochar has the greatest impact on both soils, significantly increasing SOM and plant nutrient (P, K, Ca, Mn contents, as well as increasing the electrical conductivity, which creates concerns about soil salinity. Other biochar treatments significantly elevated soil salinity in clay loam soil, except for pecan shell biochar amended soil, which was not statistically different in EC from the control treatment. Generally, the effects of the biochar amendments were minimal for many soil measurements and varied with soil texture. Effects of biochars on soil salinity and pH/nutrient availability will be important considerations for research on biochar application to arid soils.

  20. Risk assessment of linear alkylbenzene sulphonates, LAS, in agricultural soil revisited: Robust chronic toxicity tests for Folsomia candida (Collembola), Aporrectodea caliginosa (Oligochaeta) and Enchytraeus crypticus (Enchytraeidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, P. H.; Lopez, C. V.; Cassani, G.

    2007-01-01

    To obtain robust data on the toxicity of LAS, tests with the collembolan Folsomia candida L., the oligochaetes Aporrectodea caliginosa Savigny (earthworm) and Enchytraeus crypticus Westheide and Graefe (enchytraeid) were performed in a sandy loam soil. Additionally limited tests with LAS spiked...

  1. Soil compaction effects on water status of ponderosa pine assessed through 13C/12C composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, G Armando; Singer, Michael J; Powers, Robert F; Horwath, William R

    2002-05-01

    Soil compaction is a side effect of forest reestablishment practices resulting from use of heavy equipment and site preparation. Soil compaction often alters soil properties resulting in changes in plant-available water. The use of pressure chamber methods to assess plant water stress has two drawbacks: (1) the measurements are not integrative; and (2) the method is difficult to apply extensively to establish seasonal soil water status. We evaluated leaf carbon isotopic composition (delta13C) as a means of assessing effects of soil compaction on water status and growth of young ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa var. ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws) stands across a range of soil textures. Leaf delta13C in cellulose and whole foliar tissue were highly correlated. Leaf delta13C in both whole tissue and cellulose (holocellulose) was up to 1.0 per thousand lower in trees growing in non-compacted (NC) loam or clay soils than in compacted (SC) loam or clay soils. Soil compaction had the opposite effect on leaf delta13C in trees growing on sandy loam soil, indicating that compaction increased water availability in this soil type. Tree growth response to compaction also varied with soil texture, with no effect, a negative effect and a positive effect as a result of compaction of loam, clay and sandy loam soils, respectively. There was a significant correlation between 13C signature and tree growth along the range of soil textures. Leaf delta13C trends were correlated with midday stem water potentials. We conclude that leaf delta13C can be used to measure retrospective water status and to assess the impact of site preparation on tree growth. The advantage of the leaf delta13C approach is that it provides an integrative assessment of past water status in different aged leaves.

  2. Salty bark as a soil amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.B. Bollen

    1971-01-01

    Bark from Douglas-fir logs floated in sea water contained 0.75 to 1.94 percent salt (NaCl). Leaching by natural and simulated rainfall and by soaking readily removed this salt. Bush bean and tomato plants were grown in the greenhouse on a sandy loam soil to which bark of three different proportions of salt was applied as a mulch and as an incorporation at the rate of...

  3. Organic Carbon and Physical Properties in Sandy Soil after Conversion from Degraded Pasture to Eucalyptus in the Brazilian Cerrado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karla Nascimento Sena

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Soil is currently seen as the most relevant carbon sink and the most effective carbon stabilizer. In contrast, agriculture is the second largest C emitter, after burning of fossil fuels. This organic carbon (OC introduced into the soil, mainly via organic matter (OM, is essential for several soil properties and plays an extremely important role in sandy soils. The objective of this study was to describe the changes in the amounts and pools of OC and the influence thereof on some physical soil properties in areas converted from pasture to eucalyptus. The following areas were analyzed: a degraded pasture (PAST, two areas of pasture-eucalyptus conversion after 2 and 15 years (EU02 and EU15, respectively and a preserved Cerrado area (CER in the east of the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. Soil samples were taken from the 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, and 0.10-0.30 m layers. The OC was measured and analyzed, the carbon pool (CP calculated, aggregate stability, bulk density (BD, and macro- and microporosity determined, and total porosity (TP calculated to analyze the influence of land use on soil properties. The experimental design was completely randomized, and four clusters per area were established, with nine subsampling points, for a total of 36 subsamples per area, organized in 20 × 20 m grids, The soil under natural vegetation (preserved Cerrado was used as a control. The change from CER to commercial cultivation accelerates the process of OC loss (reductions of 25-35 % and reductions in soil physical quality. In the PAST area, OC was reduced by 30 % in the 0.00-0.05 m layer. Cumulative OC and CP were highest in the 0.00-0.05 m layer and decreased in the deeper layers in all land use treatments. Organic C in the 0.10-0.30 m layer was not influenced by land use, indicating the possibility of OC persistence in the soil for longer periods. Macroporosity and total porosity may be considered appropriate in CER and EU15, whereas the conditions for plant

  4. Bio-chemical properties of sandy calcareous soil treated with rice straw-based hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houssni El-Saied

    2016-06-01

    The results obtained show that, application of the investigated hydrogels positively affects bio-chemical properties of the soil. These effects are assembled in the following: (a slightly decreasing soil pH, (b increasing cation exchange capacity (CEC of the soil indicating improvement in activating chemical reactions in the soil, (c increasing organic matter (OM, organic carbon, total nitrogen percent in the soil. Because the increase in organic nitrogen surpassed that in organic carbon, a narrower CN ratio of treated soils was obtained. This indicated the mineralization of nitrogen compounds and hence the possibility to save and provide available forms of N to growing plants, (d increasing available N, P and K in treated soil, and (e improving biological activity of the soil expressed as total count of bacteria and counts of Azotobacter sp., phosphate dissolving bacteria (PDB, fungi and actinomycetes/g soil as well as the activity of both dehydrogenase and phosphatase.

  5. Various soil amendments and environmental wastes affect the (im)mobilization and phytoavailability of potentially toxic elements in a sewage effluent irrigated sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Shams, Mohamed S; Khalifa, Mohamed R; El-Dali, Mohamed A; Rinklebe, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Contamination of long-term sewage effluent irrigated soils by potentially toxic elements (PTEs) is a serious concern due to its high environmental and health risk. Our scientific hypothesis is that soil amendments can cause contradictory effects on the element mobilization and phytoavailability depending on the type of element and amendment. Therefore, we aimed to assess the impact of the application (1%) of several low cost amendments and environmental wastes on the (im)mobilization, availability, and uptake of Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, and Zn by sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) in a long term sewage effluent irrigated sandy soils collected from Egypt. The used materials include activated charcoal (AC), potassium humate (KH), phosphate rock (PR), phosphogypsum (PG), triple superphosphate (TSP), phosphoric acid (PA), sulfur (S), sugar beet factory lime (SBFL), cement bypass kiln dust (CBD), egg shell (ES), bone mill (BM), brick factory residual (BFR), ceramic powder (CP), and drinking water treatment residual (WTR). The mobilization and availability of the elements in the soil were extracted using NH4NO3 and ammonium bicarbonate- diethylene triamine penta acetic acid (AB-DTPA), respectively. The above-ground biomass samples were analyzed for the elements studied. The results confirmed our hypothesis and concluded that although some amendments like S, PA, and TSP can be used for reducing the plant uptake of Al, Cr, and Fe, they might be used with KH for enhancing the phytoextraction of Cd, Cu, Mn, and Ni. Moreover, several wastes such as BFR and WTR might be used for enhancing the phytoextraction of Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, and Ni and reducing the uptake of Mn from the studied soil. Although SBFL decreased the plant uptake of Al, Fe, Mn, and Zn, it's increased the plant uptake of Cd, Cu, and Ni. Therefore, the amendments which reduce the plant uptake of an element might be suitable candidates for its immobilization, while the amendments which increase the plant uptake of an

  6. Growth, Yield and WUE of Drip and Sprinkler Irrigated Okra Grown On Sandy Soil Under Semi-Arid Conditions in Southeast Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plauborg, Finn

    Vegetable production systems at the Keta sand spit, Southeast Ghana, are typically managed with excessive amounts of irrigation water and fertilizers on sandy soils with low inherent water and nutrient retention capacities. The shallow groundwater which is the primary irrigation water resource is...

  7. Measurement of surface redistribution of rainfall and modelling its effect on water balance calculations for a millet field on sandy soil in Niger.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaze, S.R.; Simmonds, L.P.; Brouwer, J.; Bouma, J.

    1997-01-01

    During rain there can be substantial redistribution of water at the surface of sandy soils in the Sudano-Sahelian zone, because of localised runoff and runon. This results in variable infiltration over a field. Measurements of spatial variability in infiltration and crop growth were made in a millet

  8. Dynamics of carbon pools in post-agrogenic sandy soils of southern taiga of Russia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalinina, Olga; Goryachkin, Sergey V; Karavaeva, Nina A; Lyuri, Dmitriy I; Giani, Luise

    2010-01-01

    ...) supply and mineralization. A soil chronosequence study, covering the ecosystems of 3, 20, 55, 100, and 170 years of self-restoration in southern taiga zone, shows that soil organic content of mineral horizons remains...

  9. Eighteen-year response of slash pine to wet-weather harvesting and site preparation on a poorly drained silt loam soil in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Andrew Scott; Allan E. Tiarks

    2006-01-01

    Physical disturbances to soil resulting from forest management operations may reduce tree survival and growth, but responses are soil-, species-, and disturbance-specific. We studied wet-weather harvesting, shearing, root-raking, disking, and phosphorus fertilization on a poorly drained flatwoods site in Louisiana. Slash pine survival was improved by wet-weather...

  10. Chemical speciation of heavy metals in sandy soils in relation to availability and mobility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temminghoff, E.J.M.

    1998-01-01

    The environmental risk of heavy metals which are present in soil at a certain total content is highly dependent on soil properties. Chemical speciation is a comprehensive term for the distribution of heavy metals over all possible chemical forms (species) in soil solution and in the solid

  11. Reduced nitrogen leaching by intercropping maize with red fescue on sandy soils in North Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manevski, Kiril; Børgesen, Christen Duus; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2015-01-01

    Aim To study maize (Zea mays L.) growth and soil nitrogen (N) dynamics in monocrop and intercropped systems in a North European climate and soil conditions with the support of a simulation model. Methods Field data for 3 years at two sites/soil types in Denmark and three main factors: (i) cropping...

  12. Electrochemical techniques implementation for corrosion rate measurement in function of humidity level in grounding systems (copper and stainless steel) in soil samples from Tunja (Colombia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Blanco, J.; Jimenez, C.; Vera-Monroy, S. P.; Mejía-Camacho, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, DC electrochemical techniques were used to determine the corrosion rate of copper and stainless-steel electrodes used in grounding, varying the level of humidity, in sandy loam and clay loam soils. The maximum corrosion potentials were: for copper -211 and -236mV and for stainless steel of -252 and -281mV, in sandy loam and clay loam respectively, showing that in sandy loam the values are higher, about 30mV. The mechanism by which steel controls corrosion is by diffusion, whereas in copper it is carried out by transfer of mass and charge, which affects the rate of corrosion, which in copper reached a maximum value of 5mm/yr and in Steel 0.8mm/yr, determined by Tafel approximations. The behaviour of the corrosion rate was mathematically adjusted to an asymptotic model that faithfully explains the C.R. as a function of humidity, however, it is necessary to define the relation between the factor □ established in the model and the precise characteristics of the soil, such as the permeability or quantity of ions present.

  13. Impacts of grass removal on wetting and actual water repellency in a sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oostindie Klaas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil water content and actual water repellency were assessed for soil profiles at two sites in a bare and grasscovered plot of a sand pasture, to investigate the impact of the grass removal on both properties. The soil of the plots was sampled six times in vertical transects to a depth of 33 cm between 23 May and 7 October 2002. On each sampling date the soil water contents were measured and the persistence of actual water repellency was determined of field-moist samples. Considerably higher soil water contents were found in the bare versus the grass-covered plots. These alterations are caused by differences between evaporation and transpiration rates across the plots. Noteworthy are the often excessive differences in soil water content at depths of 10 to 30 cm between the bare and grass-covered plots. These differences are a consequence of water uptake by the roots in the grass-covered plots. The water storage in the upper 19 cm of the bare soil was at least two times greater than in the grass-covered soil during dry periods. A major part of the soil profile in the grass-covered plots exhibited extreme water repellency to a depth of 19 cm on all sampling dates, while the soil profile of the bare plots was completely wettable on eight of the twelve sampling dates. Significant differences in persistence of actual water repellency were found between the grass-covered and bare plots.

  14. Research Note:Determination of soil hydraulic properties using pedotransfer functions in a semi-arid basin, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tombul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations in soil hydraulic properties such as soil moisture q(h and hydraulic conductivity K(q or K(h, may affect the performance of hydrological models. Moreover, the cost of determining soil hydraulic properties by field or laboratory methods makes alternative indirect methods desirable. In this paper, various pedotransfer functions (PTFs are used to estimate soil hydraulic properties for a small semi-arid basin (Kurukavak in the north-west of Turkey. The field measurements were a good fit with the retention curve derived using Rosetta SSC-BD for a loamy soil. To predict parameters to describe soil hydraulic characteristics, continuous PTFs such as Rosetta SSC-BD (Model H3 and SSC-BD-q33q1500 (Model H5 have been applied. Using soil hydraulic properties that vary in time and space, the characteristic curves for three soil types, loam, sandy clay loam and sandy loam have been developed. Spatial and temporal variations in soil moisture have been demonstrated on a plot and catchment scale for loamy soil. It is concluded that accurate site-specific measurements of the soil hydraulic characteristics are the only and probably the most promising method to progress in the future. Keywords: soil hydraulic properties, soil characteristic curves, PTFs

  15. Study on Soil Mobility of Two Neonicotinoid Insecticides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Mörtl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Movement of two neonicotinoid insecticide active ingredients, clothianidin (CLO and thiamethoxam (TMX, was investigated in different soil types (sand, clay, or loam and in pumice. Elution profiles were determined to explore differences in binding capacity. Soil characterized by high organic matter content retained the ingredients, whereas high clay content resulted in long release of compounds. Decrease in concentration was strongly influenced by soil types: both CLO and TMX were retained in loam and clay soils and showed ready elution through sandy soil and pumice. Elution capability of the active ingredients in sandy soil correlated with their water solubility, indicating approximately 30% higher rapidity for TMX than for CLO. Soil organic carbon-water partitioning coefficients (Koc determined were in good agreement with literature values with somewhat lower value for CLO in sandy soil and substantially higher values for TMX in clay soil. High mobility of these neonicotinoid active ingredients in given soil types urges stronger precautionary approach taken during their application.

  16. Seed Burial Depth and Soil Water Content Affect Seedling Emergence and Growth of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa in the Horqin Sandy Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of seed burial depth and soil water content on seedling emergence and growth of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa (sandy elm, an important native tree species distributed over the European-Asian steppe. Experimental sand burial depths in the soil were 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 cm, and soil water contents were 4%, 8%, 12% and 16% of field capacity. All two-way ANOVA (five sand burial depths and four soil water contents results showed that seed burial depths, soil water content and their interactions significantly affected all the studied plant variables. Most of the times, seedling emergence conditions were greater at the lower sand burial depths (less than 1.0 cm than at the higher (more than 1.0 cm seed burial depths, and at the lower water content (less than 12% than at the higher soil water content. However, high seed burial depths (more than 1.5 cm or low soil water content (less than 12% reduced seedling growth or change in the root/shoot biomass ratios. In conclusion, the most suitable range of sand burial was from 0.5 to 1.0 cm soil depth and soil water content was about 12%, respectively, for the processes of seedling emergence and growth. These findings indicate that seeds of the sandy elm should be kept at rather shallow soil depths, and water should be added up to 12% of soil capacity when conducting elm planting and management. Our findings could help to create a more appropriate sandy elm cultivation and understand sparse elm woodland recruitment failures in arid and semi-arid regions.

  17. Straw gasification biochar increases plant available water capacity and plant growth in coarse sandy soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Veronika; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik; Petersen, Carsten Tilbæk

    Gasification biochar (GB) contains recalcitrant carbon that can contribute to soil carbon sequestration and soil quality improvement. However, the impact of GB on plant available water capacity (AWC) and plant growth in diverse soil types needs further reserach. A pot experiment with spring barley...... of plant biomass under both water regimes, most likely due to reduced mechanical impedance to root growth. No positive effects on plant growth were achieved by addition of WGB. Our results suggest that SGB has a great global potential to increase crop productivity on coarser soil types changing...

  18. New houses from loam. Also: Heat insulation and loam, swelling clay - mild loam, equipment for building with loam, historical loam buildings. Neue Lehmhaeuser. Ausserdem Waermedaemmung und Lehm, Blaehton - Leichtlehm, Lehmbaugeraete, historische Lehmbauten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minke, G.

    1987-01-01

    Volume 6 in the series 'Building with loam' is concerned chiefly with new buildings in loam. Until now, straw loam has mainly been used for private buildings and loam bricks chiefly for commercial building purposes. In some circumstances other building methods are more suitable and more economical. Special weight is given to the necessary wall thicknesses and material superstructure which are imperative for adequate insulation of loam buildings. (BWI).

  19. Enhancing crude oil degradation in a sandy soil: Effects of addition ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural restoration of crude oil polluted soils takes a long time, hence various soil treatments have been used to hasten the process. This study investigated the effects of the addition of poultry manure alone and in combination with surfactant (Goldcrew or Corexit) and/or alternate carbon substrate (glucose or starch) on ...

  20. Transition from Brittle Failure to Ductile Flow in a Sandy Soil | Gitau ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanical properties and deviatoric stress-strain relationships of the soil were also established. The specimens were prepared under laboratory conditions where the inter-particle cementation bonds were allowed to form to their natural state. An unsaturated soil mechanics approach was used to define critical state ...

  1. Increase in removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during bioremediation of crude oil-contaminated sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Fernando J S; de França, Francisca P

    2005-01-01

    A 23 full factorial experimental design was adopted to estimate the effects of three variables on the biodegradation of oil during soil bioremediation: bioaugmentation seeding a mixed culture, addition of fertilizer or mineral media, and correction of initial pH of the soil to 7.0. The tests were carried out in polyvinyl chloride reactors with 5.0 kg of crude oil-contaminated soil at 14 g/kg. After screening the variables, soil bioremediation tests were conduced with varied C:N ratios, yielding an increase in biodegradation of the oil heavy fraction from 24 to 65%, consumption of total n-paraffins, and a remarkable decrease in the concentration of residual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons of the soil.

  2. [Effects of short-term fencing on organic carbon fractions and physical stability of sandy sierozem in desert steppe of Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin-Guo; Song, Nai-Ping; Li, Xue-Bin; Liu, Bing-Ru

    2012-12-01

    In order to explore the change patterns of organic carbon fractions and physical stability of sandy sierozem in desert steppe at the early stage of fencing, 0-40 cm soil samples were collected from a 5-year fenced desert steppe (inside the fence) and a free grazing steppe (outside the fence) in Yanchi County of Ningxia, Northwest China, with the soil organic carbon, labile organic carbon, and particulate organic carbon contents and soil particle composition analyzed. No significant differences were observed in the soil organic carbon content and soil particle composition inside and outside the fence. The average soil organic carbon inside and outside the fences was 3.25 g x kg(-1), the percentages of sand, silt, and clay were averagely 72%, 16%, and 12%, respectively, and the soil physical stability index was 1.30% -1.31%. The soil active organic carbon showed a significant change in 10-20 cm layer. The soil labile organic carbon content was 0.80 g x kg(-1) inside the fence, which was significantly higher than that outside the fence (0.62 g x kg(-1)). The percentage of soil particulate organic carbon was 50.9% inside the fence, which was also significantly higher than that outside the fence (31.7%). The soil texture inside the fence changed from sandy to loam, and the soil labile organic carbon content increased gradually; while the soil texture outside the fence was sandy, and its vertical change was relatively smooth. The organic carbon of sandy si- erozem in the desert steppe under the conditions of short-term fencing was still in a balance between consumption and accumulation, the soil texture was relatively stable, and the soil physical stability changed little. It was suggested that the soil active organic carbon content and its relative percentage in 10-20 cm layer could be used as the indicators of early soil quality change of desert steppe.

  3. Soil Physical Constraints on Intrinsic Biodegradation of Petroleum Vapors in a Layered Subsurface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Andreas H; Henriksen, Kaj; Mortensen, Lars; Scow, Kate M; Moldrup, Per

    2010-02-01

    Naturally occurring biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the vadose zone depends on the physical soil environment influencing field-scale gas exchange and pore-scale microbial metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil physical heterogeneity on biodegradation of petroleum vapors in a 16-m-deep, layered vadose zone. Soil slurry experiments (soil/water ratio 10:30 w/w, 25°C) on benzene biodegradation under aerobic and well-mixed conditions indicated that the biodegradation potential in different textured soil samples was related to soil type rather than depth, in the order: sandy loam > fine sand > limestone. Similarly, O(2) consumption rates during in situ respiration tests performed at the site were higher in the sandy loam than in the fine sand, although the difference was less significant than in the slurries. Laboratory and field data generally agreed well and suggested a significant potential for aerobic biodegradation, even with nutrient-poor and deep subsurface conditions. In slurries of the sandy loam, the biodegradation potential declined with increasing in situ water saturation (i.e., decreasing air-filled porosity in the field). This showed a relation between antecedent undisturbed field conditions and the slurry biodegradation potential, and suggested airfilled porosity to be a key factor for the intrinsic biodegradation potential in the field.

  4. Soil Properties Control Glyphosate Sorption in Soils Amended with Birch Wood Biochar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahawaththa Gamage, Inoka Damayanthi Kumari; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    such as pesticides. In a field-based study at two experimental sites in Denmark (sandy loam soils at Risoe and Kalundborg), we investigated the influence of birch wood biochar with respect to application rate, aging (7–19 months), and physicochemical soil properties on the sorption coefficient, Kd (L kg−1......, the results show that biochar, despite initially being a poor sorbent for glyphosate, can increase glyphosate sorption in soil. However, the effect of biochar on glyphosate sorption is depends on prevailing soil physicochemical properties....

  5. Leaching of Metribuzin and its Metabolites from a Sandy Soil: Comparison between Field, Laboratory, and Modelling Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullum, M.; Henriksen, T.; Kjaer, J.; Plauborg, F.; Olsen, P.

    2003-04-01

    On a sandy field site in Denmark leaching of the two metabolites metribuzin-diketo (MD) and metribuzin-desamino-diketo (MDD) was found as a result of a double application of metribuzin according to the current Danish regulations. The leaching exceeding the maximum allowable concentration of 0.1 µg/l considerably (on a yearly average) was found as a result of the Danish Pesticide Leaching Assessment Programme (PLAP). PLAP comprises an intensive monitoring of pesticide and bromide leaching at six agricultural field sites in Denmark representing a wide range of Danish soil and climate conditions. The programme is developed as an early warning system for the Danish EPA and provides unique data sets allowing for calibration and validation. The leaching behaviour of metribuzin, MD, and MDD was evaluated by comparing field, laboratory, and modelling data. The MACRO model (verson 4.2) was applied to to the test site covering the soil profile to a depth of 5 m b.g.s., always including the groundwater table. The model was parameterized using mainly measured data supplied by literature/default values. Sorption and degradation parameters of both metribuzin and its metabolites were determined in the laboratory using soils from both top- and subsoil. Model performance with respect to solute and pesticide leaching were evaluated by comparing simulated and measured data. The latter comprising, groundwater table, soil water content measured with TDR probes at different depth, and bromide and pesticides concentration measured in grounps of suction cups situated 1 and 2 m b.g.s. Initial modelling result will be presented along with identified model limitations.

  6. Soil color indicates carbon and wetlands: developing a color-proxy for soil organic carbon and wetland boundaries on sandy coastal plains in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, M L; Van Huyssteen, C W; Brown, L R

    2017-10-13

    A relationship between soil organic carbon and soil color is acknowledged-albeit not a direct one. Since heightened carbon contents can be an indicator of wetlands, a quantifiable relationship between color and carbon might assist in determining wetland boundaries by rapid, field-based appraisal. The overarching aim of this initial study was to determine the potential of top soil color to indicate soil organic carbon, and by extension wetland boundaries, on a sandy coastal plain in South Africa. Data were collected from four wetland types in northern KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. Soil samples were taken to a depth of 300 mm in three transects in each wetland type and analyzed for soil organic carbon. The matrix color was described using a Munsell soil color chart. Various color indices were correlated with soil organic carbon. The relationship between color and carbon were further elucidated using segmented quantile regression. This showed that potentially maximal carbon contents will occur at values of low color indices, and predictably minimal carbon contents will occur at values of low or high color indices. Threshold values can thus be used to make deductions such as "when the sum of dry and wet Value and Chroma values is 9 or more, carbon content will be 4.79% and less." These threshold values can then be used to differentiate between wetland and non-wetland sites with a 70 to 100% certainty. This study successfully developed a quantifiable correlation between color and carbon and showed that wetland boundaries can be determined based thereon.

  7. Nano chitosan-NPK fertilizer enhances the growth and productivity of wheat plants grown in sandy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Aziz, H.M.M.; Hasaneen, M.N.A.; Ome, A.M.

    2016-11-01

    Nanofertilizers have become a pioneer approach in agriculture research nowadays. In this paper we investigate the delivery of chitosan nanoparticles loaded with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK) for wheat plants by foliar uptake. Chiotsan-NPK nanoparticles were easily applied to leaf surfaces and entered the stomata via gas uptake, avoiding direct interaction with soil systems. The uptake and translocation of nanoparticles inside wheat plants was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that nano particles were taken up and transported through phloem tissues. Treatment of wheat plants grown on sandy soil with nano chitosan-NPK fertilizer induced significant increases in harvest index, crop index and mobilization index of the determined wheat yield variables, as compared with control yield variables of wheat plants treated with normal non-fertilized and normal fertilized NPK. The life cycle of the nano-fertilized wheat plants was shorter than normal-fertilized wheat plants with the ratio of 23.5% (130 days compared with 170 days for yield production from date of sowing). Thus, accelerating plant growth and productivity by application of nanofertilizers can open new perspectives in agricultural practice. However, the response of plants to nanofertilizers varies with the type of plant species, their growth stages and nature of nanomaterials. (Author)

  8. Nano chitosan-NPK fertilizer enhances the growth and productivity of wheat plants grown in sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed N. A. Hasaneen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanofertilizers have become a pioneer approach in agriculture research nowadays. In this paper we investigate the delivery of chitosan nanoparticles loaded with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK for wheat plants by foliar uptake. Chiotsan-NPK nanoparticles were easily applied to leaf surfaces and entered the stomata via gas uptake, avoiding direct interaction with soil systems. The uptake and translocation of nanoparticles inside wheat plants was investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that nano particles were taken up and transported through phloem tissues. Treatment of wheat plants grown on sandy soil with nano chitosan-NPK fertilizer induced significant increases in harvest index, crop index and mobilization index of the determined wheat yield variables, as compared with control yield variables of wheat plants treated with normal non-fertilized and normal fertilized NPK. The life cycle of the nano-fertilized wheat plants was shorter than normal-fertilized wheat plants with the ratio of 23.5% (130 days compared with 170 days for yield production from date of sowing. Thus, accelerating plant growth and productivity by application of nanofertilizers can open new perspectives in agricultural practice. However, the response of plants to nanofertilizers varies with the type of plant species, their growth stages and nature of nanomaterials.

  9. Structure and Composition of Leachfield Bacterial Communities: Role of Soil Texture, Depth and Septic Tank Effluent Inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet A. Atoyan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Although groundwater quality depends on microbial processes in the soil treatment area (STA of onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS, our understanding of the development of these microbial communities is limited. We examined the bacterial communities of sand, sandy loam, and clay STAs at different depths in response to septic tank effluent (STE addition using mesocosms. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP analysis was used to compare the bacterial community structure and composition of STE, native soil prior to STE addition (UNX and soil exposed to STE (EXP. Principal component analysis separated communities with depth in sand but not in sandy loam or clay. Indices of richness, diversity, and evenness followed the order: sandy loam > sand > clay. Analysis of TRF peaks indicated that STE contributed least to the composition of STA bacterial communities (5%–16%, followed by UNX soil (18%–48%, with the highest proportion of the community made up of TRFs not detected previously in either UNX or STE (50%–82% for all three soils. Soil type and depth can have a marked effect on the structure and composition of STA bacterial communities, and on the relative contribution of native soil and STE to these communities.

  10. Seasonal variations in phosphorus fractions in semiarid sandy soils under different vegetation types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiong Zhao; Dehui Zeng; Zhiping Fan; Zhanyuan Yu; Yalin Hu; Jianwei Zhang

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the seasonal patterns of soil phosphorus (P) fractions under five vegetation types – Ulmus macrocarpa savanna, grassland, Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica plantation, Pinus tabulaeformis plantation, and Populus simonii plantation ...

  11. Assessing soil water repellency of a sandy field with visible near infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knadel, Maria; Masís Meléndez, Federico; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2016-01-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) is a widespread phenomenon caused by aggregated organic matter (OM) and layers of hydrophobic organic substances coating the surface of soil particles. These substances have a very low surface free energy, reducing a soil's water attraction. There is focus on WR due...... to its effects on germination, root growth, liquid-vapour dynamics, surface erosion and leaching of chemicals through fingered flow paths. However, common techniques for measuring WR are time-consuming and expensive. Meanwhile, it is well established that visible near infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy...... models (r2 = 0.85) were generated for WR. The majority of bands important in the vis-NIR region of WR models were related to different components of OM indicating that, across the investigated field, WR was related to specific hydrophobic components of soil OM rather than to the total amount of carbon...

  12. Soil moisture spatio-temporal behavior of Pinus pinaster stands on sandy flatlands of central Spain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Sanz, V.; Garcia-Vinas, J. I.

    2011-07-01

    Pinus pinaster stands in the center of the Iberian Peninsula frequently grow in a unique hydrological system characterized by a variable groundwater table near the soil surface and highly permeable soils (arenosols). Over the last few decades, this superficial aquifer has been overused as a water resource, especially for irrigated crops. Overuse has reached a critical level and has caused various environmental impacts and a water sustainability crisis wherein rainfall variability does not allow for a sufficient level of aquifer recharge by natural means. Within this changing scenario, soil water significantly affects the spatio-temporal ecological response, necessitating more extensive characterization of the complex soil-tree water relationship. The primary goal of the present work was to evaluate the influence of root zone soil moisture on the observed spatial response of Pinus pinaster stands. Volumetric soil moisture content was measured at eleven forest sites, using time-domain reflectometry (TDR), over a two-year observation period. The results demonstrate that the combined effect of groundwater table proximity and dune morphology associated with this area are the main factors driving very different water availability conditions among the monitored hydrological response units, which modulate maritime pine installation and development. Topographically lower areas are more heterogeneous in terms of soil moisture behavior. In these areas, the conifer forests that are connected to the water table may be the most sensitive to land use changes within current environmental change scenarios. Consequently, in these pine ecosystems, the combined influences of geomorphology and water table proximity on variations in root zone soil moisture are essential and must be considered to develop adequate adaptive management models. (Author) 25 refs.

  13. An automated microinfiltrometer to measure small-scale soil water infiltration properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Dennis C.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed an automated miniature constant-head tension infiltrometer that measures very small infiltration rates at millimetre resolution with minimal demands on the operator. The infiltrometer is made of 2.9 mm internal radius glass tube, with an integrated bubbling tower to maintain constant negative head and a porous mesh tip to avoid air-entry. In the bubbling tower, bubble formation and release changes the electrical resistance between two electrodes at the air-inlet. Tests were conducted on repacked sieved sands, sandy loam soil and clay loam soil, packed to a soil bulk density ρd of 1200 kg m-3 or 1400 kg m-3 and tested either air-dried or at a water potential ψ of -50 kPa. The change in water volume in the infiltrometer had a linear relationship with the number of bubbles, allowing bubble rate to be converted to infiltration rate. Sorptivity measured with the infiltrometer was similar between replicates and showed expected differences from soil texture and ρd, varying from 0.15 ± 0.01 (s.e. mm s-1/2 for 1400 kg m-3 clay loam at ψ = -50 kPa to 0.65 ± 0.06 mm s-1/2 for 1200 kg m-3 air dry sandy loam soil. An array of infiltrometers is currently being developed so many measurements can be taken simultaneously.

  14. Critical evaluation of particle size distribution models using soil data obtained with a laser diffraction method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Weipeng

    Full Text Available Mathematical descriptions of classical particle size distribution (PSD data are often used to estimate soil hydraulic properties. Laser diffraction methods (LDM now provide more detailed PSD measurements, but deriving a function to characterize the entire range of particle sizes is a major challenge. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of eighteen PSD functions for fitting LDM data sets from a wide range of soil textures. These models include five lognormal models, five logistic models, four van Genuchten models, two Fredlund models, a logarithmic model, and an Andersson model. The fits were evaluated using Akaike's information criterion (AIC, adjusted R2, and root-mean-square error (RMSE. The results indicated that the Fredlund models (FRED3 and FRED4 had the best performance for most of the soils studied, followed by one logistic growth function extension model (MLOG3 and three lognormal models (ONLG3, ORLG3, and SHCA3. The performance of most PSD models was better for soils with higher silt content and poorer for soils with higher clay and sand content. The FRED4 model best described the PSD of clay, silty clay, clay loam, silty clay loam, silty loam, loam, and sandy loam, whereas FRED3, MLOG3, ONLG3, ORLG3, and SHCA3 showed better performance for most soils studied.

  15. Soil Seed Bank and Plant Community Development in Passive Restoration of Degraded Sandy Grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renhui Miao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of passive restoration on soil seed bank and vegetation recovery, we measured the species composition and density of the soil seed bank, as well as the species composition, density, coverage, and height of the extant vegetation in sites passively restored for 0, 4, 7, and 12 years (S0, S4, S7, and S12 in a degraded grassland in desert land. Compared with S0, three more species in the soil seed bank at depths of 0–30 cm and one more plant species in the community was detected in S12. Seed density within the topsoil (0–5 cm was five times higher in S12 than that in S0. Plant densities in S7 and S12 were triple and quadruple than that in S0. Plant coverage was increased by 1.5 times (S4, double (S7, and triple (S12 compared with S0. Sørensen’s index of similarity in species composition between the soil seed bank and the plant community were high (0.43–0.63, but it was lower in short-term restoration sites (S4 and S7 than that in no and long-term restoration sites (S0 and S12. The soil seed bank recovered more slowly than the plant community under passive restoration. Passive restoration is a useful method to recover the soil seed bank and vegetation in degraded grasslands.

  16. Isotope fractionation of sandy-soil water during evaporation - an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Wen-Bo; Han, Liang-Feng; Tan, Hong-Bing; Wang, Shuai

    2017-06-01

    Soil samples containing water with known stable isotopic compositions were prepared. The soil water was recovered by using vacuum/heat distillation. The experiments were held under different conditions to control rates of water evaporation and water recovery. Recoveries, δ18O and δ2H values of the soil water were determined. Analyses of the data using a Rayleigh distillation model indicate that under the experimental conditions only loosely bound water is extractable in cases where the recovery is smaller than 100 %. Due to isotopic exchange between vapour and remaining water in the micro channels or capillaries of the soil matrix, isotopic fractionation may take place under near-equilibrium conditions. This causes the observed relationship between δ2H and δ18O of the extracted water samples to have a slope close to 8. The results of this study may indicate that, in arid zones when soil that initially contains water dries out, the slope of the relationship between δ2H and δ18O values should be close to 8. Thus, a smaller slope, as observed by some groundwater and soil water samples in arid zones, may be caused by evaporation of water before the water has entered the unsaturated zone.

  17. Dissipation of terbuthylazine, metolachlor and mesotrione in soils with contrasting texture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, Laura; Cardinali, Alessandra; Zanin, Giuseppe; Masin, Roberta

    2017-04-01

    Herbicides play an important role in the crops production, but their use may result in residues with undesirable effects on the environment. The determination of the herbicide dissipation rate in agricultural soil is an important issue for monitoring their environmental fate. As soil composition is one of the factors affecting herbicide persistence, this study aimed to evaluate the dissipation of three herbicides, terbuthylazine (TERB), metolachlor (METO) and mesotrione (MESO) in soils with contrasting texture. The field trial was conducted at the Padua University Experimental Farm (45.3° N, 12.0° E) in the Po Valley, north-east Italy in 2012. The persistence of three herbicides has been studied in three diverse soil textures (clay, sand and loam soil) at two different depths (0-5 and 5-15 cm). A randomized complete block design was used for this experiment with six plots (2 m × 2 m) for each of 3 treatments. TERB, METO and MESO were applied in May on maize as a formulated product (Lumax®) with hand-held field plot sprayer at a dose of 3.5 L/ha. Soil organic carbon content was the highest in clay texture (1.10%) followed by loam soil (0.67%) and sandy soil (0.24%). The soil was sampled with a soil auger before herbicides treatment, and soon after treatment soil samples were taken to assess initial concentration, then at increasing times from spraying to evaluate field dissipation kinetics (t50). The dissipation of the herbicides in the treated plots was followed for nearly 2 months after their application. The herbicides were analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The dissipation of TERB, METO and MESO could be described by a pseudo first order kinetics. Within the herbicides, TERB showed the highest t50, followed by METO and MESO. Considering the tested soil, the highest t50 value was found for clay soil texture for TERB and METO, whereas for MESO there was no difference among different soils. Significant differences were found within the 2 soil

  18. Impact of spreading olive mill waste water on agricultural soils for leaching of metal micronutrients and cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonov-Nadborny, R; Tsechansky, L; Raviv, M; Graber, E R

    2017-07-01

    Olive mill waste water (OMWW) is an acidic (pH 4-5), saline (EC ∼ 5-10 mS cm -1 ), blackish-red aqueous byproduct of the three phase olive oil production process, with a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) of up to 220,000 mg L -1 . OMWW is conventionally disposed of by uncontrolled dumping into the environment or by semi-controlled spreading on agricultural soils. It was hypothesized that spreading such liquids on agricultural soils could result in the release and mobilization of indigenous soil metals. The effect of OMWW spreading on leaching of metal cations (Na, K, Mg, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) was tested in four non-contaminated agricultural soils having different textures (sand, clay loam, clay, and loam) and chemical properties. While the OMWW contributed metals to the soil solution, it also mobilized indigenous soil metals as a function of soil clay content, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and soil pH-buffer capacity. Leaching of soil-originated metals from the sandy soil was substantially greater than from the loam and clay soils, while the clay loam was enriched with metals derived from the OMWW. These trends were attributed to cation exchange and organic-metal complex formation. The organic matter fraction of OMWW forms complexes with metal cations; these complexes may be mobile or precipitate, depending on the soil chemical and physical environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of charcoal-enriched goat manure on soil fertility parameters and growth of pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum L. in a sandy soil from northern Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Willich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of charcoal feeding on manure quality and its subsequent application to enhance soil productivity has received little attention. The objectives of the present study therefore were to investigate the effects of (i charcoal feeding on manure composition, and (ii charcoal-enriched manure application on soil fertility parameters and growth of millet (Pennisetum glaucum L.. To this end, two experiments were conducted: First, a goat feeding trial where goats were fed increasing levels of activated charcoal (AC; 0, 3, 5, 7, and 9% of total ration; second, a greenhouse pot experiment using the manure from the feeding trial as an amendment for a sandy soil from northern Oman. We measured manure C, N, P, and K concentrations, soil fertility parameters and microbial biomass indices, as well as plant yield and nutrient concentrations. Manure C concentration increased significantly (P<0.001 from 45.2% (0% AC to 60.2% (9% AC with increasing dietary AC, whereas manure N, P, and K concentrations decreased (P<0.001 from 0% AC (N: 2.5%, P: 1.5%, K: 0.8% to 9% AC (N: 1.7%, P: 0.8%, K: 0.4%. Soil organic carbon, pH, and microbial biomass N showed a response to AC-enriched manure. Yield of millet decreased slightly with AC enrichment, whereas K uptake was improved with increasing AC. We conclude that AC effects on manure quality and soil productivity depend on dosage of manure and AC, properties of AC, trial duration, and soil type.

  20. Net sulfur mineralization potential in Swedish arable soils in relation to long-term treatment history and soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Kristin; Nilsson, S Ingvar; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    The long-term treatment effect (since 1957-1966) of farmyard manure (FYM) application compared with crop residue incorporation was investigated in five soils (sandy loam to silty clay) with regards to the net sulfur (S) mineralization potential. An open incubation technique was used to determine ...... to SAccMin. Conclusively, different treatment histories influenced the quality (e.g., chemical composition) and cycling rate of the organic S pool, rather than its size...

  1. EFFECT OF SOLE AND ASSOCIATIVE ACTIONS OF ELEMENTAL SULFUR AND INOCULATION SULFUR OXIDIZING BACTERIA ON GROWTH AND NUTRIENTS CONTENTS OF PEPPER PLANTS AND THE USED SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ibrahim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of elemental sulfur (E.S rate (2.5 g/kg soil and sulfur oxidizing bacteria on pepper plant and some chemical properties of two representative soil samples varying in their texture and CaCO3 content. Pepper was grown in Shobrakheet clay loam and Nobaria sandy loam soils for 50 days. Each soil was treated with elemental sulfur (2.5 g kg-1 soil and inoculated with two sulfur oxidizing bacteria (S.O.B. No.8 and S.O.B. ATCC 8158. Elemental sulfur with or without sulfur oxidizing bacteria increased shoot dry weights of pepper plants as compared with control. The highest effect was observed with E.S + ATCC 8158 treatment which resulted in increasing the pepper shoot dry weights from 1.36 to 2.08 g pot-1 with the clay loam soil and from 0.77 to 1.37 g pot-1 with the sandy loam soil. The same treatment resulted in the highest plant content of S, N, P, K and micronutrients.

  2. Agronomic assessment of pyrolysed food waste digestate for sandy soil management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatokun, Suraj Adebayo; Yousef, Lina F; Strezov, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    The digestate (DFW) of an industrial food waste treatment plant was pyrolysed for production of biochar for its direct application as bio-fertilizer or soil enhancer. Nutrient dynamics and agronomic viability of the pyrolysed food waste digestate (PyD) produced at different temperatures were evaluated using germination index (GI), water retention/availability and mineral sorption as indicators when applied on arid soil. The pyrolysis was found to enrich P, K and other micronutrients in the biochar at an average enrichment factor of 0.87. All PyD produced at different temperatures indicated significantly low phytotoxicity with GI range of 106-168% and an average water retention capacity of 40.2%. Differential thermogravimetric (DTG) thermographs delineated the stability of the food waste digestate pyrolysed at 500 °C (PyD500) against the degradation of the digestate food waste despite the latter poor nutrient sorption potential. Plant available water in soil is 40% when treated with 100 g of digestate per kg soil, whereas PyD500 treated soil indicated minimal effect on plant available water, even with high application rates. However, the positive effects of PyD on GI and the observed enrichment in plant macro and micronutrients suggest potential agronomic benefits for PyD use, in addition to the benefits from energy production from DFW during the pyrolysis process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Emissions of nitrous oxide and ammonia from a sandy soil following surface application and incorporation of cauliflower leaf residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nett, L; Fuß, R; Flessa, H; Fink, M

    2015-11-01

    Vegetable production systems are often characterized by excessive nitrogen (N) fertilization and the incorporation of large amounts of post-harvest crop residues. This makes them particularly prone to ammonia (NH3) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Yet, urgently needed management strategies that can reduce these harmful emissions are missing, because underlying processes are not fully understood. The present study therefore focuses on the effects of residue placement on NH3 and N2O emissions. For this, cauliflower leaf residues (286 kg N/ha) were either applied as surface mulch (mulch) or mixed with the topsoil (mix) and in situ NH3 and N2O emissions were investigated. The experiment took place on a sandy soil in Northeastern Germany during summer 2012. Residue application created a high peak in N2O emissions during the first 2 weeks, irrespective of residue placement. There was no significant difference in the emission sums over the experimental period (65 days) between the mix (5·8 ± 0·68 kg N2O-N/ha) and the mulch (9·7 ± 1·53 kg N2O-N/ha) treatment. This was also the case for NH3 emissions, which exhibited a lower initial peak followed by a prolonged decline. Measured emission sums were 4·1 ± 0·33 (mix) and 5·1 ± 0·73 (mulch) kg NH3-N/ha. It was concluded that substantial NH3 and N2O emissions can occur after high input of available organic carbon and N even in a coarse-textured soil with low water-holding capacity. Other than expected, surface-application does not enhance NH3 emissions at the expense of N2O emissions compared with residue mixing into the soil, at least under the conditions of the present study.

  4. Effects of biochar, compost and biochar-compost on growth and nutrient status of maize in two Mediterranean soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolikaki, Ioanna; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2017-04-01

    During the past years, studies have shown that biochar alone or combined with compost, has the potential to improve soil fertility and maize yield mostly on tropical soils whereas experiments on Mediterranean soils are rare. Therefore, the influence of biochar, compost and mixtures of the two, on maize (Zea mays L.) growth and nutrient status were investigated, in this study. Biochars were produced from 2 feedstocks: grape pomace (GP) and rice husks (RH) pyrolyzed at 300°C. Maize was grown for 30 days in a greenhouse pot trial on two Mediterranean soils amended with biochar or/with compost at application rates of 0% and 2% (w/w) (equivalent to 0 and 16 t ha-1) and N fertilization. Total aboveground dry matter yield of maize was significantly improved relative to the control for all organic amendments, with increases in yield 43-60.8%, in sandy loam soil, while, in loam soil a statistically significant increase of 70.6-81.3% was recorded for all the amendments apart from compost. Some morphological traits, such as aboveground height of plants, shoot diameter and belowground dry matter yield were significantly increased by the organic treatments. Aboveground concentration of P was significantly increased from 1.46 mg g-1 at control to 1.69 mg g-1 at 2% GP biochar in sandy loam soil, whereas GP biochar combined with compost gave an increase of 2.03 mg g-1 compared to control 1.23 mg g-1. K and Mn concentrations of above ground tissues were significantly increased only in sandy loam soil, while Fe in both soils. N concentration of aboveground tissues declined for all the amendments in loam soil and in sandy loam soil apart from compost amendment. Significant positive impacts of amended soils on nutrients uptake were observed in both soils as compared to the control related to the improved dry matter yield of plant. The current study demonstrated that maize production could be greatly improved by biochar and compost because of the nutrients they supply and their

  5. [Dynamic changes of surface soil organic carbon and light-fraction organic carbon after mobile dune afforestation with Mongolian pine in Horqin Sandy Land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Wen; Li, Yu-qiang; Wang, Shao-kun; Feng, Jing; Su, Na

    2011-08-01

    This paper studied the dynamic changes of surface (0-15 cm) soil organic carbon (SOC) and light-fraction organic carbon (LFOC) in 25- and 35-year-old sand-fixing Mongolian pine (Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica) plantations in Horqin Sandy Land, with a mobile dune as a comparison site. After the afforestation on mobile dune, the content of coarse sand in soil decreased, while that of fine sand and clay-silt increased significantly. The SOC and LFOC contents also increased significantly, but tended to decrease with increasing soil depth. Afforestation increased the storages of SOC and LFOC in surface soil, and the increment increased with plantation age. In the two plantations, the increment of surface soil LFOC storage was much higher than that of SOC storage, suggesting that mobile dune afforestation had a larger effect on surface soil LFOC than on SOC.

  6. Conservation agriculture improves yield and reduces weeding activity in sandy soils of Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intensive tillage in many less-developed countries, including Cambodia have caused significant decline in agriculture’s natural resources and sustainability. With limited available data, long-term conventional tillage system (CT) and conservation agriculture system (CA) can affect changes in soil pr...

  7. Axial compressive bearing capacity of piles in oil-contaminated sandy soil using FCV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, Amirhossein; Ebadi, Taghi; Eslami, Abolfazl; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2018-01-01

    Oil and its derivatives contaminate many soils and not only affect their chemical and biological properties but also their geotechnical properties. As oil contamination may deteriorate the functioning of piles, this paper addresses the effects of oil contamination on soil–pile interactions. Axial

  8. The influence of clay particles on the hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahmy, M.I.

    1961-01-01

    The relation between hydraulic conductivity and size of the sand particles and clay content was investigated in artificial mixtures of sand and clay and in natural soils, in four different ways in the laboratory and field.

    In the artificial mixtures coarse aggregates of illitic clay hardly

  9. Aeolian sediment mass fluxes on a sandy soil in Central Patagonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Parigiani, J.; Cittadini, E.; Peters, P.; Scholberg, J.M.S.; Peri, P.

    2012-01-01

    The climate of Patagonia is semi-arid and characterised by frequent strong winds. Wind erosion is potentially a serious soil degradation process that impacts long-term sustainability of local agricultural systems, but the conditions and the rates of wind erosion in this region have not been studied

  10. Aeolian sediment mass fluxes on a sandy soil in Central Patagonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, G.; Parigiani, J.; Cittadini, E.; Peters, P.; Scholberg, J.; Peri, P.

    2012-01-01

    The climate of Patagonia is semi-arid and characterised by frequent strong winds. Wind erosion is potentially a serious soil degradation process that impacts long-term sustainability of local agricultural systems, but the conditions and the rates of wind erosion in this region have not been

  11. Towards improved nitrogen management in silage maize production on sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeder, J.

    1998-01-01

    Maize has become a highly appreciated crop in Dutch dairy farming during the last 25 years. The current cropping technique, however, is associated with a low recovery of soil mineral nitrogen (N) and serious losses of N to the environment. This gave rise to the research described in this

  12. Complexation with dissolved organic matter and solubility control of heavy metals in sandy soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weng, L.; Temminghoff, E.J.M.; Lofts, S.; Tipping, E.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2002-01-01

    The complexation of heavy metals with dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the environment influences the solubility and mobility of these metals. In this paper, we measured the complexation of Cu, Cd, Zn, Ni, and Pb with DOM in the soil solution at pH 3.7-6.1 using a Donnan membrane technique. The

  13. Clinoptilolite zeolite influence on nitrogen in a manure-amended sandy agricultural soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of best management practices can help improve inorganic nitrogen (N) availability to plants and reduce nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) leaching in soils. This study was conducted to determine the influence of the zeolite mineral clinoptilolite (CL) additions on NO3-N and ammonium-nitrogen (NH4-...

  14. Cleansing of sandy soils using attrition; Depollution de sols sablonneux par attrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schriker, H. Tiefel [A.K.W. Apparate und Verfahren, Hirschau (Germany); Neesse, T. [Universite d' Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2001-03-01

    The attrition process used in soil cleansing has been improved thanks to a combination with classification, dosimetry and integrated measurement processes in order to ensure a constant concentration of solids. Tests have been successfully performed on quartz sands contaminated with mineral oil. Abstract only. (J.S.)

  15. A Comparative Study of the Soil Fauna in forests and cultivated land on sandy soils in Suriname

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drift, van der J.

    1963-01-01

    1. In the coastal area of Suriname the soil and surface fauna were studied in various types of agricultural land, and compared with the fauna in the adjacent forests. 2. In primeval forest the soil macroarthropods are less numerous than in secondary forest (Formicidae excluded). They range generally

  16. Contribution of Rhizobium–Mycorrhiza–Merapi-indigenous Rhizobacteria Association on Growth and Yield of Three Cultivars Soybean Cultivated on Coastal Sandy Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Kusumastuti; Agung Astuti; Sarjiyah Sarjiyah

    2017-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effect of inoculum association between Rhizobium sp., mycorrhizae and Merapi-indigenous Rhizobacteria on the growth and yield of 3 soybean cultivars, and to determine the best inoculum and cultivars for soybean cultivation on coastal sandy soil. The study was conducted in the Agro-biotechnology and Research Laboratory and experimental station of Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta during the period of September 2015 to June 2016. Ex...

  17. Resistance of aerobic microorganisms and soil enzyme response to soil contamination with Ekodiesel Ultra fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Agata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga; Wyszkowski, Mirosław

    2017-11-01

    This study determined the susceptibility of cultured soil microorganisms to the effects of Ekodiesel Ultra fuel (DO), to the enzymatic activity of soil and to soil contamination with PAHs. Studies into the effects of any type of oil products on reactions taking place in soil are necessary as particular fuels not only differ in the chemical composition of oil products but also in the composition of various fuel improvers and antimicrobial fuel additives. The subjects of the study included loamy sand and sandy loam which, in their natural state, have been classified into the soil subtype 3.1.1 Endocalcaric Cambisols. The soil was contaminated with the DO in amounts of 0, 5 and 10 cm3 kg-1. Differences were noted in the resistance of particular groups or genera of microorganisms to DO contamination in loamy sand (LS) and sandy loam (SL). In loamy sand and sandy loam, the most resistant microorganisms were oligotrophic spore-forming bacteria. The resistance of microorganisms to DO contamination was greater in LS than in SL. It decreased with the duration of exposure of microorganisms to the effects of DO. The factor of impact (IFDO) on the activity of particular enzymes varied. For dehydrogenases, urease, arylsulphatase and β-glucosidase, it had negative values, while for catalase, it had positive values and was close to 0 for acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase. However, in both soils, the noted index of biochemical activity of soil (BA) decreased with the increase in DO contamination. In addition, a positive correlation occurred between the degree of soil contamination and its PAH content.

  18. Contribution of Rhizobium–Mycorrhiza–Merapi-indigenous Rhizobacteria Association on Growth and Yield of Three Cultivars Soybean Cultivated on Coastal Sandy Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kusumastuti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to examine the effect of inoculum association between Rhizobium sp., mycorrhizae and Merapi-indigenous Rhizobacteria on the growth and yield of 3 soybean cultivars, and to determine the best inoculum and cultivars for soybean cultivation on coastal sandy soil. The study was conducted in the Agro-biotechnology and Research Laboratory and experimental station of Faculty of Agriculture, Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta during the period of September 2015 to June 2016. Experiments were conducted by using coastal sandy soil as planting medium in polybags by employing 4 x 3 factorial experiments, arranged in completely randomised design, and placed under the field condition. The first factor used was inoculation treatment consisted of 4 combination of inoculums: (1 Rhizobium sp. – mycorrhizae, (2 Rhizobium sp. – Merapi-indigenous Rhizobacteria, (3 Rhizobium sp. – mycorrhizae – Merapi-indigenous Rhizobacteria, and (4 without inoculation. The second factor was soybean cultivars consisted of 3 varieties: (1 Grobogan, (2 Detam-1, and (3 Petek. Observation was carried out on nodulation, mycorrhizal effect, Rhizobacterial population dynamics, plant growth and yield. The results showed that Rhizobium sp.–mycorrhizae inoculated on Petek increased root growth, leaf area and yield (5,97 tonnes/ha. Rhizobium sp.–mycorrhizae inoculation only increased diameter of nodules. It was also observed that the best soybean cultivar for coastal sandy soil was Petek.

  19. Phosphatase activity in sandy soil influenced by mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal cover crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alceu Kunze

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cover crops may difffer in the way they affect rhizosphere microbiota nutrient dynamics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal cover crops on soil phosphatase activity and its persistence in subsequent crops. A three-year experiment was carried out with a Typic Quartzipsamment. Treatments were winter species, either mycorrhizal black oat (Avena strigosa Schreb or the non-mycorrhizal species oilseed radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. oleiferus Metzg and corn spurry (Spergula arvensis L.. The control treatment consisted of resident vegetation (fallow in the winter season. In the summer, a mixture of pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L. with sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea L. or with soybean (Glycine max L. was sown in all plots. Soil cores (0-10 cm and root samples were collected in six growing seasons (winter and summer of each year. Microbial biomass P was determined by the fumigation-extraction method and phosphatase activity using p-nitrophenyl-phosphate as enzyme substrate. During the flowering stage of the winter cover crops, acid phosphatase activity was 30-35 % higher in soils with the non-mycorrhizal species oilseed radish, than in the control plots, regardless of the amount of P immobilized in microbial biomass. The values of enzyme activity were intermediate in the plots with corn spurry and black oat. Alkaline phosphatase activity was 10-fold lower and less sensitive to the treatments, despite the significant relationship between the two phosphatase activities. The effect of plant species on the soil enzyme profile continued in the subsequent periods, during the growth of mycorrhizal summer crops, after completion of the life cycle of the cover crops.

  20. Soil salinity and matric potential interaction on water use, water use efficiency and yield response factor of bean and wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataar, Mahnaz; Mohhamadi, Mohammad Hossien; Shabani, Farzin

    2018-02-08

    We studied the effects of soil matric potential and salinity on the water use (WU), water use efficiency (WUE) and yield response factor (Ky), for wheat (Triticum aestivum cv. Mahdavi) and bean (Phaseoulus vulgaris cv. COS16) in sandy loam and clay loam soils under greenhouse conditions. Results showed that aeration porosity is the predominant factor controlling WU, WUE, Ky and shoot biomass (Bs) at high soil water potentials. As matric potential was decreased, soil aeration improved, with Bs, WU and Ky reaching maximum value at -6 to -10 kPa, under all salinities. Wheat WUE remained almost unchanged by reduction of matric potential under low salinities (EC ≤ 8 dSm-1), but increased under higher salinities (EC ≥ 8 dSm-1), as did bean WUE at all salinities, as matric potential decreased to -33 kPa. Wheat WUE exceeds that of bean in both sandy loam and clay loam soils. WUE of both plants increased with higher shoot/root ratio and a high correlation coefficient exists between them. Results showed that salinity decreases all parameters, particularly at high potentials (h = -2 kPa), and amplifies the effects of waterlogging. Further, we observed a strong relationship between transpiration (T) and root respiration (Rr) for all experiments.

  1. NUTRIENT RETURN THROUGH LITTERFALL IN A Eucalyptus dunnii Maiden STAND IN SANDY SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Aparecida Ludvichak

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In a forest stand, litterfall is primarily responsible for the retention and return of nutrients to the soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the return of nutrients through litterfall in a stand of Eucalyptus dunnii in a Pampa biome. For quantification of litterfall, four 420-m2 installments were marked; within each one, four 0.50-m2 collection plots were distributed. For the collection of thick branches, four 7.00-m2 sub-plots were staked out. The collected litterfall was separated into leaf, twig, thick branch, and miscellany fractions for subsequent chemical analysis. The total litterfall measured was 6.99 Mg ha-1 yr-1, and comprised 61.57% leaves, 17.34% twigs, 13.83% thick branches, and 7.26% miscellany. The total amount of macronutrients in the litterfall was 160.22 kg ha-1 yr-1, and the macronutrient transfer order was the same for the leaf, twig, and thick branch fractions (Ca > N > K > Mg > S > P. The total quantity of micronutrients was 7.55 kg ha-1 yr-1, and the transfer order was Mn > Fe > B > Zn > Cu. Maintaining litterfall on the site, especially in degraded or low fertility soils like in the Pampa biome, may contribute to possible improvements in soil characteristics.

  2. Surface soil factors and soil characteristics in geo-physical milieu of Kebbi State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleiman Usman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil erodibility (K factor is the most important tool for estimation the erosion. The aim of this study Soil factors and surface soil characteristics are important components of agricultural environment. They support surface and subsurface soils to perform many functions to agriculture and economic human developments. Understanding these factors would aid to the recognition of the values that our soil and land offered to humanity. It is therefore, aim of this study to visualise and examine the soil factors and surface soil characteristics in Kebbi State Nigeria. An Integrated Surface Soil Approach (ISSA was used in the classification and description of soil environment in the study region. The factors constituted in the ISSA are important components of soil science that theories and practice(s noted to provide ideas on how soil environment functioned. The results indicate that the surface soil environments around Arewa, Argungu, Augie, Birnin Kebbi and Dandi are physically familiar with the following surface soil characteristics: bad-lands, blown-out-lands, cirque-lands, fertile-lands, gullied-lands, miscellaneous and rock-outcrops.The major soil factors observed hat played an important role in surface soil manipulations and soil formation are alluvial, colluvial, fluvial and lacustrine; ant, earthworms and termite; and various forms of surface relief supported by temperature, rainfall, relative humidity and wind. Overall, the surface soil environment of the region was describe according to their physical appearance into fadama clay soils, fadama clay-loam soils, dryland sandy soils, dryland sandy-loam soils, dryland stony soils and organic-mineral soils.

  3. Improved retention of imidacloprid (Confidor) in soils by adding vermicompost from spent grape marc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Bayo, Jesús D; Nogales, Rogelio; Romero, Esperanza

    2007-05-25

    Batch sorption experiments of the insecticide imidacloprid by ten widely different Spanish soils were carried out. The sorption was studied for the active ingredient and its registered formulation Confidor. The temperature effect was studied at 15 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The addition of a vermicompost from spent grape marc (natural and ground), containing 344 g kg(-1) organic carbon, on the sorption of imidacloprid by two selected soils, a sandy loam and a silty clay loam, having organic carbon content of 3.6 g kg(-1) and 9.3 g kg(-1), respectively, was evaluated. Prior to the addition of this vermicompost, desorption isotherms with both selected soils, were also performed. The apparent hysteresis index (AHI) parameter was used to quantify sorption-desorption hysteresis. Sorption coefficients, K(d) and K(f), for the active ingredient and Confidor(R) in the different soils were similar. Sorption decreased with increasing temperature, this fact has special interest in greenhouse systems. A significant correlation (R(2)=0.965; Pvermicompost was an effective sorbent of this insecticide (K(f)=149). The sorption of imidacloprid increased significantly in soils amended with this vermicompost. The most pronounced effect was found in the sandy loam soil with low OC content, where the addition of 5% and 10% of vermicompost increased K(f) values by 8- and 15-fold, respectively. Soil desorption of imidacloprid was slower for the soil with the higher OC and clay content.

  4. Impact of pulp and paper mill effluents and solid wastes on soil mineralogical and physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Gopi; Bhattacharyya, Krishna G

    2015-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the impact of the effluents and the solid wastes generated by a giant pulp and paper mill in the northeastern part of India on soil mineralogy of the area. The impacts were monitored by analysis of soil samples from seven sites located in the potential impact zone and a control site where any kind of effluent discharge or solid waste dumping was absent. The soil belonged to medium texture type (sandy clay loam, sandy loam, loamy sand, and silt loam), and the soil aggregate analysis indicated higher levels of organic carbon, pH, electrical conductivity, effective cation exchange capacity, and mean weight diameter at sites receiving effluents and solid wastes from the pulp and paper mill. Depletion in soil silica level and in feldspar and quartz contents and rise in iron and calcium contents at the sites receiving effluents from the pulp and paper mill indicated significant influence on soil mineralogy. The soil contained a mixture of minerals consisting of tectosilicates (with silicate frameworks as in quartz or feldspar), phylosilicates (layered clays like kaolinite, smectite, chlorite, illite, etc.), and carbonates. Absence of pure clay minerals indicated a state of heterogeneous intermediate soil clay transformation. The significance of the mixed mineralogy in relation to the disposal of effluents and dumping of solid wastes is discussed in details.

  5. Nitrogen fertilization in the growth phase of 'Chardonnay' and 'Pinot Noir' vines and nitrogen forms in sandy soil of the Pampa Biome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Lorensini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Information on nitrogen fertilization in growing vines is still a very limited subject, especially for crops on sandy soils in the Pampa Biome in Rio Grande do Sul, where viticulture has expanded considerably in the last decade. This study aimed to assess the impact of N doses on growth of young plants of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir vines and N forms present in sandy soil in the Pampa Biome. The experiment was conducted from October 2011 to December 2012 in a vineyard in Santana do Livramento, in Southern Rio Grande do Sul State, in soil with 82 g kg-1 clay in the 0-20 cm layer. Vines of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir varieties were subjected to applications of 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, and 80 kg N ha-1 year-1. Total N in leaves, SPAD readings, stem diameter, plant height, and dry matter of the pruned material were evaluated in two growth cycles and three times. Soil samples were collected at 0-10 and 10-20 cm depths at four crop growth stages, in which N-NH4 +, N-NO3 -, and total N were analyzed and the mineral N was calculated. The N levels applied to young vines, although they did not provide relevant changes in the N-NH4 +, N-NO3 -, and mineral N contents in the soil, were able to increase the N content in the leaves, increasing plant vigor. because the reason is that there was an increase in stem diameter, plant height, and dry matter of pruned material in most evaluation periods. These parameters suggest better growth patterns and uniformity of young grapevines with possible positive effects in anticipation of production, demonstrating the importance of nitrogen fertilization strategies to the growing vines in the sandy soil conditions of the Pampa Biome.

  6. Sustainable long-term intensive application of manure to sandy soils without phosphorus leaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asomaning, Samuel K.; Abekoe, Mark K.; Dowuona, G.N.N.

    2015-01-01

    manure over 70 years and on uncultivated plots (controls). The samples were analyzed for texture, pH, total C and P and poorly ordered Al and Fe oxides as well as different P forms as assessed by the Hedley fractionation method. The results showed a fourfold P increase in the top 40 cm of the cultivated...... and uncultivated sites. P fractionation showed that the cultivated top soils were dominated by sparingly soluble Ca–P compounds that accounted for about 70% of the P gain. Thus, the results suggest that intensive crop production under tropical semi-arid conditions may be environmentally sustainable when based...

  7. [Mechanisms of grass in slope erosion control in Loess sandy soil region of Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-Hong; Gao, Jian-En; Xu, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    By adopting the method of simulated precipitation and from the viewpoint of slope hydrodynamics, in combining with the analysis of soil resistance to erosion, a quantitative study was made on the mechanisms of grass in controlling the slope erosion in the cross area of wind-water erosion in Loess Plateau of Northwest China under different combinations of rainfall intensity and slope gradient, aimed to provide basis to reveal the mechanisms of vegetation in controlling soil erosion and to select appropriate vegetation for the soil and water conservation in Loess Plateau. The grass Astragalus adsurgens with the coverage about 40% could effectively control the slope erosion. This grass had an efficiency of more than 70% in reducing sediment, and the grass root had a greater effect than grass canopy. On bare slope and on the slopes with the grass plant or only the grass root playing effect, there existed a functional relation between the flow velocity on the slopes and the rainfall intensity and slope gradient (V = DJ(0.33 i 0.5), where V is flow velocity, D is the comprehensive coefficient which varies with different underlying surfaces, i is rainfall intensity, and J is slope gradient). Both the grass root and the grass canopy could markedly decrease the flow velocity on the slopes, and increase the slope resistance, but the effect of grass root in decreasing flow velocity was greater while the effect in increasing resistance was smaller than that of grass canopy. The effect of grass root in increasing slope resistance was mainly achieved by increasing the sediment grain resistance, while the effect of canopy was mainly achieved by increasing the slope form resistance and wave resistance. The evaluation of the soil resistance to erosion by using a conceptual model of sediment generation by overland flow indicated that the critical shear stress value of bare slope and of the slopes with the grass plant or only the grass root playing effect was 0.533, 1.672 and 0

  8. Influence of zeolite and cement additions on mechanical behavior of sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mola-Abasi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the cemented sand is one of economic and environmental topics in soil stabilization. In this instance, a blend of sand, cement and other materials such as fiber, glass, nanoparticle and zeolite can be commercially available and effectively used in soil stabilization in road construction. However, the influence and effectiveness of zeolite on the properties of cemented sand systems have not been completely explored. In this study, based on an experimental program, the effects of zeolite on the characteristics of cemented sands are investigated. Stabilizing agent includes Portland cement of type II and zeolite. Results show the improvements of unconfined compressive strength (UCS and failure properties of cemented sand when the cement is replaced by zeolite at an optimum proportion of 30% after 28 days. The rate of strength improvement is approximately between 20% and 78%. The efficiency of using zeolite increases with the increases in cement amount and porosity. Finally, a power function of void-cement ratio and zeolite content is demonstrated to be an appropriate method to assess UCS of zeolite-cemented mixtures.

  9. Estimating of Soil Texture Using Landsat Imagery: a Case Study in Thatta Tehsil, Sindh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Zahid

    2016-07-01

    Soil texture is considered as an important environment factor for agricultural growth. It is the most essential part for soil classification in large scale. Today the precise soil information in large scale is of great demand from various stakeholders including soil scientists, environmental managers, land use planners and traditional agricultural users. With the increasing demand of soil properties in fine scale spatial resolution made the traditional laboratory methods inadequate. In addition the costs of soil analysis with precision agriculture systems are more expensive than traditional methods. In this regard, the application of geo-spatial techniques can be used as an alternative for examining soil analysis. This study aims to examine the ability of Geo-spatial techniques in identifying the spatial patterns of soil attributes in fine scale. Around 28 samples of soil were collected from the different areas of Thatta Tehsil, Sindh, Pakistan for analyzing soil texture. An Ordinary Least Square (OLS) regression analysis was used to relate the reflectance values of Landsat8 OLI imagery with the soil variables. The analysis showed there was a significant relationship (psoil attributes. The USDA textural classification triangle was implementing for the derivation of soil texture map in GIS environment. The outcome revealed that the 'sandy loam' was in great quantity followed by loam, sandy clay loam and clay loam. The outcome shows that the Geo-spatial techniques could be used efficiently for mapping soil texture of a larger area in fine scale. This technology helped in decreasing cost, time and increase detailed information by reducing field work to a considerable level.

  10. Effects of changes in land use on soil physical properties and soil organic carbon content in a wheat-corn-sunflower crop sequence, in a loam soil of Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, V.; Costa, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    The Argentinean Humid Pampas extend over about 60 million hectares, 90% of which are agricultural lands. The Southeast of the Buenos Aires Province is part of the Humid Pampas, it covers over 1,206,162 hectares, the mean annual temperature is 13.3 °C and the climate is sub-humid. At the present only 6% of the lands are used for pasture. The main activities are agriculture and cattle production. The main crops are wheat, sunflower, corn and soybean. The tillage systems used in the area are: moldboard plow (MP), chisel plow (CP) and no-till (NT). Excessive soil cultivation under MP generates decreases in the levels of soil organic carbon (SOC). The magnitude of such decrease depends on the intensity of the tillage system, the tillage timeliness and the amount and quality of the residues. Adopting NT may reduce the effects of intensive agriculture, through the maintenance and accumulation of SOC. However, there are evidences that, under NT, the bulk density (ρb) in the superficial layers of the soil increases. The soil compaction causes degradation of the soil structure, reduces the soil water availability and reduces the soil hydraulic conductivity. With this scenario and the tendency to increase the surface under NT in the Southeast Humid Pampas, we evaluated the evolution of some soil physical properties and the SOC in a 10-year experiment with a wheat-corn-sunflower rotation. The experiment was carried out in four localities at farmerś fields under three different tillage systems: MP, CP and NT in a randomized complete block design, considering each locality as a block. Each plot had 50 m in width by 100 m length and the treatments were: NT, MP and CP. The results of this experiment have allowed us to verify that: i) the wheat-corn-sunflower crop sequence showed a tendency to reduce the values of bulk density (ρb) but NT increased ρb in the superficial soil layers; ii) the more intensive the tillage system, the higher the change in the mean weight diameter

  11. Interaction of different irrigation strategies and soil textures on the nitrogen uptake of field grown potatoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, S.H.; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) uptake (kg ha-1) of field-grown potatoes was measured in 4.32 m2 lysimeters that were filled with coarse sand, loamy sand, and sandy loam and subjected to full (FI), deficit (DI), and partial root-zone drying (PRD) irrigation strategies. PRD and DI as water-saving irrigation treatments...... in the loamy sand had the highest amount of N uptake. The interaction between irrigation treatments and soil textures was significant, and implied that under non-limiting water conditions, loamy sand is the suitable soil for potato production because plants can take up sufficient amounts of N and it could...... potentially lead to higher yield. However, under limited water conditions and applying water-saving irrigation strategies, sandy loam and coarse sand are better growth media because N is more available for the potatoes. The simple yield prediction model was developed that could explains ca. 96...

  12. Hydrodispersive characterization of a sandy porous medium by tracer tests carried out in laboratory on undisturbed soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Aldo Pedro; Fallico, Carmine; Rios, Ana C.; Fernanda Rivera, Maria; Santillan, Patricio; Salazar, Mario

    2013-04-01

    The contamination of large areas and correspondent aquifers often imposes to implement some recovery operations which are generally complex and very expensive. Anyway, these interventions necessarily require the preventive characterization of the aquifers to be reclaimed and in particular the knowledge of the relevant hydrodispersive parameters. The determination of these parameters requires the implementation tracer tests for the specific site (Sauty JP, 1978). To reduce cost and time that such test requires tracer tests on undisturbed soil samples, representative of the whole aquifer, can be performed. These laboratory tests are much less expensive and require less time, but the results are certainly less reliable than those obtained by field tests for several reasons, including the particular scale of investigation. In any case the hydrodispersive parameters values, obtained by tests carried out in laboratory, can provide useful information on the considered aquifer, allowing to carry out initial verifications on the transmission and propagation of the pollutants in the aquifer considered. For this purpose, tracer tests with inlet of short time were carried out in the Soil Physics Laboratory of the Department of Soil Protection (University of Calabria), on a series of sandy soil samples with six different lengths, repeating each test with three different water flow velocities (5 m/d; 10 m/s and 15 m/d) (J. Feyen et al., 1998). The lengths of the samples taken into account are respectively 15 cm, 24 cm, 30 cm, 45 cm, 60 cm and 75 cm, while the solution used for each test was made of 100 ml of water and NaCl with a concentration of this substance corresponding to 10 g/L. For the porous medium taken into consideration a particle size analysis was carried out, resulting primarily made of sand, with total porosity equal to 0.33. Each soil sample was placed in a flow cell in which was inlet the tracer from the bottom upwards, measuring by a conductivimeter the

  13. Persistence, distribution, and emission of Telone C35 injected into a Florida sandy soil as affected by moisture, organic matter, and plastic film cover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J E; Ou, L T; Allen, L H; McCormack, L A; Vu, J C; Dickson, D W

    2004-05-01

    With the phase-out of methyl bromide scheduled for 2005, alternative fumigants are being sought. This study of Telone C35, a mixture of (Z)- and (E)-1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) with chloropicirin (CP), focuses on its emissions, distribution, and persistence in Florida sandy soil in microplots with different soil-water and organic matter carbon (C) content with and without two different plastic film mulches. The addition of CP did not affect the physical behavior of the isomers of 1,3-D. Slower subsurface dispersion and longer residence time of the mixed fumigant occurred at higher water content. An increase in the percent organic carbon in the soil led to a more rapid decrease for chloropicirin than for 1,3-dichloropene isomers. The use of a virtually impermeable film (VIF) for soil cover provided a more even distribution and longer persistence under all the conditions studied in comparison to polyethylene (PE) film cover or no cover. The conditions of near field capacity water content, low organic matter, and a virtually impermeable film cover yielded optimum conditions for the distribution, emission control, and persistence of Telone C35 in a Florida sandy soil.

  14. Impact of slurry management strategies on potential leaching of nutrients and pathogens in a sandy soil amended with cattle slurry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangueiro, D; Surgy, S; Napier, V; Menaia, J; Vasconcelos, E; Coutinho, J

    2014-12-15

    For farmers, management of cattle slurry (CS) is now a priority, in order to improve the fertilizer value of the slurry and simultaneously minimize its environmental impact. Several slurry pre-treatments and soil application methods to minimize ammonia emissions are now available to farmers, but the impact of such management strategies on groundwater is still unclear. A laboratory experiment was performed over 24 days in controlled conditions, with undisturbed soil columns (sandy soil) in PVC pipes (30 cm high and 5.7 cm in diameter). The treatments considered (4 replicates) were: a control with no amendment (CTR), injection of whole CS (WSI), and surface application of: whole CS (WSS), acidified (pH 5.5) whole CS (AWSS), the liquid fraction obtained by centrifugation of CS (LFS), and acidified (pH 5.5) liquid fraction (ALFS). An amount of CS equivalent to 240 kg N ha(-1) was applied in all treatments. The first leaching event was performed 72 h after application of the treatments and then leaching events were performed weekly to give a total of four irrigation events (IEs). All the leachates obtained were analyzed for mineral and organic nitrogen, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, total carbon, and phosphorus. Total coliforms and Escherichia coli were also quantified in the leachates obtained in the first IE. The results show that both acidification and separation had significant effects on the composition of the leachates: higher NO3(-) concentrations were observed for the LFS and ALFS relative to all the other treatments, throughout the experiment, and lower NO3(-) concentrations were observed for acidified relative to non-acidified treatments at IE2. Acidification of both the LF and WS led to higher NH4(+) concentrations as well as an increase of EC for treatment ALFS relative to the control, in the first IE, and lower pH values in the AWSS. Furthermore, the E. coli and total coliform concentrations in AWSS, LFS, and ALFS were significantly higher than in

  15. Fate of the antiretroviral drug tenofovir in agricultural soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne; Chapman, Ralph; Lapen, David R.; Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Tenofovir (9-(R)-(2-phosphonylmethoxypropyl)-adenine) is an antiretroviral drug widely used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections. Tenofovir is extensively and rapidly excreted unchanged in the urine. In the expectation that tenofovir could potentially reach agricultural lands through the application of municipal biosolids or wastewater, and in the absence of any environmental fate data, we evaluated its persistence in selected agricultural soils. Less than 10% of [adenine-8-{sup 14}C]-tenofovir added to soils varying widely in texture (sand, loam, clay loam) was mineralized in a 2-month incubation under laboratory conditions. Tenofovir was less readily extractable from clay soils than from a loam or a sandy loam soil. Radioactive residues of tenofovir were removed from the soil extractable fraction with DT{sub 50}s ranging from 24 {+-} 2 to 67 + 22 days (first order kinetic model) or 44 + 9 to 127 + 55 days (zero order model). No extractable transformation products were detectable by HPLC. Tenofovir mineralization in the loam soil increased with temperature (range 4 {sup o}C to 30 {sup o}C), and did not occur in autoclaved soil, suggesting a microbial basis. Mineralization rates increased with soil moisture content, ranging from air-dried to saturated. In summary, tenofovir was relatively persistent in soils, there were no extractable transformation products detected, and the response of [adenine-8-{sup 14}C]-tenofovir mineralization to soil temperature and heat sterilization indicated that the molecule was biodegraded by aerobic microorganisms. Sorption isotherms with dewatered biosolids suggested that tenofovir residues could potentially partition into the particulate fraction during sewage treatment.

  16. Effects of irrigation strategies and soils on field grown potatoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Seyed Hamid; Plauborg, Finn; Andersen, Mathias Neumann

    2011-01-01

    , loamy sand, and sandy loam. Irrigation treatments started after tuber bulking and lasted until final harvest with PRD and DI receiving 65% of FI. Potatoes irrigated with water-saving irrigation techniques (PRD and DI) did not show statistically different dry root mass and root length density (RLD, cm...... the furrows compared with the corresponding layers below the ridges. The RLD values in the soil profile of the ridges and the furrows followed the Gerwitz and Page model: RLD =˛×exp(−ˇ×z). The highest value of surface root density (˛) and rate of change in density (ˇ) was found in coarse sand while the lowest...... values of ˛ and ˇ were found in the sandy loam and loamy sand. The model estimated the effective rooting depth in coarse sand and sandy loam quite well but did slightly overestimate it in the loamy sand. Statistical analysis showed that one ˛ and ˇ value can be used for each soil irrespective...

  17. A comparison of cation sampling in forest soils by tension and tension-free lysimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    James H. Miller

    1981-01-01

    Field tests conducted in two soils with ceramic cup, ceramic plate, and tension-free lysimeters showed no concentration differences in collected cations (Ca, Mg, K, Na) between cups and plates, except for the hydrogen ion. Mean pH was 0.6 lower in cup collected samples for a sandy loam profile. Tension-free lysimeters of the design tested had persistent contamination...

  18. Investigating the Effect of Soil Texture and Fertility on Evapotranspiration and Crop Coefficient of Maize Forage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbanian Kerdabadi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Crop coefficient varies in different environmental conditions, such as deficit irrigation, salinity and intercropping. The effect of soil fertility and texture of crop coefficient and evapotranspiration of maize was investigated in this study. Low soil fertility and food shortages as a stressful environment for plants that makes it different evapotranspiration rates of evapotranspiration calculation is based on the FAO publication 56. Razzaghi et al. (2012 investigate the effect of soil type and soil-drying during the seed-filling phase on N-uptake, yield and water use, a Danish-bred cultivar (CV. Titicaca was grown in field lysimeters with sand, sandy loam and sandy clay loam soil. Zhang et al (2014 were investigated the Effect of adding different amounts of nitrogen during three years (from 2010 to 2012 on water use efficiency and crop evapotranspiration two varieties of winter wheat. The results of their study showed. The results indicated the following: (1 in this dry land farming system, increased N fertilization could raise wheat yield, and the drought-tolerant Changhan No. 58 showed a yield advantage in drought environments with high N fertilizer rates; (2 N application affected water consumption in different soil layers, and promoted wheat absorbing deeper soil water and so increased utilization of soil water; and (3 comprehensive consideration of yield and WUE of wheat indicated that the N rate of 270 kg/ha for Changhan No. 58 was better to avoid the risk of reduced production reduction due to lack of precipitation; however, under conditions of better soil moisture, the N rate of 180 kg/ha was more economic. Materials and Methods: The study was a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three soil texture treatment, including silty clay loam, loam and sandy-loam soil and three fertility treatment, including without fertilizer, one and two percent fertilizer( It was conducted at the experimental farm in

  19. [Effects of understory removal and nitrogen addition on the soil chemical and biological properties of Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica plantation in Keerqin Sandy Land].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Gui-Gang; Zhao, Qiong; Zhao, Lei; Li, Hui-Chao; Zeng, De-Hui

    2012-05-01

    A full factorial experiment was conducted to study the effects of understory removal and nitrogen addition (8 g x m(-2)) on the soil NO(3-)-N and NH(4+)-N concentrations, potential net nitrogen mineralization rate (PNM) and nitrification rate (PNN), microbial biomass C (MBC) and N (MBN), MBC/MBN, urease and acid phosphomonoesterase activities, and Olsen-P concentration in a Pinus sylvestris var. mongolica plantation in Keerqin Sandy Land during a growth season. Understory removal decreased the soil NH(4+)-N concentration, PNM, MBC, and MBN/MBN significantly, increased the soil Olsen-P concentration, but had little effects on the soil NO(3-)-N concentration, PNN, and urease and acid phosphomonoesterase activities. Nitrogen addition increased the soil NO(3-)-N concentration, PNM and PNN significantly, but had little effects on the other test properties. The interaction between understory removal and nitrogen addition had significant effects on the soil NH(4+)-N concentration, but little effects on the soil NO(3-)-N concentration. However, the soil NO(3-)-N concentration in the plots of understory removal with nitrogen addition was increased by 27%, compared with the plots of nitrogen addition alone, which might lead to the leaching of NO3-. It was suggested that understory vegetation could play an important role in affecting the soil chemical and biological properties in Mongolian pine plantations, and hence, the importance of understory vegetation should not be neglected when the forest management and restoration were implemented.

  20. A standardized soil quality index for diverse field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paul Obade, Vincent; Lal, Rattan

    2016-01-15

    Understanding the nexus between soil quality and productivity is constrained by data artifacts, compounded by limitations of the existing models. Here, we explore the potential of 4 regression methods (i.e., Reduced Regression (RR), SIMPLS, Principal Component Regression (PCR), and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR)), to synthesize 10 soil physical and chemical properties acquired from 3 major management practices and different soil layers, into an unbiased soil quality index (SQI) capable of evaluating soil functions (e.g., biomass production). The data was acquired from privately owned fields within the state of Ohio, USA, at the following land use and management sites: natural vegetation (NV) or woodlands, conventional till (CT), and no-till (NT). The soils were sampled at similar landscape positions (i.e., summit) at depth intervals of 0-10, 10-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm, and analyzed for bulk density (ρb), carbon/nitrogen (C/N) ratio, soil organic C (SOC), total N (TN), available water capacity (AWC), pH and electrical conductivity (EC). Preliminary analyses revealed the PLSR method as the most robust. The PLSR Variable Importance of Projection (VIP) was calculated, transformed into the SQI score and compared with yield data. SOC, ρb, C/N and EC were identified as the major variables influencing soil quality status. The data shows that the quality of Pewamo silty clay loam (Pw) soil was higher than Crosby Celina loams (CtA), Kibbie fine sandy loam (kbA), Glynwood silt loam (GWA) and Crosby silt loam (CrA), respectively. In 2012, the mean SQI was 42.9%, with corn and soybean yields of 7 and 2Mg/ha. The R(2) of SQI versus yield was 0.74 for corn (Zea mays L.), and 0.89 for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.). Future studies will investigate techniques for mapping this SQI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) application in acidic sandy soil in reducing leaching of phosphorus and heavy metals-a column leaching study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuangen; He, Zhenli; Yang, Xiaoe; Stoffella, Peter J

    2013-06-01

    A column leaching study was designed to investigate the leaching potential of phosphorus (P) and heavy metals from acidic sandy soils applied with dolomite phosphate rock (DPR) fertilizers containing varying amounts of DPR material and N-Viro soils. DPR fertilizers were made from DPR materials mixing with N-Viro soils at the ratios of 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 %, and applied in acidic sandy soils at the level of 100 mg available P per kilogram soil. A control and a soluble P chemical fertilizer were also included. The amended soils were incubated at room temperature with 70 % field water holding capacity for 21 days before packed into a soil column and subjected to leaching. Seven leaching events were conducted at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 28, 56, and 70, respectively, and 258.9 mL of deionized water was applied at each leaching events. The leachate was collected for the analyses of pH, electrical conductivity (EC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), major elements, and heavy metals. DPR fertilizer application resulted in elevations up to 1 unit in pH, 7-10 times in EC, and 20-40 times in K and Ca concentrations, but 3-10 times reduction in P concentration in the leachate as compared with the chemical fertilizer or the control. After seven leaching events, DPR fertilizers with adequate DPR materials significantly reduced cumulative leaching losses of Fe, P, Mn, Cu, and Zn by 20, 55, 3.7, 2.7, and 2.5 times than chemical fertilizer or control. Even though higher cumulative losses of Pb, Co, and Ni were observed after DPR fertilizer application, the loss of Pb, Co, and Ni in leachate was <0.10 mg (in total 1,812 mL leachate). Significant correlations of pH (negative) and DOC (positive) with Cu, Pb, and Zn (P<0.01) in leachate were observed. The results indicated that DPR fertilizers had a great advantage over the soluble chemical fertilizer in reducing P loss from the acidic sandy soil with minimal likelihood of heavy metal risk to the water environment. pH elevation and high

  2. Mitigation of Water Stress on Apple Trees under Rotational Irrigation Conditions by Increasing the Application Rate of Organic Fertilizers to Sandy Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Lamy Mamdoh Mohamed; Ramadan Eid, Abdelraouf; Mohsmed Rabie Abdellatif Abdelaziz, Adel; Fathy Abdelsalam Essa, El-Sayed

    2016-04-01

    Egypt, as part of Mediterranean regions, is characterized by irregular and low rainfall amount which varies between (30-150 mm.year-1), and characterized also by high temperature which increase the rate of evapotranspiration from the cultivated soil. On the other hand, New reclaimed soils are mostly occupies around 84 % of total area of Egypt, which is mainly sandy soils. These soils generally characterized by low water capacity holding, soil organic matter, and weak in nutrients retention. Under these conditions which have a great influence on crop production, there is a great needing to increase the crop water use efficiency and increasing of nutrient retention in sandy soils. In this context, two field experiments were carried out on sand soil located in north Cairo-Egypt at the experimental farm of National Research Center, El-NUBARIA, (latitude 30° 30' N, and longitude 30° 19' E). The effect of compost rates on soil hydraulic characteristics, fruit yields, quality traits, and water use efficiency and productivity of apple tree (Apple Anna Cultivar), was studied under deficit irrigation conditions. Four rates of compost [I1: control, I2: 12 ton.ha-1., I3: 24 ton.ha-1., I4: 36 ton.ha-1. and I5:48 ton.ha-1.] were applied under irrigation frequencies of (IF1 :once per week; IF2 :twice per week, IF3 :three times per week). The obtained results indicated that by increasing the application rate of compost, the available water capacity and saturated water content of sandy soil have been enhanced. In the same time, the fruit yield, quality traits and water productivity were increased by increasing the application rate of compost. It is worthy to mention that the I5IF3 treatment gave the highest values of fruit yield, quality traits and water productivity, whereas I1IF1 treatment gave the lowest values of all the above mentioned variables. As result, for apple cultivation in El-NUBARIA region, the recommended rate of compost is 48 ton.ha-1 and irrigation frequency

  3. A Case Study of Petroleum Degradation in Different Soil Textural Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogbara, Reginald B; Ayotamuno, Josiah M; Worlu, Daniel C; Fubara-Manuel, Isoteim

    2016-01-01

    Patents have been granted for a number of techniques for petroleum biodegradation including use of micro-organisms for degradation of hydrocarbon-based substances and for hydrocarbon degradation in oil reservoirs, but there is a dearth of information on hydrocarbon degradation in different soil textures. Hence, this work investigated the effects of different soil textures on degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons during a six-week period. Five soil textural classes commonly found in Port Harcourt metropolis, Nigeria, namely sand, loamy sand, sandy loam, silty clay and clay, were employed. The soils were contaminated with the same amount of crude oil and then remediated by biostimulation. Selected soil properties were monitored over time. Bacterial numbers declined significantly in the fine soil textures after petroleum contamination, but were either unaffected or increased significantly in the coarser soil textures. Hydrocarbon losses ranged from 42% - 99%; the sandy loam had the highest, while the clay soil had the least total hydrocarbon content (THC) reduction. The total heterotrophic bacterial (THB) counts generally corroborated the THC results. Fold increase in bacterial numbers due to remediation treatment decreased with increasing clay content. The results suggest that higher sand than clay content of soil favours faster hydrocarbon degradation. Hydrocarbon degradation efficiency increased with silt content among soil groupings such as fine and coarse soils but not necessarily with increasing silt content of soil. Thus, there seems to be cut-off sand and clay contents in soil at which the effect of the silt content becomes significant.

  4. Removal of a mixture of pesticides by a Streptomyces consortium: Influence of different soil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, María S; Raimondo, Enzo E; Amoroso, María J; Benimeli, Claudia S

    2017-04-01

    Although the use of organochlorine pesticides (OPs) is restricted or banned in most countries, they continue posing environmental and health concerns, so it is imperative to develop methods for removing them from the environment. This work is aimed to investigate the simultaneous removal of three OPs (lindane, chlordane and methoxychlor) from diverse types of systems by employing a native Streptomyces consortium. In liquid systems, a satisfactory microbial growth was observed accompanied by removal of lindane (40.4%), methoxychlor (99.5%) and chlordane (99.8%). In sterile soil microcosms, the consortium was able to grow without significant differences in the different textured soils (clay silty loam, sandy and loam), both contaminated or not contaminated with the OPs-mixture. The Streptomyces consortium was able to remove all the OPs in sterile soil microcosm (removal order: clay silty loam > loam > sandy). So, clay silty loam soil (CSLS) was selected for next assays. In non-sterile CSLS microcosms, chlordane removal was only about 5%, nonetheless, higher rates was observed for lindane (11%) and methoxychlor (20%). In CSLS slurries, the consortium exhibited similar growth levels, in the presence of or in the absence of the OPs-mixture. Not all pesticides were removed in the same way; the order of pesticide dissipation was: methoxychlor (26%)>lindane (12.5%)>chlordane (10%). The outlines of microbial growth and pesticides removal provide information about using actinobacteria consortium as strategies for bioremediation of OPs-mixture in diverse soil systems. Texture of soils and assay conditions (sterility, slurry formulation) were determining factors influencing the removal of each pesticide of the mixture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of biocompost-amendment on degradation of triazoles fungicides in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neera; Dureja, Prem

    2009-01-01

    Soil amendments play an important role in management of pesticide residues. Present study reports the effect of biocompost-amendment on degradation of penconazole and propiconazole (triazole fungicides) in a sandy loam soil under flooded and nonflooded (60% water holding capacity) conditions. Penconazole degraded at faster rate than propiconazole. Both the fungicides were found to be more persistent in flooded soil than nonflooded soil, but application of biocompost at 2.5% and 5.0% levels enhanced their degradation under both moisture regimes.

  6. Soil and plant nitrogen dynamics of a tomato crop under different fertilization strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doltra, Jordi; Muñoz, P; Antón, A

    2010-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted in 2007 to investigate the effects of the N fertilizer source on the soil and plant N dynamics of a tomato crop grown in a sandy loam soil. The fertilization treatments were: mineral N-fertilization applied by fertigation (TM); organic N-fertilization (TO...... basis. Soil samples were taken before planting and at harvest from depths of up to 90 cm in order to determine moisture and N-NO3- levels. The estimated amounts of total N-NO3- available in the different treatments, including the initial content in the 0-90 cm soil layer, were 560 (TC), 570 (TO) and 610...

  7. Electrochemical characterization of corrosion in materials of grounding systems, simulating conditions of synthetic soils with characteristics of local soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Guerrero, L.; Vera-Monroy, S. P.; Blanco, J.; Jimenez, C.

    2017-12-01

    The integrity of structures buried in earthing becomes relevant when analysing maintenance and replacement costs of these systems, as the deterioration is mainly due to two factors, namely: the failures caused in the electrical systems, which are due to the system. Failure in earthing due to corrosion at the interface cause an alteration in the structure of the component material and generates an undesirable resistivity that cause malfunction in this type of protection systems. Two local soils were chosen that were categorized as sandy loam and clay loam type, whose chemical characteristics were simulated by means of an electrolyte corresponding to the amount of ions present determined by a soil characterization based on the CICE (effective cation exchange coefficient), which allows us to deduce the percentage of chloride and sulphate ions present for the different levels established in the experimental matrix. The interaction of these soils with grounding electrodes is a complex problem involving many factors to consider. In this study, the rates and corrosion currents of the different soils on two types of electrodes, one copper and the other AISI 304 stainless steel, were approximated by electrochemical techniques such as potentiodynamic curves and electrochemical impedance spectra. Considerably higher speeds were determined for copper-type electrodes when compared to those based on steel. However, from the Nyquist diagrams, it was noted that copper electrodes have better electrical performance than steel ones. The soil with the highest ionic activity turned out to be the sandy loam. The clay loam soil presents a tendency to water retention and this may be the reason for the different behaviour with respect to ionic mobility. The diffusion control in the steel seems to alter the ionic mobility because its corrosion rates proved to be very similar regardless of the type of soil chemistry. In general, corrosion rates fell since tenths of a millimetre every year to

  8. The use of volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Kelud in East Java for improving yield of sweet potato grown on a sandy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Melsandi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of volcanic ash from the eruption of Mount Kelud and compost on the soil properties and production of sweet potato on a sandy soil. The treatments of this study were (a a combination of and volcanic ash with the proportion of 100: 0, 90:10, 80:20, and 70:30 (% weight, (b the addition of compost (2.5 and 5 t / ha, and (c two varieties of sweet potato (Manohara and Ayamurazaki. The soil used in this study is the topsoil (0-30 cm Psament or sandy Entisol obtained from sweet potato cultivation location in Sumber Pasir Village of Pakis District, South Malang. Ten kilograms of planting medium (soil + volcanic ash for each treatment was placed in a 15 kg plastic pot. Sixteen treatments arranged in a factorial completely randomized design with three replications. The results showed that application of Mount Kelud volcanic ash and compost was able to improve soil permeability, soil pH, organic C, and K-total, but did not significantly affect total N content, available P and K total land. The highest fresh tuber weights of 373.51 g / plant or 19.92 t / ha and 393.09 g / plant or 20.96 t / ha for Manohara and Ayumurazaki varieties, respectively, were observed in the treatment of 10% volcanic ash + 5 t compost / ha. The carbohydrate content of Manohara variety was higher than that of Ayamurazaki variety at each treatment. The highest carbohydrate content of the Manohara variety (23.52% was obtained through application of 20% volcanic ash + 2.5 t compost/ha, while that of the Ayamurazaki variety (22.42% was obtained through application of 30% volcanic ash + 2.5 t/ha.

  9. Diversity and activity of cellulose-decomposing bacteria, isolated from a sandy and a loamy soil after long-term manure application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Andreas; Klimke, Gabriele; Wirth, Stephan

    2008-04-01

    The community of culturable cellulolytic bacteria was analyzed in two long-term experimental field sites on Albic Luvisol (silty sand) and Haplic Phaeozem (loam), with and without farmyard manure treatment. Against the backdrop of significant differences in soil properties, the bacterial community structure differed clearly between sites and was affected by manure application as analyzed by T-RFLP of 16S rDNA. The population densities of cellulolytic bacteria were significantly increased by manure application in Phaeozem. Cellulose decomposing potentials of 537 isolates were tested on soluble, colloidal, and crystalline cellulose. The results showed some evidence of a greater proportion of isolates with high decomposition activity in Luvisol, but no impact from manure application could be observed in both soils. Restriction analysis and sequencing of 16S rDNA of isolates revealed a rather simple community composition that was dominated by Streptomyces (67%). The composition of the RFLP groups was affected by manure application, which was most evident in Luvisol, whereas an effect of the soil type could not be found. Although abundant RFLP groups were assigned to phylogenetically different bacterial classes (Actinobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, and Gammaproteobacteria), cellulolytic activity could not consistently be differentiated. All in all, cellulolytic capabilities of the isolates were highly variable and did not map to phylogenetic affiliation.

  10. Occurrence and distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in organo-mineral particles of alluvial sandy soil profiles at a petroleum-contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zhe [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); School of Environment, Renmin University of China, Zhongguancun Street 59, Beijing 100872 (China); Zeng, Fangang [School of Environment, Renmin University of China, Zhongguancun Street 59, Beijing 100872 (China); Xue, Nandong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Fasheng, E-mail: ligulax@vip.sina.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Anwai, Dayangfang 8, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence and the distribution of 16 USEPA priority pollutants polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated in two alluvial sandy soil profiles and in their four sizes of organo-mineral particles (< 2 {mu}m clay, 2-20 {mu}m silt, 20-200 {mu}m fine sand, and > 200 {mu}m coarse sand) beside a typical oil sludge storage site in eastern China. PAHs were mainly enriched in the surface soil (0-20 cm) and the concentrations declined in deeper soils, from 3.68 to 0.128 {mu}g/g in profile 1 and 10.8 to 0.143 {mu}g/g in profile 2 (dry wt.). The PAHs in the upper soil layers of this study site mainly came from combustion pollution, whereas in the lower soil layers petroleum contamination became the major source of PAHs. The content of different sized organo-mineral particles of this alluvial sandy soil decreased in the following order: fine sand > coarse sand > silt > clay. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all the different sized soil fractions of this study site were dominated by quartz, calcite and feldspar. The particle surface became smoother with size increasing as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized soil fractions. The highest PAH concentration was associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay > silt > coarse sand > fine sand. Soil organic matter (SOM) content, mineral composition and particle surface characteristics were suggested as three main factors affecting the distribution of PAHs in different sized organo-mineral particles. This study will help to understand the distribution and transport characteristics of PAHs in soil profiles at petroleum-contaminated sites. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PAH concentrations varied largely in different sized fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The highest PAH concentrations were associated with clay and decreased in the order: clay > silt > coarse sand > fine sand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Soil organic

  11. Biodegradation and bioremediation potential of diazinon-degrading Serratia marcescens to remove other organophosphorus pesticides from soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cycoń, Mariusz; Żmijowska, Agnieszka; Wójcik, Marcin; Piotrowska-Seget, Zofia

    2013-03-15

    The ability of diazinon-degrading Serratia marcescens to remove organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs), i.e. chlorpyrifos (CP), fenitrothion (FT), and parathion (PT) was studied in a mineral salt medium (MSM) and in three soils of different characteristics. This strain was capable of using all insecticides at concentration of 50 mg/l as the only carbon source when grown in MSM, and 58.9%, 70.5%, and 82.5% of the initial dosage of CP, FT, and PT, respectively was degraded within 14 days. The biodegradation experiment showed that autochthonous microflora in all soils was characterized by a degradation potential of all tested OPPs; however, the initial lag phases for degradation of CP and FT, especially in sandy soil, were observed. During the 42-day experiment, 45.3%, 61.4% and 72.5% of the initial dose of CP, FT, and PT, respectively, was removed in sandy soil whereas the degradation of CP, FT, and PT in the same period, in sandy loam and silty soils reached 61.4%, 79.7% and 64.2%, and 68.9%, 81.0% and 63.6%, respectively. S. marcescens introduced into sterile soils showed a higher degradation potential (5-13%) for OPPs removal than those observed in non-sterile soil with naturally occurring attenuation. Inoculation of non-sterile soils with S. marcescens enhanced the disappearance rates of all insecticides, and DT50 for CP, FT, and PT was reduced by 20.7, 11.3 and 13.0 days, and 11.9, 7.0 and 8.1 days, and 9.7, 14.5 and 12.6 days in sandy, sandy loam, and silty soils, respectively, in comparison with non-sterile soils with only indigenous microflora. This ability of S. marcescens makes it a suitable strain for bioremediation of soils contaminated with OPPs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fluensulfone sorption and mobility as affected by soil type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Kelly A; Li, Xiao; Langston, David B; Davis, Richard F; Timper, Patricia; Grey, Timothy L

    2017-09-04

    Fluensulfone is a fluoroalkenyl chemical with activity against multiple genera of plant-parasitic nematodes. The adsorption, desorption, and mobility of fluensulfone were evaluated on multiple soils from the USA in laboratory and column experiments. Adsorption data regressed to the logarithmic Freundlich equation resulted in isotherm values of 1.24 to 3.28. Soil adsorption of fluensulfone correlated positively with organic matter (0.67) and clay (0.34), but negatively with sand (-0.54). Fluensulfone soil desorption correlated to pH (0.38) and cation exchange capacity (0.44). Fluensulfone desorption from Arredondo sand soil was 26%, and from other soils ranged from 43 to 70%. In mobility experiments, fluensulfone in the leachate peaked at 3 h, gradually declining and becoming undetectable after 9 h. Recovery from leachate was 45% of the initial fluensulfone applied to the soil surface. In separate experiments, 30-cm-long soil columns were saturated with 1 L of water, and then segregated into three 10-cm sections. Fluensulfone recovery was 41, 34, 29, and 13% in Chualar sandy loam, Arredondo sand, Greenville sandy clay loam, and Tifton loamy sand, respectively, in the top 10-cm section. Data indicated that soil organic matter and clay contents will affect sorption, mobility, and dissipation of fluensulfone. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Influence of drainage status on soil and water chemistry, litter decomposition and soil respiration in central Amazonian forests on sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berton Zanchi, F.; Waterloo, M.J.; Dolman, A.J.; Groenendijk, M.; Kruijt, B.

    2011-01-01

    Central Amazonian rainforest landscape supports a mosaic of tall terra firme rainforest and ecotone campinarana, riparian and campina forests, reflecting topography-induced variations in soil, nutrient and drainage conditions. Spatial and temporal variations in litter decomposition, soil and

  14. Nitrogen fertilization on soybean under crop-livestock system and sandy soil = Nitrogênio mineral na soja integrada com a pecuária em solo arenoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvadi Antonio Balbinot Junior

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, soybean has been introduced in areas with sandy soil and tropical climate, often under crop-livestock system. The use of nitrogen (N for this crop is supplied by the soil organic matter mineralization and the biological N fixation. However, there are questions about the effect of nitrogen fertilization in soybean crop under sandy soils with a high amount of straw. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agronomic performance of two soybean cultivars in different doses (20 and 45 kg N ha-1 and application times (sowing, at flowering or early grain filling of N in sandy soil with high amount of Urochloa brizantha straw. Two experiments were conducted in Northwest of Paraná state, Brazil, the first experiment with the BMX Potência RR cultivar and the second one with the BRS 360 RR cultivar, in a sandy soil (11% clay. The experiment were composed by seven treatments (interaction between factors and the control, settled in a randomized block design with four replications. In sandy soil, with high amount of U. brizantha straw, the nitrogen fertilizer applied at different doses and at soybean development stages, cultivars BMX Potência RR and BRS 360 RR, does not influence the photoassimilates partition between stem and leaves, foliar N concentration, yield, yield components, and the oil and protein content in the grains. = No Brasil, a soja tem sido introduzida em regiões que apresentam solos arenosos e clima tropical, sendo muitas vezes integrada com a pecuária. A demanda da oleaginosa por nitrogênio(N é suprida pela mineralização da matéria orgânica do solo e pela fixação biológica do N. No entanto, há questionamentos quanto ao efeito da adubação nitrogenada na cultura da soja cultivada em solos arenosos, com alta quantidade de palha de gramíneas. Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar o desempenho de duas cultivares de soja, em solo arenoso, após dois anos com pastagem de Urochloa brizantha, submetidas a diferentes

  15. Conservation tillage, optimal water and organic nutrient supply enhance soil microbial activities during wheat (Triticum Aestivum L.) cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Singh, Geeta; Singh, Rana P.

    2011-01-01

    The field experiments were conducted on sandy loam soil at New Delhi, during 2007 and 2008 to investigate the effect of conservation tillage, irrigation regimes (sub-optimal, optimal and supra-optimal water regimes), and integrated nutrient management (INM) practices on soil biological parameters in wheat cultivation. The conservation tillage soils has shown significant (pbiofertilizer+25% Green Manure) has been used in combination with the conservation tillage and the optimum water supply. Study demonstrated that microbial activity could be regulated by tillage, water and nitrogen management in the soil in a sustainable manner. PMID:24031665

  16. Effects of organic fertilizers and biochar/organic fertilizer combinations on fertility and organic matter dynamics of a sandy soil in north-west Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Isabel; Kaiser, Michael; Polifka, Steven; Wiedner, Katja; Glaser, Bruno; Ludwig, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    Biochar and biochar/organic fertilizer combinations have been recommended as soil amendments to improve plant productivity and soil properties, as well as to increase soil organic C (OC) storage. However, these claims have been largely unverified by field experiments lasting several years. To address these issues, a field experiment was established in 2012 to analyze the effects of organic fertilizers and biochar/organic fertilizer combinations (five field replicates, fully randomized block design) on the fertility and organic matter dynamics of a sandy Cambisol. In 2016, samples were taken from the 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm soil depths of the following treatments: mineral fertilizer and maize digestate that were applied both individually and in combination with 1 t/ha or 40 t/ha biochar. Further treatments were compost and 10 t/ha composted biochar. The treatments were analyzed for the plant yield and the bulk soil samples were analyzed for the pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), OC content, microbial biomass C and the distribution of aggregate-size fractions (i.e. >2 mm, 2 mm - 250 µm, 250 - 53 µm, <53 µm). The latter were also analyzed for OC content and by FTIR. In 2012, the combination of 40 t/ha biochar+digestate accounted for about 42% higher maize (Zea mays) yields (7.9 t/ha) than the mineral fertilization treatment. For winter rye (Secale cereale) in 2013, we detected the highest yield (10.4 t/ha) for the 10 t/ha composted biochar treatment. In 2014, the highest yield for blue lupine (Lupinus angustifolius) (1.84 t/ha) was detected for the 40 t/ha biochar+digestate treatment. The first data for the soil samples indicate that the 10 t/ha composted biochar and the compost treatment are most effective in increasing the CEC, and the microbial biomass C content of the soil, while pH was not significantly affected by any of the treatments. The bulk soil OC content of the treatments receiving 40 t/ha biochar+fertilizer (digestate or mineral), 10 t/ha composted

  17. Effect of ISPAD Anaerobic Digestion on Ammonia Volatilization from Soil Applied Swine Manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan King

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Swine manure subjected to in-storage psychrophilic anaerobic digestion (ISPAD undergoes proteins degradation but limited NH3 volatilization, producing an effluent rich in plant-available nitrogen. Accordingly, ISPAD effluent can offer a higher fertilizer value during land application, as compared to manure of similar age stored in an open tank. However, this additional nitrogen can also be lost by volatilization during land application. The objective of this study was therefore to measure NH3 volatilization from both ISPAD and open tank swine manures when applied to 5 different soils, namely, washed sand, a Ste Rosalie clay, an Upland sandy loam, a St Bernard loam, and an Ormstown loam. This research was conducted using laboratory wind tunnels simulating land application. The five experimental soils offered similar pH values but different water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity, cation saturation, and organic matter. After 47 h of wind tunnel monitoring, the % of total available nitrogen (TAN or NH4 + and NH3 volatilized varied with both manure and soil type. For all soil types, the ISPAD manure consistently lost less NH3 as compared to the open tank manure, averaging 53% less. Lower volatile solids content improving manure infiltration into the soil and a more complex ionic solution explain the effect of the ISPAD manure advantages. This was reinforced by the St Bernard sandy loam losing the same nitrogen mass for both manures, because of its higher pH and buffer pH coupled with an intermediate CEC resulting in more soil solution NH3. Within each manure type, % TAN volatilized was highest for washed sand and lowest for the clay soil. As a result, ISPAD manure can offer up to 21% more plant-available nitrogen fertilizer especially when the manure is not incorporated into the soil following its application.

  18. The effects of treading by two breeds of dairy cow with different live weights on soil physical properties, poaching damage and herbage production on a poorly drained clay-loam soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohy, P; Fenton, O; Holden, N M; Humphreys, J

    2015-11-01

    There is little empirical evidence to indicate that dairy cow live weight affects the extent of soil damage at the hoof-soil interface during grazing on poorly drained permanent grassland. In the present study the impact of Holstein-Friesian (HF) dairy cows with a mean (±standard deviation) live weight of 570 (±61) kg were compared with Jersey × Holstein-Friesian (JX) with a mean live weight of 499 (±52) kg each at two stocking densities: mean 2·42 ± (0·062) and 2·66 (±0·079) cows/ha. Soil physical properties (bulk density, macroporosity, gravimetric water content, air-filled porosity, penetration resistance and shear strength), poaching damage (post-grazing soil surface deformation and hoof-print depth), herbage yield and milk production were measured throughout 2011 and 2012. Soil physical properties, post-grazing soil surface deformation and herbage production were not affected by dairy cow breed or by interactions between breed and stocking density. Hoof-print depth was higher in the HF treatments (39 v. 37 mm, s.e. 0·5 mm). Loading pressure imposed at the soil surface was the same for both breeds due to a direct correlation between live weight and hoof size. Poaching damage was greater at higher stocking density. Using the lighter JX cow offered little advantage in terms of lowering the negative impact of treading on soil physical properties or reducing poaching damage and no advantage in terms of herbage or milk production compared with the heavier HF cow.

  19. Effect of chamber enclosure time on soil respiration flux: A comparison of linear and non-linear flux calculation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandel, Tanka P; Lærke, Poul Erik; Elsgaard, Lars

    2016-01-01

    One of the shortcomings of closed chamber methods for soil respiration (SR) measurements is the decreased CO2 diffusion rate from soil to chamber headspace that may occur due to increased chamber CO2 concentrations. This feedback on diffusion rate may lead to underestimation of pre...... the effect of increasing chamber enclosure time on SR flux rates calculated using a linear, an exponential and a revised Hutchinson and Mosier model (HMR). Soil respiration rates were measured with a closed chamber in combination with an infrared gas analyzer. During SR flux measurements the chamber...... was placed on fixed collars, and CO2 concentration in the chamber headspace were recorded at 1-s intervals for 45 min. Fluxes were measured in different soil types (sandy, sandy loam and organic soils), and for various manipulations (tillage, rain and drought) and soil conditions (temperature and moisture...

  20. Black carbon yields and types in forest and cultivated sandy soils (Landes de Gascogne, France) as determined with different methods: influence of change in land use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quenea, K. [UMR CNRS, Paris (France). LBCOP; INRA-CNRS-UPMC, Thjiverval (France). BIOEMCO; Derenne, S.; Largeau, C. [UMR CNRS, Paris (France). LBCOP; Rumpel, C.; Mariotti, A. [INRA-CNRS-UPMC, Thjiverval (France). BIOEMCO; Rouzaud, J.-N. [Laboratoire de Geologie, Paris (France); Gustafsson, O. [Stockholm University (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Environmental Science; Carcaillet, C.C. [Institut de Botanique, Montpelier (France)

    2006-09-15

    Black carbon ( BC ) was isolated from sandy soils of a pine forest reference plot and an adjacent plot used maize cropping since forest clearing 22 years ago. This was performed by: (i) isolation of a refractory organic macromolecular fraction (ROM) using strong hydrolysis followed by chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO) and (ii) direct hand-picking of the untreated soils. Much lower BC contents, ca. x 300, were obtained with the ROM-CTO approach. Experiments on reference chars from the ''international BC-ring trial'' and high resolution, transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations showed that this large difference was not due to BC component losses resulting from the strong hydrolysis during ROM isolation but was due primarily to complete removal of char/charcoal upon CTO. BC is heavily dominated by char/charcoal and soot only affords a very low contribution in both soils. Calculations showed that BC accounts for a substantial part, ca 13% , of total ROM and change in land-use resulted in a large loss of BC relative to the forest soil, ca. 60% after 22 years, thus supporting recent questions raised about BC persistence in soil. (Author)

  1. Monitorization of the unsaturated zone on the sandy soils of Donana National Park; Monitorizacion de la zona no saturada en el entorno del Espacio Natural de Donana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prados, M. L.; Guardiola-Albert, C.; Vanderlinken, K.; Giraldez, J. V.; Mediavilla, C.

    2010-07-01

    Within the framework of a study into the recharge of the Almonte-Marismas aquifer, we describe the methods used to monitor water flux in the vadose zone at four sites within the Donana National Park and its surroundings. We also provide a description of land use and soil and hydrological conditions at each measurement point. Very frequent observations are required to monitor efficiently the water flux in these well-drained, sandy soils, which undergo considerable oscillations in their usually low water content. To this end we have resorted to inexpensive capacitance probes, installed at different points along the soil profiles in question according mainly to the depth of the water table. We propose a calibration method to increase the accuracy and precision of the probe measurements. Our work has demonstrated that these sensors perform well in monitoring soil water content and also validates both the installation methods used. Data analysis proves that these sensors are very useful for locating the depth of the water table accurately and emphasises the need for specific calibration for each soil in order to obtain the most accurate moisture data. (Author) 10 refs.

  2. Soil microbial and physical properties and their relations along a steep copper gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin

    2012-01-01

    ) and dehydrogenase (DHA) assays. Water dispersible clay was measured on field moist and air dried samples. For the resilience assay, soil cores (drained to -100 hPa) were subjected to uniaxial confined compression (200 kPa) followed by wet-dry or freeze-thaw cycles. Microbial enzyme activity significantly decreased...... years; from background concentrations up to 3837 mg Cu kg(-1)) on soil microbial enzyme activity, physical properties and resilience to compression. Soil samples and cores were taken from a fallow sandy loam field in Denmark. Microbial activity was quantified using fluorescein diacetate (FDA...

  3. Combined effects of tides, evaporation and rainfall on the soil conditions in an intertidal creek-marsh system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Pei; Zhou, Tingzhang; Lu, Chunhui; Shen, Chengji; Zhang, Chenming; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Li, Ling

    2017-05-01

    Salt marshes, distributed globally at the land-ocean interface, are a highly productive eco-system with valuable ecological functions. While salt marshes are affected by various eco-geo-hydrological processes and factors, soil moisture and salinity affect plant growth and play a key role in determining the structure and functions of the marsh ecosystem. To examine the variations of both soil parameters, we simulated pore-water flow and salt transport in a creek-marsh system subjected to spring-neap tides, evaporation and rainfall. The results demonstrated that within a sandy-loam marsh, the tide-induced pore-water circulation averted salt build-up due to evaporation in the near-creek area. In the marsh interior where the horizontal drainage was weak, density-driven flow was responsible for dissipating salt accumulation in the shallow soil layer. In the sandy-loam marsh, the combined influences of spring-neap tides, rainfall and evaporation led to the formation of three characteristic zones, c.f., a near-creek zone with low soil water saturation (i.e., well-aerated) and low pore-water salinity as affected by the semi-diurnal spring tides, a less well-aerated zone with increased salinity where drainage occurred during the neap tides, and an interior zone where evaporation and rainfall infiltration regulated the soil conditions. These characteristics, however, varied with the soil type. In low-permeability silt-loam and clay-loam marshes, the tide-induced drainage weakened and the soil conditions over a large area became dominated by evaporation and rainfall. Sea level rise was found to worsen the soil aeration condition but inhibit salt accumulation due to evaporation. These findings shed lights on the soil conditions underpinned by various hydrogeological processes, and have important implications for further investigations on marsh plant growth and ecosystem functions.

  4. Application of N-modified lignite and activated biochar to increase growth of summer wheat on nutrient-poor sandy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillem, Steffi; Schneider, Bernd-Uwe; Zeihser, Uwe; Hüttl, Reinhard F.

    2017-04-01

    Land degradation is recognized as the main environmental problem that adversely depletes soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (SON) stocks, which in turn directly affects the fertility and productivity of soils. Degraded soils and marginal lands are characterized by low fertility, poor physicochemical and biological properties and are almost free of soil organic matter (SOM), limiting their functional properties and, hence, their productivity. To enhance or restore the fertility of these soils, natural soil amendments such as biochar, lignite or humic acids can be added. A greenhouse experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of different application rates (5, 7.5, 11, 15, 28 t ha-1) of N-modified lignite (NL) incorporated in a nutrient-poor sandy soil from a recultivation site on plant growth, water use and nitrogen use efficiency of summer wheat. Additionally activated biochar (BC) was tested to see whether any differences exist between N-modified lignite and activated biochar at the same C-application rates. All variants with soil amendments displayed a much higher grain and straw yield and water use efficiency compared to the control sample. The differences were significant for the 28 t ha-1variant followed by the variant with 5 t ha-1 NL. With the 7.5 t ha-1 NL higher biomasses, water and nitrogen use efficiency could be achieved compared to the variant treated with BC at the same C-content. This study shows that even small amounts of N-modified lignite can increase growth, water and nitrogen use efficiency of summer wheat on marginal lands.

  5. Two years of gaseous emissions from contrasting soils amended with organic and synthetic nitrogen fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelster, D. E.; Chantigny, M. H.; Rochette, P.; Angers, D. A.; Rieux, C.; Vanasse, A.

    2012-04-01

    Animal manures are often used as a source of nitrogen (N) for agriculture; however impacts of amendment type on N2O production may vary. In this study, N2O emissions from two soil types with contrasting texture and carbon (C) content (a silty clay mixed frigid dystric eutrudept and a sandy loam mixed frigid typic dystrudept) were measured for two years under a cool, humid climate. Treatments consisted of a no N control (CTL), calcium ammonium nitrate (CAN), poultry manure (PM), liquid cattle manure (LCM), or liquid swine manure (LSM). The N sources were surface applied and immediately incorporated at 90 kg N ha-1 before seeding of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Leaching losses of N were also measured using zero-tension lysimeters located at approximately 0.35 m depth. Cumulative growing season N2O-N emissions from the silty clay ranged from 2.2 to 8.3 kg ha-1 yr-1 and were slightly lower in CTL plots than in the fertilized plots (P = 0.067). The mean N2O emission factors ranged from 2.0 to 4.4% of added N with no difference among treatments. Emissions of N2O from the sandy loam soil ranged from 0.3 to 2.2 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1, with greatest emissions following PM application (P grain yield N) were similar between treatments; while on the sandy loam, they were greatest when amended with PM. Annual N leaching losses averaged 28.7 kg ha-1 for the silty clay and 19.6 kg ha-1 for the sandy loam and were similar for all amendment types suggesting that off-site N2O emissions will also be similar amongst treatments. Preliminary data indicate that overwinter N2O emissions from sandy loam plots were consistently greater when amended with pig slurry compared with unamended soils, and that these overwinter losses may exceed growing season losses. Our findings suggest that compared to mineral N sources, manure application only increases growing season N2O flux in soils with low C content.

  6. Initial growth and yield structure of selected cultivars of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. cultivated on mineral soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szwonek Eugeniusz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to evaluate the possibility of cranberry cultivation on mineral soils and to assess the influence of vegetative biomass development, generative growth and yield components on the yielding of three cranberry cultivars originating in the USA (Stevens, Pilgrim and Ben Lear at two locations in Poland. The key biometrical traits involved in yield formation were taken into account, and the soil and plant chemical conditions were evaluated. All of the measured biometrical characteristics were strongly influenced by the location and the year of cultivation, and varietal differences were also noted. The most important determinants that explained yield variation were: the number of uprights per square meter, floral induction and berry set. However, the participation of each component in yield variation was strongly affected by the location, age of plantation and to a minor extent by the cultivar. The study confirmed the possibility of cranberry cultivation on mineral soils with a low pH. The biggest average yield of the three years was collected from cv. Stevens as cultivated on sandy soil in contrast to the same cultivar grown on sandy loam soil. In the case of sandy loam soil after acidification, cv. Pilgrim appeared to be a relatively better yielding cultivar.

  7. Performance of Low-Volume Roads with Wearing Course Layer of Silty Sandy Soil Modified with Rice Husk Ash and Lime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behak Katz, L.; Musso Laespiga, M.

    2016-07-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) is a by-product of rice milling. Its use as soil stabilizer is a way to replace the final disposal with environmental benefit. However, RHA is not cementitious itself but when mixed with lime forms cements which improve the soil properties. A research of performance of a silty sandy soil modified with RHA and lime as wearing course layer of low-volume roads was conducted through two full-scale test sections with different pavements built in Artigas, northern Uruguay. The alkaline reactivity of RHA is low because the husk burning is not controlled. The soil-RHA-lime mix design was conducted according to the Thompson’s Method. The pavement test sections were monitored through deflection measures by Benkelman beam and observations of surface condition. The deflections decreased over time in both test sections due to the development of cementation of the study materials. After one year, the dust emission was reduced, the wet skid resistance of pavement surfaces improved and there was not rutting. The researched pavements have had a good performance under the existing traffic and environmental conditions, demonstrating that wearing course layer of silty sand modified with RHA and lime is an alternative to improve the condition of low-volume roads and to replace the final disposal of RHA, with environmental, social and economic benefits. (Author)

  8. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of sandy soil columns packed to different bulk densities and water uptake by plantroots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi-Pisa, P.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory metbod used to determine both the soil moisture retention curve and the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity in soil columns under transient flow conditions during evaporation.

  9. Laboratory investigation on streaming potential for sandy soil and weathered rock; Shitsunai jikken ni yoru sashitsu jiban oyobi fuka ganban no ryudo den`i no kento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, H.; Shima, H. [OYO Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    Laboratory experiment on sandy soil and weathered rock was conducted to clarify the generation mechanism of streaming potential due to underground fluid. Streaming potential is caused by underground fluid flow, namely by fluid flow in porous substances as electrokinetic phenomenon. In experiment, Inagi sand, Toyoura sand and strongly decomposed weathered granite were used. In Inagi and Toyoura sands, positive streaming potential was observed downstream in fluid flow. Streaming potential could be nearly determined as primary function of fluid velocity, and generated streaming potential increased with fluid resistivity. Streaming potential was higher in Inagi sand than Toyoura sand, probably depending on hydraulic radius, size of bleeding channel, and conductivity of sand surface. In weathered granite, negative streaming potential was measured. In the case of positive {zeta} potential, negative streaming potential is theoretically generated downstream in fluid flow. This experiment suggested possible generation of negative streaming potential in some kinds of ground. 2 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Effect of hydrogel particle additives on water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils: a custom pressure plate apparatus and capillary bundle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Durian, D J

    2013-05-01

    To probe the effects of hydrogel particle additives on the water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils, we introduce a custom pressure plate method in which the volume of water expelled from a wet granular packing is measured as a function of applied pressure. Using a capillary bundle model, we show that the differential change in retained water per pressure increment is directly related to the cumulative cross-sectional area distribution f(r) of the water-accessible pores with radii less than r. This is validated by measurements of water expelled from a model sandy soil composed of 2-mm-diameter glass beads. In particular, it is found that the expelled water is dramatically dependent on sample height and that analysis using the capillary bundle model gives the same pore size distribution for all samples. The distribution is found to be approximately log normal, and the total cross-sectional area fraction of the accessible pore space is found to be f(0)=0.34. We then report on how the pore distribution and total water-accessible area fraction are affected by superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives, uniformly mixed into a fixed-height sample at varying concentrations. Under both fixed volume and free swelling conditions, the total area fraction of water-accessible pore space in a packing decreases exponentially as the gel concentration increases. The size distribution of the pores is significantly modified by the swollen hydrogel particles, such that large pores are clogged while small pores are formed.

  11. Soil organic matter of Chernozem in the part of Central Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítězslav Vlček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have tried to evaluate the current contents of Soil Organic Matter (SOM in the Soil Type Chernozem for Central Europe and to determine the site specific level for the Czech Republic. In the past, the observed effect of SOM on the Agronomic characteristics in particular yields. Nowadays it means a very important influence on the Environment, particularly in the terms of ecological functions of soil (the influence of the filter function, sanitation function, protection against degradation etc.. The statistical analysis included data for all the Chernozems (N = 141 regardless of subtype derived from measurements from 2003 to 2006. Measurements were carried out at selected locations in the Czech Republic.Profiles at each site were divided into topsoil and subsoil and these were separately statistically processed. When evaluating the frequency distribution, we suppose that the anthropic un-affected Soils would be approximately equal to distribution Gauss normal distribution, and both frequency distribution (in topsoil and subsoil will be similar (mollic horizon in this Soil Type on non-eroded land is relatively deep and homogeneous.Next from of the observed properties is relation between Content of Soil organic Matter and the texture, namely the content of particles smaller than 0.01 mm. The average SOM content is higher in clayey soil, clay-loam soil than in sandy soil. Differences between soil sandy-loam and clayey-loam are statistically significant. The paper also outlined the possible future development of SOM on Chernozem soils.

  12. Conservation agriculture effects on soil pore characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Lars Juhl; Abdollahi, Lotfollah

    Conservation tillage in combination with crop rotation, residue management and cover crops are key components of conservation agriculture. A positive long-term effect of applying all components of conservation agriculture on soil structural quality is expected. However, there is a lack of quantit...... results suggest that a strategy of leaving residues in the field can alleviate negative effects of reduced tillage on soil structural quality.......Conservation tillage in combination with crop rotation, residue management and cover crops are key components of conservation agriculture. A positive long-term effect of applying all components of conservation agriculture on soil structural quality is expected. However, there is a lack...... of quantitative knowledge to support this statement. This study examines the long-term effects of crop rotations, residue management and tillage on soil pore characteristics of two sandy loam soils in Denmark. Results are reported from a split plot field experiment rotation as main plot factor and tillage...

  13. Effect of biochar on soil structural characteristics: water retention and gas transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhencai; Møldrup, Per; Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad

    Biochar addition to agricultural soil has been reported to reduce climate gas emission, as well as improve soil fertility and crop productivity. Little, however, is known about biochar effects on soil structural characteristics. This study investigates if biochar-application changes soil structural...... due to the high micro porosity of added biochar. In conclusion, the results showed that biochar addition to soil changed key soil structural parameters at least in the short term (1 year). In perspective, the long-term variations in soil structural parameters and related changed in microbial activity...... characteristics, as indicated from water retention and gas transport measurements on intact soil samples. Soil was sampled from a field experiment on a sandy loam with four control plots (C) without biochar and four plots (B) with incorporated biochar at a rate of 20 tons per hectare (plot size, 6 x 8 m). The C...

  14. HPLC Analysis to Determine the Half-life and Bioavailability of the Termiticides Bifenthrin and Fipronil in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, F; Pervez, M

    2017-12-05

    The aim of this study was to test the bioavailability and degradation in soil of the termiticides bifenthrin and fipronil, which are used to treat subterranean termites (Heterotermes indicola, Wasmann). Soil collected from different areas of Lahore was categorized as sandy clay loam (SCL) or sandy loam (SL). Laboratory bioassays were conducted to determine the bioavailability ratio of bifenthrin and fipronil in each type of soil after different periods of time. LT50 values were determined posttreatment at different time intervals. Regarding soil type, both termiticides were more effective in SL soil, compared with SCL soil posttreatment. There were significant differences in termite mortality in treated compared with untreated control samples (P fipronil were 270 and 555 d in SCL and SL soil, respectively. At lower concentrations and over longer periods of time, fipronil completely degraded in SL soil, while a negligible amount was detected in SCL soil. Termiticide concentration decreased over time, as did the termiticide recovery rate. Overall, bifenthrin was more persistent than fipronil under all treatment conditions tested. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Acidification of sandy grasslands - consequences for plant diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Pål Axel; Mårtensson, Linda-Maria; Bruun, Hans Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Questions: (1) Does soil acidification in calcareous sandy grasslands lead to loss of plant diversity? (2) What is the relationship between the soil content of lime and the plant availability of mineral nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in sandy grasslands? Location: Sandy glaciofluvial deposits...... in south-eastern Sweden covered by xeric sand calcareous grasslands (EU habitat directive 6120). Methods: Soil and vegetation were investigated in most of the xeric sand calcareous grasslands in the Scania region (136 sample plots distributed over four or five major areas and about 25 different sites...... of soil P, placing a major constraint on primary productivity in sandy soils. Conclusions: Acidification of sandy grasslands leads to reduced abundance of desirable species, although the overall effect is rather weak between pH 5 and pH 9. Slopes are important for high diversity in sandy grasslands...

  16. The influence of soil type, soil water and share sharpness of a mouldboard plough on energy consumption, rate of work and tillage quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsis, A. [Station of Agricultural Power and Machinery of Sarante, Finiq (Albania); Agricultural University of Athens (Greece); Papadakis, G.; Pitsilis, J. [Agricultural University of Athens (Greece)

    1999-07-01

    The results of field tests to investigate the influence of soil type and soil water on the wear of soil tillage tools are presented. The soil water had a positive effect for loam and clay soils because the wear decreased as the water content increased. For sandy soils however, wear increased with soil water. As the thickness of the cutting edge of the plough increased, draught force and fuel consumption increased considerably, while rate of work and tillage depth increased. The quality of the tillage was seriously reduced, that is, the size of the soil clods increased as the thickness of the cutting edge of the plough increased. Also, the percentage of surface residues was greater as the thickness of the cutting edge of the plough increased. The best overall performance of the plough was obtained from the sharpest share cutting edge with a thickness of 1 mm. (author)

  17. Adsorption/desorption of copper by a sandy soil amended with various rates of manure, sewage sludge, and incinerated sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, A K; Baugh, T J; Paramasivam, S; Sajwan, K S

    2005-01-01

    Organic amendments are sometimes applied to agricultural soils to improve the physical, chemical, and microbiological properties of the soils. The organic fractions in these soil amendments also influence metal reaction, particularly the adsorption and desorption of metals, which, in turn, determine the bioavailability of the metals and hence their phytotoxicities. In this study, a Quincy fine sandy (mixed, mesic, Xeric Torripsamments) soil was treated with 0 to 160 g kg(-1) rates of either manure, sewage sludge (SS), or incinerated sewage sludge (ISS) and equilibrated in a greenhouse at near field capacity moisture content for 100 days. Following the incubation period, the soil was dried and adsorption of copper (Cu) was evaluated in a batch equilibration study at either 0, 100, 200, or 400 mg L(-1) Cu concentrations in a 0.01M CaCl2 solution. The desorption of adsorbed Cu was evaluated by three successive elutions in 0.01M CaCl2. Copper adsorption increased with an increase in manure rates. At the highest rate of manure addition (160 g kg(-1) soil), Cu adsorption was two-fold greater than that by the unamended soil at all rates of Cu additions. With increasing rates of Cu additions, the adsorption of Cu decreased from 99.4 to 77.6% of Cu applied to the 160 g kg(-1) manure amended soil. The desorption of Cu decreased with an increase in rate of manure amendment. Effects of sewage sludge amendments on Cu adsorption were somewhat similar to those as described for manure additions. Likewise, the desorption of Cu was the least at the high rate of SS addition (160 g kg(-1)), although at the lower rates there was not a clear indication of the rate effects. In contrast to the above two amendments, the ISS amendment had the least effect on Cu adsorption. At the highest rate of ISS amendment, the Cu adsorption was roughly 50% of that at the similar rate of either manure or SS amendments, across all Cu rates.

  18. Distribución de la porosidad de un suelo franco arcilloso (alfisol en condiciones semiáridas después de 15 años bajo siembra directa Soil porosity distribution of a clay loam soil (alfisol in semi-arid conditions after 15 years under direct drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Isabel Cerisola

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de un estudio más amplio sobre evolución de las propiedades físicas de un suelo sometido a tres sistemas de labranza, se realizó, en dos campañas consecutivas, un seguimiento de la distribución de la porosidad del suelo según su origen, en parcelas cultivadas bajo siembra directa continua durante 15 años. En el ensayo se consideró un trayecto de 2 metros de longitud, perpendicular a la dirección de las labores, donde se realizaron mediciones de densidad aparente seca y contenido de humedad. El cultivo extensivo de secano (cereal, en cada una de las dos campañas, fue cebada de ciclo corto y de ciclo largo. El calendario de la toma de datos de las variables medidas se fijó en 5 fechas por campaña. La porosidad estructural del suelo, debida principalmente a la alternancia de ciclos de humectación - desecación, fue calculada cada 5 cm y hasta 35 cm de profundidad. Este proceso de fisuración natural resulta suficiente para asegurar un buen drenaje y facilitar el desarrollo radicular de las plantas, siempre y cuando el contenido de humedad se mantenga dentro de la capacidad de retención de agua.On a long-term essay under direct drilling, the evolution of the physical properties of a clay loam soil, such as distribution by origin of soil porosity, has been assessed during two growing seasons. The cereal crops in each growing seasons were spring barley and winter barley, respectively. Soil physical properties were measured on a 2 m length transect located in a perpendicular line to the direction of vehicular traffic for field operations. Five sampling opportunities, within crop cycle, were used to measure the variables. Structural soil porosity, due principally to shrinkage and swelling cycles, was assessed in the 0 to 35 cm depth soil profile. This natural process seemed to be sufficient to guarantee good drainage and normal crop development, unless in the moisture content range included in field capacity.

  19. Effectiveness of the GAEC cross-compliance standard Ploughing in good soil moisture conditions in soil structure protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Dell'Abate

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Researches have been carried out within the framework on the EFFICOND Project, focused at evaluating the effectiveness of the standards of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs established for Cross Compliance implementation under EC Regulation 1782/2003. In particular the standard 3.1b deals with soil structure protection through appropriate machinery use, with particular reference to ploughing in good soil moisture conditions. The study deals with the evaluation of soil structure after tillage in tilth and no-tilth conditions at soil moisture contents other than the optimum water content for tillage. The Mean Weight Diameter (MWD of water stable aggregates was used as an indicator of tillage effectiveness. The study was carried out in the period 2008-2009 at six experimental farms belonging to Research Centres and Units of the Italian Agricultural Research Council (CRA with different pedo-climatic and cropping conditions. Farm management and data collection in the different sites were carried out by the local CRA researchers and technicians. The comparison of MWD values in tilth and no tilth theses showed statistically significant differences in most cases, depending on topsoil texture. On clay, clay loam, silty clay, and silty clay loam topsoils a general and significant increase of MWD values under no tilth conditions were observed. No significant differences were observed in silt loam and sandy loam textures, probably due to the weak soil structure of the topsoils. Moreover, ploughing in good soil moisture condition determined higher crop production and less weed development than ploughing in high soil moisture conditions.

  20. Genotoxic activity and inhibition of soil respiration by ptaquiloside, a bracken fern carcinogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Bjørn; Rasmussen, L.H.; Svendsen, Gitte Winkel

    2005-01-01

    Ptaquiloside (PTA) is a natural toxin produced by bracken (Pteridium aquilinum [L.] Kuhn). Assessment of PTA toxicity is needed because PTA deposited from bracken to soil may leach to surface and groundwater. Inhibition of soil respiration and genotoxic activity of PTA was determined by a soil...... microbial carbon transformation test and an umu test, respectively. In the carbon transformation test, sandy loam soil was incubated at five different initial concentrations of PTA for a period of 28 d, after which glucose was added and respiration measured for 12 consecutive hours. The tests were performed...... at 20 degrees C and Soil moisture content of approximately 15%. For soil material sampled in the autumn, initial PTA concentrations ranging from 0.008 to 40.6 mu g PTA/g dry soil were tested. From fitting of data by a sigmoidal function, a 10% effect dose (ED10) was estimated to 13 jig PTA/g dry soil...

  1. Measurement of ²²²Rn diffusion through sandy soil with solar cells photodiodes as the detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shitrit, Y; Dody, A; Alfassi, Z B; Berant, Z

    2012-02-01

    An experimental system was developed to study the diffusion rate of radon (²²²Rn) gas through porous media as a function of soil porosity/grain size and soil water content. Columns with different grain sizes, soil water content and soil depths were used. The system used solar cells photodiodes as alpha (α) detectors. This new detector is highly efficient and low cost compared to other known detectors. Soil water content was found to be the most dominant factor affecting the ²²²Rn diffusion rate. A maximum diffusion rate value of (6.5 ± 0.07) × 10⁻⁶ m²/s was found in dry conditions. The minimum diffusion value of less than (3.9 ± 0.14) × 10⁻⁷ m²/s was found in 2% soil water content. The experimental results were compared with theoretical calculations done with the "GREEN equation". Two discrepancies were observed: the time to equilibrium state in the measurements was longer compare to the calculated values and the α count rates were lower in the experiment compared with the theoretical calculations. These results can be explained by the differences in the system geometry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Soil water retention measurements using a combined tensiometer-coiled time domain reflectometry probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaz, C.M.P.; Hopmans, J.W.; Macedo, A.

    2002-01-01

    0.98. In addition, the mixing model approach, adapted for the tensiometer-coiled TDR probe, was successful in explaining the functional form of the coiled TDR data with about 30% of the coiled-TDR probe measurement explained by the bulk soil dielectric constant. This new TDR development provides......The objective of the presented study was to develop a single probe that can be used to determine soil water retention curves in both laboratory and field conditions, by including a coiled time domain reflectometry (TDR) probe around the porous cup of a standard tensiometer. The combined tensiometer......-silica sand], Columbia [Coarse-loamy, mixed, superactive, nonacid, thermic Oxyaquic Xerofluvents], Lincoln sandy loam (sandy, mixed, thermic Typic Ustifluvents), and a washed sand - SR130) was measured with the combined tensiometer-coiled TDR probe (coil) as a function of the soil water content (0...

  3. Temperature effects on soil bulk dielectric permittivity measured by time domain reflectometry: Experimental evidence and hypothesis development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wraith, Jon M.; Or, Dani

    1999-02-01

    Reports on temperature (T) effects on time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements of soil water content (θ) are contradictory and often exhibit conflicting trends. We imposed step T changes on sealed columns of four soils having variable θ, while monitoring bulk apparent dielectric constant (or permittivity ɛb) and bulk electrical conductivity (σb) using TDR. Measured ɛb increased substantially with increasing temperature for one silt loam soil, for all θ. For another silt loam soil and for an Oxisol, measured ɛb increased with increasing T at relatively low θ but decreased with increasingT at higher θ. For a sandy loam soil, measured ɛb decreased with increasing T for all θ. The experimental results led to the hypothesis that TDR-measured ɛb is determined by an interplay between two competing phenomena: (1) the reduction in the dielectric constant of bulk water with increased T; and (2) the increase in TDR-measured ɛb with increased T due to release of bound water. TDRmeasured ɛb is thus dependent on solid surface area and wetness. Our results have implications for routine use of TDR in fine-textured and organic soils and potentially for microwave remote sensing of soil water status.

  4. Speciation of organic matter in sandy soil size fractions as revealed by analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) and FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Morillo, Nicasio T.; González-Vila, Francisco J.; Jordán, Antonio; Zavala, Lorena M.; de la Rosa, José M.; González-Pérez, José A.

    2015-04-01

    This research deals with the assessment of organic matter structural differences in soil physical fractions before and after lipid extractions. Soil samples were collected in sandy soils, Arenosols (WRB 2006) from the Doñana National Park (SW Spain) under different vegetation cover: cork oak (Quercus suber, QS), eagle fern (Pteridium aquilinum, PA), pine (Pinus pinea, PP) and rockrose (Halimium halimifolium, HH). Two size fractions; coarse (C: 1-2 mm) and fine (F: 0.05-0.25 mm) were studied from each soil. . In addition, the two fractions from each soil were exhaustively Soxhlet extracted with a Dichlorometane-Methanol (3:1) mixture to obtain the lipid-free fractions (LF) from each size fraction (LFC and LFF). The composition of the organic matter at a molecular level in the different soil fractions was approached by analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) and FT-IR spectroscopy. These techniques are complementary and have been found suitable for the structural characterization of complex organic matrices (Moldoveanu, 1998; Piccolo and Stevenson, 1982); whereas Py-GC/MS provides detailed structural information of individual compounds present and a finger-printing of soil organic matter, FT-IR is informative about major functional groups present. The advantages of these techniques are well known: no need for pretreatment are fast to perform, highly reproducible and only small amount of samples are needed. Soil size fractions show contrasting differences in organic matter content (C 4-7 % and F > 40 %) and conspicuous differences were found in the pyrolysis products released by the fractions studied. The main families of pyrolysis compounds have well defined macromolecular precursors, such as lignin, polypeptides, polysaccharides and lipids (González-Vila et al., 2001). The C fractions yield higher relative abundance of lignin and polysaccharide derived pyrolysis compounds. Regarding the differences in the soil organic matter as affected by the different vegetation covers

  5. INTEGRATED NITROGEN AND BORON FERTILIZATION IMPROVES THE PRODUCTIVITY AND OIL QUALITY OF SUNFLOWER GROWN IN A CALCAREOUS SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    SHEHZAD, Muhammad Asif; MAQSOOD, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Among biotic and abiotic factors, imbalanced plant nutrition is more indispensable for low sunflower productivity. To assess the interaction behavior of nitrogen with boron on sunflower growth, yield and its oil quality in alkaline-calcareous soils, a field experiment was conducted for two consecutive growing seasons of 2011 and 2012. Sunflower hybrid (Helianthus annuus ‘Hysun-33’) was grown on sandy clay loam soil that was amended with diverse boron rates of 0, 2, 4, and 6 kg ha-1 under vari...

  6. FACTORS AFFECTING THE SORPTION PROPERTIES OF THE SURFACE LAYER OF SOILS DEVELOPED ON THE SLOPES OF THE NAREW RIVER VALLEY WITHIN THE PROTECTION ZONE OF THE NAREW NATIONAL PARK

    OpenAIRE

    Agnieszka Wysocka-Czubaszek; Krzysztof Micun; Robert Czubaszek

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the sorption properties of the surface layer of soils formed in different parts of the slope. The study was carried out within the protection zone of the Narew National Park on 12 individual arable fields, located on the slopes of the valley of the Narew River. The surface layers of the studied soils are loamy sands and sandy loams. The pHH2O in these soils ranges from 4.83 to 7.85, and pHKCl ranges from 4.03 to 7.81. Sorption capacity of the surface layer...

  7. Modelling long-term phophorus leaching and changes in phosphorus fertility in excessively fertilized acid sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campillo, del M.C.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.; Torrent, J.

    1999-01-01

    The sound management of agricultural soils that are heavily loaded with phosphorus (P) involves minimizing the losses of P responsible for eutrophication of surface waters, while ensuring enough P for crops. This paper describes a simple model to examine the compatibility of these two objectives in

  8. Validation of the PESTLA model: Field test using data from a sandy soil in Schaijk (the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhold AE; Swartjes FA; Hoogenboom FGG; van der Linden AMA

    1993-01-01

    Within the framework of the project "Validation of PESTLA" the Schaijk data set was used to analyse PESTLA model performance. The Schaijk data set contains field data on bentazon behaviour in a coarse textured humic gley soil cropped with maize. PESTLA model input parameters were derived

  9. Probability mapping of iron pan presence in sandy podzols in South-West France, using digital soil mapping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richer-de-Forges, Anne C.; Saby, Nicolas P.A.; Mulder, V.L.; Larochea, B.; Arrouaysa, B.; Arrouaysa, D.

    2017-01-01

    This work evaluated two different digital soil mapping methods for mapping the presence of iron pans in South-West France. The presence of iron pans limit rooting depth, thereby affecting available water content for plants and increasing vulnerability of trees to storms. In some cases, it may also

  10. Dynamics of soil organic matter in primary and secondary forest succession on sandy soils in The Netherlands: An application of the ROMUL model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadporozhskaya, M.A.; Mohren, G.M.J.; Chertov, O.G.; Komarov, A.S.; Mikhailov, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    We applied the simulation model ROMUL of soil organic matter dynamics in order to analyse and predict forest soil organic matter (SOM) changes following stand growth and also to identify gaps of data and modelling problems. SOM build-up was analysed (a) from bare sand to forest soil during a primary

  11. No-tillage lessens soil CO2 emissions the most under arid and sandy soil conditions: results from a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Khatab; Chivenge, Pauline; Ciais, Philippe; Chaplot, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    The management of agroecosystems plays a crucial role in the global carbon cycle with soil tillage leading to known organic carbon redistributions within soils and changes in soil CO2 emissions. Yet, discrepancies exist on the impact of tillage on soil CO2 emissions and on the main soil and environmental controls. A meta-analysis was conducted using 46 peer-reviewed publications totaling 174 paired observations comparing CO2 emissions over entire seasons or years from tilled and untilled soils across different climates, crop types and soil conditions with the objective of quantifying tillage impact on CO2 emissions and assessing the main controls. On average, tilled soils emitted 21 % more CO2 than untilled soils, which corresponded to a significant difference at P 3 %). Finally, nitrogen fertilization and crop residue management had little effect on the CO2 responses of soils to no-tillage. These results suggest no-tillage is an effective mitigation measure of carbon dioxide losses from dry land soils. They emphasize the importance of including information on soil factors such as texture, aggregate stability and organic carbon content in global models of the carbon cycle.

  12. Linear Shrinkage Behaviour of Compacted Loam Masonry Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAWAB ALI LAKHO

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Walls of wet loam, used in earthen houses, generally experience more shrinkage which results in cracks and less compressive strength. This paper presents a technique of producing loam masonry blocks that are compacted in drained state during casting process in order to minimize shrinkage. For this purpose, loam masonry blocks were cast and compacted at a pressure of 6 MPa and then dried in shade by covering them in plastic sheet. The results show that linear shrinkage of 2% occurred which is smaller when compared to un-compacted wet loam walls. This implies that the loam masonry blocks compacted in drained state is expected to perform better than un-compacted wet loam walls.

  13. Comparison of water distribution mechanisms under two localized irrigation techniques (Drip Irrigation & Buried Diffuser) for one week irrigation period in a sandy soil of southeastern Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Ines; Kodešová, Radka; Mechergui, Mohamed; Nikodem, Antonín; Moussa, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    The majority of agricultural ecosystems in the Mediterranean basin of northern Africa suffer from water shortage and positions these regions in a highly vulnerable to climate change. In arid regions of Tunisia and exactly in the Southeastern part, during each growing season, plant productivity in sandy-loamy soils is dramatically reduced by limited availability of soil water and nutrients. Thus, highly permeable soils are unable to retain adequate water and nutrient resource in the plant root zone. Moreover, the investments of supplemental irrigation and agricultural amendments of additional fertilization are not sustainable due to the leaching of water supplies and nutrients, which severely limit agricultural productivity. In addition, inadequate soil water distribution, costly irrigation and fertilization leads to negative responses to plant nutrients added to highly permeable soils. That's why we should use irrigation techniques with high water use efficiency. This paper focuses on the comparison between two localized irrigation techniques which are the Drip Irrigation (DI) and the Buried Diffuser (BD) that has the same flow rates (4 l/h). The BD is buried at 15 cm depths. Experimental data was obtained from Smar-Médenine located in South-East of Tunisia. The water distribution at the soil surface for BD is very important about 195 cm2 while for the DI is about 25.12 cm2. The HYDRUS 2D/3D model helped to evaluate the water distribution and compare the water balance obtained with those two irrigation techniques for one week irrigation period. There is a rapid kinetic which has a duration of 3 hours (irrigation time) and a slow kinetic which is the result of the water distribution in the soil, the plant uptake and the effect of climatic condition. There are two mechanisms that affect the two irrigation techniques: the water distribution and the position of irrigation system. As a result, irrigation with BD goes dipper in the soil. The transmission zone for this

  14. Degradation kinetics of forchlorfenuron in typical grapevine soils of India and its influence on specific soil enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Kaushik; Dasgupta, Soma; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Patil, Sangram H; Adsule, Pandurang G

    2008-05-01

    The rate of degradation of forchlorfenuron, a cytokinin-based plant growth regulator (PGR) was explored in typical grapevine soils of India with simultaneous evaluation of its effect on biochemical attributes of the test soils in terms of the activities of specific soil microbial enzymes. In all the test soils, namely clay, sandy-loam and silty-clay, the dissipation rate was faster at the beginning, which slowed down with time, indicating a non-linear pattern of degradation. Degradation in soils could best be explained by two-compartment 1st+1st order kinetics with half-life ranging between 4-10 days. The results suggest that organic matter might be playing a major role in influencing the rate of degradation of forchlorfenuron in soil. The rate of degradation in sandy-loam soil was fastest followed by clay and silty-clay soils, respectively. Comparison of the rate of degradation in natural against sterilized soils suggests that microbial degradation might be the major pathway of residue dissipation. Changes in soil enzyme activities as a consequence of forchlorfenuron treatment were studied for extra-cellular enzymes namely acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and beta -glucosidase and intracellular enzyme-dehydrogenase. Although small changes in enzyme activities were observed, forchlorfenuron did not have any significant deleterious effect on the enzymatic activity of the test soils. Simple correlation studies between degradation percentage and individual enzyme activities did not establish any significant relationships. The pattern and change of enzyme activity was primarily the effect of the incubation period rather than the effect of forchlorfenuron itself.

  15. Topographic variability influences the carbon sequestration potential of arable soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Elsgaard, Lars; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag

    2012-01-01

    There is presently limited knowledge on the influence of field spatial variability on the carbon (C) sink-source relationships in arable landscapes. This is accompanied by the fact that our understanding of soil profile C dynamics is also limited. This study aimed at investigating how spatial...... variability along a short catena influences C sinksource relationships and temporal dynamics of CO2 concentrations in soils. In spring 2011, soil samples were collected from topsoil (2-5.5 cm) and subsoil (38-41.5 cm) horizons at upslope and footslope positions in a Danish winter wheat field on a sandy loam...... soil developed on glacial till. Bulk densities and C concentrations of the soils were characterized. From June 2011, gas samples were collected at least bimonthly from the same slope positions in four spatial replicates using stainless steel needles that were permanently installed at 5, 10, 20 and 30...

  16. Nano chitosan-NPK fertilizer enhances the growth and productivity of wheat plants grown in sandy soil

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed N. A. Hasaneen; Aya M. Omer

    2016-01-01

    Nanofertilizers have become a pioneer approach in agriculture research nowadays. In this paper we investigate the delivery of chitosan nanoparticles loaded with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (NPK) for wheat plants by foliar uptake. Chiotsan-NPK nanoparticles were easily applied to leaf surfaces and entered the stomata via gas uptake, avoiding direct interaction with soil systems. The uptake and translocation of nanoparticles inside wheat plants was investigated by transmission electron m...

  17. The rhizosphere and PAH amendment mediate impacts on functional and structural bacterial diversity in sandy peat soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yrjaelae, Kim, E-mail: kim.yrjala@helsinki.f [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, General Microbiology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 56, (Biocenter 1C), 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Keskinen, Anna-Kaisa; Akerman, Marja-Leena; Fortelius, Carola [METROPOLIA University of Applied Science, Vantaa (Finland); Sipilae, Timo P. [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, General Microbiology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 56, (Biocenter 1C), 00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-05-15

    To reveal the degradation capacity of bacteria in PAH polluted soil and rhizosphere we combined bacterial extradiol ring-cleavage dioxygenase and 16S rRNA analysis in Betula pubescens rhizoremediation. Characterisation of the functional bacterial community by RFLP revealed novel environmental dioxygenases, and their putative hosts were studied by 16S rRNA amplification. Plant rhizosphere and PAH amendment effects were detected by the RFLP/T-RFLP analysis. Functional species richness increased in the birch rhizosphere and PAH amendment impacted the compositional diversity of the dioxygenases and the structural 16S rRNA community. A shift from an Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia dominated to an Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria dominated community structure was detected in polluted soil. Clone sequence analysis indicated catabolic significance of Burkholderia in PAH polluted soil. These results advance our understanding of rhizoremediation and unveil the extent of uncharacterized functional bacteria to benefit bioremediation by facilitating the development of the molecular tool box to monitor bacterial populations in biodegradation. - The bacterial community analysis using 16S rRNA and extradiol dioxygenase marker genes in rhizoremediation revealed both a rhizosphere and a PAH-pollution effect.

  18. Biochar and biological carbon cycling in temperate soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, S. A.; Vanbergen, A. J.; Bardgett, R. D.; Hopkins, D. W.; Ostle, N.

    2012-04-01

    Production of biochar, the recalcitrant residue formed by pyrolysis of plant matter, is suggested as a means of increasing storage of stable carbon (C) in the soil (1). Biochar has also been shown to act as a soil conditioner, increasing the productivity of certain crops by reducing nutrient leaching and improving soil water-holding capacity. However, the response of soil carbon pools to biochar addition is not yet well understood. Studies have shown that biochar has highly variable effects on microbial C cycling and thus on soil C storage (2,3,4). This discrepancy may be partially explained by the response of soil invertebrates, which occupy higher trophic levels and regulate microbial activity. This research aims to understand the role of soil invertebrates (i.e. Collembola and nematode worms) in biochar-mediated changes to soil C dynamics across a range of plant-soil communities. An open-air, pot-based mesocosm experiment was established in May, 2011 at the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Edinburgh. Three treatments were included in a fully-factorial design: biochar (presence [2 % w/w] or absence), soil type (arable sandy, arable sandy loam, grassland sandy loam), and vegetation type (Hordeum vulgare, Lolium perenne, unvegetated). Monitored parameters include: invertebrate and microbial species composition, soil C fluxes (CO2 and trace gas evolution, leachate C content, primary productivity and soil C content), and soil conditions (pH, moisture content and water-holding capacity). Preliminary results indicate that biochar-induced changes to soil invertebrate communities and processes are affected by pre-existing soil characteristics, and that soil texture in particular may be an important determinant of soil response to biochar addition. 1. Lehmann, 2007. A handful of carbon. Nature 447, 143-144. 2. Liang et al., 2010. Black carbon affects the cycling of non-black carbon in soil. Organic Geochemistry 41, 206-213. 3. Van Zwieten et al., 2010. Influence of

  19. Effects of storage time and straw content of cattle slurry on the mineralization of nitrogen and carbon in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, P.

    1998-01-01

    Animal slurries are stored for a variable period of time before application in the field. The effect of cattle slurry storage time and temperature on the subsequent mineralization of C and N in soil was studied under laboratory conditions. Urine and faeces from a dairy cow were sampled separately...... and mixed to a slurry. After 4 weeks of storage under anaerobic conditions at 15 degrees C, the NH4+ N content exceeded the original urinary N content of the slurry; the NH4+ content increased only slightly during the following 16 weeks of storage. After 4 weeks of storage, the proportion of slurry C...... to a sandy and a sandy loam soil. After 1 week, the preceding storage period (0-20 weeks) and temperature (5 degrees C or 15 degrees C) had no significant effect on the net release of inorganic N from the slurry in soil. Thus, the increased NH4+ content in the slurry after storage was followed by increased...

  20. Respuesta del trigo a la fertilización nitrogenada y nitroazufrada en suelos arenosos Wheat response to nitrogen and nitrogen with sulfur fertilization in sandy soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Barraco

    2009-12-01

    (S additions. However, the available information is not consistent for the diagnosis and analysis of the marginal contribution of S on wheat grain responses in combination with N fertilization. Thus, the objective of this study was to quantify the yield response of dryland wheat crops to N and NS fertilization and to determine the relationship between yield response and several soil properties in sandy soils. The study consisted in 34 field experiments within the semiarid and subhumid sandy pampas region (Argentina managed under no-tillage practices. Three treatments were evaluated: i control (without fertilization, ii 140 kg of N ha-¹ [N-NO3 soil (0-40 cm + N fertilizer], iii 140 kg of N ha-¹ [N-NO3 soil (0- 40 cm + N fertilizer] + 12 kg of S ha-¹. A positive response to N fertilization was observed in every experimental site. Mean grain yield response to the application of N was 949 kg ha-¹. Although the mean grain yield response to S fertilization was 232 kg ha-¹, only 38% of the sites (13 sites showed a significant response to this treatment. Crop response to S fertilization was not related to soil organic matter (p = 0.61, sand content (p = 0.90, soil extractable S-S0(4 ²-(p = 0.29, nor soil N-N0(3 -(p = 0.47 levels. Furthermore, it decreased with increasing maximum grain yields and it was positively related to crop responses to N fertilization. We conclude that in coarse textured soils with significant N limitations, wheat responses to S fertilization are greater and more common in low productivity sites.

  1. Analyzing the impacts of three types of biochar on soil carbon fractions and physiochemical properties in a corn-soybean rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Saroop S; Ussiri, David A N; Kumar, Sandeep; Chintala, Rajesh; Papiernik, Sharon K; Malo, Douglas D; Schumacher, Thomas E

    2017-10-01

    Biochar is a solid material obtained when biomass is thermochemically converted in an oxygen-limited environment. In most previous studies, the impacts of biochar on soil properties and organic carbon (C) were investigated under controlled conditions, mainly laboratory incubation or greenhouse studies. This 2-year field study was conducted to evaluate the influence of biochar on selected soil physical and chemical properties and carbon and nitrogen fractions for two selected soil types (clay loam and a sandy loam soil) under a corn (Zea mays L.)-soybean (Glycine max L.) rotation. The three plant based biochar materials used for this study were corn stover (CS), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson and C. Lawson) wood residue (PW), and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) (SG). Data showed that CS and SG significantly increased the pH of acidic soil at the eroded landscape position but produced no significant change in soil pH at the depositional landscape position. The effects of biochar treatments on cold water extractable C (WSC) and nitrogen (WSN) fractions for the 0-7.5 cm depth were depended on biochar and soil type. Results suggested that alkaline biochars applied at 10 Mg ha-1 can increase the pH and WSC fraction of acidic sandy loam soil, but the 10 Mg ha-1 rate might be low to substantially improve physical properties and hot water extractable C and N fractions of soil. Application of higher rates of biochar and long-term monitoring is needed to quantify the benefits of biochar under field conditions on soils in different environmental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estimation of Hydraulic properties of a sandy soil using ground-based active and passive microwave remote sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Jonard, François

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we experimentally analyzed the feasibility of estimating soil hydraulic properties from 1.4 GHz radiometer and 0.8-2.6 GHz ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. Radiometer and GPR measurements were performed above a sand box, which was subjected to a series of vertical water content profiles in hydrostatic equilibrium with a water table located at different depths. A coherent radiative transfer model was used to simulate brightness temperatures measured with the radiometer. GPR data were modeled using full-wave layered medium Green\\'s functions and an intrinsic antenna representation. These forward models were inverted to optimally match the corresponding passive and active microwave data. This allowed us to reconstruct the water content profiles, and thereby estimate the sand water retention curve described using the van Genuchten model. Uncertainty of the estimated hydraulic parameters was quantified using the Bayesian-based DREAM algorithm. For both radiometer and GPR methods, the results were in close agreement with in situ time-domain reflectometry (TDR) estimates. Compared with radiometer and TDR, much smaller confidence intervals were obtained for GPR, which was attributed to its relatively large bandwidth of operation, including frequencies smaller than 1.4 GHz. These results offer valuable insights into future potential and emerging challenges in the development of joint analyses of passive and active remote sensing data to retrieve effective soil hydraulic properties.

  3. Temperature effect on mineralization of SOM, plant litter and priming: modified by soil type?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzaroli Bleken, Marina; Berland Frøseth, Randi

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide improved temperature response functions to be used in models of soil organic carbon (SOC) and litter mineralization, with focus on the winter period. Our working hypothesis were: 1) decomposition of SOM and plant residue occurs also at temperature close to the freezing point; 2) the effect of temperature on SOC decomposition is stronger in clayey than in sandy soil; 3) decomposition and response to temperature of added plant litter is not affected by soil type. A silty clay loam (27% clay, 3% sand) and a sandy loam (6% clay, 51% sand) with similar weather and cultivation history were pre-incubated at about 15° C for about 4.5 months. Clover leaves labelled with 13C were added to half of the samples, and soil with and without clover was incubated for 142 days at 0, 4, 8.5 or 15 °C. Mineralization of SOC and clover leaves was observed also at 0° C. In the absence of added plant material, SOC decomposition followed a first order reaction which was twice as fast in the sandy soil as in the clay soil. The decomposition rate of clover leaves was also higher in the sandy soil than in the clay soil. However, the influence of temperature on SOC and on clover decomposition was the same in both soils. In presence of plant material, there was a positive priming effect on SOC, which initially correlated with decomposition of plant litter. There was a progressively lower priming effect at higher temperatures, particularly in the sandy soil, that could be understood as substrates exhaustion in a restricted volume of influence around the added clover leaves. We provide parameterised Arrhenius and alternative modifying linear temperature functions together with decay rates at reference temperature, which can be used for predicting decay rates of SOC per se and of the labile pool of clover leaves. We also show the superiority of these functions compared to the use of Q10 as temperature factor. Further, we suggest approaches for modelling

  4. Effects of temperature, water content and nitrogen fertilisation on emissions of nitrous oxide by soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. A.; Thomson, P. E.; Clayton, H.; Mctaggart, I. P.; Conen, F.

    Nitrous oxide emissions were measured from several grassland and arable soils in the field, and from two of these soils and a forest soil transferred in large monoliths to a greenhouse. The effects of fertiliser N additions and of soil water content and temperature were investigated. Emissions were in the order grazed grassland>grassland cut for conservation>potatoes>cereal crops, and generally were higher than those from temperate natural ecosystems. Based on these data, agricultural soils constitute the major soil source of N 2O in the U.K. The highest emission recorded was 8 kg N 2O-N ha -1 over 10 months, from a grazed grassland site. Emissions varied from year to year, depending particularly on rainfall at the time of fertilisation. When soil mineral N was not limiting, exponential relationships between N 2O flux and both water-filled pore space (WFPS) and temperature were observed. The Q10 value for a sandy loam was 1.6, but ranged up to 12 for a clay loam soil at high WFPS. The high values were attributed to the increase in anaerobic zones where denitrification could take place, as respiratory demand for O 2 increased. A forest soil (peaty gley) showed an optimum water potential for N 2O emission. Diurnal fluctuations in emissions were associated with diurnal cycles in soil temperature, but with varying time lags, which could be explained by the N 2O being produced at different depths.

  5. 3,4-Dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) reduces activity of ammonia oxidizers without adverse effects on non-target soil microorganisms and functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kong, Xianwang; Duan, Yun-Feng (Kevin); Schramm, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    of ammonia oxidation. We investigated effects of DMPP amendment equivalent to 0 (Control), 1 (regular dose, RD) or 10 (high dose, HD) kg ha1 in a sandy loam grassland soil at 50% water-filled pore space. Following incubation for 1, 7 or 14 d, soil was analyzed for fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis......, dehydrogenase activity, phospholipid fatty acid composition and potential ammonia oxidation. DMPP showed no significant nontarget effects (p > 0.05), but a possible stress response in HD was indicated by a factor analysis of phospholipid fatty acid composition. There was a strong DMPP inhibition on potential...... ammonia oxidation which was still significant (p oxidizing bacteria (AOB...

  6. Soil mechanical stresses in high wheel load agricultural field traffic: a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Schjønning, Per

    2017-01-01

    .6 and 0.9 m depths of a sandy loam soil at field capacity water content. The soil was ploughed annually to a depth of 0.25 m and was tested in the spring following autumn ploughing but before secondary tillage. The machinery tested was a tractor–trailer system for slurry application with a total weight...... to 300, 100 and 45 kPa at soil depths of 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9 m respectively. Comparing these with the data in the literature regarding soil strength and measured compaction effects on the soil studied, we conclude that the traffic event investigated is likely to induce serious effects on soil properties...

  7. Role of amino acid metabolites in the formation of soil organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1972-01-01

    Carbon-14 labelled cellulose or glucose were added to a medium loam and two sandy soils. The soils were incubated at 20°C for about 6 yr under laboratory conditions. Six to 12 per cent of the labelled carbon added to the soils was transformed into metabolites hydrolysable to amino acids during...... the first 10–30 days of the incubation period. The newly-formed metabolites decayed slowly as incubation continued. During the first 100–300 days of the incubation, losses of labelled amino acid carbon from soil were curvilinear when plotted on a semi-logarithmic scale. After this time the decay curves...... became linear, indicating half lives of 6–7 yr for the labelled carbon in amino acids. However, the labelled amino acid metabolites decayed at a faster rate than the native amino acid compounds of the soil, since they constituted a gradually decreasing percentage of total soil amino acid carbon...

  8. Simultaneous adsorption/desorption of quaternary ammonium herbicides by acid vineyard soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde Cid, Manuel; Paradelo Núñez, Remigio; Fernández Calviño, David; Nóvoa Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias Estévez, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Competitive adsorption and desorption of three quaternary ammonium herbicides (paraquat, diquat, and difenzoquat) have been studied in four sandy-loam acid vineyard soils from NW Spain and Portugal. The soils present organic matter contents between 3 and 48 g kg-1 and copper contents ranging from 25 to 107 mg kg-1. Adsorption has been studied under equilibrium conditions in batch experiments, and kinetics were studied in a stirred-flow chamber. Adsorption and desorption followed a Freundlich model and kinetics were well described by the pseudo-first-order model. The retention capacity for the pesticides by the four soils followed the sequence: paraquat > diquat > difenzoquat. The different adsorption capacities of each soil were not related to pH, clay or organic matter contents, as could be expected, but rather to soil copper content. The results show that competition with copper for adsorption sites is an important factor in quaternary ammonium herbicides retention in soils with these characteristics.

  9. Acid-activated biochar increased sulfamethazine retention in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithanage, Meththika; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Zhang, Ming; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Lee, Sang Soo; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-02-01

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is an ionizable and highly mobile antibiotic which is frequently found in soil and water environments. We investigated the sorption of SMZ onto soils amended with biochars (BCs) at varying pH and contact time. Invasive plants were pyrolyzed at 700 °C and were further activated with 30 % sulfuric (SBBC) and oxalic (OBBC) acids. The sorption rate of SMZ onto SBBC and OBBC was pronouncedly pH dependent and was decreased significantly when the values of soil pH increased from 3 to 5. Modeled effective sorption coefficients (K D,eff) values indicated excellent sorption on SBBC-treated loamy sand and sandy loam soils for 229 and 183 L/kg, respectively. On the other hand, the low sorption values were determined for OBBC- and BBC700-treated loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Kinetic modeling demonstrated that the pseudo second order model was the best followed by intra-particle diffusion and the Elovich model, indicating that multiple processes govern SMZ sorption. These findings were also supported by sorption edge experiments based on BC characteristics. Chemisorption onto protonated and ligand containing functional groups of the BC surface, and diffusion in macro-, meso-, and micro-pores of the acid-activated BCs are the proposed mechanisms of SMZ retention in soils. Calculated and experimental q e (amount adsorbed per kg of the adsorbent at equilibrium) values were well fitted to the pseudo second order model, and the predicted maximum equilibrium concentration of SBBC for loamy sand soils was 182 mg/kg. Overall, SBBC represents a suitable soil amendment because of its high sorption rate of SMZ in soils.

  10. Movimento do herbicida imazapyr no perfil de solos tropicais Imazapyr mobility in tropical soil profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.E. Firmino

    2008-03-01

    imazapyr. After applying 1 kg ha-1 of the herbicide on each column surface, columns were submitted to three conditions: 1 14 min/35 min rainfall simulation followed by 48 hours rest; 2 14 min/35 min rainfall simulation followed by 30 days rest; and column inversion after applying imazapyr on the surface, under sub irrigation during 20 days, followed by 10 days rest. After this stage, columns were sectioned every 5 cm of depth. Sorghum bicolor was sowed as bioindicator on each portion and after 20 days of sowing, dry matter of the above ground tissue was evaluated. The higher herbicide descending movement observed was in sandy loam soil, followed by sandy clay loam and clay soil. The ascending movement of this herbicide occurred together with water, causing herbicide distribution in all the column area in sandy clay loam and sandy loam soils, while clay soil showed a smaller ascending movement. Imazapyr presents high mobility on all three soils, together with water movement in the soil profile, both in ascending and descending motions. Such high mobility may cause ground water contamination, and also cycles of permanence of this product in the superficial layers of the soil, depending on humidity availability.

  11. Soil evolution dynamics and cultural response: Transformation of habitation patterns in the southern Netherlands (1000 BC-500 AD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roymans, Nico; Kluiving, Sjoerd; Bekkema, Marijke; van Puijenbroek, Florens

    2013-04-01

    Long-term archaeological data gathering in the southern Netherlands may deliver an interesting scale model that is suitable for the Pleistocene sand areas of the Northwest European Plain. On a micro-scale level it has become clear that Bronze Age and Iron Age farmers intensively used the landscape, resulting in relatively dense distribution patterns of settlements all over the sand plateaus. However, this agricultural use of the landscape - related to the 'celtic field' system - led to a process of soil degeneration during which initially brown moder podzols gradually transformed into degenerated humus podzols that could no longer be used as farmland. According to established 'models', this process of 'secondary podzolisation' particularly affected those sections of the landscape that were dominated by dry sandy soils with a low loam content (between c. 10 and 20%). In the later Iron Age the changing soil conditions resulted in a dramatic shift in the habitation pattern that clearly manifests itself in the Roman period; on the local scale the habitation moved from the degenerated soils to nearby zones with better soil conditions (higher loam content), which became more densely inhabited now than in the Bronze Age/Early Iron Age. The zones where the Roman period settlements concentrated became also the zones where we can find the early medieval habitation and where in the late medieval period the plaggen soils started to develop. Measured loam values of soil samples (n=181) in Veldhoven, southern Netherlands, are in agreement with the described model that the plaggen cover is located on soils containing high loam% and that humus podzolsoils of former heath areas have low loam content. Local spatial as well as vertical variations in loam content of sand layers is shown to occur, warning against single parameter research. Other potential causes for the deviation of the model are: a) the impact of fluctuating groundwater levels, b) impact of older formations with

  12. Plant uptake and geochemical phase distribution of Cd, Pb and Zn from soils after application of baghouse dust from the electric arc furnace production of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, J.H. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Adriano, D.C. [Georgia Univ., Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of this study are to determine the uptake of Cd, Pb and Zn from two soils (silt loam and sandy loam) by the common dandelion, Taraxacum officinale Weber, and ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., after application of varying rates of flue dust, to determine the geochemical phase distribution of Cd, Pb and Zn of treated soils, to examine the effect of pH on the phase distribution and plant uptake and to measure the correlation between plant uptake and metals in the geochemical phases. Carbonate, including metal hydroxides, was the major geochemical phase for the metals in the flue dust and treated soils. Especially for the plants grown on the silt loam, yield decreased dramatically as flue dust treatment rate increased and a significant pH effect was observed. Plant uptake of the metals increased with increasing treatment level but the pattern of uptake varied with the element and plant species. Concentrations of the metals were generally greater in plant roots than leaves or stems. Due to very low biomass at high treatment levels, neither species seems to have potential for stabilization of highly contaminated soils but further studies are warranted on the use of the dandelion as a phyto-monitor. Typically, there was a significant correlation between plant concentrations and levels in all soil geochemical phases for all metals. The results of this study confirm the utility of selective sequential chemical extractants in predicting plant uptake of trace metals from contaminated soils

  13. On the influence of provenance to soil quality enhanced stress reaction of young beech trees to summer drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhk, Constanze; Kämmer, Marcel; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Jürgen; Jungkunst, Hermann F

    2016-11-01

    Climate projections propose that drought stress will become challenging for establishing trees. The magnitude of stress is dependent on tree species, provenance, and most likely also highly influenced by soil quality. European Beech (Fagus sylvatica) is of major ecological and economical importance in Central European forests. The species has an especially wide physiological and ecological amplitude enabling growth under various soil conditions within its distribution area in Central Europe. We studied the effects of extreme drought on beech saplings (second year) of four climatically distinct provenances growing on different soils (sandy loam and loamy sand) in a full factorial pot experiment. Foliar δ(13)C, δ(15)N, C, and N as well as above- and belowground growth parameters served as measures for stress level and plant growth. Low-quality soil enhanced the effect of drought compared with qualitatively better soil for the above- and belowground growth parameters, but foliar δ(13)C values revealed that plant stress was still remarkable in loamy soil. For beeches of one provenance, negative sandy soil effects were clearly smaller than for the others, whereas for another provenance drought effects in sandy soil were sometimes fatal. Foliar δ(15)N was correlated with plant size during the experiment. Plasticity of beech provenances in their reaction to drought versus control conditions varied clearly. Although a general trend of declining growth under control or drought conditions in sandy soil was found compared to loamy soil, the magnitude of the effect of soil quality was highly provenance specific. Provenances seemed to show adaptations not only to drought but also to soil quality. Accordingly, scientists should integrate information about climatic pre-adaptation and soil quality within the home range of populations for species distribution modeling and foresters should evaluate soil quality and climatic parameters when choosing donor populations for

  14. Conservation tillage and traffic effects on soil condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raper, R.L.; Reeves, D.W.; Burt, E.C. [USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Auburn, AL (United States); Torbert, H.A. [USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Temple, TX (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The soil condition resulting from a five-year cotton-wheat double cropping experiment in a sandy loam Coastal Plain soil was investigated using intensive measurements of cone index and dry bulk density. Four tillage treatments including a strip-till (no surface tillage with in-row subsoiling) conservation tillage practice were analyzed. The traffic was controlled in the experimental plots with the USDA-ARS Wide-Frame Tractive Vehicle. Besides the environmental benefits of maintaining the surface residue, the strip-till treatment decreased cone index directly beneath the row, decreased surface bulk density, increased surface moisture content, decreased energy usage, and increased yields. Controlled traffic was beneficial only when in-row subsoiling was not used as an annual tillage treatment. Although differences in soil condition were seen beneath the row middles where traffic occurred, this did not affect the soil condition directly beneath the row. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. [Effect of soil texture in unsaturated zone on soil nitrate accumulation and groundwater nitrate contamination in a marginal oasis in the middle of Heihe River basin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yong-Zhong; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Rong

    2014-10-01

    In irrigated agricultural ecosystems, the accumulation, distribution and transfer of nitrate nitrogen (NO(3-)-N) in soil profile and groundwater nitrate pollution were influenced by irrigation and fertilization, and were closely related to soil textural characteristics. In this study, a monitoring section with 10 groundwater observation wells along Heihe River flood land-old oasis croplands-newly cultivated sandy croplands-fixed sandy land outside oasis was established in Pingchuan desert-oasis in Linze county in the middle of Heihe river basin, and groundwater NO(3-)-N concentration was continuously monitored. Soil texture and NO(3-)-N concentration in the unsaturated zone at different landscape locations were determined. The NO(3-)-N transfer change in soil profile, nitrate leaching of soils with different texture and fertility levels in the 0-100 cm layer were analyzed. The results indicated that the vertical distribution of soil texture was sandy loam in the 0-130 cm depth, loam in the 130-190 cm and clay loam in the 190-300 cm for the old oasis croplands. For newly cultivated sandy croplands, sand content was more than 80% in each soil layer of the 0-300 cm profile, although a thin clay layer occurred in the 140-160 cm depth. The clay layer occurred 160 cm below the sand-fixing zone outside oasis. There were significant correlations between soil NO(3-)-N concentration and silt + clay content, and the order of significant degree was the natural soils of sandy lands > the newly cultivated sandy croplands > the old oasis croplands. The loss of N leaching was closely correlated to the silt + caly content in the 0-100 cm soil depth. The groundwater NO(3-)-N concentration varied from 1.01 to 5.17 mg · L(-1), with a mean value of 2.65 mg · L(-1) and from 6.6 to 29.5 mg · L(-1), with an average of 20.8 mg · L(-1) in the area of old oasis croplands and the newly cultivated croplands, respectively. The averaged groundwater NO(3-)-N concentration in the area of newly

  16. Agronomic performance and chemical response of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) to some organic nitrogen sources and conventional nitrogen fertilizers under sandy soil conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmy, A. M.; Fawzy Ramadan, M. F.

    2009-07-01

    Sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) is an option for oilseed production, particularly in dry land areas due to good root system development. In this study, two field experiments were performed in the El-Khattara region (Sharkia Governorate, Egypt) during the 2005 season. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of organic nitrogen (ON) sources and their combinations as well as to compare the effect of ON and ammonium sulfate (AS) as a conventional fertilizer added individually or in combination on growth, yield components, oil percentage and the uptake of some macro nutrients by sunflowers grown on sandy soil.The treatments of chicken manure (CM) and a mixture of farmyard manure (FYM) with CM were superior to the other treatments and gave the highest yield, dry matter yield, NPK uptake by plants at all growth stages along with seed yield at the mature stage. The effect of the different ON on crop yield and its components may follow the order; CM> palma residues (PR)> FYM. This was more emphasized when the materials were mixed with AS at a ratio of 3:1 and 1:1. The uptake of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) by plants was affected by the addition of different N sources and treatments. The highest nutrient content and uptake by straw were obtained when treated with CM followed by PR at all growth stages, while it was PR followed by CM for seeds. Oil recovery was shown to respond to the N supply and the changes in individual fatty acids were not statistically different. However, it seems that the application of organic fertilizers resulted in an increase in total unsaturated fatty acids compared to the control. (Author) 58 refs.

  17. Effects of exogenously applied salicylic acid and putrescine alone and in combination with rhizobacteria on the phytoremediation of heavy metals and chickpea growth in sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Naeem; Bano, Asghari

    2017-09-21

    The present attempt was made to study the role of exogenously applied salicylic acid (SA) and putrescine (Put) on the phytoremediation of heavy metal and on the growth parameters of chickpea grown in sandy soil. The SA and Put were applied alone as well as in combination with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). The PGPRs, isolated from the rhizosphere of chickpea were characterized on the basis of colony morphology and biochemical traits through gram staining, catalase and oxidase tests, and identified by 16S-rRNA gene sequencing as Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus megaterium. The chickpea seeds were soaked in 24 h fresh cultures of isolates for 2-3 h prior to sowing. The growth regulators (PGRs), SA and Put (300 mg/L), were applied to the seedlings as foliar spray at 3-leaf stage. The result revealed that plants treated with SA and Put alone or in combination with PGPRs, significantly enhanced the accumulation of heavy metals in plant shoot. PGPR induces Ni accumulation in sensitive variety and Pb in both the varieties, the PGR in combination augment the bioremediation effects of PGPR and both sensitive and tolerant variety showed significant accumulation of Ni, Cd and Pb. SA was more effective in accumulating Ni and Cd whereas, significant accumulation of Pb was recorded in Put. PGPRs, further augmented the PGRs induced accumulation of heavy metals and macronutrients in chickpea shoot and in rhizosphere. SA increased the proline content of tolerant variety while decreasing the lipid peroxidation and proline content of the sensitive variety but decreased the stimulating effect of PGPR in proline production. Interactive effects of PGPR and PGRs is recommended for inducing phytoremediation in chickpea plants under drought stress.

  18. Draft forces prediction model for standard single tines by using principles of soil mechanics and soil profile evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer Khalid Ahmed Al-Neama

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains a model to predict the draft force acting on varying standard single tines by using principles of soil mechanics and soil profile evaluation. Draft force (Fd measurements were made with four standard single tines comprising Heavy Duty, Double Heart, Double Heart with Wings and Duck Foot. Tine widths were 6.5, 13.5, 45 and 40 cm, respectively. The test was conducted in a soil bin with sandy loam soil. The effects of forward speeds and working depths on draft forces were investigated under controlled lab conditions. Results were evaluated based on a prediction model. A good correlation between measured and predicted Fd values for all tines with an average absolute variation less than 15 % was found.

  19. Influences of winery-distillery waste compost stability and soil type on soil carbon dynamics in amended soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, M A; Said-Pullicino, D; Paredes, C; Cecilia, J A; Moral, R

    2010-10-01

    The application of organic materials to replenish soil organic matter and improve soil structure and fertility has become a common agronomic practice. This research deals with the effects of soil amendment with winery and distillery waste composts on organic carbon (C) mineralisation in two arable soils. A sandy-loam and clay-loam soil were treated and incubated with a number organic materials obtained from the co-composting of different proportions of grape stalk, grape marc, exhausted grape marc and vinasse, with sewage sludge or animal manure. Moreover, the effect of compost stability on C mineralisation dynamics was studied by applying organic materials from different stages of the composting process. The results obtained showed that the addition of exogenous organic matter stimulated microbial growth, enhanced soil respiration and increased water-extractable C contents in both soils, particularly in the days immediately following amendment. The initial composition of the different organic materials used, especially for the mature samples, and the texture of the receiving soil did not influence significantly the C mineralisation final values, with around 11-20% of the added organic C being mineralised over the first 140 days. However, the contribution of organic amendment to the labile organic C pool, maximum rates of soil respiration, as well as the extent of initial disturbance of the soil microbiota were all found to be related to the degree of organic matter stability. Moreover, irrespective of the type and stability of the organic amendment, the mineralogical composition of the receiving soil was found to significantly influence its resilience in such systems. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbon dioxide flux as affected by tillage and irrigation in soil converted from perennial forages to annual crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabro, J D; Sainju, U; Stevens, W B; Evans, R G

    2008-09-01

    Among greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is one of the most significant contributors to regional and global warming as well as climatic change. A field study was conducted to (i) determine the effect of soil characteristics resulting from changes in soil management practices on CO(2) flux from the soil surface to the atmosphere in transitional land from perennial forages to annual crops, and (ii) develop empirical relationships that predict CO(2) flux from soil temperature and soil water content. The CO(2) flux, soil temperature (T(s)), volumetric soil water content (theta(v)) were measured every 1-2 weeks in no-till (NT) and conventional till (CT) malt barley and undisturbed soil grass-alfalfa (UGA) systems in a Lihen sandy loam soil (sandy, mixed, frigid Entic Haplustoll) under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions in western North Dakota. Soil air-filled porosity (epsilon) was calculated from total soil porosity and theta(v) measurements. Significant differences in CO(2) fluxes between land management practices (irrigation and tillage) were observed on some measurement dates. Higher CO(2) fluxes were detected in CT plots than in NT and UGA treatments immediately after rainfall or irrigation. Soil CO(2) fluxes increased with increasing soil moisture (R(2)=0.15, Pforages to annual crops.

  1. Parameterization of norfolk sandy loam properties for stochastic modeling of light in-wheel motor UGV

    Science.gov (United States)

    To accurately develop a mathematical model for an In-Wheel Motor Unmanned Ground Vehicle (IWM UGV) on soft terrain, parameterization of terrain properties is essential to stochastically model tire-terrain interaction for each wheel independently. Operating in off-road conditions requires paying clos...

  2. influence of tillage practices on physical properties of a sandy loam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    GPR equipment. (12 channel. GPS etrex, courtesy GARMIN Corporation 1999-. 2002) was used in determining coordinates of the sites. Treatments and Experimental Design. The experiment was established as randomize complete block design (RCBD) with three tillage treatments and five replications. Three tillag.

  3. Prediction of Nitrogen Responses of Corn by Soil Nitrogen Mineralization Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Simard

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil nitrogen mineralization potential (Nmin has to be spatially quantified to enable farmers to vary N fertilizer rates, optimize crop yields, and minimize N transfer from soils to the environment. The study objectives were to assess the spatial variability in soil Nmin potential based on clay and organic matter (OM contents and the impact of grouping soils using these criteria on corn grain (Zea mays L. yield, N uptake response curves to N fertilizer, and soil residual N. Four indicators were used: OM content and three equations involving OM and clay content. The study was conducted on a 15-ha field near Montreal, Quebec, Canada. In the spring 2000, soil samples (n = 150 were collected on a 30- x 30-m grid and six rates of N fertilizer (0 to 250 kg N ha-1 were applied. Kriged maps of particle size showed areas of clay, clay loam, and fine sandy loam soils. The Nmin indicators were spatially structured but soil nitrate (NO3– was not. The N fertilizer rate to reach maximum grain yield (Nmax, as estimated by a quadratic model, varied among textural classes and Nmin indicators, and ranged from 159 to 250 kg N ha-1. The proportion of variability (R2 and the standard error of the estimate (SE varied among textural groups and Nmin indicators. The R2 ranged from 0.53 to 0.91 and the SE from 0.13 to 1.62. Corn grain N uptake was significantly affected by N fertilizer and the pattern of response differed with soil texture. For the 50 kg N ha-1 rate, the apparent Nmin potential (ANM was significantly larger in the clay loam (122 kg ha-1 than in the fine sandy loam (80 kg ha-1 or clay (64 kg ha-1 soils. The fall soil residual N was not affected by N fertlizer inputs. Textural classes can be used to predict Nmax. The Nmin indicators may also assist the variable rate N fertilizer inputs for corn production.

  4. Interactions between Soil Texture and Placement of Dairy Slurry Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, Nadia; Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Rubæk, Gitte Holton

    2011-01-01

    taurus L.) manure slurry. Surface application of slurry increased P leaching losses relative to baseline losses, but losses declined with increasing active flow volume. After elution of one pore volume, leaching averaged 0.54 kg P ha−1 from the loam, 0.38 kg P ha−1 from the sandy loam, and 0.22 kg P ha−1...

  5. Soil seal development under simulated rainfall: Structural, physical and hydrological dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenise, Elena; Simmons, Robert W.; Ahn, Sujung; Garbout, Amin; Doerr, Stefan H.; Mooney, Sacha J.; Sturrock, Craig J.; Ritz, Karl

    2018-01-01

    This study delivers new insights into rainfall-induced seal formation through a novel approach in the use of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT). Up to now seal and crust thickness have been directly quantified mainly through visual examination of sealed/crusted surfaces, and there has been no quantitative method to estimate this important property. X-ray CT images were quantitatively analysed to derive formal measures of seal and crust thickness. A factorial experiment was established in the laboratory using open-topped microcosms packed with soil. The factors investigated were soil type (three soils: silty clay loam - ZCL, sandy silt loam - SZL, sandy loam - SL) and rainfall duration (2-14 min). Surface seal formation was induced by applying artificial rainfall events, characterised by variable duration, but constant kinetic energy, intensity, and raindrop size distribution. Soil porosities derived from CT scans were used to quantify the thickness of the rainfall-induced surface seals and reveal temporal seal micro-morphological variations with increasing rainfall duration. In addition, the water repellency and infiltration dynamics of the developing seals were investigated by measuring water drop penetration time (WDPT) and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity (Kun). The range of seal thicknesses detected varied from 0.6 to 5.4 mm. Soil textural characteristics and OM content played a central role in the development of rainfall-induced seals, with coarser soil particles and lower OM content resulting in thicker seals. Two different trends in soil porosity vs. depth were identified: i) for SL soil porosity was lowest at the immediate soil surface, it then increased constantly with depth till the median porosity of undisturbed soil was equalled; ii) for ZCL and SL the highest reduction in porosity, as compared to the median porosity of undisturbed soil, was observed in a well-defined zone of maximum porosity reduction c. 0.24-0.48 mm below the soil surface. This

  6. Do soil organic carbon levels affect potential yields and nitrogen use efficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oelofse, Myles; Markussen, Bo; Knudsen, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is broadly recognised as an important parameter affecting soil quality, and can therefore contribute to improving a number of soil properties that influence crop yield. Previous research generally indicates that soil organic carbon has positive effects on crop yields...... draws on historical data sets from the Danish national field trials consisting of 560 winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) trials and 309 spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) trials conducted over the past 20 and 17 years, respectively. We hypothesised that for these two crops, the potential grain yield...... and aimed to elucidate the sole effect of SOC by controlling for potential confounding variables. No significant effect of SOC on potential winter wheat was found, whilst for spring barley, only for the course sandy loam soil type was a borderline significantly positive effect of SOC on potential yields...

  7. Long-Term Effects of Legacy Copper Contamination on Microbial Activity and Soil Physical Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Møldrup, Per; Holmstrup, Martin

    Soils heavily contaminated with copper (Cu) are considered unsuitable for agricultural use due to adverse impacts on microbial activity, soil physical properties, and direct toxicity to crops. This study investigated effects of Cu pollution from timber preservation activities between 1911 and 1924...... on soil micro-organisms and subsequent effects on physical properties of a sandy loam soil. Tillage operations over the last 70 years have caused spreading of the initially localized contamination and have created a Cu concentration gradient from 20 to 3800 mg kg-1 across an agricultural field in Hygum......-filled porosity and air permeability occurred for Cu concentrations >900 mg kg-1. There was significant negative correlation between microbial activity and the susceptibility of clay dispersion by water. These results suggest that a threshold level for Cu exists (~500 mg kg-1 for this soil type) beyond which...

  8. Estimating Soil Water Retention Curve Using The Particle Size Distribution Based on Fractal Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Chari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Water and soil retention curve is one of the most important properties of porous media to obtain in a laboratory retention curve and time associated with errors. For this reason, researchers have proposed techniques that help them to more easily acquired characteristic curve. One of these methods is the use of fractal geometry. Determining the relationship between particle size distribution fractal dimension (DPSD and fractal dimension retention curve (DSWRC can be useful. However, the full information of many soil data is not available from the grading curve and only three components (clay, silt and sand are measured.In recent decades, the use of fractal geometry as a useful tool and a bridge between the physical concept models and experimental parameters have been used.Due to the fact that both the solid phase of soil and soil pore space themselves are relatively similar, each of them can express different fractal characteristics of the soil . Materials and Methods: This study aims to determine DPSD using data soon found in the soil and creates a relationship between DPSD and DSWRC .To do this selection, 54 samples from Northern Iran and the six classes loam, clay loam, clay loam, sandy clay, silty loam and sandy loam were classified. To get the fractal dimension (DSWRC Tyler and Wheatcraft (27 retention curve equation was used.Alsothe fractal dimension particle size distribution (DPSD using equation Tyler and Wheatcraft (28 is obtained.To determine the grading curve in the range of 1 to 1000 micron particle radius of the percentage amounts of clay, silt and sand soil, the method by Skaggs et al (24 using the following equation was used. DPSD developed using gradation curves (Dm1 and three points (sand, silt and clay (Dm2, respectively. After determining the fractal dimension and fractal dimension retention curve gradation curve, regression relationship between fractal dimension is created. Results and Discussion: The results

  9. Side Effects of Nitrification Inhibitors on Non Target Microbial Processes in Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Carl Gottlieb Ottow

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural chemicals have been used extensively in modern agriculture and toxicological studies suggest a great potential for inducing undesirable effects on non target organisms. A model experiment was conducted in order to determine side effects of three nitrification inhibitors (NIs, 3,4dimethylpyrazolephosphate = DMPP, 4-Chlor-methylpyrazole phosphate = ClMPP and dicyandiamide = DCD on non target microbial processes in soils. Side effects and dose response curve of three NIs were quantified under laboratory conditions using silty clay, loam and a sandy soils. Dehydrogenase, dimethylsulfoxide reductase as well as nitrogenase activity (NA and potential denitrification capacity were measured as common and specific non target microbial processes. The influence of 5-1000 times the base concentration, dose response curves were examined, and no observable effect level = NOEL, as well as effective dose ED10 and ED50 (10% and 50% inhibition were calculated. The NOEL for microbial non target processes were about 30–70 times higher than base concentration in all investigated soils. The potential denitrification capacity revealed to be the most sensitive parameter. ClMPP exhibited the strongest influence on the non target microbial processes in the three soils. The NOEL, ED10 and ED50 values were higher in clay than in loamy or sandy soil. The NIs was the most effective in sandy soils.

  10. Soil compaction vulnerability at Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Robert H.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Carmichael, Shinji; Esque, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    Compaction vulnerability of different types of soils by hikers and vehicles is poorly known, particularly for soils of arid and semiarid regions. Engineering analyses have long shown that poorly sorted soils (for example, sandy loams) compact to high densities, whereas well-sorted soils (for example, eolian sand) do not compact, and high gravel content may reduce compaction. Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument (ORPI) in southwestern Arizona, is affected greatly by illicit activities associated with the United States–Mexico border, and has many soils that resource managers consider to be highly vulnerable to compaction. Using geospatial soils data for ORPI, compaction vulnerability was estimated qualitatively based on the amount of gravel and the degree of sorting of sand and finer particles. To test this qualitative assessment, soil samples were collected from 48 sites across all soil map units, and undisturbed bulk densities were measured. A scoring system was used to create a vulnerability index for soils on the basis of particle-size sorting, soil properties derived from Proctor compaction analyses, and the field undisturbed bulk densities. The results of the laboratory analyses indicated that the qualitative assessments of soil compaction vulnerability underestimated the area of high vulnerability soils by 73 percent. The results showed that compaction vulnerability of desert soils, such as those at ORPI, can be quantified using laboratory tests and evaluated using geographic information system analyses, providing a management tool that managers potentially could use to inform decisions about activities that reduce this type of soil disruption in protected areas.

  11. Decontamination of landfill leachate by soils with different textures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M H; Li, M M; Leung, C K; Lan, C Y

    1990-12-01

    Soils with different textures (sandy, loamy, and clay soils) were used as filters to attenuate leachate from the Gin Drinkers' Bay landfill. They were used to pack columns of different depths: 0.2, 0.6, and 1.0 m. Eight millimeters of leachate was drained into the soil columns each day for 56 days. The percolated leachates were collected weekly and their properties analyzed. It was revealed that the properties became rather stable at Day 28 and therefore only the data from Day 28 are presented. The effluents from the loamy and clay columns with depths of 0.6 and 1.0 m contained significantly lower (P less than 0.05) ammonia contents and had lower chemical oxygen demand than those from sandy soil columns. Moreover, the depth of the columns of loam and clay did not show a significant difference (P greater than 0.05). Sandy soil was the least effective in attenuating the leachate. The efficiency of all the soil columns decrease as the soil depth decreased. It was also noted that growing of tree seedings (Acacia confusa) could further improve the efficiency of the loamy soil, especially for the removal of Na. The phytotoxicity of the raw and percolated leachate was evaluated using seed germination of two plant species (Brassica chinensis and Lolium perenne) and the growth of an uncellular green alga (Chlorella pyrenoidosa). In general, the raw leachate was toxic and inhibited seed germination and root growth of the two plant species and the growth rate of the unicellular green alga. The toxicity was due to the high levels of ammonia-nitrogen. COD, iron, manganese, and sodium ions. Percolated leachate, especially from loamy and clay soil columns, exhibited a decrease in phytotoxicity. Clay or loamy soil columns of 0.6-m soil depth seemed to be sufficient to remove the phytotoxic substances in landfill leachate.

  12. Abundance of macrozoobenthos in relation to bottom soil textural types and water depth In aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nupur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural classes and different water depths on abundance of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds. Three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (TS2 and with clay loam (T3 were considered in this experiment. Samples were collected from three different depths (60.96 cm, 106.68 cm and 152.40 cm with three replications. The ranges of water quality parameters were suitable for the growth of macrozoobenthos during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed comparatively higher ranges in T2. Eight genera were recorded belonging to major groups of Chironomidae, Oligochaeta, Mollusca and Ceratoponogonidae. The highest population densities of Oligochaeta (1200±4.25 per m2, Chironomidae (1422±4.88 per m2, Ceratopogonidae (399±1.56 per m2 and Mollusca (977±2.24 per m2 were found in T2. The population densities of macrozoobenthos showed fortnightly variations in all the treatments. Among the three depths, significantly highest densities of macrozoobenthos were recorded in 106.68 cm in every treatment. The mean abundance of macrozoobenthos was significantly highest in T2. The present study indicates that loamy soil pond bottom along with water depth 106.68 cm is suitable for the growth and production of macrozoobenthos in aquaculture ponds.

  13. Abundance of plankton population densities in relation to bottom soil textural types in aquaculture ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Siddika

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plankton is an important food item of fishes and indicator for the productivity of a water body. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of bottom soil textural conditions on abundance of plankton in aquaculture pond. The experiment was carried out using three treatments, i.e., ponds bottom with sandy loam (T1, with loam (T2 and with clay loam (T3. The ranges of water quality parameters analyzed were suitable for the growth of plankton during the experimental period. Similarly, chemical properties of soil were also within suitable ranges and every parameter showed higher ranges in T2. A total 20 genera of phytoplankton were recorded belonged to Chlorophyceae (7, Cyanophyceae (5, Bacillariophyceae (5, Euglenophyceae (2 and Dinophyceae (1. On the other hand, total 13 genera of zooplankton were recorded belonged to Crustacea (7 and Rotifera (6. The highest ranges of phytoplankton and zooplankton densities were found in T2 where low to medium-type bloom was observed during the study period. Consequently, the mean abundance of plankton (phytoplankton and zooplankton density was significantly highest in T2. The highest abundance of plankton in the T2 indicated that pond bottom with loamy soil is suitable for the growth and production of plankton in aquaculture ponds.

  14. Observations of water and oil infiltration into soil: Some simulation challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, J. W.; McBride, J. F.; Simmons, C. S.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were performed to test the ability of multiphase flow theory to predict the flow behavior of an immiscible organic liquid entering an unsaturated soil medium. The infiltration and redistribution behavior of water followed by oil, and of oil followed by water, in soil columns was observed. Experiments involved both liquid entry at the top of columns with downward flow and entry at the base of columns with upward flow. Two oils (specific gravity, 0.80 and 0.86; viscosity ratio relative to water, 4.7 and 77) were used in three soils: a silt loam, a sandy loam, and a sand. The results from 17 different infiltration scenarios, each about 8 hours in duration, are compared with the predicted results obtained from a simplified explicit finite difference code for three-phase flow in a one-dimensional system. Code input required only the soil water release curve, the bulk density, the initial water content, the saturated water conductivity, the oil viscosity, and the interfacial tensions between oil and air and water and oil. The code made reasonably good predictions of water and oil redistribution in the silt loam and loamy sand, when oil followed water infiltration. It made less than satisfactory predictions for the sand, possibly because hysteresis was neglected. Infiltration time for small amounts of oil was often shorter than the code predicted for the silt loam and loamy sand. The code, which did not account for hysteresis or unstable liquid flow, also did a poor job of predicting oil and water contents when water followed oil into the soils. Visual evidence of unstable flow of the more viscous oil entering the water wet loamy sand is presented, and the implications for one- and two-dimensional experiments are discussed. The experimental results are presented to facilitate the preliminary validation of other immiscible flow codes.

  15. Incorporation of digestate selectively affects physical, chemical and biochemical properties along with CO2 emissions in two contrasting agricultural soils in the Mediterranean area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badagliacca, Giuseppe; Petrovičová, Beatrix; Zumbo, Antonino; Romeo, Maurizio; Gullì, Tommaso; Martire, Luigi; Monti, Michele; Gelsomino, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Soil incorporation of digestate represents a common practice to dispose the solid residues from biogas producing plants. Although the digestate constitutes a residual biomass rich in partially decomposed organic matter and nutrients, whose content is often highly variable and unbalanced, its potential fertilizer value can vary considerably depending on the recipient soil properties. The aim of the work was to assess short-term changes in the fertility status of two contrasting agricultural soils in Southern Italy (Calabria), olive grove on a clay acid soil (Typic Hapludalfs) and citrus grove on a sandy loam slightly calcareous soil (Typic Xerofluvents), respectively located along the Tyrrhenian or the Ionian coast. An amount of 30 t ha-1 digestate was incorporated into the soil by ploughing. Unamended tilled soil was used as control. The following soil physical, chemical and biochemical variables were monitored during the experimental period: aggregate stability, pH, electrical conductivity, organic C, total N, Olsen-P, N-NH4+, N-NO3-, microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial biomass nitrogen (MBN) and the mineralization quotient (qM). Moreover, in the olive grove soil CO2 emissions have been continuously measured at field scale for 5 months after digestate incorporation. Digestate application in both site exerted a significant positive effect on soil aggregate stability with a greater increase in clay than in sandy loam soil. Over the experimental period, digestate considerably affected the nutrient availability, namely Olsen-P, N-NH4+, N-NO3-, along with the electrical conductivity. The soil type increased significantly the soil N-NH4+ content, which was always higher in the olive than in citrus grove soil. N-NO3- content was markedly increased soon after the organic amendment, followed by a seasonal decline more evident in the sandy loam soil. Moreover, soil properties as CaCO3 content and the pH selectively affected the Olsen-P dynamics. No appreciable

  16. The sensitivity of soil enzymes, microorganisms and spring wheat to soil contamination with carfentrazone-ethyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkiel, Monika; Baćmaga, Małgorzata; Borowik, Agata; Wyszkowska, Jadwiga; Kucharski, Jan

    2017-11-27

    Herbicides pose a significant threat to the natural environment, in particular in soils that are most exposed to plant protection agents. Prolonged herbicide use leads to changes in soil metabolism and decreases soil productive potential. In this study, the influence of carfentrazone-ethyl (CE) on the microbiological and biochemical properties of soil and the yield of Triticum aestivum L. was evaluated. Carfentrazone-ethyl was applied to sandy loam (pHKCl - 7.0) in doses of 0.000, 0.264, 5.280, 10.56, 21.18, 42.24, 84.48 and 168.96 µg kg-1 DM soil. Soil samples were subjected to microbiological and biochemical analyses on experimental days 30 and 60. Carfentrazone-ethyl disrupted the biological equilibrium in soil by decreasing the abundance and biodiversity of soil-dwelling microorganisms, the activity of soil enzymes, the values of the biochemical activity indicator and spring wheat yields. Carfentrazone-ethyl had the most adverse effects when applied in doses many fold higher than those recommended by the manufacturer. The toxic effects of CE were also determined by its soil retention time. Soil treated with CE was characterized by higher counts of oligotrophic bacteria, organotrophic bacteria, bacteria of the genus Azotobacter, actinomycetes and fungi on day 60, and spore-forming oligotrophic bacteria on day 30. The activity of dehydrogenases, urease, alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase was higher on day 30 than on day 60.

  17. Tillage System and Cover Crop Effects on Soil Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2014-01-01

    depths, pore characteristics did not differ significantly among tillage treatments. At the 12- to 16-cm depth, negative effects of reduced tillage (D and H) were recorded for total porosity and air-filled porosity at −10 kPa (that is, >30-μm pores). Generally, the use of a cover crop increased air......Information about the quantitative effect of conservation tillage combined with a cover crop on soil structure is still limited. This study examined the effect of these management practices on soil pore characteristics of a sandy loam soil in a long-term field trial. The tillage treatments (main....... The cover crop thus alleviated the effect of tillage pan compaction in all tillage treatments....

  18. Effects of irrigation strategies and soils on field grown potatoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmadi, Seyed Hamid; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Plauborg, Finn

    2010-01-01

    Yield and water productivity of potatoes grown in 4.32 m2 lysimeters were measured in coarse sand, loamy sand, and sandy loam and imposed to full (FI), deficit (DI), and partial root-zone drying (PRD) irrigation strategies. PRD and DI as water-saving irrigation treatments received 65% of FI after...... tuber bulking and lasted for 6 weeks until final harvest. Analysis across the soil textures showed that fresh yields were not significant between the irrigation treatments. However, the same analysis across the irrigation treatments revealed that the effect of soil texture was significant on the fresh...... yield and loamy sand produced significantly higher fresh yield than the other two soils, probably because of higher leaf area index, higher photosynthesis rates, and "stay-green" effect late in the growing season. More analysis showed that there was a significant interaction between the irrigation...

  19. Bacteria as transporters of phosphorus through soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glæsner, N.; Bælum, Jacob; Jacobsen, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    The transport of phosphorus (P) from agricultural land has led to the eutrophication of surface waters worldwide, especially in areas with intensive animal production. In this research, we investigated the role of bacteria in the leaching of P through three agricultural soils with different......RNA genes cell−1. Leaching of bacteria was in the range of 2.5–4.5 × 105 cells ml−1 prior to application of slurry to the three soil textures. After slurry application, leaching increased to 1.1 × 106 cells ml−1 in the loamy sand, 4.9 × 106 cells ml−1 in the sandy loam and 5.0 × 106 cells ml−1 in the loam....... Based on the reported P content of soil bacteria, 0.3–1.8% of the total P leached was present in the bacterial biomass when no slurry was applied, whereas slurry application increased the leaching of P from the bacterial biomass to 3−7.9% of total P leached. Bacterial leaching was related...

  20. Evaluation of soil fertility status of Regional Agricultural Research Station, Tarahara, Sunsari, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Khadka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil fertility evaluation of an area or region is most basic decision making tool for the sustainable soil nutrient management. In order to evaluate the soil fertility status of the Regional Agricultural Research Station (RARS, Tarahara, Susari, Nepal. Using soil sampling auger 81 soil samples (0-20 cm were collected based on the variability of land. The collected samples were analyzed for their texture, structure, colour, pH, OM, N, P2O5, K2O, Ca, Mg, S, B, Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn status. The Arc-GIS 10.1 software was used for the preparation of soil fertility maps. The soil structure was granular to sub-angular blocky and varied between brown- dark grayish brown and dark gray in colour. The sand, silt and clay content were 30.32±1.4%, 48.92±0.89% and 20.76±0.92%, respectively and categorized as loam, clay loam, sandy loam, silt loam and silty clay loam in texture. The soil was moderately acidic in pH (5.98±0.08. The available sulphur (2.15±0.21 ppm, available boron (0.08±0.01 ppm and available zinc (0.35±0.03 ppm status were very low, whereas extractable magnesium (44.33±6.03 ppm showed low status. Similarly, organic matter (2.80±0.07%, total nitrogen (0.09±0.004 %, extractable calcium (1827.90±45.80 ppm and available copper (1.15±0.04 ppm were medium in content. The available phosphorus (39.77±5.27 ppm, extractable potassium (134.12±4.91 ppm, and available manganese (18.15±1.15 ppm exhibits high status, while available iron (244.7±19.70 ppm was very high. The fertilizer recommendation can be done based on determined soil fertility status to economize crop production. Furthermore, research farm should develop future research strategy accordance with the prepared soil data base.

  1. Effect of Humic Acids and pesticides on Agricultural Soil Structure and Stability and Its Implication on Soil Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaonkar, O. D.; Nambi, I. M.; G, S. K.

    2016-12-01

    The functional and morphological aspects of soil structure determine the soil quality. The dispersion of colloidal soil particles, especially the clay fraction and rupture of soil aggregates, both of which play an important role in soil structure development, lead to degradation of soil quality. The main objective of this work was to determine the effect of behaviour of soil colloids on the agricultural soil structure and quality. The effect of commercial humic acid, organophosphate pesticides and soil natural organic matter on the electrical and structural properties of the soil colloids was also studied. Agricultural soil, belonging to the sandy loam texture class from northern part of India was considered in this study. In order to understand the changes in the soil quality in the presence and absence of humic acids, the soil fabric and structure was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Electrical properties of natural soil colloids in aqueous suspensions were assessed by zeta potential measurements at varying pH values with and without the presence of humic acids and pesticides. The influence of natural organic matter was analyzed by oxidizing the natural soil organic matter with hydrogen peroxide. The zeta potential of the soil colloids was found to be negative in the pH range studied. The results indicated that hydrogen peroxide treatment lead to deflocculation of colloidal soil particles. In addition, the humic acids undergoes effective adsorption onto the soil surface imparting more negative zeta potential to the colloidal soil particles. The soil hydrophilicity decreased in the presence of humic acids which was confirmed by surface free energy determination. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence of humic acids altered the soil fabric and structure, thereby affecting the soil quality. This study assumes significance in understanding the soil aggregation and the

  2. Mechanical impedance of soil crusts and water content in loamy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josa March, Ramon; Verdú, Antoni M. C.; Mas, Maria Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Soil crust development affects soil water dynamics and soil aeration. Soil crusts act as mechanical barriers to fluid flow and, as their mechanical impedance increases with drying, they also become obstacles to seedling emergence. As a consequence, the emergence of seedling cohorts (sensitive seeds) might be reduced. However, this may be of interest to be used as an effective system of weed control. Soil crusting is determined by several factors: soil texture, rain intensity, sedimentation processes, etc. There are different ways to characterize the crusts. One of them is to measure their mechanical impedance (MI), which is linked to their moisture level. In this study, we measured the evolution of the mechanical impedance of crusts formed by three loamy soil types (clay loam, loam and sandy clay loam, USDA) with different soil water contents. The aim of this communication was to establish a mathematical relationship between the crust water content and its MI. A saturated soil paste was prepared and placed in PVC cylinders (50 mm diameter and 10 mm height) arranged on a plastic tray. Previously the plastic tray was sprayed with a hydrophobic liquid to prevent the adherence of samples. The samples on the plastic tray were left to air-dry under laboratory conditions until their IM was measured. To measure IM, a food texture analyzer was used. The equipment incorporates a mobile arm, a load cell to apply force and a probe. The arm moves down vertically at a constant rate and the cylindrical steel probe (4 mm diameter) penetrates the soil sample vertically at a constant rate. The equipment is provided with software to store data (time, vertical distance and force values) at a rate of up to 500 points per second. Water content in crust soil samples was determined as the loss of weight after oven-drying (105°C). From the results, an exponential regression between MI and the water content was obtained (determination coefficient very close to 1). This methodology allows

  3. Arsenic and Heavy Metal Contamination in Soils under Different Land Use in an Estuary in Northern Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thinh Nguyen Van

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heavy metal contamination of soil and sediment in estuaries warrants study because a healthy estuarine environment, including healthy soil, is important in order to achieve ecological balance and good aquaculture production. The Ba Lat estuary of the Red River is the largest estuary in northern Vietnam and is employed in various land uses. However, the heavy metal contamination of its soil has not yet been reported. The following research was conducted to clarify contamination levels, supply sources, and the effect of land use on heavy metal concentrations in the estuary. Soil samples were collected from the top soil layer of the estuary, and their arsenic (As, chromium (Cr, cadmium (Cd, copper (Cu, lead (Pb, and zinc (Zn concentrations were analyzed, as were other soil properties. Most soils in the estuary were loam, silt loam, or sandy loam. The pH was neutral, and the cation exchange capacity ranged from 3.8 to 20 cmol·kg−1. Manganese and iron concentrations averaged 811 µg·g−1 and 1.79%, respectively. The magnitude of the soil heavy metal concentrations decreased in the order of Zn > Pb > Cr > Cu > As > Cd. The concentrations were higher in the riverbed and mangrove forest than in other land-use areas. Except for As, the mean heavy metal concentrations were lower than the permissible levels for agricultural soils in Vietnam. The principal component analyses suggested that soil As, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cu were of anthropogenic origin, whereas Cr was of non-anthropogenic origin. The spatial distribution of concentration with land use indicated that mangrove forests play an important role in preventing the spread of heavy metals to other land uses and in maintaining the estuarine environment.

  4. The effect of different tillage and cover crops on soil quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdollahi, Lotfollah; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    This paper examines the effect of different tillage treatments and cover crop on soil physical, chemical and biological properties of a sandy loam soil in a long-term field trial set up in 2007 at Foulum, Denmark. The experimental design is a split plot design with different tillage practices...... (direct drilling (D), harrowing (H) to a depth of 8 cm and ploughing to a depth of 20 cm (P)) as main plot. The soil was cropped with cover crop (+CC) or left without cover crop (-CC) as split plot treatments in the main plots with different tillage treatments. We assessed topsoil structural quality......, indicating better friability. The interaction between cover crop and tillage treatments was significant. That is cover crop had a positive effect on direct drilling (D) (lower MWD) but not on P and H. In general there was no significant different between tillage and cover crop treatments on visual soil...

  5. Stabilisation of erodible soil by fly ash and blast furnace slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indraratna, B.; Salim, W. [Civil Engineering Division, University of Wollongong, N.S.W., Wollongong (Australia)

    2000-07-01

    Residual soils are found on large terrains which are often subjected to considerable erosion. This paper presents a detailed laboratory evaluation of the effect of fly ash and blast furnace slag on two different soils: (a) culluvium (sandy loam) from New South Wales, Australia and (b) erodible dispersive clay from northeast Thailand. Geotechnical tests were conducted to determine the compaction characteristics and the compressive and shear strength properties of the blended and natural soil specimens. The effect of the above mentioned industrial wastes on the rate of erosion and on the associated pH levels is also investigated. Fine grained fly ash is found to be useful as a void filler if used in substantial quantities, whereas selfhardening milled slag is more effective in terms of improving the internal friction angle of the treated soil. 18 refs.

  6. Shifts in soil biodiversity-A forensic comparison between Sus scrofa domesticus and vegetation decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olakanye, Ayodeji O; Thompson, Tim; Ralebitso-Senior, T Komang

    2015-12-01

    In a forensic context, microbial-mediated cadaver decomposition and nutrient recycling cannot be overlooked. As a result, forensic ecogenomics research has intensified to gain a better understanding of cadaver/soil ecology interactions as a powerful potential tool for forensic practitioners. For this study, domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) (4g) and grass (Agrostis/Festuca spp) cuttings (4g) were buried (July 2013 to July 2014) in sandy clay loam (80 g) triplicates in sealed microcosms (127 ml; 50 × 70 cm) with parallel soil only controls. The effects of the two carbon sources were determined by monitoring key environmental factors and changes in soil bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (18S rRNA gene) biodiversity. Soil pH changes showed statistically significant differences (p0.05) was observed between the treatments. Copyright © 2015 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Brief and vigorous N2O production by soil at spring thaw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren; Tiedje, James M.

    1990-01-01

    measurements; nitrate was added in excess. This effect could be reproduced in the laboratory: thawing soil cores at controlled temperature, nitrate and moisture yielded a large flush of N2O compared to an unfrozen control. The results indicate the importance of microbial N2O production during thaw for total......In an acid sandy loam soil (pH 3.8), field production of N2O was two orders of magnitude higher at thaw in the spring than at any time during the rest of the year. Soil thaw in midwinter did not result in any increase in N2O flux. Soil water content remained at, or above field capacity during...

  8. Sequential extractions for the study of radiocesium and radiostrontium dynamics in mineral and organic soils from Western Europe and Chernobyl areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigol, A.; Roig, M.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G. [Univ. de Barcelona (Spain). Dept. Quimica Analitica

    1999-03-15

    To study radiostrontium (RSr) and radiocesium (RCs) aging in soils, three sequential extraction schemes were used on Mediterranean loamy and loam-sandy soils, podsols and peaty podsols from the area near Chernobyl, and peats from Western Europe. Aging was quantified by changes in radionuclide distribution. Two factors were thought to affect radionuclide distribution: time elapsed since contamination and drying-wetting cycles. Changes in radionuclide distribution were of low significance in Mediterranean loamy and loam-sandy soils in the short term, even after drying-wetting cycles. In the short term, podsols and peaty podsols showed a decrease in the RSr exchangeable fraction in the laboratory samples, whereas samples taken 6 years after contamination did not show any further decrease. For RCs in podsols and peaty-podsols, the application of drying-wetting cycles for 9 months led to observe a 2--3-fold decrease in the exchangeable fraction, whereas time alone did not lead to any change. No RCs aging was observed in peats with a low or almost negligible content of mineral matter, low base saturation and low interception potential for RCs, even after drying-wetting cycles. Finally, changes in the radionuclide exchangeable fraction over time in these soils corresponded to changes in transfer factors over a similar period.

  9. [Movement-adsorption and its mechanism of Cd in soil under combining effects of electrokinetics and a new type of bamboo charcoal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian-Wei; Wang, Hui; Luo, Qi-Shi

    2007-08-01

    The characteristics of migration and its influencing factor of cadmium in sandy loam soil by uniform electrokinetics as well as the adsorption property by a new material-bamboo charcoal were investigated through bench-scale experiments, and the feasibility of using electrokinetic technique combined with the newly developed bamboo charcoal for remediation of cadmium contaminated soils was analyzed as well. The results show that the bamboo charcoal is good adsorption material which has comparably strong adsorption effect on Cd, bearing potential in future use, which could be simulated by both Freundlich and Langmuir models (R2 > 0.96). The migration rates of cadmium in sandy loam were high up to 0. 6786 - 0.6875cm/h under an electric gradient of 1.0V/cm, depending upon the concentration of cadmium and the distribution of electric field density. Electrokinetics effectively transported the heavy metal in the soil. In the new electrokinetic tech combining the bamboo charcoal with the same electric gradient above under the polarity reversal period of 48 hours, the cadmium in the soil could be wiped off with high efficiency (removal efficiency 79.6% in 12 days) and the pH together with water content could be well retained. The electric current in the process changed periodically according to the reversal. As a new technique, the electrokinetic movement-bamboo charcoal adsorption holds high potential in future use.

  10. Fuel consumption of tractor for different soil types in semi-arid regions; Consumo de combustivel de um trator agricola para diferentes tipos de solo em regioes semi-aridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montanha, Gustavo K. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (FAC/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agronomicas. Dept. de Engenharia Rural], E-mail: gmontanha@fca.unesp.br; Guerra, Saulo P.S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Gestao e Tecnologia Agroindustrial; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Heun, John [The University of Arizona, Maricopa, AZ (United States); Monteiro, Leonardo A. [The University of Arizona (MAC/UA), Maricopa, AZ (United States). Maricopa Agricultural Center

    2010-07-01

    The appropriate use of agricultural machinery enables greater operational efficiency and higher productivity for the farmer. Some factors such as soil type can influence the fuel consumption, one of the biggest costs. This study aimed to compare the fuel consumption of a tractor operating in two different conditions of soil in semi-arid regions. The area used for testing is located in the city of Maricopa, in Arizona, belonging to 'The University of Arizona'. The area 1 is classified as sandy clay loam soil (52% sand, 35% clay, 13% silt). The area 2 is classified as a sandy loam soil (71% sand, 12% clay and 17% silt). The tractor 4 x 2 TDA, with 88 kw (120 hp) engine power equipped with auto pilot system and an implement for tillage were used in the experiment. A data acquisition system was installed in the tractor to collect the data generated by the GPS and fuel consumption sensor. The results showed significant statistical difference in fuel consumption between soil textures. (author)

  11. Carbonate-silicate ratio for soil correction and influence on nutrition, biomass production and quality of palisade grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Ferreira de Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Silicates can be used as soil correctives, with the advantage of being a source of silicon, a beneficial element to the grasses. However, high concentrations of silicon in the plant would affect the digestibility of the forage. To evaluate the influence of the substitution of the calcium carbonate by calcium silicate on the nutrition, biomass production and the feed quality of the palisade grass [Urochloa brizantha (C. Hochstetter ex A. Rich. R. Webster], three greenhouse experiments were conducted in completely randomized designs with four replications. Experimental units (pots contained a clayey dystrophic Rhodic Haplustox, a sandy clay loam dystrophic Typic Haplustox and a sandy loam dystrophic Typic Haplustox. Each soil received substitution proportions (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 % of the carbonate by calcium silicate. The increase in the proportion of calcium silicate elevated the concentrations and accumulations of Si, Ca, Mg, and B, reduced Zn and did not alter P in the shoot of plants. The effects of the treatments on the other nutrients were influenced by the soil type. Inclusion of calcium silicate also increased the relative nutritional value and the digestibility and ingestion of the forage, while the concentration and accumulation of crude protein and the neutral detergent and acid detergent fibers decreased. Biomass production and feed quality of the palisade grass were generally higher with the 50 % calcium silicate treatment.

  12. pplication of Time-series Modeling to Predict Infiltration of Different Soil Textures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vazirpour

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infiltration is one of the most important parameters affecting irrigation. For this reason, measuring and estimating this parameter is very important, particularly when designing and managing irrigation systems. Infiltration affects water flow and solute transport in the soil surface and subsurface. Due to temporal and spatial variability, Many measurements are needed to explain the average soil infiltration characteristics under field conditions. Stochastic characteristics of the different natural phenomena led to the application of random variables and time series in predicting the performance of these phenomena. Time-series analysis is a simple and efficient method for prediction, which is widely used in various sciences. However, a few researches have investigated the time-series modeling to predict soil infiltration characteristics. In this study, capability of time series in estimating infiltration rate for different soil textures was evaluated. Materials and methods: For this purpose, the 60 and 120 minutes data of double ring infiltrometer test in Lali plain, Khuzestan, Iran, with its proposed time intervals (0, 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 80, 100, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240 minutes were used to predict cumulative infiltration until the end of the experiment time for heavy (clay, medium (loam and light (sand soil textures. Moreover, used parameters of Kostiakov-Lewis equation recommended by NRCS, 24 hours cumulative infiltration curves were applied in time-series modeling for six different soil textures (clay, clay loam, silty, silty loam, sandy loam and sand. Different time-series models including Autoregressive (AR, Moving Average (MA, Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA, ARMA model with eXogenous variables (ARMAX and AR model with eXogenous variables (ARX were evaluated in predicting cumulative infiltration. Autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation charts for each

  13. Water flow in soil from organic dairy rotations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamandé, Mathieu; Eriksen, Jørgen; Krogh, Paul Henning

    2017-01-01

    Managed grasslands are characterized by rotations of leys and arable crops. The regime of water flow evolves during the leys because of earthworm and root activity, climate and agricultural practices (fertilizer, cutting and cattle trampling). The effects of duration of the leys, cattle trampling...... and fertilizer practice on the movement of water through sandy loam soil profiles were investigated in managed grassland of a dairy operation. Experiments using tracer chemicals were performed, with or without cattle slurry application, with cutting or grazing, in the 1st and the 3rd year of ley, and in winter...... rye. Each plot was irrigated for an hour with 18·5 mm of water containing a conservative tracer, potassium bromide; 24 h after irrigation, macropores >1 mm were recorded visually on a horizontal plan of 0·7 m2 at five depths (10, 30, 40, 70 and 100 cm). The bromide (Br−) concentration in soil was also...

  14. Mass relocation through soil exhaustion: Transformation of habitation patterns in the southern Netherlands (1000 BC-500 AD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluiving, Sjoerd; Bekkema, Marijke; Roymans, Nico; van Mourik, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Long-term archaeological data gathering in the southern Netherlands may deliver an unprecedented regional comparison that could be exemplary for the Pleistocene sand areas of the Northwest European Plain. On a micro-scale level, it has become clear that Bronze Age (2000-800 BC) and Iron Age (800-12 BC) farmers intensively used the landscape, resulting in a relatively dense distribution pattern of settlements all over the ridges and planes of the cover sand landscape. However, this agricultural use of the landscape related to the "celtic field" system led to a process of soil degradation by increased acidification during which Umbric Podzols gradually transformed into Carbic Podzols that could no longer be used as farmland. According to established "models," this process of "secondary podzolization" particularly affected those sections of the landscape that were dominated by dry sandy soils with a low loam content (loam = clay and silt, between c. 10% and 20%). In the Late Iron Age (250-12 BC), the changing soil conditions resulted in a dramatic shift in the habitation pattern that clearly manifests itself in the Roman period (12 BC-410 AD); on the local scale, the habitation moved from the degenerated soils to nearby areas with better soil conditions (higher loam content), which became more densely inhabited now than in the Bronze Age/Early Iron Age (2000-500 BC). The introduction of new land management (in the later Iron Age, and also by Romans) could also have been important for soil degradation. The areas where the Roman period settlements concentrated became also the areas where we can find the early medieval habitation (447-751 AD) and where the Plaggic Anthrosols started to develop in the late medieval period (1270-1500 AD). This poster is based on the analysis of soil properties. Measured loam values of soil samples (n=181) in Veldhoven, southern Netherlands, are in agreement with the described model that the plaggen cover is located on soils containing high

  15. Fungal responses to elevated temperature and soil nitrogen availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, S.; Geyer, K.; Morrison, E. W.; Frey, S. D.

    2016-12-01

    The soil microbial community controls decomposition of organic residues which constitute a large portion of soil organic matter